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Sample records for human ventral visual

  1. The role of human ventral visual cortex in motion perception

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    Saygin, Ayse P.; Lorenzi, Lauren J.; Egan, Ryan; Rees, Geraint; Behrmann, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    Visual motion perception is fundamental to many aspects of visual perception. Visual motion perception has long been associated with the dorsal (parietal) pathway and the involvement of the ventral ‘form’ (temporal) visual pathway has not been considered critical for normal motion perception. Here, we evaluated this view by examining whether circumscribed damage to ventral visual cortex impaired motion perception. The perception of motion in basic, non-form tasks (motion coherence and motion detection) and complex structure-from-motion, for a wide range of motion speeds, all centrally displayed, was assessed in five patients with a circumscribed lesion to either the right or left ventral visual pathway. Patients with a right, but not with a left, ventral visual lesion displayed widespread impairments in central motion perception even for non-form motion, for both slow and for fast speeds, and this held true independent of the integrity of areas MT/V5, V3A or parietal regions. In contrast with the traditional view in which only the dorsal visual stream is critical for motion perception, these novel findings implicate a more distributed circuit in which the integrity of the right ventral visual pathway is also necessary even for the perception of non-form motion. PMID:23983030

  2. Functional organization and visual representations in human ventral lateral prefrontal cortex

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    Annie Wai Yiu Chan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuroimaging studies in both human and non-human primates have identified face selective activation in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex even in the absence of working memory demands. Further, research has suggested that this face-selective response is largely driven by the presence of the eyes. However, the nature and origin of visual category responses in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex remain unclear. Further, in a broader sense, how do these findings relate to our current understandings of lateral prefrontal cortex? What do these findings tell us about the underlying function and organization principles of the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex? What is the future direction for investigating visual representations in this cortex? This review focuses on the function, topography, and circuitry of the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex to enhance our understanding of the evolution and development of this cortex.

  3. A cross-validated cytoarchitectonic atlas of the human ventral visual stream.

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    Rosenke, Mona; Weiner, Kevin S; Barnett, Michael A; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Goebel, Rainer; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2017-02-16

    The human ventral visual stream consists of several areas that are considered processing stages essential for perception and recognition. A fundamental microanatomical feature differentiating areas is cytoarchitecture, which refers to the distribution, size, and density of cells across cortical layers. Because cytoarchitectonic structure is measured in 20-micron-thick histological slices of postmortem tissue, it is difficult to assess (a) how anatomically consistent these areas are across brains and (b) how they relate to brain parcellations obtained with prevalent neuroimaging methods, acquired at the millimeter and centimeter scale. Therefore, the goal of this study was to (a) generate a cross-validated cytoarchitectonic atlas of the human ventral visual stream on a whole brain template that is commonly used in neuroimaging studies and (b) to compare this atlas to a recently published retinotopic parcellation of visual cortex (Wang et al., 2014). To achieve this goal, we generated an atlas of eight cytoarchitectonic areas: four areas in the occipital lobe (hOc1-hOc4v) and four in the fusiform gyrus (FG1-FG4), then we tested how the different alignment techniques affect the accuracy of the resulting atlas. Results show that both cortex-based alignment (CBA) and nonlinear volumetric alignment (NVA) generate an atlas with better cross-validation performance than affine volumetric alignment (AVA). Additionally, CBA outperformed NVA in 6/8 of the cytoarchitectonic areas. Finally, the comparison of the cytoarchitectonic atlas to a retinotopic atlas shows a clear correspondence between cytoarchitectonic and retinotopic areas in the ventral visual stream. The successful performance of CBA suggests a coupling between cytoarchitectonic areas and macroanatomical landmarks in the human ventral visual stream, and furthermore, that this coupling can be utilized for generating an accurate group atlas. In addition, the coupling between cytoarchitecture and retinotopy highlights

  4. Functional organization and visual representations of human ventral lateral prefrontal cortex

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    Chan, Annie W.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies in both human and non-human primates have identified face selective activation in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) even in the absence of working memory (WM) demands. Further, research has suggested that this face-selective response is largely driven by the presence of the eyes. However, the nature and origin of visual category responses in the VLPFC remain unclear. In a broader sense, how do these findings relate to our current understandings of lateral prefrontal cortex? What do these findings tell us about the underlying function and organization principles of the VLPFC? What is the future direction for investigating visual representations in this cortex? This review focuses on the function, topography, and circuitry of the VLPFC to enhance our understanding of the evolution and development of this cortex. PMID:23847558

  5. Spatial attention modulates visual gamma oscillations across the human ventral stream.

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    Magazzini, Lorenzo; Singh, Krish D

    2018-02-01

    Oscillatory synchronization in the gamma frequency range has been proposed as a neuronal mechanism to prioritize processing of relevant stimuli over competing ones. Recent studies in animals found that selective spatial attention enhanced gamma-band synchronization in high-order visual areas (V4) and increased the gamma peak frequency in V1. The existence of such mechanisms in the human visual system is yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study, we used MEG, in combination with an optimised stimulus design, to record visual gamma oscillations from human early visual cortex, while participants performed a visuospatial attention cueing task. First, we reconstructed virtual sensors in V1/V2, where gamma oscillations were strongly induced by visual stimulation alone. Second, following the results of a statistical comparison between conditions of attention, we reconstructed cortical activity also in inferior occipital-temporal regions (V4). The results indicated that gamma amplitude was modulated by spatial attention across the cortical hierarchy, both in the early visual cortex and in higher-order regions of the ventral visual pathway. In contrast, we found no evidence for an increase in the gamma peak frequency in V1/V2 with attention. The gamma response tended to peak earlier in V1/V2 than in V4 by approximately 70 ms, consistent with a feed-forward role of gamma-band activity in propagating sensory representations across the visual cortical hierarchy. Together, these findings suggest that differences in experimental design or methodology can account for the inconsistencies in previous animal and human studies. Furthermore, our results are in line with the hypothesis of enhanced gamma-band synchronization as an attentional mechanism in the human visual cortex. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fast and automatic activation of an abstract representation of money in the human ventral visual pathway.

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    Catherine Tallon-Baudry

    Full Text Available Money, when used as an incentive, activates the same neural circuits as rewards associated with physiological needs. However, unlike physiological rewards, monetary stimuli are cultural artifacts: how are monetary stimuli identified in the first place? How and when does the brain identify a valid coin, i.e. a disc of metal that is, by social agreement, endowed with monetary properties? We took advantage of the changes in the Euro area in 2002 to compare neural responses to valid coins (Euros, Australian Dollars with neural responses to invalid coins that have lost all monetary properties (French Francs, Finnish Marks. We show in magneto-encephalographic recordings, that the ventral visual pathway automatically distinguishes between valid and invalid coins, within only ∼150 ms. This automatic categorization operates as well on coins subjects were familiar with as on unfamiliar coins. No difference between neural responses to scrambled controls could be detected. These results could suggest the existence of a generic, all-purpose neural representation of money that is independent of experience. This finding is reminiscent of a central assumption in economics, money fungibility, or the fact that a unit of money is substitutable to another. From a neural point of view, our findings may indicate that the ventral visual pathway, a system previously thought to analyze visual features such as shape or color and to be influenced by daily experience, could also able to use conceptual attributes such as monetary validity to categorize familiar as well as unfamiliar visual objects. The symbolic abilities of the posterior fusiform region suggested here could constitute an efficient neural substrate to deal with culturally defined symbols, independently of experience, which probably fostered money's cultural emergence and success.

  7. Differential Sampling of Visual Space in Ventral and Dorsal Early Visual Cortex.

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    Silson, Edward H; Reynolds, Richard C; Kravitz, Dwight J; Baker, Chris I

    2018-02-28

    A fundamental feature of cortical visual processing is the separation of visual processing for the upper and lower visual fields. In early visual cortex (EVC), the upper visual field is processed ventrally, with the lower visual field processed dorsally. This distinction persists into several category-selective regions of occipitotemporal cortex, with ventral and lateral scene-, face-, and object-selective regions biased for the upper and lower visual fields, respectively. Here, using an elliptical population receptive field (pRF) model, we systematically tested the sampling of visual space within ventral and dorsal divisions of human EVC in both male and female participants. We found that (1) pRFs tend to be elliptical and oriented toward the fovea with distinct angular distributions for ventral and dorsal divisions of EVC, potentially reflecting a radial bias; and (2) pRFs in ventral areas were larger (∼1.5×) and more elliptical (∼1.2×) than those in dorsal areas. These differences potentially reflect a tendency for receptive fields in ventral temporal cortex to overlap the fovea with less emphasis on precise localization and isotropic representation of space compared with dorsal areas. Collectively, these findings suggest that ventral and dorsal divisions of EVC sample visual space differently, likely contributing to and/or stemming from the functional differentiation of visual processing observed in higher-level regions of the ventral and dorsal cortical visual pathways. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The processing of visual information from the upper and lower visual fields is separated in visual cortex. Although ventral and dorsal divisions of early visual cortex (EVC) are commonly assumed to sample visual space equivalently, we demonstrate systematic differences using an elliptical population receptive field (pRF) model. Specifically, we demonstrate that (1) ventral and dorsal divisions of EVC exhibit diverging distributions of pRF angle, which are biased

  8. Conceptual size representation in ventral visual cortex.

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    Gabay, Shai; Kalanthroff, Eyal; Henik, Avishai; Gronau, Nurit

    2016-01-29

    Recent findings suggest that visual objects may be mapped along the ventral occipitotemporal cortex according to their real-world size (Konkle and Oliva, 2012). It has been argued that such mapping does not reflect an abstract, conceptual size representation, but rather the visual or functional properties associated with small versus big real-world objects. To determine whether a more abstract conceptual size representation may affect visual cortical activation we used meaningless geometrical shapes, devoid of semantic or functional associations, which were associated with specific size representations by virtue of extensive training. Following training, participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning while performing a conceptual size comparison task on the geometrical shapes. In addition, a size comparison task was conducted for numeral digits denoting small and big numbers. A region-of-interest analysis revealed larger blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses for conceptually 'big' than for conceptually 'small' shapes, as well as for big versus small numbers, within medial (parahippocampal place area, PPA) and lateral (occipital place area, OPA) place-selective regions. Processing of the 'big' visual shapes further elicited enhanced activation in early visual cortex, possibly reflecting top-down projections from PPA. By using arbitrary shapes and numbers we minimized visual, categorical, or functional influences on fMRI measurement, providing evidence for a possible neural mechanism underlying the representation of abstract conceptual size within the ventral visual stream. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Human V4 and ventral occipital retinotopic maps

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    Winawer, Jonathan; Witthoft, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    The ventral surface of the human occipital lobe contains multiple retinotopic maps. The most posterior of these maps is considered a potential homolog of macaque V4, and referred to as human V4 (‘hV4’). The location of the hV4 map, its retinotopic organization, its role in visual encoding, and the cortical areas it borders have been the subject of considerable investigation and debate over the last 25 years. We review the history of this map and adjacent maps in ventral occipital cortex, and consider the different hypotheses for how these ventral occipital maps are organized. Advances in neuroimaging, computational modeling, and characterization of the nearby anatomical landmarks and functional brain areas have improved our understanding of where human V4 is and what kind of visual representations it contains. PMID:26241699

  10. Crossmodal recruitment of the ventral visual stream in congenital blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ptito, Maurice; Matteau, Isabelle; Zhi Wang, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    We used functional MRI (fMRI) to test the hypothesis that blind subjects recruit the ventral visual stream during nonhaptic tactile-form recognition. Congenitally blind and blindfolded sighted control subjects were scanned after they had been trained during four consecutive days to perform......, inferotemporal (IT), cortex, lateral occipital tactile vision area (LOtv), and fusiform gyrus. Control subjects activated area LOtv and precuneus but not cuneus, IT and fusiform gyrus. These results indicate that congenitally blind subjects recruit key regions in the ventral visual pathway during nonhaptic...

  11. Crossmodal Recruitment of the Ventral Visual Stream in Congenital Blindness

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    Maurice Ptito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We used functional MRI (fMRI to test the hypothesis that blind subjects recruit the ventral visual stream during nonhaptic tactile-form recognition. Congenitally blind and blindfolded sighted control subjects were scanned after they had been trained during four consecutive days to perform a tactile-form recognition task with the tongue display unit (TDU. Both groups learned the task at the same rate. In line with our hypothesis, the fMRI data showed that during nonhaptic shape recognition, blind subjects activated large portions of the ventral visual stream, including the cuneus, precuneus, inferotemporal (IT, cortex, lateral occipital tactile vision area (LOtv, and fusiform gyrus. Control subjects activated area LOtv and precuneus but not cuneus, IT and fusiform gyrus. These results indicate that congenitally blind subjects recruit key regions in the ventral visual pathway during nonhaptic tactile shape discrimination. The activation of LOtv by nonhaptic tactile shape processing in blind and sighted subjects adds further support to the notion that this area subserves an abstract or supramodal representation of shape. Together with our previous findings, our data suggest that the segregation of the efferent projections of the primary visual cortex into a dorsal and ventral visual stream is preserved in individuals blind from birth.

  12. Development of the ventral body wall in the human embryo.

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    Mekonen, Hayelom K; Hikspoors, Jill P J M; Mommen, Greet; Köhler, S Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H

    2015-11-01

    Migratory failure of somitic cells is the commonest explanation for ventral body wall defects. However, the embryo increases ~ 25-fold in volume in the period that the ventral body wall forms, so that differential growth may, instead, account for the observed changes in topography. Human embryos between 4 and 10 weeks of development were studied, using amira reconstruction and cinema 4D remodeling software for visualization. Initially, vertebrae and ribs had formed medially, and primordia of sternum and hypaxial flank muscle primordium laterally in the body wall at Carnegie Stage (CS)15 (5.5 weeks). The next week, ribs and muscle primordium expanded in ventrolateral direction only. At CS18 (6.5 weeks), separate intercostal and abdominal wall muscles differentiated, and ribs, sterna, and muscles began to expand ventromedially and caudally, with the bilateral sternal bars fusing in the midline after CS20 (7 weeks) and the rectus muscles reaching the umbilicus at CS23 (8 weeks). The near-constant absolute distance between both rectus muscles and approximately fivefold decline of this distance relative to body circumference between 6 and 10 weeks identified dorsoventral growth in the dorsal body wall as determinant of the 'closure' of the ventral body wall. Concomitant with the straightening of the embryonic body axis after the 6th week, the abdominal muscles expanded ventrally and caudally to form the infraumbilical body wall. Our data, therefore, show that the ventral body wall is formed by differential dorsoventral growth in the dorsal part of the body. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  13. Development of the ventral body wall in the human embryo

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    Mekonen, Hayelom K; Hikspoors, Jill P J M; Mommen, Greet; Köhler, S Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H

    2015-01-01

    Migratory failure of somitic cells is the commonest explanation for ventral body wall defects. However, the embryo increases ∼ 25-fold in volume in the period that the ventral body wall forms, so that differential growth may, instead, account for the observed changes in topography. Human embryos between 4 and 10 weeks of development were studied, using amira® reconstruction and cinema 4D® remodeling software for visualization. Initially, vertebrae and ribs had formed medially, and primordia of sternum and hypaxial flank muscle primordium laterally in the body wall at Carnegie Stage (CS)15 (5.5 weeks). The next week, ribs and muscle primordium expanded in ventrolateral direction only. At CS18 (6.5 weeks), separate intercostal and abdominal wall muscles differentiated, and ribs, sterna, and muscles began to expand ventromedially and caudally, with the bilateral sternal bars fusing in the midline after CS20 (7 weeks) and the rectus muscles reaching the umbilicus at CS23 (8 weeks). The near-constant absolute distance between both rectus muscles and approximately fivefold decline of this distance relative to body circumference between 6 and 10 weeks identified dorsoventral growth in the dorsal body wall as determinant of the ‘closure’ of the ventral body wall. Concomitant with the straightening of the embryonic body axis after the 6th week, the abdominal muscles expanded ventrally and caudally to form the infraumbilical body wall. Our data, therefore, show that the ventral body wall is formed by differential dorsoventral growth in the dorsal part of the body. PMID:26467243

  14. Category selectivity in human visual cortex: Beyond visual object recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peelen, M.V.; Downing, P.E.

    2017-01-01

    Human ventral temporal cortex shows a categorical organization, with regions responding selectively to faces, bodies, tools, scenes, words, and other categories. Why is this? Traditional accounts explain category selectivity as arising within a hierarchical system dedicated to visual object

  15. Art for reward's sake: visual art recruits the ventral striatum.

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    Lacey, Simon; Hagtvedt, Henrik; Patrick, Vanessa M; Anderson, Amy; Stilla, Randall; Deshpande, Gopikrishna; Hu, Xiaoping; Sato, João R; Reddy, Srinivas; Sathian, K

    2011-03-01

    A recent study showed that people evaluate products more positively when they are physically associated with art images than similar non-art images. Neuroimaging studies of visual art have investigated artistic style and esthetic preference but not brain responses attributable specifically to the artistic status of images. Here we tested the hypothesis that the artistic status of images engages reward circuitry, using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during viewing of art and non-art images matched for content. Subjects made animacy judgments in response to each image. Relative to non-art images, art images activated, on both subject- and item-wise analyses, reward-related regions: the ventral striatum, hypothalamus and orbitofrontal cortex. Neither response times nor ratings of familiarity or esthetic preference for art images correlated significantly with activity that was selective for art images, suggesting that these variables were not responsible for the art-selective activations. Investigation of effective connectivity, using time-varying, wavelet-based, correlation-purged Granger causality analyses, further showed that the ventral striatum was driven by visual cortical regions when viewing art images but not non-art images, and was not driven by regions that correlated with esthetic preference for either art or non-art images. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis, leading us to propose that the appeal of visual art involves activation of reward circuitry based on artistic status alone and independently of its hedonic value. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of the ventral body wall in the human embryo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekonen, Hayelom K.; Hikspoors, Jill P. J. M.; Mommen, Greet; Köhler, S. Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2015-01-01

    Migratory failure of somitic cells is the commonest explanation for ventral body wall defects. However, the embryo increases ~ 25-fold in volume in the period that the ventral body wall forms, so that differential growth may, instead, account for the observed changes in topography. Human embryos

  17. A Ventral Visual Stream Reading Center Independent of Sensory Modality and Visual Experience

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    Lior Reich

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Visual Word Form Area (VWFA is a ventral-temporal-visual area that develops expertise for visual reading. It encodes letter-strings irrespective of case, font, or location in the visual-field, with striking anatomical reproducibility across individuals. In the blind, reading can be achieved using Braille, with a comparable level-of-expertise to that of sighted readers. We investigated which area plays the role of the VWFA in the blind. One would expect it to be at either parietal or bilateral occipital cortex, reflecting the tactile nature of the task and crossmodal plasticity, respectively. However, according to the notion that brain areas are task specific rather than sensory-modality specific, we predicted recruitment of the left-hemispheric VWFA, identically to the sighted and independent of visual experience. Using fMRI we showed that activation during Braille reading in congenitally blind individuals peaked in the VWFA, with striking anatomical consistency within and between blind and sighted. The VWFA was reading-selective when contrasted to high-level language and low-level sensory controls. Further preliminary results show that the VWFA is selectively activated also when people learn to read in a new language or using a different modality. Thus, the VWFA is a mutlisensory area specialized for reading regardless of visual experience.

  18. Ventral aspect of the visual form pathway is not critical for the perception of biological motion

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    Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon; Saygin, Ayse Pinar; Lorenzi, Lauren J.; Rees, Geraint; Behrmann, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the movements of those around us is fundamental for many daily activities, such as recognizing actions, detecting predators, and interacting with others socially. A key question concerns the neurobiological substrates underlying biological motion perception. Although the ventral “form” visual cortex is standardly activated by biologically moving stimuli, whether these activations are functionally critical for biological motion perception or are epiphenomenal remains unknown. To address this question, we examined whether focal damage to regions of the ventral visual cortex, resulting in significant deficits in form perception, adversely affects biological motion perception. Six patients with damage to the ventral cortex were tested with sensitive point-light display paradigms. All patients were able to recognize unmasked point-light displays and their perceptual thresholds were not significantly different from those of three different control groups, one of which comprised brain-damaged patients with spared ventral cortex (n > 50). Importantly, these six patients performed significantly better than patients with damage to regions critical for biological motion perception. To assess the necessary contribution of different regions in the ventral pathway to biological motion perception, we complement the behavioral findings with a fine-grained comparison between the lesion location and extent, and the cortical regions standardly implicated in biological motion processing. This analysis revealed that the ventral aspects of the form pathway (e.g., fusiform regions, ventral extrastriate body area) are not critical for biological motion perception. We hypothesize that the role of these ventral regions is to provide enhanced multiview/posture representations of the moving person rather than to represent biological motion perception per se. PMID:25583504

  19. Fatal attraction: ventral striatum predicts costly choice errors in humans.

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    Chumbley, J R; Tobler, P N; Fehr, E

    2014-04-01

    Animals approach rewards and cues associated with reward, even when this behavior is irrelevant or detrimental to the attainment of these rewards. Motivated by these findings we study the biology of financially-costly approach behavior in humans. Our subjects passively learned to predict the occurrence of erotic rewards. We show that neuronal responses in ventral striatum during this Pavlovian learning task stably predict an individual's general tendency towards financially-costly approach behavior in an active choice task several months later. Our data suggest that approach behavior may prevent some individuals from acting in their own interests. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Integrative and distinctive coding of visual and conceptual object features in the ventral visual stream.

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    Martin, Chris B; Douglas, Danielle; Newsome, Rachel N; Man, Louisa Ly; Barense, Morgan D

    2018-02-02

    A significant body of research in cognitive neuroscience is aimed at understanding how object concepts are represented in the human brain. However, it remains unknown whether and where the visual and abstract conceptual features that define an object concept are integrated. We addressed this issue by comparing the neural pattern similarities among object-evoked fMRI responses with behavior-based models that independently captured the visual and conceptual similarities among these stimuli. Our results revealed evidence for distinctive coding of visual features in lateral occipital cortex, and conceptual features in the temporal pole and parahippocampal cortex. By contrast, we found evidence for integrative coding of visual and conceptual object features in perirhinal cortex. The neuroanatomical specificity of this effect was highlighted by results from a searchlight analysis. Taken together, our findings suggest that perirhinal cortex uniquely supports the representation of fully specified object concepts through the integration of their visual and conceptual features. © 2018, Martin et al.

  1. Prior auditory information shapes visual category-selectivity in ventral occipito-temporal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Ruth; Noppeney, Uta

    2010-10-01

    Objects in our natural environment generate signals in multiple sensory modalities. This fMRI study investigated the influence of prior task-irrelevant auditory information on visually-evoked category-selective activations in the ventral occipito-temporal cortex. Subjects categorized pictures as landmarks or animal faces, while ignoring the preceding congruent or incongruent sound. Behaviorally, subjects responded slower to incongruent than congruent stimuli. At the neural level, the lateral and medial prefrontal cortices showed increased activations for incongruent relative to congruent stimuli consistent with their role in response selection. In contrast, the parahippocampal gyri combined visual and auditory information additively: activation was greater for visual landmarks than animal faces and landmark-related sounds than animal vocalizations resulting in increased parahippocampal selectivity for congruent audiovisual landmarks. Effective connectivity analyses showed that this amplification of visual landmark-selectivity was mediated by increased negative coupling of the parahippocampal gyrus with the superior temporal sulcus for congruent stimuli. Thus, task-irrelevant auditory information influences visual object categorization at two stages. In the ventral occipito-temporal cortex auditory and visual category information are combined additively to sharpen visual category-selective responses. In the left inferior frontal sulcus, as indexed by a significant incongruency effect, visual and auditory category information are integrated interactively for response selection. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Blindness alters the microstructure of the ventral but not the dorsal visual stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reislev, Nina L; Kupers, Ron; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2016-01-01

    pathways in 12 congenitally blind, 15 late blind and 15 normal sighted controls. We also studied six prematurely born individuals with normal vision to control for the effects of prematurity on brain connectivity. Our data revealed a reduction in fractional anisotropy in the ventral but not the dorsal......Visual deprivation from birth leads to reorganisation of the brain through cross-modal plasticity. Although there is a general agreement that the primary afferent visual pathways are altered in congenitally blind individuals, our knowledge about microstructural changes within the higher-order...... visual stream for both congenitally and late blind individuals. Prematurely born individuals, with normal vision, did not differ from normal sighted controls, born at term. Our data suggest that although the visual streams are structurally developing without normal visual input from the eyes, blindness...

  3. Computational Modelling of the Neural Representation of Object Shape in the Primate Ventral Visual System

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    Akihiro eEguchi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in successive stages of the primate ventral visual pathway encode the spatial structure of visual objects. In this paper, we investigate through computer simulation how these cell firing properties may develop through unsupervised visually-guided learning. Individual neurons in the model are shown to exploit statistical regularity and temporal continuity of the visual inputs during training to learn firing properties that are similar to neurons in V4 and TEO. Neurons in V4 encode the conformation of boundary contour elements at a particular position within an object regardless of the location of the object on the retina, while neurons in TEO integrate information from multiple boundary contour elements. This representation goes beyond mere object recognition, in which neurons simply respond to the presence of a whole object, but provides an essential foundation from which the brain is subsequently able to recognise the whole object.

  4. ART FOR REWARD’S SAKE: VISUAL ART RECRUITS THE VENTRAL STRIATUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Simon; Hagtvedt, Henrik; Patrick, Vanessa M.; Anderson, Amy; Stilla, Randall; Deshpande, Gopikrishna; Hu, Xiaoping; Sato, João R.; Reddy, Srinivas; Sathian, K.

    2010-01-01

    A recent study showed that people evaluate products more positively when they are physically associated with art images than similar non-art images. Neuroimaging studies of visual art have investigated artistic style and esthetic preference but not brain responses attributable specifically to the artistic status of images. Here we tested the hypothesis that the artistic status of images engages reward circuitry, using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during viewing of art and non-art images matched for content. Subjects made animacy judgments in response to each image. Relative to non-art images, art images activated, on both subject- and item-wise analyses, reward-related regions: the ventral striatum, hypothalamus and orbitofrontal cortex. Neither response times nor ratings of familiarity or esthetic preference for art images correlated significantly with activity that was selective for art images, suggesting that these variables were not responsible for the art-selective activations. Investigation of effective connectivity, using time-varying, wavelet-based, correlation-purged Granger causality analyses, further showed that the ventral striatum was driven by visual cortical regions when viewing art images but not non-art images, and was not driven by regions that correlated with esthetic preference for either art or non -art images. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis, leading us to propose that the appeal of visual art involves activation of reward circuitry based on artistic status alone and independently of its hedonic value. PMID:21111833

  5. The role of independent motion in object segmentation in the ventral visual stream: Learning to recognise the separate parts of the body.

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    Higgins, I V; Stringer, S M

    2011-03-25

    This paper investigates how the visual areas of the brain may learn to segment the bodies of humans and other animals into separate parts. A neural network model of the ventral visual pathway, VisNet, was used to study this problem. In particular, the current work investigates whether independent motion of body parts can be sufficient to enable the visual system to learn separate representations of them even when the body parts are never seen in isolation. The network was shown to be able to separate out the independently moving body parts because the independent motion created statistical decoupling between them. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The visual neuroscience of robotic grasping achieving sensorimotor skills through dorsal-ventral stream integration

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    Chinellato, Eris

    2016-01-01

    This book presents interdisciplinary research that pursues the mutual enrichment of neuroscience and robotics. Building on experimental work, and on the wealth of literature regarding the two cortical pathways of visual processing - the dorsal and ventral streams - we define and implement, computationally and on a real robot, a functional model of the brain areas involved in vision-based grasping actions. Grasping in robotics is largely an unsolved problem, and we show how the bio-inspired approach is successful in dealing with some fundamental issues of the task. Our robotic system can safely perform grasping actions on different unmodeled objects, denoting especially reliable visual and visuomotor skills. The computational model and the robotic experiments help in validating theories on the mechanisms employed by the brain areas more directly involved in grasping actions. This book offers new insights and research hypotheses regarding such mechanisms, especially for what concerns the interaction between the...

  7. Normative development of ventral striatal resting state connectivity in humans

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    Fareri, Dominic S.; Gabard-Durnam, Laurel; Goff, Bonnie; Flannery, Jessica; Gee, Dylan G.; Lumian, Daniel S.; Caldera, Christina; Tottenham, Nim

    2017-01-01

    Incentives play a crucial role in guiding behavior throughout our lives, but perhaps no more so than during the early years of life. The ventral striatum is a critical piece of an incentive-based learning circuit, sharing robust anatomical connections with subcortical (e.g., amygdala, hippocampus) and cortical structures (e.g., medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), insula) that collectively support incentive valuation and learning. Resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) is a powerful method that provides insight into the development of the functional architecture of these connections involved in incentive-based learning. We employed a seed-based correlation approach to investigate ventral striatal rsFC in a cross-sectional sample of typically developing individuals between the ages of 4.5 and 23-years old (n=66). Ventral striatal rsFC with the mPFC showed regionally specific linear age-related changes in connectivity that were associated with age-related increases in circulating testosterone levels. Further, ventral striatal connectivity with the posterior hippocampus and posterior insula demonstrated quadratic age-related changes characterized by negative connectivity in adolescence. Finally, across this age range, the ventral striatum demonstrated positive coupling with the amygdala beginning during childhood and remaining consistently positive across age. In sum, our findings suggest normative ventral striatal rsFC development is dynamic and characterized by early establishment of connectivity with medial prefrontal and limbic structures supporting incentive-based learning, as well as substantial functional reorganization with later developing regions during transitions into and out of adolescence. PMID:26087377

  8. Face-Likeness and Image Variability Drive Responses in Human Face-Selective Ventral Regions

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    Davidenko, Nicolas; Remus, David A.; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2012-01-01

    The human ventral visual stream contains regions that respond selectively to faces over objects. However, it is unknown whether responses in these regions correlate with how face-like stimuli appear. Here, we use parameterized face silhouettes to manipulate the perceived face-likeness of stimuli and measure responses in face- and object-selective ventral regions with high-resolution fMRI. We first use “concentric hyper-sphere” (CH) sampling to define face silhouettes at different distances from the prototype face. Observers rate the stimuli as progressively more face-like the closer they are to the prototype face. Paradoxically, responses in both face- and object-selective regions decrease as face-likeness ratings increase. Because CH sampling produces blocks of stimuli whose variability is negatively correlated with face-likeness, this effect may be driven by more adaptation during high face-likeness (low-variability) blocks than during low face-likeness (high-variability) blocks. We tested this hypothesis by measuring responses to matched-variability (MV) blocks of stimuli with similar face-likeness ratings as with CH sampling. Critically, under MV sampling, we find a face-specific effect: responses in face-selective regions gradually increase with perceived face-likeness, but responses in object-selective regions are unchanged. Our studies provide novel evidence that face-selective responses correlate with the perceived face-likeness of stimuli, but this effect is revealed only when image variability is controlled across conditions. Finally, our data show that variability is a powerful factor that drives responses across the ventral stream. This indicates that controlling variability across conditions should be a critical tool in future neuroimaging studies of face and object representation. PMID:21823208

  9. Top-down modulation of ventral occipito-temporal responses during visual word recognition.

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    Twomey, Tae; Kawabata Duncan, Keith J; Price, Cathy J; Devlin, Joseph T

    2011-04-01

    Although interactivity is considered a fundamental principle of cognitive (and computational) models of reading, it has received far less attention in neural models of reading that instead focus on serial stages of feed-forward processing from visual input to orthographic processing to accessing the corresponding phonological and semantic information. In particular, the left ventral occipito-temporal (vOT) cortex is proposed to be the first stage where visual word recognition occurs prior to accessing nonvisual information such as semantics and phonology. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether there is evidence that activation in vOT is influenced top-down by the interaction of visual and nonvisual properties of the stimuli during visual word recognition tasks. Participants performed two different types of lexical decision tasks that focused on either visual or nonvisual properties of the word or word-like stimuli. The design allowed us to investigate how vOT activation during visual word recognition was influenced by a task change to the same stimuli and by a stimulus change during the same task. We found both stimulus- and task-driven modulation of vOT activation that can only be explained by top-down processing of nonvisual aspects of the task and stimuli. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that vOT acts as an interface linking visual form with nonvisual processing in both bottom up and top down directions. Such interactive processing at the neural level is in agreement with cognitive and computational models of reading but challenges some of the assumptions made by current neuro-anatomical models of reading. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sleep deprivation impairs object-selective attention: a view from the ventral visual cortex.

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    Julian Lim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most prior studies on selective attention in the setting of total sleep deprivation (SD have focused on behavior or activation within fronto-parietal cognitive control areas. Here, we evaluated the effects of SD on the top-down biasing of activation of ventral visual cortex and on functional connectivity between cognitive control and other brain regions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-three healthy young adult volunteers underwent fMRI after a normal night of sleep (RW and after sleep deprivation in a counterbalanced manner while performing a selective attention task. During this task, pictures of houses or faces were randomly interleaved among scrambled images. Across different blocks, volunteers responded to house but not face pictures, face but not house pictures, or passively viewed pictures without responding. The appearance of task-relevant pictures was unpredictable in this paradigm. SD resulted in less accurate detection of target pictures without affecting the mean false alarm rate or response time. In addition to a reduction of fronto-parietal activation, attending to houses strongly modulated parahippocampal place area (PPA activation during RW, but this attention-driven biasing of PPA activation was abolished following SD. Additionally, SD resulted in a significant decrement in functional connectivity between the PPA and two cognitive control areas, the left intraparietal sulcus and the left inferior frontal lobe. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SD impairs selective attention as evidenced by reduced selectivity in PPA activation. Further, reduction in fronto-parietal and ventral visual task-related activation suggests that it also affects sustained attention. Reductions in functional connectivity may be an important additional imaging parameter to consider in characterizing the effects of sleep deprivation on cognition.

  11. Sleep Deprivation Impairs Object-Selective Attention: A View from the Ventral Visual Cortex

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    Lim, Julian; Tan, Jiat Chow; Parimal, Sarayu; Dinges, David F.; Chee, Michael W. L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Most prior studies on selective attention in the setting of total sleep deprivation (SD) have focused on behavior or activation within fronto-parietal cognitive control areas. Here, we evaluated the effects of SD on the top-down biasing of activation of ventral visual cortex and on functional connectivity between cognitive control and other brain regions. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty-three healthy young adult volunteers underwent fMRI after a normal night of sleep (RW) and after sleep deprivation in a counterbalanced manner while performing a selective attention task. During this task, pictures of houses or faces were randomly interleaved among scrambled images. Across different blocks, volunteers responded to house but not face pictures, face but not house pictures, or passively viewed pictures without responding. The appearance of task-relevant pictures was unpredictable in this paradigm. SD resulted in less accurate detection of target pictures without affecting the mean false alarm rate or response time. In addition to a reduction of fronto-parietal activation, attending to houses strongly modulated parahippocampal place area (PPA) activation during RW, but this attention-driven biasing of PPA activation was abolished following SD. Additionally, SD resulted in a significant decrement in functional connectivity between the PPA and two cognitive control areas, the left intraparietal sulcus and the left inferior frontal lobe. Conclusions/Significance SD impairs selective attention as evidenced by reduced selectivity in PPA activation. Further, reduction in fronto-parietal and ventral visual task-related activation suggests that it also affects sustained attention. Reductions in functional connectivity may be an important additional imaging parameter to consider in characterizing the effects of sleep deprivation on cognition. PMID:20140099

  12. Sustained happiness? Lack of repetition suppression in right-ventral visual cortex for happy faces.

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    Suzuki, Atsunobu; Goh, Joshua O S; Hebrank, Andrew; Sutton, Bradley P; Jenkins, Lucas; Flicker, Blair A; Park, Denise C

    2011-09-01

    Emotional stimuli have been shown to preferentially engage initial attention but their sustained effects on neural processing remain largely unknown. The present study evaluated whether emotional faces engage sustained neural processing by examining the attenuation of neural repetition suppression to repeated emotional faces. Repetition suppression of neural function refers to the general reduction of neural activity when processing a repeated stimulus. Preferential processing of emotional face stimuli, however, should elicit sustained neural processing such that repetition suppression to repeated emotional faces is attenuated relative to faces with no emotional content. We measured the reduction of functional magnetic resonance imaging signals associated with immediate repetition of neutral, angry and happy faces. Whereas neutral faces elicited the greatest suppression in ventral visual cortex, followed by angry faces, repetition suppression was the most attenuated for happy faces. Indeed, happy faces showed almost no repetition suppression in part of the right-inferior occipital and fusiform gyri, which play an important role in face-identity processing. Our findings suggest that happy faces are associated with sustained visual encoding of face identity and thereby assist in the formation of more elaborate representations of the faces, congruent with findings in the behavioral literature.

  13. Ventral and dorsal streams processing visual motion perception (FDG-PET study

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    Becker-Bense Sandra

    2012-07-01

    to be positively correlated with the rCGM of bilateral basal ganglia regions responsible for the control of motor function of the head. Conclusions Our data gave further insights into subfunctions within the complex cortical network involved in the processing of visual-vestibular interaction during CV. Specific areas of this cortical network could be attributed to the ventral stream (“what” pathway responsible for the duration after stimulus stop and to the dorsal stream (“where/how” pathway responsible for intensity aspects.

  14. Complex cells decrease errors for the Müller-Lyer illusion in a model of the visual ventral stream

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    Astrid eZeman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available To improve robustness in object recognition, many artificial visual systems imitate the way in which the human visual cortex encodes object information as a hierarchical set of features. These systems are usually evaluated in terms of their ability to accurately categorize well-defined, unambiguous objects and scenes. In the real world, however, not all objects and scenes are presented clearly, with well-defined labels and interpretations. Visual illusions demonstrate a disparity between perception and objective reality, allowing psychophysicists to methodically manipulate stimuli and study our interpretation of the environment. One prominent effect, the Müller-Lyer illusion, is demonstrated when the perceived length of a line is contracted (or expanded by the addition of arrowheads (or arrow-tails to its ends. HMAX, a benchmark object recognition system, consistently produces a bias when classifying Müller-Lyer images. HMAX is a hierarchical, artificial neural network that imitates the ‘simple’ and ‘complex’ cell layers found in the visual ventral stream. In this study, we perform two experiments to explore the Müller-Lyer illusion in HMAX, asking: 1 How do simple versus complex cell operations within HMAX affect illusory bias and precision? 2 How does varying the position of the figures in the input image affect classification using HMAX? In our first experiment, we assessed classification after traversing each layer of HMAX and found that in general, kernel operations performed by simple cells increase bias and uncertainty while max-pooling operations executed by complex cells decrease bias and uncertainty. In our second experiment, we increased variation in the positions of figures in the input that reduced bias and uncertainty in HMAX. Our findings suggest that the Müller-Lyer illusion is exacerbated by the vulnerability of simple cell operations to positional fluctuations, but ameliorated by the robustness of complex cell

  15. Experience Shapes the Development of Neural Substrates of Face Processing in Human Ventral Temporal Cortex.

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    Golarai, Golijeh; Liberman, Alina; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2017-02-01

    In adult humans, the ventral temporal cortex (VTC) represents faces in a reproducible topology. However, it is unknown what role visual experience plays in the development of this topology. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in children and adults, we found a sequential development, in which the topology of face-selective activations across the VTC was matured by age 7, but the spatial extent and degree of face selectivity continued to develop past age 7 into adulthood. Importantly, own- and other-age faces were differentially represented, both in the distributed multivoxel patterns across the VTC, and also in the magnitude of responses of face-selective regions. These results provide strong evidence that experience shapes cortical representations of faces during development from childhood to adulthood. Our findings have important implications for the role of experience and age in shaping the neural substrates of face processing in the human VTC. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The Temporal Pole Top-Down Modulates the Ventral Visual Stream During Social Cognition.

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    Pehrs, Corinna; Zaki, Jamil; Schlochtermeier, Lorna H; Jacobs, Arthur M; Kuchinke, Lars; Koelsch, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The temporal pole (TP) has been associated with diverse functions of social cognition and emotion processing. Although the underlying mechanism remains elusive, one possibility is that TP acts as domain-general hub integrating socioemotional information. To test this, 26 participants were presented with 60 empathy-evoking film clips during fMRI scanning. The film clips were preceded by a linguistic sad or neutral context and half of the clips were accompanied by sad music. In line with its hypothesized role, TP was involved in the processing of sad context and furthermore tracked participants' empathic concern. To examine the neuromodulatory impact of TP, we applied nonlinear dynamic causal modeling to a multisensory integration network from previous work consisting of superior temporal gyrus (STG), fusiform gyrus (FG), and amygdala, which was extended by an additional node in the TP. Bayesian model comparison revealed a gating of STG and TP on fusiform-amygdalar coupling and an increase of TP to FG connectivity during the integration of contextual information. Moreover, these backward projections were strengthened by emotional music. The findings indicate that during social cognition, TP integrates information from different modalities and top-down modulates lower-level perceptual areas in the ventral visual stream as a function of integration demands. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Recovering stimulus locations using populations of eye-position modulated neurons in dorsal and ventral visual streams of nonhuman primates

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    Anne B Sereno

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We recorded visual responses while monkeys fixated the same target at different gaze angles, both dorsally (lateral intraparietal cortex, LIP and ventrally (anterior inferotemporal cortex, AIT. While eye-position modulations occurred in both areas, they were both more frequent and stronger in LIP neurons. We used an intrinsic population decoding technique, multidimensional scaling, to recover eye positions, equivalent to recovering fixated target locations. We report that eye-position based visual space in LIP was more accurate (i.e., metric. Nevertheless, the AIT spatial representation remained largely topologically correct, perhaps indicative of a categorical spatial representation (i.e., a qualitative description such as left of or above as opposed to a quantitative, metrically precise description. Additionally, we developed a simple neural model of eye position signals and illustrate that differences in single cell characteristics can influence the ability to recover target position in a population of cells. We demonstrate for the first time that the ventral stream contains sufficient information for constructing an eye-position based spatial representation. Furthermore we demonstrate, in dorsal and ventral streams as well as modeling, that target locations can be extracted directly from eye position signals in cortical visual responses without computing coordinate transforms of visual space.

  18. Microstructural development: organizational differences of the fiber architecture between children and adults in dorsal and ventral visual streams.

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    Loenneker, Thomas; Klaver, Peter; Bucher, Kerstin; Lichtensteiger, Janine; Imfeld, Adrian; Martin, Ernst

    2011-06-01

    Visual perceptual skills are basically mature by the age of 7 years. White matter, however, continues to develop until late adolescence. Here, we examined children (aged 5-7 years) and adults (aged 20-30 years) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) fiber tracking to investigate the microstructural maturation of the visual system. We characterized the brain volumes, DTI indices, and architecture of visual fiber tracts passing through white matter structures adjacent to occipital and parietal cortex (dorsal stream), and to occipital and temporal cortex (ventral stream). Dorsal, but not ventral visual stream pathways were found to increase in volume during maturation. DTI indices revealed expected maturational differences, manifested as decreased mean and radial diffusivities and increased fractional anisotropy in both streams. Additionally, fractional anisotropy was increased and radial diffusivity was decreased in the adult dorsal stream, which can be explained by specific dorsal stream myelination or increasing fiber compaction. Adult dorsal stream architecture showed additional intra- and interhemispheric connections: Dorsal fibers penetrated into contralateral hemispheres via commissural structures and projection fibers extended to the superior temporal gyrus and ventral association pathways. Moreover, intra-hemispheric connectivity was particularly strong in adult dorsal stream of the right hemisphere. Ventral stream architecture also differed between adults and children. Adults revealed additional connections to posterior lateral areas (occipital-temporal gyrus), whereas children showed connections to posterior medial areas (posterior parahippocampal and lingual gyrus). Hence, in addition to dorsal stream myelination or fiber compaction, progressing maturation of intra- and interhemispheric connectivity may contribute to the development of the visual system. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Human left ventral premotor cortex mediates matching of hand posture to object use.

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    Guy Vingerhoets

    Full Text Available Visuomotor transformations for grasping have been associated with a fronto-parietal network in the monkey brain. The human homologue of the parietal monkey region (AIP has been identified as the anterior part of the intraparietal sulcus (aIPS, whereas the putative human equivalent of the monkey frontal region (F5 is located in the ventral part of the premotor cortex (vPMC. Results from animal studies suggest that monkey F5 is involved in the selection of appropriate hand postures relative to the constraints of the task. In humans, the functional roles of aIPS and vPMC appear to be more complex and the relative contribution of each region to grasp selection remains uncertain. The present study aimed to identify modulation in brain areas sensitive to the difficulty level of tool object - hand posture matching. Seventeen healthy right handed participants underwent fMRI while observing pictures of familiar tool objects followed by pictures of hand postures. The task was to decide whether the hand posture matched the functional use of the previously shown object. Conditions were manipulated for level of difficulty. Compared to a picture matching control task, the tool object - hand posture matching conditions conjointly showed increased modulation in several left hemispheric regions of the superior and inferior parietal lobules (including aIPS, the middle occipital gyrus, and the inferior temporal gyrus. Comparison of hard versus easy conditions selectively modulated the left inferior frontal gyrus with peak activity located in its opercular part (Brodmann area (BA 44. We suggest that in the human brain, vPMC/BA44 is involved in the matching of hand posture configurations in accordance with visual and functional demands.

  20. Porcine fetal ventral mesencephalic cells are targets for primed xenoreactive human T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Jan; de Haan, Aalzen; Bruin -van Dijk, Elinda; van der Gun, Ieneke; Van Dijk, Henk; Rozing, Jan; de Leij, Lou; Staal, Michiel

    2006-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine fetal ventral mesencephalic (pfVM) cells to overcome the dopamine shortage in the striatum of patients with Parkinson's disease seems a viable alternative to allotransplantion of human fetal donor tissue, especially because the latter is complicated by both practical

  1. Learning-related changes of brain activation in the visual ventral stream: an fMRI study of mirror reading skill.

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    Mochizuki-Kawai, Hiroko; Tsukiura, Takashi; Mochizuki, Satoshi; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2006-11-29

    A previous neuroimaging study has indicated that the visual dorsal stream may contribute to accurate reading of mirror-reversed words. However, the role of the visual ventral stream in the learning of mirror reading skill remains ambiguous. In the present fMRI study, we investigated learning-related changes in brain activation in the visual ventral stream in a mirror reading task. Subjects participated in three successive runs of the mirror reading task, in each of which they were asked to read mirror-reversed words and normal words as accurately and as quickly as possible. The behavioral data for the mirror reading condition showed significant improvement in reaction time but not in performance accuracy across the three runs. The activation data showed different learning-associated patterns related to the right and left visual ventral streams. On the right side, activity related to the reading of mirror stimuli was significantly greater than that related to normal stimuli in the first run only, whereas on the left side it was greater in all runs. Additional correlation analysis between response time data and percentage signal changes only in the mirror reading condition showed significant correlation on the right visual ventral stream in the first run only, whereas that on the left visual ventral stream was found only in the third run. The dissociable response between the right and left visual ventral streams may reflect learning-related changes in reading strategy and may be critical in improving the speed of reading mirror-reversed words.

  2. Perception and Action Selection Dissociate Human Ventral and Dorsal Cortex

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    Ikkai, Akiko; Jerde, Trenton A.; Curtis, Clayton E.

    2011-01-01

    We test theories about the functional organization of the human cortex by correlating brain activity with demands on perception versus action selection. Subjects covertly searched for a target among an array of 4, 8, or 12 items (perceptual manipulation) and then, depending on the color of the array, made a saccade toward, away from, or at a right…

  3. Eye movement-invariant representations in the human visual system.

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    Nishimoto, Shinji; Huth, Alexander G; Bilenko, Natalia Y; Gallant, Jack L

    2017-01-01

    During natural vision, humans make frequent eye movements but perceive a stable visual world. It is therefore likely that the human visual system contains representations of the visual world that are invariant to eye movements. Here we present an experiment designed to identify visual areas that might contain eye-movement-invariant representations. We used functional MRI to record brain activity from four human subjects who watched natural movies. In one condition subjects were required to fixate steadily, and in the other they were allowed to freely make voluntary eye movements. The movies used in each condition were identical. We reasoned that the brain activity recorded in a visual area that is invariant to eye movement should be similar under fixation and free viewing conditions. In contrast, activity in a visual area that is sensitive to eye movement should differ between fixation and free viewing. We therefore measured the similarity of brain activity across repeated presentations of the same movie within the fixation condition, and separately between the fixation and free viewing conditions. The ratio of these measures was used to determine which brain areas are most likely to contain eye movement-invariant representations. We found that voxels located in early visual areas are strongly affected by eye movements, while voxels in ventral temporal areas are only weakly affected by eye movements. These results suggest that the ventral temporal visual areas contain a stable representation of the visual world that is invariant to eye movements made during natural vision.

  4. Delayed action does not always require the ventral stream: a study on a patient with visual form agnosia.

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    Hesse, Constanze; Schenk, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    It has been suggested that while movements directed at visible targets are processed within the dorsal stream, movements executed after delay rely on the visual representations of the ventral stream (Milner & Goodale, 2006). This interpretation is supported by the observation that a patient with ventral stream damage (D.F.) has trouble performing accurate movements after a delay, but performs normally when the target is visible during movement programming. We tested D.F.'s visuomotor performance in a letter-posting task whilst varying the amount of visual feedback available. Additionally, we also varied whether D.F. received tactile feedback at the end of each trial (posting through a letter box vs posting on a screen) and whether environmental cues were available during the delay period (removing the target only vs suppressing vision completely with shutter glasses). We found that in the absence of environmental cues patient D.F. was unaffected by the introduction of delay and performed as accurately as healthy controls. However, when environmental cues and vision of the moving hand were available during and after the delay period, D.F.'s visuomotor performance was impaired. Thus, while healthy controls benefit from the availability of environmental landmarks and/or visual feedback of the moving hand, such cues seem less beneficial to D.F. Taken together our findings suggest that ventral stream damage does not always impact the ability to make delayed movements but compromises the ability to use environmental landmarks and visual feedback efficiently. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Task relevance differentially shapes ventral visual stream sensitivity to visible and invisible faces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouider, Sid; Barbot, Antoine; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2016-01-01

    requires dissociating it from the top-down influences underlying conscious recognition. Here, using visual masking to abolish perceptual consciousness in humans, we report that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses to invisible faces in the fusiform gyrus are enhanced when they are task...... relevance crucially shapes the sensitivity of fusiform regions to face stimuli, leading from enhancement to suppression of neural activity when the top-down influences accruing from conscious recognition are prevented.......Top-down modulations of the visual cortex can be driven by task relevance. Yet, several accounts propose that the perceptual inferences underlying conscious recognition involve similar top-down modulations of sensory responses. Studying the pure impact of task relevance on sensory responses...

  6. Visually guided grasping produces fMRI activation in dorsal but not ventral stream brain areas.

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    Culham, Jody C; Danckert, Stacey L; DeSouza, Joseph F X; Gati, Joseph S; Menon, Ravi S; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2003-11-01

    Although both reaching and grasping require transporting the hand to the object location, only grasping also requires processing of object shape, size and orientation to preshape the hand. Behavioural and neuropsychological evidence suggests that the object processing required for grasping relies on different neural substrates from those mediating object recognition. Specifically, whereas object recognition is believed to rely on structures in the ventral (occipitotemporal) stream, object grasping appears to rely on structures in the dorsal (occipitoparietal) stream. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to determine whether grasping (compared to reaching) produced activation in dorsal areas, ventral areas, or both. We found greater activity for grasping than reaching in several regions, including anterior intraparietal (AIP) cortex. We also performed a standard object perception localizer (comparing intact vs. scrambled 2D object images) in the same subjects to identify the lateral occipital complex (LOC), a ventral stream area believed to play a critical role in object recognition. Although LOC was activated by the objects presented on both grasping and reaching trials, there was no greater activity for grasping compared to reaching. These results suggest that dorsal areas, including AIP, but not ventral areas such as LOC, play a fundamental role in computing object properties during grasping.

  7. Asymmetric development of dorsal and ventral attention networks in the human brain.

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    Farrant, Kristafor; Uddin, Lucina Q

    2015-04-01

    Two neural systems for goal-directed and stimulus-driven attention have been described in the adult human brain; the dorsal attention network (DAN) centered in the frontal eye fields (FEF) and intraparietal sulcus (IPS), and the ventral attention network (VAN) anchored in the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and ventral frontal cortex (VFC). Little is known regarding the processes governing typical development of these attention networks in the brain. Here we use resting state functional MRI data collected from thirty 7 to 12 year-old children and thirty 18 to 31 year-old adults to examine two key regions of interest from the dorsal and ventral attention networks. We found that for the DAN nodes (IPS and FEF), children showed greater functional connectivity with regions within the network compared with adults, whereas adults showed greater functional connectivity between the FEF and extra-network regions including the posterior cingulate cortex. For the VAN nodes (TPJ and VFC), adults showed greater functional connectivity with regions within the network compared with children. Children showed greater functional connectivity between VFC and nodes of the salience network. This asymmetric pattern of development of attention networks may be a neural signature of the shift from over-representation of bottom-up attention mechanisms to greater top-down attentional capacities with development. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Asymmetric development of dorsal and ventral attention networks in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristafor Farrant

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Two neural systems for goal-directed and stimulus-driven attention have been described in the adult human brain; the dorsal attention network (DAN centered in the frontal eye fields (FEF and intraparietal sulcus (IPS, and the ventral attention network (VAN anchored in the temporoparietal junction (TPJ and ventral frontal cortex (VFC. Little is known regarding the processes governing typical development of these attention networks in the brain. Here we use resting state functional MRI data collected from thirty 7 to 12 year-old children and thirty 18 to 31 year-old adults to examine two key regions of interest from the dorsal and ventral attention networks. We found that for the DAN nodes (IPS and FEF, children showed greater functional connectivity with regions within the network compared with adults, whereas adults showed greater functional connectivity between the FEF and extra-network regions including the posterior cingulate cortex. For the VAN nodes (TPJ and VFC, adults showed greater functional connectivity with regions within the network compared with children. Children showed greater functional connectivity between VFC and nodes of the salience network. This asymmetric pattern of development of attention networks may be a neural signature of the shift from over-representation of bottom-up attention mechanisms to greater top-down attentional capacities with development.

  9. The human substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. A neuroanatomical study with notes on aging and aging diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Domburg, P H; ten Donkelaar, H J

    1991-01-01

    The present study comprises a cytoarchitectonic analysis of the human substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA); a discussion of their chemoarchitecture and fiber connections (mainly based on tract-tracing studies in primates) preceded by an overview of the wealth of tract-tracing data in rodents; a discussion of the involvement of the SN/VTA complex in Parkinson's disease (PD) and related disorders and in Alzheimer's disease (AD), including some quantitative data; and finally, some functional and pathophysiological considerations, relating nigral organization to pathophysiology and hypotheses on the etiology and distribution of AD and PD. DAergic cell populations in the mesencephalon (SN pars compacta, VTA, and the retrorubral area A8) which give rise to well-developed, DAergic, mesotelencephalic pathways, including a distinct mesostriatal system, and a substance P-immunoreactive striatotegmental system which projects to the SN pars reticulata and VTA appear to be common to reptiles, birds, and mammals (Sect. 3.1). The extensive literature on the organization of the SN/VTA complex in rats is summarized in Sect. 3.2. The mesotelencephalic projection is organized along inverted dorsal to ventral, medial to lateral, and rostral to caudal topographies. A dense DAergic innervation is characteristic of the entire striatal complex, including the caudate-putamen (the dorsal striatum), the nucleus accumbens, and the olfactory tubercle (the ventral striatum). This mesostriatal projection is compartmentally organized with distinct sets of DAergic neurons projecting to striosomes and extrasriosomal matrix, respectively, suggesting specialized channels directed at DAergic modulation of sensorimotor processing in the striatal matrix and limbic related mechanisms represented in the striosomal system. The VTA and medial part of the SN give rise to the DAergic mesolimbocortical system with extensive projections to limbic, allocortical, and neocortical structures. The

  10. Generation and properties of a new human ventral mesencephalic neural stem cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Ana; Liste, Isabel; Courtois, Elise T

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are powerful research tools for the design and discovery of new approaches to cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease. Several epigenetic and genetic strategies have been tested for long-term maintenance and expansion of these cells in vitro....... Here we report the generation of a new stable cell line of human neural stem cells derived from ventral mesencephalon (hVM1) based on v-myc immortalization. The cells expressed neural stem cell and radial glia markers like nestin, vimentin and 3CB2 under proliferation conditions. After withdrawal...

  11. Intrinsic connectivity between the hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, and ventral tegmental area in humans.

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    Kahn, I; Shohamy, D

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that memory formation in the hippocampus is modulated by the motivational significance of events, allowing past experience to adaptively guide behavior. The effects of motivation on memory are thought to depend on interactions between the hippocampus, the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Indeed, animal studies reveal anatomical pathways for circuit-level interaction between these regions. However, a homologue circuit connectivity in humans remains to be shown. We characterized this circuitry in humans by exploiting spontaneous low-frequency modulations in the fMRI signal (termed resting-state functional connectivity), which are thought to reflect functionally related regions and their organization into functional networks in the brain. We examined connectivity in this network across two datasets (hi-resolution, n = 100; standard resolution, n = 894). Results reveal convergent connectivity between the hippocampus, and both the NAcc and the VTA centered on ventral regions in the body of the hippocampus. Additionally, we found individual differences in the strength of connectivity within this network. Together, these results provide a novel task-independent characterization of circuitry underlying interactions between the hippocampus, NAcc, and VTA and provide a framework with which to understand how connectivity might reflect and constrain the effects of motivation on memory. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Turning visual shapes into sounds: early stages of reading acquisition revealed in the ventral occipitotemporal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone-Bertolotti, M; Vidal, J R; de Palma, L; Hamamé, C M; Ossandon, T; Kahane, P; Minotti, L; Bertrand, O; Lachaux, J-P

    2014-04-15

    The exact role of the left ventral occipitotemporal cortex (VOTC) during the initial stages of reading acquisition is a hotly debated issue, especially regarding the comparative effect of learning on early stimulus-dependent vs. later task-dependent processes. We show that this controversy can be solved with high-temporal resolution intracerebral EEG recordings of the VOTC. We measured High-Frequency Activity (50-150 Hz) as a proxy of population-level spiking activity while participants learned Japanese Katakana symbols, and found that learning primarily affects top-down/task-dependent neural processing, after a few minutes only. In contrast, adaptation of early bottom-up/stimulus-dependent processing takes several days to adapt and provides the basis for fluent reading. Such evidence that two consecutive stages of neural processing, stimulus- and task-dependent are differentially affected by learning, can reconcile seemingly opposite hypotheses on the role of the VOTC during reading acquisition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. REM sleep behaviour disorder and visuoperceptive dysfunction: a disorder of the ventral visual stream?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Ana; Dujardin, Kathy; Boucart, Muriel; Pins, Delphine; Delliaux, Marie; Defebvre, Luc; Derambure, Philippe; Monaca, Christelle

    2010-03-01

    In idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD), an association with visuoperceptive disorders has been described. However, such an association has not been clearly established in RBD secondary to Parkinson's disease (PD). We compared visuoperceptive function in four groups of non-demented patients (parkinsonian patients with or without RBD, patients with idiopathic RBD and control participants) via a procedure enabling the analysis of the various components of visual information processing and in order to answer the following question: is RBD associated with visuoperceptive and/or attentional disorders in PD and, if so, where is the dysfunction located along the visual pathway? Sensorial aspects of visual information were evaluated using a contrast sensitivity test, perceptual aspects were assessed using a contour-based object identification test and visual attention was measured in an attentional capture paradigm. The diagnosis of RBD was confirmed by polysomnography. We observed a higher object identification threshold (OIT) (1) in PD patients with RBD compared with PD patients without RBD and with controls and (2) in idiopathic RBD patients compared with controls. There were no significant OIT differences between PD patients with RBD and idiopathic RBD patients or between PD patients without RBD and controls. We did not find any significant inter-group differences in any of the other visuoperceptive tests. RBD, idiopathic or secondary to PD, is associated with perceptual closure dysfunction. Our results suggest that this perceptual dysfunction is specifically associated with RBD and may be related to a non-dopaminergic impairment.

  14. Targeted Differentiation of Regional Ventral Neuroprogenitors and Related Neuronal Subtypes from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liankai Chi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Embryoid body (EB formation and adherent culture (AD paradigms are equivalently thought to be applicable for neural specification of human pluripotent stem cells. Here, we report that sonic hedgehog-induced ventral neuroprogenitors under EB conditions are fated to medial ganglionic eminence (MGE, while the AD cells mostly adopt a floor-plate (FP fate. The EB-MGE later on differentiates into GABA and cholinergic neurons, while the AD-FP favors dopaminergic neuron specification. Distinct developmental, metabolic, and adhesion traits in AD and EB cells may potentially account for their differential patterning potency. Gene targeting combined with small-molecule screening experiments identified that concomitant inhibition of Wnts, STAT3, and p38 pathways (3i could largely convert FP to MGE under AD conditions. Thus, differentiation paradigms and signaling regulators can be integrated together to specify distinct neuronal subtypes for studying and treating related neurological diseases, such as epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease.

  15. Separate processing of texture and form in the ventral stream: evidence from FMRI and visual agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavina-Pratesi, C; Kentridge, R W; Heywood, C A; Milner, A D

    2010-02-01

    Real-life visual object recognition requires the processing of more than just geometric (shape, size, and orientation) properties. Surface properties such as color and texture are equally important, particularly for providing information about the material properties of objects. Recent neuroimaging research suggests that geometric and surface properties are dealt with separately within the lateral occipital cortex (LOC) and the collateral sulcus (CoS), respectively. Here we compared objects that differed either in aspect ratio or in surface texture only, keeping all other visual properties constant. Results on brain-intact participants confirmed that surface texture activates an area in the posterior CoS, quite distinct from the area activated by shape within LOC. We also tested 2 patients with visual object agnosia, one of whom (DF) performed well on the texture task but at chance on the shape task, whereas the other (MS) showed the converse pattern. This behavioral double dissociation was matched by a parallel neuroimaging dissociation, with activation in CoS but not LOC in patient DF and activation in LOC but not CoS in patient MS. These data provide presumptive evidence that the areas respectively activated by shape and texture play a causally necessary role in the perceptual discrimination of these features.

  16. First human use of hybrid synthetic/biologic mesh in ventral hernia repair: a multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, James G; El-Hayek, Kevin; Strong, Andrew T; LaPinska, Melissa Phillips; Yoo, Jin S; Pauli, Eric M; Kroh, Matthew

    2018-03-01

    Mesh options for reinforcement of ventral/incisional hernia (VIH) repair include synthetic or biologic materials. While each material has known advantages and disadvantages, little is understood about outcomes when these materials are used in combination. This multicenter study reports on the first human use of a novel synthetic/biologic hybrid mesh (Zenapro ® Hybrid Hernia Repair Device) for VIH repair. This prospective, multicenter post-market clinical trial enrolled consecutive adults who underwent elective VIH repair with hybrid mesh placed in the intraperitoneal or retromuscular/preperitoneal position. Patients were classified as Ventral Hernia Working Group (VHWG) grades 1-3 and had clean or clean-contaminated wounds. Outcomes of ventral and incisional hernia were compared using appropriate parametric tests. In all, 63 patients underwent VIH repair with hybrid mesh. Most were females (54.0%), had a mean age of 54.8 ± 10.9 years and mean body mass index of 34.5 ± 7.8 kg/m 2 , and classified as VHWG grade 2 (87.3%). Most defects were midline (92.1%) with a mean area of 106 ± 155 cm 2 . Cases were commonly classified as clean (92.1%) and were performed laparoscopically (60.3%). Primary fascial closure was achieved in 82.5% with 28.2% requiring component separation. Mesh location was frequently intraperitoneal (69.8%). Overall, 39% of patients available for follow-up at 12 months suffered surgical site events, which were generally more frequent after incisional hernia repair. Of these, seroma (23.7%) was most common, but few (8.5%) required procedural intervention. Other surgical site events that required procedural intervention included hematoma (1.7%), wound dehiscence (1.7%), and surgical site infection (3.4%). Recurrence rate was 6.8% (95% CI 2.2-16.6%) at 12-months postoperatively. Zenapro ® Hybrid Hernia Repair Device is safe and effective in VHWG grade 1-2 patients with clean wounds out to 12 months. Short-term outcomes and recurrence rate

  17. A universal role of the ventral striatum in reward-based learning: Evidence from human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Reka; Pollmann, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Reinforcement learning enables organisms to adjust their behavior in order to maximize rewards. Electrophysiological recordings of dopaminergic midbrain neurons have shown that they code the difference between actual and predicted rewards, i.e., the reward prediction error, in many species. This error signal is conveyed to both the striatum and cortical areas and is thought to play a central role in learning to optimize behavior. However, in human daily life rewards are diverse and often only indirect feedback is available. Here we explore the range of rewards that are processed by the dopaminergic system in human participants, and examine whether it is also involved in learning in the absence of explicit rewards. While results from electrophysiological recordings in humans are sparse, evidence linking dopaminergic activity to the metabolic signal recorded from the midbrain and striatum with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is available. Results from fMRI studies suggest that the human ventral striatum (VS) receives valuation information for a diverse set of rewarding stimuli. These range from simple primary reinforcers such as juice rewards over abstract social rewards to internally generated signals on perceived correctness, suggesting that the VS is involved in learning from trial-and-error irrespective of the specific nature of provided rewards. In addition, we summarize evidence that the VS can also be implicated when learning from observing others, and in tasks that go beyond simple stimulus-action-outcome learning, indicating that the reward system is also recruited in more complex learning tasks. PMID:24825620

  18. Evidence That Sleep Deprivation Downregulates Dopamine D2R in Ventral Striatum in the Human Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow N. D.; Fowler J.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Benveniste, H.; Kin, R.; Thanos, P.K.; Sergi F.

    2012-03-23

    Dopamine D2 receptors are involved with wakefulness, but their role in the decreased alertness associated with sleep deprivation is unclear. We had shown that sleep deprivation reduced dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability (measured with PET and [{sup 11}C]raclopride in controls) in striatum, but could not determine whether this reflected dopamine increases ([{sup 11}C]raclopride competes with dopamine for D2/D3 receptor binding) or receptor downregulation. To clarify this, we compared the dopamine increases induced by methylphenidate (a drug that increases dopamine by blocking dopamine transporters) during sleep deprivation versus rested sleep, with the assumption that methylphenidate's effects would be greater if, indeed, dopamine release was increased during sleep deprivation. We scanned 20 controls with [{sup 11}C]raclopride after rested sleep and after 1 night of sleep deprivation; both after placebo and after methylphenidate. We corroborated a decrease in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum with sleep deprivation (compared with rested sleep) that was associated with reduced alertness and increased sleepiness. However, the dopamine increases induced by methylphenidate (measured as decreases in D2/D3 receptor availability compared with placebo) did not differ between rested sleep and sleep deprivation, and were associated with the increased alertness and reduced sleepiness when methylphenidate was administered after sleep deprivation. Similar findings were obtained by microdialysis in rodents subjected to 1 night of paradoxical sleep deprivation. These findings are consistent with a downregulation of D2/D3 receptors in ventral striatum with sleep deprivation that may contribute to the associated decreased wakefulness and also corroborate an enhancement of D2 receptor signaling in the arousing effects of methylphenidate in humans.

  19. Visual Analysis of Humans

    CERN Document Server

    Moeslund, Thomas B

    2011-01-01

    This unique text/reference provides a coherent and comprehensive overview of all aspects of video analysis of humans. Broad in coverage and accessible in style, the text presents original perspectives collected from preeminent researchers gathered from across the world. In addition to presenting state-of-the-art research, the book reviews the historical origins of the different existing methods, and predicts future trends and challenges. This title: features a Foreword by Professor Larry Davis; contains contributions from an international selection of leading authorities in the field; includes

  20. Auditory Working Memory Load Impairs Visual Ventral Stream Processing: Toward a Unified Model of Attentional Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemen, Jane; Buchel, Christian; Buhler, Mira; Menz, Mareike M.; Rose, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Attentional interference between tasks performed in parallel is known to have strong and often undesired effects. As yet, however, the mechanisms by which interference operates remain elusive. A better knowledge of these processes may facilitate our understanding of the effects of attention on human performance and the debilitating consequences…

  1. Culture differences in neural processing of faces and houses in the ventral visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Joshua O S; Leshikar, Eric D; Sutton, Bradley P; Tan, Jiat Chow; Sim, Sam K Y; Hebrank, Andrew C; Park, Denise C

    2010-06-01

    Behavioral and eye-tracking studies on cultural differences have found that while Westerners have a bias for analytic processing and attend more to face features, East Asians are more holistic and attend more to contextual scenes. In this neuroimaging study, we hypothesized that these culturally different visual processing styles would be associated with cultural differences in the selective activity of the fusiform regions for faces, and the parahippocampal and lingual regions for contextual stimuli. East Asians and Westerners passively viewed face and house stimuli during an functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. As expected, we observed more selectivity for faces in Westerners in the left fusiform face area (FFA) reflecting a more analytic processing style. Additionally, Westerners showed bilateral activity to faces in the FFA whereas East Asians showed more right lateralization. In contrast, no cultural differences were detected in the parahippocampal place area (PPA), although there was a trend for East Asians to show greater house selectivity than Westerners in the lingual landmark area, consistent with more holistic processing in East Asians. These findings demonstrate group biases in Westerners and East Asians that operate on perceptual processing in the brain and are consistent with previous eye-tracking data that show cultural biases to faces.

  2. Generation and properties of a new human ventral mesencephalic neural stem cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, Ana; Liste, Isabel; Courtois, Elise T.; Seiz, Emma G.; Ramos, Milagros [Center of Molecular Biology ' Severo Ochoa' , Autonomous University of Madrid-C.S.I.C., Campus Cantoblanco 28049-Madrid (Spain); Meyer, Morten [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Institute of Medical Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Winslowparken 21,st, DK-500, Odense C (Denmark); Juliusson, Bengt; Kusk, Philip [NsGene A/S, Ballerup (Denmark); Martinez-Serrano, Alberto, E-mail: amserrano@cbm.uam.es [Center of Molecular Biology ' Severo Ochoa' , Autonomous University of Madrid-C.S.I.C., Campus Cantoblanco 28049-Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are powerful research tools for the design and discovery of new approaches to cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease. Several epigenetic and genetic strategies have been tested for long-term maintenance and expansion of these cells in vitro. Here we report the generation of a new stable cell line of human neural stem cells derived from ventral mesencephalon (hVM1) based on v-myc immortalization. The cells expressed neural stem cell and radial glia markers like nestin, vimentin and 3CB2 under proliferation conditions. After withdrawal of growth factors, proliferation and expression of v-myc were dramatically reduced and the cells differentiated into astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons. hVM1 cells yield a large number of dopaminergic neurons (about 12% of total cells are TH{sup +}) after differentiation, which also produce dopamine. In addition to proneural genes (NGN2, MASH1), differentiated cells show expression of several genuine mesencephalic dopaminergic markers such as: LMX1A, LMX1B, GIRK2, ADH2, NURR1, PITX3, VMAT2 and DAT, indicating that they retain their regional identity. Our data indicate that this cell line and its clonal derivatives may constitute good candidates for the study of development and physiology of human dopaminergic neurons in vitro, and to develop tools for Parkinson's disease cell replacement preclinical research and drug testing.

  3. Clonal human fetal ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic neuron precursors for cell therapy research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Ramos-Moreno

    Full Text Available A major challenge for further development of drug screening procedures, cell replacement therapies and developmental studies is the identification of expandable human stem cells able to generate the cell types needed. We have previously reported the generation of an immortalized polyclonal neural stem cell (NSC line derived from the human fetal ventral mesencephalon (hVM1. This line has been biochemically, genetically, immunocytochemically and electrophysiologically characterized to document its usefulness as a model system for the generation of A9 dopaminergic neurons (DAn. Long-term in vivo transplantation studies in parkinsonian rats showed that the grafts do not mature evenly. We reasoned that diverse clones in the hVM1 line might have different abilities to differentiate. In the present study, we have analyzed 9 hVM1 clones selected on the basis of their TH generation potential and, based on the number of v-myc copies, v-myc down-regulation after in vitro differentiation, in vivo cell cycle exit, TH⁺ neuron generation and expression of a neuronal mature marker (hNSE, we selected two clones for further in vivo PD cell replacement studies. The conclusion is that homogeneity and clonality of characterized NSCs allow transplantation of cells with controlled properties, which should help in the design of long-term in vivo experiments.

  4. A universal role of the ventral striatum in reward-based learning: evidence from human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Reka; Pollmann, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Reinforcement learning enables organisms to adjust their behavior in order to maximize rewards. Electrophysiological recordings of dopaminergic midbrain neurons have shown that they code the difference between actual and predicted rewards, i.e., the reward prediction error, in many species. This error signal is conveyed to both the striatum and cortical areas and is thought to play a central role in learning to optimize behavior. However, in human daily life rewards are diverse and often only indirect feedback is available. Here we explore the range of rewards that are processed by the dopaminergic system in human participants, and examine whether it is also involved in learning in the absence of explicit rewards. While results from electrophysiological recordings in humans are sparse, evidence linking dopaminergic activity to the metabolic signal recorded from the midbrain and striatum with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is available. Results from fMRI studies suggest that the human ventral striatum (VS) receives valuation information for a diverse set of rewarding stimuli. These range from simple primary reinforcers such as juice rewards over abstract social rewards to internally generated signals on perceived correctness, suggesting that the VS is involved in learning from trial-and-error irrespective of the specific nature of provided rewards. In addition, we summarize evidence that the VS can also be implicated when learning from observing others, and in tasks that go beyond simple stimulus-action-outcome learning, indicating that the reward system is also recruited in more complex learning tasks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Deep neural networks reveal a gradient in the complexity of neural representations across the ventral stream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güçlü, U.; Gerven, M.A.J. van

    2015-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests that the primate ventral visual pathway encodes increasingly complex stimulus features in downstream areas. We quantitatively show that there indeed exists an explicit gradient for feature complexity in the ventral pathway of the human brain. This was achieved by mapping

  6. Monocular Visual Deprivation Suppresses Excitability in Adult Human Visual Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Astrid Rosenstand; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Paulson, Olaf Bjarne

    2011-01-01

    The adult visual cortex maintains a substantial potential for plasticity in response to a change in visual input. For instance, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies have shown that binocular deprivation (BD) increases the cortical excitability for inducing phosphenes with TMS. Here, we...... employed TMS to trace plastic changes in adult visual cortex before, during, and after 48 h of monocular deprivation (MD) of the right dominant eye. In healthy adult volunteers, MD-induced changes in visual cortex excitability were probed with paired-pulse TMS applied to the left and right occipital cortex...... of visual deprivation has a substantial impact on experience-dependent plasticity of the human visual cortex....

  7. Aligning computer and human visual representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramakrishnan, K.

    2017-01-01

    Both computer vision and human visual system target the same goal: to accomplish visual tasks easily via a set of representations. In this thesis, we study to what extent representations from computer vision models align to human visual representations. To study this research question we used an

  8. The tipping point: Value differences and parallel dorsal-ventral frontal circuits gating human approach-avoidance behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlund, Michael W; Brewer, Adam T; Magee, Sandy K; Richman, David M; Solomon, Scott; Ludlum, MaDonna; Dymond, Simon

    2016-08-01

    Excessive avoidance and diminished approach behavior are both prominent features of anxiety, trauma and stress related disorders. Despite this, little is known about the neuronal mechanisms supporting gating of human approach-avoidance behavior. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to track dorsal anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal (dACC/dmPFC) activation along an approach-avoidance continuum to assess sensitivity to competing appetitive and aversive contingencies and correspondence with behavior change. Behavioral and fMRI experiments were conducted using a novel approach-avoidance task where a monetary reward appeared in the presence of a conditioned stimulus (CS), or threat, that signaled increasing probability of unconditioned stimulus (US) delivery. Approach produced the reward or probabilistic US, while avoidance prevented US delivery, and across trials, reward remained fixed while the CS threat level varied unpredictably. Increasing the CS threat level (i.e., US probability) produced the desired approach-avoidance transition and inverted U-shaped changes in decision times, electrodermal activity and activation in pregenual ACC, dACC/dmPFC, striatum, anterior insula and inferior frontal regions. Conversely, U-shaped changes in activation were observed in dorsolateral and ventromedial prefrontal cortex and bimodal changes in the orbitofrontal and ventral hippocampus. These new results show parallel dorsal-ventral frontal circuits support gating of human approach-avoidance behavior where dACC/dmPFC signals inversely correlate with value differences between approach and avoidance contingencies while ventral frontal signals correlate with the value of predictable outcomes. Our findings provide an important bridge between basic research on brain mechanisms of value-guided decision-making and value-focused clinical theories of anxiety and related interventions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Visual Culture, Art History and the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    This essay will discuss the need for the humanities to address visual culture studies as part of its interdisciplinary mission in today's university. Although mostly unnoticed in recent debates in the humanities over historical and theoretical frameworks, the relatively new field of visual culture has emerged as a corrective to a growing…

  10. Mere Exposure: Preference Change for Novel Drinks Reflected in Human Ventral Tegmental Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Ian C; Hennigan, Kelly; McClure, Samuel M

    2017-05-01

    Preferences for novel stimuli tend to develop slowly over many exposures. Psychological accounts of this effect suggest that it depends on changes in the brain's valuation system. Participants consumed a novel fluid daily for 10 days and underwent fMRI on the first and last days. We hypothesized that changes in activation in areas associated with the dopamine system would accompany changes in preference. The change in activation in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) between sessions scaled with preference change. Furthermore, a network comprising the sensory thalamus, posterior insula, and ventrolateral striatum showed differential connectivity with the VTA that correlated with individual changes in preference. Our results suggest that the VTA is centrally involved in both assigning value to sensory stimuli and influencing downstream regions to translate these value signals into subjective preference. These results have important implications for models of dopaminergic function and behavioral addiction.

  11. Human substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area involvement in computing social error signals during the ultimatum game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hétu, Sébastien; Luo, Yi; D'Ardenne, Kimberlee; Lohrenz, Terry; Montague, P Read

    2017-12-01

    As models of shared expectations, social norms play an essential role in our societies. Since our social environment is changing constantly, our internal models of it also need to change. In humans, there is mounting evidence that neural structures such as the insula and the ventral striatum are involved in detecting norm violation and updating internal models. However, because of methodological challenges, little is known about the possible involvement of midbrain structures in detecting norm violation and updating internal models of our norms. Here, we used high-resolution cardiac-gated functional magnetic resonance imaging and a norm adaptation paradigm in healthy adults to investigate the role of the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA) complex in tracking signals related to norm violation that can be used to update internal norms. We show that the SN/VTA codes for the norm's variance prediction error (PE) and norm PE with spatially distinct regions coding for negative and positive norm PE. These results point to a common role played by the SN/VTA complex in supporting both simple reward-based and social decision making. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Modeling human comprehension of data visualizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzen, Laura E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Haass, Michael Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Divis, Kristin Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilson, Andrew T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This project was inspired by two needs. The first is a need for tools to help scientists and engineers to design effective data visualizations for communicating information, whether to the user of a system, an analyst who must make decisions based on complex data, or in the context of a technical report or publication. Most scientists and engineers are not trained in visualization design, and they could benefit from simple metrics to assess how well their visualization's design conveys the intended message. In other words, will the most important information draw the viewer's attention? The second is the need for cognition-based metrics for evaluating new types of visualizations created by researchers in the information visualization and visual analytics communities. Evaluating visualizations is difficult even for experts. However, all visualization methods and techniques are intended to exploit the properties of the human visual system to convey information efficiently to a viewer. Thus, developing evaluation methods that are rooted in the scientific knowledge of the human visual system could be a useful approach. In this project, we conducted fundamental research on how humans make sense of abstract data visualizations, and how this process is influenced by their goals and prior experience. We then used that research to develop a new model, the Data Visualization Saliency Model, that can make accurate predictions about which features in an abstract visualization will draw a viewer's attention. The model is an evaluation tool that can address both of the needs described above, supporting both visualization research and Sandia mission needs.

  13. [Visual Texture Agnosia in Humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kyoko

    2015-06-01

    Visual object recognition requires the processing of both geometric and surface properties. Patients with occipital lesions may have visual agnosia, which is impairment in the recognition and identification of visually presented objects primarily through their geometric features. An analogous condition involving the failure to recognize an object by its texture may exist, which can be called visual texture agnosia. Here we present two cases with visual texture agnosia. Case 1 had left homonymous hemianopia and right upper quadrantanopia, along with achromatopsia, prosopagnosia, and texture agnosia, because of damage to his left ventromedial occipitotemporal cortex and right lateral occipito-temporo-parietal cortex due to multiple cerebral embolisms. Although he showed difficulty matching and naming textures of real materials, he could readily name visually presented objects by their contours. Case 2 had right lower quadrantanopia, along with impairment in stereopsis and recognition of texture in 2D images, because of subcortical hemorrhage in the left occipitotemporal region. He failed to recognize shapes based on texture information, whereas shape recognition based on contours was well preserved. Our findings, along with those of three reported cases with texture agnosia, indicate that there are separate channels for processing texture, color, and geometric features, and that the regions around the left collateral sulcus are crucial for texture processing.

  14. Impaired integration of object knowledge and visual input in a case of ventral simultanagnosia with bilateral damage to area V4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leek, E Charles; d'Avossa, Giovanni; Tainturier, Marie-Josèphe; Roberts, Daniel J; Yuen, Sung Lai; Hu, Mo; Rafal, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how brain damage can affect the cognitive processes that support the integration of sensory input and prior knowledge during shape perception. It is based on the first detailed study of acquired ventral simultanagnosia, which was found in a patient (M.T.) with posterior occipitotemporal lesions encompassing V4 bilaterally. Despite showing normal object recognition for single items in both accuracy and response times (RTs), and intact low-level vision assessed across an extensive battery of tests, M.T. was impaired in object identification with overlapping figures displays. Task performance was modulated by familiarity: Unlike controls, M.T. was faster with overlapping displays of abstract shapes than with overlapping displays of common objects. His performance with overlapping common object displays was also influenced by both the semantic relatedness and visual similarity of the display items. These findings challenge claims that visual perception is driven solely by feedforward mechanisms and show how brain damage can selectively impair high-level perceptual processes supporting the integration of stored knowledge and visual sensory input.

  15. Visual memory profile in 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome: are there differences in performance and neurobiological substrates between tasks linked to ventral and dorsal visual brain structures? A cross-sectional and longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostelmann, Mathilde; Schneider, Maude; Padula, Maria Carmela; Maeder, Johanna; Schaer, Marie; Scariati, Elisa; Debbané, Martin; Glaser, Bronwyn; Menghetti, Sarah; Eliez, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Children affected by the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a specific neuropsychological profile with strengths and weaknesses in several cognitive domains. Specifically, previous evidence has shown that patients with 22q11.2DS have more difficulties memorizing faces and visual-object characteristics of stimuli. In contrast, they have better performance in visuo-spatial memory tasks. The first focus of this study was to replicate these results in a larger sample of patients affected with 22q11.2DS and using a range of memory tasks. Moreover, we analyzed if the deficits were related to brain morphology in the structures typically underlying these abilities (ventral and dorsal visual streams). Finally, since the longitudinal development of visual memory is not clearly characterized in 22q11.2DS, we investigated its evolution from childhood to adolescence. Seventy-one patients with 22q11.2DS and 49 control individuals aged between 9 and 16 years completed the Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT) and specific subtests assessing visual memory from the Children's Memory Scale (CMS). The BVRT was used to compute spatial and object memory errors. For the CMS, specific subtests were classified into ventral, dorsal, and mixed subtests. Longitudinal data were obtained from a subset of 26 patients and 22 control individuals. Cross-sectional results showed that patients with 22q11.2DS were impaired in all visual memory measures, with stronger deficits in visual-object memory and memory of faces, compared to visuo-spatial memory. No correlations between morphological brain impairments and visual memory were found in patients with 22q11.2DS. Longitudinal findings revealed that participants with 22q11.2DS made more object memory errors than spatial memory errors at baseline. This difference was no longer significant at follow-up. Individuals with 22q11.2DS have impairments in visual memory abilities, with more pronounced difficulties in memorizing faces and visual

  16. Ontology-enriched Visualization of Human Anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouchard, LC

    2005-12-20

    The project focuses on the problem of presenting a human anatomical 3D model associated with other types of human systemic information ranging from physiological to anatomical information while navigating the 3D model. We propose a solution that integrates a visual 3D interface and navigation features with the display of structured information contained in an ontology of anatomy where the structures of the human body are formally and semantically linked. The displayed and annotated anatomy serves as a visual entry point into a patient's anatomy, medical indicators and other information. The ontology of medical information provides labeling to the highlighted anatomical parts in the 3D display. Because of the logical organization and links between anatomical objects found in the ontology and associated 3D model, the analysis of a structure by a physician is greatly enhanced. Navigation within the 3D visualization and between this visualization and objects representing anatomical concepts within the model is also featured.

  17. The mid-fusiform sulcus: A landmark identifying both cytoarchitectonic and functional divisions of human ventral temporal cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Kevin S.; Golarai, Golijeh; Caspers, Julian; Chuapoco, Miguel R.; Mohlberg, Hartmut; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2014-01-01

    Human ventral temporal cortex (VTC) plays a pivotal role in high-level vision. An under-studied macroanatomical feature of VTC is the mid-fusiform sulcus (MFS), a shallow longitudinal sulcus separating the lateral and medial fusiform gyrus (FG). Here, we quantified the morphological features of the MFS in 69 subjects (ages 7–40), and investigated its relationship to both cytoarchitectonic and functional divisions of VTC with four main findings. First, despite being a minor sulcus, we found that the MFS is a stable macroanatomical structure present in all 138 hemispheres with morphological characteristics developed by age 7. Second, the MFS is the locus of a lateral-medial cytoarchitechtonic transition within the posterior FG serving as the boundary between cytoarchitectonic regions FG1 and FG2. Third, the MFS predicts a lateral-medial functional transition in eccentricity bias representations in children, adolescents, and adults. Fourth, the anterior tip of the MFS predicts the location of a face-selective region, mFus-faces/FFA-2. These findings are the first to illustrate that a macroanatomical landmark identifies both cytoarchitectonic and functional divisions of high-level sensory cortex in humans and have important implications for understanding functional and structural organization in the human brain. PMID:24021838

  18. The transition in the ventral stream from feature to real-world entity representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Guy A; Zhu, Qi; Vanduffel, Wim

    2014-01-01

    We propose that the ventral visual pathway of human and non-human primates is organized into three levels: (1) ventral retinotopic cortex including what is known as TEO in the monkey but corresponds to V4A and PITd/v, and the phPIT cluster in humans, (2) area TE in the monkey and its homolog LOC and neighboring fusiform regions, and more speculatively, (3) TGv in the monkey and its possible human equivalent, the temporal pole. We attribute to these levels the visual representations of features, partial real-world entities (RWEs), and known, complete RWEs, respectively. Furthermore, we propose that the middle level, TE and its homolog, is organized into three parallel substreams, lower bank STS, dorsal convexity of TE, and ventral convexity of TE, as are their corresponding human regions. These presumably process shape in depth, 2D shape and material properties, respectively, to construct RWE representations.

  19. The transition in the ventral stream from features to real world entities representations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy A Orban

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose that the ventral visual pathway of human and non-human primates is organized into three levels: 1 ventral retinotopic cortex including what is known as TEO in the monkey but corresponds to V4A and PITd/v, and the phPIT cluster in humans, 2 area TE in the monkey and its homologue LOC and neighboring fusiform regions, and more speculatively, 3 TGv in the monkey and its possible human equivalent, the temporal pole. We attribute to these levels the visual representations of features, partial real-world entities (RWEs, and known, complete RWEs, respectively. Furthermore, we propose that the middle level, TE and its homologue, is organized into three parallel substreams, lower bank STS, dorsal convexity of TE and ventral convexity of TE, as are their corresponding human regions. These presumably process shape in depth, 2D shape and material properties, respectively, to construct RWE representations.

  20. Feature-coding transitions to conjunction-coding with progression through human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, Rosemary A; Leger, Krystal R; Serences, John T

    2017-12-01

    Identifying an object and distinguishing it from similar items depends upon the ability to perceive its component parts as conjoined into a cohesive whole, but the brain mechanisms underlying this ability remain elusive. The ventral visual processing pathway in primates is organized hierarchically: Neuronal responses in early stages are sensitive to the manipulation of simple visual features, whereas neuronal responses in subsequent stages are tuned to increasingly complex stimulus attributes. It is widely assumed that feature-coding dominates in early visual cortex whereas later visual regions employ conjunction-coding in which object representations are different from the sum of their simple feature parts. However, no study in humans has demonstrated that putative object-level codes in higher visual cortex cannot be accounted for by feature-coding and that putative feature codes in regions prior to ventral temporal cortex are not equally well characterized as object-level codes. Thus the existence of a transition from feature- to conjunction-coding in human visual cortex remains unconfirmed, and if a transition does occur its location remains unknown. By employing multivariate analysis of functional imaging data, we measure both feature-coding and conjunction-coding directly, using the same set of visual stimuli, and pit them against each other to reveal the relative dominance of one vs. the other throughout cortex. Our results reveal a transition from feature-coding in early visual cortex to conjunction-coding in both inferior temporal and posterior parietal cortices. This novel method enables the use of experimentally controlled stimulus features to investigate population-level feature and conjunction codes throughout human cortex. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We use a novel analysis of neuroimaging data to assess representations throughout visual cortex, revealing a transition from feature-coding to conjunction-coding along both ventral and dorsal pathways. Occipital

  1. Human fMRI reveals that delayed action re-recruits visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Singhal

    Full Text Available Behavioral and neuropsychological research suggests that delayed actions rely on different neural substrates than immediate actions; however, the specific brain areas implicated in the two types of actions remain unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to measure human brain activation during delayed grasping and reaching. Specifically, we examined activation during visual stimulation and action execution separated by a 18-s delay interval in which subjects had to remember an intended action toward the remembered object. The long delay interval enabled us to unambiguously distinguish visual, memory-related, and action responses. Most strikingly, we observed reactivation of the lateral occipital complex (LOC, a ventral-stream area implicated in visual object recognition, and early visual cortex (EVC at the time of action. Importantly this reactivation was observed even though participants remained in complete darkness with no visual stimulation at the time of the action. Moreover, within EVC, higher activation was observed for grasping than reaching during both vision and action execution. Areas in the dorsal visual stream were activated during action execution as expected and, for some, also during vision. Several areas, including the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS, dorsal premotor cortex (PMd, primary motor cortex (M1 and the supplementary motor area (SMA, showed sustained activation during the delay phase. We propose that during delayed actions, dorsal-stream areas plan and maintain coarse action goals; however, at the time of execution, motor programming requires re-recruitment of detailed visual information about the object through reactivation of (1 ventral-stream areas involved in object perception and (2 early visual areas that contain richly detailed visual representations, particularly for grasping.

  2. Acquiring Visual Classifiers from Human Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The human mind can remarkably imagine objects that it has never seen, touched, or heard, all in vivid detail. Moti- vated by the desire to... vivid detail. In this paper, we seek to transfer the mental images of what a human can imagine into an object recognition sys- tem. We combine the...Acquiring Visual Classifiers from Human Imagination Carl Vondrick, Hamed Pirsiavash, Aude Oliva, Antonio Torralba Massachusetts Institute of

  3. Concurrent TMS-fMRI Reveals Interactions between Dorsal and Ventral Attentional Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Joana; Thielscher, Axel; Tünnerhoff, Johannes; Noppeney, Uta

    2015-08-12

    Adaptive behavior relies on combining bottom-up sensory inputs with top-down control signals to guide responses in line with current goals and task demands. Over the past decade, accumulating evidence has suggested that the dorsal and ventral frontoparietal attentional systems are recruited interactively in this process. This fMRI study used concurrent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a causal perturbation approach to investigate the interactions between dorsal and ventral attentional systems and sensory processing areas. In a sustained spatial attention paradigm, human participants detected weak visual targets that were presented in the lower-left visual field on 50% of the trials. Further, we manipulated the presence/absence of task-irrelevant auditory signals. Critically, on each trial we applied 10 Hz bursts of four TMS (or Sham) pulses to the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). IPS-TMS relative to Sham-TMS increased activation in the parietal cortex regardless of sensory stimulation, confirming the neural effectiveness of TMS stimulation. Visual targets increased activations in the anterior insula, a component of the ventral attentional system responsible for salience detection. Conversely, they decreased activations in the ventral visual areas. Importantly, IPS-TMS abolished target-evoked activation increases in the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ) of the ventral attentional system, whereas it eliminated target-evoked activation decreases in the right fusiform. Our results demonstrate that IPS-TMS exerts profound directional causal influences not only on visual areas but also on the TPJ as a critical component of the ventral attentional system. They reveal a complex interplay between dorsal and ventral attentional systems during target detection under sustained spatial attention. Adaptive behavior relies on combining bottom-up sensory inputs with top-down attentional control. Although the dorsal and ventral frontoparietal systems are key players in

  4. Alpha-beta and gamma rhythms subserve feedback and feedforward influences among human visual cortical areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalareas, Georgios; Vezoli, Julien; van Pelt, Stan; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs; Kennedy, Henry; Fries, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Primate visual cortex is hierarchically organized. Bottom-up and top-down influences are exerted through distinct frequency channels, as was recently revealed in macaques by correlating inter-areal influences with laminar anatomical projection patterns. Because this anatomical data cannot be obtained in human subjects, we selected seven homologous macaque and human visual areas, and correlated the macaque laminar projection patterns to human inter-areal directed influences as measured with magnetoencephalography. We show that influences along feedforward projections predominate in the gamma band, whereas influences along feedback projections predominate in the alpha-beta band. Rhythmic inter-areal influences constrain a functional hierarchy of the seven homologous human visual areas that is in close agreement with the respective macaque anatomical hierarchy. Rhythmic influences allow an extension of the hierarchy to 26 human visual areas including uniquely human brain areas. Hierarchical levels of ventral and dorsal stream visual areas are differentially affected by inter-areal influences in the alpha-beta band. PMID:26777277

  5. Understanding the Dorsal and Ventral Systems of the Human Cerebral Cortex: Beyond Dichotomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, Gregoire; Thompson, William L.; Kosslyn, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, characterizations of the macrolevel functional organization of the human cerebral cortex have focused on the left and right cerebral hemispheres. However, the idea of left brain versus right brain functions has been shown to be an oversimplification. We argue here that a top-bottom divide, rather than a left-right divide, is a more…

  6. Compressive Temporal Summation in Human Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jingyang; Benson, Noah C; Kay, Kendrick N; Winawer, Jonathan

    2018-01-17

    Combining sensory inputs over space and time is fundamental to vision. Population receptive field models have been successful in characterizing spatial encoding throughout the human visual pathways. A parallel question, how visual areas in the human brain process information distributed over time, has received less attention. One challenge is that the most widely used neuroimaging method, fMRI, has coarse temporal resolution compared with the time-scale of neural dynamics. Here, via carefully controlled temporally modulated stimuli, we show that information about temporal processing can be readily derived from fMRI signal amplitudes in male and female subjects. We find that all visual areas exhibit subadditive summation, whereby responses to longer stimuli are less than the linear prediction from briefer stimuli. We also find fMRI evidence that the neural response to two stimuli is reduced for brief interstimulus intervals (indicating adaptation). These effects are more pronounced in visual areas anterior to V1-V3. Finally, we develop a general model that shows how these effects can be captured with two simple operations: temporal summation followed by a compressive nonlinearity. This model operates for arbitrary temporal stimulation patterns and provides a simple and interpretable set of computations that can be used to characterize neural response properties across the visual hierarchy. Importantly, compressive temporal summation directly parallels earlier findings of compressive spatial summation in visual cortex describing responses to stimuli distributed across space. This indicates that, for space and time, cortex uses a similar processing strategy to achieve higher-level and increasingly invariant representations of the visual world. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Combining sensory inputs over time is fundamental to seeing. Two important temporal phenomena are summation, the accumulation of sensory inputs over time, and adaptation, a response reduction for repeated

  7. A universal role of the ventral striatum in reward-based learning: Evidence from human studies

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel, Reka; Pollmann, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Reinforcement learning enables organisms to adjust their behavior in order to maximize rewards. Electrophysiological recordings of dopaminergic midbrain neurons have shown that they code the difference between actual and predicted rewards, i.e., the reward prediction error, in many species. This error signal is conveyed to both the striatum and cortical areas and is thought to play a central role in learning to optimize behavior. However, in human daily life rewards are dive...

  8. Long-term culture and differentiation of CNS precursors derived from anterior human neural rosettes following exposure to ventralizing factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colleoni, Silvia, E-mail: silviacolleoni@avantea.it [Laboratorio di Tecnologie della Riproduzione, Avantea, Via Porcellasco 7/f, 26100 Cremona (Italy); Galli, Cesare [Laboratorio di Tecnologie della Riproduzione, Avantea, Via Porcellasco 7/f, 26100 Cremona (Italy); Dipartimento Clinico Veterinario, Universita di Bologna, Via Tolara di Sopra 50, 40064 Ozzano Emilia (Italy); Giannelli, Serena G. [Stem Cells and Neurogenesis Unit, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 58, 20132 Milan (Italy); Armentero, Marie-Therese; Blandini, Fabio [Laboratory of Functional Neurochemistry, Interdepartmental Research Center for Parkinson' s Disease, Neurological Institute C. Mondino, Via Mondino 2, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Broccoli, Vania, E-mail: broccoli.vania@hsr.it [Stem Cells and Neurogenesis Unit, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 58, 20132 Milan (Italy); Lazzari, Giovanna, E-mail: giovannalazzari@avantea.it [Laboratorio di Tecnologie della Riproduzione, Avantea, Via Porcellasco 7/f, 26100 Cremona (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    In this study we demonstrated that neural rosettes derived from human ES cells can give rise either to neural crest precursors, following expansion in presence of bFGF and EGF, or to dopaminergic precursors after exposure to ventralizing factors Shh and FGF8. Both regionalised precursors are capable of extensive proliferation and differentiation towards the corresponding terminally differentiated cell types. In particular, peripheral neurons, cartilage, bone, smooth muscle cells and also pigmented cells were obtained from neural crest precursors while tyrosine hydroxylase and Nurr1 positive dopaminergic neurons were derived from FGF8 and Shh primed rosette cells. Gene expression and immunocytochemistry analyses confirmed the expression of dorsal and neural crest genes such as Sox10, Slug, p75, FoxD3, Pax7 in neural precursors from bFGF-EGF exposed rosettes. By contrast, priming of rosettes with FGF8 and Shh induced the expression of dopaminergic markers Engrailed1, Pax2, Pitx3, floor plate marker FoxA2 and radial glia markers Blbp and Glast, the latter in agreement with the origin of dopaminergic precursors from floor plate radial glia. Moreover, in vivo transplant of proliferating Shh/FGF8 primed precursors in parkinsonian rats demonstrated engraftment and terminal dopaminergic differentiation. In conclusion, we demonstrated the derivation of long-term self-renewing precursors of selected regional identity as potential cell reservoirs for cell therapy applications, such as CNS degenerative diseases, or for the development of toxicological tests.

  9. Mouse and human genetic analyses associate kalirin with ventral striatal activation during impulsivity and with alcohol misuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda ePeña-Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Impulsivity is associated with a spectrum of psychiatric disorders including drug addiction. To investigate genetic associations with impulsivity and initiation of drug taking, we took a two-step approach. First, we identified genes whose expression level in prefrontal cortex, striatum and accumbens were associated with impulsive behaviour in the 5-choice serial reaction time task across 10 BXD recombinant inbred (BXD RI mouse strains and their progenitor C57BL/6J and DBA2/J strains. Behavioural data were correlated with regional gene expression using GeneNetwork (www.genenetwork.org, to identify 44 genes whose probability of association with impulsivity exceeded a false discovery rate of <0.05. We then interrogated the IMAGEN database of 1423 adolescents for potential associations of SNPs in human homologues of those genes identified in the mouse study, with brain activation during impulsive performance in the Monetary Incentive Delay task, and with novelty seeking scores from the Temperament and Character Inventory, as well as alcohol-experience. There was a significant overall association between the human homologues of impulsivity-related genes and percentage of premature responses in the MID task and with fMRI BOLD-response in ventral striatum (VS during reward anticipation. In contrast, no significant association was found between the polygenic scores and anterior cingulate cortex activation. Univariate association analyses revealed that the G allele (major of the intronic SNP rs6438839 in the KALRN gene was significantly associated with increased VS activation. Additionally, the A-allele (minor of KALRN intronic SNP rs4634050, belonging to the same haplotype block, was associated with increased frequency of binge drinking.

  10. Visualizing Human Migration Trhough Space and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambotti, G.; Guan, W.; Gest, J.

    2015-07-01

    Human migration has been an important activity in human societies since antiquity. Since 1890, approximately three percent of the world's population has lived outside of their country of origin. As globalization intensifies in the modern era, human migration persists even as governments seek to more stringently regulate flows. Understanding this phenomenon, its causes, processes and impacts often starts from measuring and visualizing its spatiotemporal patterns. This study builds a generic online platform for users to interactively visualize human migration through space and time. This entails quickly ingesting human migration data in plain text or tabular format; matching the records with pre-established geographic features such as administrative polygons; symbolizing the migration flow by circular arcs of varying color and weight based on the flow attributes; connecting the centroids of the origin and destination polygons; and allowing the user to select either an origin or a destination feature to display all flows in or out of that feature through time. The method was first developed using ArcGIS Server for world-wide cross-country migration, and later applied to visualizing domestic migration patterns within China between provinces, and between states in the United States, all through multiple years. The technical challenges of this study include simplifying the shapes of features to enhance user interaction, rendering performance and application scalability; enabling the temporal renderers to provide time-based rendering of features and the flow among them; and developing a responsive web design (RWD) application to provide an optimal viewing experience. The platform is available online for the public to use, and the methodology is easily adoptable to visualizing any flow, not only human migration but also the flow of goods, capital, disease, ideology, etc., between multiple origins and destinations across space and time.

  11. Assessment of Human Acellular Dermis Graft in Porcine Models for Ventral Hernia Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sambit; Baker, Andrew R; Haskins, Ivy N; Krpata, David M; Rosen, Michael J; Derwin, Kathleen A

    2017-08-03

    Preclinical evaluation of hernia meshes is commonly performed in porcine models. We recently developed two surgically induced porcine hernia models-an incisional and an excisional model-that formed persistent hernias in the absence of graft repair. Herein, we investigate if these models will continue to form a hernia after graft repair. Ten pigs were used to create two hernia models-a 10-cm partial-thickness incisional defect (n = 5) and an 8 × 8-cm full-thickness excisional defect (n = 5). The defects were repaired using a 12 × 12-cm human acellular dermis graft placed in a preperitoneal/retrorectus sublay position and fixed using transfascial sutures. Postoperative management included the use of suction drainage for 1 week and an abdominal binder for 4 weeks in the more severe excisional model. Hernia development was assessed clinically, and hernia defect size and volume were measured using postoperative computed tomography (CT) imaging over 12 weeks. Radiographic inflation testing (2 L inflation), biaxial mechanical testing, and histological evaluation were also performed at 12 weeks. All pigs with the excisional model, but none with the incisional model, developed a clinically relevant hernia. At the end of 12 weeks, the excisional model had a significantly greater hernia defect size (259 ± 51 cm(2) vs. 47 ± 16 cm(2)) and repair volume (865 ± 414 cm(3) vs. 85 ± 52 cm(3)) compared with the incisional model. The excisional model also showed an order of magnitude greater increase in repair volume (280 cm(3) vs. 47 cm(3)) compared with the incisional model upon 2 L inflation. Furthermore, the excisional model showed a trend of having higher dilatational strain at average biaxial load of 250 N and lower stiffness compared with the incisional model. The excisional model had a thin, hypercellular hernia sac spanning the defect, whereas the incisional model had a thick densely fibrotic scar bridging the defect

  12. Lightness computation by the human visual system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Michael E.

    2017-05-01

    A model of achromatic color computation by the human visual system is presented, which is shown to account in an exact quantitative way for a large body of appearance matching data collected with simple visual displays. The model equations are closely related to those of the original Retinex model of Land and McCann. However, the present model differs in important ways from Land and McCann's theory in that it invokes additional biological and perceptual mechanisms, including contrast gain control, different inherent neural gains for incremental, and decremental luminance steps, and two types of top-down influence on the perceptual weights applied to local luminance steps in the display: edge classification and spatial integration attentional windowing. Arguments are presented to support the claim that these various visual processes must be instantiated by a particular underlying neural architecture. By pointing to correspondences between the architecture of the model and findings from visual neurophysiology, this paper suggests that edge classification involves a top-down gating of neural edge responses in early visual cortex (cortical areas V1 and/or V2) while spatial integration windowing occurs in cortical area V4 or beyond.

  13. Image quality assessment and human visual system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xinbo; Lu, Wen; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong

    2010-07-01

    This paper summaries the state-of-the-art of image quality assessment (IQA) and human visual system (HVS). IQA provides an objective index or real value to measure the quality of the specified image. Since human beings are the ultimate receivers of visual information in practical applications, the most reliable IQA is to build a computational model to mimic the HVS. According to the properties and cognitive mechanism of the HVS, the available HVS-based IQA methods can be divided into two categories, i.e., bionics methods and engineering methods. This paper briefly introduces the basic theories and development histories of the above two kinds of HVS-based IQA methods. Finally, some promising research issues are pointed out in the end of the paper.

  14. Human versus non-cross-linked porcine acellular dermal matrix used for ventral hernia repair: comparison of in vivo fibrovascular remodeling and mechanical repair strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kristin Turza; Burns, Nadja K; Rios, Carmen N; Mathur, Anshu B; Butler, Charles E

    2011-06-01

    Human acellular dermal matrix (HADM) and non-cross-linked porcine acellular dermal matrix (ncl-PADM) are clinically useful for complex ventral hernia repair. Direct comparisons between the two in vivo are lacking, however. This study compared clinically relevant early outcomes with these bioprosthetic materials when used for ventral hernia repair. Seventy-two guinea pigs underwent inlay repair of surgically created hernias with HADM (n = 37) or ncl-PADM (n = 35). Repair sites were harvested at 1, 2, or 4 weeks postoperatively. Adhesions were graded and quantified. Mechanical testing and histologic and immunohistologic (factor VIII) analyses of cellular and vascular infiltration were performed. No infections or recurrent hernias occurred. No difference was observed in mean adhesion surface area or tenacity between groups. Mean cellular infiltration (p hernia and/or bulge incidence.

  15. Reduced insulin sensitivity is related to less endogenous dopamine at D2/3 receptors in the ventral striatum of healthy nonobese humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Borlido, Carol; Hahn, Margaret; Feng, Zhe; Fervaha, Gagan; Gerretsen, Philip; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Wilson, Alan; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-02-25

    Food addiction is a debated topic in neuroscience. Evidence suggests diabetes is related to reduced basal dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens, similar to persons with drug addiction. It is unknown whether insulin sensitivity is related to endogenous dopamine levels in the ventral striatum of humans. We examined this using the agonist dopamine D2/3 receptor radiotracer [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO and an acute dopamine depletion challenge. In a separate sample of healthy persons, we examined whether dopamine depletion could alter insulin sensitivity. Insulin sensitivity was estimated for each subject from fasting plasma glucose and insulin using the Homeostasis Model Assessment II. Eleven healthy nonobese and nondiabetic persons (3 female) provided a baseline [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO scan, 9 of which provided a scan under dopamine depletion, allowing estimates of endogenous dopamine at dopamine D2/3 receptor. Dopamine depletion was achieved via alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (64mg/kg, P.O.). In 25 healthy persons (9 female), fasting plasma and glucose was acquired before and after dopamine depletion. Endogenous dopamine at ventral striatum dopamine D2/3 receptor was positively correlated with insulin sensitivity (r(7)=.84, P=.005) and negatively correlated with insulin levels (r(7)=-.85, P=.004). Glucose levels were not correlated with endogenous dopamine at ventral striatum dopamine D2/3 receptor (r(7)=-.49, P=.18). Consistently, acute dopamine depletion in healthy persons significantly decreased insulin sensitivity (t(24)=2.82, P=.01), increased insulin levels (t(24)=-2.62, P=.01), and did not change glucose levels (t(24)=-0.93, P=.36). In healthy individuals, diminished insulin sensitivity is related to less endogenous dopamine at dopamine D2/3 receptor in the ventral striatum. Moreover, acute dopamine depletion reduces insulin sensitivity. These findings may have important implications for neuropsychiatric populations with metabolic abnormalities. © The Author 2015. Published by

  16. Increasing suppression of saccade-related transients along the human visual hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Tal; Davidesco, Ido; Meshulam, Meir; Groppe, David M; Mégevand, Pierre; Yeagle, Erin M; Goldfinger, Matthew S; Harel, Michal; Melloni, Lucia; Schroeder, Charles E; Deouell, Leon Y; Mehta, Ashesh D; Malach, Rafael

    2017-08-29

    A key hallmark of visual perceptual awareness is robustness to instabilities arising from unnoticeable eye and eyelid movements. In previous human intracranial (iEEG) work (Golan et al., 2016) we found that excitatory broadband high-frequency activity transients, driven by eye blinks, are suppressed in higher-level but not early visual cortex. Here, we utilized the broad anatomical coverage of iEEG recordings in 12 eye-tracked neurosurgical patients to test whether a similar stabilizing mechanism operates following small saccades. We compared saccades (1.3°-3.7°) initiated during inspection of large individual visual objects with similarly-sized external stimulus displacements. Early visual cortex sites responded with positive transients to both conditions. In contrast, in both dorsal and ventral higher-level sites the response to saccades (but not to external displacements) was suppressed. These findings indicate that early visual cortex is highly unstable compared to higher-level visual regions which apparently constitute the main target of stabilizing extra-retinal oculomotor influences.

  17. Theories of Visual Rhetoric: Looking at the Human Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Mary

    2001-01-01

    Considers how visuals are constructions that are products of a writer's interpretation with its own "power-laden agenda." Reviews the current approach taken by composition scholars, surveys richer interdisciplinary work on visuals, and (by using visuals connected with the Human Genome Project) models an analysis of visuals as rhetoric.…

  18. Oscillatory synchrony and human visual cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallon-Baudry, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Oscillatory synchrony could be used to establish dynamic links between the various cortical areas participating in the same cognitive process. Is it possible to detect oscillatory synchrony in humans, and is it relevant to behavior? There is now converging evidence for the existence of a transient oscillatory activity in the gamma range (30-60 Hz), obtained in response to static visual objects, and having only a loose temporal relationship to stimulus onset. This so-called "induced" gamma response is much larger in response to coherent static or moving objects. However, functional variations of gamma and/or beta (15-20 Hz) oscillations are not restricted to perceptive, bottom-up mechanisms, but are also observed during visual imagery or short-term memory maintenance. Oscillations at the scalp level thus seem to reflect large-scale neural cooperativity in a variety of task-dependent networks. Human intra-cranial recordings in a short-term memory paradigm further reveal the existence and the task-dependency of oscillatory synchrony in the beta range, between focal sites separated by several centimeters and with a few milliseconds time-lag. These findings thus confirm experimentally the hypothesis of a functional role of synchronized oscillatory activity in the coordination of distributed neural activity in humans, and support Hebb's concept of short-term memory maintenance by reentrant activity within the activated network. In addition, the intra-cranial data obtained in humans and monkeys also help to better understand the neural mechanisms generating scalp-recorded oscillations.

  19. Graphical Visualization of Human Exploration Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Erica M.; Williams-Byrd, Julie; Arney, Dale C.; Simon, Matthew A.; Williams, Phillip A.; Barsoum, Christopher; Cowan, Tyler; Larman, Kevin T.; Hay, Jason; Burg, Alex

    2016-01-01

    NASA's pioneering space strategy will require advanced capabilities to expand the boundaries of human exploration on the Journey to Mars (J2M). The Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) architecture serves as a framework to identify critical capabilities that need to be developed and tested in order to enable a range of human exploration destinations and missions. Agency-wide System Maturation Teams (SMT) are responsible for the maturation of these critical exploration capabilities and help formulate, guide and resolve performance gaps associated with the EMC-identified capabilities. Systems Capability Organization Reporting Engine boards (SCOREboards) were developed to integrate the SMT data sets into cohesive human exploration capability stories that can be used to promote dialog and communicate NASA's exploration investments. Each SCOREboard provides a graphical visualization of SMT capability development needs that enable exploration missions, and presents a comprehensive overview of data that outlines a roadmap of system maturation needs critical for the J2M. SCOREboards are generated by a computer program that extracts data from a main repository, sorts the data based on a tiered data reduction structure, and then plots the data according to specified user inputs. The ability to sort and plot varying data categories provides the flexibility to present specific SCOREboard capability roadmaps based on customer requests. This paper presents the development of the SCOREboard computer program and shows multiple complementary, yet different datasets through a unified format designed to facilitate comparison between datasets. Example SCOREboard capability roadmaps are presented followed by a discussion of how the roadmaps are used to: 1) communicate capability developments and readiness of systems for future missions, and 2) influence the definition of NASA's human exploration investment portfolio through capability-driven processes. The paper concludes with a description

  20. Modeling human judgments of urban visual air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Paulette; Stewart, Thomas R.; Dennis, Robin L.

    The overall approach to establishing a complete predictive model link between pollutant emissions and human judgments of urban visual air quality (UVAQ) is presented. The field study design and data analysis procedures developed for analyzing the human components of visual air quality assessment are outlined. The air quality simulation model which relates pollutant emissions to human judgments of visual cues which comprise visual air quality judgments is described. Measured and modeled cues are compared for five typical visual air quality days in the winter of 1981 for Denver, Colorado. The comparisons suggest that the perceptual cue model, based on dispersion and radiative transfer theory, does not adequately predict human judgments of UVAQ cues. Analysis of the limits of predictability of the human judgments and the predictive capability of the model components indicates that the greatest improvements toward achieving a predictive UVAQ model lie in a reformulation of the theoretical descriptions of visual cues.

  1. Image Visual Realism: From Human Perception to Machine Computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shaojing; Ng, Tian-Tsong; Koenig, Bryan L; Herberg, Jonathan S; Jiang, Ming; Shen, Zhiqi; Zhao, Qi

    2017-08-30

    Visual realism is defined as the extent to which an image appears to people as a photo rather than computer generated. Assessing visual realism is important in applications like computer graphics rendering and photo retouching. However, current realism evaluation approaches use either labor-intensive human judgments or automated algorithms largely dependent on comparing renderings to reference images. We develop a reference-free computational framework for visual realism prediction to overcome these constraints. First, we construct a benchmark dataset of 2520 images with comprehensive human annotated attributes. From statistical modeling on this data, we identify image attributes most relevant for visual realism. We propose both empirically-based (guided by our statistical modeling of human data) and CNN-learned features to predict visual realism of images. Our framework has the following advantages: (1) it creates an interpretable and concise empirical model that characterizes human perception of visual realism; (2) it links computational features to latent factors of human image perception.

  2. A methodology for coupling a visual enhancement device to human visual attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic, Aleksandar; Black, John A., Jr.; Panchanathan, Sethuraman

    2009-02-01

    The Human Variation Model views disability as simply "an extension of the natural physical, social, and cultural variability of mankind." Given this human variation, it can be difficult to distinguish between a prosthetic device such as a pair of glasses (which extends limited visual abilities into the "normal" range) and a visual enhancement device such as a pair of binoculars (which extends visual abilities beyond the "normal" range). Indeed, there is no inherent reason why the design of visual prosthetic devices should be limited to just providing "normal" vision. One obvious enhancement to human vision would be the ability to visually "zoom" in on objects that are of particular interest to the viewer. Indeed, it could be argued that humans already have a limited zoom capability, which is provided by their highresolution foveal vision. However, humans still find additional zooming useful, as evidenced by their purchases of binoculars equipped with mechanized zoom features. The fact that these zoom features are manually controlled raises two questions: (1) Could a visual enhancement device be developed to monitor attention and control visual zoom automatically? (2) If such a device were developed, would its use be experienced by users as a simple extension of their natural vision? This paper details the results of work with two research platforms called the Remote Visual Explorer (ReVEx) and the Interactive Visual Explorer (InVEx) that were developed specifically to answer these two questions.

  3. Attention to Color Sharpens Neural Population Tuning via Feedback Processing in the Human Visual Cortex Hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Mandy V; Loewe, Kristian; Merkel, Christian; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Schoenfeld, Mircea A; Tsotsos, John K; Hopf, Jens-Max

    2017-10-25

    Attention can facilitate the selection of elementary object features such as color, orientation, or motion. This is referred to as feature-based attention and it is commonly attributed to a modulation of the gain and tuning of feature-selective units in visual cortex. Although gain mechanisms are well characterized, little is known about the cortical processes underlying the sharpening of feature selectivity. Here, we show with high-resolution magnetoencephalography in human observers (men and women) that sharpened selectivity for a particular color arises from feedback processing in the human visual cortex hierarchy. To assess color selectivity, we analyze the response to a color probe that varies in color distance from an attended color target. We find that attention causes an initial gain enhancement in anterior ventral extrastriate cortex that is coarsely selective for the target color and transitions within ∼100 ms into a sharper tuned profile in more posterior ventral occipital cortex. We conclude that attention sharpens selectivity over time by attenuating the response at lower levels of the cortical hierarchy to color values neighboring the target in color space. These observations support computational models proposing that attention tunes feature selectivity in visual cortex through backward-propagating attenuation of units less tuned to the target.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Whether searching for your car, a particular item of clothing, or just obeying traffic lights, in everyday life, we must select items based on color. But how does attention allow us to select a specific color? Here, we use high spatiotemporal resolution neuromagnetic recordings to examine how color selectivity emerges in the human brain. We find that color selectivity evolves as a coarse to fine process from higher to lower levels within the visual cortex hierarchy. Our observations support computational models proposing that feature selectivity increases over time by attenuating the

  4. Metabolomics of Neurotransmitters and Related Metabolites in Post-Mortem Tissue from the Dorsal and Ventral Striatum of Alcoholic Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashem, Mohammed Abul; Ahmed, Selina; Sultana, Nilufa; Ahmed, Eakhlas U; Pickford, Russell; Rae, Caroline; Šerý, Omar; McGregor, Iain S; Balcar, Vladimir J

    2016-02-01

    We report on changes in neurotransmitter metabolome and protein expression in the striatum of humans exposed to heavy long-term consumption of alcohol. Extracts from post mortem striatal tissue (dorsal striatum; DS comprising caudate nucleus; CN and putamen; P and ventral striatum; VS constituted by nucleus accumbens; NAc) were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomics was studied in CN by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass-spectrometry. Proteomics identified 25 unique molecules expressed differently by the alcohol-affected tissue. Two were dopamine-related proteins and one a GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD65. Two proteins that are related to apoptosis and/or neuronal loss (BiD and amyloid-β A4 precursor protein-binding family B member 3) were increased. There were no differences in the levels of dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydrophenylacetic acid (DOPAC), serotonin (5HT), homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (HIAA), histamine, L-glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Tryp) between the DS (CN and P) and VS (NAc) in control brains. Choline (Ch) and acetylcholine (Ach) were higher and norepinephrine (NE) lower, in the VS. Alcoholic striata had lower levels of neurotransmitters except for Glu (30 % higher in the alcoholic ventral striatum). Ratios of DOPAC/DA and HIAA/5HT were higher in alcoholic striatum indicating an increase in the DA and 5HT turnover. Glutathione was significantly reduced in all three regions of alcohol-affected striatum. We conclude that neurotransmitter systems in both the DS (CN and P) and the VS (NAc) were significantly influenced by long-term heavy alcohol intake associated with alcoholism.

  5. Different impressions of other agents obtained through social interaction uniquely modulate dorsal and ventral pathway activities in the social human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Terada, Kazunori; Morita, Tomoyo; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Haji, Tomoki; Kozima, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Omori, Takashi; Asada, Minoru; Naito, Eiichi

    2014-09-01

    Internal (neuronal) representations in the brain are modified by our experiences, and this phenomenon is not unique to sensory and motor systems. Here, we show that different impressions obtained through social interaction with a variety of agents uniquely modulate activity of dorsal and ventral pathways of the brain network that mediates human social behavior. We scanned brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 16 healthy volunteers when they performed a simple matching-pennies game with a human, human-like android, mechanical robot, interactive robot, and a computer. Before playing this game in the scanner, participants experienced social interactions with each opponent separately and scored their initial impressions using two questionnaires. We found that the participants perceived opponents in two mental dimensions: one represented "mind-holderness" in which participants attributed anthropomorphic impressions to some of the opponents that had mental functions, while the other dimension represented "mind-readerness" in which participants characterized opponents as intelligent. Interestingly, this "mind-readerness" dimension correlated to participants frequently changing their game tactic to prevent opponents from envisioning their strategy, and this was corroborated by increased entropy during the game. We also found that the two factors separately modulated activity in distinct social brain regions. Specifically, mind-holderness modulated activity in the dorsal aspect of the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and medial prefrontal and posterior paracingulate cortices, while mind-readerness modulated activity in the ventral aspect of TPJ and the temporal pole. These results clearly demonstrate that activity in social brain networks is modulated through pre-scanning experiences of social interaction with a variety of agents. Furthermore, our findings elucidated the existence of two distinct functional networks in the social human brain

  6. Hyper-arousal decreases human visual thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Adam J; Philbeck, John W; Wirtz, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Arousal has long been known to influence behavior and serves as an underlying component of cognition and consciousness. However, the consequences of hyper-arousal for visual perception remain unclear. The present study evaluates the impact of hyper-arousal on two aspects of visual sensitivity: visual stereoacuity and contrast thresholds. Sixty-eight participants participated in two experiments. Thirty-four participants were randomly divided into two groups in each experiment: Arousal Stimulation or Sham Control. The Arousal Stimulation group underwent a 50-second cold pressor stimulation (immersing the foot in 0-2° C water), a technique known to increase arousal. In contrast, the Sham Control group immersed their foot in room temperature water. Stereoacuity thresholds (Experiment 1) and contrast thresholds (Experiment 2) were measured before and after stimulation. The Arousal Stimulation groups demonstrated significantly lower stereoacuity and contrast thresholds following cold pressor stimulation, whereas the Sham Control groups showed no difference in thresholds. These results provide the first evidence that hyper-arousal from sensory stimulation can lower visual thresholds. Hyper-arousal's ability to decrease visual thresholds has important implications for survival, sports, and everyday life.

  7. Hyper-arousal decreases human visual thresholds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J Woods

    Full Text Available Arousal has long been known to influence behavior and serves as an underlying component of cognition and consciousness. However, the consequences of hyper-arousal for visual perception remain unclear. The present study evaluates the impact of hyper-arousal on two aspects of visual sensitivity: visual stereoacuity and contrast thresholds. Sixty-eight participants participated in two experiments. Thirty-four participants were randomly divided into two groups in each experiment: Arousal Stimulation or Sham Control. The Arousal Stimulation group underwent a 50-second cold pressor stimulation (immersing the foot in 0-2° C water, a technique known to increase arousal. In contrast, the Sham Control group immersed their foot in room temperature water. Stereoacuity thresholds (Experiment 1 and contrast thresholds (Experiment 2 were measured before and after stimulation. The Arousal Stimulation groups demonstrated significantly lower stereoacuity and contrast thresholds following cold pressor stimulation, whereas the Sham Control groups showed no difference in thresholds. These results provide the first evidence that hyper-arousal from sensory stimulation can lower visual thresholds. Hyper-arousal's ability to decrease visual thresholds has important implications for survival, sports, and everyday life.

  8. Human performance at sea assessed by dynamic visual acuity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Munnoch, K.; Perrault, D.

    2008-01-01

    Human performance may, among other things, depend on the ability to visually discern (small) objects. This ability is generally quantified under static conditions by means of the visual acuity, a measure of the minimum angle resolved by the eye. However, when the subject himself, his or her eyes,

  9. Modeling Human Aesthetic Perception of Visual Textures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thumfart, Stefan; Jacobs, Richard H. A. H.; Lughofer, Edwin; Eitzinger, Christian; Cornelissen, Frans W.; Groissboeck, Werner; Richter, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Texture is extensively used in areas such as product design and architecture to convey specific aesthetic information. Using the results of a psychological experiment, we model the relationship between computational texture features and aesthetic properties of visual textures. Contrary to previous

  10. Visually lossless coding based on temporal masking in human vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Velibor; Hock, Howard S.; Kalva, Hari

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a method for perceptual video compression that exploits the phenomenon of backward temporal masking. We present an overview of visual temporal masking and discuss models to identify portions of a video sequences masked due to this phenomenon exhibited by the human visual system. A quantization control model based on the psychophysical model of backward visual temporal masking was developed. We conducted two types of subjective evaluations and demonstrated that the proposed method up to 10% bitrate savings on top of state of the art encoder with visually identical video. The proposed methods were evaluated using HEVC encoder.

  11. Attentional functions in dorsal and ventral simultanagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, John; Bundesen, Claus; Olson, Andrew; Humphreys, Glyn; Ward, Robert; Kyllingsbæk, Søren; van Raamsdonk, Monique; Rorden, Chris; Chavda, Swarup

    2003-12-01

    Whole report of brief letter arrays is used to analyse basic attentional deficits in dorsal and ventral variants of simultanagnosia. Using Bundesen's Theory of Visual Attention (TVA), a number of previous theoretical suggestions are formalised and tested, including primary deficit in processing more than one display element, attentional stickiness, foveal bias, and global weakness of the visual representation. Interestingly, data from two cases, one dorsal and one ventral, show little true deficit in simultaneous perception, or selective deficit in those TVA parameters (short-term memory capacity, attentional weighting) specifically associated with multi-element displays. Instead there is a general reduction in speed of visual processing (processing rate in TVA), effective even for a single display element but compounded when two or more elements compete.

  12. Variational adaptive image denoising model based on human visual system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjun; Liu, Chanjuan; Zou, Hailin

    2011-11-01

    A variational image adaptive denoising model based on human visual system is proposed by introducing control parameter p which can determine the diffusion intensity to Total Variation (TV) model. The model can adaptively select the value of parameter p according to human visual system noise visibility value of each pixel which makes diffusion intensity close to edges smaller than those far away from edges. For this method is more consistent with human perception, human eyes can perceive the improvement of image quality intuitively. Numerical experiments show that the proposed method can overcome staircase effect, remove the noise while preserving significant image details and better performance has been achieved.

  13. Objective assessment of the human visual attentional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeford, Kevin T; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J; Yadav, Naveen K; Ludlam, Diana P

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an objective way to assess human visual attention using the alpha-band component of the visual-evoked potential (VEP). Six different attentional conditions were tested: eyes-open, eyes-closed, eyes-closed with backwards number counting, and three rapid-serial visual presentation (RSVP) tasks. Eighteen visually normal, young-adult subjects (ages 21-28 years) were tested binocularly at 1 m for each condition on two separate days. The Diopsys™ NOVA-TR system was used to obtain the visual-evoked potential (VEP) and extracted alpha wave and its related power spectrum. Additionally, the Visual Search and Attention Test (VSAT) was administered as a subjective measure of visual attention. Subjects exhibited significant decreases in power in the alpha band when comparing the eyes-closed with the eyes-open conditions, with power in the eyes-closed condition being, on average, twice as large. The response from the other four conditions did not reflect the differential attentional demands. The ratio of the power in the eyes-closed condition to the eyes-open condition in the lower-alpha frequencies (8-10 Hz) was found to be significantly correlated with the group's performance on the VSAT, especially the 10-Hz component. An individual's ability to attenuate their alpha component during visual processing may be a predictor of their visual attentional state. These findings solidify the role of the VEP alpha subcomponent as an objective electrophysiological correlate of visual attention, which may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of human visual attention disorders in the future.

  14. Visual graphics for human rights, social justice, democracy and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article presents a study using an action research approach in the classroom between 2005–2010, in order to inculcate awareness of human rights among ... The critical outcomes impact positively on the use of graphic images in the curriculum as a visual methodology to re-insert the discourse of human rights as a basic ...

  15. Characterization of cognitive deficits in rats overexpressing human alpha-synuclein in the ventral tegmental area and medial septum using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Hélène; Jewett, Michael; Landeck, Natalie; Nilsson, Nathalie; Schagerlöf, Ulrika; Leanza, Giampiero; Kirik, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Intraneuronal inclusions containing alpha-synuclein (a-syn) constitute one of the pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD) and are accompanied by severe neurodegeneration of A9 dopaminergic neurons located in the substantia nigra. Although to a lesser extent, A10 dopaminergic neurons are also affected. Neurodegeneration of other neuronal populations, such as the cholinergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic cell groups, has also been documented in PD patients. Studies in human post-mortem PD brains and in rodent models suggest that deficits in cholinergic and dopaminergic systems may be associated with the cognitive impairment seen in this disease. Here, we investigated the consequences of targeted overexpression of a-syn in the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic and septohippocampal cholinergic pathways. Rats were injected with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors encoding for either human wild-type a-syn or green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the ventral tegmental area and the medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca, two regions rich in dopaminergic and cholinergic neurons, respectively. Histopathological analysis showed widespread insoluble a-syn positive inclusions in all major projections areas of the targeted nuclei, including the hippocampus, neocortex, nucleus accumbens and anteromedial striatum. In addition, the rats overexpressing human a-syn displayed an abnormal locomotor response to apomorphine injection and exhibited spatial learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze task, in the absence of obvious spontaneous locomotor impairment. As losses in dopaminergic and cholinergic immunoreactivity in both the GFP and a-syn expressing animals were mild-to-moderate and did not differ from each other, the behavioral impairments seen in the a-syn overexpressing animals appear to be determined by the long term persisting neuropathology in the surviving neurons rather than by neurodegeneration.

  16. Characterization of cognitive deficits in rats overexpressing human alpha-synuclein in the ventral tegmental area and medial septum using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Hall

    Full Text Available Intraneuronal inclusions containing alpha-synuclein (a-syn constitute one of the pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD and are accompanied by severe neurodegeneration of A9 dopaminergic neurons located in the substantia nigra. Although to a lesser extent, A10 dopaminergic neurons are also affected. Neurodegeneration of other neuronal populations, such as the cholinergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic cell groups, has also been documented in PD patients. Studies in human post-mortem PD brains and in rodent models suggest that deficits in cholinergic and dopaminergic systems may be associated with the cognitive impairment seen in this disease. Here, we investigated the consequences of targeted overexpression of a-syn in the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic and septohippocampal cholinergic pathways. Rats were injected with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors encoding for either human wild-type a-syn or green fluorescent protein (GFP in the ventral tegmental area and the medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca, two regions rich in dopaminergic and cholinergic neurons, respectively. Histopathological analysis showed widespread insoluble a-syn positive inclusions in all major projections areas of the targeted nuclei, including the hippocampus, neocortex, nucleus accumbens and anteromedial striatum. In addition, the rats overexpressing human a-syn displayed an abnormal locomotor response to apomorphine injection and exhibited spatial learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze task, in the absence of obvious spontaneous locomotor impairment. As losses in dopaminergic and cholinergic immunoreactivity in both the GFP and a-syn expressing animals were mild-to-moderate and did not differ from each other, the behavioral impairments seen in the a-syn overexpressing animals appear to be determined by the long term persisting neuropathology in the surviving neurons rather than by neurodegeneration.

  17. Preprocessing of emotional visual information in the human piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Patrick; Bestgen, Anne-Kathrin; Lech, Robert K; Kuchinke, Lars; Suchan, Boris

    2017-08-23

    This study examines the processing of visual information by the olfactory system in humans. Recent data point to the processing of visual stimuli by the piriform cortex, a region mainly known as part of the primary olfactory cortex. Moreover, the piriform cortex generates predictive templates of olfactory stimuli to facilitate olfactory processing. This study fills the gap relating to the question whether this region is also capable of preprocessing emotional visual information. To gain insight into the preprocessing and transfer of emotional visual information into olfactory processing, we recorded hemodynamic responses during affective priming using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Odors of different valence (pleasant, neutral and unpleasant) were primed by images of emotional facial expressions (happy, neutral and disgust). Our findings are the first to demonstrate that the piriform cortex preprocesses emotional visual information prior to any olfactory stimulation and that the emotional connotation of this preprocessing is subsequently transferred and integrated into an extended olfactory network for olfactory processing.

  18. Visual dictionaries as intermediate features in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandan eRamakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The human visual system is assumed to transform low level visual features to object and scene representations via features of intermediate complexity. How the brain computationally represents intermediate features is still unclear. To further elucidate this, we compared the biologically plausible HMAX model and Bag of Words (BoW model from computer vision. Both these computational models use visual dictionaries, candidate features of intermediate complexity, to represent visual scenes, and the models have been proven effective in automatic object and scene recognition. These models however differ in the computation of visual dictionaries and pooling techniques. We investigated where in the brain and to what extent human fMRI responses to short video can be accounted for by multiple hierarchical levels of the HMAX and BoW models. Brain activity of 20 subjects obtained while viewing a short video clip was analyzed voxel-wise using a distance-based variation partitioning method. Results revealed that both HMAX and BoW explain a significant amount of brain activity in early visual regions V1, V2 and V3. However BoW exhibits more consistency across subjects in accounting for brain activity compared to HMAX. Furthermore, visual dictionary representations by HMAX and BoW explain significantly some brain activity in higher areas which are believed to process intermediate features. Overall our results indicate that, although both HMAX and BoW account for activity in the human visual system, the BoW seems to more faithfully represent neural responses in low and intermediate level visual areas of the brain.

  19. Audio visual information fusion for human activity analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Thagadur Shivappa, Shankar

    2010-01-01

    Human activity analysis in unconstrained environments using far-field sensors is a challenging task. The fusion of audio and visual cues enables us to build robust and efficient human activity analysis systems. Traditional fusion schemes including feature-level, classifier-level and decision-level fusion have been explored in task- specific contexts to provide robustness to sensor and environmental noise. However, human activity analysis involves the extraction of information from audio and v...

  20. Psychological Correlates of a Model of the Human Visual System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model of the human visual system is investigated for psychological correlates. A priori hypotheses from the model concerned with human...identification of defocused letters as well as identification of rotated letters have been validated with the computer model. Gestalt principles of similarity...is also psychologically correlated. It is further postulated that the human perceptual space is the image domain from spatially filtered transforms of

  1. Understanding human visual systems and its impact on our intelligent instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strojnik Scholl, Marija; Páez, Gonzalo; Scholl, Michelle K.

    2013-09-01

    We review the evolution of machine vision and comment on the cross-fertilization from the neural sciences onto flourishing fields of neural processing, parallel processing, and associative memory in optical sciences and computing. Then we examine how the intensive efforts in mapping the human brain have been influenced by concepts in computer sciences, control theory, and electronic circuits. We discuss two neural paths that employ the input from the vision sense to determine the navigational options and object recognition. They are ventral temporal pathway for object recognition (what?) and dorsal parietal pathway for navigation (where?), respectively. We describe the reflexive and conscious decision centers in cerebral cortex involved with visual attention and gaze control. Interestingly, these require return path though the midbrain for ocular muscle control. We find that the cognitive psychologists currently study human brain employing low-spatial-resolution fMRI with temporal response on the order of a second. In recent years, the life scientists have concentrated on insect brains to study neural processes. We discuss how reflexive and conscious gaze-control decisions are made in the frontal eye field and inferior parietal lobe, constituting the fronto-parietal attention network. We note that ethical and experiential learnings impact our conscious decisions.

  2. Human visual cortical responses to specular and matte motion flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Eui eKam

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Determining the compositional properties of surfaces in the environment is an important visual capacity. One such property is specular reflectance, which encompasses the range from matte to shiny surfaces. Visual estimation of specular reflectance can be informed by characteristic motion profiles; a surface with a specular reflectance that is difficult to determine while static can be confidently disambiguated when set in motion. Here, we used fMRI to trace the sensitivity of human visual cortex to such motion cues, both with and without photometric cues to specular reflectance. Participants viewed rotating blob-like objects that were rendered as images (photometric or dots (kinematic with either matte-consistent or shiny-consistent specular reflectance profiles. We were unable to identify any areas in low and mid-level human visual cortex that responded preferentially to surface specular reflectance from motion. However, univariate and multivariate analyses identified several visual areas; V1, V2, V3, V3A/B, and hMT+, capable of differentiating shiny from matte surface flows. These results indicate that the machinery for extracting kinematic cues is present in human visual cortex, but the areas involved in integrating such information with the photometric cues necessary for surface specular reflectance remain unclear.

  3. Visuals and Visualisation of Human Body Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, Sindhu; Ramadas, Jayashree

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the role of diagrams and text in middle school students' understanding and visualisation of human body systems. We develop a common framework based on structure and function to assess students' responses across diagram and verbal modes. Visualisation is defined in terms of understanding transformations on structure and relating…

  4. Morphological and histomorphometric evaluation of the ventral rectus sheath of the rectus abdominis muscle, fascia lata and pectoral fascia. The beginning of a morphological information bank of human fascias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Avalos, Rodolfo; Soto-Domínguez, Adolfo; García-Juárez, Jaime; Cardenas-Serna, Marcela; Esparza-Hernández, Claudia N; Carreño-Salcedo, Sofía Alejandra; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, Roberto; Loera-Arias, María de Jesús; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo E; Guzmán-López, Santos

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize and compare the morphological and histomorphometric characteristics of the pectoral fascia, fascia lata and ventral rectus sheath. Twenty cadaveric samples of these fascias were analyzed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, orcein, Van Gieson, Masson's trichrome and Verhoeff¨s stain (1200 slides in total). Morphological evaluation, semiquantitative, morphometric and microdensitometric analysis of elastic fibers present in each of the tissues and a morphometrical analysis of tissue thickness were performed. The mean value of the pectoral fascia thickness was 612±68.13 μm; 84±246 μm for the fascia lata and 584±92 μm for the ventral rectus sheath. The area occupied by the elastic fibers in the pectoral fascia was 12.24±5.84%; 6,54±3.85% for the fascia lata and 11.11±5.26% for the ventral rectus sheath. There were no statistically significant differences when comparing the mean values between the pectoral fascia and the ventral rectus sheath (p=0.07). There were statistically significant differences when comparing the fascia lata to the pectoral fascia and the ventral rectus sheath (p≤0.001). This study reports other morphological characteristics not described in previous histological studies of the analyzed tissues. The results of the morphometric and densitometric analysis in this study reveal that the fascia lata has the fewest elastic fibers of all the tissues analyzed, and the pectoral fascia has the most. These results will be useful for the beginning of a morphological information bank of human fascias.

  5. From humans to computers cognition through visual perception

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, Viktor Vasilievitch

    1991-01-01

    This book considers computer vision to be an integral part of the artificial intelligence system. The core of the book is an analysis of possible approaches to the creation of artificial vision systems, which simulate human visual perception. Much attention is paid to the latest achievements in visual psychology and physiology, the description of the functional and structural organization of the human perception mechanism, the peculiarities of artistic perception and the expression of reality. Computer vision models based on these data are investigated. They include the processes of external d

  6. Morphological Texture Manipulation for The Evaluation of Human Visual Sensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Chie Muraki; Asano, Akira; Li, Liang; Fujimoto, Takako

    Since the surface texture of materials often affects human visual impressions as much as or more than the design, shape, or color properties, texture characteristics have been studied as features of object identification. We have been investigating the effect of texture on visual impression and objective identification using black fabrics that do not exhibit any effects of color. Our studies showed that visual impressions of texture correspond to complex micro-components and global structures of image features of those textures. Our results also showed that some important elements influence human visual impressions and identification of textures. Because of a variety of fibrous structures, it is not easy to provide a systematic analysis of clothing materials. Nevertheless, developing the method and collecting data on these elements and their effects using these image features will be important. To make this research applicable for wider use, we have been studying precisely what it is about an arbitrary texture that influences human visual impressions and sensibility. As a new step, in this paper, a texture is altered and transformed using the parameter estimation method of texture based on mathematical morphology, which is often used for extracting image components that are useful for representation and description. A texture is decomposed into a primitive and grain arrangement which correspond to local and global characteristics, respectively. Different textures are created by modifying the primitive and the arrangement to investigate the effects of modifications of local and global features. The relationship between the parameters and visual impressions of the modified textures were evaluated. This study shows that influence of both local and global structures of the texture along with their combinations and mutual interactions are important for identification of human visual impression.

  7. Ventral-clap modes of hovering passerines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hung; Ting, Shang-Chieh; Su, Jian-Yuan; Soong, Chyi-Yeou; Yang, Jing-Tang

    2013-02-01

    Some small birds typically clap their wings ventrally, particularly during hovering. To investigate this phenomenon, we analyzed the kinematic motion and wake flow field of two passerine species that hover with the same flapping frequency. For these two birds, the ventral clap is classified as direct and cupping. Japanese White-eyes undertake a direct clap via their hand wings, whereas Gouldian Finches undertake a cupping clap with one wing overlaying the other. As a result of their morphological limitation, birds of both greater size and wing span cup their wings to increase the wing speed during a ventral clap because of the larger wing loading. This morphological limitation leads also to a structural discrepancy of the wake flow fields between these two passerine species. At the instant of clapping, the direct clap induces a downward air velocity 1.68 times and generates a weight-normalized lift force 1.14 times that for the cupping clap. The direct clap produces a small upward jet and a pair of counter-rotating vortices, both of which abate the transient lift at the instant of clapping, but they are not engendered by the cupping clap. The aerodynamic mechanisms generated with a ventral clap help the small birds to avoid abrupt body swinging at the instant of clapping so as to maintain their visual stability during hovering.

  8. Visual gravitational motion and the vestibular system in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Bosco, Gianfranco; Indovina, Iole; La Scaleia, Barbara; Maffei, Vincenzo; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Zago, Myrka

    2013-12-26

    The visual system is poorly sensitive to arbitrary accelerations, but accurately detects the effects of gravity on a target motion. Here we review behavioral and neuroimaging data about the neural mechanisms for dealing with object motion and egomotion under gravity. The results from several experiments show that the visual estimates of a target motion under gravity depend on the combination of a prior of gravity effects with on-line visual signals on target position and velocity. These estimates are affected by vestibular inputs, and are encoded in a visual-vestibular network whose core regions lie within or around the Sylvian fissure, and are represented by the posterior insula/retroinsula/temporo-parietal junction. This network responds both to target motions coherent with gravity and to vestibular caloric stimulation in human fMRI studies. Transient inactivation of the temporo-parietal junction selectively disrupts the interception of targets accelerated by gravity.

  9. Visual gravitational motion and the vestibular system in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eLacquaniti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The visual system is poorly sensitive to arbitrary accelerations, but accurately detects the effects of gravity on a target motion. Here we review behavioral and neuroimaging data about the neural mechanisms for dealing with object motion and egomotion under gravity. The results from several experiments show that the visual estimates of a target motion under gravity depend on the combination of a prior of gravity effects with on-line visual signals on target position and velocity. These estimates are affected by vestibular inputs, and are encoded in a visual-vestibular network whose core regions lie within or around the Sylvian fissure, and are represented by the posterior insula/retroinsula/temporo-parietal junction. This network responds both to target motions coherent with gravity and to vestibular caloric stimulation in human fMRI studies. Transient inactivation of the temporo-parietal junction selectively disrupts the interception of targets accelerated by gravity.

  10. Visualization of monoamine oxidase in human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Pappas, N.; Shea, C.; MacGregor, R.R.; Logan, J.

    1996-12-31

    Monoamine oxidase is a flavin enzyme which exists in two subtypes, MAO A and MAO B. In human brain MAO B predominates and is largely compartmentalized in cell bodies of serotonergic neurons and glia. Regional distribution of MAO B was determined by positron computed tomography with volunteers after the administration of deuterium substituted [11C]L-deprenyl. The basal ganglia and thalamus exhibited the greatest concentrations of MAO B with intermediate levels in the frontal cortex and cingulate gyrus while lowest levels were observed in the parietal and temporal cortices and cerebellum. We observed that brain MAO B increases with are in health normal subjects, however the increases were generally smaller than those revealed with post-mortem studies.

  11. Functional Dissociations within the Ventral Object Processing Pathway: Cognitive Modules or a Hierarchical Continuum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, Rosemary A.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Saksida, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the organization and function of the ventral object processing pathway. The prevailing theoretical approach in this field holds that the ventral object processing stream has a modular organization, in which visual perception is carried out in posterior regions and visual memory is carried out, independently, in the anterior temporal…

  12. Visual servo control for a human-following robot

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burke, Michael G

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This thesis presents work completed on the design of control and vision components for use in a monocular vision-based human-following robot. The use of vision in a controller feedback loop is referred to as vision-based or visual servo control...

  13. Human Factors Evaluation of Advanced Electric Power Grid Visualization Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Dauenhauer, Peter M.; Wierks, Tamara G.; Podmore, Robin

    2009-04-01

    This report describes initial human factors evaluation of four visualization tools (Graphical Contingency Analysis, Force Directed Graphs, Phasor State Estimator and Mode Meter/ Mode Shapes) developed by PNNL, and proposed test plans that may be implemented to evaluate their utility in scenario-based experiments.

  14. Lithium pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in postnatal day 20 rats results in greater neuronal injury in ventral versus dorsal hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, Jeffrey J.; Pouliot, Wendy; Scheerlinck, Peter; Dudek, F. Edward

    2011-01-01

    Many quantitative animal studies examining the possible relationship between hippocampal neuronal loss and the development of epilepsy have examined only the dorsal hippocampus. The ventral hippocampus, however, represents the more homologous structure to the anterior hippocampus in humans which is the area associated with the maximal damage in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. This study tested the hypothesis that the ventral hippocampus has greater neuronal injury than the dorsal hippocampus in an animal model of chemoconvulsant-status epilepticus at postnatal day 20. Status epilepticus was induced in postnatal day 20 Sprague Dawley rat pups with the chemoconvulsant lithium-pilocarpine and brain tissue was examined with Fluoro-Jade B. Horizontal sections (n=7) favoring a visualization of the ventral hippocampus showed marked Fluoro-Jade B staining in CA1, CA3, and hilar region. Coronal sections favoring a visualization of the dorsal hippocampus did not consistently show as robust a staining pattern in these regions. In coronal sections where both the dorsal and ventral hippocampus could be viewed, greater staining was always seen in ventral versus dorsal hippocampus. Quantitative analysis of cell counts demonstrated a significant difference between ventral and dorsal hippocampus in CA1and CA3, but not hilus. These results demonstrate that in ventral hippocampus, lithium pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus consistently results in hippocampal neuronal injury in postnatal day 20 rats. This study shows the importance of including the ventral hippocampus in any analysis of seizure-induced hippocampal neuronal injury, and raises concerns about the accuracy of studies quantifying hippocampal neuronal loss when only the dorsal hippocampus is examined. PMID:21669257

  15. Individual human serum differs in the amount of antibodies with affinity for pig fetal ventral mesencephalic cells and the ability to lyse these cells by complement activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, J; de Haan, A; Bruin, E; van der Gun, Ieneke; van Dijk, H; Rozing, J; de Leij, L; Staal, M

    2004-01-01

    Xenografting pig fetal ventral mesencephalic (pfVM) cells to repair the dopamine deficit in patients with Parkinson's disease is the focus of both experimental and clinical investigations. Although there have been marked advances in the experimental and even clinical application of these xenogeneic

  16. Human eye visual hyperacuity: Controlled diffraction for image resolution improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunas, A.; Domínguez, O.; Martinez-Conde, S.; Macknik, S. L.; Del-Río, C.

    2017-09-01

    The Human Visual System appears to be using a low number of sensors for image capturing, and furthermore, regarding the physical dimensions of cones—photoreceptors responsible for the sharp central vision—we may realize that these sensors are of a relatively small size and area. Nonetheless, the human eye is capable of resolving fine details thanks to visual hyperacuity and presents an impressive sensitivity and dynamic range when set against conventional digital cameras of similar characteristics. This article is based on the hypothesis that the human eye may be benefiting from diffraction to improve both image resolution and acquisition process. The developed method involves the introduction of a controlled diffraction pattern at an initial stage that enables the use of a limited number of sensors for capturing the image and makes possible a subsequent post-processing to improve the final image resolution.

  17. Autonomous facial recognition system inspired by human visual system based logarithmical image visualization technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qianwen; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos

    2017-05-01

    Autonomous facial recognition system is widely used in real-life applications, such as homeland border security, law enforcement identification and authentication, and video-based surveillance analysis. Issues like low image quality, non-uniform illumination as well as variations in poses and facial expressions can impair the performance of recognition systems. To address the non-uniform illumination challenge, we present a novel robust autonomous facial recognition system inspired by the human visual system based, so called, logarithmical image visualization technique. In this paper, the proposed method, for the first time, utilizes the logarithmical image visualization technique coupled with the local binary pattern to perform discriminative feature extraction for facial recognition system. The Yale database, the Yale-B database and the ATT database are used for computer simulation accuracy and efficiency testing. The extensive computer simulation demonstrates the method's efficiency, accuracy, and robustness of illumination invariance for facial recognition.

  18. Functional specialization in dorsal and ventral premotor areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Eiji; Tanji, Jun

    2004-01-01

    The premotor cortex (PM) in the bilateral lateral hemisphere of nonhuman primates and the human has been implicated in the sensorial guidance of movements. This is in contrast to more medial motor areas that are involved more in the temporal structuring of movements based on memorized information. The PM is further subdivided into dorsal (PMd) and ventral (PMv) parts. In this chapter, we describe our attempts to find differences in the use of these two areas in a nonhuman primate for programming future motor actions based on visual signals. We show that neurons in the PMv are involved primarily in receiving visuospatial signals and in specifying the spatial location of the target to be reached. In contrast, neurons in the PMd are involved more in integrating information about which arm to use and the target to be reached. Thus, PMd neurons are more implicated than those of the PMv in the preparation for a future motor action.

  19. Visual-vestibular conflict induced by virtual reality in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiduki, Hironori; Nishiike, Suetaka; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Katsunori; Kubo, Takeshi; Takeda, Noriaki

    2003-04-17

    Conflicting inputs from visual and vestibular afferents produce motion sickness and postural instability. However, the relationship of visual and vestibular inputs to each other remains obscure. In this study, we examined the development of subjective sickness- and balance-related symptoms and objective equilibrium ataxia induced by visual-vestibular conflict (VVC) stimulation using virtual reality. The subjective symptoms evaluated by Graybiel's and Hamilton's criteria got gradually worse during the VVC. The objective postural instability was not observed during the VVC, but it occurred immediately after the VVC. There was a time lag between the subjective symptoms and objective ataxia induced by VVC. Our study suggests that the VVC inputs are processed in different pathways causing subjective autonomic symptoms and postural instability in humans.

  20. Modeling and Visualization of Human Activities for Multicamera Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aswin C. Sankaranarayanan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multicamera networks are becoming complex involving larger sensing areas in order to capture activities and behavior that evolve over long spatial and temporal windows. This necessitates novel methods to process the information sensed by the network and visualize it for an end user. In this paper, we describe a system for modeling and on-demand visualization of activities of groups of humans. Using the prior knowledge of the 3D structure of the scene as well as camera calibration, the system localizes humans as they navigate the scene. Activities of interest are detected by matching models of these activities learnt a priori against the multiview observations. The trajectories and the activity index for each individual summarize the dynamic content of the scene. These are used to render the scene with virtual 3D human models that mimic the observed activities of real humans. In particular, the rendering framework is designed to handle large displays with a cluster of GPUs as well as reduce the cognitive dissonance by rendering realistic weather effects and illumination. We envision use of this system for immersive visualization as well as summarization of videos that capture group behavior.

  1. Effects of Horizontal Acceleration on Human Visual Acuity and Stereopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Tsai, Ming-Ling; Chang, Wei-Kang; Yang, Tzu-Hung; Yauan, Chien-Han; Wang, Chih-Hung; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Wu, Yi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The effect of horizontal acceleration on human visual acuity and stereopsis is demonstrated in this study. Twenty participants (mean age 22.6 years) were enrolled in the experiment. Acceleration from two different directions was performed at the Taiwan High-Speed Rail Laboratory. Gx and Gy (0.1 g) were produced on an accelerating platform where the subjects stood. The visual acuity and stereopsis of the right eye were measured before and during the acceleration. Acceleration stereopsis. Vision decreased (mean from 0.02 logMAR to 0.25 logMAR) and stereopsis declined significantly (mean from 40 s to 60.2 s of arc) when Gx > 0.1 g. Visual acuity worsened (mean from 0.02 logMAR to 0.19 logMAR) and poor stereopsis was noted (mean from 40 s to 50.2 s of arc) when Gy > 0.1 g. The effect of acceleration from the X-axis on the visual system was higher than that from the Y-axis. During acceleration, most subjects complained of ocular strain when reading. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the exact levels of visual function loss during Gx and Gy. PMID:25607601

  2. Dorsal and Ventral Pathways for Prosody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammler, Daniela; Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Anwander, Alfred; Bestelmeyer, Patricia E G; Belin, Pascal

    2015-12-07

    Our vocal tone--the prosody--contributes a lot to the meaning of speech beyond the actual words. Indeed, the hesitant tone of a "yes" may be more telling than its affirmative lexical meaning. The human brain contains dorsal and ventral processing streams in the left hemisphere that underlie core linguistic abilities such as phonology, syntax, and semantics. Whether or not prosody--a reportedly right-hemispheric faculty--involves analogous processing streams is a matter of debate. Functional connectivity studies on prosody leave no doubt about the existence of such streams, but opinions diverge on whether information travels along dorsal or ventral pathways. Here we show, with a novel paradigm using audio morphing combined with multimodal neuroimaging and brain stimulation, that prosody perception takes dual routes along dorsal and ventral pathways in the right hemisphere. In experiment 1, categorization of speech stimuli that gradually varied in their prosodic pitch contour (between statement and question) involved (1) an auditory ventral pathway along the superior temporal lobe and (2) auditory-motor dorsal pathways connecting posterior temporal and inferior frontal/premotor areas. In experiment 2, inhibitory stimulation of right premotor cortex as a key node of the dorsal stream decreased participants' performance in prosody categorization, arguing for a motor involvement in prosody perception. These data draw a dual-stream picture of prosodic processing that parallels the established left-hemispheric multi-stream architecture of language, but with relative rightward asymmetry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chemical Probes for Visualizing Intact Animal and Human Brain Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hei Ming; Ng, Wai-Lung; Gentleman, Steve M; Wu, Wutian

    2017-06-22

    Newly developed tissue clearing techniques can be used to render intact tissues transparent. When combined with fluorescent labeling technologies and optical sectioning microscopy, this allows visualization of fine structure in three dimensions. Gene-transfection techniques have proved very useful in visualizing cellular structures in animal models, but they are not applicable to human brain tissue. Here, we discuss the characteristics of an ideal chemical fluorescent probe for use in brain and other cleared tissues, and offer a comprehensive overview of currently available chemical probes. We describe their working principles and compare their performance with the goal of simplifying probe selection for neuropathologists and stimulating probe development by chemists. We propose several approaches for the development of innovative chemical labeling methods which, when combined with tissue clearing, have the potential to revolutionize how we study the structure and function of the human brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Entrainment of Human Alpha Oscillations Selectively Enhances Visual Conjunction Search.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Notger G Müller

    Full Text Available The functional role of the alpha-rhythm which dominates the human electroencephalogram (EEG is unclear. It has been related to visual processing, attentional selection and object coherence, respectively. Here we tested the interaction of alpha oscillations of the human brain with visual search tasks that differed in their attentional demands (pre-attentive vs. attentive and also in the necessity to establish object coherence (conjunction vs. single feature. Between pre- and post-assessment elderly subjects received 20 min/d of repetitive transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS over the occipital cortex adjusted to their individual alpha frequency over five consecutive days. Compared to sham the entrained alpha oscillations led to a selective, set size independent improvement in the conjunction search task performance but not in the easy or in the hard feature search task. These findings suggest that cortical alpha oscillations play a specific role in establishing object coherence through suppression of distracting objects.

  5. A New Conceptualization of Human Visual Sensory-Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Öğmen, Haluk; Herzog, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Memory is an essential component of cognition and disorders of memory have significant individual and societal costs. The Atkinson-Shiffrin "modal model" forms the foundation of our understanding of human memory. It consists of three stores: Sensory Memory (SM), whose visual component is called iconic memory, Short-Term Memory (STM; also called working memory, WM), and Long-Term Memory (LTM). Since its inception, shortcomings of all three components of the modal model have been identified. Wh...

  6. Temporal sensitivity. [time dependent human perception of visual stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1986-01-01

    Human visual temporal sensitivity is examined. The stimuli used to measure temporal sensitivity are described and the linear systems theory is reviewed in terms of temporal sensitivity. A working model which represents temporal sensitivity is proposed. The visibility of a number of temporal wave forms, sinusoids, rectangular pulses, and pulse pairs, is analyzed. The relation between spatial and temporal effects is studied. Temporal variations induced by image motion and the effects of light adaptation on temporal sensitivity are considered.

  7. Rats and humans differ in processing collinear visual features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M Meier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral studies in humans and rats demonstrate that visual detection of a target stimulus is sensitive to surrounding spatial patterns. In both species, the detection of an oriented visual target is affected when the surrounding region contains flanking stimuli that are collinear to the target. In many studies, collinear flankers have been shown to improve performance in humans, both absolutely (compared to performance with no flankers and relative to non-collinear flankers. More recently, collinear flankers have been shown to impair performance in rats both absolutely and relative to non-collinear flankers. However, these observations spanned different experimental paradigms. Past studies in humans have shown that the magnitude and even sign of flanker effects can depend critically on the details of stimulus and task design. Therefore either task differences or species could explain the opposite findings. Here we provide a direct comparison of behavioral data between species and show that these differences persist -- collinear flankers improve performance in humans, and impair performance in rats -- in spite of controls that match stimuli, experimental paradigm, and learning procedure. There is evidence that the contrasts of the target and the flankers could affect whether surround processing is suppressive or faciliatory. In a second experiment, we explored a range of contrast conditions in the rat, to determine if contrast could explain the lack of collinear facilitation. Using different pairs of target and flanker contrast, the rat’s collinear impairment was confirmed to be robust across a range of contrast conditions. We conclude that processing of collinear features is indeed different between rats and humans. We speculate that the observed difference between rat and human is caused by the combined impact of differences in the statistics in natural retinal images, the representational capacity of neurons in visual cortex, and

  8. Visual Positioning Indoors: Human Eyes vs. Smartphone Cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dewen; Chen, Ruizhi; Chen, Liang

    2017-11-16

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies and their related applications are now developing at a rapid pace. Indoor positioning will be one of the core technologies that enable AI applications because people spend 80% of their time indoors. Humans can locate themselves related to a visually well-defined object, e.g., a door, based on their visual observations. Can a smartphone camera do a similar job when it points to an object? In this paper, a visual positioning solution was developed based on a single image captured from a smartphone camera pointing to a well-defined object. The smartphone camera simulates the process of human eyes for the purpose of relatively locating themselves against a well-defined object. Extensive experiments were conducted with five types of smartphones on three different indoor settings, including a meeting room, a library, and a reading room. Experimental results shown that the average positioning accuracy of the solution based on five smartphone cameras is 30.6 cm, while that for the human-observed solution with 300 samples from 10 different people is 73.1 cm.

  9. Unveiling the mystery of visual information processing in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Emanuel

    2008-08-15

    It is generally accepted that human vision is an extremely powerful information processing system that facilitates our interaction with the surrounding world. However, despite extended and extensive research efforts, which encompass many exploration fields, the underlying fundamentals and operational principles of visual information processing in human brain remain unknown. We still are unable to figure out where and how along the path from eyes to the cortex the sensory input perceived by the retina is converted into a meaningful object representation, which can be consciously manipulated by the brain. Studying the vast literature considering the various aspects of brain information processing, I was surprised to learn that the respected scholarly discussion is totally indifferent to the basic keynote question: "What is information?" in general or "What is visual information?" in particular. In the old days, it was assumed that any scientific research approach has first to define its basic departure points. Why was it overlooked in brain information processing research remains a conundrum. In this paper, I am trying to find a remedy for this bizarre situation. I propose an uncommon definition of "information", which can be derived from Kolmogorov's Complexity Theory and Chaitin's notion of Algorithmic Information. Embracing this new definition leads to an inevitable revision of traditional dogmas that shape the state of the art of brain information processing research. I hope this revision would better serve the challenging goal of human visual information processing modeling.

  10. Repeatability and reliability of human eye in visual shade selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özat, P B; Tuncel, İ; Eroğlu, E

    2013-12-01

    Deficiencies in the human visual percep-tion system have challenged the efficiency of the visual shade-matching protocol. The aim of this study was to evaluate the repeatability and reliability of human eye in visual shade selection. Fifty-four volunteering dentists were asked to match the shade of an upper right central incisor tooth of a single subject. The Vita 3D-Master shade guide was used for the protocol. Before each shade-matching procedure, the definitive codes of the shade tabs were hidden by an opaque strip and the shade tabs were placed into the guide randomly. The procedure was repeated 1 month later to ensure that visual memory did not affect the results. The L*, a* and b* values of the shade tabs were measured with a dental spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade) to produce quantitative values to evaluate the protocol. The paired samples t-test and Pearson correlation test were used to compare the 1st and 2nd selections. The Yates-corrected chi-square test was use to compare qualitative values. Statistical significance was accepted at P < 0·05. Comparing baseline and 1st month records, statistical significance (P < 0·001) was found among qualitative data regarding repeatability on a yes/no (1/0) basis, revealing a very low percentage of repeatability (11·1%). Comparing baseline and 1st month records, statistical significance was not found (P = 0·000) among the L*, a*, b* and ΔE variables. These results indicate that dentists perform insufficiently regarding repeatability in visual shade matching, but they are able to select clinically acceptable shades. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A direct demonstration of functional specialization in human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeki, S; Watson, J D; Lueck, C J; Friston, K J; Kennard, C; Frackowiak, R S

    1991-03-01

    We have used positron emission tomography (PET), which measures regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), to demonstrate directly the specialization of function in the normal human visual cortex. A novel technique, statistical parametric mapping, was used to detect foci of significant change in cerebral blood flow within the prestriate cortex, in order to localize those parts involved in the perception of color and visual motion. For color, we stimulated the subjects with a multicolored abstract display containing no recognizable objects (Land color Mondrian) and contrasted the resulting blood flow maps with those obtained when subjects viewed an identical display consisting of equiluminous shades of gray. The comparison identified a unique area (area V4) located in the lingual and fusiform gyri of the prestriate cortex. For motion, blood flow maps when subjects viewed moving or stationary black and white random-square patterns were contrasted. The comparison identified a unique area located in the region of the temporo-parieto-occipital junction (area V5). We thus provide direct evidence to show that, just as in the macaque monkey, different areas of the human prestriate visual cortex are specialized for different attributes of vision. The striate cortex (V1) and the contiguous visual area (V2), which in the monkey brain feed both the homologous areas, were active in all 4 conditions. This pattern of activity allowed us to use an extension of the approach to assess the functional relationship between the 3 areas during color and motion stimulation. This is based on an hypothesis-led analysis of the covariance structure of the blood flow maps and promises to be a powerful tool for inferring anatomical pathways in the normal human brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Visual assessment of the radiation distribution in the ISS Lab module: visualization in the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saganti, P. B.; Zapp, E. N.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    The US Lab module of the International Space Station (ISS) is a primary working area where the crewmembers are expected to spend majority of their time. Because of the directionality of radiation fields caused by the Earth shadow, trapped radiation pitch angle distribution, and inherent variations in the ISS shielding, a model is needed to account for these local variations in the radiation distribution. We present the calculated radiation dose (rem/yr) values for over 3,000 different points in the working area of the Lab module and estimated radiation dose values for over 25,000 different points in the human body for a given ambient radiation environment. These estimated radiation dose values are presented in a three dimensional animated interactive visualization format. Such interactive animated visualization of the radiation distribution can be generated in near real-time to track changes in the radiation environment during the orbit precession of the ISS.

  13. Extension of a human visual system model for display simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchessoux, Cédric; Rombaut, Alexis; Kimpe, Tom; Vermeulen, Brecht; Demeester, Piet

    2008-02-01

    In the context of medical display validation, a simulation chain has been developed to facilitate display design and image quality validation. One important part is the human visual observer model to quantify the quality perception of the simulated images. Since several years, multiple research groups are modeling the various aspects of human perception to integrate them in a complete Human Visual System (HVS) and developing visible image difference metrics. In our framework, the JNDmetrix is used. It reflects the human subjective assessment of images or video fidelity. Nevertheless, the system is limited and not suitable for our accurate simulations. There is a limitation to RGB 8 bits integer images and the model takes into account display parameters like gamma, black offset, ambient light... It needs to be extended. The solutions proposed to extend the HVS model are: precision enhancement to overcome the 8 bit limit, color space conversion between XYZ and RGB and adaptation to the display parameters. The preprocessing does not introduce any kind of perceived distortion caused for example by precision enhancement. With this extension the model is used in a daily basis in the display simulation chain.

  14. Aversive learning shapes neuronal orientation tuning in human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTeague, Lisa M; Gruss, L Forest; Keil, Andreas

    2015-07-28

    The responses of sensory cortical neurons are shaped by experience. As a result perceptual biases evolve, selectively facilitating the detection and identification of sensory events that are relevant for adaptive behaviour. Here we examine the involvement of human visual cortex in the formation of learned perceptual biases. We use classical aversive conditioning to associate one out of a series of oriented gratings with a noxious sound stimulus. After as few as two grating-sound pairings, visual cortical responses to the sound-paired grating show selective amplification. Furthermore, as learning progresses, responses to the orientations with greatest similarity to the sound-paired grating are increasingly suppressed, suggesting inhibitory interactions between orientation-selective neuronal populations. Changes in cortical connectivity between occipital and fronto-temporal regions mirror the changes in visuo-cortical response amplitudes. These findings suggest that short-term behaviourally driven retuning of human visual cortical neurons involves distal top-down projections as well as local inhibitory interactions.

  15. Ventral Abdominal Hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi Tchernev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A 63-year-old Caucasian female patient presented with redness of the both foot and lower legs, as well as edema of the left lower leg, accompanied by subjective complaints of burning. Fever was not reported. Well-circumscribed oval shaped tumor formation was revealed also on the abdominal wall, with hyperpigmented and depigmented areas on its ulcerated surface, measuring approximately 10/10cm in diameter, with soft-elastic texture on palpation.  The lesion occurred in 2011, according to the patient’s history. No subjective complaints were reported in association. The performed ultrasonography revealed intestinal loops in the hernial sac, without incarceration. The diagnosis of ventral abdominal hernia without mechanical ileus was made. The patient was referred for planned surgical procedure, because of her refusal on this stage.The clinical manifestation of the tumor formation on the abdominal wall, required wide spectrum of differential diagnosis, including aneurysm of the abdominal aorta, abdominal tumor, subcutaneous tumor or metastasis or hernia. In the presented cases, the abdominal wall mass was a sporadic clinical finding in the framework of the total-body skin examination in patient with erysipelas. The lack of subjective symptoms, as well as the reported history for hysterectomy and previously abscessus were not enough indicative symptoms for the correct diagnosis. The diagnosis of non-complicated hernia was made via ultrasonography, while the clinical differentiation between hernia and other life-threatening conditions as aneurysms or tumor was not possible.

  16. Dog Breed Differences in Visual Communication with Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Akitsugu; Romero, Teresa; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Saito, Atsuko; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) have developed a close relationship with humans through the process of domestication. In human-dog interactions, eye contact is a key element of relationship initiation and maintenance. Previous studies have suggested that canine ability to produce human-directed communicative signals is influenced by domestication history, from wolves to dogs, as well as by recent breed selection for particular working purposes. To test the genetic basis for such abilities in purebred dogs, we examined gazing behavior towards humans using two types of behavioral experiments: the 'visual contact task' and the 'unsolvable task'. A total of 125 dogs participated in the study. Based on the genetic relatedness among breeds subjects were classified into five breed groups: Ancient, Herding, Hunting, Retriever-Mastiff and Working). We found that it took longer time for Ancient breeds to make an eye-contact with humans, and that they gazed at humans for shorter periods of time than any other breed group in the unsolvable situation. Our findings suggest that spontaneous gaze behavior towards humans is associated with genetic similarity to wolves rather than with recent selective pressure to create particular working breeds.

  17. ReconMap: an interactive visualization of human metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Alberto; Daníelsdóttir, Anna Dröfn; Gawron, Piotr; Jóhannsson, Freyr; Jónsdóttir, Soffía; Jarlsson, Sindri; Gunnarsson, Jón Pétur; Brynjólfsson, Sigurður; Schneider, Reinhard; Thiele, Ines; Fleming, Ronan M T

    2017-02-15

    A genome-scale reconstruction of human metabolism, Recon 2, is available but no interface exists to interactively visualize its content integrated with omics data and simulation results. We manually drew a comprehensive map, ReconMap 2.0, that is consistent with the content of Recon 2. We present it within a web interface that allows content query, visualization of custom datasets and submission of feedback to manual curators. ReconMap can be accessed via http://vmh.uni.lu , with network export in a Systems Biology Graphical Notation compliant format released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. A Constraint-Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) Toolbox extension to interact with ReconMap is available via https://github.com/opencobra/cobratoolbox . ronan.mt.fleming@gmail.com.

  18. Multiple spatial frequency channels in human visual perceptual memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, V A; Whitaker, D; Heron, J; McKeefry, D J

    2011-12-08

    Current models of short-term visual perceptual memory invoke mechanisms that are closely allied to low-level perceptual discrimination mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which human visual perceptual memory for spatial frequency is based upon multiple, spatially tuned channels similar to those found in the earliest stages of visual processing. To this end we measured how performance on a delayed spatial frequency discrimination paradigm was affected by the introduction of interfering or 'memory masking' stimuli of variable spatial frequency during the delay period. Masking stimuli were shown to induce shifts in the points of subjective equality (PSE) when their spatial frequencies were within a bandwidth of 1.2 octaves of the reference spatial frequency. When mask spatial frequencies differed by more than this value, there was no change in the PSE from baseline levels. This selective pattern of masking was observed for different spatial frequencies and demonstrates the existence of multiple, spatially tuned mechanisms in visual perceptual memory. Memory masking effects were also found to occur for horizontal separations of up to 6 deg between the masking and test stimuli and lacked any orientation selectivity. These findings add further support to the view that low-level sensory processing mechanisms form the basis for the retention of spatial frequency information in perceptual memory. However, the broad range of transfer of memory masking effects across spatial location and other dimensions indicates more long range, long duration interactions between spatial frequency channels that are likely to rely contributions from neural processes located in higher visual areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Coordinates of Human Visual and Inertial Heading Perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Thomas Crane

    Full Text Available Heading estimation involves both inertial and visual cues. Inertial motion is sensed by the labyrinth, somatic sensation by the body, and optic flow by the retina. Because the eye and head are mobile these stimuli are sensed relative to different reference frames and it remains unclear if a perception occurs in a common reference frame. Recent neurophysiologic evidence has suggested the reference frames remain separate even at higher levels of processing but has not addressed the resulting perception. Seven human subjects experienced a 2s, 16 cm/s translation and/or a visual stimulus corresponding with this translation. For each condition 72 stimuli (360° in 5° increments were delivered in random order. After each stimulus the subject identified the perceived heading using a mechanical dial. Some trial blocks included interleaved conditions in which the influence of ±28° of gaze and/or head position were examined. The observations were fit using a two degree-of-freedom population vector decoder (PVD model which considered the relative sensitivity to lateral motion and coordinate system offset. For visual stimuli gaze shifts caused shifts in perceived head estimates in the direction opposite the gaze shift in all subjects. These perceptual shifts averaged 13 ± 2° for eye only gaze shifts and 17 ± 2° for eye-head gaze shifts. This finding indicates visual headings are biased towards retina coordinates. Similar gaze and head direction shifts prior to inertial headings had no significant influence on heading direction. Thus inertial headings are perceived in body-centered coordinates. Combined visual and inertial stimuli yielded intermediate results.

  20. Visual Prediction Error Spreads Across Object Features in Human Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiefeng; Summerfield, Christopher; Egner, Tobias

    2016-12-14

    Visual cognition is thought to rely heavily on contextual expectations. Accordingly, previous studies have revealed distinct neural signatures for expected versus unexpected stimuli in visual cortex. However, it is presently unknown how the brain combines multiple concurrent stimulus expectations such as those we have for different features of a familiar object. To understand how an unexpected object feature affects the simultaneous processing of other expected feature(s), we combined human fMRI with a task that independently manipulated expectations for color and motion features of moving-dot stimuli. Behavioral data and neural signals from visual cortex were then interrogated to adjudicate between three possible ways in which prediction error (surprise) in the processing of one feature might affect the concurrent processing of another, expected feature: (1) feature processing may be independent; (2) surprise might "spread" from the unexpected to the expected feature, rendering the entire object unexpected; or (3) pairing a surprising feature with an expected feature might promote the inference that the two features are not in fact part of the same object. To formalize these rival hypotheses, we implemented them in a simple computational model of multifeature expectations. Across a range of analyses, behavior and visual neural signals consistently supported a model that assumes a mixing of prediction error signals across features: surprise in one object feature spreads to its other feature(s), thus rendering the entire object unexpected. These results reveal neurocomputational principles of multifeature expectations and indicate that objects are the unit of selection for predictive vision. We address a key question in predictive visual cognition: how does the brain combine multiple concurrent expectations for different features of a single object such as its color and motion trajectory? By combining a behavioral protocol that independently varies expectation of

  1. Visible light-based human visual system conceptual model

    OpenAIRE

    Prangnell, Lee

    2016-01-01

    There is a widely held belief in the digital image and video processing community, which is as follows: the Human Visual System (HVS) is more sensitive to luminance (often confused with brightness) than photon energies (often confused with chromaticity and chrominance). Passages similar to the following occur with high frequency in the peer reviewed literature and academic text books: “the HVS is much more sensitive to brightness than colour” or “the HVS is much more sensitive to luma than ch...

  2. Human performance on visually presented Traveling Salesman problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, D; Butavicius, M; Lee, M; Medvedev, A

    2001-01-01

    Little research has been carried out on human performance in optimization problems, such as the Traveling Salesman problem (TSP). Studies by Polivanova (1974, Voprosy Psikhologii, 4, 41-51) and by MacGregor and Ormerod (1996, Perception & Psychophysics, 58, 527-539) suggest that: (1) the complexity of solutions to visually presented TSPs depends on the number of points on the convex hull; and (2) the perception of optimal structure is an innate tendency of the visual system, not subject to individual differences. Results are reported from two experiments. In the first, measures of the total length and completion speed of pathways, and a measure of path uncertainty were compared with optimal solutions produced by an elastic net algorithm and by several heuristic methods. Performance was also compared under instructions to draw the shortest or the most attractive pathway. In the second, various measures of performance were compared with scores on Raven's advanced progressive matrices (APM). The number of points on the convex hull did not determine the relative optimality of solutions, although both this factor and the total number of points influenced solution speed and path uncertainty. Subjects' solutions showed appreciable individual differences, which had a strong correlation with APM scores. The relation between perceptual organization and the process of solving visually presented TSPs is briefly discussed, as is the potential of optimization for providing a conceptual framework for the study of intelligence.

  3. Disparity-tuned population responses from human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottereau, Benoit R; McKee, Suzanne P; Ales, Justin M; Norcia, Anthony M

    2011-01-19

    We used source imaging of visual evoked potentials to measure neural population responses over a wide range of horizontal disparities (0.5-64 arcmin). The stimulus was a central disk that moved back and forth across the fixation plane at 2 Hz, surrounded either by binocularly uncorrelated dots (disparity noise) or by correlated dots presented in the fixation plane. Both disk and surround were composed of dynamic random dots to remove coherent monocular information. Disparity tuning was measured in five visual regions of interest (ROIs) [V1, human middle temporal area (hMT+), V4, lateral occipital complex (LOC), and V3A], defined in separate functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. The disparity tuning functions peaked between 2 and 16 arcmin for both types of surround in each ROI. Disparity tuning in the V1 ROI was unaffected by the type of surround, but surround correlation altered both the amplitude and phase of the disparity responses in the other ROIs. Response amplitude increased when the disk was in front of the surround in the V3A and LOC ROIs, indicating that these areas encode figure-ground relationships and object convexity. The correlated surround produced a consistent phase lag at the second harmonic in the hMT+ and V4 ROIs without a change in amplitude, while in the V3A ROI, both phase and amplitude effects were observed. Sensitivity to disparity context is thus widespread in visual cortex, but the dynamics of these contextual interactions differ across regions.

  4. Image Fusion Algorithms Using Human Visual System in Transform Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadhi, Radhika; Swamy Kilari, Veera; Samayamantula, Srinivas Kumar

    2017-08-01

    The endeavor of digital image fusion is to combine the important visual parts from various sources to advance the visibility eminence of the image. The fused image has a more visual quality than any source images. In this paper, the Human Visual System (HVS) weights are used in the transform domain to select appropriate information from various source images and then to attain a fused image. In this process, mainly two steps are involved. First, apply the DWT to the registered source images. Later, identify qualitative sub-bands using HVS weights. Hence, qualitative sub-bands are selected from different sources to form high quality HVS based fused image. The quality of the HVS based fused image is evaluated with general fusion metrics. The results show the superiority among the state-of-the art resolution Transforms (MRT) such as Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT), Contourlet Transform (CT), and Non Sub Sampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT) using maximum selection fusion rule.

  5. Sensitivity to Acceleration in the Human Early Visual System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryohei Nakayama

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is widely believed that the human visual system is insensitive to acceleration in moving stimuli. This notion is supported by evidence that detection sensitivity for velocity modulation in moving stimuli is a lowpass function of the velocity modulation's temporal frequency. However, the lowpass function might be a mixture of detection by attention-based tracking and low-level mechanisms sensitive to acceleration. To revisit the issue of acceleration perception in relation to attentive tracking, we measured detection sensitivities for velocity modulations at various temporal frequencies (0.25–8 Hz by using drifting gratings within long or short spatial windows that make the tracking of grating easier or more difficult respectively. Results showed that modulation sensitivity is lowpass for gratings with long windows but bandpass for gratings with short windows (peak at ~1 Hz. Moreover, we found that lowpass sensitivity becomes bandpass when we removed observer attention by a concurrent letter identification task. An additional visual-search experiment showed that a target dot moving with a velocity modulation at relatively high temporal frequencies (~2–4 Hz was most easily detected among dots moving at various constant velocities. These results support the notion that high sensitivity to sluggish velocity modulation is a product of attentively tracking of moving stimuli and that the visual system is directly sensitive to accelerations and/or decelerations at the preattentive level.

  6. Probabilistic Mapping of Human Visual Attention from Head Pose Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Veronese

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective interaction between a human and a robot requires the bidirectional perception and interpretation of actions and behavior. While actions can be identified as a directly observable activity, this might not be sufficient to deduce actions in a scene. For example, orienting our face toward a book might suggest the action toward “reading.” For a human observer, this deduction requires the direction of gaze, the object identified as a book and the intersection between gaze and book. With this in mind, we aim to estimate and map human visual attention as directed to a scene, and assess how this relates to the detection of objects and their related actions. In particular, we consider human head pose as measurement to infer the attention of a human engaged in a task and study which prior knowledge should be included in such a detection system. In a user study, we show the successful detection of attention to objects in a typical office task scenario (i.e., reading, working with a computer, studying an object. Our system requires a single external RGB camera for head pose measurements and a pre-recorded 3D point cloud of the environment.

  7. Sensing Super-Position: Human Sensing Beyond the Visual Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, David A.; Schipper, John F.

    2007-01-01

    The coming decade of fast, cheap and miniaturized electronics and sensory devices opens new pathways for the development of sophisticated equipment to overcome limitations of the human senses. This paper addresses the technical feasibility of augmenting human vision through Sensing Super-position by mixing natural Human sensing. The current implementation of the device translates visual and other passive or active sensory instruments into sounds, which become relevant when the visual resolution is insufficient for very difficult and particular sensing tasks. A successful Sensing Super-position meets many human and pilot vehicle system requirements. The system can be further developed into cheap, portable, and low power taking into account the limited capabilities of the human user as well as the typical characteristics of his dynamic environment. The system operates in real time, giving the desired information for the particular augmented sensing tasks. The Sensing Super-position device increases the image resolution perception and is obtained via an auditory representation as well as the visual representation. Auditory mapping is performed to distribute an image in time. The three-dimensional spatial brightness and multi-spectral maps of a sensed image are processed using real-time image processing techniques (e.g. histogram normalization) and transformed into a two-dimensional map of an audio signal as a function of frequency and time. This paper details the approach of developing Sensing Super-position systems as a way to augment the human vision system by exploiting the capabilities of Lie human hearing system as an additional neural input. The human hearing system is capable of learning to process and interpret extremely complicated and rapidly changing auditory patterns. The known capabilities of the human hearing system to learn and understand complicated auditory patterns provided the basic motivation for developing an image-to-sound mapping system. The

  8. Human brain functional MRI and DTI visualization with virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Moreland, John; Zhang, Jingyu

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional MRI (fMRI) are two active research areas in neuroimaging. DTI is sensitive to the anisotropic diffusion of water exerted by its macromolecular environment and has been shown useful in characterizing structures of ordered tissues such as the brain white matter, myocardium, and cartilage. The diffusion tensor provides two new types of information of water diffusion: the magnitude and the spatial orientation of water diffusivity inside the tissue. This information has been used for white matter fiber tracking to review physical neuronal pathways inside the brain. Functional MRI measures brain activations using the hemodynamic response. The statistically derived activation map corresponds to human brain functional activities caused by neuronal activities. The combination of these two methods provides a new way to understand human brain from the anatomical neuronal fiber connectivity to functional activities between different brain regions. In this study, virtual reality (VR) based MR DTI and fMRI visualization with high resolution anatomical image segmentation and registration, ROI definition and neuronal white matter fiber tractography visualization and fMRI activation map integration is proposed. Rationale and methods for producing and distributing stereoscopic videos are also discussed.

  9. Research status of the influence of the scattering for human eye's visual quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Yue Luo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With the development of society, the new requirements for visual health are put forward. In the past, visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were used to evaluate the visual function of human eye, but it is subjective and limited, not really reflecting human eye's visual function. In order to pursue a more sensitive and accurate objective evaluation method, experts at home and abroad make some exploratory research on visual quality. The study confirmed that the scattering is an independent factor affecting the visual quality of human eye, it can make a more scientific evaluation of visual function.This article summarizes the influence of scattering for the visual quality of human eye, according to related research at home and abroad in recent years.

  10. Selective integration of auditory-visual looming cues by humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappe, Céline; Thut, Gregor; Romei, Vincenzo; Murray, Micah M

    2009-03-01

    An object's motion relative to an observer can confer ethologically meaningful information. Approaching or looming stimuli can signal threats/collisions to be avoided or prey to be confronted, whereas receding stimuli can signal successful escape or failed pursuit. Using movement detection and subjective ratings, we investigated the multisensory integration of looming and receding auditory and visual information by humans. While prior research has demonstrated a perceptual bias for unisensory and more recently multisensory looming stimuli, none has investigated whether there is integration of looming signals between modalities. Our findings reveal selective integration of multisensory looming stimuli. Performance was significantly enhanced for looming stimuli over all other multisensory conditions. Contrasts with static multisensory conditions indicate that only multisensory looming stimuli resulted in facilitation beyond that induced by the sheer presence of auditory-visual stimuli. Controlling for variation in physical energy replicated the advantage for multisensory looming stimuli. Finally, only looming stimuli exhibited a negative linear relationship between enhancement indices for detection speed and for subjective ratings. Maximal detection speed was attained when motion perception was already robust under unisensory conditions. The preferential integration of multisensory looming stimuli highlights that complex ethologically salient stimuli likely require synergistic cooperation between existing principles of multisensory integration. A new conceptualization of the neurophysiologic mechanisms mediating real-world multisensory perceptions and action is therefore supported.

  11. A New Conceptualization of Human Visual Sensory-Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öğmen, Haluk; Herzog, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Memory is an essential component of cognition and disorders of memory have significant individual and societal costs. The Atkinson–Shiffrin “modal model” forms the foundation of our understanding of human memory. It consists of three stores: Sensory Memory (SM), whose visual component is called iconic memory, Short-Term Memory (STM; also called working memory, WM), and Long-Term Memory (LTM). Since its inception, shortcomings of all three components of the modal model have been identified. While the theories of STM and LTM underwent significant modifications to address these shortcomings, models of the iconic memory remained largely unchanged: A high capacity but rapidly decaying store whose contents are encoded in retinotopic coordinates, i.e., according to how the stimulus is projected on the retina. The fundamental shortcoming of iconic memory models is that, because contents are encoded in retinotopic coordinates, the iconic memory cannot hold any useful information under normal viewing conditions when objects or the subject are in motion. Hence, half-century after its formulation, it remains an unresolved problem whether and how the first stage of the modal model serves any useful function and how subsequent stages of the modal model receive inputs from the environment. Here, we propose a new conceptualization of human visual sensory memory by introducing an additional component whose reference-frame consists of motion-grouping based coordinates rather than retinotopic coordinates. We review data supporting this new model and discuss how it offers solutions to the paradoxes of the traditional model of sensory memory. PMID:27375519

  12. Effective Connectivity between Ventral Occipito-Temporal and Ventral Inferior Frontal Cortex during Lexico-Semantic Processing. A Dynamic Causal Modeling Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Perrone-Bertolotti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that dorsal and ventral pathways support distinct aspects of language processing. Yet, the full extent of their involvement and their inter-regional connectivity in visual word recognition is still unknown. Studies suggest that they might reflect the dual-route model of reading, with the dorsal pathway more involved in grapho-phonological conversion during phonological tasks, and the ventral pathway performing lexico-semantic access during semantic tasks. Furthermore, this subdivision is also suggested at the level of the inferior frontal cortex, involving ventral and dorsal parts for lexico-semantic and phonological processing, respectively. In the present study, we assessed inter-regional brain connectivity and task-induced modulations of brain activity during a phoneme detection and semantic categorization tasks, using fMRI in healthy subject. We used a dynamic causal modeling approach to assess inter-regional connectivity and task demand modulation within the dorsal and ventral pathways, including the following network components: the ventral occipito-temporal cortex (vOTC; dorsal and ventral, the superior temporal gyrus (STG; dorsal, the dorsal inferior frontal gyrus (dIFG; dorsal, and the ventral IFG (vIFG; ventral. We report three distinct inter-regional interactions supporting orthographic information transfer from vOTC to other language regions (vOTC -> STG, vOTC -> vIFG and vOTC -> dIFG regardless of task demands. Moreover, we found that (a during semantic processing (direct ventral pathway the vOTC -> vIFG connection strength specifically increased and (b a lack of modulation of the vOTC -> dIFG connection strength by the task that could suggest a more general involvement of the dorsal pathway during visual word recognition. Results are discussed in terms of anatomo-functional connectivity of visual word recognition network.

  13. An extensible framework for provenance in human terrain visual analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rick; Slingsby, Aiden; Dykes, Jason; Xu, Kai; Wood, Jo; Nguyen, Phong H; Stephens, Derek; Wong, B L William; Zheng, Yongjun

    2013-12-01

    We describe and demonstrate an extensible framework that supports data exploration and provenance in the context of Human Terrain Analysis (HTA). Working closely with defence analysts we extract requirements and a list of features that characterise data analysed at the end of the HTA chain. From these, we select an appropriate non-classified data source with analogous features, and model it as a set of facets. We develop ProveML, an XML-based extension of the Open Provenance Model, using these facets and augment it with the structures necessary to record the provenance of data, analytical process and interpretations. Through an iterative process, we develop and refine a prototype system for Human Terrain Visual Analytics (HTVA), and demonstrate means of storing, browsing and recalling analytical provenance and process through analytic bookmarks in ProveML. We show how these bookmarks can be combined to form narratives that link back to the live data. Throughout the process, we demonstrate that through structured workshops, rapid prototyping and structured communication with intelligence analysts we are able to establish requirements, and design schema, techniques and tools that meet the requirements of the intelligence community. We use the needs and reactions of defence analysts in defining and steering the methods to validate the framework.

  14. Systematic variation of population receptive field properties across cortical depth in human visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fracasso, Alessio; Petridou, N; Dumoulin, Serge O

    2016-01-01

    Receptive fields (RFs) in visual cortex are organized in antagonistic, center-surround, configurations. RF properties change systematically across eccentricity and between visual field maps. However, it is unknown how center-surround configurations are organized in human visual cortex across lamina.

  15. A Digital Simulation of Psychological Correlates of a Model of the Human Visual System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    model’s ability to exhibit Gestalt grouping principles and visual illusions. Psychological correlates were obtained by comparing human visual performance...to the computer model’s performance; the correlation factors were high. Patterns containing Gestalt grouping principles and various visual illusions

  16. The Processing Speed of Humans on Various Visual Tasks: An Analysis of Relationships. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, James J.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the various techniques used to estimate the time required by the human to process a visual stimuli, i.e., recognize a stimulus input into the visual perceptual system. Sixteen tests of visual processing speed were administered to 110 undergraduate students. In summary, scores tended…

  17. Spotting and tracking good biometrics with the human visual system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold; Jenkins, Jeffrey; Hsu, Charles

    2011-06-01

    We mathematically model the mammalian Visual System's (VS) capability of spotting objects. How can a hawk see a tiny running rabbit from miles above ground? How could that rabbit see the approaching hawk? This predatorprey interaction draws parallels with spotting a familiar person in a crowd. We assume that mammal eyes use peripheral vision to perceive unexpected changes from our memory, and then use our central vision (fovea) to pay attention. The difference between an image and our memory of that image is usually small, mathematically known as a 'sparse representation'. The VS communicates with the brain using a finite reservoir of neurotransmittents, which produces an on-center and thus off-surround Hubel/Wiesel Mexican hat receptive field. This is the basis of our model. This change detection mechanism could drive our attention, allowing us to hit a curveball. If we are about to hit a baseball, what information extracted by our HVS tells us where to swing? Physical human features such as faces, irises, and fingerprints have been successfully used for identification (Biometrics) for decades, recently including voice and walking style for identification from further away. Biologically, humans must use a change detection strategy to achieve an ordered sparseness and use a sigmoid threshold for noisy measurements in our Hetero-Associative Memory [HAM] classifier for fault tolerant recall. Human biometrics is dynamic, and therefore involves more than just the surface, requiring a 3 dimensional measurement (i.e. Daugman/Gabor iris features). Such a measurement can be achieved using the partial coherence of a laser's reflection from a 3-D biometric surface, creating more degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) to meet the Army's challenge of distant Biometrics. Thus, one might be able to increase the standoff loss of less distinguished degrees of freedom (DOF).

  18. The selectivity of responses to red-green colour and achromatic contrast in the human visual cortex: an fMRI adaptation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Kathy T; Chang, Dorita H F; Hess, Robert F

    2015-12-01

    There is controversy as to how responses to colour in the human brain are organized within the visual pathways. A key issue is whether there are modular pathways that respond selectively to colour or whether there are common neural substrates for both colour and achromatic (Ach) contrast. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation to investigate the responses of early and extrastriate visual areas to colour and Ach contrast. High-contrast red-green (RG) and Ach sinewave rings (0.5 cycles/degree, 2 Hz) were used as both adapting stimuli and test stimuli in a block design. We found robust adaptation to RG or Ach contrast in all visual areas. Cross-adaptation between RG and Ach contrast occurred in all areas indicating the presence of integrated, colour and Ach responses. Notably, we revealed contrasting trends for the two test stimuli. For the RG test, unselective processing (robust adaptation to both RG and Ach contrast) was most evident in the early visual areas (V1 and V2), but selective responses, revealed as greater adaptation between the same stimuli than cross-adaptation between different stimuli, emerged in the ventral cortex, in V4 and VO in particular. For the Ach test, unselective responses were again most evident in early visual areas but Ach selectivity emerged in the dorsal cortex (V3a and hMT+). Our findings support a strong presence of integrated mechanisms for colour and Ach contrast across the visual hierarchy, with a progression towards selective processing in extrastriate visual areas. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Visual Graphics for Human Rights, Social Justice, Democracy and the Public Good

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanackchand, Vedant; Berman, Kim

    2012-01-01

    The value of human rights in a democratic South Africa is constantly threatened and often waived for nefarious reasons. We contend that the use of visual graphics among incoming university visual art students provides a mode of engagement that helps to inculcate awareness of human rights, social responsibility, and the public good in South African…

  20. A human visual based binarization technique for histological images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreyas, Kamath K. M.; Rajendran, Rahul; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos

    2017-05-01

    In the field of vision-based systems for object detection and classification, thresholding is a key pre-processing step. Thresholding is a well-known technique for image segmentation. Segmentation of medical images, such as Computed Axial Tomography (CAT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), X-Ray, Phase Contrast Microscopy, and Histological images, present problems like high variability in terms of the human anatomy and variation in modalities. Recent advances made in computer-aided diagnosis of histological images help facilitate detection and classification of diseases. Since most pathology diagnosis depends on the expertise and ability of the pathologist, there is clearly a need for an automated assessment system. Histological images are stained to a specific color to differentiate each component in the tissue. Segmentation and analysis of such images is problematic, as they present high variability in terms of color and cell clusters. This paper presents an adaptive thresholding technique that aims at segmenting cell structures from Haematoxylin and Eosin stained images. The thresholded result can further be used by pathologists to perform effective diagnosis. The effectiveness of the proposed method is analyzed by visually comparing the results to the state of art thresholding methods such as Otsu, Niblack, Sauvola, Bernsen, and Wolf. Computer simulations demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method in segmenting critical information.

  1. Multiscale color invariants based on the human visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderley, J F; Fisher, M H

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes a new representation for color texture using a set of multiscale illuminant invariant features. The approach was specifically developed to investigate the feasibility of using machine vision to automatically monitor populations of animal species in ecologically sensitive regions, such as the Amazon Forest. The approach uses a combination of Finlayson's (1994) color angle idea and Gabor multichannel filters and was inspired by the multichannel model of the human visual system (HVS). Using a database of color textures from three species of Amazonian monkey, and also a previously published reference database of color regions, we show that the approach performs better than methods based on color angles or Gabor filters alone. The Monkey database was compiled from texture segments extracted from a video of the Amazon Forest using a spatio-temporal segmentation algorithm. The approach is evaluated by applying two different classification tests in order to measure the quality of the recognition features root mean square (RMS) analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis.

  2. Perception of biological motion in visual agnosia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huberle, Elisabeth; Rupek, Paul; Lappe, Markus; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2012-01-01

    ...") visual information processing pathway. Patients with brain damage of the ventral pathway typically present with signs of visual agnosia, the inability to identify and discriminate objects by visual exploration, but show normal perception...

  3. The Danish ventral hernia database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgstrand, Frederik; Jorgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The Danish Ventral Hernia Database (DVHD) provides national surveillance of current surgical practice and clinical postoperative outcomes. The intention is to reduce postoperative morbidity and hernia recurrence, evaluate new treatment strategies, and facilitate nationwide implementation...... of operations and is an excellent tool for observing changes over time, including adjustment of several confounders. This national database registry has impacted on clinical practice in Denmark and led to a high number of scientific publications in recent years....

  4. Visual and acoustic communication in non-human animals: a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    between communication in visual and auditory modalities, contrast the differences in how these systems are studied, and to encourage a broader approach within each. While the physical nature of acoustic and visual stimuli leads to divergent strategies for detection and processing, there are many similarities in the type of ...

  5. Deficits in Human Visual Spatial Attention Following Thalamic Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-20

    the CT scan findings at the time of initial testing seven weeks after the ictus . At that time he still manifested some psychomotor retardation and mild...visual neglect. At the time of retesting six months after the ictus , he was alert, lucid and subtle visual neglect was evident only on a letter

  6. Opposing Amygdala and Ventral Striatum Connectivity during Emotion Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Wolf, Daniel H.; Pinkham, Amy E.; Ruparel, Kosha; Elliott, Mark A.; Valdez, Jeffrey N.; Overton, Eve; Seubert, Janina; Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.; Loughead, James

    2011-01-01

    Lesion and electrophysiological studies in animals provide evidence of opposing functions for subcortical nuclei such as the amygdala and ventral striatum, but the implications of these findings for emotion identification in humans remain poorly described. Here we report a high-resolution fMRI study in a sample of 39 healthy subjects who performed…

  7. Ventral pallidum roles in reward and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kyle S; Tindell, Amy J; Aldridge, J Wayne; Berridge, Kent C

    2009-01-23

    In recent years the ventral pallidum has become a focus of great research interest as a mechanism of reward and incentive motivation. As a major output for limbic signals, the ventral pallidum was once associated primarily with motor functions rather than regarded as a reward structure in its own right. However, ample evidence now suggests that ventral pallidum function is a major mechanism of reward in the brain. We review data indicating that (1) an intact ventral pallidum is necessary for normal reward and motivation, (2) stimulated activation of ventral pallidum is sufficient to cause reward and motivation enhancements, and (3) activation patterns in ventral pallidum neurons specifically encode reward and motivation signals via phasic bursts of excitation to incentive and hedonic stimuli. We conclude that the ventral pallidum may serve as an important 'limbic final common pathway' for mesocorticolimbic processing of many rewards.

  8. Concurrent TMS-fMRI Reveals Interactions between Dorsal and Ventral Attentional Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leitao, Joana; Thielscher, Axel; Tuennerhoff, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    detected weak visual targets that were presented in the lower-left visual field on 50% of the trials. Further, we manipulated the presence/absence of task-irrelevant auditory signals. Critically, on each trial we applied 10 Hz bursts of four TMS (or Sham) pulses to the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). IPS......-TMS relative to Sham-TMS increased activation in the parietal cortex regardless of sensory stimulation, confirming the neural effectiveness of TMS stimulation. Visual targets increased activations in the anterior insula, a component of the ventral attentional system responsible for salience detection....... Conversely, they decreased activations in the ventral visual areas. Importantly, IPS-TMS abolished target-evoked activation increases in the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ) of the ventral attentional system, whereas it eliminated target-evoked activation decreases in the right fusiform. Our results...

  9. Distinct modulatory effects of satiety and sibutramine on brain responses to food images in humans: a double dissociation across hypothalamus, amygdala, and ventral striatum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fletcher, P.C.; Napolitano, A.; Skeggs, A.; Miller, S.R.; Delafont, B.; Cambridge, V.C.; de Wit, S.; Nathan, P.J.; Brooke, A.; O'Rahilly, S.; Farooqi, I.S.; Bullmore, E.T.

    2010-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore brain responses to food images in overweight humans, examining independently the impact of a prescan meal ("satiety") and the anti-obesity drug sibutramine, a serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor. We identified significantly

  10. Visual graphics for human rights, social justice, democracy and the public good

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedant Nanackchand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The value of human rights in a democratic South Africa is constantly threatened and often waived for nefarious reasons. We contend that the use of visual graphics among incoming university visual art students provides a mode of engagement that helps to inculcate awareness of human rights, social responsibility, and the public good in South African higher education. Visual graphics, the subject of the research project which forms a key component of a Masters dissertation by one of the authors, provides an opportunity to counter a noticeable decline in the students' response and sensitivity to the freedoms entrenched in the South African Bill of Rights. The article presents a study using an action research approach in the classroom between 2005-2010, in order to inculcate awareness of human rights among participating students and deepen their understanding of social responsibility. The method used involved an introduction to specific visual art curricular intervention projects which required incoming first-year students to develop visual responses to address selected human rights violations and, in their second year, to develop their visual voice in order to promote human rights advocacy through civic engagement. The critical outcomes impact positively on the use of graphic images in the curriculum as a visual methodology to re-insert the discourse of human rights as a basic tenet of constitutional democracy in higher education.

  11. Diffusion MRI properties of the human uncinate fasciculus correlate with the ability to learn visual associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Cibu; Avram, Alexandru; Pierpaoli, Carlo; Baker, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The uncinate fasciculus (UF) is a cortico-cortico white matter pathway that links the anterior temporal and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). In the monkey, transection of the UF causes significant impairments in learning conditional visual-visual associations, while object discrimination remains intact, suggesting an important role for the UF in mediating the learning of complex visual associations. Whether this functional role extends to the human UF has not been tested directly. Here, we used diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) and behavioral experiments to examine the relation between learning visual associations and the structural properties of the human UF. In a group of healthy adults, we segmented the UF and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) and derived dMRI measures of the structural properties of the two pathways. We also used a behavioral experiment adapted from the monkey studies to characterize the ability of these individuals to learn to associate a person's face with a group of specific scenes (conditional visual-visual association). We then tested whether the variability in the dMRI measures of the two pathways correlated with variability in the ability to rapidly learn the face-place associations. Our study suggests that in the human, the left UF may be important for mediating the rapid learning of conditional visual-visual associations whereas the right UF may play an important role in the immediate retrieval of visual-visual associations. These results provide preliminary evidence suggesting similarities and differences in the functional role of the UF in monkeys compared to humans. The findings presented here contribute to our understanding of the functional role of the UF in humans and the functional neuroanatomy of the brain networks involved in visual cognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Visualization of Large-Scale Narrative Data Describing Human Error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, William J; Robinson, Saul D; Belt, Stephen M

    2017-06-01

    Objective Introduced is a visual data exploration technique for compiling, reducing, organizing, visually rendering, and filtering text-based narratives for detailed analysis. Background The analysis of data sets provides an increasingly difficult problem. The method of visual representation is considered an effective tool in many applications. The focus of this study was to determine if a latent semantic analysis-based projection of narrative data into a geographic information systems software program provided a useful tool for reducing and organizing large sums of narrative data for analysis. Method This approach utilizes latent semantic analysis to reduce narratives to a high-dimensional vector, truncates the vector to a two-dimensional projection through application of isometric mapping, and then visually renders the result with geographic information systems software. This method is demonstrated on aviation self-reported safety narratives sourced from the Aviation Safety Reporting System. Results Thematic regions from the corpus are illustrated along with the first five topics identified. Conclusion Shown is the ability to assimilate a large number of narratives, identify contextual themes, recognize common events and outliers, and organize resultant topics. Application Large narrative-based data sets present in aviation and other domains may be visualized to facilitate efficient analysis, enhance comprehension, and improve safety.

  13. Inhibitory and facilitatory connectivity from ventral premotor to primary motor cortex in healthy humans at rest--a bifocal TMS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäumer, T; Schippling, S; Kroeger, J

    2009-01-01

    stimulation (TMS) to examine intrahemispheric connectivity between left PMv and M1 in humans. A conditioning stimulus (CS) was applied to PMv at intensities of 80% and 90% of active motor threshold (AMT) and 90% and 110% of resting motor threshold (RMT). A supra-threshold test stimulus (TS) was given 2, 4, 6....... SIGNIFICANCE: The fact that conditioning effects following PMd stimulation differ from those after PMv stimulation supports the concept that inputs from premotor cortices to M1 are functionally segregated....

  14. Human Factors Assessment of Vibration Effects on Visual Performance During Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Kritina

    2009-01-01

    The Human Factors Assessment of Vibration Effects on Visual Performance During Launch (Visual Performance) investigation will determine visual performance limits during operational vibration and g-loads on the Space Shuttle, specifically through the determination of minimum readable font size during ascent using planned Orion display formats. Research Summary: The aim of the Human Factors Assessment of Vibration Effects on Visual Performance during Launch (Visual Performance) investigation is to provide supplementary data to that collected by the Thrust Oscillation Seat Detailed Technical Objective (DTO) 695 (Crew Seat DTO) which will measure seat acceleration and vibration from one flight deck and two middeck seats during ascent. While the Crew Seat DTO data alone are important in terms of providing a measure of vibration and g-loading, human performance data are required to fully interpret the operational consequences of the vibration values collected during Space Shuttle ascent. During launch, crewmembers will be requested to view placards with varying font sizes and indicate the minimum readable size. In combination with the Crew Seat DTO, the Visual Performance investigation will: Provide flight-validated evidence that will be used to establish vibration limits for visual performance during combined vibration and linear g-loading. o Provide flight data as inputs to ongoing ground-based simulations, which will further validate crew visual performance under vibration loading in a controlled environment. o Provide vibration and performance metrics to help validate procedures for ground tests and analyses of seats, suits, displays and controls, and human-in-the-loop performance.

  15. Integration of motion responses underlying directional motion anisotropy in human early visual cortical areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, W.; van Wezel, Richard Jack Anton; Petridou, N.; Ramsey, N.F.; Raemaekers, M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent imaging studies have reported directional motion biases in human visual cortex when perceiving moving random dot patterns. It has been hypothesized that these biases occur as a result of the integration of motion detector activation along the path of motion in visual cortex. In this study we

  16. The predicting brain: anticipation of moving objects in human visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, W.

    2015-01-01

    The human brain is nearly constantly subjected to visual motion signals originating from a large variety of external sources. It is the job of the central nervous system to determine correspondence among visual motion input across spatially distant locations within certain time frames. In order to

  17. Predictions to motion stimuli in human early visual cortex : Effects of motion displacement on motion predictability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413971309; Ramsey, N. F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07313774X; Raemaekers, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31370709X

    2015-01-01

    Recently, several studies showed that fMRI BOLD responses to moving random dot stimuli are enhanced at the location of dot appearance, i.e., the motion trailing edge. Possibly, BOLD activity in human visual cortex reflects predictability of visual motion input. In the current study, we investigate

  18. Two eyes, one vision: binocular motion perception in human visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendregt, M.

    2016-01-01

    An important aspect of human vision is the fact that it is binocular, i.e. that we have two eyes. As a result, the brain nearly always receives two slightly different images of the same visual scene. Yet, we only perceive a single image and thus our brain has to actively combine the binocular visual

  19. Population activity in the human dorsal pathway predicts the accuracy of visual motion detection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donner, T.H.; Siegel, M.; Oostenveld, R.; Fries, P.; Bauer, M.; Engel, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    A person's ability to detect a weak visual target stimulus varies from one viewing to the next. We tested whether the trial-to-trial fluctuations of neural population activity in the human brain are related to the fluctuations of behavioral performance in a "yes-no" visual motion-detection task. We

  20. [Analytical model of readaptation of the human visual system after light exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, N D

    2003-01-01

    The process of readaptation of the human visual system is considered as the behavior of a follow-up system, with the brightness of the background being the control signal. The times of recovery of visual acuity calculated by the model are compared with the experimental data.

  1. Spatial vision meets spatial cognition: examining the effect of visual blur on human visually guided route learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, Megan E; Collin, Charles A

    2010-01-01

    Visual navigation is a task that involves processing two-dimensional light patterns on the retinas to obtain knowledge of how to move through a three-dimensional environment. Therefore, modifying the basic characteristics of the two-dimensional information provided to navigators should have important and informative effects on how they navigate. Despite this, few basic research studies have examined the effects of systematically modifying the available levels of spatial visual detail on navigation performance. In this study, we tested the effects of a range of visual blur levels--approximately equivalent to various degrees of low-pass spatial frequency filtering--on participants' visually guided route-learning performance using desktop virtual renderings of the Hebb-Williams mazes. Our findings show that the function of blur and time to finish the mazes follows a sigmoidal pattern, with the inflection point around +2 D of experienced defocus. This suggests that visually guided route learning is fairly robust to blur, with the threshold level being just above the limit for legal blindness. These findings have implications for models of route learning, as well as for practical situations in which humans must navigate under conditions of blur.

  2. Using a human cognition model in the creation of collaborative knowledge visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Tera Marie; Ribarsky, William

    2008-04-01

    This paper explores the basis and usefulness of a predictive model for the architecture of data and knowledge visualizations based on human higher-cognition, including human tendencies in reasoning heuristics and cognitive biases. The strengths and weakness of would-be human and computer collaborators are explored, and a model framework is outlined and discussed.

  3. The Connectome Visualization Utility: Software for Visualization of Human Brain Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LaPlante, R.A.; Douw, L.; Tang, W.; Stufflebeam, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    In analysis of the human connectome, the connectivity of the human brain is collected from multiple imaging modalities and analyzed using graph theoretical techniques. The dimensionality of human connectivity data is high, and making sense of the complex networks in connectomics requires

  4. A Visual Review of the Human Pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Ditte Høyer; Kilian, Mogens; Goodsell, David

    2017-01-01

    cycle in eight watercolor paintings. The paintings are done to a consistent nanometer scale based on currently available data from structural biology and proteomics. In this review article, the paintings are used to provide a visual review of protein synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall...

  5. Auditory-Visual Perception of Changing Distance by Human Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Andrews, Arlene S.; Lennon, Elizabeth M.

    1985-01-01

    Examines, in two experiments, 5-month-old infants' sensitivity to auditory-visual specification of distance and direction of movement. One experiment presented two films with soundtracks in either a match or mismatch condition; the second showed the two films side-by-side with a single soundtrack appropriate to one. Infants demonstrated visual…

  6. Visual and acoustic communication in non-human animals: a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Also, the research traditions in each tend to differ, with studies of mechanisms of acoustic communication tending to take a more reductionist tack often concentrating on single signal parameters, and studies of visual communication tending to be more concerned with multivariate signal arrays in natural environments and ...

  7. Visualizing the Anthropocene: Human Land Use History and Environmental Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard D. Periman

    2006-01-01

    The term “Anthropocene” defines the current, human-dominated, geological epoch of human-caused environmental influences. Some researchers believe that the beginning of this epoch coincides with the inception of the Industrial Revolution (Crutzen and Stoermer 2000). Research is revealing that humans have affected environments on global and local scales for millennia....

  8. Visual agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, R; Masjuan, J

    2016-03-01

    Visual agnosia is defined as an impairment of object recognition, in the absence of visual acuity or cognitive dysfunction that would explain this impairment. This condition is caused by lesions in the visual association cortex, sparing primary visual cortex. There are 2 main pathways that process visual information: the ventral stream, tasked with object recognition, and the dorsal stream, in charge of locating objects in space. Visual agnosia can therefore be divided into 2 major groups depending on which of the two streams is damaged. The aim of this article is to conduct a narrative review of the various visual agnosia syndromes, including recent developments in a number of these syndromes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  9. Human Occipital and Parietal GABA Selectively Influence Visual Perception of Orientation and Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chen; Sandberg, Kristian; Andersen, Lau Møller; Blicher, Jakob Udby; Rees, Geraint

    2017-09-13

    GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in human brain. The level of GABA varies substantially across individuals, and this variability is associated with interindividual differences in visual perception. However, it remains unclear whether the association between GABA level and visual perception reflects a general influence of visual inhibition or whether the GABA levels of different cortical regions selectively influence perception of different visual features. To address this, we studied how the GABA levels of parietal and occipital cortices related to interindividual differences in size, orientation, and brightness perception. We used visual contextual illusion as a perceptual assay since the illusion dissociates perceptual content from stimulus content and the magnitude of the illusion reflects the effect of visual inhibition. Across individuals, we observed selective correlations between the level of GABA and the magnitude of contextual illusion. Specifically, parietal GABA level correlated with size illusion magnitude but not with orientation or brightness illusion magnitude; in contrast, occipital GABA level correlated with orientation illusion magnitude but not with size or brightness illusion magnitude. Our findings reveal a region- and feature-dependent influence of GABA level on human visual perception. Parietal and occipital cortices contain, respectively, topographic maps of size and orientation preference in which neural responses to stimulus sizes and stimulus orientations are modulated by intraregional lateral connections. We propose that these lateral connections may underlie the selective influence of GABA on visual perception.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT GABA, the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in human visual system, varies substantially across individuals. This interindividual variability in GABA level is linked to interindividual differences in many aspects of visual perception. However, the widespread influence of GABA raises the

  10. Cross-Modal Sensory Integration of Visual-Tactile Motion Information: Instrument Design and Human Psychophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice M. K. Wong

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Information obtained from multiple sensory modalities, such as vision and touch, is integrated to yield a holistic percept. As a haptic approach usually involves cross-modal sensory experiences, it is necessary to develop an apparatus that can characterize how a biological system integrates visual-tactile sensory information as well as how a robotic device infers object information emanating from both vision and touch. In the present study, we develop a novel visual-tactile cross-modal integration stimulator that consists of an LED panel to present visual stimuli and a tactile stimulator with three degrees of freedom that can present tactile motion stimuli with arbitrary motion direction, speed, and indentation depth in the skin. The apparatus can present cross-modal stimuli in which the spatial locations of visual and tactile stimulations are perfectly aligned. We presented visual-tactile stimuli in which the visual and tactile directions were either congruent or incongruent, and human observers reported the perceived visual direction of motion. Results showed that perceived direction of visual motion can be biased by the direction of tactile motion when visual signals are weakened. The results also showed that the visual-tactile motion integration follows the rule of temporal congruency of multi-modal inputs, a fundamental property known for cross-modal integration.

  11. Cross-modal sensory integration of visual-tactile motion information: instrument design and human psychophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Ting-Yu; Lee, Tsung-Chi; Saha, Sudipta; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Gomez-Ramirez, Manuel; Chou, Shih-Wei; Wong, Alice M K

    2013-05-31

    Information obtained from multiple sensory modalities, such as vision and touch, is integrated to yield a holistic percept. As a haptic approach usually involves cross-modal sensory experiences, it is necessary to develop an apparatus that can characterize how a biological system integrates visual-tactile sensory information as well as how a robotic device infers object information emanating from both vision and touch. In the present study, we develop a novel visual-tactile cross-modal integration stimulator that consists of an LED panel to present visual stimuli and a tactile stimulator with three degrees of freedom that can present tactile motion stimuli with arbitrary motion direction, speed, and indentation depth in the skin. The apparatus can present cross-modal stimuli in which the spatial locations of visual and tactile stimulations are perfectly aligned. We presented visual-tactile stimuli in which the visual and tactile directions were either congruent or incongruent, and human observers reported the perceived visual direction of motion. Results showed that perceived direction of visual motion can be biased by the direction of tactile motion when visual signals are weakened. The results also showed that the visual-tactile motion integration follows the rule of temporal congruency of multi-modal inputs, a fundamental property known for cross-modal integration.

  12. Visualization of hierarchically structured information for human-computer interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Suh Hyun; Lee, J. K.; Choi, I. K.; Kye, S. C.; Lee, N. K. [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-11-01

    Visualization techniques can be used to support operator's information navigation tasks on the system especially consisting of an enormous volume of information, such as operating information display system and computerized operating procedure system in advanced control room of nuclear power plants. By offering an easy understanding environment of hierarchically structured information, these techniques can reduce the operator's supplementary navigation task load. As a result of that, operators can pay more attention on the primary tasks and ultimately improve the cognitive task performance. In this report, an interface was designed and implemented using hyperbolic visualization technique, which is expected to be applied as a means of optimizing operator's information navigation tasks. 15 refs., 19 figs., 32 tabs. (Author)

  13. Visualizing the site of drug action in living human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhara, Tetsuya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    PET is the only technique available to date to measure molecular interactions in vivo, but the basic mechanism of molecular interaction in vivo is not yet fully understood. However, PET can allow visualization of various phenomena which we can not observe with in vitro techniques. Progress in PET study will provide a new viewpoint for drug development and the study of molecular mechanism in the brain. (J.P.N.)

  14. Large-scale Contextual Effects in Early Human Visual Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Jun Joo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A commonly held view about neurons in early visual cortex is that they serve as localized feature detectors. Here, however, we demonstrate that the responses of neurons in early visual cortex are sensitive to global visual patterns. Using multiple methodologies–psychophysics, fMRI, and EEG–we measured neural responses to an oriented Gabor (“target” embedded in various orientation patterns. Specifically, we varied whether a central target deviated from its context by changing distant orientations while leaving the immediately neighboring flankers unchanged. The results of psychophysical contrast adaptation and fMRI experiments show that a target that deviates from its context results in more neural activity compared to a target that is grouped into an alternating pattern. For example, the neural response to a vertically oriented target was greater when it deviated from the orientation of flankers (HHVHH compared to when it was grouped into an alternating pattern (VHVHV. We then found that this pattern-sensitive response manifests in the earliest sensory component of the event-related potential to the target. Finally, in a forced-choice classification task of “noise” stimuli, perceptions are biased to “see” an orientation that deviates from its context. Our results show that neurons in early visual cortex are sensitive to large-scale global patterns in images in a way that is more sophisticated than localized feature detection. Our results showing a reduced neural response to statistical redundancies in images is not only optimal from an information theory perspective but also takes into account known energy constraints in neural processing.

  15. Human vision, visual processing, and digital display; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 18-20, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogowitz, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on human vision, visual processing, and digital display are presented. The general topics considered include: physics and psychophysics of displayed information; visual performance and image quality; vision-based algorithms for image processing; visual sampling, compression, and representation; texture, pattern, and motion; color perception, coding, and representation. Some individual topics discussed are: respective fields and visual representations; psychophysical rating of image compression techniques; new paradigm for testing human and machine motion perception; motion perception model with interactions between spatial frequency channels; application of visual psychophysics to the design of video systems for use in space; unified model for human color perception and visual adaptation.

  16. Rapid discrimination of visual scene content in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anokhin, Andrey P; Golosheykin, Simon; Sirevaag, Erik; Kristjansson, Sean; Rohrbaugh, John W; Heath, Andrew C

    2006-06-06

    The rapid evaluation of complex visual environments is critical for an organism's adaptation and survival. Previous studies have shown that emotionally significant visual scenes, both pleasant and unpleasant, elicit a larger late positive wave in the event-related brain potential (ERP) than emotionally neutral pictures. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether neuroelectric responses elicited by complex pictures discriminate between specific, biologically relevant contents of the visual scene and to determine how early in the picture processing this discrimination occurs. Subjects (n = 264) viewed 55 color slides differing in both scene content and emotional significance. No categorical judgments or responses were required. Consistent with previous studies, we found that emotionally arousing pictures, regardless of their content, produce a larger late positive wave than neutral pictures. However, when pictures were further categorized by content, anterior ERP components in a time window between 200 and 600 ms following stimulus onset showed a high selectivity for pictures with erotic content compared to other pictures regardless of their emotional valence (pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant) or emotional arousal. The divergence of ERPs elicited by erotic and non-erotic contents started at 185 ms post-stimulus in the fronto-central midline region, with a later onset in parietal regions. This rapid, selective, and content-specific processing of erotic materials and its dissociation from other pictures (including emotionally positive pictures) suggests the existence of a specialized neural network for prioritized processing of a distinct category of biologically relevant stimuli with high adaptive and evolutionary significance.

  17. Human Mobility Monitoring in Very Low Resolution Visual Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyan Bo Bo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an automated system for monitoring mobility patterns using a network of very low resolution visual sensors (30 × 30 pixels. The use of very low resolution sensors reduces privacy concern, cost, computation requirement and power consumption. The core of our proposed system is a robust people tracker that uses low resolution videos provided by the visual sensor network. The distributed processing architecture of our tracking system allows all image processing tasks to be done on the digital signal controller in each visual sensor. In this paper, we experimentally show that reliable tracking of people is possible using very low resolution imagery. We also compare the performance of our tracker against a state-of-the-art tracking method and show that our method outperforms. Moreover, the mobility statistics of tracks such as total distance traveled and average speed derived from trajectories are compared with those derived from ground truth given by Ultra-Wide Band sensors. The results of this comparison show that the trajectories from our system are accurate enough to obtain useful mobility statistics.

  18. Semi-automatic measurement of visual verticality perception in humans reveals a new category of visual field dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R. Kaleff

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous assessment of verticality by means of rod and rod and frame tests indicated that human subjects can be more (field dependent or less (field independent influenced by a frame placed around a tilted rod. In the present study we propose a new approach to these tests. The judgment of visual verticality (rod test was evaluated in 50 young subjects (28 males, ranging in age from 20 to 27 years by randomly projecting a luminous rod tilted between -18 and +18° (negative values indicating left tilts onto a tangent screen. In the rod and frame test the rod was displayed within a luminous fixed frame tilted at +18 or -18°. Subjects were instructed to verbally indicate the rod’s inclination direction (forced choice. Visual dependency was estimated by means of a Visual Index calculated from rod and rod and frame test values. Based on this index, volunteers were classified as field dependent, intermediate and field independent. A fourth category was created within the field-independent subjects for whom the amount of correct guesses in the rod and frame test exceeded that of the rod test, thus indicating improved performance when a surrounding frame was present. In conclusion, the combined use of subjective visual vertical and the rod and frame test provides a specific and reliable form of evaluation of verticality in healthy subjects and might be of use to probe changes in brain function after central or peripheral lesions.

  19. The Relation of Visual Signs In The Narrative Structure of MTV Exit Human Trafficking Campaign Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winny Gunarti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Human trafficking is a violation of the human rights. One of the campaign to fight against this crime takes the form of a digital campaign that aired on television and internet.   This study discusses the narrative structure of human trafficking campaign video from non-profit organization MTV Exit in 2012. This video campaign combines art collage and graphic art in its narrative structure. Nonverbal visual elements displayed in the form of a digital photo collage with animated illustrations setting. We consider this video campaign quite interesting as it is visually inform the public about the importance of safe migration through the visual signs in the narrative structure. This study analyzes qualitatively the relation of nonverbal visual signs in the narrative collage and illustration. Denotative and connotative analysis with structural semiotics approach is needed to understand the meaning of visual signs in the context of humans as cultural beings in their communities. This study is expected to be a model example of visual communication campaigns that can foster public awareness of the issue of human trafficking, especially for young women and children as young generation.

  20. Comparison of dogs and humans in visual scanning of social interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Törnqvist, Heini; Somppi, Sanni; Koskela, Aija; Krause, Christina M.; Vainio, Outi; Kujala, Miiamaaria V.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated similarities in gazing behaviour of dogs and humans, but comparisons under similar conditions are rare, and little is known about dogs' visual attention to social scenes. Here, we recorded the eye gaze of dogs while they viewed images containing two humans or dogs either interacting socially or facing away: the results were compared with equivalent data measured from humans. Furthermore, we compared the gazing behaviour of two dog and two human populations w...

  1. Direct tactile stimulation of dorsal occipito-temporal cortex in a visual agnosic

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Harriet A.; Humphreys, Glyn W.

    2009-01-01

    The human occipito-temporal cortex is preferentially activated by images of objects as opposed to scrambled images [1]. Touching objects (versus textures) also activates this region [2–10]. We used neuropsychological fMRI to probe whether dorsal regions of the lateral occipital cortex (LO) are activated in tactile recognition without mediation through visual recognition. We tested a patient (HJA) with visual agnosia due to bilateral lesions of the ventral occipito-temporal cortex but spared d...

  2. Laparoscopic Ventral and Incisional Hernia Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenaar, E.B.

    2009-01-01

    Ventral and incisional hernia repair is one of the most frequently performed operations in daily surgical practice. Laparoscopic ventral and incisional hernia repair (LVIHR) is gaining increasing adoption in surgical practice. It has theoretical advantages but improvements in technique can still be

  3. Disorder of higher visual function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Jason J S

    2011-02-01

    Both monkey and human neuroimaging studies show that visual processing beyond the striate cortex involves a highly complex network of regions with modular functions. Lesions within this network lead to specific clinical syndromes. In this review we discuss studies on blindsight, which is the ability of remaining regions to support vision in the absence of striate cortex or visual awareness, recent work on 'ventral stream' syndromes such as object agnosia, alexia, prosopagnosia, and topographagnosia, which follow damage to medial occipitotemporal structures, and simultanagnosia, the classic 'dorsal stream' deficit related to bilateral occipitoparietal lesions. We highlight work on the anatomic basis of blindsight, the recent description of the new disorder developmental topographic disorientation, and studies contrasting global and local perception in simultanagnosia. These studies advance our understanding of the mechanisms of complex visual processing and provide an important neuropsychological complement to our expanding knowledge about vision from functional neuroimaging.

  4. SVA: software for annotating and visualizing sequenced human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Dongliang; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K; Shianna, Kevin V; He, Min; Pelak, Kimberly; Heinzen, Erin L; Need, Anna C; Cirulli, Elizabeth T; Maia, Jessica M; Dickson, Samuel P; Zhu, Mingfu; Singh, Abanish; Allen, Andrew S; Goldstein, David B

    2011-07-15

    Here we present Sequence Variant Analyzer (SVA), a software tool that assigns a predicted biological function to variants identified in next-generation sequencing studies and provides a browser to visualize the variants in their genomic contexts. SVA also provides for flexible interaction with software implementing variant association tests allowing users to consider both the bioinformatic annotation of identified variants and the strength of their associations with studied traits. We illustrate the annotation features of SVA using two simple examples of sequenced genomes that harbor Mendelian mutations. Freely available on the web at http://www.svaproject.org.

  5. Bioinformatic analysis of Rp1 gene causing visual disparity in humans

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited diseases that damage rod and cone cells located in human retina. A nonsense mutation R677X has been identified in RP1 gene which not only causes mRNA degradation but also results in truncated protein production leading towards visual disparity in humans. Secondary ...

  6. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina using optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, S S; Jones, S M; Chen, D C; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S; Laut, S P; Werner, J S

    2006-01-05

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sees the human retina sharply with adaptive optics. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina at micrometer-scale resolution is possible by enhancing Fourier-domain optical-coherence tomography with adaptive optics, which compensate for the eye's optical aberrations.

  7. Visual graphics for human rights, social justice, democracy and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    article presents a first- and second-year curriculum intervention conducted ... of active citizenship that can be integrated into longer term higher education experience. ..... on the need for social justice in a society fraught with class and human.

  8. Semantics of the Visual Environment Encoded in Parahippocampal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Michael F; Price, Amy Rose; Peelle, Jonathan E; Grossman, Murray

    2016-03-01

    Semantic representations capture the statistics of experience and store this information in memory. A fundamental component of this memory system is knowledge of the visual environment, including knowledge of objects and their associations. Visual semantic information underlies a range of behaviors, from perceptual categorization to cognitive processes such as language and reasoning. Here we examine the neuroanatomic system that encodes visual semantics. Across three experiments, we found converging evidence indicating that knowledge of verbally mediated visual concepts relies on information encoded in a region of the ventral-medial temporal lobe centered on parahippocampal cortex. In an fMRI study, this region was strongly engaged by the processing of concepts relying on visual knowledge but not by concepts relying on other sensory modalities. In a study of patients with the semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (semantic dementia), atrophy that encompassed this region was associated with a specific impairment in verbally mediated visual semantic knowledge. Finally, in a structural study of healthy adults from the fMRI experiment, gray matter density in this region related to individual variability in the processing of visual concepts. The anatomic location of these findings aligns with recent work linking the ventral-medial temporal lobe with high-level visual representation, contextual associations, and reasoning through imagination. Together, this work suggests a critical role for parahippocampal cortex in linking the visual environment with knowledge systems in the human brain.

  9. Comparison of visual sensitivity to human and object motion in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Martha D; Delmolino, Lara; Tanaka, James W; Shiffrar, Maggie

    2010-08-01

    Successful social behavior requires the accurate detection of other people's movements. Consistent with this, typical observers demonstrate enhanced visual sensitivity to human movement relative to equally complex, nonhuman movement [e.g., Pinto & Shiffrar, 2009]. A psychophysical study investigated visual sensitivity to human motion relative to object motion in observers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants viewed point-light depictions of a moving person and, for comparison, a moving tractor and discriminated between coherent and scrambled versions of these stimuli in unmasked and masked displays. There were three groups of participants: young adults with ASD, typically developing young adults, and typically developing children. Across masking conditions, typical observers showed enhanced visual sensitivity to human movement while observers in the ASD group did not. Because the human body is an inherently social stimulus, this result is consistent with social brain theories [e.g., Pelphrey & Carter, 2008; Schultz, 2005] and suggests that the visual systems of individuals with ASD may not be tuned for the detection of socially relevant information such as the presence of another person. Reduced visual sensitivity to human movements could compromise important social behaviors including, for example, gesture comprehension.

  10. Human posture classification for intelligent visual surveillance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rababaah, Haroun; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2008-04-01

    Intelligent surveillance systems (ISS) have gained a significant attention in recent years due to the nationwide security concerns. Some of the important applications of ISS include: homeland security, border monitoring, battlefield intelligence, and sensitive facility monitoring. The essential requirements of an ISS include: (1) multi-modality multi-sensor data and information fusion, (2) communication networking, (3) distributed data/information processing,(4) Automatic target recognition and tracking, (5) Scenario profiling from discrete correlated/uncorrelated events, (6) Context-based situation reasoning, and (7) Collaborative resource sharing and decision support systems. In this paper we have addressed the problem of humanposture classification in crowded urban terrain environments. Certain range of human postures can be attributed to different suspicious acts of intruders in a constrained environment. By proper time analysis of human trespassers' postures in an environment, it would be possible to identify and differentiate malicious intention of the trespassers from other normal human behaviors. Specifically in this paper, we have proposed an image processing-based approach for characterization of five different human postures including: standing, bending, crawling, carrying a heavy object, and holding a long object. Two approaches were introduced to address the problem: template-matching and Hamming Adaptive Neural Network (HANN) classifiers. The former approach performs human posture characterization via binary-profile projection and applies a correlation-based method for classification of human postures. The latter approach is based a HANN technique. For training of the neural, the posture-patterns are initially compressed, thresholded, and serialized. The binary posture-pattern arrays were then used for training of the HANN. The comparative performance evaluation of both approaches the same set of training and testing examples were used to measure

  11. Ventral Tegmental Area Afferents and Drug-Dependent Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Idaira eOliva; Matthew eWanat

    2016-01-01

    Drug-related behaviors in both humans and rodents are commonly thought to arise from aberrant learning processes. Preclinical studies demonstrate that the acquisition and expression of many drug-dependent behaviors involves the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a midbrain structure comprised of dopamine, GABA, and glutamate neurons. Drug experience alters the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input onto VTA dopamine neurons, suggesting a critical role for VTA afferents in mediating the effects o...

  12. Auditory and visual sequence learning in humans and monkeys using an artificial grammar learning paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Alice E; Petkov, Christopher I; Wilson, Benjamin

    2017-07-05

    Language flexibly supports the human ability to communicate using different sensory modalities, such as writing and reading in the visual modality and speaking and listening in the auditory domain. Although it has been argued that nonhuman primate communication abilities are inherently multisensory, direct behavioural comparisons between human and nonhuman primates are scant. Artificial grammar learning (AGL) tasks and statistical learning experiments can be used to emulate ordering relationships between words in a sentence. However, previous comparative work using such paradigms has primarily investigated sequence learning within a single sensory modality. We used an AGL paradigm to evaluate how humans and macaque monkeys learn and respond to identically structured sequences of either auditory or visual stimuli. In the auditory and visual experiments, we found that both species were sensitive to the ordering relationships between elements in the sequences. Moreover, the humans and monkeys produced largely similar response patterns to the visual and auditory sequences, indicating that the sequences are processed in comparable ways across the sensory modalities. These results provide evidence that human sequence processing abilities stem from an evolutionarily conserved capacity that appears to operate comparably across the sensory modalities in both human and nonhuman primates. The findings set the stage for future neurobiological studies to investigate the multisensory nature of these sequencing operations in nonhuman primates and how they compare to related processes in humans. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Human visual perceptual organization beats thinking on speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Helm, Peter A

    2017-05-01

    What is the degree to which knowledge influences visual perceptual processes? This question, which is central to the seeing-versus-thinking debate in cognitive science, is often discussed using examples claimed to be proof of one stance or another. It has, however, also been muddled by the usage of different and unclear definitions of perception. Here, for the well-defined process of perceptual organization, I argue that including speed (or efficiency) into the equation opens a new perspective on the limits of top-down influences of thinking on seeing. While the input of the perceptual organization process may be modifiable and its output enrichable, the process itself seems so fast (or efficient) that thinking hardly has time to intrude and is effective mostly after the fact.

  14. Can Human Visual Surveillance be Improved with Intent Recognition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Tavakkoli

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In video surveillance applications, trained operators watch a number of screens simultaneously to detect potential security threats. Looking for such events in real time, in multiple videos simultaneously, is cognitively challenging for human operators. This study suggests that there is a significant need to use an automated video analysis system to aid human perception of security events in video surveillance applications. In this paper the performance of humans in observing a simulated environment is studied and quantified. Furthermore, this paper proposes an automated mechanism to detect events before they occur by means of an automated intent recognition system. Upon the detection of a potential event the proposed mechanism communicates the location of such potential threat to the human operator to redirect attention to the areas of interest within the video. Studying the improvements achieved by applying the intent recognition into the simulated video surveillance application in a two phase trial supports the need for an automated event detection approach in improving human video surveillance performance. Moreover, this paper presents a comparison of the performance in video surveillance with and without the aid of the intent recognition mechanism.

  15. Vestibular Activation Differentially Modulates Human Early Visual Cortex and V5/MT Excitability and Response Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Lopez, Jessica; Arshad, Qadeer; Schultz, Simon R; Walsh, Vincent; Yousif, Nada

    2013-01-01

    Head movement imposes the additional burdens on the visual system of maintaining visual acuity and determining the origin of retinal image motion (i.e., self-motion vs. object-motion). Although maintaining visual acuity during self-motion is effected by minimizing retinal slip via the brainstem vestibular-ocular reflex, higher order visuovestibular mechanisms also contribute. Disambiguating self-motion versus object-motion also invokes higher order mechanisms, and a cortical visuovestibular reciprocal antagonism is propounded. Hence, one prediction is of a vestibular modulation of visual cortical excitability and indirect measures have variously suggested none, focal or global effects of activation or suppression in human visual cortex. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced phosphenes to probe cortical excitability, we observed decreased V5/MT excitability versus increased early visual cortex (EVC) excitability, during vestibular activation. In order to exclude nonspecific effects (e.g., arousal) on cortical excitability, response specificity was assessed using information theory, specifically response entropy. Vestibular activation significantly modulated phosphene response entropy for V5/MT but not EVC, implying a specific vestibular effect on V5/MT responses. This is the first demonstration that vestibular activation modulates human visual cortex excitability. Furthermore, using information theory, not previously used in phosphene response analysis, we could distinguish between a specific vestibular modulation of V5/MT excitability from a nonspecific effect at EVC. PMID:22291031

  16. Statistical analysis of human visual impressions on morphological image manipulation of gray scale textures

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Liang; Asano, Akira; Asano-Muraki, Chie

    2010-01-01

    A method of evaluating human visual impressions of gray scale textures using morphological manipulation is proposed. To study the effects of textural features on human Kansei, we introduced a texture analysis method based on mathematical morphology. Kansei is a Japanese word for sensibility or emotion. Kansei engineering is an approach to connect human sensibility with engineering applications. The proposed method allows us to manipulate global and local properties of a texture separately. Va...

  17. Tracking blood vessels in human forearms using visual servoing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savarimuthu, Thiusius Rajeeth; Ellekilde, Lars-Peter; Hansen, Morten

    compensation. By using images taken with near-infrared light to locate the blood vessels in a human forearm and using the same images to detects movements of the arm, this paper shows that it is possible make a robot arm, potentially equipped with a needle for drawing the blood, compensate for the movements...

  18. Visual graphics for human rights, social justice, democracy and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The theoretical positioning of this article also draws from a framework that advocates for teaching a ... Evans (cited in. Abdi & Schultz, 2008:25-37) provides a qualitative and historical analysis of the “human rights ... mous participants) from the standpoint of aesthetic, conceptual and empirical perspectives. Stage four of the ...

  19. The visual development of hand-centered receptive fields in a neural network model of the primate visual system trained with experimentally recorded human gaze changes

    OpenAIRE

    Galeazzi, Juan M.; Navajas, Joaquin; Mender, Bedeho M. W.; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Minini, Loredana; Stringer, Simon M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurons have been found in the primate brain that respond to objects in specific locations in hand-centered coordinates. A key theoretical challenge is to explain how such hand-centered neuronal responses may develop through visual experience. In this paper we show how hand-centered visual receptive fields can develop using an artificial neural network model, VisNet, of the primate visual system when driven by gaze changes recorded from human test subjects as they completed a jigsaw....

  20. Breaking Snake Camouflage: Humans Detect Snakes More Accurately than Other Animals under Less Discernible Visual Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Kawai

    Full Text Available Humans and non-human primates are extremely sensitive to snakes as exemplified by their ability to detect pictures of snakes more quickly than those of other animals. These findings are consistent with the Snake Detection Theory, which hypothesizes that as predators, snakes were a major source of evolutionary selection that favored expansion of the visual system of primates for rapid snake detection. Many snakes use camouflage to conceal themselves from both prey and their own predators, making it very challenging to detect them. If snakes have acted as a selective pressure on primate visual systems, they should be more easily detected than other animals under difficult visual conditions. Here we tested whether humans discerned images of snakes more accurately than those of non-threatening animals (e.g., birds, cats, or fish under conditions of less perceptual information by presenting a series of degraded images with the Random Image Structure Evolution technique (interpolation of random noise. We find that participants recognize mosaic images of snakes, which were regarded as functionally equivalent to camouflage, more accurately than those of other animals under dissolved conditions. The present study supports the Snake Detection Theory by showing that humans have a visual system that accurately recognizes snakes under less discernible visual conditions.

  1. Breaking Snake Camouflage: Humans Detect Snakes More Accurately than Other Animals under Less Discernible Visual Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Nobuyuki; He, Hongshen

    2016-01-01

    Humans and non-human primates are extremely sensitive to snakes as exemplified by their ability to detect pictures of snakes more quickly than those of other animals. These findings are consistent with the Snake Detection Theory, which hypothesizes that as predators, snakes were a major source of evolutionary selection that favored expansion of the visual system of primates for rapid snake detection. Many snakes use camouflage to conceal themselves from both prey and their own predators, making it very challenging to detect them. If snakes have acted as a selective pressure on primate visual systems, they should be more easily detected than other animals under difficult visual conditions. Here we tested whether humans discerned images of snakes more accurately than those of non-threatening animals (e.g., birds, cats, or fish) under conditions of less perceptual information by presenting a series of degraded images with the Random Image Structure Evolution technique (interpolation of random noise). We find that participants recognize mosaic images of snakes, which were regarded as functionally equivalent to camouflage, more accurately than those of other animals under dissolved conditions. The present study supports the Snake Detection Theory by showing that humans have a visual system that accurately recognizes snakes under less discernible visual conditions.

  2. ACES Human Sexuality Training Network Handbook. A Compilation of Sexuality Course Syllabi and Audio-Visual Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association for Counseling and Development, Alexandria, VA.

    This handbook contains a compilation of human sexuality course syllabi and audio-visual materials. It was developed to enable sex educators to identify and contact one another, to compile Human Sexuality Course Syllabi from across the country, and to bring to attention audio-visual materials which are available for teaching Human Sexuality…

  3. Data Mining and Visualization of Large Human Behavior Data Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuttone, Andrea

    and credit card transactions – have provided us new sources for studying our behavior. In particular smartphones have emerged as new tools for collecting data about human activity, thanks to their sensing capabilities and their ubiquity. This thesis investigates the question of what we can learn about human...... behavior from this rich and pervasive mobile sensing data. In the first part, we describe a large-scale data collection deployment collecting high-resolution data for over 800 students at the Technical University of Denmark using smartphones, including location, social proximity, calls and SMS. We provide...... an overview of the technical infrastructure, the experimental design, and the privacy measures. The second part investigates the usage of this mobile sensing data for understanding personal behavior. We describe two large-scale user studies on the deployment of self-tracking apps, in order to understand...

  4. Preliminary Investigation of Visual Attention to Human Figures in Photographs: Potential Considerations for the Design of Aided AAC Visual Scene Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Krista M.; Light, Janice

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Many individuals with complex communication needs may benefit from visual aided augmentative and alternative communication systems. In visual scene displays (VSDs), language concepts are embedded into a photograph of a naturalistic event. Humans play a central role in communication development and might be important elements in VSDs.…

  5. Simple control-theoretic models of human steering activity in visually guided vehicle control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Ronald A.

    1991-01-01

    A simple control theoretic model of human steering or control activity in the lateral-directional control of vehicles such as automobiles and rotorcraft is discussed. The term 'control theoretic' is used to emphasize the fact that the model is derived from a consideration of well-known control system design principles as opposed to psychological theories regarding egomotion, etc. The model is employed to emphasize the 'closed-loop' nature of tasks involving the visually guided control of vehicles upon, or in close proximity to, the earth and to hypothesize how changes in vehicle dynamics can significantly alter the nature of the visual cues which a human might use in such tasks.

  6. Application of local binary pattern and human visual Fibonacci texture features for classification different medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghavi, Foram; Agaian, Sos

    2017-05-01

    The goal of this paper is to (a) test the nuclei based Computer Aided Cancer Detection system using Human Visual based system on the histopathology images and (b) Compare the results of the proposed system with the Local Binary Pattern and modified Fibonacci -p pattern systems. The system performance is evaluated using different parameters such as accuracy, specificity, sensitivity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value on 251 prostate histopathology images. The accuracy of 96.69% was observed for cancer detection using the proposed human visual based system compared to 87.42% and 94.70% observed for Local Binary patterns and the modified Fibonacci p patterns.

  7. [Multimedia (visual collaboration) brings true nature of human life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, N

    2000-03-01

    Videoconferencing system, high-quality visual collaboration, is bringing Multimedia into a society. Multimedia, high quality media such as TV broadcast, looks expensive because it requires broadband network with 100-200 Mpbs bandwidth or 3,700 analog telephone lines. However, thanks to the existing digital-line called N-ISDN (Narrow Integrated Service Digital Network) and PictureTel's audio/video compression technologies, it becomes far less expensive. N-ISDN provides 128 Kbps bandwidth, over twice wider than analog line. PictureTel's technology instantly compress audio/video signal into 1/1,000 in size. This means, with ISDN and PictureTel technology. Multimedia is materialized over even single ISDN line. This will allow doctor to remotely meet face-to-face with a medical specialist or patients to interview, conduct physical examinations, review records, and prescribe treatments. Bonding multiple ISDN lines will further improve video quality that enables remote surgery. Surgeon can perform an operation on internal organ by projecting motion video from Endoscope's CCD camera to large display monitor. Also, PictureTel provides advanced technologies of eliminating background noise generated by surgical knives or scalpels during surgery. This will allow sound of the breath or heartbeat be clearly transmitted to the remote site. Thus, Multimedia eliminates the barrier of distance, enabling people to be just at home, to be anywhere in the world, to undergo up-to-date medical treatment by expertise. This will reduce medical cost and allow people to live in the suburbs, in less pollution, closer to the nature. People will foster more open and collaborative environment by participating in local activities. Such community-oriented life-style will atone for mass consumption, materialistic economy in the past, then bring true happiness and welfare into our life after all.

  8. Modulation of visual processing by attention and emotion: windows on causal interactions between human brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuilleumier, Patrik; Driver, Jon

    2007-05-29

    Visual processing is not determined solely by retinal inputs. Attentional modulation can arise when the internal attentional state (current task) of the observer alters visual processing of the same stimuli. This can influence visual cortex, boosting neural responses to an attended stimulus. Emotional modulation can also arise, when affective properties (emotional significance) of stimuli, rather than their strictly visual properties, influence processing. This too can boost responses in visual cortex, as for fear-associated stimuli. Both attentional and emotional modulation of visual processing may reflect distant influences upon visual cortex, exerted by brain structures outside the visual system per se. Hence, these modulations may provide windows onto causal interactions between distant but interconnected brain regions. We review recent evidence, noting both similarities and differences between attentional and emotional modulation. Both can affect visual cortex, but can reflect influences from different regions, such as fronto-parietal circuits versus the amygdala. Recent work on this has developed new approaches for studying causal influences between human brain regions that may be useful in other cognitive domains. The new methods include application of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) measures in brain-damaged patients to study distant functional impacts of their focal lesions, and use of transcranial magnetic stimulation concurrently with fMRI or EEG in the normal brain. Cognitive neuroscience is now moving beyond considering the putative functions of particular brain regions, as if each operated in isolation, to consider, instead, how distinct brain regions (such as visual cortex, parietal or frontal regions, or amygdala) may mutually influence each other in a causal manner.

  9. Visual artificial grammar learning: comparative research on humans, kea (Nestor notabilis) and pigeons (Columba livia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stobbe, Nina; Westphal-Fitch, Gesche; Aust, Ulrike; Fitch, W. Tecumseh

    2012-01-01

    Artificial grammar learning (AGL) provides a useful tool for exploring rule learning strategies linked to general purpose pattern perception. To be able to directly compare performance of humans with other species with different memory capacities, we developed an AGL task in the visual domain. Presenting entire visual patterns simultaneously instead of sequentially minimizes the amount of required working memory. This approach allowed us to evaluate performance levels of two bird species, kea (Nestor notabilis) and pigeons (Columba livia), in direct comparison to human participants. After being trained to discriminate between two types of visual patterns generated by rules at different levels of computational complexity and presented on a computer screen, birds and humans received further training with a series of novel stimuli that followed the same rules, but differed in various visual features from the training stimuli. Most avian and all human subjects continued to perform well above chance during this initial generalization phase, suggesting that they were able to generalize learned rules to novel stimuli. However, detailed testing with stimuli that violated the intended rules regarding the exact number of stimulus elements indicates that neither bird species was able to successfully acquire the intended pattern rule. Our data suggest that, in contrast to humans, these birds were unable to master a simple rule above the finite-state level, even with simultaneous item presentation and despite intensive training. PMID:22688635

  10. Primary ventral or groin hernia in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oma, Erling; Bay-Nielsen, M; Jensen, K K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prevalence, management, and risk of emergency operation for primary ventral or groin hernia in pregnancy are unknown. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalences of primary ventral or groin hernia in pregnancy and the potential risks for elective and emergency repair...... was conducted to identify patients registered with a primary ventral or groin hernia in pregnancy. Follow-up was conducted by review of medical record notes within the Capital Region of Denmark supplemented with structured telephone interviews on indication. RESULTS: In total, 20,714 pregnant women were...... included in the study cohort. Seventeen (0.08%) and 25 (0.12%) women were registered with a primary ventral and groin hernia, respectively. None underwent elective or emergency repair in pregnancy, and all had uncomplicated childbirth. In 10 women, the groin bulge disappeared spontaneously after delivery...

  11. Visualization of risk of radiogenic second cancer in the organs and tissues of the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Mirkovic, Dragan; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2015-04-28

    Radiogenic second cancer is a common late effect in long term cancer survivors. Currently there are few methods or tools available to visually evaluate the spatial distribution of risks of radiogenic late effects in the human body. We developed a risk visualization method and demonstrated it for radiogenic second cancers in tissues and organs of one patient treated with photon volumetric modulated arc therapy and one patient treated with proton craniospinal irradiation. Treatment plans were generated using radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPS) and dose information was obtained from TPS. Linear non-threshold risk coefficients for organs at risk of second cancer incidence were taken from the Biological Effects of Ionization Radiation VII report. Alternative risk models including linear exponential model and linear plateau model were also examined. The predicted absolute lifetime risk distributions were visualized together with images of the patient anatomy. The risk distributions of second cancer for the two patients were visually presented. The risk distributions varied with tissue, dose, dose-risk model used, and the risk distribution could be similar to or very different from the dose distribution. Our method provides a convenient way to directly visualize and evaluate the risks of radiogenic second cancer in organs and tissues of the human body. In the future, visual assessment of risk distribution could be an influential determinant for treatment plan scoring.

  12. Distributed Neural Plasticity for Shape Learning in the Human Visual Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Lisa R; Sarkheil, Pegah; Welchman, Andrew E

    2005-01-01

    Expertise in recognizing objects in cluttered scenes is a critical skill for our interactions in complex environments and is thought to develop with learning. However, the neural implementation of object learning across stages of visual analysis in the human brain remains largely unknown. Using combined psychophysics and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we show a link between shape-specific learning in cluttered scenes and distributed neuronal plasticity in the human visual cortex. We report stronger fMRI responses for trained than untrained shapes across early and higher visual areas when observers learned to detect low-salience shapes in noisy backgrounds. However, training with high-salience pop-out targets resulted in lower fMRI responses for trained than untrained shapes in higher occipitotemporal areas. These findings suggest that learning of camouflaged shapes is mediated by increasing neural sensitivity across visual areas to bolster target segmentation and feature integration. In contrast, learning of prominent pop-out shapes is mediated by associations at higher occipitotemporal areas that support sparser coding of the critical features for target recognition. We propose that the human brain learns novel objects in complex scenes by reorganizing shape processing across visual areas, while taking advantage of natural image correlations that determine the distinctiveness of target shapes. PMID:15934786

  13. Colour and luminance contrasts predict the human detection of natural stimuli in complex visual environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas E; Rojas, Bibiana; Mappes, Johanna; Rautiala, Petri; Kemp, Darrell J

    2017-09-01

    Much of what we know about human colour perception has come from psychophysical studies conducted in tightly-controlled laboratory settings. An enduring challenge, however, lies in extrapolating this knowledge to the noisy conditions that characterize our actual visual experience. Here we combine statistical models of visual perception with empirical data to explore how chromatic (hue/saturation) and achromatic (luminant) information underpins the detection and classification of stimuli in a complex forest environment. The data best support a simple linear model of stimulus detection as an additive function of both luminance and saturation contrast. The strength of each predictor is modest yet consistent across gross variation in viewing conditions, which accords with expectation based upon general primate psychophysics. Our findings implicate simple visual cues in the guidance of perception amidst natural noise, and highlight the potential for informing human vision via a fusion between psychophysical modelling and real-world behaviour. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. A New Repeating Color Watermarking Scheme Based on Human Visual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chin-Chen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a human-visual-model-based scheme that effectively protects the intellectual copyright of digital images. In the proposed method, the theory of the visual secret sharing scheme is used to create a master watermark share and a secret watermark share. The watermark share is kept secret by the owner. The master watermark share is embedded into the host image to generate a watermarked image based on the human visual model. The proposed method conforms to all necessary conditions of an image watermarking technique. After the watermarked image is put under various attacks such as lossy compression, rotating, sharpening, blurring, and cropping, the experimental results show that the extracted digital watermark from the attacked watermarked images can still be robustly detected using the proposed method.

  15. Structural and functional correlates of visual field asymmetry in the human brain by diffusion kurtosis MRI and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Caitlin; Ho, Leon C; Murphy, Matthew C; Conner, Ian P; Wollstein, Gadi; Cham, Rakie; Chan, Kevin C

    2016-11-09

    Human visual performance has been observed to show superiority in localized regions of the visual field across many classes of stimuli. However, the underlying neural mechanisms remain unclear. This study aims to determine whether the visual information processing in the human brain is dependent on the location of stimuli in the visual field and the corresponding neuroarchitecture using blood-oxygenation-level-dependent functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion kurtosis MRI, respectively, in 15 healthy individuals at 3 T. In fMRI, visual stimulation to the lower hemifield showed stronger brain responses and larger brain activation volumes than the upper hemifield, indicative of the differential sensitivity of the human brain across the visual field. In diffusion kurtosis MRI, the brain regions mapping to the lower visual field showed higher mean kurtosis, but not fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity compared with the upper visual field. These results suggested the different distributions of microstructural organization across visual field brain representations. There was also a strong positive relationship between diffusion kurtosis and fMRI responses in the lower field brain representations. In summary, this study suggested the structural and functional brain involvements in the asymmetry of visual field responses in humans, and is important to the neurophysiological and psychological understanding of human visual information processing.

  16. Changes in brain morphology in albinism reflect reduced visual acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Holly; von dem Hagen, Elisabeth A H; Davies, George; Chambers, Claire; Gouws, Andre; Hoffmann, Michael; Morland, Antony B

    2014-07-01

    Albinism, in humans and many animal species, has a major impact on the visual system, leading to reduced acuity, lack of binocular function and nystagmus. In addition to the lack of a foveal pit, there is a disruption to the routing of the nerve fibers crossing at the optic chiasm, resulting in excessive crossing of fibers to the contralateral hemisphere. However, very little is known about the effect of this misrouting on the structure of the post-chiasmatic visual pathway, and the occipital lobes in particular. Whole-brain analyses of cortical thickness in a large cohort of subjects with albinism showed an increase in cortical thickness, relative to control subjects, particularly in posterior V1, corresponding to the foveal representation. Furthermore, mean cortical thickness across entire V1 was significantly greater in these subjects compared to controls and negatively correlated with visual acuity in albinism. Additionally, the group with albinism showed decreased gyrification in the left ventral occipital lobe. While the increase in cortical thickness in V1, also found in congenitally blind subjects, has been interpreted to reflect a lack of pruning, the decreased gyrification in the ventral extrastriate cortex may reflect the reduced input to the foveal regions of the ventral visual stream. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Visual learning shapes the processing of complex movement stimuli in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastorff, Jan; Kourtzi, Zoe; Giese, Martin A

    2009-11-04

    Recognition of actions and complex movements is fundamental for social interactions and action understanding. While the relationship between motor expertise and visual recognition of body movements has received a vast amount of interest, the role of visual learning remains largely unexplored. Combining psychophysics and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments, we investigated neural correlates of visual learning of complex movements. Subjects were trained to visually discriminate between very similar complex movement stimuli generated by motion morphing that were either compatible (experiments 1 and 2) or incompatible (experiment 3) with human movement execution. Employing an fMRI adaptation paradigm as index of discriminability, we scanned human subjects before and after discrimination training. The results of experiment 1 revealed three different effects as a consequence of training: (1) Emerging fMRI-selective adaptation in general motion-related areas (hMT/V5+, KO/V3b) for the differences between human-like movements. (2) Enhanced of fMRI-selective adaptation already present before training in biological motion-related areas (pSTS, FBA). (3) Changes covarying with task difficulty in frontal areas. Moreover, the observed activity changes were specific to the trained movement patterns (experiment 2). The results of experiment 3, testing artificial movement stimuli, were strikingly similar to the results obtained for human movements. General and biological motion-related areas showed movement-specific changes in fMRI-selective adaptation for the differences between the stimuli after training. These results support the existence of a powerful visual machinery for the learning of complex motion patterns that is independent of motor execution. We thus propose a key role of visual learning in action recognition.

  18. How humans react to changing rewards during visual foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinxia; Gong, Xue; Fougnie, Daryl; Wolfe, Jeremy M

    2017-11-01

    Much is known about the speed and accuracy of search in single-target search tasks, but less attention has been devoted to understanding search in multiple-target foraging tasks. These tasks raise and answer important questions about how individuals decide to terminate searches in cases in which the number of targets in each display is unknown. Even when asked to find every target, individuals quit before exhaustively searching a display. Because a failure to notice targets can have profound effects (e.g., missing a malignant tumor in an X-ray), it is important to develop strategies that could limit such errors. Here, we explored the impact of different reward patterns on these failures. In the Neutral condition, reward for finding a target was constant over time. In the Increasing condition, reward increased for each successive target in a display, penalizing early departure from a display. In the Decreasing condition, reward decreased for each successive target in a display. The experimental results demonstrate that observers will forage for longer (and find more targets) when the value of successive targets increases (and the opposite when value decreases). The data indicate that observers were learning to utilize knowledge of the reward pattern and to forage optimally over the course of the experiment. Simulation results further revealed that human behavior could be modeled with a variant of Charnov's Marginal Value Theorem (MVT) (Charnov, 1976) that includes roles for reward and learning.

  19. Human visual search behaviour is far from ideal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowska, Anna; Clarke, Alasdair D F; Hunt, Amelia R

    2017-02-22

    Evolutionary pressures have made foraging behaviours highly efficient in many species. Eye movements during search present a useful instance of foraging behaviour in humans. We tested the efficiency of eye movements during search using homogeneous and heterogeneous arrays of line segments. The search target is visible in the periphery on the homogeneous array, but requires central vision to be detected on the heterogeneous array. For a compound search array that is heterogeneous on one side and homogeneous on the other, eye movements should be directed only to the heterogeneous side. Instead, participants made many fixations on the homogeneous side. By comparing search of compound arrays to an estimate of search performance based on uniform arrays, we isolate two contributions to search inefficiency. First, participants make superfluous fixations, sacrificing speed for a perceived (but not actual) gain in response certainty. Second, participants fixate the homogeneous side even more frequently than predicted by inefficient search of uniform arrays, suggesting they also fail to direct fixations to locations that yield the most new information. © 2017 The Author(s).

  20. Bringing CLARITY to the human brain: visualization of Lewy pathology in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, A K L; Hurry, M E D; Ng, O T W; DeFelice, J; Lai, H M; Pearce, R K B; Wong, G T-C; Chang, R C-C; Gentleman, S M

    2016-10-01

    CLARITY is a novel technique which enables three-dimensional visualization of immunostained tissue for the study of circuitry and spatial interactions between cells and molecules in the brain. In this study, we aimed to compare methodological differences in the application of CLARITY between rodent and large human post mortem brain samples. In addition, we aimed to investigate if this technique could be used to visualize Lewy pathology in a post mortem Parkinson's brain. Rodent and human brain samples were clarified and immunostained using the passive version of the CLARITY technique. Samples were then immersed in different refractive index matching media before mounting and visualizing under a confocal microscope. We found that tissue clearing speed using passive CLARITY differs according to species (human vs. rodents), brain region and degree of fixation (fresh vs. formalin-fixed tissues). Furthermore, there were advantages to using specific refractive index matching media. We have applied this technique and have successfully visualized Lewy body inclusions in three dimensions within the nucleus basalis of Meynert, and the spatial relationship between monoaminergic fibres and Lewy pathologies among nigrostriatal fibres in the midbrain without the need for physical serial sectioning of brain tissue. The effective use of CLARITY on large samples of human tissue opens up many potential avenues for detailed pathological and morphological studies. © 2015 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Neuropathological Society.

  1. Real-time kymographic imaging for visualizing human vocal-fold vibratory function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, Qingjun; Schutte, Harm K.

    A stand-alone kymographic system for visualizing human vocal-fold vibration in real time is presented. By using a dual charge-coupled-device construction, the system not only provides kymographic images but also simultaneously presents structural images for navigating the endoscope to a desired

  2. Animate and Inanimate Objects in Human Visual Cortex: Evidence for Task-Independent Category Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggett, Alison J.; Pritchard, Iwan C.; Downing, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence from neuropsychology suggests that the distinction between animate and inanimate kinds is fundamental to human cognition. Previous neuroimaging studies have reported that viewing animate objects activates ventrolateral visual brain regions, whereas inanimate objects activate ventromedial regions. However, these studies have typically…

  3. SDBI 1904: Human Factors Assessment of Vibration Effects on Visual Performance during Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Shelby G.; Holden, Kritina; Root, Phillip; Ebert, Douglas; Jones, Jeffery; Adelstein, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of the of Human Factors Short Duration Bioastronautics Investigation (SDBI) 1904 is to determine visual performance limits during operational vibration and g-loads, specifically through the determination of minimal usable font sized using Orion-type display formats. Currently there is little to no data available to quantify human visual performance under these extreme conditions. Existing data on shuttle vibration magnitude and frequency is incomplete, does not address sear and crew vibration in the current configuration, and does not address human visual performance. There have been anecdotal reports of performance decrements from shuttle crews, but no structured data has been collected. The SDBI is a companion effort to the Detailed Test Objective (DTO) 695, which will measure shuttle seat accelerations (vibration) during ascent. Data fro the SDBI will serve an important role in interpreting the DTO vibration data. This data will be collected during the ascent phase of three shuttle missions (STS-119, 127, and 128). Both SDBI1904 and DTO 695 are low impact with respect to flight resources, and combined they represent an efficient and focused problem solving approach. The SDBI and DTO data will be correlated to determine the nature of perceived visual performance under varying vibrations and g-loads. This project will provide: 1) Immediate data for developing preliminary human performance vibration requirements; 2) Flight validated inputs for ongoing and future ground-based research; and 3) Information of functional needs that will drive Orion display format design decisions.

  4. Bioinformatic analysis of Rp1 gene causing visual disparity in humans

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Bioinformatic analysis of Rp1 gene causing visual disparity in humans. Sana Zahra and Hamid Rashid*. Department of Bioinformatics, Mohammad Ali Jinnah University, Islamabad, Pakistan. Accepted 5 November, 2010. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited diseases that damage rod and cone cells located in.

  5. Preliminary investigation of visual attention to human figures in photographs: potential considerations for the design of aided AAC visual scene displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Krista M; Light, Janice

    2011-12-01

    Many individuals with complex communication needs may benefit from visual aided augmentative and alternative communication systems. In visual scene displays (VSDs), language concepts are embedded into a photograph of a naturalistic event. Humans play a central role in communication development and might be important elements in VSDs. However, many VSDs omit human figures. In this study, the authors sought to describe the distribution of visual attention to humans in naturalistic scenes as compared with other elements. Nineteen college students observed 8 photographs in which a human figure appeared near 1 or more items that might be expected to compete for visual attention (such as a Christmas tree or a table loaded with food). Eye-tracking technology allowed precise recording of participants' gaze. The fixation duration over a 7-s viewing period and latency to view elements in the photograph were measured. Participants fixated on the human figures more rapidly and for longer than expected based on the size of these figures, regardless of the other elements in the scene. Human figures attract attention in a photograph even when presented alongside other attractive distracters. Results suggest that humans may be a powerful means to attract visual attention to key elements in VSDs.

  6. Do Visual Illusions Probe the Visual Brain?: Illusions in Action without a Dorsal Visual Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Yann; Danckert, James; Blangero, Annabelle; Rossetti, Yves

    2007-01-01

    Visual illusions have been shown to affect perceptual judgements more so than motor behaviour, which was interpreted as evidence for a functional division of labour within the visual system. The dominant perception-action theory argues that perception involves a holistic processing of visual objects or scenes, performed within the ventral,…

  7. The effect of lens-induced anisometropia on accommodation and vergence during human visual development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Shrikant R; Candy, T Rowan

    2011-06-01

    Clear and single binocular vision, a prerequisite for normal human visual development, is achieved through accommodation and vergence. Anisometropia is associated with abnormal visual development, but its impact on accommodation and vergence, and therefore on the individual's visual experience, is not known. This study determined the impact of transiently induced anisometropia on accommodative and vergence performance of the typically developing human visual system. One hundred eighteen subjects (age range, 2.9 months to 41.1 years) watched a cartoon movie that moved between 80 and 33 cm under six different viewing conditions: binocular and monocular, and with ±2 diopters (D) and ±4 D of lens-induced anisometropia. Twenty-one subjects (age range, 3.1 months to 12.1 years) also watched the movie with 11% induced aniseikonia. Accommodation and vergence were recorded in both eyes using a videoretinoscope (25 Hz). The main effect of viewing condition was statistically significant for both accommodation and vergence (both P anisometropia conditions (P 0.5). Accommodative and vergence gains of the typically developing visual system deteriorated marginally (accommodation more than vergence) with transiently induced anisometropia (up to ±4 D) and did not deteriorate significantly with induced aniseikonia of 11%. Some binocular cues remained with ±4 D of induced anisometropia and 11% induced aniseikonia, as indicated by the accommodative and vergence gains being higher than in monocular viewing.

  8. Early visual evoked potentials are modulated by eye position in humans induced by whole body rotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petit Laurent

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To reach and grasp an object in space on the basis of its image cast on the retina requires different coordinate transformations that take into account gaze and limb positioning. Eye position in the orbit influences the image's conversion from retinotopic (eye-centered coordinates to an egocentric frame necessary for guiding action. Neuroimaging studies have revealed eye position-dependent activity in extrastriate visual, parietal and frontal areas that is along the visuo-motor pathway. At the earliest vision stage, the role of the primary visual area (V1 in this process remains unclear. We used an experimental design based on pattern-onset visual evoked potentials (VEP recordings to study the effect of eye position on V1 activity in humans. Results We showed that the amplitude of the initial C1 component of VEP, acknowledged to originate in V1, was modulated by the eye position. We also established that putative spontaneous small saccades related to eccentric fixation, as well as retinal disparity cannot explain the effects of changing C1 amplitude of VEP in the present study. Conclusions The present modulation of the early component of VEP suggests an eye position-dependent activity of the human primary visual area. Our findings also evidence that cortical processes combine information about the position of the stimulus on the retinae with information about the location of the eyes in their orbit as early as the stage of primary visual area.

  9. The Qumran Visualization Project: Prospects for Digital Humanities in Theological Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin P. Murphy

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Digital Humanities are a hot topic in disciplines as varied as literature, history and cultural studies, but at present theology and religious studies departments seem to be lagging behind. This essay will offer a critical review of one Digital Humanities project that is relevant to theological libraries and Biblical Studies: the Qumran Visualization Project. The essay will discuss why theological libraries should start considering the Digital Humanities, and then offer some strategies for how libraries can support, promote or otherwise engage with this type of project.

  10. Lateralized visual behavior in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) performing audio-visual tasks: the right visual field advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfour, F; Marten, K

    2006-01-10

    Analyzing cerebral asymmetries in various species helps in understanding brain organization. The left and right sides of the brain (lateralization) are involved in different cognitive and sensory functions. This study focuses on dolphin visual lateralization as expressed by spontaneous eye preference when performing a complex cognitive task; we examine lateralization when processing different visual stimuli displayed on an underwater touch-screen (two-dimensional figures, three-dimensional figures and dolphin/human video sequences). Three female bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) were submitted to a 2-, 3- or 4-, choice visual/auditory discrimination problem, without any food reward: the subjects had to correctly match visual and acoustic stimuli together. In order to visualize and to touch the underwater target, the dolphins had to come close to the touch-screen and to position themselves using monocular vision (left or right eye) and/or binocular naso-ventral vision. The results showed an ability to associate simple visual forms and auditory information using an underwater touch-screen. Moreover, the subjects showed a spontaneous tendency to use monocular vision. Contrary to previous findings, our results did not clearly demonstrate right eye preference in spontaneous choice. However, the individuals' scores of correct answers were correlated with right eye vision, demonstrating the advantage of this visual field in visual information processing and suggesting a left hemispheric dominance. We also demonstrated that the nature of the presented visual stimulus does not seem to have any influence on the animals' monocular vision choice.

  11. Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Damage Is Associated with Decreased Ventral Striatum Volume and Response to Reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujara, Maia S; Philippi, Carissa L; Motzkin, Julian C; Baskaya, Mustafa K; Koenigs, Michael

    2016-05-04

    The ventral striatum and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) are two central nodes of the "reward circuit" of the brain. Human neuroimaging studies have demonstrated coincident activation and functional connectivity between these brain regions, and animal studies have demonstrated that the vmPFC modulates ventral striatum activity. However, there have been no comparable data in humans to address whether the vmPFC may be critical for the reward-related response properties of the ventral striatum. In this study, we used fMRI in five neurosurgical patients with focal vmPFC lesions to test the hypothesis that the vmPFC is necessary for enhancing ventral striatum responses to the anticipation of reward. In support of this hypothesis, we found that, compared with age- and gender-matched neurologically healthy subjects, the vmPFC-lesioned patients had reduced ventral striatal activity during the anticipation of reward. Furthermore, we observed that the vmPFC-lesioned patients had decreased volumes of the accumbens subregion of the ventral striatum. Together, these functional and structural neuroimaging data provide novel evidence for a critical role for the vmPFC in contributing to reward-related activity of the ventral striatum. These results offer new insight into the functional and structural interactions between key components of the brain circuitry underlying human affective function and decision-making. Maladaptive decision-making is a common problem across multiple mental health disorders. Developing new pathophysiologically based strategies for diagnosis and treatment thus requires a better understanding of the brain circuits responsible for adaptive decision-making and related psychological subprocesses (e.g., reward valuation, anticipation, and motivation). Animal studies provide evidence that these functions are mediated through direct interactions between two key nodes of a posited "reward circuit," the ventral striatum and the ventromedial prefrontal

  12. Time-compressed preplay of anticipated events in human primary visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Matthias; Kok, Peter; de Lange, Floris P

    2017-05-23

    Perception is guided by the anticipation of future events. It has been hypothesized that this process may be implemented by pattern completion in early visual cortex, in which a stimulus sequence is recreated after only a subset of the visual input is provided. Here we test this hypothesis using ultra-fast functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure BOLD activity at precisely defined receptive field locations in visual cortex (V1) of human volunteers. We find that after familiarizing subjects with a spatial sequence, flashing only the starting point of the sequence triggers an activity wave in V1 that resembles the full stimulus sequence. This preplay activity is temporally compressed compared to the actual stimulus sequence and remains present even when attention is diverted from the stimulus sequence. Preplay might therefore constitute an automatic prediction mechanism for temporal sequences in V1.

  13. HPIminer: A text mining system for building and visualizing human protein interaction networks and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Suresh; Kalpana, Raja; Monickaraj, Pankaj Moses; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2015-04-01

    The knowledge on protein-protein interactions (PPI) and their related pathways are equally important to understand the biological functions of the living cell. Such information on human proteins is highly desirable to understand the mechanism of several diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease. Because much of that information is buried in biomedical literature, an automated text mining system for visualizing human PPI and pathways is highly desirable. In this paper, we present HPIminer, a text mining system for visualizing human protein interactions and pathways from biomedical literature. HPIminer extracts human PPI information and PPI pairs from biomedical literature, and visualize their associated interactions, networks and pathways using two curated databases HPRD and KEGG. To our knowledge, HPIminer is the first system to build interaction networks from literature as well as curated databases. Further, the new interactions mined only from literature and not reported earlier in databases are highlighted as new. A comparative study with other similar tools shows that the resultant network is more informative and provides additional information on interacting proteins and their associated networks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Retinoid Uptake, Processing, and Secretion in Human iPS-RPE Support the Visual Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz, Alberto; Greene, Whitney A.; Plamper, Mark L.; Choi, Jae Hyek; Johnson, Anthony J.; Tsin, Andrew T.; Wang, Heuy-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Retinal pigmented epithelium derived from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells (iPS-RPE) may be a source of cells for transplantation. For this reason, it is essential to determine the functional competence of iPS-RPE. One key role of the RPE is uptake and processing of retinoids via the visual cycle. The purpose of this study is to investigate the expression of visual cycle proteins and the functional ability of the visual cycle in iPS-RPE. Methods. iPS-RPE was derived from human iPS cells. Immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and Western blot analysis were used to detect expression of RPE genes lecithin-retinol acyl transferase (LRAT), RPE65, cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP), and pigment epithelium–derived factor (PEDF). All-trans retinol was delivered to cultured cells or whole cell homogenate to assess the ability of the iPS-RPE to process retinoids. Results. Cultured iPS-RPE expresses visual cycle genes LRAT, CRALBP, and RPE65. After incubation with all-trans retinol, iPS-RPE synthesized up to 2942 ± 551 pmol/mg protein all-trans retinyl esters. Inhibition of LRAT with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) prevented retinyl ester synthesis. Significantly, after incubation with all-trans retinol, iPS-RPE released 188 ± 88 pmol/mg protein 11-cis retinaldehyde into the culture media. Conclusions. iPS-RPE develops classic RPE characteristics and maintains expression of visual cycle proteins. The results of this study confirm that iPS-RPE possesses the machinery to process retinoids for support of visual pigment regeneration. Inhibition of all-trans retinyl ester accumulation by NEM confirms LRAT is active in iPS-RPE. Finally, the detection of 11-cis retinaldehyde in the culture medium demonstrates the cells' ability to process retinoids through the visual cycle. This study demonstrates expression of key visual cycle machinery and complete visual cycle activity in iPS-RPE. PMID:24255038

  15. Saturation in Phosphene Size with Increasing Current Levels Delivered to Human Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosking, William H; Sun, Ping; Ozker, Muge; Pei, Xiaomei; Foster, Brett L; Beauchamp, Michael S; Yoshor, Daniel

    2017-07-26

    Electrically stimulating early visual cortex results in a visual percept known as a phosphene. Although phosphenes can be evoked by a wide range of electrode sizes and current amplitudes, they are invariably described as small. To better understand this observation, we electrically stimulated 93 electrodes implanted in the visual cortex of 13 human subjects who reported phosphene size while stimulation current was varied. Phosphene size increased as the stimulation current was initially raised above threshold, but then rapidly reached saturation. Phosphene size also depended on the location of the stimulated site, with size increasing with distance from the foveal representation. We developed a model relating phosphene size to the amount of activated cortex and its location within the retinotopic map. First, a sigmoidal curve was used to predict the amount of activated cortex at a given current. Second, the amount of active cortex was converted to degrees of visual angle by multiplying by the inverse cortical magnification factor for that retinotopic location. This simple model accurately predicted phosphene size for a broad range of stimulation currents and cortical locations. The unexpected saturation in phosphene sizes suggests that the functional architecture of cerebral cortex may impose fundamental restrictions on the spread of artificially evoked activity and this may be an important consideration in the design of cortical prosthetic devices.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Understanding the neural basis for phosphenes, the visual percepts created by electrical stimulation of visual cortex, is fundamental to the development of a visual cortical prosthetic. Our experiments in human subjects implanted with electrodes over visual cortex show that it is the activity of a large population of cells spread out across several millimeters of tissue that supports the perception of a phosphene. In addition, we describe an important feature of the production of phosphenes by

  16. Retinoid uptake, processing, and secretion in human iPS-RPE support the visual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz, Alberto; Greene, Whitney A; Plamper, Mark L; Choi, Jae Hyek; Johnson, Anthony J; Tsin, Andrew T; Wang, Heuy-Ching

    2014-01-09

    Retinal pigmented epithelium derived from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells (iPS-RPE) may be a source of cells for transplantation. For this reason, it is essential to determine the functional competence of iPS-RPE. One key role of the RPE is uptake and processing of retinoids via the visual cycle. The purpose of this study is to investigate the expression of visual cycle proteins and the functional ability of the visual cycle in iPS-RPE. iPS-RPE was derived from human iPS cells. Immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and Western blot analysis were used to detect expression of RPE genes lecithin-retinol acyl transferase (LRAT), RPE65, cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP), and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). All-trans retinol was delivered to cultured cells or whole cell homogenate to assess the ability of the iPS-RPE to process retinoids. Cultured iPS-RPE expresses visual cycle genes LRAT, CRALBP, and RPE65. After incubation with all-trans retinol, iPS-RPE synthesized up to 2942 ± 551 pmol/mg protein all-trans retinyl esters. Inhibition of LRAT with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) prevented retinyl ester synthesis. Significantly, after incubation with all-trans retinol, iPS-RPE released 188 ± 88 pmol/mg protein 11-cis retinaldehyde into the culture media. iPS-RPE develops classic RPE characteristics and maintains expression of visual cycle proteins. The results of this study confirm that iPS-RPE possesses the machinery to process retinoids for support of visual pigment regeneration. Inhibition of all-trans retinyl ester accumulation by NEM confirms LRAT is active in iPS-RPE. Finally, the detection of 11-cis retinaldehyde in the culture medium demonstrates the cells' ability to process retinoids through the visual cycle. This study demonstrates expression of key visual cycle machinery and complete visual cycle activity in iPS-RPE.

  17. Recent Visual Experience Shapes Visual Processing in Rats through Stimulus-Specific Adaptation and Response Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinken, Kasper; Vogels, Rufin; Op de Beeck, Hans

    2017-03-20

    From an ecological point of view, it is generally suggested that the main goal of vision in rats and mice is navigation and (aerial) predator evasion [1-3]. The latter requires fast and accurate detection of a change in the visual environment. An outstanding question is whether there are mechanisms in the rodent visual system that would support and facilitate visual change detection. An experimental protocol frequently used to investigate change detection in humans is the oddball paradigm, in which a rare, unexpected stimulus is presented in a train of stimulus repetitions [4]. A popular "predictive coding" theory of cortical responses states that neural responses should decrease for expected sensory input and increase for unexpected input [5, 6]. Despite evidence for response suppression and enhancement in noninvasive scalp recordings in humans with this paradigm [7, 8], it has proven challenging to observe both phenomena in invasive action potential recordings in other animals [9-11]. During a visual oddball experiment, we recorded multi-unit spiking activity in rat primary visual cortex (V1) and latero-intermediate area (LI), which is a higher area of the rodent ventral visual stream. In rat V1, there was only evidence for response suppression related to stimulus-specific adaptation, and not for response enhancement. However, higher up in area LI, spiking activity showed clear surprise-based response enhancement in addition to stimulus-specific adaptation. These results show that neural responses along the rat ventral visual stream become increasingly sensitive to changes in the visual environment, suggesting a system specialized in the detection of unexpected events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-Term Visuo-Gustatory Appetitive and Aversive Conditioning Potentiate Human Visual Evoked Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Gert R J; Laugesen, Jakob L; Møller, Per; Bredie, Wender L P; Schachtman, Todd R; Liljendahl, Christina; Viemose, Ida

    2017-01-01

    Human recognition of foods and beverages are often based on visual cues associated with flavors. The dynamics of neurophysiological plasticity related to acquisition of such long-term associations has only recently become the target of investigation. In the present work, the effects of appetitive and aversive visuo-gustatory conditioning were studied with high density EEG-recordings focusing on late components in the visual evoked potentials (VEPs), specifically the N2-P3 waves. Unfamiliar images were paired with either a pleasant or an unpleasant juice and VEPs evoked by the images were compared before and 1 day after the pairings. In electrodes located over posterior visual cortex areas, the following changes were observed after conditioning: the amplitude from the N2-peak to the P3-peak increased and the N2 peak delay was reduced. The percentage increase of N2-to-P3 amplitudes was asymmetrically distributed over the posterior hemispheres despite the fact that the images were bilaterally symmetrical across the two visual hemifields. The percentage increases of N2-to-P3 amplitudes in each experimental subject correlated with the subject's evaluation of positive or negative hedonic valences of the two juices. The results from 118 scalp electrodes gave surface maps of theta power distributions showing increased power over posterior visual areas after the pairings. Source current distributions calculated from swLORETA revealed that visual evoked currents rose as a result of conditioning in five cortical regions-from primary visual areas and into the inferior temporal gyrus (ITG). These learning-induced changes were seen after both appetitive and aversive training while a sham trained control group showed no changes. It is concluded that long-term visuo-gustatory conditioning potentiated the N2-P3 complex, and it is suggested that the changes are regulated by the perceived hedonic valence of the US.

  19. Integration of Motion Responses Underlying Directional Motion Anisotropy in Human Early Visual Cortical Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Wouter; Van Wezel, Richard J. A.; Petridou, Natalia; Ramsey, Nick F.; Raemaekers, Mathijs

    2013-01-01

    Recent imaging studies have reported directional motion biases in human visual cortex when perceiving moving random dot patterns. It has been hypothesized that these biases occur as a result of the integration of motion detector activation along the path of motion in visual cortex. In this study we investigate the nature of such motion integration with functional MRI (fMRI) using different motion stimuli. Three types of moving random dot stimuli were presented, showing either coherent motion, motion with spatial decorrelations or motion with temporal decorrelations. The results from the coherent motion stimulus reproduced the centripetal and centrifugal directional motion biases in V1, V2 and V3 as previously reported. The temporally decorrelated motion stimulus resulted in both centripetal and centrifugal biases similar to coherent motion. In contrast, the spatially decorrelated motion stimulus resulted in small directional motion biases that were only present in parts of visual cortex coding for higher eccentricities of the visual field. In combination with previous results, these findings indicate that biased motion responses in early visual cortical areas most likely depend on the spatial integration of a simultaneously activated motion detector chain. PMID:23840711

  20. Learning acts on distinct processes for visual form perception in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Stephen D; Li, Sheng; Kourtzi, Zoe

    2012-01-18

    Learning is known to facilitate our ability to detect targets in clutter and optimize brain processes for successful visual recognition. Previous brain-imaging studies have focused on identifying spatial patterns (i.e., brain areas) that change with learning, implicating occipitotemporal and frontoparietal areas. However, little is known about the interactions within this network that mediate learning-dependent improvement in complex perceptual tasks (i.e., discrimination of visual forms in clutter). Here we take advantage of the complementary high spatial and temporal resolution of simultaneous EEG-fMRI to identify the learning-dependent changes in spatiotemporal brain patterns that mediate enhanced behavioral sensitivity in the discrimination of global forms after training. We measured the observers' choices when discriminating between concentric and radial patterns presented in noise before and after training. Similarly, we measured the choices of a pattern classifier when predicting each stimulus from EEG-fMRI signals. By comparing the performance of human observers and classifiers, we demonstrated that learning alters sensitivity to visual forms and EEG-fMRI activation patterns related to distinct visual recognition processes. In particular, behavioral improvement after training was associated with changes in (1) early processes involved in the integration of global forms in higher occipitotemporal and parietal areas, and (2) later processes related to categorical judgments in frontal circuits. Thus, our findings provide evidence that learning acts on distinct visual recognition processes and shapes feedforward interactions across brain areas to support performance in complex perceptual tasks.

  1. Depth cues in human visual perception and their realization in 3D displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, Stephan; Häussler, Ralf; Fütterer, Gerald; Leister, Norbert

    2010-04-01

    Over the last decade, various technologies for visualizing three-dimensional (3D) scenes on displays have been technologically demonstrated and refined, among them such of stereoscopic, multi-view, integral imaging, volumetric, or holographic type. Most of the current approaches utilize the conventional stereoscopic principle. But they all lack of their inherent conflict between vergence and accommodation since scene depth cannot be physically realized but only feigned by displaying two views of different perspective on a flat screen and delivering them to the corresponding left and right eye. This mismatch requires the viewer to override the physiologically coupled oculomotor processes of vergence and eye focus that may cause visual discomfort and fatigue. This paper discusses the depth cues in the human visual perception for both image quality and visual comfort of direct-view 3D displays. We concentrate our analysis especially on near-range depth cues, compare visual performance and depth-range capabilities of stereoscopic and holographic displays, and evaluate potential depth limitations of 3D displays from a physiological point of view.

  2. Laceration of the muscle ventral serrato

    OpenAIRE

    Dragonetti, Ana María; Boccia, Francisco Osvaldo; Luna, M. M.; Leone, F.

    2005-01-01

    La presentación es informar al profesional veterinario sobre el desgarro bilateral del músculo serrato ventral, una afección de escasa incidencia en la clínica de pequeños animales, a través de la descripción detallada de un caso clínico y su resolución quirúrgica exitosa. The presentation of the work has as objective to inform the veterinary professional on an affection of scarce incidence in the clinic of the small animals, like is the bilateral laceration of the muscle ventral serrato, ...

  3. Visual Warning Signals Optimized for Human Perception: What the Eye Sees Fastest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. L. Gros

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to answer the question of how to design a visual warning signal that is most easily seen and produces the quickest reaction time. This is a classic problem of bionic optimization—if one knows the properties of the receiver one can most easily find a suitable solution. Because the peak of the spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity function of the human visual system occurs at non-zero spatial and temporal frequencies, it is likely that movement enhances the detectability of threshold visual signals. Earlier studies employing extended drifting sinewave gratings bear out this prediction. We have studied the ability of human observers to detect threshold visual signals for both moving and stationary stimuli. We used discrete, localized signals such as might be employed in aerospace or automotive warning signal displays. Moving stimuli show a superior detectability to non-moving stimuli of the same integrated energy. Moving stimuli at threshold detectability are seen faster than non-moving threshold stimuli. Under some conditions the speed advantage is over 0.25 seconds. Similar advantages have also been shown to occur for suprathreshold signals.

  4. Area summation in human visual system: psychophysics, fMRI, and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurminen, Lauri; Kilpeläinen, Markku; Laurinen, Pentti; Vanni, Simo

    2009-11-01

    Contextual modulation is a fundamental feature of sensory processing, both on perceptual and on single-neuron level. When the diameter of a visual stimulus is increased, the firing rate of a cell typically first increases (summation field) and then decreases (surround field). Such an area summation function draws a comprehensive profile of the receptive field structure of a neuron, including areas outside the classical receptive field. We investigated area summation in human vision with psychophysics and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The stimuli were drifting sine wave gratings similar to those used in previous macaque single-cell area summation studies [corrected]. A model was developed to facilitate comparison of area summation in fMRI to area summation in psychophysics and single cells. The model consisted of units with an antagonistic receptive field structure found in single cells in the primary visual cortex. The receptive field centers of the model neurons were distributed in the region of the visual field covered by a single voxel. The measured area summation functions were qualitatively similar to earlier single-cell data. The model with parameters derived from psychophysics captured the spatial structure of the summation field in the primary visual cortex as measured with fMRI. The model also generalized to a novel situation in which the neural population was displaced from the stimulus center. The current study shows that contextual modulation arises from similar spatially antagonistic and overlapping excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms, both in single cells and in human vision.

  5. Towards visual and vocal mimicry recognition in human-human interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, X.; Truong, Khiet Phuong; Pantic, Maja; Nijholt, Antinus; Tunstel, E.; Nahavandi, S.; Stoica, A.

    2011-01-01

    During face-to-face interpersonal interaction, people have a tendency to mimic each other. People not only mimic postures, mannerisms, moods or emotions, but they also mimic several speech-related behaviors. In this paper we describe how visual and vocal behavioral information expressed between two

  6. [Influence of human body target's spectral characteristics on visual range of low light level image intensifiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Ju; Yang, Wen-Bin; Xu, Hui; Liu, Lei; Tao, Yuan-Yaun

    2013-11-01

    To study the effect of different human target's spectral reflective characteristic on low light level (LLL) image intensifier's distance, based on the spectral characteristics of the night-sky radiation and the spectral reflective coefficients of common clothes, we established a equation of human body target's spectral reflective distribution, and analyzed the spectral reflective characteristics of different human targets wearing the clothes of different color and different material, and from the actual detection equation of LLL image intensifier distance, discussed the detection capability of LLL image intensifier for different human target. The study shows that the effect of different human target's spectral reflective characteristic on LLL image intensifier distance is mainly reflected in the average reflectivity rho(-) and the initial contrast of the target and the background C0. Reflective coefficient and spectral reflection intensity of cotton clothes are higher than polyester clothes, and detection capability of LLL image intensifier is stronger for the human target wearing cotton clothes. Experimental results show that the LLL image intensifiers have longer visual ranges for targets who wear cotton clothes than targets who wear same color but polyester clothes, and have longer visual ranges for targets who wear light-colored clothes than targets who wear dark-colored clothes. And in the full moon illumination conditions, LLL image intensifiers are more sensitive to the clothes' material.

  7. Decoding of faces and face components in face-sensitive human visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Nichols

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A great challenge to the field of visual neuroscience is to understand how faces are encoded and represented within the human brain. Here we show evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI for spatially distributed processing of the whole face and its components in face-sensitive human visual cortex. We used multi-class linear pattern classifiers constructed with a leave-one-scan-out verification procedure to discriminate brain activation patterns elicited by whole faces, the internal features alone, and the external head outline alone. Furthermore, our results suggest that whole faces are represented disproportionately in the fusiform cortex (FFA whereas the building blocks of faces are represented disproportionately in occipitotemporal cortex (OFA. Faces and face components may therefore be organized with functional clustering within both the FFA and OFA, but with specialization for face components in the OFA and the whole face in the FFA.

  8. Development of Glutamatergic Proteins in Human Visual Cortex across the Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Caitlin R; Beshara, Simon P; Jones, David G; Murphy, Kathryn M

    2017-06-21

    Traditionally, human primary visual cortex (V1) has been thought to mature within the first few years of life, based on anatomical studies of synapse formation, and establishment of intracortical and intercortical connections. Human vision, however, develops well beyond the first few years. Previously, we found prolonged development of some GABAergic proteins in human V1 (Pinto et al., 2010). Yet as >80% of synapses in V1 are excitatory, it remains unanswered whether the majority of synapses regulating experience-dependent plasticity and receptive field properties develop late, like their inhibitory counterparts. To address this question, we used Western blotting of postmortem tissue from human V1 (12 female, 18 male) covering a range of ages. Then we quantified a set of postsynaptic glutamatergic proteins (PSD-95, GluA2, GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B), calculated indices for functional pairs that are developmentally regulated (GluA2:GluN1; GluN2A:GluN2B), and determined interindividual variability. We found early loss of GluN1, prolonged development of PSD-95 and GluA2 into late childhood, protracted development of GluN2A until ∼40 years, and dramatic loss of GluN2A in aging. The GluA2:GluN1 index switched at ∼1 year, but the GluN2A:GluN2B index continued to shift until ∼40 year before changing back to GluN2B in aging. We also identified young childhood as a stage of heightened interindividual variability. The changes show that human V1 develops gradually through a series of five orchestrated stages, making it likely that V1 participates in visual development and plasticity across the lifespan. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Anatomical structure of human V1 appears to mature early, but vision changes across the lifespan. This discrepancy has fostered two hypotheses: either other aspects of V1 continue changing, or later changes in visual perception depend on extrastriate areas. Previously, we showed that some GABAergic synaptic proteins change across the lifespan, but most

  9. An audio-visual dataset of human-human interactions in stressful situations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefter, I.; Burghouts, G.J.; Rothkrantz, L.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Stressful situations are likely to occur at human operated service desks, as well as at human-computer interfaces used in public domain. Automatic surveillance can help notifying when extra assistance is needed. Human communication is inherently multimodal e.g. speech, gestures, facial expressions.

  10. Attention Priority Map of Face Images in Human Early Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Ce; He, Dongjun; Fang, Fang

    2018-01-03

    Attention priority maps are topographic representations that are used for attention selection and guidance of task-related behavior during visual processing. Previous studies have identified attention priority maps of simple artificial stimuli in multiple cortical and subcortical areas, but investigating neural correlates of priority maps of natural stimuli is complicated by the complexity of their spatial structure and the difficulty of behaviorally characterizing their priority map. To overcome these challenges, we reconstructed the topographic representations of upright/inverted face images from fMRI BOLD signals in human early visual areas primary visual cortex (V1) and the extrastriate cortex (V2 and V3) based on a voxelwise population receptive field model. We characterized the priority map behaviorally as the first saccadic eye movement pattern when subjects performed a face-matching task relative to the condition in which subjects performed a phase-scrambled face-matching task. We found that the differential first saccadic eye movement pattern between upright/inverted and scrambled faces could be predicted from the reconstructed topographic representations in V1-V3 in humans of either sex. The coupling between the reconstructed representation and the eye movement pattern increased from V1 to V2/3 for the upright faces, whereas no such effect was found for the inverted faces. Moreover, face inversion modulated the coupling in V2/3, but not in V1. Our findings provide new evidence for priority maps of natural stimuli in early visual areas and extend traditional attention priority map theories by revealing another critical factor that affects priority maps in extrastriate cortex in addition to physical salience and task goal relevance: image configuration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Prominent theories of attention posit that attention sampling of visual information is mediated by a series of interacting topographic representations of visual space known as

  11. Visualization of nerve fiber orientation in gross histological sections of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axer, H; Berks, G; Keyserlingk, D G

    2000-12-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) allows visualization of the orientation of the nervous fibers in the living brain. For comparison, a method was developed to examine the orientation of fibers in histological sections of the human brain. Serial sections through the entire human brain were analyzed regarding fiber orientation using polarized light. Direction of fibers in the cutting plane was obtained by measuring the azimuth with the lowest intensity value at each point, and inclination of fibers in the section was evaluated using fuzzy logic approximations. Direction and inclination of fibers revealing their three-dimensional orientation were visualized by colored arrows mapped into the images. Using this procedure, various fiber tracts were identified (pyramidal tract, radiatio optica, radiatio acustica, arcuate fascicle, and 11 more). Intermingled fibers could be separated from each other. The orientation of the fiber tracts derived from polarized light microscopy was validated by confocal laser scanning microscopy in a defined volume of the internal capsule, where the fiber orientation was studied in four human brains. The polarization method visualizes the high degree of intermingled fiber bundles in the brain, so that distinct fiber pathways cannot be understood as solid, compact tracts: Neighbouring bundles of fibers can belong to different systems of fibers distinguishable by their orientation. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Independent effects of motivation and spatial attention in the human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Mareike; Rossi, Valentina; Vanlessen, Naomi; Grass, Annika; Schacht, Annekathrin; Pourtois, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Motivation and attention constitute major determinants of human perception and action. Nonetheless, it remains a matter of debate whether motivation effects on the visual cortex depend on the spatial attention system, or rely on independent pathways. This study investigated the impact of motivation and spatial attention on the activity of the human primary and extrastriate visual cortex by employing a factorial manipulation of the two factors in a cued pattern discrimination task. During stimulus presentation, we recorded event-related potentials and pupillary responses. Motivational relevance increased the amplitudes of the C1 component at ∼70 ms after stimulus onset. This modulation occurred independently of spatial attention effects, which were evident at the P1 level. Furthermore, motivation and spatial attention had independent effects on preparatory activation as measured by the contingent negative variation; and pupil data showed increased activation in response to incentive targets. Taken together, these findings suggest independent pathways for the influence of motivation and spatial attention on the activity of the human visual cortex. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Nonthermal sensory input and altered human thermoregulation: effects of visual information depicting hot or cold environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Jun'ya; Nishimura, Takayuki; Choi, Damee; Egashira, Yuka; Watanuki, Shigeki

    2015-10-01

    A recent study showed that thermoregulatory-like cardiovascular responses can be invoked simply by exposure to visual information, even though the thermal environments are neutral and unchanged. However, it was not clear how such responses affect actual human body temperature regulation. We investigated whether such visually invoked physiological responses can substantively affect human core body temperature in a thermally challenging cold environment. Participants comprised 13 graduate or undergraduate students viewing different video images containing hot, cold, or no scenery, while room temperature was gradually lowered from 28 to 16 °C over 80 min. Rectal temperature, mean skin temperature, core to skin temperature gradient, and oxygen consumption were measured during the experiment. Rectal temperature was significantly lower when hot video images were presented compared to when control video images were presented. Oxygen consumption was comparable among all video images, but core to skin temperature gradient was significantly lower when hot video images were presented. This result suggests that visual information, even in the absence of thermal energy, can affect human thermodynamics and core body temperature.

  14. Canine and human visual cortex intact and responsive despite early retinal blindness from RPE65 mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey K Aguirre

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available RPE65 is an essential molecule in the retinoid-visual cycle, and RPE65 gene mutations cause the congenital human blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA. Somatic gene therapy delivered to the retina of blind dogs with an RPE65 mutation dramatically restores retinal physiology and has sparked international interest in human treatment trials for this incurable disease. An unanswered question is how the visual cortex responds after prolonged sensory deprivation from retinal dysfunction. We therefore studied the cortex of RPE65-mutant dogs before and after retinal gene therapy. Then, we inquired whether there is visual pathway integrity and responsivity in adult humans with LCA due to RPE65 mutations (RPE65-LCA.RPE65-mutant dogs were studied with fMRI. Prior to therapy, retinal and subcortical responses to light were markedly diminished, and there were minimal cortical responses within the primary visual areas of the lateral gyrus (activation amplitude mean +/- standard deviation [SD] = 0.07% +/- 0.06% and volume = 1.3 +/- 0.6 cm(3. Following therapy, retinal and subcortical response restoration was accompanied by increased amplitude (0.18% +/- 0.06% and volume (8.2 +/- 0.8 cm(3 of activation within the lateral gyrus (p < 0.005 for both. Cortical recovery occurred rapidly (within a month of treatment and was persistent (as long as 2.5 y after treatment. Recovery was present even when treatment was provided as late as 1-4 y of age. Human RPE65-LCA patients (ages 18-23 y were studied with structural magnetic resonance imaging. Optic nerve diameter (3.2 +/- 0.5 mm was within the normal range (3.2 +/- 0.3 mm, and occipital cortical white matter density as judged by voxel-based morphometry was slightly but significantly altered (1.3 SD below control average, p = 0.005. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in human RPE65-LCA patients revealed cortical responses with a markedly diminished activation volume (8.8 +/- 1.2 cm(3 compared to controls

  15. Implied motion because of instability in Hokusai Manga activates the human motion-sensitive extrastriate visual cortex: an fMRI study of the impact of visual art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Naoyuki; Matsuyoshi, Daisuke; Ikeda, Takashi; Osaka, Mariko

    2010-03-10

    The recent development of cognitive neuroscience has invited inference about the neurosensory events underlying the experience of visual arts involving implied motion. We report functional magnetic resonance imaging study demonstrating activation of the human extrastriate motion-sensitive cortex by static images showing implied motion because of instability. We used static line-drawing cartoons of humans by Hokusai Katsushika (called 'Hokusai Manga'), an outstanding Japanese cartoonist as well as famous Ukiyoe artist. We found 'Hokusai Manga' with implied motion by depicting human bodies that are engaged in challenging tonic posture significantly activated the motion-sensitive visual cortex including MT+ in the human extrastriate cortex, while an illustration that does not imply motion, for either humans or objects, did not activate these areas under the same tasks. We conclude that motion-sensitive extrastriate cortex would be a critical region for perception of implied motion in instability.

  16. Neural correlates of body and face perception following bilateral destruction of the primary visual cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Stock, Jan; Tamietto, Marco; Zhan, Minye; Heinecke, Armin; Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Legrand, Lore B; Pegna, Alan J; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    Non-conscious visual processing of different object categories was investigated in a rare patient with bilateral destruction of the visual cortex (V1) and clinical blindness over the entire visual field. Images of biological and non-biological object categories were presented consisting of human bodies, faces, butterflies, cars, and scrambles. Behaviorally, only the body shape induced higher perceptual sensitivity, as revealed by signal detection analysis. Passive exposure to bodies and faces activated amygdala and superior temporal sulcus. In addition, bodies also activated the extrastriate body area, insula, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and cerebellum. The results show that following bilateral damage to the primary visual cortex and ensuing complete cortical blindness, the human visual system is able to process categorical properties of human body shapes. This residual vision may be based on V1-independent input to body-selective areas along the ventral stream, in concert with areas involved in the representation of bodily states, like insula, OFC, and cerebellum.

  17. Influence of visual feedback on human task performance in ITER remote handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schropp, Gwendolijn Y.R., E-mail: g.schropp@heemskerk-innovative.nl [Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Heemskerk Innovative Technology, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Heemskerk, Cock J.M. [Heemskerk Innovative Technology, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Kappers, Astrid M.L.; Tiest, Wouter M. Bergmann [Helmholtz Institute-Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Elzendoorn, Ben S.Q. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM/FOM, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Clusterand ITER-NL, PO box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Bult, David [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM/FOM, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Clusterand ITER-NL, PO box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The performance of human operators in an ITER-like test facility for remote handling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different sources of visual feedback influence how fast one can complete a maintenance task. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insights learned could be used in design of operator work environment or training procedures. - Abstract: In ITER, maintenance operations will be largely performed by remote handling (RH). Before ITER can be put into operation, safety regulations and licensing authorities require proof of maintainability for critical components. Part of the proof will come from using standard components and procedures. Additional verification and validation is based on simulation and hardware tests in 1:1 scale mockups. The Master Slave manipulator system (MS2) Benchmark Product was designed to implement a reference set of maintenance tasks representative for ITER remote handling. Experiments were performed with two versions of the Benchmark Product. In both experiments, the quality of visual feedback varied by exchanging direct view with indirect view (using video cameras) in order to measure and analyze its impact on human task performance. The first experiment showed that both experienced and novice RH operators perform a simple task significantly better with direct visual feedback than with camera feedback. A more complex task showed a large variation in results and could not be completed by many novice operators. Experienced operators commented on both the mechanical design and visual feedback. In a second experiment, a more elaborate task was tested on an improved Benchmark product. Again, the task was performed significantly faster with direct visual feedback than with camera feedback. In post-test interviews, operators indicated that they regarded the lack of 3D perception as the primary factor hindering their performance.

  18. Human vocal organ: visible-human-male-based three-dimensional visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-woo; Lee, Donghun; Han, Jong H.; Kim, Bohyung; Kim, Dongsung; Kang, Heung Sik

    2002-05-01

    The Visible Human Project planned and promoted by National Library of Medicine (NLM) provides cryosection images of the normal male and female human bodies. The anatomy of human vocal organ is difficult to understand and to imagine due to its complexity. The purpose of this study is to develop the three-dimensionally computerized atlas of the human vocal organ using Visible Human male dataset. A self-developed program with C language and a recent personal computer can show specific organs and structures separately or together, rotate them at three axes, cross-section them transparently at any angles, and zoom them in and out. As a result, our own PC-based program will be a more interactive, more detailed, and more realistic three-dimensional computerized atlas of a human vocal organ including larygopharynx.

  19. Music notation: a new method for visualizing social interaction in animals and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chase Ivan D

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Researchers have developed a variety of techniques for the visual presentation of quantitative data. These techniques can help to reveal trends and regularities that would be difficult to see if the data were left in raw form. Such techniques can be of great help in exploratory data analysis, making apparent the organization of data sets, developing new hypotheses, and in selecting effects to be tested by statistical analysis. Researchers studying social interaction in groups of animals and humans, however, have few tools to present their raw data visually, and it can be especially difficult to perceive patterns in these data. In this paper I introduce a new graphical method for the visual display of interaction records in human and animal groups, and I illustrate this method using data taken on chickens forming dominance hierarchies. Results This new method presents data in a way that can help researchers immediately to see patterns and connections in long, detailed records of interaction. I show a variety of ways in which this new technique can be used: (1 to explore trends in the formation of both group social structures and individual relationships; (2 to compare interaction records across groups of real animals and between real animals and computer-simulated animal interactions; (3 to search for and discover new types of small-scale interaction sequences; and (4 to examine how interaction patterns in larger groups might emerge from those in component subgroups. In addition, I discuss how this method can be modified and extended for visualizing a variety of different kinds of social interaction in both humans and animals. Conclusion This method can help researchers develop new insights into the structure and organization of social interaction. Such insights can make it easier for researchers to explain behavioural processes, to select aspects of data for statistical analysis, to design further studies, and to formulate

  20. Effects of visual demonstration, verbal instructions, and prompted verbal descriptions on the performance of human subjects in conditional discriminations

    OpenAIRE

    Ribes-Iñesta, Emilio; Cepeda, Ma. Luisa; Hickman, Hortencia; Moreno, Diana; Peñalosa, Eduardo

    1992-01-01

    A study was conducted to confirm prior results concerning the role of prompted verbal descriptions of visually demonstrated stimulus relations in the acquisition and transfer of identity, difference, and similarity-matching relations (Ribes et al., 1988). Four groups of human adults were trained with these three matching relations under four different procedures: (1) visual demonstration without response requirement, (2) verbal instructions, (3) visual demonstration plus prompted verbal descr...

  1. Comparison of dogs and humans in visual scanning of social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törnqvist, Heini; Somppi, Sanni; Koskela, Aija; Krause, Christina M; Vainio, Outi; Kujala, Miiamaaria V

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated similarities in gazing behaviour of dogs and humans, but comparisons under similar conditions are rare, and little is known about dogs' visual attention to social scenes. Here, we recorded the eye gaze of dogs while they viewed images containing two humans or dogs either interacting socially or facing away: the results were compared with equivalent data measured from humans. Furthermore, we compared the gazing behaviour of two dog and two human populations with different social experiences: family and kennel dogs; dog experts and non-experts. Dogs' gazing behaviour was similar to humans: both species gazed longer at the actors in social interaction than in non-social images. However, humans gazed longer at the actors in dog than human social interaction images, whereas dogs gazed longer at the actors in human than dog social interaction images. Both species also made more saccades between actors in images representing non-conspecifics, which could indicate that processing social interaction of non-conspecifics may be more demanding. Dog experts and non-experts viewed the images very similarly. Kennel dogs viewed images less than family dogs, but otherwise their gazing behaviour did not differ, indicating that the basic processing of social stimuli remains similar regardless of social experiences.

  2. Pain and convalescence following laparoscopic ventral hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    , and general well-being were obtained from each patient. Follow-up was six months. Average pain from postoperative day (POD) 0-2 and POD 0-6 measured on a 0-100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) was 61 and 48, respectively. Pain scores reached preoperative values at POD 30. The incidence of severe chronic pain...... to group assignment. The primary outcome was average pain from POD 0-2 (VAS score). Secondary outcome parameters were fatigue, general well-being and time to resume normal daily activity. Follow-up was one month for all. Patients in the FS group reported significantly less pain at POD 0-2 (median VAS 38...... satisfaction. This issue must have first priority in future ventral hernia repair research. It is now documented, that the simple application of fibrin glue instead of titanium tacks for mesh fixation in LVHR of defects period of convalescence. Long...

  3. Pain and convalescence following laparoscopic ventral hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2011-01-01

    , and general well-being were obtained from each patient. Follow-up was six months. Average pain from postoperative day (POD) 0-2 and POD 0-6 measured on a 0-100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) was 61 and 48, respectively. Pain scores reached preoperative values at POD 30. The incidence of severe chronic pain...... to group assignment. The primary outcome was average pain from POD 0-2 (VAS score). Secondary outcome parameters were fatigue, general well-being and time to resume normal daily activity. Follow-up was one month for all. Patients in the FS group reported significantly less pain at POD 0-2 (median VAS 38...... satisfaction. This issue must have first priority in future ventral hernia repair research. It is now documented, that the simple application of fibrin glue instead of titanium tacks for mesh fixation in LVHR of defects period of convalescence. Long...

  4. Activity in human visual and parietal cortex reveals object-based attention in working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Benjamin; Kaiser, Jochen; Rahm, Benjamin; Bledowski, Christoph

    2015-02-25

    Visual attention enables observers to select behaviorally relevant information based on spatial locations, features, or objects. Attentional selection is not limited to physically present visual information, but can also operate on internal representations maintained in working memory (WM) in service of higher-order cognition. However, only little is known about whether attention to WM contents follows the same principles as attention to sensory stimuli. To address this question, we investigated in humans whether the typically observed effects of object-based attention in perception are also evident for object-based attentional selection of internal object representations in WM. In full accordance with effects in visual perception, the key behavioral and neuronal characteristics of object-based attention were observed in WM. Specifically, we found that reaction times were shorter when shifting attention to memory positions located on the currently attended object compared with equidistant positions on a different object. Furthermore, functional magnetic resonance imaging and multivariate pattern analysis of visuotopic activity in visual (areas V1-V4) and parietal cortex revealed that directing attention to one position of an object held in WM also enhanced brain activation for other positions on the same object, suggesting that attentional selection in WM activates the entire object. This study demonstrated that all characteristic features of object-based attention are present in WM and thus follows the same principles as in perception. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/353360-10$15.00/0.

  5. Probabilistic White Matter Atlases of Human Auditory, Basal Ganglia, Language, Precuneus, Sensorimotor, Visual and Visuospatial Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figley, Teresa D; Mortazavi Moghadam, Behnoush; Bhullar, Navdeep; Kornelsen, Jennifer; Courtney, Susan M; Figley, Chase R

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite the popularity of functional connectivity analyses and the well-known topology of several intrinsic cortical networks, relatively little is known about the white matter regions (i.e., structural connectivity) underlying these networks. In the current study, we have therefore performed fMRI-guided diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography to create probabilistic white matter atlases for eight previously identified functional brain networks, including the Auditory, Basal Ganglia, Language, Precuneus, Sensorimotor, Primary Visual, Higher Visual and Visuospatial Networks. Methods: Whole-brain diffusion imaging data were acquired from a cohort of 32 healthy volunteers, and were warped to the ICBM template using a two-stage, high-dimensional, non-linear spatial normalization procedure. Deterministic tractography, with fractional anisotropy (FA) ≥0.15 and deviation angle matter atlases (i.e., for each tract and each network as a whole) were saved as NIFTI images in stereotaxic ICBM coordinates, and have been added to the UManitoba-JHU Functionally-Defined Human White Matter Atlas (http://www.nitrc.org/projects/uofm_jhu_atlas/). Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this work represents the first attempt to comprehensively identify and map white matter connectomes for the Auditory, Basal Ganglia, Language, Precuneus, Sensorimotor, Primary Visual, Higher Visual and Visuospatial Networks. Therefore, the resulting probabilistic atlases represent a unique tool for future neuroimaging studies wishing to ascribe voxel-wise or ROI-based changes (i.e., in DTI or other quantitative white matter imaging signals) to these functional brain networks.

  6. About turn: the visual representation of human body orientation revealed by adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Rebecca P; Clifford, Colin W G; Calder, Andrew J

    2009-03-01

    Body orientation provides an important cue to other individuals' focus of attention, particularly when one is viewing them at a distance. Single-cell recording in macaques has identified cells in the superior temporal sulcus that show a view-selective response to particular body orientations. Whether similar separable coding is found in humans is not known, and there is currently no functional account of the visual representation of seen body orientation. This study addressed this issue using visual adaptation. Experiment 1 demonstrated distinct channels that code left- and right-oriented bodies. Experiment 2 investigated whether the visual representation of body orientation is best accounted for by an opponent-coding system, which has been shown to account for the visual representation of facial identity, or by a multichannel system, which provides the optimal account of coding line orientation and direction of motion. Our results provide evidence for multichannel coding of seen body orientation, with separate channels (or neuronal populations) selectively tuned to different body directions.

  7. Attraction of position preference by spatial attention throughout human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Barrie P; Harvey, Ben M; Dumoulin, Serge O

    2014-10-01

    Voluntary spatial attention concentrates neural resources at the attended location. Here, we examined the effects of spatial attention on spatial position selectivity in humans. We measured population receptive fields (pRFs) using high-field functional MRI (fMRI) (7T) while subjects performed an attention-demanding task at different locations. We show that spatial attention attracts pRF preferred positions across the entire visual field, not just at the attended location. This global change in pRF preferred positions systematically increases up the visual hierarchy. We model these pRF preferred position changes as an interaction between two components: an attention field and a pRF without the influence of attention. This computational model suggests that increasing effects of attention up the hierarchy result primarily from differences in pRF size and that the attention field is similar across the visual hierarchy. A similar attention field suggests that spatial attention transforms different neural response selectivities throughout the visual hierarchy in a similar manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-uniform phase sensitivity in spatial frequency maps of the human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farivar, Reza; Clavagnier, Simon; Hansen, Bruce C; Thompson, Ben; Hess, Robert F

    2017-02-15

    Just as a portrait painting can come from a collection of coarse and fine details, natural vision can be decomposed into coarse and fine components. Previous studies have shown that the early visual areas in the brain represent these components in a map-like fashion. Other studies have shown that these same visual areas can be sensitive to how coarse and fine features line up in space. We found that the brain actually jointly represents both the scale of the feature (fine, medium, or coarse) and the alignment of these features in space. The results suggest that the visual cortex has an optimized representation particularly for the alignment of fine details, which are crucial in understanding the visual scene. Complex natural scenes can be decomposed into their oriented spatial frequency (SF) and phase relationships, both of which are represented locally at the earliest stages of cortical visual processing. The SF preference map in the human cortex, obtained using synthetic stimuli, is orderly and correlates strongly with eccentricity. In addition, early visual areas show sensitivity to the phase information that describes the relationship between SFs and thereby dictates the structure of the image. Taken together, two possibilities arise for the joint representation of SF and phase: either the entirety of the cortical SF map is uniformly sensitive to phase, or a particular set of SFs is selectively phase sensitive - for example, greater phase sensitivity for higher SFs that define fine-scale edges in a complex scene. To test between these two possibilities, we constructed a novel continuous natural scene video whereby phase information was maintained in one SF band but scrambled elsewhere. By shifting the central frequency of the phase-aligned band in time, we mapped the phase-sensitive SF preference of the visual cortex. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that phase sensitivity in early visual areas is biased toward higher SFs. Compared to a SF

  9. Lateral and medial ventral occipitotemporal regions interact during the recognition of images revealed from noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eNordhjem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies suggest different functional roles for the medial and the lateral ventral sections in object recognition. Texture and surface information is processed in medial regions, while shape information is processed in lateral sections. This begs the question whether and how these functionally specialized sections interact with each other and with early visual cortex to facilitate object recognition. In the current research, we set out to answer this question. In an fMRI study, thirteen subjects viewed and recognized images of objects and animals that were gradually revealed from noise while their brains were being scanned. We applied dynamic causal modeling (DCM – a method to characterize network interactions – to determine the modulatory effect of object recognition on a network comprising the primary visual cortex (V1, the lingual gyrus (LG in medial ventral cortex and the lateral occipital cortex (LO. We found that object recognition modulated the bilateral connectivity between LG and LO. Moreover, the feed-forward connectivity from V1 to LG and LO was modulated, while there was no evidence for feedback from these regions to V1 during object recognition. In particular, the interaction between medial and lateral areas supports a framework in which visual recognition of objects is achieved by networked regions that integrate information on image statistics, scene content and shape – rather than by a single categorically specialized region – within the ventral visual cortex.

  10. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation reduces psychophysically measured surround suppression in the human visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Spiegel

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a safe, non-invasive technique for transiently modulating the balance of excitation and inhibition within the human brain. It has been reported that anodal tDCS can reduce both GABA mediated inhibition and GABA concentration within the human motor cortex. As GABA mediated inhibition is thought to be a key modulator of plasticity within the adult brain, these findings have broad implications for the future use of tDCS. It is important, therefore, to establish whether tDCS can exert similar effects within non-motor brain areas. The aim of this study was to assess whether anodal tDCS could reduce inhibitory interactions within the human visual cortex. Psychophysical measures of surround suppression were used as an index of inhibition within V1. Overlay suppression, which is thought to originate within the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN, was also measured as a control. Anodal stimulation of the occipital poles significantly reduced psychophysical surround suppression, but had no effect on overlay suppression. This effect was specific to anodal stimulation as cathodal stimulation had no effect on either measure. These psychophysical results provide the first evidence for tDCS-induced reductions of intracortical inhibition within the human visual cortex.

  11. Infrared dim and small target detecting and tracking method inspired by Human Visual System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiabin; Huang, Xinsheng; Zheng, Yongbin; Shen, Lurong; Bai, Shengjian

    2014-01-01

    Detecting and tracking dim and small target in infrared images and videos is one of the most important techniques in many computer vision applications, such as video surveillance and infrared imaging precise guidance. Recently, more and more algorithms based on Human Visual System (HVS) have been proposed to detect and track the infrared dim and small target. In general, HVS concerns at least three mechanisms including contrast mechanism, visual attention and eye movement. However, most of the existing algorithms simulate only a single one of the HVS mechanisms, resulting in many drawbacks of these algorithms. A novel method which combines the three mechanisms of HVS is proposed in this paper. First, a group of Difference of Gaussians (DOG) filters which simulate the contrast mechanism are used to filter the input image. Second, a visual attention, which is simulated by a Gaussian window, is added at a point near the target in order to further enhance the dim small target. This point is named as the attention point. Eventually, the Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) algorithm is first introduced to predict the attention point of the next frame of an image which simulates the eye movement of human being. Experimental results of infrared images with different types of backgrounds demonstrate the high efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method to detect and track the dim and small targets.

  12. Non-visual biological effects of light on human cognition, alertness, and mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaye; Wang, Huihui; Shen, Junfei; Sun, Peng; Xie, Ting; Zhang, Siman; Zheng, Zhenrong

    2017-09-01

    Light exerts non-visual effects on a wide range of biological functions and behavior apart from the visual effect. Light can regulate human circadian rhythms, like the secretion of melatonin and cortisol. Light also has influence on body's physiological parameters, such as blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature. However, human cognitive performance, alertness and mood under different lighting conditions have not been considered thoroughly especially for the complicated visual task like surgical operating procedure. In this paper, an experiment was conducted to investigate the cognition, alertness and mood of healthy participants in a simulated operating room (OR) in the hospital. A LED surgical lamp was used as the light source, which is mixed by three color LEDs (amber, green and blue). The surgical lamp is flexible on both spectrum and intensity. Exposed to different light settings, which are varied from color temperature and luminance, participants were asked to take psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) for alertness measurement, alphabet test for cognitive performance measurement, positive and negative affect schedule (PANAS) for mood measurement. The result showed the participants' cognitive performance, alertness and mood are related to the color temperature and luminance of the LED light. This research will have a guidance for the surgical lighting environment, which can not only enhance doctors' efficiency during the operations, but also create a positive and peaceful surgical lighting environment.

  13. The effect of non-linear human visual system components on linear model observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yani; Pham, Binh T.; Eckstein, Miguel P.

    2004-05-01

    Linear model observers have been used successfully to predict human performance in clinically relevant visual tasks for a variety of backgrounds. On the other hand, there has been another family of models used to predict human visual detection of signals superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds (masks). These masking models usually include a number of non-linear components in the channels that reflect properties of the firing of cells in the primary visual cortex (V1). The relationship between these two traditions of models has not been extensively investigated in the context of detection in noise. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of including some of these non-linear components into a linear channelized Hotelling observer (CHO), and the associated practical implications for medical image quality evaluation. In particular, we evaluate whether the rank order evaluation of two compression algorithms (JPEG vs. JPEG 2000) is changed by inclusion of the non-linear components. The results show: a) First that the simpler linear CHO model observer outperforms CHO model with the nonlinear components investigated. b) The rank order of model observer performance for the compression algorithms did not vary when the non-linear components were included. For the present task, the results suggest that the addition of the physiologically based channel non-linearities to a channelized Hotelling might add complexity to the model observers without great impact on medical image quality evaluation.

  14. BrainNet Viewer: a network visualization tool for human brain connectomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mingrui; Wang, Jinhui; He, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The human brain is a complex system whose topological organization can be represented using connectomics. Recent studies have shown that human connectomes can be constructed using various neuroimaging technologies and further characterized using sophisticated analytic strategies, such as graph theory. These methods reveal the intriguing topological architectures of human brain networks in healthy populations and explore the changes throughout normal development and aging and under various pathological conditions. However, given the huge complexity of this methodology, toolboxes for graph-based network visualization are still lacking. Here, using MATLAB with a graphical user interface (GUI), we developed a graph-theoretical network visualization toolbox, called BrainNet Viewer, to illustrate human connectomes as ball-and-stick models. Within this toolbox, several combinations of defined files with connectome information can be loaded to display different combinations of brain surface, nodes and edges. In addition, display properties, such as the color and size of network elements or the layout of the figure, can be adjusted within a comprehensive but easy-to-use settings panel. Moreover, BrainNet Viewer draws the brain surface, nodes and edges in sequence and displays brain networks in multiple views, as required by the user. The figure can be manipulated with certain interaction functions to display more detailed information. Furthermore, the figures can be exported as commonly used image file formats or demonstration video for further use. BrainNet Viewer helps researchers to visualize brain networks in an easy, flexible and quick manner, and this software is freely available on the NITRC website (www.nitrc.org/projects/bnv/).

  15. BrainNet Viewer: a network visualization tool for human brain connectomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingrui Xia

    Full Text Available The human brain is a complex system whose topological organization can be represented using connectomics. Recent studies have shown that human connectomes can be constructed using various neuroimaging technologies and further characterized using sophisticated analytic strategies, such as graph theory. These methods reveal the intriguing topological architectures of human brain networks in healthy populations and explore the changes throughout normal development and aging and under various pathological conditions. However, given the huge complexity of this methodology, toolboxes for graph-based network visualization are still lacking. Here, using MATLAB with a graphical user interface (GUI, we developed a graph-theoretical network visualization toolbox, called BrainNet Viewer, to illustrate human connectomes as ball-and-stick models. Within this toolbox, several combinations of defined files with connectome information can be loaded to display different combinations of brain surface, nodes and edges. In addition, display properties, such as the color and size of network elements or the layout of the figure, can be adjusted within a comprehensive but easy-to-use settings panel. Moreover, BrainNet Viewer draws the brain surface, nodes and edges in sequence and displays brain networks in multiple views, as required by the user. The figure can be manipulated with certain interaction functions to display more detailed information. Furthermore, the figures can be exported as commonly used image file formats or demonstration video for further use. BrainNet Viewer helps researchers to visualize brain networks in an easy, flexible and quick manner, and this software is freely available on the NITRC website (www.nitrc.org/projects/bnv/.

  16. Functional mapping of the human visual cortex with intravoxel incoherent motion MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Federau

    Full Text Available Functional imaging with intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is demonstrated. Images were acquired at 3 Tesla using a standard Stejskal-Tanner diffusion-weighted echo-planar imaging sequence with multiple b-values. Cerebro-spinal fluid signal, which is highly incoherent, was suppressed with an inversion recovery preparation pulse. IVIM microvascular perfusion parameters were calculated according to a two-compartment (vascular and non-vascular diffusion model. The results obtained in 8 healthy human volunteers during visual stimulation are presented. The IVIM blood flow related parameter fD* increased 170% during stimulation in the visual cortex, and 70% in the underlying white matter.

  17. Direct Visual Servoing to Track Trajectories in Human-Robot Cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Pomares

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a dynamic image-based control system to guide two coupled robots. The first robot is a Mitsubishi PA-10 robotic manipulator which has a second mini-robot with 3 degrees of freedom (DOF attached at its end-effector. The vision system used for the guidance of both robots is composed of a camera at the end-effector of the mini-robot. The paper presents a new method to perform the mini-robot guidance using dynamic control to track a previous generated image trajectory. The mini-robot performs the tracking in a workspace in cooperation with a human operator. Therefore, the proposed visual control is combined with virtual visual servoing to perform a safety behavior.

  18. Complex for monitoring visual acuity and its application for evaluation of human psycho-physiological state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokoumov, P. S.; Khabibullin, T. R.; Tolstaya, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The existing psychological theories associate the movement of a human eye with its reactions to external change: what we see, hear and feel. By analyzing the glance, we can compare the external human response (which shows the behavior of a person), and the natural reaction (that they actually feels). This article describes the complex for detection of visual activity and its application for evaluation of the psycho-physiological state of a person. The glasses with a camera capture all the movements of the human eye in real time. The data recorded by the camera are transmitted to the computer for processing implemented with the help of the software developed by the authors. The result is given in an informative and an understandable report, which can be used for further analysis. The complex shows a high efficiency and stable operation and can be used both, for the pedagogic personnel recruitment and for testing students during the educational process.

  19. Short Duration Bioastronautics Investigation 1904: Human Factors Assessment of Vibration Effects on Visual Performance during Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Shelby; Holden, Kritina; Ebert, Douglas; Root, Phillip; Adelstein, Bernard; Jones, Jeffery

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of the Short Duration Bioastronautics Investigation (SDBI) 1904 was to determine visual performance limits during Shuttle operational vibration and g-loads, specifically through the determination of minimal usable font sizes using Orion-type display formats. Currently there is little to no data available to quantify human visual performance under the extreme g- and vibration conditions of launch. Existing data on shuttle vibration magnitude and frequency is incomplete and does not address human visual performance. There have been anecdotal reports of performance decrements from shuttle crews, but no structured data have been collected. Previous work by NASA on the effects of vibration and linear g-loads on human performance was conducted during the Gemini era, but these experiments were performed using displays and controls that are dramatically different than current concepts being considered by the Constellation Program. Recently, three investigations of visual performance under vibration have been completed at NASA Ames Research Center: the first examining whole-body vibration, the second employing whole-body vibration coupled with a sustained g-load, and a third examining the effects of peak versus extended duration vibration. However, all of these studies were conducted using only a single x-axis direction (eyeballs in/out). Estimates of thrust oscillations from the Constellation Ares-I first stage are driving the need for realistic human performance requirements. SDBI 1904 was an opportunity to address the need for requirements by conducting a highly focused and applied evaluation in a relevant spaceflight environment. The SDBI was a companion effort to Detailed Test Objective (DTO) 695, which measured shuttle seat accelerations (vibration) during ascent. Data from the SDBI will serve an important role in interpreting the DTO vibration data. Both SDBI 1904 and DTO 695 were low impact with respect to flight resources, and combined, they

  20. Human postural responses to motion of real and virtual visual environments under different support base conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergner, T; Schweigart, G; Maurer, C; Blümle, A

    2005-12-01

    The role of visual orientation cues for human control of upright stance is still not well understood. We, therefore, investigated stance control during motion of a visual scene as stimulus, varying the stimulus parameters and the contribution from other senses (vestibular and leg proprioceptive cues present or absent). Eight normal subjects and three patients with chronic bilateral loss of vestibular function participated. They stood on a motion platform inside a cabin with an optokinetic pattern on its interior walls. The cabin was sinusoidally rotated in anterior-posterior (a-p) direction with the horizontal rotation axis through the ankle joints (f=0.05-0.4 Hz; A (max)=0.25 degrees -4 degrees ; v (max)=0.08-10 degrees /s). The subjects' centre of mass (COM) angular position was calculated from opto-electronically measured body sway parameters. The platform was either kept stationary or moved by coupling its position 1:1 to a-p hip position ('body sway referenced', BSR, platform condition), by which proprioceptive feedback of ankle joint angle became inactivated. The visual stimulus evoked in-phase COM excursions (visual responses) in all subjects. (1) In normal subjects on a stationary platform, the visual responses showed saturation with both increasing velocity and displacement of the visual stimulus. The saturation showed up abruptly when visually evoked COM velocity and displacement reached approximately 0.1 degrees /s and 0.1 degrees , respectively. (2) In normal subjects on a BSR platform (proprioceptive feedback disabled), the visual responses showed similar saturation characteristics, but at clearly higher COM velocity and displacement values ( approximately 1 degrees /s and 1 degrees , respectively). (3) In patients on a stationary platform (no vestibular cues), the visual responses were basically similar to those of the normal subjects, apart from somewhat higher gain values and less-pronounced saturation effects. (4) In patients on a BSR platform (no

  1. EVALUATING A SEGMENTATION-RESISTANT CAPTCHA INSPIRED BY THE HUMAN VISUAL SYSTEM MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Moez Khan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Visual CAPTCHAs are widely used these days on the Internet as a means of distinguishing between humans and computers. They help protect servers from being flooded by requests from malicious scripts. However, they are not very secure. Numerous image processing algorithms are able to discern the characters used in the CAPTCHAs. It has been suggested that CAPTCHAs can be made more secure if they are distorted in ways that makes segmentation difficult. However, out of all the reviewed distortions present in current CAPTCHAs there are none that allow for a high level of segmentation difficulty. Furthermore, CAPTCHAs also need to be used by humans who may not find certain distortions tolerable. Thus, the problem of selecting a good distortion becomes a tradeoff between user acceptability and computer solvability. It is hypothesized in this paper that rather than use low-level image distortions, optical distortions based on the Gestalt laws of perception that govern human visual system models should be applied. These distortions would ensure widespread user acceptability (as they are based on the internal workings of the HVS, and be very difficult for computers to solve (as HVS perception models have been difficult to implement in computers. This paper aims to explore the feasibility of employing Gestalt-inspired distortion in CAPTCHAs by first implementing a CAPTCHA cracker and then evaluating the performance of some manually generated Gestalt CAPTCHA’s against some existing CAPTCHAs.

  2. Steady-state visually evoked potential correlates of human body perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giabbiconi, Claire-Marie; Jurilj, Verena; Gruber, Thomas; Vocks, Silja

    2016-11-01

    In cognitive neuroscience, interest in the neuronal basis underlying the processing of human bodies is steadily increasing. Based on functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, it is assumed that the processing of pictures of human bodies is anchored in a network of specialized brain areas comprising the extrastriate and the fusiform body area (EBA, FBA). An alternative to examine the dynamics within these networks is electroencephalography, more specifically so-called steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEPs). In SSVEP tasks, a visual stimulus is presented repetitively at a predefined flickering rate and typically elicits a continuous oscillatory brain response at this frequency. This brain response is characterized by an excellent signal-to-noise ratio-a major advantage for source reconstructions. The main goal of present study was to demonstrate the feasibility of this method to study human body perception. To that end, we presented pictures of bodies and contrasted the resulting SSVEPs to two control conditions, i.e., non-objects and pictures of everyday objects (chairs). We found specific SSVEPs amplitude differences between bodies and both control conditions. Source reconstructions localized the SSVEP generators to a network of temporal, occipital and parietal areas. Interestingly, only body perception resulted in activity differences in middle temporal and lateral occipitotemporal areas, most likely reflecting the EBA/FBA.

  3. Development of a scheme which visualizes the human-product interaction in minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veelen; Goossens; Meijer

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study is to visualize in a scheme all factors that are part of or influence the human-product interaction in minimally invasive surgery (MIS). The factors involved in the interaction are identified and investigated by means of literature studies, product information from producers and retailers, and by observation of MIS procedures. An interaction scheme has been compiled which encompasses the following factors: A product factor, divided into the surgical functions of image visualization, workspace creation, tissue treatment, tissue assessment, and procedure support. A human factor, divided into the functions of perception, cognition, and action. Internal factors (perceptional, cognitive, and action) and external factors (social, political, physical, clinical, and technological) that influence the interaction. Two product examples are used to demonstrate the use of the interaction scheme. The results show that when the design of a product focuses on limited factors, problems arise related to those factors which are not considered. The interaction scheme is a new way to represent the human-product interaction in MIS. It can be used to structure and to gain insight into problems that occur with the use of MIS products. The scheme also elucidates the factors that are involved in the interaction so that they can be considered in product and operating room design.

  4. Laminar imaging of positive and negative BOLD in human visual cortex at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracasso, Alessio; Luijten, Peter R; Dumoulin, Serge O; Petridou, Natalia

    2017-02-14

    Deciphering the direction of information flow is critical to understand the brain. Data from non-human primate histology shows that connections between lower to higher areas (e.g. retina→V1), and between higher to lower areas (e.g. V1←V2) can be dissociated based upon the distribution of afferent synapses at the laminar level. Ultra-high field scanners opened up the possibility to image brain structure and function at an unprecedented level of detail. Taking advantage of the increased spatial resolution available, it could theoretically be possible to disentangle activity from different cortical depths from human cerebral cortex, separately studying different compartments across depth. Here we use half-millimeter human functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, MRI) to derive laminar profiles in early visual cortex using a paradigm known to elicit two separate responses originating from an excitatory and a suppressive source, avoiding any contamination due to blood-stealing. We report the shape of laminar blood level oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) profiles from the excitatory and suppressive conditions. We analyse positive and negative %BOLD laminar profiles with respect to the dominating linear trend towards the pial surface, a confounding feature of gradient echo BOLD fMRI, and examine the correspondence with the anatomical landmark of input-related signals in primary visual cortex, the stria of Gennari. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Visualization of early influenza A virus trafficking in human dendritic cells using STED microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezzah Baharom

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses (IAV primarily target respiratory epithelial cells, but can also replicate in immune cells, including human dendritic cells (DCs. Super-resolution microscopy provides a novel method of visualizing viral trafficking by overcoming the resolution limit imposed by conventional light microscopy, without the laborious sample preparation of electron microscopy. Using three-color Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED microscopy, we visualized input IAV nucleoprotein (NP, early and late endosomal compartments (EEA1 and LAMP1 respectively, and HLA-DR (DC membrane/cytosol by immunofluorescence in human DCs. Surface bound IAV were internalized within 5 min of infection. The association of virus particles with early endosomes peaked at 5 min when 50% of NP+ signals were also EEA1+. Peak association with late endosomes occurred at 15 min when 60% of NP+ signals were LAMP1+. At 30 min of infection, the majority of NP signals were in the nucleus. Our findings illustrate that early IAV trafficking in human DCs proceeds via the classical endocytic pathway.

  6. Neuromuscular blockade during laparoscopic ventral herniotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Roar; Madsen, Matias V; Asadzadeh, Sami

    2015-01-01

    's rating of surgical conditions during suturing, duration of surgery and duration of the suturing of the hernia. CONCLUSION: This randomised cross-over study investigated a potential effect on the surgical workspace in laparoscopic ventral herniotomy using deep NMB compared with no NMB. The study may......INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic herniotomy is the preferred technique for some ventral hernias. Several factors may influence the surgical conditions, one being the depth of neuromuscular blockade (NMB) applied. We hypothesised that deep neuromuscular blockade defined as a post-tetanic count below eight...... would provide a better surgical workspace. METHODS: This was an investigator-initiated, assessor- and patient-blinded randomised cross-over study. A total of 34 patients with planned laparoscopic umbilical, incisional and linea alba herniotomy were studied. Patients would be randomised to receive deep...

  7. Enhanced recovery after giant ventral hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K K; Brøndum, T L; Harling, H.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Giant ventral hernia repair is associated with a high risk of postoperative morbidity and prolonged length of stay (LOS). Enhanced recovery (ERAS) measures have proved to lead to decreased morbidity and LOS after various surgical procedures, but never after giant hernia repair. The current...... study prospectively examined the results of implementation of an ERAS pathway including high-dose preoperative glucocorticoid, and compared the outcome with patients previously treated according to standard care (SC). METHODS: Consecutive patients who underwent giant ventral hernia repair were included...... was 0.92. There were no differences when comparing readmission (5 vs. 2, P = 0.394), postoperative complications (7 vs. 4, P = 0. 458), or reoperation (5 vs. 1, P = 0.172) in ERAS versus controls. CONCLUSIONS: The current study suggests that an ERAS pathway including preoperative high...

  8. Neuromuscular blockade during laparoscopic ventral herniotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Roar; Madsen, Matias V; Asadzadeh, Sami

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic herniotomy is the preferred technique for some ventral hernias. Several factors may influence the surgical conditions, one being the depth of neuromuscular blockade (NMB) applied. We hypothesised that deep neuromuscular blockade defined as a post-tetanic count below eight......'s rating of surgical conditions during suturing, duration of surgery and duration of the suturing of the hernia. CONCLUSION: This randomised cross-over study investigated a potential effect on the surgical workspace in laparoscopic ventral herniotomy using deep NMB compared with no NMB. The study may...... provide knowledge relevant to other laparoscopic techniques. FUNDING: The study is funded by a research grant from the Investigator Initiated Studies Program of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02247466....

  9. Cortical representation of persistent visual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Edden M; Golan, Tal; Knight, Robert T; Deouell, Leon Y

    2017-08-12

    Research into visual neural activity has focused almost exclusively on onset- or change-driven responses and little is known about how information is encoded in the brain during sustained periods of visual perception. We used intracranial recordings in humans to determine the degree to which the presence of a visual stimulus is persistently encoded by neural activity. The correspondence between stimulus duration and neural response duration was strongest in early visual cortex and gradually diminished along the visual hierarchy, such that is was weakest in inferior-temporal category-selective regions. A similar posterior-anterior gradient was found within inferior temporal face-selective regions, with posterior but not anterior sites showing persistent face-selective activity. The results suggest that regions that appear uniform in terms of their category selectivity are dissociated by how they temporally represent a stimulus in support of ongoing visual perception, and delineate a large-scale organizing principle of the ventral visual stream. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Effects of ventral striatal lesions on first- and second-order appetitive conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    McDannald, Michael A.; Setlow, Barry; Holland, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Rats with bilateral lesions of the ventral striatal nucleus accumbens failed to acquire Pavlovian second-order conditioning to auditory stimuli paired with visual stimuli that had previously received first-order pairings with food. This deficit in second-order conditioning was specific to learning driven by incentive properties of the first-order cues, and was observed whether the first-order training had occurred prior to or after lesion surgery. Lesions also produced deficits in the display...

  11. Representation of body identity and body actions in extrastriate body area and ventral premotor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgesi, Cosimo; Candidi, Matteo; Ionta, Silvio; Aglioti, Salvatore M

    2007-01-01

    Although inherently linked, body form and body action may be represented in separate neural substrates. Using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in healthy individuals, we show that interference with the extrastriate body area impairs the discrimination of bodily forms, and interference with the ventral premotor cortex impairs the discrimination of bodily actions. This double dissociation suggests that whereas extrastriate body area mainly processes actors' body identity, premotor cortex is crucial for visual discriminations of actions.

  12. Structural and functional changes across the visual cortex of a patient with visual form agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Holly; Thomas, Owen M; Minini, Loredana; Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana; Milner, A David; Parker, Andrew J

    2013-07-31

    Loss of shape recognition in visual-form agnosia occurs without equivalent losses in the use of vision to guide actions, providing support for the hypothesis of two visual systems (for "perception" and "action"). The human individual DF received a toxic exposure to carbon monoxide some years ago, which resulted in a persisting visual-form agnosia that has been extensively characterized at the behavioral level. We conducted a detailed high-resolution MRI study of DF's cortex, combining structural and functional measurements. We present the first accurate quantification of the changes in thickness across DF's occipital cortex, finding the most substantial loss in the lateral occipital cortex (LOC). There are reduced white matter connections between LOC and other areas. Functional measures show pockets of activity that survive within structurally damaged areas. The topographic mapping of visual areas showed that ordered retinotopic maps were evident for DF in the ventral portions of visual cortical areas V1, V2, V3, and hV4. Although V1 shows evidence of topographic order in its dorsal portion, such maps could not be found in the dorsal parts of V2 and V3. We conclude that it is not possible to understand fully the deficits in object perception in visual-form agnosia without the exploitation of both structural and functional measurements. Our results also highlight for DF the cortical routes through which visual information is able to pass to support her well-documented abilities to use visual information to guide actions.

  13. Ambulatory groin and ventral hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, P; Pélissier, E; Levard, H; Perniceni, T; Denet, C; Gayet, B

    2010-10-01

    Ambulatory surgery is not commonly practiced in France today. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the feasibility of ambulatory hernia repair in a consecutive series of unselected patients. From June 2008 to October 2009, 257 patients (238 men and 19 women, median age 65 years) were treated in a same-day surgery unit for 270 hernias (244 groin hernias, 25 ventral hernias and one Spiegelian hernia). For groin hernia, the techniques included the totally extraperitoneal repair (TEP) in 108 cases, the transinguinal preperitoneal (TIPP) approach in 106 cases and other alternative techniques in 30 cases; for ventral hernias, the technique was an open suture in 20 cases, an open prosthetic repair in four cases and laparoscopic repair in one case. Anesthesia was general in 145 cases, local in 121 cases and spinal in four cases. Repair was completed in a same-day surgery setting in 242 (89.6%) cases; hospital stay greater than 23 hours was planned for 21 (7.8%) patients while non-programmed hospitalizations were necessary for seven (2.6%) patients. There were two (0.7%) readmissions and nine (3.3%) benign postoperative complications. These results suggest that groin and ventral hernia repair can be performed in an outpatient setting in nearly 90% of unselected patients. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Ventral hernia repair with simultaneous panniculectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, K C; Weider, L; Fischer, J; Hopkins, J; Antonetti, A; Manders, E K; Dunn, E

    1996-08-01

    The repair of a ventral hernia in an obese patient presents an interesting clinical challenge. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 55 patients who, over a 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, concomitantly underwent both ventral herniorrhaphy and panniculectomy or abdominoplasty. In six of 55 patients, the hernia was recurrent. Forty-six patients had primary abdominal wall hernias or diastasis recti. Nineteen of 55 patients had weight greater than 200 lbs. This last subset of patients had a significantly higher incidence of complications, such as seroma, cellulitis, and persistent wound drainage. In our 55 patients, we experienced only two hernia recurrences (3.6%) during an average patient follow-up of 53 weeks. From this experience, we believe that simultaneous ventral hernia repair and panniculectomy is a safe and efficacious approach to these two problems so commonly found in the obese patient. Patients with a preoperative weight greater than 200 lbs can be expected to have a greater risk of wound complications. In all cases, the wounds eventually healed with no long-term sequelae.

  15. The timing of visual evoked potential activity in human area V4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, H; Weyen, U; Frackowiak, R S; Romaya, J; Zeki, S

    1994-07-22

    Studies of human occipital visual cortex have demonstrated functional specializations for colour and for motion, with a pivotal area for colour processing (area V4) being located in the fusiform gyrus. To study the timing of arrival of signals in area V4 we have recorded multi-channel visual evoked potentials (VEPS) to colour and grey 'Mondrian' stimuli, spatio-temporal dipole source analysis being computed on two independent group averages of five and six subjects respectively. Three active brain regions were identified, which we interpret to correspond to areas V1, V2 and V4; they showed sequential but overlapping activity in time with no difference in magnitude between colour and grey stimulated VEPs. Source analysis of the difference potentials, colour minus grey, isolated source activity resulting from colour stimulation and located it in the region of area V4. Activity in area V4 started at 100 ms and peaked at 135 ms after the onset of the visual stimulus.

  16. Supporting Clinical Cognition: A Human-Centered Approach to a Novel ICU Information Visualization Dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiola, Anthony; Srinivas, Preethi; Duke, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Advances in intensive care unit bedside displays/interfaces and electronic medical record (EMR) technology have not adequately addressed the topic of visual clarity of patient data/information to further reduce cognitive load during clinical decision-making. We responded to these challenges with a human-centered approach to designing and testing a decision-support tool: MIVA 2.0 (Medical Information Visualization Assistant, v.2). Envisioned as an EMR visualization dashboard to support rapid analysis of real-time clinical data-trends, our primary goal originated from a clinical requirement to reduce cognitive overload. In the study, a convenience sample of 12 participants were recruited, in which quantitative and qualitative measures were used to compare MIVA 2.0 with ICU paper medical-charts, using time-on-task, post-test questionnaires, and interviews. Findings demonstrated a significant difference in speed and accuracy with the use of MIVA 2.0. Qualitative outcomes concurred, with participants acknowledging the potential impact of MIVA 2.0 for reducing cognitive load and enabling more accurate and quicker decision-making.

  17. ArchiLD: hierarchical visualization of linkage disequilibrium in human populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Melchiotti

    Full Text Available Linkage disequilibrium (LD is an essential metric for selecting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs to use in genetic studies and identifying causal variants from significant tag SNPs. The explosion in the number of polymorphisms that can now be genotyped by commercial arrays makes the interpretation of triangular correlation plots, commonly used for visualizing LD, extremely difficult in particular when large genomics regions need to be considered or when SNPs in perfect LD are not adjacent but scattered across a genomic region. We developed ArchiLD, a user-friendly graphical application for the hierarchical visualization of LD in human populations. The software provides a powerful framework for analyzing LD patterns with a particular focus on blocks of SNPs in perfect linkage as defined by r(2. Thanks to its integration with the UCSC Genome Browser, LD plots can be easily overlapped with additional data on regulation, conservation and expression. ArchiLD is an intuitive solution for the visualization of LD across large or highly polymorphic genomic regions. Its ease of use and its integration with the UCSC Genome Browser annotation potential facilitates the interpretation of association results and enables a more informed selection of tag SNPs for genetic studies.

  18. Patient-tailored multimodal neuroimaging, visualization and quantification of human intra-cerebral hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Sheng-Yang M.; Irimia, Andrei; Vespa, Paul M.; Van Horn, John D.

    2016-03-01

    In traumatic brain injury (TBI) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the heterogeneity of lesion sizes and types necessitates a variety of imaging modalities to acquire a comprehensive perspective on injury extent. Although it is advantageous to combine imaging modalities and to leverage their complementary benefits, there are difficulties in integrating information across imaging types. Thus, it is important that efforts be dedicated to the creation and sustained refinement of resources for multimodal data integration. Here, we propose a novel approach to the integration of neuroimaging data acquired from human patients with TBI/ICH using various modalities; we also demonstrate the integrated use of multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data for TBI analysis based on both visual observations and quantitative metrics. 3D models of healthy-appearing tissues and TBIrelated pathology are generated, both of which are derived from multimodal imaging data. MRI volumes acquired using FLAIR, SWI, and T2 GRE are used to segment pathology. Healthy tissues are segmented using user-supervised tools, and results are visualized using a novel graphical approach called a `connectogram', where brain connectivity information is depicted within a circle of radially aligned elements. Inter-region connectivity and its strength are represented by links of variable opacities drawn between regions, where opacity reflects the percentage longitudinal change in brain connectivity density. Our method for integrating, analyzing and visualizing structural brain changes due to TBI and ICH can promote knowledge extraction and enhance the understanding of mechanisms underlying recovery.

  19. Intraocular Telescopic System Design: Optical and Visual Simulation in a Human Eye Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoulinakis, Georgios; Ferrer-Blasco, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To design an intraocular telescopic system (ITS) for magnifying retinal image and to simulate its optical and visual performance after implantation in a human eye model. Methods. Design and simulation were carried out with a ray-tracing and optical design software. Two different ITS were designed, and their visual performance was simulated using the Liou-Brennan eye model. The difference between the ITS was their lenses' placement in the eye model and their powers. Ray tracing in both centered and decentered situations was carried out for both ITS while visual Strehl ratio (VSOTF) was computed using custom-made MATLAB code. Results. The results show that between 0.4 and 0.8 mm of decentration, the VSOTF does not change much either for far or near target distances. The image projection for these decentrations is in the parafoveal zone, and the quality of the image projected is quite similar. Conclusion. Both systems display similar quality while they differ in size; therefore, the choice between them would need to take into account specific parameters from the patient's eye. Quality does not change too much between 0.4 and 0.8 mm of decentration for either system which gives flexibility to the clinician to adjust decentration to avoid areas of retinal damage.

  20. Intraocular Telescopic System Design: Optical and Visual Simulation in a Human Eye Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Zoulinakis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To design an intraocular telescopic system (ITS for magnifying retinal image and to simulate its optical and visual performance after implantation in a human eye model. Methods. Design and simulation were carried out with a ray-tracing and optical design software. Two different ITS were designed, and their visual performance was simulated using the Liou-Brennan eye model. The difference between the ITS was their lenses’ placement in the eye model and their powers. Ray tracing in both centered and decentered situations was carried out for both ITS while visual Strehl ratio (VSOTF was computed using custom-made MATLAB code. Results. The results show that between 0.4 and 0.8 mm of decentration, the VSOTF does not change much either for far or near target distances. The image projection for these decentrations is in the parafoveal zone, and the quality of the image projected is quite similar. Conclusion. Both systems display similar quality while they differ in size; therefore, the choice between them would need to take into account specific parameters from the patient’s eye. Quality does not change too much between 0.4 and 0.8 mm of decentration for either system which gives flexibility to the clinician to adjust decentration to avoid areas of retinal damage.

  1. The roles of gamma-band oscillatory synchrony in human visual cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallon-Baudry, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Oscillatory synchrony in the gamma (30-120 Hz) range has initially been related both theoretically and experimentally to visual grouping. Its functional role in human visual cognition turns out to be much broader, especially when attention, memory or awareness are concerned. Induced gamma oscillations are thus not related to a single cognitive function, and are probably better understood in terms of a population mechanism taking advantage of the neuron's fine temporal tuning: the 10-30 ms time precision imposed by gamma-band rhythms could favor the selective transmission of synchronized information (attention) and foster synaptic plasticity (memory). Besides, gamma oscillatory synchrony also seems related to the emergence of visual awareness. The recent discovery that gamma oscillations could appear simultaneously in distinct areas at distinct frequencies and with different functional correlates further suggests the existence of a flexible multiplexing schema, integrating frequency bands within the gamma range but also at lower frequency bands. Understanding how and when oscillations at different frequencies interact has become a major challenge for the years to come.

  2. Limits on perceptual encoding can be predicted from known receptive field properties of human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael A; Rhee, Juliana Y; Alvarez, George A

    2016-01-01

    Human cognition has a limited capacity that is often attributed to the brain having finite cognitive resources, but the nature of these resources is usually not specified. Here, we show evidence that perceptual interference between items can be predicted by known receptive field properties of the visual cortex, suggesting that competition within representational maps is an important source of the capacity limitations of visual processing. Across the visual hierarchy, receptive fields get larger and represent more complex, high-level features. Thus, when presented simultaneously, high-level items (e.g., faces) will often land within the same receptive fields, while low-level items (e.g., color patches) will often not. Using a perceptual task, we found long-range interference between high-level items, but only short-range interference for low-level items, with both types of interference being weaker across hemifields. Finally, we show that long-range interference between items appears to occur primarily during perceptual encoding and not during working memory maintenance. These results are naturally explained by the distribution of receptive fields and establish a link between perceptual capacity limits and the underlying neural architecture. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. White matter anisotropy in the ventral language pathway predicts sound-to-word learning success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Francis C K; Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Garibaldi, Kyla; Wong, Patrick C M

    2011-06-15

    According to the dual stream model of auditory language processing, the dorsal stream is responsible for mapping sound to articulation and the ventral stream plays the role of mapping sound to meaning. Most researchers agree that the arcuate fasciculus (AF) is the neuroanatomical correlate of the dorsal steam; however, less is known about what constitutes the ventral one. Nevertheless, two hypotheses exist: one suggests that the segment of the AF that terminates in middle temporal gyrus corresponds to the ventral stream, and the other suggests that it is the extreme capsule that underlies this sound-to-meaning pathway. The goal of this study was to evaluate these two competing hypotheses. We trained participants with a sound-to-word learning paradigm in which they learned to use a foreign phonetic contrast for signaling word meaning. Using diffusion tensor imaging, a brain-imaging tool to investigate white matter connectivity in humans, we found that fractional anisotropy in the left parietal-temporal region positively correlated with the performance in sound-to-word learning. In addition, fiber tracking revealed a ventral pathway, composed of the extreme capsule and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, that mediated auditory comprehension. Our findings provide converging evidence supporting the importance of the ventral steam, an extreme capsule system, in the frontal-temporal language network. Implications for current models of speech processing are also discussed.

  4. Fetal porcine ventral mesencephalon graft. Determination of the optimal gestational age for implantation in Parkinsonian patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HogenEsch, RI; Koopmans, J; Copray, JCVM; van Roon, WMC; Kema, [No Value; Molenaar, G; Go, KG; Staal, MJ

    Human fetal ventral mesencephalon tissue has been used as dopaminergic striatal implants in Parkinsonian patients, so far with variable effects. Fetuses from animals that breed in large litters, e.g., pigs, have been considered as alternative donors of dopaminergic tissue. The optimal gestational

  5. Feasibility and outcome after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair using Proceed mesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J.; Burcharth, J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are many different meshes available for laparoscopic repair of ventral hernias. A relatively new product is the Proceed mesh with a bioresorbable layer against the bowels and a polypropylene layer against the abdominal wall. There are, however, no human data available. The aim...

  6. Do you see what I see? The difference between dog and human visual perception may affect the outcome of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongrácz, Péter; Ujvári, Vera; Faragó, Tamás; Miklósi, Ádám; Péter, András

    2017-07-01

    The visual sense of dogs is in many aspects different than that of humans. Unfortunately, authors do not explicitly take into consideration dog-human differences in visual perception when designing their experiments. With an image manipulation program we altered stationary images, according to the present knowledge about dog-vision. Besides the effect of dogs' dichromatic vision, the software shows the effect of the lower visual acuity and brightness discrimination, too. Fifty adult humans were tested with pictures showing a female experimenter pointing, gazing or glancing to the left or right side. Half of the pictures were shown after they were altered to a setting that approximated dog vision. Participants had difficulty to find out the direction of glancing when the pictures were in dog-vision mode. Glances in dog-vision setting were followed less correctly and with a slower response time than other cues. Our results are the first that show the visual performance of humans under circumstances that model how dogs' weaker vision would affect their responses in an ethological experiment. We urge researchers to take into consideration the differences between perceptual abilities of dogs and humans, by developing visual stimuli that fit more appropriately to dogs' visual capabilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. 3D Visual Sensing of the Human Hand for the Remote Operation of a Robotic Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Gil

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available New low cost sensors and open free libraries for 3D image processing are making important advances in robot vision applications possible, such as three-dimensional object recognition, semantic mapping, navigation and localization of robots, human detection and/or gesture recognition for human-machine interaction. In this paper, a novel method for recognizing and tracking the fingers of a human hand is presented. This method is based on point clouds from range images captured by a RGBD sensor. It works in real time and it does not require visual marks, camera calibration or previous knowledge of the environment. Moreover, it works successfully even when multiple objects appear in the scene or when the ambient light is changed. Furthermore, this method was designed to develop a human interface to control domestic or industrial devices, remotely. In this paper, the method was tested by operating a robotic hand. Firstly, the human hand was recognized and the fingers were detected. Secondly, the movement of the fingers was analysed and mapped to be imitated by a robotic hand.

  8. Parietal structure and function explain human variation in working memory biases of visual attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, David; Rotshtein, Pia; Kanai, Ryota

    2014-04-01

    Recent research indicates that human attention appears inadvertently biased by items that match the contents of working memory (WM). WM-biases can lead to attentional costs when the memory content matches goal-irrelevant items and to attentional benefits when it matches the sought target. Here we used functional and structural MRI data to determine the neural basis of human variation in WM biases. We asked whether human variation in WM-benefits and WM-costs merely reflects the process of attentional capture by the contents of WM or whether variation in WM biases may be associated with distinct forms of cognitive control over internal WM signals based on selection goals. Human ability to use WM contents to facilitate selection was positively correlated with gray matter volume in the left superior posterior parietal cortex (PPC), while the ability to overcome interference by WM-matching distracters was associated with the left inferior PPC in the anterior IPS. Functional activity in the left PPC, measured by functional MRI, also predicted the magnitude of WM-costs on selection. Both structure and function of left PPC mediate the expression of WM biases in human visual attention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Human retinal gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis shows advancing retinal degeneration despite enduring visual improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cideciyan, Artur V; Jacobson, Samuel G; Beltran, William A; Sumaroka, Alexander; Swider, Malgorzata; Iwabe, Simone; Roman, Alejandro J; Olivares, Melani B; Schwartz, Sharon B; Komáromy, András M; Hauswirth, William W; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2013-02-05

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) associated with retinal pigment epithelium-specific protein 65 kDa (RPE65) mutations is a severe hereditary blindness resulting from both dysfunction and degeneration of photoreceptors. Clinical trials with gene augmentation therapy have shown partial reversal of the dysfunction, but the effects on the degeneration are not known. We evaluated the consequences of gene therapy on retinal degeneration in patients with RPE65-LCA and its canine model. In untreated RPE65-LCA patients, there was dysfunction and degeneration of photoreceptors, even at the earliest ages. Examined serially over years, the outer photoreceptor nuclear layer showed progressive thinning. Treated RPE65-LCA showed substantial visual improvement in the short term and no detectable decline from this new level over the long term. However, retinal degeneration continued to progress unabated. In RPE65-mutant dogs, the first one-quarter of their lifespan showed only dysfunction, and there was normal outer photoreceptor nuclear layer thickness retina-wide. Dogs treated during the earlier dysfunction-only stage showed improved visual function and dramatic protection of treated photoreceptors from degeneration when measured 5-11 y later. Dogs treated later during the combined dysfunction and degeneration stage also showed visual function improvement, but photoreceptor loss continued unabated, the same as in human RPE65-LCA. The results suggest that, in RPE65 disease treatment, protection from visual function deterioration cannot be assumed to imply protection from degeneration. The effects of gene augmentation therapy are complex and suggest a need for a combinatorial strategy in RPE65-LCA to not only improve function in the short term but also slow retinal degeneration in the long term.

  10. Cross-sensory facilitation reveals neural interactions between visual and tactile motion in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica eGori

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Many recent studies show that the human brain integrates information across the different senses and that stimuli of one sensory modality can enhance the perception of other modalities. Here we study the processes that mediate cross-modal facilitation and summation between visual and tactile motion. We find that while summation produced a generic, non-specific improvement of thresholds, probably reflecting higher-order interaction of decision signals, facilitation reveals a strong, direction-specific interaction, which we believe reflects sensory interactions. We measured visual and tactile velocity discrimination thresholds over a wide range of base velocities and conditions. Thresholds for both visual and tactile stimuli showed the characteristic dipper function, with the minimum thresholds occurring at a given pedestal speed. When visual and tactile coherent stimuli were combined (summation condition the thresholds for these multi-sensory stimuli also showed a dipper function with the minimum thresholds occurring in a similar range to that for unisensory signals. However, the improvement of multisensory thresholds was weak and not directionally specific, well predicted by the maximum likelihood estimation model (agreeing with previous research. A different technique (facilitation did, however, reveal direction-specific enhancement. Adding a non-informative pedestal motion stimulus in one sensory modality (vision or touch selectively lowered thresholds in the other, by the same amount as pedestals in the same modality. Facilitation did not occur for neutral stimuli like sounds (that would also have reduced temporal uncertainty, nor for motion in opposite direction, even in blocked trials where the subjects knew that the motion was in the opposite direction showing that the facilitation was not under subject control. Cross-sensory facilitation is strong evidence for functionally relevant cross-sensory integration at early levels of sensory

  11. iELVis: An open source MATLAB toolbox for localizing and visualizing human intracranial electrode data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groppe, David M; Bickel, Stephan; Dykstra, Andrew R; Wang, Xiuyuan; Mégevand, Pierre; Mercier, Manuel R; Lado, Fred A; Mehta, Ashesh D; Honey, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    Intracranial electrical recordings (iEEG) and brain stimulation (iEBS) are invaluable human neuroscience methodologies. However, the value of such data is often unrealized as many laboratories lack tools for localizing electrodes relative to anatomy. To remedy this, we have developed a MATLAB toolbox for intracranial electrode localization and visualization, iELVis. NEW METHOD: iELVis uses existing tools (BioImage Suite, FSL, and FreeSurfer) for preimplant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) segmentation, neuroimaging coregistration, and manual identification of electrodes in postimplant neuroimaging. Subsequently, iELVis implements methods for correcting electrode locations for postimplant brain shift with millimeter-scale accuracy and provides interactive visualization on 3D surfaces or in 2D slices with optional functional neuroimaging overlays. iELVis also localizes electrodes relative to FreeSurfer-based atlases and can combine data across subjects via the FreeSurfer average brain. It takes 30-60min of user time and 12-24h of computer time to localize and visualize electrodes from one brain. We demonstrate iELVis's functionality by showing that three methods for mapping primary hand somatosensory cortex (iEEG, iEBS, and functional MRI) provide highly concordant results. COMPARISON WITH EXISTING METHODS: iELVis is the first public software for electrode localization that corrects for brain shift, maps electrodes to an average brain, and supports neuroimaging overlays. Moreover, its interactive visualizations are powerful and its tutorial material is extensive. iELVis promises to speed the progress and enhance the robustness of intracranial electrode research. The software and extensive tutorial materials are freely available as part of the EpiSurg software project: https://github.com/episurg/episurg. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasticity in the Human Visual Cortex: An Ophthalmology-Based Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Andreia Martins; Silva, Maria Fátima; Murta, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    Neuroplasticity refers to the ability of the brain to reorganize the function and structure of its connections in response to changes in the environment. Adult human visual cortex shows several manifestations of plasticity, such as perceptual learning and adaptation, working under the top-down influence of attention. Plasticity results from the interplay of several mechanisms, including the GABAergic system, epigenetic factors, mitochondrial activity, and structural remodeling of synaptic connectivity. There is also a downside of plasticity, that is, maladaptive plasticity, in which there are behavioral losses resulting from plasticity changes in the human brain. Understanding plasticity mechanisms could have major implications in the diagnosis and treatment of ocular diseases, such as retinal disorders, cataract and refractive surgery, amblyopia, and in the evaluation of surgical materials and techniques. Furthermore, eliciting plasticity could open new perspectives in the development of strategies that trigger plasticity for better medical and surgical outcomes. PMID:24205505

  13. Contributions of local speech encoding and functional connectivity to audio-visual speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Bruno L; Ince, Robin A A; Gross, Joachim; Schyns, Philippe G; Panzeri, Stefano; Kayser, Christoph

    2017-06-07

    Seeing a speaker's face enhances speech intelligibility in adverse environments. We investigated the underlying network mechanisms by quantifying local speech representations and directed connectivity in MEG data obtained while human participants listened to speech of varying acoustic SNR and visual context. During high acoustic SNR speech encoding by temporally entrained brain activity was strong in temporal and inferior frontal cortex, while during low SNR strong entrainment emerged in premotor and superior frontal cortex. These changes in local encoding were accompanied by changes in directed connectivity along the ventral stream and the auditory-premotor axis. Importantly, the behavioral benefit arising from seeing the speaker's face was not predicted by changes in local encoding but rather by enhanced functional connectivity between temporal and inferior frontal cortex. Our results demonstrate a role of auditory-frontal interactions in visual speech representations and suggest that functional connectivity along the ventral pathway facilitates speech comprehension in multisensory environments.

  14. Comprehensive reconstruction and visualization of non-coding regulatory networks in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnici, Vincenzo; Russo, Francesco; Bombieri, Nicola; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba

    2014-01-01

    Research attention has been powered to understand the functional roles of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Many studies have demonstrated their deregulation in cancer and other human disorders. ncRNAs are also present in extracellular human body fluids such as serum and plasma, giving them a great potential as non-invasive biomarkers. However, non-coding RNAs have been relatively recently discovered and a comprehensive database including all of them is still missing. Reconstructing and visualizing the network of ncRNAs interactions are important steps to understand their regulatory mechanism in complex systems. This work presents ncRNA-DB, a NoSQL database that integrates ncRNAs data interactions from a large number of well established on-line repositories. The interactions involve RNA, DNA, proteins, and diseases. ncRNA-DB is available at http://ncrnadb.scienze.univr.it/ncrnadb/. It is equipped with three interfaces: web based, command-line, and a Cytoscape app called ncINetView. By accessing only one resource, users can search for ncRNAs and their interactions, build a network annotated with all known ncRNAs and associated diseases, and use all visual and mining features available in Cytoscape.

  15. Comprehensive Reconstruction and Visualization of Non-Coding Regulatory Networks in Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnici, Vincenzo; Russo, Francesco; Bombieri, Nicola; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba

    2014-01-01

    Research attention has been powered to understand the functional roles of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Many studies have demonstrated their deregulation in cancer and other human disorders. ncRNAs are also present in extracellular human body fluids such as serum and plasma, giving them a great potential as non-invasive biomarkers. However, non-coding RNAs have been relatively recently discovered and a comprehensive database including all of them is still missing. Reconstructing and visualizing the network of ncRNAs interactions are important steps to understand their regulatory mechanism in complex systems. This work presents ncRNA-DB, a NoSQL database that integrates ncRNAs data interactions from a large number of well established on-line repositories. The interactions involve RNA, DNA, proteins, and diseases. ncRNA-DB is available at http://ncrnadb.scienze.univr.it/ncrnadb/. It is equipped with three interfaces: web based, command-line, and a Cytoscape app called ncINetView. By accessing only one resource, users can search for ncRNAs and their interactions, build a network annotated with all known ncRNAs and associated diseases, and use all visual and mining features available in Cytoscape. PMID:25540777

  16. Self-Control and Impulsiveness in Nondieting Adult Human Females: Effects of Visual Food Cues and Food Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzano, Lori-Ann B.; Chelonis, John J.; Casey, Caitlin; Forward, Marion; Stachowiak, Jacqueline A.; Wood, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Self-control can be defined as the choice of a larger, more delayed reinforcer over a smaller, less delayed reinforcer, and impulsiveness as the opposite. Previous research suggests that exposure to visual food cues affects adult humans' self-control. Previous research also suggests that food deprivation decreases adult humans' self-control. The…

  17. Convolutional neural network-based encoding and decoding of visual object recognition in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeliger, K; Fritsche, M; Güçlü, U; Schoenmakers, S; Schoffelen, J-M; Bosch, S E; van Gerven, M A J

    2017-07-16

    Representations learned by deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for object recognition are a widely investigated model of the processing hierarchy in the human visual system. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, CNN representations of visual stimuli have previously been shown to correspond to processing stages in the ventral and dorsal streams of the visual system. Whether this correspondence between models and brain signals also holds for activity acquired at high temporal resolution has been explored less exhaustively. Here, we addressed this question by combining CNN-based encoding models with magnetoencephalography (MEG). Human participants passively viewed 1,000 images of objects while MEG signals were acquired. We modelled their high temporal resolution source-reconstructed cortical activity with CNNs, and observed a feed-forward sweep across the visual hierarchy between 75 and 200 ms after stimulus onset. This spatiotemporal cascade was captured by the network layer representations, where the increasingly abstract stimulus representation in the hierarchical network model was reflected in different parts of the visual cortex, following the visual ventral stream. We further validated the accuracy of our encoding model by decoding stimulus identity in a left-out validation set of viewed objects, achieving state-of-the-art decoding accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Accessing orthographic representations from speech: the role of left ventral occipitotemporal cortex in spelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludersdorfer, Philipp; Kronbichler, Martin; Wimmer, Heinz

    2015-04-01

    The present fMRI study used a spelling task to investigate the hypothesis that the left ventral occipitotemporal cortex (vOT) hosts neuronal representations of whole written words. Such an orthographic word lexicon is posited by cognitive dual-route theories of reading and spelling. In the scanner, participants performed a spelling task in which they had to indicate if a visually presented letter is present in the written form of an auditorily presented word. The main experimental manipulation distinguished between an orthographic word spelling condition in which correct spelling decisions had to be based on orthographic whole-word representations, a word spelling condition in which reliance on orthographic whole-word representations was optional and a phonological pseudoword spelling condition in which no reliance on such representations was possible. To evaluate spelling-specific activations the spelling conditions were contrasted with control conditions that also presented auditory words and pseudowords, but participants had to indicate if a visually presented letter corresponded to the gender of the speaker. We identified a left vOT cluster activated for the critical orthographic word spelling condition relative to both the control condition and the phonological pseudoword spelling condition. Our results suggest that activation of left vOT during spelling can be attributed to the retrieval of orthographic whole-word representations and, thus, support the position that the left vOT potentially represents the neuronal equivalent of the cognitive orthographic word lexicon. © 2014 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Visualization of particle flux in the human body on the surface of Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saganti, P.B.; Cucinotta, F.A. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Johnson Space Center; Wilson, J.W.; Schimmerling, W. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center

    2002-12-01

    For a given galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment, information on the particle flux of protons, alpha particles, and heavy ions, that varies with respect to the topographical altitude on the Martian surface, are needed for planning exploration missions to Mars. The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission with its Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument has been providing precise topographical surface map of the Mars. With this topographical data, the particle flux at the Martian surface level through the CO{sub 2} atmospheric shielding for solar minimum and solar maximum conditions are calculated. These particle flux calculations are then transported first through an anticipated shielding of a conceptual shelter with several water equivalent shield values (up to 50 g/cm{sup 2} of water in steps of 5 g/cm{sup 2}) considered to represent a surface habitat, and then into the human body. Model calculations are accomplished utilizing the high Z and energy transport (HZETRN), quantum multiple-scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation(QMSFRG), and SUM-MARS codes. Particle flux calculations for 12 different locations in the human body were considered from skin depth to the internal organs including the blood-forming organs (BFO). Visualization of particle flux in the human body at different altitudes on the Martian surface behind a known shielding is anticipated to provide guidance for assessing radiation environment risk on the Martian surface for future human missions.(author)

  20. MALINA: a web service for visual analytics of human gut microbiota whole-genome metagenomic reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyakht, Alexander V; Popenko, Anna S; Belenikin, Maxim S; Altukhov, Ilya A; Pavlenko, Alexander V; Kostryukova, Elena S; Selezneva, Oksana V; Larin, Andrei K; Karpova, Irina Y; Alexeev, Dmitry G

    2012-12-07

    MALINA is a web service for bioinformatic analysis of whole-genome metagenomic data obtained from human gut microbiota sequencing. As input data, it accepts metagenomic reads of various sequencing technologies, including long reads (such as Sanger and 454 sequencing) and next-generation (including SOLiD and Illumina). It is the first metagenomic web service that is capable of processing SOLiD color-space reads, to authors' knowledge. The web service allows phylogenetic and functional profiling of metagenomic samples using coverage depth resulting from the alignment of the reads to the catalogue of reference sequences which are built into the pipeline and contain prevalent microbial genomes and genes of human gut microbiota. The obtained metagenomic composition vectors are processed by the statistical analysis and visualization module containing methods for clustering, dimension reduction and group comparison. Additionally, the MALINA database includes vectors of bacterial and functional composition for human gut microbiota samples from a large number of existing studies allowing their comparative analysis together with user samples, namely datasets from Russian Metagenome project, MetaHIT and Human Microbiome Project (downloaded from http://hmpdacc.org). MALINA is made freely available on the web at http://malina.metagenome.ru. The website is implemented in JavaScript (using Ext JS), Microsoft .NET Framework, MS SQL, Python, with all major browsers supported.

  1. Saccades during visual exploration align hippocampal 3-8 Hz rhythms in human and non-human primates

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    Kari L Hoffman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Visual exploration in primates depends on saccadic eye movements that cause alternations of neural suppression and enhancement. This modulation extends beyond retinotopic areas, and is thought to facilitate perception; yet saccades may also influence brain regions critical for forming memories of these exploratory episodes. The hippocampus, for example, shows oscillatory activity that is generally associated with encoding of information. Whether or how hippocampal oscillations are influenced by eye movements is unknown. We recorded the neural activity in the human and macaque hippocampus during visual scene search. Across species, saccadic eye movements were associated with a time-limited alignment of a low-frequency (3-8 Hz rhythm. The phase alignment depended on the task and not only on eye movements per se, and the frequency band was not a direct consequence of saccade rate. Hippocampal theta-frequency oscillations are produced by other mammals during repetitive exploratory behaviors, including whisking, sniffing, echolocation and locomotion. The present results may reflect a similar yet distinct primate homologue supporting active perception during exploration.

  2. Decorrelated Input Dissociates Narrow Band γ Power and BOLD in Human Visual Cortex.

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    Butler, Russell; Bernier, Pierre-Michel; Lefebvre, Jérémie; Gilbert, Guillaume; Whittingstall, Kevin

    2017-05-31

    Although fMRI using the BOLD contrast is widely used for noninvasively mapping hemodynamic brain activity in humans, its exact link to underlying neural processing is poorly understood. Whereas some studies have reported that BOLD signals measured in visual cortex are tightly linked to neural activity in the narrow band γ (NBG) range, others have found a weak correlation between the two. To elucidate the mechanisms behind these conflicting findings, we hypothesized that BOLD reflects the strength of synaptic inputs to cortex, whereas NBG is more dependent on how well these inputs are correlated. To test this, we measured NBG, BOLD, and cerebral blood flow responses to stimuli that either correlate or decorrelate neural activity in human visual cortex. Next, we simulated a recurrent network model of excitatory and inhibitory neurons that reproduced in detail the experimental NBG and BOLD data. Results show that the visually evoked BOLD response was solely predicted by the sum of local inputs, whereas NBG was critically dependent on how well these inputs were correlated. In summary, the NBG-BOLD relationship strongly depends on the nature of sensory input to cortex: stimuli that increase the number of correlated inputs to visual cortex will increase NBG and BOLD in a similar manner, whereas stimuli that increase the number of decorrelated inputs will dissociate the two. The NBG-BOLD relationship is therefore not fixed but is rather highly dependent on input correlations that are both stimulus- and state-dependent. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT It is widely believed that γ oscillations in cortex are tightly linked to local hemodynamic activity. Here, we present experimental evidence showing how a stimulus can increase local blood flow to the brain despite suppressing γ power. Moreover, using a sophisticated model of cortical neurons, it is proposed that this occurs when synaptic input to cortex is strong yet decorrelated. Because input correlations are largely determined

  3. The Influence of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes on Visual Screening and Diagnosis of Cervical Precancer and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeronimo, Jose; Bansil, Pooja; Valdez, Melissa; Kang, Le-Ni; Zhao, Fang-Hui; Qiao, You-Lin; Chen, Wen; Zhang, Xun; Paul, Proma; Bai, Ping; Peck, Roger; Li, Jing; Chen, Feng; Stoler, Mark H; Castle, Philip E

    2015-07-01

    To examine the influence of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes on the sensitivity of visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) for screening, and colposcopy for diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 (CIN2) or more severe (CIN2+). Women aged 25 to 65 years from China (n = 7,541) were screened with 6 tests (careHPV and Hybrid Capture 2 on self- and clinician-collected specimens; HPV-16, HPV-18, HPV-45 E6 detection; and VIA). Biopsies from women with a diagnosis of CIN2+ underwent testing for 25 HPV genotypes using SPF10/LiPA. Human papillomavirus genotyping results were classified according to broad categories of cancer risk. Among the 143 women with a diagnosis of CIN2+, the percentage who were HPV16 positive increased with increasing severity of diagnosis: 33.3% for CIN2 (n = 39), 69.1% for CIN3 (n = 94), and 90% for cancer (n = 10). There was a higher percentage of HPV-16 in women with abnormal colposcopic impression (p = .007) and positive VIA (p = .02) than normal colposcopy and negative VIA, respectively. Colposcopy and VIA were more sensitive to detect CIN2+ among HPV-16- and/or HPV-18-positive women than HPV-16-/HPV-18-negative women (67.4% vs 43.1%, p = .008, for colposcopy; and 53.3% vs 37.3%, p = .08, for VIA). Human papillomavirus type 16 is related to more clear visual acetowhite changes in the epithelium. Therefore, we should expect a reduction of the performance of VIA for cervical cancer screening to identify women with CIN2+, and reduction of the performance of colposcopy to diagnose CIN2+, in vaccinated populations.

  4. Ubiquitous crossmodal Stochastic Resonance in humans: auditory noise facilitates tactile, visual and proprioceptive sensations.

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    Eduardo Lugo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stochastic resonance is a nonlinear phenomenon whereby the addition of noise can improve the detection of weak stimuli. An optimal amount of added noise results in the maximum enhancement, whereas further increases in noise intensity only degrade detection or information content. The phenomenon does not occur in linear systems, where the addition of noise to either the system or the stimulus only degrades the signal quality. Stochastic Resonance (SR has been extensively studied in different physical systems. It has been extended to human sensory systems where it can be classified as unimodal, central, behavioral and recently crossmodal. However what has not been explored is the extension of this crossmodal SR in humans. For instance, if under the same auditory noise conditions the crossmodal SR persists among different sensory systems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using physiological and psychophysical techniques we demonstrate that the same auditory noise can enhance the sensitivity of tactile, visual and propioceptive system responses to weak signals. Specifically, we show that the effective auditory noise significantly increased tactile sensations of the finger, decreased luminance and contrast visual thresholds and significantly changed EMG recordings of the leg muscles during posture maintenance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that crossmodal SR is a ubiquitous phenomenon in humans that can be interpreted within an energy and frequency model of multisensory neurons spontaneous activity. Initially the energy and frequency content of the multisensory neurons' activity (supplied by the weak signals is not enough to be detected but when the auditory noise enters the brain, it generates a general activation among multisensory neurons of different regions, modifying their original activity. The result is an integrated activation that promotes sensitivity transitions and the signals are then perceived. A physiologically

  5. Laparoscopic management of nonmidline ventral hernia.

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    Lal, Romesh; Sharma, Deborshi; Hazrah, Priya; Kumar, Pawan; Borgharia, Saurabh; Agarwal, Abhinav

    2014-07-01

    Ventral hernias may be primary or incisional and classified as midline ventral hernias (MVHs) or non-MVHs (NMVHs). NMVHs are rarer, and their laparoscopic management is technically challenging because of varied anatomic locations, differences in patient positioning at time of surgery, and lack of adequate lateral space for mesh fixation, compounded by the proximity of major organs and bony landmarks. A retrospective review of all the NMVHs operated on in a clinical unit is presented. One hundred eighty-three cases met the criteria of ventral hernia, with 25 cases (13.66%) as NMVH. These NMVHs included lumbar (n=5), suprapubic (n=7), iliac (n=10), and subcostal (n=3). Univariate and multivariate analyses were done using SPSS version 19 software (IBM, Armonk, NY). Continuous data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test/t test, and categorical data were analyzed using the chi-squared test. A P value of ≤.05 was considered significant. Demographic profile and presentation were similar in all groups. One case each had seromuscular intestinal injury in the iliac group (P=.668), splenic injury in the lumbar group, and liver injury in the subcostal group (P=.167). In the iliac group there was 1 patient with hematoma (P=.668), whereas seroma was seen in 1 lumbar group patient and 2 iliac group patients (P=.518). Persistent cough impulse was seen in 1 case each in the iliac and lumbar groups (P=.593). One case in the iliac group recurred after primary surgery (P=.668). NMVHs have a similar spectrum of difficulty and complication profile as those of laparoscopic MVH repairs. Laparoscopic repair of a non-midline hernia is technically challenging but definitely feasible. The incidence of complications and recurrence rate might be more than those for MVHs, but its actual validation needs a much larger comparative study having a longer follow-up.

  6. The visual development of hand-centered receptive fields in a neural network model of the primate visual system trained with experimentally recorded human gaze changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Juan M; Navajas, Joaquín; Mender, Bedeho M W; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Minini, Loredana; Stringer, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    Neurons have been found in the primate brain that respond to objects in specific locations in hand-centered coordinates. A key theoretical challenge is to explain how such hand-centered neuronal responses may develop through visual experience. In this paper we show how hand-centered visual receptive fields can develop using an artificial neural network model, VisNet, of the primate visual system when driven by gaze changes recorded from human test subjects as they completed a jigsaw. A camera mounted on the head captured images of the hand and jigsaw, while eye movements were recorded using an eye-tracking device. This combination of data allowed us to reconstruct the retinal images seen as humans undertook the jigsaw task. These retinal images were then fed into the neural network model during self-organization of its synaptic connectivity using a biologically plausible trace learning rule. A trace learning mechanism encourages neurons in the model to learn to respond to input images that tend to occur in close temporal proximity. In the data recorded from human subjects, we found that the participant's gaze often shifted through a sequence of locations around a fixed spatial configuration of the hand and one of the jigsaw pieces. In this case, trace learning should bind these retinal images together onto the same subset of output neurons. The simulation results consequently confirmed that some cells learned to respond selectively to the hand and a jigsaw piece in a fixed spatial configuration across different retinal views.

  7. Visual short-term memory: activity supporting encoding and maintenance in retinotopic visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneve, Markus H; Alnæs, Dag; Endestad, Tor; Greenlee, Mark W; Magnussen, Svein

    2012-10-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated that retinotopic cortex maintains information about visual stimuli during retention intervals. However, the process by which transient stimulus-evoked sensory responses are transformed into enduring memory representations is unknown. Here, using fMRI and short-term visual memory tasks optimized for univariate and multivariate analysis approaches, we report differential involvement of human retinotopic areas during memory encoding of the low-level visual feature orientation. All visual areas show weaker responses when memory encoding processes are interrupted, possibly due to effects in orientation-sensitive primary visual cortex (V1) propagating across extrastriate areas. Furthermore, intermediate areas in both dorsal (V3a/b) and ventral (LO1/2) streams are significantly more active during memory encoding compared with non-memory (active and passive) processing of the same stimulus material. These effects in intermediate visual cortex are also observed during memory encoding of a different stimulus feature (spatial frequency), suggesting that these areas are involved in encoding processes on a higher level of representation. Using pattern-classification techniques to probe the representational content in visual cortex during delay periods, we further demonstrate that simply initiating memory encoding is not sufficient to produce long-lasting memory traces. Rather, active maintenance appears to underlie the observed memory-specific patterns of information in retinotopic cortex. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. MIECTOMÍA SACROCOCCIGEA VENTRAL EN EQUINOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mastoby Martínez M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una técnica quirúrgica basada en una incisión pequeña del músculo sacrococcigeo ventral,con el fin de realzar la elegancia del caballo al andar teniendo presente los aspectos bioéticos dela medicina veterinaria. En los animales intervenidos no se presento complicación y se logró elobjetivo, por lo que se propone esta técnica quirúrgica para que sea practicada por los veterianriosdurante su ejercicio profesional.

  9. MovExp: A Versatile Visualization Tool for Human-Computer Interaction Studies with 3D Performance and Biomechanical Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmas, Gregorio; Bachynskyi, Myroslav; Oulasvirta, Antti; Seidel, Hans-Peter; Weinkauf, Tina

    2014-12-01

    In Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), experts seek to evaluate and compare the performance and ergonomics of user interfaces. Recently, a novel cost-efficient method for estimating physical ergonomics and performance has been introduced to HCI. It is based on optical motion capture and biomechanical simulation. It provides a rich source for analyzing human movements summarized in a multidimensional data set. Existing visualization tools do not sufficiently support the HCI experts in analyzing this data. We identified two shortcomings. First, appropriate visual encodings are missing particularly for the biomechanical aspects of the data. Second, the physical setup of the user interface cannot be incorporated explicitly into existing tools. We present MovExp, a versatile visualization tool that supports the evaluation of user interfaces. In particular, it can be easily adapted by the HCI experts to include the physical setup that is being evaluated, and visualize the data on top of it. Furthermore, it provides a variety of visual encodings to communicate muscular loads, movement directions, and other specifics of HCI studies that employ motion capture and biomechanical simulation. In this design study, we follow a problem-driven research approach. Based on a formalization of the visualization needs and the data structure, we formulate technical requirements for the visualization tool and present novel solutions to the analysis needs of the HCI experts. We show the utility of our tool with four case studies from the daily work of our HCI experts.

  10. Modulation of high-frequency vestibuloocular reflex during visual tracking in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, V. E.; Leigh, R. J.; Thomas, C. W.; Averbuch-Heller, L.; Zivotofsky, A. Z.; Discenna, A. O.; Dell'Osso, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    1. Humans may visually track a moving object either when they are stationary or in motion. To investigate visual-vestibular interaction during both conditions, we compared horizontal smooth pursuit (SP) and active combined eye-head tracking (CEHT) of a target moving sinusoidally at 0.4 Hz in four normal subjects while the subjects were either stationary or vibrated in yaw at 2.8 Hz. We also measured the visually enhanced vestibuloocular reflex (VVOR) during vibration in yaw at 2.8 Hz over a peak head velocity range of 5-40 degrees/s. 2. We found that the gain of the VVOR at 2.8 Hz increased in all four subjects as peak head velocity increased (P < 0.001), with minimal phase changes, such that mean retinal image slip was held below 5 degrees/s. However, no corresponding modulation in vestibuloocular reflex gain occurred with increasing peak head velocity during a control condition when subjects were rotated in darkness. 3. During both horizontal SP and CEHT, tracking gains were similar, and the mean slip speed of the target's image on the retina was held below 5.5 degrees/s whether subjects were stationary or being vibrated at 2.8 Hz. During both horizontal SP and CEHT of target motion at 0.4 Hz, while subjects were vibrated in yaw, VVOR gain for the 2.8-Hz head rotations was similar to or higher than that achieved during fixation of a stationary target. This is in contrast to the decrease of VVOR gain that is reported while stationary subjects perform CEHT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  11. Classic and Golli Myelin Basic Protein have distinct developmental trajectories in human visual cortex

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    Caitlin R Siu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally myelin is viewed as insulation around axons however more recent studies have shown it plays an important role in plasticity, axonal metabolism and neuroimmune signalling. Myelin is a complex multi-protein structure composed of hundreds of proteins, with Myelin Basic Protein (MBP being the most studied. MBP has two families: Classic-MBP that is necessary for activity driven compaction of myelin around axons, and Golli-MBP that is found in neurons, oligodendrocytes, and T cells, and has been called a 'molecular link' between the nervous and immune systems. In visual cortex myelin proteins interact with immune processes to affect experience-dependent plasticity. We studied myelin in human visual cortex using Western blotting to quantify Classic- and Golli-MBP expression in post-mortem tissue samples ranging in age from 20 days to 80 years. We found that Classic- and Golli-MBP have different patterns of change across the lifespan: Classic-MBP gradually increases to 42 years and then declines into aging; Golli-MBP has changes that are coincident with milestones in visual system sensitive period, before gradually increasing into aging. There are 3 stages in the balance between Classic- and Golli-MBP expression, with Golli-MBP dominating early, then shifting to Classic-MBP, and back to Golli-MBP in aging. Also Golli-MBP has a wave of high inter-individual variability during childhood. These results about cortical MBP expression are timely because they compliment recent advances in MRI techniques that produce high resolution maps of cortical myelin in normal and diseased brain. In addition the unique pattern of Golli-MBP expression across the lifespan suggests that it supports high levels of neuroimmune interaction in cortical development and in aging.

  12. Factor structure of the human gamma band oscillatory response to visual (contrast) stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carozzo, Simone; De Carli, Fabrizio; Beelke, Manolo; Saturno, Moreno; Garbarino, Sergio; Martello, Cristina; Sannita, Walter G

    2004-07-01

    Visual contrast stimulation evokes in man an oscillatory mass response at approximately 20.0-35.0 Hz, consistent with stimulus-dependent synchronous oscillations in multiunit animal recordings from visual cortex, but shorter in duration and phase-locked to stimulus. A factor analysis was applied to characterize the signal structure under stimulus conditions inducing an oscillatory response and to identify possible subcomponents in normal volunteers. Contrast stimuli were gratings with a sinusoidal luminance profile (9.0 degrees; 5.0 cycle/degree; 80% contrast; reversal 1.06 Hz). The amplitude spectrum of the signal was computed by Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) and the oscillatory response was separated from the corresponding visually evoked potential (VEP) by DFT high-pass filter at 19.0 Hz. Nine consecutive waves were identified in all subjects (60 volunteers), with amplitudes/latencies consistent with normative studies. A factor analysis was computed 1- in the frequency domain, on the amplitude values of the signal components (2 Hz resolution), and 2- in the time domain, on the latencies/amplitudes of the averaged VEP and oscillatory responses. (1) Two non-overlapping factors accounted for the approximately 2-20.0 and approximately 20.0-40.0 Hz signal components, with separation of the approximately 20.0-35.0 Hz oscillatory response from low frequency VEPs. (2) Two factors on latencies and one factor on amplitudes (independent of each other and from those of VEPs) accounted for the average approximately 20.0-35.0 Hz oscillatory response. The factor structure further indicates an oscillatory structure and some independence from conventional VEPs of the human oscillatory response to contrast, with a separation between the oscillatory response early and late waves possibly reflecting functional differences.

  13. Cognitive Neurostimulation: Learning to Volitionally Sustain Ventral Tegmental Area Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacInnes, Jeff J.; Dickerson, Kathryn C.; Chen, Nan-kuei; Adcock, R. Alison

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Activation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and mesolimbic networks is essential to motivation, performance, and learning. Humans routinely attempt to motivate themselves, with unclear efficacy or impact on VTA networks. Using fMRI, we found untrained participants’ motivational strategies failed to consistently activate VTA. After real-time VTA neurofeedback training, however, participants volitionally induced VTA activation without external aids, relative to baseline, Pre-Test, and control groups. VTA self-activation was accompanied by increased mesolimbic network connectivity. Among two comparison groups (no neurofeedback, false neurofeedback) and an alternate neurofeedback group (nucleus accumbens), none sustained activation in target regions of interest nor increased VTA functional connectivity. The results comprise two novel demonstrations: learning and generalization after VTA neurofeedback training and the ability to sustain VTA activation without external reward or reward cues. These findings suggest theoretical alignment of ideas about motivation and midbrain physiology and the potential for generalizable interventions to improve performance and learning. PMID:26948894

  14. Neurons controlling voluntary vocalization in the macaque ventral premotor cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gino Coudé

    Full Text Available The voluntary control of phonation is a crucial achievement in the evolution of speech. In humans, ventral premotor cortex (PMv and Broca's area are known to be involved in voluntary phonation. In contrast, no neurophysiological data are available about the role of the oro-facial sector of nonhuman primates PMv in this function. In order to address this issue, we recorded PMv neurons from two monkeys trained to emit coo-calls. Results showed that a population of motor neurons specifically fire during vocalization. About two thirds of them discharged before sound onset, while the remaining were time-locked with it. The response of vocalization-selective neurons was present only during conditioned (voluntary but not spontaneous (emotional sound emission. These data suggest that the control of vocal production exerted by PMv neurons constitutes a newly emerging property in the monkey lineage, shedding light on the evolution of phonation-based communication from a nonhuman primate species.

  15. Direct visualization of Parkinson's disease by in vivo human brain imaging using 7.0T magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Zang-Hee; Oh, Se-Hong; Kim, Jong-Min; Park, Sung-Yeon; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk; Jeong, Hye-Jin; Kim, Young-Bo; Chi, Je-Geun; Park, Chan-Woong; Huston, John; Lee, Kendall H; Jeon, Beom S

    2011-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder resulting from progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) pars compacta. Therefore, imaging of the SN has been regarded to hold greatest potential for use in the diagnosis of PD. At the 7.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), it is now possible to delineate clearly the shapes and boundaries of the SN. We scanned eight early and two advanced PD patients, along with nine age-matched control subjects, using a 7.0T MRI in an attempt to directly visualize the SN and quantify the differences in shape and boundaries of SN between PD subjects in comparison with the normal control subjects. In the normal controls, the boundaries between the SN and crus cerebri appear smooth, and clean "arch" shapes that stretch ventrally from posterior to anterior. In contrast, these smooth and clean arch-like boundaries were lost in PD subjects. The measured correlation analyses show that, in PD patients, there is age-dependent correlation and substantially stronger UPDRS motor score-dependent correlation. These results suggest that, by using 7.0T MRI, it appears possible to use these visible and distinctive changes in morphology as a diagnostic marker of PD. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  16. Dynamic Network Communication in the Human Functional Connectome Predicts Perceptual Variability in Visual Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiwei; Zeljic, Kristina; Jiang, Qinying; Gu, Yong; Wang, Wei; Wang, Zheng

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitous variability between individuals in visual perception is difficult to standardize and has thus essentially been ignored. Here we construct a quantitative psychophysical measure of illusory rotary motion based on the Pinna-Brelstaff figure (PBF) in 73 healthy volunteers and investigate the neural circuit mechanisms underlying perceptual variation using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We acquired fMRI data from a subset of 42 subjects during spontaneous and 3 stimulus conditions: expanding PBF, expanding modified-PBF (illusion-free) and expanding modified-PBF with physical rotation. Brain-wide graph analysis of stimulus-evoked functional connectivity patterns yielded a functionally segregated architecture containing 3 discrete hierarchical networks, commonly shared between rest and stimulation conditions. Strikingly, communication efficiency and strength between 2 networks predominantly located in visual areas robustly predicted individual perceptual differences solely in the illusory stimulus condition. These unprecedented findings demonstrate that stimulus-dependent, not spontaneous, dynamic functional integration between distributed brain networks contributes to perceptual variability in humans. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. A novel color image compression algorithm using the human visual contrast sensitivity characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Juncai; Liu, Guizhong

    2017-03-01

    In order to achieve higher image compression ratio and improve visual perception of the decompressed image, a novel color image compression scheme based on the contrast sensitivity characteristics of the human visual system (HVS) is proposed. In the proposed scheme, firstly the image is converted into the YCrCb color space and divided into sub-blocks. Afterwards, the discrete cosine transform is carried out for each sub-block, and three quantization matrices are built to quantize the frequency spectrum coefficients of the images by combining the contrast sensitivity characteristics of HVS. The Huffman algorithm is used to encode the quantized data. The inverse process involves decompression and matching to reconstruct the decompressed color image. And simulations are carried out for two color images. The results show that the average structural similarity index measurement (SSIM) and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) under the approximate compression ratio could be increased by 2.78% and 5.48%, respectively, compared with the joint photographic experts group (JPEG) compression. The results indicate that the proposed compression algorithm in the text is feasible and effective to achieve higher compression ratio under ensuring the encoding and image quality, which can fully meet the needs of storage and transmission of color images in daily life.

  18. Pupil size directly modulates the feedforward response in human primary visual cortex independently of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombeke, Klaas; Duthoo, Wout; Mueller, Sven C; Hopf, Jens-Max; Boehler, C Nico

    2016-02-15

    Controversy revolves around the question of whether psychological factors like attention and emotion can influence the initial feedforward response in primary visual cortex (V1). Although traditionally, the electrophysiological correlate of this response in humans (the C1 component) has been found to be unaltered by psychological influences, a number of recent studies have described attentional and emotional modulations. Yet, research into psychological effects on the feedforward V1 response has neglected possible direct contributions of concomitant pupil-size modulations, which are known to also occur under various conditions of attentional load and emotional state. Here we tested the hypothesis that such pupil-size differences themselves directly affect the feedforward V1 response. We report data from two complementary experiments, in which we used procedures that modulate pupil size without differences in attentional load or emotion while simultaneously recording pupil-size and EEG data. Our results confirm that pupil size indeed directly influences the feedforward V1 response, showing an inverse relationship between pupil size and early V1 activity. While it is unclear in how far this effect represents a functionally-relevant adaptation, it identifies pupil-size differences as an important modulating factor of the feedforward response of V1 and could hence represent a confounding variable in research investigating the neural influence of psychological factors on early visual processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anatomical constraints on visualization of the human hippocampus using echo-planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, Shuichiro; Kirino, Takaaki [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8655, Tokyo (Japan); Mihara, Ban [Department of Neurology, Mihara Memorial Hospital, 366 Ohta-machi, Isesaki-city, 372-0006, Gunma (Japan); Sugishita, Morihiro [Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8654, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Reliable visualization of the hippocampus on echo-planar imaging (EPI) is essential in analyzing memory function using functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, the hippocampal area is notoriously prone to susceptibility artifacts caused by structures at the skull base, and avoiding such artifacts by appropriately selecting the subjects for a study is of practical importance. To elucidate factors affecting the extent of the artifacts we obtained EPI in a total of 62 hippocampi from 31 healthy volunteers and evaluated various anatomical measurements possibly associated with the quality of the images. The hippocampal head was sufficiently well demonstrated on 40 of 62 images (65%), and there were two parameters that significantly differed between the good (n=40) and poor (n=22) imaging studies: The vertical diameter (DV) of the opening of the internal acoustic meatus (IAM) and the pneumatization rate of the sphenoid sinus (RP-SS). From logistic regression analysis with the stepwise method, in addition to these two factors, the distance between the hippocampal body and IAM (Dhippo-IAM) and the distance between the hippocampal head and the middle cranial fossa at the skull base (Dhippo-base) were extracted. DV-IAM, RP-SS, and Dhippo-base were negatively correlated with the good imaging of the hippocampal head. On the other hand, Dhippo-IAM was positively correlated. These easily measurable parameters will be helpful in selecting subjects and in increasing the efficiency of hippocampal visualization in studies on human memory function. (orig.)

  20. Visual exploration patterns of human figures in action: An eye tracker study with art paintings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eVillani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Art exploration is a complex process conditioned by factors at different levels and includes both basic visual principles and complex cognitive factors. The human figure is considered a critical factor attracting the attention in art painting. Using an eye-tracking methodology, the goal of this study was to explore different elements of the human figure performing an action (face and body parts in action in complex social scenes characterized by different levels of social interaction between agents depicted in scenes (individual vs. social. The sample included 44 laypersons, and the stimuli consisted of 10 fine art paintings representing the figurative style of classical art. The results revealed different scanning patterns of the human figure elements related to the level of social interaction of agents depicted in the scene. The agents’ face attracted eye movements in social interaction scenes while the agents’ body parts attracted eye movements only when the agents were involved in individual actions. These processes were confirmed specifically in participants with high empathic abilities who became immediately fixated on faces to develop a mimetic engagement with other agents. Future studies integrating other measures would help confirm the results obtained and strengthen their implication for embodiment processes.

  1. Visual exploration patterns of human figures in action: an eye tracker study with art paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Daniela; Morganti, Francesca; Cipresso, Pietro; Ruggi, Simona; Riva, Giuseppe; Gilli, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Art exploration is a complex process conditioned by factors at different levels and includes both basic visual principles and complex cognitive factors. The human figure is considered a critical factor attracting the attention in art painting. Using an eye-tracking methodology, the goal of this study was to explore different elements of the human figure performing an action (face and body parts in action) in complex social scenes characterized by different levels of social interaction between agents depicted in scenes (individual vs. social). The sample included 44 laypersons, and the stimuli consisted of 10 fine art paintings representing the figurative style of classical art. The results revealed different scanning patterns of the human figure elements related to the level of social interaction of agents depicted in the scene. The agents’ face attracted eye movements in social interaction scenes while the agents’ body parts attracted eye movements only when the agents were involved in individual actions. These processes were confirmed specifically in participants with high empathic abilities who became immediately fixated on faces to develop a mimetic engagement with other agents. Future studies integrating other measures would help confirm the results obtained and strengthen their implication for embodiment processes. PMID:26579021

  2. Methyl-triclosan binding to human serum albumin: multi-spectroscopic study and visualized molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wenjuan; Chen, Yonglei; Li, Dayong; Chen, Xingguo; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-10-01

    Methyl-triclosan (MTCS), a transformation product and metabolite of triclosan, has been widely spread in environment through the daily use of triclosan which is a commonly used anti-bacterial and anti-fungal substance in consumer products. Once entering human body, MTCS could affect the conformation of human serum albumin (HSA) by forming MTCS-HSA complex and alter function of protein and endocrine in human body. To evaluate the potential toxicity of MTCS, the binding mechanism of HSA with MTCS was investigated by UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Binding constants, thermodynamic parameters, the binding forces and the specific binding site were studied in detail. Binding constant at room tempreture (T = 298K) is 6.32 × 10(3)L mol(-1); ΔH(0), ΔS(0) and ΔG(0) were 22.48 kJ mol(-1), 148.16 J mol(-1)K(-1) and -21.68 kJ mol(-1), respectively. The results showed that the interactions between MTCS and HSA are mainly hydrophobic forces. The effects of MTCS on HSA conformation were also discussed. The binding distance (r = 1.2 nm) for MTCS-HSA system was calculated by the efficiency of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The visualized binding details were also exhibited by molecular modeling method and the results could agree well with that from the experimental study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Stimulus selectivity in dorsal and ventral prefrontal cortex after training in working memory tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Travis; Qi, Xue-Lian; Stanford, Terrence R.; Constantinidis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex is known to represent different types of information in working memory. Contrasting theories propose that the dorsal and ventral regions of the lateral prefrontal cortex are innately specialized for the representation of spatial and non-spatial information respectively (Goldman-Rakic, 1996), or that the two regions are shaped by the demands of cognitive tasks imposed on them (Miller, 2000). To resolve this issue, we recorded from neurons in the two regions, prior to and at multiple stages of training monkeys on visual working memory tasks. Prior to training, substantial functional differences were present between the two regions. Dorsal prefrontal cortex exhibited higher overall responsiveness to visual stimuli and higher selectivity for spatial information. After training, stimulus selectivity generally decreased, though dorsal prefrontal cortex retained higher spatial selectivity regardless of task performed. Ventral prefrontal cortex appeared to be affected to a greater extent by the nature of task performed. Our results indicate that regional specialization for stimulus selectivity is present in the primate prefrontal cortex regardless of training. Dorsal areas of the prefrontal cortex are inherently organized to represent spatial information and training has little influence on this spatial bias. Ventral areas are biased toward non-spatial information although they are more influenced by training both in terms of activation and changes in stimulus selectivity. PMID:21525266

  4. The critical phase for visual control of human walking over complex terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthis, Jonathan Samir; Barton, Sean L; Fajen, Brett R

    2017-08-08

    To walk efficiently over complex terrain, humans must use vision to tailor their gait to the upcoming ground surface without interfering with the exploitation of passive mechanical forces. We propose that walkers use visual information to initialize the mechanical state of the body before the beginning of each step so the resulting ballistic trajectory of the walker's center-of-mass will facilitate stepping on target footholds. Using a precision stepping task and synchronizing target visibility to the gait cycle, we empirically validated two predictions derived from this strategy: (1) Walkers must have information about upcoming footholds during the second half of the preceding step, and (2) foot placement is guided by information about the position of the target foothold relative to the preceding base of support. We conclude that active and passive modes of control work synergistically to allow walkers to negotiate complex terrain with efficiency, stability, and precision.

  5. High-Frequency EEG Variations in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder during Human Faces Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina A. Reis Paula

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the impairment in the social reciprocity, interaction/language, and behavior, with stereotypes and signs of sensory function deficits. Electroencephalography (EEG is a well-established and noninvasive tool for neurophysiological characterization and monitoring of the brain electrical activity, able to identify abnormalities related to frequency range, connectivity, and lateralization of brain functions. This research aims to evidence quantitative differences in the frequency spectrum pattern between EEG signals of children with and without ASD during visualization of human faces in three different expressions: neutral, happy, and angry. Quantitative clinical evaluations, neuropsychological evaluation, and EEG of children with and without ASD were analyzed paired by age and gender. The results showed stronger activation in higher frequencies (above 30 Hz in frontal, central, parietal, and occipital regions in the ASD group. This pattern of activation may correlate with developmental characteristics in the children with ASD.

  6. Visualization of drug distribution of topical minocycline in human facial skin with fluorescence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsmeier, Maiko; Sawant, Tanvee; Lac, Diana; Yamamoto, Akira; Chen, Xin; Nagavarapu, Usha; Evans, Conor L.; Chan, Kin Foong

    2017-02-01

    Minocycline is an antibiotic regularly prescribed to treat acne vulgaris. The only commercially available minocycline comes in an oral dosage form, which often results in systemic adverse effects. A topical minocycline composition (BPX-01) was developed to provide localized and targeted delivery to the epidermis and pilosebaceous unit where acne-related bacteria, Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), reside. As minocycline is a known fluorophore, fluorescence microscopy was performed to investigate its potential use in visualizing minocycline distribution within tissues. BPX-01 with various concentrations of minocycline, was applied topically to freshly excised human facial skin specimens. Spatial distribution of minocycline and its fluorescence intensity within the stratum corneum, epidermis, dermis, and pilosebaceous unit were assessed. The resulting fluorescence intensity data as a function of minocycline concentration may indicate clinically relevant therapeutic doses of topical BPX-01 needed to kill P. acnes and reduce inflammation for successful clinical outcomes.

  7. High-Frequency EEG Variations in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder during Human Faces Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Celina A Reis; Reategui, Camille; Costa, Bruna Karen de Sousa; da Fonseca, Caio Queiroz; da Silva, Luana; Morya, Edgard; Brasil, Fabricio Lima

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the impairment in the social reciprocity, interaction/language, and behavior, with stereotypes and signs of sensory function deficits. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a well-established and noninvasive tool for neurophysiological characterization and monitoring of the brain electrical activity, able to identify abnormalities related to frequency range, connectivity, and lateralization of brain functions. This research aims to evidence quantitative differences in the frequency spectrum pattern between EEG signals of children with and without ASD during visualization of human faces in three different expressions: neutral, happy, and angry. Quantitative clinical evaluations, neuropsychological evaluation, and EEG of children with and without ASD were analyzed paired by age and gender. The results showed stronger activation in higher frequencies (above 30 Hz) in frontal, central, parietal, and occipital regions in the ASD group. This pattern of activation may correlate with developmental characteristics in the children with ASD.

  8. Driver's drowsiness detection using an enhanced image processing technique inspired by the human visual system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholerdi, Hedyeh A.; TaheriNejad, Nima; Ghaderi, Reza; Baleghi, Yaser

    2016-01-01

    Unfit drivers are the cause of tens of thousands of incidents on the roads which lead to injuries and deaths. Therefore, it is very important to take preventive measures against such incidents. One of the unfit driving conditions is driving while being drowsy. Using image processing techniques, drowsiness of the driver could be detected and hence such incidents could be prevented. In this work, inspired by how images are processed by the human visual system, an enhancement for driver's drowsiness detection is suggested. Furthermore, to improve the robustness of the drowsiness detection system, the mechanism for using energy levels in frames is changed. Lastly, a better decision making process is proposed. To measure the merit of the system, it is applied to a set of drivers' data. Test results show that using the proposed system, success rate of the drowsiness detection system is 90%.

  9. Atypical evening cortisol profile induces visual recognition memory deficit in healthy human subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilpin Heather

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diurnal rhythm-mediated endogenous cortisol levels in humans are characterised by a peak in secretion after awakening that declines throughout the day to an evening trough. However, a significant proportion of the population exhibits an atypical cycle of diurnal cortisol due to shift work, jet-lag, aging, and mental illness. Results The present study has demonstrated a correlation between elevation of cortisol in the evening and deterioration of visual object recognition memory. However, high evening cortisol levels have no effect on spatial memory. Conclusion This study suggests that atypical evening salivary cortisol levels have an important role in the early deterioration of recognition memory. The loss of recognition memory, which is vital for everyday life, is a major symptom of the amnesic syndrome and early stages of Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, this study will promote a potential physiologic marker of early deterioration of recognition memory and a possible diagnostic strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Direct visualization of lipid domains in human skin stratum corneum's lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, I; Norlen, Lars; Bagatolli, Luis

    2007-01-01

    ; and iii), whether pH has a direct effect on the lipid matrix phase behavior. In this work the lateral structure of membranes composed of lipids extracted from human skin stratum corneum was studied in a broad temperature range (10 degrees C-90 degrees C) using different techniques such as differential...... resolution limit 300 nm) to a single gel phase at pH 7, coexistence of different gel phases between pH 5 and 6, and no fluid phase at any pH. This observation suggests that the local pH in the stratum corneum may control the physical properties of the extracellular lipid matrix by regulating membrane lateral......-dimensional morphology of the stratum corneum extracellular space. These structures can be directly visualized using the aforementioned fluorescence microscopy techniques. At skin physiological temperatures (28 degrees C-32 degrees C), the phase state of these hydrated bilayers correspond microscopically (radial...

  11. Complex Ventral Hernias: A Review of Past to Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Charles N; Fowler, Aaron; Al-Temimi, Mohammed H; Ali, Aamna; Johna, Samir; Tessier, Deron

    2018-01-01

    With the incidence of ventral hernias increasing, surgeons are faced with greater complexity in dealing with these conditions. Proper knowledge of the history and the advancements made in managing complex ventral hernias will enhance surgical results. This review article highlights the literature regarding complex ventral hernias, including a shift from a focus that stressed surgical technique toward a multimodal approach, which involves optimization and identification of suboptimal characteristics.

  12. Development of the visual word form area requires visual experience: Evidence from blind Braille readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Judy S; Kanjlia, Shipra; Merabet, Lotfi B; Bedny, Marina

    2017-10-23

    Learning to read causes the development of a letter- and word-selective region known as the visual word form area (VWFA) within the human ventral visual object stream. Why does a reading-selective region develop at this anatomical location? According to one hypothesis, the VWFA develops at the nexus of visual inputs from retinotopic cortices and linguistic input from the fronto-temporal language network because reading involves extracting linguistic information from visual symbols. Surprisingly, the anatomical location of the VWFA is also active when blind individuals read Braille by touch, suggesting that vision is not required for the development of the VWFA. In this study, we tested the alternative prediction that VWFA development is in fact influenced by visual experience. We predicted that in the absence of vision, the "VWFA" is incorporated into the fronto-temporal language network and participates in high-level language processing. Congenitally blind (n=10) and sighted control (n=15), male and female participants each took part in two fMRI experiments: 1) word reading (Braille for blind and print for sighted participants), and 2) listening to spoken sentences of different grammatical complexity (both groups). We find that in blind, but not sighted participants, the anatomical location of the VWFA responds both to written words and to the grammatical complexity of spoken sentences. This suggests that in blindness, this region takes on high-level linguistic functions, becoming less selective for reading. More generally, the current findings suggest that experience during development has a major effect on functional specialization in the human cortex.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTThe visual word form area (VWFA) is a region in the human cortex that becomes specialized for the recognition of written letters and words. Why does this particular brain region become specialized for reading? We tested the hypothesis that the VWFA develops within the ventral visual stream

  13. Effects of ventral striatal lesions on first- and second-order appetitive conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannald, Michael A; Setlow, Barry; Holland, Peter C

    2013-08-01

    Rats with bilateral lesions of the ventral striatal nucleus accumbens failed to acquire Pavlovian second-order conditioning to auditory stimuli paired with visual stimuli that had previously received first-order pairings with food. This deficit in second-order conditioning was specific to learning driven by incentive properties of the first-order cues, and was observed whether the first-order training had occurred prior to or after lesion surgery. Lesions also produced deficits in the display of conditioned responses to the first-order conditioned stimulus, but only when they were made after first-order training. These results suggest a specific role for the ventral striatum in acquiring and expressing incentive properties of conditioned stimuli through second-order conditioning, as well as a more general role in expressing previously acquired Pavlovian conditioned responses. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. fMRI of global visual perception in simultanagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelbach, Marc; Erb, Michael; Klockgether, Thomas; Moskau, Susanna; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2009-03-01

    The integration of visual elements into global perception seems to be implemented separately to single object perception. This assumption is supported by the existence of patients with simultanagnosia who can identify single objects but are incapable of integrating multiple visual items. We investigated a case of simultanagnosia due to posterior cortical atrophy without structural brain damage who demonstrated an incomplete simultanagnosia. The patient successfully recognized a global stimulus in one trial but failed to do so just a few seconds later. Using event-related fMRI, we contrasted post hoc selected trials of successful global perception with trials of global recognition failure. We found circumscribed clusters of activity at the right and left primary intermediate sulci and a bilateral cluster at the ventral precuneus. The integration of multiple visual elements resulting in a conscious perception of their gestalt seems to rely on these bilateral structures in the human lateral and medial inferior parietal cortex.

  15. Investigation of human visual cortex responses to flickering light using functional near infrared spectroscopy and constrained ICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Duc Thang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The human visual sensitivity to the flickering light has been under investigation for decades. The finding of research in this area can contribute to the understanding of human visual system mechanism and visual disorders, and establishing diagnosis and treatment of diseases. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of the flickering light to the visual cortex by monitoring the hemodynamic responses of the brain with the functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS method. Since the acquired fNIRS signals are affected by physiological factors and measurement artifacts, constrained independent component analysis (cICA was applied to extract the actual fNIRS responses from the obtained data. The experimental results revealed significant changes (p < 0.0001 of the hemodynamic responses of the visual cortex from the baseline when the flickering stimulation was activated. With the uses of cICA, the contrast to noise ratio (CNR, reflecting the contrast of hemodynamic concentration between rest and task, became larger. This indicated the improvement of the fNIRS signals when the noise was eliminated. In subsequent studies, statistical analysis was used to infer the correlation between the fNIRS signals and the visual stimulus. We found that there was a slight decrease of the oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (about 5.69% over four frequencies when the modulation increased. However, the variations of oxy and deoxy-hemoglobin were not statistically significant.

  16. A vertex model of Drosophila ventral furrow formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Spahn

    Full Text Available Ventral furrow formation in Drosophila is an outstanding model system to study the mechanisms involved in large-scale tissue rearrangements. Ventral cells accumulate myosin at their apical sides and, while being tightly coupled to each other via apical adherens junctions, execute actomyosin contractions that lead to reduction of their apical cell surface. Thereby, a band of constricted cells along the ventral epithelium emerges which will form a tissue indentation along the ventral midline (the ventral furrow. Here we adopt a 2D vertex model to simulate ventral furrow formation in a surface view allowing easy comparison with confocal live-recordings. We show that in order to reproduce furrow morphology seen in vivo, a gradient of contractility must be assumed in the ventral epithelium which renders cells more contractile the closer they lie to the ventral midline. The model predicts previous experimental findings, such as the gain of eccentric morphology of constricting cells and an incremental fashion of apical cell area reduction. Analysis of the model suggests that this incremental area reduction is caused by the dynamical interplay of cell elasticity and stochastic contractility as well as by the opposing forces from contracting neighbour cells. We underpin results from the model through in vivo analysis of ventral furrow formation in wildtype and twi mutant embryos. Our results show that ventral furrow formation can be accomplished as a "tug-of-war" between stochastically contracting, mechanically coupled cells and may require less rigorous regulation than previously thought.For the developmental biologist it is a fascinating question how cells can coordinate major tissue movements during embryonic development. The so-called ventral furrow of the Drosophila embryo is a well-studied example of such a process when cells from a ventral band, spanning nearly the entire length of the embryo, undergo dramatic shape change by contracting their

  17. Visual fixation in human newborns correlates with extensive white matter networks and predicts long-term neurocognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stjerna, Susanna; Sairanen, Viljami; Gröhn, Riitta; Andersson, Sture; Metsäranta, Marjo; Lano, Aulikki; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2015-03-25

    Infants are well known to seek eye contact, and they prefer to fixate on developmentally meaningful objects, such as the human face. It is also known, that visual abilities are important for the developmental cascades of cognition from later infancy to childhood. It is less understood, however, whether newborn visual abilities relate to later cognitive development, and whether newborn ability for visual fixation can be assigned to early microstructural maturation. Here, we investigate relationship between newborn visual fixation (VF) and gaze behavior (GB) to performance in visuomotor and visual reasoning tasks in two cohorts with cognitive follow-up at 2 (n = 57) and 5 (n = 1410) years of age. We also analyzed brain microstructural correlates to VF (n = 45) by voxel-based analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) in newborn diffusion tensor imaging. Our results show that newborn VF is significantly related to visual-motor performance at both 2 and 5 years, as well as to visual reasoning at 5 years of age. Moreover, good newborn VF relates to widely increased FA levels across the white matter. Comparison to motor performance indicated that early VF is preferentially related to visuocognitive development, and that early motor performance relates neither to white matter integrity nor to visuocognitive development. The present findings suggest that newborn VF is supported by brainwide subcortical networks and it represents an early building block for the developmental cascades of cognition. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354824-06$15.00/0.

  18. ‘Little Gunshots, but with the blaze of lightning’: Xavier Herbert, Visuality and Human Rights

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    Jane Lydon

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Xavier Herbert published his bestseller Capricornia in 1938, following two periods spent in the Northern Territory. His next major work, Poor Fellow My Country (1975, was not published until thirty-seven years later, but was also set in the north during the 1930s. One significant difference between the two novels is that by 1975 photo-journalism had become a significant force for influencing public opinion and reforming Aboriginal policy. Herbert’s novel, centring upon Prindy as vulnerable Aboriginal child, marks a sea change in perceptions of Aboriginal people and their place in Australian society, and a radical shift toward use of photography as a means of revealing the violation of human rights after World War II. In this article I review Herbert’s visual narrative strategies in the context of debates about this key historical shift and the growing impact of photography in human rights campaigns. I argue that Poor Fellow My Country should be seen as a textual re-enactment, set in Herbert’s and the nation’s past, yet coloured by more recent social changes that were facilitated and communicated through the camera’s lens. Like all re-enactments, it is written in the past conditional: it asks, what if things had been different? It poses a profound challenge to the state project of scientific modernity that was the Northern Territory over the first decades of the twentieth century.

  19. X-ray micro computed tomography for the visualization of an atherosclerotic human coronary artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matviykiv, Sofiya; Buscema, Marzia; Deyhle, Hans; Pfohl, Thomas; Zumbuehl, Andreas; Saxer, Till; Müller, Bert

    2017-06-01

    Atherosclerosis refers to narrowing or blocking of blood vessels that can lead to a heart attack, chest pain or stroke. Constricted segments of diseased arteries exhibit considerably increased wall shear stress, compared to the healthy ones. One of the possibilities to improve patient’s treatment is the application of nano-therapeutic approaches, based on shear stress sensitive nano-containers. In order to tailor the chemical composition and subsequent physical properties of such liposomes, one has to know precisely the morphology of critically stenosed arteries at micrometre resolution. It is often obtained by means of histology, which has the drawback of offering only two-dimensional information. Additionally, it requires the artery to be decalcified before sectioning, which might lead to deformations within the tissue. Micro computed tomography (μCT) enables the three-dimensional (3D) visualization of soft and hard tissues at micrometre level. μCT allows lumen segmentation that is crucial for subsequent flow simulation analysis. In this communication, tomographic images of a human coronary artery before and after decalcification are qualitatively and quantitatively compared. We analyse the cross section of the diseased human coronary artery before and after decalcification, and calculate the lumen area of both samples.

  20. Interactions between motion and form processing in the human visual system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George eMather

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The predominant view of motion and form processing in the human visual system assumes that these two attributes are handled by separate and independent modules. Motion processing involves filtering by direction-selective sensors, followed by integration to solve the aperture problem. Form processing involves filtering by orientation-selective and size-selective receptive fields, followed by integration to encode object shape. It has long been known that motion signals can influence form processing in the well-known Gestalt principle of common fate; texture elements which share a common motion property are grouped into a single contour or texture region. However recent research in psychophysics and neuroscience indicates that the influence of form signals on motion processing is more extensive than previously thought. First, the salience and apparent direction of moving lines depends on how the local orientation and direction of motion combine to match the receptive field properties of motion-selective neurons. Second, orientation signals generated by ‘motion-streaks’ influence motion processing; motion sensitivity, apparent direction and adaptation are affected by simultaneously present orientation signals. Third, form signals generated by human body shape influence biological motion processing, as revealed by studies using point-light motion stimuli. Thus form-motion integration seems to occur at several different levels of cortical processing, from V1 to STS.

  1. Allium sativum L. Improves Visual Memory and Attention in Healthy Human Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnim, Sara; Haque, Parsa Sanjana; Bari, Md. Sazzadul; Hossain, Md. Monir; Islam, Sardar Mohd. Ashraful; Shahriar, Mohammad; Bhuiyan, Mohiuddin Ahmed; Bin Sayeed, Muhammad Shahdaat

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that Allium sativum L. (AS) protects amyloid-beta peptide-induced apoptosis, prevents oxidative insults to neurons and synapses, and thus prevent Alzheimer's disease progression in experimental animals. However, there is no experimental evidence in human regarding its putative role in memory and cognition. We have studied the effect of AS consumption by healthy human volunteers on visual memory, verbal memory, attention, and executive function in comparison to control subjects taking placebo. The study was conducted over five weeks and twenty volunteers of both genders were recruited and divided randomly into two groups: A (AS) and B (placebo). Both groups participated in the 6 computerized neuropsychological tests of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) twice: at the beginning and after five weeks of the study. We found statistically significant difference (p 0.05) beneficial effects on verbal memory and executive function within a short period of time among the volunteers. Study for a longer period of time with patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases might yield more relevant results regarding the potential therapeutic role of AS. PMID:26351508

  2. Neural Correlates of Visual Spatial Attention in Electrocorticographic (ECoG Signals in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysegul eGunduz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Attention is a cognitive selection mechanism that allocates the limited processing resources of the brain to the sensory streams most relevant to our immediate goals, thereby enhancing responsiveness and behavioral performance. The underlying neural mechanisms of orienting attention are distributedacross a widespread cortical network. While aspects of this network have been extensively studied, details about the electrophysiological dynamics of this network are scarce. In this study, we investigated attentional networks using electrocorticographic (ECoG recordings from the surface ofthe brain, which combine broad spatial coverage with high temporal resolution, in five human subjects. ECoG was recorded when subjects covertly attended to a spatial location and responded to contrast changes in the presence of distractors in a modified Posner cueing task. ECoG amplitudes in the alpha, beta and gamma bands identified neural changes associated with covert attention and motor preparation/execution in the different stages of the task. The results show that attentional engagement was primarily associated with ECoG activity in the visual, prefrontal, premotor, and parietal cortices. Motor preparation/execution was associated with ECoG activity in premotor/sensorimotor cortices. In summary, our results illustrate rich and distributed cortical dynamics that are associated with orienting attention and the subsequent motor preparation and execution. These findings are largely consistent with and expand on primate studies using intracortical recordings and human functional neuroimaging studies.

  3. Audio-Visual Tibetan Speech Recognition Based on a Deep Dynamic Bayesian Network for Natural Human Robot Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Audio-visual speech recognition is a natural and robust approach to improving human-robot interaction in noisy environments. Although multi-stream Dynamic Bayesian Network and coupled HMM are widely used for audio-visual speech recognition, they fail to learn the shared features between modalities and ignore the dependency of features among the frames within each discrete state. In this paper, we propose a Deep Dynamic Bayesian Network (DDBN to perform unsupervised extraction of spatial-temporal multimodal features from Tibetan audio-visual speech data and build an accurate audio-visual speech recognition model under a no frame-independency assumption. The experiment results on Tibetan speech data from some real-world environments showed the proposed DDBN outperforms the state-of-art methods in word recognition accuracy.

  4. [Asymmetry of the latent periods of saccades in human depending on visual space complicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, O V; Tereshchenko, L V; Molchanov, S A; Latanov, A V; Shulgovskiĭ, V V

    2006-01-01

    Saccadic latencies of visually-guided saccades of 10 right-handed subjects with right-leading eyes were studied. Stimulation paradigm was spatially bidimentional, and stimuli were shown along horizontal and vertical meridians. Three traditional single step GAP - NO DELAY - OVERLAP temporal paradigms were used. In the first experiment, each paradigm was applied separately (simple visual space). In the second experiment, all the three paradigms were varied pseudo-random order and equiprobably, which complicated the time parameters of visual stimulation (complicated visual space). Asymmetry of visually-guided saccades along the vertical and horizontal meridians was revealed. The character of this asymmetry varied between subjects. MANOVA showed that the factor of visual space complicity (simple or complicated visual space) affected the latent period of saccades to a greater extent than the factor of stimulus lateralization (stimulus presentation in the left/right or upper/lower visual hemifields).

  5. A Computational Model of Active Vision for Visual Search in Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    interfaces. - 5 - This paper describes a computational model of visual search for HCI that integrates a contemporary understanding of visual...such as by associating jewelry with cloth) and provided visual structure to random layouts. Figure 10 shows a layout with semantically-cohesive

  6. Transformation from a Retinal to a Cyclopean Representation in Human Visual Cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendregt, Martijn; Harvey, Ben M.; Rokers, Bas; Dumoulin, Serge O.

    2015-01-01

    We experience our visual world as seen from a single viewpoint, even though our two eyes receive slightly different images. One role of the visual system is to combine the two retinal images into a single representation of the visual field, sometimes called the cyclopean image [1]. Conventional

  7. EEG oscillations reflect visual short-term memory processes for the change detection in human faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyoung-Dong; Min, Byoung-Kyong; Lee, Kyoung-Min

    2010-11-01

    People often fail to notice a large change in the visual scene when the change occurs during a brief interruption of the viewing. Since the change is well above perceptual threshold in continuous viewing, the failure (termed change blindness) has been attributed to abnormal visual short-term memory (VSTM). However, it is still unclear where the abnormality lies among the phases in VSTM, namely, encoding, maintenance, and retrieval-comparison. EEG oscillations, especially the gamma activity, have been suggested as neural signatures of VSTM, but have not been examined in the context of change blindness. Thus, we asked in the present study whether change detection or failure is correlated with EEG oscillatory activities and, if so, whether the timing and the spatial distribution of the oscillations could pin-point the abnormal phase of VSTM in change blindness. While on EEG recording, subjects watched morphed pictures of human faces in trials which consisted of a 200-ms initial image display, a 500-ms blank period, and a 200-ms comparison image display. The two images were either the same or clearly different above threshold. Trials with different images were classified as hit or missed, based on subjects' responses, and EEG data were compared between the two types of trials. Enhanced gamma activity was observed in the right temporal-parietal region during all periods in the hit trials compared to the missed ones. Frontal theta activity was increased during initial image encoding, whereas beta activity was decreased during maintenance and retrieval-comparison in the hit trials. These results point to weak encoding of initial images as the culprit for a later failure in change detection, while abnormal processing in subsequent phases of VSTM may result from the weak encoding and also contribute to change blindness. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Measuring Connectivity in the Primary Visual Pathway in Human Albinism Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorian, Anahit; McKetton, Larissa; Schneider, Keith A

    2016-08-11

    In albinism, the number of ipsilaterally projecting retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is significantly reduced. The retina and optic chiasm have been proposed as candidate sites for misrouting. Since a correlation between the number of lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) relay neurons and LGN size has been shown, and based on previously reported reductions in LGN volumes in human albinism, we suggest that fiber projections from LGN to the primary visual cortex (V1) are also reduced. Studying structural differences in the visual system of albinism can improve the understanding of the mechanism of misrouting and subsequent clinical applications. Diffusion data and tractography are useful for mapping the OR (optic radiation). This manuscript describes two algorithms for OR reconstruction in order to compare brain connectivity in albinism and controls.An MRI scanner with a 32-channel head coil was used to acquire structural scans. A T1-weighted 3D-MPRAGE sequence with 1 mm(3) isotropic voxel size was used to generate high-resolution images for V1 segmentation. Multiple proton density (PD) weighted images were acquired coronally for right and left LGN localization. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scans were acquired with 64 diffusion directions. Both deterministic and probabilistic tracking methods were run and compared, with LGN as the seed mask and V1 as the target mask. Though DTI provides relatively poor spatial resolution, and accurate delineation of OR may be challenging due to its low fiber density, tractography has been shown to be advantageous both in research and clinically. Tract based spatial statistics (TBSS) revealed areas of significantly reduced white matter integrity within the OR in patients with albinism compared to controls. Pairwise comparisons revealed a significant reduction in LGN to V1 connectivity in albinism compared to controls. Comparing both tracking algorithms revealed common findings, strengthening the reliability of the technique.

  9. Resonance Raman examination of the wavelength regulation mechanism in human visual pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochendoerfer, G G; Wang, Z; Oprian, D D; Mathies, R A

    1997-06-03

    Resonance Raman spectra of recombinant human green and red cone pigments have been obtained to examine the molecular mechanism of color recognition by visual pigments. Spectra were acquired using a 77 K resonance Raman microprobe or preresonance Raman spectroscopy. The vibrational bands were assigned by comparison to the spectra of bovine rhodopsin and model compounds. The C=NH stretching frequencies of rhodopsin, the green cone pigment, and the red cone pigment in H2O (D2O) are found at 1656 (1623), 1640 (1618), and 1644 cm(-1), respectively. Together with previous resonance Raman studies on iodopsin [Lin, S. W., Imamoto, Y., Fukada, Y., Shichida, Y., Yoshizawa, T., & Mathies, R. A. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 2151-2160], these values suggest that red and green pigments have very similar Schiff base environments, while the Schiff base group in rhodopsin is more strongly hydrogen-bonded to its protein environment. The absence of significant frequency and intensity differences of modes in the fingerprint and the hydrogen out-of-plane wagging regions for all these pigments does not support the hypothesis that local chromophore interactions with charged protein residues and/or chromophore planarization are crucial for the absorption differences among these pigments. However, our data are consistent with the idea that the Schiff base group in blue visual pigments is stabilized by protein and water dipoles and that the removal of this dipolar field shifts the absorption maximum from blue to green. A further red shift of the lambda(max) from the green to the red pigment is successfully modeled by the addition of hydroxyl-bearing amino acids (Ser164, Tyr261, and Thr269) close to the ionone ring that lower the transition energy by interacting with the change of dipole moment of the chromophore upon excitation. The increased hydrogen bonding of the protonated Schiff base group in rhodopsin is predicted to account for the 30 nm blue shift of its absorption maximum compared to

  10. Anticipatory VOR suppression induced by visual and nonvisual stimuli in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, G R; Paige, G D

    2004-09-01

    We compared the predictive behavior of smooth pursuit (SP) and suppression of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) in humans by examining anticipatory smooth eye movements, a phenomenon that arises after repeated presentations of sudden target movement preceded by an auditory warning cue. We investigated whether anticipatory smooth eye movements also occur prior to cued head motion, particularly when subjects expect interaction between the VOR and either real or imagined head-fixed targets. Subjects were presented with horizontal motion stimuli consisting of a visual target alone (SP), head motion in darkness (VOR), or head motion in the presence of a real or imagined head-fixed target (HFT and IHFT, respectively). Stimulus sequences were delivered as single cycles of a velocity sinusoid (frequency: 0.5 or 1.0 Hz) that were either cued (a sound cue 400 ms earlier) or noncued. For SP, anticipatory smooth eye movements developed over repeated trials in the cued, but not the noncued, condition. In the VOR condition, no such anticipatory eye movements were observed even when cued. In contrast, anticipatory responses were observed under cued, but not noncued, HFT and IHFT conditions, as for SP. Anticipatory HFT responses increased in proportion to the velocity of preceding stimuli. In general, anticipatory gaze responses were similar in cued SP, HFT, and IHFT conditions and were appropriate for expected target motion in space. Anticipatory responses may represent the output of a central mechanism for smooth-eye-movement generation that operates during predictive SP as well as VOR modulations that are linked with SP even in the absence of real visual targets.

  11. Visual sign phonology: insights into human reading and language from a natural soundless phonology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitto, L A; Langdon, C; Stone, A; Andriola, D; Kartheiser, G; Cochran, C

    2016-11-01

    Among the most prevailing assumptions in science and society about the human reading process is that sound and sound-based phonology are critical to young readers. The child's sound-to-letter decoding is viewed as universal and vital to deriving meaning from print. We offer a different view. The crucial link for early reading success is not between segmental sounds and print. Instead the human brain's capacity to segment, categorize, and discern linguistic patterning makes possible the capacity to segment all languages. This biological process includes the segmentation of languages on the hands in signed languages. Exposure to natural sign language in early life equally affords the child's discovery of silent segmental units in visual sign phonology (VSP) that can also facilitate segmental decoding of print. We consider powerful biological evidence about the brain, how it builds sound and sign phonology, and why sound and sign phonology are equally important in language learning and reading. We offer a testable theoretical account, reading model, and predictions about how VSP can facilitate segmentation and mapping between print and meaning. We explain how VSP can be a powerful facilitator of all children's reading success (deaf and hearing)-an account with profound transformative impact on learning to read in deaf children with different language backgrounds. The existence of VSP has important implications for understanding core properties of all human language and reading, challenges assumptions about language and reading as being tied to sound, and provides novel insight into a remarkable biological equivalence in signed and spoken languages. WIREs Cogn Sci 2016, 7:366-381. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1404 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The Human EST Ontology Explorer: a tissue-oriented visualization system for ontologies distribution in human EST collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanesi Luciano

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NCBI dbEST currently contains more than eight million human Expressed Sequenced Tags (ESTs. This wide collection represents an important source of information for gene expression studies, provided it can be inspected according to biologically relevant criteria. EST data can be browsed using different dedicated web resources, which allow to investigate library specific gene expression levels and to make comparisons among libraries, highlighting significant differences in gene expression. Nonetheless, no tool is available to examine distributions of quantitative EST collections in Gene Ontology (GO categories, nor to retrieve information concerning library-dependent EST involvement in metabolic pathways. In this work we present the Human EST Ontology Explorer (HEOE http://www.itb.cnr.it/ptp/human_est_explorer, a web facility for comparison of expression levels among libraries from several healthy and diseased tissues. Results The HEOE provides library-dependent statistics on the distribution of sequences in the GO Direct Acyclic Graph (DAG that can be browsed at each GO hierarchical level. The tool is based on large-scale BLAST annotation of EST sequences. Due to the huge number of input sequences, this BLAST analysis was performed with the aid of grid computing technology, which is particularly suitable to address data parallel task. Relying on the achieved annotation, library-specific distributions of ESTs in the GO Graph were inferred. A pathway-based search interface was also implemented, for a quick evaluation of the representation of libraries in metabolic pathways. EST processing steps were integrated in a semi-automatic procedure that relies on Perl scripts and stores results in a MySQL database. A PHP-based web interface offers the possibility to simultaneously visualize, retrieve and compare data from the different libraries. Statistically significant differences in GO categories among user selected libraries can

  13. Regional Cortical Grey Matter Loss in Parkinson's Disease Without Dementia is Independent from Visual Hallucinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meppelink, Anne Marthe; de Jong, Bauke M.; Teune, Laura K.; van Laar, Teus

    In our previous functional magnetic resonance imaging study, Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with visual hallucinations (VH) showed reduced activations in ventral/ lateral visual association cortices preceding image recognition, compared with both PD patients without VH and healthy controls. The

  14. "Limulus" Psychophysics: Spectral Sensitivity of the Ventral Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Gerald S.

    1976-01-01

    The ventral eye of "Limulus" (horseshoe crab) contains only one type of photoreceptor. Behaviors mediated by the ventral eye provide an unambiguous representation of the function of that single-receptor type. Compares such behaviors with results of acute, single-cell investigations to assay for the contributions of candidate neural codes in the…

  15. Ventral onlay graft bulbar urethroplasty using buccal mucosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess the ongoing role of ventral onlay oral mucosa free graft in the treatment of bulbar urethral stricture. Methods: Detailed review of technical consideration and outcomes from the author's institution along with review of other peer reviewed literature. Results: Of 62 patients undergoing ventral onlay buccal ...

  16. The issue of ventral versus dorsal approach in bulbar urethral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E. Palminteri

    increased over time the use of Ventral Graft and decreased the use of dorsal graft [7]. From surgical point of view, the Barbagli Dorsal Grafting by Dor- sal approach ... seems reduce the risk of fistula; in reality there is a similar rate of fistula with both ventral and dorsal grafting. The disadvantage of the dorsal approach is that it ...

  17. Motor-Auditory-Visual Integration: The Role of the Human Mirror Neuron System in Communication and Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bel, Ronald M.; Pineda, Jaime A.; Sharma, Anu

    2009-01-01

    The mirror neuron system (MNS) is a trimodal system composed of neuronal populations that respond to motor, visual, and auditory stimulation, such as when an action is performed, observed, heard or read about. In humans, the MNS has been identified using neuroimaging techniques (such as fMRI and mu suppression in the EEG). It reflects an…

  18. "The Project Cannot Be Approved in Its Current Form": Feminist Visual Research Meets the Human Research Ethics Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    This article reflects on a university human research ethics committee's unease regarding a feminist visual pilot study within the field of education. The small exploratory study proposed to explore a migrant mother's production of her son's identity through her family photograph collection. The committee requested substantial…

  19. Visual cues given by humans are not sufficient for Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) to find hidden food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnik, Joshua M; Pokorny, Jennifer J; Keratimanochaya, Titiporn; Webb, Christine; Beronja, Hana F; Hennessy, Alice; Hill, James; Hill, Virginia J; Kiss, Rebecca; Maguire, Caitlin; Melville, Beckett L; Morrison, Violet M B; Seecoomar, Dannah; Singer, Benjamin; Ukehaxhaj, Jehona; Vlahakis, Sophia K; Ylli, Dora; Clayton, Nicola S; Roberts, John; Fure, Emilie L; Duchatelier, Alicia P; Getz, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that domesticated species--due to artificial selection by humans for specific, preferred behavioral traits--are better than wild animals at responding to visual cues given by humans about the location of hidden food. \\Although this seems to be supported by studies on a range of domesticated (including dogs, goats and horses) and wild (including wolves and chimpanzees) animals, there is also evidence that exposure to humans positively influences the ability of both wild and domesticated animals to follow these same cues. Here, we test the performance of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) on an object choice task that provides them with visual-only cues given by humans about the location of hidden food. Captive elephants are interesting candidates for investigating how both domestication and human exposure may impact cue-following as they represent a non-domesticated species with almost constant human interaction. As a group, the elephants (n = 7) in our study were unable to follow pointing, body orientation or a combination of both as honest signals of food location. They were, however, able to follow vocal commands with which they were already familiar in a novel context, suggesting the elephants are able to follow cues if they are sufficiently salient. Although the elephants' inability to follow the visual cues provides partial support for the domestication hypothesis, an alternative explanation is that elephants may rely more heavily on other sensory modalities, specifically olfaction and audition. Further research will be needed to rule out this alternative explanation.

  20. Paired-pulse behavior of visually evoked potentials recorded in human visual cortex using patterned paired-pulse stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höffken, Oliver; Grehl, Torsten; Dinse, Hubert R; Tegenthoff, Martin; Bach, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Paired-pulse stimulation techniques are used as common tools to investigate cortical excitability and cortical plastic changes. Similar to investigations in the somatosensory and motor system here we applied a new paired-pulse paradigm to study the paired-pulse behavior of visually evoked potentials (VEPs) in 25 healthy subjects. VEPs were recorded and the responses to the first and the second P100 peak were analyzed at different SOAs [stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) = interstimulus interval (ISI) + pulse duration (13 ms)]. Two measures describe the paired pulse interaction: the "amplitude ratio", the ratio of the second to the first amplitude, and the "latency shift", the difference of the inter-peak interval between the P100 peaks and the respective SOA. To separate alterations in the amplitude of the second VEP response due to changes in paired-pulse inhibition from those originating from superposition of the two waveforms, particularly at short SOAs, we created a waveform template from recordings made at SOAs of 1 s, where interaction can be assumed to be negligible. Superposed traces of VEP recordings were then created by adding two templates at delays corresponding to the SOAs used. The original recordings were then digitally subtracted from the traces obtained by superposition. Analysis of the subtracted traces revealed evidence that at short SOAs the second VEP response is substantially suppressed, a finding comparable to the paired-pulse inhibition described for motor and somatosensory cortex following paired-pulse stimulation. However, paired-pulse inhibition seen in V1 varied considerably from subject to subject, both in respect to amplitude, and to time of maximal inhibition. We found paired-pulse inhibition ranging from 12 to 76% (mean 34%) at SOAs between 80 (shortest discriminable SOA) and 320 ms (mean 128 ms). At intermediate SOAs between 80 and 720 ms (mean 215 ms) the amplitude ratios were between 94 and 145% (mean 116%) indicative of slight

  1. Visual object and visuospatial cognition in Huntington's disease: implications for information processing in corticostriatal circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, A D; Watkins, L H; Sahakian, B J; Hodges, J R; Robbins, T W

    2000-07-01

    The primate visual system contains two major streams of visual information processing. The ventral stream is directed into the inferior temporal cortex and is concerned with visual object cognition, whereas the dorsal stream is directed into the posterior parietal cortex and is concerned with visuospatial cognition. Both of these processing streams send projections to the basal ganglia, and the ventral stream may also receive reciprocal connections from the basal ganglia. Although a role for the basal ganglia in visual object and visuospatial cognition has been suggested, little work has been carried out in this area in humans. The primary site of neuropathology in Huntington's disease is the basal ganglia, and hence Huntington's disease provides an important model for the role of the human basal ganglia in visual object and visuospatial cognition, and its breakdown in disease. We examined performance on a wide battery of tests of both visual object and visuospatial recognition memory, working memory, attention, associative learning and perception, enabling us to specify more fully the role of the basal ganglia in visual object and visuospatial cognition, and the disruption of these processes in Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease patients exhibited deficits on tests of pattern and spatial recognition memory; showed impaired simultaneous matching and delay-independent delayed matching-to-sample deficits; showed spared accuracy but impaired reaction times in visual search; were impaired in spatial but not visual object working memory; and showed impaired pattern-location associative learning. The results of our investigations suggest a particular role for the striatum in context-dependent action selection, in line with current computational theories of basal ganglia function.

  2. Using virtual reality to test the regularity priors used by the human visual system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Eric; Kwon, TaeKyu; Pizlo, Zygmunt

    2017-09-01

    Virtual reality applications provide an opportunity to test human vision in well-controlled scenarios that would be difficult to generate in real physical spaces. This paper presents a study intended to evaluate the importance of the regularity priors used by the human visual system. Using a CAVE simulation, subjects viewed virtual objects in a variety of experimental manipulations. In the first experiment, the subject was asked to count the objects in a scene that was viewed either right-side-up or upside-down for 4 seconds. The subject counted more accurately in the right-side-up condition regardless of the presence of binocular disparity or color. In the second experiment, the subject was asked to reconstruct the scene from a different viewpoint. Reconstructions were accurate, but the position and orientation error was twice as high when the scene was rotated by 45°, compared to 22.5°. Similarly to the first experiment, there was little difference between monocular and binocular viewing. In the third experiment, the subject was asked to adjust the position of one object to match the depth extent to the frontal extent among three objects. Performance was best with symmetrical objects and became poorer with asymmetrical objects and poorest with only small circular markers on the floor. Finally, in the fourth experiment, we demonstrated reliable performance in monocular and binocular recovery of 3D shapes of objects standing naturally on the simulated horizontal floor. Based on these results, we conclude that gravity, horizontal ground, and symmetry priors play an important role in veridical perception of scenes.

  3. Visualization of ex vivo human ciliated epithelium and induced flow using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yuye; Gamm, Uta A.; Yao, Xinwen; Arteaga-Solis, Emilio; Emala, Charles W.; Choma, Michael A.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2017-04-01

    The ciliated epithelium is important to the human respiratory system because it clears mucus that contains harmful microorganisms and particulate matter. We report the ex vivo visualization of human trachea/bronchi ciliated epithelium and induced flow characterized by using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). A total number of 17 samples from 7 patients were imaged. Samples were obtained from Columbia University Department of Anesthesiology's tissue bank. After excision, the samples were placed in Gibco Medium 199 solution with oxygen at 4°C until imaging. The samples were maintained at 36.7°C throughout the experiment. The imaging protocol included obtaining 3D volumes and 200 consecutive B-scans parallel to the head-to-feet direction (superior-inferior axis) of the airway, using Thorlabs Telesto system at 1300 nm at 28 kHz A-line rate and a custom built high resolution SDOCT system at 800nm at 32 kHz A-line rate. After imaging, samples were processed with H and E histology. Speckle variance of the time resolved datasets demonstrate significant contrast at the ciliated epithelium sites. Flow images were also obtained after injecting 10μm polyester beads into the solution, which shows beads traveling trajectories near the ciliated epithelium areas. In contrary, flow images taken in the orthogonal plane show no beads traveling trajectories. This observation is in line with our expectation that cilia drive flow predominantly along the superior-inferior axis. We also observed the protective function of the mucus, shielding the epithelium from the invasion of foreign objects such as microspheres. Further studies will be focused on the cilia's physiological response to environmental changes such as drug administration and physical injury.

  4. Visual attention, an indicator of human-animal relationships? A study of domestic horses (Equus caballus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline eRochais

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available As visual attention is an intrinsic part of social relationships, and because relationships are built on a succession of interactions, their establishment involves learning and attention. The emotional, rewarding or punishing, content can modulate selective attention. In horses, the use of positive/negative reinforcement during training determines short and long-term human-horse relationships. In a recent study in horses, where either food or withers’ grooming were used as a reward, it appeared that only the food-rewarded horses learned the task and show better relationship with humans. In the present study, we hypothesized that this differential effect of grooming/food rewards on learning performances could be due to attentional processes. Monitoring, gazes and behaviors directed towards the trainer revealed that the use of a food reward (FR as positive reinforcement increased horses’ selective attention towards their trainer. Conversely, horses trained with grooming reward (GR expressed more inattentive responses and did not show a decrease of agitated behavior. However, individual plotting of attention versus rate of learning performances revealed a complex pattern. Thus, while all FR horses showed a window of attention related to faster learning performances, GR horses’ pattern followed an almost normal curve where the extreme animals (i.e. highest and lowest attention had the slowest learning performances. On the other hand, learning was influenced by attention: at the end of training, the more attentive horses had also better learning performances. This study, based on horses, contributes to the general debates on the place of attentional processes at the interface of emotion and cognition and open new lines of thought about individual sensitivities (only individuals can tell what an appropriate reward is, attentional processes and learning.

  5. Wave aberration of human eyes and new descriptors of image optical quality and visual performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Marco; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2010-02-01

    The expansion of wavefront-sensing techniques redefined the meaning of refractive error in clinical ophthalmology. Clinical aberrometers provide detailed measurements of the eye's wavefront aberration. The distribution and contribution of each higher-order aberration to the overall wavefront aberration in the individual eye can now be accurately determined and predicted. Using corneal or ocular wavefront sensors, studies have measured the interindividual and age-related changes in the wavefront aberration in the normal population with the goal of optimizing refractive surgery outcomes for the individual. New objective optical-quality metrics would lead to better use and interpretation of newly available information on aberrations in the eye. However, the first metrics introduced, based on sets of Zernike polynomials, is not completely suitable to depict visual quality because they do not directly relate to the quality of the retinal image. Thus, several approaches to describe the real, complex optical performance of human eyes have been implemented. These include objective metrics that quantify the quality of the optical wavefront in the plane of the pupil (ie, pupil-plane metrics) and others that quantify the quality of the retinal image (ie, image-plane metrics). These metrics are derived by wavefront aberration information from the individual eye. This paper reviews the more recent knowledge of the wavefront aberration in human eyes and discusses the image-quality and optical-quality metrics and predictors that are now routinely calculated by wavefront-sensor software to describe the optical and image quality in the individual eye. Copyright 2010 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Human visual system-based image enhancement and logarithmic contrast measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, Karen A; Wharton, Eric J; Agaian, Sos S

    2008-02-01

    Varying scene illumination poses many challenging problems for machine vision systems. One such issue is developing global enhancement methods that work effectively across the varying illumination. In this paper, we introduce two novel image enhancement algorithms: edge-preserving contrast enhancement, which is able to better preserve edge details while enhancing contrast in images with varying illumination, and a novel multihistogram equalization method which utilizes the human visual system (HVS) to segment the image, allowing a fast and efficient correction of nonuniform illumination. We then extend this HVS-based multihistogram equalization approach to create a general enhancement method that can utilize any combination of enhancement algorithms for an improved performance. Additionally, we propose new quantitative measures of image enhancement, called the logarithmic Michelson contrast measure (AME) and the logarithmic AME by entropy. Many image enhancement methods require selection of operating parameters, which are typically chosen using subjective methods, but these new measures allow for automated selection. We present experimental results for these methods and make a comparison against other leading algorithms.

  7. Towards a unified model of face and object recognition in the human visual system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy eWallis

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the mechanisms and neural substrates underlying visual recognition in humans has made considerable progress over the past thirty years. During this period a divide has developed between the fields of object and face recognition. In the psychological literature, in particular, there has been a palpable disconnect between the two fields. This paper follows a trend in part of the face-recognition literature to try to reconcile what we know about these two forms of recognition by considering the effects of learning. Taking a widely accepted, self-organizing model of object recognition, this paper explains how such a system is affected by repeated exposure to specific stimulus classes. In so doing, it explains how many aspects of recognition generally regarded as unusual to faces (holistic processing, configural processing, sensitivity to inversion, the other race effect, the prototype effect, etc. are emergent properties of category-specific learning within such a system. Overall, the paper describes how a single model of recognition learning can and does produce the two, apparently very different types of stimulus representation associated with faces and objects.

  8. Coding of visual object features and feature conjunctions in the human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Martinovic

    Full Text Available Object recognition is achieved through neural mechanisms reliant on the activity of distributed coordinated neural assemblies. In the initial steps of this process, an object's features are thought to be coded very rapidly in distinct neural assemblies. These features play different functional roles in the recognition process--while colour facilitates recognition, additional contours and edges delay it. Here, we selectively varied the amount and role of object features in an entry-level categorization paradigm and related them to the electrical activity of the human brain. We found that early synchronizations (approx. 100 ms increased quantitatively when more image features had to be coded, without reflecting their qualitative contribution to the recognition process. Later activity (approx. 200-400 ms was modulated by the representational role of object features. These findings demonstrate that although early synchronizations may be sufficient for relatively crude discrimination of objects in visual scenes, they cannot support entry-level categorization. This was subserved by later processes of object model selection, which utilized the representational value of object features such as colour or edges to select the appropriate model and achieve identification.

  9. [Diseases of the peripheral and visual nervous system during infection with human immunodeficiency virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova-Sotolongo, P; Casanova-Carrillo, P; Casanova-Carrillo, C

    Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is often accompanied by neurological complications. One of these includes disorders affecting the peripheral and visual nervous system, especially during the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) stage. The peripheral neuropathies associated with infection by HIV are an assorted group of disorders, which include acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multiple mononeuropathy and neuropathies related to the herpes zoster virus or cytomegalovirus. The most common and clinically important of the neuropathies is painful distal sensory polyneuropathy (DSP). The most severely affected cranial nerves are V and VII. The isolation of HIV from the affected nerves suggests a direct role, but an immune mechanism is also possible. Although cytomegalovirus may be associated with a variety of peripheral nerve syndromes, its clinical presentation as a primary demyelinating polyneuropathy is unusual. DSP and antiretroviral toxic neuropathy are the most common HIV-associated neuropathies. Both HIV infection, by itself, and the neurotoxicity of certain drugs in tritherapy contribute to the development of painful peripheral sensory neuropathy. In researching into the cause of HIV-associated neuropathy further studies are needed to determine the relative roles played by the viral infection and the activation of the immunological factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of the damage done in axons, the dorsal root ganglion and in the sensory pathways in the spinal cord.

  10. Visible Watermarking Technique Based on Human Visual System for Single Sensor Digital Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Santoyo-Garcia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a visible watermarking algorithm, in which a visible watermark is embedded into the Bayer Colour Filter Array (CFA domain. The Bayer CFA is the most common raw image representation for images captured by single sensor digital cameras equipped in almost all mobile devices. In proposed scheme, the captured image is watermarked before it is compressed and stored in the storage system. Then this method enforces the rightful ownership of the watermarked image, since there is no other version of the image rather than the watermarked one. We also take into consideration the Human Visual System (HVS so that the proposed technique provides desired characteristics of a visible watermarking scheme, such that the embedded watermark is sufficiently perceptible and at same time not obtrusive in colour and grey-scale images. Unlike other Bayer CFA domain visible watermarking algorithms, in which only binary watermark pattern is supported, proposed watermarking algorithm allows grey-scale and colour images as watermark patterns. It is suitable for advertisement purpose, such as digital library and e-commerce, besides copyright protection.

  11. Determinants of Global Color-Based Selection in Human Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Mandy V; Boehler, Carsten N; Stoppel, Christian M; Merkel, Christian; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Schoenfeld, Mircea A; Hopf, Jens-Max

    2015-09-01

    Feature attention operates in a spatially global way, with attended feature values being prioritized for selection outside the focus of attention. Accounts of global feature attention have emphasized feature competition as a determining factor. Here, we use magnetoencephalographic recordings in humans to test whether competition is critical for global feature selection to arise. Subjects performed a color/shape discrimination task in one visual field (VF), while irrelevant color probes were presented in the other unattended VF. Global effects of color attention were assessed by analyzing the response to the probe as a function of whether or not the probe's color was a target-defining color. We find that global color selection involves a sequence of modulations in extrastriate cortex, with an initial phase in higher tier areas (lateral occipital complex) followed by a later phase in lower tier retinotopic areas (V3/V4). Importantly, these modulations appeared with and without color competition in the focus of attention. Moreover, early parts of the modulation emerged for a task-relevant color not even present in the focus of attention. All modulations, however, were eliminated during simple onset-detection of the colored target. These results indicate that global color-based attention depends on target discrimination independent of feature competition in the focus of attention. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Resting state functional connectivity of the ventral auditory pathway in musicians with absolute pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Goo; Knösche, Thomas R

    2017-08-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the ability to recognize pitch chroma of tonal sound without external references, providing a unique model of the human auditory system (Zatorre: Nat Neurosci 6 () 692-695). In a previous study (Kim and Knösche: Hum Brain Mapp () 3486-3501), we identified enhanced intracortical myelination in the right planum polare (PP) in musicians with AP, which could be a potential site for perceptional processing of pitch chroma information. We speculated that this area, which initiates the ventral auditory pathway, might be crucially involved in the perceptual stage of the AP process in the context of the "dual pathway hypothesis" that suggests the role of the ventral pathway in processing nonspatial information related to the identity of an auditory object (Rauschecker: Eur J Neurosci 41 () 579-585). To test our conjecture on the ventral pathway, we investigated resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) from musicians with varying degrees of AP. Should our hypothesis be correct, RSFC via the ventral pathway is expected to be stronger in musicians with AP, whereas such group effect is not predicted in the RSFC via the dorsal pathway. In the current data, we found greater RSFC between the right PP and bilateral anteroventral auditory cortices in musicians with AP. In contrast, we did not find any group difference in the RSFC of the planum temporale (PT) between musicians with and without AP. We believe that these findings support our conjecture on the critical role of the ventral pathway in AP recognition. Hum Brain Mapp 38:3899-3916, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Functional organization of locomotor interneurons in the ventral lumbar spinal cord of the newborn rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Antri

    Full Text Available Although the mammalian locomotor CPG has been localized to the lumbar spinal cord, the functional-anatomical organization of flexor and extensor interneurons has not been characterized. Here, we tested the hypothesis that flexor and extensor interneuronal networks for walking are physically segregated in the lumbar spinal cord. For this purpose, we performed optical recordings and lesion experiments from a horizontally sectioned lumbar spinal cord isolated from neonate rats. This ventral hemi spinal cord preparation produces well-organized fictive locomotion when superfused with 5-HT/NMDA. The dorsal surface of the preparation was visualized using the Ca(2+ indicator fluo-4 AM, while simultaneously monitoring motor output at ventral roots L2 and L5. Using calcium imaging, we provided a general mapping view of the interneurons that maintained a stable phase relationship with motor output. We showed that the dorsal surface of L1 segment contains a higher density of locomotor rhythmic cells than the other segments. Moreover, L1 segment lesioning induced the most important changes in the locomotor activity in comparison with lesions at the T13 or L2 segments. However, no lesions led to selective disruption of either flexor or extensor output. In addition, this study found no evidence of functional parcellation of locomotor interneurons into flexor and extensor pools at the dorsal-ventral midline of the lumbar spinal cord of the rat.

  14. Delayed presentation of osteochondroma on the ventral surface of the scapula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, O S; Kelly, J I V

    2012-04-01

    Osteochondroma is a cartilage-covered bony excrescence that arises from the surface of a bone. It is the most common benign bone tumor in the scapula and can also present as multiple masses in multiple hereditary exostosis. A solitary scapular lesion might lead to "snapping scapula" syndrome, which is characterized by a sometimes audible but usually palpable grinding sensation experienced with scapular abduction. Snapping scapula is usually painless without specific symptoms; however, discomfort may result from the mechanical effects of a ventral scapular mass projecting onto a normally smooth, gliding scapulothoracic joint. Furthermore, malignant transformation of the cartilaginous cap, by virtue of the increased mass, may precipitate symptoms. The visual deformities and interference with major joint function are the most frequent musculoskeletal complaints related by patients. Indications for operative intervention include painful mechanical dysfunction unresponsive to conservative measures and sarcomatous change. Ventral scapular osteochondromas have been reported to cause scapular asymmetry and should be ruled out as part of a differential diagnosis to a "winged" scapula. A solitary osteochondroma can be excised either by arthroscopic or by open means, with the size of the lesion dictating precise management. Scapular osteochondromas usually are detected early during maturation due to mechanical symptoms or gross deformity. Unfortunately, most require surgical excision. Most surgical excisions have been reported in adolescents and young adults. We report an unusual case of osteochondroma from the ventral surface of the scapula in 56-year-old woman who had experienced delayed onset mechanical symptoms which required surgical excision.

  15. Representation of Glossy Material Surface in Ventral Superior Temporal Sulcal Area of Common Marmosets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Naohisa; Banno, Taku; Abe, Hiroshi; Tani, Toshiki; Suzuki, Wataru; Ichinohe, Noritaka

    2017-01-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is one of the smallest species of primates, with high visual recognition abilities that allow them to judge the identity and quality of food and objects in their environment. To address the cortical processing of visual information related to material surface features in marmosets, we presented a set of stimuli that have identical three-dimensional shapes (bone, torus or amorphous) but different material appearances (ceramic, glass, fur, leather, metal, stone, wood, or matte) to anesthetized marmoset, and recorded multiunit activities from an area ventral to the superior temporal sulcus (STS) using multi-shanked, and depth resolved multi-electrode array. Out of 143 visually responsive multiunits recorded from four animals, 29% had significant main effect only of the material, 3% only of the shape and 43% of both the material and the shape. Furthermore, we found neuronal cluster(s), in which most cells: (1) showed a significant main effect in material appearance; (2) the best stimulus was a glossy material (glass or metal); and (3) had reduced response to the pixel-shuffled version of the glossy material images. The location of the gloss-selective area was in agreement with previous macaque studies, showing activation in the ventral bank of STS. Our results suggest that perception of gloss is an important ability preserved across wide range of primate species.

  16. Dorsal and ventral working memory-related brain areas support distinct processes in contextual cueing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginelli, Angela A; Baumgartner, Florian; Pollmann, Stefan

    2013-02-15

    Behavioral evidence suggests that the use of implicitly learned spatial contexts for improved visual search may depend on visual working memory resources. Working memory may be involved in contextual cueing in different ways: (1) for keeping implicitly learned working memory contents available during search or (2) for the capture of attention by contexts retrieved from memory. We mapped brain areas that were modulated by working memory capacity. Within these areas, activation was modulated by contextual cueing along the descending segment of the intraparietal sulcus, an area that has previously been related to maintenance of explicit memories. Increased activation for learned displays, but not modulated by the size of contextual cueing, was observed in the temporo-parietal junction area, previously associated with the capture of attention by explicitly retrieved memory items, and in the ventral visual cortex. This pattern of activation extends previous research on dorsal versus ventral stream functions in memory guidance of attention to the realm of attentional guidance by implicit memory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Object Representations in Human Visual Cortex Formed Through Temporal Integration of Dynamic Partial Shape Views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Tanya; Zohary, Ehud

    2018-01-17

    We typically recognize visual objects using the spatial layout of their parts, which are present simultaneously on the retina. Therefore, shape extraction is based on integration of the relevant retinal information over space. The lateral occipital complex (LOC) can represent shape faithfully in such conditions. However, integration over time is sometimes required to determine object shape. To study shape extraction through temporal integration of successive partial shape views, we presented human participants (both men and women) with artificial shapes that moved behind a narrow vertical or horizontal slit. Only a tiny fraction of the shape was visible at any instant at the same retinal location. However, observers perceived a coherent whole shape instead of a jumbled pattern. Using fMRI and multivoxel pattern analysis, we searched for brain regions that encode temporally integrated shape identity. We further required that the representation of shape should be invariant to changes in the slit orientation. We show that slit-invariant shape information is most accurate in the LOC. Importantly, the slit-invariant shape representations matched the conventional whole-shape representations assessed during full-image runs. Moreover, when the same slit-dependent shape slivers were shuffled, thereby preventing their spatiotemporal integration, slit-invariant shape information was reduced dramatically. The slit-invariant representation of the various shapes also mirrored the structure of shape perceptual space as assessed by perceptual similarity judgment tests. Therefore, the LOC is likely to mediate temporal integration of slit-dependent shape views, generating a slit-invariant whole-shape percept. These findings provide strong evidence for a global encoding of shape in the LOC regardless of integration processes required to generate the shape percept. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Visual objects are recognized through spatial integration of features available simultaneously on

  18. Wrist ultrasound examination – scanning technique and ultrasound anatomy. Part 2: Ventral wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyprian Olchowy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound imaging of the musculoskeletal system is an important element of the diagnostic and therapeutic protocol. Clinical decisions, including those regarding surgical procedures, are often based solely on ultrasound imaging. However, detailed knowledge on the anatomy and a correct scanning technique are crucial for an accurate diagnosis. Modern ultrasonographic equipment allows obtaining detailed anatomical images of muscle tendons, ligaments, nerves and vessels of the carpal area. Ventral wrist ultrasound is one of the most common diagnostic procedures in patients with suspected carpal tunnel syndrome. Ventral wrist evaluation is also often performed in patients with wrist pain of unclear etiology, rheumatic diseases, wrist injuries or symptoms of ulnar neuropathy. The aim of this paper is to present ultrasound images with corresponding anatomical schemes. The technique of ultrasound examination of the ventral wrist along with practical guidance to help obtain highly diagnostic images is also discussed. The present paper is the second part of an article devoted to ultrasound anatomy and wrist ultrasound technique – the part discussing the dorsal side of the wrist was published in the Journal of Ultrasonography, Vol. 15, No 61. The following anatomical structures should be visualized during an ultrasound examination of the ventral wrist, both in the carpal tunnel as well as proximally and distally to it: four flexor digitorum superficialis tendons, four flexor digitorum profundus tendons, flexor pollicis longus, flexor carpi radialis tendon, median nerve and flexor retinaculum; in the carpal tunnel as well as proximally and distally to it: the ulnar nerve, ulnar artery and veins; the tendon of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle; carpal joints.

  19. ROCIT : a visual object recognition algorithm based on a rank-order coding scheme.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, Antonio Ignacio; Reeves, Paul C.; Jones, John J.; Farkas, Benjamin D.

    2004-06-01

    This document describes ROCIT, a neural-inspired object recognition algorithm based on a rank-order coding scheme that uses a light-weight neuron model. ROCIT coarsely simulates a subset of the human ventral visual stream from the retina through the inferior temporal cortex. It was designed to provide an extensible baseline from which to improve the fidelity of the ventral stream model and explore the engineering potential of rank order coding with respect to object recognition. This report describes the baseline algorithm, the model's neural network architecture, the theoretical basis for the approach, and reviews the history of similar implementations. Illustrative results are used to clarify algorithm details. A formal benchmark to the 1998 FERET fafc test shows above average performance, which is encouraging. The report concludes with a brief review of potential algorithmic extensions for obtaining scale and rotational invariance.

  20. Transformation of visual direction requires the cognitive visual system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, Bruce

    2001-06-01

    We differentiate a cognitive branch of the visual system form a sensorimotor branch with the Roelofs effect, a perception that a target's position is biased in the direction opposite the offset of a surrounding fame. When a small fixed target is presented inside a frame that is offset to one side, normal humans perceive the target to be deviated in the direction opposite the frame's offset. They can still jab the target accurately, however, even though it is perceptually mislocalized. This dissociation indicates that motor coordinates are coded in a 'sensorimotor', possibly dorsal, pathway containing visual information that can be inconsistent with perceived information in a 'cognitive', possibly ventral pathway. Lack of a Roelofs effect indicates use of information in the sensorimotor pathway, independent from perception. We ask whether the sensorimotor pathway can handle a transformation of target position, in an anti-jabbing task analogous to anti-saccade tasks: the observer jabs a position symmetrically opposite the target's position, relative to the midline of the head. A 1 deg left or right. Observers were to jab the symmetrically opposite position as soon as the target disappeared. The result was a large and consistent Roelofs effect for an open-loop motor task, indicating that information from the cognitive pathway must be used to perform this task.

  1. Visual search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Bijl, P.

    2003-01-01

    Visual search, with or without the aid of optical or electro-optical instruments, plays a significant role in various types of military and civilian operations (e.g., reconnaissance, surveillance, and search and rescue). Advance knowledge of human visual search and target acquisition performance is

  2. How bumblebees use lateral and ventral optic flow cues for position control in environments of different proximity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linander, Nellie; Baird, Emily; Dacke, Marie

    2017-05-01

    Flying insects frequently navigate through environments of different complexity. In this study, buff-tailed bumblebees (Bombus terrestris L.) were trained to fly along tunnels of different widths, from 60 to 240 cm. In tunnel widths of 60 and 120 cm, bumblebees control their lateral position by balancing the magnitude of translational optic flow experienced in the lateral visual field of each eye. In wider tunnels, bumblebees use translational optic flow cues in the ventral visual field to control their lateral position and to steer along straight tracks. Our results also suggest that bumblebees prefer to fly over surfaces that provide strong ventral optic flow cues, rather than over featureless ones. Together, these strategies allow bumblebees to minimize the risk of collision and to maintain relatively straight flight paths in a broad range of environments.

  3. Basic multisensory functions can be acquired after congenital visual pattern deprivation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putzar, L.; Gondan, Matthias; Röder, B.

    2012-01-01

    People treated for bilateral congenital cataracts offer a model to study the influence of visual deprivation in early infancy on visual and multisensory development. We investigated cross-modal integration capabilities in cataract patients using a simple detection task that provided redundant...

  4. Evaluation of visual acuity and color vision in normal human eyes with a sutureless temporary amniotic membrane patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, Shigeyuki; Kobayashi, Akira; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa; Tseng, Scheffer C G

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate how sutureless amniotic membrane patches may affect visual functions in normal human eyes. Prospective intervention study. Ten sets of sutureless amniotic membrane patch manufactured as PROKERA were inserted in one eye of six normal patients. Four sets (one each) were inserted in four patients, while six sets (three each) were inserted in two patients. Uncorrected distant and near visual acuities, color vision, amniotic membrane thickness measured by pachymetry, and total symptom scores were compared before and after insertion. Within 30 minutes after insertion, mean distant visual acuities decreased from -0.22 +/- 0.06 to 0.92 +/- 0.45 logarithmic minimum angle of resolution (logMAR). Among 10 sets of PROKERA inserted, the largest optotype (1.0 logMAR) of the near vision chart could not be recognized in five, but color vision evaluated by Panel D-15 was still preserved in all. Total symptom scores increased to 47.8 +/- 9.1 points (maximum, 100 points). Among symptoms, total scores for foreign body sensation (17.8 +/- 3.6) and blurred vision (17.8 +/- 4.4) were high. Loss of distant visual acuity and increases of symptom scores were not correlated with amniotic membrane thickness, of which the mean was 67.6 +/- 25.2 mum. However, amniotic membrane that was less opaque tended to provide relatively good visual acuities. Because of the relative non-transparency of sutureless amniotic membrane patches in PROKERA, distant and near visual acuities decreased in normal human eyes. The foreign body sensation noted after insertion is primarily derived from the rigid supporting skirt.

  5. Altered white matter in early visual pathways of humans with amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Brian; Spiegel, Daniel P; Thompson, Benjamin; Pestilli, Franco; Rokers, Bas

    2015-09-01

    Amblyopia is a visual disorder caused by poorly coordinated binocular input during development. Little is known about the impact of amblyopia on the white matter within the visual system. We studied the properties of six major visual white-matter pathways in a group of adults with amblyopia (n=10) and matched controls (n=10) using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and fiber tractography. While we did not find significant differences in diffusion properties in cortico-cortical pathways, patients with amblyopia exhibited increased mean diffusivity in thalamo-cortical visual pathways. These findings suggest that amblyopia may systematically alter the white matter properties of early visual pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Visualization and tissue classification of human breast cancer images using ultrahigh-resolution OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xinwen; Gan, Yu; Chang, Ernest; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Feldman, Sheldon; Hendon, Christine

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers, and recognized as the third leading cause of mortality in women. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables three dimensional visualization of biological tissue with micrometer level resolution at high speed, and can play an important role in early diagnosis and treatment guidance of breast cancer. In particular, ultra-high resolution (UHR) OCT provides images with better histological correlation. This paper compared UHR OCT performance with standard OCT in breast cancer imaging qualitatively and quantitatively. Automatic tissue classification algorithms were used to automatically detect invasive ductal carcinoma in ex vivo human breast tissue. Human breast tissues, including non-neoplastic/normal tissues from breast reduction and tumor samples from mastectomy specimens, were excised from patients at Columbia University Medical Center. The tissue specimens were imaged by two spectral domain OCT systems at different wavelengths: a home-built ultra-high resolution (UHR) OCT system at 800 nm (measured as 2.72 μm axial and 5.52 μm lateral) and a commercial OCT system at 1,300 nm with standard resolution (measured as 6.5 μm axial and 15 μm lateral), and their imaging performances were analyzed qualitatively. Using regional features derived from OCT images produced by the two systems, we developed an automated classification algorithm based on relevance vector machine (RVM) to differentiate hollow-structured adipose tissue against solid tissue. We further developed B-scan based features for RVM to classify invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) against normal fibrous stroma tissue among OCT datasets produced by the two systems. For adipose classification, 32 UHR OCT B-scans from 9 normal specimens, and 28 standard OCT B-scans from 6 normal and 4 IDC specimens were employed. For IDC classification, 152 UHR OCT B-scans from 6 normal and 13 IDC specimens, and 104 standard OCT B-scans from 5 normal and 8 IDC specimens

  7. Effects of visual demonstration, verbal instructions, and prompted verbal descriptions on the performance of human subjects in conditional discriminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribes-Iñesta, Emilio; Cepeda, Ma. Luisa; Hickman, Hortencia; Moreno, Diana; Peñalosa, Eduardo

    1992-01-01

    A study was conducted to confirm prior results concerning the role of prompted verbal descriptions of visually demonstrated stimulus relations in the acquisition and transfer of identity, difference, and similarity-matching relations (Ribes et al., 1988). Four groups of human adults were trained with these three matching relations under four different procedures: (1) visual demonstration without response requirement, (2) verbal instructions, (3) visual demonstration plus prompted verbal description, and (4) visual demonstration plus verbal instructions. These procedures were presented at the beginning of the training period before subjects could respond to the experimental task. Although most subjects in the four groups acquired the conditional discrimination under the three matching relations, only those in the two instruction-related groups showed some intramodal and extramodal transfer in tests with stimuli that had not been used in training. These results suggest the importance of measuring extra-situational and trans-situational generalization, and raise the need to distinguish between formal and functional verbal factors in the regulation of human behavior. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:22477044

  8. [Retinotopic organization of the human visual cortex: a 3T fMRI study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffart, L; Conrath, J; Matonti, F; Galland, F; Wotawa, N; Chavane, F; Castet, E; Ridings, B; Masson, G S

    2007-10-01

    INTRODUCTION. We used high-field (3T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to map the retinotopic organization of human cortical areas. Retinotopic maps were reconstructed using existing mapping techniques. Stimuli were made of a rotating wedge stimulus, which provided angular coordinate maps, and an expanding or contracting ring, which provided eccentricity coordinate maps. Stimuli consisted of a grey background alternating with a flickering checkerboard. A Brucker 3T scanner equipped with a head coil and a custom optical system was used to acquire sets of echoplanar images of 20 occipital coronal slices within a RT of 2.111 ms and an 8 mm3 voxel resolution. Surface models of each subject's occipital lobes were constructed using the Brainvisa software from a sagittal T1-weighted image with a 1 mm3 voxel resolution. The cortical models were then inflated to obtain unfolded surfaces. Statistical analyses of the functional data were made under SPM99, and the response amplitudes were finally assigned to the cortical reconstructed surfaces. We identified boundaries between different early visual areas (V1, V2, V3) using eccentricity and polar angle retinotopic maps and detection of reversals in the representation of the polar angle. Both complete maps and reversals corresponding to the V1/V2 borders were clearly visible with a single recording session. Also, we were able to compare data from subjects across various fMRI acquisitions and found that there was a strong correlation between maps acquired at different sessions for the same subject. We developed a quick (mapping method at 3T, which makes it possible to study the cortical remapping in patients with retinal scotomas.

  9. A behavioural investigation of human visual short term memory for colour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, V A; Parry, N R A; McKeefry, D J

    2010-09-01

    We examined visual short term memory (VSTM) for colour using a delayed-match-to-sample paradigm. In these experiments we measured the effects of increasing inter-stimulus interval (ISI), varying between 0 and 10 s, on the ability of five colour normal human observers to make colour matches between a reference and subsequently presented test stimuli. The coloured stimuli used were defined by different chromatic axes on the isoluminant plane of DKL colour space. In preliminary experiments we used a hue scaling procedure to identify a total of 12 colour stimuli which served as reference hues in the colour memory experiments: four stimuli were exemplars of red, green, blue and yellow colour appearance categories, four were located between these categories and a further four were located on the cardinal axes that isolated the activity of the cone-opponent mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that there is a reduction in the ability of observers to make accurate colour matches with increasing ISIs and that this reduced performance was similar for all colour stimuli. However, the shifts in hue that were measured between the reference and matched test stimuli were significantly greater for the cardinal stimuli compared to those measured for the stimuli defined by the hue scaling procedure. This deterioration in the retention of hue in VSTM for stimuli that isolate cone-opponent mechanisms may be a reflection of the reorganisation of colour processing that occurs in the cortex where colour appearance mechanisms become more prominent. © 2010 The Authors, Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics © 2010 The College of Optometrists.

  10. Visualization of extracellular matrix components within sectioned Salmonella biofilms on the surface of human gallstones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna M Marshall

    Full Text Available Chronic carriage of Salmonella Typhi is mediated primarily through the formation of bacterial biofilms on the surface of cholesterol gallstones. Biofilms, by definition, involve the formation of a bacterial community encased within a protective macromolecular matrix. Previous work has demonstrated the composition of the biofilm matrix to be complex and highly variable in response to altered environmental conditions. Although known to play an important role in bacterial persistence in a variety of contexts, the Salmonella biofilm matrix remains largely uncharacterized under physiological conditions. Initial attempts to study matrix components and architecture of the biofilm matrix on gallstone surfaces were hindered by the auto-fluorescence of cholesterol. In this work we describe a method for sectioning and direct visualization of extracellular matrix components of the Salmonella biofilm on the surface of human cholesterol gallstones and provide a description of the major matrix components observed therein. Confocal micrographs revealed robust biofilm formation, characterized by abundant but highly heterogeneous expression of polysaccharides such as LPS, Vi and O-antigen capsule. CsgA was not observed in the biofilm matrix and flagellar expression was tightly restricted to the biofilm-cholesterol interface. Images also revealed the presence of preexisting Enterobacteriaceae encased within the structure of the gallstone. These results demonstrate the use and feasibility of this method while highlighting the importance of studying the native architecture of the gallstone biofilm. A better understanding of the contribution of individual matrix components to the overall biofilm structure will facilitate the development of more effective and specific methods to disrupt these bacterial communities.

  11. Visual laterality in belugas (Delphinapterus leucas) and Pacific white-sided dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens) when viewing familiar and unfamiliar humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeater, Deirdre B; Hill, Heather M; Baus, Natalie; Farnell, Heather; Kuczaj, Stan A

    2014-11-01

    Lateralization of cognitive processes and motor functions has been demonstrated in a number of species, including humans, elephants, and cetaceans. For example, bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) have exhibited preferential eye use during a variety of cognitive tasks. The present study investigated the possibility of visual lateralization in 12 belugas (Delphinapterus leucas) and six Pacific white-sided dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens) located at two separate marine mammal facilities. During free swim periods, the belugas and Pacific white-sided dolphins were presented a familiar human, an unfamiliar human, or no human during 10-15 min sessions. Session videos were coded for gaze duration, eye presentation at approach, and eye preference while viewing each stimulus. Although we did not find any clear group level lateralization, we found individual left eye lateralized preferences related to social stimuli for most belugas and some Pacific white-sided dolphins. Differences in gaze durations were also observed. The majority of individual belugas had longer gaze durations for unfamiliar rather than familiar stimuli. These results suggest that lateralization occurs during visual processing of human stimuli in belugas and Pacific white-sided dolphins and that these species can distinguish between familiar and unfamiliar humans.

  12. Visual Learning Alters the Spontaneous Activity of the Resting Human Brain: An fNIRS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Haijing; Li, Hao; Sun, Li; Su, Yongming; Huang, Jing; Song, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) has been widely used to investigate spontaneous brain activity that exhibits correlated fluctuations. RSFC has been found to be changed along the developmental course and after learning. Here, we investigated whether and how visual learning modified the resting oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO) functional brain connectivity by using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). We demonstrate that after five days of training on an orientation discrimination task constrained to the right visual field, resting HbO functional connectivity and directed mutual interaction between high-level visual cortex and frontal/central areas involved in the top-down control were significantly modified. Moreover, these changes, which correlated with the degree of perceptual learning, were not limited to the trained left visual cortex. We conclude that the resting oxygenated hemoglobin functional connectivity could be used as a predictor of visual learning, supporting the involvement of high-level visual cortex and the involvement of frontal/central cortex during visual perceptual learning. PMID:25243168

  13. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of methods of mesh fixation during laparoscopic ventral hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, J J; Öberg, S; Andresen, K

    2018-01-01

    review included studies with human adults with a ventral hernia repaired with an intraperitoneal onlay mesh. The outcome was recurrence at least 6 months after operation. Cohort studies with 50 or more participants and all RCTs were included. PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched on 22......BACKGROUND: Ventral hernia repairs are common and have high recurrence rates. They are usually repaired laparoscopically with an intraperitoneal mesh, which can be fixed in various ways. The aim was to evaluate the recurrence rates for the different fixation techniques. METHODS: This systematic...

  14. Influence of Chronic Amphetamine Treatment and Acute Withdrawal on Serotonin Synthesis and Clearance Mechanisms in the Rat Ventral Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jeffrey L.; Scholl, Jamie L.; Solanki, Rajeshwari R.; Watt, Michael J.; Lowry, Christopher A.; Renner, Kenneth J.; Forster, Gina L.

    2012-01-01

    Amphetamine withdrawal in both humans and rats is associated with increased anxiety states, which are thought to contribute to drug relapse. Serotonin in the ventral hippocampus mediates affective behaviors, and reduced serotonin levels in this region are observed in rat models of high anxiety, including during withdrawal from chronic amphetamine. This goal of this study was to understand the mechanisms by which reduced ventral hippocampus serotonergic neurotransmission occurs during amphetamine withdrawal. Serotonin synthesis (assessed by accumulation of serotonin precursor as a measure of the capacity of in vivo tryptophan hydroxylase activity), expression of serotonergic transporters, and in vivo serotonergic clearance using in vivo microdialysis, were assessed in the ventral hippocampus in adult male Sprague Dawley rats at 24 hours withdrawal from chronic amphetamine. Overall, results showed that diminished extracellular serotonin at 24 hours withdrawal from chronic amphetamine was not accompanied by a change in capacity for serotonin synthesis (in vivo tryptophan hydroxylase activity), nor serotonin transporter expression or function in the ventral hippocampus, but instead was associated with increased expression and function of organic cation transporters (low affinity, high capacity serotonin transporters). These findings suggest that 24 hours withdrawal from chronic amphetamine reduces the availability of extracellular serotonin in the ventral hippocampus by increasing organic cation transporter-mediated serotonin clearance, which may represent at future pharmacological target for reversing anxiety states during drug withdrawal. PMID:23157166

  15. Trap-door durotomy for ventral calcified thoracic meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob D. Dickerman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ventral calcified meningiomas of the upper thoracic spine provide a unique challenge due to their location. The posterior approach has long been utilized for resection of ventral meningiomas with high success rates and low morbidity. There are a number of anatomical factors that can increase the difficulty in the case including patient body habitus, calcified tumors ventrally located can be adherent to the cord or anterior spinal artery, angle of the ribs and the vascularity in and around the tumor. We present a very challenging case of a large ventral calcified meningioma at T4 in a patient with body mass index of 50 (5′6, 337 lbs who presented with progressive paraplegia.

  16. Fourier Descriptors Based on the Structure of the Human Primary Visual Cortex with Applications to Object Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Bohi, Amine; Prandi, Dario; Guis, Vincente; Bouchara, Frédéric; Gauthier, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    International audience; In this paper we propose a supervised object recognition method using new global features and inspired by the model of the human primary visual cortex V1 as the semidiscrete roto-translation group $SE(2,N)=\\mathbb Z_N\\rtimes \\mathbb{R}^2$. The proposed technique is based on generalized Fourier descriptors on the latter group, which are invariant to natural geometric transformations (rotations, translations). These descriptors are then used to feed an SVM classifier. We...

  17. Faster scaling of visual neurons in cortical areas relative to subcortical structures in non-human primate brains

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, C. E.; Leitch, D. B.; Wong, P.; Kaas, J. H.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2012-01-01

    Cortical expansion, both in absolute terms and in relation to subcortical structures, is considered a major trend in mammalian brain evolution with important functional implications, given that cortical computations should add complexity and flexibility to information processing. Here, we investigate the numbers of neurons that compose 4 structures in the visual pathway across 11 non-human primate species to determine the scaling relationships that apply to these structures and among them. We...

  18. Poster: Observing change in crowded data sets in 3D space - Visualizing gene expression in human tissues

    KAUST Repository

    Rogowski, Marcin

    2013-03-01

    We have been confronted with a real-world problem of visualizing and observing change of gene expression between different human tissues. In this paper, we are presenting a universal representation space based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as opposed to force-directed layouts encountered most often in similar problems. We are discussing the methods we devised to make observing change more convenient in a 3D virtual reality environment. © 2013 IEEE.

  19. Amphioxus mouth after dorso-ventral inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Takao; Reimer, James D; Morov, Arseniy R; Kuratani, Shigeru; Yasui, Kinya

    2016-01-01

    Deuterostomes (animals with 'secondary mouths') are generally accepted to develop the mouth independently of the blastopore. However, it remains largely unknown whether mouths are homologous among all deuterostome groups. Unlike other bilaterians, in amphioxus the mouth initially opens on the left lateral side. This peculiar morphology has not been fully explained in the evolutionary developmental context. We studied the developmental process of the amphioxus mouth to understand whether amphioxus acquired a new mouth, and if so, how it is related to or differs from mouths in other deuterostomes. The left first somite in amphioxus produces a coelomic vesicle between the epidermis and pharynx that plays a crucial role in the mouth opening. The vesicle develops in association with the amphioxus-specific Hatschek nephridium, and first opens into the pharynx and then into the exterior as a mouth. This asymmetrical development of the anterior-most somites depends on the Nodal-Pitx signaling unit, and the perturbation of laterality-determining Nodal signaling led to the disappearance of the vesicle, producing a symmetric pair of anterior-most somites that resulted in larvae lacking orobranchial structures. The vesicle expressed bmp2/4, as seen in ambulacrarian coelomic pore-canals, and the mouth did not open when Bmp2/4 signaling was blocked. We conclude that the amphioxus mouth, which uniquely involves a mesodermal coelomic vesicle, shares its evolutionary origins with the ambulacrarian coelomic pore-canal. Our observations suggest that there are at least three types of mouths in deuterostomes, and that the new acquisition of chordate mouths was likely related to the dorso-ventral inversion that occurred in the last common ancestor of chordates.

  20. Face-infringement space: the frame of reference of the ventral intraparietal area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Gin; Klam, François; Graf, Werner

    2012-07-01

    Experimental studies have shown that responses of ventral intraparietal area (VIP) neurons specialize in head movements and the environment near the head. VIP neurons respond to visual, auditory, and tactile stimuli, smooth pursuit eye movements, and passive and active movements of the head. This study demonstrates mathematical structure on a higher organizational level created within VIP by the integration of a complete set of variables covering face-infringement. Rather than positing dynamics in an a priori defined coordinate system such as those of physical space, we assemble neuronal receptive fields to find out what space of variables VIP neurons together cover. Section 1 presents a view of neurons as multidimensional mathematical objects. Each VIP neuron occupies or is responsive to a region in a sensorimotor phase space, thus unifying variables relevant to the disparate sensory modalities and movements. Convergence on one neuron joins variables functionally, as space and time are joined in relativistic physics to form a unified spacetime. The space of position and motion together forms a neuronal phase space, bridging neurophysiology and the physics of face-infringement. After a brief review of the experimental literature, the neuronal phase space natural to VIP is sequentially characterized, based on experimental data. Responses of neurons indicate variables that may serve as axes of neural reference frames, and neuronal responses have been so used in this study. The space of sensory and movement variables covered by VIP receptive fields joins visual and auditory space to body-bound sensory modalities: somatosensation and the inertial senses. This joining of allocentric and egocentric modalities is in keeping with the known relationship of the parietal lobe to the sense of self in space and to hemineglect, in both humans and monkeys. Following this inductive step, variables are formalized in terms of the mathematics of graph theory to deduce which

  1. Reading without the left ventral occipito-temporal cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghier, Mohamed L.; Neufeld, Nicholas H.; Zeidman, Peter; Leff, Alex P.; Mechelli, Andrea; Nagendran, Arjuna; Riddoch, Jane M.; Humphreys, Glyn W.; Price, Cathy J.

    2012-01-01

    The left ventral occipito-temporal cortex (LvOT) is thought to be essential for the rapid parallel letter processing that is required for skilled reading. Here we investigate whether rapid written word identification in skilled readers can be supported by neural pathways that do not involve LvOT. Hypotheses were derived from a stroke patient who acquired dyslexia following extensive LvOT damage. The patient followed a reading trajectory typical of that associated with pure alexia, re-gaining the ability to read aloud many words with declining performance as the length of words increased. Using functional MRI and dynamic causal modelling (DCM), we found that, when short (three to five letter) familiar words were read successfully, visual inputs to the patient’s occipital cortex were connected to left motor and premotor regions via activity in a central part of the left superior temporal sulcus (STS). The patient analysis therefore implied a left hemisphere “reading-without-LvOT” pathway that involved STS. We then investigated whether the same reading-without-LvOT pathway could be identified in 29 skilled readers and whether there was inter-subject variability in the degree to which skilled reading engaged LvOT. We found that functional connectivity in the reading-without-LvOT pathway was strongest in individuals who had the weakest functional connectivity in the LvOT pathway. This observation validates the findings of our patient’s case study. Our findings highlight the contribution of a left hemisphere reading pathway that is activated during the rapid identification of short familiar written words, particularly when LvOT is not involved. Preservation and use of this pathway may explain how patients are still able to read short words accurately when LvOT has been damaged. PMID:23017598

  2. Photodynamic damage of glial cells in crayfish ventral nerve cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, M. S.; Duz, E.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising method for treatment of brain tumors, the most of which are of glial origin. In the present work we studied PDT-mediated injury of glial cells in nerve tissue, specifically, in abdominal connectives in the crayfish ventral nerve cord. The preparation was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and irradiated 30 min with the diode laser (670 nm, 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2). After following incubation in the darkness during 1- 10 hours it was fluorochromed with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to reveal nuclei of living, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The chain-like location of the glial nuclei allowed visualization of those enveloping giant axons and blood vessels. The level of glial necrosis in control preparations was about 2-5 %. Apoptosis was not observed in control preparations. PDT significantly increased necrosis of glial cells to 52 or 67 % just after irradiation with 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2, respectively. Apoptosis of glial cells was observed only at 10 hours after light exposure. Upper layers of the glial envelope of the connectives were injured stronger comparing to deep ones: the level of glial necrosis decreased from 100 to 30 % upon moving from the connective surface to the plane of the giant axon inside the connective. Survival of glial cells was also high in the vicinity of blood vessels. One can suggest that giant axons and blood vessels protect neighboring glial cells from photodynamic damage. The mechanism of such protective action remains to be elucidated.

  3. Reading without the left ventral occipito-temporal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghier, Mohamed L; Neufeld, Nicholas H; Zeidman, Peter; Leff, Alex P; Mechelli, Andrea; Nagendran, Arjuna; Riddoch, Jane M; Humphreys, Glyn W; Price, Cathy J

    2012-12-01

    The left ventral occipito-temporal cortex (LvOT) is thought to be essential for the rapid parallel letter processing that is required for skilled reading. Here we investigate whether rapid written word identification in skilled readers can be supported by neural pathways that do not involve LvOT. Hypotheses were derived from a stroke patient who acquired dyslexia following extensive LvOT damage. The patient followed a reading trajectory typical of that associated with pure alexia, re-gaining the ability to read aloud many words with declining performance as the length of words increased. Using functional MRI and dynamic causal modelling (DCM), we found that, when short (three to five letter) familiar words were read successfully, visual inputs to the patient's occipital cortex were connected to left motor and premotor regions via activity in a central part of the left superior temporal sulcus (STS). The patient analysis therefore implied a left hemisphere "reading-without-LvOT" pathway that involved STS. We then investigated whether the same reading-without-LvOT pathway could be identified in 29 skilled readers and whether there was inter-subject variability in the degree to which skilled reading engaged LvOT. We found that functional connectivity in the reading-without-LvOT pathway was strongest in individuals who had the weakest functional connectivity in the LvOT pathway. This observation validates the findings of our patient's case study. Our findings highlight the contribution of a left hemisphere reading pathway that is activated during the rapid identification of short familiar written words, particularly when LvOT is not involved. Preservation and use of this pathway may explain how patients are still able to read short words accurately when LvOT has been damaged. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. P1-32: Response of Human Visual System to Paranormal Stimuli Appearing in Three-Dimensional Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisoo Hong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D display became one of indispensable features of commercial TVs in recent years. However, the 3D content displayed by 3D display may contain the abrupt change of depth when the scene changes, which might be considered as a paranormal stimulus. Because the human visual system is not accustomed to such paranormal stimuli in natural conditions, they can cause unexpected responses which usually induce discomfort. Following the change of depth expressed by 3D display, the eyeballs rotate to match the convergence to the new 3D image position. The amount of rotation varies according to the initial longitudinal location and depth displacement of 3D image. Because the change of depth is abrupt, there is delay in human visual system following the change and such delay can be a source of discomfort. To guarantee the safety in watching 3D TV, the acceptable level of displacement in the longitudinal direction should be revealed quantitatively. Additionally, the artificially generated scenes also can provide paranormal stimuli such as periodic depth variations. In the presentation, we investigate the response of human visual system to such paranormal stimuli given by 3D display system. Using the result of investigation, we can give guideline to creating the 3D content to minimize the discomfort coming from the paranormal stimuli.

  5. Ventral tegmental area afferents and drug-dependent behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idaira eOliva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug-related behaviors in both humans and rodents are commonly thought to arise from aberrant learning processes. Preclinical studies demonstrate that the acquisition and expression of many drug-dependent behaviors involves the ventral tegmental area (VTA, a midbrain structure comprised of dopamine, GABA and glutamate neurons. Drug experience alters the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input onto VTA dopamine neurons, suggesting a critical role for VTA afferents in mediating the effects of drugs. In this review we present evidence implicating the VTA in drug-related behaviors, highlight the diversity of neuronal populations in the VTA, and discuss the behavioral effects of selectively manipulating VTA afferents. Future experiments are needed to determine which VTA afferents and what neuronal populations in the VTA mediate specific drug-dependent behaviors. Further studies are also necessary for identifying the afferent-specific synaptic alterations onto dopamine and non-dopamine neurons in the VTA following drug administration. The identification of neural circuits and adaptations involved with drug-dependent behaviors can highlight potential neural targets for pharmacological and deep brain stimulation interventions to treat substance abuse disorders.

  6. Visual Servoing for Optimization of Anticancer Drug Uptake in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    Chicago, IL) equipped with Visual Basic automation features also access these portable text files. The JCFG was produced using Visual Cafe ...with PET ." In both proposals we will use the same three oligonucleotide sequences. We will target the same mRNA species coding for the bcl-2 protein...expression with PET . Annual Report: Callahan, Parvin Page 122 1 Specific aims 1. Aid the intelligent design of antisense compounds useful for imaging

  7. Cortical sources of Vernier acuity in the human visual system: An EEG-source imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Chuan; Kim, Yee-Joon; Verghese, Preeti

    2017-01-01

    Vernier acuity determines the relative position of visual features with a precision better than the sampling resolution of cone receptors in the retina. Because Vernier displacement is thought to be mediated by orientation-tuned mechanisms, Vernier acuity is presumed to be processed in striate visual cortex (V1). However, there is considerable evidence suggesting that Vernier acuity is dependent not only on structures in V1 but also on processing in extrastriate cortical regions. Here we used...

  8. Increased ventral-striatal activity during monetary decision making is a marker of problem poker gambling severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevers, Damien; Noël, Xavier; He, Qinghua; Melrose, James A; Bechara, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of different neural systems on monetary decision making in frequent poker gamblers, who vary in their degree of problem gambling. Fifteen frequent poker players, ranging from non-problem to high-problem gambling, and 15 non-gambler controls were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). During IGT deck selection, between-group fMRI analyses showed that frequent poker gamblers exhibited higher ventral-striatal but lower dorsolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal activations as compared with controls. Moreover, using functional connectivity analyses, we observed higher ventral-striatal connectivity in poker players, and in regions involved in attentional/motor control (posterior cingulate), visual (occipital gyrus) and auditory (temporal gyrus) processing. In poker gamblers, scores of problem gambling severity were positively associated with ventral-striatal activations and with the connectivity between the ventral-striatum seed and the occipital fusiform gyrus and the middle temporal gyrus. Present results are consistent with findings from recent brain imaging studies showing that gambling disorder is associated with heightened motivational-reward processes during monetary decision making, which may hamper one's ability to moderate his level of monetary risk taking. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Biomimetic collagen/elastin meshes for ventral hernia repair in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minardi, Silvia; Taraballi, Francesca; Wang, Xin; Cabrera, Fernando J; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Robbins, Andrew B; Sandri, Monica; Moreno, Michael R; Weiner, Bradley K; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-03-01

    Ventral hernia repair remains a major clinical need. Herein, we formulated a type I collagen/elastin crosslinked blend (CollE) for the fabrication of biomimetic meshes for ventral hernia repair. To evaluate the effect of architecture on the performance of the implants, CollE was formulated both as flat sheets (CollE Sheets) and porous scaffolds (CollE Scaffolds). The morphology, hydrophylicity and in vitro degradation were assessed by SEM, water contact angle and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. The stiffness of the meshes was determined using a constant stretch rate uniaxial tensile test, and compared to that of native tissue. CollE Sheets and Scaffolds were tested in vitro with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (h-BM-MSC), and finally implanted in a rat ventral hernia model. Neovascularization and tissue regeneration within the implants was evaluated at 6weeks, by histology, immunofluorescence, and q-PCR. It was found that CollE Sheets and Scaffolds were not only biomechanically sturdy enough to provide immediate repair of the hernia defect, but also promoted tissue restoration in only 6weeks. In fact, the presence of elastin enhanced the neovascularization in both sheets and scaffolds. Overall, CollE Scaffolds displayed mechanical properties more closely resembling those of native tissue, and induced higher gene expression of the entire marker genes tested, associated with de novo matrix deposition, angiogenesis, adipogenesis and skeletal muscles, compared to CollE Sheets. Altogether, this data suggests that the improved mechanical properties and bioactivity of CollE Sheets and Scaffolds make them valuable candidates for applications of ventral hernia repair. Due to the elevated annual number of ventral hernia repair in the US, the lack of successful grafts, the design of innovative biomimetic meshes has become a prime focus in tissue engineering, to promote the repair of the abdominal wall, avoid recurrence. Our meshes (Coll

  10. Modulation of activity in human visual area V1 during memory masking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneve, Markus H; Alnæs, Dag; Endestad, Tor; Greenlee, Mark W; Magnussen, Svein

    2011-04-15

    Neurons in the primary visual cortex, V1, are specialized for the processing of elemental features of the visual stimulus, such as orientation and spatial frequency. Recent fMRI evidence suggest that V1 neurons are also recruited in visual perceptual memory; a number of studies using multi-voxel pattern analysis have successfully decoded stimulus-specific information from V1 activity patterns during the delay phase in memory tasks. However, consistent fMRI signal modulations reflecting the memory process have not yet been demonstrated. Here, we report evidence, from three subjects, that the low V1 BOLD activity during retention of low-level visual features is caused by competing interactions between neural populations coding for different values along the spectrum of the dimension remembered. We applied a memory masking paradigm in which the memory representation of a masker stimulus interferes with a delayed spatial frequency discrimination task when its frequency differs from the discriminanda with ±1 octave and found that impaired behavioral performance due to masking is reflected in weaker V1 BOLD signals. This cross-channel inhibition in V1 only occurs with retinotopic overlap between the masker and the sample stimulus of the discrimination task. The results suggest that memory for spatial frequency is a local process in the retinotopically organized visual cortex.

  11. Modulation of activity in human visual area V1 during memory masking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus H Sneve

    Full Text Available Neurons in the primary visual cortex, V1, are specialized for the processing of elemental features of the visual stimulus, such as orientation and spatial frequency. Recent fMRI evidence suggest that V1 neurons are also recruited in visual perceptual memory; a number of studies using multi-voxel pattern analysis have successfully decoded stimulus-specific information from V1 activity patterns during the delay phase in memory tasks. However, consistent fMRI signal modulations reflecting the memory process have not yet been demonstrated. Here, we report evidence, from three subjects, that the low V1 BOLD activity during retention of low-level visual features is caused by competing interactions between neural populations coding for different values along the spectrum of the dimension remembered. We applied a memory masking paradigm in which the memory representation of a masker stimulus interferes with a delayed spatial frequency discrimination task when its frequency differs from the discriminanda with ±1 octave and found that impaired behavioral performance due to masking is reflected in weaker V1 BOLD signals. This cross-channel inhibition in V1 only occurs with retinotopic overlap between the masker and the sample stimulus of the discrimination task. The results suggest that memory for spatial frequency is a local process in the retinotopically organized visual cortex.

  12. Human cortical neural correlates of visual fatigue during binocular depth perception: An fNIRS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Cai

    Full Text Available Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS was adopted to investigate the cortical neural correlates of visual fatigue during binocular depth perception for different disparities (from 0.1° to 1.5°. By using a slow event-related paradigm, the oxyhaemoglobin (HbO responses to fused binocular stimuli presented by the random-dot stereogram (RDS were recorded over the whole visual dorsal area. To extract from an HbO curve the characteristics that are correlated with subjective experiences of stereopsis and visual fatigue, we proposed a novel method to fit the time-course HbO curve with various response functions which could reflect various processes of binocular depth perception. Our results indicate that the parietal-occipital cortices are spatially correlated with binocular depth perception and that the process of depth perception includes two steps, associated with generating and sustaining stereovision. Visual fatigue is caused mainly by generating stereovision, while the amplitude of the haemodynamic response corresponding to sustaining stereovision is correlated with stereopsis. Combining statistical parameter analysis and the fitted time-course analysis, fNIRS could be a promising method to study visual fatigue and possibly other multi-process neural bases.

  13. Sensitive period for a multimodal response in human visual motion area MT/MST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedny, Marina; Konkle, Talia; Pelphrey, Kevin; Saxe, Rebecca; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2010-11-09

    The middle temporal complex (MT/MST) is a brain region specialized for the perception of motion in the visual modality. However, this specialization is modified by visual experience: after long-standing blindness, MT/MST responds to sound. Recent evidence also suggests that the auditory response of MT/MST is selective for motion. The developmental time course of this plasticity is not known. To test for a sensitive period in MT/MST development, we used fMRI to compare MT/MST function in congenitally blind, late-blind, and sighted adults. MT/MST responded to sound in congenitally blind adults, but not in late-blind or sighted adults, and not in an individual who lost his vision between ages of 2 and 3 years. All blind adults had reduced functional connectivity between MT/MST and other visual regions. Functional connectivity was increased between MT/MST and lateral prefrontal areas in congenitally blind relative to sighted and late-blind adults. These data suggest that early blindness affects the function of feedback projections from prefrontal cortex to MT/MST. We conclude that there is a sensitive period for visual specialization in MT/MST. During typical development, early visual experience either maintains or creates a vision-dominated response. Once established, this response profile is not altered by long-standing blindness. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Integration of visual and tactile information in reproduction of traveled distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churan, Jan; Paul, Johannes; Klingenhoefer, Steffen; Bremmer, Frank

    2017-09-01

    In the natural world, self-motion always stimulates several different sensory modalities. Here we investigated the interplay between a visual optic flow stimulus simulating self-motion and a tactile stimulus (air flow resulting from self-motion) while human observers were engaged in a distance reproduction task. We found that adding congruent tactile information (i.e., speed of the air flow and speed of visual motion are directly proportional) to the visual information significantly improves the precision of the actively reproduced distances. This improvement, however, was smaller than predicted for an optimal integration of visual and tactile information. In contrast, incongruent tactile information (i.e., speed of the air flow and speed of visual motion are inversely proportional) did not improve subjects' precision indicating that incongruent tactile information and visual information were not integrated. One possible interpretation of the results is a link to properties of neurons in the ventral intraparietal area that have been shown to have spatially and action-congruent receptive fields for visual and tactile stimuli.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study shows that tactile and visual information can be integrated to improve the estimates of the parameters of self-motion. This, however, happens only if the two sources of information are congruent-as they are in a natural environment. In contrast, an incongruent tactile stimulus is still used as a source of information about self-motion but it is not integrated with visual information. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. HIV/AIDS in the visual arts: applying discipline-based art education (DBAE) to medical humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapajos, Ricardo

    2003-06-01

    Health professions educators have been systematically attempting to insert the humanities into health professions curricula for over 4 decades, with various degrees of success. Among the several medical humanities, the visual arts seem particularly adequate for the teaching/learning of crucial aspects of medicine. Educational efforts in the arts require, however, a sound pedagogical philosophy of art education. Health professions educators need therefore to be aware of educational frameworks in the arts. Discipline-based art education (DBAE) is a recognised contemporary educational framework for the teaching/learning of the arts, which may be adapted to medical humanities. It is the ultimate objective of this essay to share the experience of applying this educational framework to a course in a medical curriculum. The author describes a course on the representations of HIV/AIDS in the visual arts, with explicit reference to its objectives, content, instructional features and student assessment in the light of DBAE, whose principles and characteristics are described in detail. Discipline-based art education may be applied to medical humanities courses in a medical curriculum. This essay throws light on how this structure may be particularly useful for designing other pedagogically sound art courses in health professions curricula.

  16. Changes in Women's Facial Skin Color over the Ovulatory Cycle are Not Detectable by the Human Visual System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P Burriss

    Full Text Available Human ovulation is not advertised, as it is in several primate species, by conspicuous sexual swellings. However, there is increasing evidence that the attractiveness of women's body odor, voice, and facial appearance peak during the fertile phase of their ovulatory cycle. Cycle effects on facial attractiveness may be underpinned by changes in facial skin color, but it is not clear if skin color varies cyclically in humans or if any changes are detectable. To test these questions we photographed women daily for at least one cycle. Changes in facial skin redness and luminance were then quantified by mapping the digital images to human long, medium, and shortwave visual receptors. We find cyclic variation in skin redness, but not luminance. Redness decreases rapidly after menstrual onset, increases in the days before ovulation, and remains high through the luteal phase. However, we also show that this variation is unlikely to be detectable by the human visual system. We conclude that changes in skin color are not responsible for the effects of the ovulatory cycle on women's attractiveness.

  17. Changes in Women's Facial Skin Color over the Ovulatory Cycle are Not Detectable by the Human Visual System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burriss, Robert P; Troscianko, Jolyon; Lovell, P George; Fulford, Anthony J C; Stevens, Martin; Quigley, Rachael; Payne, Jenny; Saxton, Tamsin K; Rowland, Hannah M

    2015-01-01

    Human ovulation is not advertised, as it is in several primate species, by conspicuous sexual swellings. However, there is increasing evidence that the attractiveness of women's body odor, voice, and facial appearance peak during the fertile phase of their ovulatory cycle. Cycle effects on facial attractiveness may be underpinned by changes in facial skin color, but it is not clear if skin color varies cyclically in humans or if any changes are detectable. To test these questions we photographed women daily for at least one cycle. Changes in facial skin redness and luminance were then quantified by mapping the digital images to human long, medium, and shortwave visual receptors. We find cyclic variation in skin redness, but not luminance. Redness decreases rapidly after menstrual onset, increases in the days before ovulation, and remains high through the luteal phase. However, we also show that this variation is unlikely to be detectable by the human visual system. We conclude that changes in skin color are not responsible for the effects of the ovulatory cycle on women's attractiveness.

  18. Changes in Women’s Facial Skin Color over the Ovulatory Cycle are Not Detectable by the Human Visual System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burriss, Robert P.; Troscianko, Jolyon; Lovell, P. George; Fulford, Anthony J. C.; Stevens, Martin; Quigley, Rachael; Payne, Jenny; Saxton, Tamsin K.; Rowland, Hannah M.

    2015-01-01

    Human ovulation is not advertised, as it is in several primate species, by conspicuous sexual swellings. However, there is increasing evidence that the attractiveness of women’s body odor, voice, and facial appearance peak during the fertile phase of their ovulatory cycle. Cycle effects on facial attractiveness may be underpinned by changes in facial skin color, but it is not clear if skin color varies cyclically in humans or if any changes are detectable. To test these questions we photographed women daily for at least one cycle. Changes in facial skin redness and luminance were then quantified by mapping the digital images to human long, medium, and shortwave visual receptors. We find cyclic variation in skin redness, but not luminance. Redness decreases rapidly after menstrual onset, increases in the days before ovulation, and remains high through the luteal phase. However, we also show that this variation is unlikely to be detectable by the human visual system. We conclude that changes in skin color are not responsible for the effects of the ovulatory cycle on women’s attractiveness. PMID:26134671

  19. A Blind Adaptive Color Image Watermarking Scheme Based on Principal Component Analysis, Singular Value Decomposition and Human Visual System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Imran

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A blind adaptive color image watermarking scheme based on principal component analysis, singular value decomposition, and human visual system is proposed. The use of principal component analysis to decorrelate the three color channels of host image, improves the perceptual quality of watermarked image. Whereas, human visual system and fuzzy inference system helped to improve both imperceptibility and robustness by selecting adaptive scaling factor, so that, areas more prone to noise can be added with more information as compared to less prone areas. To achieve security, location of watermark embedding is kept secret and used as key at the time of watermark extraction, whereas, for capacity both singular values and vectors are involved in watermark embedding process. As a result, four contradictory requirements; imperceptibility, robustness, security and capacity are achieved as suggested by results. Both subjective and objective methods are acquired to examine the performance of proposed schemes. For subjective analysis the watermarked images and watermarks extracted from attacked watermarked images are shown. For objective analysis of proposed scheme in terms of imperceptibility, peak signal to noise ratio, structural similarity index, visual information fidelity and normalized color difference are used. Whereas, for objective analysis in terms of robustness, normalized correlation, bit error rate, normalized hamming distance and global authentication rate are used. Security is checked by using different keys to extract the watermark. The proposed schemes are compared with state-of-the-art watermarking techniques and found better performance as suggested by results.

  20. Financial implications of ventral hernia repair: a hospital cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Drew; Davenport, Daniel L; Korosec, Ryan L; Roth, J Scott

    2013-01-01

    Complicated ventral hernias are often referred to tertiary care centers. Hospital costs associated with these repairs include direct costs (mesh materials, supplies, and nonsurgeon labor costs) and indirect costs (facility fees, equipment depreciation, and unallocated labor). Operative supplies represent a significant component of direct costs, especially in an era of proprietary synthetic meshes and biologic grafts. We aim to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of complex abdominal wall hernia repair at a tertiary care referral facility. Cost data on all consecutive open ventral hernia repairs (CPT codes 49560, 49561, 49565, and 49566) performed between 1 July 2008 and 31 May 2011 were analyzed. Cases were analyzed based upon hospital status (inpatient vs. outpatient) and whether the hernia repair was a primary or secondary procedure. We examined median net revenue, direct costs, contribution margin, indirect costs, and net profit/loss. Among primary hernia repairs, cost data were further analyzed based upon mesh utilization (no mesh, synthetic, or biologic). Four-hundred and fifteen patients underwent ventral hernia repair (353 inpatients and 62 outpatients); 173 inpatients underwent ventral hernia repair as the primary procedure; 180 inpatients underwent hernia repair as a secondary procedure. Median net revenue ($17,310 vs. 10,360, p financial loss was $8,370. Outpatient ventral hernia repairs, with and without synthetic mesh, resulted in median net losses of $1,560 and 230, respectively. Ventral hernia repair is associated with overall financial losses. Inpatient synthetic mesh repairs are essentially budget neutral. Outpatient and inpatient repairs without mesh result in net financial losses. Inpatient biologic mesh repairs result in a negative contribution margin and striking net financial losses. Cost-effective strategies for managing ventral hernias in a tertiary care environment need to be developed in light of the financial implications of this patient

  1. 3Omics: a web-based systems biology tool for analysis, integration and visualization of human transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuo, Tien-Chueh; Tian, Tze-Feng; Tseng, Yufeng Jane

    2013-01-01

    .... The 3Omics one-click web tool was developed to visualize and rapidly integrate multiple human inter- or intra-transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data by combining five commonly used analyses...

  2. Role of projections from ventral medial prefrontal cortex to nucleus accumbens shell in context-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossert, Jennifer M; Stern, Anna L; Theberge, Florence R M; Marchant, Nathan J; Wang, Hui-Ling; Morales, Marisela; Shaham, Yavin

    2012-04-04

    In humans, exposure to contexts previously associated with heroin use can provoke relapse. In rats, exposure to heroin-paired contexts after extinction of drug-reinforced responding in different contexts reinstates heroin seeking. This effect is attenuated by inhibition of glutamate or dopamine transmission in nucleus accumbens shell, or inactivation of ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Here, we used an anatomical asymmetrical disconnection procedure to demonstrate that an interaction between glutamatergic projections from ventral mPFC to accumbens shell and local dopamine D(1) postsynaptic receptors contributes to context-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking. We also combined the marker of neuronal activity, Fos, with the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold to assess activation in this pathway during context-induced reinstatement. Rats were trained to self-administer heroin for 12 d; drug infusions were paired with a discrete tone-light cue. Lever pressing was subsequently extinguished in a nondrug-associated context in the presence of the discrete cue. Rats were then tested in the heroin- or extinction-associated contexts under extinction conditions. Injections of muscimol + baclofen into ventral mPFC in one hemisphere and D(1)-family receptor antagonist SCH 23390 into the contralateral or ipsilateral accumbens shell decreased context-induced reinstatement. Unilateral injections of muscimol + baclofen into ventral mPFC or SCH 23390 into the accumbens shell had no effect. Context-induced reinstatement was associated with increased Fos expression in ventral mPFC neurons, including those projecting to accumbens shell, with higher double-labeling in the ipsilateral projection than in the contralateral projection. Our results demonstrate that activation of glutamatergic projections from ventral mPFC to accumbens shell, previously implicated in inhibition of cocaine relapse, promotes heroin relapse.

  3. Functional MRI Representational Similarity Analysis Reveals a Dissociation between Discriminative and Relative Location Information in the Human Visual System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvi N Roth

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural responses in visual cortex are governed by a topographic mapping from retinal locations to cortical responses. Moreover, at the voxel population level early visual cortex (EVC activity enables accurate decoding of stimuli locations. However, in many cases information enabling one to discriminate between locations (i.e. discriminative information may be less relevant than information regarding the relative location of two objects (i.e. relative information. For example, when planning to grab a cup, determining whether the cup is located at the same retinal location as the hand is hardly relevant, whereas the location of the cup relative to the hand is crucial for performing the action.We have previously used multivariate pattern analysis techniques to measure discriminative location information, and found the highest levels in early visual cortex, in line with other studies. Here we show, using representational similarity analysis, that availability of discriminative information in fMRI activation patterns does not entail availability of relative information. Specifically, we find that relative location information can be reliably extracted from activity patterns in posterior intraparietal sulcus (pIPS, but not from EVC, where we find the spatial representation to be warped.We further show that this variability in relative information levels between regions can be explained by a computational model based on an array of receptive fields. Moreover, when the model’s receptive fields are extended to include inhibitory surround regions, the model can account for the spatial warping in EVC.These results demonstrate how size and shape properties of receptive fields in human visual cortex contribute to the transformation of discriminative spatial representation into relative spatial representation along the visual stream.

  4. Reading visually embodied meaning from the brain: Visually grounded computational models decode visual-object mental imagery induced by written text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Andrew James; Bruni, Elia; Lopopolo, Alessandro; Poesio, Massimo; Baroni, Marco

    2015-10-15

    Embodiment theory predicts that mental imagery of object words recruits neural circuits involved in object perception. The degree of visual imagery present in routine thought and how it is encoded in the brain is largely unknown. We test whether fMRI activity patterns elicited by participants reading objects' names include embodied visual-object representations, and whether we can decode the representations using novel computational image-based semantic models. We first apply the image models in conjunction with text-based semantic models to test predictions of visual-specificity of semantic representations in different brain regions. Representational similarity analysis confirms that fMRI structure within ventral-temporal and lateral-occipital regions correlates most strongly with the image models and conversely text models correlate better with posterior-parietal/lateral-temporal/inferior-frontal regions. We use an unsupervised decoding algorithm that exploits commonalities in representational similarity structure found within both image model and brain data sets to classify embodied visual representations with high accuracy (8/10) and then extend it to exploit model combinations to robustly decode different brain regions in parallel. By capturing latent visual-semantic structure our models provide a route into analyzing neural representations derived from past perceptual experience rather than stimulus-driven brain activity. Our results also verify the benefit of combining multimodal data to model human-like semantic representations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Visual Coding of Human Bodies: Perceptual Aftereffects Reveal Norm-Based, Opponent Coding of Body Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Gillian; Jeffery, Linda; Boeing, Alexandra; Calder, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the discovery of body-selective neural areas in occipitotemporal cortex, little is known about how bodies are visually coded. We used perceptual adaptation to determine how body identity is coded. Brief exposure to a body (e.g., anti-Rose) biased perception toward an identity with opposite properties (Rose). Moreover, the size of this…

  6. Interactions of top-down and bottom-up mechanisms in human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMains, Stephanie; Kastner, Sabine

    2011-01-12

    Multiple stimuli present in the visual field at the same time compete for neural representation by mutually suppressing their evoked activity throughout visual cortex, providing a neural correlate for the limited processing capacity of the visual system. Competitive interactions among stimuli can be counteracted by top-down, goal-directed mechanisms such as attention, and by bottom-up, stimulus-driven mechanisms. Because these two processes cooperate in everyday life to bias processing toward behaviorally relevant or particularly salient stimuli, it has proven difficult to study interactions between top-down and bottom-up mechanisms. Here, we used an experimental paradigm in which we first isolated the effects of a bottom-up influence on neural competition by parametrically varying the degree of perceptual grouping in displays that were not attended. Second, we probed the effects of directed attention on the competitive interactions induced with the parametric design. We found that the amount of attentional modulation varied linearly with the degree of competition left unresolved by bottom-up processes, such that attentional modulation was greatest when neural competition was little influenced by bottom-up mechanisms and smallest when competition was strongly influenced by bottom-up mechanisms. These findings suggest that the strength of attentional modulation in the visual system is constrained by the degree to which competitive interactions have been resolved by bottom-up processes related to the segmentation of scenes into candidate objects.