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Sample records for human tumor microvascular

  1. Tumor microvascular changes in antiangiogenic treatment : Assessment by magnetic resonance contrast media of different molecular weights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turetschek, K; Preda, A; Novikov, [No Value; Brasch, RC; Weinmann, HJ; Wunderbaldinger, P; Roberts, TPL

    Purpose: To test magnetic resonance (MR) contrast media of different molecular weights (MWs) for their potential to characterize noninvasively microvascular changes in an experimental tumor treatment model. Materials and Methods: MD-MBA-435, a poorly differentiated human breast cancer cell line, was

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha increases myocardial microvascular transport in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P R; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Høyer, S

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a primary mediator in the pathogenesis of tissue injury, and high circulating levels of TNF-alpha are found in a variety of pathological conditions. In open-chest anesthetized dogs, the effects of intracoronary recombinant human TNF-alpha (rTNF-alpha; 10...... hydrophilic molecules across the myocardial microvascular barrier in vivo and induce a prolonged decrease in cardiac performance. These effects may be important elements in myocardial pathophysiology....

  3. Listeriolysin O mediates cytotoxicity against human brain microvascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penetration of the brain microvascular endothelial layer is one of the routes L. monocytogenes use to breach the blood-brain barrier. Because host factors in the blood severely limit direct invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) by L. monocytogenes, alternative mechanisms m...

  4. Teflon granulomas mimicking cerebellopontine angle tumors following microvascular decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep, Nicholas L; Graffeo, Christopher S; Copeland, William R; Link, Michael J; Atkinson, John L; Neff, Brian A; Raghunathan, Aditya; Carlson, Matthew L

    2017-03-01

    To report two patients with a history of microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm who presented with Teflon granulomas (TG) mimicking cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumors and to perform a systematic review of the English-language literature. Case series at a single tertiary academic referral center and systematic review. Retrospective chart review with analysis of clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings. Systematic review using PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, and Web of Science databases. Two patients with large skull base TGs mimicking CPA tumors clinically and radiographically were managed at the authors' institution. The first presented 4 years after MVD with asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss, multiple progressive cranial neuropathies, and brainstem edema due to a growing TG. Reoperation with resection of the granuloma confirmed a foreign-body reaction consisting of multinucleated giant cells containing intracytoplasmic Teflon particles. The second patient presented 11 years after MVD with asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss and recurrent hemifacial spasm. No growth was noted over 2 years, and the patient has been managed expectantly. Only one prior case of TG after MVD for hemifacial spasm has been reported in the English literature. TG is a rare complication of MVD for hemifacial spasm. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients presenting with a new-onset enhancing mass of the CPA after MVD, even when performed decades earlier. A thorough clinical and surgical history is critical toward establishing an accurate diagnosis to guide management and prevent unnecessary morbidity. Surgical intervention is not required unless progressive neurologic complications ensue. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:715-719, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P cyclic AMP accumulation, PKA, and PKC activity but was not associated with the activation of downstream events such as CRE and AP-1 binding activity. These data support the hypothesis that HMEC-1 is a suitable model to study the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on microvascular endothelial cells. Continued studies with HMEC-1 may prove advantageous in delineation of the molecular pathophysiology associated with diabetic microangiopathy.

  6. Metastatic pathway and the microvascular and physicochemical microenvironments of human melanoma xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruixia; Andersen, Lise Mari K; Rofstad, Einar K

    2017-10-10

    Malignant melanoma of the skin can metastasize through blood vessels and lymphatics. The primary tumor develops a vascular microenvironment characterized by abnormal blood vessels and lymphatics and a physicochemical microenvironment characterized by low oxygen tension, regions with hypoxic tissue, and high interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). This study aimed at identifying relationships between the metastatic route of melanomas and characteristic features of the microvascular and physicochemical microenvironments of the primary tumor. Two patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models (E-13, N-15) and four cell line-derived xenografts (CDX) models (C-10, D-12, R-18, T-22) of human melanoma were included in the study. Tumors were transplanted to an orthotopic site in BALB/c-nu/nu mice, and when the tumors had grown to a volume of 500-600 mm3, the IFP of the primary tumor was measured and the hypoxia marker pimonidazole was administered before the host mouse was euthanized. The primary tumor, lungs, and six pairs of lymph nodes were evaluated by examining hematoxylin/eosin-stained and immunostained histological preparations. The expression of angiogenesis-related genes was assessed by quantitative PCR. C-10, D-12, and E-13 tumors disseminated primarily by the hematogenous route and developed pulmonary metastases. These tumors showed high angiogenic activity and high expression of the F3 gene as well as ANGPT2 and TIE1, genes encoding proteins of the angiopoietin-tie system. N-15, R-18, and T-22 tumors disseminated mainly by the lymphogenous route and developed metastases in draining lymph nodes. These tumors had highly elevated IFP and showed high expression of NRP2, a gene encoding neuropilin-2. The primary metastatic route of orthotopic human melanoma xenografts and the development of lung and lymph node metastases are influenced significantly by the microvascular and physicochemical microenvironments of the primary tumor.

  7. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P pathophysiology associated with diabetic microangiopathy.

  8. Microvascular changes in AT17-tumors of mouse during radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Seidl, S

    2000-01-01

    responsible for rising permeability, which contradicts the former hypothesis of leaky vessels caused by apoptosis. Large radiation doses damage tumor cells and blood vessels and cause growth reduction and regression. Tumors exceeding in size 1-2 mm require nutrition by blood vessels for tumor survival. We aimed to record changes in architecture, structure and function of tumor vascularisation after radiation. 12 AT17-mammary-adenocarcinomas of mouse were examined before and immediately after fractionated radiotherapy total dose 42 or 78 Gray. Double intravital perfusion (20 min interval) with fluorochrome-conjugated lectin (HPA-TRITC, HPA-FITC) was used to mark all perfused vessels. Cryostat sections of the tumors were viewed by a laser-scanning-microscope and 2-channel-images shown as mismatch-mosaics. Due to this technique, with labeling lasting 4 hours, it was possible to confirm intermittent perfusion, describe complete microvessel architecture and make statements about endothelial cell function. After 42...

  9. Interaction of stromal and microvascular components in keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Neto, Ernesto Santos; Cangussu, Maria Cristina Teixeira; Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo; Guimarães, Vanessa Sousa; Ramos, Eduardo Antônio Gonçalves; Xavier, Flávia Caló Aquino; Cury, Patrícia Ramos; Carneiro Júnior, Braúlio; Leonardi, Rosalia; Dos Santos, Jean Nunes

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the interaction of stromal components in odontogenic tumors. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate mast cells (MCs), myofibroblasts, macrophages, and their possible association with angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs). Thirty cases of KCOTs were included and analyzed by immunohistochemistry for mast cell tryptase, α-SMA, CD34, CD163, and D240. For comparative purpose, 15 radicular cysts (CRs) and 7 pericoronal follicles (PFs) were included. There was an increase in MCs for RCs and this difference was significant when they were compared to KCOTS and PFs. A significant increase in the density of MFs was observed for KCOTs when compared to RCs and PFs (P = 0.00). No significant difference in CD163-positive macrophages (P = 0.084) and CD34-positive vessels (P = 0.244) densities was observed between KCOTs, RCs, and PFs, although KCOTs showed a higher density of all proteins. Significant difference in lymphatic vessel density was observed for KCOTs when compared to RCs and PFs (P = 0.00). Positive correlation was observed between mast cell tryptase and CD34 in KCOTs (P = 0.025). A significant interaction between the MC population and CD34-positive vessels in KCOTs supported the hypothesis that MCs and blood vessels contribute to the stromal scaffold of KCOT. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Localised cutaneous microvascular adaptation to exercise training in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Ceri L; Carter, Howard H; Thijssen, Dick H J; Birk, Gurpreet K; Cable, N Timothy; Low, David A; Kerstens, Floortje; Meeuwis, Iris; Dawson, Ellen A; Green, Daniel J

    2018-02-07

    Exercise training induces adaptation in conduit and resistance arteries in humans, partly as a consequence of repeated elevation in blood flow and shear stress. The stimuli associated with intrinsic cutaneous microvascular adaptation to exercise training have been less comprehensively studied. We studied 14 subjects who completed 8-weeks cycle ergometer training, with partial cuff inflation on one forearm to unilaterally attenuate cutaneous blood flow responses during each exercise-training bout. Before and after training, bilateral forearm skin microvascular dilation was determined using cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC: skin flux/blood pressure) responses to gradual localised heater disk stimulation performed at rest (33, 40, 42 and 44 °C). Cycle exercise induced significant increases in forearm cutaneous flux and temperature, which were attenuated in the cuffed arm (2-way ANOVA interaction-effect; P < 0.01). We found that forearm CVC at 42 and 44 °C was significantly lower in the uncuffed arm following 8-weeks of cycle training (P < 0.01), whereas no changes were apparent in the contralateral cuffed arm (P = 0.77, interaction-effect P = 0.01). Lower limb exercise training in healthy young men leads to lower CVC-responses to a local heating stimulus, an adaptation mediated, at least partly, by a mechanism related to episodic increases in skin blood flow and/or skin temperature.

  11. In vitro analysis of human periodontal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubokawa, Mizuki; Sato, Soh

    2014-08-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) participate in key aspects of vascular biology, such as maintenance of capillary permeability, initiation of coagulation, and regulation of inflammation. According to previous reports, ECs have revealed highly specific characteristics depending on the organs and tissues. However, some reports have described the characteristics of the capillaries formed by human periodontal ECs. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to examine the functional characteristics of the periodontal microvascular ECs in vitro. Human periodontal ligament-endothelial cells (HPDL-ECs) and human gingiva-endothelial cells (HG-ECs) were isolated by immunoprecipitation with magnetic beads conjugated to a monoclonal anti-CD31 antibody. The isolated HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs were characterized to definitively demonstrate that these cell cultures represented pure ECs. Human umbilical-vein ECs and human dermal microvascular ECs were used for comparison. These cells were compared according to the proliferation potential, the formation of capillary-like tubes, the transendothelial electric resistance (TEER), and the expression of tight junction proteins. HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs with characteristic cobblestone monolayer morphology were obtained, as determined by light microscopy at confluence. Furthermore, the HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs expressed the EC markers platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (also known as CD31), von Willebrand factor, and Ulex europaeus agglutinin 1, and the cells stained strongly positive for CD31 and CD309. In addition, the HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs were observed to form capillary-like tubes, and they demonstrated uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. Functional analyses of the HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs showed that, compared to the control cells, tube formation persisted for only a brief period of time, and TEER was substantially reduced at confluence. Furthermore, the cells exhibited delocalization of zonula occludens-1 and occludin at cell-cell contact sites

  12. Differential effects of Bartonella henselae on human and feline macro- and micro-vascular endothelial cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berrich, Moez; Kieda, Claudine; Grillon, Catherine; Monteil, Martine; Lamerant, Nathalie; Gavard, Julie; Boulouis, Henri Jean; Haddad, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    ... lines.To this purpose, we have developed nine feline EC lines which allowed comparing the effects of Bartonella strains on human and feline micro-vascular ECs representative of the infection development...

  13. Coronary Microvascular Resistance: Methods for Its Quantification in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Knaapen, P.; Camici, P G; Marques, K M J; Nijveldt, R.J; Bax, J J; Westerhof, N.; Gotte, M.J.W.; Jerosch-Herold, M.; Schelbert, H R; Lammertsma, A A; Rossum, van, E.N.A.

    2009-01-01

    Coronary microvascular dysfunction is a topic that has recently gained considerable interest in the medical community owing to the growing awareness that microvascular dysfunction occurs in a number of myocardial disease states and has important prognostic implications. With this growing awareness, comes the desire to accurately assess the functional capacity of the coronary microcirculation for diagnostic purposes as well as to monitor the effects of therapeutic interventions that are target...

  14. Isolation and Culture of Human Microvascular endothelium for comparison of the morphological and molecular characteristics of Microvascular endothelial cells under normal gravity against simulated micro gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tholcopiyan L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelial cells play a major role in wound healing and also in growth of the tumors. Angiogenesis can be a target for treating diseases that are due to either poor vascularisation or decreased blood supply as in stroke, ulcers, heart disease, etc or abnormal and increased vasculature like in tumours. Application of specific compounds that may inhibit or induce the creation of new blood vessels in the body may help in the treatment of such diseases (1. Ex vivo generation of blood vessels may offer an excellent alternative to the synthetic valves that are being currently used in cardiology. Micro gravity also referred to, as weightlessness is not essentially zero gravity but rather minimal gravity. According to cell type, micro gravity causes variety of changes in proliferation and differentiation of cells while also affecting the migration of cells and cellular functions (2, 3. Siamwala et al from AUKBC have already studied the effects of microgravity on the microvascular endothelial cells from bovine lung and macrovascular endothelial cells from the bovine pulmonary artery. It was observed that the proliferation and migration of macrovascular endothelial cells were increased in microgravity (4, 5. Nitric oxide production was also studied and observed that microgravity treatment did not change nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells (4OBJECTIVE: Isolation and Comparison of culture characteristics of Human microvascular endothelium cultured conventionally and in novel nanomaterial scaffold and further study the morphological and molecular characteristics of microvascular endothelial cells under normal gravity against simulated micro gravityMATERIALS AND METHODS: The human Omentum samples were obtained using surgical procedures after informed consent. The microvascular endothelial cells were isolated following the protocol described by Scott et al (6.The isolated cells were seeded in two groups; Group I

  15. Early microvascular changes in the preterm neonate: a comparative study of the human and guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Rebecca M; Palliser, Hannah K; Lakkundi, Anil; de Waal, Koert; Latter, Joanna L; Clifton, Vicki L; Wright, Ian M R

    2014-09-17

    Dysfunction of the transition from fetal to neonatal circulatory systems may be a major contributor to poor outcome following preterm birth. Evidence exists in the human for both a period of low flow between 5 and 11 h and a later period of increased flow, suggesting a hypoperfusion-reperfusion cycle over the first 24 h following birth. Little is known about the regulation of peripheral blood flow during this time. The aim of this study was to conduct a comparative study between the human and guinea pig to characterize peripheral microvascular behavior during circulatory transition. Very preterm (≤28 weeks GA), preterm (29-36 weeks GA), and term (≥37 weeks GA) human neonates underwent laser Doppler analysis of skin microvascular blood flow at 6 and 24 h from birth. Guinea pig neonates were delivered prematurely (62 day GA) or at term (68-71 day GA) and laser Doppler analysis of skin microvascular blood flow was assessed every 2 h from birth. In human preterm neonates, there is a period of high microvascular flow at 24 h after birth. No period of low flow was observed at 6 h. In preterm animals, microvascular flow increased after birth, reaching a peak at 10 h postnatal age. Blood flow then steadily decreased, returning to delivery levels by 24 h. Preterm birth was associated with higher baseline microvascular flow throughout the study period in both human and guinea pig neonates. The findings do not support a hypoperfusion-reperfusion cycle in the microcirculation during circulatory transition. The guinea pig model of preterm birth will allow further investigation of the mechanisms underlying microvascular function and dysfunction during the initial extrauterine period. © 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  16. Selenoglycoproteins attenuate adhesion of tumor cells to the brain microvascular endothelium via a process involving NF-κB activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Jagoda K; Choi, Jeong June; Xiao, Rijin; Eum, Sung Yong; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Wolff, Gretchen; Spangler, Leya; Power, Ronan F; Toborek, Michal

    2015-02-01

    Selenium-containing compounds and selenized yeast have anticancer properties. In order to address possible mechanisms involved in these effects, selenoglycoproteins (SGPs) were extracted from selenium-enriched yeast at pH 4.0 and 6.5 (the fractions are called SGP40 and SGP65, respectively), followed by evaluation of their impact on the interactions of lung and breast tumor cells with human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs). Extracted SGPs, especially SGP40, significantly inhibited adhesion of tumor cells to HBMECs and their transendothelial migration. Because the active components of SGPs are unknown, small selenium-containing compounds [leucyl-valyl-selenomethionyl-arginine (LVSe-MR) and methylselenoadenosine (M-Se-A)], which are normally present in selenized yeast, were introduced as additional treatment groups. Treatment of HBMECs with SGP40, LVSe-MR and M-Se-A induced changes in gene signatures, which suggested a central involvement of nuclear factor (NF)-κB-dependent pathway. These observations were confirmed in the subsequent analysis of NF-κB DNA binding activity, quantitative measurements of the expression of selected genes and proteins, and tumor cell adhesion assay with a specific NF-κB inhibitor as the additional treatment factor. These findings indicate that specific organic selenium-containing compounds have the ability to inhibit tumor cell adhesion to brain endothelial cells via down-regulation of NF-κB. SGPs appear to be more effective than small selenium-containing compounds, suggesting the role of not only selenium but also the glycoprotein component in the observed protective impact. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Gene expression microarray data from human microvascular endothelial cells supplemented with a low concentration of niacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Hughes-Large

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The systemic lipid modifying drug, niacin, can directly improve human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, possibly through activation of niacin receptors “Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity” (Hughes-Large et al. 2014. Here we provide accompanying data collected using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays to identify changes in gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with 10 μM niacin. Statistical analyses of robust multi-array average (RMA values revealed that only 16 genes exhibited greater than 1.3-fold differential expression. Of these 16, only 5 were identified protein coding genes, while 3 of the remaining 11 genes appeared to be small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs. Altered expression of EFCAB4B, NAP1L2, and OR13C8 was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR.

  18. Microvascular density, CD68 and tryptase expression in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaccio, Christian; Ingravallo, Giuseppe; Gaudio, Francesco; Perrone, Tommasina; Nico, Beatrice; Maoirano, Eugenio; Specchia, Giorgina; Ribatti, Domenico

    2014-11-01

    Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of Non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by clinical and biological heterogeneity attributable both to the tumor cells and the complex tumor-microenvironment surrounding them. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and mast cells are two major components of the tumor inflammatory infiltrate with a definite role in enhancing tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we have investigated CD68 and tryptase expression and their relationship with microvascular density (MVD) in chemo-resistant and chemosensitive patients affected by DLBCL. CD68 and tryptase expression as well as MVD were increased in chemo-resistant patients when compared with chemosensitive patients. Tryptase expression showed a positive correlation with MVD, supporting a role for mast cell in DLBCL tumor angiogenesis, while CD68 correlation with MVD was not significant, indicating a different role for TAMs than angiogenesis in DLBCL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Tumor angiogenic factor and human skin tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, J E; Hubler, W R

    1975-03-01

    A transparent acrylic hamster cheek-pouch chamber was used to investigate the elaboration of a tumor angiogenic factor (TAF) by human cutaneous neoplasms; direct tumor implantations, transfilter diffusion, and soluble tumor extracts were used in the study. A diffusible and filterable TAF was extracted from cutaneous tumors and produced distinctive patterns of sequential vasodilatation, tortuosity, and neovascular proliferation in the cheek-pouch membrane. Malignant human neoplasms (eg, melanoma, basal cell epithelioma, squamous cell carcinoma, lymphoma) produced striking neovascularization; vascular tumors (eg, Kaposi sarcoma, pyogenic granuloma, vascular histiocytoma) stimulated dramatic hyperemia and ectasia. Angiogenesis was conspicuously absent after implantation of control materials and nevoid or normal cutaneous components (with the exception of epidermis). Tumor angiogenic factor appears to induce direct stimulation of endothelial cell mitosis and may be essential for survival of nutritionally ravenous neoplastic tissues. The interference with TAF has therapeutic implications.

  20. GLP-1 increases microvascular recruitment but not glucose uptake in human and rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Holst, Jens Juul; Rattigan, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The insulinotropic gut hormone, glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been proposed to have effects on vascular function and glucose disposal. However, whether GLP-1 is able to increase microvascular recruitment (MVR) in humans has not been investigated. GLP-1 was infused in the femoral artery...... in overnight fasted healthy young men. Microvascular recruitment was measured with real time contrast-enhanced ultrasound and leg glucose uptake by the leg balance technique with and without inhibition of the insulinotropic response of GLP-1 by co-infusion of octreotide. As a positive control, MVR and leg...

  1. Exercise increases human skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity via coordinated increases in microvascular perfusion and molecular signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Frøsig, Christian; Kjøbsted, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a major health risk and although exercise clearly improves skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity, the mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that initiation of a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp four hours after single-legged exercise in humans increased microvascular perfusion...

  2. Bone marrow blood vessel ossification and "microvascular dead space" in rat and human long bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisby, Rhonda D

    2014-07-01

    Severe calcification of the bone microvascular network was observed in rats, whereby the bone marrow blood vessels appeared ossified. This study sought to characterize the magnitude of ossification in relation to patent blood vessels and adipocyte content in femoral diaphyses. Additionally, this study confirmed the presence of ossified vessels in patients with arteriosclerotic vascular disease and peripheral vascular disease and cellulitis. Young (4-6 month; n=8) and old (22-24 month; n=8) male Fischer-344 rats were perfused with barium sulfate to visualize patent bone marrow blood vessels. Femoral shafts were processed for bone histomorphometry to quantify ossified (Goldner's Trichrome) and calcified (Alizarin Red) vessels. Adipocyte content was also determined. Additional femora (n=5/age group) were scanned via μCT to quantify microvascular ossification. Bone marrow blood vessels from the rats and the human patients were also isolated and examined via microscopy. Ossified vessels (rats and humans) had osteocyte lacunae on the vessel surfaces and "normal" vessels were transitioning into bone. The volume of ossified vessels was 4800% higher (possification of bone marrow blood vessels in rats and humans. Ossification presumably results in "microvascular dead space" in regard to loss of patency and vasomotor function as opposed to necrosis. Progression of bone microvascular ossification may provide the common link associated with age-related changes in bone and bone marrow. The clinical implications may be evident in the difficulties treating bone disease in the elderly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Galectin-1 suppresses methamphetamine induced neuroinflammation in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: Neuroprotective role in maintaining blood brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Neil U; Aalinkeel, R; Reynolds, J L; Nair, B B; Sykes, D E; Mammen, M J; Schwartz, S A; Mahajan, S D

    2015-10-22

    Methamphetamine (Meth) abuse can lead to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity leading to compromised CNS function. The role of Galectins in the angiogenesis process in tumor-associated endothelial cells (EC) is well established; however no data are available on the expression of Galectins in normal human brain microvascular endothelial cells and their potential role in maintaining BBB integrity. We evaluated the basal gene/protein expression levels of Galectin-1, -3 and -9 in normal primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) that constitute the BBB and examined whether Meth altered Galectin expression in these cells, and if Galectin-1 treatment impacted the integrity of an in-vitro BBB. Our results showed that BMVEC expressed significantly higher levels of Galectin-1 as compared to Galectin-3 and -9. Meth treatment increased Galectin-1 expression in BMVEC. Meth induced decrease in TJ proteins ZO-1, Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 was reversed by Galectin-1. Our data suggests that Galectin-1 is involved in BBB remodeling and can increase levels of TJ proteins ZO-1 and Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 which helps maintain BBB tightness thus playing a neuroprotective role. Galectin-1 is thus an important regulator of immune balance from neurodegeneration to neuroprotection, which makes it an important therapeutic agent/target in the treatment of drug addiction and other neurological conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha increases myocardial microvascular transport in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P R; Svendsen, J H; Høyer, Christian S

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a primary mediator in the pathogenesis of tissue injury, and high circulating levels of TNF-alpha are found in a variety of pathological conditions. In open-chest anesthetized dogs, the effects of intracoronary recombinant human TNF-alpha (rTNF-alpha; 100...

  5. Pathophysiological roles of microvascular alterations in pulmonary inflammatory diseases: possible implications of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and CXC chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanami Orihara

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Kanami Orihara, Akio MatsudaDepartment of Allergy and Immunology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and bronchial asthma are common respiratory diseases that are caused by chronic infl ammation of the airways. Although these diseases are mediated by substantially distinct immunological reactions, especially in mild cases, they both show increased numbers of neutrophils, increased production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and poor responses to corticosteroids, particularly in patients with severe diseases. These immunological alterations may contribute strongly to airway structural changes, commonly referred to as airway remodeling. Microvascular alterations, a component of airway remodeling and caused by chronic inflammation, are observed and appear to be clinically involved in both diseases. It has been well established that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF plays important roles in the airway microvascular alterations in mild and moderate cases of both diseases, but any role that VEGF might play in severe cases of these diseases remains unclear. Here, we review recent research findings, including our own data, and discuss the possibility that TNF-α and its associated CXC chemokines play roles in microvascular alterations that are even more crucial than those of VEGF in patients with severe COPD or asthma.Keywords: TNF-α, CXC chemokines, corticosteroid, pulmonary microvessels, COPD, asthma

  6. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha increases myocardial microvascular transport in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P R; Svendsen, J H; Høyer, Christian S

    1994-01-01

    ng/kg for 60 min) on myocardial microvascular transport of a small hydrophilic indicator was examined by the single-injection, residue-detection method. Intracoronary infusion of rTNF-alpha increased myocardial microvascular transport after 120 min. This increase was preceded by a sustained decline...... in cardiac output and was associated with the appearance of areas with myocardial necrosis in the regional left ventricular wall. The myocardial plasma flow rate and maximum plasma flow rate in response to a 30-s coronary occlusion were not influenced by rTNF-alpha, although a decrease in the myocardial...... hydrophilic molecules across the myocardial microvascular barrier in vivo and induce a prolonged decrease in cardiac performance. These effects may be important elements in myocardial pathophysiology....

  7. Differential Effects of Bartonella henselae on Human and Feline Macro- and Micro-Vascular Endothelial Cells: e20204

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moez Berrich; Claudine Kieda; Catherine Grillon; Martine Monteil; Nathalie Lamerant; Julie Gavard; Henri Jean Boulouis; Nadia Haddad

    2011-01-01

    .... To this purpose, we have developed nine feline EC lines which allowed comparing the effects of Bartonella strains on human and feline micro-vascular ECs representative of the infection development...

  8. Perfusion MRI derived indices of microvascular shunting and flow control correlate with tumor grade and outcome in patients with cerebral glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tietze, Anna; Mouridsen, Kim; Lassen-Ramshad, Yasmin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Deficient microvascular blood flow control is thought to cause tumor hypoxia and increase resistance to therapy. In glioma patients, we tested whether perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI) based indices of microvascular flow control provide more information on tumor grade and patient outcome...... than does the established PWI angiogenesis marker, cerebral blood volume (CBV). Material and Methods: Seventy-two glioma patients (sixty high-grade, twelve low-grade gliomas) were included. Capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH) and COV, its ratio to blood mean transit time, provide indices...

  9. Up-to-date Doppler techniques for breast tumor vascularity: superb microvascular imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ah Young; Seo, Bo Kyoung

    2017-08-19

    Ultrasonographic Doppler techniques have improved greatly over the years, allowing more sophisticated evaluation of breast tumor vascularity. Superb microvascular imaging (SMI) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) with second-generation contrast agents are two representative up-to-date techniques. SMI is a sensitive Doppler technique that adopts an intelligent filter system to separate low-flow signals from artifacts. With the development of second-generation contrast agents, CEUS has also emerged as a useful Doppler technique for evaluating tumor microcirculation. Both techniques can improve the diagnostic performance of gray-scale ultrasonography by providing vascular information useful not only for the morphologic assessment of microvessels, but also for the quantitative analysis of perfusion. In this review, we explain the imaging principles and previous research underlying these two vascular techniques, and describe our clinical experiences.

  10. Nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBT), a nucleoside transport inhibitor, protects against Shiga toxin cytotoxicity in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmi, K; Kiyokawa, N; Sekino, T; Suzuki, T; Mimori, K; Taguchi, T; Nakajima, H; Katagiri, Y U; Fujimoto, J; Nakao, H; Takeda, T

    2001-01-01

    Infections with Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause microvascular endothelial cell damage, resulting in hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. The prevention of endothelial cell damage is therefore a crucial step in overcoming this disorder. Here, we report that nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBT), a nucleoside transport inhibitor, has a protective effect against the cytotoxicity of Stxs in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). The relative viability of cells treated with 1.5-15 pM of Stx1 was reduced to 10-20% of that without Stx1. However, the viability of cells treated with NBT (10-100 microM) remained higher than 80%, even in the presence of Stx1. NBT also protected against Stx1 cytotoxicity in sodium butyrate-treated hypersensitive HMVECs. The protective effect of NBT against Stx cytotoxicity may be due to the depletion of ATP in the cells, thereby inhibiting the entry of Stx1.

  11. Cultivation of Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells on Topographical Substrates to Mimic the Human Corneal Endothelium

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    Jie Shi Chua

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human corneal endothelial cells have a limited ability to replicate in vivo and in vitro. Allograft transplantation becomes necessary when an accident or trauma results in excessive cell loss. The reconstruction of the cornea endothelium using autologous cell sources is a promising alternative option for therapeutic or in vitro drug testing applications. The native corneal endothelium rests on the Descemet’s membrane, which has nanotopographies of fibers and pores. The use of synthetic topographies mimics the native environment, and it is hypothesized that this can direct the behavior and growth of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs to resemble the corneal endothelium. In this study, HMVECs are cultivated on substrates with micron and nano-scaled pillar and well topographies. Closely packed HMVEC monolayers with polygonal cells and well-developed tight junctions were formed on the topographical substrates. Sodium/potassium (Na+/K+ adenine triphosphatase (ATPase expression was enhanced on the microwells substrate, which also promotes microvilli formation, while more hexagonal-like cells are found on the micropillars samples. The data obtained suggests that the use of optimized surface patterning, in particular, the microtopographies, can induce HMVECs to adopt a more corneal endothelium-like morphology with similar barrier and pump functions. The mechanism involved in cell contact guidance by the specific topographical features will be of interest for future studies.

  12. Numerical Modeling of Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through a Remodeled Solid Tumor Microvascular Network.

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    M Soltani

    Full Text Available Modeling of interstitial fluid flow involves processes such as fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. To date, majority of microvascular flow modeling has been done at different levels and scales mostly on simple tumor shapes with their capillaries. However, with our proposed numerical model, more complex and realistic tumor shapes and capillary networks can be studied. Both blood flow through a capillary network, which is induced by a solid tumor, and fluid flow in tumor's surrounding tissue are formulated. First, governing equations of angiogenesis are implemented to specify the different domains for the network and interstitium. Then, governing equations for flow modeling are introduced for different domains. The conservation laws for mass and momentum (including continuity equation, Darcy's law for tissue, and simplified Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow through capillaries are used for simulating interstitial and intravascular flows and Starling's law is used for closing this system of equations and coupling the intravascular and extravascular flows. This is the first study of flow modeling in solid tumors to naturalistically couple intravascular and extravascular flow through a network. This network is generated by sprouting angiogenesis and consisting of one parent vessel connected to the network while taking into account the non-continuous behavior of blood, adaptability of capillary diameter to hemodynamics and metabolic stimuli, non-Newtonian blood flow, and phase separation of blood flow in capillary bifurcation. The incorporation of the outlined components beyond the previous models provides a more realistic prediction of interstitial fluid flow pattern in solid tumors and surrounding tissues. Results predict higher interstitial pressure, almost two times, for realistic model compared to the simplified model.

  13. Perfusion MRI derived indices of microvascular shunting and flow control correlate with tumor grade and outcome in patients with cerebral glioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tietze

    Full Text Available Deficient microvascular blood flow control is thought to cause tumor hypoxia and increase resistance to therapy. In glioma patients, we tested whether perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI based indices of microvascular flow control provide more information on tumor grade and patient outcome than does the established PWI angiogenesis marker, cerebral blood volume (CBV.Seventy-two glioma patients (sixty high-grade, twelve low-grade gliomas were included. Capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH and the coefficient of variation (COV, its ratio to blood mean transit time, provide indices of microvascular flow control and the extent to which oxygen can be extracted by tumor tissue. The ability of these parameters and CBV to differentiate tumor grade were assessed by receiver operating characteristic curves and logistic regression. Their ability to predict time to progression and overall survival was examined by the Cox proportional-hazards regression model, and by survival curves using log-rank tests.The best prediction of grade (AUC = 0.876; p < 0.05 was achieved by combining knowledge of CBV and CTH in the enhancing tumor and peri-focal edema, and patients with glioblastoma multiforme were identified best by CTH (AUC = 0.763; p<0.001. CTH outperformed CBV and COV in predicting time to progression and survival in all gliomas and in a subgroup consisting of only high-grade gliomas.Our study confirms the importance of microvascular flow control in tumor growth by demonstrating that determining CTH improves tumor grading and outcome prediction in glioma patients compared to CBV alone.

  14. Microvascular Angina

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or chest pain, may be a symptom of coronary microvascular disease (MVD) . Coronary MVD is heart disease that affects ... Learn more: What is angina or chest pain? Coronary microvascular disease (MVD) Stable Angina Unstable Angina Variant Angina This ...

  15. In Vivo Optical Imaging of Tumor and Microvascular Response to Ionizing Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Azusa Maeda; Leung, Michael K. K.; Leigh Conroy; Yonghong Chen; Jiachuan Bu; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Shani Mintzberg; Carl Virtanen; Julissa Tsao; Winegarden, Neil A.; Yanchun Wang; Lily Morikawa; I. Alex Vitkin; Jaffray, David A.; Hill, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a widely used cancer treatment. However, understanding how ionizing radiation affects tumor cells and their vasculature, particularly at cellular, subcellular, genetic, and protein levels, has been limited by an inability to visualize the response of these interdependent components within solid tumors over time and in vivo. Here we describe a new preclinical experimental platform combining intravital multimodal optical microscopy for cellular-level longitudinal imaging, a smal...

  16. In vivo optical imaging of tumor and microvascular response to ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Maeda

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is a widely used cancer treatment. However, understanding how ionizing radiation affects tumor cells and their vasculature, particularly at cellular, subcellular, genetic, and protein levels, has been limited by an inability to visualize the response of these interdependent components within solid tumors over time and in vivo. Here we describe a new preclinical experimental platform combining intravital multimodal optical microscopy for cellular-level longitudinal imaging, a small animal x-ray microirradiator for reproducible spatially-localized millimeter-scale irradiations, and laser-capture microdissection of ex vivo tissues for transcriptomic profiling. Using this platform, we have developed new methods that exploit the power of optically-enabled microscopic imaging techniques to reveal the important role of the tumor microvasculature in radiation response of tumors. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of this preclinical platform to study quantitatively--with cellular and sub-cellular details--the spatio-temporal dynamics of the biological response of solid tumors to ionizing radiation in vivo.

  17. In vivo optical imaging of tumor and microvascular response to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Azusa; Leung, Michael K K; Conroy, Leigh; Chen, Yonghong; Bu, Jiachuan; Lindsay, Patricia E; Mintzberg, Shani; Virtanen, Carl; Tsao, Julissa; Winegarden, Neil A; Wang, Yanchun; Morikawa, Lily; Vitkin, I Alex; Jaffray, David A; Hill, Richard P; DaCosta, Ralph S

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a widely used cancer treatment. However, understanding how ionizing radiation affects tumor cells and their vasculature, particularly at cellular, subcellular, genetic, and protein levels, has been limited by an inability to visualize the response of these interdependent components within solid tumors over time and in vivo. Here we describe a new preclinical experimental platform combining intravital multimodal optical microscopy for cellular-level longitudinal imaging, a small animal x-ray microirradiator for reproducible spatially-localized millimeter-scale irradiations, and laser-capture microdissection of ex vivo tissues for transcriptomic profiling. Using this platform, we have developed new methods that exploit the power of optically-enabled microscopic imaging techniques to reveal the important role of the tumor microvasculature in radiation response of tumors. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of this preclinical platform to study quantitatively--with cellular and sub-cellular details--the spatio-temporal dynamics of the biological response of solid tumors to ionizing radiation in vivo.

  18. Effects of Parietaria judaica pollen extract on human microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverna, Simona; Flugy, Anna; Colomba, Paolo; Barranca, Marilisa; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2008-08-08

    Pollinosis from Parietaria judaica is one of the main causes of allergy in the Mediterranean area. The present study is designed to assess if P. judaica pollens contain bioactive compounds able to elicit a functional response in endothelial cells. We have demonstrated that addition of pollen extract to human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) induces a modification of cell morphology, actin cytoskeletal rearrangements and an increase in endothelial cell permeability. We further showed that the treatment of endothelial cells with pollen extract causes an increase of E-selectin and VCAM-1 protein levels as well as an increase of IL-8 production. The stimulation of cell-cell adhesion molecules was paralleled by a dose-dependent increase of adhesion of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) to HMVEC-L monolayer. Our results suggest for the first time that pollen affect directly endothelial cells (EC) modulating critical functions related to the inflammatory response.

  19. Obligatory role of hyperaemia and shear stress in microvascular adaptation to repeated heating in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel J; Carter, Howard H; Fitzsimons, Matthew G; Cable, N Timothy; Thijssen, Dick H J; Naylor, Louise H

    2010-05-01

    The endothelium, a single layer of cells lining the entire circulatory system, plays a key role in maintaining vascular health. Endothelial dysfunction independently predicts cardiovascular events and improvement in endothelial function is associated with decreased vascular risk. Previous studies have suggested that exercise training improves endothelial function in macrovessels, a benefit mediated via repeated episodic increases in shear stress. However, less is known of the effects of shear stress modulation in microvessels. In the present study we examined the hypothesis that repeated skin heating improves cutaneous microvascular vasodilator function via a shear stress-dependent mechanism. We recruited 10 recreationally active males who underwent bilateral forearm immersion in warm water (42 degrees C), 3 times per week for 30 min. During these immersion sessions, shear stress was manipulated in one arm by inflating a pneumatic cuff to 100 mmHg, whilst the other arm remained uncuffed. Vasodilatation to local heating, a NO-dependent response assessed using laser Doppler, improved across the 8 week intervention period in the uncuffed arm (cutaneous vascular conductance week 0 vs. week 4 at 41 degrees C: 1.37 +/- 0.45 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.91 units, P = 0.04; 42 degrees C: 2.06 +/- 0.45 vs. 2.68 +/- 0.83 units; P = 0.04), whereas no significant changes were evident in the cuffed arm. We conclude that increased blood flow, and the likely attendant increase in shear stress, is a key physiological stimulus for enhancing microvascular vasodilator function in humans.

  20. Differentiation and characterization of human pluripotent stem cell-derived brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Matthew J; Wilson, Hannah K; Canfield, Scott G; Qian, Tongcheng; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2016-05-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a critical component of the central nervous system (CNS) that regulates the flux of material between the blood and the brain. Because of its barrier properties, the BBB creates a bottleneck to CNS drug delivery. Human in vitro BBB models offer a potential tool to screen pharmaceutical libraries for CNS penetration as well as for BBB modulators in development and disease, yet primary and immortalized models respectively lack scalability and robust phenotypes. Recently, in vitro BBB models derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have helped overcome these challenges by providing a scalable and renewable source of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). We have demonstrated that hPSC-derived BMECs exhibit robust structural and functional characteristics reminiscent of the in vivo BBB. Here, we provide a detailed description of the methods required to differentiate and functionally characterize hPSC-derived BMECs to facilitate their widespread use in downstream applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells resist elongation due to shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinitz, Adam; DeStefano, Jackson; Ye, Mao; Wong, Andrew D; Searson, Peter C

    2015-05-01

    Endothelial cells in straight sections of vessels are known to elongate and align in the direction of flow. This phenotype has been replicated in confluent monolayers of bovine aortic endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in cell culture under physiological shear stress. Here we report on the morphological response of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) in confluent monolayers in response to shear stress. Using a microfluidic platform we image confluent monolayers of HBMECs and HUVECs under shear stresses up to 16 dyne cm(-2). From live-cell imaging we quantitatively analyze the cell morphology and cell speed as a function of time. We show that HBMECs do not undergo a classical transition from cobblestone to spindle-like morphology in response to shear stress. We further show that under shear stress, actin fibers are randomly oriented in the cells indicating that there is no cytoskeletal remodeling. These results suggest that HBMECs are programmed to resist elongation and alignment under shear stress, a phenotype that may be associated with the unique properties of the blood-brain barrier. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Adenoviral Transduction of Human Acid Sphingomyelinase into Neo-Angiogenic Endothelium Radiosensitizes Tumor Cure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, John D.; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; García-Barros, Mónica; Feldman, Regina; Rao, Shyam; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Harats, Dror; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Fuks, Zvi; Sadelain, Michel; Kolesnick, Richard

    2013-01-01

    These studies define a new mechanism-based approach to radiosensitize tumor cure by single dose radiotherapy (SDRT). Published evidence indicates that SDRT induces acute microvascular endothelial apoptosis initiated via acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) translocation to the external plasma membrane. Ensuing microvascular damage regulates radiation lethality of tumor stem cell clonogens to effect tumor cure. Based on this biology, we engineered an ASMase-producing vector consisting of a modified pre-proendothelin-1 promoter, PPE1(3x), and a hypoxia-inducible dual-binding HIF-2α-Ets-1 enhancer element upstream of the asmase gene, inserted into a replication-deficient adenovirus yielding the vector Ad5H2E-PPE1(3x)-ASMase. This vector confers ASMase over-expression in cycling angiogenic endothelium in vitro and within tumors in vivo, with no detectable enhancement in endothelium of normal tissues that exhibit a minute fraction of cycling cells or in non-endothelial tumor or normal tissue cells. Intravenous pretreatment with Ad5H2E-PPE1(3x)-ASMase markedly increases SDRT cure of inherently radiosensitive MCA/129 fibrosarcomas, and converts radiation-incurable B16 melanomas into biopsy-proven tumor cures. In contrast, Ad5H2E-PPE1(3x)-ASMase treatment did not impact radiation damage to small intestinal crypts as non-dividing small intestinal microvessels did not overexpress ASMase and were not radiosensitized. We posit that combination of genetic up-regulation of tumor microvascular ASMase and SDRT provides therapeutic options for currently radiation-incurable human tumors. PMID:23936314

  3. Adenoviral transduction of human acid sphingomyelinase into neo-angiogenic endothelium radiosensitizes tumor cure.

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    Branka Stancevic

    Full Text Available These studies define a new mechanism-based approach to radiosensitize tumor cure by single dose radiotherapy (SDRT. Published evidence indicates that SDRT induces acute microvascular endothelial apoptosis initiated via acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase translocation to the external plasma membrane. Ensuing microvascular damage regulates radiation lethality of tumor stem cell clonogens to effect tumor cure. Based on this biology, we engineered an ASMase-producing vector consisting of a modified pre-proendothelin-1 promoter, PPE1(3x, and a hypoxia-inducible dual-binding HIF-2α-Ets-1 enhancer element upstream of the asmase gene, inserted into a replication-deficient adenovirus yielding the vector Ad5H2E-PPE1(3x-ASMase. This vector confers ASMase over-expression in cycling angiogenic endothelium in vitro and within tumors in vivo, with no detectable enhancement in endothelium of normal tissues that exhibit a minute fraction of cycling cells or in non-endothelial tumor or normal tissue cells. Intravenous pretreatment with Ad5H2E-PPE1(3x-ASMase markedly increases SDRT cure of inherently radiosensitive MCA/129 fibrosarcomas, and converts radiation-incurable B16 melanomas into biopsy-proven tumor cures. In contrast, Ad5H2E-PPE1(3x-ASMase treatment did not impact radiation damage to small intestinal crypts as non-dividing small intestinal microvessels did not overexpress ASMase and were not radiosensitized. We posit that combination of genetic up-regulation of tumor microvascular ASMase and SDRT provides therapeutic options for currently radiation-incurable human tumors.

  4. Piperine Decreases Binding of Drugs to Human Plasma and Increases Uptake by Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Raghvendra K; Leeners, Brigitte; Imthurn, Bruno; Merki-Feld, Gabriele Susanne; Rosselli, Marinella

    2017-09-26

    We previously reported that piperine, an active alkaloidal principal of black and long peppers, enhances drug bioavailability by inhibiting drug metabolism. Another mechanism influencing drug availability/uptake is its free fraction. Since piperine is highly lipophilic, we hypothesize that it could also interact with drugs through binding displacement and influence their bioavailability. Accordingly, using equilibrium dialysis, we investigated whether piperine alters the binding of model drug ligands, that is flunitrazepam, diazepam, warfarin, salicylic acid, propranolol, lidocaine, and disopyramide to human plasma (n = 4). Since alterations in binding influence drug disposition, we also studied the effects of piperine on the uptake of plasma bound (3) H-propranolol and (14) C-warfarin by cultured bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). Piperine (1-1000 μM) increased the free fraction (fu) of both albumin and alpha-acid glycoprotein bound drugs in a concentration-dependent manner (p piperine (10 μM) increased the uptake of (3) H-propranolol and (14) C-warfarin by BMECs (p piperine displaces plasma bound drugs from both albumin and alpha-acid glycoprotein and facilitates drug uptake across biological membranes (e.g. BMEC). Moreover, it is feasible that piperine may similarly facilitate the transport of drugs into tissues, in vivo, and alter both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of administered drugs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Infectomic Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Infected with Cryptococcus neoformans

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    Ambrose Jong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to dissect the pathogenesis of Cryptococcus neoformans meningoencephalitis, a genomic survey of the changes in gene expression of human brain microvascular endothelial cells infected by C. neoformans was carried out in a time-course study. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed sigificant fluctuations in the expression levels of different groups of genes during the pathogen-host interaction. Self-organizing map (SOM analysis revealed that most genes were up- or downregulated 2 folds or more at least at one time point during the pathogen-host engagement. The microarray data were validated by Western blot analysis of a group of genes, including β-actin, Bcl-x, CD47, Bax, Bad, and Bcl-2. Hierarchical cluster profile showed that 61 out of 66 listed interferon genes were changed at least at one time point. Similarly, the active responses in expression of MHC genes were detected at all stages of the interaction. Taken together, our infectomic approaches suggest that the host cells significantly change the gene profiles and also actively participate in immunoregulations of the central nervous system (CNS during C. neoformans infection.

  6. Action of shiga toxin type-2 and subtilase cytotoxin on human microvascular endothelial cells.

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    María M Amaral

    Full Text Available The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS associated with diarrhea is a complication of Shiga toxin (Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infection. In Argentina, HUS is endemic and responsible for acute and chronic renal failure in children younger than 5 years old. The human kidney is the most affected organ due to the presence of very Stx-sensitive cells, such as microvascular endothelial cells. Recently, Subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB was proposed as a new toxin that may contribute to HUS pathogenesis, although its action on human glomerular endothelial cells (HGEC has not been described yet. In this study, we compared the effects of SubAB with those caused by Stx2 on primary cultures of HGEC isolated from fragments of human pediatric renal cortex. HGEC were characterized as endothelial since they expressed von Willebrand factor (VWF and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1. HGEC also expressed the globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 receptor for Stx2. Both, Stx2 and SubAB induced swelling and detachment of HGEC and the consequent decrease in cell viability in a time-dependent manner. Preincubation of HGEC with C-9 -a competitive inhibitor of Gb3 synthesis-protected HGEC from Stx2 but not from SubAB cytotoxic effects. Stx2 increased apoptosis in a time-dependent manner while SubAB increased apoptosis at 4 and 6 h but decreased at 24 h. The apoptosis induced by SubAB relative to Stx2 was higher at 4 and 6 h, but lower at 24 h. Furthermore, necrosis caused by Stx2 was significantly higher than that induced by SubAB at all the time points evaluated. Our data provide evidence for the first time how SubAB could cooperate with the development of endothelial damage characteristic of HUS pathogenesis.

  7. Co-culture model consisting of human brain microvascular endothelial and peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strazza, Marianne; Maubert, Monique E.; Pirrone, Vanessa; Wigdahl, Brian; Nonnemacher, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous systems exist to model the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with the goal of understanding the regulation of passage into the central nervous system (CNS) and the potential impact of selected insults on BBB function. These models typically focus on the intrinsic cellular properties of the BBB, yet studies of peripheral cell migration are often excluded due to technical restraints. New Method This method allows for the study of in vitro cellular transmigration following exposure to any treatment of interest through optimization of co-culture conditions for the human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) cell line, hCMEC/D3, and primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results hCMEC/D3 cells form functionally confluent monolayers on collagen coated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) transwell inserts, as assessed by microscopy and tracer molecule (FITC-dextran (FITC-D)) exclusion. Two components of complete hCMEC/D3 media, EBM-2 base-media and hydrocortisone (HC), were determined to be cytotoxic to PBMCs. By combining the remaining components of complete hCMEC/D3 media with complete PBMC media a resulting co-culture media was established for use in hCMEC/D3 – PBMC co-culture functional assays. Comparison with existing methods Through this method, issues of extensive differences in culture media conditions are resolved allowing for treatments and functional assays to be conducted on the two cell populations co-cultured simultaneously. Conclusion Described here is an in vitro co-culture model of the BBB, consisting of the hCMEC/D3 cell line and primary human PBMCs. The co-culture media will now allow for the study of exposure to potential insults to BBB function over prolonged time courses. PMID:27216631

  8. Zika Virus Persistently Infects and Is Basolaterally Released from Primary Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

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    Megan C. Mladinich

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus that has emerged as the cause of encephalitis and fetal microencephaly in the Americas. ZIKV uniquely persists in human bodily fluids for up to 6 months, is sexually transmitted, and traverses the placenta and the blood-brain barrier (BBB to damage neurons. Cells that support persistent ZIKV replication and mechanisms by which ZIKV establishes persistence remain enigmatic but central to ZIKV entry into protected neuronal compartments. The endothelial cell (EC lining of capillaries normally constrains transplacental transmission and forms the BBB, which selectively restricts access of blood constituents to neurons. We found that ZIKV (strain PRVABC59 persistently infects and continuously replicates in primary human brain microvascular ECs (hBMECs, without cytopathology, for >9 days and following hBMEC passage. ZIKV did not permeabilize hBMECs but was released basolaterally from polarized hBMECs, suggesting a direct mechanism for ZIKV to cross the BBB. ZIKV-infected hBMECs were rapidly resistant to alpha interferon (IFN-α and transiently induced, but failed to secrete, IFN-β and IFN-λ. Global transcriptome analysis determined that ZIKV constitutively induced IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7, IRF9, and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs 1 to 9 days postinfection, despite persistently replicating in hBMECs. ZIKV constitutively induced ISG15, HERC5, and USP18, which are linked to hepatitis C virus (HCV persistence and IFN regulation, chemokine CCL5, which is associated with immunopathogenesis, as well as cell survival factors. Our results reveal that hBMECs act as a reservoir of persistent ZIKV replication, suggest routes for ZIKV to cross hBMECs into neuronal compartments, and define novel mechanisms of ZIKV persistence that can be targeted to restrict ZIKV spread.

  9. Protease activated receptor signaling is required for African trypanosome traversal of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Dennis J Grab

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs as an in vitro model for how African trypanosomes cross the human blood-brain barrier (BBB we recently reported that the parasites cross the BBB by generating calcium activation signals in HBMECs through the activity of parasite cysteine proteases, particularly cathepsin L (brucipain. In the current study, we examined the possible role of a class of protease stimulated HBMEC G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs known as protease activated receptors (PARs that might be implicated in calcium signaling by African trypanosomes.Using RNA interference (RNAi we found that in vitro PAR-2 gene (F2RL1 expression in HBMEC monolayers could be reduced by over 95%. We also found that the ability of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense to cross F2RL1-silenced HBMEC monolayers was reduced (39%-49% and that HBMECs silenced for F2RL1 maintained control levels of barrier function in the presence of the parasite. Consistent with the role of PAR-2, we found that HBMEC barrier function was also maintained after blockade of Galpha(q with Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT. PAR-2 signaling has been shown in other systems to have neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective roles and our data implicate a role for proteases (i.e. brucipain and PAR-2 in African trypanosome/HBMEC interactions. Using gene-profiling methods to interrogate candidate HBMEC pathways specifically triggered by brucipain, several pathways that potentially link some pathophysiologic processes associated with CNS HAT were identified.Together, the data support a role, in part, for GPCRs as molecular targets for parasite proteases that lead to the activation of Galpha(q-mediated calcium signaling. The consequence of these events is predicted to be increased permeability of the BBB to parasite transmigration and the initiation of neuroinflammation, events precursory to CNS disease.

  10. Thalidomide inhibits inflammatory and angiogenic activation of human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Daniel J.; Nelson, Victoria M.; Otterson, Mary F.; Shaker, Reza; Binion, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The glutamic acid derivative thalidomide is a transcriptional inhibitor of TNF-α but is also known to affect human blood vessels, which may underlie its teratogenicity. Thalidomide has been used in the treatment of refractory Crohn's disease (CD), but the therapeutic mechanism is not defined. We examined the effect of thalidomide on primary cultures of human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMEC), the relevant endothelial cell population in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), to determine its effect on endothelial activation, leukocyte interaction, and VEGF-induced angiogenesis. HIMEC cultures were pretreated with thalidomide before activation with either TNF-α/LPS or VEGF. A low-shear-stress flow adhesion assay with either U-937 or whole blood was used to assess HIMEC activation following TNF-α/LPS, and a Wright's stain identified adherent leukocytes. Expression of cell adhesion molecules (E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) was assessed using radioimmunoassay. Effects of thalidomide on NF-κB activation, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in TNF-α/LPS-activated HIMEC were determined by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Thalidomide blocked adhesion of both U-937 and whole blood leukocytes by 50% in HIMEC, inhibiting binding of all classes of leukocytes. Thalidomide also blocked NF-κB and cell adhesion molecule expression in HIMEC. In marked contrast, thalidomide did not affect either iNOS or COX-2 expression, two key molecules that play a role in the downregulation of HIMEC activation. VEGF-induced HIMEC transmigration, growth, proliferation, tube formation, and Akt phosphorylation were significantly inhibited by thalidomide. In summary, thalidomide exerted a potent effect on HIMEC growth and activation, suggesting that it may also function via an endothelial mechanism in the treatment of CD. PMID:19926820

  11. Zika Virus Persistently Infects and Is Basolaterally Released from Primary Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladinich, Megan C.; Schwedes, John

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus that has emerged as the cause of encephalitis and fetal microencephaly in the Americas. ZIKV uniquely persists in human bodily fluids for up to 6 months, is sexually transmitted, and traverses the placenta and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to damage neurons. Cells that support persistent ZIKV replication and mechanisms by which ZIKV establishes persistence remain enigmatic but central to ZIKV entry into protected neuronal compartments. The endothelial cell (EC) lining of capillaries normally constrains transplacental transmission and forms the BBB, which selectively restricts access of blood constituents to neurons. We found that ZIKV (strain PRVABC59) persistently infects and continuously replicates in primary human brain microvascular ECs (hBMECs), without cytopathology, for >9 days and following hBMEC passage. ZIKV did not permeabilize hBMECs but was released basolaterally from polarized hBMECs, suggesting a direct mechanism for ZIKV to cross the BBB. ZIKV-infected hBMECs were rapidly resistant to alpha interferon (IFN-α) and transiently induced, but failed to secrete, IFN-β and IFN-λ. Global transcriptome analysis determined that ZIKV constitutively induced IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), IRF9, and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) 1 to 9 days postinfection, despite persistently replicating in hBMECs. ZIKV constitutively induced ISG15, HERC5, and USP18, which are linked to hepatitis C virus (HCV) persistence and IFN regulation, chemokine CCL5, which is associated with immunopathogenesis, as well as cell survival factors. Our results reveal that hBMECs act as a reservoir of persistent ZIKV replication, suggest routes for ZIKV to cross hBMECs into neuronal compartments, and define novel mechanisms of ZIKV persistence that can be targeted to restrict ZIKV spread. PMID:28698279

  12. Influenza H5N1 virus infection of polarized human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Kit M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus is entrenched in poultry in Asia and Africa and continues to infect humans zoonotically causing acute respiratory disease syndrome and death. There is evidence that the virus may sometimes spread beyond respiratory tract to cause disseminated infection. The primary target cell for HPAI H5N1 virus in human lung is the alveolar epithelial cell. Alveolar epithelium and its adjacent lung microvascular endothelium form host barriers to the initiation of infection and dissemination of influenza H5N1 infection in humans. These are polarized cells and the polarity of influenza virus entry and egress as well as the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from the virus infected cells are likely to be central to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Aim To study influenza A (H5N1 virus replication and host innate immune responses in polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells and its relevance to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Methods We use an in vitro model of polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells grown in transwell culture inserts to compare infection with influenza A subtype H1N1 and H5N1 viruses via the apical or basolateral surfaces. Results We demonstrate that both influenza H1N1 and H5N1 viruses efficiently infect alveolar epithelial cells from both apical and basolateral surface of the epithelium but release of newly formed virus is mainly from the apical side of the epithelium. In contrast, influenza H5N1 virus, but not H1N1 virus, efficiently infected polarized microvascular endothelial cells from both apical and basolateral aspects. This provides a mechanistic explanation for how H5N1 virus may infect the lung from systemic circulation. Epidemiological evidence has implicated ingestion of virus-contaminated foods as the source of infection in some instances and our

  13. Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Large, Jennifer M; Pang, Dominic K T; Robson, Debra L; Chan, Pak; Toma, Jelena; Borradaile, Nica M

    2014-12-01

    Niacin (nicotinic acid) as a monotherapy can reduce vascular disease risk, but its mechanism of action remains controversial, and may not be dependent on systemic lipid modifying effects. Niacin has recently been shown to improve endothelial function and vascular regeneration, independent of correcting dyslipidemia, in rodent models of vascular injury and metabolic disease. As a potential biosynthetic precursor for NAD(+), niacin could elicit these vascular benefits through NAD(+)-dependent, sirtuin (SIRT) mediated responses. Alternatively, niacin may act through its receptor, GPR109A, to promote endothelial function, though endothelial cells are not known to express this receptor. We hypothesized that niacin directly improves endothelial cell function during exposure to lipotoxic conditions and sought to determine the potential mechanism(s) involved. Angiogenic function in excess palmitate was assessed by tube formation following treatment of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) with either a relatively low concentration of niacin (10 μM), or nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) (1 μM), a direct NAD(+) precursor. Although both niacin and NMN improved HMVEC tube formation during palmitate overload, only NMN increased cellular NAD(+) and SIRT1 activity. We further observed that HMVEC express GRP109A. Activation of this receptor with either acifran or MK-1903 recapitulated niacin-induced improvements in HMVEC tube formation, while GPR109A siRNA diminished the effect of niacin. Niacin, at a low concentration, improves HMVEC angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, likely independent of NAD(+) biosynthesis and SIRT1 activation, but rather through niacin receptor activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmat, Tauseef M; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Schwerk, Christian; Schroten, Horst

    2014-01-01

    The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci) facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC) is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF) staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  15. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauseef M Asmat

    Full Text Available The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  16. Expression of Hyaluronan in human tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boregowda Rajeev K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development and progression of human tumors is accompanied by various cellular, biochemical and genetic alterations. These events include tumor cells interaction with extracellular matrix molecules including hyaluronan (HA. Hyaluronan is a large polysaccharide associated with pericellular matrix of proliferating, migrating cells. Its implication in malignant transformation, tumor progression and with the degree of differentiation in various invasive tumors has well accepted. It has been well known the role HA receptors in tumor growth and metastasis in various cancer tissues. Previously we have observed the unified over expression of Hyaluronic Acid Binding Protein (HABP, H11B2C2 antigen by the tumor cells in various types progressing tumor tissues with different grades. However, the poor understanding of relation between HA and HA-binding protein expression on tumor cells during tumor progression as well as the asymmetric observations of the role of HA expression in tumor progression prompted us to examine the degree of HA expression on tumor cells vs. stroma in various types of human tumors with different grades. Methods In the present study clinically diagnosed tumor tissue samples of different grades were used to screen the histopathological expression of hyaluronan by using b-PG (biotinylated proteoglycan as a probe and we compared the relative HA expression on tumor cells vs. stroma in well differentiated and poorly differentiated tumors. Specificity of the reaction was confirmed either by pre-digesting the tissue sections with hyaluronidase enzyme or by staining the sections with pre-absorbed complex of the probe and HA-oligomers. Results We show here the down regulation of HA expression in tumor cells is associated with progression of tumor from well differentiated through poorly differentiated stage, despite the constant HA expression in the tumor associated stroma. Conclusion The present finding enlighten the

  17. [Effects of transient exposure to high glucose on biological behaviors of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, L; Yang, H Z; Li, X C; Huang, X Q; Yuan, B; Zhou, Z D

    2017-02-20

    Objective: To observe the effects of transient exposure to high glucose on biological behaviors of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells cultured in vitro. Methods: The dividing method and treatment of cells for the detection of all indexes in this study were as follows. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells of the 4th passage were divided into 3 groups according to the random number table, with 12 wells in each group. Cells in control group (C) were cultured with complete culture solution containing 5 mmol/L D-glucose for 7 d. Cells in transient high glucose group (THG) were cultured with complete culture solution containing 30 mmol/L D-glucose for 2 d and complete culture solution containing 5 mmol/L D-glucose for 5 d. Cells in prolonged high glucose group (PHG) were cultured with complete culture solution containing 30 mmol/L D-glucose for 7 d. (1) The cell morphology in groups C and PHG on culture day 7 and that in group THG on culture day 2 and 7 was observed by inverted optical microscope. (2) On culture day 0, 2, 4, and 7, cell proliferation rate was determined by cell viability analyzing counter. (3) After culture day 2, the scratch experiment was performed, and the cells were further cultured. At post scratch hour (PSH) 0, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120, the scratch area was measured, and the cell migration rates of the latter 5 time points were calculated. (4) On culture day 0, 2, 4, and 7, the cell apoptosis rate was determined by cell analyzer. (5) Cells were seeded into Matrigel to culture for 24 h after culture day 7. The formation of vessel-like structure was observed by inverted optical microscope. The length and number of branch point of vessel-like structure were calculated. (6) On culture day 2, 4, and 7, mRNA expression of vascularization-related gene tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3) was determined with real-time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Data were processed with

  18. Time lapse phase contrast video microscopy of directed migration of human microvascular endothelial cells on matrigel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meade-Tollin, L. C.; van Noorden, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Migration of microvascular endothelial cells is an early and critical step in angiogenesis. Formation of branching and polygonal cellular aggregates by endothelial cells on matrigel has often been considered to be an in vitro model for angiogenesis, although formation of lumens has not always been

  19. Oxytocin inhibits ox-LDL-induced adhesion of monocytic THP-1 cells to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuyan; Pan, Shengying; Tan, Jing; Zhao, Weina; Liu, Fengguo

    2017-12-15

    The attachment of monocytes to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVEs) caused by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is associated with an early event and the pathological progression of cerebrovascular diseases. Oxytocin (OT) is a human peptide hormone that is traditionally used as a medication to facilitate childbirth. However, little information is available regarding the physiological function of OT in brain endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, our results indicate that the oxytocin receptor (OTR) was expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVEs) and was upregulated in response to ox-LDL in a concentration-dependent manner. Notably, OT significantly suppressed ox-LDL-induced attachment of THP-1 monocytes to HBMVEs. Furthermore, we found that OT reduced the expression of adhesion molecules, such as VCAM-1 and E-selectin. Interestingly, it was shown that OT could restore ox-LDL-induced reduction of KLF4 in HBMVEs. Importantly, knockdown of KLF4 abolished the inhibitory effects of OT on ox-LDL-induced expressions of VCAM-1 and E-selectin as well as the adhesion of human monocytic THP-1 cells to endothelial HBMVEs. Mechanistically, we found that the stimulatory effects of OT on KLF4 expression are mediated by the MEK5/MEF2A pathway. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  1. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q D; Wang, J H; Condron, C; Bouchier-Hayes, D; Redmond, H P

    2001-04-01

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  2. Glutathione Levels in Human Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamcsik, Michael P.; Kasibhatla, Mohit S.; Teeter, Stephanie D.; Colvin, O. Michael

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes clinical studies in which glutathione was measured in tumor tissue from patients with brain, breast, gastrointestinal, gynecological, head and neck and lung cancer. Glutathione tends to be elevated in breast, ovarian, head and neck and lung cancer and lower in brain and liver tumors compared to disease-free tissue. Cervical, colorectal, gastric and esophageal cancers show both higher and lower levels of tumor glutathione. Some studies show an inverse relationship between patient survival and tumor glutathione. Based on this survey, we recommend approaches that may improve the clinical value of glutathione as a biomarker. PMID:22900535

  3. Acute limb heating improves macro- and microvascular dilator function in the leg of aged humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Steven A; Gagnon, Daniel; Adams, Amy N; Cramer, Matthew N; Kouda, Ken; Crandall, Craig G

    2017-01-01

    Local heating of an extremity increases blood flow and vascular shear stress throughout the arterial tree. Local heating acutely improves macrovascular dilator function in the upper limbs of young healthy adults through a shear stress-dependent mechanism but has no such effect in the lower limbs of this age group. The effect of acute limb heating on dilator function within the atherosclerotic prone vasculature of the lower limbs of aged adults is unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that acute lower limb heating improves macro- and microvascular dilator function within the leg vasculature of aged adults. Nine young and nine aged adults immersed their lower limbs at a depth of ~33 cm into a heated (~42°C) circulated water bath for 45 min. Before and 30 min after heating, macro (flow-mediated dilation)- and microvascular (reactive hyperemia) dilator functions were assessed in the lower limb, following 5 min of arterial occlusion, via Doppler ultrasound. Compared with preheat, macrovascular dilator function was unchanged following heating in young adults (P = 0.6) but was improved in aged adults (P = 0.04). Similarly, microvascular dilator function, as assessed by peak reactive hyperemia, was unchanged following heating in young adults (P = 0.1) but was improved in aged adults (P age dependent manner. We demonstrate that lower limb heating acutely improves macro- and microvascular dilator function within the atherosclerotic prone vasculature of the leg in aged adults. These findings provide evidence for a potential therapeutic use of chronic lower limb heating to improve vascular health in primary aging and various disease conditions. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Resistance of human brain microvascular endothelial cells in culture to methylmercury: cell-density-dependent defense mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirooka, Takashi; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Chika; Yasutake, Akira; Satoh, Masahiko; Eto, Komyo; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2010-06-01

    Vascular toxicity is important for understanding the neurotoxicity of methylmercury, because microvessels strongly influence the construction of microenvironment around neurons. Previously, we found that low density-human brain microvascular pericytes are markedly susceptible to methylmercury cytotoxicity due to high expression levels of the L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT-1) that transports methylmercury into the cells. Although LAT-1 can be, in general, highly expressed in sparse cells that require amino acids for growth, we found that human brain microvascular endothelial cells, regardless of cell density, were resistant to methylmercury cytotoxicity. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this resistance, we exposed the endothelial cells at low and high cell densities to methylmercury and determined the extent of nonspecific cell damage, intracellular accumulation of methylmercury, expression of LAT-1 and LAT-2 mRNAs, and intracellular expression of reduced glutathione and metallothionein. These experiments indicate that sparse endothelial cells intracellularly accumulate more methylmercury via the highly expressed LAT-1, but are resistant to methylmercury cytotoxicity by higher expression of the protective sulfhydryl peptides, namely, reduced glutathione and metallothionein. It is suggested that both nonspecific and functional damage is caused in pericytes, whereas functional abnormalities rather than nonspecific damage may occur to a greater extent in the endothelial cells in the brain microvessels exposed to methylmercury. The previous and present data also suggest that methylmercury exhibits toxicity in endothelial cells in a manner different from that in pericytes in the brain microvessels.

  5. Effects ofPlasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes on matrix metalloproteinase-9 regulation in human microvascular endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah D Alessandro; Nicoletta Basilico; Mauro Prato

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases(MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases(TIMPs) in human microvascular endothelium(HMEC-1) exposed to erythrocytes infected by different strains ofPlasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum).Methods:HMEC-1 cells were co-incubated for72 h with erythrocytes infected by late stage trophozoite of D10(chloroquine-sensitive) orW2(chloroquine-resistant)P. falciparum strains.Cell supernatants were then collected and the levels of pro- or active gelatinasesMMP-9 andMMP-2 were evaluated by gelatin zymography and densitometry.The release of pro-MMP-9,MMP-3,MMP-1 andTIMP-1 proteins was analyzed by western blotting and densitometry.Results:Infected erythrocytes inducedde novo proMMP-9 andMMP-9 release.Neither basal levels of proMMP-2 were altered, nor activeMMP-2 was found.MMP-3 andMMP-1 secretion was significantly enhanced, whereas basalTIMP-1 was unaffected.All effects were similar for both strains. Conclusions:P. falciparum parasites, either chloroquine-sensitive or -resistant, induce the release of activeMMP-9 protein from human microvascular endothelium, by impairing balances between proMMP-9 and its inhibitor, and by enhancing the levels of its activators.This work provides new evidence onMMP involvement in malaria, pointing atMMP-9 as a possible target in adjuvant therapy.

  6. NKX2-3 transcriptional regulation of endothelin-1 and VEGF signaling in human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NKX2-3 is associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. NKX2-3 is expressed in microvascular endothelial cells and the muscularis mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMECs are actively involved in the pathogenesis of IBD and IBD-associated microvascular dysfunction. To understand the cellular function of NKX2-3 and its potential role underlying IBD pathogenesis, we investigated the genes regulated by NKX2-3 in HIMEC using cDNA microarray. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: NKX2-3 expression was suppressed by shRNA in two HIMEC lines and gene expression was profiled by cDNA microarray. Pathway Analysis was used to identify gene networks according to biological functions and associated pathways. Validation of microarray and genes expression in intestinal tissues was assessed by RT-PCR. NKX2-3 regulated genes are involved in immune and inflammatory response, cell proliferation and growth, metabolic process, and angiogenesis. Several inflammation and angiogenesis related signaling pathways that play important roles in IBD were regulated by NKX2-3, including endothelin-1 and VEGF-PI3K/AKT-eNOS. Expression levels of NKX2-3, VEGFA, PI3K, AKT, and eNOS are increased in intestinal tissues from IBD patients and expression levels of EDN1 are decreased in intestinal tissues from IBD patients. These results demonstrated the important roles of NKX2-3, VEGF, PI3K, AKT, eNOS, and EDN1 in IBD pathogenesis. Correlation analysis showed a positive correlation between mRNA expression of NKX2-3 and VEGFA and a negative correlation between mRNA expression of NKX2-3 and EDN1 in intestinal tissues from IBD patients. CONCLUSION/RELEVANCE: NKX2-3 may play an important role in IBD pathogenesis by regulating endothelin-1 and VEGF signaling in HIMECs.

  7. The ING tumor suppressor genes: status in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérillon, Claire; Bigot, Nicolas; Pedeux, Rémy

    2014-04-01

    ING genes (ING1-5) were identified has tumor suppressor genes. ING proteins are characterized as Type II TSGs since they are involved in the control of cell proliferation, apoptosis and senescence. They may also function as Type I TSGs since they are also involved in DNA replication and repair. Most studies have reported that they are frequently lost in human tumors and epigenetic mechanisms or misregulation of their transcription may be involved. Recently, studies have described that this loss may be caused by microRNA inhibition. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on ING functions, their involvement in tumor suppression and, in order to give a full assessment of the current knowledge, we review all the studies that have examined ING status in human cancers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quercetin protects human brain microvascular endothelial cells from fibrillar β-amyloid1–40-induced toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjie Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta-peptides (Aβ are known to undergo active transport across the blood-brain barrier, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy has been shown to be a prominent feature in the majority of Alzheimer׳s disease. Quercetin is a natural flavonoid molecule and has been demonstrated to have potent neuroprotective effects, but its protective effect on endothelial cells under Aβ-damaged condition is unclear. In the present study, the protective effects of quercetin on brain microvascular endothelial cells injured by fibrillar Aβ1–40 (fAβ1–40 were observed. The results show that fAβ1–40-induced cytotoxicity in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs can be relieved by quercetin treatment. Quercetin increases cell viability, reduces the release of lactate dehydrogenase, and relieves nuclear condensation. Quercetin also alleviates intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and increases superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, it strengthens the barrier integrity through the preservation of the transendothelial electrical resistance value, the relief of aggravated permeability, and the increase of characteristic enzyme levels after being exposed to fAβ1–40. In conclusion, quercetin protects hBMECs from fAβ1–40-induced toxicity.

  9. Non-invasive evaluation of vasomotor and metabolic functions of microvascular endothelium in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorovich, Andrey A

    2012-07-01

    Correlation between metabolic and microhemodynamic processes in skin was assessed through acute pharmacological test with metabolically active Actovegin in 28 healthy volunteers. Laser Doppler flowmetry in combination with wavelet analysis of blood flow oscillations was used to identify functional state of arteriolar-venular areas of microvascular bed in the right forearm skin; capillary blood flow parameters were assessed through computer capillaroscopy in the nail bed of the right hand on the 4th finger. The metabolic effect (improved oxygen uptake and glucose disposal by tissues) was accompanied by significant increase in endothelial rhythm amplitude by 98% (pendothelium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tick-borne encephalitis virus infects human brain microvascular endothelial cells without compromising blood-brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palus, Martin; Vancova, Marie; Sirmarova, Jana; Elsterova, Jana; Perner, Jan; Ruzek, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Alteration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a hallmark of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), a life-threating human viral neuroinfection. However, the mechanism of BBB breakdown during TBE, as well as TBE virus (TBEV) entry into the brain is unclear. Here, primary human microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) were infected with TBEV to study interactions with the BBB. Although the number of infected cells was relatively low in culture (10 6 pfu/ml). Infection did not induce any significant changes in the expression of key tight junction proteins or upregulate the expression of cell adhesion molecules, and did not alter the highly organized intercellular junctions between HBMECs. In an in vitro BBB model, the virus crossed the BBB via a transcellular pathway without compromising the integrity of the cell monolayer. The results indicate that HBMECs may support TBEV entry into the brain without altering BBB integrity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of shear stress on iPSC-derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (dhBMECs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStefano, Jackson G; Xu, Zinnia S; Williams, Ashley J; Yimam, Nahom; Searson, Peter C

    2017-08-04

    The endothelial cells that form the lumen of capillaries and microvessels are an important component of the blood-brain barrier. Cell phenotype is regulated by transducing a range of biomechanical and biochemical signals in the local microenvironment. Here we report on the role of shear stress in modulating the morphology, motility, proliferation, apoptosis, and protein and gene expression, of confluent monolayers of human brain microvascular endothelial cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. To assess the response of derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (dhBMECs) to shear stress, confluent monolayers were formed in a microfluidic device. Monolayers were subjected to a shear stress of 4 or 12 dyne cm -2 for 40 h. Static conditions were used as the control. Live cell imaging was used to assess cell morphology, cell speed, persistence, and the rates of proliferation and apoptosis as a function of time. In addition, immunofluorescence imaging and protein and gene expression analysis of key markers of the blood-brain barrier were performed. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells exhibit a unique phenotype in response to shear stress compared to static conditions: (1) they do not elongate and align, (2) the rates of proliferation and apoptosis decrease significantly, (3) the mean displacement of individual cells within the monolayer over time is significantly decreased, (4) there is no cytoskeletal reorganization or formation of stress fibers within the cell, and (5) there is no change in expression levels of key blood-brain barrier markers. The characteristic response of dhBMECs to shear stress is significantly different from human and animal-derived endothelial cells from other tissues, suggesting that this unique phenotype that may be important in maintenance of the blood-brain barrier. The implications of this work are that: (1) in confluent monolayers of dhBMECs, tight junctions are formed under static conditions, (2) the formation

  12. Human breast microvascular endothelial cells retain phenotypic traits in long-term finite life span culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Valgardur; Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Kjartansson, Jens

    2007-01-01

    uptake of low-density lipoprotein, and had E-selectin induced upon treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. The first signs of senescence in passage 14 were accompanied by gain of trisomy 11. At passage 18 cells showed chromosomal aberrations and growth arrest as revealed by beta......Attempts to study endothelial-epithelial interactions in the human breast have been hampered by lack of protocols for long-term cultivation of breast endothelial cells (BRENCs). The aim of this study was to establish long-term cultures of BRENCs and to compare their phenotypic traits......-galactosidase staining. We demonstrate here that breast microvasculature may serve as a large-scale source for expansion of BRENCs with molecular and functional traits preserved. These cells will form the basis for studies on the role of endothelial cells in breast morphogenesis....

  13. Functional expression of choline transporter like-protein 1 (CTL1) and CTL2 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwao, Beniko; Yara, Miki; Hara, Naomi; Kawai, Yuiko; Yamanaka, Tsuyoshi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Inazu, Masato

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we examined the molecular and functional characterization of choline transporter in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs). Choline uptake into hBMECs was a saturable process that was mediated by a Na(+)-independent, membrane potential and pH-dependent transport system. The cells have two different [(3)H]choline transport systems with Km values of 35.0 ± 4.9 μM and 54.1 ± 8.1 μM, respectively. Choline uptake was inhibited by choline, acetylcholine (ACh) and the choline analog hemicholinium-3 (HC-3). Various organic cations also interacted with the choline transport system. Choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) and CTL2 mRNA were highly expressed, while mRNA for high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT1) and organic cation transporters (OCTs) were not expressed in hBMECs. CTL1 and CTL2 proteins were localized to brain microvascular endothelial cells in human brain cortical sections. Both CTL1 and CTL2 proteins were expressed on the plasma membrane and mitochondria. CTL1 and CTL2 proteins are mainly expressed in plasma membrane and mitochondria, respectively. We conclude that choline is mainly transported via an intermediate-affinity choline transport system, CTL1 and CTL2, in hBMECs. These transporters are responsible for the uptake of extracellular choline and organic cations. CTL2 participate in choline transport mainly in mitochondria, and may be the major site for the control of choline oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Spatial distribution of mast cells and macrophages around tumor glands in human breast ductal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Roberto; Guidolin, Diego; Annese, Tiziana; Tortorella, Cinzia; Ruggieri, Simona; Rega, Serena; Zito, Francesco A; Nico, Beatrice; Ribatti, Domenico

    2017-10-01

    Macrophages and mast cells are usually present in the tumor microenvironment and play an important role as regulators of inflammation, immunological response and angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we have evaluated macrophage, mast cell, and microvessel density in a selected group of different grade of invasive breast carcinoma tumor specimens. Furthermore, we have investigated the pattern of distribution of CD68-positive macrophages and tryptase-positive mast cells around tumor glands. Results have shown that: A) Macrophages are more numerous in G2 and G3 breast cancer stages respect to controls, the per cent of macrophages in G1 samples was comparable to the controls, and the spatial relationship between macrophages and glands (as indicated by the mean cell-to-gland distance) correlated with CD31-positive vessels. B) Mast cells in G2 and G3 tumor specimens show a significant increase in their number as compared to control samples, and their spatial distribution around the glands did not show any significant difference among groups. Overall, the results of this study confirm the important role of macrophages and mast cells in tumor progression and angiogenesis in human ductal breast cancer, and pointed out the spatial relationship between tumor macrophages and glands, and its correlation with microvascular density. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride on β-arrestin-1 expression in lipopolysaccharide-induced human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, J. [Department of Anesthesiology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Xiao, F. [Department of Osteology, Pu Ai Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zhang, Z.Z.; Wang, Y.P.; Chen, K.; Wang, Y.L. [Department of Anesthesiology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2013-12-02

    β-arrestins are expressed proteins that were first described, and are well-known, as negative regulators of G protein-coupled receptor signaling. Penehyclidine hydrochloride (PHC) is a new anti-cholinergic drug that can inhibit biomembrane lipid peroxidation, and decrease cytokines and oxyradicals. However, to date, no reports on the effects of PHC on β-arrestin-1 in cells have been published. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PHC on β-arrestin-1 expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC). Cultured HPMEC were pretreated with PHC, followed by LPS treatment. Muscarinic receptor mRNAs were assayed by real-time quantitative PCR. Cell viability was assayed by the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) conversion test. The dose and time effects of PHC on β-arrestin-1 expression in LPS-induced HPMEC were determined by Western blot analysis. Cell malondialdehyde (MDA) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured. It was found that the M{sub 3} receptor was the one most highly expressed, and was activated 5 min after LPS challenge. Furthermore, 2 μg/mL PHC significantly upregulated expression of β-arrestin-1 within 10 to 15 min. Compared with the control group, MDA levels in cells were remarkably increased and SOD activities were significantly decreased in LPS pretreated cells, while PHC markedly decreased MDA levels and increased SOD activities. We conclude that PHC attenuated ROS injury by upregulating β-arrestin-1 expression, thereby implicating a mechanism by which PHC may exert its protective effects against LPS-induced pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell injury.

  16. Immunohistochemical evaluation of microvascular rarefaction in hypertensive humans and in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiardi, Silvia; Rodella, Luigi F; De Ciuceis, Carolina; Porteri, Enzo; Boari, Gianluca E M; Rezzani, Rita; Rizzardi, Nicola; Platto, Caterina; Tiberio, Guido A M; Giulini, Stefano M; Rizzoni, Damiano; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    No data are presently available about changes in capillary density in the skeletal muscle and in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) in relation to the development of hypertension. We have investigated 4 week-old and 12 week-old SHR and age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto controls (WKY). Microvessel density (MVD) in the cerebral cortex and in a skeletal muscle were evaluated in sections stained for CD31. We also evaluated MVD in the dermal tissue of normotensive subjects and essential hypertensive patients. Subcutaneous small resistance arteries were dissected and mounted in a micromyograph and the media to lumen ratio (M/L) was measured. A significant reduction in MVD in the skeletal muscle and in the brain of SHR was clearly observed at 12 weeks of age, after the development of hypertension, but not at 4 weeks of age (pre-hypertensive condition). In hypertensive patients a significant reduction in the dermal MVD and an inverse correlation between M/L and MVD was observed. Our results suggest that, in the brain and skeletal muscle of adult SHR after the development of hypertension, and in the derma of adult essential hypertensive patients microvascular rarefaction may occur.

  17. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es una Parálisis ...

  18. Effect of steroid hormones and retinoids on the formation of capillary-like tubular structures of human microvascular endothelial cells in fibrin matrices is related to urokinase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansink, M; Koolwijk, P; van Hinsbergh, V; Kooistra, T

    1998-08-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new capillary blood vessels, is a feature of a variety of pathological processes. To study the effects of a specific group of hormones (all ligands of the steroid/retinoid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily) on the angiogenic process in humans, we have used a model system in which human microvascular endothelial cells from foreskin (hMVEC) are cultured on top of a human fibrin matrix in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. This model mimics the in vivo situation where fibrin appears to be a common component of the matrix present at sites of chronic inflammation and tumor stroma. Our results show that testosterone and dexamethasone are strong inhibitors and all-trans retinoic acid (at-RA) and 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cis RA) are potent stimulators of the formation of capillary-like tubular structures. These effects are mediated by their respective nuclear hormone receptors as demonstrated by the use of specific synthetic receptor agonists and antagonists. 17beta-estradiol, progesterone, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 did not affect or only weakly affected in vitro angiogenesis, which may be related to the lack of significant nuclear receptor expression. Although hMVEC express both thyroid hormone receptors alpha and beta, no effect of thyroid hormone on tube formation was found. The effects of testosterone, dexamethasone, at-RA, and 9-cis RA on tube formation were accompanied by parallel changes in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) expression, at both mRNA and antigen levels. Exogenous suppletion of the medium with single chain u-PA enhances tube formation in our in vitro model, whereas quenching of u-PA activity (but not of tissue-type plasminogen activator activity) or of u-PA binding to u-PA receptor by specific antibodies suppressed basal and retinoid-stimulated tube formation. Moreover, addition of scu-PA to testosterone- or dexamethasone-treated hMVEC restored the suppressed

  19. Adhesive properties of Enterobacter sakazakii to human epithelial and brain microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pospischil Andreas

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterobacter sakazakii is an opportunistic pathogen that has been associated with sporadic cases and outbreaks causing meningitis, necrotizing enterocolitis and sepsis especially in neonates. However, up to now little is known about the mechanisms of pathogenicity in E. sakazakii. A necessary state in the successful colonization, establishment and ultimately production of disease by microbial pathogens is the ability to adhere to host surfaces such as mucous membranes, gastric and intestinal epithelial or endothelial tissue. This study examined for the first time the adherence ability of 50 E. sakazakii strains to the two epithelial cell lines HEp-2 and Caco-2, as well as the brain microvascular endothelial cell line HBMEC. Furthermore, the effects of bacterial culture conditions on the adherence behaviour were investigated. An attempt was made to characterize the factors involved in adherence. Results Two distinctive adherence patterns, a diffuse adhesion and the formation of localized clusters of bacteria on the cell surface could be distinguished on all three cell lines. In some strains, a mixture of both patterns was observed. Adherence was maximal during late exponential phase, and increased with higher MOI. The adhesion capacity of E. sakazakii to HBMEC cells was affected by the addition of blood to the bacteria growth medium. Mannose, hemagglutination, trypsin digestion experiments and transmission electron microscopy suggested that the adhesion of E. sakazakii to the epithelial and endothelial cells is mainly non-fimbrial based. Conclusion Adherence experiments show heterogeneity within different E. sakazakii strains. In agreement with studies on E. cloacae, we found no relationship between the adhesive capacities in E. sakazakii and the eventual production of specific fimbriae. Further studies will have to be carried out in order to determine the adhesin(s involved in the interaction of E. sakazakii with cells and to

  20. Iron oxide nanoparticles induce human microvascular endothelial cell permeability through reactive oxygen species production and microtubule remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xianglin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered iron nanoparticles are being explored for the development of biomedical applications and many other industry purposes. However, to date little is known concerning the precise mechanisms of translocation of iron nanoparticles into targeted tissues and organs from blood circulation, as well as the underlying implications of potential harmful health effects in human. Results The confocal microscopy imaging analysis demonstrates that exposure to engineered iron nanoparticles induces an increase in cell permeability in human microvascular endothelial cells. Our studies further reveal iron nanoparticles enhance the permeability through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the stabilization of microtubules. We also showed Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathways are involved in iron nanoparticle-induced cell permeability. The inhibition of ROS demonstrate ROS play a major role in regulating Akt/GSK-3β – mediated cell permeability upon iron nanoparticle exposure. These results provide new insights into the bioreactivity of engineered iron nanoparticles which can inform potential applications in medical imaging or drug delivery. Conclusion Our results indicate that exposure to iron nanoparticles induces an increase in endothelial cell permeability through ROS oxidative stress-modulated microtubule remodeling. The findings from this study provide new understandings on the effects of nanoparticles on vascular transport of macromolecules and drugs.

  1. The Multifaceted Responses of Primary Human Astrocytes and Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells to the Lyme Disease Spirochete, Borrelia Burgdorferi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A. Brissette

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The vector-borne pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi, causes a multi-system disorder including neurological complications. These neurological disorders, collectively termed neuroborreliosis, can occur in up to 15% of untreated patients. The neurological symptoms are probably a result of a glial-driven, host inflammatory response to the bacterium. However, the specific contributions of individual glial and other support cell types to the pathogenesis of neuroborreliosis are relatively unexplored. The goal of this project was to characterize specific astrocyte and endothelial cell responses to B. burgdorferi. Primary human astrocytes and primary HBMEC (human brain microvascular endothelial cells were incubated with B. burgdorferi over a 72-h period and the transcriptional responses to the bacterium were analyzed by real-time PCR arrays. There was a robust increase in several surveyed chemokine and related genes, including IL (interleukin-8, for both primary astrocytes and HBMEC. Array results were confirmed with individual sets of PCR primers. The production of specific chemokines by both astrocytes and HBMEC in response to B. burgdorferi, including IL-8, CXCL-1, and CXCL-10, were confirmed by ELISA. These results demonstrate that primary astrocytes and HBMEC respond to virulent B. burgdorferi by producing a number of chemokines. These data suggest that infiltrating phagocytic cells, particularly neutrophils, attracted by chemokines expressed at the BBB (blood–brain barrier may be important contributors to the early inflammatory events associated with neuroborreliosis.

  2. ESCRT-0 Component Hrs Promotes Macropinocytosis of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus in Human Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Kumar, Binod; Ansari, Mairaj Ahmed; Dutta, Dipanjan; Iqbal, Jawed; Gjyshi, Olsi; Bottero, Virginie; Chandran, Bala

    2016-04-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) enters human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-d), its naturalin vivotarget cells, by lipid raft-dependent macropinocytosis. The internalized viral envelope fuses with the macropinocytic membrane, and released capsid is transported to the nuclear vicinity, resulting in the nuclear entry of viral DNA. The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) proteins, which include ESCRT-0, -I, -II, and -III, play a central role in endosomal trafficking and sorting of internalized and ubiquitinated receptors. Here, we examined the role of ESCRT-0 component Hrs (hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate) in KSHV entry into HMVEC-d by macropinocytosis. Knockdown of Hrs by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) transduction resulted in significant decreases in KSHV entry and viral gene expression. Immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) and plasma membrane isolation and proximity ligation assay (PLA) demonstrated the translocation of Hrs from the cytosol to the plasma membrane of infected cells and association with α-actinin-4. In addition, infection induced the plasma membrane translocation and activation of the serine/threonine kinase ROCK1, a downstream target of the RhoA GTPase. Hrs knockdown reduced these associations, suggesting that the recruitment of ROCK1 is an Hrs-mediated event. Interaction between Hrs and ROCK1 is essential for the ROCK1-induced phosphorylation of NHE1 (Na(+)/H(+)exchanger 1), which is involved in the regulation of intracellular pH. Thus, our studies demonstrate the plasma membrane association of ESCRT protein Hrs during macropinocytosis and suggest that KSHV entry requires both Hrs- and ROCK1-dependent mechanisms and that ROCK1-mediated phosphorylation of NHE1 and pH change is an essential event required for the macropinocytosis of KSHV. Macropinocytosis is the major entry pathway of KSHV in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells, the natural target cells of KSHV

  3. Human Tumor Antigens Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Olivera J

    2017-05-01

    The question of whether human tumors express antigens that can be recognized by the immune system has been answered with a resounding YES. Most were identified through spontaneous antitumor humoral and cellular immune responses found in cancer patients and include peptides, glycopeptides, phosphopeptides, viral peptides, and peptides resulting from common mutations in oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes, or common gene fusion events. Many have been extensively tested as candidates for anticancer vaccines. More recently, attention has been focused on the potentially large number of unique tumor antigens, mutated neoantigens, that are the predicted products of the numerous mutations revealed by exome sequencing of primary tumors. Only a few have been confirmed as targets of spontaneous immunity and immunosurveillance, and even fewer have been tested in preclinical and clinical settings. The field has been divided for a long time on the relative importance of shared versus mutated antigens in tumor surveillance and as candidates for vaccines. This question will eventually need to be answered in a head to head comparison in well-designed clinical trials. One advantage that shared antigens have over mutated antigens is their potential to be used in vaccines for primary cancer prevention. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(5); 347-54. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Morphine induces expression of platelet-derived growth factor in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: implication for vascular permeability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiu Wen

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of antiretroviral therapy, complications of HIV-1 infection with concurrent drug abuse are an emerging problem. Morphine, often abused by HIV-infected patients, is known to accelerate neuroinflammation associated with HIV-1 infection. Detailed molecular mechanisms of morphine action however, remain poorly understood. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, primarily due to its potent mitogenic and permeability effects. Whether morphine exposure results in enhanced vascular permeability in brain endothelial cells, likely via induction of PDGF, remains to be established. In the present study, we demonstrated morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, an effect that was abrogated by the opioid receptor antagonist-naltrexone. Pharmacological blockade (cell signaling and loss-of-function (Egr-1 approaches demonstrated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, PI3K/Akt and the downstream transcription factor Egr-1 respectively, in morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB. Functional significance of increased PDGF-BB manifested as increased breach of the endothelial barrier as evidenced by decreased expression of the tight junction protein ZO-1 in an in vitro model system. Understanding the regulation of PDGF expression may provide insights into the development of potential therapeutic targets for intervention of morphine-mediated neuroinflammation.

  5. Signaling mechanisms in tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced death of microvascular endothelial cells of the corpus luteum

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    Rueda Bo R

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The microvasculature of the corpus luteum (CL, which comprises greater than 50% of the total number of cells in the CL, is thought to be the first structure to undergo degeneration via apoptosis during luteolysis. These studies compared the apoptotic potential of various cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, TNFα; interferon gamma, IFNγ; soluble Fas ligand, sFasL, a FAS activating antibody (FasAb, and the luteolytic hormone prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α on CL-derived endothelial (CLENDO cells. Neither sFasL, FasAb nor PGF2α had any effect on CLENDO cell viability. Utilizing morphological and biochemical parameters it was evident that TNFα and IFNγ initiated apoptosis in long-term cultures. However, TNFα was the most potent stimulus for CLENDO cell apoptosis at early time points. Unlike many other studies described in non-reproductive cell types, TNFα induced apoptosis of CLENDO cells occurs in the absence of inhibitors of protein synthesis. TNFα-induced death is typically associated with acute activation of distinct intracellular signaling pathways (e.g. MAPK and sphingomyelin pathways. Treatment with TNFα for 5–30 min activated MAPKs (ERK, p38, and JNK, and increased ceramide accumulation. Ceramide, a product of sphingomyelin hydrolysis, can serve as an upstream activator of members of the MAPK family independently in numerous cell types, and is a well-established pro-apoptotic second messenger. Like TNFα, treatment of CLENDO cells with exogenous ceramide significantly induced endothelial apoptosis. Ceramide also activated the JNK pathway, but had no effect on ERK and p38 MAPKs. Pretreatment of CLENDO cells with glutathione (GSH, an intracellular reducing agent and known inhibitor of reactive oxygen species (ROS or TNFα-induced apoptosis, significantly attenuated TNFα-induced apoptosis. It is hypothesized that TNFα kills CLENDO cells through elevation of reactive oxygen species, and intracellular signals that promote

  6. RNA-seq reveals novel transcriptome of genes and their isoforms in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells treated with thrombin.

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    Li Qin Zhang

    Full Text Available The dysregulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin has been implicated in the development of a number of pathologic disorders such as inflammatory conditions, cancer, diabetes, coronary heart disease. However, transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin is not completely understood. In the present study, Illumina RNA-seq was used to profile the transcriptome in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L treated with thrombin for 6 h to gain insight into thrombin's direct effects on the endothelial function. Out of 100 million total reads from a paired end sequencing assay, 91-94% of the reads were aligned to over 16,000 genes in the reference human genome. Thrombin upregulated 150 known genes and 480 known isoforms, and downregulated 2,190 known genes and 3,574 known isoforms by at least 2 fold. Of note, thrombin upregulated 1,775 previously unknown isoforms and downregulated 12,202 previously unknown isoforms by at least 2 fold. Many genes displayed isoform specific differential expression levels and different usage of transcriptional start sites after the thrombin treatment. The cross comparisons between our RNA-seq data and those of DNA microarray analysis of either 6 h thrombin treated HUVEC or 5 h TNFα treated HMVEC have provided a significant overlapping list of differentially expressed genes, supporting the robust utility of our dataset. Further in-depth follow-up analysis of the transcriptional regulation reported in this study may shed light on molecular pathogenic mechanisms underlying thrombin mediated endothelial dysfunction in various diseases and provide new leads of potential therapeutic targets.

  7. RNA-seq Reveals Novel Transcriptome of Genes and Their Isoforms in Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells Treated with Thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li Qin; Cheranova, Dilyara; Gibson, Margaret; Ding, Shinghua; Heruth, Daniel P.; Fang, Deyu; Ye, Shui Qing

    2012-01-01

    The dysregulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin has been implicated in the development of a number of pathologic disorders such as inflammatory conditions, cancer, diabetes, coronary heart disease. However, transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial cells by thrombin is not completely understood. In the present study, Illumina RNA-seq was used to profile the transcriptome in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) treated with thrombin for 6 h to gain insight into thrombin's direct effects on the endothelial function. Out of 100 million total reads from a paired end sequencing assay, 91–94% of the reads were aligned to over 16,000 genes in the reference human genome. Thrombin upregulated 150 known genes and 480 known isoforms, and downregulated 2,190 known genes and 3,574 known isoforms by at least 2 fold. Of note, thrombin upregulated 1,775 previously unknown isoforms and downregulated 12,202 previously unknown isoforms by at least 2 fold. Many genes displayed isoform specific differential expression levels and different usage of transcriptional start sites after the thrombin treatment. The cross comparisons between our RNA-seq data and those of DNA microarray analysis of either 6 h thrombin treated HUVEC or 5 h TNFα treated HMVEC have provided a significant overlapping list of differentially expressed genes, supporting the robust utility of our dataset. Further in-depth follow-up analysis of the transcriptional regulation reported in this study may shed light on molecular pathogenic mechanisms underlying thrombin mediated endothelial dysfunction in various diseases and provide new leads of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:22359579

  8. Microvascular Recruitment in Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker

    In this PhD work a new method for measuring microvascular recruitment was developed and evaluated, using continues real-time imaging of contrast enhanced ultrasound. Gas-filled microbubbles were infused intravenously and by taking advantage of the echogenic properties of the microbubbles the reso......In this PhD work a new method for measuring microvascular recruitment was developed and evaluated, using continues real-time imaging of contrast enhanced ultrasound. Gas-filled microbubbles were infused intravenously and by taking advantage of the echogenic properties of the microbubbles...... the resonating sound from the microbubbles in the systemic circulation were recorded for determination of microvascular recruitment in designated muscle segments. Results showed that microvascular recruitment increased with insulin stimulation by ~30% in rats and ~40% in humans (study I). Furthermore...... hormone glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) in the microcirculation. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 analogs are drugs used for treatments of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes but the vascular effects of GLP-1 in vivo are elusive. Here it was shown that GLP-1 rapidly increased the microvascular recruitment...

  9. Vitamin E isoforms differentially regulate intercellular adhesion molecule-1 activation of PKCα in human microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Hiam Abdala-Valencia

    Full Text Available ICAM-1-dependent leukocyte recruitment in vivo is inhibited by the vitamin E isoform d-α-tocopherol and elevated by d-γ-tocopherol. ICAM-1 is reported to activate endothelial cell signals including protein kinase C (PKC, but the PKC isoform and the mechanism for ICAM-1 activation of PKC are not known. It is also not known whether ICAM-1 signaling in endothelial cells is regulated by tocopherol isoforms. We hypothesized that d-α-tocopherol and d-γ-tocopherol differentially regulate ICAM-1 activation of endothelial cell PKC.ICAM-1 crosslinking activated the PKC isoform PKCα but not PKCβ in TNFα-pretreated human microvascular endothelial cells. ICAM-1 activation of PKCα was blocked by the PLC inhibitor U73122, ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, and xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol. ERK1/2 activation was blocked by inhibition of XO and PLC but not by inhibition of PKCα, indicating that ERK1/2 is downstream of XO and upstream of PKCα during ICAM-1 signaling. During ICAM-1 activation of PKCα, the XO-generated ROS did not oxidize PKCα. Interestingly, d-α-tocopherol inhibited ICAM-1 activation of PKCα but not the upstream signal ERK1/2. The d-α-tocopherol inhibition of PKCα was ablated by the addition of d-γ-tocopherol.Crosslinking ICAM-1 stimulated XO/ROS which activated ERK1/2 that then activated PKCα. ICAM-1 activation of PKCα was inhibited by d-α-tocopherol and this inhibition was ablated by the addition of d-γ-tocopherol. These tocopherols regulated ICAM-1 activation of PKCα without altering the upstream signal ERK1/2. Thus, we identified a mechanism for ICAM-1 activation of PKC and determined that d-α-tocopherol and d-γ-tocopherol have opposing regulatory functions for ICAM-1-activated PKCα in endothelial cells.

  10. Edaravone protected human brain microvascular endothelial cells from methylglyoxal-induced injury by inhibiting AGEs/RAGE/oxidative stress.

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    Wenlu Li

    Full Text Available Subjects with diabetes experience an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease and stroke compared with nondiabetic age-matched individuals. Increased formation of reactive physiological dicarbonyl compound methylglyoxal (MGO seems to be implicated in the development of diabetic vascular complication due to its protein glycation and oxidative stress effect. Edaravone, a novel radical scavenger, has been reported to display the advantageous effects on ischemic stroke both in animals and clinical trials; however, little is known about whether edaravone has protective effects on diabetic cerebrovascular injury. Using cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC, protective effects of edaravone on MGO and MGO enhancing oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD induced injury were investigated. Cell injury was measured by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT formation, cell account, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release and Rhodamine 123 staining. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs formation and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE expression were measured by western blotting. Cellular oxidative stress was measured by reactive oxygen species (ROS release. Treatment of MGO for 24 h significantly induced HBMEC injury, which was inhibited by pretreatment of edaravone from 10-100 µmol/l. What's more, treatment of MGO enhanced AGEs accumulation, RAGE expression and ROS release in the cultured HBMEC, which were inhibited by 100 µmol/l edaravone. Finally, treatment of MGO for 24 h and then followed by 3 h OGD insult significantly enhanced cell injury when compared with OGD insult only, which was also protected by 100 µmol/l edaravone. Thus, edaravone protected HBMEC from MGO and MGO enhancing OGD-induced injury by inhibiting AGEs/RAGE/oxidative stress.

  11. Hypoxia upregulates Bcl-2 expression and suppresses interferon-gamma induced antiangiogenic activity in human tumor derived endothelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Jiang Huai

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia in solid tumors potentially stimulates angiogenesis by promoting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production and upregulating VEGF receptor expression. However, it is unknown whether hypoxia can modulate the effect of anti-angiogenic treatment on tumor-derived endothelium. METHODS: Human tumor-derived endothelial cells (HTDEC) were freshly isolated from surgically removed human colorectal tumors by collagenase\\/DNase digestion and Percol gradient sedimentation. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring BrdU incorporation, and capillary tube formation was measured using Matrigel. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry and ELISA, and Bcl-2 expression was detected by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Under aerobic culture conditions (5% CO2 plus 21% O2) HTDEC expressed less Bcl-2 and were more susceptible to IFN-gamma-induced apoptosis with significant reductions in both cell proliferation and capillary tube formation, when compared with normal human macrovascular and microvascular EC. Following exposure of HTDEC to hypoxia (5% CO2 plus 2% O2), IFN-gamma-induced cell apoptosis, and antiangiogenic activity (i.e. an inhibition in cell proliferation and capillary tube formation) in HTDEC were markedly attenuated. This finding correlated with hypoxia-induced upregulation of Bcl-2 expression in HTDEC. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that hypoxia can protect HTDEC against IFN-gamma-mediated cell death and antiangiogenic activity, and suggest that improvement of tumor oxygenation may potentiate the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies specifically targeting the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis.

  12. Heparanase mediates vascular endothelial growth factor gene transcription in high-glucose human retinal microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingwei; Leng, Xuan; Hu, Yijun; Shen, Huangxuan; Song, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To observe the nuclear expression and interaction of heparanase and RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II), an enzyme that catalyzes the transcription of DNA in eukaryotic cells) in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs) under high glucose condition and to investigate the association of heparanase with the transcription activity of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene promoter. Methods Cultured HRECs were maintained for 3 days in media with high or normal glucose. The expressions of heparanase and RNA Pol II in each group were analyzed with immunofluorescence. Co-immunoprecipitation was applied to detect the interaction of heparanase and Pol II proteins. Cells in both groups were used for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with anti-heparanase and anti-RNA Pol II antibodies to identify high-confidence heparanase-binding regions across the entire VEGF gene promoter. Moreover, real-time PCR was used to demonstrate the interaction between heparanase and the VEGF gene promoter region. Results The immunofluorescence studies showed that the nuclear expression of heparanase was intense in high-glucose HRECs but faint in the normal group; RNA Pol II in the nucleus was also intense in high glucose HRECs, and the distribution of heparanase was consistent with that of RNA Pol II. The co-immunoprecipitation data showed that heparanase combined with RNA Pol II in HRECs cells treated with high glucose, and the molecular size of HPA interacted with RNA Pol II was 50 kDa, while no combination of two proteins was evident in normal HRECs cells. Real-time PCR–based ChIP results showed that the high-confidence HPA-binding region was −1155 to −1018 (containing hypoxia response element) in the VEGF gene promoter, and the cells treated with high glucose showed increases in heparanase and RNA Pol II in the VEGF gene promoter region compared with the normal glucose treated cells (t = –3.244, p = 0.032; t = –6.096, p = 0.004, respectively

  13. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta S Laranjeira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol–gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves. Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1 and collagen type I (COL I on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  14. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjeira, Marta S.; Carvalho, Ângela; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; Hansford, Derek; Ferraz, Maria Pia; Coimbra, Susana; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol-gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves). Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC) and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and collagen type I (COL I) on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  15. Contacting co-culture of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells alters barrier function of human embryonic stem cell derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skottman, H; Muranen, J; Lähdekorpi, H; Pajula, E; Mäkelä, K; Koivusalo, L; Koistinen, A; Uusitalo, H; Kaarniranta, K; Juuti-Uusitalo, K

    2017-10-01

    Here we evaluated the effects of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (hREC) on mature human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. The hESC-RPE cells (Regea08/017, Regea08/023 or Regea11/013) and hREC (ACBRI 181) were co-cultured on opposite sides of transparent membranes for up to six weeks. Thereafter barrier function, small molecule permeability, localization of RPE and endothelial cell marker proteins, cellular fine structure, and growth factor secretion of were evaluated. After co-culture, the RPE specific CRALBP and endothelial cell specific von Willebrand factor were appropriately localized. In addition, the general morphology, pigmentation, and fine structure of hESC-RPE cells were unaffected. Co-culture increased the barrier function of hESC-RPE cells, detected both with TEER measurements and cumulative permeability of FD4 - although the differences varied among the cell lines. Co-culturing significantly altered VEGF and PEDF secretion, but again the differences were cell line specific. The results of this study showed that co-culture with hREC affects hESC-RPE functionality. In addition, co-culture revealed drastic cell line specific differences, most notably in growth factor secretion. This model has the potential to be used as an in vitro outer blood-retinal barrier model for drug permeability testing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of short-term walnut consumption on human microvascular function and its relationship to plasma epoxide content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Roberta R; Yim, Sun J; Shearer, Gregory C; Hackman, Robert M; Djurica, Dragana; Newman, John W; Shindel, Alan W; Keen, Carl L

    2015-12-01

    Improved vascular function after the incorporation of walnuts into controlled or high-fat diets has been reported; however, the mechanism(s) underlying this effect of walnuts is(are) poorly defined. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the acute and short-term effects of walnut intake on changes in microvascular function and the relationship of these effects to plasma epoxides, the cytochrome-P450-derived metabolites of fatty acids. Thirty-eight hypercholesterolemic postmenopausal women were randomized to 4 weeks of 5 g or 40 g of daily walnut intake. All outcomes were measured after an overnight fast and 4 h after walnut intake. Microvascular function, assessed as the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), was the primary outcome measure, with serum lipids and plasma epoxides as secondary measures. Compared to 5 g of daily walnut intake, consuming 40 g/d of walnuts for 4 weeks increased the RHI and Framingham RHI. Total cholesterol and low- and high-density cholesterol did not significantly change after walnut intake. The change in RHI after 4 weeks of walnut intake was associated with the change in the sum of plasma epoxides (r=0.65, P=.002) but not with the change in the sum of plasma hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. Of the individual plasma epoxides, arachidonic-acid-derived 14(15)-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid was most strongly associated with the change in microvascular function (r=0.72, Pfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. In Vitro Efficient Expansion of Tumor Cells Deriving from Different Types of Human Tumor Samples

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    Ilaria Turin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining human tumor cell lines from fresh tumors is essential to advance our understanding of antitumor immune surveillance mechanisms and to develop new ex vivo strategies to generate an efficient anti-tumor response. The present study delineates a simple and rapid method for efficiently establishing primary cultures starting from tumor samples of different types, while maintaining the immuno-histochemical characteristics of the original tumor. We compared two different strategies to disaggregate tumor specimens. After short or long term in vitro expansion, cells analyzed for the presence of malignant cells demonstrated their neoplastic origin. Considering that tumor cells may be isolated in a closed system with high efficiency, we propose this methodology for the ex vivo expansion of tumor cells to be used to evaluate suitable new drugs or to generate tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or vaccines.

  18. Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peanut plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by or linked with viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Most anal cancers (human papillomavirus) Some ...

  19. Blocking of α1β1 and α2β1 adhesion molecules inhibits eosinophil migration through human lung microvascular endothelial cell monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisława Bazan-Socha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In cell trafficking to the airways in asthma, among integrins the most important are those containing α4 and β2 subunits. We have previously shown that also blocking of collagen receptors, α1β1 and α2β1 integrins, inhibits transmigration of eosinophils of asthmatic subjects through a monolayer of skin microvascular endothelial cells seeded on collagen IV coated inserts. However, it was not clear whether this observation was limited to asthma or depended on the type of microvascular cell and collagen IV used as a base. In the current study we performed a transmigration assay using human lung microvascular endothelial cells seeded directly on a plastic surface as a base and blood cells isolated from 12 representatives of each of two groups, asthmatics and healthy donors, by gradient centrifugation, followed by immunomagnetic negative separation of eosinophils. Isolated eosinophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were inhibited by snake venom-derived integrin antagonists including viperistatin and VP12, as inhibitors of α1β1 and α2β1 integrin, respectively, and VLO5 and VLO4, as inhibitors of α4β1 and α5β1 integrin, respectively. All snake venom-derived anti-adhesive proteins were effective in inhibiting eosinophil transmigration, whilst only VLO5 and VLO4 reduced PBMC mobility in this assay. This observation was similar in both groups of subjects studied. α1β1 and α2β1 integrins could be involved in transmigration of eosinophil to the inflammatory site. Migratory inhibition was observed in asthma subjects as well as in healthy donors, and did not depend on origin of endothelial cells or the extracellular matrix component used as a base.

  20. The role of cyclo-oxygenase-1 in high-salt diet-induced microvascular dysfunction in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavka, Ana; Cosic, Anita; Jukic, Ivana; Jelakovic, Bojan; Lombard, Julian H; Phillips, Shane A; Seric, Vatroslav; Mihaljevic, Ivan; Drenjancevic, Ines

    2015-12-15

    Recent studies have shown that some of the deleterious effects of a high-salt (HS) diet are independent of elevated blood pressure and are associated with impaired endothelial function. Increased generation of cyclo-oxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2)-derived vasoconstrictor factors and endothelial activation may contribute to impaired vascular relaxation during HS loading. The present study aimed to assess the regulation of microvascular reactivity and to clarify the role of COX-1 and COX-2 in normotensive subjects on a short-term HS diet. The present study demonstrates the important role of COX-1 derived vasoconstrictor metabolites in regulation of microvascular blood flow during a HS diet. These results help to explain how even short-term HS diets may impact upon microvascular reactivity without changes in blood pressure and suggest that a vasoconstrictor metabolite of COX-1 could play a role in this impaired tissue blood flow. The present study aimed to assess the effect of a 1-week high-salt (HS) diet on the role of cyclo-oxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) and the vasoconstrictor prostaglandins, thromboxane A2 (TXA2 ) and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α ), on skin microcirculatory blood flow, as well as to detect its effect on markers of endothelial activation such as soluble cell adhesion molecules. Young women (n = 54) were assigned to either the HS diet group (N = 30) (∼14 g day(-1) NaCl ) or low-salt (LS) diet group (N = 24) (diet protocols. One HS diet group subset received 100 mg of indomethacin (non-selective COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitor), and another HS group subset received 200 mg of celecoxib (selective COX-2 inhibitor) before repeating laser Doppler flowmetry measurements. Blood pressure was unchanged after the HS diet, although it significantly reduced after the LS diet. Twenty-four hour urinary sodium was increased, and plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone levels were decreased after the HS diet. The HS diet significantly impaired PORH and

  1. From reverse transcription to human brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrenko V. V.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcriptase from avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV was the subject of the study, from which the investi- gations of the Department of biosynthesis of nucleic acids were started. Production of AMV in grams quantities and isolation of AMV reverse transcriptase were established in the laboratory during the seventies of the past cen- tury and this initiated research on the cDNA synthesis, cloning and investigation of the structure and functions of the eukaryotic genes. Structures of salmon insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF family genes and their transcripts were determined during long-term investigations. Results of two modern techniques, microarray-ba- sed hybridization and SAGE, were used for the identification of the genes differentially expressed in astrocytic gliomas and human normal brain. Comparison of SAGE results on the genes overexpressed in glioblastoma with the results of microarray analysis revealed a limited number of common genes. 105 differentially expressed genes, common to both methods, can be included in the list of candidates for the molecular typing of glioblastoma. The first experiments on the classification of glioblastomas based on the data of the 20 genes expression were conducted by using of artificial neural network analysis. The results of these experiments showed that the expression profiles of these genes in 224 glioblastoma samples and 74 normal brain samples could be according to the Koho- nen’s maps. The CHI3L1 and CHI3L2 genes of chitinase-like cartilage protein were revealed among the most overexpressed genes in glioblastoma, which could have prognostic and diagnostic potential. Results of in vitro experiments demonstrated that both proteins, CHI3L1 and CHI3L2, may initiate the phosphorylation of ERK1/ ERK2 and AKT kinases leading to the activation of MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling cascades in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, human glioblastoma U87MG, and U373 cells. The new human cell line

  2. Cyclophosphamide Enhances Human Tumor Growth in Nude Rat Xenografted Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjen Jeffrey Wu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the immunomodulatory chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide (CTX on tumor growth was investigated in primary and metastatic intracerebral and subcutaneous rat xenograft models. Nude rats were treated with CTX (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally 24 hours before human ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3, small cell lung carcinoma (LX-1 SCLC, and glioma (UW28, U87MG, and U251 tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or in the right cerebral hemisphere or were infused into the right internal carotid artery. Tumor development was monitored and recorded. Potential mechanisms were further investigated. Only animals that received both CTX and Matrigel showed consistent growth of subcutaneous tumors. Cyclophosphamide pretreatment increased the percentage (83.3% vs 0% of animals showing intraperitoneal tumors. In intracerebral implantation tumor models, CTX pretreatment increased the tumor volume and the percentage of animals showing tumors. Cyclophosphamide increased lung carcinoma bone and facial metastases after intra-arterial injection, and 20% of animals showed brain metastases. Cyclophosphamide transiently decreased nude rat white blood cell counts and glutathione concentration, whereas serum vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly elevated. Cyclophosphamide also increased CD31 reactivity, a marker of vascular endothelium, and macrophage (CD68-positive infiltration into glioma cell-inoculated rat brains. Cyclophosphamide may enhance primary and metastatic tumor growth through multiple mechanisms, including immune modulation, decreased response to oxidative stress, increased tumor vascularization, and increased macrophage infiltration. These findings may be clinically relevant because chemotherapy may predispose human cancer subjects to tumor growth in the brain or other tissues.

  3. Identification and manipulation of tumor associated macrophages in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heusinkveld Moniek

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Evading immune destruction and tumor promoting inflammation are important hallmarks in the development of cancer. Macrophages are present in most human tumors and are often associated with bad prognosis. Tumor associated macrophages come in many functional flavors ranging from what is known as classically activated macrophages (M1 associated with acute inflammation and T-cell immunity to immune suppressive macrophages (M2 associated with the promotion of tumor growth. The role of these functionally different myeloid cells is extensively studied in mice tumor models but dissimilarities in markers and receptors make the direct translation to human cancer difficult. This review focuses on recent reports discriminating the type of infiltrating macrophages in human tumors and the environmental cues present that steer their differentiation. Finally, immunotherapeutic approaches to interfere in this process are discussed.

  4. Short-term resistance training with blood flow restriction enhances microvascular filtration capacity of human calf muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Colin; Vance, Steven; Brown, Maggie

    2010-07-01

    Resistance training increases muscle strength and endurance but may require high intensity and long duration to enhance capillarity. Vascular occlusion during low-load resistance training augments the strength and endurance gains compared with low-load resistance training alone, but in this study we investigated whether it also promotes microvascular filtration capacity, an index of capillarity. Nine healthy males performed short-term low-intensity resistance training of the calf muscles (four sets of 50 heel raises, three times a week for 4 weeks) under restricted (thigh cuff inflated to 150 mmHg on the non-dominant leg) or unrestricted (dominant leg without thigh cuff) blood flow conditions. Before and after resistance training, calf filtration capacity and resting blood flow were assessed by strain gauge plethysmography, and calf muscle strength and fatigue were assessed respectively by maximal voluntary contraction and force decline during electrically evoked ischaemic contractions in both legs. Calf filtration capacity increased by 26% in the restricted leg but did not increase significantly in the unrestricted leg. Calf muscle strength was 18% greater in the restricted leg but unchanged in the unrestricted leg. Calf muscle fatigue and resting blood flow did not change in either leg. Resistance training promoted microvascular filtration capacity, an effect that was somewhat enhanced by blood flow restriction, and could be due to increased capillarization.

  5. Recombinant human erythropoietin alpha improves the efficacy of radiotherapy of a human tumor xenograft, affecting tumor cells and microvessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevey, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Bereczky, B.; Gilly, R.; Kenessey, I.; Raso, E.; Simon, E.; Timar, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Dobos, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Vago, A. [Central Lab., National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Kasler, M. [Head and Neck Surgery, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Doeme, B. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Tovari, J. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); 1. Inst. of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary)

    2008-01-15

    Background and purpose: tumor-induced anemia often occurs in cancer patients, and is corrected by recombinant human erythropoietins (rHuEPOs). Recent studies indicated that, besides erythroid progenitor cells, tumor and endothelial cells express erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) as well; therefore, rHuEPO may affect their functions. Here, the effect of rHuEPO{alpha} on irradiation in EPOR-positive human squamous cell carcinoma xenograft was tested. Material and methods: A431 tumor-bearing SCID mice were treated from the tumor implantation with rHuEPO{alpha} at human-equivalent dose. Xenografts were irradiated (5 Gy) on day 14, and the final tumor mass was measured on day 22. The systemic effects of rHuEPO{alpha} on the hemoglobin level, on tumor-associated blood vessels and on hypoxia-inducible factor-(HIF-)1{alpha} expression of the tumor xenografts were monitored. The proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity of A431 cancer cells treated with rHuEPO{alpha} and irradiation were also tested in vitro. Results: in vitro, rHuEPO{alpha} treatment alone did not modify the proliferation of EPOR-positive A431 tumor cells but enhanced the effect of irradiation on proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity. In vivo, rHuEPO{alpha} administration compensated the tumor-induced anemia in SCID mice and decreased tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression but had no effect on tumor growth. At the same time rHuEPO{alpha} treatment significantly increased the efficacy of radiotherapy in vivo (tumor weight of 23.9 {+-} 4.7 mg and 34.9 {+-} 4.6 mg, respectively), mediated by increased tumoral blood vessel destruction. Conclusion: rHuEPO{alpha} treatment may modulate the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy not only by reducing systemic hypoxia and tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression, but also by destroying tumoral vessels. (orig.)

  6. Metallothioneins in human tumors and potential roles in carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherian, M. George; Jayasurya, A.; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2003-12-10

    Metallothioneins (MT) are a group of low-molecular weight, cysteine rich intracellular proteins, which are encoded by a family of genes containing at least 10 functional isoforms in human. The expression and induction of these proteins have been associated with protection against DNA damage, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Moreover, MT may potentially activate certain transcriptional factors by donating zinc. Although MT is a cytosolic protein in resting cells, it can be translocated transiently to the cell nucleus during cell proliferation and differentiation. A number of studies have shown an increased expression of MT in various human tumors of the breast, colon, kidney, liver, lung, nasopharynx, ovary, prostate, salivary gland, testes, thyroid and urinary bladder. However, MT is down-regulated in certain tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma and liver adenocarcinoma. Hence, the expression of MT is not universal to all human tumors, but may depend on the differentiation status and proliferative index of tumors, along with other tissue factors and gene mutations. In certain tumors such as germ cell carcinoma, the expression of MT is closely related to the tumor grade and proliferative activity. Increased expression of MT has also been observed in less differentiated tumors. Thus, expression of MT may be a potential prognostic marker for certain tumors. There are few reports on the expression of the different isoforms of MT which have been analyzed by specific gene probes. They reveal that certain isoforms are expressed in specific cell types. The factors which can influence MT induction in human tumors are not yet understood. Down-regulation of MT synthesis in hepatic tumors may be related to hypermethylation of the MT-promoter or mutation of other genes such as the p53 tumor suppressor gene. In vitro studies using human cancer cells suggest a possible role for p53 and the estrogen-receptor on the expression and induction of MT in epithelial neoplastic cells

  7. Generation of Brain Microvascular Endothelial-Like Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Co-Culture with C6 Glioma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Minami

    Full Text Available The blood brain barrier (BBB is formed by brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs and tightly regulates the transport of molecules from blood to neural tissues. In vitro BBB models from human pluripotent stem cell (PSCs-derived BMECs would be useful not only for the research on the BBB development and function but also for drug-screening for neurological diseases. However, little is known about the differentiation of human PSCs to BMECs. In the present study, human induced PSCs (iPSCs were differentiated into endothelial cells (ECs, and further maturated to BMECs. Interestingly, C6 rat glioma cell-conditioned medium (C6CM, in addition to C6 co-culture, induced the differentiation of human iPSC-derived ECs (iPS-ECs to BMEC-like cells, increase in the trans-endothelial electrical resistance, decreased in the dextran transport and up-regulation of gene expression of tight junction molecules in human iPS-ECs. Moreover, Wnt inhibitors attenuated the effects of C6CM. In summary, we have established a simple protocol of the generation of BMEC-like cells from human iPSCs, and have demonstrated that differentiation of iPS-ECs to BMEC-like cells is induced by C6CM-derived signals, including canonical Wnt signals.

  8. Developing a xenograft human tumor model in immunocompetent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel, Matthew T; Narayanan, Sanjeev; Ganta, Chanran; Shreshta, Tej B; Marquez, Alejandro; Pyle, Marla; Hill, Jennifer; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2018-01-01

    Animal models are essential to cancer research, but current xenograft models are limited in their utility especially due to the lack of an immune system. Here we demonstrate that a xenograft tumor model can be developed in immunocompetent mice by tolerizing murine fetuses to human tumor cells. A375 human melanoma cells were injected into day E14 fetuses and after birth mice were challenged with A375 cells to determine their ability to develop tumors. Intravenous injections of cells resulted in metastatic-like lung tumors, which were verified to be human in origin by immunohistochemistry and PCR. These results were replicated with several other human tumor types: BxPC3 (human pancreatic adenocarcinoma), MDA-MB-231 (human breast adenocarcinoma), M21 (human melanoma), and HeLa (human cervical adenocarcinoma). Development of an immunocompetent xenograft tumor model would allow the further elucidation of the interaction of the immune system with therapy in both preclinical research and patient derived xenografts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tumor endothelial inflammation predicts clinical outcome in diverse human cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Pitroda

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial cells contribute to the pathogenesis of numerous human diseases by actively regulating the stromal inflammatory response; however, little is known regarding the role of endothelial inflammation in the growth of human tumors and its influence on the prognosis of human cancers.Using an experimental model of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α-mediated inflammation, we characterized inflammatory gene expression in immunopurified tumor-associated endothelial cells. These genes formed the basis of a multivariate molecular predictor of overall survival that was trained and validated in four types of human cancer.We report that expression of experimentally derived tumor endothelial genes distinguished pathologic tissue specimens from normal controls in several human diseases associated with chronic inflammation. We trained these genes in human cancer datasets and defined a six-gene inflammatory signature that predicted significantly reduced overall survival in breast cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer, and glioma. This endothelial-derived signature predicted outcome independently of, but cooperatively with, standard clinical and pathological prognostic factors. Consistent with these findings, conditioned culture media from human endothelial cells stimulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines accelerated the growth of human colon and breast tumors in immunodeficient mice as compared with conditioned media from untreated endothelial cells.This study provides the first prognostic cancer gene signature derived from an experimental model of tumor-associated endothelial inflammation. These findings support the notion that activation of inflammatory pathways in non-malignant tumor-infiltrating endothelial cells contributes to tumor growth and progression in multiple human cancers. Importantly, these results identify endothelial-derived factors that could serve as potential targets for therapy in diverse human cancers.

  10. Fetal microchimerism in human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broestl, Lauren; Rubin, Joshua B; Dahiya, Sonika

    2017-09-18

    Sex differences in cancer incidence and survival, including central nervous system tumors, are well documented. Multiple mechanisms contribute to sex differences in health and disease. Recently, the presence of fetal-in-maternal microchimeric cells has been shown to have prognostic significance in breast and colorectal cancers. The frequency and potential role of these cells has not been investigated in brain tumors. We therefore selected two common primary adult brain tumors for this purpose: meningioma, which is sex hormone responsive and has a higher incidence in women, and glioblastoma, which is sex hormone independent and occurs more commonly in men. Quantitative PCR was used to detect the presence of male DNA in tumor samples from women with a positive history of male pregnancy and a diagnosis of either glioblastoma or meningioma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for the X and Y chromosomes was used to verify the existence of intact male cells within tumor tissue. Fetal microchimerism was found in approximately 80% of glioblastoma cases and 50% of meningioma cases. No correlations were identified between the presence of microchimerism and commonly used clinical or molecular diagnostic features of disease. The impact of fetal microchimeric cells should be evaluated prospectively. © 2017 International Society of Neuropathology.

  11. West Nile virus infection modulates human brain microvascular endothelial cells tight junction proteins and cell adhesion molecules: Transmigration across the in vitro blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Saguna; Lo, Yeung; Chapagain, Moti; Lum, Stephanie; Kumar, Mukesh; Gurjav, Ulziijargal; Luo, Haiyan; Nakatsuka, Austin; Nerurkar, Vivek R

    2009-03-15

    Neurological complications such as inflammation, failure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and neuronal death contribute to the mortality and morbidity associated with WNV-induced meningitis. Compromised BBB indicates the ability of the virus to gain entry into the CNS via the BBB, however, the underlying mechanisms, and the specific cell types associated with WNV-CNS trafficking are not well understood. Brain microvascular endothelial cells, the main component of the BBB, represent a barrier to virus dissemination into the CNS and could play key role in WNV spread via hematogenous route. To investigate WNV entry into the CNS, we infected primary human brain microvascular endothelial (HBMVE) cells with the neurovirulent strain of WNV (NY99) and examined WNV replication kinetics together with the changes in the expressions of key tight junction proteins (TJP) and cell adhesion molecules (CAM). WNV infection of HBMVE cells was productive as analyzed by plaque assay and qRT-PCR, and did not induce cytopathic effect. Increased mRNA and protein expressions of TJP (claudin-1) and CAM (vascular cell adhesion molecule and E-selectin) were observed at days 2 and 3 after infection, respectively, which coincided with the peak in WNV replication. Further, using an in vitro BBB model comprised of HBMVE cells, we demonstrate that cell-free WNV can cross the BBB, without compromising the BBB integrity. These data suggest that infection of HBMVE cells can facilitate entry of cell-free virus into the CNS without disturbing the BBB, and increased CAM may assist in the trafficking of WNV-infected immune cells into the CNS, via 'Trojan horse' mechanism, thereby contributing to WNV dissemination in the CNS and associated pathology.

  12. Tumor-derived exosomes elicit tumor suppression in murine hepatocellular carcinoma models and humans in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Quan; Zuo, Bingfeng; Lu, Zhen; Gao, Xianjun; You, Abin; Wu, Chenxuan; Du, Zhi; Yin, HaiFang

    2016-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains a global challenge due to high morbidity and mortality rates and poor response to treatment. Immunotherapy, based on introduction of dendritic cells (DCs) activated by tumor cell lysates as antigens ex vivo, shows limited response rates in HCC patients. Here, we demonstrate that tumor cell-derived exosomes (TEXs), displaying an array of HCC antigens, can elicit a stronger immune response than cell lysates in vitro and in vivo. Significant tumor growth inhibition was achieved in ectopic and orthotopic HCC mice treated with TEX-pulsed DCs. Importantly, the tumor immune microenvironment was significantly improved in orthotopic HCC mice treated by TEX-pulsed DCs, demonstrated by increased numbers of T lymphocytes, elevated levels of interferon-γ, and decreased levels of interleukin-10 and tumor growth factor-β in tumor sites. As expected, T cells played an essential role in the TEX-pulsed DC-mediated immune response. Notably, exosomes from HCC cells not only promoted HCC-specific cytolysis but also provided cross-protective effects against pancreatic cancer cells. Moreover, HCC-specific cytolysis, elicited by DCs pulsed with human HepG2 cell-derived exosomes, was observed across different human HCC cells irrespective of human leukocyte antigen types. HCC TEXs can potently carry HCC antigens, trigger a strong DC-mediated immune response, and improve the HCC tumor microenvironment. (Hepatology 2016;64:456-472). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  13. Infrared Spectra of Human Breast Tumor Tissue and Experimental Animal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Belkov, M. V.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Pekhnyo, V. I.; Kozachkova, A. N.; Tsarik, H. V.; Kutsenko, I. P.; Sharykina, N. I.; Butra, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used Fourier transform IR spectroscopy methods to conduct comparative studies of human breast tumors and sarcoma 180 tumor grafted into mice. The IR spectral parameters used to identify tumor tissue in mice with the sarcoma 180 strain proved to be identical to the parameters for human breast tissue in cancer. In the presence of a malignant tumor in humans, the most intense C=O vibrational bands in the protein molecules are observed in the interval 1710-1680 cm-1. For a benign tumor, in the IR spectra of breast tissue the intense bands are located in the interval 1670-1650 cm-1. We spectroscopically monitored the diagnosis and the chemotherapy process using the model of sarcoma 180 in mice. As the therapeutic drugs, we used synthesized coordination compounds based on palladium complexes with diphosphonic acid derivatives. We demonstrate the promising potential of palladium complexes with zoledronic acid as an effective cytostatic. In therapy using a palladium complex with zoledronic acid, the effect of tumor growth inhibition is accompanied by a change in its spectral characteristics. The parameters of the IR spectra for tumor tissue after treatment are close to those of the IR spectra for healthy tissue.

  14. Relation between Irofulven (MGI-114) systemic exposure and tumor response in human solid tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggas, Markos; Stewart, Clinton F; Woo, Michael H; Fouladi, Maryam; Cheshire, Pamela J; Peterson, Jennifer K; Friedman, Henry S; Billups, Catherine; Houghton, Peter J

    2002-09-01

    Irofulven is a novel, small molecular weight semisynthetic compound, derived from a family of mushroom toxins known as illudins. This DNA alkylating agent has a chemical structure unlike any other chemotherapeutic agent in clinical use. The molecule is currently being studied in several Phase I, II, and III trials. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the antitumor activity of Irofulven in a panel of 20 pediatric solid tumor xenografts and to relate the Irofulven systemic exposure, defined as area under the concentration time curve, to the antitumor dose associated with tumor regression in the tumor models. Irofulven was administered i.v. daily for 5 days with courses repeated every 21 days for a total of three cycles. The minimum effective dose of Irofulven causing objective regression (> or =50% volume regression) of advanced tumors was determined for each of 19 of 20 independently derived tumor models (12 brain tumors, 4 neuroblastomas, and 4 rhabdomyosarcomas). At the maximum tolerated dose for three cycles of treatment (4.6 mg/kg/day) objective regressions were determined in 14 of 18 tumor lines (78%). However, the dose-response relationship was acute. At 2 mg/kg only 3 of 15 tumors tested demonstrated objective regressions, and in 3 additional tumors volume regressions were not achieved at a higher dose level (3 mg/kg), hence were not additionally tested. After administering the maximum tolerated dose (tolerated for one or two cycles of treatment) of Irofulven, 7 mg/kg, to mice bearing sensitive and resistant human tumors plasma concentration-time profiles were determined. Tumors were highly sensitive to Irofulven, but the systemic exposure required for a significant rate of objective response in this panel of tumors is in excess of that achievable in patients at tolerable doses, using this schedule of drug administration.

  15. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Gudkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed.

  16. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  17. Prediction of microvascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinomas with gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging: Impact of intra-tumoral fat detected on chemical-shift images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Ji Hye [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Kon, E-mail: jmyr@dreamwiz.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sanghyeok [Department of Radiology, Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Choi, Dongil; Lee, Won Jae [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC. • Alfa-fetoprotein, tumor size, and fat component were associated with MVI of HCC. • Chemical shift MRI should be considered for the evaluation of HCC. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the impact of intra-tumoral fat detected by chemical-shift MR imaging in predicting the MVI of HCC. Materials and methods: Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging of 365 surgically proven HCCs from 365 patients (306 men, 59 women; mean age, 55.6 years) were evaluated. HCCs were classified into two groups, fat-containing and non-fat-containing, based on the presence of fat on chemical-shift images. Fat-containing HCCs were subdivided into diffuse or focal fatty change groups. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify clinical and MR findings associated with MVI. Results: Based on MR imaging, 66 tumors were classified as fat-containing HCCs and 299 as non-fat-containing HCCs. Among the 66 fat-containing HCCs, 38 (57.6%) showed diffuse fatty changes and 28 (42.4%) showed focal fatty changes. MVI was present in 18 (27.3%) fat-containing HCCs and in 117 (39.1%) non-fat-containing HCCs (P = 0.07). Univariate analysis revealed that serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and tumor size were significantly associated with MVI (P < 0.001). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that log AFP (odds ratio 1.178, P = 0.0016), tumor size (odds ratio 1.809, P < 0.001), and intra-tumoral fat (odds ratio 0.515, P = 0.0387) were independent variables associated with MVI. Conclusion: Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC and, therefore, a possibly more favorable prognosis, but the clinical value of this finding is uncertain.

  18. Phosphorylethanolamine content of human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Y; Yokota, A; Koga, Y

    1994-12-01

    Phosphorylethanolamine (PEA) is the major component of the phosphomonoester peak detected by phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy, but the absolute concentration has not been determined. This study measured the PEA concentration in biopsy specimens of brain tumors and lobectomized cerebral cortex using high-performance liquid chromatography. The concentration of PEA was 118.5 +/- 10.0 mumol/100 g wet wt in cortex, and was significantly higher in malignant gliomas, metastatic pulmonary adenocarcinoma, and neurinoma. The concentration of PEA was especially high in pituitary adenoma, malignant lymphoma, and medulloblastoma.

  19. SKI knockdown inhibits human melanoma tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dahu; Lin, Qiushi; Box, Neil; Roop, Dennis; Ishii, Shunsuke; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Fan, Tao; Hornyak, Thomas J; Reed, Jon A; Stavnezer, Ed; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Medrano, Estela E

    2009-12-01

    The SKI protein represses the TGF-beta tumor suppressor pathway by associating with the Smad transcription factors. SKI is upregulated in human malignant melanoma tumors in a disease-progression manner and its overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of melanoma cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which SKI antagonizes TGF-beta signaling in vivo have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that human melanoma cells in which endogenous SKI expression was knocked down by RNAi produced minimal orthotopic tumor xenograft nodules that displayed low mitotic rate and prominent apoptosis. These minute tumors exhibited critical signatures of active TGF-beta signaling including high levels of nuclear Smad3 and p21(Waf-1), which are not found in the parental melanomas. To understand how SKI promotes tumor growth we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches and found that simultaneously to blocking the TGF-beta-growth inhibitory pathway, SKI promotes the switch of Smad3 from tumor suppression to oncogenesis by favoring phosphorylations of the Smad3 linker region in melanoma cells but not in normal human melanocytes. In this context, SKI is required for preventing TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of the oncogenic protein c-MYC, and for inducing the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, a mediator of tumor growth and angiogenesis. Together, the results indicate that SKI exploits multiple regulatory levels of the TGF-beta pathway and its deficiency restores TGF-beta tumor suppressor and apoptotic activities in spite of the likely presence of oncogenic mutations in melanoma tumors.

  20. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells and Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells Differentially Facilitate Leukocyte Recruitment and Utilize Chemokines for T Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumei Man

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells that functionally express blood brain barrier (BBB properties are useful surrogates for studying leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions at the BBB. In this study, we compared two different endothelial cellular models: transfected human brain microvascular endothelial cells (THBMECs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. With each grow under optimal conditions, confluent THBMEC cultures showed continuous occludin and ZO-1 immunoreactivity, while HUVEC cultures exhibited punctate ZO-1 expression at sites of cell-cell contact only. Confluent THBMEC cultures on 24-well collagen-coated transwell inserts had significantly higher transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER and lower solute permeability than HUVECs. Confluent THBMECs were more restrictive for mononuclear cell migration than HUVECs. Only THBMECs utilized abluminal CCL5 to facilitate T-lymphocyte migration in vitro although both THBMECs and HUVECs employed CCL3 to facilitate T cell migration. These data establish baseline conditions for using THBMECs to develop in vitro BBB models for studying leukocyte-endothelial interactions during neuroinflammation.

  1. In vitro model of cerebral ischemia by using brain microvascular endothelial cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubu, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Kawabata, Kenji

    2017-04-29

    Brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), which play a central role in blood brain barrier (BBB), can be used for the evaluation of drug transport into the brain. Although human BMEC cell lines have already been reported, they lack original properties such as barrier integrity. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) can be used for various applications such as regenerative therapy, drug screening, and pathological study. In the recent study, an induction method of BMECs from PSCs has been established, making it possible to more precisely study the in vitro human BBB function. Here, using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived BMECs, we examined the effects of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and OGD/reoxygenation (OGD/R) on BBB permeability. OGD disrupted the barrier function, and the dysfunction was rapidly restored by re-supply of the oxygen and glucose. Interestingly, TNF-α, which is known to be secreted from astrocytes and microglia in the cerebral ischemia, prevented the restoration of OGD-induced barrier dysfunction in an apoptosis-independent manner. Thus, we could establish the in vitro BBB disease model that mimics the cerebral ischemia by using iPS cell-derived BMECs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  3. Induction of tumor necrosis factor expression and resistance in a human breast tumor cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Spriggs, D; Imamura, K; Rodriguez, C; Horiguchi, J; Kufe, D W

    1987-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a polypeptide cytokine that is cytotoxic to some but not all tumor cells. The basis for resistance to the cytotoxic effects of this agent remains unclear. We have studied the development of TNF resistance in human ZR-75-1 breast carcinoma cells. ZR-75-1 cells have undetectable levels of TNF RNA and protein. However, TNF transcripts are transiently induced in these cells by exposure to recombinant human TNF. This induction of TNF RNA is associated with production...

  4. Thiram activates NF-kappaB and enhances ICAM-1 expression in human microvascular endothelial HMEC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpios-Piec, Dagmara; Grosicka-Maciąg, Emilia; Woźniak, Katarzyna; Kowalewski, Cezary; Kiernozek, Ewelina; Szumiło, Maria; Rahden-Staroń, Iwonna

    2015-02-01

    Thiram (TMTD) is a fungicidal and bactericidal agent used as antiseptic, seed disinfectant and animal repellent. In the light of known properties, thiram is considered to be used as an inhibitor of angiogenesis and/or inflammation. Since angiogenesis requires the growth of vascular endothelial cells we have used microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC-1 to elucidate the effect of thiram on normal and stimulated cells. We cultured HMEC-1 cells in the presence of thiram at low concentration (0.5 µg/mL or 2 µg/mL) (0.2 µM or 0.8 µM) or TNF-α (10 ng/mL) alone, and thiram together with TNF-α. TNF-α was used as a cytokine that triggers changes characteristic for inflammatory state of the cell. We carried out an in vitro study aimed at assessing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of NF-κB, and expression of cell adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM-1. It was found that TMTD produced ROS and activated NF-κB. Activation of NF-κB was concurrent with an increase in ICAM-1 expression on the surface of HMEC-1 cells. ICAM-1 reflects intensity of inflammation in endothelial cell milieu. The expression of VCAM-1 and PECAM-1 on these cells was not changed by thiram. It was also found that stimulation of the HMEC-1 cells with the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α caused activation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression with concomitant decrease of PECAM-1 cell surface expression above the control levels. Treatment with thiram and TNF-α changed cellular response compared with effects observed after treatment with TNF-α alone, i.e. further increase of ICAM-1 expression and impairment of the TNF-α effect on PECAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. This study demonstrated that thiram acts as a pro-oxidant, and elicits in endothelial cell environment effects characteristic for inflammation. However, when it is present concurrently with pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α interferes with its action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tim-3 expression defines regulatory T cells in human tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yan

    Full Text Available Tim-3, a member of the novel Tim (T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain family, has been reported to negatively regulate the immune responses against viral infection and had implications for autoimmune disease. However, the nature and role of Tim-3(+ CD4 T cells in human tumors remain largely unknown. In the present study, we characterized Tim-3(+ CD4 T cells in 100 specimens from human hepatocellular, cervical, colorectal and ovarian carcinoma patients. Compared with peripheral blood and nontumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, the lymphocytes isolated from the corresponding tumor tissues of hepatocellular, cervical, colorectal and ovarian carcinoma patients contained significantly greater proportion of Tim-3(+ CD4 T cells. The majority of tumor-derived Tim-3(+ CD4 T cells exhibited an impaired capacity to produce IFN-γ and IL-2, but expressed higher levels of CD25, Foxp3, CTLA-4 and GITR than their Tim-3(- CD4 T cell counterparts. In contrast, most Tim-3(+ CD4 T cells isolated from the paired nontumor tissues and peripheral blood did not express these molecules. Moreover, tumor-derived Tim-3(+ CD4 T cells, but not tumor-derived Tim-3(- CD4 T cells, significantly suppressed the proliferation of autologous CD8(+ T cells in vitro. Notably, multi-color immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy demonstrated that Tim-3(+Foxp3(+CD4(+ cells were preferentially distributed in the tumor nest rather than the peritumoral stroma of hepatocellular carcinoma. Together, our data indicate that Tim-3-expressing CD4 T cells in human tumors could represent the functional regulatory T cells which contribute to the formation of the immune-suppressive tumor micromilieu.

  6. Sensitive detection of viral transcripts in human tumor transcriptomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven-Eric Schelhorn

    Full Text Available In excess of 12% of human cancer incidents have a viral cofactor. Epidemiological studies of idiopathic human cancers indicate that additional tumor viruses remain to be discovered. Recent advances in sequencing technology have enabled systematic screenings of human tumor transcriptomes for viral transcripts. However, technical problems such as low abundances of viral transcripts in large volumes of sequencing data, viral sequence divergence, and homology between viral and human factors significantly confound identification of tumor viruses. We have developed a novel computational approach for detecting viral transcripts in human cancers that takes the aforementioned confounding factors into account and is applicable to a wide variety of viruses and tumors. We apply the approach to conducting the first systematic search for viruses in neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. The diverse clinical progression of this disease as well as related epidemiological and virological findings are highly suggestive of a pathogenic cofactor. However, a viral etiology of neuroblastoma is currently contested. We mapped 14 transcriptomes of neuroblastoma as well as positive and negative controls to the human and all known viral genomes in order to detect both known and unknown viruses. Analysis of controls, comparisons with related methods, and statistical estimates demonstrate the high sensitivity of our approach. Detailed investigation of putative viral transcripts within neuroblastoma samples did not provide evidence for the existence of any known human viruses. Likewise, de-novo assembly and analysis of chimeric transcripts did not result in expression signatures associated with novel human pathogens. While confounding factors such as sample dilution or viral clearance in progressed tumors may mask viral cofactors in the data, in principle, this is rendered less likely by the high sensitivity of our approach and the number of biological replicates

  7. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  8. Isolevuglandins as a gauge of lipid peroxidation in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, H P; Roberts, L J; Davies, S S; Pohlmann, P; Parl, F F; Estes, S; Maeng, J; Parker, B; Mernaugh, R

    2017-05-01

    The cellular production of free radicals or reactive oxygen species (ROS) can lead to protein, lipid or DNA modifications and tumor formation. The cellular lipids undergo structural changes through the actions of enzymes (e.g. cyclooxygenases) or free radicals to form a class of compounds called Isolevuglandins (IsoLGs). The recruitment and continued exposure of tissue to ROS and IsoLGs causes increased cell proliferation, mutagenesis, loss of normal cell function and angiogenesis. The elevated concentration of ROS in cancerous tissues suggests that these mediators play an important role in cancer development. We hypothesized that tumors with elevated ROS levels would similarly possess an increased concentration of IsoLGs when compared with normal tissue. Using D11, an ScFv recombinant antibody specific for IsoLGs, we utilized immunohistochemistry to visualize the presence of IsoLG in human tumors compared to normal adjacent tissue (NAT) to the same tumor. We found that IsoLG concentrations were elevated in human breast, colon, kidney, liver, lung, pancreatic and tongue tumor cells when compared to NAT and believe that IsoLGs can be used as a gauge indicative of lipid peroxidation in tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tumor Associated Neutrophils in Human Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    isolated from the samepatientwithNSCLC.Tcellproliferation in responsetoCD3/CD28wasperformedasdescribed inMaterials andMethods. Cell proliferationwas...PMNswere isolated as described inMaterials andMethods and then added to allogeneic MLR in the presence of neutralizing mouse anti-human LOX-1 antibody (10 mg

  10. Let-7i attenuates human brain microvascular endothelial cell damage in oxygen glucose deprivation model by decreasing toll-like receptor 4 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Wei; Tian, Canhui; Peng, Shunli; Zhou, Liang; Pan, Suyue; Deng, Zhen

    2017-11-04

    The let-7 family of microRNAs (miRNAs) plays an important role on endothelial cell function. However, there have been few studies on their role under ischemic conditions. In this study, we demonstrate that let-7i, belonging to the let-7 family, rescues human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) in an oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model. Our data show that the expression of let-7 family miRNAs was downregulated after OGD. Overexpression of let-7i significantly alleviated cell death and improved survival of OGD-treated HBMECs. Let-7i also protected permeability in an in vitro blood brain barrier (BBB) model. Further, let-7i downregulated the expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an inflammation trigger. Moreover, overexpression of let-7i decreased matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression under OGD. Upon silencing TLR4 expression in HBMECs, the anti-inflammatory effect of let-7i was abolished. Our research suggests that let-7i promotes OGD-induced inflammation via downregulating TLR4 expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Protein C activation peptide inhibits the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and interleukin-8 induced by TNF-α in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina-Canseco, María Del Socorro; Páez-Arenas, Araceli; Massó, Felipe; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo; Martínez-Cruz, Ruth; Hernández-Cruz, Pedro; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Martínez-Cruz, Margarito; Pérez-Campos Mayoral, Laura; Pérez-Santiago, Alma Dolores; Zenteno, Edgar

    2012-10-08

    Activated protein C (APC) is generated from the cleavage of protein C by thrombin coupled to thrombomodulin and, subsequently, is released as protein C activation peptide (papC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of papC on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1), activated with 5 ng//mL TNF-α. Flow cytometry showed that papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, after activation with TNF-a. Similarly, RT-PCR analysis revealed that 2 and 4 pM papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1 and IL-8 mRNA in TNF-α-treated HMEC-1. In addition, the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase(eNOS) increased in HMEC-1 treated with papC, compared to those without treatment. Furthermore, Jurkat cell adhesion to HMEC-1 induced by TNF-a was significantly inhibited after the addition of papC, compared to HMEC-1 without papC (p = 0.03). Finally, a control peptide analog to papC showed no effect on the expression of ICAM and VCAM on the surface of HMEC-1. In conclusion, our results suggest that papC exerts anti-inflammatory effects on endothelial cells.

  12. Protective Effects of Scutellarin on Human Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Hypoxia-Reoxygenation Injury and Its Possible Target-Related Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meina Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scutellarin (SCU is one of the main components of traditional Chinese medicine plant Erigeron breviscapus (Vant. Hand.-Mazz. In this paper, we studied the protective effects of SCU on human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs against hypoxia-reoxygenation (HR injury and its possible target-related proteins. Results of MTT assay showed that pretreatment of SCU at doses of 1, 5, and 10 μM for 2 h could significantly inhibit the decrease in cell viability of HCMECs induced by HR injury. Subcellular fractions of cells treated with vehicle control, 1 μM SCU, HR injury, or 1 μM SCU + HR injury were separated by ultracentrifugation. The protein expression profiles of cytoplasm and membrane/nuclei fractions were checked using protein two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE. Proteins differentially expressed between control and SCU-treated group, control and HR group, or HR and SCU + HR group were identified using mass spectrometry (MS/MS. Possible interaction network of these target-related proteins was predicted using bioinformatic analysis. The influence of SCU on the expression levels of these proteins was confirmed using Western blotting assay. The results indicated that proteins such as p27BBP protein (EIF6, heat shock 60 kDa protein 1 (HSPD1, and chaperonin containing TCP1 subunit 6A isoform (CCT6A might play important roles in the effects of SCU.

  13. Prospective clinical trial of a human tumor cloning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Hoff, D D; Clark, G M; Stogdill, B J; Sarosdy, M F; O'Brien, M T; Casper, J T; Mattox, D E; Page, C P; Cruz, A B; Sandbach, J F

    1983-04-01

    A prospective clinical trial was performed to evaluate the usefulness of a human tumor cloning system for selecting single-agent chemotherapy for patients with advanced cancers. Six hundred four single-agent trials were performed in the 470 patients whose tumors were submitted for drug sensitivity testing. Only 246 of these 604 trials (41%) could be directed by the cloning system results because of inadequate tumor growth and other difficulties. In these 246 prospective trials, there was a 60% true positive and an 85% true negative rate for predicting for response or lack of response of an individual patient's tumor to the single agent. There was also a relationship between the percentage of decrease in survival of tumor colony-forming units and the probability of a clinical response of the patient's tumor to the same drug used in vivo. Despite these encouraging findings, work to improve tumor growth and additional prospective clinical trials of the system are needed before the system can be recommended for routine clinical use.

  14. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marconato Laura

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies.

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates tumor angiogenesis of human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunamura, Makoto; Duda, Dan G; Ghattas, Maivel H; Lozonschi, Lucian; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Yamauchi, Jun-Ichiro; Matsuno, Seiki; Shibahara, Shigeki; Abraham, Nader G

    2003-01-01

    Angiogenesis is necessary for the continued growth of solid tumors, invasion and metastasis. Several studies clearly showed that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in angiogenesis. In this study, we used the vital microscope system, transparent skinfold model, lung colonization model and transduced pancreatic cancer cell line (Panc-1)/human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) cells, to precisely analyze, for the first time, the effect of hHO-1 gene on tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Our results revealed that HO-1 stimulates angiogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma in severe combined immune deficient mice. Overexpression of human hHO-1 after its retroviral transfer into Panc-1 cells did not interfere with tumor growth in vitro. While in vivo the development of tumors was accelerated upon transfection with hHO-1. On the other hand, inhibition of heme oxygenase (HO) activity by stannous mesoporphyrin was able transiently to delay tumor growth in a dose dependent manner. Tumor angiogenesis was markedly increased in Panc-1/hHO-1 compared to mock transfected and wild type. Lectin staining and Ki-67 proliferation index confirmed these results. In addition hHO-1 stimulated in vitro tumor angiogenesis and increased endothelial cell survival. In a lung colonization model, overexpression of hHO-1 increased the occurrence of metastasis, while inhibition of HO activity by stannous mesoporphyrin completely inhibited the occurrence of metastasis. In conclusion, overexpression of HO-1 genes potentiates pancreatic cancer aggressiveness, by increasing tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis and that the inhibition of the HO system may be of useful benefit for the future treatment of the disease.

  16. Genetically engineered rat gliomas: PDGF-driven tumor initiation and progression in tv-a transgenic rats recreate key features of human brain cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina P Connolly

    Full Text Available Previously rodent preclinical research in gliomas frequently involved implantation of cell lines such as C6 and 9L into the rat brain. More recently, mouse models have taken over, the genetic manipulability of the mouse allowing the creation of genetically accurate models outweighed the disadvantage of its smaller brain size that limited time allowed for tumor progression. Here we illustrate a method that allows glioma formation in the rat using the replication competent avian-like sarcoma (RCAS virus / tumor virus receptor-A (tv-a transgenic system of post-natal cell type-specific gene transfer. The RCAS/tv-a model has emerged as a particularly versatile and accurate modeling technology by enabling spatial, temporal, and cell type-specific control of individual gene transformations and providing de novo formed glial tumors with distinct molecular subtypes mirroring human GBM. Nestin promoter-driven tv-a (Ntv-a transgenic Sprague-Dawley rat founder lines were created and RCAS PDGFA and p53 shRNA constructs were used to initiate intracranial brain tumor formation. Tumor formation and progression were confirmed and visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and spectroscopy. The tumors were analyzed using histopathological and immunofluorescent techniques. All experimental animals developed large, heterogeneous brain tumors that closely resembled human GBM. Median survival was 92 days from tumor initiation and 62 days from the first point of tumor visualization on MRI. Each tumor-bearing animal showed time dependent evidence of malignant progression to high-grade glioma by MRI and neurological examination. Post-mortem tumor analysis demonstrated the presence of several key characteristics of human GBM, including high levels of tumor cell proliferation, pseudopalisading necrosis, microvascular proliferation, invasion of tumor cells into surrounding tissues, peri-tumoral reactive astrogliosis, lymphocyte infiltration, presence of numerous tumor

  17. Genetically engineered rat gliomas: PDGF-driven tumor initiation and progression in tv-a transgenic rats recreate key features of human brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Nina P; Stokum, Jesse A; Schneider, Craig S; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Xu, Su; Galisteo, Rebeca; Castellani, Rudolph J; Kim, Anthony J; Simard, J Marc; Winkles, Jeffrey A; Holland, Eric C; Woodworth, Graeme F

    2017-01-01

    Previously rodent preclinical research in gliomas frequently involved implantation of cell lines such as C6 and 9L into the rat brain. More recently, mouse models have taken over, the genetic manipulability of the mouse allowing the creation of genetically accurate models outweighed the disadvantage of its smaller brain size that limited time allowed for tumor progression. Here we illustrate a method that allows glioma formation in the rat using the replication competent avian-like sarcoma (RCAS) virus / tumor virus receptor-A (tv-a) transgenic system of post-natal cell type-specific gene transfer. The RCAS/tv-a model has emerged as a particularly versatile and accurate modeling technology by enabling spatial, temporal, and cell type-specific control of individual gene transformations and providing de novo formed glial tumors with distinct molecular subtypes mirroring human GBM. Nestin promoter-driven tv-a (Ntv-a) transgenic Sprague-Dawley rat founder lines were created and RCAS PDGFA and p53 shRNA constructs were used to initiate intracranial brain tumor formation. Tumor formation and progression were confirmed and visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy. The tumors were analyzed using histopathological and immunofluorescent techniques. All experimental animals developed large, heterogeneous brain tumors that closely resembled human GBM. Median survival was 92 days from tumor initiation and 62 days from the first point of tumor visualization on MRI. Each tumor-bearing animal showed time dependent evidence of malignant progression to high-grade glioma by MRI and neurological examination. Post-mortem tumor analysis demonstrated the presence of several key characteristics of human GBM, including high levels of tumor cell proliferation, pseudopalisading necrosis, microvascular proliferation, invasion of tumor cells into surrounding tissues, peri-tumoral reactive astrogliosis, lymphocyte infiltration, presence of numerous tumor

  18. Recombinant human endostatin normalizes tumor vasculature and enhances radiation response in xenografted human nasopharyngeal carcinoma models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypoxic tumor cells can reduce the efficacy of radiation. Antiangiogenic therapy may transiently "normalize" the tumor vasculature to make it more efficient for oxygen delivery. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the recombinant human endostatin (endostar can create a "vascular normalization window" to alleviate hypoxia and enhance the inhibitory effects of radiation therapy in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transient changes in morphology of tumor vasculature and hypoxic tumor cell fraction in response to endostar were detected in mice bearing CNE-2 and 5-8F human NPC xenografts. Various treatment schedules were tested to assess the influence of endostar on the effect of radiation therapy. Several important factors relevant to the angiogenesis were identified through immunohistochemical staining. During endostar treatment, tumor vascularity decreased, while the basement membrane and pericyte coverage associated with endothelial cells increased, which supported the idea of vessel normalization. Hypoxic tumor cell fraction also decreased after the treatment. The transient modulation of tumor physiology caused by endostar improved the effect of radiation treatment compared with other treatment schedules. The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-14 decreased, while the level of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF increased. CONCLUSIONS: Endostar normalized tumor vasculature, which alleviated hypoxia and significantly sensitized the function of radiation in anti-tumor in human NPC. The results provide an important experimental basis for combining endostar with radiation therapy in human NPC.

  19. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from the BC1 iPS Cell Line Exhibit a Blood-Brain Barrier Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katt, Moriah E; Xu, Zinnia S; Gerecht, Sharon; Searson, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells that form capillaries in the brain are highly specialized, with tight junctions that minimize paracellular transport and an array of broad-spectrum efflux pumps that make drug delivery to the brain extremely challenging. One of the major limitations in blood-brain barrier research and the development of drugs to treat central nervous system diseases is the lack of appropriate cell lines. Recent reports indicate that the derivation of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a solution to this problem. Here we demonstrate the derivation of hBMECs extended to two new human iPSC lines: BC1 and GFP-labeled BC1. These hBMECs highly express adherens and tight junction proteins VE-cadherin, ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. The addition of retinoic acid upregulates VE-cadherin expression, and results in a significant increase in transendothelial electrical resistance to physiological values. The permeabilities of tacrine, rhodamine 123, and Lucifer yellow are similar to values obtained for MDCK cells. The efflux ratio for rhodamine 123 across hBMECs is in the range 2-4 indicating polarization of efflux transporters. Using the rod assay to assess cell organization in small vessels and capillaries, we show that hBMECs resist elongation with decreasing diameter but show progressive axial alignment. The derivation of hBMECs with a blood-brain barrier phenotype from the BC1 cell line highlights that the protocol is robust. The expression of GFP in hBMECs derived from the BC1-GFP cell line provides an important new resource for BBB research.

  20. Cytostatic and apoptotic effects of paclitaxel in human ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millenbaugh, N J; Gan, Y; Au, J L

    1998-01-01

    The present study evaluated the cytostatic and apoptotic effects of a 24-hr paclitaxel treatment in ovarian tumors. Three-dimensional histocultures of surgical specimens from patients (n = 17) were used. The cytostatic effect was measured by inhibition of 96-hr cumulative DNA precursor incorporation and induction of apoptosis was determined by morphological changes. Paclitaxel produced partial inhibition of DNA precursor incorporation in about 40% of tumors (maximum inhibition of approximately 30%) and induced apoptosis in about 90% of tumors (maximum apoptotic index of approximately 15%). In responsive tumors, maximum cytostatic and apoptotic effects were achieved at < or = 1 microM with no further enhancement by increasing the drug concentration to 10 microM. In individual tumors, the apoptotic effect inversely correlated with cytostatic effect (r2 = 0.27, p = 0.031), and the maximal apoptotic index correlated with the LI for the untreated controls (r2 = 0.38, p < 0.01). More than 95% of apoptotic cells after paclitaxel treatment were labeled with DNA precursor. The incomplete cytostatic and apoptotic effects of paclitaxel and the link between DNA synthesis and apoptosis in ovarian tumors are similar to our previous findings in other human solid tumors. These findings suggest that (a) apoptosis is the major paclitaxel effect in advanced ovarian tumors, (b) tumor sensitivity to drug-induced cytostatic effect is opposite to sensitivity to apoptotic effect, (c) paclitaxel-induced apoptosis increases with increased cell proliferation and is completed after DNA synthesis, and (d) further increasing the dose to elevate plasma concentration beyond 1 microM may not improve treatment outcome.

  1. Humanized mouse xenograft models: narrowing the tumor-microenvironment gap

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, J. Jason; Bird, Gregory; Refaeli, Yosef; Jimeno, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cancer research has long been hampered by the limitations of the current model systems. Both cultured cells and mouse xenografts grow in an environment highly dissimilar to that of their originating tumor, frequently resulting in promising treatments that are ultimately clinically ineffective. The development of highly immunodeficient mouse strains into which human immune systems can be engrafted can help bridge this gap. Humanized mice (HM) allow researchers to examine xenograft growth in th...

  2. Candidate pathways linking inducible nitric oxide synthase to a basal-like transcription pattern and tumor progression in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambs, Stefan; Glynn, Sharon A

    2011-02-15

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) is an inflammation responsive enzyme (EC 1.14.13.39) that is induced during acute and chronic inflammation and tissue injury as part of the host defense and wound healing process. NOS2 up-regulation leads to increased nitric oxide (NO) production, the means by which this enzyme can initiate NO-dependent signal transduction, influence the redox state of cells and induce modifications of proteins, lipids, and DNA. Aberrant expression of NOS2 has been observed in many types of human tumors. In breast cancer, increased NOS2 is associated with markers of poor outcome and decreased survival. Growth factor and cytokine signaling, tissue remodeling, NF-kB activation, and hypoxia are candidate mechanisms that induce NOS2 in tumor epithelial and tumor-infiltrating cells. NOS2 induction will trigger the release of variable amounts of NO into the tumor microenvironment and can activate oncogenic pathways, including the Akt, epidermal growth factor receptor and c-Myc signaling pathways, and stimulate tumor microvascularization. Constitutively increased NO levels may also select for mutant p53 cells to overcome the tumor suppressor function of NO-activated wild-type p53. More recent findings suggest that NO induces stem cell-like tumor characteristics in breast cancer. In this review, we will discuss the effects of NO in tumor biology and disease progression with an emphasis on breast cancer, and will examine the mechanisms that link increased NO to a basal-like transcription pattern in human breast tumors and poor disease outcome.

  3. Hyperglycaemia promotes human brain microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis via induction of protein kinase C-βI and prooxidant enzyme NADPH oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beili Shao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood–brain barrier disruption represents a key feature in hyperglycaemia-aggravated cerebral damage after an ischaemic stroke. Although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown, activation of protein kinase C (PKC is thought to play a critical role. This study examined whether apoptosis of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC might contribute to hyperglycaemia-evoked barrier damage and assessed the specific role of PKC in this phenomenon. Treatments with hyperglycaemia (25 mM or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, a protein kinase C activator, 100 nM significantly increased NADPH oxidase activity, O2•− generation, proapoptotic protein Bax expression, TUNEL-positive staining and caspase-3/7 activities. Pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase, PKC-α, PKC-β or PKC-βI via their specific inhibitors and neutralisation of O2•− by a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic, MnTBAP normalised all the aforementioned increases induced by hyperglycaemia. Suppression of these PKC isoforms also negated the stimulatory effects of hyperglycaemia on the protein expression of NADPH oxidase membrane-bound components, Nox2 and p22-phox which determine the overall enzymatic activity. Silencing of PKC-βI gene through use of specific siRNAs abolished the effects of both hyperglycaemia and PMA on endothelial cell NADPH oxidase activity, O2•− production and apoptosis and consequently improved the integrity and function of an in vitro model of human cerebral barrier comprising HBMEC, astrocytes and pericytes. Hyperglycaemia-mediated apoptosis of HBMEC contributes to cerebral barrier dysfunction and is modulated by sequential activations of PKC-βI and NADPH oxidase.

  4. Identification of novel tumor-associated cell surface sialoglycoproteins in human glioblastoma tumors using quantitative proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Autelitano

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiform (GBM remains clinical indication with significant "unmet medical need". Innovative new therapy to eliminate residual tumor cells and prevent tumor recurrences is critically needed for this deadly disease. A major challenge of GBM research has been the identification of novel molecular therapeutic targets and accurate diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers. Many of the current clinical therapeutic targets of immunotoxins and ligand-directed toxins for high-grade glioma (HGG cells are surface sialylated glycoproteins. Therefore, methods that systematically and quantitatively analyze cell surface sialoglycoproteins in human clinical tumor samples would be useful for the identification of potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for malignant gliomas. In this study, we used the bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategy (BOCR in combination with label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (LFQ-MS to characterize and accurately quantify the individual cell surface sialoproteome in human GBM tissues, in fetal, adult human astrocytes, and in human neural progenitor cells (NPCs. We identified and quantified a total of 843 proteins, including 801 glycoproteins. Among the 843 proteins, 606 (72% are known cell surface or secreted glycoproteins, including 156 CD-antigens, all major classes of cell surface receptor proteins, transporters, and adhesion proteins. Our findings identified several known as well as new cell surface antigens whose expression is predominantly restricted to human GBM tumors as confirmed by microarray transcription profiling, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining. This report presents the comprehensive identification of new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the treatment of malignant gliomas using quantitative sialoglycoproteomics with clinically relevant, patient derived primary glioma cells.

  5. A bioimage informatics based reconstruction of breast tumor microvasculature with computational blood flow predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatelos, Spyros K; Kim, Eugene; Pathak, Arvind P; Popel, Aleksander S

    2014-01-01

    Induction of tumor angiogenesis is among the hallmarks of cancer and a driver of metastatic cascade initiation. Recent advances in high-resolution imaging enable highly detailed three-dimensional geometrical representation of the whole-tumor microvascular architecture. This enormous increase in complexity of image-based data necessitates the application of informatics methods for the analysis, mining and reconstruction of these spatial graph data structures. We present a novel methodology that combines ex-vivo high-resolution micro-computed tomography imaging data with a bioimage informatics algorithm to track and reconstruct the whole-tumor vasculature of a human breast cancer model. The reconstructed tumor vascular network is used as an input of a computational model that estimates blood flow in each segment of the tumor microvascular network. This formulation involves a well-established biophysical model and an optimization algorithm that ensures mass balance and detailed monitoring of all the vessels that feed and drain blood from the tumor microvascular network. Perfusion maps for the whole-tumor microvascular network are computed. Morphological and hemodynamic indices from different regions are compared to infer their role in overall tumor perfusion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Humanized Mouse Xenograft Models: Narrowing the Tumor-Microenvironment Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, J Jason; Bird, Gregory; Refaeli, Yosef; Jimeno, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    Cancer research has long been hampered by the limitations of the current model systems. Both cultured cells and mouse xenografts grow in an environment highly dissimilar to that of their originating tumor, frequently resulting in promising treatments that are ultimately clinically ineffective. The development of highly immunodeficient mouse strains into which human immune systems can be engrafted can help bridge this gap. Humanized mice (HM) allow researchers to examine xenograft growth in the context of a human immune system and resultant tumor microenvironment, and recent studies have highlighted the increased similarities in attendant tumor structure, metastasis, and signaling to those features in cancer patients. This setting also facilitates the examination of investigational cancer therapies, including new immunotherapies. This review discusses recent advancements in the generation and application of HM models, their promise in cancer research, and their potential in generating clinically relevant treatments. This review also focuses on current efforts to improve HM models by engineering mouse strains expressing human cytokines or HLA proteins and implanting human bone, liver, and thymus tissue to facilitate immune cell maturation and trafficking. Finally, we discuss how these improvements may help direct future HM model cancer studies. Cancer Res; 76(21); 6153-8. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Decoding NADPH oxidase 4 expression in human tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Meitzler

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4 is a redox active, membrane-associated protein that contributes to genomic instability, redox signaling, and radiation sensitivity in human cancers based on its capacity to generate H2O2 constitutively. Most studies of NOX4 in malignancy have focused on the evaluation of a small number of tumor cell lines and not on human tumor specimens themselves; furthermore, these studies have often employed immunological tools that have not been well characterized. To determine the prevalence of NOX4 expression across a broad range of solid tumors, we developed a novel monoclonal antibody that recognizes a specific extracellular region of the human NOX4 protein, and that does not cross-react with any of the other six members of the NOX gene family. Evaluation of 20 sets of epithelial tumors revealed, for the first time, high levels of NOX4 expression in carcinomas of the head and neck (15/19 patients, esophagus (12/18 patients, bladder (10/19 patients, ovary (6/17 patients, and prostate (7/19 patients, as well as malignant melanoma (7/15 patients when these tumors were compared to histologically-uninvolved specimens from the same organs. Detection of NOX4 protein upregulation by low levels of TGF-β1 demonstrated the sensitivity of this new probe; and immunofluorescence experiments found that high levels of endogenous NOX4 expression in ovarian cancer cells were only demonstrable associated with perinuclear membranes. These studies suggest that NOX4 expression is upregulated, compared to normal tissues, in a well-defined, and specific group of human carcinomas, and that its expression is localized on intracellular membranes in a fashion that could modulate oxidative DNA damage.

  8. Significance of rat mammary tumors for human risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Jose

    2015-02-01

    We have previously indicated that the ideal animal tumor model should mimic the human disease. This means that the investigator should be able to ascertain the influence of host factors on the initiation of tumorigenesis, mimic the susceptibility of tumor response based on age and reproductive history, and determine the response of the tumors induced to chemotherapy. The utilization of experimental models of mammary carcinogenesis in risk assessment requires that the influence of ovarian, pituitary, and placental hormones, among others, as well as overall reproductive events are taken into consideration, since they are important modifiers of the susceptibility of the organ to neoplastic development. Several species, such as rodents, dogs, cats, and monkeys, have been evaluated for these purposes; however, none of them fulfills all the criteria specified previously. Rodents, however, are the most widely used models; therefore, this work will concentrate on discussing the rat rodent model of mammary carcinogenesis. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  9. p130Cas scaffolds the signalosome to direct adaptor-effector cross talk during Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus trafficking in human microvascular dermal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Dutta, Sujoy; Chandran, Bala

    2014-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) interacts with cell surface receptors, such as heparan sulfate, integrins (α3β1, αVβ3, and αVβ5), and EphrinA2 (EphA2), and activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Src, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), c-Cbl, and RhoA GTPase signal molecules early during lipid raft (LR)-dependent productive macropinocytic entry into human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our recent studies have identified CIB1 as a signal amplifier facilitating EphA2 phosphorylation and subsequent cytoskeletal cross talk during KSHV macropinocytosis. Although CIB1 lacks an enzymatic activity and traditional adaptor domain or known interacting sequence, it associated with the KSHV entry signal complex and the CIB1-KSHV association was sustained over 30 min postinfection. To identify factors scaffolding the EphA2-CIB1 signal axis, the role of major cellular scaffold protein p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate of Src) was investigated. Inhibitor and small interfering RNA (siRNA) studies demonstrated that KSHV induced p130Cas in an EphA2-, CIB1-, and Src-dependent manner. p130Cas and Crk were associated with KSHV, LRs, EphA2, and CIB1 early during infection. Live-cell microscopy and biochemical studies demonstrated that p130Cas knockdown did not affect KSHV entry but significantly reduced productive nuclear trafficking of viral DNA and routed KSHV to lysosomal degradation. p130Cas aided in scaffolding adaptor Crk to downstream guanine nucleotide exchange factor phospho-C3G possibly to coordinate GTPase signaling during KSHV trafficking. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that p130Cas acts as a bridging molecule between the KSHV-induced entry signal complex and the downstream trafficking signalosome in endothelial cells and suggest that simultaneous targeting of KSHV entry receptors with p130Cas would be an attractive potential avenue for therapeutic intervention in KSHV infection. Eukaryotic cell adaptor molecules, without any intrinsic

  10. Rejuvenation of stored human red blood cells reverses the renal microvascular oxygenation deficit in an isovolemic transfusion model in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raat, Nicolaas J. H.; Hilarius, Petra M.; Johannes, Tanja; de Korte, Dirk; Ince, Can; Verhoeven, Arthur J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Storage of red blood cells (RBCs) results in various biochemical changes, including a decrease in cellular adenosine triphosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate acid. Previously it was shown that stored human RBCs show a deficit in the oxygenation of the microcirculation in the gut of

  11. Development and Validation of an In-Cell Western for Quantifying P-Glycoprotein Expression in Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial (hCMEC/D3) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Mitchell P; Pan, Yijun; Short, Jennifer L; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2017-09-01

    An in-cell western (ICW) protocol detecting the relative expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in human cerebro-microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) was developed and optimized, with the intention of improving throughput relative to western blotting (WB). For validation of the ICW protocol, hCMEC/D3 cells were incubated with known P-gp upregulators (10 μM rifampicin and 5 μM SR12813) and treated with siRNA targeted against MDR1, before measuring changes in P-gp expression, using both ICW and WB in parallel. To confirm a relationship between the detected P-gp expression and function, the uptake of the P-gp substrate rhodamine-123 was assessed following SR12813 treatment. Rifampicin and SR12813 significantly upregulated P-gp expression (1.5-fold and 1.9-fold, respectively) compared to control, as assessed by the ICW protocol. WB analysis of the same treatments revealed 1.4-fold and 1.5-fold upregulations. MDR1 siRNA reduced P-gp abundance by 20% and 35% when assessed by ICW and WB, respectively. SR12813 treatment reduced rhodamine-123 uptake by 18%, indicating that the observed changes in P-gp expression by ICW were associated with comparable functional changes. The correlation of P-gp upregulation by WB, rhodamine-123 uptake, and the ICW protocol provide validation of a new ICW method as an alternative method for quantification of P-gp in hCMEC/D3 cells. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. In vitro characterization of pralidoxime transport and acetylcholinesterase reactivation across MDCK cells and stem cell-derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BC1-hBMECs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Minn, Il; Chambers, Janice E; Searson, Peter C

    2016-07-11

    Current therapies for organophosphate poisoning involve administration of oximes, such as pralidoxime (2-PAM), that reactivate the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Studies in animal models have shown a low concentration in the brain following systemic injection. To assess 2-PAM transport, we studied transwell permeability in three Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCKII) cell lines and stem cell-derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BC1-hBMECs). To determine whether 2-PAM is a substrate for common brain efflux pumps, experiments were performed in the MDCKII-MDR1 cell line, transfected to overexpress the P-gp efflux pump, and the MDCKII-FLuc-ABCG2 cell line, transfected to overexpress the BCRP efflux pump. To determine how transcellular transport influences enzyme reactivation, we developed a modified transwell assay where the inhibited acetylcholinesterase enzyme, substrate, and reporter are introduced into the basolateral chamber. Enzymatic activity was inhibited using paraoxon and parathion. The permeability of 2-PAM is about 2 × 10(-6) cm s(-1) in MDCK cells and about 1 × 10(-6) cm s(-1) in BC1-hBMECs. Permeability is not influenced by pre-treatment with atropine. In addition, 2-PAM is not a substrate for the P-gp or BCRP efflux pumps. The low permeability explains poor brain penetration of 2-PAM and therefore the slow enzyme reactivation. This elucidates one of the reasons for the necessity of sustained intravascular (IV) infusion in response to organophosphate poisoning.

  13. Absence of human cytomegalovirus infection in childhood brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardi, Iacopo; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Becciani, Sabrina; Facchini, Ludovica; Guidi, Milena; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Moriondo, Maria; Baroni, Gianna; Stival, Alessia; Farina, Silvia; Genitori, Lorenzo; de Martino, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common human pathogen which induces different clinical manifestations related to the age and the immune conditions of the host. HCMV infection seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of adult glioblastomas. The aim of our study was to detect the presence of HCMV in high grade gliomas and other pediatric brain tumors. This hypothesis might have important therapeutic implications, offering a new target for adjuvant therapies. Among 106 pediatric patients affected by CNS tumors we selected 27 patients with a positive HCMV serology. The serological analysis revealed 7 patients with positive HCMV IGG (≥14 U/mL), whom had also a high HCMV IgG avidity, suggesting a more than 6 months-dated infection. Furthermore, HCMV IGM were positive (≥22 U/mL) in 20 patients. Molecular and immunohistochemical analyses were performed in all the 27 samples. Despite a positive HCMV serology, confirmed by ELISA, no viral DNA was shown at the PCR analysis in the patients' neoplastic cells. At immunohistochemistry, no expression of HCMV antigens was observed in tumoral cells. Our results are in agreement with recent results in adults which did not evidence the presence of HCMV genome in glioblastoma lesions. We did not find any correlation between HCMV infection and pediatric CNS tumors.

  14. Ex Vivo Behaviour of Human Bone Tumor Endothelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Infante, Teresa [SDN-Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, IRCCS, 80143 Naples (Italy); Cesario, Elena [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy); Gallo, Michele; Fazioli, Flavio [Division of Skeletal Muscles Oncology Surgery, National Cancer Institute, Pascale Foundation, 80131 Naples (Italy); De Chiara, Annarosaria [Anatomic Pathology Unit, National Cancer Institute, Pascale Foundation, 80131 Naples (Italy); Tutucci, Cristina; Apice, Gaetano [Medical Oncology of Bone and Soft Sarcoma tissues Unit, National Cancer Institute, Pascale Foundation, 80131 Naples (Italy); Nigris, Filomena de, E-mail: filomena.denigris@unina2.it [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy)

    2013-04-11

    Cooperation between endothelial cells and bone in bone remodelling is well established. In contrast, bone microvasculature supporting the growth of primary tumors and metastasis is poorly understood. Several antiangiogenic agents have recently been undergoing trials, although an extensive body of clinical data and experimental research have proved that angiogenic pathways differ in each tumor type and stage. Here, for the first time, we characterize at the molecular and functional level tumor endothelial cells from human bone sarcomas at different stages of disease and with different histotypes. We selected a CD31{sup +} subpopulation from biopsies that displayed the capability to grow as adherent cell lines without vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our findings show the existence in human primary bone sarcomas of highly proliferative endothelial cells expressing CD31, CD44, CD105, CD146 and CD90 markers. These cells are committed to develop capillary-like structures and colony formation units, and to produce nitric oxide. We believe that a better understanding of tumor vasculature could be a valid tool for the design of an efficacious antiangiogenic therapy as adjuvant treatment of sarcomas.

  15. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor is necessary to protect fetal human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells against hyperoxic injury: Mechanistic roles of antioxidant enzymes and RelB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shaojie; Patel, Ananddeep; Chu, Chun; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Welty, Stephen E.; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy, E-mail: shivanna@bcm.edu

    2015-07-15

    Hyperoxia contributes to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) protects adult and newborn mice against hyperoxic lung injury by mediating increases in the expression of phase I (cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A) and phase II (NADP(H) quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)) antioxidant enzymes (AOE). AhR positively regulates the expression of RelB, a component of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) protein that contributes to anti-inflammatory processes in adult animals. Whether AhR regulates the expression of AOE and RelB, and protects fetal primary human lung cells against hyperoxic injury is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that AhR-deficient fetal human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) will have decreased RelB activation and AOE, which will in turn predispose them to increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and cell death compared to AhR-sufficient HPMEC upon exposure to hyperoxia. AhR-deficient HPMEC showed increased hyperoxia-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and cell death compared to AhR-sufficient HPMEC. Additionally, AhR-deficient cell culture supernatants displayed increased macrophage inflammatory protein 1α and 1β, indicating a heightened inflammatory state. Interestingly, loss of AhR was associated with a significantly attenuated CYP1A1, NQO1, superoxide dismutase 1(SOD1), and nuclear RelB protein expression. These findings support the hypothesis that decreased RelB activation and AOE in AhR-deficient cells is associated with increased hyperoxic injury compared to AhR-sufficient cells. - Highlights: • AhR deficiency potentiates oxygen toxicity in human fetal lung cells. • Deficient AhR signaling increases hyperoxia-induced cell death. • AhR deficiency increases hyperoxia-induced ROS generation and inflammation. • Anti-oxidant enzyme levels are attenuated in AhR-deficient lung cells

  16. Adenosine receptors regulate gap junction coupling of the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells hCMEC/D3 by Ca2+influx through cyclic nucleotide-gated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Almke; Bintig, Willem; Begandt, Daniela; Klett, Anne; Siller, Ina G; Gregor, Carola; Schaarschmidt, Frank; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Hell, Stefan W; Ngezahayo, Anaclet

    2017-04-15

    Gap junction channels are essential for the formation and regulation of physiological units in tissues by allowing the lateral cell-to-cell diffusion of ions, metabolites and second messengers. Stimulation of the adenosine receptor subtype A 2B increases the gap junction coupling in the human blood-brain barrier endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Although the increased gap junction coupling is cAMP-dependent, neither the protein kinase A nor the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP were involved in this increase. We found that cAMP activates cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels and thereby induces a Ca 2+ influx, which leads to the increase in gap junction coupling. The report identifies CNG channels as a possible physiological link between adenosine receptors and the regulation of gap junction channels in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. The human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 was used to characterize the physiological link between adenosine receptors and the gap junction coupling in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. Expressed adenosine receptor subtypes and connexin (Cx) isoforms were identified by RT-PCR. Scrape loading/dye transfer was used to evaluate the impact of the A 2A and A 2B adenosine receptor subtype agonist 2-phenylaminoadenosine (2-PAA) on the gap junction coupling. We found that 2-PAA stimulated cAMP synthesis and enhanced gap junction coupling in a concentration-dependent manner. This enhancement was accompanied by an increase in gap junction plaques formed by Cx43. Inhibition of protein kinase A did not affect the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. In contrast, the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel inhibitor l-cis-diltiazem, as well as the chelation of intracellular Ca 2+ with BAPTA, or the absence of external Ca 2+ , suppressed the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. Moreover, we observed a 2-PAA-dependent activation of CNG channels by a combination of

  17. Placental growth factor enhances angiogenesis in human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells via PI3K/Akt pathway: Potential implications of inflammation bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yi, E-mail: mondayzy@126.com; Tu, Chuantao, E-mail: tu.chuantao@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Zhao, Yuan, E-mail: zhao.yuan@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Liu, Hongchun, E-mail: liuhch@aliyun.com; Zhang, Shuncai, E-mail: zhang.shuncai@zs-hospital.sh.cn

    2016-02-19

    Background: Angiogenesis plays a major role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Placental growth factor (PlGF) is a specific regulator of pathological angiogenesis and is upregulated in the sera of IBD patients. Therefore, the role of PlGF in IBD angiogenesis was investigated here using HIMECs. Methods: The expression of PlGF and its receptors in human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMECs) and inflamed mucosa of IBD patients were examined using quantitative PCR and western blot analysis and the role of PlGF in IBD HIMECs was further explored using small interfering RNA (siRNA). The induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine by PlGF in HIMECs was confirmed by ELISA. The capacity of PlGF to induce angiogenesis in HIMECs was tested through proliferation, cell-migration, matrigel tubule-formation assays and its underlying signaling pathway were explored by western blot analysis of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt phosphorylation. Results: mRNA and protein expression of PlGF and its receptor NRP-1 were significantly increased in IBD HIMECs. Inflamed mucosa of IBD patients also displayed higher expression of PIGF. The production of IL-6 and TNF-α in culture supernatant of HIMECs treated with exogenous recombinant human PlGF-1 (rhPlGF-1) were increased. Furthermore, rhPlGF-1 significantly induced HIMECs migration and tube formation in a dose-dependent manner and knockdown of endogenous PlGF in IBD HIMECs using siRNA substantially reduced these angiogenesis activities. PlGF induced PI3K/Akt phosphorylation in HIMECs and pretreatment of PlGF-stimulated HIMECs with PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) significantly inhibited the PlGF-induced cell migration and tube formation. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated the pro-inflammatory and angiogenic effects of PlGF on HIMECs in IBD through activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. PlGF/PI3K/Akt signaling may serve as a potential therapeutic target for IBD. - Highlights: • Expression of PlGF and its receptor NRP-1

  18. Cat Mammary Tumors: Genetic Models for the Human Counterpart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Adega

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The records are not clear, but Man has been sheltering the cat inside his home for over 12,000 years. The close proximity of this companion animal, however, goes beyond sharing the same roof; it extends to the great similarity found at the cellular and molecular levels. Researchers have found a striking resemblance between subtypes of feline mammary tumors and their human counterparts that goes from the genes to the pathways involved in cancer initiation and progression. Spontaneous cat mammary pre-invasive intraepithelial lesions (hyperplasias and neoplasias and malignant lesions seem to share a wide repertoire of molecular features with their human counterparts. In the present review, we tried to compile all the genetics aspects published (i.e., chromosomal alterations, critical cancer genes and their expression regarding cat mammary tumors, which support the cat as a valuable alternative in vitro cell and animal model (i.e., cat mammary cell lines and the spontaneous tumors, respectively, but also to present a critical point of view of some of the issues that really need to be investigated in future research.

  19. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Xinyu [Department of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Lab of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Han, Xingpeng [Department of Pathology, Tianjin Chest Hospital, Tianjin 300051 (China); Zhang, Fang [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Enzymology, Yangtze Delta Region Institute of Tsinghua University, Jiaxing 314006, Zhejiang (China); He, Miao [Life Sciences School, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Zhang, Yi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Zhi, Xiu-Yi, E-mail: xiuyizhi@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Zhao, Hong, E-mail: zhaohong9@sina.com [Department of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Lab of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  20. CIB1 synergizes with EphrinA2 to regulate Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus macropinocytic entry in human microvascular dermal endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirosree Bandyopadhyay

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available KSHV envelope glycoproteins interact with cell surface heparan sulfate and integrins, and activate FAK, Src, PI3-K, c-Cbl, and Rho-GTPase signal molecules in human microvascular dermal endothelial (HMVEC-d cells. c-Cbl mediates the translocation of virus bound α3β1 and αVβ3 integrins into lipid rafts (LRs, where KSHV interacts and activates EphrinA2 (EphA2. EphA2 associates with c-Cbl-myosin IIA and augmented KSHV-induced Src and PI3-K signals in LRs, leading to bleb formation and macropinocytosis of KSHV. To identify the factor(s coordinating the EphA2-signal complex, the role of CIB1 (calcium and integrin binding protein-1 associated with integrin signaling was analyzed. CIB1 knockdown did not affect KSHV binding to HMVEC-d cells but significantly reduced its entry and gene expression. In contrast, CIB1 overexpression increased KSHV entry in 293 cells. Single virus particle infection and trafficking during HMVEC-d cell entry was examined by utilizing DiI (envelope and BrdU (viral DNA labeled virus. CIB1 was associated with KSHV in membrane blebs and in Rab5 positive macropinocytic vesicles. CIB1 knockdown abrogated virus induced blebs, macropinocytosis and virus association with the Rab5 macropinosome. Infection increased the association of CIB1 with LRs, and CIB1 was associated with EphA2 and KSHV entry associated signal molecules such as Src, PI3-K, and c-Cbl. CIB1 knockdown significantly reduced the infection induced EphA2, Src and Erk1/2 activation. Mass spectrometry revealed the simultaneous association of CIB1 and EphA2 with the actin cytoskeleton modulating myosin IIA and alpha-actinin 4 molecules, and CIB1 knockdown reduced EphA2's association with myosin IIA and alpha-actinin 4. Collectively, these studies revealed for the first time that CIB1 plays a role in virus entry and macropinocytosis, and suggested that KSHV utilizes CIB1 as one of the key molecule(s to coordinate and sustain the EphA2 mediated signaling involved in its

  1. M3 receptor is involved in the effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride reduced endothelial injury in LPS-stimulated human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qinghong; Xiao, Fei; Liu, Qiangsheng; Zheng, Fei; Shen, Shiwen; He, Qianwen; Chen, Kai; Wang, Yanlin; Zhang, Zongze; Zhan, Jia

    2017-11-17

    LPS has been recently shown to induce muscarinic acetylcholine 3 receptor (M3 receptor) expression and penehyclidine hydrochloride (PHC) is an anticholinergic drug which could block the expression of M3 receptor. PHC has been demonstrated to perform protective effect on cell injury. This study is to investigate whether the effect of PHC on microvascular endothelial injury is related to its inhibition of M3 receptor or not. HPMVECs were treated with specific M3 receptor shRNA or PBS, and randomly divided into LPS group (A group), LPS+PHC group (B group), LPS + M3 shRNA group (C group) and LPS + PHC + M3 shRNA group (D group). Cells were collected at 60 min after LPS treatment to measure levels of LDH, endothelial permeability, TNF-α and IL-6 levels, NF-κB p65 activation, I-κB protein expression, p38MAPK, and ERK1/2 activations as well as M3 mRNA expression. PHC could decrease LDH levels, cell permeability, TNF-α and IL-6 levels, p38 MAPK, ERK1/2, NF-κB p65 activations and M3 mRNA expressions compared with LPS group. When M3 receptor was silence, the changes of these indices were much more obvious. These findings suggest that M3 receptor plays an important role in LPS-induced pulmonary microvascular endothelial injury, which is regulated through NF-κB p65 and MAPK activation. And knockout of M3 receptor could attenuate LPS-induced pulmonary microvascular endothelial injury. Regulative effects of PHC on pulmonary microvascular permeability and NF-κB p65 as well as MAPK activations are including but not limited to inhibition of M3 receptor. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. The Contribution Of Toll-Like Receptors In The Pathogenesis Of Diabetic Retinopathy In Human Microvascular Retinal Endothelial Cells In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Dad Bakhsh, Fadheela

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease including the eye causing macrovascular as well as microvascular complications known as diabetic retinopathy (DR), thus increasing the risk of vision impairment and blindness among working adults. The activation of the innate immune system during diabetes leads to an increase in certain biomarkers which in turn can antagonize the immune system leading to more complications. Toll like receptors (TLRs) are receptors of the...

  3. Label-free electrochemical detection of human methyltransferase from tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Ariel L; Muren, Natalie B; Hill, Michael G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2014-10-21

    The role of abnormal DNA methyltransferase activity in the development and progression of cancer is an essential and rapidly growing area of research, both for improved diagnosis and treatment. However, current technologies for the assessment of methyltransferase activity, particularly from crude tumor samples, limit this work because they rely on radioactivity or fluorescence and require bulky instrumentation. Here, we report an electrochemical platform that overcomes these limitations for the label-free detection of human DNA(cytosine-5)-methyltransferase1 (DNMT1) methyltransferase activity, enabling measurements from crude cultured colorectal cancer cell lysates (HCT116) and biopsied tumor tissues. Our multiplexed detection system involving patterning and detection from a secondary electrode array combines low-density DNA monolayer patterning and electrocatalytically amplified DNA charge transport chemistry to measure selectively and sensitively DNMT1 activity within these complex and congested cellular samples. Based on differences in DNMT1 activity measured with this assay, we distinguish colorectal tumor tissue from healthy adjacent tissue, illustrating the effectiveness of this two-electrode platform for clinical applications.

  4. Microvascular inflammation in atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Vitiello

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Atherogenesis is the pathogenetic process leading to formation of the atheroma lesion. It is associated to a chronic inflammatory state initially stimulated by an aberrant accumulation of lipid molecules beyond the endothelial barrier. This event triggers a cascade of deleterious events mainly through immune cell stimulation with the consequent liberation of potent pro-inflammatory and tissue damaging mediators. The atherogenetic process implies marked modifications of endothelial cell functions and a radical change in the endothelial–leukocyte interaction pattern. Moreover, accumulating evidence shows an important link between microvascular and inflammatory responses and major cardiovascular risk factors. This review illustrates the current knowledge on the effects of obesity, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes on microcirculation; their pathophysiological implications will be discussed.

  5. Adoptively transferred human lung tumor specific cytotoxic T cells can control autologous tumor growth and shape tumor phenotype in a SCID mouse xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrone Soldano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-tumor efficacy of human immune effector cells, such as cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs, has been difficult to study in lung cancer patients in the clinical setting. Improved experimental models for the study of lung tumor-immune cell interaction as well as for evaluating the efficacy of adoptive transfer of immune effector cells are needed. Methods To address questions related to the in vivo interaction of human lung tumor cells and immune effector cells, we obtained an HLA class I + lung tumor cell line from a fresh surgical specimen, and using the infiltrating immune cells, isolated and characterized tumor antigen-specific, CD8+ CTLs. We then established a SCID mouse-human tumor xenograft model with the tumor cell line and used it to study the function of the autologous CTLs provided via adoptive transfer. Results The tumor antigen specific CTLs isolated from the tumor were found to have an activated memory phenotype and able to kill tumor cells in an antigen specific manner in vitro. Additionally, the tumor antigen-specific CTLs were fully capable of homing to and killing autologous tumors in vivo, and expressing IFN-γ, each in an antigen-dependent manner. A single injection of these CTLs was able to provide significant but temporary control of the growth of autologous tumors in vivo without the need for IL-2. The timing of injection of CTLs played an essential role in the outcome of tumor growth control. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of surviving tumor cells following CTL treatment indicated that the surviving tumor cells expressed reduced MHC class I antigens on their surface. Conclusion These studies confirm and extend previous studies and provide additional information regarding the characteristics of CTLs which can be found within a patient's tumor. Moreover, the in vivo model described here provides a unique window for observing events that may also occur in patients undergoing adoptive cellular

  6. Phase transitions in tumor growth: IV relationship between metabolic rate and fractal dimension of human tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt-Mar, J. A.; Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Cocho, G.; Mansilla, R.; Martin, R. R.; Montero, S.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2017-05-01

    By the use of thermodynamics formalism of irreversible processes, complex systems theory and systems biology, it is derived a relationship between the production of entropy per unit time, the fractal dimension and the tumor growth rate for human tumors cells. The thermodynamics framework developed demonstrates that, the dissipation function is a Landau potential and also the Lyapunov function of the dynamical behavior of tumor growth, which indicate the directional character, stability and robustness of the phenomenon. The entropy production rate may be used as a quantitative index of the metastatic potential of tumors. The current theoretical framework will hopefully provide a better understanding of cancer and contribute to improvements in cancer treatment.

  7. Telomere length modulation in human astroglial brain tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico La Torre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomeres alteration during carcinogenesis and tumor progression has been described in several cancer types. Telomeres length is stabilized by telomerase (h-TERT and controlled by several proteins that protect telomere integrity, such as the Telomere Repeat-binding Factor (TRF 1 and 2 and the tankyrase-poli-ADP-ribose polymerase (TANKs-PARP complex. OBJECTIVE: To investigate telomere dysfunction in astroglial brain tumors we analyzed telomeres length, telomerase activity and the expression of a panel of genes controlling the length and structure of telomeres in tissue samples obtained in vivo from astroglial brain tumors with different grade of malignancy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight Low Grade Astrocytomas (LGA, 11 Anaplastic Astrocytomas (AA and 11 Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM samples were analyzed. Three samples of normal brain tissue (NBT were used as controls. Telomeres length was assessed through Southern Blotting. Telomerase activity was evaluated by a telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP assay. The expression levels of TRF1, TRF2, h-TERT and TANKs-PARP complex were determined through Immunoblotting and RT-PCR. RESULTS: LGA were featured by an up-regulation of TRF1 and 2 and by shorter telomeres. Conversely, AA and GBM were featured by a down-regulation of TRF1 and 2 and an up-regulation of both telomerase and TANKs-PARP complex. CONCLUSIONS: In human astroglial brain tumours, up-regulation of TRF1 and TRF2 occurs in the early stages of carcinogenesis determining telomeres shortening and genomic instability. In a later stage, up-regulation of PARP-TANKs and telomerase activation may occur together with an ADP-ribosylation of TRF1, causing a reduced ability to bind telomeric DNA, telomeres elongation and tumor malignant progression.

  8. Tumor environmental factors glucose deprivation and lactic acidosis induce mitotic chromosomal instability--an implication in aneuploid human tumors.

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    Chunyan Dai

    Full Text Available Mitotic chromosomal instability (CIN plays important roles in tumor progression, but what causes CIN is incompletely understood. In general, tumor CIN arises from abnormal mitosis, which is caused by either intrinsic or extrinsic factors. While intrinsic factors such as mitotic checkpoint genes have been intensively studied, the impact of tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor CIN is largely unknown. We investigate if glucose deprivation and lactic acidosis--two tumor microenvironmental factors--could induce cancer cell CIN. We show that glucose deprivation with lactic acidosis significantly increases CIN in 4T1, MCF-7 and HCT116 scored by micronuclei, or aneuploidy, or abnormal mitosis, potentially via damaging DNA, up-regulating mitotic checkpoint genes, and/or amplifying centrosome. Of note, the feature of CIN induced by glucose deprivation with lactic acidosis is similar to that of aneuploid human tumors. We conclude that tumor environmental factors glucose deprivation and lactic acidosis can induce tumor CIN and propose that they are potentially responsible for human tumor aneuploidy.

  9. Tumor Environmental Factors Glucose Deprivation and Lactic Acidosis Induce Mitotic Chromosomal Instability – An Implication in Aneuploid Human Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunpeng; Hu, Xun

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic chromosomal instability (CIN) plays important roles in tumor progression, but what causes CIN is incompletely understood. In general, tumor CIN arises from abnormal mitosis, which is caused by either intrinsic or extrinsic factors. While intrinsic factors such as mitotic checkpoint genes have been intensively studied, the impact of tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor CIN is largely unknown. We investigate if glucose deprivation and lactic acidosis – two tumor microenvironmental factors – could induce cancer cell CIN. We show that glucose deprivation with lactic acidosis significantly increases CIN in 4T1, MCF-7 and HCT116 scored by micronuclei, or aneuploidy, or abnormal mitosis, potentially via damaging DNA, up-regulating mitotic checkpoint genes, and/or amplifying centrosome. Of note, the feature of CIN induced by glucose deprivation with lactic acidosis is similar to that of aneuploid human tumors. We conclude that tumor environmental factors glucose deprivation and lactic acidosis can induce tumor CIN and propose that they are potentially responsible for human tumor aneuploidy. PMID:23675453

  10. The humanized anti-human AMHRII mAb 3C23K exerts an anti-tumor activity against human ovarian cancer through tumor-associated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougherara, Houcine; Némati, Fariba; Nicolas, André; Massonnet, Gérald; Pugnière, Martine; Ngô, Charlotte; Le Frère-Belda, Marie-Aude; Leary, Alexandra; Alexandre, Jérôme; Meseure, Didier; Barret, Jean-Marc; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle; Pèlegrin, André; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Prost, Jean-François; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Decaudin, Didier

    2017-11-21

    Müllerian inhibiting substance, also called anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of AMH type II receptor-positive tumor cells, such as human ovarian cancers (OCs). On this basis, a humanized glyco-engineered monoclonal antibody (3C23K) has been developed. The aim of this study was therefore to experimentally confirm the therapeutic potential of 3C23K in human OCs. We first determined by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and cytofluorometry analyses the expression of AMHRII in patient's tumors and found that a majority (60 to 80% depending on the detection technique) of OCs were positive for this marker. We then provided evidence that the tumor stroma of OC is enriched in tumor-associated macrophages and that these cells are responsible for 3C23K-induced killing of tumor cells through ADCP and ADCC mechanisms. In addition, we showed that 3C23K reduced macrophages induced-T cells immunosuppression. Finally, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of 3C23K alone and in combination with a carboplatin-paclitaxel chemotherapy in a panel of OC Patient-Derived Xenografts. In those experiments, we showed that 3C23K significantly increased the proportion and the quality of chemotherapy-based in vivo responses. Altogether, our data support the potential interest of AMHRII targeting in human ovarian cancers and the evaluation of 3C23K in further clinical trials.

  11. Pretargeted 177Lu radioimmunotherapy of carcinoembryonic antigen-expressing human colonic tumors in mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schoffelen, R; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Franssen, G.M; Sharkey, R.M; Goldenberg, D.M; McBride, W.J; Rossi, E.A; Eek, A; Oyen, W.J.G; Boerman, O.C

    2010-01-01

    ... (CEA)-expressing human tumors. METHODS: To obtain the optimal therapeutic efficacy, several strategies were evaluated to increase the total amount of radioactivity targeted to subcutaneous LS174T colon cancer tumors in BALB/c nude mice...

  12. Functional expression of TWEAK and the receptor Fn14 in human malignant ovarian tumors: possible implication for ovarian tumor intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Gu

    Full Text Available The aim of this current study was to investigate the expression of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK and its receptor fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14 in human malignant ovarian tumors, and test TWEAK's potential role on tumor progression in cell models in-vitro. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC, we found that TWEAK and its receptor Fn14 were expressed in human malignant ovarian tumors, but not in normal ovarian tissues or in borderline/benign epithelial ovarian tumors. High levels of TWEAK expression was detected in the majority of malignant tumors (36 out of 41, 87.80%. Similarly, 35 out of 41 (85.37% malignant ovarian tumors were Fn14 positive. In these malignant ovarian tumors, however, TWEAK/Fn14 expression was not corrected with patients' clinical subtype/stages or pathological features. In vitro, we demonstrated that TWEAK only inhibited ovarian cancer HO-8910PM cell proliferation in combination with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, whereas either TWEAK or TNF-α alone didn't affect HO-8910PM cell growth. TWEAK promoted TNF-α production in cultured THP-1 macrophages. Meanwhile, conditioned media from TWEAK-activated macrophages inhibited cultured HO-8910PM cell proliferation and invasion. Further, TWEAK increased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 production in cultured HO-8910PM cells to possibly recruit macrophages. Our results suggest that TWEAK/Fn14, by activating macrophages, could be ovarian tumor suppressors. The unique expression of TWEAK/Fn14 in malignant tumors indicates that it might be detected as a malignant ovarian tumor marker.

  13. Coronary microvascular dysfunction, microvascular angina, and treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinescu, Mark A; Löffler, Adrián I; Ouellette, Michelle; Smith, Lavone; Kramer, Christopher M; Bourque, Jamieson M

    2015-02-01

    Angina without coronary artery disease (CAD) has substantial morbidity and is present in 10% to 30% of patients undergoing angiography. Coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) is present in 50% to 65% of these patients. The optimal treatment of this cohort is undefined. We performed a systematic review to evaluate treatment strategies for objectively-defined CMD in the absence of CAD. We included studies assessing therapy in human subjects with angina and coronary flow reserve or myocardial perfusion reserve coronary artery stenosis ≥50% or structural heart disease. Only 8 papers met the strict inclusion criteria. The papers were heterogeneous, using different treatments, endpoints, and definitions of CMD. The small sample sizes severely limit the power of these studies, with an average of 11 patients per analysis. Studies evaluating sildenafil, quinapril, estrogen, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation application demonstrated benefits in their respective endpoints. No benefit was found with L-arginine, doxazosin, pravastatin, and diltiazem. Our systematic review highlights that there is little data to support therapies for CMD. We assess the data meeting rigorous inclusion criteria and review the related but excluded published data. We additionally describe the next steps needed to address this research gap, including a standardized definition of CMD, routine assessment of CMD in studies of chest pain without obstructive CAD, and specific therapy assessment in the population with confirmed CMD. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Protein C activation peptide inhibits the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and interleukin-8 induced by TNF-a in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells Protein C activation peptide inhibits the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and interleukin-8 induced by TNF-a in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Del Socorro Pina-Canseco

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Activated protein C (APC is generated from the cleavage of protein C by thrombin coupled to thrombomodulin
    and, subsequently, is released as protein C activation peptide (papC. The aim of this study was to
    evaluate the effect of papC on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1, activated with 5 ng/
    /mL TNF-a. Flow cytometry showed that papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, after activation
    with TNF-a. Similarly, RT-PCR analysis revealed that 2 and 4 pM papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1
    and IL-8 mRNA in TNF-a-treated HMEC-1. In addition, the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase
    (eNOS increased in HMEC-1 treated with papC, compared to those without treatment. Furthermore, Jurkat
    cell adhesion to HMEC-1 induced by TNF-a was significantly inhibited after the addition of papC, compared to
    HMEC-1 without papC (p = 0.03. Finally, a control peptide analog to papC showed no effect on the expression
    of ICAM and VCAM on the surface of HMEC-1. In conclusion, our results suggest that papC exerts antiinflammatory
    effects on endothelial cells.Activated protein C (APC is generated from the cleavage of protein C by thrombin coupled to thrombomodulin
    and, subsequently, is released as protein C activation peptide (papC. The aim of this study was to
    evaluate the effect of papC on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1, activated with 5 ng/
    /mL TNF-a. Flow cytometry showed that papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, after activation
    with TNF-a. Similarly, RT-PCR analysis revealed that 2 and 4 pM papC inhibited the expression of VCAM-1
    and IL-8 mRNA in TNF-a-treated HMEC-1. In addition, the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase
    (eNOS increased in HMEC-1 treated with papC, compared to those without treatment. Furthermore, Jurkat
    cell adhesion to HMEC-1 induced by TNF-a was significantly inhibited after the

  15. Humanized mouse model of ovarian cancer recapitulates patient solid tumor progression, ascites formation, and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B Bankert

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death from gynecological cancer. Understanding the biology of this disease, particularly how tumor-associated lymphocytes and fibroblasts contribute to the progression and metastasis of the tumor, has been impeded by the lack of a suitable tumor xenograft model. We report a simple and reproducible system in which the tumor and tumor stroma are successfully engrafted into NOD-scid IL2Rγ(null (NSG mice. This is achieved by injecting tumor cell aggregates derived from fresh ovarian tumor biopsy tissues (including tumor cells, and tumor-associated lymphocytes and fibroblasts i.p. into NSG mice. Tumor progression in these mice closely parallels many of the events that are observed in ovarian cancer patients. Tumors establish in the omentum, ovaries, liver, spleen, uterus, and pancreas. Tumor growth is initially very slow and progressive within the peritoneal cavity with an ultimate development of tumor ascites, spontaneous metastasis to the lung, increasing serum and ascites levels of CA125, and the retention of tumor-associated human fibroblasts and lymphocytes that remain functional and responsive to cytokines for prolonged periods. With this model one will be able to determine how fibroblasts and lymphocytes within the tumor microenvironment may contribute to tumor growth and metastasis, and will make it possible to evaluate the efficacy of therapies that are designed to target these cells in the tumor stroma.

  16. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-02-09

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy.

  17. In vivo VEGF imaging with radiolabeled bevacizumab in a human ovarian tumor xenograft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagengast, Wouter B.; Hospers, Geke A.; Mulder, Nanno H.; de Jong, Johan R.; Hollema, Harry; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; van Dongen, Guns A.; Perk, Lars R.; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), released by tumor cells, is an important growth factor in tumor angiogenesis. The humanized monoclonal antibody bevacizumab blocks VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis by binding, thereby neutralizing VEGF. Our aim was to develop radiolabeled bevacizumab for

  18. Modification of the hypoxic fraction of a xenografted human colon tumor by differentiation-inducing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leith, J.T.

    1988-05-18

    Xenografted tumors were produced in nude mice by injection of HCT-15 human colon tumor cells. The hypoxic fractions of control tumors as determined from x-ray survival curves were approximately 18%. Other tumors were treated (every day X 9) with daily injections of N-methylformamide (150 mg/kg) or sodium butyrate (2,000 mg/kg). For both agents, it was found that the hypoxic fractions were less than 0.05% and less than 1.7%, respectively. These data indicate that selected differentiation-inducing agents could be of value for treatment of human solid tumors that contain hypoxic cells.

  19. Mouse x human heterohybridomas as fusion partners with human B cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, W L; Thielemans, K; Dilley, J; Levy, R

    1986-05-01

    Surface idiotype (Id) of B cell malignancies is an excellent tumor-specific marker. We have, however, recently described heterogeneity of tumor Id in some cases. We therefore sought a way to isolate, reliably and efficiently, different species of idiotype from a potentially heterogeneous population. In this report we demonstrate our success using a series of mouse X human heterohybridomas as fusion partners with human B cell tumors. Three lines (K6H6/B5, K6H9/G12, SBC/H20) demonstrated excellent fusion efficiency with 75%-85% of wells plated containing hybrids. Two cell lines, K6H9/G12 and SBC/H20 had a tendency to secrete a single Ig chain (heavy or light chain), whereas the K6H6/B5 cell line secreted whole immunoglobulin (Ig) in greater than 80% of the hybrids. This line secreted significant amounts of Ig (2.73 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells) and was relatively stable in culture. Since this line has such a high fusion efficiency the products of normal B cells admixed with tumor may be recovered, allowing the opportunity of isolating host anti-tumor antibodies. In order to prove that hybrids were derived from the tumor, Southern blot analysis of rearranged DNA was performed in selected cases. Fusions with this line provide the potential for recovering many different species of idiotype in a mixed population. This will facilitate the production of mouse monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies against many variants and against different idiotopes.

  20. WISP-2 expression in human salivary gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzu, Yukinao; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Kato, Masaki; Higo, Morihiro; Nimura, Yoshinori; Harada, Koji; Numata, Tsutomu; Seki, Naohiko; Sato, Mitsunobu; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2006-04-01

    This study was designed to disclose detailed genetic mechanisms in salivary gland tumors (SGTs) for development of novel independent marker. We constructed an in-house cDNA microarray carrying 2,201 cDNA clones derived from SGT and oral squamous cell carcinoma cDNA libraries. Four cell lines that originated from the SGT-derived cell lines were analyzed using this microarray system. The genes identified by our microarray system were further analyzed at the mRNA or protein expression level in other types of human cancer cell lines and clinical samples (ten normal salivary glands [NSGs], eleven pleomorphic adenomas, ten adenoid cystic carcinomas and three adenocarcinomas). Two up-regulated genes and six down-regulated genes were identified in common when compared with the control RNA. Of the up-regulated genes, WISP-2, which plays an important role in breast carcinogenesis, was selected for further analyses. We found a higher expression of the WISP-2 gene in the SGT-derived cell lines compared with other types of human cancer cell lines. Furthermore, WISP-2 mRNA and protein expression levels in NSGs were significantly higher than those in SGTs. These results suggest that WISP-2 could be a reliable independent marker and that down-regulation or loss of the WISP-2 gene may be associated with the development of SGTs.

  1. Modified Continuous Loop Technique for microvascular anastomosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified method of continuous loop technique for microvascular anastomosis is described. The handling of loop is easier & even last suture is placed under vision. This makes the microvascular anastomosis easier and simpler.

  2. Protective Effects of MicroRNA-126 on Human Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells Against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Injury and Inflammatory Response by Activating PI3K/Akt/eNOS Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Hui; Chen, Yan; Gao, Chuan-Yu; Cui, Zhen-Tian; Yao, Jian-Min

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the protective effects of the microRNA-126 (miR-126)-mediated PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway on human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs) against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced injury and the inflammatory response. Untreated HCMECs were selected for the control group. After H/R treatment and cell transfection, the HCMECs were assigned to the H/R, miR-126 mimic, mimic-negative control (NC), miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin (an inhibitor of PI3K) and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Super oxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured utilizing commercial kits. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed to detect miR-126 expression and the mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory factors. Western blotting was used to determine the expression of key members in the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. ACCK-8 assay and flow cytometry were employed to examine cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. The angiogenic ability in each group was detected by the lumen formation test. Compared to the control group, p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, NO, VEGF and SOD levels, cell proliferation and in vitro lumen formation ability were decreased, while the ROS content, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression and cell apoptosis were significantly increased in the H/R, mimic-NC, miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Additionally, in comparison with the H/R group, the miR-126 mimic group had elevated p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, increased NO, VEGF and SOD contents, and strengthened cell proliferation and lumen formation abilities but also exhibited decreased ROS content, reduced IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α expressions, and weakened cell apoptosis, while the miR-126 inhibitor

  3. Protective Effects of MicroRNA-126 on Human Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells Against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Injury and Inflammatory Response by Activating PI3K/Akt/eNOS Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hui Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study explored the protective effects of the microRNA-126 (miR-126-mediated PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway on human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R-induced injury and the inflammatory response. Methods: Untreated HCMECs were selected for the control group. After H/R treatment and cell transfection, the HCMECs were assigned to the H/R, miR-126 mimic, mimic-negative control (NC, miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin (an inhibitor of PI3K and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Super oxide dismutase (SOD, nitric oxide (NO, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and reactive oxygen species (ROS were measured utilizing commercial kits. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were performed to detect miR-126 expression and the mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory factors. Western blotting was used to determine the expression of key members in the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. ACCK-8 assay and flow cytometry were employed to examine cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. The angiogenic ability in each group was detected by the lumen formation test. Results: Compared to the control group, p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, NO, VEGF and SOD levels, cell proliferation and in vitro lumen formation ability were decreased, while the ROS content, interleukin (IL-6, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α expression and cell apoptosis were significantly increased in the H/R, mimic-NC, miR-126 inhibitor, inhibitor-NC, wortmannin and miR-126 mimic + wortmannin groups. Additionally, in comparison with the H/R group, the miR-126 mimic group had elevated p/t-PI3K, p/t-Akt and p/t-eNOS expression, increased NO, VEGF and SOD contents, and strengthened cell proliferation and lumen formation abilities but also exhibited decreased ROS content, reduced IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α expressions, and weakened cell

  4. Microvascular Dysfunction and Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, T. Michael; Faraci, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of vascular risk factors on cognitive function has garnered much interest in recent years. The appropriate distribution of oxygen, glucose and other nutrients by the cerebral vasculature is critical for proper cognitive performance. The cerebral microvasculature is a key site of vascular resistance and a preferential target for small vessel disease. While deleterious effects of vascular risk factors on microvascular function are known, the contribution of this dysfunction to cognitive deficits is less clear. In this review, we summarize current evidence for microvascular dysfunction in brain. We highlight effects of select vascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes and hyperhomocysteinemia) on the pial and parenchymal circulation. Lastly, we discuss potential links between microvascular disease and cognitive function, highlighting current gaps in our understanding. PMID:26988697

  5. Rosetting Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind to human brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro, demonstrating a dual adhesion phenotype mediated by distinct P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Yvonne; Kuhnrae, Pongsak; Higgins, Matthew K; Ghumra, Ashfaq; Rowe, J Alexandra

    2014-03-01

    Adhesion interactions between Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IE) and human cells underlie the pathology of severe malaria. IE cytoadhere to microvascular endothelium or form rosettes with uninfected erythrocytes to survive in vivo by sequestering IE in the microvasculature and avoiding splenic clearance mechanisms. Both rosetting and cytoadherence are mediated by the parasite-derived IE surface protein family Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). Rosetting and cytoadherence have been widely studied as separate entities; however, the ability of rosetting P. falciparum strains to cytoadhere has received little attention. Here, we show that IE of the IT/R29 strain expressing a rosette-mediating PfEMP1 variant (IT4var09) cytoadhere in vitro to a human brain microvascular endothelial cell line (HBEC-5i). Cytoadherence was inhibited by heparin and by treatment of HBEC-5i with heparinase III, suggesting that the endothelial receptors for IE binding are heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Antibodies to the N-terminal regions of the IT4var09 PfEMP1 variant (NTS-DBL1α and DBL2γ domains) specifically inhibited and reversed cytoadherence down to low concentrations (experiments showed that the NTS-DBLα and DBL2γ domains bind strongly to heparin, with half-maximal binding at a concentration of ∼0.5 μM in both cases. Therefore, cytoadherence of IT/R29 IE is distinct from rosetting, which is primarily mediated by NTS-DBL1α interactions with complement receptor 1. These data show that IT4var09-expressing parasites are capable of dual interactions with both endothelial cells and uninfected erythrocytes via distinct receptor-ligand interactions.

  6. Tropomyosin-1, A Putative Tumor-Suppressor and a Biomarker of Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    cDNA. Lobular carcinoma - 2 A polyclonal pan-TM antibody that recognizes multiple TM Phyllodes tumor - 1 Not determined from the initial pathology...AD Award Number: DAMD17-98-1-8162 TITLE: Tropomyosin-1, A Putative Tumor -Suppressor and a Biomarker of Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Tropomyosin-l, A Putative Tumor -Suppressor and a Biomarker DAMD17-98-1-8162 of Human Breast Cancer 6. A UTHOR

  7. High-resolution three-dimensional digital imaging of the human renal microcirculation: An aid to evaluating microvascular alterations in chronic kidney disease in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, Noriko; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Aoba, Takaaki; Kikuchi, Kazunori; Nagata, Michio

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a new virtual microscopy method, with two- and three-dimensional (2D, 3D) synchronization, that enables visualization of the human renal microvasculature. The method was used to evaluate 120-150 serially cut sections of paraffin-embedded human renal tissue from nephrectomized samples. Virtual microscopy images of sections double-immunostained with antibodies against CD34 (an endothelium marker) and smooth muscle actin (an arterial media marker) and stained with periodic acid-Schiff were processed using digital imaging analysis software. Image registration was conducted to generate 3D displays with red-green-blue color segmentation. The reconstructed images of the microvasculature, including the interlobular arteries and the glomeruli, allowed visualization of 3D structures and direct glomerular connections. Synchronizing these 3D images with the corresponding 2D images revealed the relationships between arteriosclerotic lesions and downstream glomeruli. Thus, interlobular arteries with moderate intimal thickening and afferent arterioles with segmental hyalinosis/sclerosis, as seen on the 2D images, exhibited wall irregularities on the corresponding 3D images. However, these lesions were not directly influenced by lesions in downstream glomeruli, such as sclerotic lesions. Our virtual-slide method based on 2D and 3D image synchronization provides a comprehensive view of the renal microcirculation and therefore novel insights into the pathogenesis of vascular-associated renal diseases. © 2015 Japanese Society of Pathology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Human breast adipose tissue: characterization of factors that change during tumor progression in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Sabrina Johanna; Sacca, Paula Alejandra; Pistone-Creydt, Mercedes; Coló, Federico Andrés; Serra, María Florencia; Santino, Flavia Eliana; Sasso, Corina Verónica; Lopez-Fontana, Constanza Matilde; Carón, Rubén Walter; Calvo, Juan Carlos; Pistone-Creydt, Virginia

    2017-02-07

    Adipose microenvironment is involved in signaling pathways that influence breast cancer. We aim to characterize factors that are modified: 1) in tumor and non tumor human breast epithelial cell lines when incubated with conditioned media (CMs) from human breast cancer adipose tissue explants (hATT) or normal breast adipose tissue explants (hATN); 2) in hATN-CMs vs hATT-CMs; 3) in the tumor associated adipocytes vs. non tumor associated adipocytes. We used hATN or hATT- CMs on tumor and non-tumor breast cancer cell lines. We evaluated changes in versican, CD44, ADAMTS1 and Adipo R1 expression on cell lines or in the different CMs. In addition we evaluated changes in the morphology and expression of these factors in slices of the different adipose tissues. The statistical significance between different experimental conditions was evaluated by one-way ANOVA. Tukey's post-hoc tests were performed within each individual treatment. hATT-CMs increase versican, CD44, ADAMTS1 and Adipo R1 expression in breast cancer epithelial cells. Furthermore, hATT-CMs present higher levels of versican expression compared to hATN-CMs. In addition, we observed a loss of effect in cellular migration when we pre-incubated hATT-CMs with chondroitinase ABC, which cleaves GAGs chains bound to the versican core protein, thus losing the ability to bind to CD44. Adipocytes associated with the invasive front are reduced in size compared to adipocytes that are farther away. Also, hATT adipocytes express significantly higher amounts of versican, CD44 and Adipo R1, and significantly lower amounts of adiponectin and perilipin, unlike hATN adipocytes. We conclude that hATT secrete a different set of proteins compared to hATN. Furthermore, versican, a proteoglycan that is overexpressed in hATT-CMs compared to hATN-CMs, might be involved in the tumorogenic behavior observed in both cell lines employed. In addition, we may conclude that adipocytes from the tumor microenvironment show a less differentiated

  9. Expression of CD44 splice variants in human primary brain tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, P.; Troost, D.; Morsink, F.; Keehnen, R. M.; Leenstra, S.; Bosch, D. A.; Pals, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    Expression of CD44, particularly of certain splice variants, has been linked to tumor progression and metastatic potential in a number of different animal and human cancers. Although differential expression of CD44 standard epitopes (CD44s) in human brain tumors has been reported, the expression of

  10. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents in gemcitabine-resistant human tumor cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bree, Chris; Castro Kreder, Natasja; Loves, Willem J. P.; Franken, Nicolaas A. P.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Haveman, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine cross-resistance to anti-tumor treatments in 2',2'difluorodeoxycytidine (dFdC, gemcitabine)-resistant human tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human lung carcinoma cells SW-1573 (SWp) were made resistant to dFdC (SWg). Sensitivity to cisplatin (cDDP), paclitaxel,

  11. Salinomycin efficiency assessment in non-tumor (HB4a) and tumor (MCF-7) human breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Andressa Megumi; D Epiro, Gláucia Fernanda Rocha; Marques, Lilian Areal; Semprebon, Simone Cristine; Sartori, Daniele; Ribeiro, Lúcia Regina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    The search for anticancer drugs has led researchers to study salinomycin, an ionophore antibiotic that selectively destroys cancer stem cells. In this study, salinomycin was assessed in two human cell lines, a breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and a non-tumor breast cell line (HB4a), to verify its selective action against tumor cells. Real-time assessment of cell proliferation showed that HB4a cells are more resistant to salinomycin than MCF-7 tumor cell line, and these data were confirmed in a cytotoxicity assay. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values show the increased sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to salinomycin. In the comet assay, only MCF-7 cells showed the induction of DNA damage. Flow cytometric analysis showed that cell death by apoptosis/necrosis was only induced in the MCF-7 cells. The increased expression of GADD45A and CDKN1A genes was observed in all cell lines. Decreased expression of CCNA2 and CCNB1 genes occurred only in tumor cells, suggesting G2/M cell cycle arrest. Consequently, cell death was activated in tumor cells through strong inhibition of the antiapoptotic genes BCL-2, BCL-XL, and BIRC5 genes in MCF-7 cells. These data demonstrate the selectivity of salinomycin in killing human mammary tumor cells. The cell death observed only in MCF-7 tumor cells was confirmed by gene expression analysis, where there was downregulation of antiapoptotic genes. These data contribute to clarifying the mechanism of action of salinomycin as a promising antitumor drug and, for the first time, we observed the higher resistance of HB4a non-tumor breast cells to salinomycin.

  12. Aerobic Glycolysis as a Marker of Tumor Aggressiveness: Preliminary Data in High Grade Human Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei G. Vlassenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Glucose metabolism outside of oxidative phosphorylation, or aerobic glycolysis (AG, is a hallmark of active cancer cells that is not directly measured with standard 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography (PET. In this study, we characterized tumor regions with elevated AG defined based on PET measurements of glucose and oxygen metabolism. Methods. Fourteen individuals with high-grade brain tumors underwent structural MR scans and PET measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF, oxygen (CMRO2 and glucose (CMRGlu metabolism, and AG, using 15O-labeled CO, O2 and H2O, and FDG, and were compared to a normative cohort of 20 age-matched individuals. Results. Elevated AG was observed in most high-grade brain tumors and it was associated with decreased CMRO2 and CBF, but not with significant changes in CMRGlu. Elevated AG was a dramatic and early sign of tumor growth associated with decreased survival. AG changes associated with tumor growth were differentiated from the effects of nonneoplastic processes such as epileptic seizures. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate that high-grade brain tumors exhibit elevated AG as a marker of tumor growth and aggressiveness. AG may detect areas of active tumor growth that are not evident on conventional FDG PET.

  13. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  14. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fecher

    Full Text Available Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and -testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. Human lung tumor cells cultured on the scaffold formed cluster and exhibited an up-regulation of the carcinoma-associated marker mucin1 as well as a reduced proliferation rate compared to respective 2D culture. Additionally, employing functional imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET these tumor cell cluster could be detected and tracked over time. This approach allowed monitoring of a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in the in vitro lung tumor model non-destructively. Surprisingly, FDG-PET assessment of single tumor cell cluster on the same scaffold exhibited differences in their response to therapy, indicating heterogeneity in the lung tumor model. In conclusion, our complex lung tumor test system features important characteristics of tumors and its microenvironment and allows monitoring of tumor growth and -metabolism in combination with functional imaging. In longitudinal studies, new therapeutic approaches and their long-term effects can be evaluated to adapt treatment regimes in future.

  15. Constitutive phosphorylation of Shc proteins in human tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelicci, G; Lanfrancone, L; Salcini, A E

    1995-01-01

    cells. In tumor cells with known TK gene alterations Shc proteins were constitutively phosphorylated and complexed with the activated TK. No constitutive Shc phosphorylation was found in primary cell cultures and normal tissues. In 14 of 27 tumor cell lines with no reported TK alterations, Shc proteins...... activated TKs and that the analysis of Shc phosphorylation allow the identification of tumors with constitutive TK activation....

  16. Multiple roles of protein kinase a in arachidonic acid-mediated Ca2+ entry and tumor-derived human endothelial cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Genova, Tullio; Pupo, Emanuela; Tomatis, Cristiana; Genazzani, Armando; Zaninetti, Roberta; Munaron, Luca

    2010-11-01

    We recently showed that arachidonic acid (AA) triggers calcium signals in endothelial cells derived from human breast carcinoma (B-TEC). In particular, AA-dependent Ca(2+) entry is involved in the early steps of tumor angiogenesis in vitro. Here, we investigated the multiple roles of the nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathways in AA-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in the same cells. B-TEC stimulation with 5 μmol/L AA resulted in endothelial NO synthase (NOS) phosphorylation at Ser(1177), and NO release was measured with the fluorescent NO-sensitive probe DAR4M-AM. PKA inhibition by the use of the membrane-permeable PKA inhibitory peptide myristoylated PKI(14-22) completely prevented both AA- and NO-induced calcium entry and abolished B-TEC migration promoted by AA. AA-dependent calcium entry and cell migration were significantly affected by both the NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and the NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide, suggesting that NO release is functionally involved in the signaling dependent on AA. Moreover, pretreatment with carboxyamidotriazole, an antiangiogenic compound that interferes with agonist-activated calcium entry, prevented AA-dependent B-TEC motility. Interestingly, even in the absence of AA, enhancement of the cyclic AMP/PKA pathway with the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin evoked a calcium entry dependent on NOS recruitment and NO release. The functional relevance of AA-induced calcium entry could be restricted to tumor-derived endothelial cells (EC) because AA evoked a smaller calcium entry in normal human microvascular ECs compared with B-TECs, and even more importantly, it was unable to promote cell motility in wound healing assay. This evidence opens an intriguing opportunity for differential pharmacologic treatment between normal and tumor-derived human ECs. ©2010 AACR.

  17. Study of Arachidonic Acid Pathway in Human Bladder Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Matsuyama

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological studies and animal experiments have demonstrated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs reduce the incidence of colorectal carcinoma. Cyclooxygenase (COX is the principal target of NSAIDs. COX is the first oxidase in the process of prostaglandin production from arachidonic acid. COX enzyme may be involved in the initiation and/or the promotion of tumorigenesis due to NSAIDs inhibition of COX. Lipoxygenase (LOX is also an initial enzyme in the pathway for producing leukotrienes from arachidonic acid. Similar to COX, LOX enzyme may also be involved in the initiation and/or promotion of tumorigenesis. Peroxisome proliferator activator-receptor (PPAR-γ is a ligand-activated transcriptional factor belonging to the steroid receptor superfamily. PPAR-γ plays a role in both adipocyte differentiation and tumorigenesis. PPAR-γ is one target for cell growth modulation of NSAIDs. In this review, we report the expression of COX-2, LOX and PPAR-γ in human bladder tumor tissues as well as the effects of COX-2 and LOX inhibitors and PPAR-γ ligand.

  18. Study of Arachidonic Acid Pathway in Human Bladder Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Matsuyama

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological studies and animal experiments have demonstrated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs reduce the incidence of colorectal carcinoma. Cyclooxygenase (COX is the principal target of NSAIDs. COX is the first oxidase in the process of prostaglandin production from arachidonic acid. COX enzyme may be involved in the initiation and/or the promotion of tumorigenesis due to NSAIDs inhibition of COX. Lipoxygenase (LOX is also an initial enzyme in the pathway for producing leukotrienes from arachidonic acid. Similar to COX, LOX enzyme may also be involved in the initiation and/or promotion of tumorigenesis. Peroxisome proliferator activator-receptor (PPAR-γ is a ligand-activated transcriptional factor belonging to the steroid receptor superfamily. PPAR-γ plays a role in both adipocyte differentiation and tumorigenesis. PPAR-γ is one target for cell growth modulation of NSAIDs. In this review, we report the expression of COX-2, LOX and PPAR-γ in human bladder tumor tissues as well as the effects of COX-2 and LOX inhibitors and PPAR-γ ligand.

  19. The expression of Egfl7 in human normal tissues and epithelial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chun; Yang, Lian-Yue; Wu, Fan; Tao, Yi-Ming; Liu, Lin-Sen; Zhang, Jin-Fan; He, Ya-Ning; Tang, Li-Li; Chen, Guo-Dong; Guo, Lei

    2013-04-23

    To investigate the expression of Egfl7 in normal adult human tissues and human epithelial tumors.
 RT-PCR and Western blot were employed to detect Egfl7 expression in normal adult human tissues and 10 human epithelial tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), lung cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, esophageal cancer, malignant glioma, ovarian cancer and renal cancer. Immunohistochemistry and cytoimmunofluorescence were subsequently used to determine the localization of Egfl7 in human epithelial tumor tissues and cell lines. ELISA was also carried out to examine the serum Egfl7 levels in cancer patients. In addition, correlations between Egfl7 expression and clinicopathological features as well as prognosis of HCC and breast cancer were also analyzed on the basis of immunohistochemistry results.
 Egfl7 was differentially expressed in 19 adult human normal tissues and was overexpressed in all 10 human epithelial tumor tissues. The serum Egfl7 level was also significantly elevated in cancer patients. The increased Egfl7 expression in HCC correlated with vein invasion, absence of capsule formation, multiple tumor nodes and poor prognosis. Similarly, upregulation of Egfl7 in breast cancer correlated strongly with TNM stage, lymphatic metastasis, estrogen receptor positivity, Her2 positivity and poor prognosis. 
 Egfl7 is significantly upregulated in human epithelial tumor tissues, suggesting Egfl7 to be a potential biomarker for human epithelial tumors, especially HCC and breast cancer.

  20. INTERNALIZATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDE ACIPENSIN 1 INTO HUMAN TUMOR CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Umnyakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Search for new compounds providing delivery of drugs into infected or neoplastic cells, is an important direction of biomedical research. Cell-penetrating peptides are among those compounds, due to their ability to translocate through membranes of eukaryotic cells, serving as potential carriers of various therapeutic agents to the target cells. The aim of present work was to investigate the ability of acipensin 1, an antimicrobial peptide of innate immune system, for in vitro penetration into human tumor cells. Acipensin 1 is a cationic peptide that we have previously isolated from leukocytes of the Russian sturgeon, Acipenser gueldenstaedtii. Capability of acipensin 1 to enter the human erytroleukemia K-562 cells has been investigated for the first time. A biotechnological procedure for producing a recombinant acipensin 1 peptide has been developed. The obtained peptide was conjugated with a fluorescent probe BODIPY FL. By means of confocal microscopy, we have shown that the tagged acipensin 1 rapidly enters into K-562 cells and can be detected in the intracellular space within 5 min after its addition to the cell culture. Using flow cytometry technique, penetration kinetics of the labeled peptide into K-562 cells (at nontoxic micromolar concentrations has been studied. We have observed a rapid internalization of the peptide to the target cells, thus confirming the results of microscopic analysis, i.e, the labeled acipensin was detectable in K-562 cells as soon as wihin 2-3 seconds after its addition to the incubation medium. The maximum of fluorescence was reached within a period of approx. 45 seconds, with further “plateau” at the terms of >100 seconds following cell stimulation with the test compound. These data support the concept, that the antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity system possess the features of cell-penetrating peptides, and allow us to consider the studied sturgeon peptide a promising template for development of new

  1. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase in human ovarian tumors and tumor-associated macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimp, AH; Hollema, H; Kempinga, C; van der Zee, AGJ; de Vries, EGE; Daemen, T

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates whether and to what extent cyclooxygenase type-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide-synthase (iNOS), both known to have an immunosuppressive effect, are expressed in human ovarian tumors. Because COX-2 and iNOS can be expressed by activated macrophages, the presence of

  2. Microvascular Disease After Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Lun Ooi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Individuals who reach end-stage kidney disease (CKD5 have a high risk of vascular events that persists even after renal transplantation. This study compared the prevalence and severity of microvascular disease in transplant recipients and patients with CKD5. Methods: Individuals with a renal transplant or CKD5 were recruited consecutively from renal clinics, and underwent bilateral retinal photography (Canon CR5-45, Canon. Their retinal images were deidentified and reviewed for hypertensive/microvascular signs by an ophthalmologist and a trained grader (Wong and Mitchell classification, and for vessel caliber at a grading centre using a computer-assisted method and Knudtson's modification of the Parr-Hubbard formula. Results: Ninety-two transplant recipients (median duration 6.4 years, range 0.8 to 28.8 and 70 subjects with CKD5 were studied. Transplant recipients were younger (pConclusions: Hypertensive/microvascular disease occurred just as often and was generally as severe in transplant recipients and subjects with CKD5. Microvascular disease potentially contributes to increased cardiac events post- transplantation.

  3. Intravascular Stenting in Microvascular Anastomoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assersen, Kristine; Sørensen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background The effect of intravascular stenting (IVaS) on microvascular anastomoses has given adverse results. For experienced microsurgeons the benefit of IVaS is doubtful. We have investigated the potential benefit of the IVaS technique for two groups of inexperienced microsurgeons with differe...

  4. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C; Heth, Jason A; Maher, Cormac O; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D; Freudiger, Christian W; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A

    2015-10-14

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a nondestructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. We show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ = 0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Somatostatin receptors in human adrenal gland tumors--immunohistochemical study.

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz Stepień; Hanna Pisarek; Robert Kubiak; Marek Pawlikowski

    2008-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors subtypes (SSTR 1-5) were demonstrated in surgically obtained adrenal gland tumors by means of immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results of the present study demonstrate that somatostatin receptors are expressed in adrenal tumors in a varied manner which is specific in each case. It provides different diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities.

  6. Somatostatin receptors in human adrenal gland tumors--immunohistochemical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Stepień

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Somatostatin receptors subtypes (SSTR 1-5 were demonstrated in surgically obtained adrenal gland tumors by means of immunohistochemistry (IHC. Results of the present study demonstrate that somatostatin receptors are expressed in adrenal tumors in a varied manner which is specific in each case. It provides different diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities.

  7. P53 MUTATIONS IN HUMAN LUNG-TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MILLER, CW; ASLO, A; KOK, K; YOKOTA, J; BUYS, CHCM; TERADA, M; KOEFFLER, HP; Simon, K.

    1992-01-01

    Mutation of one p53 allele and loss of the normal p53 allele [loss of heterozygosity (LOH)] occur in many tumors including lung cancers. These alterations apparently contribute to development of cancer by interfering with the tumor suppressor activity of p53. We directly sequenced amplified DNA in

  8. Steroid Tumor Environment in Male and Female Mice Model of Canine and Human Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Caceres

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC shares clinical and histopathological characteristics with human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC and has been proposed as a good model for studying the human disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of female and male mice to reproduce IMC and IBC tumors and identify the hormonal tumor environment. To perform the study sixty 6–8-week-old male and female mice were inoculated subcutaneously with a suspension of 106 IPC-366 and SUM149 cells. Tumors and serum were collected and used for hormonal analysis. Results revealed that IPC-366 reproduced tumors in 90% of males inoculated after 2 weeks compared with 100% of females that reproduced tumor at the same time. SUM149 reproduced tumors in 40% of males instead of 80% of females that reproduced tumors after 4 weeks. Both cell lines produce distant metastasis in lungs being higher than the metastatic rates in females. EIA analysis revealed that male tumors had higher T and SO4E1 concentrations compared to female tumors. Serum steroid levels were lower than those found in tumors. In conclusion, IBC and IMC male mouse model is useful as a tool for IBC research and those circulating estrogens and intratumoral hormonal levels are crucial in the development and progression of tumors.

  9. Protective effect of pre-infarction angina on microvascular obstruction after primary percutaneous coronary intervention is blunted in humans by cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccoli, Giampaolo; Scalone, Giancarla; Cosentino, Nicola; Fabretti, Alessandro; Mirizzi, Alessandro Mandurino; Gramegna, Mario; Panebianco, Mario; Roberto, Marco; Crea, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Pre-infarction angina (PIA) has been shown to reduce the microvascular obstruction (MVO) rate in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We sought to evaluate the potential modulator role of cardiovascular risk factors (CRFs) on this protective effect. Two hundred patients with STEMI were enrolled. PIA was defined as typical chest pain within the 48 h preceding STEMI onset. Angiographic MVO was defined as TIMI flow grade <2 or TIMI flow 3 with myocardial blush grade <2; electrocardiographic (ECG) MVO was defined as ST-segment elevation resolution <70%. Common CRFs were collected. In the absence of hypertension, both angiographic and ECG MVO rates were lower in patients with PIA as compared with those without, whereas, in the presence of hypertension, they were similar in both study groups (P for interaction=0.01 and P=0.014, respectively). Among nonsmokers, angiographic and ECG MVO rates were lower in patients with PIA as compared with those without, whereas within smokers, they were similar in both study groups (P for interaction=0.037 and P=0.037, respectively). In the absence of dyslipidemia, the angiographic and ECG MVO rates were lower in patients with PIA as compared with those without, whereas within dyslipidemic patients, they were similar in both study groups (P for interaction=0.012 and P=0.04, respectively). The protective effect of PIA on MVO is blunted by CRFs.

  10. Human xenografts are not rejected in a naturally occurring immunodeficient porcine line: a human tumor model in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel, Matthew T; Balivada, Sivasai; Beck, Amanda P; Kerrigan, Maureen A; Pyle, Marla M; Dekkers, Jack C M; Wyatt, Carol R; Rowland, Robert R R; Anderson, David E; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2012-04-01

    Animal models for cancer therapy are invaluable for preclinical testing of potential cancer treatments; however, therapies tested in such models often fail to translate into clinical settings. Therefore, a better preclinical model for cancer treatment testing is needed. Here we demonstrate that an immunodeficient line of pigs can host and support the growth of xenografted human tumors and has the potential to be an effective animal model for cancer therapy. Wild-type and immunodeficient pigs were injected subcutaneously in the left ear with human melanoma cells (A375SM cells) and in the right ear with human pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1). All immunodeficient pigs developed tumors that were verified by histology and immunohistochemistry. Nonaffected littermates did not develop tumors. Immunodeficient pigs, which do not reject xenografted human tumors, have the potential to become an extremely useful animal model for cancer therapy because of their similarity in size, anatomy, and physiology to humans.

  11. Antitumor activity of irofulven against human ovarian cancer cell lines, human tumor colony-forming units, and xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laar, E S; Izbicka, E; Weitman, S; Medina-Gundrum, L; Macdonald, J R; Waters, S J

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic activity of irofulven (HMAF, MGI 114), a unique chemotherapeutic agent currently under clinical investigation, in various preclinical models of ovarian cancer. Antiproliferative effects of irofulven in ovarian cancer cell lines and ovarian tumor specimens were characterized in vitro using sulforhodamine B and human tumor colony-forming assays, respectively. Irofulven demonstrated marked activity against a panel of ovarian tumor cell lines, including IGROV1, OVCAR-3, OVCAR-4, OVCAR-5, OVCAR-8, and SK-OV-3, all of which exhibit various drug resistance mechanisms. In human tumor cloning assays, irofulven inhibited colony formation in surgically derived ovarian tumors at concentrations as low as 0.001 micro g /ml and indicated superior activity in comparison with paclitaxel when tested against the same tumor specimens. The antitumor activity of irofulven compared to that of paclitaxel was also examined using the SK-OV-3 xenograft model. In mice bearing subcutaneously implanted SK-OV-3 tumors, treatment with paclitaxel failed to inhibit tumor growth; whereas mice treated with maximum tolerated doses of irofulven had a 25% partial shrinkage rate, and the remaining animals had a mean tumor growth inhibition of 82%. The potent activity of irofulven against ovarian tumors in vitro and in vivo supports the evaluation of its clinical activity in ovarian cancer.

  12. Antibody directed against human YKL-40 increases tumor volume in a human melanoma xenograft model in scid mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salamon, Johannes; Hoffmann, Tatjana; Elies, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Induced overexpression of the secretory protein YKL-40 promotes tumor growth in xenograft experiments. We investigated if targeting YKL-40 with a monoclonal antibody could inhibit tumor growth. YKL-40 expressing human melanoma cells (LOX) were injected subcutenously in Balb/c scid mice. Animals...

  13. Phenotypic characterization of drug resistance and tumor initiating cancer stem cells from human bone tumor osteosarcoma cell line OS-77

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell theory suggest that presence of small subpopulation of cancer stem cells are the major implication in the cancer treatment and also responsible for tumor recurrence. Based on Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion technique, we have identified about 3.3% of cancer stem like side population (SP cells from human osteosarcoma OS-77 cell line whose prevalence is significantly reduced to 0.3% after treatment with verapamil. The sphere formation assay revealed that osteosarcoma SP cells are highly capable to form tumor spheres (sarcospheres. Further by immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR, we show that OS-77 SP cells have enhanced expression of stem cell surface markers such as CD44, Nanog and ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter gene (ABCG2 which contributes to self-renewal and drug resistance, respectively. Our findings help to designing a novel therapeutic drug which could effectively target the cancer stem cells and prevent the tumor relapse.

  14. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) triggers autophagic tumor cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Trulsson, Maria; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Mograbi, Baharia; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-03-01

    HAMLET, a complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, kills a wide range of tumor cells. Here we propose that HAMLET causes macroautophagy in tumor cells and that this contributes to their death. Cell death was accompanied by mitochondrial damage and a reduction in the level of active mTOR and HAMLET triggered extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and the formation of double-membrane-enclosed vesicles typical of macroautophagy. In addition, HAMLET caused a change from uniform (LC3-I) to granular (LC3-II) staining in LC3-GFP-transfected cells reflecting LC3 translocation during macroautophagy, and this was blocked by the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. HAMLET also caused accumulation of LC3-II detected by Western blot when lysosomal degradation was inhibited suggesting that HAMLET caused an increase in autophagic flux. To determine if macroautophagy contributed to cell death, we used RNA interference against Beclin-1 and Atg5. Suppression of Beclin-1 and Atg5 improved the survival of HAMLET-treated tumor cells and inhibited the increase in granular LC3-GFP staining. The results show that HAMLET triggers macroautophagy in tumor cells and suggest that macroautophagy contributes to HAMLET-induced tumor cell death.

  15. Engagement of the Mannose Receptor by Tumoral Mucins Activates an Immune Suppressive Phenotype in Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allavena, P.; Chieppa, M.; Bianchi, G.; Solinas, G.; Fabbri, M.; Laskarin, G.; Mantovani, A.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAMs) are abundantly present in the stroma of solid tumors and modulate several important biological processes, such as neoangiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion, and suppression of adaptive immune responses. Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) constitute a large family of transmembrane carbohydrate-binding receptors that recognize pathogens as well as endogenous glycoproteins. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that some CLRs can inhibit the immune response. In this study we investigated TAM-associated molecules potentially involved in their immune suppressive activity. We found that TAMs isolated from human ovarian carcinoma samples predominantly express the CLRs Dectin-1, MDL-1, MGL, DCIR, and most abundantly the Mannose Receptor (MR). Components of carcinomatous ascites and purified tumoral mucins (CA125 and TAG-72) bound the MR and induced its internalization. MR engagement by tumoral mucins and by an agonist anti-MR antibody modulated cytokine production by TAM toward an immune-suppressive profile: increase of IL-10, absence of IL-12, and decrease of the Th1-attracting chemokine CCL3. This study highlights that tumoral mucin-mediated ligation of the MR on infiltrating TAM may contribute to their immune suppressive phenotype. PMID:21331365

  16. Absence of tumor growth stimulation in a panel of 16 human tumor cell lines by mistletoe extracts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Gerhard; Fiebig, Heinz-Herbert

    2002-04-01

    Extracts of Viscum album (mistletoe) are widely used as complementary cancer therapies in Europe. The mistletoe lectins have been identified as the main active principle of mistletoe extracts. They have been shown to exhibit cytotoxic effects as well as immunomodulatory activities. The latter is exemplified by induction of cytokine secretion and increased activity of natural killer cells. Recent reports, however, indicated possible tumor growth stimulation by mistletoe extracts. Therefore, the three aqueous mistletoe extracts (Iscador M special, Iscador Qu special and Iscador P) were evaluated for antiproliferative and/or stimulatory effects in a panel of 16 human tumor cell lines in vitro using a cellular proliferation assay. The results show no evidence of stimulation of tumor growth by any of the three Iscador preparations, comprising central nervous system, gastric, non-small cell lung, mammary, prostate, renal and uterine cancer cell lines, as well as cell lines from hematological malignancies and melanomas. On the contrary, Iscador preparations containing a high lectin concentration (Iscador M special and Iscador Qu special) showed antitumor activity in the mammary cancer cell line MAXF 401NL at the 15 microg/ml dose level with a more than 70% growth inhibition compared to untreated control cells. In addition, a slight antitumor activity (growth inhibition 30-70%) was found in three tumor cell lines for Iscador M special and in seven tumor cell lines for Iscador Qu special, respectively. Iscador P, which contains no mistletoe lectin I, showed no antiproliferative activity.

  17. GT198 Expression Defines Mutant Tumor Stroma in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheqiong; Peng, Min; Cheng, Liang; Jones, Kimya; Maihle, Nita J; Mivechi, Nahid F; Ko, Lan

    2016-05-01

    Human breast cancer precursor cells remain to be elucidated. Using breast cancer gene product GT198 (PSMC3IP; alias TBPIP or Hop2) as a unique marker, we revealed the cellular identities of GT198 mutant cells in human breast tumor stroma. GT198 is a steroid hormone receptor coactivator and a crucial factor in DNA repair. Germline mutations in GT198 are present in breast and ovarian cancer families. Somatic mutations in GT198 are present in ovarian tumor stromal cells. Herein, we show that human breast tumor stromal cells carry GT198 somatic mutations and express cytoplasmic GT198 protein. GT198(+) stromal cells share vascular smooth muscle cell origin, including myoepithelial cells, adipocytes, capillary pericytes, and stromal fibroblasts. Frequent GT198 mutations are associated with GT198(+) tumor stroma but not with GT198(-) tumor cells. GT198(+) progenitor cells are mostly capillary pericytes. When tested in cultured cells, mutant GT198 induces vascular endothelial growth factor promoter, and potentially promotes angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Our results suggest that multiple lineages of breast tumor stromal cells are mutated in GT198. These findings imply the presence of mutant progenitors, whereas their descendants, carrying the same GT198 mutations, are collectively responsible for forming breast tumor microenvironment. GT198 expression is, therefore, a specific marker of mutant breast tumor stroma and has the potential to facilitate diagnosis and targeted treatment of human breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cholesterol masks membrane glycosphingolipid tumor-associated antigens to reduce their immunodetection in human cancer biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Anton; Binnington, Beth; Ngan, Bo; Chadwick, Karen; Fleshner, Neil; Lingwood, Clifford A

    2013-11-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are neoplastic and normal/cancer stem cell markers and GSL/cholesterol-containing membrane rafts are increased in cancer cell plasma membranes. We define a novel means by which cancer cells can restrict tumor-associated GSL immunoreactivity. The GSL-cholesterol complex reorients GSL carbohydrate to a membrane parallel, rather than perpendicular conformation, largely unavailable for antibody recognition. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin cholesterol extraction of all primary human tumor frozen sections tested (ovarian, testicular, neuroblastoma, prostate, breast, colon, pheochromocytoma and ganglioneuroma), unmasked previously "invisible" membrane GSLs for immunodetection. In ovarian carcinoma, globotriaosyl ceramide (Gb3), the GSL receptor for the antineoplastic Escherichia coli-derived verotoxin, was increased throughout the tumor. In colon carcinoma, Gb3 detection was vastly increased within the neovasculature and perivascular stroma. In tumors considered Gb3 negative (neuroblastoma, Leydig testicular tumor and pheochromocytoma), neovascular Gb3 was unmasked. Tumor-associated GSL stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4 and globoH were unmasked according to tumor: SSEA-1 in prostate/colon; SSEA-3 in prostate; SSEA-4 in pheochromocytoma/some colon tumors; globoH in prostate/some colon tumors. In colon, anti-SSEA-1 was tumor cell specific. Within the GSL-cholesterol complex, filipin-cholesterol binding was also reduced. These results may relate to the ill-defined benefit of statins on cancer prognosis, for example, prostate carcinoma. We found novel anti-tumor GSL antibodies circulating in 3/5 statin-treated, but not untreated, prostate cancer patients. Lowering tumor membrane cholesterol may permit immune recognition of otherwise unavailable tumor-associated GSL carbohydrate, for more effective immunosurveillance and active/passive immunotherapy. Our results show standard immunodetection of tumor GSLs significantly under assesses

  19. Microvascularization on collared peccary placenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Tatiana Carlesso; Oliveira, Moacir Franco; Dantzer, Vibeke

    2012-01-01

    The microvascularization of the collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu) placenta was studied by vascular casts and immunolocalization of a-smooth muscle actin and vimentin, to identify the three dimensional organization and vascular flow interrelation in the microvasculature between the maternal...... and fetal compartments of the placentae. The immunolocalization of vimentin in the vascular endothelium and in the smooth muscle cells of blood vessels showed indented capillaries along the uterine epithelium and the trophoblast at the sides of complementary maternal and fetal microfolds, or rugae...... into a microvascular network wall in a basket-like fashion. At the base of these baskets venules were formed. On the fetal side, arterioles branched centrally in the fetal rugae into a capillary network in a bulbous form, complementary to the opposite maternal depressions forming the baskets. At the base...

  20. Fumaric Acid Esters Do Not Reduce Inflammatory NF-κB/p65 Nuclear Translocation, ICAM-1 Expression and T-Cell Adhesiveness of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarmann, Axel; Nehen, Mathias; Deiß, Annika; Buttmann, Mathias

    2015-08-13

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is approved for disease-modifying treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Animal experiments suggested that part of its therapeutic effect is due to a reduction of T-cell infiltration of the central nervous system (CNS) by uncertain mechanisms. Here we evaluated whether DMF and its primary metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF) modulate pro-inflammatory intracellular signaling and T-cell adhesiveness of nonimmortalized single donor human brain microvascular endothelial cells at low passages. Neither DMF nor MMF at concentrations of 10 or 50 µM blocked the IL-1β-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65, whereas the higher concentration of DMF inhibited the nuclear entry of p65 in human umbilical vein endothelium cultured in parallel. DMF and MMF also did not alter the IL-1β-stimulated activation of p38 MAPK in brain endothelium. Furthermore, neither DMF nor MMF reduced the basal or IL-1β-inducible expression of ICAM-1. In accordance, both fumaric acid esters did not reduce the adhesion of activated Jurkat T cells to brain endothelium under basal or inflammatory conditions. Therefore, brain endothelial cells probably do not directly mediate a potential blocking effect of fumaric acid esters on the inflammatory infiltration of the CNS by T cells.

  1. Fumaric Acid Esters Do Not Reduce Inflammatory NF-κB/p65 Nuclear Translocation, ICAM-1 Expression and T-Cell Adhesiveness of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Haarmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dimethyl fumarate (DMF is approved for disease-modifying treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Animal experiments suggested that part of its therapeutic effect is due to a reduction of T-cell infiltration of the central nervous system (CNS by uncertain mechanisms. Here we evaluated whether DMF and its primary metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF modulate pro-inflammatory intracellular signaling and T-cell adhesiveness of nonimmortalized single donor human brain microvascular endothelial cells at low passages. Neither DMF nor MMF at concentrations of 10 or 50 µM blocked the IL-1β-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65, whereas the higher concentration of DMF inhibited the nuclear entry of p65 in human umbilical vein endothelium cultured in parallel. DMF and MMF also did not alter the IL-1β-stimulated activation of p38 MAPK in brain endothelium. Furthermore, neither DMF nor MMF reduced the basal or IL-1β-inducible expression of ICAM-1. In accordance, both fumaric acid esters did not reduce the adhesion of activated Jurkat T cells to brain endothelium under basal or inflammatory conditions. Therefore, brain endothelial cells probably do not directly mediate a potential blocking effect of fumaric acid esters on the inflammatory infiltration of the CNS by T cells.

  2. Intravascular Stenting in Microvascular Anastomoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assersen, Kristine; Sørensen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background The effect of intravascular stenting (IVaS) on microvascular anastomoses has given adverse results. For experienced microsurgeons the benefit of IVaS is doubtful. We have investigated the potential benefit of the IVaS technique for two groups of inexperienced microsurgeons with differe...... or experienced microsurgeons regardless of their clinical experience. The study also shows that some surgical experience seems to be an advantage in performing microsurgery....

  3. Tumor-infiltrating plasmacytoid dendritic cells promote immunosuppression by Tr1 cells in human liver tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedroza-Gonzalez, A.; Zhou, G.; Vargas-Mendez, E.; Boor, P.P.; Mancham, S.; Verhoef, C.; Polak, W.G.; Grunhagen, D.; Pan, Q.; Janssen, H.; Garcia-Romo, G.S.; Biermann, K.; Tjwa, E.T.; Ijzermans, J.N.M.; Kwekkeboom, J.; Sprengers, D.

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ type 1 T regulatory (Tr1) cells have a crucial role in inducing tolerance. Immune regulation by these cells is mainly mediated through the secretion of high amounts of IL-10. Several studies have suggested that this regulatory population may be involved in tumor-mediated immune-suppression.

  4. Characterization of acylfulvene histiospecific toxicity in human tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelner, M J; McMorris, T C; Montoya, M A; Estes, L; Uglik, S F; Rutherford, M; Samson, K M; Bagnell, R D; Taetle, R

    1998-01-01

    Acylfulvene derivatives demonstrate marked efficacy in xenograft carcinoma models as compared with the parent illudin compounds. To elucidate the increased therapeutic efficacy of acylfulvene analogs, we compared them with the illudin compounds in terms of their in vitro cytotoxicity, cellular accumulation and DNA incorporation. The cytotoxicity of various acylfulvene analogs was tested in vitro against a variety of tumor cell lines. Radiolabelled acylfulvene analog was prepared and used for cellular accumulation and DNA incorporation studies. The prototype acylfulvene analog retained selective histiospecific toxicity towards myeloid leukemia and various carcinoma cell lines. In vitro killing of tumor cells by acylfulvene required up to a 30-fold increase in molecules per cell, as compared with illudin S, indicating that acylfulvene was less toxic on a cellular level. At equitoxic concentrations, acylfulvene incorporation into genomic tumor cell DNA was equivalent to illudin S suggesting that cellular metabolism has a role in acylfulvene cytotoxicity. Analysis of cellular accumulation of acylfulvene into tumor cells revealed a markedly higher Vmax for tumor cells, and a lower Vd for diffusion accumulation into other cells. The combination of higher Vmax and lower Vd may explain the increased in vivo efficacy of acylfulvene.

  5. Effects of charged particles on human tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn D Held

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of charged particle therapy in cancer treatment is growing rapidly, in large part because the exquisite dose localization of charged particles allows for higher radiation doses to be given to tumor tissue while normal tissues are exposed to lower doses and decreased volumes of normal tissues are irradiated. In addition, charged particles heavier than protons have substantial potential clinical advantages because of their additional biological effects including greater cell killing effectiveness, decreased radiation resistance of hypoxic cells in tumors and reduced cell cycle dependence of radiation response. These biological advantages depend on many factors such as endpoint, cell or tissue type, dose, dose rate or fractionation, charged particle type and energy, and oxygen concentration. This review summarizes the unique biological advantages of charged particle therapy and highlights recent research and areas of particular research needs, such as quantification of Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE for various tumor types and radiation qualities, role of genetic background of tumor cells in determining response to charged particles, sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, role of charged particles in tumors with hypoxic fractions and importance of fractionation, including use of hypofractionation, with charged particles.

  6. Roles of F-box proteins in human digestive system tumors (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jian; Lv, Liang; Huo, Jirong

    2014-12-01

    F-box proteins (FBPs), the substrate-recognition subunit of E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase, are the important components of Ub proteasome system (UPS). FBPs are involved in multiple cellular processes through ubiquitylation and subsequent degradation of their target proteins. Many studies have described the roles of FBPs in human cancers. Digestive system tumors account for a large proportion of all the tumors, and their mortality is very high. This review summarizes for the first time the roles of FBPs in digestive system tumorige-nesis and tumor progression, aiming at finding new routes for the rational design of targeted anticancer therapies in digestive system tumors.

  7. A Role for T-Lymphocytes in Human Breast Cancer and in Canine Mammary Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment has a prominent role in carcinogenesis and benefits the proliferation and survival of malignant cells, promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Mammary tumors are frequently infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of immune cells where T-lymphocytes have a great importance. Interestingly, similar inflammatory cell infiltrates, cytokine and chemokine expression in humans and canine mammary tumors were recently described. However, in both species, despite all the scientific evidences that appoint for a significant role of T-lymphocytes, a definitive conclusion concerning the effectiveness of T-cell dependent immune mechanisms has not been achieved yet. In the present review, we describe similarities between human breast cancer and canine mammary tumors regarding tumor T-lymphocyte infiltration, such as relationship of TILs and mammary tumors malignancy, association of ratio CD4+/ CD8+ T-cells with low survival rates, promotion of tumor progression by Th2 cells actions, and association of great amounts of Treg cells with poor prognostic factors. This apparent parallelism together with the fact that dogs develop spontaneous tumors in the context of a natural immune system highlight the dog as a possible useful biological model for studies in human breast cancer immunology.

  8. Comprehensive allelotype and genetic anaysis of 466 human nervous system tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Deimling, A; Fimmers, R; Schmidt, M C

    2000-01-01

    Brain tumors pose a particular challenge to molecular oncology. Many different tumor entities develop in the nervous system and some of them appear to follow distinct pathogenic routes. Molecular genetic alterations have increasingly been reported in nervous system neoplasms. However, a considera...... may provide a valuable framework for future studies to delineate molecular pathways in many types of human central nervous system tumors.......Brain tumors pose a particular challenge to molecular oncology. Many different tumor entities develop in the nervous system and some of them appear to follow distinct pathogenic routes. Molecular genetic alterations have increasingly been reported in nervous system neoplasms. However......, a considerable number of affected genes remain to be identified. We present here a comprehensive allelotype analysis of 466 nervous system tumors based on loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies with 129 microsatellite markers that span the genome. Specific alterations of the EGFR, CDK4, CDKN2A, TP53, DMBT1, NF2...

  9. Effect of full flavor and denicotinized cigarettes exposure on the brain microvascular endothelium: a microarray-based gene expression study using a human immortalized BBB endothelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Pooja; Sajja, Ravi K; Prasad, Shikha; Cucullo, Luca

    2015-06-23

    oxidative and inflammatory potential. Toxicants present in soluble cigarette smoke extracts (CSE) and not nicotine seem to be the primary determinant of vascular toxicity. In this respect our results from this and previous studies suggest that chronic TS exposure can overcome Nrf2 and NFκB-p65 dependent cytoprotective mechanisms of the brain microvascular endothelium possibly leading to BBB impairment and loss of BBB integrity.

  10. The guinea pig as an animal model for studying perinatal changes in microvascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Rebecca M; Palliser, Hannah K; Kelleher, Meredith A; Hirst, Jonathan J; Wright, Ian M R

    2012-01-01

    Microvascular dysfunction, characterized by inappropriate vasodilatation and high blood flow in the peripheral microcirculation, is linked to physiologic instability and poor outcome in neonates. Specifically, preterm neonates have significantly higher levels of baseline microvascular blood flow than term neonates at 24 h postnatal age. Because of similarities between human and guinea pig endocrine profiles and maturity at birth, we hypothesized that preterm guinea pig neonates would provide a suitable model for studying the mechanisms underlying transitional microvascular function. Guinea pigs that were delivered preterm showed immaturity and had markedly reduced viability. Baseline microvascular blood flow was significantly higher in preterm animals than in term animals. No effect of intrauterine growth restriction or birth weight on baseline microvascular blood flow was observed in either preterm or term animals. These results are consistent with recent clinical findings and support the use of the guinea pig as a suitable model for future studies of the mechanisms underlying perinatal microvascular behavior. Guinea pigs were delivered either prematurely or at term. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to study microvascular blood flow at 23 h postnatal age.

  11. Oncolytic Virotherapy Synergism with Signaling Inhibitors: Rapamycin Increases Myxoma Virus Tropism for Human Tumor Cells▿

    OpenAIRE

    Stanford, Marianne M.; Barrett, John W.; Nazarian, Steven H.; Werden, Steven; McFadden, Grant

    2006-01-01

    Myxoma virus is a rabbit-specific poxvirus pathogen that also exhibits a unique tropism for human tumor cells and is dramatically oncolytic for human cancer xenografts. Most tumor cell lines tested are permissive for myxoma infection in a fashion intimately tied to the activation state of Akt kinase. A host range factor of myxoma virus, M-T5, directly interacts with Akt and mediates myxoma virus tumor cell tropism. mTOR is a regulator of cell growth and metabolism downstream of Akt and is spe...

  12. Who Is at Risk for Coronary Microvascular Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Coronary Microvascular Disease? Coronary microvascular disease can affect both men and women. However, women may be at risk for coronary microvascular disease if they have lower than normal levels of ...

  13. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Lessi, Francesca; Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-07-30

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma.

  14. Criteria to define HLA haplotype loss in human solid tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramal, LM; van der Zwan, AW; Collado, A; Lopez-Nevot, MA; Tilanus, M; Garrido, F

    Short tandem repeat (STR) markers are currently used to define loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of genes and chromosomes in tumors. Chromosome 6 and chromosome 15 STR markers are applied to define loss of HLA and related genes (e.g. TAP and beta(2)m) The number of STR identified in the HLA region is

  15. Analysis of molecular changes during human melanocytic tumor progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, Nicole Johanna Wilhelmina de

    2005-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive types of cancer, due to its potency to disseminate early in tumor progression. The incidence is still rising, even though the rate of change has leveled off in the last decade. As melanoma cells are relatively insensitive to classical systemic therapies, like

  16. Over-expression of HOX-8, the human homologue of the mouse Hox-8 homeobox gene, in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M; Tanaka, M; Iwase, T; Naito, Y; Sugimura, H; Kino, I

    1993-07-15

    A human ovarian yolk sac tumor cDNA library was screened for homeobox genes with an oligonucleotide probe under low stringent condition. Three homeobox genes were isolated, two of which were identified as HHO.c1 and HB24. The third was highly homologous with the mouse Hox-8 gene and was designated as HOX-8. Studies on RNAs from 25 human tumor tissues and cell lines showed that the profile of HOX-8 expression was different from those of HHO.c1 and HB24. The expression of HOX-8 was not detected in hematopoietic tumor cells, in which HHO.c1 and HB24 were highly expressed. HOX-8 was expressed at higher levels in a variety of tumors of epithelial origin than in their corresponding normal tissues more frequently than HHO.c1 and HB24. All three homeobox genes were highly expressed in a yolk sac tumor, an immature tumor of gonadal origin. These results suggest that HOX-8 plays a more important role in human tumors of epithelial origin than those of hematopoietic origin.

  17. Targeting Homologous Recombination in Notch-Driven C. elegans Stem Cell and Human Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinzhu Deng

    Full Text Available Mammalian NOTCH1-4 receptors are all associated with human malignancy, although exact roles remain enigmatic. Here we employ glp-1(ar202, a temperature-sensitive gain-of-function C. elegans NOTCH mutant, to delineate NOTCH-driven tumor responses to radiotherapy. At ≤20°C, glp-1(ar202 is wild-type, whereas at 25°C it forms a germline stem cell⁄progenitor cell tumor reminiscent of human cancer. We identify a NOTCH tumor phenotype in which all tumor cells traffic rapidly to G2⁄M post-irradiation, attempt to repair DNA strand breaks exclusively via homology-driven repair, and when this fails die by mitotic death. Homology-driven repair inactivation is dramatically radiosensitizing. We show that these concepts translate directly to human cancer models.

  18. Cysteine-rich domain of human ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha) supports tumor cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iba, K; Albrechtsen, R; Gilpin, B J

    1999-01-01

    The ADAMs (A disintegrin and metalloprotease) comprise a family of membrane-anchored cell surface proteins with a putative role in cell-cell and/or cell-matrix interactions. By immunostaining, ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha) was up-regulated in several human carcinomas and could be detected along the tumor...... cell membranes. Because of this intriguing staining pattern, we investigated whether human ADAM 12 supports tumor cell adhesion. Using an in vitro assay using recombinant polypeptides expressed in Escherichia coli, we examined the ability of individual domains of human ADAM 12 and ADAM 15 to support...... tumor cell adhesion. We found that the disintegrin-like domain of human ADAM 15 supported adhesion of alphavbeta3-expressing A375 melanoma cells. In the case of human ADAM 12, however, recombinant polypeptides of the cysteine-rich domain but not the disintegrin-like domain supported cell adhesion...

  19. Suppressive effects of tumor cell-derived 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine on human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Frederik C; Singer, Katrin; Poller, Kerstin; Bernhardt, Luise; Strobl, Carolin D; Limm, Katharina; Ritter, Axel P; Gottfried, Eva; Völkl, Simon; Jacobs, Benedikt; Peter, Katrin; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Dettmer, Katja; Oefner, Peter J; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Kreutz, Marina P; Aigner, Michael; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment represents one of the main obstacles for immunotherapy of cancer. The tumor milieu is among others shaped by tumor metabolites such as 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA). Increased intratumoral MTA levels result from a lack of the MTA-catabolizing enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) in tumor cells and are found in various tumor entities. Here, we demonstrate that MTA suppresses proliferation, activation, differentiation, and effector function of antigen-specific T cells without eliciting cell death. Conversely, if MTA is added to highly activated T cells, MTA exerts cytotoxic effects on T cells. We identified the Akt pathway, a critical signal pathway for T cell activation, as a target of MTA, while, for example, p38 remained unaffected. Next, we provide evidence that MTA exerts its immunosuppressive effects by interfering with protein methylation in T cells. To confirm the relevance of the suppressive effects of exogenously added MTA on human T cells, we used an MTAP-deficient tumor cell-line that was stably transfected with the MTAP-coding sequence. We observed that T cells stimulated with MTAP-transfected tumor cells revealed a higher proliferative capacity compared to T cells stimulated with Mock-transfected cells. In conclusion, our findings reveal a novel immune evasion strategy of human tumor cells that could be of interest for therapeutic targeting.

  20. Vascular network remodeling via vessel cooption, regression and growth in tumors

    CERN Document Server

    Bartha, K

    2016-01-01

    The transformation of the regular vasculature in normal tissue into a highly inhomogeneous tumor specific capillary network is described by a theoretical model incorporating tumor growth, vessel cooption, neo-vascularization, vessel collapse and cell death. Compartmentalization of the tumor into several regions differing in vessel density, diameter and in necrosis is observed for a wide range of parameters in agreement with the vessel morphology found in human melanoma. In accord with data for human melanoma the model predicts, that microvascular density (MVD, regarded as an important diagnostic tool in cancer treatment, does not necessarily determine the tempo of tumor progression. Instead it is suggested, that the MVD of the original tissue as well as the metabolic demand of the individual tumor cell plays the major role in the initial stages of tumor growth.

  1. Human T cell crosstalk is induced by tumor membrane transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Uzana

    Full Text Available Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC. Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+ T-APCs. We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+ T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1 Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2 Fratricide (killing of CD8+ T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response.

  2. Oncolytic virotherapy synergism with signaling inhibitors: Rapamycin increases myxoma virus tropism for human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Marianne M; Barrett, John W; Nazarian, Steven H; Werden, Steven; McFadden, Grant

    2007-02-01

    Myxoma virus is a rabbit-specific poxvirus pathogen that also exhibits a unique tropism for human tumor cells and is dramatically oncolytic for human cancer xenografts. Most tumor cell lines tested are permissive for myxoma infection in a fashion intimately tied to the activation state of Akt kinase. A host range factor of myxoma virus, M-T5, directly interacts with Akt and mediates myxoma virus tumor cell tropism. mTOR is a regulator of cell growth and metabolism downstream of Akt and is specifically inhibited by rapamycin. We report that treatment of nonpermissive human tumor cell lines, which normally restrict myxoma virus replication, with rapamycin dramatically increased virus tropism and spread in vitro. This increased myxoma replication is concomitant with global effects on mTOR signaling, specifically, an increase in Akt kinase. In contrast to the effects on human cancer cells, rapamycin does not increase myxoma virus replication in rabbit cell lines or permissive human tumor cell lines with constitutively active Akt. This indicates that rapamycin increases the oncolytic capacity of myxoma virus for human cancer cells by reconfiguring the internal cell signaling environment to one that is optimal for productive virus replication and suggests the possibility of a potentially therapeutic synergism between kinase signaling inhibitors and oncolytic poxviruses for cancer treatment.

  3. Matrix architecture defines the preferential localization and migration of T cells into the stroma of human lung tumors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salmon, Hélène; Franciszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Damotte, Diane; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Validire, Pierre; Trautmann, Alain; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Donnadieu, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    .... Studies using fixed tumor samples from human patients have shown that T cells accumulate more efficiently in the stroma than in tumor islets, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are unknown...

  4. Microvascular techniques in surgery of laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, R. [Univ. Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    An article describes application of microvascular techniques in reconstructive surgery following tumor resection of laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. Author describes bases of the method and reports results of surgery for 63 patients operated in the ORL university department of Wuerzburg. The voice quality was assessed in 20 cases by different measurements. Several complications were also reported. In 15 cases during and some weeks after postoperative radiation therapy a temporary aspiration occurred. In most cases the aspiration disappeared spontaneously within two months after finishing the radiotherapy

  5. Steady-state properties of sodium channels from healthy and tumorous human brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, C.; Wartenberg, H. C.; Duch, D. S.; Urban, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    This extensive bilayer study of unpurified human brain channels from non-diseased and tumorous human brain involves more than 300 lipid bilayer experiments. Single channel conductances and subconductances, single channel fractional open times, the voltage-dependence of tetrodotoxin (TTX) block and

  6. Expression of metastasis-associated protein 3 in human brain glioma related to tumor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shouqin; Hui, Guangyan; Hou, Fanggao; Shi, Hua; Zhou, Guoqing; Yan, Han; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jinfeng

    2015-10-01

    Glioma represents a disparate group of tumors characterized by high invasion ability, and therefore it is of clinical significance to identify molecular markers and therapeutic targets for better clinical management. Previously, metastasis-associated protein family (MTA) is considered to promote tumor cell invasion and metastasis of human malignancies. Recently, the newly identified MTA3 has been shown to play conflicting roles in human malignancies, while the expression pattern and potential clinical significance of MTA3 in human glioma have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we investigated the protein expression of MTA3 by immunohistochemistry assay and analyzed its association with glioma prognosis in 186 cases of patients. Results showed that MTA3 expression was decreased in glioma compared with that in normal brain (P human glioma and negatively associated with prognosis of patients, suggesting that MTA3 may play a tumor suppressor role in glioma.

  7. Alvocidib (Flavopiridol) suppresses tumor growth in SCID mice with human esophageal cancer xenografts without inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinsuke; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Sugano, Masahiko; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Sonoue, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Toshiharu; Tsurumaru, Masahiko

    2006-08-01

    Alvocidib (Flavopiridol, HMR1275) is a potent inhibitor of multiple cyclin-dependent kinases and has been identified recently as an antitumor agent in several cancers. Previous studies have shown that alvocidib could potentially treat esophageal cancer in vitro. This study evaluates alvocidib for its ability to suppress tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice bearing TE8 human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) xenografts. Alvocidib treatment of 10mg/kg body weight reduced tumor volume significantly. Immunohistochemistry analysis of alvocidib-treated tumor sections showed significant reductions in cyclin D1, VEGF, and Rb levels. Alvocidib treatment did not cause a marked increase in apoptotic tumor cells by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) analysis, yet hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed tumor necrosis. In vivo investigation of alvocidib treatment confirmed antitumor activity in TE8 esophageal xenografts. These findings suggest that alvocidib could be a useful anti-cancer agent for esophageal cancer.

  8. Growth curves of three human malignant tumors transplanted to nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spang-Thomsen, M; Nielsen, A; Visfeldt, J

    1980-01-01

    Experimental growth data for three human malignant tumors transplanted to nude mice of BALB/c origin are analyzed statistically in order to investigate whether they can be described according to the Gompertz function. The aim is to set up unequivocal standards for planned therapeutic experiments...... and to develop an essential part of the determination of proliferation parameters for the tumors. The results indicate that the course of tumor growth can be described with good approximation by the Gompertz function. A transformation of this function depicts the growth rectilinearly and appears to be suitable...... as a standard, e.g. in therapeutic experiments. The course of tumor growth is independent of the size of the transplant, and whether tumors are transplanted in the right or left or both flanks of the recipient mice. Furthermore, the growth does not vary in a systematic way with the number of passages in nude...

  9. Mechanical characterization of human brain tumors from patients and comparison to potential surgical phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Daniel C; Rubiano, Andrés; Dyson, Kyle; Simmons, Chelsey S

    2017-01-01

    While mechanical properties of the brain have been investigated thoroughly, the mechanical properties of human brain tumors rarely have been directly quantified due to the complexities of acquiring human tissue. Quantifying the mechanical properties of brain tumors is a necessary prerequisite, though, to identify appropriate materials for surgical tool testing and to define target parameters for cell biology and tissue engineering applications. Since characterization methods vary widely for soft biological and synthetic materials, here, we have developed a characterization method compatible with abnormally shaped human brain tumors, mouse tumors, animal tissue and common hydrogels, which enables direct comparison among samples. Samples were tested using a custom-built millimeter-scale indenter, and resulting force-displacement data is analyzed to quantify the steady-state modulus of each sample. We have directly quantified the quasi-static mechanical properties of human brain tumors with effective moduli ranging from 0.17-16.06 kPa for various pathologies. Of the readily available and inexpensive animal tissues tested, chicken liver (steady-state modulus 0.44 ± 0.13 kPa) has similar mechanical properties to normal human brain tissue while chicken crassus gizzard muscle (steady-state modulus 3.00 ± 0.65 kPa) has similar mechanical properties to human brain tumors. Other materials frequently used to mimic brain tissue in mechanical tests, like ballistic gel and chicken breast, were found to be significantly stiffer than both normal and diseased brain tissue. We have directly compared quasi-static properties of brain tissue, brain tumors, and common mechanical surrogates, though additional tests would be required to determine more complex constitutive models.

  10. Mechanical characterization of human brain tumors from patients and comparison to potential surgical phantoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel C Stewart

    Full Text Available While mechanical properties of the brain have been investigated thoroughly, the mechanical properties of human brain tumors rarely have been directly quantified due to the complexities of acquiring human tissue. Quantifying the mechanical properties of brain tumors is a necessary prerequisite, though, to identify appropriate materials for surgical tool testing and to define target parameters for cell biology and tissue engineering applications. Since characterization methods vary widely for soft biological and synthetic materials, here, we have developed a characterization method compatible with abnormally shaped human brain tumors, mouse tumors, animal tissue and common hydrogels, which enables direct comparison among samples. Samples were tested using a custom-built millimeter-scale indenter, and resulting force-displacement data is analyzed to quantify the steady-state modulus of each sample. We have directly quantified the quasi-static mechanical properties of human brain tumors with effective moduli ranging from 0.17-16.06 kPa for various pathologies. Of the readily available and inexpensive animal tissues tested, chicken liver (steady-state modulus 0.44 ± 0.13 kPa has similar mechanical properties to normal human brain tissue while chicken crassus gizzard muscle (steady-state modulus 3.00 ± 0.65 kPa has similar mechanical properties to human brain tumors. Other materials frequently used to mimic brain tissue in mechanical tests, like ballistic gel and chicken breast, were found to be significantly stiffer than both normal and diseased brain tissue. We have directly compared quasi-static properties of brain tissue, brain tumors, and common mechanical surrogates, though additional tests would be required to determine more complex constitutive models.

  11. Mechanical characterization of human brain tumors from patients and comparison to potential surgical phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubiano, Andrés; Dyson, Kyle; Simmons, Chelsey S.

    2017-01-01

    While mechanical properties of the brain have been investigated thoroughly, the mechanical properties of human brain tumors rarely have been directly quantified due to the complexities of acquiring human tissue. Quantifying the mechanical properties of brain tumors is a necessary prerequisite, though, to identify appropriate materials for surgical tool testing and to define target parameters for cell biology and tissue engineering applications. Since characterization methods vary widely for soft biological and synthetic materials, here, we have developed a characterization method compatible with abnormally shaped human brain tumors, mouse tumors, animal tissue and common hydrogels, which enables direct comparison among samples. Samples were tested using a custom-built millimeter-scale indenter, and resulting force-displacement data is analyzed to quantify the steady-state modulus of each sample. We have directly quantified the quasi-static mechanical properties of human brain tumors with effective moduli ranging from 0.17–16.06 kPa for various pathologies. Of the readily available and inexpensive animal tissues tested, chicken liver (steady-state modulus 0.44 ± 0.13 kPa) has similar mechanical properties to normal human brain tissue while chicken crassus gizzard muscle (steady-state modulus 3.00 ± 0.65 kPa) has similar mechanical properties to human brain tumors. Other materials frequently used to mimic brain tissue in mechanical tests, like ballistic gel and chicken breast, were found to be significantly stiffer than both normal and diseased brain tissue. We have directly compared quasi-static properties of brain tissue, brain tumors, and common mechanical surrogates, though additional tests would be required to determine more complex constitutive models. PMID:28582392

  12. Bioinformatics Analysis of the Human Surfaceome Reveals New Targets for a Variety of Tumor Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André L. Fonseca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that 10 to 20% of all genes in the human genome encode cell surface proteins and due to their subcellular localization these proteins represent excellent targets for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics. Therefore, a precise characterization of the surfaceome set in different types of tumor is needed. Using TCGA data from 15 different tumor types and a new method to identify cancer genes, the S-score, we identified several potential therapeutic targets within the surfaceome set. This allowed us to expand a previous analysis from us and provided a clear characterization of the human surfaceome in the tumor landscape. Moreover, we present evidence that a three-gene set—WNT5A, CNGA2, and IGSF9B—can be used as a signature associated with shorter survival in breast cancer patients. The data made available here will help the community to develop more efficient diagnostic and therapeutic tools for a variety of tumor types.

  13. Expression profiles of SnoN in normal and cancerous human tissues support its tumor suppressor role in human cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine S Jahchan

    Full Text Available SnoN is a negative regulator of TGF-β signaling and also an activator of the tumor suppressor p53 in response to cellular stress. Its role in human cancer is complex and controversial with both pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic activities reported. To clarify its role in human cancer and provide clinical relevance to its signaling activities, we examined SnoN expression in normal and cancerous human esophageal, ovarian, pancreatic and breast tissues. In normal tissues, SnoN is expressed in both the epithelium and the surrounding stroma at a moderate level and is predominantly cytoplasmic. SnoN levels in all tumor epithelia examined are lower than or similar to that in the matched normal samples, consistent with its anti-tumorigenic activity in epithelial cells. In contrast, SnoN expression in the stroma is highly upregulated in the infiltrating inflammatory cells in high-grade esophageal and ovarian tumor samples, suggesting that SnoN may potentially promote malignant progression through modulating the tumor microenvironment in these tumor types. The overall levels of SnoN expression in these cancer tissues do not correlate with the p53 status. However, in human cancer cell lines with amplification of the snoN gene, a strong correlation between increased SnoN copy number and inactivation of p53 was detected, suggesting that the tumor suppressor SnoN-p53 pathway must be inactivated, either through downregulation of SnoN or inactivation of p53, in order to allow cancer cell to proliferate and survive. These data strongly suggest that SnoN can function as a tumor suppressor at early stages of tumorigenesis in human cancer tissues.

  14. West Nile virus-induced cell adhesion molecules on human brain microvascular endothelial cells regulate leukocyte adhesion and modulate permeability of the in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Roe

    Full Text Available Characterizing the mechanisms by which West Nile virus (WNV causes blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption, leukocyte infiltration into the brain and neuroinflammation is important to understand the pathogenesis of WNV encephalitis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs in mediating the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes across human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE. Infection with WNV (NY99 strain significantly induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin in human endothelial cells and infected mice brain, although the levels of their ligands on leukocytes (VLA-4, LFA-1and MAC-1 did not alter. The permeability of the in vitro BBB model increased dramatically following the transmigration of monocytes and lymphocytes across the models infected with WNV, which was reversed in the presence of a cocktail of blocking antibodies against ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. Further, WNV infection of HBMVE significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to the HBMVE monolayer and transmigration across the infected BBB model. The blockade of these CAMs reduced the adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes across the infected BBB model. Further, comparison of infection with highly neuroinvasive NY99 and non-lethal (Eg101 strain of WNV demonstrated similar level of virus replication and fold-increase of CAMs in HBMVE cells suggesting that the non-neuropathogenic response of Eg101 is not because of its inability to infect HBMVE cells. Collectively, these results suggest that increased expression of specific CAMs is a pathological event associated with WNV infection and may contribute to leukocyte infiltration and BBB disruption in vivo. Our data further implicate that strategies to block CAMs to reduce BBB disruption may limit neuroinflammation and virus-CNS entry via 'Trojan horse' route, and improve WNV disease outcome.

  15. West Nile virus-induced cell adhesion molecules on human brain microvascular endothelial cells regulate leukocyte adhesion and modulate permeability of the in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Kelsey; Orillo, Beverly; Verma, Saguna

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing the mechanisms by which West Nile virus (WNV) causes blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, leukocyte infiltration into the brain and neuroinflammation is important to understand the pathogenesis of WNV encephalitis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in mediating the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes across human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE). Infection with WNV (NY99 strain) significantly induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin in human endothelial cells and infected mice brain, although the levels of their ligands on leukocytes (VLA-4, LFA-1and MAC-1) did not alter. The permeability of the in vitro BBB model increased dramatically following the transmigration of monocytes and lymphocytes across the models infected with WNV, which was reversed in the presence of a cocktail of blocking antibodies against ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. Further, WNV infection of HBMVE significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to the HBMVE monolayer and transmigration across the infected BBB model. The blockade of these CAMs reduced the adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes across the infected BBB model. Further, comparison of infection with highly neuroinvasive NY99 and non-lethal (Eg101) strain of WNV demonstrated similar level of virus replication and fold-increase of CAMs in HBMVE cells suggesting that the non-neuropathogenic response of Eg101 is not because of its inability to infect HBMVE cells. Collectively, these results suggest that increased expression of specific CAMs is a pathological event associated with WNV infection and may contribute to leukocyte infiltration and BBB disruption in vivo. Our data further implicate that strategies to block CAMs to reduce BBB disruption may limit neuroinflammation and virus-CNS entry via 'Trojan horse' route, and improve WNV disease outcome.

  16. PCR Expression Analysis Of the Estrogeninducible Gene Bcei in Gastrointestinal and Other Human Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Wundrack

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay was developed to test for tumor cell specific expression of the BCEI gene. This new marker gene, reported at first for human breast cancer, was found specifically active in various gastrointestinal carcinomas by previously applying immunohistochemistry and RNA (Northern blot analysis. Presently, by using reverse transcription -PCR analysis, a series of primary tumor tissues and established tumor cell lines were testcd for BCEI transcription. This approach was compared to immunostaining achieved by an antibody directed against the BCEI gene’s product. The result demonstrate the superior sensitivity of PCR by indicating the gene’ s expression in cases where immunohistochemical testing remained negative.

  17. Circadian clocks and tumor biology: what is to learn from human skin biopsies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Zsuzsanna; Battyáni, Zita; Szekeres, György; Csernus, Valér; Nagy, András D

    2013-07-01

    Some of the components of the circadian molecular clock have been shown to link directly to tumor suppression. Most studies on human tumorous biopsies with consistently down-regulated clock gene expression suggested a protective role for these genes against cancer formation. To highlight some limitations of this hypothesis we review these data in light of recent evidences from animal research, epidemiologic studies, and clinical data on skin tumors. We emphasize the role of circadian rhythmic orchestration in cellular metabolism with a potential in cancer development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Human tumor-associated viruses and new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D; Gutkind, J S

    2008-12-01

    The study of acute-transforming retroviruses and their oncogenes and of the multiple mechanisms deployed by DNA viruses to circumvent the growth-suppressive and proapoptotic function of tumor suppressor genes has provided the foundation of our current understanding of cancer biology. Unlike acute-transforming animal viruses, however, human tumor-associated viruses lead to malignancies with a prolonged latency and in conjunction with other environmental and host-related cooperating events. The relevance of viral infection to human cancer development has often been debated. We now know that at least six human viruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human papilloma virus (HPV), human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1) and Kaposi's associated sarcoma virus (KSHV) contribute to 10-15% of the cancers worldwide. Hence, the opportunity exists to fight cancer at the global scale by preventing the spread of these viruses, by the development and distribution of effective and safe antiviral vaccines, and by identifying their oncogenic mechanism. Here, we discuss the molecular events underlying the neoplastic potential of the human tumor-associated viruses, with emphasis on the enigmatic KSHV and its numerous virally hijacked proangiogenic, immune-evasive and tumor-promoting genes. The emerging information may facilitate the development of new molecular-targeted approaches to prevent and treat virally associated human malignancies.

  19. Cerebral glial tumors and human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection. More than a coincidental association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulignier, A; Mikol, J; Pialoux, G; Eliaszewicz, M; Thurel, C; Thiebaut, J B

    1994-07-15

    The authors describe the clinical and morphologic patterns in four patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) who developed intracranial glial tumors. This retrospective study reports 70 patients at various stages of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection who underwent stereotactic brain biopsy for an intracerebral space-occupying lesion. Of these patients, four had glial tumors: one astroblastoma, two astrocytomas, and one glioblastoma. Glial tumors probably arise from a complex interplay of factors; possibilities include the activation of a dominant oncogene or viral inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene by a viral promoter (like the tat protein), impairment of immune defenses (which facilitates the growth of astrocytomas in acute lymphoblastic leukemia), production of cellular growth factors, cytokines, possible infection of glial cells by HIV, and the potentiation of a coinfectious agent. These cases illustrate that glial tumors should be considered in the differential diagnosis of brain masses in HIV-1 infection, especially because specific treatment for these tumors is available. Moreover, the occurrence of glial tumors in AIDS patients is not only an important event from a clinical point of view, but may also have implications for the pathogenesis of tumors in AIDS.

  20. Strategies for Human Tumor Virus Discoveries: From Microscopic Observation to Digital Transcriptome Subtraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirvish, Ezra D; Shuda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Over 20% of human cancers worldwide are associated with infectious agents, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Various methods have been used to identify human tumor viruses, including electron microscopic observations of viral particles, immunologic screening, cDNA library screening, nucleic acid hybridization, consensus PCR, viral DNA array chip, and representational difference analysis. With the Human Genome Project, a large amount of genetic information from humans and other organisms has accumulated over the last decade. Utilizing the available genetic databases, Feng et al. (2007) developed digital transcriptome subtraction (DTS), an in silico method to sequentially subtract human sequences from tissue or cellular transcriptome, and discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) from Merkel cell carcinoma. Here, we review the background and methods underlying the human tumor virus discoveries and explain how DTS was developed and used for the discovery of MCV.

  1. Human pancreatic tumors grown in mice release tissue factor-positive microvesicles that increase venous clot size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisada, Y; Ay, C; Auriemma, A C; Cooley, B C; Mackman, N

    2017-11-01

    Essentials Tumor-bearing mice have larger venous clots than controls. Human tissue factor is present in clots in tumor-bearing mice. Inhibition of human tissue factor reduces clot size in tumor-bearing mice. This new mouse model may be useful to study mechanisms of cancer-associated thrombosis. Background Pancreatic cancer patients have a high rate of venous thromboembolism. Human pancreatic tumors and cell lines express high levels of tissue factor (TF), and release TF-positive microvesicles (TF+ MVs). In pancreatic cancer patients, tumor-derived TF+ MVs are present in the blood, and increased levels are associated with venous thromboembolism and decreased survival. Previous studies have shown that mice with orthotopic human or murine pancreatic tumors have circulating tumor-derived TF+ MVs, an activated clotting system, and increased incidence and mean clot weight in an inferior vena cava stenosis model. These results suggest that TF+ MVs contribute to thrombosis. However, the specific role of tumor-derived TF+ MVs in venous thrombosis in mice has not been determined. Objectives To test the hypothesis that tumor-derived TF+ MVs enhance thrombosis in mice. Methods We determined the contribution of TF+ MVs derived from human pancreatic tumors grown orthotopically in nude mice to venous clot formation by using an anti-human TF mAb. We used an inferior vena cava stasis model of venous thrombosis. Results Tumor-bearing mice had significantly larger clots than control mice. Clots from tumor-bearing mice contained human TF, suggesting the incorporation of tumor-derived MVs. Importantly, administration of an anti-human TF mAb reduced clot size in tumor-bearing mice but did not affect clot size in control mice. Conclusions Our results indicate that TF+ MVs released from orthotopic pancreatic tumors increase venous thrombosis in mice. This new model may be useful for evaluating the roles of different factors in cancer-associated thrombosis. © 2017 International Society on

  2. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Mahmoud M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp. are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Methods Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 oC for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A. Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. Results More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 oC hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil

  3. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp.) are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Methods Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 oC for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231) and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A). Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. Results More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 oC hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil treatment. Boswellia sacra

  4. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts express pro-inflammatory factors in human breast and ovarian tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erez, Neta, E-mail: netaerez@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Pathology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Glanz, Sarah [Department of Pathology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Raz, Yael [Department of Pathology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, LIS Maternity Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Avivi, Camilla [Department of Pathology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Barshack, Iris [Department of Pathology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Department of Pathology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express pro-inflammatory factors. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors correlates with tumor invasiveness. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors is associated with NF-κb activation in CAFs. -- Abstract: Inflammation has been established in recent years as a hallmark of cancer. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs) support tumorigenesis by stimulating angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We previously demonstrated that CAFs also mediate tumor-enhancing inflammation in a mouse model of skin carcinoma. Breast and ovarian carcinomas are amongst the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in women and cancer-related inflammation is linked with both these tumor types. However, the role of CAFs in mediating inflammation in these malignancies remains obscure. Here we show that CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express high levels of the pro-inflammatory factors IL-6, COX-2 and CXCL1, previously identified to be part of a CAF pro-inflammatory gene signature. Moreover, we show that both pro-inflammatory signaling by CAFs and leukocyte infiltration of tumors are enhanced in invasive ductal carcinoma as compared with ductal carcinoma in situ. The pro-inflammatory genes expressed by CAFs are known NF-κB targets and we show that NF-κB is up-regulated in breast and ovarian CAFs. Our data imply that CAFs mediate tumor-promoting inflammation in human breast and ovarian tumors and thus may be an attractive target for stromal-directed therapeutics.

  5. Evaluation of Antiproliferative Potential of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles on HeLa Human Cervical Tumor Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoriţa Diaconeasa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 nanoparticles as nanomaterials have promising biomedical applications. In this paper, the cytotoxicity induced by CONPs human cervical tumor cells was investigated. Cerium oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using the precipitation method. The nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferation of HeLa human cervical tumor cells in a dose dependent manner but did not showed to be cytotoxic as analyzed by MTT assay. The administrated treatment decreased the HeLa cell viability cells from 100% to 65% at the dose of 100 μg/mL.

  6. Classification of microvascular patterns via cluster analysis reveals their prognostic significance in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Lin, Zhi-Xiong; Lin, Guo-Shi; Zhou, Chang-Fu; Chen, Yu-Peng; Wang, Xing-Fu; Zheng, Zong-Qing

    2015-01-01

    There are limited researches focusing on microvascular patterns (MVPs) in human glioblastoma and their prognostic impact. We evaluated MVPs of 78 glioblastomas by CD34/periodic acid-Schiff dual staining and by cluster analysis of the percentage of microvascular area for distinct microvascular formations. The distribution of 5 types of basic microvascular formations, that is, microvascular sprouting (MS), vascular cluster (VC), vascular garland (VG), glomeruloid vascular proliferation (GVP), and vasculogenic mimicry (VM), was variable. Accordingly, cluster analysis classified MVPs into 2 types: type I MVP displayed prominent MSs and VCs, whereas type II MVP had numerous VGs, GVPs, and VMs. By analyzing the proportion of microvascular area for each type of formation, we determined that glioblastomas with few MSs and VCs had many GVPs and VMs, and vice versa. VG seemed to be a transitional type of formation. In case of type I MVP, expression of Ki-67 and p53 but not MGMT was significantly higher as compared with those of type II MVP (P < .05). Survival analysis showed that the type of MVPs presented as an independent prognostic factor of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (both P < .001). Type II MVP had a more negative influence on PFS and OS than did type I MVP. We conclude that the heterogeneous MVPs in glioblastoma can be categorized properly by certain histopathologic and statistical analyses and may influence clinical outcome. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cancer stem cells from human breast tumors are involved in spontaneous metastases in orthotopic mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiping; Patel, Manishkumar R.; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Patsialou, Antonia; Qian, Dalong; Lin, Jiahui; Wen, Susanna; Chang, Ya-Fang; Bachmann, Michael H.; Shimono, Yohei; Dalerba, Piero; Adorno, Maddalena; Lobo, Neethan; Bueno, Janet; Dirbas, Frederick M.; Goswami, Sumanta; Somlo, George; Condeelis, John; Contag, Christopher H.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Clarke, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the role of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in metastasis, we generated human-in-mouse breast cancer orthotopic models using patient tumor specimens, labeled with optical reporter fusion genes. These models recapitulate human cancer features not captured with previous models, including spontaneous metastasis in particular, and provide a useful platform for studies of breast tumor initiation and progression. With noninvasive imaging approaches, as few as 10 cells of stably labeled BCSCs could be tracked in vivo, enabling studies of early tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis. These advances in BCSC imaging revealed that CD44+ cells from both primary tumors and lung metastases are highly enriched for tumor-initiating cells. Our metastatic cancer models, combined with noninvasive imaging techniques, constitute an integrated approach that could be applied to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the dissemination of metastatic CSCs (MCSCs) and to explore therapeutic strategies targeting MCSCs in general or to evaluate individual patient tumor cells and predict response to therapy. PMID:20921380

  8. High hydrostatic pressure induces immunogenic cell death in human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucikova, Jitka; Moserova, Irena; Truxova, Iva; Hermanova, Ivana; Vancurova, Irena; Partlova, Simona; Fialova, Anna; Sojka, Ludek; Cartron, Pierre-Francois; Houska, Milan; Rob, Lukas; Bartunkova, Jirina; Spisek, Radek

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have identified molecular events characteristic of immunogenic cell death (ICD), including surface exposure of calreticulin (CRT), the heat shock proteins HSP70 and HSP90, the release of high-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) and the release of ATP from dying cells. We investigated the potential of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) to induce ICD in human tumor cells. HHP induced the rapid expression of HSP70, HSP90 and CRT on the cell surface. HHP also induced the release of HMGB1 and ATP. The interaction of dendritic cells (DCs) with HHP-treated tumor cells led to a more rapid rate of DC phagocytosis, upregulation of CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR and the release of interleukin IL-6, IL-12p70 and TNF-α. DCs pulsed with tumor cells killed by HHP induced high numbers of tumor-specific T cells. DCs pulsed with HHP-treated tumor cells also induced the lowest number of regulatory T cells. In addition, we found that the key features of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptotic pathway, such as reactive oxygen species production, phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α and activation of caspase-8, were activated by HHP treatment. Therefore, HHP acts as a reliable and potent inducer of ICD in human tumor cells. © 2014 UICC.

  9. Rapid spread of mouse mammary tumor virus in cultured human breast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günzburg Walter H

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV as a causative agent in human breast carcinogenesis has recently been the subject of renewed interest. The proposed model is based on the detection of MMTV sequences in human breast cancer but not in healthy breast tissue. One of the main drawbacks to this model, however, was that until now human cells had not been demonstrated to sustain productive MMTV infection. Results Here, we show for the first time the rapid spread of mouse mammary tumor virus, MMTV(GR, in cultured human mammary cells (Hs578T, ultimately leading to the infection of every cell in culture. The replication of the virus was monitored by quantitative PCR, quantitative RT-PCR and immunofluorescence imaging. The infected human cells expressed, upon cultivation with dexamethasone, MMTV structural proteins and released spiked B-type virions, the infectivity of which could be neutralized by anti-MMTV antibody. Replication of the virus was efficiently blocked by an inhibitor of reverse transcription, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine. The human origin of the infected cells was confirmed by determining a number of integration sites hosting the provirus, which were unequivocally identified as human sequences. Conclusion Taken together, our results show that human cells can support replication of mouse mammary tumor virus.

  10. Hersintuzumab: A novel humanized anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody induces potent tumor growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Soltantoyeh, Tahereh; Hosseini-Ghatar, Reza; Bahadori, Tannaz; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Navabi, Shadi Sadat; Farid, Samira; Karimi-Jafari, Mohammad Hossein; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Shokri, Fazel

    2017-10-06

    Humanized monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against HER2 including trastuzumab and pertuzumab are widely used to treat HER2 overexpressing metastatic breast cancers. These two mAbs recognize distinct epitopes on HER2 and their combination induces a more potent blockade of HER2 signaling than trastuzumab alone. Recently, we have reported characterization of a new chimeric mAb (c-1T0) which binds to an epitope different from that recognized by trastuzumab and significantly inhibits proliferation of HER2 overexpressing tumor cells. Here, we describe humanization of this mAb by grafting all six complementarity determining regions (CDRs) onto human variable germline genes. Humanized VH and VL sequences were synthesized and ligated to human γ1 and κ constant region genes using splice overlap extension (SOE) PCR. Subsequently, the humanized antibody designated hersintuzumab was expressed and characterized by ELISA, Western blot and flow cytometry. The purified humanized mAb binds to recombinant HER2 and HER2-overexpressing tumor cells with an affinity comparable with the chimeric and parental mouse mAbs. It recognizes an epitope distinct from those recognized by trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Binding of hersintuzumab to HER2 overexpressing tumor cells induces G1 cell cycle arrest, inhibition of ERK and AKT signaling pathways and growth inhibition. Moreover, hersintuzumab could induce antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) on BT-474 cells. This new humanized mAb is a potentially valuable tool for single or combination breast cancer therapy.

  11. Pharmacological approaches to coronary microvascular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarini, Giacinta; Huqi, Alda; Morrone, Doralisa; Capozza, Paola; Todiere, Giancarlo; Marzilli, Mario

    2014-12-01

    In recent decades coronary microvascular dysfunction has been increasingly identified as a relevant contributor to several cardiovascular conditions. Indeed, coronary microvascular abnormalities have been recognized in patients suffering acute myocardial infarction, chronic stable angina and cardiomyopathies, and also in patients with hypertension, obesity and diabetes. In this review, we will examine pathophysiological information needed to understand pharmacological approaches to coronary microvascular dysfunction in these different clinical contexts. Well-established drugs and new pharmacological agents, including those for which only preclinical data are available, will be covered in detail. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Brain Tumor Tropism of Transplanted Human Neural Stem Cells Is Induced by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Ole Schmidt

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs offers a new potential therapeutic approach as a cell-based delivery system for gene therapy in brain tumors. This is based on the unique capacity of NSCs to migrate throughout the brain and to target invading tumor cells. However, the signals controlling the targeted migration of transplanted NSCs are poorly defined. We analyzed the in vitro and in vivo effects of angiogenic growth factors and protein extracts from surgical specimens of brain tumor patients on NSC migration. Here, we demonstrate that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is able to induce a long-range attraction of transplanted human NSCs from distant sites in the adult brain. Our results indicate that tumorupregulated VEGF and angiogenic-activated microvasculature are relevant guidance signals for NSC tropism toward brain tumors.

  13. Comprehensive allelotype and genetic anaysis of 466 human nervous system tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Deimling, A; Fimmers, R; Schmidt, M C

    2000-01-01

    Brain tumors pose a particular challenge to molecular oncology. Many different tumor entities develop in the nervous system and some of them appear to follow distinct pathogenic routes. Molecular genetic alterations have increasingly been reported in nervous system neoplasms. However......, a considerable number of affected genes remain to be identified. We present here a comprehensive allelotype analysis of 466 nervous system tumors based on loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies with 129 microsatellite markers that span the genome. Specific alterations of the EGFR, CDK4, CDKN2A, TP53, DMBT1, NF2...... may provide a valuable framework for future studies to delineate molecular pathways in many types of human central nervous system tumors....

  14. Prevention of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related tumors in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, Mario; Šterbenc, Anja; Lunar, Maja M

    2017-10-20

    In comparison to their HIV-negative counterparts, people living with HIV (PLWH) have a higher prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in various anatomical sites coupled with increased HPV persistence, higher risk of HPV-related tumors, and faster disease progression. Areas covered: Gender-neutral prevention strategies for HPV-related cancers in PLWH discussed: ABC approach, HPV vaccination, antiretroviral treatment (ART), anal cancer screening, and smoking cessation. Gender specific strategies: cervical cancer screening reduces the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer and circumcision might reduce the risk of HPV infections in men. Expert commentary: HPV-related cancer incidence has not declined (e.g. cervical cancer) and has even increased (e.g. anal cancer) in the ART era, demanding an effective HPV prevention strategy. HPV vaccination should be introduced into national prevention programs worldwide immediately because current prophylactic vaccines are safe, tolerable, and immunogenic in PLWH. HPV vaccine efficacy trials in PLWH are essential to determine the most appropriate immunization schedule. The population most at risk of anal cancer is HIV-positive men who have sex with men, who are not protected by herd immunity if only the female population is vaccinated. Unvaccinated PLWH need enhanced surveillance for early detection of HPV-related cancers and their precursors.

  15. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species’ regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF –p53 axis activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07702.001 PMID:26575287

  16. Ultrastructural changes of mitochondria in human retinoblastoma: correlation with tumor differentiation and invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lata; Nag, Tapas C; Kashyap, Seema

    2016-05-01

    Retinoblastoma still represents a challenge for pediatric tumors. Mitochondria have been implicated in tumor progression, cell differentiation, and apoptotic pathways. Electron microscopy allows the study of mitochondrial morphology and it is still debated in human retinoblastoma. Demographic, clinical, and histopathological parameters were recorded in 17 enucleated retinoblastoma specimens. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed to study tumor characteristics and the extent of invasion in ocular structures. The aim of this study was to describe and analyze the mitochondrial morphology in human retinoblastoma by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). There was a male preponderance in our study. Ages ranged from 2 to 78 months. Histopathological analysis revealed that 15 (88.2 %) tumors were poorly differentiated retinoblastomas. Massive choroidal invasion was the most frequent histopathological high-risk factor among the others. Histopathological high-risk factors were found in 7/17 (41.1 %) cases. Tumor samples of all patients were examined by means of TEM. All cases showed tumor cells with high nucleocytoplasmic ratio. Poorly differentiated retinoblastoma cases showed fewer mitochondria, scant cytoplasm, disorganized organelles (mitochondria), and necrosis, whereas well-differentiated retinoblastomas had larger number of mitochondria and more organized organelles. However, there was no significant difference in mitochondrial changes between invasive and noninvasive tumors. Our study observed that cristolysis and swollen mitochondria were more frequent in retinoblastoma tumors. Understanding the structural and functional characteristics of mitochondria in retinoblastoma might be essential for the design of future therapeutic strategies. The authors have no proprietary or commercial interest in any materials discussed in this article.

  17. MUC1 positive, Kras and Pten driven mouse gynecologic tumors replicate human tumors and vary in survival and nuclear grade based on anatomical location.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas S Tirodkar

    Full Text Available Activating mutations of Kras oncogene and deletions of Pten tumor suppressor gene play important roles in cancers of the female genital tract. We developed here new preclinical models for gynecologic cancers, using conditional (Cre-loxP mice with floxed genetic alterations in Kras and Pten. The triple transgenic mice, briefly called MUC1KrasPten, express human MUC1 antigen as self and carry a silent oncogenic KrasG12D and Pten deletion mutation. Injection of Cre-encoding adenovirus (AdCre in the ovarian bursa, oviduct or uterus activates the floxed mutations and initiates ovarian, oviductal, and endometrial cancer, respectively. Anatomical site-specific Cre-loxP recombination throughout the genital tract of MUC1KrasPten mice leads to MUC1 positive genital tract tumors, and the development of these tumors is influenced by the anatomical environment. Endometrioid histology was consistently displayed in all tumors of the murine genital tract (ovaries, oviducts, and uterus. Tumors showed increased expression of MUC1 glycoprotein and triggered de novo antibodies in tumor bearing hosts, mimicking the immunobiology seen in patients. In contrast to the ovarian and endometrial tumors, oviductal tumors showed higher nuclear grade. Survival for oviduct tumors was significantly lower than for endometrial tumors (p = 0.0015, yet similar to survival for ovarian cancer. Oviducts seem to favor the development of high grade tumors, providing preclinical evidence in support of the postulated role of fallopian tubes as the originating site for high grade human ovarian tumors.

  18. Establishment of a spontaneous metastasis tumor model for human ErbB-2 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xin; He, Yu; Yao, Wenbing; Gao, Xiangdong

    2017-04-01

    Human ErbB-2 (Her-2) is a critical target for cancer immunotherapy, and its over-expression can promote cancer migration and invasion. Compared with passive antibody therapy, vaccination treatment is more effective in the prevention of cancer recurrence. BALB-neuT mouse is a spontaneous metastasis tumor model used for testing the anti-tumor metastatic effect of rat ErbB-2 (neu) vaccine. However, no spontaneous metastasis tumor model used for evaluating Her-2 vaccine has been developed. In the current study, we attempted to use murine melanoma cell lines to establish a stable spontaneous metastasis tumor model for Her-2 vaccines. We developed Her-2-positive B16F10 and B16BL6 cell lines expressing similar Her-2 levels as the typical human tumor cell line SKBR-3. Results showed that Her-2-positive B16BL6, rather than B16F10, cell line could effectively and spontaneously transfer to the lungs approximately 28days after the removal of primary tumors because it has stronger adhesion and invasion capacities. A stable spontaneous metastasis model was developed through in vivo screening of Her-2-positvie B16BL6 cells twice. This model was successfully applied in the analysis of the anti-metastatic efficacy of a tumor vaccine based on heat shock protein. Thus, we first established a spontaneous metastasis model that stably expresses Her-2 at similar levels as human cancers. This model can be used to evaluate the anti-metastatic efficacy of Her-2 vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. A human colon adenocarcinoma xenograft--radiation response, cellular composition, and tumor disaggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, C M; Keng, P C; Siemann, D W; Sutherland, R M

    1987-02-01

    The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line WiDr was xenografted and the tumor characterized. When athymic mice (NCR-nu) were inoculated with 10(6) cells, tumors appeared after 7-14 days with a 93-100% take rate and grew with an initial volume-doubling time of around 6 days. For optimizing the tumor disaggregation method, a comparison was made of two dissociation procedures and of different dissociation times. An enzyme cocktail (collagenase, DNase, pronase) resulted in total viable cell yields of 1-3 X 10(7) cells/g tumor tissue. Cell yield decreased with increasing tumor weight. Disaggregation with trypsin gave lower cell yields; and so, although the plating efficiencies (PEs) were higher, the enzyme cocktail was chosen for tumor disaggregation. On the basis of morphologic identification, cell suspensions prepared from WiDr tumors, by use of the enzyme cocktail for 2 hours, contained 49% malignant cells as well as a significant fraction of nonneoplastic cells. The major nonneoplastic host cell component was macrophage (33%); lymphocytes (13%) and granulocytes (5%) also were present. Host cells could be separated from neoplastic cells by centrifugal elutriation. By mixing various proportions of host and tumor cells, it was subsequently shown that the presence of host cells did not influence the malignant cell PE unless the cell suspensions contained greater than 90% host cells. Single-cell suspensions prepared from WiDr tumors, with use of the enzyme cocktail for 2 hours, were irradiated and then plated for survival (D0 = 1.5 Gy; n = 5) (D0, the 37% dose slope). A comparison was made of the sensitivity to radiation, after the different dissociation methods. The radiation sensitivities after 1.5-hour trypsinization and 2- and 6-hour enzyme cocktail administrations were similar, but after 0.5 hour of trypsin, the cells were more sensitive to radiation.

  20. cis-4-[{sup 18}F]-Fluoro-L-proline fails to detect peripheral tumors in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoffels, Gabriele; Pauleit, Dirk [Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics-Medicine, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich, FRG (Germany); Haas, Rainer; Kobbe, Guido [Department of Oncology, Hematology, and Clinical Immunology, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, FRG (Germany); Salber, Dagmar [C. and O. Vogt Institute of Brain Research, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, FRG (Germany); Hamacher, Kurt; Coenen, Heinz H. [Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics - Nuclear Chemistry, Research Centre Juelich, Juelich, FRG (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics-Medicine, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich, FRG (Germany)], E-mail: k.j.langen@fz-juelich.de

    2008-11-15

    System A amino acid transport is increased in transformed and malignant cells. The amino acid 4-cis[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-proline (cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro) has been shown to be a substrate of the System A amino acid carrier. In this pilot study, we investigated the diagnostic potential of cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro in patients with various tumors in comparison with [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Methods: Eight patients (seven females, one male, age range 43-77 years) with large primary, recurrent or metastatic tumors of different histologies were included in this study. One patient had a recurrent non-Hodgkin lymphoma; two patients, metastatic colon or rectal cancer; one, a metastatic endometrial cancer; one, a multiple myeloma; one, an Ewing sarcoma; one, a metastatic breast cancer and one, a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PET scans of the trunk were acquired at 1 h after intravenous injection of 400 MBq cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro and compared to PET scans with [{sup 18}F]FDG. Results: None of the tumors or metastatic lesions in this series of patients demonstrated relevant uptake of cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro. In contrast, all tumors with exception of the multiple myeloma showed an intensive uptake of [{sup 18}F]FDG. The mean standardized uptake value of cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro in the tumor or metastases was significantly lower than that of [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake (1.7{+-}0.6 vs. 5.7{+-}3.0; n=8; P<.01). Conclusion: Although other System A-specific tracers have shown relevant tumor uptake, cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro fails to detect most types of human tumors. Based on these results, we cannot recommend a further evaluation of this tracer as a tumor-seeking agent.

  1. cis-4-[(18)F]-Fluoro-l-proline fails to detect peripheral tumors in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffels, Gabriele; Pauleit, Dirk; Haas, Rainer; Kobbe, Guido; Salber, Dagmar; Hamacher, Kurt; Coenen, Heinz H; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2008-11-01

    System A amino acid transport is increased in transformed and malignant cells. The amino acid 4-cis[(18)F]fluoro-l-proline (cis-[(18)F]FPro) has been shown to be a substrate of the System A amino acid carrier. In this pilot study, we investigated the diagnostic potential of cis-[(18)F]FPro in patients with various tumors in comparison with [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Eight patients (seven females, one male, age range 43-77 years) with large primary, recurrent or metastatic tumors of different histologies were included in this study. One patient had a recurrent non-Hodgkin lymphoma; two patients, metastatic colon or rectal cancer; one, a metastatic endometrial cancer; one, a multiple myeloma; one, an Ewing sarcoma; one, a metastatic breast cancer and one, a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PET scans of the trunk were acquired at 1 h after intravenous injection of 400 MBq cis-[(18)F]FPro and compared to PET scans with [(18)F]FDG. None of the tumors or metastatic lesions in this series of patients demonstrated relevant uptake of cis-[(18)F]FPro. In contrast, all tumors with exception of the multiple myeloma showed an intensive uptake of [(18)F]FDG. The mean standardized uptake value of cis-[(18)F]FPro in the tumor or metastases was significantly lower than that of [(18)F]FDG uptake (1.7+/-0.6 vs. 5.7+/-3.0; n=8; P<.01). Although other System A-specific tracers have shown relevant tumor uptake, cis-[(18)F]FPro fails to detect most types of human tumors. Based on these results, we cannot recommend a further evaluation of this tracer as a tumor-seeking agent.

  2. Role of Tumor Associated Fibroblasts in Human Liver Regeneration, Cirrhosis, and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cesselli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor associated fibroblasts (TAFs are considered a microenvironmental element critical for tumor growth and progression. Experimental studies suggest that their origin could be from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs derived from the bone marrow. However, the role played by TAFs in cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma development, and progression is largely unknown, and in vitro human models are missing. This paper for the first time demonstrates that (1 human neoplastic livers possess a population of multipotent adult stem cells (MASCs with properties of TAFs; (2 a population of MASC-derived TAFs is already present in cirrhotic, not yet neoplastic, livers; (3 MASCs isolated from nonneoplastic and noncirrhotic liver scan acquire a TAF phenotype when grown in a medium conditioned by tumor cell lines, supporting the notion that TAF could originate from resident primitive cells (MASCs, possibly through a paracrine mechanism.

  3. Coronary microvascular dysfunction in overt diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bratis

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: In patients with DM2 myocardial perfusion reserve is markedly decreased, suggestive of microvascular disease. In this small cohort MPRI impairment did not correlate to the LV EF deterioration.

  4. Intravital multiphoton imaging reveals multicellular streaming as a crucial component of in vivo cell migration in human breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsialou, Antonia; Bravo-Cordero, Jose Javier; Wang, Yarong; Entenberg, David; Liu, Huiping; Clarke, Michael; Condeelis, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in breast cancer patients. Cell migration is an essential component of almost every step of the metastatic cascade, especially the early step of invasion inside the primary tumor. In this report, we have used intravital multiphoton microscopy to visualize the different migration patterns of human breast tumor cells in live primary tumors. We used xenograft tumors of MDA-MB-231 cells as well as a low passage xenograft tumor from orthotopically injected patient-derived breast tumor cells. Direct visualization of human tumor cells in vivo shows two patterns of high-speed migration inside primary tumors: a. single cells and b. multicellular streams (i.e., cells following each other in a single file but without cohesive cell junctions). Critically, we found that only streaming and not random migration of single cells was significantly correlated with proximity to vessels, with intravasation and with numbers of elevated circulating tumor cells in the bloodstream. Finally, although the two human tumors were derived from diverse genetic backgrounds, we found that their migratory tumor cells exhibited coordinated gene expression changes that led to the same end-phenotype of enhanced migration involving activating actin polymerization and myosin contraction. Our data are the first direct visualization and assessment of in vivo migration within a live patient-derived breast xenograft tumor. PMID:25013744

  5. Restricted 12p amplification and RAS mutation in human germ cell tumors of the adult testis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Roelofs; J.W. Oosterhuis (Wolter); L.H.J. Looijenga (Leendert); C. Bokemeyer; M.C. Mostert (Marijke); K. Pompe; G. Zafarana (Gaetano); M. van Oorschot; R.J.H.L.M. van Gurp (Ruud); A.J.M. Gillis (Ad); J.A. Stoop (Hans); H.B. Beverloo (Berna)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractHuman testicular germ-cell tumors of young adults (TGCTs), both seminomas and nonseminomas, are characterized by 12p overrepresentation, mostly as isochromosomes, of which the biological and clinical significance is still unclear. A limited number of TGCTs has been

  6. H-1 chemical shift imaging characterization of human brain tumor and edema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijens, PE; Oudkerk, M

    Longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times of metabolites in human brain tumor, peritumoral edema, and unaffected brain tissue were assessed from point resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) H-1 chemical shift imaging results at different repetition times (TR = 1500 and 5000 ms; T1: n = 19) and

  7. Novel biomarkers of coronary microvascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Olivia Y; Lee, Suegene K; Eshtehardi, Parham; Samady, Habib

    2016-07-01

    Coronary microvascular disease in the absence of myocardial diseases has traditionally been diagnosed through coronary reactivity testing in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Compared with invasive procedures, blood-based biomarkers may have reduced cost, less risk of physical harm and greater accessibility, making them ideal for an outpatient management strategy. There are a variety of biomarkers available with potential utility in the management of microvascular disease; however, none have yet been extensively validated or established in this clinical patient population.

  8. HIV-1/cocaine induced oxidative stress disrupts tight junction protein-1 in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells: role of Ras/ERK1/2 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjali Dalvi

    Full Text Available Intravenous drug use (IVDU is the major risk factor in the development of HIV-related pulmonary arterial hypertension (HRPAH; however, the pathogenesis of HRPAH in association with IVDU has yet to be characterized. Endothelial injury is considered to be an initiating factor for pulmonary vascular remodeling in animal models of PAH. Our previous study shows that simultaneous exposure to HIV-Trans-activator of transcription (Tat and cocaine exacerbates both disruption of tight junction proteins and permeability of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells compared with either treatment alone. We here now demonstrate that this HIV-Tat and cocaine mediated endothelial dysfunction accompanies with increase in hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radicals generation and involves redox sensitive signaling pathway. Pretreatment with antioxidant cocktail attenuated the cocaine and Tat mediated disassembly of Zonula Occludens (ZO-1 and enhancement of endothelial monolayer permeability. Furthermore, inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin or siRNA-mediated knockdown of gp-91(phox abolished the Tat/cocaine-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS production, suggesting the NADPH oxidase mediated generation of oxidative radicals. In addition, ROS dependent activation of Ras and ERK1/2 Kinase was observed to be mediating the TJP-1 disassembly, and endothelial dysfunction in response to cocaine and Tat exposure. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that Tat/cocaine -mediated production of ROS activate Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 pathway that contributes to disruption of tight junction protein leading to pulmonary endothelial dysfunction associated with pulmonary vascular remodeling.

  9. Telomerase inhibition improves tumor response to radiotherapy in a murine orthotopic model of human glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandon, Sylvain; Malleval, Céline; El Hamdani, Badia; Battiston-Montagne, Priscillia; Bolbos, Radu; Langlois, Jean-Baptiste; Manas, Patrick; Gryaznov, Sergei M; Alphonse, Gersende; Honnorat, Jérôme; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Poncet, Delphine

    2015-07-17

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequent and aggressive type of adult brain tumor. Most GBMs express telomerase; a high level of intra-tumoral telomerase activity (TA) is predictive of poor prognosis. Thus, telomerase inhibitors are promising options to treat GBM. These inhibitors increase the response to radiotherapy (RT), in vitro as well as in vivo. Since typical treatments for GBM include RT, our objective was to evaluate the efficiency of Imetelstat (TA inhibitor) combined with RT. We used a murine orthotopic model of human GBM (N = 8 to11 mice per group) and μMRI imaging to evaluate the efficacy of Imetelstat (delivered by intra-peritoneal injection) alone and combined with RT. Using a clinically established protocol, we demonstrated that Imetelstat significantly: (i) inhibited the TA in the very center of the tumor, (ii) reduced tumor volume as a proportion of TA inhibition, and (iii) increased the response to RT, in terms of tumor volume regression and survival increase. Imetelstat is currently evaluated in refractory brain tumors in young patients (without RT). Our results support its clinical evaluation combined with RT to treat GBM.

  10. Combined treatment of syngeneic murine tumors and xenotransplanted human lung cancer by immunotherapy and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashima, H.; Yasumoto, K.; Yanagawa, E.; Takayama, K. (Kyushu Cancer Center, Fukuoka (Japan)); Nomoto, K.

    1981-06-01

    The synergistic effect of nonspecific immunotherapy with cell-wall skeleton of BCG on radiotherapy against two syngeneic murine tumors, a methylcho-lanthrene-induced tumor (MCA) and a spontaneous well-differentiated mammary adenocarcinoma (Br-1), was studied in (+/+) BALB/c mice and (nu/nu) mice of BALB/c background. Single irradiation of tumors with a dose of 2000 rad induced complete shrinkage in about 18% of MCA and Br-1 tumors in (+/+) mice. Single irradiation did not induce complete shrinkage of tumors in (nu/nu) mice. When immunotherapy was combined with radiotherapy, the rates of complete shrinkage of MCA and Br-1 tumors increased to 82 and 61%, respectively. In contrast, such a strong synergistic effect was not observed in (nu/nu) mice. Moreover, human lung cancers (two squamous cell carcinomas and two small cell carcinomas) xenotransplanted to nude mice were treated with the combined therapy. The effect was stronger on squamous cell carcinomas than on small cell carcinomas.

  11. A Tumor-stroma Targeted Oncolytic Adenovirus Replicated in Human Ovary Cancer Samples and Inhibited Growth of Disseminated Solid Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M Veronica; Rivera, Angel A; Viale, Diego L; Benedetti, Lorena; Cuneo, Nicasio; Kimball, Kristopher J; Wang, Minghui; Douglas, Joanne T; Zhu, Zeng B; Bravo, Alicia I; Gidekel, Manuel; Alvarez, Ronald D; Curiel, David T; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the tumor stroma in addition to the malignant cell compartment is of paramount importance to achieve complete tumor regression. In this work, we modified a previously designed tumor stroma-targeted conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) based on the SPARC promoter by introducing a mutated E1A unable to bind pRB and pseudotyped with a chimeric Ad5/3 fiber (Ad F512v1), and assessed its replication/lytic capacity in ovary cancer in vitro and in vivo. AdF512v1 was able to replicate in fresh samples obtained from patients: (i) with primary human ovary cancer; (ii) that underwent neoadjuvant treatment; (iii) with metastatic disease. In addition, we show that four intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of 5 × 1010 v.p. eliminated 50% of xenografted human ovary tumors disseminated in nude mice. Moreover, AdF512v1 replication in tumor models was enhanced 15–40-fold when the tumor contained a mix of malignant and SPARC-expressing stromal cells (fibroblasts and endothelial cells). Contrary to the wild-type virus, AdF512v1 was unable to replicate in normal human ovary samples while the wild-type virus can replicate. This study provides evidence on the lytic capacity of this CRAd and highlights the importance of targeting the stromal tissue in addition to the malignant cell compartment to achieve tumor regression. PMID:22948673

  12. Cytostasis of tumor cell lines by granulocytes from cancer patients and normal human donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korec, S; Herberman, R B; Cannon, G B; Reid, J; Braatz, J A

    1981-08-15

    Granulocytes of normal human donors were previously shown to have cytostatic activity in vitro against a variety of tumor cell lines. In the present study, we have compared the levels of granulocyte-mediated cytostatic activity in cancer patients and normal donors. In an initial study of 25 tumor-bearing patients and 21 individuals with benign or no disease, decreased cytostatic activity was observed in 84% of the cancer patients. Nine cancer patients with no evidence of disease had reactivity in the normal range. Granulocytes separated by a one-step method on a double Ficoll-Percoll gradient showed decreased reactivity. This procedure eliminated the differences previously detected between tumor-bearing patients and controls. Addition of either pooled normal AB human serum or autologous serum to the assay restored the reactivity. Only with autologous serum and not with allogeneic serum, were the differences between tumor-bearing patients and controls again seen. Therefore, in a subsequent study, we examined the effect of serum on cytostasis by normal granulocytes that were isolated on double gradients. We observed lowered serum restorative activity (SRA) in 41 of the 46 (89%) tumor-bearing patients tested. Fractionation of sera by Sephadex G-200 chromatography indicated that SRA of both cancer patients and normal donors was in the 100,000 molecular weight region.

  13. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Leten

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683 in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1 outliers can be detected earlier, (2 GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3 a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents.

  14. Clotrimazole disrupts glycolysis in human breast cancer without affecting non-tumoral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Raquel Guimarães; Calaça, Isadora de Castro; Celestrini, Deborah de Moura; Correia, Ana Helena; Costa, Mauricio Augusto Silva Magalhães; Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2011-08-01

    Human breast cancer tissues, as well as normal tissues from the same patients, were treated with clotrimazole (CTZ) and have their capacities for glucose consumption and lactate production evaluated. This treatment strongly decreased the lactate production rate by tumor tissues (85% inhibition) without affecting the other measurements made, i.e. lactate production by control tissues or glucose consumption by both, control and tumor tissues. This result directly correlates with the inhibition promoted by CTZ on the activity of the major regulatory glycolytic enzyme 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK) that was observed in tumor tissues (84% inhibition) but not in control tissues. Fractionation of the tissues revealed that this inhibition does not occur in the soluble fraction of the enzyme, but is exclusive of a particulate fraction. It has been previously shown that the particulate fraction of PFK activity in tumors is associated to actin filaments (f-actin). Thus, we investigated whether CTZ would affect the association between PFK and f-actin and we found that the drug directly induces the dissociation of the two proteins in the same extent that it inhibits lactate production, total PFK activity and the particulate PFK activity. We concluded that CTZ disrupts glycolysis on human breast tumor tissues, inhibiting PFK activity by dissociating the enzyme from f-actin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of cloned cells, animal model, and ATRA sensitivity of human testicular yolk sac tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Junfeng

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The testicular yolk sac tumor (TYST is the most common neoplasm originated from germ cells differentiated abnormally, a major part of pediatric malignant testicular tumors. The present study aimed at developing and validating the in vitro and vivo models of TYST and evaluating the sensitivity of TYST to treatments, by cloning human TYST cells and investigating the histology, ultra-structure, growth kinetics and expression of specific proteins of cloned cells. We found biological characteristics of cloned TYST cells were similar to the yolk sac tumor and differentiated from the columnar to glandular-like or goblet cells-like cells. Chromosomes for tumor identification in each passage met nature of the primary tumor. TYST cells were more sensitive to all-trans-retinoic acid which had significantly inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Cisplatin induced apoptosis of TYST cells through the activation of p53 expression and down-regulation of Bcl- expression. Thus, we believe that cloned TYST cells and the animal model developed here are useful to understand the molecular mechanism of TYST cells and develop potential therapies for human TYST.

  16. Human adipose tissue from normal and tumoral breast regulates the behavior of mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone Creydt, Virginia; Fletcher, Sabrina Johanna; Giudice, Jimena; Bruzzone, Ariana; Chasseing, Norma Alejandra; Gonzalez, Eduardo Gustavo; Sacca, Paula Alejandra; Calvo, Juan Carlos

    2013-02-01

    Stromal-epithelial interactions mediate both breast development and breast cancer progression. In the present work, we evaluated the effects of conditioned media (CMs) of human adipose tissue explants from normal (hATN) and tumor (hATT) breast on proliferation, adhesion, migration and metalloproteases activity on tumor (MCF-7 and IBH-7) and non-tumor (MCF-10A) human breast epithelial cell lines. Human adipose tissues were obtained from patients and the conditioned medium from hATN and hATT collected after 24 h of incubation. MCF-10A, MCF-7 and IBH-7 cells were grown and incubated with CMs and proliferation and adhesion, as well as migration ability and metalloprotease activity, of epithelial cells after exposing cell cultures to hATN- or hATT-CMs were quantified. The statistical significance between different experimental conditions was evaluated by one-way ANOVA. Tukey's post hoc tests were performed. Tumor and non-tumor breast epithelial cells significantly increased their proliferation activity after 24 h of treatment with hATT-CMs compared to control-CMs. Furthermore, cellular adhesion of these two tumor cell lines was significantly lower with hATT-CMs than with hATN-CMs. Therefore, hATT-CMs seem to induce significantly lower expression or less activity of the components involved in cellular adhesion than hATN-CMs. In addition, hATT-CMs induced pro-MMP-9 and MMP-9 activity and increased the migration of MCF-7 and IBH-7 cells compared to hATN-CMs. We conclude that the microenvironment of the tumor interacts in a dynamic way with the mutated epithelium. This evidence leads to the possibility to modify the tumor behavior/phenotype through the regulation or modification of its microenvironment. We developed a model in which we obtained CMs from adipose tissue explants completely, either from normal or tumor breast. In this way, we studied the contribution of soluble factors independently of the possible effects of direct cell contact.

  17. CXCL10-induced migration of adoptively transferred human natural killer cells toward solid tumors causes regression of tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennerberg, Erik; Kremer, Veronika; Childs, Richard; Lundqvist, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Adoptive infusion of natural killer (NK) cells is being increasingly explored as a therapy in patients with cancer, although clinical responses are thus far limited to patients with hematological malignancies. Inadequate homing of infused NK cells to the tumor site represents a key factor that may explain the poor anti-tumor effect of NK cell therapy against solid tumors. One of the major players in the regulation of lymphocyte chemotaxis is the chemokine receptor chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 3 (CXCR3) which is expressed on activated NK cells and induces NK cell migration toward gradients of the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL9, 10 and 11). Here, we show that ex vivo expansion of human NK cells results in a tenfold increased expression of the CXCR3 receptor compared with resting NK cells (p = 0.04). Consequently, these NK cells displayed an improved migratory capacity toward solid tumors, which was dependent on tumor-derived CXCL10. In xenograft models, adoptively transferred NK cells showed increased migration toward CXCL10-transfected melanoma tumors compared with CXCL10-negative wild-type tumors, resulting in significantly reduced tumor burden and increased survival (median survival 41 vs. 32 days, p = 0.03). Furthermore, administration of interferon-gamma locally in the tumor stimulated the production of CXCL10 in subcutaneous melanoma tumors resulting in increased infiltration of adoptively transferred CXCR3-positive expanded NK cells. Our findings demonstrate the importance of CXCL10-induced chemoattraction in the anti-tumor response of adoptively transferred expanded NK cells against solid melanoma tumors.

  18. Reduction in cardiolipin decreases mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity and increases glucose transport into and across human brain cerebral microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hieu M; Mejia, Edgard M; Chang, Wenguang; Wang, Ying; Watson, Emily; On, Ngoc; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-10-01

    Microvessel endothelial cells form part of the blood-brain barrier, a restrictively permeable interface that allows transport of only specific compounds into the brain. Cardiolipin is a mitochondrial phospholipid required for function of the electron transport chain and ATP generation. We examined the role of cardiolipin in maintaining mitochondrial function necessary to support barrier properties of brain microvessel endothelial cells. Knockdown of the terminal enzyme of cardiolipin synthesis, cardiolipin synthase, in hCMEC/D3 cells resulted in decreased cellular cardiolipin levels compared to controls. The reduction in cardiolipin resulted in decreased mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, increased pyruvate kinase activity, and increased 2-deoxy-[(3) H]glucose uptake and glucose transporter-1 expression and localization to membranes in hCMEC/D3 cells compared to controls. The mechanism for the increase in glucose uptake was an increase in adenosine-5'-monophosphate kinase and protein kinase B activity and decreased glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta activity. Knockdown of cardiolipin synthase did not affect permeability of fluorescent dextran across confluent hCMEC/D3 monolayers grown on Transwell(®) inserts. In contrast, knockdown of cardiolipin synthase resulted in an increase in 2-deoxy-[(3) H]glucose transport across these monolayers compared to controls. The data indicate that in hCMEC/D3 cells, spare respiratory capacity is dependent on cardiolipin. In addition, reduction in cardiolipin in these cells alters their cellular energy status and this results in increased glucose transport into and across hCMEC/D3 monolayers. Microvessel endothelial cells form part of the blood-brain barrier, a restrictively permeable interface that allows transport of only specific compounds into the brain. In human adult brain endothelial cell hCMEC/D3 monolayers cultured on Transwell(®) plates, knockdown of cardiolipin synthase results in decrease in mitochondrial

  19. Model Microvascular Networks Can Have Many Equilibria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karst, Nathaniel J; Geddes, John B; Carr, Russell T

    2017-03-01

    We show that large microvascular networks with realistic topologies, geometries, boundary conditions, and constitutive laws can exhibit many steady-state flow configurations. This is in direct contrast to most previous studies which have assumed, implicitly or explicitly, that a given network can only possess one equilibrium state. While our techniques are general and can be applied to any network, we focus on two distinct network types that model human tissues: perturbed honeycomb networks and random networks generated from Voronoi diagrams. We demonstrate that the disparity between observed and predicted flow directions reported in previous studies might be attributable to the presence of multiple equilibria. We show that the pathway effect, in which hematocrit is steadily increased along a series of diverging junctions, has important implications for equilibrium discovery, and that our estimates of the number of equilibria supported by these networks are conservative. If a more complete description of the plasma skimming effect that captures red blood cell allocation at junctions with high feed hematocrit were to be obtained empirically, then the number of equilibria found by our approach would at worst remain the same and would in all likelihood increase significantly.

  20. Inhibition of activated Ras suppresses multiple oncogenic Hub genes in human epithelial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Wang, Ping; Luo, Hui; Wang, Xi-Rui; Wang, Xie-Feng; Zhang, Jun-Xia; Wang, Ying-Yi; Yao, Lei; Liu, Ning; You, Yong-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Cancer cells may involve diverse mutations, but they often rely on continued expression of a single oncoprotein for survival, as a response to targeting this protein. Generally, Ras is overexpressed in human epithelial tumors and cancellation of activated Ras inhibits carcinoma cell proliferation and differentiation ability, and induces apoptotosis of tumor cells. However, the mechanisms of inhibition of activated Ras that suppress the malignancy activity of human epithelial tumors remain to be illuminated. We utilized text-mining of MEDLINE abstracts with natural language processing to establish the Ras biologic association network, and identified several interactions of this network with the Ras pathway. Our investigation not only examined the expression of Ras and Hub genes (PIK3CA, MDM2, CCND1, EGFR, JUN, MYC, VEGFA, ERK1 and ERK2) but also confirmed inhibition of activated Ras reduced expression of multiple oncogene in vitro studies. Our studies provide strong support for the conclusion that cancellation of activated Ras specifically regulates defective Ras pathways in human tumor cells.

  1. Induction of Anti-Tumor Immune Responses by Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with 177Lu-DOTATATE in a Murine Model of a Human Neuroendocrine Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bzorek

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT is a relatively new mode of internally targeted radiotherapy currently in clinical trials. In PRRT, ionizing radioisotopes conjugated to somatostatin analogues are targeted to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs via somatostatin receptors. Despite promising clinical results, very little is known about the mechanism of tumor control. By using NCI-H727 cells in an in vivo murine xenograft model of human NETs, we showed that 177Lu-DOTATATE PRRT led to increased infiltration of CD86+ antigen presenting cells into tumor tissue. We also found that following treatment with PRRT, there was significantly increased tumor infiltration by CD49b+/FasL+ NK cells potentially capable of tumor killing. Further investigation into the immunomodulatory effects of PRRT will be essential in improving treatment efficacy.

  2. Induction of Anti-Tumor Immune Responses by Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with (177)Lu-DOTATATE in a Murine Model of a Human Neuroendocrine Tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Yin; Pfeifer, Andreas Klaus; Myschetzky, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a relatively new mode of internally targeted radiotherapy currently in clinical trials. In PRRT, ionizing radioisotopes conjugated to somatostatin analogues are targeted to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) via somatostatin receptors. Despite promising...... clinical results, very little is known about the mechanism of tumor control. By using NCI-H727 cells in an in vivo murine xenograft model of human NETs, we showed that 177Lu-DOTATATE PRRT led to increased infiltration of CD86+ antigen presenting cells into tumor tissue. We also found that following...... treatment with PRRT, there was significantly increased tumor infiltration by CD49b+/FasL+ NK cells potentially capable of tumor killing. Further investigation into the immunomodulatory effects of PRRT will be essential in improving treatment efficacy....

  3. Impact of tumor position, conductivity distribution and tissue homogeneity on the distribution of tumor treating fields in a human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshoej, Anders Rosendal; Hansen, Frederik Lundgaard; Thielscher, Axel

    2017-01-01

    and in deep tumors embedded in white matter. The field strength was not higher for tumors close to the active electrode. Left/right field directions were generally superior to anterior/posterior directions. Central necrosis focally enhanced the field near tumor boundaries perpendicular to the applied field...

  4. Dendritic Cells in the Context of Human Tumors: Biology and Experimental Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovitz, Ilan; Melzer, Susanne; Amar, Sarah; Bocsi, József; Bloch, Merav; Efroni, Sol; Ram, Zvi; Tárnok, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent and versatile antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the immune system. DC have an exceptional ability to comprehend the immune context of a captured antigen based on molecular signals identified from its vicinity. The analyzed information is then conveyed to other immune effector cells. Such capability enables DC to play a pivotal role in mediating either an immunogenic response or immune tolerance towards an acquired antigen. This review summarizes current knowledge on DC in the context of human tumors. It covers the basics of human DC biology, elaborating on the different markers, morphology and function of the different subsets of human DC. Human blood-borne DC are comprised of at least three subsets consisting of one plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and two to three myeloid DC (mDC) subsets. Some tissues have unique DC. Each subset has a different phenotype and function and may induce pro-tumoral or anti-tumoral effects. The review also discusses two methods fundamental to the research of DC on the single-cell level: multicolor flow cytometry (FCM) and image-based cytometry (IC). These methods, along with new genomics and proteomics tools, can provide high-resolution information on specific DC subsets and on immune and tumor cells with which they interact. The different layers of collected biological data may then be integrated using Immune-Cytomics modeling approaches. Such novel integrated approaches may help unravel the complex network of cellular interactions that DC carry out within tumors, and may help harness this complex immunological information into the development of more effective treatments for cancer.

  5. Increased expression of CYP4Z1 promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in human breast cancer

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    Yu, Wei [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Chai, Hongyan [Center for Gene Diagnosis, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Xie, Xianfei; Zheng, Hao; Wang, Chenlong; Wang, Xue [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yang, Guifang [Department of Pathology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Cai, Xiaojun [Department of Ophthalmology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Falck, John R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Yang, Jing, E-mail: yangjingliu@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4Z1, a novel CYP4 family member, is over-expressed in human mammary carcinoma and associated with high-grade tumors and poor prognosis. However, the precise role of CYP4Z1 in tumor progression is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer. Stable expression of CYP4Z1 in T47D and BT-474 human breast cancer cells significantly increased mRNA expression and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and decreased mRNA levels and secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), without affecting cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth in vitro. Notably, the conditioned medium from CYP4Z1-expressing cells enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and promoted angiogenesis in the zebrafish embryo and chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In addition, there were lower levels of myristic acid and lauric acid, and higher contents of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in CYP4Z1-expressing T47D cells compared with vector control. CYP4Z1 overexpression significantly increased tumor weight and microvessel density by 2.6-fold and 1.9-fold in human tumor xenograft models, respectively. Moreover, CYP4Z1 transfection increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt, while PI3K or ERK inhibitors and siRNA silencing reversed CYP4Z1-mediated changes in VEGF-A and TIMP-2 expression. Conversely, HET0016, an inhibitor of the CYP4 family, potently inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis with associated changes in the intracellular levels of myristic acid, lauric acid and 20-HETE. Collectively, these data suggest that increased CYP4Z1 expression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer partly via PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 activation. -- Highlights: ► CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes human breast cancer growth and angiogenesis. ► The pro-angiogenic effects of CYP4Z1 have

  6. Screening of urocanic acid isomers in human basal and squamous cell carcinoma tumors compared with tumor periphery and healthy skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decara, Juan Manuel; Aguilera, José; Abdala, Roberto; Sánchez, Purificación; Figueroa, Félix L; Herrera, Enrique

    2008-10-01

    Trans-urocanic acid is a major chromophore for ultraviolet (UV) radiation in human epidermis. The UV induces photoisomerization of trans-urocanic acid (tUCA) form to cis-urocanic acid (cUCA) and has been reported as an important mediator in the immunosuppression induced by UV. This immunomodulation has been recognized as an important factor related to skin cancer development. This is the first time that UCA isomers have been measured in epidermis of skin biopsies from patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and compared with the tumor periphery and biopsies of healthy photoexposed and non-photoexposed skin as controls. The UCA isomers were separated and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography. Analysis of UCA in healthy skin showed significant increase in total UCA content in non-photoexposed body sites compared with highly exposed skins. In contrast, the percentage of cUCA was higher in photoexposed body sites. Maximal levels of cUCA were found in cheek, forehead and forearm and lower levels in abdomen and thigh. No differences were found in total UCA concentration between the tumor samples and healthy photoexposed skin. However, differences were found in relation between isomers. Higher levels of cUCA were detected in SCC biopsies (44% of total UCA) compared with samples of BCC and that of healthy photoexposed skin (30%). These results suggest that the UV radiation exposure, a main factor in development of SCC can be mediated, apart from direct effect to cells (DNA damage), by immunosuppression pathways mediated by high production of cUCA.

  7. Number of Polyploid Giant Cancer Cells and Expression of EZH2 Are Associated with VM Formation and Tumor Grade in Human Ovarian Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the associations among the number of polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs and vasculogenic mimicry (VM, EZH2 expression, and serous ovarian tumor grade, a total of 80 paraffin-embedded serous ovarian tumor samples including 21 cases of primary carcinoma and their metastatic tumors, 26 cases of primary carcinoma without metastasis, and 12 cases of serous borderline cystadenoma were analyzed. PGCCs and VM were detected in human serous ovarian tumor. The metastatic foci of ovarian carcinoma had the highest number of PGCCs and VM. The number of PGCCs and VM increased with the grade of ovarian carcinomas. PGCCs generated erythrocytes via budding and together they formed VM. Tumor cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts were positive for EZH2 immunohistochemical staining. The tumor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts in the metastatic foci had the highest staining index of EZH2 staining. Both tumor cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts express EZH2 which then contributes to the malignant grade of serous ovarian tumor.

  8. Clonal mutations in primary human glial tumors: evidence in support of the mutator hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Chitra

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A verifiable consequence of the mutator hypothesis is that even low grade neoplasms would accumulate a large number of mutations that do not influence the tumor phenotype (clonal mutations. In this study, we have attempted to quantify the number of clonal mutations in primary human gliomas of astrocytic cell origin. These alterations were identified in tumor tissue, microscopically confirmed to have over 70% neoplastic cells. Methods Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis was performed using a set of fifteen 10-mer primers of arbitrary but definite sequences in 17 WHO grade II astrocytomas (low grade diffuse astrocytoma or DA and 16 WHO grade IV astrocytomas (Glioblastoma Multiforme or GBM. The RAPD profile of the tumor tissue was compared with that of the leucocyte DNA of the same patient and alteration(s scored. A quantitative estimate of the overall genomic changes in these tumors was obtained by 2 different modes of calculation. Results The overall change in the tumors was estimated to be 4.24% in DA and 2.29% in GBM by one method and 11.96% and 6.03% in DA and GBM respectively by the other. The difference between high and lower grade tumors was statistically significant by both methods. Conclusion This study demonstrates the presence of extensive clonal mutations in gliomas, more in lower grade. This is consistent with our earlier work demonstrating that technique like RAPD analysis, unbiased for locus, is able to demonstrate more intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in lower grade gliomas compared to higher grade. The results support the mutator hypothesis proposed by Loeb.

  9. No evidence for active human papillomavirus (HPV) in fields surrounding HPV-positive oropharyngeal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietbergen, Michelle M; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J M; Moukhtari, Nadia; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Brink, Arjen; Sie, Daoud; Ylstra, Bauke; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J; Snijders, Peter J F; Brakenhoff, Ruud H; Leemans, C René

    2014-02-01

    Patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs) have a better prognosis than patients with HPV-negative OPSCCs. Important factors contributing to this better prognosis are relatively low numbers of local/regional recurrences (LRRs) and second primary tumors (SPTs) in patients with HPV-positive OPSCC. These low numbers may be explained in addition by the absence of a 'field cancerization' effect, which is a cause of LRRs and SPTs in patients with HPV-negative OPSCC. We aimed to detect a possible 'field effect' in patients with HPV-positive OPSCC. As HPV is involved in the early stage of carcinogenesis in OPSCCs, its presence is considered a reliable marker for the detection of such a field effect. Therefore, the presence of transcriptionally active HPV was analyzed in the mucosa surrounding HPV-positive OPSCCs. We included 20 patients who were surgically treated for an HPV-positive OPSCC in the period 2000-2006. Of each patient, the formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor sample and all available resection margins were collected. In total, 97 resection margins were investigated with an average of five resection margins per tumor. All samples were analyzed for the presence of tumor and the presence of transcriptionally active HPV by HPV16-E6-mRNA detection. All tumors were HPV16-E6-mRNA positive. HPV16-E6-mRNA could be detected in the resection margins that contained tumor (n = 6). All tumor-negative resection margins (n = 91) scored negative for HPV16-E6-mRNA. In conclusion, transcriptional active HPV could not be detected in the mucosa surrounding an HPV-positive OPSCC, which suggests the absence of field effect. This observation may explain the lower number of LRRs and SPTs in HPV-positive patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Intraoral microvascular anastomosis for segmental mandibular reconstruction following removal of an ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkenke, Emeka; Agaimy, Abbas; St Pierre, Michael; Gratzki, Nils; Stockmann, Philipp; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius

    2013-05-01

    Cases of immediate bony microvascular reconstruction following segmental mandibulectomy in children are hard to find in the current literature. Moreover, microvascular segmental mandibular reconstruction that adopts an intraoral anastomosis technique has not been described so far. Therefore, the present clinical report aims at extending the armamentarium of bony microvascular reconstruction in pediatric cases of segmental mandibulectomy by highlighting an intraoral microvascular anastomosing technique.A 6-year-old boy, who suffered from an ameloblastoma of the mural type in the mandible, received a radical segmental mandibular resection because of the high recurrence rate of this tumor entity. Immediate reconstruction was carried out with a fibular double-barrel graft. Microvascular anastomoses were performed in an end-to-end fashion with the facial artery and vein as recipient vessels. The postoperative course was uneventful. There was no impairment of speech, deglutition, mastication, and facial nerve function. The facial appearance remained unobtrusive. On removal of the reconstruction plate 3 months after the reconstruction procedure, bleeding from the reconstructed mandibular segment indicated vascularization of the graft.It seems that segmental mandibulectomy and simultaneous microvascular bony reconstruction do not necessarily lead to impaired function as far as speech, deglutition, and mastication are concerned. Instead, the intraoral anastomosis technique allows waiving extraoral skin incisions and subsequent scarring, leaving the facial appearance unchanged and unobtrusive. Especially, the potential risk of stigmatization of the patient is avoided. Therefore, decision making in the choice of 1 or the other reconstruction option following segmental mandibulectomy should always consider the adoption of an intraoral anastomosing technique.

  11. Experimental radioimmunotherapy of a xenografted human colonic tumor (GW-39) producing carcinoembryonic antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldenberg, D.M.; Gaffar, S.A.; Bennett, S.J.; Beach, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    Experiments were undertaken to evaluate the antitumor effects of 131I-labeled goat antibody immunoglobulin G prepared against carcinoembryonic antigen in hamsters bearing the carcinoembryonic antigen-producing GW-39 human colonic carcinoma. At a single injection of 1 mCi 131I and higher, a marked growth inhibition of GW-39 tumors, as well as a considerable increase in the survival time of the tumor-bearing hamsters, could be achieved. At a dose of 1 mCi, the radioactive affinity-purified antibody appeared to be superior to radioactive normal goat immunoglobulin G in influencing tumor growth and survival time, but no significant difference could be seen at the higher dose of 2 mCi given. Radiobiological calculations indicated that the tumors received, at up to 20 days after therapy, 1325 rads for the specific antibody and only 411 rads for the normal immunoglobulin G preparation. These findings encourage the further evaluation of antibodies to tumor markers for isotopic cancer therapy.

  12. Perfusion kinetics in human brain tumor with DCE-MRI derived model and CFD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, A; Bansal, A; Singh, A; Sinha, N

    2017-07-05

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death all over the world. Among the strategies that are used for cancer treatment, the effectiveness of chemotherapy is often hindered by factors such as irregular and non-uniform uptake of drugs inside tumor. Thus, accurate prediction of drug transport and deposition inside tumor is crucial for increasing the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic treatment. In this study, a computational model of human brain tumor is developed that incorporates dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data into a voxelized porous media model. The model takes into account realistic transport and perfusion kinetics parameters together with realistic heterogeneous tumor vasculature and accurate arterial input function (AIF), which makes it patient specific. The computational results for interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), interstitial fluid velocity (IFV) and tracer concentration show good agreement with the experimental results. The computational model can be extended further for predicting the deposition of chemotherapeutic drugs in tumor environment as well as selection of the best chemotherapeutic drug for a specific patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. CD200-expressing human basal cell carcinoma cells initiate tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmont, Chantal S; Benketah, Antisar; Reed, Simon H; Hawk, Nga V; Telford, William G; Ohyama, Manabu; Udey, Mark C; Yee, Carole L; Vogel, Jonathan C; Patel, Girish K

    2013-01-22

    Smoothened antagonists directly target the genetic basis of human basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most common of all cancers. These drugs inhibit BCC growth, but they are not curative. Although BCC cells are monomorphic, immunofluorescence microscopy reveals a complex hierarchical pattern of growth with inward differentiation along hair follicle lineages. Most BCC cells express the transcription factor KLF4 and are committed to terminal differentiation. A small CD200(+) CD45(-) BCC subpopulation that represents 1.63 ± 1.11% of all BCC cells resides in small clusters at the tumor periphery. By using reproducible in vivo xenograft growth assays, we determined that tumor initiating cell frequencies approximate one per 1.5 million unsorted BCC cells. The CD200(+) CD45(-) BCC subpopulation recreated BCC tumor growth in vivo with typical histological architecture and expression of sonic hedgehog-regulated genes. Reproducible in vivo BCC growth was achieved with as few as 10,000 CD200(+) CD45(-) cells, representing ~1,500-fold enrichment. CD200(-) CD45(-) BCC cells were unable to form tumors. These findings establish a platform to study the effects of Smoothened antagonists on BCC tumor initiating cell and also suggest that currently available anti-CD200 therapy be considered, either as monotherapy or an adjunct to Smoothened antagonists, in the treatment of inoperable BCC.

  14. Gene expression signature of fibroblast serum response predicts human cancer progression: similarities between tumors and wounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Y Chang

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer invasion and metastasis have been likened to wound healing gone awry. Despite parallels in cellular behavior between cancer progression and wound healing, the molecular relationships between these two processes and their prognostic implications are unclear. In this study, based on gene expression profiles of fibroblasts from ten anatomic sites, we identify a stereotyped gene expression program in response to serum exposure that appears to reflect the multifaceted role of fibroblasts in wound healing. The genes comprising this fibroblast common serum response are coordinately regulated in many human tumors, allowing us to identify tumors with gene expression signatures suggestive of active wounds. Genes induced in the fibroblast serum-response program are expressed in tumors by the tumor cells themselves, by tumor-associated fibroblasts, or both. The molecular features that define this wound-like phenotype are evident at an early clinical stage, persist during treatment, and predict increased risk of metastasis and death in breast, lung, and gastric carcinomas. Thus, the transcriptional signature of the response of fibroblasts to serum provides a possible link between cancer progression and wound healing, as well as a powerful predictor of the clinical course in several common carcinomas.

  15. The cytogenetic theory of the pathogenesis of human adult male germ cell tumors. Review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaganti, R S; Houldsworth, J

    1998-01-01

    Human male germ cell tumors (GCTs) represent a biological paradox because, in order to develop into a pluripotential tumor, a germ cell destined to a path of limited or no proliferation must acquire the potential for unlimited proliferation. In addition, it must acquire the ability to elicit embryonal differentiation patterns without the reciprocal inputs from fertilization and the imprinting-associated genomic changes which are a part of normal embryonal development. Although much speculated about, the genetic mechanisms underlying these properties of male GCTs remain enigmatic. Recent cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses of these tumors are providing new insights and new testable hypotheses. Based on our recent work, we propose two such hypotheses. One relates to the mechanism of germ cell transformation and germ cell tumor development. We suggest that the invariable 12p amplification noted as early as in carcinoma in situ/intratubular germ cell neoplasia (CIS/ITGCN) lesions leads to deregulated overexpression of cyclin D2, a cell cycle G1/S checkpoint regulator with oncogeneic potential. Such overexpression reinitiates the cell cycle. We visualize this happening during the pachytene stage of meiosis through aberrant recombinational events which lead to 12p amplification. The other hypothesis relates to the origin of primary extragonadal GCTs. By comparing cytogenetic changes in primary mediastinal versus gonadal lesions, we propose that, in contrast to long-standing speculation that primary extra-gonadal tumors arise from embryonally misplaced primordial germ cells, these lesions arise from migration of transformed gonadal germ cells.

  16. Nano-Pulse Stimulation induces immunogenic cell death in human papillomavirus-transformed tumors and initiates an adaptive immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph G Skeate

    Full Text Available Nano-Pulse Stimulation (NPS is a non-thermal pulsed electric field modality that has been shown to have cancer therapeutic effects. Here we applied NPS treatment to the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16-transformed C3.43 mouse tumor cell model and showed that it is effective at eliminating primary tumors through the induction of immunogenic cell death while subsequently increasing the number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes within the tumor microenvironment. In vitro NPS treatment of C3.43 cells resulted in a doubling of activated caspase 3/7 along with the translocation of phosphatidylserine (PS to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, indicating programmed cell death activity. Tumor-bearing mice receiving standard NPS treatment showed an initial decrease in tumor volume followed by clearing of tumors in most mice, and a significant increase in overall survival. Intra-tumor analysis of mice that were unable to clear tumors showed an inverse correlation between the number of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and the size of the tumor. Approximately half of the mice that cleared established tumors were protected against tumor re-challenge on the opposite flank. Selective depletion of CD8+ T cells eliminated this protection, suggesting that NPS treatment induces an adaptive immune response generating CD8+ T cells that recognize tumor antigen(s associated with the C3.43 tumor model. This method may be utilized in the future to not only ablate primary tumors, but also to induce an anti-tumor response driven by effector CD8+ T cells capable of protecting individuals from disease recurrence.

  17. SSEA-1 is an enrichment marker for tumor-initiating cells in human glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myung Jin; Woolard, Kevin; Nam, Do-Hyun; Lee, Jeongwu; Fine, Howard A

    2009-05-08

    CD133+ populations of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells are reportedly enriched for tumor stem cells (TSCs) or tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Approximately 40% of freshly isolated GBM specimens, however, do not contain CD133+ tumor cells, raising the possibility that CD133 may not be a universal enrichment marker for GBM TSCs/TICs. Here we demonstrate that stage-specific embryonic antigen 1(SSEA-1/LeX)+ GBM cells fulfill the functional criteria for TSC/TIC, since (1) SSEA-1+ cells are highly tumorigenic in vivo, unlike SSEA-1- cells; (2) SSEA-1+ cells can give rise to both SSEA-1+ and SSEA-1- cells, thereby establishing a cellular hierarchy; and (3) SSEA-1+ cells have self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials. A distinct subpopulation of SSEA-1+ cells was present in all but one of the primary GBMs examined (n = 24), and most CD133+ tumor cells were also SSEA-1+, suggesting that SSEA-1 may be a general TSC/TIC enrichment marker in human GBMs.

  18. [Vitamin D metabolism and signaling in human hepatocellular carcinoma and surrounding non-tumorous liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Evelin; Balla, Bernadett; Kósa, János; Lakatos, Péter András; Lazáry, Áron; Németh, Dániel; Jozilan, Hasan; Somorácz, Áron; Korompay, Anna; Gyöngyösi, Benedek; Borka, Katalin; Kiss, András; Kupcsulik, Péter; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Szalay, Ferenc

    2016-11-01

    1,25-Dihydroxy vitamin D 3 mediates antitumor effects in hepatocellular carcinoma. We examined mRNA and protein expression differences in 1,25-Dihydroxy vitamin D 3 -inactivating CYP24A1, mRNA of activating CYP27B1 enzymes, and that of VDR between human hepatocellular carcinoma and surrounding non-tumorous liver. Snap-frozen tissues from 13 patients were studied for mRNA and protein expression of CYP24A1. Paraffin-embedded tissues from 36 patients were used to study mRNA of VDR and CYP27B1. mRNA expression was measured by RT-PCR, CYP24A1 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry. Expression of VDR and CYP27B1 was significantly lower in hepatocellular carcinoma compared with non-tumorous liver (pexpressed CYP24A1 mRNA, but neither of the non-tumorous liver. The gene activation was followed by CYP24A1 protein synthesis. The presence of CYP24A1 mRNA and the reduced expression of VDR and CYP27B1 mRNA in human hepatocellular carcinoma samples indicate decreased bioavailability of 1,25-Dihydroxy vitamin D 3 , providing an escape mechanism from the anti-tumor effect. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(48), 1910-1918.

  19. Differences in Redox Regulatory Systems in Human Lung and Liver Tumors Suggest Different Avenues for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Tobe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A common characteristic of many cancer cells is that they suffer from oxidative stress. They, therefore, require effective redox regulatory systems to combat the higher levels of reactive oxygen species that accompany accelerated growth compared to the normal cells of origin. An elevated dependence on these systems in cancers suggests that targeting these systems may provide an avenue for retarding the malignancy process. Herein, we examined the redox regulatory systems in human liver and lung cancers by comparing human lung adenocarcinoma and liver carcinoma to their respective surrounding normal tissues. Significant differences were found in the two major redox systems, the thioredoxin and glutathione systems. Thioredoxin reductase 1 levels were elevated in both malignancies, but thioredoxin was highly upregulated in lung tumor and only slightly upregulated in liver tumor, while peroxiredoxin 1 was highly elevated in lung tumor, but downregulated in liver tumor. There were also major differences within the glutathione system between the malignancies and their normal tissues. The data suggest a greater dependence of liver on either the thioredoxin or glutathione system to drive the malignancy, while lung cancer appeared to depend primarily on the thioredoxin system.

  20. The CD47-signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPa) interaction is a therapeutic target for human solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, Stephen B; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Gentles, Andrew J; Sahoo, Debashis; Dalerba, Piero; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Wang, Jian; Contreras-Trujillo, Humberto; Martin, Robin; Cohen, Justin D; Lovelace, Patricia; Scheeren, Ferenc A; Chao, Mark P; Weiskopf, Kipp; Tang, Chad; Volkmer, Anne Kathrin; Naik, Tejaswitha J; Storm, Theresa A; Mosley, Adriane R; Edris, Badreddin; Schmid, Seraina M; Sun, Chris K; Chua, Mei-Sze; Murillo, Oihana; Rajendran, Pradeep; Cha, Adriel C; Chin, Robert K; Kim, Dongkyoon; Adorno, Maddalena; Raveh, Tal; Tseng, Diane; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Enger, Per Øyvind; Steinberg, Gary K; Li, Gordon; So, Samuel K; Majeti, Ravindra; Harsh, Griffith R; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N H; Sunwoo, John B; Alizadeh, Ash A; Clarke, Michael F; Weissman, Irving L

    2012-04-24

    CD47, a "don't eat me" signal for phagocytic cells, is expressed on the surface of all human solid tumor cells. Analysis of patient tumor and matched adjacent normal (nontumor) tissue revealed that CD47 is overexpressed on cancer cells. CD47 mRNA expression levels correlated with a decreased probability of survival for multiple types of cancer. CD47 is a ligand for SIRPα, a protein expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells. In vitro, blockade of CD47 signaling using targeted monoclonal antibodies enabled macrophage phagocytosis of tumor cells that were otherwise protected. Administration of anti-CD47 antibodies inhibited tumor growth in orthotopic immunodeficient mouse xenotransplantation models established with patient tumor cells and increased the survival of the mice over time. Anti-CD47 antibody therapy initiated on larger tumors inhibited tumor growth and prevented or treated metastasis, but initiation of the therapy on smaller tumors was potentially curative. The safety and efficacy of targeting CD47 was further tested and validated in immune competent hosts using an orthotopic mouse breast cancer model. These results suggest all human solid tumor cells require CD47 expression to suppress phagocytic innate immune surveillance and elimination. These data, taken together with similar findings with other human neoplasms, show that CD47 is a commonly expressed molecule on all cancers, its function to block phagocytosis is known, and blockade of its function leads to tumor cell phagocytosis and elimination. CD47 is therefore a validated target for cancer therapies.

  1. A mouse mammary tumor virus-like long terminal repeat superantigen in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Xu, Dongping; Li, Yan; Qu, Chunfeng; Holland, James F; Pogo, Beatriz G-T

    2004-06-15

    We previously reported a 660-bp mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-like env gene sequence in approximately 38% of human breast cancer DNA, but not in normal breasts or other tumors. This MMTV-like env gene sequence was expressed in 66% of the env gene-positive human breast cancers. An entire proviral structure was identified in human breast cancer DNA with high homology to MMTV and low homology to known human endogenous retrovirus. MMTV-like long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences were also detected in 41.5% of human breast cancers. They contain hormone-responsive elements, TEF-1 family elements, and the open reading frame for the superantigen (SAg). We have now amplified and sequenced MMTV-like sag sequences from 10 human breast cancers, and we found that they are highly homologous to those of MMTV. However, deletions and insertions at the COOH-terminal of sag were observed. The immune function of the human MMTV-like LTR SAg was also investigated. The sag gene was cloned and expressed in a human B-cell line (Ramos). T-cell proliferation and cytokine releasing assays were performed after cocultivation of T cells with irradiated Ramos SAg-expressing cells. The results indicate that expression of the human SAg stimulates T-cell activation in vitro, as the mouse SAg does. Because the T-cell responses in vitro are considered similar to those in vivo, these results suggest that the human LTR SAg might also play a role in human breast carcinogenesis.

  2. Expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) in human breast cancer correlates with low tumor grade, and inhibits tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardini, E; Agresti, R; Tagliabue, E

    2000-01-01

    of Src family kinases, and regulation of integrin signaling, cell adhesion, and growth factor responsiveness. To explore its potential contribution to human neoplasia, we surveyed RPTPalpha protein levels in primary human breast cancer. We found RPTPalpha levels to vary widely among tumors, with 29......% of cases manifesting significant overexpression. High RPTPalpha protein levels correlated significantly with low tumor grade and positive estrogen receptor status. Expression of RPTPalpha in breast carcinoma cells led to growth inhibition, associated with increased accumulation in G0 and G1, and delayed...... tumor growth and metastasis. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a study correlating expression level of a specific bona fide PTP with neoplastic disease status in humans....

  3. The Impact of Epithelial-Stromal Interactions on Human Breast Tumor Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0357 TITLE: The Impact of Epithelial-Stromal Interactions on Human Breast Tumor Heterogeneity PRINCIPAL... Heterogeneity 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0357 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Crista Thompson 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail... Heterogeneity is a key factor underlying the variability in patient response to treatment, especially in Triple-Negative (TN) breast cancer cases. In

  4. Cytotoxicity of Tumor Antigen Specific Human T Cells Is Unimpaired by Arginine Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knies, Diana; Medenhoff, Sergej; Wabnitz, Guido; Luckner-Minden, Claudia; Feldmeyer, Nadja; Voss, Ralf-Holger; Kropf, Pascale; Müller, Ingrid; Conradi, Roland; Samstag, Yvonne; Theobald, Matthias; Ho, Anthony D.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hundemer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-growth is often associated with the expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells that lead to local or systemic arginine depletion via the enzyme arginase. It is generally assumed that this arginine deficiency induces a global shut-down of T cell activation with ensuing tumor immune escape. While the impact of arginine depletion on polyclonal T cell proliferation and cytokine secretion is well documented, its influence on chemotaxis, cytotoxicity and antigen specific activation of human T cells has not been demonstrated so far. We show here that chemotaxis and early calcium signaling of human T cells are unimpaired in the absence of arginine. We then analyzed CD8+ T cell activation in a tumor peptide as well as a viral peptide antigen specific system: (i) CD8+ T cells with specificity against the MART-1aa26–35*A27L tumor antigen expanded with in vitro generated dendritic cells, and (ii) clonal CMV pp65aa495–503 specific T cells and T cells retrovirally transduced with a CMV pp65aa495–503 specific T cell receptor were analyzed. Our data demonstrate that human CD8+ T cell antigen specific cytotoxicity and perforin secretion are completely preserved in the absence of arginine, while antigen specific proliferation as well as IFN-γ and granzyme B secretion are severely compromised. These novel results highlight the complexity of antigen specific T cell activation and demonstrate that human T cells can preserve important activation-induced effector functions in the context of arginine deficiency. PMID:23717444

  5. Cytotoxicity of tumor antigen specific human T cells is unimpaired by arginine depletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Munder

    Full Text Available Tumor-growth is often associated with the expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells that lead to local or systemic arginine depletion via the enzyme arginase. It is generally assumed that this arginine deficiency induces a global shut-down of T cell activation with ensuing tumor immune escape. While the impact of arginine depletion on polyclonal T cell proliferation and cytokine secretion is well documented, its influence on chemotaxis, cytotoxicity and antigen specific activation of human T cells has not been demonstrated so far. We show here that chemotaxis and early calcium signaling of human T cells are unimpaired in the absence of arginine. We then analyzed CD8(+ T cell activation in a tumor peptide as well as a viral peptide antigen specific system: (i CD8(+ T cells with specificity against the MART-1aa26-35*A27L tumor antigen expanded with in vitro generated dendritic cells, and (ii clonal CMV pp65aa495-503 specific T cells and T cells retrovirally transduced with a CMV pp65aa495-503 specific T cell receptor were analyzed. Our data demonstrate that human CD8(+ T cell antigen specific cytotoxicity and perforin secretion are completely preserved in the absence of arginine, while antigen specific proliferation as well as IFN-γ and granzyme B secretion are severely compromised. These novel results highlight the complexity of antigen specific T cell activation and demonstrate that human T cells can preserve important activation-induced effector functions in the context of arginine deficiency.

  6. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 deficiency attenuates growth while promoting chemosensitivity of human endometrial xenograft tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Anne M; Zhang, Ling; Pru, Cindy A; Clark, Nicole C; McCallum, Melissa L; Blok, Leen J; Shioda, Toshi; Peluso, John J; Rueda, Bo R; Pru, James K

    2015-01-28

    during chemotherapeutic stress. In sum, these in vitro and in vivo findings demonstrate that PGRMC1 plays a prominent role in the growth and chemoresistance of human endometrial tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypoxic regulation of cytoglobin and neuroglobin expression in human normal and tumor tissues

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    Emara Marwan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytoglobin (Cygb and neuroglobin (Ngb are recently identified globin molecules that are expressed in vertebrate tissues. Upregulation of Cygb and Ngb under hypoxic and/or ischemic conditions in vitro and in vivo increases cell survival, suggesting possible protective roles through prevention of oxidative damage. We have previously shown that Ngb is expressed in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM cell lines, and that expression of its transcript and protein can be significantly increased after exposure to physiologically relevant levels of hypoxia. In this study, we extended this work to determine whether Cygb is also expressed in GBM cells, and whether its expression is enhanced under hypoxic conditions. We also compared Cygb and Ngb expression in human primary tumor specimens, including brain tumors, as well as in human normal tissues. Immunoreactivity of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX, a hypoxia-inducible metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate, was used as an endogenous marker of hypoxia. Results Cygb transcript and protein were expressed in human GBM cells, and this expression was significantly increased in most cells following 48 h incubation under hypoxia. We also showed that Cygb and Ngb are expressed in both normal tissues and human primary cancers, including GBM. Among normal tissues, Cygb and Ngb expression was restricted to distinct cell types and was especially prominent in ductal cells. Additionally, certain normal organs (e.g. stomach fundus, small bowel showed distinct regional co-localization of Ngb, Cygb and CA IX. In most tumors, Ngb immunoreactivity was significantly greater than that of Cygb. In keeping with previous in vitro results, tumor regions that were positively stained for CA IX were also positive for Ngb and Cygb, suggesting that hypoxic upregulation of Ngb and Cygb also occurs in vivo. Conclusions Our finding of hypoxic up-regulation of Cygb/Ngb in GBM cell lines and human

  8. Microvascular Effects Of Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieman, T. J.; Fingar, Victor H.

    1989-06-01

    Tumor destruction in photodynamic therapy is the result of the combination of direct cellular toxicity and damage to tumor microvasculature. These phenomena appear to be caused by tissue interactions with toxic oxygen compounds which are formed when light interacts with photosensitizing agents. Although injury to cell membranes, mitochondria and the nucleus have been noted, such injuries by themselves tend to be sublethal and cannot totally account for the effectiveness of PDT. The mechanism of effect of PDT on the vasculature has not been fully investigated. The vascular effects are believed to involve both intravascular and perivascular phenomena. Platelet aggregation appears to be an early event. Changes to the endothelium, and smooth muscle contraction as well as increased capillary permeability have also been observed during therapy. Initial experiments using'cyclooxygenase inhibitors indicate that arachidonic acid metabolites are active elements in producing the vascular phase of the therapeutic response and that these microvasculature effects appear to be critical to permanent tumor destruction.

  9. Nek8, a NIMA family kinase member, is overexpressed in primary human breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Alex J; Boylan, John F

    2004-03-17

    The family of human Nek (NIMA Related Kinase) kinases currently contains 11 members. We have identified Nek8 as a new member of the Nek kinase family. For many of the Nek family members, primary tumor expression data and function have been limited. However, all of the Nek family proteins share considerable homology with the Never In Mitosis, gene A (NIMA) kinase from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. NIMA, as well as its most closely related human ortholog, Nek2, are required for G(2)/M progression and promote centrosome maturation during mitosis. We isolated Nek8 from a primary human colon cDNA library, and found it to be highly homologous to murine Nek8. Recently, a previously named Nek8 sequence was renamed Nek9/Nercc1 in Genbank due to its lack of homology to murine Nek8 and its high homology to murine Nek9. Interestingly, in our study, phylogenetic analysis suggests that human Nek8 and Nek9 form a subfamily within the Nek family. Nek8 has high homology to the Nek family kinase domain as well as to a regulator of chromosome condensation domain (RCC1), which is also present in Nek9. The open reading frame of human Nek8 encodes a 692 amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 75 kDa. Nek8 is differently expressed between normal human breast tissue and breast tumors. Overexpression of a mutated kinase domain Nek8 in U2-0S cells led to a decrease in actin protein, and a small increase in the level of cdk1/cyclinB1. Our data demonstrate for the first time that Nek8 is a novel tumor associated gene, and shares considerable sequence homology with the Nek family of protein kinases and may be involved in G(2)/M progression.

  10. Exosomal lipids impact notch signaling and induce death of human pancreatic tumoral SOJ-6 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Beloribi

    Full Text Available Exosomes are of increasing interest as alternative mode of cell-to-cell communication. We previously reported that exosomes secreted by human SOJ-6 pancreatic tumor cells induce (glycoprotein ligand-independent cell death and inhibit Notch-1 pathway, this latter being particularly active during carcinogenesis and in cancer stem cells. Therefore, we asked whether exosomal lipids were key-elements for cell death and hypothesized that cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains were privileged sites of exosome interactions with tumor cells. To address these questions and based on the lipid composition of exosomes from SOJ-6 cells (Ristorcelli et al. (2008 FASEB J. 22; 3358-3369 enriched in cholesterol and sphingomyelin (lipids forming liquid-ordered phase, Lo and depleted in phospholipids (lipids forming liquid-disordered phase, Ld, we designed Synthetic Exosome-Like Nanoparticles (SELN with ratios Lo/Ld from 3.0 to 6.0 framing that of SOJ-6 cell exosomes. SELN decreased tumor cell survival, the higher the Lo/Ld ratio, the lower the cell survival. This decreased survival was due to activation of cell death with inhibition of Notch pathway. FRET analyses indicated fusions/exchanges of SELN with cell membranes. Fluorescent SELN co-localized with the ganglioside GM1 then with Rab5A, markers of lipid microdomains and of early endosomes, respectively. These interactions occurred at lipid microdomains of plasma and/or endosome membranes where the Notch-1 pathway matures. We thus demonstrated a major role for lipids in interactions between SELN and tumor cells, and in the ensued cell death. To our knowledge this is the first report on such effects of lipidic nanoparticles on tumor cell behavior. This may have implications in tumor progression.

  11. Expression Profile of Genes Related to Drug Metabolism in Human Brain Tumors.

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    Pantelis Stavrinou

    Full Text Available Endogenous and exogenous compounds as well as carcinogens are metabolized and detoxified by phase I and II enzymes, the activity of which could be crucial to the inactivation and hence susceptibility to carcinogenic factors. The expression of these enzymes in human brain tumor tissue has not been investigated sufficiently. We studied the association between tumor pathology and the expression profile of seven phase I and II drug metabolizing genes (CYP1A1, CYP1B1, ALDH3A1, AOX1, GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM3 and some of their proteins.Using qRT-PCR and western blotting analysis the gene and protein expression in a cohort of 77 tumors were investigated. The major tumor subtypes were meningioma, astrocytoma and brain metastases, -the later all adenocarcinomas from a lung primary.Meningeal tumors showed higher expression levels for AOX1, CYP1B1, GSTM3 and GSTP1. For AOX1, GSTM and GSTP1 this could be verified on a protein level as well. A negative correlation between the WHO degree of malignancy and the strength of expression was identified on both transcriptional and translational level for AOX1, GSTM3 and GSTP1, although the results could have been biased by the prevalence of meningiomas and glioblastomas in the inevitably bipolar distribution of the WHO grades. A correlation between the gene expression and the protein product was observed for AOX1, GSTP1 and GSTM3 in astrocytomas.The various CNS tumors show different patterns of drug metabolizing gene expression. Our results suggest that the most important factor governing the expression of these enzymes is the histological subtype and to a far lesser extent the degree of malignancy itself.

  12. Mutational analysis of the extracellular Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene in human parathyroid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, Yoshitaka; Arnold, A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Pollak, M.R.; Brown, E.M. [Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Despite recent progress, such as the identification of PRAD1/cyclin D1 as a parathyroid oncogene, it is likely that many genes involved in the molecular pathogenesis of parathyroid tumors remain unknown. Individuals heterozygous for inherited mutations in the extracellular Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene that reduce its biological activity exhibit a disorder termed familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia or familial benign hypercalcemia, which is characterized by reduced responsiveness of parathyroid and kidney to calcium and by PTH-dependent hypercalcemia. Those who are homozygous for such mutations present with neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism and have marked parathroid hypercellularity. Thus, the Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene is a candidate parathyroid tumor suppressor gene, with inactivating mutations plausibly explaining set-point abnormalities in the regulation of both parathyroid cellular proliferation and PTH secretion by extracellular Ca{sup 2+} similar to those seen in hyperparathyroidism. Using a ribonuclease A protection assay that has detected multiple mutations in the Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene in familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and covers more than 90% of its coding region, we sought somatic mutations in this gene in a total of 44 human parathyroid tumors (23 adenomas, 4 carcinomas, 5 primary hyperplasias, and 12 secondary hyperplasias). No such mutations were detected in these 44 tumors. Thus, our studies suggest that somatic mutation of the Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene does not commonly contribute to the pathogenesis of sporadic parathyroid tumors. As such, PTH set-point dysfunction in parathroid tumors may well be secondary to other clonal proliferative defects and/or mutations in other components of the extracellular Ca{sup 2+}-sensing pathway. 29 refs., 2 figs.

  13. What are the implications of human papillomavirus status in oropharyngeal tumors for clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klozar, Jan; Tachezy, Ruth

    2014-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) status itself is an important and very probably the strongest prognostic factor in head and neck cancer. Because of the prognostic advantage of patients with HPV-positive cancers, the issue of the quality of life of survivors has become increasingly important. The possibility of treatment de-escalation in patients with virally induced tumors is being considered. Many challenges have to be addressed in order to integrate HPV status in the routine decision-making in patients with oropharyngeal cancer. The present review discusses the standardization of detection methods suitable for clinical use and the differences in predictive parameters between patients with HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors. The gold standard for the identification of patients with oropharyngeal tumors etiologically linked to HPV infection is undoubtedly the detection of HPV 16 E6/E7 mRNA. The detection of a surrogate marker of active viral infection, p16ink4a, has a low sensitivity when used alone and must therefore be combined with the detection of HPV DNA or HPV-specific antibodies. The detailed knowledge of the importance of specific prognostic parameters is crucial in the choice of treatment. Nodal staging is probably much less important in HPV-positive cancers. It is of great importance to implement standardized testing for the identification of patients with HPV-induced oropharyngeal tumors. The treatment decision models in HPV-positive tumors have to take into account the probably different prognostic value of nodal parameters. Before introducing treatment de-escalation in patients with virally induced tumors into clinical practice, more research and clinical studies are needed.

  14. Presence of kisspeptin-like immunoreactivity in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Shoji, Itaru; Shibasaki, Akiko; Kato, Ichiro; Hiraishi, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Hajime; Kaneko, Kiriko; Murakami, Osamu; Morimoto, Ryo; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Ito, Sadayoshi; Totsune, Kazuhito

    2010-05-01

    Kisspeptins are neuropeptides which activate the hypothalamo-pituitary gonadal axis and are considered to play important physiological roles in the reproduction. Kisspeptins have also been reported to stimulate the aldosterone secretion from the adrenal cortex. However, the expression of kisspeptins in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors has not been clarified yet. We, therefore, studied the presence of kisspeptin-like immunoreactivity (LI) in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors (adrenocortical adenomas, adrenocortical carcinomas, and pheochromocytomas) by radioimmunoassay and immunocytochemistry. Kisspeptin-LI was detected in all the tissues examined; normal portions of adrenal glands (3.0 +/- 2.3 pmol/g wet weight, n = 21, mean +/- SD), aldosterone-producing adenomas (4.6 +/- 3.3 pmol/g wet weight, n = 10), cortisol-producing adenomas (2.7 +/- 1.4 pmol/g wet weight, n = 14), adrenocortical carcinomas (1.7 +/- 0.2 pmol/g wet weight, n = 4), and pheochromocytomas (1.8 +/- 0.8 pmol/g wet weight, n = 6). There was no significant difference in kisspeptin-LI levels among them. Immunocytochemistry showed positive kisspeptin-immunostaining in normal adrenal glands, with stronger immunostaining found in the medulla. Furthermore, positive kisspeptin-immunostaining was found in all types of adrenal tumors examined; adrenocortical adenomas, adrenocortical carcinomas, and pheochromocytomas. The intensity of kisspeptin-immunostaining in these adrenal tumors was, however, not so strong as that in normal adrenal medulla. The present study has shown for the first time the presence of kisspeptin-LI in adrenal glands and adrenal tumors.

  15. Comparative characteristics of mammary glands cancer in humans and animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorobyova О.V.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

     

    This review is devoted to a comparative analysis of receptor status, immunity, angiogenesis, metastatic mammal glands cancer expression profiling in humans and animals. Angiogenesis has been assessed by quantitative and immunohistochemical characteristics by means of evaluation of microvascular density (MVD using Claudin-5 (CLDN-5 as a marker of vascular endothelium in tumors of mammary glands in dogs.

  16. Quality of clinical brain tumor MR spectra judged by humans and machine learning tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyathanahally, Sreenath P; Mocioiu, Victor; Pedrosa de Barros, Nuno; Slotboom, Johannes; Wright, Alan J; Julià-Sapé, Margarida; Arús, Carles; Kreis, Roland

    2017-10-10

    To investigate and compare human judgment and machine learning tools for quality assessment of clinical MR spectra of brain tumors. A very large set of 2574 single voxel spectra with short and long echo time from the eTUMOUR and INTERPRET databases were used for this analysis. Original human quality ratings from these studies as well as new human guidelines were used to train different machine learning algorithms for automatic quality control (AQC) based on various feature extraction methods and classification tools. The performance was compared with variance in human judgment. AQC built using the RUSBoost classifier that combats imbalanced training data performed best. When furnished with a large range of spectral and derived features where the most crucial ones had been selected by the TreeBagger algorithm it showed better specificity (98%) in judging spectra from an independent test-set than previously published methods. Optimal performance was reached with a virtual three-class ranking system. Our results suggest that feature space should be relatively large for the case of MR tumor spectra and that three-class labels may be beneficial for AQC. The best AQC algorithm showed a performance in rejecting spectra that was comparable to that of a panel of human expert spectroscopists. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Current Diagnostic and Therapeutic Strategies in Microvascular Angina

    OpenAIRE

    Mumma, Bryn; Flacke, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular angina is common among patients with signs and symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Unfortunately, microvascular is often under-recognized in clinical settings. The diagnosis of microvascular angina relies on assessment of the functional status of the coronary microvasculature. Invasive strategies include acetylcholine provocation, intracoronary Doppler ultrasound, and intracoronary thermodilut...

  18. CXCL1-Mediated Interaction of Cancer Cells with Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Promotes Tumor Progression in Human Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makito Miyake

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs are reported to be associated with poor prognosis, depending on their pro-tumoral roles. Current knowledge of TAMs and CAFs in the tumor microenvironment of urothelial cancer of the bladder (UCB is limited. Therefore, we investigated the paracrine effect induced by TAMs and CAFs in the tumor microenvironment of human UCB. For this, we first carried out immunohistochemical analysis for CXCL1, CD204 (TAM marker, αSMA (CAF marker, E-cadherin, and MMP2 using 155 UBC tissue samples. Next, CXCL1-overexpressing clones of THP-1-derived TAMs and NIH3T3-derived CAFs were developed by lentiviral vector infection. The immunohistochemical study showed high CXCL1 levels in UCB cells to be associated with enhanced recruitment of TAMs/CAFs, higher metastatic potential, and poor prognosis. Three-dimensional (3D co-culture of UCB cells and TAMs/CAFs suggested that CXCL1 production in TAMs/CAFs play an important role in cell-to-cell adhesion and interaction among cancer cells and these stromal cells. CXCL1-expressing TAMs/CAFs enhanced tumor growth of subcutaneous UCB tumors in nude mice when injected together. In addition, an experiment using the orthotopic bladder cancer model revealed that CXCL1 production in TAMs/CAFs supported tumor implantation into the murine bladder wall and UCB growth when injected together, which was confirmed by clinical data of patients with bladder cancer. Thus, CXCL1 signaling in the tumor microenvironment is highly responsible for repeated intravesical recurrence, disease progression, and drug resistance through enhanced invasion ability. In conclusion, disrupting CXCL1 signaling to dysregulate this chemokine is a promising therapeutic approach for human UCB.

  19. Tumor-released Galectin-3, a soluble inhibitory ligand of human NKp30, plays an important role in tumor escape from NK cell attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Guo, Huaijian; Geng, Jianlin; Zheng, Xiaodong; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2014-11-28

    Human Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding protein expressed by tumor cells, has been reported to act as an immune regulator in antitumor T cells. However, its effect on natural killer (NK) cells is elusive. Using a recombinant human NK cell-activating receptor, NKp30 fusion protein (NKp30-Fc), we found that soluble NKp30-Fc could immunoprecipitate Galectin-3. The direct interaction between NKp30 and Galectin-3 was further confirmed using surface plasmon resonance experiments. Because Galectin-3 was mainly released from tumor cells in a soluble form in our study, the binding assay was performed to show that soluble Galectin-3 specifically bound to NK cells and NKp30 on the surface of the NK cells. Functionally, when soluble Galectin-3 was added to the NK-tumor cell coculture system, the NKp30-mediated, but not NKG2D-mediated, cytolysis and CD107a expression in the NK cells were inhibited, and these phenotypes could be restored by preincubation of soluble Galectin-3 with NKp30-Fc fusion protein or the addition of anti-Gal-3 antibody alone. Moreover, genetic down-regulation of Galectin-3 (shGal-3) resulted in tumor cells being more sensitive to NK cell lysis, and, reversely, Galectin-3-overexpressing HeLa cells (exGal-3) became less sensitive to NK cell killing. The results of these in vitro experiments were supported by studies in shGal-3-HeLa or exGal-3-HeLa xenograft non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mice after NK cell adoptive immunotherapy, indicating that Galectin-3 strongly antagonizes human NK cell attack against tumors in vivo. These findings indicate that Galectin-3 may function as an immune regulator to inhibit NK cell function against tumors, therefore providing a new therapeutic target for tumor treatment. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. POU5F1 (OCT3/4) identifies cells with pluripotent potential in human germ cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.H.J. Looijenga (Leendert); C.A. de Gouveia Brazao; J. Kononen; A.J.M. Gillis (Ad); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); E.J.J. van Zoelen (Everardus); D.T. Schneider (Dominik); J.W. Oosterhuis (Wolter); R.F.A. Weber (Robert); K.P. Wolffenbuttel (Katja); E.J. Perlman; H. van Dekken (Herman); C. Bokemeyer; G. Sauter; J.A. Stoop (Hans); H.P. de Leeuw; F.U. Honecker (Friedemann)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractHuman germ cell tumors (GCTs) may have variable histology and clinical behavior, depending on factors such as sex of the patient, age at clinical diagnosis, and anatomical site of the tumor. Some types of GCT, i.e., the seminomas/germinomas/dysgerminomas and

  1. Transit time homogenization in ischemic stroke - A novel biomarker of penumbral microvascular failure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engedal, Thorbjørn S; Hjort, Niels; Hougaard, Kristina D

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia causes widespread capillary no-flow in animal studies. The extent of microvascular impairment in human stroke, however, is unclear. We examined how acute intra-voxel transit time characteristics and subsequent recanalization affect tissue outcome on follow-up MRI in a historic c...

  2. Expression of iron-related genes in human brain and brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britton Robert S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defective iron homeostasis may be involved in the development of some diseases within the central nervous system. Although the expression of genes involved in normal iron balance has been intensively studied in other tissues, little is known about their expression in the brain. We investigated the mRNA levels of hepcidin (HAMP, HFE, neogenin (NEO1, transferrin receptor 1 (TFRC, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2, and hemojuvelin (HFE2 in normal human brain, brain tumors, and astrocytoma cell lines. The specimens included 5 normal brain tissue samples, 4 meningiomas, one medulloblastoma, 3 oligodendrocytic gliomas, 2 oligoastrocytic gliomas, 8 astrocytic gliomas, and 3 astrocytoma cell lines. Results Except for hemojuvelin, all genes studied had detectable levels of mRNA. In most tumor types, the pattern of gene expression was diverse. Notable findings include high expression of transferrin receptor 1 in the hippocampus and medulla oblongata compared to other brain regions, low expression of HFE in normal brain with elevated HFE expression in meningiomas, and absence of hepcidin mRNA in astrocytoma cell lines despite expression in normal brain and tumor specimens. Conclusion These results indicate that several iron-related genes are expressed in normal brain, and that their expression may be dysregulated in brain tumors.

  3. Drug screening of cancer cell lines and human primary tumors using droplet microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ada Hang-Heng; Li, Haoran; Jia, Yanwei; Mak, Pui-In; Martins, Rui Paulo da Silva; Liu, Yan; Vong, Chi Man; Wong, Hang Cheong; Wong, Pak Kin; Wang, Haitao; Sun, Heng; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2017-08-22

    Precision Medicine in Oncology requires tailoring of therapeutic strategies to individual cancer patients. Due to the limited quantity of tumor samples, this proves to be difficult, especially for early stage cancer patients whose tumors are small. In this study, we exploited a 2.4 × 2.4 centimeters polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based microfluidic chip which employed droplet microfluidics to conduct drug screens against suspended and adherent cancer cell lines, as well as cells dissociated from primary tumor of human patients. Single cells were dispersed in aqueous droplets and imaged within 24 hours of drug treatment to assess cell viability by ethidium homodimer 1 staining. Our results showed that 5 conditions could be screened for every 80,000 cells in one channel on our chip under current circumstances. Additionally, screening conditions have been adapted to both suspended and adherent cancer cells, giving versatility to potentially all types of cancers. Hence, this study provides a powerful tool for rapid, low-input drug screening of primary cancers within 24 hours after tumor resection from cancer patients. This paves the way for further technological advancement to cutting down sample size and increasing drug screening throughput in advent to personalized cancer therapy.

  4. Epo receptors are not detectable in primary human tumor tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Elliott

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (Epo is a cytokine that binds and activates an Epo receptor (EpoR expressed on the surface of erythroid progenitor cells to promote erythropoiesis. While early studies suggested EpoR transcripts were expressed exclusively in the erythroid compartment, low-level EpoR transcripts were detected in nonhematopoietic tissues and tumor cell lines using sensitive RT-PCR methods. However due to the widespread use of nonspecific anti-EpoR antibodies there are conflicting data on EpoR protein expression. In tumor cell lines and normal human tissues examined with a specific and sensitive monoclonal antibody to human EpoR (A82, little/no EpoR protein was detected and it was not functional. In contrast, EpoR protein was reportedly detectable in a breast tumor cell line (MCF-7 and breast cancer tissues with an anti-EpoR polyclonal antibody (M-20, and functional responses to rHuEpo were reported with MCF-7 cells. In another study, a functional response was reported with the lung tumor cell line (NCI-H838 at physiological levels of rHuEpo. However, the specificity of M-20 is in question and the absence of appropriate negative controls raise questions about possible false-positive effects. Here we show that with A82, no EpoR protein was detectable in normal human and matching cancer tissues from breast, lung, colon, ovary and skin with little/no EpoR in MCF-7 and most other breast and lung tumor cell lines. We show further that M-20 provides false positive staining with tissues and it binds to a non-EpoR protein that migrates at the same size as EpoR with MCF-7 lysates. EpoR protein was detectable with NCI-H838 cells, but no rHuEpo-induced phosphorylation of AKT, STAT3, pS6RP or STAT5 was observed suggesting the EpoR was not functional. Taken together these results raise questions about the hypothesis that most tumors express high levels of functional EpoR protein.

  5. The hen model of human ovarian cancer develops anti-mesothelin autoantibodies in response to mesothelin expressing tumors

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    Yu Yi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Study of the hen immune system led to seminal contributions to basic immunological principles. Recent studies of spontaneous ovarian cancer in the laying hen show strikingly similar tumor types and antigen expression compared to human ovarian cancer, suggesting hens would be valuable for studies of tumor immunology and pre-clinical vaccine development. Circulating mesothelin is a relatively specific marker for human ovarian cancer and autoantibodies to mesothelin were reported. We hypothesized that hen tumors express mesothelin and that circulating anti-mesothelin antibodies occur in response to tumors. Methods Mesothelin mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR in hen ovarian tumors and normal ovaries. Mesothelin protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC and two-dimensional SDS-PAGE Western blots. Anti-mesothelin antibodies were assessed by immunoassay of sera from hens with normal ovaries and with ovarian tumors. Results Significant mesothelin mRNA expression was observed in 57% (12/21 of hen ovarian tumors but not in normal ovaries and was found predominantly in serous tumors as in humans. Mesothelin protein was detected in tumors with mesothelin mRNA by IHC and 2D Western blots, but not in normal ovaries or tumors without mesothelin mRNA. Circulating anti-mesothelin antibodies occurred in 44% (n = 4/9 of hens with ovarian tumors which express mesothelin mRNA and were not found in hens with tumors that did not express mesothelin (n = 0/5 or normal ovaries (n = 0/5. Conclusion The results support the utility of the hen as a novel model for preclinical studies of mesothelin as a biomarker and a target for immunotherapy.

  6. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database: A Comprehensive Resource for Mouse Models of Human Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupke, Debra M; Begley, Dale A; Sundberg, John P; Richardson, Joel E; Neuhauser, Steven B; Bult, Carol J

    2017-11-01

    Research using laboratory mice has led to fundamental insights into the molecular genetic processes that govern cancer initiation, progression, and treatment response. Although thousands of scientific articles have been published about mouse models of human cancer, collating information and data for a specific model is hampered by the fact that many authors do not adhere to existing annotation standards when describing models. The interpretation of experimental results in mouse models can also be confounded when researchers do not factor in the effect of genetic background on tumor biology. The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) database is an expertly curated, comprehensive compendium of mouse models of human cancer. Through the enforcement of nomenclature and related annotation standards, MTB supports aggregation of data about a cancer model from diverse sources and assessment of how genetic background of a mouse strain influences the biological properties of a specific tumor type and model utility. Cancer Res; 77(21); e67-70. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Early T cell signalling is reversibly altered in PD-1+ T lymphocytes infiltrating human tumors.

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    Shu-Fang Wang

    Full Text Available To improve cancer immunotherapy, a better understanding of the weak efficiency of tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes (TIL is necessary. We have analyzed the functional state of human TIL immediately after resection of three types of tumors (NSCLC, melanoma and RCC. Several signalling pathways (calcium, phosphorylation of ERK and Akt and cytokine secretion are affected to different extents in TIL, and show a partial spontaneous recovery within a few hours in culture. The global result is an anergy that is quite distinct from clonal anergy induced in vitro, and closer to adaptive tolerance in mice. PD-1 (programmed death -1 is systematically expressed by TIL and may contribute to their anergy by its mere expression, and not only when it interacts with its ligands PD-L1 or PD-L2, which are not expressed by every tumor. Indeed, the TCR-induced calcium and ERK responses were reduced in peripheral blood T cells transfected with PD-1. Inhibition by sodium stibogluconate of the SHP-1 and SHP-2 phosphatases that associate with several inhibitory receptors including PD-1, relieves part of the anergy apparent in TIL or in PD-1-transfected T cells. This work highlights some of the molecular modifications contributing to functional defects of human TIL.

  8. Viscum album neutralizes tumor-induced immunosuppression in a human in vitro cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinborn, Carmen; Klemd, Amy Marisa; Sanchez-Campillo, Ann-Sophie; Rieger, Sophie; Scheffen, Marieke; Sauer, Barbara; Garcia-Käufer, Manuel; Urech, Konrad; Follo, Marie; Ücker, Annekathrin; Kienle, Gunver Sophia; Huber, Roman; Gründemann, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cells have the capacity to secrete immunosuppressive substances in order to diminish dendritic cell (DC) activity and thereby escape from immune responses. The impact of mistletoe (Viscum album) extracts (VAE), which are frequently used as an additive anti-cancer therapy to stimulate the immune response, is still unknown. Using a human cellular system, the impact of two different VAE (VAEA + VAEI) on the maturation of human dendritic cells and on T cell function has been investigated using flow cytometry, automated fluorescence microscopy and cytokine bead array assays. Furthermore, we examined whether VAEI was able to counteract tumor-induced immunosuppression within this cellular system using a renal cancer cell model. The role of mistletoe lectin (ML) was analyzed using ML-specific antibodies and ML-depleted VAEI. VAEI and VAEA augmented the maturation of dendritic cells. VAEI abrogated tumor-induced immunosuppression of dendritic cells and both processes were partially mediated by ML since ML-depleted VAEI and ML-specific antibodies almost neutralized the rehabilitative effects of VAEI on DC maturation. Using these settings, co-culture experiments with purified CD4+ T cells had no influence on T cell proliferation and activation but did have an impact on IFN-γ secretion. The study provides a potential mode-of-action of VAE as an additive cancer therapy based on immunomodulatory effects. However, the impact on the in vivo situation has to be evaluated in further studies.

  9. Viscum album neutralizes tumor-induced immunosuppression in a human in vitro cell model.

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    Carmen Steinborn

    Full Text Available Tumor cells have the capacity to secrete immunosuppressive substances in order to diminish dendritic cell (DC activity and thereby escape from immune responses. The impact of mistletoe (Viscum album extracts (VAE, which are frequently used as an additive anti-cancer therapy to stimulate the immune response, is still unknown. Using a human cellular system, the impact of two different VAE (VAEA + VAEI on the maturation of human dendritic cells and on T cell function has been investigated using flow cytometry, automated fluorescence microscopy and cytokine bead array assays. Furthermore, we examined whether VAEI was able to counteract tumor-induced immunosuppression within this cellular system using a renal cancer cell model. The role of mistletoe lectin (ML was analyzed using ML-specific antibodies and ML-depleted VAEI. VAEI and VAEA augmented the maturation of dendritic cells. VAEI abrogated tumor-induced immunosuppression of dendritic cells and both processes were partially mediated by ML since ML-depleted VAEI and ML-specific antibodies almost neutralized the rehabilitative effects of VAEI on DC maturation. Using these settings, co-culture experiments with purified CD4+ T cells had no influence on T cell proliferation and activation but did have an impact on IFN-γ secretion. The study provides a potential mode-of-action of VAE as an additive cancer therapy based on immunomodulatory effects. However, the impact on the in vivo situation has to be evaluated in further studies.

  10. PRMT1 regulates tumor growth and metastasis of human melanoma via targeting ALCAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Zhengwen; Ma, Tengxiao; Huo, Ran

    2016-07-01

    Overexpression of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) is associated with various types of cancer. The present study aimed to determine the expression level of PRMT1 in human melanoma and investigate its biological function. The clinical significance of PRMT1 was determined by screening the Oncomine database, and the increased expression of PRMT in melanoma was confirmed by western blot analysis. Furthermore, the current study demonstrated that PRMT1 was overexpressed in melanoma cell lines compared with human immortalized keratinocytes and PIG1 immortalized human melanocytes. Silencing PRMT1 in A375 and Hs294T cells significantly suppressed tumor growth and metastatic ability of the melanoma cell line compared with the negative control. These changes were in accordance with the upregulation of the cadherin 1 level and downregulation of several metastatic‑associated genes determined by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction array. Liquid chromatography‑mass spectrometry demonstrated that activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) may be a direct target of PRMT1, and the interaction was confirmed by co‑immunoprecipitation. Compared with negative controls, the protein level of ALCAM was decreased following the silencing of PRMT1, and re‑expression of ALCAM in A375/shPRMT1 or Hs294T/shPRMT1 cells using an expression vector restored the colony formation and metastatic ability of the cells. In conclusion, the current results indicated that PRMT1 is overexpressed in human melanoma, and may regulate tumor growth and metastasis via targeting ALCAM.

  11. Optical clearing and fluorescence deep-tissue imaging for 3D quantitative analysis of the brain tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerweij, Tonny; Dusoswa, Sophie A; Negrean, Adrian; Hendrikx, Esther M L; de Vries, Helga E; Kole, Jeroen; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Vandertop, W Peter; Noske, David P; Tannous, Bakhos A; Musters, René J P; van Kooyk, Yvette; Wesseling, Pieter; Zhao, Xi Wen; Wurdinger, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Three-dimensional visualization of the brain vasculature and its interactions with surrounding cells may shed light on diseases where aberrant microvascular organization is involved, including glioblastoma (GBM). Intravital confocal imaging allows 3D visualization of microvascular structures and migration of cells in the brain of mice, however, with limited imaging depth. To enable comprehensive analysis of GBM and the brain microenvironment, in-depth 3D imaging methods are needed. Here, we employed methods for optical tissue clearing prior to 3D microscopy to visualize the brain microvasculature and routes of invasion of GBM cells. We present a workflow for ex vivo imaging of optically cleared brain tumor tissues and subsequent computational modeling. This workflow was used for quantification of the microvasculature in relation to nuclear or cellular density in healthy mouse brain tissues and in human orthotopic, infiltrative GBM8 and E98 glioblastoma models. Ex vivo cleared mouse brain tissues had a >10-fold imaging depth as compared to intravital imaging of mouse brain in vivo. Imaging of optically cleared brain tissue allowed quantification of the 3D microvascular characteristics in healthy mouse brains and in tissues with diffuse, infiltrative growing GBM8 brain tumors. Detailed 3D visualization revealed the organization of tumor cells relative to the vasculature, in both gray matter and white matter regions, and patterns of multicellular GBM networks collectively invading the brain parenchyma. Optical tissue clearing opens new avenues for combined quantitative and 3D microscopic analysis of the topographical relationship between GBM cells and their microenvironment.

  12. Inhibitory effects of cinnamon-water extract on human tumor cell lines

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    Nazila Ariaee-Nasab

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To question the inhibitory effect of cinnamon-water extract (CWE on four human tumor cell lines (AGs, HeLa, MCF-7 and MDA-MB234. Naturally, compounds are an important source for clinical proposes. Cinnamon, a plant-derived spice, is widely used as a food additive and has been attracted many researches in recent years to find its pharmaceutical benefits. Methods: In order to find the answer to this subject, the water extract of cinnamon was prepared and cell proliferation was evaluated using MTT assay. The effect of apoptosis was investigated by DNA fragmentation analysis. Results: The inhibitory effect of CWE on the growth of the cells was significant. DNA fragmentation was found in cultured AGs and MCF-7 cell lines treated by CWE. Conclusions: This study showed the anti-neoplastic activity of CWE on tumor cell lines.

  13. Tumor growth effects of rapamycin on human biliary tract cancer cells

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    Heuer Matthias

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver transplantation is an important treatment option for patients with liver-originated tumors including biliary tract carcinomas (BTCs. Post-transplant tumor recurrence remains a limiting factor for long-term survival. The mammalian target of rapamycin-targeting immunosuppressive drug rapamycin could be helpful in lowering BTC recurrence rates. Therein, we investigated the antiproliferative effect of rapamycin on BTC cells and compared it with standard immunosuppressants. Methods We investigated two human BTC cell lines. We performed cell cycle and proliferation analyses after treatment with different doses of rapamycin and the standard immunosuppressants, cyclosporine A and tacrolimus. Results Rapamycin inhibited the growth of two BTC cell lines in vitro. By contrast, an increase in cell growth was observed among the cells treated with the standard immunosuppressants. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that rapamycin inhibits BTC cell proliferation and thus might be the preferred immunosuppressant for patients after a liver transplantation because of BTC.

  14. Imaging beta-galactosidase activity in human tumor xenografts and transgenic mice using a chemiluminescent substrate.

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    Li Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Detection of enzyme activity or transgene expression offers potential insight into developmental biology, disease progression, and potentially personalized medicine. Historically, the lacZ gene encoding the enzyme beta-galactosidase has been the most common reporter gene and many chromogenic and fluorogenic substrates are well established, but limited to histology or in vitro assays. We now present a novel approach for in vivo detection of beta-galactosidase using optical imaging to detect light emission following administration of the chemiluminescent 1,2-dioxetane substrate Galacto-Light PlusTM. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: B-gal activity was visualized in stably transfected human MCF7-lacZ tumors growing in mice. LacZ tumors were identified versus contralateral wild type tumors as controls, based on two- to tenfold greater light emission following direct intra tumoral or intravenous administration of reporter substrate. The 1,2-dioxetane substrate is commercially available as a kit for microplate-based assays for beta-gal detection, and we have adapted it for in vivo application. Typically, 100 microl substrate mixture was administered intravenously and light emission was detected from the lacZ tumor immediately with gradual decrease over the next 20 mins. Imaging was also undertaken in transgenic ROSA26 mice following subcutaneous or intravenous injection of substrate mixture. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Light emission was detectable using standard instrumentation designed for more traditional bioluminescent imaging. Use of 1,2-dioxetane substrates to detect enzyme activity offers a new paradigm for non-invasive biochemistry in vivo.

  15. Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Target Brain Tumor-Initiating Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Ah; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kwon, Sung Eun; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon; Choi, Jung Won; Jin, Xiong; Lim, Ja Yun; Kim, Hyunggee; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2015-01-01

    In neuro-oncology, the biology of neural stem cells (NSCs) has been pursued in two ways: as tumor-initiating cells (TICs) and as a potential cell-based vehicle for gene therapy. NSCs as well as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been reported to possess tumor tropism capacities. However, there is little data on the migratory capacity of MSCs toward brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs). This study focuses on the ability of human adipose tissue derived MSCs (hAT-MSCs) to target BTICs and their crosstalk in the microenvironment. BTICs were isolated from three different types of brain tumors. The migration capacities of hAT-MSCs toward BTICs were examined using an in vitro migration assay and in vivo bioluminescence imaging analysis. To investigate the crosstalk between hAT-MSCs and BTICs, we analyzed the mRNA expression patterns of cyto-chemokine receptors by RT-qPCR and the protein level of their ligands in co-cultured medium. The candidate cyto-chemokine receptors were selectively inhibited using siRNAs. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that hAT-MSCs possess migratory abilities to target BTICs isolated from medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT) and glioblastoma. Different types of cyto-chemokines are involved in the crosstalk between hAT-MSCs and BTICs (medulloblastoma and AT/RT: CXCR4/SDF-1, CCR5/RANTES, IL6R/IL-6 and IL8R/IL8; glioblastoma: CXCR4/SDF-1, IL6R/IL-6, IL8R/IL-8 and IGF1R/IGF-1). Our findings demonstrated the migratory ability of hAT-MSCs for BTICs, implying the potential use of MSCs as a delivery vehicle for gene therapy. This study also confirmed the expression of hAT-MSCs cytokine receptors and the BTIC ligands that play roles in their crosstalk.

  16. Serum human chorionic gonadotropin is associated with angiogenesis in germ cell testicular tumors

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    Avilés-Salas Alejandro

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germ cell testicular tumors have survival rate that diminishes with high tumor marker levels, such as human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG. hCG may regulate vascular neoformation through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Our purpose was to determine the relationship between hCG serum levels, angiogenesis, and VEGF expression in germ cell testicular tumors. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 101 patients. Serum levels of hCG, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, and lactate dehydrogenase were measured prior to surgery. Vascular density (VD and VEGF tissue expression were determined by immunohistochemistry and underwent double-blind analysis. Results Histologically, 46% were seminomas and 54%, non-seminomas. Median follow-up was 43 ± 27 months. Relapse was present in 7.5% and mortality in 11.5%. Factors associated with high VD included non-seminoma type (p = 0.016, AFP ≥ 14.7 ng/mL (p = 0.0001, and hCG ≥ 25 mIU/mL (p = 0.0001. In multivariate analysis, the only significant VD-associated factor was hCG level (p = 0.04. When hCG levels were stratified, concentrations ≥ 25 mIU/mL were related with increased neovascularization (p Conclusion This is the first study that relates increased serum hCG levels with vascularization in testicular germ cell tumors. Hence, its expression might play a role in tumor angiogenesis, independent of VEGF expression, and may explain its association with poor prognosis. hCG might represent a molecular target for therapy.

  17. Quantification of retinoid concentrations in human serum and brain tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ramadan; Campos, Benito; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Haefeli, Walter E; Herold-Mende, Christel; Burhenne, Jürgen

    2012-05-06

    Retinoic acid signaling is essential for central nervous system (CNS) differentiation and appears to be impaired in tumors. Thus far, there are no established methods to quantify relevant retinoids (all-trans-retinoic acid, 9-cis-retinoic acid, 13-cis retinoic acid, and retinol) in human brain tumors. We developed a single step extraction and quantification procedure for polar and apolar retinoids in normal tissue, lipid-rich brain tumor tissues, and serum. This quantification procedure is based on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode-array detection (DAD) using all-trans-acitretin as an internal standard and extraction by liquid-liquid partition with ethyl acetate and borate buffer at pH 9. Recovery with this extraction procedure was higher than earlier (two-step) liquid-liquid extraction procedures based on hexane, NaOH, and HCl. The overall quantification procedure was validated according to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines and fulfilled all criteria of accuracy, precision, selectivity, recovery, and stability. The overall method accuracy varied between -5.6% and +5.4% for serum and -3.8% and +6.2% for tissues, and overall precision ranged from 3.1% to 6.9% for serum and 2.1% to 8.3% for tissues (%CV batch-to-batch). The lower limit of quantification for all compounds in tumor tissue (and serum) was 3.9 ng g(-1) (ng mL(-1)). Using this assay, photodegradation of the retinoids was evaluated and endogenous polar and apolar retinoids were quantified in sera and brain tumor tissues of patients and compared with serum and tonsil tissue concentrations of controls. It may thus serve as a suitable method for the characterization of retinoid uptake and metabolism in the respective compartments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Bacoside A Induces Tumor Cell Death in Human Glioblastoma Cell Lines through Catastrophic Macropinocytosis

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    Sebastian John

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a highly aggressive type of brain tumor with an extremely poor prognosis. Recent evidences have shown that the “biomechanical imbalances” induced in GBM patient-derived glioblastoma cells (GC and in vivo via the administration of synthetic small molecules, may effectively inhibit disease progression and prolong survival of GBM animal models. This novel concept associated with de novo anti-GBM drug development has however suffered obstacles in adequate clinical utility due to the appearance of unrelated toxicity in the prolonged therapeutic windows. Here, we took a “drug repurposing approach” to trigger similar physico-chemical disturbances in the GBM tumor cells, wherein, the candidate therapeutic agent has been previously well established for its neuro-protective roles, safety, efficacy, prolonged tolerance and excellent brain bioavailability in human subjects and mouse models. In this study, we show that the extracts of an Indian traditional medicinal plant Bacopa monnieri (BM and its bioactive component Bacoside A can generate dosage associated tumor specific disturbances in the hydrostatic pressure balance of the cell via a mechanism involving excessive phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIA (CaMKIIA/CaMK2A enzyme that is further involved in the release of calcium from the smooth endoplasmic reticular networks. High intracellular calcium stimulated massive macropinocytotic extracellular fluid intake causing cell hypertrophy in the initial stages, excessive macropinosome enlargement and fluid accumulation associated organellar congestion, cell swelling, cell rounding and membrane rupture of glioblastoma cells; with all these events culminating into a non-apoptotic, physical non-homeostasis associated glioblastoma tumor cell death. These results identify glioblastoma tumor cells to be a specific target of the tested herbal medicine and therefore can be exploited as a safe anti

  19. Bacoside A Induces Tumor Cell Death in Human Glioblastoma Cell Lines through Catastrophic Macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Sebastian; Sivakumar, K C; Mishra, Rashmi

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive type of brain tumor with an extremely poor prognosis. Recent evidences have shown that the "biomechanical imbalances" induced in GBM patient-derived glioblastoma cells (GC) and in vivo via the administration of synthetic small molecules, may effectively inhibit disease progression and prolong survival of GBM animal models. This novel concept associated with de novo anti-GBM drug development has however suffered obstacles in adequate clinical utility due to the appearance of unrelated toxicity in the prolonged therapeutic windows. Here, we took a "drug repurposing approach" to trigger similar physico-chemical disturbances in the GBM tumor cells, wherein, the candidate therapeutic agent has been previously well established for its neuro-protective roles, safety, efficacy, prolonged tolerance and excellent brain bioavailability in human subjects and mouse models. In this study, we show that the extracts of an Indian traditional medicinal plant Bacopa monnieri (BM) and its bioactive component Bacoside A can generate dosage associated tumor specific disturbances in the hydrostatic pressure balance of the cell via a mechanism involving excessive phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIA (CaMKIIA/CaMK2A) enzyme that is further involved in the release of calcium from the smooth endoplasmic reticular networks. High intracellular calcium stimulated massive macropinocytotic extracellular fluid intake causing cell hypertrophy in the initial stages, excessive macropinosome enlargement and fluid accumulation associated organellar congestion, cell swelling, cell rounding and membrane rupture of glioblastoma cells; with all these events culminating into a non-apoptotic, physical non-homeostasis associated glioblastoma tumor cell death. These results identify glioblastoma tumor cells to be a specific target of the tested herbal medicine and therefore can be exploited as a safe anti-GBM therapeutic.

  20. Increased Immunostaining of Fibulin-1, an Estrogen-Regulated Protein in the Stroma of Human Ovarian Epithelial Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Roger, Pascal; Pujol, Pascal; Lucas, Annick; Baldet, Pierre; Rochefort, Henri

    1998-01-01

    Fibulin-1, an extracellular matrix protein, is secreted by human ovarian metastatic cancer cell lines under estrogen stimulation. Fibulin-1 expression was quantified by immunohistochemistry and computer-aided image analysis in 44 human ovarian epithelial tumors and 14 normal ovaries. The fibulin-1 staining intensity in proximal stroma, close to the surface of epithelial cells and tumor cells, progressively increased from normal ovaries to serous carcinomas. In all lesions, excluding cystadeno...

  1. Usp9x Promotes Survival in Human Pancreatic Cancer and Its Inhibition Suppresses Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma In Vivo Tumor Growth

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    Anupama Pal

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Usp9x has emerged as a potential therapeutic target in some hematologic malignancies and a broad range of solid tumors including brain, breast, and prostate. To examine Usp9x tumorigenicity and consequence of Usp9x inhibition in human pancreatic tumor models, we carried out gain- and loss-of-function studies using established human pancreatic tumor cell lines (PANC1 and MIAPACA2 and four spontaneously immortalized human pancreatic patient-derived tumor (PDX cell lines. The effect of Usp9x activity inhibition by small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor G9 was assessed in 2D and 3D culture, and its efficacy was tested in human tumor xenografts. Overexpression of Usp9x increased 3D growth and invasion in PANC1 cells and up-regulated the expression of known Usp9x substrates Mcl-1 and ITCH. Usp9x inhibition by shRNA-knockdown or by G9 treatment reduced 3D colony formation in PANC1 and PDX cell lines, induced rapid apoptosis in MIAPACA2 cells, and associated with reduced Mcl-1 and ITCH protein levels. Although G9 treatment reduced human MIAPACA2 tumor burden in vivo, in mouse pancreatic cancer cell lines established from constitutive (8041 and doxycycline-inducible (4668 KrasG12D/Tp53R172H mouse pancreatic tumors, Usp9x inhibition increased and sustained the 3D colony growth and showed no significant effect on tumor growth in 8041-xenografts. Thus, Usp9x inhibition may be therapeutically active in human PDAC, but this activity was not predicted from studies of genetically engineered mouse pancreatic tumor models.

  2. F3-targeted cisplatin-hydrogel nanoparticles as an effective therapeutic that targets both murine and human ovarian tumor endothelial cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Ira; Wang, Shouyan; Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Lee, Youg-Eun Koo; Fan, Wenzhe; Gong, Yusong; Burgos-Ojeda, Daniela; Spahlinger, Greg; Kopelman, R; Buckanovich, Ronald J

    2010-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that ovarian cancer may be highly responsive to antivascular therapeutics. We have developed an antivascular tumor therapeutic using the F3 peptide to target cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles (F3-Cis-Np) to tumor vessels. We show that although F3-Cis-Np bind with high specificity to both human ovarian tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells in vitro, they only show cytotoxic activity against the tumor endothelial cells. In vivo these nanoparticles bind primarily to tumor endothelial cells. Therapeutic studies in both flank and orthotopic i.p. murine ovarian tumor models, as well as human tumor xenograft models, show rapid tumor regression with treatment. Treatment was associated with significant vascular necrosis consistent with an antivascular effect. Furthermore, treatment was active in both platinum-sensitive and platinum-resistant cell lines. Importantly, we show that F3-Cis-Np bind to human tumor endothelial cells in vitro and to human tumor vessels in vivo. Therapy targeting human vasculature in vivo with F3-Cis-Np led to near complete loss of all human tumor vessels in a murine model of human tumor vasculature. Our studies indicate that F3-targeted vascular therapeutics may be an effective treatment modality in human ovarian cancer. ©2010 AACR.

  3. A human monoclonal antibody targeting the stem cell factor receptor (c-Kit) blocks tumor cell signaling and inhibits tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Maria B; Brennan, Laura; Damoci, Christopher B; Prewett, Marie C; O’Mahony, Marguerita; Duignan, Inga J; Credille, Kelly M; DeLigio, James T; Starodubtseva, Marina; Amatulli, Michael; Zhang, Yiwei; Schwartz, Kaben D; Burtrum, Douglas; Balderes, Paul; Persaud, Kris; Surguladze, David; Loizos, Nick; Paz, Keren; Kotanides, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell factor receptor (c-Kit) exerts multiple biological effects on target cells upon binding its ligand stem cell factor (SCF). Aberrant activation of c-Kit results in dysregulated signaling and is implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous cancers. The development of more specific and effective c-Kit therapies is warranted given its essential role in tumorigenesis. In this study, we describe the biological properties of CK6, a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody against the extracellular region of human c-Kit. CK6 specifically binds c-Kit receptor with high affinity (EC50 = 0.06 nM) and strongly blocks its interaction with SCF (IC50 = 0.41 nM) in solid phase assays. Flow cytometry shows CK6 binding to c-Kit on the cell surface of human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), melanoma, and leukemia tumor cell lines. Furthermore, exposure to CK6 inhibits SCF stimulation of c-Kit tyrosine kinase activity and downstream signaling pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (AKT), in addition to reducing tumor cell line growth in vitro. CK6 treatment significantly decreases human xenograft tumor growth in NCI-H526 SCLC (T/C% = 57) and Malme-3M melanoma (T/C% = 58) models in vivo. The combination of CK6 with standard of care chemotherapy agents, cisplatin and etoposide for SCLC or dacarbazine for melanoma, more potently reduces tumor growth (SCLC T/C% = 24, melanoma T/C% = 38) compared with CK6 or chemotherapy alone. In summary, our results demonstrate that CK6 is a c-Kit antagonist antibody with tumor growth neutralizing properties and are highly suggestive of potential therapeutic application in treating human malignancies harboring c-Kit receptor. PMID:24921944

  4. Preoperative assessment of microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Jayasree; Zheng, Jian; Gönen, Mithat; Jarnagin, William R.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Do, Richard K. G.; Simpson, Amber L.

    2017-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common liver cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide.1 Resection or liver transplantation may be curative in patients with early-stage HCC but early recurrence is common.2, 3 Microvascular invasion (MVI) is one of the most important predictors of early recurrence.3 The identification of MVI prior to surgery would optimally select patients for potentially curative resection or liver transplant. However, MVI can only be diagnosed by microscopic assessment of the resected tumor. The aim of the present study is to apply CT-based texture analysis to identify pre-operative imaging predictors of MVI in patients with HCC. Texture features are derived from CT and analyzed individually as well as in combination, to evaluate their ability to predict MVI. A two-stage classification is employed: HCC tumors are automatically categorized into uniform or heterogenous groups followed by classification into the presence or absence of MVI. We achieve an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.76 and accuracy of 76.7% for uniform lesions and AUC of 0.79 and accuracy of 74.06% for heterogeneous tumors. These results suggest that MVI can be accurately and objectively predicted from preoperative CT scans.

  5. The Target of 5-Lipoxygenase is a Novel Strategy over Human Urological Tumors than the Target of Cyclooxygenase-2

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    Masahide Matsuyama

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of arachidonic acid by either the cyclooxygenase (COX or lipoxygenase (LOX pathway generates eicosanoids, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases, including cancer. It is now considered that they play important roles in tumor promotion, progression, and metastasis, also, the involvement of COX and LOX expression and function in tumor growth and metastasis has been reported in human tumor cell lines. In this study, we examined the expression of COX and LOX in human urological tumors (renal cell carcinoma, bladder tumor, prostate cancer, testicular cancer by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR, and we also examined the effects of COX and LOX (5- and 12-LOX inhibitors in those cells by MTT assay, hoechest staining, and flow cytometry. COX-2, 5-LOX and 12-LOX expressions were significantly more extensive and intense in malignant tissues than in normal tissues. Furthermore, 5-LOX inhibitor induced the reduction of malignant cell viability through early apoptosis. These results demonstrated COX-2 and LOX were induced in urological tumors, and 5-LOX inhibitor may mediate potent antiproliferative effects against urological tumors cells. Thus, 5-LOX may become a new target in the treatment of urological tumors.

  6. The Target of 5-Lipoxygenase is a Novel Strategy over Human Urological Tumors than the Target of Cyclooxygenase-2

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    Masahide Matsuyama

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of arachidonic acid by either the cyclooxygenase (COX or lipoxygenase (LOX pathway generates eicosanoids, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases, including cancer. It is now considered that they play important roles in tumor promotion, progression, and metastasis, also, the involvement of COX and LOX expression and function in tumor growth and metastasis has been reported in human tumor cell lines. In this study, we examined the expression of COX and LOX in human urological tumors (renal cell carcinoma, bladder tumor, prostate cancer, testicular cancer by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR, and we also examined the effects of COX and LOX (5- and 12-LOX inhibitors in those cells by MTT assay, hoechest staining, and flow cytometry. COX-2, 5-LOX and 12-LOX expressions were significantly more extensive and intense in malignant tissues than in normal tissues. Furthermore, 5-LOX inhibitor induced the reduction of malignant cell viability through early apoptosis. These results demonstrated COX-2 and LOX were induced in urological tumors, and 5-LOX inhibitor may mediate potent antiproliferative effects against urological tumors cells. Thus, 5-LOX may become a new target in the treatment of urological tumors.

  7. AAV-mediated human PEDF inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in murine colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis model

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    Wu Qin Jie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis, therefore antiangiogenic therapy was widely investigated as a promising approach for cancer therapy. Recently, pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF has been shown to be the most potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. Adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors have been intensively studied due to their wide tropisms, nonpathogenicity, and long-term transgene expression in vivo. The objective of this work was to evaluate the ability of AAV-mediated human PEDF (hPEDF as a potent tumor suppressor and a potential candidate for cancer gene therapy. Methods Recombinant AAV2 encoding hPEDF (rAAV2-hPEDF was constructed and produced, and then was assigned for in vitro and in vivo experiments. Conditioned medium from cells infected with rAAV2-hPEDF was used for cell proliferation and tube formation tests of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Subsequently, colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis (CRPC mouse model was established and treated with rAAV2-hPEDF. Therapeutic efficacy of rAAV2-hPEDF were investigated, including tumor growth and metastasis, survival time, microvessel density (MVD and apoptosis index of tumor tissues, and hPEDF levels in serum and ascites. Results rAAV2-hPEDF was successfully constructed, and transmission electron microscope (TEM showed that rAAV2-hPEDF particles were non-enveloped icosahedral shape with a diameter of approximately 20 nm. rAAV2-hPEDF-infected cells expressed hPEDF protein, and the conditioned medium from infected cells inhibited proliferation and tube-formation of HUVECs in vitro. Furthermore, in CRPC mouse model, rAAV2-hPEDF significantly suppressed tumor growth and metastasis, and prolonged survival time of treated mice. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that rAAV2-hPEDF could inhibit angiogenesis and induce apoptosis in tumor tissues. Besides, hPEDF levels in serum and ascites of rAAV2-hPEDF-treated mice were significant

  8. Chemokine receptor CXCR7 regulates the invasion, angiogenesis and tumor growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

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    Li Fan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of recent advances in diagnostic and therapeutic measures, the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients remains poor. Therefore, it is crucial to understand what factors are involved in promoting development of HCC. Evidence is accumulating that members of the chemokine receptor family are viewed as promising therapeutic targets in the fight against cancer. More recent studies have revealed that chemokine receptor CXCR7 plays an important role in cancer development. However, little is known about the effect of CXCR7 on the process of HCC cell invasion and angiogenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of CXCR7 in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues and cell lines and to evaluate the role of CXCR7 in tumor growth, angiogenesis and invasion of HCC cells. Methods We constructed CXCR7 expressing shRNA, and CXCR7shRNA was subsequently stably transfected into human HCC cells. We evaluated the effect of CXCR7 inhibition on cell invasion, adhesion, VEGF secretion, tube formation and tumor growth. Immunohistochemistry was done to assess the expression of CXCR7 in human hepatocellular carcinoma tissues and CD31 in tumor of mice. We also evaluated the effect of VEGF stimulation on expression of CXCR7. Results CXCR7 was overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. We showed that high invasive potential HCC cell lines express high levels of CXCR7. In vitro, CXCL12 was found to induce invasion, adhesion, tube formation, and VEGF secretion in SMMC-7721 cells. These biological effects were inhibited by silencing of CXCR7 in SMMC-7721 cells. In addition, we also found that VEGF stimulation can up-regulate CXCR7 expression in SMMC-7721 cells and HUVECs. More importantly, enhanced expression of CXCR7 by VEGF was founctional. In vivo, tumor growth and angiogenesis were suppressed by knockdown of CXCR7 in SMMC-7721 cells. However, silencing of CXCR7 did not affect metastasis of tumor in vivo

  9. Characterization of MGI 114 (HMAF) histiospecific toxicity in human tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelner, M J; McMorris, T C; Montoya, M A; Estes, L; Uglik, S F; Rutherford, M; Samson, K M; Bagnell, R D; Taetle, R

    1999-01-01

    The acylfulvenes are a class of antitumor agents derived from the fungal toxin illudin S. One acylfulvene derivative, MGI 114 (HMAF), demonstrates marked efficacy in xenograft carcinoma models when compared to the parent acylfulvene or related illudin compounds. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the two analogs in animals, however, is similar. To help elucidate the basis of the increased therapeutic efficacy of MGI 114, we determined the in vitro cytotoxicity, cellular accumulation and DNA incorporation of this drug and compared the results with those from the parent acylfulvene analog. The cytotoxicity of acylfulvene analogs was tested in vitro against a variety of tumor cell lines. Radiolabeled MGI 114 was used for cellular accumulation and DNA incorporation studies. MGI 114 retained relative histiospecific toxicity towards myeloid leukemia and various carcinoma cell lines previously noted with the parent acylfulvene compound. Markedly fewer intracellular molecules of MGI 114 were required to kill human tumor cells in vitro as compared to the parent acylfulvene, indicating that MGI 114 was markedly more toxic on a cellular level. At equitoxic concentrations, however, the incorporation of MGI 114 into genomic tumor cell DNA was equivalent to that of acylfulvene. Analysis of cellular accumulation of MGI 114 into tumor cells revealed a lower Vmax for tumor cells, and a markedly lower Vd for diffusion accumulation as compared to acylfulvene. The addition of a single methylhydroxyl group to acylfulvene to produce MGI 114 results in a marked increase in cytotoxicity in vitro towards tumor cells as demonstrated by the reduction in IC50 values. There was a corresponding decrease in the number of intracellular molecules of MGI 114 required to kill tumor cells, but no quantitative alteration in covalent binding of the drugs to DNA at equitoxic concentrations. This indicates that cellular metabolism plays a role in the in vitro cytotoxicity of MGI 114. The equivalent

  10. Comparison of methods of microvascular staining and quantification in prostate carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Borre, Michael; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2002-01-01

    of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens from TURPs on 51 consecutive patients with prostate carcinoma were immunostained for CD34 and von Willebrand Factor (vWF). Estimates of microvascular density were based on projecting a 10 x 10 grid or a Chalkley grid onto a vascular hot spot of the invasive...... prostate carcinoma. Anti-CD34 antibodies stained microvessels in all 51 tumors, whereas anti-vWF antibodies in 6 tumors resulted in intense background staining causing omission of these. Anti-CD34 antibodies highlighted significantly more microvessels than anti-vWF antibodies, and the anti-CD34 vascular...... scores with either of the counting methods were significantly correlated, which was not the case with vWF. Both grids used on anti-CD34-stained sections resulted in vascular scores that could separate the tumors into prognostic groups. This was not possible using the Chalkley grid on vWF-stained tumors...

  11. The use of free microvascular techniques to improve the results of Van Nes rotationplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Pankaj; Agrawal, Nikhil; Kocak, Ergun

    2013-06-01

    Van Nes rotationplasty is a limb-salvage used for reconstruction after resection of a distal femoral or proximal tibial osteosarcoma in the pediatric patient. After resection, the distal leg is reapproximated to the level of tumor resection. The goal is to optimize extremity functionality such that the ankle functions as a knee joint. Traditionally, the vessels and nerves around the tumor are preserved within the distal leg. In the first case of our series, this method resulted in thrombosis, flap loss, and ultimately amputation secondary to venous torsion and thrombosis. In the following 2 cases, the intervening vasculature was resected along with the tumor, and the distal pedicles were anastomosed to their proximal counterparts using microvascular techniques. In addition to expediting resection of the tumor as well as allowing wider tumor resection margins, this technique also precludes thrombosis and subsequent flap loss.

  12. Flotillin-1 protein is upregulated in human endometrial cancer and localization shifts from epithelial to stromal with increasing tumor grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, Amy Louise; Rainczuk, Kate; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynecological malignancy. Flotillin-1 is an integral membrane protein and estrogen responsive gene. Flotillin-1 expression and localization in human endometrial cancers grades 1-3 was investigated using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Flotillin-1 mRNA levels were unchanged in endometrial cancer versus benign endometrium. Flotillin-1 protein was significantly reduced in the epithelial compartment with increasing tumor grade, although levels increased in the tumor stroma across grades. We have identified a novel factor in human endometrial cancer and observed a shift in epithelial to stromal localization with increasing tumor grade in women.

  13. Degranulating mast cells in fibrotic regions of human tumors and evidence that mast cell heparin interferes with the growth of tumor cells through a mechanism involving fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanakubo Emi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mast cells that are present in fibrotic regions of cancer can suppress the growth of tumor cells through an indirect mechanism involving peri-tumoral fibroblasts. Methods We first immunostained a wide variety of human cancers for the presence of degranulated mast cells. In a subsequent series of controlled in vitro experiments, we then co-cultured UACC-812 human breast cancer cells with normal fibroblasts in the presence or absence of different combinations and doses of mast cell tryptase, mast cell heparin, a lysate of the human mast cell line HMC-1, and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7, a powerful, heparin-binding growth factor for breast epithelial cells. Results Degranulating mast cells were localized predominantly in the fibrous tissue of every case of breast cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and Hodgkin's disease that we examined. Mast cell tryptase and HMC-1 lysate had no significant effect on the clonogenic growth of cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. By contrast, mast cell heparin at multiple doses significantly reduced the size and number of colonies of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, especially in the presence of FGF-7. Neither heparin nor FGF-7, individually or in combination, produced any significant effect on the clonogenic growth of breast cancer cells cultured without fibroblasts. Conclusion Degranulating mast cells are restricted to peri-tumoral fibrous tissue, and mast cell heparin is a powerful inhibitor of clonogenic growth of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. These results may help to explain the well-known ability of heparin to inhibit the growth of primary and metastatic tumors.

  14. Computational analysis of expression of human embryonic stem cell-associated signatures in tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaosheng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cancer stem cell model has been proposed based on the linkage between human embryonic stem cells and human cancer cells. However, the evidences supporting the cancer stem cell model remain to be collected. In this study, we extensively examined the expression of human embryonic stem cell-associated signatures including core genes, transcription factors, pathways and microRNAs in various cancers using the computational biology approach. Results We used the class comparison analysis and survival analysis algorithms to identify differentially expressed genes and their associated transcription factors, pathways and microRNAs among normal vs. tumor or good prognosis vs. poor prognosis phenotypes classes based on numerous human cancer gene expression data. We found that most of the human embryonic stem cell- associated signatures were frequently identified in the analysis, suggesting a strong linkage between human embryonic stem cells and cancer cells. Conclusions The present study revealed the close linkage between the human embryonic stem cell associated gene expression profiles and cancer-associated gene expression profiles, and therefore offered an indirect support for the cancer stem cell theory. However, many interest issues remain to be addressed further.

  15. The effect of exercise training on cutaneous microvascular reactivity: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanting, Sean M; Johnson, Nathan A; Baker, Michael K; Caterson, Ian D; Chuter, Vivienne H

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to review the efficacy of exercise training for improving cutaneous microvascular reactivity in response to local stimulus in human adults. Systematic review with meta-analysis. A systematic search of Medline, Cinahl, AMED, Web of Science, Scopus, and Embase was conducted up to June 2015. Included studies were controlled trials assessing the effect of an exercise training intervention on cutaneous microvascular reactivity as instigated by local stimulus such as local heating, iontophoresis and post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia. Studies where the control was only measured at baseline or which included participants with vasospastic disorders were excluded. Two authors independently reviewed and selected relevant controlled trials and extracted data. Quality was assessed using the Downs and Black checklist. Seven trials were included, with six showing a benefit of exercise training but only two reaching statistical significance with effect size ranging from -0.14 to 1.03. The meta-analysis revealed that aerobic exercise had a moderate statistically significant effect on improving cutaneous microvascular reactivity (effect size (ES)=0.43, 95% CI: 0.08-0.78, p=0.015). Individual studies employing an exercise training intervention have tended to have small sample sizes and hence lacked sufficient power to detect clinically meaningful benefits to cutaneous microvascular reactivity. Pooled analysis revealed a clear benefit of exercise training on improving cutaneous microvascular reactivity in older and previously inactive adult cohorts. Exercise training may provide a cost-effective option for improving cutaneous microvascular reactivity in adults and may be of benefit to those with cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders such as diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) kills human glioblastoma cells in brain xenografts by an apoptosis-like mechanism and prolongs survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gronli, Janne; Mork, Sverre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Svanborg, Catharina

    2004-03-15

    Malignant brain tumors present a major therapeutic challenge because no selective or efficient treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate that intratumoral administration of human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) prolongs survival in a human glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft model, by selective induction of tumor cell apoptosis. HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that is formed from alpha-lactalbumin when the protein changes its tertiary conformation and binds oleic acid as a cofactor. HAMLET induces apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cells in vitro, but the therapeutic effect in vivo has not been examined. In this study, invasively growing human GBM tumors were established in nude rats (Han:rnu/rnu Rowett, n = 20) by transplantation of human GBM biopsy spheroids. After 7 days, HAMLET was administered by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery for 24 h into the tumor area; and alpha-lactalbumin, the native, folded variant of the same protein, was used as a control. HAMLET reduced the intracranial tumor volume and delayed the onset of pressure symptoms in the tumor-bearing rats. After 8 weeks, all alpha-lactalbumin-treated rats had developed pressure symptoms, but the HAMLET-treated rats remained asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed large differences in tumor volume (456 versus 63 mm(3)). HAMLET caused apoptosis in vivo in the tumor but not in adjacent intact brain tissue or in nontransformed human astrocytes, and no toxic side effects were observed. The results identify HAMLET as a new candidate in cancer therapy and suggest that HAMLET should be additionally explored as a novel approach to controlling GBM progression.

  17. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) up-regulates tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) production in human tumor cells: exploring the functional significance in tumor cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Anitha S; Hu, Xioulong; Rothman, Vicki L; Tuszynski, George P

    2009-12-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), a matrix-bound adhesive glycoprotein, has been shown to modulate tumor progression. We previously demonstrated that TSP-1 up-regulates matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our studies suggested that the balance between MMPs and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) is a key determinant in tumor cell invasion. We now report that TSP-1 up-regulates TIMP-1 expression in both human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. The effect of TSP-1 on TIMP-1 expression was examined in human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (MDA-MB-231) and human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3-NI and PC3-ML) treated with exogenous TSP-1. TIMP-1 expression was also examined in TSP-1 stably transfected breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-435). Northern and western blot analysis revealed TIMP-1 mRNA and TIMP-1 protein expression increased with increasing concentrations of TSP-1. This effect was inhibited by antibodies against the type I repeat domain of TSP-1 further suggesting that TSP-1 mediates TIMP-1 secretion. Inhibition of TSP-1 induced TIMP-1 levels increased tumor cell invasion. We conclude that TSP-1 is involved in influencing the critical balance between MMPs and their inhibitors, maintaining the controlled degradation of the extracellular matrix needed to support metastasis and our results may provide an explanation for the divergent activities reported for TSP-1 in tumor progression.

  18. Circadian expression of clock- and tumor suppressor genes in human oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieker, Derek; Jenne, Isabel; Koenigsrainer, Ingmar; Zdichavsky, Marty; Nieselt, Kay; Buck, Katharina; Zieker, Judith; Beckert, Stefan; Glatzle, Joerg; Spanagel, Rainer; Koenigsrainer, Alfred; Northoff, Hinnak; Loeffler, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are daily oscillations of multiple biological processes driven by endogenous clocks. Imbalance of these rhythms has been associated with cancerogenesis in humans. To further elucidate the role circadian clocks have in cellular growth control, tumor suppression and cancer treatment, it is revealing to know how clock genes and clock-controlled genes are regulated in healthy humans. Therefore comparative microarray analyses were conducted investigating the relative mRNA expression of clock genes throughout a 24-hour period in cell samples obtained from oral mucosa of eight healthy diurnally active male study participants. Differentially expressed selected genes of interest were additionally evaluated using qRT-PCR. Microarray analysis revealed 33 significant differentially regulated clock genes and clock- controlled genes, throughout a one day period (6.00h, 12.00h, 18.00h, 24.00h). Hereof were 16 clock genes and 17 clock- controlled genes including tumor suppressor- and oncogenes. qRT-PCR of selected genes of interest, such as hPER2, hCRY1, hBMAL1, hCCRN4L and hSMAD5 revealed significant circadian regulations. Our study revealed a proper circadian regulation profile of several clock- and tumor suppressor genes at defined points in time in the participants studied. These findings could provide important information regarding genes displaying the same expression profile in the gastrointestinal tract amounting to a physiological expression profile of healthy humans. In the future asynchronous regulations of those genes might be an additional assistant method to detect derivations distinguishing normal from malignant tissue or assessing risk factors for cancer. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Differential expression of human homeodomain TGIFLX in brain tumor cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Raoofian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most common and the most lethal primary brain cancer. This malignancy is highly locally invasive, rarely metastatic and resistant to current therapies. Little is known about the distinct molecular biology of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM in terms of initiation and progression. So far, several molecular mechanisms have been suggested to implicate in GBM development. Homeodomain (HD transcription factors play central roles in the expression of genomic information in all known eukaryotes. The TGIFX homeobox gene was originally discovered in human adult testes. Our previous study showed implications of TGIFLX in prostate cancer and azoospermia, although the molecular mechanism by which TGIFLX acts is unknown. Moreover, studies reported that HD proteins are involved in normal and abnormal brain developments. We examined the expression pattern of TGIFLX in different human brain tumor cell lines including U87MG, A172, Daoy and 1321N1. Interestingly, real time RT-PCR and western blot analysis revealed a high level of TGIFLX expression in A172 cells but not in the other cell lines. We subsequently cloned the entire coding sequence of TGIFLX gene into the pEGFP-N1 vector, eukaryotic expression vector encoding eGFP, and transfected into the U-87 MG cell line. The TGIFLX-GFP expression was confirmed by real time RT-PCR and UV-microscopic analysis. Upon transfection into U87 cells, fusion protein TGIFLX-GFP was found to locate mainly in the nucleus. This is the first report to determine the nuclear localization of TGIFLX and evaluation of its expression level between different brain tumor cell lines. Our data also suggest that TGIFLX gene dysregulation could be involved in the pathogenesis of some human brain tumors.

  20. Oncolytic viruses sensitize human tumor cells for NY-ESO-1 tumor antigen recognition by CD4+ effector T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, Tiphaine; Violland, Mathilde; Boisgerault, Nicolas; Dutoit, Soizic; Vignard, Virginie; Münz, Christian; Gannage, Monique; Dréno, Brigitte; Vaivode, Kristine; Pjanova, Dace; Labarrière, Nathalie; Wang, Yaohe; Chiocca, E Antonio; Boeuf, Fabrice Le; Bell, John C; Erbs, Philippe; Tangy, Frédéric; Grégoire, Marc; Fonteneau, Jean-François

    2018-01-01

    Oncolytic immunotherapy using oncolytic viruses (OV) has been shown to stimulate the antitumor immune response by inducing the release of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and danger signals from the dying infected tumor cells. In this study, we sought to determine if the lysis of tumor cells induced by different OV: measles virus, vaccinia virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, herpes simplex type I virus, adenovirus or enterovirus, has consequences on the capacity of tumor cells to present TAA, such as NY-ESO-1. We show that the co-culture of NY-ESO-1 neg /HLA-DP4 pos melanoma cells with NY-ESO-1 pos /HLA-DP4 neg melanoma cells infected and killed by different OV induces an intercellular transfer of NY-ESO-1 that allows the recognition of NY-ESO-1 neg /HLA-DP4 pos tumor cells by an HLA-DP4/NY-ESO-1 (157-170) -specific CD4+ cytotoxic T cell clone, NY67. We then confirmed this result in a second model with an HLA-DP4+ melanoma cell line that expresses a low amount of NY-ESO-1. Recognition of this cell line by the NY67 clone is largely increased in the presence of OV productive infection. Altogether, our results show for the first time another mechanism of stimulation of the anti-tumor immune response by OV, via the loading of tumor cells with TAA that sensitizes them for direct recognition by specific effector CD4+ T cells, supporting the use of OV for cancer immunotherapy.

  1. TLR4 activates NF-{kappa}B in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Dori C., E-mail: dwoods2@partners.org [Vincent Center for Reproductive Biology, Vincent Obstetrics and Gynecology Service, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); White, Yvonne A.R. [Vincent Center for Reproductive Biology, Vincent Obstetrics and Gynecology Service, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Dau, Caroline [University of California, San Francisco, School of Dentistry, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Johnson, A.L. [Center for Reproductive Biology and Health, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} TLR4 is expressed in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells. {yields} Acting through TLR4, LPS and HSP60 induce a NF{kappa}B signaling cascade in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation or inhibition did not alter chemosensitivity to TRAIL or cisplatin. -- Abstract: Previous studies have demonstrated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the surface epithelium of normal ovaries (OSE) and in epithelial ovarian tumors. Most notably, OSE-derived cancers express TLR4, which activates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) signaling cascade as a mediator of inflammatory response. Currently, there is considerable interest in elucidating the role of TLR-mediated signaling in cancers. Nevertheless, the expression of TLRs in granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary, and the extent to which GCT expression of TLRs may influence cell-signaling pathways and/or modulate the efficacy of chemotherapeutics, has yet to be determined. In the present study, human GCT lines (COV434 and KGN) were utilized to evaluate expression of functional TLR4. TLR4 is expressed in GCT cell lines and ligation of TLR4 with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) led to I{kappa}B degradation and activation of NF-{kappa}B. NF-{kappa}B activation was confirmed by nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B p65 following treatment with LPS and the naturally occurring ligand, HSP60. Notably, immunoneutralization of TLR4 blocked nuclear localization, and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B signaling attenuated LPS-induced TNF{alpha} plus increased doubling time in both cell lines. Contradictory to reports using human OSE cell lines, inhibition of NF-{kappa}B signaling failed to sensitize GCT lines to TRAIL or cisplatin. In summary, findings herein are the first to demonstrate a functional TLR-signaling pathway specifically in GCTs, and indicate that in contrast to OSE-derived cancers, inhibition of NF-{kappa}B does not sensitize GCTs to TRAIL or cisplatin.

  2. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic (Pindborg) tumor-associated amyloid consists of a novel human protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Alan; Murphy, Charles L; Weaver, Kristal; Weiss, Deborah T; Hrncic, Rudi; Eulitz, Manfred; Donnell, Robert L; Sletten, Knut; Westermark, Gunilla; Westermark, Per

    2003-11-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors (CEOTs), also known as Pindborg tumors, are characterized by the presence of squamous-cell proliferation, calcification, and, notably, amyloid deposits. On the basis of immunohistochemical analyses, the amyloidogenic component had heretofore been deemed to consist of cytokeratin-related or other molecules; however, its chemical composition had never been elucidated. We have used our microanalytic techniques to characterize the protein nature of CEOT-associated amyloid isolated from specimens obtained from 3 patients. As evidenced by the results of amino-acid sequencing and mass spectrometry, the fibrils were found to be composed of a polypeptide of approximately 46 mer. This component was identical in sequence to the N-terminal portion of a hypothetical 153-residue protein encoded by the FLJ20513 gene cloned from the human KATO III cell line. That the amyloid protein was derived from this larger molecule was demonstrated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplification of tumor-cell RNA where a full-length FLJ20513 transcript was found. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the amyloid within the CEOTs immunostained with antibodies prepared against a synthetic FLJ20513-related dodecapeptide. Our studies provide unequivocal evidence that CEOT-associated amyloid consists of a unique and previously undescribed protein that we provisionally designate APin.

  3. Immunoexpression of integrins in ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, and human tooth germs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Andrade, Emanuel Sávio; Miguel, Márcia Cristina da Costa; de Almeida Freitas, Roseana; Pereira Pinto, Leão; Batista de Souza, Lélia

    2008-07-01

    The expression of integrins alpha2beta1, alpha3beta1, and alpha5beta1 in 30 ameloblastomas (20 solid and 10 unicystic tumors), 12 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs), and 5 human tooth germs in different stages of odontogenesis was analyzed. The distribution, location, pattern, and intensity of immunohistochemical expression were evaluated. Intensity was analyzed using scores (0 = absence, 1 = weak staining, and 2 = strong staining). No difference in the immunoexpression of the integrins was observed between solid and unicystic ameloblastomas. When these two ameloblastoma types were pooled into a single group, the following significant differences were found: immunoexpression of integrin alpha2beta1 was stronger in ameloblastomas than in AOTs and tooth germs, and the expression of integrin alpha5beta1 was stronger in ameloblastomas than in AOTs. The lack of detection of integrin alpha3beta1 in tooth germs and its detection in the odontogenic tumors studied suggest that this integrin might be used as a marker of neoplastic transformation in odontogenic tissues.

  4. Biochemical Signatures of Doppel Protein in Human Astrocytomas to Support Prediction in Tumor Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rognoni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Doppel (Dpl is a membrane-bound glycoprotein mainly expressed in the testis of adult healthy people. It is generally absent in the central nervous system, but its coding gene sequence is ectopically expressed in astrocytoma specimens and in derived cell lines. In this paper, we investigated the expression and the biochemical features of Dpl in a panel of 49 astrocytoma specimens of different WHO malignancy grades. As a result, Dpl was expressed in the majority of the investigated specimens (86%, also including low grade samples. Importantly, Dpl exhibited different cellular localizations and altered glycan moieties composition, depending on the tumor grade. Most low-grade astrocytomas (83% showed a membrane-bound Dpl, like human healthy testis tissue, whereas the majority of high-grade astrocytomas (75% displayed a cytosolic Dpl. Deglycosylation studies with N-glycosidase F and/or neuraminidase highlighted defective glycan moieties and an unexpected loss of sialic acid. To find associations between glial tumor progression and Dpl biochemical features, predictive bioinformatics approaches were produced. In particular, Decision tree and Nomogram analysis showed well-defined Dpl-based criteria that separately clustered low-and high-grade astrocytomas. Taken together, these findings show that in astrocytomas, Dpl undergoes different molecular processes that might constitute additional helpful tools to characterize the glial tumor progression.

  5. Pit-1 inhibits BRCA1 and sensitizes human breast tumors to cisplatin and vitamin D treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Samuel; Arias, Efigenia; Sigueiro, Rita; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Martinez-Ordoñez, Anxo; Castelao, Esteban; Eiró, Noemí; Garcia-Caballero, Tomás; Macia, Manuel; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Maestro, Miguel; Vizoso, Francisco; Mouriño, Antonio; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2015-06-10

    The POU class 1 homeobox 1 (POU1F1, also known as Pit-1), pertaining to the Pit-Oct-Unc (POU) family of transcription factors, has been related to tumor growth and metastasis in breast. However, its role in response to breast cancer therapy is unknown. We found that Pit-1 down-regulated DNA-damage and repair genes, and specifically inhibited BRCA1 gene expression, sensitizing breast cancer cells to DNA-damage agents. Administration of 1α, 25-dihydroxy-3-epi-vitamin D3 (3-Epi, an endogenous low calcemic vitamin D metabolite) reduced Pit-1 expression, and synergized with cisplatin, thus, decreasing cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro, and reducing tumor growth in vivo. In addition, fifteen primary cultures of human breast tumors showed significantly decreased proliferation when treated with 3-Epi+cisplatin, compared to cisplatin alone. This response positively correlated with Pit-1 levels. Our findings demonstrate that high levels of Pit-1 and reduced BRCA1 levels increase breast cancer cell susceptibility to 3-Epi+cisplatin therapy.

  6. FBXW7 Acts as an Independent Prognostic Marker and Inhibits Tumor Growth in Human Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanchun Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available F-box and WD repeat domain-containing 7 (FBXW7 is a potent tumor suppressor in human cancers including breast cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we found that the expressions of FBXW7 protein and mRNA levels in osteosarcoma (OS cases were significantly lower than those in normal bone tissues. Clinical analysis indicated that FBXW7 was expressed at lower levels in OS patients with advanced clinical stage, high T classification and poor histological differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that high expression of FBXW7 was correlated with a better 5-year survival of OS patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that FBXW7 was an independent prognostic marker in OS. Our in vitro studies showed that FBXW7 overexpression inhibited cell cycle transition and cell proliferation, and promoted apoptosis in both U2OS and MG-63 cells. In a nude mouse xenograft model, FBXW7 overexpression slowed down tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and growth arrest. Mechanistically, FBXW7 inversely regulated oncoprotein c-Myc and cyclin E levels in both U2OS and MG-63 cells. Together these findings suggest that FBXW7 may serve as a prognostic biomarker and inhibit tumor progression by inducing apoptosis and growth arrest in OS.

  7. Clinical implications of chemotherapy-induced tumor gene expression in human breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sing-Huang; Lee, Soo-Chin

    2010-03-01

    There has been much interest in generating gene signatures to predict treatment response in breast cancer. There are at least 15 published studies that describe baseline tumor gene signatures predicting chemotherapy sensitivity. As an extension of these baseline studies, there have been at least 8 published studies evaluating chemotherapy-induced tumor genomic changes over time in human breast cancers. Studies on chemotherapy-induced gene expression changes were reviewed in detail. Drug-induced biological changes within the tumor shed light on mechanisms of drug resistance and provided valuable insights regarding genes and pathways that were regulated by different drugs, including therapeutic targets that could be exploited to overcome resistance. One study also suggested post-chemotherapy gene signatures to be more predictive of response and survival than the unchallenged baseline signatures. Studies on chemotherapy-induced changes, although informative, are logistically demanding to execute, often with significant attrition of collected samples resulting in small datasets. They are further limited by heterogeneity of study population, chemotherapy regimens used, timing of the post-therapy sample and definition of response endpoint, making cross-comparisons of studies and data interpretation difficult. Future studies should address these limitations, and should involve larger sample sets and prospective studies for validation.

  8. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with multimodal multiscale optical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulon, Fanny; Metais, Camille; Jamme, Frederic; Zanello, Marc; Varlet, Pascale; Devaux, Bertrand; Refregiers, Matthieu; Abi Haidar, Darine

    2017-02-01

    Brain tumor surgeries are facing major challenges to improve patients' quality of life. The extent of resection while preserving surrounding eloquent brain areas is necessary to equilibrate the onco-functional. A tool able to increase the accuracy of tissue analysis and to deliver an immediate diagnostic on tumor, could drastically improve actual surgeries and patient survival rates. To achieve such performances a complete optical study, ranging from ultraviolet to infrared, of biopsies has been started by our group. Four different contrasts were used: 1) spectral analysis covering the DUV to IR range, 2) two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging and one photon time domain measurement, 3) second harmonic generation imaging and 4) fluorescence imaging using DUV to IR, one and two photon excitation. All these measurements were done on the endogenous fluorescence of tissues to avoid any bias and further clinical complication due to the introduction of external markers. The different modalities are then crossed to build a matrix of criteria to discriminate tumorous tissues. The results of multimodal optical analysis on human biopsies were compared to the gold standard histopathology.

  9. Characterization of Mild Whole-Body Hyperthermia Protocols Using Human Breast, Ovarian, and Colon Tumors Grown in Severe Combined Immunodeficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Repasky

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We have shown that one treatment of fever-like whole body hyperthermia (WBH on mice bearing human breast tumors results in a tumor growth delay. Our goal was to repeat this study in mice bearing human ovarian or colon tumors. We further evaluated this WBH protocol by performing multiple and interrupted WBH treatments.

  10. Higher Numbers of T-Bet+ Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes Associate with Better Survival in Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun; Chen, Lujun; Xu, Bin; Xiong, Yuqi; Yang, Min; Rui, Xiaohui; Shi, Liangrong; Wu, Changping; Jiang, Jingting; Lu, Binfeng

    2017-01-01

    T-bet, a member of the T-box family of transcription factors, is a key marker of type I immune response within the tumor microenvironment, and has been previously reported by us to serve as an important prognostic indicator for human gastric cancer patients and a potential biomarker for immunotherapy. In the present study, we aimed to assess the clinical significance and prognostic value of T-bet+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in human epithelial ovarian cancer. The immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the infiltration density of T-bet+ lymphoid cells in human epithelial ovarian cancer tissues, and the flow cytometry analysis was used to further analyze the presence of T-bet+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes subgroups in cancer tissues. Our immunohistochemistry analysis showed increased number of T-bet+ lymphoid cells in the human epithelial ovarian cancer tissues, and the flow cytometry analysis further demonstrated the presence of T-bet+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes subgroups including CD4+ , CD8+ T cells and NK cells. In addition, we also observed a significant association of T-bet+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes density in the tumor nest of cancer with not only serum CA125 levels but also with distant metastasis. However no association was observed with other characteristics like patients' age, pathological type, FIGO stage, tumor site and tumor size. Furthermore, the survival analysis showed that higher density of T-bet+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes both in tumor nest and tumor stroma of cancer tissues was significantly associated with better patient survival. In addition, the density of T-bet+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in tumor nest appeared to be an independent risk factor for predicting patients' postoperative prognoses. Our data indicated that the key transcription factor T-bet might play an important role in the type I immune cells mediated antitumor response, and the density of T-bet+ lymphocytes in human epithelial ovarian cancer tissues

  11. Higher Numbers of T-Bet+ Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes Associate with Better Survival in Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: T-bet, a member of the T-box family of transcription factors, is a key marker of type I immune response within the tumor microenvironment, and has been previously reported by us to serve as an important prognostic indicator for human gastric cancer patients and a potential biomarker for immunotherapy. In the present study, we aimed to assess the clinical significance and prognostic value of T-bet+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in human epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods: The immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the infiltration density of T-bet+ lymphoid cells in human epithelial ovarian cancer tissues, and the flow cytometry analysis was used to further analyze the presence of T-bet+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes subgroups in cancer tissues. Results: Our immunohistochemistry analysis showed increased number of T-bet+ lymphoid cells in the human epithelial ovarian cancer tissues, and the flow cytometry analysis further demonstrated the presence of T-bet+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes subgroups including CD4+ , CD8+ T cells and NK cells. In addition, we also observed a significant association of T-bet+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes density in the tumor nest of cancer with not only serum CA125 levels but also with distant metastasis. However no association was observed with other characteristics like patients' age, pathological type, FIGO stage, tumor site and tumor size. Furthermore, the survival analysis showed that higher density of T-bet+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes both in tumor nest and tumor stroma of cancer tissues was significantly associated with better patient survival. In addition, the density of T-bet+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in tumor nest appeared to be an independent risk factor for predicting patients’ postoperative prognoses. Conclusions: Our data indicated that the key transcription factor T-bet might play an important role in the type I immune cells mediated antitumor response, and the

  12. Microvascular responsiveness in obesity: implications for therapeutic intervention

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    Bagi, Zsolt; Feher, Attila; Cassuto, James

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has detrimental effects on the microcirculation. Functional changes in microvascular responsiveness may increase the risk of developing cardiovascular complications in obese patients. Emerging evidence indicates that selective therapeutic targeting of the microvessels may prevent life-threatening obesity-related vascular complications, such as ischaemic heart disease, heart failure and hypertension. It is also plausible that alterations in adipose tissue microcirculation contribute to the development of obesity. Therefore, targeting adipose tissue arterioles could represent a novel approach to reducing obesity. This review aims to examine recent studies that have been focused on vasomotor dysfunction of resistance arteries in obese humans and animal models of obesity. Particularly, findings in coronary resistance arteries are contrasted to those obtained in other vascular beds. We provide examples of therapeutic attempts, such as use of statins, ACE inhibitors and insulin sensitizers to prevent obesity-related microvascular complications. We further identify some of the important challenges and opportunities going forward. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3 PMID:21797844

  13. Expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes in human thyroid tumors: the immunohistochemical and molecular biology (RT-PCR investigation

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    Pisarek Hanna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human endocrine tumors often express the somatostatin receptors SSTR 1–5 with different intensity. It has been widely investigated their distribution in pituitary adenomas, brain tumors, adrenal tumors and neuroendocrine tumors in gastrointestinal tract (NET. Some of studies also concern the expression of SSTRs in thyroid tumors but they are mainly limited to parafollicular C cells – derived medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC. Results of SSTR 1–5 detection in other thyroid pathologies like follicular adenomas and papillary cancers are still scarce and often controversial, depending of investigation method used. The aim of this study was to report the presence of all the 5 subtypes of SSTR (including 2A and 2B SSTR isoforms in some surgically treated human thyroid tumors by means of immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR method and to correlate the results obtained with both techniques. SSTR 1 protein was expressed in 88.8% of investigated cases, SSTR 2A and 2B both in 44.4%, SSTR 3 in 55.5%, SSTR 4 in 11.2% and SSTR 5 in 33.3%. SSTR 1 is the dominant form in the thyroid gland tumor and hyperplasia. We found positive confirmation of both methods in 88.8% for SSTR 1, 2A, 3 subtypes, in 22.2% for SSTR 4 and in 100% for SSTR 5. It suggests that somatostatin multiligand analogs or selective SSTR 1 agonists may be used in thyroid tumors treatment.

  14. Suppressive effects of tumor cell-derived 5′-deoxy-5′-methylthioadenosine on human T cells

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    Henrich, Frederik C.; Singer, Katrin; Poller, Kerstin; Bernhardt, Luise; Strobl, Carolin D.; Limm, Katharina; Ritter, Axel P.; Gottfried, Eva; Völkl, Simon; Jacobs, Benedikt; Peter, Katrin; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Dettmer, Katja; Oefner, Peter J.; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Kreutz, Marina P.; Aigner, Michael; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment represents one of the main obstacles for immunotherapy of cancer. The tumor milieu is among others shaped by tumor metabolites such as 5′-deoxy-5′-methylthioadenosine (MTA). Increased intratumoral MTA levels result from a lack of the MTA-catabolizing enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) in tumor cells and are found in various tumor entities. Here, we demonstrate that MTA suppresses proliferation, activation, differentiation, and effector function of antigen-specific T cells without eliciting cell death. Conversely, if MTA is added to highly activated T cells, MTA exerts cytotoxic effects on T cells. We identified the Akt pathway, a critical signal pathway for T cell activation, as a target of MTA, while, for example, p38 remained unaffected. Next, we provide evidence that MTA exerts its immunosuppressive effects by interfering with protein methylation in T cells. To confirm the relevance of the suppressive effects of exogenously added MTA on human T cells, we used an MTAP-deficient tumor cell-line that was stably transfected with the MTAP-coding sequence. We observed that T cells stimulated with MTAP-transfected tumor cells revealed a higher proliferative capacity compared to T cells stimulated with Mock-transfected cells. In conclusion, our findings reveal a novel immune evasion strategy of human tumor cells that could be of interest for therapeutic targeting. PMID:27622058

  15. A rapid and quantitative method to detect human circulating tumor cells in a preclinical animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shih-Hsin; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Huang, Li-Chi; Lin, Chun-Yu; Hsu, Kai-Wen; Hsieh, Wen-Shyang; Chi, Wei-Ming; Lee, Chia-Hwa

    2017-06-23

    As cancer metastasis is the deadliest aspect of cancer, causing 90% of human deaths, evaluating the molecular mechanisms underlying this process is the major interest to those in the drug development field. Both therapeutic target identification and proof-of-concept experimentation in anti-cancer drug development require appropriate animal models, such as xenograft tumor transplantation in transgenic and knockout mice. In the progression of cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the most critical factor in determining the prognosis of cancer patients. Several studies have demonstrated that measuring CTC-specific markers in a clinical setting (e.g., flow cytometry) can provide a current status of cancer development in patients. However, this useful technique has rarely been applied in the real-time monitoring of CTCs in preclinical animal models. In this study, we designed a rapid and reliable detection method by combining a bioluminescent in vivo imaging system (IVIS) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR)-based analysis to measure CTCs in animal blood. Using the IVIS Spectrum CT System with 3D-imaging on orthotropic-developed breast-tumor-bearing mice. In this manuscript, we established a quick and reliable method for measuring CTCs in a preclinical animal mode. The key to this technique is the use of specific human and mouse GUS primers on DNA/RNA of mouse peripheral blood under an absolute qPCR system. First, the high sensitivity of cancer cell detection on IVIS was presented by measuring the luciferase carried MDA-MB-231 cells from 5 to 5x10(11) cell numbers with great correlation (R(2) = 0.999). Next, the MDA-MB-231 cell numbers injected by tail vein and their IVIS radiance signals were strongly corrected with qPCR-calculated copy numbers (R(2) > 0.99). Furthermore, by applying an orthotropic implantation animal model, we successfully distinguished xenograft tumor-bearing mice and control mice with a significant difference (p < 0

  16. The PTPN14 Tumor Suppressor Is a Degradation Target of Human Papillomavirus E7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalmás, Anita; Tomaić, Vjekoslav; Basukala, Om; Massimi, Paola; Mittal, Suruchi; Kónya, József; Banks, Lawrence

    2017-04-01

    Activation of signaling pathways ensuring cell growth is essential for the proliferative competence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-infected cells. Tyrosine kinases and phosphatases are key regulators of cellular growth control pathways. A recently identified potential cellular target of HPV E7 is the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN14, which is a potential tumor suppressor and is linked to the control of the Hippo and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathways. In this study, we show that the E7 proteins of both high-risk and low-risk mucosal HPV types can interact with PTPN14. This interaction is independent of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and involves residues in the carboxy-terminal region of E7. We also show that high-risk E7 induces proteasome-mediated degradation of PTPN14 in cells derived from cervical tumors. This degradation appears to be independent of cullin-1 or cullin-2 but most likely involves the UBR4/p600 ubiquitin ligase. The degree to which E7 downregulates PTPN14 would suggest that this interaction is important for the viral life cycle and potentially also for the development of malignancy. In support of this we find that overexpression of PTPN14 decreases the ability of HPV-16 E7 to cooperate with activated EJ-ras in primary cell transformation assays.IMPORTANCE This study links HPV E7 to the deregulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase signaling pathways. PTPN14 is classified as a potential tumor suppressor protein, and here we show that it is very susceptible to HPV E7-induced proteasome-mediated degradation. Intriguingly, this appears to use a mechanism that is different from that employed by E7 to target pRb. Therefore, this study has important implications for our understanding of the molecular basis for E7 function and also sheds important light on the potential role of PTPN14 as a tumor suppressor. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Bioinformatic screening of human ESTs for differentially expressed genes in normal and tumor tissues

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    Mouchiroud Dominique

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to the explosion of information generated by human genomics, analysis of publicly available databases can help identify potential candidate genes relevant to the cancerous phenotype. The aim of this study was to scan for such genes by whole-genome in silico subtraction using Expressed Sequence Tag (EST data. Methods Genes differentially expressed in normal versus tumor tissues were identified using a computer-based differential display strategy. Bcl-xL, an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, was selected for confirmation by western blot analysis. Results Our genome-wide expression analysis identified a set of genes whose differential expression may be attributed to the genetic alterations associated with tumor formation and malignant growth. We propose complete lists of genes that may serve as targets for projects seeking novel candidates for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Our validation result showed increased protein levels of Bcl-xL in two different liver cancer specimens compared to normal liver. Notably, our EST-based data mining procedure indicated that most of the changes in gene expression observed in cancer cells corresponded to gene inactivation patterns. Chromosomes and chromosomal regions most frequently associated with aberrant expression changes in cancer libraries were also determined. Conclusion Through the description of several candidates (including genes encoding extracellular matrix and ribosomal components, cytoskeletal proteins, apoptotic regulators, and novel tissue-specific biomarkers, our study illustrates the utility of in silico transcriptomics to identify tumor cell signatures, tumor-related genes and chromosomal regions frequently associated with aberrant expression in cancer.

  18. [Study of skin retraction applied to the treatment of skin tumors. Mapping of the human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, P; Benatar, M; Cardot-Leccia, N; Lebreton, E; Chignon-Sicard, B

    2012-04-01

    Skin, the main organ of the human body, is equipped with own biomechanical characteristics, highly variable depending on intra-individual factors (location, weight status, dermatological diseases…) and interindividual (age, sex…). Despite some recent cutometric studies, our review of the literature shows that there is no currently reliable analytical model representing the biomechanical behavior of the skin. Yet, this is a central issue in dermatology surgery, especially in the treatment of skin tumors, for the proper observance of surgical margins. We studied prospectively on 75 resection specimens (about 71 patient(s)), for the treatment of skin lesions tumor suspicious or known malignant or benign. Room dimensions were measured before and 5 minutes after excision, leading us to calculate a ratio of retraction of the skin surface. This retraction was correlated with age, gender, tumor type, and anatomic location of the site of excision. The power of retraction of the skin varies significantly by region of the body. It is maximum in the upper limb (hand excluded) and in the cervical region. At the cephalic region, skin of the ear and periorbital skin have capacities of important early retraction. Unlike the lower limb (foot excluded), the back skin of the nose and face appear to be a minimum of shrinkage. Age also seems to change on that capacity shrinkage, sex would have no influence. Our study confirms the variations in the ability of skin retraction based on a number of factors. In dermato-oncology, that power retraction could cause significant differences between clinical surgical margins and final pathologist margins. We believe it must be taken into account by the couple surgeon-pathologist, especially in the context of invasive and/or recurrent tumors. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  19. Human Leukocyte Antigen E Contributes to Protect Tumor Cells from Lysis by Natural Killer Cells12

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    Monaco, Elisa Lo; Tremante, Elisa; Cerboni, Cristina; Melucci, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Zingoni, Alessandra; Nicotra, Maria Rita; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2011-01-01

    The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK) cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3) of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D). Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network. PMID:21969815

  20. Human leukocyte antigen E contributes to protect tumor cells from lysis by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Monaco, Elisa; Tremante, Elisa; Cerboni, Cristina; Melucci, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Zingoni, Alessandra; Nicotra, Maria Rita; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2011-09-01

    The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK) cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3) of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D). Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network.

  1. Human Leukocyte Antigen E Contributes to Protect Tumor Cells from Lysis by Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Lo Monaco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3 of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D. Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network.

  2. Potent anti-cancer effects of citrus peel flavonoids in human prostate xenograft tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-Shu; Li, Shiming; Miyauchi, Yutaka; Suzawa, Michiko; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent malignancies and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Fruit and vegetable consumption is a novel, non-toxic therapeutic approach that can be used to prevent and treat prostate cancer. Citrus peels and their extracts have been reported to have potent pharmacological activities and health benefits due to the abundance of flavonoids in citrus fruits, particularly in the peels. Our previous studies demonstrated that oral administration of Gold Lotion (GL), an extract of multiple varieties of citrus peels containing abundant flavonoids, including a large percentage of polymethoxyflavones (PMFs), effectively suppressed azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic tumorigenesis. However, the efficacy of GL against prostate cancer has not yet been investigated. Here, we explored the anti-tumor effects of GL using a human prostate tumor xenograft mouse model. Our data demonstrated that treatment with GL by both intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection and oral administration dramatically reduced both the weights (57%-100% inhibition) and volumes (78%-94% inhibition) of the tumors without any observed toxicity. These inhibitory effects were accompanied by mechanistic down-regulation of the protein levels of inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase, iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2, COX-2), metastasis (matrix metallopeptidase-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9), angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF), and proliferative molecules, as well as by the induction of apoptosis in prostate tumors. Our findings suggest that GL is an effective anti-cancer agent that may potentially serve as a novel therapeutic option for prostate cancer treatment.

  3. The continuum model of selection in human tumors: general paradigm or niche product?

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    Leedham, Simon; Tomlinson, Ian

    2012-07-01

    Berger and colleagues recently proposed a continuum model of how somatic mutations cause tumors to grow, thus supplementing the established binary models, such as oncogene activation and "two hits" at tumor suppressor loci. In the basic continuum model, decreases or increases in gene function, short of full inactivation or activation, impact linearly on cancer development. An extension, called the fail-safe model, envisaged an optimum level of gene derangement for tumor growth, but proposed that the cell gained protection from tumorigenesis because additional mutations caused excessive derangement. Most of the evidence in support of the continuum model came from Pten mutant mice rather than humans. In this article, we assess the validity and applicability of the continuum and fail-safe models. We suggest that the latter is of limited use: In part, it restates the existing "just right" of optimum intermediate gene derangement in tumorigenesis, and in part it is inherently implausible that a cell should avoid becoming cancerous only when it is some way down the road to that state. In contrast, the basic continuum model is a very useful addition to the other genetic models of tumorigenesis, especially in certain scenarios. Fittingly for a quantitative model, we propose that the continuum model is most likely to apply where multiple, cancer-promoting mutations have relatively small, additive effects, either through the well-established case of additive germline predisposition alleles or in a largely hypothetical situation where cancers may have acquired several somatic "mini-driver" mutations, each with weaker effects than classical tumor suppressors or fully activated oncogenes. ©2012 AACR.

  4. Picropodophyllin inhibits tumor growth of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a mouse model

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    Yin, Shu-Cheng [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China); Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Guo, Wei [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Tao, Ze-Zhang, E-mail: zezhangtao@gmail.com [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China)

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •We identified that PPP inhibits IGF-1R/Akt pathway in NPC cells. •PPP dose-dependently inhibits NPC cell proliferation in vitro. •PPP suppresses tumor growth of NPC in nude mice. •PPP have little effect on microtubule assembly. -- Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a cell membrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity and plays important roles in cell transformation, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Picropodophyllin (PPP) is a selective IGF-1R inhibitor and shows promising antitumor effects for several human cancers. However, its antitumor effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the antitumor activity of PPP in NPC using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal model. We found that PPP dose-dependently decreased the IGF-induced phosphorylation and activity of IGF-1R and consequently reduced the phosphorylation of Akt, one downstream target of IGF-1R. In addition, PPP inhibited NPC cell proliferation in vitro. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of PPP for NPC cell line CNE-2 was ⩽1 μM at 24 h after treatment and ⩽0.5 μM at 48 h after treatment, respectively. Moreover, administration of PPP by intraperitoneal injection significantly suppressed the tumor growth of xenografted NPC in nude mice. Taken together, these results suggest targeting IGF-1R by PPP may represent a new strategy for treatment of NPCs with positive IGF-1R expression.

  5. Structure-activity relationships of diverse xanthones against multidrug resistant human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiwen; Ma, Chenyao; Ma, Yun; Li, Xiang; Chen, Yong; Chen, Jianwei

    2017-02-01

    Thirteen xanthones were isolated naturally from the stem of Securidaca inappendiculata Hassk, and structure-activity relationships (SARs) of these compounds were comparatively predicted for their cytotoxic activity against three human multidrug resistant (MDR) cell lines MCF-7/ADR, SMMC-7721/Taxol, and A549/Taxol cells. The results showed that the selected xanthones exhibited different potent cytotoxic activity against the growth of different human tumor cell lines, and most of the xanthones exhibited selective cytotoxicity against SMMC-7721/Taxol cells. Furthermore, some tested xanthones showed stronger cytotoxicity than Cisplatin, which has been used in clinical application extensively. The SARs analysis revealed that the cytotoxic activities of diverse xanthones were affected mostly by the number and position of methoxyl and hydroxyl groups. Xanthones with more free hydroxyl and methoxyl groups increased the cytotoxic activity significantly, especially for those with the presence of C-3 hydroxyl and C-4 methoxyl groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Solutions for the Cell Cycle in Cell Lines Derived from Human Tumors

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    B. Zubik-Kowal

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the paper is to compute efficiently solutions for model equations that have the potential to describe the growth of human tumor cells and their responses to radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The mathematical model involves four unknown functions of two independent variables: the time variable t and dimensionless relative DNA content x. The unknown functions can be thought of as the number density of cells and are solutions of a system of four partial differential equations. We construct solutions of the system, which allow us to observe the number density of cells for different t and x values. We present results of our experiments which simulate population kinetics of human cancer cells in vitro. Our results show a correspondence between predicted and experimental data.

  7. A Chlamydomonas-derived Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 vaccine induces specific tumor protection.

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    Olivia C Demurtas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The E7 protein of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV type 16, being involved in malignant cellular transformation, represents a key antigen for developing therapeutic vaccines against HPV-related lesions and cancers. Recombinant production of this vaccine antigen in an active form and in compliance with good manufacturing practices (GMP plays a crucial role for developing effective vaccines. E7-based therapeutic vaccines produced in plants have been shown to be active in tumor regression and protection in pre-clinical models. However, some drawbacks of in whole-plant vaccine production encouraged us to explore the production of the E7-based therapeutic vaccine in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, an organism easy to grow and transform and fully amenable to GMP guidelines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An expression cassette encoding E7GGG, a mutated, attenuated form of the E7 oncoprotein, alone or as a fusion with affinity tags (His6 or FLAG, under the control of the C. reinhardtii chloroplast psbD 5' UTR and the psbA 3' UTR, was introduced into the C. reinhardtii chloroplast genome by homologous recombination. The protein was mostly soluble and reached 0.12% of total soluble proteins. Affinity purification was optimized and performed for both tagged forms. Induction of specific anti-E7 IgGs and E7-specific T-cell proliferation were detected in C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with total Chlamydomonas extract and with affinity-purified protein. High levels of tumor protection were achieved after challenge with a tumor cell line expressing the E7 protein. CONCLUSIONS: The C. reinhardtii chloroplast is a suitable expression system for the production of the E7GGG protein, in a soluble, immunogenic form. The production in contained and sterile conditions highlights the potential of microalgae as alternative platforms for the production of vaccines for human uses.

  8. Systems biology of human epilepsy applied to patients with brain tumors.

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    Mittal, Sandeep; Shah, Aashit K; Barkmeier, Daniel T; Loeb, Jeffrey A

    2013-12-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of recurrent seizures that can be associated with a wide variety of acquired and developmental brain lesions. Current medications for patients with epilepsy can suppress seizures; they do not cure or modify the underlying disease process. On the other hand, surgical removal of focal brain regions that produce seizures can be curative. This surgical procedure can be more precise with the placement of intracranial recording electrodes to identify brain regions that generate seizure activity as well as those that are critical for normal brain function. The detail that goes into these surgeries includes extensive neuroimaging, electrophysiology, and clinical data. Combined with precisely localized tissues removed, these data provide an unparalleled opportunity to learn about the interrelationships of many "systems" in the human brain not possible in just about any other human brain disorder. Herein, we describe a systems biology approach developed to study patients who undergo brain surgery for epilepsy and how we have begun to apply these methods to patients whose seizures are associated with brain tumors. A central goal of this clinical and translational research program is to improve our understanding of epilepsy and brain tumors and to improve diagnosis and treatment outcomes of both. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  9. The Relationship Between Spontaneous Telomere Loss and Chromosome Instability in a Human Tumor Cell Line

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    Bijan Fouladi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome instability plays an important role in cancer by promoting the alterations in the genome required for tumor cell progression. The loss of telomeres that protect the ends of chromosomes and prevent chromosome fusion has been proposed as one mechanism for chromosome instability in cancer cells, however, there is little direct evidence to support this hypothesis. To investigate the relationship between spontaneous telomere loss and chromosome instability in human cancer cells, clones of the EJ-30 tumor cell line were isolated in which a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk gene was integrated immediately adjacent to a telomere. Selection for HSV-tkdeficient cells with ganciclovir demonstrated a high rate of loss of the end these "marked" chromosomes (10-4 events/cell per generation. DNA sequence and cytogenetic analysis suggests that the loss of function of the HSV-tk gene most often involves telomere loss, sister chromatid fusion, and prolonged periods of chromosome instability. In some HSV-tk-deficient cells, telomeric repeat sequences were added on to the end of the truncated HSV-tk gene at a new location, whereas in others, no telomere was detected on the end of the marked chromosome. These results suggest that spontaneous telomere loss is a mechanism for chromosome instability in human cancer cells.

  10. Expected resolution and detectability of adenocarcinoma tumors within human breast in time-resolved images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Nossal, Ralph J.; Dadmarz, Roya; Schwartzentruber, Douglas; Bonner, Robert F.

    1995-04-01

    The prospects for time-resolved optical mammography rests on the ability to detect adenocarcinoma within the breast with sufficient resolution and specificity to compete with X-ray mammography. We characterized the optical properties of an unusually large (6 cm diameter) fresh adenocarcinoma and normal breast tissue (determined by histology to be predominantly adipose tissue) obtained from a patient undergoing mastectomy. Large specimens (5 mm thick and 3 cm wide) allowed the determination of absorption and scattering coefficients and their spatial heterogeneity as probed with a 1 mm diameter laser beam at 633 nm and 800 nm utilizing total reflectance and transmittance measure with integrating spheres. The difference between scattering coefficients of the malignant tumor and those of normal (principally adipose) breast tissue at 633 nm was much greater than the heterogeneity within each sample. This scattering difference is the principal source of contrast, particularly in time-resolved images. However, the high scattering coefficient of normal breast tissue at 633 nm limits the practicality of time-resolved mammography of a human breast compressed to 5 cm. Although the scattering coefficient of the normal breast tissue decreases at 800 nm, the differences between the optical properties of normal and abnormal breast tissue also are reduced. We used these empirical results in theoretical expressions obtained from random walk theory to quantify the expected resolution, contrast, and the detected intensity of 3, 6, and 9 mm tumors within otherwise homogeneous human breasts as a function of the gating-time of time-resolved optical mammography.

  11. DADS Suppresses Human Esophageal Xenograft Tumors through RAF/MEK/ERK and Mitochondria-Dependent Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoran Yin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Diallyl disulfide (DADS is a natural organosulfur compound isolated from garlic. DADS has various biological properties, including anticancer, antiangiogenic, and antioxidant effects. However, the anticancer mechanisms of DADS in human esophageal carcinoma have not been elucidated, especially in vivo. In this study, MTT assay showed that DADS significantly reduced cell viability in human esophageal carcinoma ECA109 cells, but was relatively less toxic in normal liver cells. The pro–apoptotic effect of DADS on ECA109 cells was detected by Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide (PI staining. Flow cytometry analysis showed that DADS promoted apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner and the apoptosis rate could be decreased by caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO. Xenograft study in nude mice showed that DADS treatment inhibited the growth of ECA109 tumor in both 20 and 40 mg/kg DADS groups without obvious side effects. DADS inhibited ECA109 tumor proliferation by down-regulating proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA. DADS induced apoptosis by activating a mitochondria-dependent pathway with the executor of caspase-3, increasing p53 level and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and downregulating the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway in ECA109 xenograft tumosr. Based on studies in cell culture and animal models, the findings here indicate that DADS is an effective and safe anti-cancer agent for esophageal carcinoma.

  12. Increasing epidermal growth factor receptor expression in human melanocytic tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, P E; Moretti, S; Koenders, P G; Weterman, M A; van Muijen, G N; Gianotti, B; Ruiter, D J

    1992-08-01

    Different results have been reported on the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in human melanocytic lesions, which may be due to different methodologic approaches. Therefore, we compared EGFR expression in six human melanoma cell lines by utilizing the monoclonal antibodies 2E9, 425, and 225, applying four immunocytochemical staining procedures. The results were compared with those obtained by a multiple point ligand binding assay. In addition, Northern blot analysis was performed. A three-step immunoperoxidase method using the monoclonal antibody 2E9 proved most sensitive. Staining intensities, estimated semiquantitatively, correlated well with the quantitative data obtained by the ligand-binding assay. Expression on the mRNA level was also in agreement with these results. Immunohistochemical staining of a large series of human cutaneous melanocytic lesions using the method selected showed differential EGFR expression in various stages of melanocytic tumor progression: 19% of common nevocellular nevi; 61% of dysplastic nevi, 89% of primary cutaneous melanomas, and 91% of melanoma metastases showed staining of the melanocytic cells. Intralesional heterogeneity of EGFR expression was present. Although the mean percentage of positive melanocytic cells in positive lesions did not increase with progression, mean staining intensity was stronger in malignant lesions compared to benign lesions. Ligand binding assays showed that EGFR expression in the highly metastasizing cell lines MV3 and BLM was at least 40 times higher than in the cell lines IF6, 530, M14, and Mel57, which do not or only sporadically metastasize after subcutaneous inoculation in nude mice. Although the differences between the various stages of progression are not absolute, we provide further evidence that EGFR expression increases in human melanocytic tumor progression.

  13. Invasive assessment of coronary microvascular dysfunction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the index of microvascular resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutiérrez-Barrios, Alejandro, E-mail: aleklos@hotmail.com [Cardiology Department, Jerez Hospital, Jerez (Spain); Camacho-Jurado, Francisco [Cardiology Department, Punta Europa Hospital, Algeciras (Spain); Díaz-Retamino, Enrique; Gamaza-Chulián, Sergio; Agarrado-Luna, Antonio; Oneto-Otero, Jesús; Del Rio-Lechuga, Ana; Benezet-Mazuecos, Javier [Cardiology Department, Jerez Hospital, Jerez (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Summary: We present a review of microvascular dysfunction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and an interesting case of a symptomatic familial HCM patient with inducible ischemia by single photon emission computed tomography. Coronary angiography revealed normal epicardial arteries. Pressure wire measurements of fractional flow reserve (FFR), coronary flow reserve (CFR) and index of microvascular resistance (IMR) demonstrated a significant microcirculatory dysfunction. This is the first such case that documents this abnormality invasively using the IMR. The measurement of IMR, a novel marker of microcirculatory dysfunction, provides novel insights into the pathophysiology of this condition. - Highlights: • Microvascular dysfunction is a common feature in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and represents a strong predictor of unfavorable outcome and cardiovascular mortality. • The index of microvascular resistance (IMR) is a new method for invasively assessing the state of the coronary microcirculation using a single pressure-temperature sensor-tipped coronary wire. • However assessment of IMR in HCM has not been previously reported. We report a case in which microvascular dysfunction is assessed by IMR. This index may be useful in future researches of HCM.

  14. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.-F. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.-Y. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, R.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Nuclear Medicine Department, Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Pang Fei [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hwang, J.-J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jjhwang@ym.edu.tw

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk) and luciferase (luc). Both {sup 131}I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  15. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Fang; Lin, Yi-Yu; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Liu, Ren-Shen; Pang, Fei; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1- tk) and luciferase ( luc). Both 131I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  16. Radionuclide assessment of pulmonary microvascular permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeneveld, A.B.J. [Medical Intensive Care Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Free University Hospital, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-04-01

    The literature has been reviewed to evaluate the technique and clinical value of radionuclide measurements of microvascular permeability and oedema formation in the lungs. Methodology, modelling and interpretation vary widely among studies. Nevertheless, most studies agree on the fact that the measurement of permeability via pulmonary radioactivity measurements of intravenously injected radiolabelled proteins versus that in the blood pool, the so-called pulmonary protein transport rate (PTR), can assist the clinician in discriminating between permeability oedema of the lungs associated with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and oedema caused by an increased filtration pressure, for instance in the course of cardiac disease, i.e. pressure-induced pulmonary oedema. Some of the techniques used to measure PTR are also able to detect subclinical forms of lung microvascular injury not yet complicated by permeability oedema. This may occur after cardiopulmonary bypass and major vascular surgery, for instance. By paralleling the clinical severity and course of the ARDS, the PTR method may also serve as a tool to evaluate new therapies for the syndrome. Taken together, the currently available radionuclide methods, which are applicable at the bedside in the intensive care unit, may provide a gold standard for detecting minor and major forms of acute microvascular lung injury, and for evaluating the severity, course and response to treatment. (orig.). With 2 tabs.

  17. Hepatitis B surface antigen fusions delivered by DNA vaccination elicit CTL responses to human papillomavirus oncoproteins associated with tumor protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, O; Kattenbelt, J; Cochrane, M; Thomson, S; Gould, A; Tindle, R

    2010-10-01

    We describe the construction and evaluation of a recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-vectored DNA vaccine encoding the E7 and E6 tumor-associated oncoproteins of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16. We show the induction of effector and memory cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to E7 and E6 class I-restricted epitopes after a single immunization, which were associated with tumor prevention and therapy. The findings vindicate the use of a HBsAg-based DNA vaccine as a vehicle to elicit responses to co-encoded tumor antigens, and have specific implications for the development of a therapeutic vaccine for HPV-associated squamous carcinomas.

  18. Significance of radioimmunoassay of human chorionic gonadotropin and alpha fetoprotein in nonseminomatous germ cell tumors of the testis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kausitz, J.; Hupka, S. (Institute for Postgradual Training of Physicians and Pharmaceutists, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia)); Cerny, V.; Bohunicky, L.; Korec, S. (Ustav Klinickej Onkologie, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia))

    1980-01-01

    Radioimmunoassays human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and alpha fetoprotein (AFP) made in 49 patients with nonseminomatous testicular tumors showed that these investigations make the diagnosis more precise, permit to follow up the dynamics of the course of the disease and the effectiveness of treatment and may help to reveal the presence of otherwise undetectable tumorous metastases. The significance of these assays is enhanced if the two tumorous proteins are investigated in parallel. The results proved positive in 43 (87.8%) and false negative in 6 (12.2%) of the patients. The absence of HCG and AFP production in some patients with active disorder has not as yet been elucidated.

  19. The Effects of Vandetanib on Paclitaxel Tumor Distribution and Antitumor Activity in a Xenograft Model of Human Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Cesca

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the effects of vandetanib, a small-molecule receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor receptor, on paclitaxel (PTX tumor distribution and antitumor activity in xenograft models of human ovarian carcinoma. Nude mice bearing A2780-1A9 xenografts received daily (5, 10, or 15 days doses of vandetanib (50 mg/kg per os, combined with PTX (20 mg/kg intravenously. Morphologic and functional modifications associated with the tumor vasculature (CD31 and α-smooth muscle actin staining and Hoechst 33342 perfusion and PTX concentrations in plasma and tumor tissues were analyzed. Activity was evaluated as inhibition of tumor growth subcutaneously and spreading into the peritoneal cavity. Vandetanib treatment produced no significant change in tumor vessel density, although a reduced number of large vessels, an increased percentage of mature vessels, and diminished tumor perfusion were evident. Pretreatment with vandetanib led to decreased tumor PTX levels within 1 hour of PTX injection, although 24 hours later, tumor PTX levels were comparable with controls. In efficacy studies, the combination of vandetanib plus PTX improved antitumor activity compared with vandetanib or PTX alone, with greater effects being obtained when PTX was administered before vandetanib. The combination of PTX plus vandetanib reduced tumor burden in the peritoneal cavity of mice and significantly increased their survival. Analysis of vascular changes and PTX tumor uptake in vandetanib-treated tumors may help to guide the scheduling of vandetanib plus PTX combinations and may have implications for the design of clinical trials with these drugs.

  20. 5′-AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Supports the Growth of Aggressive Experimental Human Breast Cancer Tumors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laderoute, Keith R.; Calaoagan, Joy M.; Chao, Wan-ru; Dinh, Dominc; Denko, Nicholas; Duellman, Sarah; Kalra, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohe; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sambucetti, Lidia; Boros, Laszlo G.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid tumor growth can establish metabolically stressed microenvironments that activate 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a ubiquitous regulator of ATP homeostasis. Previously, we investigated the importance of AMPK for the growth of experimental tumors prepared from HRAS-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts and for primary brain tumor development in a rat model of neurocarcinogenesis. Here, we used triple-negative human breast cancer cells in which AMPK activity had been knocked down to investigate the contribution of AMPK to experimental tumor growth and core glucose metabolism. We found that AMPK supports the growth of fast-growing orthotopic tumors prepared from MDA-MB-231 and DU4475 breast cancer cells but had no effect on the proliferation or survival of these cells in culture. We used in vitro and in vivo metabolic profiling with [13C]glucose tracers to investigate the contribution of AMPK to core glucose metabolism in MDA-MB-231 cells, which have a Warburg metabolic phenotype; these experiments indicated that AMPK supports tumor glucose metabolism in part through positive regulation of glycolysis and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate cycle. We also found that AMPK activity in the MDA-MB-231 tumors could systemically perturb glucose homeostasis in sensitive normal tissues (liver and pancreas). Overall, our findings suggest that the contribution of AMPK to the growth of aggressive experimental tumors has a critical microenvironmental component that involves specific regulation of core glucose metabolism. PMID:24993821

  1. 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) supports the growth of aggressive experimental human breast cancer tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laderoute, Keith R; Calaoagan, Joy M; Chao, Wan-ru; Dinh, Dominc; Denko, Nicholas; Duellman, Sarah; Kalra, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohe; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sambucetti, Lidia; Boros, Laszlo G

    2014-08-15

    Rapid tumor growth can establish metabolically stressed microenvironments that activate 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a ubiquitous regulator of ATP homeostasis. Previously, we investigated the importance of AMPK for the growth of experimental tumors prepared from HRAS-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts and for primary brain tumor development in a rat model of neurocarcinogenesis. Here, we used triple-negative human breast cancer cells in which AMPK activity had been knocked down to investigate the contribution of AMPK to experimental tumor growth and core glucose metabolism. We found that AMPK supports the growth of fast-growing orthotopic tumors prepared from MDA-MB-231 and DU4475 breast cancer cells but had no effect on the proliferation or survival of these cells in culture. We used in vitro and in vivo metabolic profiling with [(13)C]glucose tracers to investigate the contribution of AMPK to core glucose metabolism in MDA-MB-231 cells, which have a Warburg metabolic phenotype; these experiments indicated that AMPK supports tumor glucose metabolism in part through positive regulation of glycolysis and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate cycle. We also found that AMPK activity in the MDA-MB-231 tumors could systemically perturb glucose homeostasis in sensitive normal tissues (liver and pancreas). Overall, our findings suggest that the contribution of AMPK to the growth of aggressive experimental tumors has a critical microenvironmental component that involves specific regulation of core glucose metabolism. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Immunofluorescence microscopy to assess enzymes controlling nitric oxide availability and microvascular blood flow in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Matthew; Shepherd, Sam O; Shaw, Christopher S; Achten, Juul; Costa, Matthew L; Wagenmakers, Anton J M

    2012-10-01

    The net production of NO by the muscle microvascular endothelium is a key regulator of muscle microvascular blood flow. Here, we describe the development of a method to quantify the protein content and phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS content and eNOS ser(1177) phosphorylation) and NAD(P)H oxidase expression. Human muscle cryosections were stained using antibodies targeting eNOS, p-eNOS ser(1177) and NOX2 in combination with markers of the endothelium and the sarcolemma. Quantitation was achieved by analyzing fluorescence intensity within the area stained positive for the microvascular endothelium. Analysis was performed in duplicate and repeated five times to investigate CV. In addition, eight healthy males (age 21 ± 1 year, BMI 24.4 ± 1.0 kg/m(2)) completed one hour of cycling exercise at ~65%VO(2max) . Muscle biopsies were taken from the m. vastus lateralis before and immediately after exercise and analyzed using the new methods. The CV of all methods was between 6.5 and 9.5%. Acute exercise increased eNOS serine(1177) phosphorylation (fold change 1.29 ± 0.05, p < 0.05). These novel methodologies will allow direct investigations of the molecular mechanisms underpinning the microvascular responses to insulin and exercise, the impairments that occur in sedentary, obese and elderly individuals and the effect of lifestyle interventions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Purification of the NF2 tumor suppressor protein from human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Hitesh K; Yoshinaga, Kazumi; Seo, Pil-Soo; Lutchman, Mohini; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A; Hanada, Toshihiko; Chishti, Athar H

    2006-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disease predisposing individuals to the risk of developing tumors of cranial and spinal nerves. The NF2 tumor suppressor protein, known as Merlin/Schwanomin, is a member of the protein 4.1 superfamily that function as links between the cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane. Upon selective extraction of membrane-associated proteins from erythrocyte plasma membrane (ghosts) using low ionic strength solution, the bulk of NF2 protein remains associated with the spectrin-actin depleted inside-out-vesicles. Western blot analysis showed a approximately 70 kDa polypeptide in the erythrocyte plasma membrane. Furthermore, quantitative removal of NF2 protein from the inside-out-vesicles was achieved using 1.0 M potassium iodide, a treatment known to remove tightly-bound peripheral membrane proteins. These results suggest a novel mode of NF2 protein association with the erythrocyte membrane that is distinct from the known membrane interactions of protein 4.1. Based on these biochemical properties, several purification strategies were devised to isolate native NF2 protein from human erythrocyte ghosts. Using purified and recombinant NF2 protein as internal standards, we quantified approximately 41-65,000 molecules of NF2 protein per erythrocyte. We provide evidence for the presence of NF2 protein in the human erythrocyte membrane. The identification of NF2 protein in the human erythrocyte membrane will make it feasible to discover novel interactions of NF2 protein utilizing powerful techniques of erythrocyte biochemistry and genetics in mammalian cells.

  4. Growth of peripheral and central nervous system tumors is supported by cytoplasmic c-Fos in humans and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Silvestre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that the transcription factor c-Fos is also capable of associating to endoplasmic reticulum membranes (ER and activating phospholipid synthesis. Herein we examined phospholipid synthesis status in brain tumors from human patients and from NPcis mice, an animal model of the human disease Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In human samples, c-Fos expression was at the limit of detection in non-pathological specimens, but was abundantly expressed associated to ER membranes in tumor cells. This was also observed in CNS of adult tumor-bearing NPcis mice but not in NPcis fos(-/- KO mice. A glioblastoma multiforme and a malignant PNS tumor from a NF1 patient (MPNST showed a 2- and 4- fold c-Fos-dependent phospholipid synthesis activation, respectively. MPNST samples also showed increased cell proliferation rates and abundant c-Fos expression. CONCLUSIONS: Results highlight a role of cytoplasmic c-Fos as an activator of phospholipid synthesis in events demanding high rates of membrane biogenesis as occurs for the exacerbated growth of tumors cells. They also disclose this protein as a potential target for controlling tumor growth in the nervous system.

  5. Interleukin-17 Promotes Neutrophil-Mediated Immunity by Activating Microvascular Pericytes and Not Endothelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rebecca; Lauridsen, Holly M.; Amezquita, Robert A.; Pierce, Richard W.; Jane-wit, Dan; Fang, Caodi; Pellowe, Amanda S.; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy C.; Gonzalez, Anjelica L.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    A classical hallmark of acute inflammation is neutrophil infiltration of tissues, a multi-step process that involves sequential cell-cell interactions of circulating leukocytes with interleukin (IL)-1- or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-activated microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes (PCs) that form the wall of the postcapillary venules. The initial infiltrating cells accumulate perivascularly in close proximity to PCs. IL-17, a pro-inflammatory cytokine that acts on target cells via a heterodimeric receptor formed by IL-17RA and IL-17RC subunits, also promotes neutrophilic inflammation but its effects on vascular cells are less clear. We report that both cultured human ECs and PCs strongly express IL-17RC and, while neither cell type expresses much IL-17RA, PCs express significantly more than ECs. IL-17, alone or synergistically with TNF, significantly alters inflammatory gene expression in cultured human PCs but not ECs. RNA-seq analysis identifies many IL-17-induced transcripts in PCs encoding proteins known to stimulate neutrophil-mediated immunity. Conditioned media (CM) from IL-17-activated PCs, but not ECs, induce pertussis toxin-sensitive neutrophil polarization, likely mediated by PC-secreted chemokines, and also stimulate neutrophil production of pro-inflammatory molecules, including TNF, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8. Furthermore, IL-17-activated PCs but not ECs can prolong neutrophil survival by producing G-CSF and GM-CSF, delaying the mitochondria outer membrane permeabilization and caspase 9 activation. Importantly, neutrophils exhibit enhanced phagocytic capacity after activation by CM from IL-17-treated PCs. We conclude that PCs, not ECs, are the major target of IL-17 within the microvessel wall and that IL-17-activated PCs can modulate neutrophil functions within the perivascular tissue space. PMID:27534549

  6. Characterization of ABT-806, a Humanized Tumor-Specific Anti-EGFR Monoclonal Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Edward B; Phillips, Andrew C; Buchanan, Fritz G; Kingsbury, Gillian; Zhang, Yumin; Meulbroek, Jonathan A; Cole, Todd B; DeVries, Peter J; Falls, Hugh D; Beam, Christine; Gu, Jinming; Digiammarino, Enrico L; Palma, Joann P; Donawho, Cherrie K; Goodwin, Neal C; Scott, Andrew M

    2015-05-01

    Despite clinical efficacy, current approved agents targeting EGFR are associated with on-target toxicities as a consequence of disrupting normal EGFR function. MAb 806 is a novel EGFR antibody that selectively targets a tumor-selective epitope suggesting that a mAb 806-based therapeutic would retain antitumor activity without the on-target toxicities associated with EGFR inhibition. To enable clinical development, a humanized variant of mAb 806 designated ABT-806 was generated and is currently in phase 1 trials. We describe the characterization of binding and functional properties of ABT-806 compared with the clinically validated anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab. ABT-806 binds the mutant EGFRvIII with high affinity and, relative to cetuximab, exhibits increased potency against glioblastoma multiforme cell line and patient-derived xenografts expressing this form of the receptor. ABT-806 also inhibits the growth of squamous cell carcinoma xenograft models expressing high levels of wild-type EGFR, associated with inhibition of EGFR signaling, although higher doses of ABT-806 than cetuximab are required for similar activity. ABT-806 enhances in vivo potency of standard-of-care therapies used to treat glioblastoma multiforme and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. An indium-labeled version of ABT-806, [(111)In]-ABT-806, used to investigate the relationship between dose and receptor occupancy, revealed greater receptor occupancy at lowers doses in an EGFRvIII-expressing model and significant uptake in an orthotopic model. Collectively, these results suggest that ABT-806 may have antitumor activity superior to cetuximab in EGFRvIII-expressing tumors, and similar activity to cetuximab in tumors highly overexpressing wild-type EGFR with reduced toxicity. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Light dosimetry in vivo in interstitial photodynamic therapy of human tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynes, Anne M.; Diebold, Simon; Lignon, Dominique; Granjon, Yves; Guillemin, Francois H.

    1991-11-01

    Photodynamic therapy, developed since 1961 with Lipson''s studies, is now limited in its clinical applications by the lack of knowledge about light comportment and the action of hematoporphyrin in tissues. Using human tumor models in mice, the intratumoral light flux was measured during an interstitial illumination (cylindrical diffusor 5 mm of length) by an argon dye laser emitting continuously at 630 nm (Spectra-Physics 375 B). The flux measured was captured by a plane-cut fiber (400 micrometers ) linked with an optical power meter (Newport 815). The light decrease in tissue had an exponential shape, and k, the global attenuation coefficient, was easily calculated as well as the depth penetration (1/k). Control measurements were performed in beef muscle, and the k value was very consistent with published data. In small tumors (3), the results presented a good reproducibility for the same histology (ksarcoma equals 0.48 +/- 0.08 mm-1, kcholangiocarcinoma equals 0.67 +/- 0.01 mm-1). The intraperitoneal injection of hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD at 10 mg/kg) did not seem to significantly influence the light evolution in tissues compared with control measurements without HpD. The simplicity and the reproducibility of this technique raises hopes of a coming clinical application and a possible comparison between different studies with measurable references.

  8. Field Effect Transistor Biosensor Using Antigen Binding Fragment for Detecting Tumor Marker in Human Serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shanshan; Hotani, Kaori; Hideshima, Sho; Kuroiwa, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Takuya; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Mori, Yasuro; Osaka, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Detection of tumor markers is important for cancer diagnosis. Field-effect transistors (FETs) are a promising method for the label-free detection of trace amounts of biomolecules. However, detection of electrically charged proteins using antibody-immobilized FETs is limited by ionic screening by the large probe molecules adsorbed to the transistor gate surface, reducing sensor responsiveness. Here, we investigated the effect of probe molecule size on the detection of a tumor marker, α-fetoprotein (AFP) using a FET biosensor. We demonstrated that the small receptor antigen binding fragment (Fab), immobilized on a sensing surface as small as 2–3 nm, offers a higher degree of sensitivity and a wider concentration range (100 pg/mL–1 μg/mL) for the FET detection of AFP in buffer solution, compared to the whole antibody. Therefore, the use of a small Fab probe molecule instead of a whole antibody is shown to be effective for improving the sensitivity of AFP detection in FET biosensors. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that a Fab-immobilized FET subjected to a blocking treatment, to avoid non-specific interactions, could sensitively and selectively detect AFP in human serum. PMID:28788579

  9. Mode of action and human relevance of THF-induced mouse liver tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Christopher J; Rushton, Erik K; Vardy, Audrey; Higgins, Larry; Augello, Andrea; Parod, Ralph J

    2017-07-05

    In a National Toxicology Program (NTP) bioassay, inhalation of tetrahydrofuran (THF) induced liver tumors in female B6C3F1 mice but not in male mice or rats of either sex. Since THF is not genotoxic, the NTP concluded this carcinogenic activity was likely mediated via non-genotoxic modes of action (MOA). Based on evidence that THF and phenobarbital share a similar MOA, female Car/Pxr knock-out mice were orally exposed to THF to evaluate the potential role of CAR activation in the MOA for THF-induced liver tumors. Because data from this oral study with Car/Pxr knock-out mice (C57Bl/6) and the inhalation studies with wild type mice (B6C3F1) reported by NTP and others were derived from different strains, oral studies with wild type B6C3F1 and C57Bl/6 mice were conducted to ensure THF responses in both strains were comparable. As seen in inhalation studies with THF, oral exposure of wild type female mice to a maximum tolerated dose of THF increased total P450 content, CAR-related P450 activities, and hepatocyte proliferation; these effects were not observed in Car/Pxr knock-out female mice. This finding supports the hypothesis THF-induced carcinogenicity is likely mediated via CAR activation that has limited, if any, relevance to humans. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression in borderline ovarian tumors: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantbirojn, Patou; Triratanachat, Surang; Trivijitsilp, Prasert; Niruthisard, Somchai

    2009-03-01

    To investigate the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in epithelial borderline ovarian tumor (BOT) by immunohistochemistry with correlation to clinicopathologic variables. Paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 62 borderline ovarian tumors (47 mucinous, 14 serous, and 1 clear cell) and 12 epthelial ovarian carcinomas were immunostained with antibodies to hTERT. The intensity and quantity of the immunostaining was determined and analyzed with clinicopathological characteristics. hTERT expression was detected in 48.4% of BOT and all cases of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. In immunoreactive BOT 50% of cases were scored as high expression. Serous BOT had the highest rate of hTERT expression. There was no significant statistical difference of hTERT immunoreactivity between histologic types of BOT. No hTERT immunoreactivity was observed in the benign parts of the same slides of each immunoreactive case. hTERT immunoreactivity was positively correlated with FIGO stage (p = 0.04), but not with other variables. The mean follow-up time of BOT cases was 81.63 months and no recurrence or death was noted. hTERT expression was found in half of BOT and all of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. High hTERT expression was associated with FIGO stage.

  11. Human cytomegalovirus-encoded US28 may act as a tumor promoter in colorectal cancer.

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    Cai, Zhen-Zhai; Xu, Jian-Gang; Zhou, Yu-Hui; Zheng, Ji-Hang; Lin, Ke-Zhi; Zheng, Shu-Zhi; Ye, Meng-Si; He, Yun; Liu, Chang-Bao; Xue, Zhan-Xiong

    2016-03-07

    To assess human cytomegalovirus-encoded US28 gene function in colorectal cancer (CRC) pathogenesis. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to determine US28 expression in 103 CRC patient samples and 98 corresponding adjacent noncancerous samples. Patient data were compared by age, sex, tumor location, histological grade, Dukes' stage, and overall mean survival time. In addition, the US28 gene was transiently transfected into the CRC LOVO cell line, and cell proliferation was assessed using a cell counting kit-8 assay. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry and a cell invasion transwell assay were also carried out. US28 levels were clearly higher in CRC tissues (38.8%) than in adjacent noncancerous samples (7.1%) (P = 0.000). Interestingly, elevated US28 amounts in CRC tissues were significantly associated with histological grade, metastasis, Dukes' stage, and overall survival (all P < 0.05); meanwhile, US28 expression was not significantly correlated with age, sex or tumor location. In addition, multivariate Cox regression data revealed US28 level as an independent CRC prognostic marker (P = 0.000). LOVO cells successfully transfected with the US28 gene exhibited higher viability, greater chemotherapy resistance, accelerated cell cycle progression, and increased invasion ability. US28 expression is predictive of poor prognosis and may promote CRC.

  12. Surface modification of microparticles causes differential uptake responses in normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño, Tania; Soriano, Jorge; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme

    2015-01-01

    The use of micro- and nanodevices as multifunctional systems for biomedical applications has experienced an exponential growth during the past decades. Although a large number of studies have focused on the design and fabrication of new micro- and nanosystems capable of developing multiple functions, a deeper understanding of their interaction with cells is required. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of different microparticle surfaces on their interaction with normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cell lines. For this, AlexaFluor488 IgG functionalized polystyrene microparticles (3 μm) were coated with Polyethyleneimine (PEI) at two different molecular weights, 25 and 750 kDa. The effect of microparticle surface properties on cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and endocytic pathways were assessed for both normal and tumoral cell lines. Results showed a differential response between the two cell lines regarding uptake efficiency and mechanisms of endocytosis, highlighting the potential role of microparticle surface tunning for specific cell targeting. PMID:26068810

  13. Field Effect Transistor Biosensor Using Antigen Binding Fragment for Detecting Tumor Marker in Human Serum

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    Shanshan Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Detection of tumor markers is important for cancer diagnosis. Field-effect transistors (FETs are a promising method for the label-free detection of trace amounts of biomolecules. However, detection of electrically charged proteins using antibody-immobilized FETs is limited by ionic screening by the large probe molecules adsorbed to the transistor gate surface, reducing sensor responsiveness. Here, we investigated the effect of probe molecule size on the detection of a tumor marker, α-fetoprotein (AFP using a FET biosensor. We demonstrated that the small receptor antigen binding fragment (Fab, immobilized on a sensing surface as small as 2–3 nm, offers a higher degree of sensitivity and a wider concentration range (100 pg/mL–1 μg/mL for the FET detection of AFP in buffer solution, compared to the whole antibody. Therefore, the use of a small Fab probe molecule instead of a whole antibody is shown to be effective for improving the sensitivity of AFP detection in FET biosensors. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that a Fab-immobilized FET subjected to a blocking treatment, to avoid non-specific interactions, could sensitively and selectively detect AFP in human serum.

  14. Curcumin Inhibits Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Pancreatic Cancer

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    Sabrina Bimonte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm originating from transformed cells arising in tissues forming the pancreas. The best chemotherapeutic agent used to treat pancreatic cancer is the gemcitabine. However, gemcitabine treatment is associated with many side effects. Thus novel strategies involving less toxic agents for treatment of pancreatic cancer are necessary. Curcumin is one such agent that inhibits the proliferation and angiogenesis of a wide variety of tumor cells, through the modulation of many cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated whether curcumin plays antitumor effects in MIA PaCa-2 cells. In vitro studies showed that curcumin inhibits the proliferation and enhances apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 cells. To test whether the antitumor activity of curcumin is also observed in vivo, we generated an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer by injection of MIA PaCa-2 cells in nude mice. We placed mice on diet containing curcumin at 0.6% for 6 weeks. In these treated mice tumors were smaller with respect to controls and showed a downregulation of the transcription nuclear factor NF-κB and NF-κB-regulated gene products. Overall, our data indicate that curcumin has a great potential in treatment of human pancreatic cancer through the modulation of NF-κB pathway.

  15. Tumor Vascularity Assessed By Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Intravital Microscopy Imaging

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    Jon-Vidar Gaustad

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI is considered to be a useful method for characterizing the vascularity of tumors. However, detailed studies of experimental tumors comparing DCE-MRI-derived parametric images with images of the morphology and function of the microvascular network have not been reported. In this communication, we describe a novel MR-compatible mouse dorsal window chamber and report comparative DCE-MRI and intravital microscopy studies of A-07-GFP tumors xenografted to BALB/c nu/nu mice. Blood supply time (BST images (i.e., images of the time from when arterial blood enters a tumor through the supplying artery until it reaches a vessel segment within the tumor and morphologic images of the microvascular network were produced by intravital microscopy. Images of E·F (E is the initial extraction fraction of Gd-DTPA and F is perfusion were produced by subjecting DCE-MRI series to Kety analysis. The E·F images mirrored the morphology (microvascular density and the function (BST of the microvascular networks well. Tumor regions showing high E·F values colocalized with tumor regions showing high microvascular density and low BST values. Significant correlations were found between E·F and microvascular density and between E·F and BST, both within and among tumors.

  16. Tumor Vascularity Assessed By Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Intravital Microscopy Imaging1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Brurberg, Kjetil G; Simonsen, Trude G; Mollatt, Camilla S; Rofstad, Einar K

    2008-01-01

    Gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is considered to be a useful method for characterizing the vascularity of tumors. However, detailed studies of experimental tumors comparing DCE-MRI-derived parametric images with images of the morphology and function of the microvascular network have not been reported. In this communication, we describe a novel MR-compatible mouse dorsal window chamber and report comparative DCE-MRI and intravital microscopy studies of A-07-GFP tumors xenografted to BALB/c nu/nu mice. Blood supply time (BST) images (i.e., images of the time from when arterial blood enters a tumor through the supplying artery until it reaches a vessel segment within the tumor) and morphologic images of the microvascular network were produced by intravital microscopy. Images of E·F (E is the initial extraction fraction of Gd-DTPA and F is perfusion) were produced by subjecting DCE-MRI series to Kety analysis. The E·F images mirrored the morphology (microvascular density) and the function (BST) of the microvascular networks well. Tumor regions showing high E·F values colocalized with tumor regions showing high microvascular density and low BST values. Significant correlations were found between E·F and microvascular density and between E·F and BST, both within and among tumors. PMID:18392132

  17. Development of a Fully Human Anti-PDGFRβ Antibody That Suppresses Growth of Human Tumor Xenografts and Enhances Antitumor Activity of an Anti-VEGFR2 Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juqun Shen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ is upregulated in most of solid tumors. It is expressed by pericytes/smooth muscle cells, fibroblast, macrophage, and certain tumor cells. Several PDGF receptor-related antagonists are being developed as potential antitumor agents and have demonstrated promising antitumor activity in both preclinical and clinical settings. Here, we produced a fully human neutralizing antibody, IMC-2C5, directed against PDGFRβ from an antibody phage display library. IMC-2C5 binds to both human and mouse PDGFRβ and blocks PDGF-B from binding to the receptor. IMC-2C5 also blocks ligand-stimulated activation of PDGFRβ and downstream signaling molecules in tumor cells. In animal studies, IMC-2C5 significantly delayed the growth of OVCAR-8 and NCI-H460 human tumor xenografts in nude mice but failed to show antitumor activities in OVCAR-5 and Caki-1 xenografts. Our results indicate that the antitumor efficacy of IMC-2C5 is primarily due to its effects on tumor stroma, rather than on tumor cells directly. Combination of IMC-2C5 and DC101, an anti-mouse vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 antibody, resulted in significantly enhanced antitumor activity in BxPC-3, NCI-H460, and HCT-116 xenografts, compared with DC101 alone, and the trend of additive effects to DC101 treatment in several other tumor models. ELISA analysis of NCI-H460 tumor homogenates showed that IMC-2C5 attenuated protein level of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor elevated by DC101 treatment. Finally, IMC-2C5 showed a trend of additive effects when combined with DC101/chemotherapy in MIA-PaCa-2 and NCI-H460 models. Taken together, these results lend great support to the use of PDGFRβ antagonists in combination with other antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of a broad range of human cancers.

  18. An integrated genomic approach identifies persistent tumor suppressive effects of transforming growth factor-β in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Misako; Kadota, Mitsutaka; Tang, Binwu; Yang, Howard H; Yang, Yu-an; Shan, Mengge; Weng, Jia; Welsh, Michael A; Flanders, Kathleen C; Nagano, Yoshiko; Michalowski, Aleksandra M; Clifford, Robert J; Lee, Maxwell P; Wakefield, Lalage M

    2014-06-02

    Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) play a dual role in breast cancer, with context-dependent tumor-suppressive or pro-oncogenic effects. TGF-β antagonists are showing promise in early-phase clinical oncology trials to neutralize the pro-oncogenic effects. However, there is currently no way to determine whether the tumor-suppressive effects of TGF-β are still active in human breast tumors at the time of surgery and treatment, a situation that could lead to adverse therapeutic responses. Using a breast cancer progression model that exemplifies the dual role of TGF-β, promoter-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcriptomic approaches were applied to identify a core set of TGF-β-regulated genes that specifically reflect only the tumor-suppressor arm of the pathway. The clinical significance of this signature and the underlying biology were investigated using bioinformatic analyses in clinical breast cancer datasets, and knockdown validation approaches in tumor xenografts. TGF-β-driven tumor suppression was highly dependent on Smad3, and Smad3 target genes that were specifically enriched for involvement in tumor suppression were identified. Patterns of Smad3 binding reflected the preexisting active chromatin landscape, and target genes were frequently regulated in opposite directions in vitro and in vivo, highlighting the strong contextuality of TGF-β action. An in vivo-weighted TGF-β/Smad3 tumor-suppressor signature was associated with good outcome in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cohorts. TGF-β/Smad3 effects on cell proliferation, differentiation and ephrin signaling contributed to the observed tumor suppression. Tumor-suppressive effects of TGF-β persist in some breast cancer patients at the time of surgery and affect clinical outcome. Carefully tailored in vitro/in vivo genomic approaches can identify such patients for exclusion from treatment with TGF-β antagonists.

  19. Replication Study: The CD47-signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPa) interaction is a therapeutic target for human solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrigan, Stephen K

    2017-01-19

    In 2015, as part of the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology, we published a Registered Report (Chroscinski et al., 2015) that described how we intended to replicate selected experiments from the paper "The CD47-signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPa) interaction is a therapeutic target for human solid tumors "(Willingham et al., 2012). Here we report the results of those experiments. We found that treatment of immune competent mice bearing orthotopic breast tumors with anti-mouse CD47 antibodies resulted in short-term anemia compared to controls, consistent with the previously described function of CD47 in normal phagocytosis of aging red blood cells and results reported in the original study (Table S4; Willingham et al., 2012). The weight of tumors after 30 days administration of anti-CD47 antibodies or IgG isotype control were not found to be statistically different, whereas the original study reported inhibition of tumor growth with anti-CD47 treatment (Figure 6A,B; Willingham et al., 2012). However, our efforts to replicate this experiment were confounded because spontaneous regression of tumors occurred in several of the mice. Additionally, the excised tumors were scored for inflammatory cell infiltrates. We found IgG and anti-CD47 treated tumors resulted in minimal to moderate lymphocytic infiltrate, while the original study observed sparse lymphocytic infiltrate in IgG-treated tumors and increased inflammatory cell infiltrates in anti-CD47 treated tumors (Figure 6C; Willingham et al., 2012). Furthermore, we observed neutrophilic infiltration was slightly increased in anti-CD47 treated tumors compared to IgG control. Finally, we report a meta-analysis of the result.

  20. XeCl excimer laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy for human cerebral tumor diagnosis: preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrillier, Sigrid; Hor, Frederic; Desgeorges, Michel; Ettori, Dominique; Sitbon, Jean R.

    1993-09-01

    Three-hundred-eight nm laser-induced autofluorescence spectra of the normal human brain, astrocytoma grade IV and glioblastoma grade IV specimens, have been recorded in vitro two hours after surgical resection. Typical fluorescence spectra for normal (N) and malignant (M) tissue show 4 maxima at about 352, 362, 383, and 460 nm. These spectra are analyzed in detail. Subtle differences in normalized spectra of N and M tissues appear to be large enough for diagnosis. Several criteria such as maxima and minima absolute intensity and intensity ratios at typical wavelengths are computed and used to classify the tissue. This preliminary study shows that fluorescence spectroscopy with 308 nm UV excitation could be a valid technique for discriminating tumor types. However, it should be noted that these measurements are made in vitro. Living tissues may have different spectral characteristics, therefore future in vivo investigations must be performed.

  1. 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT-PET imaging for monitoring everolimus effect on tumor-growth in neuroendocrine tumors: studies in human tumor xenografts in mice.

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    Camilla Bardram Johnbeck

    Full Text Available The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has shown promising results in some but not all neuroendocrine tumors. Therefore, early assessment of treatment response would be beneficial. In this study, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro treatment effect of everolimus in neuroendocrine tumors and evaluated the performance of 18F-FDG and the proliferation tracer 18F-FLT for treatment response assessment by PET imaging.The effect of everolimus on the human carcinoid cell line H727 was examined in vitro with the MTT assay and in vivo on H727 xenograft tumors. The mice were scanned at baseline with 18F-FDG or 18F-FLT and then treated with either placebo or everolimus (5 mg/kg daily for 10 days. PET/CT scans were repeated at day 1,3 and 10.Everolimus showed significant inhibition of H727 cell proliferation in vitro at concentrations above 1 nM. In vivo tumor volumes measured relative to baseline were significantly lower in the everolimus group compared to the control group at day 3 (126±6% vs. 152±6%; p = 0.016, day 7 (164±7% vs. 226±13%; p<0.001 and at day 10 (194±10% vs. 281±18%; p<0.001. Uptake of 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT showed little differences between control and treatment groups, but individual mean uptake of 18F-FDG at day 3 correlated with tumor growth day 10 (r2 = 0.45; P = 0.034, 18F-FLT mean uptake at day 1 correlated with tumor growth day 7 (r2 = 0.63; P = 0.019 and at day 3 18F-FLT correlated with tumor growth day 7 (r2 = 0.87; P<0.001 and day 10 (r2 = 0.58; P = 0.027.Everolimus was effective in vitro and in vivo in human xenografts lung carcinoid NETs and especially early 18F-FLT uptake predicted subsequent tumor growth. We suggest that 18F-FLT PET can be used for tailoring therapy for neuroendocrine tumor patients through early identification of responders and non-responders.

  2. Homogeneous expansion of human T-regulatory cells via tumor necrosis factor receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Yoshiaki; Mera, Toshiyuki; Wang, Limei; Faustman, Denise L

    2013-11-06

    T-regulatory cells (T(regs)) are a rare lymphocyte subtype that shows promise for treating infectious disease, allergy, graft-versus-host disease, autoimmunity, and asthma. Clinical applications of T(regs) have not been fully realized because standard methods of expansion ex vivo produce heterogeneous progeny consisting of mixed populations of CD4 + T cells. Heterogeneous progeny are risky for human clinical trials and face significant regulatory hurdles. With the goal of producing homogeneous T(regs), we developed a novel expansion protocol targeting tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFR) on T(regs). In in vitro studies, a TNFR2 agonist was found superior to standard methods in proliferating human T(regs) into a phenotypically homogeneous population consisting of 14 cell surface markers. The TNFR2 agonist-expanded T(regs) also were functionally superior in suppressing a key T(reg) target cell, cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Targeting the TNFR2 receptor during ex vivo expansion is a new means for producing homogeneous and potent human T(regs) for clinical opportunities.

  3. Compositional features are potentially involved in the regulation of gene expression of tumor suppressor genes in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjari, Mohammadreza; Khoshnevisan, Atefeh; Behmanesh, Mehrdad

    2014-12-15

    Different mechanisms regulate the expression level of tissue specific genes in human. Here we report some compositional features such as codon usage bias, amino acid usage bias, codon frequency, and base composition which may be potentially related to mRNA amount of tissue specific tumor suppressor genes. Our findings support the possibility that structural elements in gene and protein may play an important role in the regulation of tumor suppressor genes, development, and tumorigenesis. The data presented here can open broad vistas in the understanding and treatment of a variety of human malignancies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sensitivity of endometrial cancer cells from primary human tumor samples to new potential anticancer peptide lactaptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, Olga A; Sakaeva, Galiya R; Fomin, Alexander S; Nushtaeva, Anna A; Semenov, Dmitry V; Kuligina, Elena V; Gulyaeva, Ludmila F; Gerasimov, Alexey V; Richter, Vladimir A

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is the most common gynecologic malignancy which is associated with a poor prognosis when diagnosed at an advanced stage; therefore, the discovery of efficacious new drugs is required to reinforce conventional chemotherapy. Short-term cultures of primary cells from endometrial tumors could be used for testing new anticancer therapeutics as well as for the development of personalized cancer therapy strategy. Here, the antitumor effect of a recombinant analogue of lactaptin (RL2), a new potential anticancer molecule, was examined against primary human endometrial cancer cells. Primary cell cultures of malignant and normal human endometrium were performed by enzymatic digestion of