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Sample records for human trna synthetase

  1. Functional expansion of human tRNA synthetases achieved by structural inventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-01-21

    Known as an essential component of the translational apparatus, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase family catalyzes the first step reaction in protein synthesis, that is, to specifically attach each amino acid to its cognate tRNA. While preserving this essential role, tRNA synthetases developed other roles during evolution. Human tRNA synthetases, in particular, have diverse functions in different pathways involving angiogenesis, inflammation and apoptosis. The functional diversity is further illustrated in the association with various diseases through genetic mutations that do not affect aminoacylation or protein synthesis. Here we review the accumulated knowledge on how human tRNA synthetases used structural inventions to achieve functional expansions.

  2. Structural context for mobilization of a human tRNA synthetase from its cytoplasmic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Pengfei; Zhang, Hui-Min; Shapiro, Ryan; Marshall, Alan G; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Guo, Min

    2011-05-17

    Human lysyl-tRNA synthetase is bound to the multi-tRNA synthetase complex (MSC) that maintains and regulates the aminoacylation and nuclear functions of LysRS. The p38 scaffold protein binds LysRS to the MSC and, only with the appropriate cue, mobilizes LysRS for redirection to the nucleus to interact with the microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF). In recent work, an (α(2))(2) LysRS tetramer crystallized to yield a high-resolution structure and raised the question of how LysRS is arranged (dimer or tetramer) in the MSC to interact with p38. To understand the structural organization of the LysRS-p38 complex that regulates LysRS mobilization, we investigated the complex by use of small angle X-ray scattering and hydrogen-deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry in solution. The structure revealed a surprising α(2)β(1):β(1)α(2) organization in which a dimeric p38 scaffold holds two LysRS α(2) dimers in a parallel configuration. Each of the N-terminal 48 residues of p38 binds one LysRS dimer and, in so doing, brings two copies of the LysRS dimer into the MSC. The results suggest that this unique geometry, which reconfigures the LysRS tetramer from α(2):α(2) to α(2)β(1):β(1)α(2), is designed to control both retention and mobilization of LysRS from the MSC.

  3. Mutational switching of a yeast tRNA synthetase into a mammalian-like synthetase cytokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianming; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Ewalt, Karla L; Schimmel, Paul

    2002-12-03

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases catalyze the attachment of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs. A link was recently established between protein biosynthesis and cytokine signal transduction. Human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase can be split into two fragments, each of which has a distinct cytokine function. This activity is specific to the human enzyme. It is absent in the enzymes from lower organisms such as bacteria and yeast. Here, yeast tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS), which lacks cytokine activity, was used as a model to explore how a human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase during evolution acquired novel functions beyond aminoacylation. We found that a rationally designed mutant yeast TyrRS(ELR) gained cytokine function. The mutant yeast enzyme gained this function without sacrifice of aminoacylation activity. Therefore, relatively simple alteration of a basic structural motif imparts cytokine activity to a tRNA synthetase while preserving its canonical function. Further work established that mutational switching of a yeast protein to a mammalian-like cytokine was specific to this synthetase and not to just any yeast ortholog of a mammalian cytokine.

  4. Molecular recognition of histidine tRNA by histidyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatoyo, Yukari; Iwaki, Jun; Suzuki, Satoko; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the recognition sites of histidine tRNA for histidyl-tRNA synthetase from an extreme hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, we examined histidylation activities by using overexpressed histidyl-tRNA synthetase and various histidine tRNA transcripts that were prepared by in vitro transcription system. Results indicated that anticodon was not recognized by the histidyl-tRNA synthetase similar to that of Escherichia coli histidine tRNA recognition system. Discriminator base C73 was weekly recognized and an additional G residue was specifically recognized by the enzyme.

  5. Characterization of the human laminin beta2 chain locus (LAMB2): linkage to a gene containing a nonprocessed, transcribed LAMB2-like pseudogene (LAMB2L) and to the gene encoding glutaminyl tRNA synthetase (QARS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Jäger, A C; Khurana, T S

    1999-01-01

    The laminin beta2 chain is an important constituent of certain kidney and muscle basement membranes. We have generated a detailed physical map of a 110-kb genomic DNA segment surrounding the human laminin beta2 chain gene (LAMB2) on chromosome 3p21.3-->p21.2, a region paralogous with the chromosome...... 7q22-->q31 region that contains the laminin beta1 chain gene locus (LAMB1). Several CpG islands and a novel polymorphic microsatellite marker (D3S4594) were identified. The 3' end of LAMB2 lies 16 kb from the 5' end of the glutaminyl tRNA synthetase gene (QARS). About 20 kb upstream of LAMB2 we...... found a gene encoding a transcribed, non-processed LAMB2-like pseudogene (LAMB2L). The sequence of 1.75 kb of genomic DNA at the 3' end of LAMB2L was similar to exons 8-12 of the laminin beta2 chain gene. The LAMB2L-LAMB2-QARS cluster lies telomeric to the gene encoding the laminin-binding protein...

  6. The Mitochondrial Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetases: Genes and Syndromes

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    Daria Diodato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC disorders are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases. This is because protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis and maintenance of mitochondria, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication, transcription, and translation, require nuclear-encoded genes. In the past decade, a growing number of syndromes associated with dysfunction of mtDNA translation have been reported. This paper reviews the current knowledge of mutations affecting mitochondrial aminoacyl tRNAs synthetases and their role in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the different clinical presentations.

  7. Recognition sites of glycine tRNA for glycyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Koji; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2005-01-01

    To elucidate the tRNA recognition sites of glycine tRNA from an extreme thermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, we examined glycylation activities using in vitro mutant glycine tRNA transcripts and recombinant A. pernix glycyl-tRNA synthetase. The recognition nucleotides were determined to be C35 and C36 of anticodon, C2-G71 and G3-C70 base-pairs of acceptor stem. However, discriminator base A73 was not recognized by glycyl-tRNA synthetase.

  8. Determination of phenylalanine tRNA recognition sites by phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Wataru; Kimura, Manami; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2007-01-01

    Phenylalanine tRNA identity has been determined in the bacteria and the eukaryote system, but remains unknown for the archaea system. To investigate the molecular recognition mechanism of phenylalanine tRNA by phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, various mutant transcripts of phenylalanine tRNA prepared by an in vitro transcription system were examined by overexpressed A. pernix phenylalanyl tRNA synthetase. The results indicated that anticodon nucleotides G34, A35 and A36, discriminator base A73 and G20 in the variable pocket were base-specifically recognized by A. pernix phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

  9. A Drosophila model for mito-nuclear diseases generated by an incompatible interaction between tRNA and tRNA synthetase

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    Marissa A. Holmbeck

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Communication between the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes is vital for cellular function. The assembly of mitochondrial enzyme complexes, which produce the majority of cellular energy, requires the coordinated expression and translation of both mitochondrially and nuclear-encoded proteins. The joint genetic architecture of this system complicates the basis of mitochondrial diseases, and mutations both in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA- and nuclear-encoded genes have been implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction. Previously, in a set of mitochondrial-nuclear introgression strains, we characterized a dual genome epistasis in which a naturally occurring mutation in the Drosophila simulans simw501 mtDNA-encoded transfer RNA (tRNA for tyrosine (tRNATyr interacts with a mutation in the nuclear-encoded mitochondrially localized tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we show that the incompatible mitochondrial-nuclear combination results in locomotor defects, reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity, decreased oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS enzyme activity and severe alterations in mitochondrial morphology. Transgenic rescue strains containing nuclear variants of the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase are sufficient to rescue many of the deleterious phenotypes identified when paired with the simw501 mtDNA. However, the severity of this defective mito-nuclear interaction varies across traits and genetic backgrounds, suggesting that the impact of mitochondrial dysfunction might be tissue specific. Because mutations in mitochondrial tRNATyr are associated with exercise intolerance in humans, this mitochondrial-nuclear introgression model in Drosophila provides a means to dissect the molecular basis of these, and other, mitochondrial diseases that are a consequence of the joint genetic architecture of mitochondrial function.

  10. Effect of anoxia and Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass tincture on the activity of tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in isolated pig heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasauskas, Artūras; Rodovicius, Hiliaras; Viezeliene, Dale; Lazauskas, Robertas

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effect of anoxia and Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass tincture on the activities of different tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in isolated pig heart. The isolated pig heart was perfused according to the modified method of Langendorf, using an artificial blood circulation apparatus. Anoxia 20 min in duration was performed by perfusion of isolated heart with Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer saturated with gas mixture (95% N(2) and 5% CO(2)). Control heart was perfused with the same buffer saturated with gas mixture (95% O(2) and 5% CO(2)). Effect of Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass tincture was evaluated by perfusion of isolated heart with a buffer containing tincture. Total tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases were isolated from pig heart. Activities of tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases were measured by the aminoacylation reaction using C(14)-amino acids. Anoxia 20 min in duration has caused a decrease in the acceptor activity of tRNA and increase in the activities of aminacyl-tRNA synthetases. Polyscias filicifolia Bailey tincture did not affect the acceptor activity of tRNA and activities aminacyl-tRNA synthetases. After 20-min anoxic perfusion with the buffer containing Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass tincture, the acceptor activities of tRNA increased to the control value and activities of aminacyl-tRNA synthetases reached the control value. The acceptor activity of tRNA from isolated pig heart decreased and activities of aminacyl-tRNA synthetases increased under anoxia. Perfusion with buffer containing tincture of Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass restored acceptor activities of tRNA and activities of aminacyl-tRNA synthetases.

  11. MD Simulations of tRNA and Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Dynamics, Folding, Binding, and Allostery

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    Rongzhong Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are classes of biomolecules that have been extensively studied for decades, the finer details of how they carry out their fundamental biological functions in protein synthesis remain a challenge. Recent molecular dynamics (MD simulations are verifying experimental observations and providing new insight that cannot be addressed from experiments alone. Throughout the review, we briefly discuss important historical events to provide a context for how far the field has progressed over the past few decades. We then review the background of tRNA molecules, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and current state of the art MD simulation techniques for those who may be unfamiliar with any of those fields. Recent MD simulations of tRNA dynamics and folding and of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dynamics and mechanistic characterizations are discussed. We highlight the recent successes and discuss how important questions can be addressed using current MD simulations techniques. We also outline several natural next steps for computational studies of AARS:tRNA complexes.

  12. MD Simulations of tRNA and Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Dynamics, Folding, Binding, and Allostery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongzhong; Macnamara, Lindsay M.; Leuchter, Jessica D.; Alexander, Rebecca W.; Cho, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    While tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are classes of biomolecules that have been extensively studied for decades, the finer details of how they carry out their fundamental biological functions in protein synthesis remain a challenge. Recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are verifying experimental observations and providing new insight that cannot be addressed from experiments alone. Throughout the review, we briefly discuss important historical events to provide a context for how far the field has progressed over the past few decades. We then review the background of tRNA molecules, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and current state of the art MD simulation techniques for those who may be unfamiliar with any of those fields. Recent MD simulations of tRNA dynamics and folding and of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dynamics and mechanistic characterizations are discussed. We highlight the recent successes and discuss how important questions can be addressed using current MD simulations techniques. We also outline several natural next steps for computational studies of AARS:tRNA complexes. PMID:26184179

  13. Insights into substrate promiscuity of human seryl-tRNA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Kaitlyn M; Puppala, Anupama K; Lee, Jonathan W; Lee, Hyun; Simonović, Miljan

    2017-11-01

    Seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS) attaches L-serine to the cognate serine tRNA (tRNA Ser ) and the noncognate selenocysteine tRNA (tRNA Sec ). The latter activity initiates the anabolic cycle of selenocysteine (Sec), proper decoding of an in-frame Sec UGA codon, and synthesis of selenoproteins across all domains of life. While the accuracy of SerRS is important for overall proteome integrity, it is its substrate promiscuity that is vital for the integrity of the selenoproteome. This raises a question as to what elements in the two tRNA species, harboring different anticodon sequences and adopting distinct folds, facilitate aminoacylation by a common aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. We sought to answer this question by analyzing the ability of human cytosolic SerRS to bind and act on tRNA Ser , tRNA Sec , and 10 mutant and chimeric constructs in which elements of tRNA Ser were transposed onto tRNA Sec We show that human SerRS only subtly prefers tRNA Ser to tRNA Sec , and that discrimination occurs at the level of the serylation reaction. Surprisingly, the tRNA mutants predicted to adopt either the 7/5 or 8/5 fold are poor SerRS substrates. In contrast, shortening of the acceptor arm of tRNA Sec by a single base pair yields an improved SerRS substrate that adopts an 8/4 fold. We suggest that an optimal tertiary arrangement of structural elements within tRNA Sec and tRNA Ser dictate their utility for serylation. We also speculate that the extended acceptor-TΨC arm of tRNA Sec evolved as a compromise for productive binding to SerRS while remaining the major recognition element for other enzymes involved in Sec and selenoprotein synthesis. © 2017 Holman et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  14. Determination of tryptophan tRNA recognition sites for tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Wataru; Umehara, Takuya; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the recognition mechanism of tryptophan tRNA by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from extreme hyperthermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, tryptophanylation activities were examined by using mutant tryptophan tRNA transcripts prepared by in vitro transcription system. Their transcripts were aminoacylated with tryptophan by overexpressed A. pernix tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase. The results indicated that anticodon nucleotides C34, C35 and A36, discriminator base A73, G1-C72 and G2-C71 base pairs of acceptor stem were base-specifically recognized by A. pernix tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase.

  15. Evolutionary Limitation and Opportunities for Developing tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors with 5-Binding-Mode Classification

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    Pengfei Fang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs are enzymes that catalyze the transfer of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs as building blocks for translation. Each of the aaRS families plays a pivotal role in protein biosynthesis and is indispensable for cell growth and survival. In addition, aaRSs in higher species have evolved important non-translational functions. These translational and non-translational functions of aaRS are attractive for developing antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic agents and for treating other human diseases. The interplay between amino acids, tRNA, ATP, EF-Tu and non-canonical binding partners, had shaped each family with distinct pattern of key sites for regulation, with characters varying among species across the path of evolution. These sporadic variations in the aaRSs offer great opportunity to target these essential enzymes for therapy. Up to this day, growing numbers of aaRS inhibitors have been discovered and developed. Here, we summarize the latest developments and structural studies of aaRS inhibitors, and classify them with distinct binding modes into five categories.

  16. Molecular recognition of tryptophan tRNA by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Wataru; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2009-05-01

    The identity elements of transfer RNA are the molecular basis for recognition by each cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. In the archaea system, the tryptophan tRNA identity has not been determined in detail. To investigate the molecular recognition mechanism of tryptophan tRNA by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) from the hyperthermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, various mutant transcripts of tryptophan tRNA prepared by an in vitro transcription system were examined by overexpression of A. pernix TrpRS. Substitution of the discriminator base, A73, impaired tryptophan incorporation activity. Changing the G1-C72 base pair to other base pairs also decreased the aminoacylation activity. Substitutions of anticodon CCA revealed that the C34 and C35 mutants dramatically reduced aminoacylation with tryptophan, but the A36 mutants had the same activity as the wild type. The results indicate that the anticodon nucleotides C34, C35, discriminator base A73 and G1-C72 base pair are major recognition sites for A. pernix TrpRS.

  17. Genetic Code Optimization for Cotranslational Protein Folding: Codon Directional Asymmetry Correlates with Antiparallel Betasheets, tRNA Synthetase Classes

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    Hervé Seligmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new codon property, codon directional asymmetry in nucleotide content (CDA, reveals a biologically meaningful genetic code dimension: palindromic codons (first and last nucleotides identical, codon structure XZX are symmetric (CDA = 0, codons with structures ZXX/XXZ are 5′/3′ asymmetric (CDA = −1/1; CDA = −0.5/0.5 if Z and X are both purines or both pyrimidines, assigning negative/positive (−/+ signs is an arbitrary convention. Negative/positive CDAs associate with (a Fujimoto's tetrahedral codon stereo-table; (b tRNA synthetase class I/II (aminoacylate the 2′/3′ hydroxyl group of the tRNA's last ribose, respectively; and (c high/low antiparallel (not parallel betasheet conformation parameters. Preliminary results suggest CDA-whole organism associations (body temperature, developmental stability, lifespan. Presumably, CDA impacts spatial kinetics of codon-anticodon interactions, affecting cotranslational protein folding. Some synonymous codons have opposite CDA sign (alanine, leucine, serine, and valine, putatively explaining how synonymous mutations sometimes affect protein function. Correlations between CDA and tRNA synthetase classes are weaker than between CDA and antiparallel betasheet conformation parameters. This effect is stronger for mitochondrial genetic codes, and potentially drives mitochondrial codon-amino acid reassignments. CDA reveals information ruling nucleotide-protein relations embedded in reversed (not reverse-complement sequences (5′-ZXX-3′/5′-XXZ-3′.

  18. The early history of tRNA recognition by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    2006-10-04

    Oct 4, 2006 ... were incubated in cell-free extracts of Escherichia coli or rat liver, it was shown that the amino acids ... in the aqueous phase after phenol treatment of cellular extracts. Thus, the biochemical challenge is ..... the pseudoknot, allows building of a tRNA acceptor stem with a single strand of RNA (Rietveld et al ...

  19. Proteomic interrogation of androgen action in prostate cancer cells reveals roles of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases.

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    Adaikkalam Vellaichamy

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer remains the most common malignancy among men in United States, and there is no remedy currently available for the advanced stage hormone-refractory cancer. This is partly due to the incomplete understanding of androgen-regulated proteins and their encoded functions. Whole-cell proteomes of androgen-starved and androgen-treated LNCaP cells were analyzed by semi-quantitative MudPIT ESI- ion trap MS/MS and quantitative iTRAQ MALDI- TOF MS/MS platforms, with identification of more than 1300 high-confidence proteins. An enrichment-based pathway mapping of the androgen-regulated proteomic data sets revealed a significant dysregulation of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, indicating an increase in protein biosynthesis- a hallmark during prostate cancer progression. This observation is supported by immunoblot and transcript data from LNCaP cells, and prostate cancer tissue. Thus, data derived from multiple proteomics platforms and transcript data coupled with informatics analysis provides a deeper insight into the functional consequences of androgen action in prostate cancer.

  20. Improving target amino acid selectivity in a permissive aminoacyl tRNA synthetase through counter-selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungwienwong, Itthipol; Hostetler, Zachary M; Blizzard, Robert J; Porter, Joseph J; Driggers, Camden M; Mbengi, Lea Z; Villegas, José A; Speight, Lee C; Saven, Jeffery G; Perona, John J; Kohli, Rahul M; Mehl, Ryan A; Petersson, E James

    2017-05-03

    The amino acid acridon-2-ylalanine (Acd) can be a valuable probe of protein dynamics, either alone or as part of a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) or photo-induced electron transfer (eT) probe pair. We have previously reported the genetic incorporation of Acd by an aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (RS). However, this RS, developed from a library of permissive RSs, also incorporates N-phenyl-aminophenylalanine (Npf), a trace byproduct of one Acd synthetic route. We have performed negative selections in the presence of Npf and analyzed the selectivity of the resulting AcdRSs by in vivo protein expression and detailed kinetic analyses of the purified RSs. We find that selection conferred a ∼50-fold increase in selectivity for Acd over Npf, eliminating incorporation of Npf contaminants, and allowing one to use a high yielding Acd synthetic route for improved overall expression of Acd-containing proteins. More generally, our report also provides a cautionary tale on the use of permissive RSs, as well as a strategy for improving selectivity for the target amino acid.

  1. Structural characterization of antibiotic self-immunity tRNA synthetase in plant tumour biocontrol agent.

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    Chopra, Shaileja; Palencia, Andrés; Virus, Cornelia; Schulwitz, Sarah; Temple, Brenda R; Cusack, Stephen; Reader, John

    2016-10-07

    Antibiotic-producing microbes evolved self-resistance mechanisms to avoid suicide. The biocontrol Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 secretes the Trojan Horse antibiotic agrocin 84 that is selectively transported into the plant pathogen A. tumefaciens and processed into the toxin TM84. We previously showed that TM84 employs a unique tRNA-dependent mechanism to inhibit leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), while the TM84-producer prevents self-poisoning by expressing a resistant LeuRS AgnB2. We now identify a mechanism by which the antibiotic-producing microbe resists its own toxin. Using a combination of structural, biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that AgnB2 evolved structural changes so as to resist the antibiotic by eliminating the tRNA-dependence of TM84 binding. Mutagenesis of key resistance determinants results in mutants adopting an antibiotic-sensitive phenotype. This study illuminates the evolution of resistance in self-immunity genes and provides mechanistic insights into a fascinating tRNA-dependent antibiotic with applications for the development of anti-infectives and the prevention of biocontrol emasculation.

  2. Studies on crenarchaeal tyrosylation accuracy with mutational analyses of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and tyrosine tRNA from Aeropyrum pernix.

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    Iwaki, Jun; Endo, Kanako; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Fujimoto, Zui; Momma, Mitsuru; Kuno, Atsushi; Nishimura, Susumu; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2012-12-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases play a key role in the translation of genetic code into correct protein sequences. These enzymes recognize cognate amino acids and tRNAs from noncognate counterparts, and catalyze the formation of aminoacyl-tRNAs. While Although several tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases (TyrRSs) from various species have been structurally and functionally well characterized, the crenarchaeal TyrRS remains poorly understood. In this study, we performed mutational analyses on tyrosine tRNA (tRNA(Tyr)) and TyrRS from the crenarchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix, to investigate the molecular recognition mechanism. Kinetics for tyrosylation using in vitro transcript indicated that the discriminator base A73 and adjacent G72 in the acceptor stem are identity elements of tRNA(Tyr), whereas the C1 base and anticodon had modest roles as identity determinants. Intriguingly, in contrast to the identity element of eukaryotic/euryarchaeal TyrRSs, the first base-pair (C1-G72) of the acceptor stem was not essential in crenarchaeal TyrRS as a pair. Furthermore, A. pernix TyrRS mutants were constructed at positions Tyr39 and Asp172, which could form hydrogen bonds with the 4-hydroxyl group of l-tyrosine. The tyrosylation activities with the mutants resulted that Asp172 mutants completely abolished tyrosylation activity, whereas Tyr39 mutants had no effect on activity. Thus, crenarchaeal TyrRS appears to adopt different molecular recognition mechanism from other TyrRSs.

  3. Infidelity of translation of encephalomyocarditis viral RNA with tRNA from human malignant trophoblastic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, O.K.; Kuchino, Y.

    1977-09-23

    We have investigated tRNA from the human malignant trophoblastic cells (BeWo cell) and human chorionic tissue for the translation of specific mRNAs, in a tRNA-dependent protein synthesizing system from Ehrlich ascites cells. BeWo cell tRNA and chorionic tRNA supported oviduct mRNA or encephalomyocarditis (EMC) viral RNA directed amino acid incorporation into polypeptides equally effectively. Polypeptides synthesized with oviduct mRNA and tRNA from both sources were identical upon sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. But the EMC RNA directed polypeptides synthesized with BeWo cell tRNA were different from those synthesized with chorionic tRNA. A polypeptide (molecular weight 58,000) was apparently not synthesized and the synthesis of a faster moving component (molecular weight, 14,000) was enhanced when BeWo cell tRNA was used. These results imply a functional difference in tRNA from human malignant cells compared to their normal counterpart.

  4. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation study of archaeal leucyl-tRNA synthetase in complex with different mischarged tRNA in editing conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayevsky, A V; Sharifi, M; Tukalo, M A

    2017-09-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play important roles in maintaining the accuracy of protein synthesis. Some aaRSs accomplish this via editing mechanisms, among which leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) edits non-cognate amino acid norvaline mainly by post-transfer editing. However, the molecular basis for this pathway for eukaryotic and archaeal LeuRS remain unclear. In this study, a complex of archaeal P. horikoshii LeuRS (PhLeuRS) with misacylated tRNALeu was modeled wherever tRNA's acceptor stem was oriented directly into the editing site. To understand the distinctive features of organization we reconstructed a complex of PhLeuRS with tRNA and visualize post-transfer editing interactions mode by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. To study molecular basis for substrate selectivity by PhLeuRS's editing site we utilized MD simulation of the entire LeuRS complexes using a diverse charged form of tRNAs, namely norvalyl-tRNALeu and isoleucyl-tRNALeu. In general, the editing site organization of LeuRS from P.horikoshii has much in common with bacterial LeuRS. The MD simulation results revealed that the post-transfer editing substrate norvalyl-A76, binds more strongly than isoleucyl-A76. Moreover, the branched side chain of isoleucine prevents water molecules from being closer and hence the hydrolysis reaction slows significantly. To investigate a possible mechanism of the post-transfer editing reaction, by PhLeuRS we have determined that two water molecules (the attacking and assisting water molecules) are localized near the carbonyl group of the amino acid to be cleaved off. These water molecules approach the substrate from the opposite side to that observed for Thermus thermophilus LeuRS (TtLeuRS). Based on the results obtained, it was suggested that the post-transfer editing mechanism of PhLeuRS differs from that of prokaryotic TtLeuRS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Predicted class-I aminoacyl tRNA synthetase-like proteins in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis

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    Iyer Lakshminarayan M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies point to a great diversity of non-ribosomal peptide synthesis systems with major roles in amino acid and co-factor biosynthesis, secondary metabolism, and post-translational modifications of proteins by peptide tags. The least studied of these systems are those utilizing tRNAs or aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AAtRS in non-ribosomal peptide ligation. Results Here we describe novel examples of AAtRS related proteins that are likely to be involved in the synthesis of widely distributed peptide-derived metabolites. Using sensitive sequence profile methods we show that the cyclodipeptide synthases (CDPSs are members of the HUP class of Rossmannoid domains and are likely to be highly derived versions of the class-I AAtRS catalytic domains. We also identify the first eukaryotic CDPSs in fungi and in animals; they might be involved in immune response in the latter organisms. We also identify a paralogous version of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase, which is widespread in bacteria, and present evidence using contextual information that it might function independently of protein synthesis as a peptide ligase in the formation of a peptide- derived secondary metabolite. This metabolite is likely to be heavily modified through multiple reactions catalyzed by a metal-binding cupin domain and a lysine N6 monooxygenase that are strictly associated with this paralogous methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MtRS. We further identify an analogous system wherein the MtRS has been replaced by more typical peptide ligases with the ATP-grasp or modular condensation-domains. Conclusions The prevalence of these predicted biosynthetic pathways in phylogenetically distant, pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria suggests that metabolites synthesized by them might participate in interactions with the host. More generally, these findings point to a complete spectrum of recruitment of AAtRS to various non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways, ranging from the

  6. Two complementary enzymes for threonylation of tRNA in crenarchaeota: crystal structure of Aeropyrum pernix threonyl-tRNA synthetase lacking a cis-editing domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Satoru; Juan, Ella Czarina Magat; Sato, Yoshiteru; Miyashita, Yu-Ichiro; Hoque, Md Mominul; Suzuki, Kaoru; Sagara, Tsubasa; Tsunoda, Masaru; Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Takénaka, Akio

    2009-11-27

    In protein synthesis, threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) must recognize threonine (Thr) from the 20 kinds of amino acids and the cognate tRNA(Thr) from different tRNAs in order to generate Thr-tRNA(Thr). In general, an organism possesses one kind of gene corresponding to ThrRS. However, it has been recently found that some organisms have two different genes for ThrRS in the genome, suggesting that their proteins ThrRS-1 and ThrRS-2 function separately and complement each other in the threonylation of tRNA(Thr), one for catalysis and the other for trans-editing of misacylated Ser-tRNA(Thr). In order to clarify their three-dimensional structures, we performed X-ray analyses of two putatively assigned ThrRSs from Aeropyrum pernix (ApThrRS-1 and ApThrRS-2). These proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and crystallized. The crystal structure of ApThrRS-1 has been successfully determined at 2.3 A resolution. ApThrRS-1 is a dimeric enzyme composed of two identical subunits, each containing two domains for the catalytic reaction and for anticodon binding. The essential editing domain is completely missing as expected. These structural features reveal that ThrRS-1 catalyzes only the aminoacylation of the cognate tRNA, suggesting the necessity of the second enzyme ThrRS-2 for trans-editing. Since the N-terminal sequence of ApThrRS-2 is similar to the sequence of the editing domain of ThrRS from Pyrococcus abyssi, ApThrRS-2 has been expected to catalyze deaminoacylation of a misacylated serine moiety at the CCA terminus.

  7. Alternative tRNA priming of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcription explains sequence variation in the primer-binding site that has been attributed to APOBEC3G activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Atze T.; Vink, Monique; Berkhout, Ben

    2005-01-01

    It is generally assumed that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) uses exclusively the cellular tRNA(3)(Lys) molecule as a primer for reverse transcription. We demonstrate that HIV-1 uses not only tRNA(3)(Lys) but also an alternative tRNA primer. This tRNA was termed tRNA(5)(Lys), and the

  8. Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase: the first crystallization of a human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnefond, Luc; Frugier, Magali; Touzé, Elodie; Lorber, Bernard; Florentz, Catherine; Giegé, Richard, E-mail: r.giege@ibmc.u-strasbg.fr; Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; Sauter, Claude [Département ‘Machineries Traductionnelles’, Architecture et Réactivité de l’ARN, Université Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, CNRS, IBMC, 15 Rue René Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg (France)

    2007-04-01

    Crystals of human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase lacking the C-terminal S4-like domain diffract to 2.7 Å resolution and are suitable for structure determination. Human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and a truncated version with its C-terminal S4-like domain deleted were purified and crystallized. Only the truncated version, which is active in tyrosine activation and Escherichia coli tRNA{sup Tyr} charging, yielded crystals suitable for structure determination. These tetragonal crystals, belonging to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, were obtained in the presence of PEG 4000 as a crystallizing agent and diffracted X-rays to 2.7 Å resolution. Complete data sets could be collected and led to structure solution by molecular replacement.

  9. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-30

    observation consistent with our original hypothesis. Investigations into tRNA modifications within the anticodon region have led to the identification of an...altered tiM Isoaccepting species to translate disparate mR A’s more efficiently. As we have now found, 7-mthylguanlne does inhibit tiM transglycosylase from...guanine into tRMA, J. Biol. Chem. 253:9082 (1978). 20. R. Glaser, M. Nonoyama, R. T. Szymanowski and W. Graham, Human nasopharyugeal carcinoma positiv

  10. Human tRNA genes function as chromatin insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Jesse R; Chiu, Jonathan; Zhu, Jingchun; Katzman, Sol; Kurukuti, Sreenivasulu; Wade, Paul A; Haussler, David; Kamakaka, Rohinton T

    2012-01-01

    Insulators help separate active chromatin domains from silenced ones. In yeast, gene promoters act as insulators to block the spread of Sir and HP1 mediated silencing while in metazoans most insulators are multipartite autonomous entities. tDNAs are repetitive sequences dispersed throughout the human genome and we now show that some of these tDNAs can function as insulators in human cells. Using computational methods, we identified putative human tDNA insulators. Using silencer blocking, transgene protection and repressor blocking assays we show that some of these tDNA-containing fragments can function as barrier insulators in human cells. We find that these elements also have the ability to block enhancers from activating RNA pol II transcribed promoters. Characterization of a putative tDNA insulator in human cells reveals that the site possesses chromatin signatures similar to those observed at other better-characterized eukaryotic insulators. Enhanced 4C analysis demonstrates that the tDNA insulator makes long-range chromatin contacts with other tDNAs and ETC sites but not with intervening or flanking RNA pol II transcribed genes. PMID:22085927

  11. Entamoeba lysyl-tRNA synthetase contains a cytokine-like domain with chemokine activity towards human endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Castro de Moura

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunological pressure encountered by protozoan parasites drives the selection of strategies to modulate or avoid the immune responses of their hosts. Here we show that the parasite Entamoeba histolytica has evolved a chemokine that mimics the sequence, structure, and function of the human cytokine HsEMAPII (Homo sapiens endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II. This Entamoeba EMAPII-like polypeptide (EELP is translated as a domain attached to two different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS that are overexpressed when parasites are exposed to inflammatory signals. EELP is dispensable for the tRNA aminoacylation activity of the enzymes that harbor it, and it is cleaved from them by Entamoeba proteases to generate a standalone cytokine. Isolated EELP acts as a chemoattractant for human cells, but its cell specificity is different from that of HsEMAPII. We show that cell specificity differences between HsEMAPII and EELP can be swapped by site directed mutagenesis of only two residues in the cytokines' signal sequence. Thus, Entamoeba has evolved a functional mimic of an aaRS-associated human cytokine with modified cell specificity.

  12. Entamoeba lysyl-tRNA Synthetase Contains a Cytokine-Like Domain with Chemokine Activity towards Human Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung Min; Kim, Sunghoon; Celada, Antonio; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2011-01-01

    Immunological pressure encountered by protozoan parasites drives the selection of strategies to modulate or avoid the immune responses of their hosts. Here we show that the parasite Entamoeba histolytica has evolved a chemokine that mimics the sequence, structure, and function of the human cytokine HsEMAPII (Homo sapiens endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II). This Entamoeba EMAPII-like polypeptide (EELP) is translated as a domain attached to two different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) that are overexpressed when parasites are exposed to inflammatory signals. EELP is dispensable for the tRNA aminoacylation activity of the enzymes that harbor it, and it is cleaved from them by Entamoeba proteases to generate a standalone cytokine. Isolated EELP acts as a chemoattractant for human cells, but its cell specificity is different from that of HsEMAPII. We show that cell specificity differences between HsEMAPII and EELP can be swapped by site directed mutagenesis of only two residues in the cytokines' signal sequence. Thus, Entamoeba has evolved a functional mimic of an aaRS-associated human cytokine with modified cell specificity. PMID:22140588

  13. Biocytin synthetase activity in human milk as assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oizumi, J; Hayakawa, K

    1993-01-29

    A reversed-phase liquid chromatographic assay for biocytin synthetase activity has been developed. By this method, biocytin synthetase, isolated to homogeneity from human milk, was found to synthetize biocytin from biotin and L-lysine in the presence of ATP and magnesium ion(s). Both ATP and magnesium ion(s) were required for the synthesis of biocytin. Equal molar amounts of ADP and ATP were produced and consumed, respectively, in the course of the production of the same molar amount of biocytin; however, production of AMP was not observed. Biocytin synthetase Michaelis constants were 2.5, 1.8, and 0.11 mM for biotin, L-lysine, and ATP, respectively. Biocytin synthetase from milk was shown to synthesize biocytin in a stoichiometric amount.

  14. The gene encoding human glutathione synthetase (GSS) maps to the long arm of chromosome 20 at band 11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G.C.; Vaska, V.L.; Ford, J.H. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville (Australia)] [and others

    1995-12-10

    Two forms of glutathione synthetase deficiency have been described. While one form is mild, causing hemolytic anemia, the other more severe form causes 5-oxoprolinuria with secondary neurological involvement. Despite the existence of two deficiency phenotypes, Southern blots hybridized with a glutathione synthetase cDNA suggest that there is a single glutathione synthetase gene in the human genome. Analysis of somatic cell hybrids showed the human glutathione synthetase gene (GSS) to be located on chromosome 20, and this assignment has been refined to subband 20q11.2 using in situ hybridization. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Expression of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 reflects the state of villus architecture in human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gassler, Nikolaus; Kopitz, Jürgen; Tehrani, Arman

    2004-01-01

    . Screening of antibodies from a hybridoma library led to the identification of an acyl-CoA synthetase 5-specific monoclonal antibody. Protein synthesis, mRNA expression, and the enzyme activity of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 were studied by several methods in human small intestinal tissues with Crohn's disease...... or coeliac disease, respectively. Acyl-CoA synthetase 5 mRNA and protein levels were substantially reduced in injured small intestinal mucosa. Moreover, impaired synthesis of the acyl-CoA synthetase 5 protein was reflected by a decrease in intramucosal enzyme activity. Subtle changes of the acyl...

  16. Association of human mitochondrial lysyl-tRNA synthetase with HIV-1 GagPol does not require other viral proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Kobbi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In human, the cytoplasmic (cLysRS and mitochondrial (mLysRS species of lysyl-tRNA synthetase are encoded by a single gene. Following HIV-1 infection, mLysRS is selectively taken up into viral particles along with the three tRNALys isoacceptors. The GagPol polyprotein precursor is involved in this process. With the aim to reconstitute in vitro the HIV-1 tRNA3Lys packaging complex, we first searched for the putative involvement of another viral protein in the selective viral hijacking of mLysRS only. After screening all the viral proteins, we observed that Vpr and Rev have the potential to interact with mLysRS, but that this association does not take place at the level of the assembly of mLysRS into the packaging complex. We also show that tRNA3Lys can form a ternary complex with the two purified proteins mLysRS and the Pol domain of GagPol, which mimicks its packaging complex.

  17. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, Ryu [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Mizuno, Rie [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Watanabe, Kazunori, E-mail: watanabe@ric.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Ijiri, Kenichi [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  18. Purification, Structure and Properties of Escherichia coli tRNA Pseudouridine Synthase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    enzymes which are reactive at C5 of uracil ( thymidylate synthase and aminoacyl synthetases). The deduced amino acid sequence of PSUI was also compared with...localize the sites of tRNA interaction with PSUI. The mechanism elucidated by Santi and others for thymidylate synthase (34-38) provides a conceptual...aminoacyl tRNA synthetases with residue U8 of their cognate tRNA substrates (39,40). In the case of thymidylate synthase , I the catalytic nucleophile is

  19. Characterization of human GTPBP3, a GTP-binding protein involved in mitochondrial tRNA modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroya, Magda; Prado, Silvia; Esteve, Juan M; Soriano, Miguel A; Aguado, Carmen; Pérez-Martínez, David; Martínez-Ferrandis, José I; Yim, Lucía; Victor, Victor M; Cebolla, Elvira; Montaner, Asunción; Knecht, Erwin; Armengod, M-Eugenia

    2008-12-01

    Human GTPBP3 is an evolutionarily conserved, multidomain protein involved in mitochondrial tRNA modification. Characterization of its biochemical properties and the phenotype conferred by GTPBP3 inactivation is crucial to understanding the role of this protein in tRNA maturation and its effects on mitochondrial respiration. We show that the two most abundant GTPBP3 isoforms exhibit moderate affinity for guanine nucleotides like their bacterial homologue, MnmE, although they hydrolyze GTP at a 100-fold lower rate. This suggests that regulation of the GTPase activity, essential for the tRNA modification function of MnmE, is different in GTPBP3. In fact, potassium-induced dimerization of the G domain leads to stimulation of the GTPase activity in MnmE but not in GTPBP3. The GTPBP3 N-terminal domain mediates a potassium-independent dimerization, which appears as an evolutionarily conserved property of the protein family, probably related to the construction of the binding site for the one-carbon-unit donor in the modification reaction. Partial inactivation of GTPBP3 by small interfering RNA reduces oxygen consumption, ATP production, and mitochondrial protein synthesis, while the degradation of these proteins slightly increases. It also results in mitochondria with defective membrane potential and increased superoxide levels. These phenotypic traits suggest that GTPBP3 defects contribute to the pathogenesis of some oxidative phosphorylation diseases.

  20. A single Danio rerio hars gene encodes both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial histidyl-tRNA synthetases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley L Waldron

    Full Text Available Histidyl tRNA Synthetase (HARS is a member of the aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (ARS family of enzymes. This family of 20 enzymes is responsible for attaching specific amino acids to their cognate tRNA molecules, a critical step in protein synthesis. However, recent work highlighting a growing number of associations between ARS genes and diverse human diseases raises the possibility of new and unexpected functions in this ancient enzyme family. For example, mutations in HARS have been linked to two different neurological disorders, Usher Syndrome Type IIIB and Charcot Marie Tooth peripheral neuropathy. These connections raise the possibility of previously undiscovered roles for HARS in metazoan development, with alterations in these functions leading to complex diseases. In an attempt to establish Danio rerio as a model for studying HARS functions in human disease, we characterized the Danio rerio hars gene and compared it to that of human HARS. Using a combination of bioinformatics, molecular biology, and cellular approaches, we found that while the human genome encodes separate genes for cytoplasmic and mitochondrial HARS protein, the Danio rerio genome encodes a single hars gene which undergoes alternative splicing to produce the respective cytoplasmic and mitochondrial versions of Hars. Nevertheless, while the HARS genes of humans and Danio differ significantly at the genomic level, we found that they are still highly conserved at the amino acid level, underscoring the potential utility of Danio rerio as a model organism for investigating HARS function and its link to human diseases in vivo.

  1. Reduced replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mutants that use reverse transcription primers other than the natural tRNA(3Lys)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, A. T.; Klaver, B.; Berkhout, B.

    1995-01-01

    Replication of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and other retroviruses involves reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome into a double-stranded DNA. This reaction is primed by the cellular tRNA(3Lys) molecule, which binds to a complementary sequence in the viral genome, referred

  2. Expression of human aspartyl-tRNA synthetase in COS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, C; Qasba, P K; Yang, D C

    1994-11-09

    Mammalian aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (DRS) occurs in a multi-enzyme complex of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, while DRS exists as free soluble enzymes in bacteria and yeast. The properties of human DRS transient expressed in COS cells were examined. After transfection of COS cells with the recombinant plasmids pSVL-63 that contained hDRS cDNA coding and non-coding sequences, and pSV-hDRS where the non-coding sequences were deleted, DRS in the transfected COS cells significantly increased compared to mock transfected cells. COS cells transfected with pSV-hDRS delta 32 that contained N-terminal 32 residue-coding sequence deleted hDRS cDNA showed no increase in DRS activity. Northern blot analysis showed that concentrations of corresponding mRNAs of hDRS and hDRS delta 32 were greatly enhanced in transfected cells. The increases in the level of the transcripts were much higher than those of the corresponding proteins. Gel filtration analysis showed that hDRS in pSV-hDRS transfected cells expressed as a low molecular weight form of hDRS and pSV-hDRS delta 32 transfected cells did not. Epitope tagging and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy was used to localize hDRS. Both hDRSmyc and hDRS delta 32myc were localized in the cytoplasm and showed diffused patterns. These results showed that hDRS has little tendency to aggregate in vivo and suggested that the N-terminal extension in hDRS was not involved in the expression and sub-cellular localization of hDRS, but may play a role in the maintenance of enzymatic activity of hDRS in COS cells.

  3. A human tRNA methyltransferase 9-like protein prevents tumour growth by regulating LIN9 and HIF1-α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Ulrike; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Patil, Ashish; Endres, Lauren; Estrada, Yeriel; Chan, Clement TY; Su, Dan; Dedon, Peter C; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Begley, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to aberrant regulation of translation as a driver of cell transformation in cancer. Given the direct control of translation by tRNA modifications, tRNA modifying enzymes may function as regulators of cancer progression. Here, we show that a tRNA methyltransferase 9-like (hTRM9L/KIAA1456) mRNA is down-regulated in breast, bladder, colorectal, cervix and testicular carcinomas. In the aggressive SW620 and HCT116 colon carcinoma cell lines, hTRM9L is silenced and its re-expression and methyltransferase activity dramatically suppressed tumour growth in vivo. This growth inhibition was linked to decreased proliferation, senescence-like G0/G1-arrest and up-regulation of the RB interacting protein LIN9. Additionally, SW620 cells re-expressing hTRM9L did not respond to hypoxia via HIF1-α-dependent induction of GLUT1. Importantly, hTRM9L-negative tumours were highly sensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotics and this was associated with altered tRNA modification levels compared to antibiotic resistant hTRM9L-expressing SW620 cells. Our study links hTRM9L and tRNA modifications to inhibition of tumour growth via LIN9 and HIF1-α-dependent mechanisms. It also suggests that aminoglycoside antibiotics may be useful to treat hTRM9L-deficient tumours. PMID:23381944

  4. An archaeal tRNA-synthetase complex that enhances aminoacylation under extreme conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Hausmann, Corinne D

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play an integral role in protein synthesis, functioning to attach the correct amino acid with its cognate tRNA molecule. AaRSs are known to associate into higher-order multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complexes (MSC) involved in archaeal and eukaryotic translation...

  5. Complete mitochondrial genomes of the human follicle mites Demodex brevis and D. folliculorum: novel gene arrangement, truncated tRNA genes, and ancient divergence between species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palopoli, Michael F; Minot, Samuel; Pei, Dorothy; Satterly, Alicia; Endrizzi, Julie

    2014-12-16

    Follicle mites of the genus Demodex are found on a wide diversity of mammals, including humans; surprisingly little is known, however, about the evolution of this association. Additional sequence information promises to facilitate studies of Demodex variation within and between host species. Here we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequences of two species of Demodex known to live on humans--Demodex brevis and D. folliculorum--which are the first such genomes available for any member of the genus. We analyzed these sequences to gain insight into the evolution of mitochondrial genomes within the Acariformes. We also used relaxed molecular clock analyses, based on alignments of mitochondrial proteins, to estimate the time of divergence between these two species. Both Demodex genomes shared a novel gene order that differs substantially from the ancestral chelicerate pattern, with transfer RNA (tRNA) genes apparently having moved much more often than other genes. Mitochondrial tRNA genes of both species were unusually short, with most of them unable to encode tRNAs that could fold into the canonical cloverleaf structure; indeed, several examples lacked both D- and T-arms. Finally, the high level of sequence divergence observed between these species suggests that these two lineages last shared a common ancestor no more recently than about 87 mya. Among Acariformes, rearrangements involving tRNA genes tend to occur much more often than those involving other genes. The truncated tRNA genes observed in both Demodex species would seem to require the evolution of extensive tRNA editing capabilities and/or coevolved interacting factors. The molecular machinery necessary for these unusual tRNAs to function might provide an avenue for developing treatments of skin disorders caused by Demodex. The deep divergence time estimated between these two species sets a lower bound on the time that Demodex have been coevolving with their mammalian hosts, and supports the

  6. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    the resolution and quantitation of modified ucleosides in the urine of cancer patients would not be particularly useful for the cell culture studies...Comparison of nucleic acid catabolism by normal human fibroblasts and fibroblasts transformed with methylazoxymethyl alcohol ( MAMA ),an activated...catabolite in long-term, pulse-chase experiments. However, the kinetics of catabolism differed, in that only the MAMA -transformed cells had generated

  7. Origins and Early Evolution of the tRNA Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Tamura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern transfer RNAs (tRNAs are composed of ~76 nucleotides and play an important role as “adaptor” molecules that mediate the translation of information from messenger RNAs (mRNAs. Many studies suggest that the contemporary full-length tRNA was formed by the ligation of half-sized hairpin-like RNAs. A minihelix (a coaxial stack of the acceptor stem on the T-stem of tRNA can function both in aminoacylation by aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and in peptide bond formation on the ribosome, indicating that it may be a vestige of the ancestral tRNA. The universal CCA-3′ terminus of tRNA is also a typical characteristic of the molecule. “Why CCA?” is the fundamental unanswered question, but several findings give a comprehensive picture of its origin. Here, the origins and early evolution of tRNA are discussed in terms of various perspectives, including nucleotide ligation, chiral selectivity of amino acids, genetic code evolution, and the organization of the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center (PTC. The proto-tRNA molecules may have evolved not only as adaptors but also as contributors to the composition of the ribosome.

  8. Domain movements during CCA-addition: a new function for motif C in the catalytic core of the human tRNA nucleotidyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Felix G M; Rickert, Christian; Bluschke, Alexander; Betat, Heike; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Mörl, Mario

    2015-01-01

    CCA-adding enzymes are highly specific RNA polymerases that synthesize and maintain the sequence CCA at the tRNA 3'-end. This nucleotide triplet is a prerequisite for tRNAs to be aminoacylated and to participate in protein biosynthesis. During CCA-addition, a set of highly conserved motifs in the catalytic core of these enzymes is responsible for accurate sequential nucleotide incorporation. In the nucleotide binding pocket, three amino acid residues form Watson-Crick-like base pairs to the incoming CTP and ATP. A reorientation of these templating amino acids switches the enzyme's specificity from CTP to ATP recognition. However, the mechanism underlying this essential structural rearrangement is not understood. Here, we show that motif C, whose actual function has not been identified yet, contributes to the switch in nucleotide specificity during polymerization. Biochemical characterization as well as EPR spectroscopy measurements of the human enzyme reveal that mutating the highly conserved amino acid position D139 in this motif interferes with AMP incorporation and affects interdomain movements in the enzyme. We propose a model of action, where motif C forms a flexible spring element modulating the relative orientation of the enzyme's head and body domains to accommodate the growing 3'-end of the tRNA. Furthermore, these conformational transitions initiate the rearranging of the templating amino acids to switch the specificity of the nucleotide binding pocket from CTP to ATP during CCA-synthesis.

  9. Selection of tRNA charging quality control mechanisms that increase mistranslation of the genetic code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yadavalli, Srujana S; Ibba, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Mistranslation can follow two events during protein synthesis: production of non-cognate amino acid:transfer RNA (tRNA) pairs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and inaccurate selection of aminoacyl-tRNAs by the ribosome. Many aaRSs actively edit non-cognate amino acids, but editing mechanisms...

  10. Structure of a tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase containing an iron–sulfur cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gye Won; Yang, Xiang-Lei; McMullan, Daniel; Chong, Yeeting E.; Krishna, S. Sri; Rife, Christopher L.; Weekes, Dana; Brittain, Scott M.; Abdubek, Polat; Ambing, Eileen; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; van den Bedem, Henry; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Schimmel, Paul; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    A novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that contains an iron–sulfur cluster in the tRNA anticodon-binding region and efficiently charges tRNA with tryptophan has been found in Thermotoga maritima. The crystal structure of TmTrpRS (tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase; TrpRS; EC 6.1.1.2) reveals an iron–sulfur [4Fe–­4S] cluster bound to the tRNA anticodon-binding (TAB) domain and an l-­tryptophan ligand in the active site. None of the other T. maritima aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) contain this [4Fe–4S] cluster-binding motif (C-x 22-C-x 6-C-x 2-C). It is speculated that the iron–sulfur cluster contributes to the stability of TmTrpRS and could play a role in the recognition of the anticodon. PMID:20944229

  11. Structure of a tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase containing an iron-sulfur cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gye Won; Yang, Xiang Lei; McMullan, Daniel; Chong, Yeeting E; Krishna, S Sri; Rife, Christopher L; Weekes, Dana; Brittain, Scott M; Abdubek, Polat; Ambing, Eileen; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C; Grzechnik, Slawomir K; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D; Morse, Andrew T; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; van den Bedem, Henry; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Elsliger, Marc André; Schimmel, Paul; Wilson, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    A novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that contains an iron-sulfur cluster in the tRNA anticodon-binding region and efficiently charges tRNA with tryptophan has been found in Thermotoga maritima. The crystal structure of TmTrpRS (tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase; TrpRS; EC 6.1.1.2) reveals an iron-sulfur [4Fe-4S] cluster bound to the tRNA anticodon-binding (TAB) domain and an L-tryptophan ligand in the active site. None of the other T. maritima aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) contain this [4Fe-4S] cluster-binding motif (C-x₂₂-C-x₆-C-x₂-C). It is speculated that the iron-sulfur cluster contributes to the stability of TmTrpRS and could play a role in the recognition of the anticodon.

  12. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase by RNAi suppresses cell growth in human melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhou, Fusheng; Du, Wenhui; Dou, Jinfa; Xu, Yu; Gao, Wanwan; Chen, Gang; Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Yang, Sen

    2016-05-01

    Melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, causes more than 40,000 deaths each year worldwide. And epidermoid carcinoma is another major form of skin cancer, which could be studied together with melanoma in several aspects. Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine, and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance and prognosis in several human cancers. The present study aims to explore the potential role of ASNS in melanoma cells A375 and human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. We applied a lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) system to study its function in cell growth of both cells. The results revealed that inhibition of ASNS expression by RNAi significantly suppressed the growth of melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells, and induced a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in melanoma cells. Knockdown of ASNS in A375 cells remarkably downregulated the expression levels of CDK4, CDK6, and Cyclin D1, and upregulated the expression of p21. Therefore, our study provides evidence that ASNS may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. tRNA acceptor-stem and anticodon bases embed separate features of amino acid chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Charles W.; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-01-01

    abstract The universal genetic code is a translation table by which nucleic acid sequences can be interpreted as polypeptides with a wide range of biological functions. That information is used by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to translate the code. Moreover, amino acid properties dictate protein folding. We recently reported that digital correlation techniques could identify patterns in tRNA identity elements that govern recognition by synthetases. Our analysis, and the functionality of truncated synthetases that cannot recognize the tRNA anticodon, support the conclusion that the tRNA acceptor stem houses an independent code for the same 20 amino acids that likely functioned earlier in the emergence of genetics. The acceptor-stem code, related to amino acid size, is distinct from a code in the anticodon that is related to amino acid polarity. Details of the acceptor-stem code suggest that it was useful in preserving key properties of stereochemically-encoded peptides that had developed the capacity to interact catalytically with RNA. The quantitative embedding of the chemical properties of amino acids into tRNA bases has implications for the origins of molecular biology. PMID:26595350

  14. Oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1 expression in human breast and prostate cancer cases, and its regulation by sex steroid hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Jorge Maia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1 is an interferon-induced protein characterised by its capacity to catalyse the synthesis of 2ʹ-5ʹ-linked oligomers of adenosine from adenosine triphosphate (2-5A. The 2-5A binds to a latent Ribonuclease L (RNase L, which subsequently dimerises into its active form and may play an important role in the control of cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Previously, our research group identified OAS1 as a differentially-expressed gene in breast and prostate cancer cell lines when compared to normal cells. This study evaluates: i the expression of OAS1 in human breast and prostate cancer specimens; and ii the effect of sex steroid hormones in regulating the expression of OAS1 in breast (MCF-7 and prostate (LNCaP cancer cell lines. The obtained results showed that OAS1 expression was down-regulated in human infiltrative ductal carcinoma of breast, adenocarcinoma of prostate, and benign prostate hyperplasia, both at mRNA and protein level. In addition, OAS1 expression was negatively correlated with the progression of breast and prostate cancer. With regards to the regulation of OAS1 gene, it was demonstrated that 17β-estradiol (E2 down-regulates OAS1 gene in MCF-7 cell lines, an effect that seems to be dependent on the activation of oestrogen receptor (ER. On the other hand, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT treatment showed no effect on the expression of OAS1 in LNCaP cell lines. The lower levels of OAS1 in breast and prostate cancer cases indicated that the OAS1/RNaseL apoptotic pathway may be compromised in breast and prostate tumours. Moreover, the present findings suggested that this effect may be enhanced by oestrogen in ER-positive breast cancers.

  15. Biosynthesis of selenocysteine on its tRNA in eukaryotes.

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    Xue-Ming Xu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenocysteine (Sec is cotranslationally inserted into protein in response to UGA codons and is the 21st amino acid in the genetic code. However, the means by which Sec is synthesized in eukaryotes is not known. Herein, comparative genomics and experimental analyses revealed that the mammalian Sec synthase (SecS is the previously identified pyridoxal phosphate-containing protein known as the soluble liver antigen. SecS required selenophosphate and O-phosphoseryl-tRNA([Ser]Sec as substrates to generate selenocysteyl-tRNA([Ser]Sec. Moreover, it was found that Sec was synthesized on the tRNA scaffold from selenide, ATP, and serine using tRNA([Ser]Sec, seryl-tRNA synthetase, O-phosphoseryl-tRNA([Ser]Sec kinase, selenophosphate synthetase, and SecS. By identifying the pathway of Sec biosynthesis in mammals, this study not only functionally characterized SecS but also assigned the function of the O-phosphoseryl-tRNA([Ser]Sec kinase. In addition, we found that selenophosphate synthetase 2 could synthesize monoselenophosphate in vitro but selenophosphate synthetase 1 could not. Conservation of the overall pathway of Sec biosynthesis suggests that this pathway is also active in other eukaryotes and archaea that synthesize selenoproteins.

  16. Interferon-mediated antiviral state in human MRC5 cells in the absence of detectable levels of 2-5A synthetase and protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurs, E; Hovanessian, A G; Montagnier, L

    1981-02-01

    Treatment of human HeLa and MRC5 cells with human alpha (leukocyte) and beta (fibroblast) interferon results in the development of an antiviral state against two types of viruses: vesicular stomatitis virus (rhabdovirus) and encephalomyocarditis virus (picornavirus). These cells, however, differ in their ability to synthesize the two double-stranded (ds) RNA-dependent enzymatic activities, pppA(2'p5'A)n synthetase (2-5A synthetase) and protein kinase which have been reported to be induced in several cell lines by interferon. Both the 2-5A synthetase and the protein kinase are enhanced by several fold in HeLa cells on treatment with interferon. In contrast, neither the 2-5A synthetase nor the protein kinase can be detected in MRC5 cell treated or not treated with interferon. The lack of detection of the 2-5A synthetase in MRC5 cells is not associated with the absence of the other components of the 2-5A system (2-5A dependent nuclease and 2'-phosphodiesterase). We have previously shown that MRC5 cells are sensitive to the action of 2-5A and furthermore the inhibitory action of 2-5A on these cells is transient. Mixing experiments between HeLa and MRC5 cell fractions after partial purification on columns of poly(I).poly(C)-Sepharose, showed that the absence of detection of the protein kinase activity in MRC5 cells cannot be attributed to the presence of phosphatases or other inhibitors of phosphorylation in control or interferon-treated MRC5 cell extracts. In addition, we show that the interferon-mediated protein kinase activity in HeLa cell extracts can be precipitated by treatment at pH 5, a procedure which leads to an enhanced level of detectable protein kinase activity in general. Once again, however, MRC5 cell extracts fail to show any interferon-mediated protein kinase activity. These results suggest that either the two enzyme activities are not necessary for the development of the antiviral response induced by interferon or the intracellular events leading to

  17. Recognition of tRNAs with a long variable arm by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

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    Tukalo M. A.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In prokaryotic cells three tRNA species, tRNASer, tRNALeu and tRNATyr, possess a long variable arm of 11–20 nucleotides (type 2 tRNA rather than usual 4 or 5 nucleotides (type 1 tRNA. In this review we have summarized the results of our research on the structural basis for recognition and discrimination of type 2 tRNAs by Thermus thermophilus seryl-, tyrosyl- and leucyl-tRNA synthetases (SerRS, TyrRS and LeuRS obtained by X-ray crystallography and chemical probing tRNA in solution. Crystal structures are now known of all three aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases complexed with type 2 tRNAs and the different modes of tRNA recognition represented by these structures will be discussed. In particular, emphasis will be given to the results on recognition of characteristic shape of type 2 tRNAs by cognate synthetases. In tRNASer, tRNATyr and tRNALeu the orientation of the long variable arm with respect to the body of the tRNA is different and is controlled by different packing of the core. In the case of SerRS the N-terminal domain and in the case of TyrRS, the C-terminal domain, bind to the characteristic long variable arm of the cognate RNA, thus recognizing the unique shape of the tRNA. The core of T. thermophilus tRNALeu has several layers of unusual base-pairs, which are revealed by the crystal structure of tRNALeu complexed with T. thermophilus LeuRS and by probing a ligand-free tRNA by specific chemical reagents in solution. In the crystal structure of the LeuRS-tRNALeu complex the unique D-stem structure is recognized by the C-terminal domain of LeuRS and these data are in good agreement with those obtained in solution. LeuRS has canonical class I mode of tRNA recognition, approaching the tRNA acceptor stem from the D-stem and minor groove of the acceptor stem side. SerRS also has canonical class II mode of tRNA recognition and approaches tRNASer from opposite, variable stem and major groove of acceptor stem site. And finally, TyrRS in strong

  18. USING RECOMBINANT HUMAN CARBAMOYL PHOSPHATE SYNTHETASE 1 (CPS1) FOR STUDYING THIS ENZYME'S FUNCTION, REGULATION, PATHOLOGY AND STRUCTURE

    OpenAIRE

    DÍEZ FERNÁNDEZ, CARMEN

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1), a 1462-residue mitochondrial enzyme, catalyzes the entry of ammonia into the urea cycle, which converts ammonia, the neurotoxic waste product of protein catabolism, into barely toxic urea. The urea cycle inborn error and rare disease CPS1 deficiency (CPS1D) is inherited with mendelian autosomal recessive inheritance, being due to CPS1 gene mutations (>200 mutations reported), and causing life-threatening hyperammonemia. We have produced recomb...

  19. Association of a multi-synthetase complex with translating ribosomes in the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raina, Medha; Elgamal, Sara; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    )-triphosphatase 205, thiamine monophosphate kinase 179, pyruvate formate lyase family activating protein 298, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (mevanolate), N(2), N(2)-dimethylguanosine tRNA methyltransferase 145, N2, N2-dimethylguanosine tRNA methyltransferase 170, putative 5-methylcytosine restriction......-oxoglutarate ferredoxin oxidoreductase subunit gamma 352, 2-oxoglutarate ferredoxin oxidoreductase subunit alpha 407, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, N-terminus of large subunit 172, AP endonuclease (base excision repair pathway) 365, CTP synthetase 105, PBP family phospholipid-binding protein 272, lipoate...

  20. Analysis of the complement and molecular evolution of tRNA genes in cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barris Wesley C

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information regarding the number and organization of transfer RNA (tRNA genes at the genome level is becoming readily available with the increase of DNA sequencing of whole genomes. However the identification of functional tRNA genes is challenging for species that have large numbers of repetitive elements containing tRNA derived sequences, such as Bos taurus. Reliable identification and annotation of entire sets of tRNA genes allows the evolution of tRNA genes to be understood on a genomic scale. Results In this study, we explored the B. taurus genome using bioinformatics and comparative genomics approaches to catalogue and analyze cow tRNA genes. The initial analysis of the cow genome using tRNAscan-SE identified 31,868 putative tRNA genes and 189,183 pseudogenes, where 28,830 of the 31,868 predicted tRNA genes were classified as repetitive elements by the RepeatMasker program. We then used comparative genomics to further discriminate between functional tRNA genes and tRNA-derived sequences for the remaining set of 3,038 putative tRNA genes. For our analysis, we used the human, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, horse, dog, chicken and fugu genomes to predict that the number of active tRNA genes in cow lies in the vicinity of 439. Of this set, 150 tRNA genes were 100% identical in their sequences across all nine vertebrate genomes studied. Using clustering analyses, we identified a new tRNA-GlyCCC subfamily present in all analyzed mammalian genomes. We suggest that this subfamily originated from an ancestral tRNA-GlyGCC gene via a point mutation prior to the radiation of the mammalian lineages. Lastly, in a separate analysis we created phylogenetic profiles for each putative cow tRNA gene using a representative set of genomes to gain an overview of common evolutionary histories of tRNA genes. Conclusion The use of a combination of bioinformatics and comparative genomics approaches has allowed the confident identification of a

  1. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L; Steitz, Thomas A; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-11-25

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNA(Pyl) have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate N(ε)-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNA(Pyl). Here, we examine an N(ε)-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids.

  2. Recoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases for synthetic biology by rational protein-RNA engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadd, Andrew; Perona, John J

    2014-12-19

    We have taken a rational approach to redesigning the amino acid binding and aminoacyl-tRNA pairing specificities of bacterial glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase. The four-stage engineering incorporates generalizable design principles and improves the pairing efficiency of noncognate glutamate with tRNA(Gln) by over 10(5)-fold compared to the wild-type enzyme. Better optimized designs of the protein-RNA complex include substantial reengineering of the globular core region of the tRNA, demonstrating a role for specific tRNA nucleotides in specifying the identity of the genetically encoded amino acid. Principles emerging from this engineering effort open new prospects for combining rational and genetic selection approaches to design novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that ligate noncanonical amino acids onto tRNAs. This will facilitate reconstruction of the cellular translation apparatus for applications in synthetic biology.

  3. Structure of Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase-Halofuginone Complex Provides Basis for Development of Drugs against Malaria and Toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vitul; Yogavel, Manickam; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Touquet, Bastien; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Sharma, Amit

    2015-05-05

    The Chinese herb Dichroa febrifuga has traditionally treated malaria-associated fever. Its active component febrifugine (FF) and derivatives such as halofuginone (HF) are potent anti-malarials. Here, we show that FF-based derivatives arrest parasite growth by direct interaction with and inhibition of the protein translation enzyme prolyl-tRNA synthetase (PRS). Dual administration of inhibitors that target different tRNA synthetases suggests high utility of these drug targets. We reveal the ternary complex structure of PRS-HF and adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate where the latter facilitates HF integration into the PRS active site. Structural analyses also highlight spaces within the PRS architecture for HF derivatization of its quinazolinone, but not piperidine, moiety. We also show a remarkable ability of HF to kill the related human parasite Toxoplasma gondii, suggesting wider HF efficacy against parasitic PRSs. Hence, our cell-, enzyme-, and structure-based data on FF-based inhibitors strengthen the case for their inclusion in anti-malarial and anti-toxoplasmosis drug development efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Hanne Cecilie; Eriksson, Ulf Dennis; Møller, Inge Skrumsager

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of the cytosolic enzyme glutamine synthetase 1 (GS1) has been investigated in numerous cases with the goal of improving crop nitrogen use efficiency. However, the outcome has generally been inconsistent. Here, we review possible reasons underlying the lack of success and conclude...

  5. MiSynPat: An integrated knowledge base linking clinical, genetic, and structural data for disease-causing mutations in human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulinier, Luc; Ripp, Raymond; Castillo, Gaston; Poch, Olivier; Sissler, Marie

    2017-10-01

    Numerous mutations in each of the mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) have been implicated in human diseases. The mutations are autosomal and recessive and lead mainly to neurological disorders, although with pleiotropic effects. The processes and interactions that drive the etiology of the disorders associated with mitochondrial aaRSs (mt-aaRSs) are far from understood. The complexity of the clinical, genetic, and structural data requires concerted, interdisciplinary efforts to understand the molecular biology of these disorders. Toward this goal, we designed MiSynPat, a comprehensive knowledge base together with an ergonomic Web server designed to organize and access all pertinent information (sequences, multiple sequence alignments, structures, disease descriptions, mutation characteristics, original literature) on the disease-linked human mt-aaRSs. With MiSynPat, a user can also evaluate the impact of a possible mutation on sequence-conservation-structure in order to foster the links between basic and clinical researchers and to facilitate future diagnosis. The proposed integrated view, coupled with research on disease-related mt-aaRSs, will help to reveal new functions for these enzymes and to open new vistas in the molecular biology of the cell. The purpose of MiSynPat, freely available at http://misynpat.org, is to constitute a reference and a converging resource for scientists and clinicians. © 2017 The Authors. Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Seryl-tRNA Synthetases in Translation and Beyond

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    Marko Močibob

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For a long time seryl-tRNA synthetases (SerRSs stood as an archetypal, canonical aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS, exhibiting only basic tRNA aminoacylation activity and with no moonlighting functions beyond protein biosynthesis. The picture has changed substantially in recent years after the discovery that SerRSs play an important role in antibiotic production and resistance and act as a regulatory factor in vascular development, as well as after the discovery of mitochondrial morphogenesis factor homologous to SerRS in insects. In this review we summarize the recent research results from our laboratory, which advance the understanding of seryl-tRNA synthetases and further paint the dynamic picture of unexpected SerRS activities. SerRS from archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus was shown to interact with the large ribosomal subunit and it was postulated to contribute to a more efficient translation by the"tRNA channeling" hypothesis. Discovery of the atypical SerRS in a small number of methanogenic archaea led to the discovery of a new family of enzymes in numerous bacteria - amino acid:[carrier protein] ligases (aa:CP ligases. These SerRS homologues resigned tRNA aminoacylation activity, and instead adopted carrier proteins as the acceptors of activated amino acids. The crystal structure of the aa:CP ligase complex with the carrier protein revealed that the interactions between two macromolecules are incomparable to tRNA binding by the aaRS and consequently represent a true evolutionary invention. Kinetic investigations of SerRSs and the accuracy of amino acid selection revealed that SerRSs possess pre-transfer proofreading activity, challenging the widely accepted presumption that hydrolytic proofreading activity must reside in an additional, separate editing domain, not present in SerRSs. Finally, the plant tRNA serylation system is discussed, which is particularly interesting due to the fact that protein biosynthesis takes place

  7. Kinetic partitioning between synthetic and editing pathways in class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases occurs at both pre-transfer and post-transfer hydrolytic steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetesic, Nevena; Perona, John J; Gruic-Sovulj, Ita

    2012-07-20

    Comprehensive steady-state and transient kinetic studies of the synthetic and editing activities of Escherichia coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) demonstrate that the enzyme depends almost entirely on post-transfer editing to endow the cell with specificity against incorporation of norvaline into protein. Among the three class I tRNA synthetases possessing a dedicated post-transfer editing domain (connective peptide 1; CP1 domain), LeuRS resembles valyl-tRNA synthetase in its reliance on post-transfer editing, whereas isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase differs in retaining a distinct tRNA-dependent synthetic site pre-transfer editing activity to clear noncognate amino acids before misacylation. Further characterization of the post-transfer editing activity in LeuRS by single-turnover kinetics demonstrates that the rate-limiting step is dissociation of deacylated tRNA and/or amino acid product and highlights the critical role of a conserved aspartate residue in mediating the first-order hydrolytic steps on the enzyme. Parallel analyses of adenylate and aminoacyl-tRNA formation reactions by wild-type and mutant LeuRS demonstrate that the efficiency of post-transfer editing is controlled by kinetic partitioning between hydrolysis and dissociation of misacylated tRNA and shows that trans editing after rebinding is a competent kinetic pathway. Together with prior analyses of isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase and valyl-tRNA synthetase, these experiments provide the basis for a comprehensive model of editing by class I tRNA synthetases, in which kinetic partitioning plays an essential role at both pre-transfer and post-transfer steps.

  8. Kinetic Partitioning between Synthetic and Editing Pathways in Class I Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases Occurs at Both Pre-transfer and Post-transfer Hydrolytic Steps*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetesic, Nevena; Perona, John J.; Gruic-Sovulj, Ita

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensive steady-state and transient kinetic studies of the synthetic and editing activities of Escherichia coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) demonstrate that the enzyme depends almost entirely on post-transfer editing to endow the cell with specificity against incorporation of norvaline into protein. Among the three class I tRNA synthetases possessing a dedicated post-transfer editing domain (connective peptide 1; CP1 domain), LeuRS resembles valyl-tRNA synthetase in its reliance on post-transfer editing, whereas isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase differs in retaining a distinct tRNA-dependent synthetic site pre-transfer editing activity to clear noncognate amino acids before misacylation. Further characterization of the post-transfer editing activity in LeuRS by single-turnover kinetics demonstrates that the rate-limiting step is dissociation of deacylated tRNA and/or amino acid product and highlights the critical role of a conserved aspartate residue in mediating the first-order hydrolytic steps on the enzyme. Parallel analyses of adenylate and aminoacyl-tRNA formation reactions by wild-type and mutant LeuRS demonstrate that the efficiency of post-transfer editing is controlled by kinetic partitioning between hydrolysis and dissociation of misacylated tRNA and shows that trans editing after rebinding is a competent kinetic pathway. Together with prior analyses of isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase and valyl-tRNA synthetase, these experiments provide the basis for a comprehensive model of editing by class I tRNA synthetases, in which kinetic partitioning plays an essential role at both pre-transfer and post-transfer steps. PMID:22648413

  9. Mutations in the mitochondrial methionyl-tRNA synthetase cause a neurodegenerative phenotype in flies and a recessive ataxia (ARSAL in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vafa Bayat

    Full Text Available An increasing number of genes required for mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, or function have been found to be mutated in metabolic disorders and neurological diseases such as Leigh Syndrome. In a forward genetic screen to identify genes required for neuronal function and survival in Drosophila photoreceptor neurons, we have identified mutations in the mitochondrial methionyl-tRNA synthetase, Aats-met, the homologue of human MARS2. The fly mutants exhibit age-dependent degeneration of photoreceptors, shortened lifespan, and reduced cell proliferation in epithelial tissues. We further observed that these mutants display defects in oxidative phosphorylation, increased Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS, and an upregulated mitochondrial Unfolded Protein Response. With the aid of this knowledge, we identified MARS2 to be mutated in Autosomal Recessive Spastic Ataxia with Leukoencephalopathy (ARSAL patients. We uncovered complex rearrangements in the MARS2 gene in all ARSAL patients. Analysis of patient cells revealed decreased levels of MARS2 protein and a reduced rate of mitochondrial protein synthesis. Patient cells also exhibited reduced Complex I activity, increased ROS, and a slower cell proliferation rate, similar to Drosophila Aats-met mutants.

  10. Degenerative knee joint disease in mice lacking 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate synthetase 2 (Papss2) activity: a putative model of human PAPSS2 deficiency-associated arthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford-Hutchinson, Alice F; Ali, Zenobia; Seerattan, Ruth A; Cooper, David M L; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Salo, Paul T; Jirik, Frank R

    2005-05-01

    Murine brachymorphism (bm) results from an autosomal recessive mutation of the Papss2 gene that encodes 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate synthetase 2, one of the principal enzymes required for the sulfation of extracellular matrix molecules in cartilage and other tissues. A spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia has been identified in Pakistani kindred having a mutation of PAPSS2. In addition to skeletal malformations that include short stature evident at birth due to limb shortening, brachydactyly, and kyphoscoliosis, affected individuals demonstrate premature onset degenerative joint disease. We investigated whether loss of Papss2 activity would similarly lead to degenerative joint disease in mice. Mice carrying the bm mutation on a C57BL/6 background were obtained from the Jackson Laboratory. Limbs were analyzed by micro-computed tomography (microCT) and histology. At 12 months of age both male and female bm mice exhibited severe degenerative knee joint disease, with cartilage damage being primarily evident in the patello-femoral and medial compartments. Control 12-14-month-old C57BL/6 mice, in contrast, only occasionally demonstrated minimal cartilage damage. muCT imaging of bm limbs revealed shortened diaphyses associated with flared metaphyses in the proximal elements of both fore and hind limbs. Additionally, the bm hind limbs demonstrated extensive structural alterations, characterized by distortion of the patello-femoral groove, and prominent bowing of both tibia and fibula. The bm mutant, which develops severe articular cartilage lesions of the knee joint by approximately 12 months of age, represents a novel example of murine degenerative joint disease, possibly representing a model of human PAPSS2 deficiency-associated arthrosis.

  11. Protein folding and tRNA biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Mónica; Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Ehrlich, Ricardo

    2017-10-01

    Polypeptides can fold into tertiary structures while they are synthesized by the ribosome. In addition to the amino acid sequence, protein folding is determined by several factors within the cell. Among others, the folding pathway of a nascent polypeptide can be affected by transient interactions with other proteins, ligands, or the ribosome, as well as by the translocation through membrane pores. Particularly, the translation machinery and the population of tRNA under different physiological or adaptive responses can dramatically affect protein folding. This review summarizes the scientific evidence describing the role of translation kinetics and tRNA populations on protein folding and addresses current efforts to better understand tRNA biology. It is organized into three main parts, which are focused on: (i) protein folding in the cellular context; (ii) tRNA biology and the complexity of the tRNA population; and (iii) available methods and technical challenges in the characterization of tRNA pools. In this manner, this work illustrates the ways by which functional properties of proteins may be modulated by cellular tRNA populations.

  12. In Silico Discovery of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaxue Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs are enzymes that catalyze the transfer of amino acids to their cognate tRNA. They play a pivotal role in protein synthesis and are essential for cell growth and survival. The aaRSs are one of the leading targets for development of antibiotic agents. In this review, we mainly focused on aaRS inhibitor discovery and development using in silico methods including virtual screening and structure-based drug design. These computational methods are relatively fast and cheap, and are proving to be of great benefit for the rational development of more potent aaRS inhibitors and other pharmaceutical agents that may usher in a much needed generation of new antibiotics.

  13. Mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase mutations underlie fatal infantile Alpers encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elo, Jenni M; Yadavalli, Srujana S; Euro, Liliya

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has turned out to be a powerful tool to uncover genetic basis of childhood mitochondrial disorders. We utilized whole-exome analysis and discovered novel compound heterozygous mutations in FARS2 (mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer RNA synthetase), encoding the mitochon......Next-generation sequencing has turned out to be a powerful tool to uncover genetic basis of childhood mitochondrial disorders. We utilized whole-exome analysis and discovered novel compound heterozygous mutations in FARS2 (mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer RNA synthetase), encoding...... the mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetase (mtPheRS) in two patients with fatal epileptic mitochondrial encephalopathy. The mutations affected highly conserved amino acids, p.I329T and p.D391V. Recently, a homozygous FARS2 variant p.Y144C was reported in a Saudi girl with mitochondrial...... was impaired. Our results imply that the three FARS2 mutations directly impair aminoacylation function and stability of mtPheRS, leading to a decrease in overall tRNA charging capacity. This study establishes a new genetic cause of infantile mitochondrial Alpers encephalopathy and reports a new mitochondrial...

  14. Disrupted tRNA Genes and tRNA Fragments: A Perspective on tRNA Gene Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Kanai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are small non-coding RNAs with lengths of approximately 70–100 nt. They are directly involved in protein synthesis by carrying amino acids to the ribosome. In this sense, tRNAs are key molecules that connect the RNA world and the protein world. Thus, study of the evolution of tRNA molecules may reveal the processes that led to the establishment of the central dogma: genetic information flows from DNA to RNA to protein. Thanks to the development of DNA sequencers in this century, we have determined a huge number of nucleotide sequences from complete genomes as well as from transcriptomes in many species. Recent analyses of these large data sets have shown that particular tRNA genes, especially in Archaea, are disrupted in unique ways: some tRNA genes contain multiple introns and some are split genes. Even tRNA molecules themselves are fragmented post-transcriptionally in many species. These fragmented small RNAs are known as tRNA-derived fragments (tRFs. In this review, I summarize the progress of research into the disrupted tRNA genes and the tRFs, and propose a possible model for the molecular evolution of tRNAs based on the concept of the combination of fragmented tRNA halves.

  15. Effects of Heterologous tRNA Modifications on the Production of Proteins Containing Noncanonical Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Crnković

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of proteins with noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs enables the creation of protein-based biomaterials with diverse new chemical properties that may be attractive for material science. Current methods for large-scale production of ncAA-containing proteins, frequently carried out in Escherichia coli, involve the use of orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (o-aaRSs and tRNAs (o-tRNAs. Although o-tRNAs are designed to be orthogonal to endogenous aaRSs, their orthogonality to the components of the E. coli metabolism remains largely unexplored. We systematically investigated how the E. coli tRNA modification machinery affects the efficiency and orthogonality of o-tRNASep used for production of proteins with the ncAA O-phosphoserine (Sep. The incorporation of Sep into a green fluorescent protein (GFP in 42 E. coli strains carrying deletions of single tRNA modification genes identified several genes that affect the o-tRNA activity. Deletion of cysteine desulfurase (iscS increased the yield of Sep-containing GFP more than eightfold, while overexpression of dimethylallyltransferase MiaA and pseudouridine synthase TruB improved the specificity of Sep incorporation. These results highlight the importance of tRNA modifications for the biosynthesis of proteins containing ncAAs, and provide a novel framework for optimization of o-tRNAs.

  16. Multistep modeling of protein structure: application towards refinement of tyr-tRNA synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, S.; Shibata, M.; Roychoudhury, M.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    The scope of multistep modeling (MSM) is expanding by adding a least-squares minimization step in the procedure to fit backbone reconstruction consistent with a set of C-alpha coordinates. The analytical solution of Phi and Psi angles, that fits a C-alpha x-ray coordinate is used for tyr-tRNA synthetase. Phi and Psi angles for the region where the above mentioned method fails, are obtained by minimizing the difference in C-alpha distances between the computed model and the crystal structure in a least-squares sense. We present a stepwise application of this part of MSM to the determination of the complete backbone geometry of the 321 N terminal residues of tyrosine tRNA synthetase to a root mean square deviation of 0.47 angstroms from the crystallographic C-alpha coordinates.

  17. The early history of tRNA recognition by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006-10-04

    Oct 4, 2006 ... Author Affiliations. Richard Giegé1. Département `Machineries Traductionnelles', UPR 9002 `Architecture et Réactivité de l'ARN', Institut de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire du CNRS, 15 rue René Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg cedex, France ...

  18. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Hanne Cecilie

    fertilizer requirement. The enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) has been a major topic in plant nitrogen research for decades due to its central role in plant N metabolism. The cytosolic version of this enzyme (GS1) plays an important role in relation to primary N assimilation as well as in relation to N...

  19. The crystal structure of tRNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    However, my attention was soon captured by the 'strange'. tRNA, shown to be formylmethionyl-tRNA (fMet-tRNA), recently discovered by Kjeld Marcker and Fred Sanger. I was able to put my experience of decoding and cell-free protein synthesis to good use in a close collaboration with. Marcker over the next six years.

  20. tRNA Biology in Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalia Salinas-Giegé

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are the powerhouses of eukaryotic cells. They are considered as semi-autonomous because they have retained genomes inherited from their prokaryotic ancestor and host fully functional gene expression machineries. These organelles have attracted considerable attention because they combine bacterial-like traits with novel features that evolved in the host cell. Among them, mitochondria use many specific pathways to obtain complete and functional sets of tRNAs as required for translation. In some instances, tRNA genes have been partially or entirely transferred to the nucleus and mitochondria require precise import systems to attain their pool of tRNAs. Still, tRNA genes have also often been maintained in mitochondria. Their genetic arrangement is more diverse than previously envisaged. The expression and maturation of mitochondrial tRNAs often use specific enzymes that evolved during eukaryote history. For instance many mitochondria use a eukaryote-specific RNase P enzyme devoid of RNA. The structure itself of mitochondrial encoded tRNAs is also very diverse, as e.g., in Metazoan, where tRNAs often show non canonical or truncated structures. As a result, the translational machinery in mitochondria evolved adapted strategies to accommodate the peculiarities of these tRNAs, in particular simplified identity rules for their aminoacylation. Here, we review the specific features of tRNA biology in mitochondria from model species representing the major eukaryotic groups, with an emphasis on recent research on tRNA import, maturation and aminoacylation.

  1. tRNA Biology in Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Giegé, Thalia; Giegé, Richard; Giegé, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of eukaryotic cells. They are considered as semi-autonomous because they have retained genomes inherited from their prokaryotic ancestor and host fully functional gene expression machineries. These organelles have attracted considerable attention because they combine bacterial-like traits with novel features that evolved in the host cell. Among them, mitochondria use many specific pathways to obtain complete and functional sets of tRNAs as required for translation. In some instances, tRNA genes have been partially or entirely transferred to the nucleus and mitochondria require precise import systems to attain their pool of tRNAs. Still, tRNA genes have also often been maintained in mitochondria. Their genetic arrangement is more diverse than previously envisaged. The expression and maturation of mitochondrial tRNAs often use specific enzymes that evolved during eukaryote history. For instance many mitochondria use a eukaryote-specific RNase P enzyme devoid of RNA. The structure itself of mitochondrial encoded tRNAs is also very diverse, as e.g., in Metazoan, where tRNAs often show non canonical or truncated structures. As a result, the translational machinery in mitochondria evolved adapted strategies to accommodate the peculiarities of these tRNAs, in particular simplified identity rules for their aminoacylation. Here, we review the specific features of tRNA biology in mitochondria from model species representing the major eukaryotic groups, with an emphasis on recent research on tRNA import, maturation and aminoacylation. PMID:25734984

  2. Selection of functional tRNA primers and primer binding site sequences from a retroviral combinatorial library: identification of new functional tRNA primers in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Pedersen, F S

    2000-01-01

    retro-viruses have revealed evidence of molecular adapt-ation towards the specific tRNA isoacceptor used as replication primer. In this study, murine leukemia virus tRNA utilisation is investigated by in vivo screening of a retroviral vector combinatorial library with randomised primer binding sites....... While most of the selected primer binding sites are complementary to the 3'-end of tRNA((Pro)), we also retrieved PBS sequences matching four other tRNA molecules and demonstrate that Akv murine leukemia virus vectors may efficiently replicate using tRNA(Arg(CCU)), tRNA(Phe(GAA))and a hitherto unknown......Retroviral reverse transcription is initiated from a cellular tRNA molecule and all known exogenous isolates of murine leukemia virus utilise a tRNA(Pro)molecule. While several studies suggest flexibility in murine leukemia virus primer utilisation, studies on human immunodeficiency virus and avian...

  3. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs of human genes required for mitochondrial tRNA modification cause similar electron transport chain defects but different nuclear responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Navarro-González

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Several oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS diseases are caused by defects in the post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs. Mutations in MTO1 or GTPBP3 impair the modification of the wobble uridine at position 5 of the pyrimidine ring and cause heart failure. Mutations in TRMU affect modification at position 2 and cause liver disease. Presently, the molecular basis of the diseases and why mutations in the different genes lead to such different clinical symptoms is poorly understood. Here we use Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism to investigate how defects in the TRMU, GTPBP3 and MTO1 orthologues (designated as mttu-1, mtcu-1, and mtcu-2, respectively exert their effects. We found that whereas the inactivation of each C. elegans gene is associated with a mild OXPHOS dysfunction, mutations in mtcu-1 or mtcu-2 cause changes in the expression of metabolic and mitochondrial stress response genes that are quite different from those caused by mttu-1 mutations. Our data suggest that retrograde signaling promotes defect-specific metabolic reprogramming, which is able to rescue the OXPHOS dysfunction in the single mutants by stimulating the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle flux through complex II. This adaptive response, however, appears to be associated with a biological cost since the single mutant worms exhibit thermosensitivity and decreased fertility and, in the case of mttu-1, longer reproductive cycle. Notably, mttu-1 worms also exhibit increased lifespan. We further show that mtcu-1; mttu-1 and mtcu-2; mttu-1 double mutants display severe growth defects and sterility. The animal models presented here support the idea that the pathological states in humans may initially develop not as a direct consequence of a bioenergetic defect, but from the cell's maladaptive response to the hypomodification status of mt-tRNAs. Our work highlights the important association of the defect-specific metabolic rewiring with the

  4. An Appended Domain Results in an Unusual Architecture for Malaria Parasite Tryptophanyl-tRNA Synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sameena; Garg, Ankur; Sharma, Arvind; Camacho, Noelia; Picchioni, Daria; Saint-Léger, Adélaïde; de Pouplana, Lluís Ribas; Yogavel, Manickam; Sharma, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Specific activation of amino acids by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) is essential for maintaining fidelity during protein translation. Here, we present crystal structure of malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (Pf-WRS) catalytic domain (AAD) at 2.6 Å resolution in complex with L-tryptophan. Confocal microscopy-based localization data suggest cytoplasmic residency of this protein. Pf-WRS has an unusual N-terminal extension of AlaX-like domain (AXD) along with linker regions which together seem vital for enzymatic activity and tRNA binding. Pf-WRS is not proteolytically processed in the parasites and therefore AXD likely provides tRNA binding capability rather than editing activity. The N-terminal domain containing AXD and linker region is monomeric and would result in an unusual overall architecture for Pf-WRS where the dimeric catalytic domains have monomeric AXDs on either side. Our PDB-wide comparative analyses of 47 WRS crystal structures also provide new mechanistic insights into this enzyme family in context conserved KMSKS loop conformations. PMID:23776638

  5. Viral tRNA Mimicry from a Biocommunicative Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Ariza-Mateos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available RNA viruses have very small genomes which limits the functions they can encode. One of the strategies employed by these viruses is to mimic key factors of the host cell so they can take advantage of the interactions and activities these factors typically participate in. The viral RNA genome itself was first observed to mimic cellular tRNA over 40 years ago. Since then researchers have confirmed that distinct families of RNA viruses are accessible to a battery of cellular factors involved in tRNA-related activities. Recently, potential tRNA-like structures have been detected within the sequences of a 100 mRNAs taken from human cells, one of these being the host defense interferon-alpha mRNA; these are then additional to the examples found in bacterial and yeast mRNAs. The mimetic relationship between tRNA, cellular mRNA, and viral RNA is the central focus of two considerations described below. These are subsequently used as a preface for a final hypothesis drawing on concepts relating to mimicry from the social sciences and humanities, such as power relations and creativity. Firstly, the presence of tRNA-like structures in mRNAs indicates that the viral tRNA-like signal could be mimicking tRNA-like elements that are contextualized by the specific carrier mRNAs, rather than, or in addition to, the tRNA itself, which would significantly increase the number of potential semiotic relations mediated by the viral signals. Secondly, and in particular, mimicking a host defense mRNA could be considered a potential new viral strategy for survival. Finally, we propose that mRNA’s mimicry of tRNA could be indicative of an ancestral intracellular conflict in which species of mRNAs invaded the cell, but from within. As the meaning of the mimetic signal depends on the context, in this case, the conflict that arises when the viral signal enters the cell can change the meaning of the mRNAs’ internal tRNA-like signals, from their current significance to that

  6. The pimeloyl-CoA synthetase BioW defines a new fold for adenylate-forming enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, Paola; Manandhar, Miglena; Dong, Shi-Hui; Deveryshetty, Jaigeeth; Agarwal, Vinayak; Cronan, John E.; Nair, Satish K.

    2017-04-17

    Reactions that activate carboxylates through acyl-adenylate intermediates are found throughout biology and include acyl- and aryl-CoA synthetases and tRNA synthetases. Here we describe the characterization of Aquifex aeolicus BioW, which represents a new protein fold within the superfamily of adenylating enzymes. Substrate-bound structures identified the enzyme active site and elucidated the mechanistic strategy for conjugating CoA to the seven-carbon α,ω-dicarboxylate pimelate, a biotin precursor. Proper position of reactive groups for the two half-reactions is achieved solely through movements of active site residues, as confirmed by site-directed mutational analysis. The ability of BioW to hydrolyze adenylates of noncognate substrates is reminiscent of pre-transfer proofreading observed in some tRNA synthetases, and we show that this activity can be abolished by mutation of a single residue. These studies illustrate how BioW can carry out three different biologically prevalent chemical reactions (adenylation, thioesterification, and proofreading) in the context of a new protein fold.

  7. A comprehensive tRNA deletion library unravels the genetic architecture of the tRNA pool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohar Bloom-Ackermann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deciphering the architecture of the tRNA pool is a prime challenge in translation research, as tRNAs govern the efficiency and accuracy of the process. Towards this challenge, we created a systematic tRNA deletion library in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aimed at dissecting the specific contribution of each tRNA gene to the tRNA pool and to the cell's fitness. By harnessing this resource, we observed that the majority of tRNA deletions show no appreciable phenotype in rich medium, yet under more challenging conditions, additional phenotypes were observed. Robustness to tRNA gene deletion was often facilitated through extensive backup compensation within and between tRNA families. Interestingly, we found that within tRNA families, genes carrying identical anti-codons can contribute differently to the cellular fitness, suggesting the importance of the genomic surrounding to tRNA expression. Characterization of the transcriptome response to deletions of tRNA genes exposed two disparate patterns: in single-copy families, deletions elicited a stress response; in deletions of genes from multi-copy families, expression of the translation machinery increased. Our results uncover the complex architecture of the tRNA pool and pave the way towards complete understanding of their role in cell physiology.

  8. Common peptides study of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Gottlieb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs constitute an essential enzyme super-family, providing fidelity of the translation process of mRNA to proteins in living cells. They are common to all kingdoms and are of utmost importance to all organisms. It is thus of great interest to understand the evolutionary relationships among them and underline signature motifs defining their common domains. RESULTS: We utilized the Common Peptides (CPs framework, based on extracted deterministic motifs from all aaRSs, to study family-specific properties. We identified novel aaRS-class related signatures that may supplement the current classification methods and provide a basis for identifying functional regions specific to each aaRS class. We exploited the space spanned by the CPs in order to identify similarities between aaRS families that are not observed using sequence alignment methods, identifying different inter-aaRS associations across different kingdom of life. We explored the evolutionary history of the aaRS families and evolutionary origins of the mitochondrial aaRSs. Lastly, we showed that prevalent CPs significantly overlap known catalytic and binding sites, suggesting that they have meaningful functional roles, as well as identifying a motif shared between aaRSs and a the Biotin-[acetyl-CoA carboxylase] synthetase (birA enzyme overlapping binding sites in both families. CONCLUSIONS: The study presents the multitude of ways to exploit the CP framework in order to extract meaningful patterns from the aaRS super-family. Specific CPs, discovered in this study, may play important roles in the functionality of these enzymes. We explored the evolutionary patterns in each aaRS family and tracked remote evolutionary links between these families.

  9. A Major Determinant for Binding and Aminoacylation of tRNAAla in Cytoplasmic Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase Is Mutated in Dominant Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latour, Philippe; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Baudelet-Méry, Chantal; Soichot, Pierre; Cusin, Veronica; Faivre, Laurence; Locatelli, Marie-Claire; Mayençon, Martine; Sarcey, Annie; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Camu, William; David, Albert; Rousson, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common cause of inherited peripheral neuropathy, with an estimated frequency of 1/2500. We studied a large family with 17 patients affected by the axonal form of CMT (CMT2). Analysis of the 15 genes or loci known to date was negative. Genome-wide genotyping identified a CMT2 locus in 16q21-q23 between D16S3050 and D16S3106. The maximum two-point LOD score was 4.77 at θ = 0 for marker D16S3050. Sequencing of candidate genes identified a unique mutation, c.986G>A (p.Arg329His), affecting a totally conserved amino acid in the helical domain of cytoplasmic alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS). A second family with the same mutation and a different founder was then identified in a cohort of 91 CMT2 families. Although mislocation of mutant Arg329His-AlaRS in axons remains to be evaluated, experimental data point mostly to a quantitative reduction in tRNAAla aminoacylation. Aminoacylation and editing functions closely cooperate in AlaRS, and Arg329His mutation could also lead to qualitative errors participating in neurodegeneration. Our report documents in 18 patients the deleterious impact of a mutation in human cytoplasmic AlaRS and broadens the spectrum of defects found in tRNA synthetases. Patients present with sensory-motor distal degeneration secondary to predominant axonal neuropathy, slight demyelination, and no atypical or additional CNS features. PMID:20045102

  10. tRNA modifying enzymes, NSUN2 and METTL1, determine sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil in HeLa cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Okamoto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonessential tRNA modifications by methyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved and have been reported to stabilize mature tRNA molecules and prevent rapid tRNA decay (RTD. The tRNA modifying enzymes, NSUN2 and METTL1, are mammalian orthologs of yeast Trm4 and Trm8, which are required for protecting tRNA against RTD. A simultaneous overexpression of NSUN2 and METTL1 is widely observed among human cancers suggesting that targeting of both proteins provides a novel powerful strategy for cancer chemotherapy. Here, we show that combined knockdown of NSUN2 and METTL1 in HeLa cells drastically potentiate sensitivity of cells to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU whereas heat stress of cells revealed no effects. Since NSUN2 and METTL1 are phosphorylated by Aurora-B and Akt, respectively, and their tRNA modifying activities are suppressed by phosphorylation, overexpression of constitutively dephosphorylated forms of both methyltransferases is able to suppress 5-FU sensitivity. Thus, NSUN2 and METTL1 are implicated in 5-FU sensitivity in HeLa cells. Interfering with methylation of tRNAs might provide a promising rationale to improve 5-FU chemotherapy of cancer.

  11. Hepatocytes explanted in the spleen preferentially express carbamoylphosphate synthetase rather than glutamine synthetase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, W. H.; Been, W.; Charles, R.; Moorman, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    Urea cycle enzymes and glutamine synthetase are essential for NH3 detoxification and systemic pH homeostasis in mammals. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase, the first and flux-determining enzyme of the cycle, is found only in a large periportal compartment, and glutamine synthetase is found only in a

  12. The Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus halodurans Aspartyl-tRNA Synthetases Retain Recognition of tRNA(Asn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nilendra; Raff, Hannah; Islam, Mohammed Tarek; Feen, Melanie; Garofalo, Denise M; Sheppard, Kelly

    2016-02-13

    Synthesis of asparaginyl-tRNA (Asn-tRNA(Asn)) in bacteria can be formed either by directly ligating Asn to tRNA(Asn) using an asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS) or by synthesizing Asn on the tRNA. In the latter two-step indirect pathway, a non-discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (ND-AspRS) attaches Asp to tRNA(Asn) and the amidotransferase GatCAB transamidates the Asp to Asn on the tRNA. GatCAB can be similarly used for Gln-tRNA(Gln) formation. Most bacteria are predicted to use only one route for Asn-tRNA(Asn) formation. Given that Bacillus halodurans and Bacillus subtilis encode AsnRS for Asn-tRNA(Asn) formation and Asn synthetases to synthesize Asn and GatCAB for Gln-tRNA(Gln) synthesis, their AspRS enzymes were thought to be specific for tRNA(Asp). However, we demonstrate that the AspRSs are non-discriminating and can be used with GatCAB to synthesize Asn. The results explain why B. subtilis with its Asn synthetase genes knocked out is still an Asn prototroph. Our phylogenetic analysis suggests that this may be common among Firmicutes and 30% of all bacteria. In addition, the phylogeny revealed that discrimination toward tRNA(Asp) by AspRS has evolved independently multiple times. The retention of the indirect pathway in B. subtilis and B. halodurans likely reflects the ancient link between Asn biosynthesis and its use in translation that enabled Asn to be added to the genetic code. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Acetylation of lysine ϵ-amino groups regulates aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase activity inEscherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qing; Ji, Quan-Quan; Yan, Wei; Yang, Fang; Wang, En-Duo

    2017-06-23

    Previous proteomic analyses have shown that aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in many organisms can be modified by acetylation of Lys. In this present study, leucyl-tRNA synthetase and arginyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli ( Ec LeuRS and Ec ArgRS) were overexpressed and purified and found to be acetylated on Lys residues by MS. Gln scanning mutagenesis revealed that Lys 619 , Lys 624 , and Lys 809 in Ec LeuRS and Lys 126 and Lys 408 in Ec ArgRS might play important roles in enzyme activity. Furthermore, we utilized a novel protein expression system to obtain enzymes harboring acetylated Lys at specific sites and investigated their catalytic activity. Acetylation of these Lys residues could affect their aminoacylation activity by influencing amino acid activation and/or the affinity for tRNA. In vitro assays showed that acetyl-phosphate nonenzymatically acetylates Ec LeuRS and Ec ArgRS and suggested that the sirtuin class deacetylase CobB might regulate acetylation of these two enzymes. These findings imply a potential regulatory role for Lys acetylation in controlling the activity of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and thus protein synthesis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Mutation of the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase gene, YARS2, causes myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia--MLASA syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Lisa G; Cooper, Sandra; Hickey, Peter; Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; McKenzie, Matthew; Compton, Alison; Lim, Sze Chern; Thorburn, David; Ryan, Michael T; Giegé, Richard; Bahlo, Melanie; Christodoulou, John

    2010-07-09

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are a heterogeneous group of disorders in which the underlying genetic defect is often unknown. We have identified a pathogenic mutation (c.156C>G [p.F52L]) in YARS2, located at chromosome 12p11.21, by using genome-wide SNP-based homozygosity analysis of a family with affected members displaying myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA). We subsequently identified the same mutation in another unrelated MLASA patient. The YARS2 gene product, mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (YARS2), was present at lower levels in skeletal muscle whereas fibroblasts were relatively normal. Complex I, III, and IV were dysfunctional as indicated by enzyme analysis, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. A mitochondrial protein-synthesis assay showed reduced levels of respiratory chain subunits in myotubes generated from patient cell lines. A tRNA aminoacylation assay revealed that mutant YARS2 was still active; however, enzyme kinetics were abnormal compared to the wild-type protein. We propose that the reduced aminoacylation activity of mutant YARS2 enzyme leads to decreased mitochondrial protein synthesis, resulting in mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction. MLASA has previously been associated with PUS1 mutations; hence, the YARS2 mutation reported here is an alternative cause of MLASA. Copyright 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biallelic Mutations of Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase Cause a Specific Type of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Prevalent on Réunion Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadchouel, Alice; Wieland, Thomas; Griese, Matthias; Baruffini, Enrico; Lorenz-Depiereux, Bettina; Enaud, Laurent; Graf, Elisabeth; Dubus, Jean Christophe; Halioui-Louhaichi, Sonia; Coulomb, Aurore; Delacourt, Christophe; Eckstein, Gertrud; Zarbock, Ralf; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Cartault, François; Meitinger, Thomas; Lodi, Tiziana; de Blic, Jacques; Strom, Tim M

    2015-05-07

    Methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MARS) catalyzes the ligation of methionine to tRNA and is critical for protein biosynthesis. We identified biallelic missense mutations in MARS in a specific form of pediatric pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a severe lung disorder that is prevalent on the island of Réunion and the molecular basis of which is unresolved. Mutations were found in 26 individuals from Réunion and nearby islands and in two families from other countries. Functional consequences of the mutated alleles were assessed by growth of wild-type and mutant strains and methionine-incorporation assays in yeast. Enzyme activity was attenuated in a liquid medium without methionine but could be restored by methionine supplementation. In summary, identification of a founder mutation in MARS led to the molecular definition of a specific type of PAP and will enable carrier screening in the affected community and possibly open new treatment opportunities. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. CCA addition to tRNA: implications for tRNA quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ya-Ming

    2010-04-01

    The CCA sequence is conserved at the 3' end of all mature tRNA molecules to function as the site of amino acid attachment. This sequence is acquired and maintained by stepwise nucleotide addition by the ubiquitous CCA enzyme, which is an unusual RNA polymerase that does not use a nucleic acid template for nucleotide addition. Crystal structural work has divided CCA enzymes into two structurally distinct classes, which differ in the mechanism of template-independent nucleotide selection. Recent kinetic work of the class II E. coli CCA enzyme has demonstrated a rapid and uniform rate constant for the chemistry of nucleotide addition at each step of CCA synthesis, although the enzyme uses different determinants to control the rate of each step. Importantly, the kinetic work reveals that, at each step of CCA synthesis, E. coli CCA enzyme has an innate ability to discriminate against tRNA backbone damage. This discrimination suggests the possibility of a previously unrecognized quality control mechanism that would prevent damaged tRNA from CCA maturation and from entering the ribosome machinery of protein synthesis. This quality control is relevant to cellular stress conditions that damage tRNA backbone and predicts a role of CCA addition in stress response.

  17. Maf1-mediated regulation of yeast RNA polymerase III is correlated with CCA addition at the 3' end of tRNA precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foretek, Dominika; Nuc, Przemysław; Żywicki, Marek; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Kudla, Grzegorz; Boguta, Magdalena

    2017-05-15

    In eukaryotic cells tRNA synthesis is negatively regulated by the protein Maf1, conserved from yeast to humans. Maf1 from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mediates repression of trna transcription when cells are transferred from medium with glucose to medium with glycerol, a non-fermentable carbon source. The strain with deleted gene encoding Maf1 (maf1Δ) is viable but accumulates tRNA precursors. In this study tRNA precursors were analysed by RNA-Seq and Northern hybridization in wild type strain and maf1Δ mutant grown in glucose medium or upon shift to repressive conditions. A negative effect of maf1Δ mutant on the addition of the auxiliary CCA nucleotides to the 3' end of pre-tRNAs was observed in cells shifted to unfavourable growth conditions. This effect was reduced by overexpression of the yeast CCA1 gene encoding ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferase. The CCA sequence at the 3' end is important for export of tRNA precursors from the nucleus and essential for tRNA charging with amino acids. Data presented here indicate that CCA-addition to intron-containing end-processed tRNA precursors is a limiting step in tRNA maturation when there is no Maf1 mediated RNA polymerase III (Pol III) repression. The correlation between CCA synthesis and Pol III regulation by Maf1 could be important in coordination of tRNA transcription, processing and regulation of translation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A WHEP Domain Regulates the Dynamic Structure and Activity of Caenorhabditis elegans Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Yao; Chien, Chin-I; Chang, Chia-Pei; Lin, Bo-Chun; Wang, Chien-Chia

    2016-08-05

    WHEP domains exist in certain eukaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and play roles in tRNA or protein binding. We present evidence herein that cytoplasmic and mitochondrial forms of Caenorhabditis elegans glycyl-tRNA synthetase (CeGlyRS) are encoded by the same gene (CeGRS1) through alternative initiation of translation. The cytoplasmic form possessed an N-terminal WHEP domain, whereas its mitochondrial isoform possessed an extra N-terminal sequence consisting of an mitochondrial targeting signal and an appended domain. Cross-species complementation assays showed that CeGRS1 effectively rescued the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial defects of a yeast GRS1 knock-out strain. Although both forms of CeGlyRS efficiently charged the cytoplasmic tRNAs(Gly) of C. elegans, the mitochondrial form was much more efficient than its cytoplasmic counterpart in charging the mitochondrial tRNA(Gly) isoacceptor, which carries a defective TψC hairpin. Despite the WHEP domain per se lacking tRNA binding activity, deletion of this domain reduced the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. Most interestingly, the deletion mutant possessed a higher thermal stability and a somewhat lower structural flexibility. Our study suggests a role for the WHEP domain as a regulator of the dynamic structure and activity of the enzyme. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. A paralog of lysyl-tRNA synthetase aminoacylates a conserved lysine residue in translation elongation factor P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Sumida, Tomomi; Ishii, Ryohei; Takemoto, Chie; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2010-09-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) paralogs with unknown functions exist in various species. We now report novel 'protein lysylation' by an Escherichia coli lysyl-tRNA synthetase paralog, GenX/PoxA/YjeA. X-ray crystallographic analysis shows that the structure of the GenX protein resembles that of a class II aaRS. Further in vitro studies reveal that it specifically aminoacylates EF-P with lysine. The shape of the protein substrate mimics that of the L-shaped tRNA, and its lysylation site corresponds to the tRNA 3' end. Thus, we show how the aaRS architecture can be adapted to achieve aminoacylation of a specific protein. Moreover, in vivo analyses reveal that the translation elongation factor P (EF-P) lysylation by GenX is enhanced by YjeK (lysine 2,3-aminomutase paralog), which is encoded next to the EF-P gene, and might convert alpha-lysyl-EF-P to beta-lysyl-EF-P. In vivo analyses indicate that the EF-P modification by GenX and YjeK is essential for cell survival.

  20. The CCA-end of P-tRNA Contacts Both the Human RPL36AL and the A-site Bound Translation Termination Factor eRF1 at the Peptidyl Transferase Center of the Human 80S Ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hountondji, Codjo; Bulygin, Konstantin; Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Woisard, Anne; Tuffery, Pierre; Nakayama, Jun-Ichi; Frolova, Ludmila; Nierhaus, Knud H; Karpova, Galina; Baouz, Soria

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that the E-site specific protein RPL36AL present in human ribosomes can be crosslinked with the CCA-end of a P-tRNA in situ. Here we report the following: (i) We modeled RPL36AL into the structure of the archaeal ortholog RPL44E extracted from the known X-ray structure of the 50S subunit of Haloarcula marismortui. Superimposing the obtained RPL36AL structure with that of P/E tRNA observed in eukaryotic 80S ribosomes suggested that RPL36AL might in addition to its CCA neighbourhood interact with the inner site of the tRNA elbow similar to an interaction pattern known from tRNA•synthetase pairs. (ii) Accordingly, we detected that the isolated recombinant protein RPL36AL can form a tight binary complex with deacylated tRNA, and even tRNA fragments truncated at their CCA end showed a high affinity in the nanomolar range supporting a strong interaction outside the CCA end. (iii) We constructed programmed 80S complexes containing the termination factor eRF1 (stop codon UAA at the A-site) and a 2',3'-dialdehyde tRNA (tRNAox) analog at the P-site. Surprisingly, we observed a crosslinked ternary complex containing the tRNA, eRF1 and RPL36AL crosslinked both to the aldehyde groups of tRNAox at the 2'- and 3'-positions of the ultimate A. We also demonstrated that, upon binding to the ribosomal A-site, eRF1 induces an alternative conformation of the ribosome and/or the tRNA, leading to a novel crosslink of tRNAox to another large-subunit ribosomal protein (namely L37) rather than to RPL36AL, both ribosomal proteins being labeled in a mutually exclusive fashion. Since the human 80S ribosome in complex with P-site bound tRNAox and A-site bound eRF1 corresponds to the post-termination state of the ribosome, the results represent the first biochemical evidence for the positioning of the CCA-arm of the P-tRNA in close proximity to both RPL36AL and eRF1 at the end of the translation process.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with severe glutathione synthetase deficiency also develop recurrent bacterial infections. Related Information What does it mean if a disorder seems to run in my family? What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase superactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and PRPP also play a key role in recycling purines from the breakdown of DNA and RNA, ... of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: Gout Educational Resources (4 links) Disease InfoSearch: Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase superactivity ...

  3. An ENU-induced mutation in mouse glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) causes peripheral sensory and motor phenotypes creating a model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilli, Francesca; Bros-Facer, Virginie; Williams, Hazel P.; Banks, Gareth T.; AlQatari, Mona; Chia, Ruth; Tucci, Valter; Groves, Michael; Nickols, Carole D.; Seburn, Kevin L.; Kendall, Rachel; Cader, Muhammed Z.; Talbot, Kevin; van Minnen, Jan; Burgess, Robert W.; Brandner, Sebastian; Martin, Joanne E.; Koltzenburg, Martin; Greensmith, Linda; Nolan, Patrick M.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations in the enzyme glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) cause motor and sensory axon loss in the peripheral nervous system in humans, described clinically as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D or distal spinal muscular atrophy type V. Here, we characterise a new mouse mutant, GarsC201R, with a point mutation that leads to a non-conservative substitution within GARS. Heterozygous mice with a C3H genetic background have loss of grip strength, decreased motor flexibility and disruption of fine motor control; this relatively mild phenotype is more severe on a C57BL/6 background. Homozygous mutants have a highly deleterious set of features, including movement difficulties and death before weaning. Heterozygous animals have a reduction in axon diameter in peripheral nerves, slowing of nerve conduction and an alteration in the recovery cycle of myelinated axons, as well as innervation defects. An assessment of GARS levels showed increased protein in 15-day-old mice compared with controls; however, this increase was not observed in 3-month-old animals, indicating that GARS function may be more crucial in younger animals. We found that enzyme activity was not reduced detectably in heterozygotes at any age, but was diminished greatly in homozygous mice compared with controls; thus, homozygous animals may suffer from a partial loss of function. The GarsC201R mutation described here is a contribution to our understanding of the mechanism by which mutations in tRNA synthetases, which are fundamentally important, ubiquitously expressed enzymes, cause axonopathy in specific sets of neurons. PMID:19470612

  4. Characterization of the tRNA ligases of pathogenic fungi Aspergillus fumigatus and Coccidioides immitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remus, Barbara S; Schwer, Beate; Shuman, Stewart

    2016-10-01

    Yeast tRNA ligase (Trl1) is an essential trifunctional enzyme that repairs RNA breaks with 2',3'-cyclic-PO4 and 5'-OH ends. Trl1 is composed of C-terminal cyclic phosphodiesterase and central polynucleotide kinase domains that heal the broken ends to generate the 3'-OH, 2'-PO4, and 5'-PO4 termini required for sealing by an N-terminal ligase domain. Trl1 enzymes are found in all human fungal pathogens and they are promising targets for antifungal drug discovery because: (i) their domain structures and biochemical mechanisms are unique compared to the mammalian RtcB-type tRNA splicing enzyme; and (ii) there are no obvious homologs of the Trl1 ligase domain in mammalian proteomes. Here we characterize the tRNA ligases of two human fungal pathogens: Coccidioides immitis and Aspergillus fumigatus The biological activity of CimTrl1 and AfuTrl1 was verified by showing that their expression complements a Saccharomyces cerevisiae trl1Δ mutant. Purified recombinant AfuTrl1 and CimTrl1 proteins were catalytically active in joining 2',3'-cyclic-PO4 and 5'-OH ends in vitro, either as full-length proteins or as a mixture of separately produced healing and sealing domains. The biochemical properties of CimTrl1 and AfuTrl1 are similar to those of budding yeast Trl1, particularly with respect to their preferential use of GTP as the phosphate donor for the polynucleotide kinase reaction. Our findings provide genetic and biochemical tools to screen for inhibitors of tRNA ligases from pathogenic fungi. © 2016 Remus et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. Kinetic Origin of Substrate Specificity in Post-Transfer Editing by Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulic, Morana; Cvetesic, Nevena; Zivkovic, Igor; Palencia, Andrés; Cusack, Stephen; Bertosa, Branimir; Gruic-Sovulj, Ita

    2017-10-27

    The intrinsic editing capacities of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases ensure a high-fidelity translation of the amino acids that possess effective non-cognate aminoacylation surrogates. The dominant error-correction pathway comprises deacylation of misaminoacylated tRNA within the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase editing site. To assess the origin of specificity of Escherichia coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) against the cognate aminoacylation product in editing, we followed binding and catalysis independently using cognate leucyl- and non-cognate norvalyl-tRNALeu and their non-hydrolyzable analogues. We found that the amino acid part (leucine versus norvaline) of (mis)aminoacyl-tRNAs can contribute approximately 10-fold to ground-state discrimination at the editing site. In sharp contrast, the rate of deacylation of leucyl- and norvalyl-tRNALeu differed by about 104-fold. We further established the critical role for the A76 3'-OH group of the tRNALeu in post-transfer editing, which supports the substrate-assisted deacylation mechanism. Interestingly, the abrogation of the LeuRS specificity determinant threonine 252 did not improve the affinity of the editing site for the cognate leucine as expected, but instead substantially enhanced the rate of leucyl-tRNALeu hydrolysis. In line with that, molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the wild-type enzyme, but not the T252A mutant, enforced leucine to adopt the side-chain conformation that promotes the steric exclusion of a putative catalytic water. Our data demonstrated that the LeuRS editing site exhibits amino acid specificity of kinetic origin, arguing against the anticipated prominent role of steric exclusion in the rejection of leucine. This feature distinguishes editing from the synthetic site, which relies on ground-state discrimination in amino acid selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. RNA Polymerase III Output Is Functionally Linked to tRNA Dimethyl-G26 Modification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneeshkumar G Arimbasseri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Control of the differential abundance or activity of tRNAs can be important determinants of gene regulation. RNA polymerase (RNAP III synthesizes all tRNAs in eukaryotes and it derepression is associated with cancer. Maf1 is a conserved general repressor of RNAP III under the control of the target of rapamycin (TOR that acts to integrate transcriptional output and protein synthetic demand toward metabolic economy. Studies in budding yeast have indicated that the global tRNA gene activation that occurs with derepression of RNAP III via maf1-deletion is accompanied by a paradoxical loss of tRNA-mediated nonsense suppressor activity, manifested as an antisuppression phenotype, by an unknown mechanism. We show that maf1-antisuppression also occurs in the fission yeast S. pombe amidst general activation of RNAP III. We used tRNA-HydroSeq to document that little changes occurred in the relative levels of different tRNAs in maf1Δ cells. By contrast, the efficiency of N2,N2-dimethyl G26 (m(22G26 modification on certain tRNAs was decreased in response to maf1-deletion and associated with antisuppression, and was validated by other methods. Over-expression of Trm1, which produces m(22G26, reversed maf1-antisuppression. A model that emerges is that competition by increased tRNA levels in maf1Δ cells leads to m(22G26 hypomodification due to limiting Trm1, reducing the activity of suppressor-tRNASerUCA and accounting for antisuppression. Consistent with this, we show that RNAP III mutations associated with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy decrease tRNA transcription, increase m(22G26 efficiency and reverse antisuppression. Extending this more broadly, we show that a decrease in tRNA synthesis by treatment with rapamycin leads to increased m(22G26 modification and that this response is conserved among highly divergent yeasts and human cells.

  7. Glutathione synthetase deficiency associated with antenatal cerebral bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brüggemann, L. W.; Groenendaal, F.; Ristoff, E.; Larsson, A.; Duran, M.; van Lier, J. A. C.; Dorland, L.; Berger, R.; de Koning, T. J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a newborn with glutathione synthetase deficiency and intracranial haemorrhages. Because the latter are rare in term newborns a possible relationship with glutathione synthetase deficiency will be discussed

  8. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A., E-mail: merritt@u.washington.edu [Medical Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa, (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine.

  9. Activation of 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase by single-stranded and double-stranded RNA aptamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, R; Norby, P L; Martensen, P M

    1998-01-01

    A number of small RNA molecules that are high affinity ligands for the 46-kDa form of human 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase have been identified by the SELEX method. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicates that these RNAs bind to the enzyme with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range....... Competition experiments indicate that the binding site for the small RNAs on the 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase molecule at least partially overlaps that for the synthetic double-stranded RNA, poly(I).poly(C). Several of the RNAs function as potent activators of 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase in vitro......-stranded RNA, can also be activated by RNA ligands with little secondary structure. Since 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase possesses no homology to other known RNA-binding proteins, the development of small specific ligands by SELEX should facilitate studies of RNA-protein interactions and may reveal novel...

  10. The tRNA Elbow in Structure, Recognition and Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prominent in the L-shaped three-dimensional structure of tRNAs is the “elbow” where their two orthogonal helical stacks meet. It has a conserved structure arising from the interaction of the terminal loops of the D- and T-stem-loops, and presents to solution a flat face of a tertiary base pair between the D- and T-loops. In addition to the ribosome, which interacts with the elbow in all three of its tRNA binding sites, several cellular RNAs and many proteins are known to recognize the elbow. At least three classes of non-coding RNAs, namely 23S rRNA, ribonuclease P, and the T-box riboswitches, recognize the tRNA elbow employing an identical structural motif consisting of two interdigitated T-loops. In contrast, structural solutions to tRNA-elbow recognition by proteins are varied. Some enzymes responsible for post-transcriptional tRNA modification even disrupt the elbow structure in order to access their substrate nucleotides. The evolutionary origin of the elbow is mysterious, but, because it does not explicitly participate in the flow of genetic information, it has been proposed to be a late innovation. Regardless, it is biologically essential. Even some viruses that hijack the cellular machinery using tRNA decoys have convergently evolved near-perfect mimics of the tRNA elbow.

  11. Experimental Confirmation of a Whole Set of tRNA Molecules in Two Archaeal Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoh-ichi; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Based on the genomic sequences for most archaeal species, only one tRNA gene (isodecoder) is predicted for each triplet codon. This observation promotes analysis of a whole set of tRNA molecules and actual splicing patterns of interrupted tRNA in one organism. The entire genomic sequences of two Creanarchaeota, Aeropyrum pernix and Sulfolobus tokodaii, were determined approximately 15 years ago. In these genome datasets, 47 and 46 tRNA genes were detected, respectively. Among them, 14 and 24 genes, respectively, were predicted to be interrupted tRNA genes. To confirm the actual transcription of these predicted tRNA genes and identify the actual splicing patterns of the predicted interrupted tRNA molecules, RNA samples were prepared from each archaeal species and used to synthesize cDNA molecules with tRNA sequence-specific primers. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of cDNA clones representing unspliced and spliced forms of interrupted tRNA molecules indicated that some introns were located at positions other than one base 3' from anticodon region and that bulge-helix-bulge structures were detected around the actual splicing sites in each interrupted tRNA molecule. Whole-set analyses of tRNA molecules revealed that the archaeal tRNA splicing mechanism may be essential for efficient splicing of all tRNAs produced from interrupted tRNA genes in these archaea. PMID:25608653

  12. Experimental Confirmation of a Whole Set of tRNA Molecules in Two Archaeal Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoh-ichi Watanabe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the genomic sequences for most archaeal species, only one tRNA gene (isodecoder is predicted for each triplet codon. This observation promotes analysis of a whole set of tRNA molecules and actual splicing patterns of interrupted tRNA in one organism. The entire genomic sequences of two Creanarchaeota, Aeropyrum pernix and Sulfolobus tokodaii, were determined approximately 15 years ago. In these genome datasets, 47 and 46 tRNA genes were detected, respectively. Among them, 14 and 24 genes, respectively, were predicted to be interrupted tRNA genes. To confirm the actual transcription of these predicted tRNA genes and identify the actual splicing patterns of the predicted interrupted tRNA molecules, RNA samples were prepared from each archaeal species and used to synthesize cDNA molecules with tRNA sequence-specific primers. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of cDNA clones representing unspliced and spliced forms of interrupted tRNA molecules indicated that some introns were located at positions other than one base 3' from anticodon region and that bulge-helix-bulge structures were detected around the actual splicing sites in each interrupted tRNA molecule. Whole-set analyses of tRNA molecules revealed that the archaeal tRNA splicing mechanism may be essential for efficient splicing of all tRNAs produced from interrupted tRNA genes in these archaea.

  13. Growth factors regulate glutamine synthetase activity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Khaled

    2012-07-10

    Jul 10, 2012 ... medium; NB, nutrient broth medium; NF, nitrogen fixation medium; SDS-PAGE, sodium dodecyl sulfate ... compounds, such as amino acids, as their sole source of nitrogen. In each case, substitution of ammonia by .... polymyxa producing glutamine synthetase. Different protein patterns of the total cellular ...

  14. Syntheses of stable, synthetic diadenosine polyphosphate analogues using recombinant histidine-tagged lysyl tRNA synthetase (LysU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael; Azhar, M Ameruddin; Kamal, Ahmed; Miller, Andrew D

    2014-05-15

    Recombinant Escherichia coli lysyl-tRNA synthase (LysU) has been previously utilised in the production of stabile, synthetic diadenosine polyphosphate (ApnA) analogues. Here we report on the extended use of a new recombinant histidine residue-tagged LysU as a tool for highly controlled phosphatephosphate bond formation between nucleotides, avoiding the need for complex protecting group chemistries. Resulting high yielding tandem LysU-based biosynthetic-synthetic/synthetic-biosynthetic strategies emerge for the preparation of varieties of ApnA analogues directly from inexpensive natural nucleotides and nucleosides. Analogues so formed make a useful small library with which to probe ApnA activities in vitro and in vivo leading to the discovery of new, potentially potent biopharmaceuticals active against chronic pain and other chronic, high-burden disease states. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Tandemly repeated tRNA pseudogenes in photobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, S; Cedergren, R

    1988-01-01

    A region distal to three tRNA genes in Photobacterium phosphoreum, a Gram-negative eubacterium, unexpectedly contains a high number of repeated DNA segments that are closely related to the adjacent tRNAPro gene. The 5' to 3' order of this cluster is tRNAPro-tRNAHis-tRNAPro followed by eight tRNAPro-like structures interspersed by rho-independent terminators. The two tRNAPro genes, which are identical, and the tRNAHis gene have 86% and 87% positional identity, respectively, to their counterparts in the argT operon of Escherichia coli. The facts that these tRNA-like structures are not transcribed, in contrast to the tRNA retropseudogenes of eukaryotes, and that these structures are clustered near their progenitor suggest they are an unusual class of tRNA pseudogenes that arose by tandem duplication. Images PMID:3194413

  16. tRNA's modifications bring order to gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustilo, Estella M; Vendeix, Franck Ap; Agris, Paul F

    2008-04-01

    The posttranscriptional modification of RNA is a significant investment in genes, enzymes, substrates, and energy. Advances in molecular genetics and structural biology indicate strongly that modifications of tRNA's anticodon domain control gene expression. Modifications at the anticodon's wobble position are required for recognition of rarely used codons and restrict or expand codon recognition depending on their chemistries. A shift of the translational reading frame occurs in the absence of modifications at either wobble position-34 or the conserved purine-37, 3'-adjacent to the anticodon, causing expression of alternate protein sequences. These modifications have in common their contribution of order to tRNA's anticodon.

  17. Effect of continuous-wave and amplitude-modulated 2.45 GHz microwave radiation on the liver and brain aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases of in utero exposed mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubinyi, G.; Thuroczy, G.; Bakos, J.; Boeloeni, E.; Sinay, H.; Szabo, L.D. [National Frederic Joliot-Curie Research Inst. for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary)

    1996-12-31

    Investigations have been carried out concerning the effects of microwave (MW) exposure on the aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) synthetase of the progeny of females that were exposed during their entire period of gestation (19 days). The changes caused by continuous-wave (CW) and amplitude-modulated (AM) MW radiation have been compared. CFLP mice were exposed to MW radiation for 100 min each day in an anechoic room. The MW frequency was 2.45 GHz, and the amplitude modulation had a 50 Hz rectangular waveform (on/off ratio, 50/50%). The average power density exposure was 3 mW/cm{sup 2}, and the whole body specific absorption rate (SAR) was 4.23 {+-} 0.63 W/kg. The weight and mortality of the progeny were followed until postnatal day 24. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase enzymes and tRNA from the brains and livers of the offspring (461 exposed, 487 control) were isolated. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase activities were determined. The postnatal increase of body weight and organ weight was not influenced by the prenatal MW radiation. The activity of enzyme isolated form the brain showed a significant decrease after CW MW exposure, but the changes were not significant after 50 Hz AM MW exposure. The activity of the enzyme isolated from liver increased under CW and 50 Hz modulated MW.

  18. The TATA-binding protein participates in TFIIIB assembly on tRNA genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Huet, J.; Sentenac, A

    1992-01-01

    The TATA-binding protein TBP has been recently recognized as a general class III transcription factor. Using the gel shift assay to monitor initiation complex assembly on a yeast tRNA gene, we show that TBP is required for the TFIIIC-dependent assembly of TFIIIB. TFIIIB depleted of TBP by a simple chromatographic step does not bind stably to the TFIIIC-tDNA complex. Addition of yeast or human recombinant TBP allows the formation of a TFIIIB-TBP-TFIIIC-tDNA complex. The presence of TBP in the ...

  19. Deep Sequencing of Serum Small RNAs Identifies Patterns of 5′ tRNA Half and YRNA Fragment Expression Associated with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Dhahbi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Small noncoding RNAs circulating in the blood may serve as signaling molecules because of their ability to carry out a variety of cellular functions. We have previously described tRNA- and YRNA-derived small RNAs circulating as components of larger complexes in the blood of humans and mice; the characteristics of these small RNAs imply specific processing, secretion, and physiological regulation. In this study, we have asked if changes in the serum abundance of these tRNA and YRNA fragments are associated with a diagnosis of cancer. We used deep sequencing and informatics analysis to catalog small RNAs in the sera of breast cancer cases and normal controls. 5′ tRNA halves and YRNA fragments are abundant in both groups, but we found that a breast cancer diagnosis is associated with changes in levels of specific subtypes. This prompted us to look at existing sequence datasets of serum small RNAs from 42 breast cancer cases, taken at the time of diagnosis. We find significant changes in the levels of specific 5′ tRNA halves and YRNA fragments associated with clinicopathologic characteristics of the cancer. Although these findings do not establish causality, they suggest that circulating 5′ tRNA halves and YRNA fragments with known cellular functions may participate in breast cancer syndromes and have potential as circulating biomarkers. Larger studies with multiple types of cancer are needed to adequately evaluate their potential use for the development of noninvasive cancer screening.

  20. Functional role of C-terminal domain of Thermus thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tukalo M. A.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study a role of C-terminal domain of T. thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRSTT in the reactions of aminoacylation and editing. Methods. A mutant of LeuRSTT without C- terminal domain (ΔС was obtained by the method of mutagenesis. The kinetic constants in aminoacylation reaction catalyzed by LeuRS and its mutant (ΔС were determined by the methods of equilibrium enzyme kinetics. To evaluate the contribution of C-terminal domain to interaction of the enzyme with tRNALeu, Kd of a complex between tRNA and LeuRSTT and its mutant ΔС was determined by fluorescence titration. Results. The C-terminal domain is shown to play a significant role in the aminoacylation and editing reactions of LeuRSTT and not essential for the activity in the reaction of amino acid activation. The kinetic parameters of aminoacylation of tRNALeu and tRNATyr by LeuRS and ΔС mutant were also determined, their analysis suggests that the C-domain is not critical for the manifestation of specificity of the enzyme in the recognition of homologous RNAs. At the same time a significant influence of the C-terminal domain on the value of catalytic constant was shown. At the domain deletion the kcat value is lower by 152-fold. Conclusion. The C-terminal domain of LeuRSTT is evolutionarily acquired to enhance the rate of catalysis in the aminoacylation and editing reactions, and makes no significant contribution to the specificity of the enzyme in the recognition of tRNA.

  1. Initiator tRNA genes template the 3' CCA end at high frequencies in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardell, David H; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2016-12-08

    While the CCA sequence at the mature 3' end of tRNAs is conserved and critical for translational function, a genetic template for this sequence is not always contained in tRNA genes. In eukaryotes and Archaea, the CCA ends of tRNAs are synthesized post-transcriptionally by CCA-adding enzymes. In Bacteria, tRNA genes template CCA sporadically. In order to understand the variation in how prokaryotic tRNA genes template CCA, we re-annotated tRNA genes in tRNAdb-CE database version 0.8. Among 132,129 prokaryotic tRNA genes, initiator tRNA genes template CCA at the highest average frequency (74.1%) over all functional classes except selenocysteine and pyrrolysine tRNA genes (88.1% and 100% respectively). Across bacterial phyla and a wide range of genome sizes, many lineages exist in which predominantly initiator tRNA genes template CCA. Convergent and parallel retention of CCA templating in initiator tRNA genes evolved in independent histories of reductive genome evolution in Bacteria. Also, in a majority of cyanobacterial and actinobacterial genera, predominantly initiator tRNA genes template CCA. We also found that a surprising fraction of archaeal tRNA genes template CCA. We suggest that cotranscriptional synthesis of initiator tRNA CCA 3' ends can complement inefficient processing of initiator tRNA precursors, "bootstrap" rapid initiation of protein synthesis from a non-growing state, or contribute to an increase in cellular growth rates by reducing overheads of mass and energy to maintain nonfunctional tRNA precursor pools. More generally, CCA templating in structurally non-conforming tRNA genes can afford cells robustness and greater plasticity to respond rapidly to environmental changes and stimuli.

  2. Discovery of ATP-Competitive Inhibitors of tRNAIle Lysidine Synthetase (TilS) by High-Throughput Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B; Plant, Helen; Walsh, Jarrod; Sylvester, Mark; Hu, Jun; Gao, Ning; Livchak, Stephania; Tentarelli, Sharon; Thresher, Jason

    2014-09-01

    A novel, ultrahigh-throughput, fluorescence anisotropy-based assay was developed and used to screen a 1.4-million-sample library for compounds that compete with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for binding to Escherichia coli tRNA(Ile) lysidine synthetase (TilS), an essential, conserved, ATP-dependent, tRNA-modifying enzyme of bacterial pathogens. TilS modifies a cytidine base in the anticodon loop of Ile2 tRNA by attaching lysine, thereby altering codon recognition of the CAU anticodon from AUG (methionine) to AUA (isoleucine). A scintillation proximity assay for the incorporation of lysine into Ile2 tRNA was used to eliminate false positives in the initial screen resulting from detection artifacts as well as compounds competitive with the fluorescent label instead of ATP, and to measure inhibitor potencies against E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa TilS isozymes. The tRNA(Ile) substrate for P. aeruginosa TilS was identified for the first time to enable these measurements. ATP-competitive binding of inhibitors was confirmed by one-dimensional ligand-observe nuclear magnetic resonance. A preliminary structure-activity relationship is shown for two inhibitor series. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  3. E. coli glutamyl-tRNA synthetase is inhibited by anticodon stem-loop domains and a minihelix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustilo, Estella M; Dubois, Daniel Y; Lapointe, Jacques; Agris, Paul F

    2007-07-01

    Portions of E. coli tRNA(Glu) having identity determinants for glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (ERS, EC 6.1.1.17) have been designed to be the first RNA inhibitors of a Class I synthetase. ERS recognizes the 2-thionyl group of 2-thio-5-methylaminomethyluridine (mnm(5)s(2)U(34)) in the first or wobble anticodon position of E. coli tRNA(Glu). The interaction, as revealed by structural analysis, though specific, appears tenuous. Thus, it is surprising that RNAs designed from this tRNA's anticodon stem and loop domain with (ASL(Glu)-s(2)U(34)) and without s(2)U(34) are bound by ERS and inhibit aminoacylation of the native tRNA. ASL(Glu), ASL(Glu)-s(2)U(34), and a minihelix(Glu) composed of identity determinants of the amino acid accepting stem were thermally stable under conditions of aminoacylation (T(m)s = 75 +/- 1.5, 76 +/- 0.9 and 83 +/- 2.0 degrees C, respectively). In binding competition, the modified ASL(Glu)-s(2)U(34) bound ERS with a higher affinity (half maximal inhibiting concentration, IC(50), 5.1 +/- 0.4 microM) than its unmodified counterpart, ASL(Glu) (IC(50), 10.3 +/- 0.6 microM). The minihelix(Glu), ASL(Glu)-s(2)U(34) and ASL(Glu) bound ERS with K(d)s of 9.9 +/- 3.3, 6.5 +/- 1.7 and 20.5 +/- 3.8 microM. ERS aminoacylation of tRNA(Glu) was inhibited by the tRNA fragments. Unmodified ASL(Glu), minihelix(Glu), and ASL(Glu)-s(2)U(34) exhibited a K(ic) of 1.9 +/- 0.2 microM, 4.1 +/- 0.2 microM, and 6.5 +/- 0.1 microM, respectively. The modified ASL(Glu)-s(2)U(34), though having a higher affinity for ERS, may be released more readily and thus, not be as good an inhibitor as the unmodified ASL. Thus, the RNA constructs are effective tools to study RNA-protein interaction.

  4. Role of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in infectious diseases and targets for therapeutic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Varun; Reader, John; Forsyth, Karin-Musier

    2014-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) play a pivotal role in protein synthesis and cell viability. These 22 "housekeeping" enzymes (1 for each standard amino acid plus pyrrolysine and o-phosphoserine) are specifically involved in recognizing and aminoacylating their cognate tRNAs in the cellular pool with the correct amino acid prior to delivery of the charged tRNA to the protein synthesis machinery. Besides serving this canonical function, higher eukaryotic AARSs, some of which are organized in the cytoplasm as a multisynthetase complex of nine enzymes plus additional cellular factors, have also been implicated in a variety of non-canonical roles. AARSs are involved in the regulation of transcription, translation, and various signaling pathways, thereby ensuring cell survival. Based in part on their versatility, AARSs have been recruited by viruses to perform essential functions. For example, host synthetases are packaged into some retroviruses and are required for their replication. Other viruses mimic tRNA-like structures in their genomes, and these motifs are aminoacylated by the host synthetase as part of the viral replication cycle. More recently, it has been shown that certain large DNA viruses infecting animals and other diverse unicellular eukaryotes encode tRNAs, AARSs, and additional components of the protein-synthesis machinery. This chapter will review our current understanding of the role of host AARSs and tRNA-like structures in viruses and discuss their potential as anti-viral drug targets. The identification and development of compounds that target bacterial AARSs, thereby serving as novel antibiotics, will also be discussed. Particular attention will be given to recent work on a number of tRNA-dependent AARS inhibitors and to advances in a new class of natural "pro-drug" antibiotics called Trojan Horse inhibitors. Finally, we will explore how bacteria that naturally produce AARS-targeting antibiotics must protect themselves against cell suicide using

  5. One ancestor for two codes viewed from the perspective of two complementary modes of tRNA aminoacylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szathmáry Eörs

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic code is brought into action by 20 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. These enzymes are evenly divided into two classes (I and II that recognize tRNAs from the minor and major groove sides of the acceptor stem, respectively. We have reported recently that: (1 ribozymic precursors of the synthetases seem to have used the same two sterically mirror modes of tRNA recognition, (2 having these two modes might have helped in preventing erroneous aminoacylation of ancestral tRNAs with complementary anticodons, yet (3 the risk of confusion for the presumably earliest pairs of complementarily encoded amino acids had little to do with anticodons. Accordingly, in this communication we focus on the acceptor stem. Results Our main result is the emergence of a palindrome structure for the acceptor stem's common ancestor, reconstructed from the phylogenetic trees of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. In parallel, for pairs of ancestral tRNAs with complementary anticodons, we present updated evidence of concerted complementarity of the second bases in the acceptor stems. These two results suggest that the first pairs of "complementary" amino acids that were engaged in primordial coding, such as Gly and Ala, could have avoided erroneous aminoacylation if and only if the acceptor stems of their adaptors were recognized from the same, major groove, side. The class II protein synthetases then inherited this "primary preference" from isofunctional ribozymes. Conclusion Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the genetic code per se (the one associated with the anticodons and the operational code of aminoacylation (associated with the acceptor diverged from a common ancestor that probably began developing before translation. The primordial advantage of linking some amino acids (most likely glycine and alanine to the ancestral acceptor stem may have been selective retention in a protocell surrounded by a leaky membrane for use in

  6. One ancestor for two codes viewed from the perspective of two complementary modes of tRNA aminoacylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Andrei S; Szathmáry, Eörs; Rodin, Sergei N

    2009-01-27

    The genetic code is brought into action by 20 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. These enzymes are evenly divided into two classes (I and II) that recognize tRNAs from the minor and major groove sides of the acceptor stem, respectively. We have reported recently that: (1) ribozymic precursors of the synthetases seem to have used the same two sterically mirror modes of tRNA recognition, (2) having these two modes might have helped in preventing erroneous aminoacylation of ancestral tRNAs with complementary anticodons, yet (3) the risk of confusion for the presumably earliest pairs of complementarily encoded amino acids had little to do with anticodons. Accordingly, in this communication we focus on the acceptor stem. Our main result is the emergence of a palindrome structure for the acceptor stem's common ancestor, reconstructed from the phylogenetic trees of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. In parallel, for pairs of ancestral tRNAs with complementary anticodons, we present updated evidence of concerted complementarity of the second bases in the acceptor stems. These two results suggest that the first pairs of "complementary" amino acids that were engaged in primordial coding, such as Gly and Ala, could have avoided erroneous aminoacylation if and only if the acceptor stems of their adaptors were recognized from the same, major groove, side. The class II protein synthetases then inherited this "primary preference" from isofunctional ribozymes. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the genetic code per se (the one associated with the anticodons) and the operational code of aminoacylation (associated with the acceptor) diverged from a common ancestor that probably began developing before translation. The primordial advantage of linking some amino acids (most likely glycine and alanine) to the ancestral acceptor stem may have been selective retention in a protocell surrounded by a leaky membrane for use in nucleotide and coenzyme synthesis. Such acceptor stems

  7. Seryl-tRNA Synthetases from Methanogenic Archaea: Suppression of Bacterial Amber Mutation and Heterologous Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drasko Boko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic archaea possess unusual seryl-tRNA synthetases (SerRS, evolutionarily distinct from the SerRSs found in other archaea, eucaryotes and bacteria. Our recent X-ray structural analysis of Methanosarcina barkeri SerRS revealed an idiosyncratic N-terminal domain and catalytic zinc ion in the active site. To shed further light on substrate discrimination by methanogenic-type SerRS, we set up to explore in vivo the interaction of methanogenic-type SerRSs with their cognate tRNAs in Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression of various methanogenic-type SerRSs was toxic for E. coli, resulting in the synthesis of erroneous proteins, as revealed by β-galactosidase stability assay. Although SerRSs from methanogenic archaea recognize tRNAsSer from all three domains of life in vitro, the toxicity presumably precluded the complementation of endogenous SerRS function in both, E. coli and S. cerevisiae. However, despite the observed toxicity, coexpression of methanogenic-type SerRS with its cognate tRNA suppressed bacterial amber mutation.

  8. Retinal Vasculitis in Anti-Synthetase Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Christopher P; Pecen, Paula E; Baynes, Kimberly; Ehlers, Justis P; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a history of anti-synthetase syndrome-related myositis and interstitial lung disease presented with acute-onset blurry vision and rash on her hands and feet. Visual acuity was hand motion in her right eye and 20/40 in her left eye. Dilated fundus exam showed extensive retinal vasculitis, diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, and subretinal fluid. Optical coherence tomography revealed significant macular thickening, and fluorescein angiography revealed vascular leakage with peripheral nonperfusion. Aggressive systemic immunosuppression was initiated, with gradual resolution of her disease during 8 months of follow-up. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:874-879.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Biosynthesis and functions of sulfur modifications in tRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki eShigi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur is an essential element for a variety of cellular constituents in all living organisms. In tRNA molecules, there are many sulfur-containing nucleosides, such as the derivatives of 2‑thiouridine (s2U, 4-thiouridine (s4U, 2-thiocytidine (s2C, and 2-methylthioadenosine (ms2A. Earlier studies established the functions of these modifications for accurate and efficient translation, including proper recognition of the codons in mRNA or stabilization of tRNA structure. In many cases, the biosynthesis of these sulfur modifications starts with cysteine desulfurases, which catalyze the generation of persulfide (an activated form of sulfur from cysteine. Many sulfur-carrier proteins are responsible for delivering this activated sulfur to each biosynthesis pathway. Finally, specific modification enzymes activate target tRNAs and then incorporate sulfur atoms. Intriguingly, the biosynthesis of 2-thiouridine in all domains of life is functionally and evolutionarily related to the ubiquitin-like post-translational modification system of cellular proteins in eukaryotes. This review summarizes the recent characterization of the biosynthesis of sulfur modifications in tRNA and the novel roles of this modification in cellular functions in various model organisms, with a special emphasis on 2-thiouridine derivatives. Each biosynthesis pathway of sulfur-containing molecules is mutually modulated via sulfur trafficking, and 2-thiouridine and codon usage bias have been proposed to control the translation of specific genes.

  10. Characterization of cereulide synthetase, a toxin-producing macromolecular machine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego A Alonzo

    Full Text Available Cereulide synthetase is a two-protein nonribosomal peptide synthetase system that produces a potent emetic toxin in virulent strains of Bacillus cereus. The toxin cereulide is a depsipeptide, as it consists of alternating aminoacyl and hydroxyacyl residues. The hydroxyacyl residues are derived from keto acid substrates, which cereulide synthetase selects and stereospecifically reduces with imbedded ketoreductase domains before incorporating them into the growing depsipeptide chain. We present an in vitro biochemical characterization of cereulide synthetase. We investigate the kinetics and side chain specificity of α-keto acid selection, evaluate the requirement of an MbtH-like protein for adenylation domain activity, assay the effectiveness of vinylsulfonamide inhibitors on ester-adding modules, perform NADPH turnover experiments and evaluate in vitro depsipeptide biosynthesis. This work also provides biochemical insight into depsipeptide-synthesizing nonribosomal peptide synthetases responsible for other bioactive molecules such as valinomycin, antimycin and kutzneride.

  11. Capture, unfolding, and detection of individual tRNA molecules using a nanopore device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Smith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNA are the most common RNA molecules in cells and have critical roles as both translators of the genetic code and regulators of protein synthesis. As such, numerous methods have focused on studying tRNA abundance and regulation, with the most widely used methods being RNA-seq and microarrays. Though revolutionary to transcriptomics, these assays are limited by an inability to encode tRNA modifications in the requisite cDNA. These modifications are abundant in tRNA and critical to their function. Here we describe proof-of-concept experiments where individual tRNA molecules are examined as linear strands using a biological nanopore. This method utilizes an enzymatically ligated synthetic DNA adapter to concentrate tRNA at the lipid bilayer of the nanopore device and efficiently denature individual tRNA molecules as they are pulled through the α-hemolysin (α-HL nanopore. Additionally, the DNA adapter provides a loading site for ϕ29 DNA polymerase (ϕ29 DNAP, which acts as a brake on the translocating tRNA. This increases the dwell time of adapted tRNA in the nanopore, allowing us to identify the region of the nanopore signal that is produced by the translocating tRNA itself. Using adapter-modified E. coli tRNAfMet and tRNALys, we show that the nanopore signal during controlled translocation is dependent on the identity of the tRNA. This confirms that adapter-modified tRNA can translocate end-to-end through nanopores and provides the foundation for future work in direct sequencing of individual transfer RNA with a nanopore-based device.

  12. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirando, Adam C; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F; Baldor, Linda C; Howe, Alan K; Ebert, Alicia M; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S

    2015-08-14

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans.

  13. Novel Hybrid Virtual Screening Protocol Based on Molecular Docking and Structure-Based Pharmacophore for Discovery of Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors as Antibacterial Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chi; He, Gu; Jiang, Qinglin; Han, Bo; Peng, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Methione tRNA synthetase (MetRS) is an essential enzyme involved in protein biosynthesis in all living organisms and is a potential antibacterial target. In the current study, the structure-based pharmacophore (SBP)-guided method has been suggested to generate a comprehensive pharmacophore of MetRS based on fourteen crystal structures of MetRS-inhibitor complexes. In this investigation, a hybrid protocol of a virtual screening method, comprised of pharmacophore model-based virtual screening (PBVS), rigid and flexible docking-based virtual screenings (DBVS), is used for retrieving new MetRS inhibitors from commercially available chemical databases. This hybrid virtual screening approach was then applied to screen the Specs (202,408 compounds) database, a structurally diverse chemical database. Fifteen hit compounds were selected from the final hits and shifted to experimental studies. These results may provide important information for further research of novel MetRS inhibitors as antibacterial agents. PMID:23839093

  14. Overexpression of human fatty acid transport protein 2/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) reveals distinct patterns of trafficking of exogenous fatty acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melton, Elaina M. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Center for Cardiovascular Sciences, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY (United States); Cerny, Ronald L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); DiRusso, Concetta C. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Black, Paul N., E-mail: pblack2@unl.edu [Department of Biochemistry, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Roles of FATP2 in fatty acid transport/activation contribute to lipid homeostasis. •Use of 13C- and D-labeled fatty acids provide novel insights into FATP2 function. •FATP2-dependent trafficking of FA into phospholipids results in distinctive profiles. •FATP2 functions in the transport and activation pathways for exogenous fatty acids. -- Abstract: In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4 h. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The

  15. Overexpression of human fatty acid transport protein 2/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) reveals distinct patterns of trafficking of exogenous fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Elaina M; Cerny, Ronald L; DiRusso, Concetta C; Black, Paul N

    2013-11-01

    In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4h. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The trafficking of exogenous C16:0 and C22:6 into PA was significant where there was 6.9- and 5.3-fold increased incorporation, respectively, over the control; C18:3 and C20:4 also trended to increase in the PA pool while there were no changes for C18:1 and C18:2. The trafficking of C18:3 into PC and PI trended higher and approached significance. In the case of C20:4, expression of

  16. An alanine tRNA gene cluster from Nephila clavipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, E; Candelas, G C

    1996-06-01

    We report the sequence of a 2.3-kb genomic DNA fragment from the orb-web spider, Nephila clavipes (Nc). The fragment contains four regions of high homology to tRNA(Ala). The members of this irregularly spaced cluster of genes are oriented in the same direction and have the same anticodon (GCA), but their sequence differs at several positions. Initiation and termination signals, as well as consensus intragenic promoter sequences characteristic of tRNA genes, have been identified in all genes. tRNA(Ala) are involved in the regulation of the fibroin synthesis in the large ampullate Nc glands.

  17. tRNA - RMG | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/rmg/LATEST/rmg_trna.zip File size: 1 KB Simple search URL http:...ption Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us tRNA - RMG | LSDB Archive ...

  18. Early days of tRNA research: Discovery, function, purification and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    2006-10-04

    Oct 4, 2006 ... exchange and by their reaction with neutral hydroxylamine to form amino acid hydroxamates1 (figure 2). ... also catalyzed the transfer of the activated amino acid to the. tRNA (Berg and Ofengand 1958; Lipmann .... (i) complete cleavage of the purified tRNA with base- specific nucleases such as pancreatic ...

  19. Spinach Leaf Acetyl-Coenzyme a Synthetase: Purification and Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carolyn A. Zeiher; Douglas D. Randall

    1991-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase was purified 364-fold from leaves of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) using ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by ion exchange, dye-ligand, and gel permeation chromatography...

  20. TRYPTOPHANASE-TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHETASE SYSTEMS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundlich, Martin; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1962-01-01

    Freundlich, Martin (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and Herman C. Lichstein. Tryptophanase-tryptophan synthetase systems in Escherichia coli. III. Requirements for enzyme synthesis. J. Bacteriol. 84:996–1006. 1962.—The requirements for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase in Escherichia coli during repression release were studied. The kinetics of the formation of tryptophan synthetase differed in the two strains examined; this was attributed to differences in the endogenous level of tryptophan in the bacterial cells. The formation of both enzymes was inhibited by chloramphenicol, and by the absence of arginine in an arginine-requiring mutant. These results are indicative of a requirement for protein synthesis for enzyme formation. Requirements for nucleic acid synthesis were examined by use of a uracil- and thymine-requiring mutant, and with purine and pyrimidine analogues. The results obtained suggest that some type of ribonucleic acid synthesis was necessary for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase. PMID:13959620

  1. Mechanism of 3'-Matured tRNA Discrimination from 3'-Immature tRNA by Class-II CCA-Adding Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Seisuke; Tomita, Kozo

    2016-06-07

    CCA-adding enzyme adds the 3'-CCA of tRNA, using CTP and ATP as substrates, and terminates RNA synthesis after completion of CCA addition, without using a nucleic acid template. The complex structure of class-II Thermotoga maritima CCA-adding enzyme and mature tRNA with 3'-CCA revealed the mechanisms by which the enzyme terminates RNA synthesis after completion of 3'-CCA addition, and discriminates 3'-mature tRNA from 3'-immature tRNA. After completion of 3'-CCA addition at the catalytic site, the 3'-CCA refolds and relocates to the release site, which is discrete from the catalytic site. The 3'-CCA forms a continuously stacked, stable conformation together with the enzyme. Consequently, the 3'-mature tRNA rotates relative to the surface of the enzyme, and only the 3'-mature tRNA is ready for release. The 3'-regions of immature tRNAs cannot form the stable stacking conformation in the release site; thus, the 3' end is relocated in the catalytic site, and the 3'-CCA is reconstructed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Origin, evolution, and mechanism of 5′ tRNA editing in chytridiomycete fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    LAFOREST, MARIE-JOSÉE; BULLERWELL, CHARLES E.; FORGET, LISE; LANG, B. FRANZ

    2004-01-01

    5′ tRNA editing has been demonstrated to occur in the mitochondria of the distantly related rhizopod amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and the chytridiomycete fungus Spizellomyces punctatus. In these organisms, canonical tRNA structures are restored by removing mismatched nucleotides at the first three 5′ positions and replacing them with nucleotides capable of forming Watson–Crick base pairs with their 3′ counterparts. This form of editing seems likely to occur in members of Amoebozoa other than A. castellanii, as well as in members of Heterolobosea. Evidence for 5′ tRNA editing has not been found to date, however, in any other fungus including the deeply branching chytridiomycete Allomyces macrogynus. We predicted that a similar form of tRNA editing would occur in members of the chytridiomycete order Monoblepharidales based on the analysis of complete mitochondrial tRNA complements. This prediction was confirmed by analysis of tRNA sequences using a tRNA circularization/ RT-PCR-based approach. The presence of partially and completely unedited tRNAs in members of the Monoblepharidales suggests the involvement of a 5′-to-3′ exonuclease rather than an endonuclease in removing the three 5′ nucleotides from a tRNA substrate. Surprisingly, analysis of the mtDNA of the chytridiomycete Rhizophydium brooksianum, which branches as a sister group to S. punctatus in molecular phylogenies, did not suggest the presence of editing. This prediction was also confirmed experimentally. The absence of tRNA editing in R. brooksianum raises the possibility that 5′ tRNA editing may have evolved twice independently within Chytridiomycota, once in the lineage leading to S. punctatus and once in the lineage leading to the Monoblepharidales. PMID:15247432

  3. Origin, evolution, and mechanism of 5' tRNA editing in chytridiomycete fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforest, Marie-Josée; Bullerwell, Charles E; Forget, Lise; Lang, B Franz

    2004-08-01

    5' tRNA editing has been demonstrated to occur in the mitochondria of the distantly related rhizopod amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and the chytridiomycete fungus Spizellomyces punctatus. In these organisms, canonical tRNA structures are restored by removing mismatched nucleotides at the first three 5' positions and replacing them with nucleotides capable of forming Watson-Crick base pairs with their 3' counterparts. This form of editing seems likely to occur in members of Amoebozoa other than A. castellanii, as well as in members of Heterolobosea. Evidence for 5' tRNA editing has not been found to date, however, in any other fungus including the deeply branching chytridiomycete Allomyces macrogynus. We predicted that a similar form of tRNA editing would occur in members of the chytridiomycete order Monoblepharidales based on the analysis of complete mitochondrial tRNA complements. This prediction was confirmed by analysis of tRNA sequences using a tRNA circularization/RT-PCR-based approach. The presence of partially and completely unedited tRNAs in members of the Monoblepharidales suggests the involvement of a 5'-to-3' exonuclease rather than an endonuclease in removing the three 5' nucleotides from a tRNA substrate. Surprisingly, analysis of the mtDNA of the chytridiomycete Rhizophydium brooksianum, which branches as a sister group to S. punctatus in molecular phylogenies, did not suggest the presence of editing. This prediction was also confirmed experimentally. The absence of tRNA editing in R. brooksianum raises the possibility that 5' tRNA editing may have evolved twice independently within Chytridiomycota, once in the lineage leading to S. punctatus and once in the lineage leading to the Monoblepharidales.

  4. tRNA gene diversity in the three domains of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke eFujishima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNA (tRNA is widely known for its key role in decoding mRNA into protein. Despite their necessity and relatively short nucleotide sequences, a large diversity of gene structures and RNA secondary structures of pre-tRNAs and mature tRNAs have recently been discovered in the three domains of life. Growing evidences of disrupted tRNA genes in the genomes of Archaea reveals unique gene structures such as, intron-containing tRNA, split tRNA, and permuted tRNA. Coding sequence for these tRNAs are either separated with introns, fragmented, or permuted at the genome level. Although evolutionary scenario behind the tRNA gene disruption is still unclear, diversity of tRNA structure seems to be co-evolved with their processing enzyme, so-called RNA splicing endonuclease. Metazoan mitochondrial tRNAs (mtRNAs are known for their unique lack of either one or two arms from the typical tRNA cloverleaf structure, while still maintaining functionality. Recently identified nematode-specific V-arm containing tRNAs (nev-tRNAs possess long variable arms that are specific to eukaryotic class II tRNASer and tRNALeu but also decode class I tRNA codons. Moreover, many tRNA-like sequences have been found in the genomes of different organisms and viruses. Thus this review is aimed to cover the latest knowledge on tRNA gene diversity and further recapitulate the evolutionary and biological aspects that caused such uniqueness.

  5. Characterization of benzoxaborole-based antifungal resistance mutations demonstrates that editing depends on electrostatic stabilization of the leucyl-tRNA synthetase editing cap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Jaya; Mao, Weimin; Lincecum, Tommie L; Alley, M R K; Martinis, Susan A

    2011-10-03

    The broad-spectrum benzoxaborole antifungal AN2690 blocks protein synthesis by inhibiting leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) via a novel oxaborole tRNA trapping mechanism in the editing site. Herein, one set of resistance mutations is at Asp487 outside the LeuRS hydrolytic editing pocket, in a region of unknown function. It is located within a eukaryote/archaea specific insert I4, which forms part of a cap over a benzoxaborole-AMP that is bound in the LeuRS CP1 domain editing active site. Mutational and biochemical analysis at Asp487 identified a salt bridge between Asp487 and Arg316 in the hinge region of the I4 cap of yeast LeuRS that is critical for tRNA deacylation. We hypothesize that this electrostatic interaction stabilizes the cap during binding of the editing substrate for hydrolysis. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transfer RNA and human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A Abbott

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA genes are hotspots for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase, mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers, and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes. Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing. Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  7. Defects in tRNA modification associated with neurological and developmental dysfunctions in Caenorhabditis elegans elongator mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changchun Chen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Elongator is a six subunit protein complex, conserved from yeast to humans. Mutations in the human Elongator homologue, hELP1, are associated with the neurological disease familial dysautonomia. However, how Elongator functions in metazoans, and how the human mutations affect neural functions is incompletely understood. Here we show that in Caenorhabditis elegans, ELPC-1 and ELPC-3, components of the Elongator complex, are required for the formation of the 5-carbamoylmethyl and 5-methylcarboxymethyl side chains of wobble uridines in tRNA. The lack of these modifications leads to defects in translation in C. elegans. ELPC-1::GFP and ELPC-3::GFP reporters are strongly expressed in a subset of chemosensory neurons required for salt chemotaxis learning. elpc-1 or elpc-3 gene inactivation causes a defect in this process, associated with a posttranscriptional reduction of neuropeptide and a decreased accumulation of acetylcholine in the synaptic cleft. elpc-1 and elpc-3 mutations are synthetic lethal together with those in tuc-1, which is required for thiolation of tRNAs having the 5'methylcarboxymethyl side chain. elpc-1; tuc-1 and elpc-3; tuc-1 double mutants display developmental defects. Our results suggest that, by its effect on tRNA modification, Elongator promotes both neural function and development.

  8. Chitin synthetase in encysting Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba invadens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.; Gillin, F.D.

    1987-05-01

    Giardia lamblia (Gl) and Entamoeba invadens (Ei) are protozoan parasites with two morphologic stages in their life cycles. Motile trophozoites colonize the intestine of humans and reptiles respectively. Water resistant cysts, which can survive outside the host, transmit infection. In vitro cyst formation of Ei from trophozoites has been reported, and the authors have recently induced in vitro encystation of Gl. Although the cyst walls of both parasites contain chitin, it synthesis by encysting trophozoites has not been reported. The authors now show that encystation conditions greatly increase chitin synthetase (CS) specific activity (incorporation of /sup 3/H GlcNAc from UDP-GlcNAc into TCA-or alcohol-precipitable material). Extracts of encysting Gl incorporated 3.6 nmol/mg protein in 5 hr compared to < 0.005 in controls. Extracts of encysting Fi incorporated 4.8 n mol/mg protein, compared to 1.7 in the control. CS activity of both parasites requires preformed chitin. The Gl enzyme requires a reducing agent, is inhibited by digitonin and the CS inhibitors, polyoxin D and Nikkomycin, but not by tunicamycin. The product is digested by chitinase. Ei enzyme does not require a reducing agent and is stimulated by 1 mg/ml digitonin, but inhibited by higher concentrations. These studies demonstrate CS enzymes which may play important roles in encystation of Gl and Ei.

  9. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  10. tRNA genes protect a reporter gene from epigenetic silencing in mouse cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersole, Thomas; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Samoshkin, Alexander; Kouprina, Natalay; Pavlicek, Adam; White, Robert J; Larionov, Vladimir

    2011-08-15

    It is a well-established fact that the tRNA genes in yeast can function as chromatin barrier elements. However, so far there is no experimental evidence that tRNA and other Pol III-transcribed genes exhibit barrier activity in mammals. This study utilizes a recently developed reporter gene assay to test a set of Pol III-transcribed genes and gene clusters with variable promoter and intergenic regions for their ability to prevent heterochromatin-mediated reporter gene silencing in mouse cells. The results show that functional copies of mouse tRNA genes are effective barrier elements. The number of tRNA genes as well as their orientation influence barrier function. Furthermore, the DNA sequence composition of intervening and flanking regions affects barrier activity of tRNA genes. Barrier activity was maintained for much longer time when the intervening and flanking regions of tRNA genes were replaced by AT-rich sequences, suggesting a negative role of DNA methylation in the establishment of a functional barrier. Thus, our results suggest that tRNA genes are essential elements in establishment and maintenance of chromatin domain architecture in mammalian cells.

  11. Effect of correlated tRNA abundances on translation errors and evolution of codon usage bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premal Shah

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that tRNA abundances are thought to play a major role in determining translation error rates, their distribution across the genetic code and the resulting implications have received little attention. In general, studies of codon usage bias (CUB assume that codons with higher tRNA abundance have lower missense error rates. Using a model of protein translation based on tRNA competition and intra-ribosomal kinetics, we show that this assumption can be violated when tRNA abundances are positively correlated across the genetic code. Examining the distribution of tRNA abundances across 73 bacterial genomes from 20 different genera, we find a consistent positive correlation between tRNA abundances across the genetic code. This work challenges one of the fundamental assumptions made in over 30 years of research on CUB that codons with higher tRNA abundances have lower missense error rates and that missense errors are the primary selective force responsible for CUB.

  12. Interaction of tRNA with Eukaryotic Ribosome

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    Dmitri Graifer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of currently available data concerning interactions of tRNAs with the eukaryotic ribosome at various stages of translation. These data include the results obtained by means of cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography applied to various model ribosomal complexes, site-directed cross-linking with the use of tRNA derivatives bearing chemically or photochemically reactive groups in the CCA-terminal fragment and chemical probing of 28S rRNA in the region of the peptidyl transferase center. Similarities and differences in the interactions of tRNAs with prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes are discussed with concomitant consideration of the extent of resemblance between molecular mechanisms of translation in eukaryotes and bacteria.

  13. SCREENING OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND GENES CODING POLYKETIDE SYNTHETASE AND NONRIBOSOMAL PEPTIDE SYNTHETASE OF ACTINOMYCETE ISOLATES

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    Silvia Kovácsová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe antimicrobial activity using agar plate diffusion method and screening genes coding polyketide synthetase (PKS-I and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS from actinomycetes. A total of 105 actinomycete strains were isolated from arable soil. Antimicrobial activity was demonstrated at 54 strains against at least 1 of total 12 indicator organisms. Antifungal properties were recorded more often than antibacterial properties. The presence of PKS-I and NRPS genes were founded at 61 of total 105 strains. The number of strains with mentioned biosynthetic enzyme gene fragments matching the anticipated length were 19 (18% and 50 (47% respectively. Overall, five actinomycete strains carried all the biosynthetical genes, yet no antimicrobial activity was found against any of tested pathogens. On the other hand, twenty-one strains showed antimicrobial activity even though we were not able to amplify any of the PKS or NRPS genes from them. Combination of the two methods showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of actinomycetes isolated from arable soil, which indicate that actinomycetes are valuable reservoirs of novel bioactive compounds.

  14. Chromosomal location of the gene encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1983-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli with a partially defective phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (ribosephosphate pyrophosphokinase) has been characterized genetically. The genetic lesion causing the altered phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase, prs, was mapped at 26 min on the linkage map by con...

  15. Evolutionary divergence of chloroplast FAD synthetase proteins

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    Arilla-Luna Sonia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flavin adenine dinucleotide synthetases (FADSs - a group of bifunctional enzymes that carry out the dual functions of riboflavin phosphorylation to produce flavin mononucleotide (FMN and its subsequent adenylation to generate FAD in most prokaryotes - were studied in plants in terms of sequence, structure and evolutionary history. Results Using a variety of bioinformatics methods we have found that FADS enzymes localized to the chloroplasts, which we term as plant-like FADS proteins, are distributed across a variety of green plant lineages and constitute a divergent protein family clearly of cyanobacterial origin. The C-terminal module of these enzymes does not contain the typical riboflavin kinase active site sequence, while the N-terminal module is broadly conserved. These results agree with a previous work reported by Sandoval et al. in 2008. Furthermore, our observations and preliminary experimental results indicate that the C-terminus of plant-like FADS proteins may contain a catalytic activity, but different to that of their prokaryotic counterparts. In fact, homology models predict that plant-specific conserved residues constitute a distinct active site in the C-terminus. Conclusions A structure-based sequence alignment and an in-depth evolutionary survey of FADS proteins, thought to be crucial in plant metabolism, are reported, which will be essential for the correct annotation of plant genomes and further structural and functional studies. This work is a contribution to our understanding of the evolutionary history of plant-like FADS enzymes, which constitute a new family of FADS proteins whose C-terminal module might be involved in a distinct catalytic activity.

  16. Evolutionary divergence of chloroplast FAD synthetase proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Flavin adenine dinucleotide synthetases (FADSs) - a group of bifunctional enzymes that carry out the dual functions of riboflavin phosphorylation to produce flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and its subsequent adenylation to generate FAD in most prokaryotes - were studied in plants in terms of sequence, structure and evolutionary history. Results Using a variety of bioinformatics methods we have found that FADS enzymes localized to the chloroplasts, which we term as plant-like FADS proteins, are distributed across a variety of green plant lineages and constitute a divergent protein family clearly of cyanobacterial origin. The C-terminal module of these enzymes does not contain the typical riboflavin kinase active site sequence, while the N-terminal module is broadly conserved. These results agree with a previous work reported by Sandoval et al. in 2008. Furthermore, our observations and preliminary experimental results indicate that the C-terminus of plant-like FADS proteins may contain a catalytic activity, but different to that of their prokaryotic counterparts. In fact, homology models predict that plant-specific conserved residues constitute a distinct active site in the C-terminus. Conclusions A structure-based sequence alignment and an in-depth evolutionary survey of FADS proteins, thought to be crucial in plant metabolism, are reported, which will be essential for the correct annotation of plant genomes and further structural and functional studies. This work is a contribution to our understanding of the evolutionary history of plant-like FADS enzymes, which constitute a new family of FADS proteins whose C-terminal module might be involved in a distinct catalytic activity. PMID:20955574

  17. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cánovas Francisco M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1 and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2. Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types.

  18. A Conserved Proline Triplet in Val-tRNA Synthetase and the Origin of Elongation Factor P

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    Agata L. Starosta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial ribosomes stall on polyproline stretches and require the elongation factor P (EF-P to relieve the arrest. Yet it remains unclear why evolution has favored the development of EF-P rather than selecting against the occurrence of polyproline stretches in proteins. We have discovered that only a single polyproline stretch is invariant across all domains of life, namely a proline triplet in ValS, the tRNA synthetase, that charges tRNAVal with valine. Here, we show that expression of ValS in vivo and in vitro requires EF-P and demonstrate that the proline triplet located in the active site of ValS is important for efficient charging of tRNAVal with valine and preventing formation of mischarged Thr-tRNAVal as well as efficient growth of E. coli in vivo. We suggest that the critical role of the proline triplet for ValS activity may explain why bacterial cells coevolved the EF-P rescue system.

  19. Plant tumour biocontrol agent employs a tRNA-dependent mechanism to inhibit leucyl-tRNA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Shaileja; Palencia, Andrés; Virus, Cornelia; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Temple, Brenda R; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Cusack, Stephen; Reader, John S

    2013-01-01

    Leucyl-tRNA synthetases (LeuRSs) have an essential role in translation and are promising targets for antibiotic development. Agrocin 84 is a LeuRS inhibitor produced by the biocontrol agent Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 that targets pathogenic strains of A. tumefaciens, the causative agent of plant tumours. Agrocin 84 acts as a molecular Trojan horse and is processed inside the pathogen into a toxic moiety (TM84). Here we show using crystal structure, thermodynamic and kinetic analyses, that this natural antibiotic employs a unique and previously undescribed mechanism to inhibit LeuRS. TM84 requires tRNA(Leu) for tight binding to the LeuRS synthetic active site, unlike any previously reported inhibitors. TM84 traps the enzyme-tRNA complex in a novel 'aminoacylation-like' conformation, forming novel interactions with the KMSKS loop and the tRNA 3'-end. Our findings reveal an intriguing tRNA-dependent inhibition mechanism that may confer a distinct evolutionary advantage in vivo and inform future rational antibiotic design.

  20. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  1. Base-pairing versatility determines wobble sites in tRNA anticodons of vertebrate mitogenomes.

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    Miguel M Fonseca

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vertebrate mitochondrial genomes typically have one transfer RNA (tRNA for each synonymous codon family. This limited anticodon repertoire implies that each tRNA anticodon needs to wobble (establish a non-Watson-Crick base pairing between two nucleotides in RNA molecules to recognize one or more synonymous codons. Different hypotheses have been proposed to explain the factors that determine the nucleotide composition of wobble sites in vertebrate mitochondrial tRNA anticodons. Until now, the two major postulates--the "codon-anticodon adaptation hypothesis" and the "wobble versatility hypothesis"--have not been formally tested in vertebrate mitochondria because both make the same predictions regarding the composition of anticodon wobble sites. The same is true for the more recent "wobble cost hypothesis". PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we have analyzed the occurrence of synonymous codons and tRNA anticodon wobble sites in 1553 complete vertebrate mitochondrial genomes, focusing on three fish species with mtDNA codon usage bias reversal (L-strand is GT-rich. These mitogenomes constitute an excellent opportunity to study the evolution of the wobble nucleotide composition of tRNA anticodons because due to the reversal the predictions for the anticodon wobble sites differ between the existing hypotheses. We observed that none of the wobble sites of tRNA anticodons in these unusual mitochondrial genomes coevolved to match the new overall codon usage bias, suggesting that nucleotides at the wobble sites of tRNA anticodons in vertebrate mitochondrial genomes are determined by wobble versatility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that, at wobble sites of tRNA anticodons in vertebrate mitogenomes, selection favors the most versatile nucleotide in terms of wobble base-pairing stability and that wobble site composition is not influenced by codon usage. These results are in agreement with the "wobble versatility hypothesis".

  2. Analyses of Genomic tRNA Reveal Presence of Novel tRNAs in Oryza sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Tapan K.; Bae, Hanhong

    2017-01-01

    Transfer rRNAs are important molecules responsible for the translation event during protein synthesis. tRNAs are widespread found in unicellular to multi-cellular organisms. Analysis of tRNA gene family members in Oryza sativa revealed the presence of 750 tRNA genes distributed unevenly in different chromosomes. The length of O. sativa tRNAs genes were ranged from 66 to 91 nucleotides encoding 52 isoacceptor in total. tRNASer found in chromosome 8 of O. sativa encoded only 66 nucleotides which is the smallest tRNA of O. sativa and to our knowledge, this is the smallest gene of eukaryotic lineage reported so far. Analyses revealed the presence of several novel/pseudo tRNA genes in O. sativa which are reported for the first time. Multiple sequence alignment of tRNAs revealed the presence of family specific conserved consensus sequences. Functional study of these novel tRNA and family specific conserved consensus sequences will be crucial to decipher their importance in biological events. The rate of transition of O. sativa tRNA was found to be higher than the rate of transversion. Evolutionary study revealed, O. sativa tRNAs were evolved from the lineages of multiple common ancestors. Duplication and loss study of tRNAs genes revealed, majority of the O. sativa tRNA were duplicated and 17 of them were found to be undergone loss during the evolution. Orthology and paralogy study showed, the majority of O. sativa tRNA were paralogous and only a few of tRNASer were found to contain orthologous tRNAs. PMID:28713421

  3. Inactivation of Escherichia coli phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase by the 2',3'-dialdehyde derivative of ATP. Identification of active site lysines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilden, Ida; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Harlow, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    . Cysteine 229 may also be labeled by oATP. Of these four residues, Lys193 is completely conserved within the family of PRPP synthetases, and Lys181 is found at a position in the sequence where the cognate amino acid (Asp181) in human isozyme I PRPP synthetase has been previously implicated in the regulation...... of enzymatic activity. These results imply a functional role for at least two of the identified amino acid residues.......M. Reaction with radioactive oATP demonstrated that complete inactivation of the enzyme corresponded to reaction at two or more sites with limiting stoichiometries of approximately 0.7 and 1.3 mol of oATP incorporated/mol of PRPP synthetase subunit. oATP served as a substrate in the presence of ribose-5...

  4. Three-Dimensional Algebraic Models of the tRNA Code and 12 Graphs for Representing the Amino Acids

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    Marco V. José

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional algebraic models, also called Genetic Hotels, are developed to represent the Standard Genetic Code, the Standard tRNA Code (S-tRNA-C, and the Human tRNA code (H-tRNA-C. New algebraic concepts are introduced to be able to describe these models, to wit, the generalization of the 2n-Klein Group and the concept of a subgroup coset with a tail. We found that the H-tRNA-C displayed broken symmetries in regard to the S-tRNA-C, which is highly symmetric. We also show that there are only 12 ways to represent each of the corresponding phenotypic graphs of amino acids. The averages of statistical centrality measures of the 12 graphs for each of the three codes are carried out and they are statistically compared. The phenotypic graphs of the S-tRNA-C display a common triangular prism of amino acids in 10 out of the 12 graphs, whilst the corresponding graphs for the H-tRNA-C display only two triangular prisms. The graphs exhibit disjoint clusters of amino acids when their polar requirement values are used. We contend that the S-tRNA-C is in a frozen-like state, whereas the H-tRNA-C may be in an evolving state.

  5. Mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes: non-linkage with syndromes of Wolfram and chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ouweland, J M; Bruining, G J; Lindhout, D; Wit, J M; Veldhuyzen, B F; Maassen, J A

    1992-01-01

    We have recently identified a point mutation in the mitochondrially encoded tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene which associates with a combination of type II diabetes mellitus and sensorineural hearing loss in a large pedigree. To extend this finding to other syndromes which exhibit a combination of diabetes mellitus and hearing loss we have sequenced all mitochondrial tRNA genes from two patients with the Wolfram syndrome, a rare congenital disease characterized by diabetes mellitus, deafness, diabetes insipidus and optic atrophy. In each patient, a single different mutation was identified. One is an A to G transition mutation at np 12,308 in tRNA(Leu(CUN)) gene in a region which is highly conserved between species during evolution. This mutation has been described by Lauber et al. (1) as associating with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO). The other is a C to T transition mutation at np 15,904 in tRNA(Thr) gene. Both mutations are also present in the general population (frequency tRNA(Leu(CUN)) mutation 0.16, tRNA(Thr) mutation 0.015). These findings suggest that evolutionarily conserved regions in mitochondrial tRNA genes can exhibit a significant polymorphism in humans, and that the mutation at np 12,308 in the tRNA(Leu(CUN)) gene is unlikely to be associated with CPEO and Wolfram syndrome. Images PMID:1542564

  6. A genetically encoded fluorescent tRNA is active in live-cell protein synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Isao; Igarashi, Takao; Sakaguchi, Reiko; Nitharwal, Ram G.; Takase, Ryuichi; Han, Kyu Young; Leslie, Benjamin J.; Liu, Cuiping; Gamper, Howard; Ha, Taekjip; Sanyal, Suparna

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) perform essential tasks for all living cells. They are major components of the ribosomal machinery for protein synthesis and they also serve in non-ribosomal pathways for regulation and signaling metabolism. We describe the development of a genetically encoded fluorescent tRNA fusion with the potential for imaging in live Escherichia coli cells. This tRNA fusion carries a Spinach aptamer that becomes fluorescent upon binding of a cell-permeable and non-toxic fluorophore. We show that, despite having a structural framework significantly larger than any natural tRNA species, this fusion is a viable probe for monitoring tRNA stability in a cellular quality control mechanism that degrades structurally damaged tRNA. Importantly, this fusion is active in E. coli live-cell protein synthesis allowing peptidyl transfer at a rate sufficient to support cell growth, indicating that it is accommodated by translating ribosomes. Imaging analysis shows that this fusion and ribosomes are both excluded from the nucleoid, indicating that the fusion and ribosomes are in the cytosol together possibly engaged in protein synthesis. This fusion methodology has the potential for developing new tools for live-cell imaging of tRNA with the unique advantage of both stoichiometric labeling and broader application to all cells amenable to genetic engineering. PMID:27956502

  7. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase A renders Trypanosoma brucei auxotrophic to asparagine.

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    Inês Loureiro

    Full Text Available Asparagine synthetase (AS catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of aspartate into asparagine using ammonia or glutamine as nitrogen source. There are two distinct types of AS, asparagine synthetase A (AS-A, known as strictly ammonia-dependent, and asparagine synthetase B (AS-B, which can use either ammonia or glutamine. The absence of AS-A in humans, and its presence in trypanosomes, suggested AS-A as a potential drug target that deserved further investigation. We report the presence of functional AS-A in Trypanosoma cruzi (TcAS-A and Trypanosoma brucei (TbAS-A: the purified enzymes convert L-aspartate into L-asparagine in the presence of ATP, ammonia and Mg(2+. TcAS-A and TbAS-A use preferentially ammonia as a nitrogen donor, but surprisingly, can also use glutamine, a characteristic so far never described for any AS-A. TbAS-A knockdown by RNAi didn't affect in vitro growth of bloodstream forms of the parasite. However, growth was significantly impaired when TbAS-A knockdown parasites were cultured in medium with reduced levels of asparagine. As expected, mice infections with induced and non-induced T. brucei RNAi clones were similar to those from wild-type parasites. However, when induced T. brucei RNAi clones were injected in mice undergoing asparaginase treatment, which depletes blood asparagine, the mice exhibited lower parasitemia and a prolonged survival in comparison to similarly-treated mice infected with control parasites. Our results show that TbAS-A can be important under in vivo conditions when asparagine is limiting, but is unlikely to be suitable as a drug target.

  8. Glutamine synthetase is essential in early mouse embryogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Youji; Hakvoort, Theodorus B. M.; Vermeulen, Jacqueline L. M.; Lamers, Wouter H.; van Roon, Maria A.

    2007-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is expressed in a tissue-specific and developmentally controlled manner, and functions to remove ammonia or glutamate. Furthermore, it is the only enzyme that can synthesize glutamine de novo. Since congenital deficiency of GS has not been reported, we investigated its role

  9. Binding of Divalent Magnesium by Escherichia coli Phosphoribosyl Diphosphate Synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of binding of the substrates MgATP and ribose 5-phosphate as well as Mg2+ to the enzyme 5-phospho-d-ribosyl a-1-diphosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli has been analyzed. By use of the competive inhibitors of ATP and ribose 5-phosphate binding, a,ß-methylene ATP and (+)-1-a,2-a...

  10. Restoration Of Glutamine Synthetase Activity, Nitric Oxide Levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Propolis has been proposed to be protective on neurodegenerative disorders. To understand the neuroprotective effects of honeybee propolis, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, nitric oxide (NO), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) were studied in different brain ...

  11. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, S.M.; Habash, D.Z.

    2009-07-02

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  12. Decreased Red Cell Uroporphyrinogen I Synthetase Activity in Intermittent Acute Porphyria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, L. James; Meyer, Urs A.; Felsher, Bertram F.; Redeker, Allan G.; Marver, Harvey S.

    1972-01-01

    Intermittent acute porphyria has recently been distinguished biochemically from other genetic hepatic porphyrias by the observation of diminished hepatic uroporphyrinogen I synthetase activity and increased δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase activity. Since deficient uroporphyrinogen I synthetase may be reflected in nonhepatic tissues, we have assayed this enzyme in red cell hemolysates from nonporphyric subjects and from patients with genetic hepatic porphyria. Only patients with intermittent acute porphyria had decreased erythrocyte uroporphyrinogen I synthetase activity which was approximately 50% of normal. The apparent Km of partially purified uroporphyrinogen I synthetase was 6 × 10−6m in both nonporphyrics and patients with intermittent acute porphyria. These data provide further evidence for a primary mutation affecting uroporphyrinogen I synthetase in intermittent acute porphyria. Further-more, results of assay of red cell uroporphyrinogen I synthetase activity in a large family with intermittent acute porphyria suggest that this test may be a reliable indicator of the heterozygous state. PMID:5056653

  13. Informational redundancy of tRNA(4Ser) and tRNA(7Ser) genes in Drosophila melanogaster and evidence for intergenic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, J; Sinclair, D A; Hayashi, S; Tener, G M; Grigliatti, T A

    1991-05-20

    Variant tRNA genes have been widely observed in multicellular eukaryotes. Recent biochemical studies have shown that some of them are expressed in a tissue- or a stage-specific manner. These findings would thus imply that certain modified tRNAs may be crucial for the development of the organism. Using Drosophila melanogaster as a model, we have taken a combined genetic and molecular approach to examine critically the possible biological functions of tRNA(4, 7Ser) genes. We showed that at least 50% of the total templates can be deleted from the genome without inducing abnormal phenotypes such as Minute, or a decrease in viability. In addition, two of the tRNASer variant genes that are unique in sequence are also completely dispensable. This strongly implies that even though they may be expressed in vivo, they play no essential role in the development of the fruitfly. By comparison with some of the corresponding tRNA genes in another sibling species, Drosophila erecta, our results suggest strongly that the variants are products non-reciprocal exchanges among the tRNA(4, 7Ser), genes. Such intergenic recombination events may have a major influence in the concerted evolution of the two gene families.

  14. Mode of action of RNase BN/RNase Z on tRNA precursors: RNase BN does not remove the CCA sequence from tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Tanmay; Deutscher, Murray P

    2010-07-23

    RNase BN, the Escherichia coli homolog of RNase Z, was previously shown to act as both a distributive exoribonuclease and an endoribonuclease on model RNA substrates and to be inhibited by the presence of a 3'-terminal CCA sequence. Here, we examined the mode of action of RNase BN on bacteriophage and bacterial tRNA precursors, particularly in light of a recent report suggesting that RNase BN removes CCA sequences (Takaku, H., and Nashimoto, M. (2008) Genes Cells 13, 1087-1097). We show that purified RNase BN can process both CCA-less and CCA-containing tRNA precursors. On CCA-less precursors, RNase BN cleaved endonucleolytically after the discriminator nucleotide to allow subsequent CCA addition. On CCA-containing precursors, RNase BN acted as either an exoribonuclease or endoribonuclease depending on the nature of the added divalent cation. Addition of Co(2+) resulted in higher activity and predominantly exoribonucleolytic activity, whereas in the presence of Mg(2+), RNase BN was primarily an endoribonuclease. In no case was any evidence obtained for removal of the CCA sequence. Certain tRNA precursors were extremely poor substrates under any conditions tested. These findings provide important information on the ability of RNase BN to process tRNA precursors and help explain the known physiological properties of this enzyme. In addition, they call into question the removal of CCA sequences by RNase BN.

  15. Loss of a conserved tRNA anticodon modification perturbs cellular signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Zinshteyn

    Full Text Available Transfer RNA (tRNA modifications enhance the efficiency, specificity and fidelity of translation in all organisms. The anticodon modification mcm(5s(2U(34 is required for normal growth and stress resistance in yeast; mutants lacking this modification have numerous phenotypes. Mutations in the homologous human genes are linked to neurological disease. The yeast phenotypes can be ameliorated by overexpression of specific tRNAs, suggesting that the modifications are necessary for efficient translation of specific codons. We determined the in vivo ribosome distributions at single codon resolution in yeast strains lacking mcm(5s(2U. We found accumulations at AAA, CAA, and GAA codons, suggesting that translation is slow when these codons are in the ribosomal A site, but these changes appeared too small to affect protein output. Instead, we observed activation of the GCN4-mediated stress response by a non-canonical pathway. Thus, loss of mcm(5s(2U causes global effects on gene expression due to perturbation of cellular signaling.

  16. Determinants of tRNA Recognition by the Radical SAM Enzyme RlmN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Fitzsimmons

    Full Text Available RlmN, a bacterial radical SAM methylating enzyme, has the unusual ability to modify two distinct types of RNA: 23S rRNA and tRNA. In rRNA, RlmN installs a methyl group at the C2 position of A2503 of 23S rRNA, while in tRNA the modification occurs at nucleotide A37, immediately adjacent to the anticodon triplet. Intriguingly, only a subset of tRNAs that contain an adenosine at position 37 are substrates for RlmN, suggesting that the enzyme carefully probes the highly conserved tRNA fold and sequence features to identify its targets. Over the past several years, multiple studies have addressed rRNA modification by RlmN, while relatively few investigations have focused on the ability of this enzyme to modify tRNAs. In this study, we utilized in vitro transcribed tRNAs as model substrates to interrogate RNA recognition by RlmN. Using chimeras and point mutations, we probed how the structure and sequence of RNA influences methylation, identifying position 38 of tRNAs as a critical determinant of substrate recognition. We further demonstrate that, analogous to previous mechanistic studies with fragments of 23S rRNA, tRNA methylation requirements are consistent with radical SAM reactivity. Together, our findings provide detailed insight into tRNA recognition by a radical SAM methylating enzyme.

  17. Antibiotic inhibition of the movement of tRNA substrates through a peptidyl transferase cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, B T; Rodriguez-Fonseca, C; Leviev, I

    1996-01-01

    movement of the 5' end of P-site-bound tRNA relative to the ribosome that occurs on peptide bond formation. The 3' ends of the tRNAs enter, and move through, a catalytic cavity where antibiotics are considered to act by at least three primary mechanisms: (i) they interfere with the entry of the aminoacyl......The present review attempts to deal with movement of tRNA substrates through the peptidyl transferase centre on the large ribosomal subunit and to explain how this movement is interrupted by antibiotics. It builds on the concept of hybrid tRNA states forming on ribosomes and on the observed...... moiety into the catalytic cavity before peptide bond formation; (ii) they inhibit movement of the nascent peptide along the peptide channel, a process that may generally involve destabilization of the peptidyl tRNA, and (iii) they prevent movement of the newly deacylated tRNA between the P/P and hybrid P...

  18. tRNA modification profiles of the fast-proliferating cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Chao; Niu, Leilei; Song, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Xiong, Xin; Zhang, Xianhua [Departmentof Pharmacy, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang, Zhenxi; Yang, Yi; Yi, Fan [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhan, Jun; Zhang, Hongquan [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology and Tumor Biology, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Yang, Zhenjun; Zhang, Li-He [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhai, Suodi [Departmentof Pharmacy, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, Hua, E-mail: huali88@sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Ye, Min, E-mail: yemin@bjmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Du, Quan, E-mail: quan.du@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Despite the recent progress in RNA modification study, a comprehensive modification profile is still lacking for mammalian cells. Using a quantitative HPLC/MS/MS assay, we present here a study where RNA modifications are examined in term of the major RNA species. With paired slow- and fast-proliferating cell lines, distinct RNA modification profiles are first revealed for diverse RNA species. Compared to mRNAs, increased ribose and nucleobase modifications are shown for the highly-structured tRNAs and rRNAs, lending support to their contribution to the formation of high-order structures. This study also reveals a dynamic tRNA modification profile in the fast-proliferating cells. In addition to cultured cells, this unique tRNA profile has been further confirmed with endometrial cancers and their adjacent normal tissues. Taken together, the results indicate that tRNA is a actively regulated RNA species in the fast-proliferating cancer cells, and suggest that they may play a more active role in biological process than expected. -- Highlights: •RNA modifications were first examined in term of the major RNA species. •A dynamic tRNA modifications was characterized for the fast-proliferating cells. •The unique tRNA profile was confirmed with endometrial cancers and their adjacent normal tissues. •tRNA was predicted as an actively regulated RNA species in the fast-proliferating cancer cells.

  19. tRNA integrity is a prerequisite for rapid CCA addition: implication for quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupasquier, Marcel; Kim, Sangbumn; Halkidis, Konstantine; Gamper, Howard; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2008-06-06

    CCA addition to the 3' end is an essential step in tRNA maturation. High-resolution crystal structures of the CCA enzymes reveal primary enzyme contact with the tRNA minihelix domain, consisting of the acceptor stem and T stem-loop. RNA and DNA minihelices are efficient substrates for CCA addition in steady-state kinetics. However, in contrast to structural models and steady-state experiments, we show here by single-turnover kinetics that minihelices are insufficient substrates for the Escherichia coli CCA enzyme and that only the full-length tRNA is kinetically competent. Even a nick in the full-length tRNA backbone in the T loop, or as far away from the minihelix domain as in the anticodon loop, prevents efficient CCA addition. These results suggest a kinetic quality control provided by the CCA enzyme to inspect the integrity of the tRNA molecule and to discriminate against nicked or damaged species from further maturation.

  20. The CCA-adding enzyme: A central scrutinizer in tRNA quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betat, Heike; Mörl, Mario

    2015-09-01

    tRNA nucleotidyltransferase adds the invariant CCA-terminus to the tRNA 3'-end, a central step in tRNA maturation. This CCA-adding enzyme is a specialized RNA polymerase that synthesizes the CCA sequence at high fidelity in all kingdoms of life. Recently, an additional function of this enzyme was identified, where it generates a specific degradation tag on structurally unstable tRNAs. This tag consists of an additional repeat of the CCA triplet, leading to a 3'-terminal CCACCA sequence. In order to explain how the enzyme catalyzes this extended polymerization reaction, Kuhn et al. solved a series of co-crystal structures of the CCA-adding enzyme from Archaeoglobus fulgidus in complex with different tRNA substrates. They show that the enzyme forces a bound unstable tRNA to refold the acceptor stem for a second round of CCA-addition, while stable transcripts are robust enough to resist this isomerization. In this review, we discuss how the CCA-adding enzyme uses a simple yet very elegant way to scrutinize its substrates for sufficient structural stability and, consequently, functionality. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Entamoeba histolytica acetyl-CoA synthetase: biomarker of acute amoebic liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huat, Lim Boon; Garcia, Alfonso Olivos; Ning, Tan Zi; Kin, Wong Weng; Noordin, Rahmah; Azham, Siti Shafiqah Anaqi; Jie, Lee Zhi; Ching, Guee Cher; Chong, Foo Phiaw; Dam, Pim Chau

    2014-06-01

    To characterize the Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) antigen(s) recognized by moribound amoebic liver abscess hamsters. Crude soluble antigen of E. histolytica was probed with sera of moribund hamsters in 1D- and 2D-Western blot analyses. The antigenic protein was then sent for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The corresponding gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21-AI to produce the recombinant E. histolytica ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (EhACS) protein. A customised ELISA was developed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the recombinant protein. A ∼75 kDa protein band with a pI value of 5.91-6.5 was found to be antigenic; and not detected by sera of hamsters in the control group. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed the protein to be the 77 kDa E. histolytica ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (EhACS). The customised ELISA results revealed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity when tested against infected (n=31) and control group hamsters (n=5) serum samples, respectively. This finding suggested the significant role of EhACS as a biomarker for moribund hamsters with acute amoebic liver abscess (ALA) infection. It is deemed pertinent that future studies explore the potential roles of EhACS in better understanding the pathogenesis of ALA; and in the development of vaccine and diagnostic tests to control ALA in human populations.

  2. Entamoeba histolytica acetyl-CoA synthetase: biomarker of acute amoebic liver abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huat, Lim Boon; Garcia, Alfonso Olivos; Ning, Tan Zi; Kin, Wong Weng; Noordin, Rahmah; Azham, Siti Shafiqah Anaqi; Jie, Lee Zhi; Ching, Guee Cher; Chong, Foo Phiaw; Dam, Pim Chau

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize the Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) antigen(s) recognized by moribound amoebic liver abscess hamsters. Methods Crude soluble antigen of E. histolytica was probed with sera of moribund hamsters in 1D- and 2D-Western blot analyses. The antigenic protein was then sent for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The corresponding gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21-AI to produce the recombinant E. histolytica ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (EhACS) protein. A customised ELISA was developed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the recombinant protein. Results A ∼75 kDa protein band with a pI value of 5.91-6.5 was found to be antigenic; and not detected by sera of hamsters in the control group. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed the protein to be the 77 kDa E. histolytica ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (EhACS). The customised ELISA results revealed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity when tested against infected (n=31) and control group hamsters (n=5) serum samples, respectively. Conclusions This finding suggested the significant role of EhACS as a biomarker for moribund hamsters with acute amoebic liver abscess (ALA) infection. It is deemed pertinent that future studies explore the potential roles of EhACS in better understanding the pathogenesis of ALA; and in the development of vaccine and diagnostic tests to control ALA in human populations. PMID:25182945

  3. Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ameur, Salma; Aloulou, Hajer; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Kamoun, Thouraya; Kaabachi, Naziha; Hachicha, Mongia

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency (GSSD) is a rare disorder of glutathione metabolism with varying clinical severity. Patients may present with hemolytic anemia alone or together with acidosis and central nervous system impairment. Diagnosis is made by clinical presentation and detection of elevated concentrations of 5-oxoproline in urine and low glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes or cultured skin fibroblasts. The prognosis seems to depend on early diagnosis and treatment. We report a 4 months old Tunisian male infant who presented with severe metabolic acidosis with high anion gap and hemolytic anemia. High level of 5-oxoproline was detected in her urine and diagnosis of GSSD was made. Treatment consists of the correction of acidosis, blood transfusion, and supplementation with antioxidants. He died of severe metabolic acidosis and sepsis at the age of 15 months.

  4. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli, Identification of a mutant enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Nygaard, Per

    1982-01-01

    , stimulated the mutant enzyme. The activity of PRib-PP synthetase in crude extract was higher in the mutant than in the parent. When starved for purines an accumulation of PRib-PP was observed in the parent strain, while the pool decreased in the mutant. During pyrimidine starvation derepression of PRib....... Kinetic analysis of the mutant PRib-PP synthetase revealed an apparent Km for ATP and ribose 5-phosphate of 1.0 mM and 240 μM respectively, compared to 60 μM and 45 μM respectively for the wild-type enzyme. ADP, which inhibits the wild-type enzyme at a concentration of 0.5 mM ribose 5-phosphate...

  5. Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Complexes in Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Havrylenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are essential enzymes for interpreting the genetic code. They are responsible for the proper pairing of codons on mRNA with amino acids. In addition to this canonical, translational function, they are also involved in the control of many cellular pathways essential for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Association of several of these enzymes within supramolecular assemblies is a key feature of organization of the translation apparatus in eukaryotes. It could be a means to control their oscillation between translational functions, when associated within a multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex (MARS, and nontranslational functions, after dissociation from the MARS and association with other partners. In this review, we summarize the composition of the different MARS described from archaea to mammals, the mode of assembly of these complexes, and their roles in maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  6. Novel and heteroplasmic mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes in Brugada syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah Tafti, Mahsasadat; Khatami, Mehri; Rezaei, Shiva; Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi; Hadadzadeh, Mehdi

    2017-10-05

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a rare cardiac arrhythmia characterized by sudden death associated with electrocardiogram patterns characterized by incomplete right bundle-branch block and ST-segment elevations in the anterior precordial leads. This syndrome predominantly is seen in younger males with structurally normal hearts. Mitochondrial variants particularly mt-tRNA mutations, are hot spots that lead to cardiological disorders. Previous studies have shown that mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes play an important causal or modifying role in BrS. The present study aims to evaluate the involvement of mitochondrial tRNA genes in arrhythmogenic BrS. In this study, 40 Iranian patients were investigated for the presence of the mutations in 6 mitochondrial tRNA genes (tRNA Ile, Met, Gln, Asn, Ala and Trp) by PCR-SSCP analysis. There were 4 mutations in tRNA genes, that for first time, were found in Brugada patients and these mutations were not in controls. Three of them were heteroplasmic and located in tRNAGln (T4377A) and tRNAMet (G4407A and C4456T) which were assessed as pathogenic mutations. A homoplasmic variant (5580T > C) in tRNATrp gene was located within the junction region between tRNATrp and tRNAAla genes. This mutation may disturb the processing of mt-tRNATrp. The results of this study suggest that mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes might lead to deficiencies in translational process of critical proteins of the respiratory chain and potentially lead to BrS in Iranian subjects.

  7. A voltage-gated pore for translocation of tRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koley, Sandip; Adhya, Samit, E-mail: nilugrandson@gmail.com

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •A tRNA translocating complex was assembled from purified proteins. •The complex translocates tRNA at a membrane potential of ∼60 mV. •Translocation requires Cys and His residues in the Fe–S center of RIC6 subunit. -- Abstract: Very little is known about how nucleic acids are translocated across membranes. The multi-subunit RNA Import Complex (RIC) from mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania tropica induces translocation of tRNAs across artificial or natural membranes, but the nature of the translocation pore remains unknown. We show that subunits RIC6 and RIC9 assemble on the membrane in presence of subunit RIC4A to form complex R3. Atomic Force Microscopy of R3 revealed particles with an asymmetric surface groove of ∼20 nm rim diameter and ∼1 nm depth. R3 induced translocation of tRNA into liposomes when the pH of the medium was lowered to ∼6 in the absence of ATP. R3-mediated tRNA translocation could also be induced at neutral pH by a K{sup +} diffusion potential with an optimum of 60–70 mV. Point mutations in the Cys{sub 2}–His{sub 2} Fe-binding motif of RIC6, which is homologous to the respiratory Complex III Fe–S protein, abrogated import induced by low pH but not by K{sup +} diffusion potential. These results indicate that the R3 complex forms a pore that is gated by a proton-generated membrane potential and that the Fe–S binding region of RIC6 has a role in proton translocation. The tRNA import complex of L. tropica thus contains a novel macromolecular channel distinct from the mitochondrial protein import pore that is apparently involved in tRNA import in some species.

  8. tRNA's wobble decoding of the genome: 40 years of modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agris, Paul F; Vendeix, Franck A P; Graham, William D

    2007-02-09

    The genetic code is degenerate, in that 20 amino acids are encoded by 61 triplet codes. In 1966, Francis Crick hypothesized that the cell's limited number of tRNAs decoded the genome by recognizing more than one codon. The ambiguity of that recognition resided in the third base-pair, giving rise to the Wobble Hypothesis. Post-transcriptional modifications at tRNA's wobble position 34, especially modifications of uridine 34, enable wobble to occur. The Modified Wobble Hypothesis proposed in 1991 that specific modifications of a tRNA wobble nucleoside shape the anticodon architecture in such a manner that interactions were restricted to the complementary base plus a single wobble pairing for amino acids with twofold degenerate codons. However, chemically different modifications at position 34 would expand the ability of a tRNA to read three or even four of the fourfold degenerate codons. One foundation of Crick's Wobble Hypothesis was that a near-constant geometry of canonical base-pairing be maintained in forming all three base-pairs between the tRNA anticodon and mRNA codon on the ribosome. In accepting an aminoacyl-tRNA, the ribosome requires maintenance of a specific geometry for the anticodon-codon base-pairing. However, it is the post-transcriptional modifications at tRNA wobble position 34 and purine 37, 3'-adjacent to the anticodon, that pre-structure the anticodon domain to ensure the correct codon binding. The modifications create both the architecture and the stability needed for decoding through restraints on anticodon stereochemistry and conformational space, and through selective hydrogen bonding. A physicochemical understanding of modified nucleoside contributions to the tRNA anticodon domain architecture and its decoding of the genome has advanced RNA world evolutionary theory, the principles of RNA chemistry, and the application of this knowledge to the introduction of new amino acids to proteins.

  9. A stochastic modeling of isotope exchange reactions in glutamine synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmiruk, N. V.; Boronovskiy, S. E.; Nartsissov, Ya R.

    2017-11-01

    The model presented in this work allows simulation of isotopic exchange reactions at chemical equilibrium catalyzed by a glutamine synthetase. To simulate the functioning of the enzyme the algorithm based on the stochastic approach was applied. The dependence of exchange rates for 14C and 32P on metabolite concentration was estimated. The simulation results confirmed the hypothesis of the ascertained validity for preferred order random binding mechanism. Corresponding values of K0.5 were also obtained.

  10. Crystal structure of carbapenam synthetase (CarA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew T; Gerratana, Barbara; Stapon, Anthony; Townsend, Craig A; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2003-10-17

    Carbapenam synthetase (CarA) is an ATP/Mg2+-dependent enzyme that catalyzes formation of the beta-lactam ring in (5R)-carbapenem-3-carboxylic acid biosynthesis. CarA is homologous to beta-lactam synthetase (beta-LS), which is involved in clavulanic acid biosynthesis. The catalytic cycles of CarA and beta-LS mediate substrate adenylation followed by beta-lactamization via a tetrahedral intermediate or transition state. Another member of this family of ATP/Mg2+-dependent enzymes, asparagine synthetase (AS-B), catalyzes intermolecular, rather than intramolecular, amide bond formation in asparagine biosynthesis. The crystal structures of apo-CarA and CarA complexed with the substrate (2S,5S)-5-carboxymethylproline (CMPr), ATP analog alpha,beta-methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate (AMP-CPP), and a single Mg2+ ion have been determined. CarA forms a tetramer. Each monomer resembles beta-LS and AS-B in overall fold, but key differences are observed. The N-terminal domain lacks the glutaminase active site found in AS-B, and an extended loop region not observed in beta-LS or AS-B is present. Comparison of the C-terminal synthetase active site to that in beta-LS reveals that the ATP binding site is highly conserved. By contrast, variations in the substrate binding pocket reflect the different substrates of the two enzymes. The Mg2+ coordination is also different. Several key residues in the active site are conserved between CarA and beta-LS, supporting proposed roles in beta-lactam formation. These data provide further insight into the structures of this class of enzymes and suggest that CarA might be a versatile target for protein engineering experiments aimed at developing improved production methods and new carbapenem antibiotics.

  11. Recurrent adenylation domain replacement in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laakso Kati

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microcystins are small cyclic heptapeptide toxins produced by a range of distantly related cyanobacteria. Microcystins are synthesized on large NRPS-PKS enzyme complexes. Many structural variants of microcystins are produced simulatenously. A recombination event between the first module of mcyB (mcyB1 and mcyC in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster is linked to the simultaneous production of microcystin variants in strains of the genus Microcystis. Results Here we undertook a phylogenetic study to investigate the order and timing of recombination between the mcyB1 and mcyC genes in a diverse selection of microcystin producing cyanobacteria. Our results provide support for complex evolutionary processes taking place at the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains which recognize and activate the amino acids found at X and Z positions. We find evidence for recent recombination between mcyB1 and mcyC in strains of the genera Anabaena, Microcystis, and Hapalosiphon. We also find clear evidence for independent adenylation domain conversion of mcyB1 by unrelated peptide synthetase modules in strains of the genera Nostoc and Microcystis. The recombination events replace only the adenylation domain in each case and the condensation domains of mcyB1 and mcyC are not transferred together with the adenylation domain. Our findings demonstrate that the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains are recombination hotspots in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster. Conclusion Recombination is thought to be one of the main mechanisms driving the diversification of NRPSs. However, there is very little information on how recombination takes place in nature. This study demonstrates that functional peptide synthetases are created in nature through transfer of adenylation domains without the concomitant transfer of condensation domains.

  12. ß-Lysine discrimination by lysyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilreath, Marla S; Roy, Hervé; Bullwinkle, Tammy J

    2011-01-01

    Elongation factor P is modified with (R)-ß-lysine by the lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS) paralog PoxA. PoxA specificity is orthogonal to LysRS, despite their high similarity. To investigate a- and ß-lysine recognition by LysRS and PoxA, amino acid replacements were made in the LysRS active site gui...

  13. Movement of the 3'-end of tRNA through the peptidyl transferase centre and its inhibition by antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirillov, Stanislav; Porse, Bo Torben; Vester, Birthe

    1997-01-01

    experimental data and, especially, those relevant to substrate movements through the peptidyl transferase centre. With the exception of deacylated tRNA, which binds at the E-site, ribosomal interactions of the 3'-ends of the tRNA substrates generate only a small part of the total free energy of t...

  14. Fatty Acid Synthetase of Spinacia oleracea Leaves 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakata, Takashi; Stumpf, Paul K.

    1982-01-01

    The molecular organization of fatty acid synthetase system in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. var. Viroflay) leaves was examined by a procedure similar to that employed for the safflower system (Carthamus tinctorius var. UC-1). The crude extract contained all the component activities (acetyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, β-ketoacyl-ACP synthetase, β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase, β-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydrase, and enoyl-ACP reductase [I]) involved in the synthesis of fatty acids, but enoyl-ACP reductase (II) present in safflower seeds extract could not be detected spectrophotometrically. By polyethylene glycol fractionation followed by several chromatographic procedures, i.e. Sephadex G-200, hydroxyapatite, and blue-agarose, the component enzymes were clearly separated from one another. Properties of β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase, β-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydrase, and enoyl-ACP reductase (I) from spinach were compared with the same enzymes in safflower seeds and Escherichia coli. From these results, it was concluded that the fatty acid synthetase system of spinach leaves, as well as that of safflower seeds, was nonassociated and similar to the Escherichia coli system. PMID:16662382

  15. Predicting the pathogenicity of novel variants in mitochondrial tRNA with MitoTIP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Sonney

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Novel or rare variants in mitochondrial tRNA sequences may be observed after mitochondrial DNA analysis. Determining whether these variants are pathogenic is critical, but confirmation of the effect of a variant on mitochondrial function can be challenging. We have used available databases of benign and pathogenic variants, alignment between diverse tRNAs, structural information and comparative genomics to predict the impact of all possible single-base variants and deletions. The Mitochondrial tRNA Informatics Predictor (MitoTIP is available through MITOMAP at www.mitomap.org. The source code for MitoTIP is available at www.github.com/sonneysa/MitoTIP.

  16. Biophysical analysis of Arabidopsis protein-only RNase P alone and in complex with tRNA provides a refined model of tRNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, Franziska; Schelcher, Cédric; Fernandez-Millan, Pablo; Gobert, Anthony; Birck, Catherine; Thureau, Aurélien; Roblin, Pierre; Giegé, Philippe; Sauter, Claude

    2017-08-25

    RNase P is a universal enzyme that removes 5' leader sequences from tRNA precursors. The enzyme is therefore essential for maturation of functional tRNAs and mRNA translation. RNase P represents a unique example of an enzyme that can occur either as ribonucleoprotein or as protein alone. The latter form of the enzyme, called protein-only RNase P (PRORP), is widespread in eukaryotes in which it can provide organellar or nuclear RNase P activities. Here, we have focused on Arabidopsis nuclear PRORP2 and its interaction with tRNA substrates. Affinity measurements helped assess the respective importance of individual pentatricopeptide repeat motifs in PRORP2 for RNA binding. We characterized the PRORP2 structure by X-ray crystallography and by small-angle X-ray scattering in solution as well as that of its complex with a tRNA precursor by small-angle X-ray scattering. Of note, our study reports the first structural data of a PRORP-tRNA complex. Combined with complementary biochemical and biophysical analyses, our structural data suggest that PRORP2 undergoes conformational changes to accommodate its substrate. In particular, the catalytic domain and the RNA-binding domain can move around a central hinge. Altogether, this work provides a refined model of the PRORP-tRNA complex that illustrates how protein-only RNase P enzymes specifically bind tRNA and highlights the contribution of protein dynamics to achieve this specific interaction. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. The eucaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex: suggestions for its structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases from eucaryotic cells generally are isolated as high molecular weight complexes comprised of multiple synthetase activities, and often containing other components as well. A model is proposed for the synthetase complex in which hydrophobic extensions on the proteins serve to maintain them in their high molecular weight form, but are not needed for catalytic activity. The structural similarity of these enzymes to certain membrane-bound proteins, and its implications for synthetase localization and function in vivo, are discussed. PMID:6746733

  18. Selective inhibition of type 2 fatty acid synthetase by the antibiotic thiolactomycin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Ikuo; Kawaguchi, Akihiko; Yamada, Mitsuhiro (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1984-03-01

    The antibiotic thiolactomycin inhibits the fatty acid synthesis from both (1-/sup 14/C)-acetate and (2/sup 14/C) malonyl-CoA of spinach leaves, developing castor bean endosperms and avocado mesocarp. On the other hand, fatty acid synthetases of Brevibacterium ammoniagenes and Corynebacterium glutamicum are much less sensitive to this antibiotic. As Hayashi et al. have indicated in their paper that thiolactomycin inhibits fatty acid synthetase of Escherichia coli but has little effect on the synthetases of yeast and rat liver, thiolactomycin is suggested to be a selective inhibitor of type 2 fatty acid synthetases.

  19. Affinity labelling in situ of the bL12 protein on E. coli 70S ribosomes by means of a tRNA dialdehyde derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hountondji, Codjo; Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Le Caër, Jean-Pierre; Lancelot, Véronique; Cognet, Jean A H; Baouz, Soria

    2017-12-01

    In this report, we have used periodate-oxidized tRNA (tRNAox) as an affinity laleling reagent to demonstrate that: (i) the bL12 protein contacts the CCA-arm of P-site bound tRNA on the Escherichia coli 70S ribosomes; (ii) the stoichiometry of labelling is one molecule of tRNAox bound to one polypeptide chain of endogenous bL12; (iii) cross-linking in situ of bL12 with tRNAox on the ribosomes provokes the loss of activity; (iv) intact tRNA protects bL12 in the 70S ribosomes against cross-linking with tRNAox; (v) both tRNAox and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) compete for the same or for proximal cross-linking site(s) on bL12 inside the ribosome; (vi) the stoichiometry of cross-linking of PLP to the recombinant E. coli bL12 protein is one molecule of PLP covalently bound per polypeptide chain; (vii) the amino acid residue of recombinant bL12 cross-linked with PLP is Lys-65; (viii) Lys-65 of E. coli bL12 corresponds to Lys-53 of eL42 which was previously shown to cross-link with P-site bound tRNAox on human 80S ribosomes in situ; (ix) finally, E. coli bL12 and human eL42 proteins display significant primary structure similarities, which argues for evolutionary conservation of these two proteins located at the tRNA-CCA binding site on eubacterial and eukaryal ribosomes. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Ribosome dynamics and tRNA movement by time-resolved electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Niels; Konevega, Andrey L; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V; Stark, Holger

    2010-07-15

    The translocation step of protein synthesis entails large-scale rearrangements of the ribosome-transfer RNA (tRNA) complex. Here we have followed tRNA movement through the ribosome during translocation by time-resolved single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Unbiased computational sorting of cryo-EM images yielded 50 distinct three-dimensional reconstructions, showing the tRNAs in classical, hybrid and various novel intermediate states that provide trajectories and kinetic information about tRNA movement through the ribosome. The structures indicate how tRNA movement is coupled with global and local conformational changes of the ribosome, in particular of the head and body of the small ribosomal subunit, and show that dynamic interactions between tRNAs and ribosomal residues confine the path of the tRNAs through the ribosome. The temperature dependence of ribosome dynamics reveals a surprisingly flat energy landscape of conformational variations at physiological temperature. The ribosome functions as a Brownian machine that couples spontaneous conformational changes driven by thermal energy to directed movement.

  1. Caveolin 3 gene and mitochondrial tRNA methionin gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Results gave further proof to decreased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA, which leads to increased expression in caveolin 3 mRNA in lymphocytes of DMD patients compared to controls. However using SSCP, there was no evidence for tRNA (Met) gene mutation among DMD patients and ...

  2. Protozoan ALKBH8 Oxygenases Display both DNA Repair and tRNA Modification Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zdżalik, Daria; Vågbø, Cathrine B; Kirpekar, Finn

    2014-01-01

    , interestingly, two protozoan ALKBH8s also catalyzed wobble uridine modification of tRNA, thus displaying a dual in vitro activity. Also, we found the modification status of tRNAGly(UCC) to be unaltered in an ALKBH8 deficient mutant of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, indicating that bacterial ALKBH8s have a function...

  3. Evolution of a tRNA operon in gamma purple bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, S; Cedergren, R

    1989-01-01

    Genomic DNA from eubacteria belonging to the gamma-3 subdivision of purple bacteria, as classified by Woese (C.R. Woese, Microbiol. Rev. 51:221-271, 1987), were probed with the argT operon of Escherichia coli encoding 5'-tRNA(Arg)-tRNA(His)-tRNA(Leu)-tRNA(Pro)-3'. The homologous operon from Vibrio harveyi was isolated and sequenced. Comparison of the five available sequences of this tRNA cluster from members of the families Enterobacteriaceae, Aeromonadaceae, and Vibrionaceae led to the conclusion that variations in different versions of this operon arose not only by point mutations but also by duplication and addition-deletion of entire tRNA genes. This data base permitted the formulation of a proposal dealing with the evolutionary history of this operon and suggested that DNA regions containing tRNA genes are active centers (hot spots) of recombination. Finally, since the operon from V. harveyi was not highly repetitive and did not contain tRNA pseudogenes, as in the Photobacterium phosphoreum operon, hybridization of genomic DNAs from different photobacterial strains with probes specific for the repeated pseudogene element was performed. We conclude that the phylogenetic distribution of the repetitive DNA is restricted to strains of P. phosphoreum. Images PMID:2687235

  4. Biochemical and Structures Studies of tRNA Modificaton and Repair Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chun

    2009-01-01

    RNA hypermodifications near the anticodon of tRNA are fundamental for the efficiency and fidelity of protein synthesis. Dimethylallyltransferase (DMATase) catalyzes transfer of a dimethylallyl moiety from dimethylallyl pyrophosphate to N6 of A37 in certain tRNAs. We first determined the crystal structures of "Pseudomonas aeruginosa" DMATase.…

  5. Machine News and Volatility: The Dow Jones Industrial Average and the TRNA Sentiment Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This paper features an analysis of the relationship between the volatility of the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) Index and a sentiment news series using daily data obtained from the Thomson Reuters News Analytics (TRNA) provided by SIRCA (The Securities Industry

  6. tRNA sequence data, annotation data and curation data - tRNADB-CE | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data List Contact us tRNA...DB-CE tRNA sequence data, annotation data and curation data Data detail Data name tRNA s...equence data, annotation data and curation data DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00720-001 Description of data contents Data of tRNA... search results and curation data. Three prediction programs (tRNAScan-SE, Aragorn and tRNA fi...nder) were used together to search tRNA genes. If the prediction results did not

  7. Mitochondrial tRNA cleavage by tRNA-targeting ribonuclease causes mitochondrial dysfunction observed in mitochondrial disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: atetsu@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shimizu, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Hidaka, Makoto; Masaki, Haruhiko, E-mail: amasaki@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • MTS-tagged ribonuclease was translocated successfully to the mitochondrial matrix. • MTS-tagged ribonuclease cleaved mt tRNA and reduced COX activity. • Easy and reproducible method of inducing mt tRNA dysfunction. - Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a genome possessed by mitochondria. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during aerobic respiration in mitochondria, mtDNA is commonly exposed to the risk of DNA damage. Mitochondrial disease is caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and mutations or deletions on mitochondrial tRNA (mt tRNA) genes are often observed in mtDNA of patients with the disease. Hence, the correlation between mt tRNA activity and mitochondrial dysfunction has been assessed. Then, cybrid cells, which are constructed by the fusion of an enucleated cell harboring altered mtDNA with a ρ{sup 0} cell, have long been used for the analysis due to difficulty in mtDNA manipulation. Here, we propose a new method that involves mt tRNA cleavage by a bacterial tRNA-specific ribonuclease. The ribonuclease tagged with a mitochondrial-targeting sequence (MTS) was successfully translocated to the mitochondrial matrix. Additionally, mt tRNA cleavage, which resulted in the decrease of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, was observed.

  8. Comparative analysis of nuclear tRNA genes of Nasonia vitripennis and other arthropods, and relationships to codon usage bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behura, S K; Stanke, M; Desjardins, C A; Werren, J H; Severson, D W

    2010-02-01

    Using bioinformatics methods, we identified a total of 221 and 199 tRNA genes in the nuclear genomes of Nasonia vitripennis and honey bee (Apis mellifera), respectively. We performed comparative analyses of Nasonia tRNA genes with honey bee and other selected insects to understand genomic distribution, sequence evolution and relationship of tRNA copy number with codon usage patterns. Many tRNA genes are located physically close to each other in the form of small clusters in the Nasonia genome. However, the number of clusters and the tRNA genes that form such clusters vary from species to species. In particular, the Ala-, Pro-, Tyr- and His-tRNA genes tend to accumulate in clusters in Nasonia but not in honey bee, whereas the bee contains a long cluster of 15 tRNA genes (of which 13 are Gln-tRNAs) that is absent in Nasonia. Though tRNA genes are highly conserved, contrasting patterns of nucleotide diversity are observed among the arm and loop regions of tRNAs between Nasonia and honey bee. Also, the sequence convergence between the reconstructed ancestral tRNAs and the present day tRNAs suggests a common ancestral origin of Nasonia and honey bee tRNAs. Furthermore, we also present evidence that the copy number of isoacceptor tRNAs (those having a different anticodon but charge the same amino acid) is correlated with codon usage patterns of highly expressed genes in Nasonia.

  9. Structural similarities and functional differences clarify evolutionary relationships between tRNA healing enzymes and the myelin enzyme CNPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandam, Gopinath; Raasakka, Arne; Myllykoski, Matti; Kursula, Inari; Kursula, Petri

    2017-05-16

    Eukaryotic tRNA splicing is an essential process in the transformation of a primary tRNA transcript into a mature functional tRNA molecule. 5'-phosphate ligation involves two steps: a healing reaction catalyzed by polynucleotide kinase (PNK) in association with cyclic phosphodiesterase (CPDase), and a sealing reaction catalyzed by an RNA ligase. The enzymes that catalyze tRNA healing in yeast and higher eukaryotes are homologous to the members of the 2H phosphoesterase superfamily, in particular to the vertebrate myelin enzyme 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase). We employed different biophysical and biochemical methods to elucidate the overall structural and functional features of the tRNA healing enzymes yeast Trl1 PNK/CPDase and lancelet PNK/CPDase and compared them with vertebrate CNPase. The yeast and the lancelet enzymes have cyclic phosphodiesterase and polynucleotide kinase activity, while vertebrate CNPase lacks PNK activity. In addition, we also show that the healing enzymes are structurally similar to the vertebrate CNPase by applying synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. We provide a structural analysis of the tRNA healing enzyme PNK and CPDase domains together. Our results support evolution of vertebrate CNPase from tRNA healing enzymes with a loss of function at its N-terminal PNK-like domain.

  10. Mutation of the Mitochondrial Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetase Gene, YARS2, Causes Myopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Sideroblastic Anemia—MLASA Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Lisa G.; Cooper, Sandra; Hickey, Peter; Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; McKenzie, Matthew; Compton, Alison; Lim, Sze Chern; Thorburn, David; Ryan, Michael T.; Giegé, Richard; Bahlo, Melanie; Christodoulou, John

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are a heterogeneous group of disorders in which the underlying genetic defect is often unknown. We have identified a pathogenic mutation (c.156C>G [p.F52L]) in YARS2, located at chromosome 12p11.21, by using genome-wide SNP-based homozygosity analysis of a family with affected members displaying myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA). We subsequently identified the same mutation in another unrelated MLASA patient. The YARS2 gene product, mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (YARS2), was present at lower levels in skeletal muscle whereas fibroblasts were relatively normal. Complex I, III, and IV were dysfunctional as indicated by enzyme analysis, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. A mitochondrial protein-synthesis assay showed reduced levels of respiratory chain subunits in myotubes generated from patient cell lines. A tRNA aminoacylation assay revealed that mutant YARS2 was still active; however, enzyme kinetics were abnormal compared to the wild-type protein. We propose that the reduced aminoacylation activity of mutant YARS2 enzyme leads to decreased mitochondrial protein synthesis, resulting in mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction. MLASA has previously been associated with PUS1 mutations; hence, the YARS2 mutation reported here is an alternative cause of MLASA. PMID:20598274

  11. Structural analysis of FAD synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina Milagros

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prokaryotic FAD synthetase family – a group of bifunctional enzymes that catalyse riboflavin phosphorylation and FMN adenylylation within a single polypeptide chain- was analysed in terms of sequence and structure. Results Sequences of nearly 800 prokaryotic species were aligned. Those related with bifunctional FAD synthetase activities showed conservation of several consensus regions and highly conserved residues. A 3D model for the FAD synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes (CaFADS was generated. This model confirms that the N-terminal and C-terminal domains are related to nucleotydyltransferases and riboflavin kinases, respectively. Models for the interaction of CaFADS with its substrates were also produced, allowing location of all the protein substrates in their putative binding pockets. These include two independent flavin binding sites for each CaFADS activity. Conclusion For the first time, the putative presence of a flavin binding site for the adenylylation activity, independent from that related with the phosphorylation activity, is shown. Additionally, these models suggest the functional relevance of some residues putatively involved in the catalytic processes. Their relevant roles were analysed by site-directed mutagenesis. A role was confirmed for H28, H31, S164 and T165 in the stabilisation of the P groups and the adenine moiety of ATP and, the P of FMN for the adenylylation. Similarly, T208, N210 and E268 appear critical for accommodation of the P groups of ATP and the ribityl end of RF in the active site for the phosphorylation process. Finally, the C-terminal domain was shown to catalyse the phosphorylation process on its own, but no reaction at all was observed with the individually expressed N-terminal domain.

  12. Glutamine versus ammonia utilization in the NAD synthetase family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica De Ingeniis

    Full Text Available NAD is a ubiquitous and essential metabolic redox cofactor which also functions as a substrate in certain regulatory pathways. The last step of NAD synthesis is the ATP-dependent amidation of deamido-NAD by NAD synthetase (NADS. Members of the NADS family are present in nearly all species across the three kingdoms of Life. In eukaryotic NADS, the core synthetase domain is fused with a nitrilase-like glutaminase domain supplying ammonia for the reaction. This two-domain NADS arrangement enabling the utilization of glutamine as nitrogen donor is also present in various bacterial lineages. However, many other bacterial members of NADS family do not contain a glutaminase domain, and they can utilize only ammonia (but not glutamine in vitro. A single-domain NADS is also characteristic for nearly all Archaea, and its dependence on ammonia was demonstrated here for the representative enzyme from Methanocaldococcus jannaschi. However, a question about the actual in vivo nitrogen donor for single-domain members of the NADS family remained open: Is it glutamine hydrolyzed by a committed (but yet unknown glutaminase subunit, as in most ATP-dependent amidotransferases, or free ammonia as in glutamine synthetase? Here we addressed this dilemma by combining evolutionary analysis of the NADS family with experimental characterization of two representative bacterial systems: a two-subunit NADS from Thermus thermophilus and a single-domain NADS from Salmonella typhimurium providing evidence that ammonia (and not glutamine is the physiological substrate of a typical single-domain NADS. The latter represents the most likely ancestral form of NADS. The ability to utilize glutamine appears to have evolved via recruitment of a glutaminase subunit followed by domain fusion in an early branch of Bacteria. Further evolution of the NADS family included lineage-specific loss of one of the two alternative forms and horizontal gene transfer events. Lastly, we identified NADS

  13. Increased hepatic glycogen synthetase and decreased phosphorylase in trained rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbo, H; Saugmann, P; Richter, Erik

    1979-01-01

    Rats were either physically trained by a 12 wk swimming program or were freely eating or weight matched, sedentary controls. Trained rats had a higher relative liver weight and total hepatic glycogen synthetase (EC 2.4.1.11) activity and a lower phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1) activity than the other...... groups of rats. These changes may partly explain the demonstrated training-induced increase in glucose tolerance. None of the findings could be ascribed to differences in foold intake or body weight....

  14. Primer Dependent and Independent Forms of Soluble Starch Synthetase from Developing Barley Endosperms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreis, M.

    1980-01-01

    The activity of soluble starch synthetase (ADP-glucose: agr-1,4-glucan agr-4-glucosyltransferase) in the non-purified extract from 16 day-old Bomi barley endosperms (Hordeum vulgare L.) was low and the reaction was non-linear when plotted against protein concentration. Starch synthetase was purif...

  15. Uroporphyrinogen-I-synthetase activity in red blood cells of lead-exposed workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Waseef, A.

    1982-01-01

    Lead-exposed (n . 26) and control (n . 12) subjects were investigated for their blood lead concentration erythrocyte 5-amino-laevulinic acid dehydratase (5-ALAD) and erythrocyte uroporphyrinogen-I-synthetase (URO-I-S) activity; 5-amino-laevulinic acid (5-ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG) were used as substrates in the synthetase assay. In the lead workers erythrocyte 5-ALA dehydratase was grossly inhibited but with PBG as substrate the synthetase activity was not significantly different from the control group. With 5-ALA as substrate the synthetase assay showed marked inhibition. Addition of zinc (0.1 mmol/l) and dithiotheritol (0.5 mmol/l) brought the activities of both the dehydratase and synthetase (using 5-ALA as substrate) back into the ranges seen in the control group. With porphobilinogen as substrate higher concentrations of zinc caused inhibition of the synthetase, whilst reduction of added zinc to 0.01 mmol/l resulted in stimulation of the synthetase. A good correlation (r . 0.87) was obtained in synthetase assay when PBG and 5-aminolaevulinate (with added zinc and dithiothreitol) were used as substrates. With these additions 5-ALA may be used as a substrate in the URO-I-S assay in the investigation of latent cases of acute intermittent porphyria.

  16. Crystal structure analysis reveals functional flexibility in the selenocysteine-specific tRNA from mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg M Ganichkin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selenocysteine tRNAs (tRNA(Sec exhibit a number of unique identity elements that are recognized specifically by proteins of the selenocysteine biosynthetic pathways and decoding machineries. Presently, these identity elements and the mechanisms by which they are interpreted by tRNA(Sec-interacting factors are incompletely understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied rational mutagenesis to obtain well diffracting crystals of murine tRNA(Sec. tRNA(Sec lacking the single-stranded 3'-acceptor end ((ΔGCCARNA(Sec yielded a crystal structure at 2.0 Å resolution. The global structure of (ΔGCCARNA(Sec resembles the structure of human tRNA(Sec determined at 3.1 Å resolution. Structural comparisons revealed flexible regions in tRNA(Sec used for induced fit binding to selenophosphate synthetase. Water molecules located in the present structure were involved in the stabilization of two alternative conformations of the anticodon stem-loop. Modeling of a 2'-O-methylated ribose at position U34 of the anticodon loop as found in a sub-population of tRNA(Secin vivo showed how this modification favors an anticodon loop conformation that is functional during decoding on the ribosome. Soaking of crystals in Mn(2+-containing buffer revealed eight potential divalent metal ion binding sites but the located metal ions did not significantly stabilize specific structural features of tRNA(Sec. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide the most highly resolved structure of a tRNA(Sec molecule to date and assessed the influence of water molecules and metal ions on the molecule's conformation and dynamics. Our results suggest how conformational changes of tRNA(Sec support its interaction with proteins.

  17. Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency pre and post newborn screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraka R. Donti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of biotin metabolism resulting in multiple carboxylase deficiency. The typical presentation described in the medical literature is of neonatal onset within hours to weeks of birth with emesis, hypotonia, lethargy, seizures, metabolic ketolactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, developmental delay, skin rash and alopecia. The condition is screened for by newborn screening (NBS tandem mass spectroscopy by elevated hydroxypentanoylcarnitine on dried blood spots. Urine organic acid profile may demonstrate elevated lactic, 3-OH isovaleric, 3-OH propionic, 3-MCC, methylcitric acids, and tiglylglycine consistent with loss of function of the above carboxylases. Here we describe a cohort of patients, 2 diagnosed pre-NBS and 3 post-NBS with broad differences in initial presentation and phenotype. In addition, prior to the advent of NBS, there are isolated reports of late-onset holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the medical literature, which describe patients diagnosed between 1 and 8 years of life, however to our knowledge there are no reports of late-onset HCLS being missed by NBS. Also we report two cases, each with novel pathogenic variants HCLS, diagnosed at age 3 years and 21 months respectively. The first patient had a normal newborn screen whilst the second had an abnormal newborn screen but was misdiagnosed as 3-methylcrotonylcarboxylase (3-MCC deficiency and subsequently lost to follow-up until they presented again with severe metabolic acidosis.

  18. Protein Synthesis in E. coli: Dependence of Codon-Specific Elongation on tRNA Concentration and Codon Usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudorf, Sophia; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    To synthesize a protein, a ribosome moves along a messenger RNA (mRNA), reads it codon by codon, and takes up the corresponding ternary complexes which consist of aminoacylated transfer RNAs (aa-tRNAs), elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), and GTP. During this process of translation elongation, the ribosome proceeds with a codon-specific rate. Here, we present a general theoretical framework to calculate codon-specific elongation rates and error frequencies based on tRNA concentrations and codon usages. Our theory takes three important aspects of in-vivo translation elongation into account. First, non-cognate, near-cognate and cognate ternary complexes compete for the binding sites on the ribosomes. Second, the corresponding binding rates are determined by the concentrations of free ternary complexes, which must be distinguished from the total tRNA concentrations as measured in vivo. Third, for each tRNA species, the difference between total tRNA and ternary complex concentration depends on the codon usages of the corresponding cognate and near-cognate codons. Furthermore, we apply our theory to two alternative pathways for tRNA release from the ribosomal E site and show how the mechanism of tRNA release influences the concentrations of free ternary complexes and thus the codon-specific elongation rates. Using a recently introduced method to determine kinetic rates of in-vivo translation from in-vitro data, we compute elongation rates for all codons in Escherichia coli. We show that for some tRNA species only a few tRNA molecules are part of ternary complexes and, thus, available for the translating ribosomes. In addition, we find that codon-specific elongation rates strongly depend on the overall codon usage in the cell, which could be altered experimentally by overexpression of individual genes.

  19. An evolutionary approach uncovers a diverse response of tRNA 2-thiolation to elevated temperatures in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alings, Fiona; Sarin, L Peter; Fufezan, Christian; Drexler, Hannes C A; Leidel, Sebastian A

    2015-02-01

    Chemical modifications of transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules are evolutionarily well conserved and critical for translation and tRNA structure. Little is known how these nucleoside modifications respond to physiological stress. Using mass spectrometry and complementary methods, we defined tRNA modification levels in six yeast species in response to elevated temperatures. We show that 2-thiolation of uridine at position 34 (s(2)U34) is impaired at temperatures exceeding 30°C in the commonly used Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains S288C and W303, and in Saccharomyces bayanus. Upon stress relief, thiolation levels recover and we find no evidence that modified tRNA or s(2)U34 nucleosides are actively removed. Our results suggest that loss of 2-thiolation follows accumulation of newly synthesized tRNA that lack s(2)U34 modification due to temperature sensitivity of the URM1 pathway in S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Furthermore, our analysis of the tRNA modification pattern in selected yeast species revealed two alternative phenotypes. Most strains moderately increase their tRNA modification levels in response to heat, possibly constituting a common adaptation to high temperatures. However, an overall reduction of nucleoside modifications was observed exclusively in S288C. This surprising finding emphasizes the importance of studies that utilize the power of evolutionary biology, and highlights the need for future systematic studies on tRNA modifications in additional model organisms. © 2015 Alings et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  20. Characterization of a whole set of tRNA molecules in an aerobic hyper-thermophilic Crenarchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Syuji; Kikuchi, Hisashi; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka

    2005-01-01

    The tRNA molecule has an important role in translation, the function of which is to carry amino acids to the ribosomes. It is known that tRNA is transcribed from tRNA genes, some of which, in Eukarya and Archaea, contain introns. A computational analysis of the complete genome of Aeropyrum pernix K1 predicted the presence of 14 intron-containing tRNA genes. To elucidate whether these introns are actually processed in living cells and what mechanism detects the intron regions, cDNAs for premature and mature forms of the tRNA molecules transcribed from the intron-containing tRNA genes in the model aerobic acidothermophilic crenarchaeon, A. pernix K1 were identified and analyzed. A comparison between the nucleotide sequences of these two types of cDNAs indicated that the intron regions of the tRNA molecules were indeed processed in A. pernix K1 living cells. Some cDNA clones showed that the actual splicing positions were different from those predicted by computational analysis. However, the bulge-helix-bulge structure, which has been previously identified in exon-intron boundaries of archaeal tRNA genes, was evident in all boundary regions confirmed in this work. These results indicate that the generally described mechanism for tRNA processing in Archaea is utilized for processing the intron region of the tRNA molecules in A. pernix K1.

  1. Translational infidelity-induced protein stress results from a deficiency in Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ashish; Chan, Clement T Y; Dyavaiah, Madhu; Rooney, John P; Dedon, Peter C; Begley, Thomas J

    2012-07-01

    Correct codon-anticodon pairing promotes translational fidelity, with these interactions greatly facilitated by modified nucleosides found in tRNA. We hypothesized that wobble uridine modifications catalyzed by tRNA methyltransferase 9 (Trm9) are essential for translational fidelity. In support, we have used phenotypic, reporter and protein-based assays to demonstrate increased translational infidelity in trm9Δ Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Codon reengineering studies suggest that Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications promote fidelity during the translation of specific genes, those rich in arginine and glutamic acid codons from mixed boxes. Using quantitative tRNA modification analysis, we determined that trm9Δ cells are only deficient in 2 of 23 tRNA modifications, with those 2, 5-methoxycarbonylmethyluridine (mcm ( 5) U) and 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm ( 5) s ( 2) U), classified as key determinants of translational fidelity. We also show that in the absence of mcm ( 5) U and mcm ( 5) s ( 2) U, the resulting translational infidelity promotes protein errors and activation of unfolded protein and heat shock responses. These data support a model in which Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications promote fidelity during the translation of specific transcripts, with decreased wobble base modification leading to translational infidelity, protein errors and activation of protein stress response pathways.

  2. Plant-Specific Preprotein and Amino Acid Transporter Proteins Are Required for tRNA Import into Mitochondria1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Teixeira, Pedro F.; Narsai, Reena; Ivanova, Aneta; Megel, Cyrille; Schock, Annette; Kraus, Sabrina; Glaser, Elzbieta; Philippar, Katrin; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Soll, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A variety of eukaryotes, in particular plants, do not contain the required number of tRNAs to support the translation of mitochondria-encoded genes and thus need to import tRNAs from the cytosol. This study identified two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) proteins, Tric1 and Tric2 (for tRNA import component), which on simultaneous inactivation by T-DNA insertion lines displayed a severely delayed and chlorotic growth phenotype and significantly reduced tRNA import capacity into isolated mitochondria. The predicted tRNA-binding domain of Tric1 and Tric2, a sterile-α-motif at the C-terminal end of the protein, was required to restore tRNA uptake ability in mitochondria of complemented plants. The purified predicted tRNA-binding domain binds the T-arm of the tRNA for alanine with conserved lysine residues required for binding. T-DNA inactivation of both Tric proteins further resulted in an increase in the in vitro rate of in organello protein synthesis, which was mediated by a reorganization of the nuclear transcriptome, in particular of genes encoding a variety of proteins required for mitochondrial gene expression at both the transcriptional and translational levels. The characterization of Tric1/2 provides mechanistic insight into the process of tRNA import into mitochondria and supports the theory that the tRNA import pathway resulted from the repurposing of a preexisting protein import apparatus. PMID:27789739

  3. Hydrophobic Properties of tRNA with Varied Conformations Evaluated by an Aqueous Two-Phase System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Keishi; Tomita, Hibiki; Tanaka, Seishiro; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The surface properties of transfer RNA (tRNA) were analyzed using a poly(ethylene glycol)/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS), where the surface net hydrophobicity (HFS) and the local hydrophobicity (LH) were evaluated based on the partition coefficient of tRNA in the ATPS. According to the evaluated HFS values, the surface of the tRNA molecule was hydrophilic at 20° -40 °C, and it became hydrophobic at 50° -80 °C because of the exposure of the intrinsic nucleobases of tRNA. In contrast, the LH values were found to be maximal at 20° -40 °C. The conformation of tRNA was investigated by Raman and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, corroborating the results with the calculated prediction of its secondary structure (Mfold). It was shown that 66% of A-form structure existed at room temperature; the base stacking (θ265) was gradually decreased, and the A-form structure (θ208) was denatured along with a sigmoid curve against the temperature increase; the denatured secondary structures were observed above 50° C by Mfold prediction. The HFS value of the DNA duplex was found to be hydrophilic, compared to that of the single-stranded DNA, indicating that the exposure of nucleobases is a key factor of the hydrophobic properties of nucleotides. We conclude that the hydrophobic property of the tRNA surface was directly affected by its conformational transition. PMID:23091416

  4. Preparation of Translationally Competent tRNA by Direct Chemical Acylation

    OpenAIRE

    Duffy, Noah H.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    2010-01-01

    Nonsense codon suppression for unnatural amino acid incorporation requires the preparation of a suppressor aminoacyl-tRNA. Chemical acylation strategies are general but inefficient and arduous. A recent report (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 15848) showed acylation of RNA mediated by lanthanum(III) using amino acid phosphate esters. The successful implementation of this methodology to full-length suppressor tRNA is described, and it is shown that the derived aminoacyl-tRNA is translationally co...

  5. Antenatal and postnatal radiologic diagnosis of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandaralage, Sahan P.S. [Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service, Southport, Queensland (Australia); Griffith University, School of Medicine, Southport, Queensland (Australia); Farnaghi, Soheil [Caboolture Hospital, Caboolture, Queensland (Australia); Dulhunty, Joel M.; Kothari, Alka [Redcliffe Hospital, Redcliffe, Queensland (Australia); The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Herston, Queensland (Australia)

    2016-03-15

    Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency results in impaired activation of enzymes implicated in glucose, fatty acid and amino acid metabolism. Antenatal imaging and postnatal imaging are useful in making the diagnosis. Untreated holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is fatal, while antenatal and postnatal biotin supplementation is associated with good clinical outcomes. Although biochemical assays are required for definitive diagnosis, certain radiologic features assist in the diagnosis of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency. To review evidence regarding radiologic diagnostic features of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the antenatal and postnatal period. A systematic review of all published cases of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency identified by a search of Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Science. A total of 75 patients with holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency were identified from the systematic review, which screened 687 manuscripts. Most patients with imaging (19/22, 86%) had abnormal findings, the most common being subependymal cysts, ventriculomegaly and intraventricular hemorrhage. Although the radiologic features of subependymal cysts, ventriculomegaly, intraventricular hemorrhage and intrauterine growth restriction may be found in the setting of other pathologies, these findings should prompt consideration of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in at-risk children. (orig.)

  6. Sequence-dependent base-stacking stabilities guide tRNA folding energy landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongzhong; Ge, Heming W; Cho, Samuel S

    2013-10-24

    The folding of bacterial tRNAs with disparate sequences has been observed to proceed in distinct folding mechanisms despite their structural similarity. To explore the folding landscapes of tRNA, we performed ion concentration-dependent coarse-grained TIS model MD simulations of several E. coli tRNAs to compare their thermodynamic melting profiles to the classical absorbance spectra of Crothers and co-workers. To independently validate our findings, we also performed atomistic empirical force field MD simulations of tRNAs, and we compared the base-to-base distances from coarse-grained and atomistic MD simulations to empirical base-stacking free energies. We then projected the free energies to the secondary structural elements of tRNA, and we observe distinct, parallel folding mechanisms whose differences can be inferred on the basis of their sequence-dependent base-stacking stabilities. In some cases, a premature, nonproductive folding intermediate corresponding to the Ψ hairpin loop must backtrack to the unfolded state before proceeding to the folded state. This observation suggests a possible explanation for the fast and slow phases observed in tRNA folding kinetics.

  7. Silent Polymorphisms: Can the tRNA Population Explain Changes in Protein Properties?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Fernández-Calero

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Silent mutations are being intensively studied. We previously showed that the estrogen receptor alpha Ala87’s synonymous polymorphism affects its functional properties. Whereas a link has been clearly established between the effect of silent mutations, tRNA abundance and protein folding in prokaryotes, this connection remains controversial in eukaryotic systems. Although a synonymous polymorphism can affect mRNA structure or the interaction with specific ligands, it seems that the relative frequencies of isoacceptor tRNAs could play a key role in the protein-folding process, possibly through modulation of translation kinetics. Conformational changes could be subtle but enough to cause alterations in solubility, proteolysis profiles, functional parameters or intracellular targeting. Interestingly, recent advances describe dramatic changes in the tRNA population associated with proliferation, differentiation or response to chemical, physical or biological stress. In addition, several reports reveal changes in tRNAs’ posttranscriptional modifications in different physiological or pathological conditions. In consequence, since changes in the cell state imply quantitative and/or qualitative changes in the tRNA pool, they could increase the likelihood of protein conformational variants, related to a particular codon usage during translation, with consequences of diverse significance. These observations emphasize the importance of genetic code flexibility in the co-translational protein-folding process.

  8. Horizontal gene transfer of chlamydial-like tRNA genes into early vascular plant mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knie, Nils; Polsakiewicz, Monika; Knoop, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial genomes of lycophytes are surprisingly diverse, including strikingly different transfer RNA (tRNA) gene complements: No mitochondrial tRNA genes are present in the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii, whereas 26 tRNAs are encoded in the chondrome of the clubmoss Huperzia squarrosa. Reinvestigating the latter we found that trnL(gag) and trnS(gga) had never before been identified in any other land plant mitochondrial DNA. Sensitive sequence comparisons showed these two tRNAs as well as trnN(guu) and trnS(gcu) to be very similar to their respective counterparts in chlamydial bacteria. We identified homologs of these chlamydial-type tRNAs also in other lycophyte, fern, and gymnosperm DNAs, suggesting horizontal gene transfer (HGT) into mitochondria in the early vascular plant stem lineages. These findings extend plant mitochondrial HGT to affect individual tRNA genes, to include bacterial donors, and suggest that Chlamydiae on top of their recently proposed key role in primary chloroplast establishment may also have participated in early tracheophyte genome evolution. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. RNase MRP cleaves pre-tRNASer-Met in the tRNA maturation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuichiro; Takeda, Jun; Adachi, Kousuke; Nobe, Yuko; Kobayashi, Junya; Hirota, Kouji; Oliveira, Douglas V; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease mitochondrial RNA processing (RNase MRP) is a multifunctional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is involved in the maturation of various types of RNA including ribosomal RNA. RNase MRP consists of a potential catalytic RNA and several protein components, all of which are required for cell viability. We show here that the temperature-sensitive mutant of rmp1, the gene for a unique protein component of RNase MRP, accumulates the dimeric tRNA precursor, pre-tRNA(Ser-Met). To examine whether RNase MRP mediates tRNA maturation, we purified the RNase MRP holoenzyme from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and found that the enzyme directly and selectively cleaves pre-tRNA(Ser-Met), suggesting that RNase MRP participates in the maturation of specific tRNA in vivo. In addition, mass spectrometry-based ribonucleoproteomic analysis demonstrated that this RNase MRP consists of one RNA molecule and 11 protein components, including a previously unknown component Rpl701. Notably, limited nucleolysis of RNase MRP generated an active catalytic core consisting of partial mrp1 RNA fragments, which constitute "Domain 1" in the secondary structure of RNase MRP, and 8 proteins. Thus, the present study provides new insight into the structure and function of RNase MRP.

  10. A modified dinucleotide motif specifies tRNA recognition by TLR7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Steffen; Rimbach, Katharina; Eigenbrod, Tatjana; Dalpke, Alexander H; Helm, Mark

    2014-09-01

    RNA can function as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) whose recognition by the innate immune system alerts the body to an impending microbial infection. The recognition of tRNA as either self or nonself RNA by TLR7 depends on its modification patterns. In particular, it is known that the presence of a ribose methylated guanosine at position 18, which is overrepresented in self-RNA, antagonizes an immune response. Here, we report that recognition extends to the next downstream nucleotide and the effectively recognized molecular detail is actually a methylated dinucleotide. The most efficient nucleobases combination of this motif includes two purines, while pyrimidines diminish the effect of ribose methylation. The constraints of this motif stay intact when transposed to other parts of the tRNA. The results argue against a fixed orientation of the tRNA during interaction with TLR7 and, rather, suggest a processive type of inspection. © 2014 Kaiser et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  11. Fluorescent labeling of tRNA dihydrouridine residues: Mechanism and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jaskiran; Raj, Monika; Cooperman, Barry S.

    2011-01-01

    Dihydrouridine (DHU) positions within tRNAs have long been used as sites to covalently attach fluorophores, by virtue of their unique chemical reactivity toward reduction by NaBH4, their abundance within prokaryotic and eukaryotic tRNAs, and the biochemical functionality of the labeled tRNAs so produced. Interpretation of experiments employing labeled tRNAs can depend on knowing the distribution of dye among the DHU positions present in a labeled tRNA. Here we combine matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectroscopy (MALDI-MS) analysis of oligonucleotide fragments and thin layer chromatography to resolve and quantify sites of DHU labeling by the fluorophores Cy3, Cy5, and proflavin in Escherichia coli tRNAPhe and E. coli tRNAArg. The MALDI-MS results led us to re-examine the precise chemistry of the reactions that result in fluorophore introduction into tRNA. We demonstrate that, in contrast to an earlier suggestion that has long been unchallenged in the literature, such introduction proceeds via a substitution reaction on tetrahydrouridine, the product of NaBH4 reduction of DHU, resulting in formation of substituted tetrahydrocytidines within tRNA. PMID:21628433

  12. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase (ASNS) suppresses cell proliferation and inhibits tumor growth in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qingxiang; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Li; Zheng, Jia; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Bangmao

    2016-10-01

    Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine. ASNS is deemed as a promising therapeutic target and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance in several human cancers. However, its role in gastric cancer tumorigenesis has not been investigated. In this study, we employed small interfering RNA (siRNA) to transiently knockdown ASNS in two gastric cancer cell lines, AGS and MKN-45, followed by growth rate assay and colony formation assay. Dose response curve analysis was performed in AGS and MKN-45 cells with stable ASNS knockdown to assess sensitivity to cisplatin. Xenograft experiment was performed to examine in vivo synergistic effects of ASNS depletion and cisplatin on tumor growth. Expression level of ASNS was evaluated in human patient samples using quantitative PCR. Kaplan-Meier curve analysis was performed to evaluate association between ASNS expression and patient survival. Transient knockdown of ASNS inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in AGS and MKN-45 cells. Stable knockdown of ASNS conferred sensitivity to cisplatin in these cells. Depletion of ASNS and cisplatin treatment exerted synergistic effects on tumor growth in AGS xenografts. Moreover, ASNS was found to be up-regulated in human gastric cancer tissues compared with matched normal colon tissues. Low expression of ASNS was significantly associated with better survival in gastric cancer patients. ASNS may contribute to gastric cancer tumorigenesis and may represent a novel therapeutic target for prevention or intervention of gastric cancer.

  13. The Sites of Transcription and Translation for Euglena Chloroplastic Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, L. I.; Egan, J.; Reynolds, R. J.; Nix, C. E.; Schiff, J. A.; Barnett, W. Edgar

    1974-01-01

    We find that cycloheximide completely blocks the light-induced apearance of Euglena chloroplastic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in dark-grown cells of Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris. Streptomycin, on the other hand, has no effect on the light-induction of these organellar enzymes. These observations, together with the finding that an aplastidic mutant (strain W3BUL, which has neither significant plastid structure nor detectable chloroplast DNA) contains low levels of the chloroplastic synthetases, indicate that the chloroplastic synthetases are transcriptional products of nuclear genes and are translated on cytoplasmic ribosomes prior to compartmentalization within the chloroplasts. PMID:4525469

  14. Regulation of Angiogenesis by Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Mirando

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their canonical roles in translation the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs have developed secondary functions over the course of evolution. Many of these activities are associated with cellular survival and nutritional stress responses essential for homeostatic processes in higher eukaryotes. In particular, six ARSs and one associated factor have documented functions in angiogenesis. However, despite their connection to this process, the ARSs are mechanistically distinct and exhibit a range of positive or negative effects on aspects of endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and survival. This variability is achieved through the appearance of appended domains and interplay with inflammatory pathways not found in prokaryotic systems. Complete knowledge of the non-canonical functions of ARSs is necessary to understand the mechanisms underlying the physiological regulation of angiogenesis.

  15. Transformation of Bacillus Subtilis with cloned thymidylate synthetases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Edward M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Biology and Biophysics

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis carries two genes, thyA and thyB, each encoding different protein products, with thymidylate synthetase (TSase) activity. Either of these genes alone is sufficient for thymidine independence in B. subtilis. In addition there exist two B. subtilis temperate bacteriophages which upon infection of thymine requiring auxotrophs results in conversion of the organism to thymine independence. Chimeric plasmids selected for Thy+ transforming activity in E. coli were constructed and then used as a source of defined highly enriched DNA with which to transform competent B. subtilis. These plasmids were studied for their: (1) abiility to transform B. subtilis to thymine independence; (2) site of integration within the B. subtilis chromosome upon transformation; (3) phenotype of Thy+ plasmid generated transformants; and (4) nucleotide sequence homology among the cloned DNA fragments conferring thymine independence. Plasmids containing the two bacteriophage thy genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyA, whereas the plasmids containing the cloned B. subtilis chromosomal genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyB. Utilizing similar technology, the ability of an entirely foreign hybred bacterial plasmiid to transform B. subtilis was examined. In this case the gene from E. coli encoding thymidylate synthetase was cloned in the plasmid pBR322. The resulting chimeric plasmid was effective in transforming both E. coli and B. subtilis to thymine prototrophy. Uncloned linear E. coli chromosomal DNA was unable to transform thymine requiring strains of B. subtilis to thymine independence. Although the Thy/sup +/ transformants of E. coli contained plasmid DNA, the Thy+ transformants derived from the transformation of B. subtilis did not contain detectable extrachromosomal DNA. Instead the DNA from the chimeric plasmid was integrated into the chromosome of B. subtilis. (ERB)

  16. Genetic code in evolution: switching species-specific aminoacylation with a peptide transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakasugi, K; Quinn, C L; Tao, N; Schimmel, P

    1998-01-02

    The genetic code is established in aminoacylation reactions whereby amino acids are joined to tRNAs bearing the anticodons of the genetic code. Paradoxically, while the code is universal there are many examples of species-specific aminoacylations, where a tRNA from one taxonomic domain cannot be acylated by a synthetase from another. Here we consider an example where a human, but not a bacterial, tRNA synthetase charges its cognate eukaryotic tRNA and where the bacterial, but not the human, enzyme charges the cognate bacterial tRNA. While the bacterial enzyme has less than 10% sequence identity with the human enzyme, transplantation of a 39 amino acid peptide from the human into the bacterial enzyme enabled the latter to charge its eukaryotic tRNA counterpart in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, substitution of the corresponding peptide of the bacterial enzyme for that of the human enabled the human enzyme to charge bacterial tRNA. This peptide element discriminates a base pair difference in the respective tRNA acceptor stems. Thus, functionally important co-adaptations of a synthetase to its tRNA act as small modular units that can be moved across taxonomic domains and thereby preserve the universality of the code.

  17. From (p)ppGpp to (pp)pGpp: Characterization of Regulatory Effects of pGpp Synthesized by the Small Alarmone Synthetase of Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaca, Anthony O; Kudrin, Pavel; Colomer-Winter, Cristina; Beljantseva, Jelena; Liu, Kuanqing; Anderson, Brent; Wang, Jue D; Rejman, Dominik; Potrykus, Katarzyna; Cashel, Michael; Hauryliuk, Vasili; Lemos, José A

    2015-09-01

    The bacterial stringent response (SR) is a conserved stress tolerance mechanism that orchestrates physiological alterations to enhance cell survival. This response is mediated by the intracellular accumulation of the alarmones pppGpp and ppGpp, collectively called (p)ppGpp. In Enterococcus faecalis, (p)ppGpp metabolism is carried out by the bifunctional synthetase/hydrolase E. faecalis Rel (RelEf) and the small alarmone synthetase (SAS) RelQEf. Although Rel is the main enzyme responsible for SR activation in Firmicutes, there is emerging evidence that SASs can make important contributions to bacterial homeostasis. Here, we showed that RelQEf synthesizes ppGpp more efficiently than pppGpp without the need for ribosomes, tRNA, or mRNA. In addition to (p)ppGpp synthesis from GDP and GTP, RelQEf also efficiently utilized GMP to form GMP 3'-diphosphate (pGpp). Based on this observation, we sought to determine if pGpp exerts regulatory effects on cellular processes affected by (p)ppGpp. We found that pGpp, like (p)ppGpp, strongly inhibits the activity of E. faecalis enzymes involved in GTP biosynthesis and, to a lesser extent, transcription of rrnB by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. Activation of E. coli RelA synthetase activity was observed in the presence of both pGpp and ppGpp, while RelQEf was activated only by ppGpp. Furthermore, enzymatic activity of RelQEf is insensitive to relacin, a (p)ppGpp analog developed as an inhibitor of "long" RelA/SpoT homolog (RSH) enzymes. We conclude that pGpp can likely function as a bacterial alarmone with target-specific regulatory effects that are similar to what has been observed for (p)ppGpp. Accumulation of the nucleotide second messengers (p)ppGpp in bacteria is an important signal regulating genetic and physiological networks contributing to stress tolerance, antibiotic persistence, and virulence. Understanding the function and regulation of the enzymes involved in (p)ppGpp turnover is therefore critical for designing

  18. Structural Aspects of Phenylalanylation and Quality Control in Three Major Forms of Phenylalanyl-tRNA Synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Klipcan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs are a canonical set of enzymes that specifically attach corresponding amino acids to their cognate transfer RNAs in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, and nucleus. The aaRSs display great differences in primary sequence, subunit size, and quaternary structure. Existence of three types of phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS—bacterial (αβ2, eukaryotic/archaeal cytosolic (αβ2, and mitochondrial α—is a prominent example of structural diversity within the aaRSs family. Although archaeal/eukaryotic and bacterial PheRSs share common topology of the core domains and the B3/B4 interface, where editing activity of heterotetrameric PheRSs is localized, the detailed investigation of the three-dimensional structures from three kingdoms revealed significant variations in the local design of their synthetic and editing sites. Moreover, as might be expected from structural data eubacterial, Thermus thermophilus and human cytoplasmic PheRSs acquire different patterns of tRNAPhe anticodon recognition.

  19. High cerebral guanidinoacetate and variable creatine concentrations in argininosuccinate synthetase and lyase deficiency : Implications for treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, F. J.; Reijngoud, D. J.; Verhoeven, N. M.; Soorani-Lunsing, R. J.; Jakobs, C.; Sijens, P. E.

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral creatine and guanidinoacetate and blood and urine metabolites were studied in four patients with argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) or argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) deficiency receiving large doses of arginine. Urine and blood metabolites varied largely. Cerebral guanidinoacetate was

  20. Studies towards the synthesis of ATP analogs as potential glutamine synthetase inhibitors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salisu, S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In research directed at the development of adenine triphosphate (ATP) analogs as potential glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitors, adenine and allopurinol derivatives have been synthesized either as novel ATP analogs or as scaffolds...

  1. 3-substituted anilines as scaffolds for the construction of glutamine synthetase and DXP-reductoisomerase inhibitors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutorwa, M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available -1 Synthetic Communications Volume 39, Issue 15, 2009 3-Substituted Anilines as Scaffolds for the Construction of Glutamine Synthetase and DXP-Reductoisomerase Inhibitors Marius Mutorwaa, Sheriff Salisua, Gregory L. Blatchbc, Colin Kenyond & Perry T...

  2. Amino acid environment determines expression of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in embryonic rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, W. H.; van Roon, M.; Mooren, P. G.; de Graaf, A.; Charles, R.

    1985-01-01

    A completely defined medium (EHM-1), which reflects the amino acid composition of fetal rat serum and contains albumin as the sole proteinaceous compound, allows the accumulation of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the presence of dexamethasone, dibutyryl cyclic

  3. Holocarboxylase Synthetase 1 Physically Interacts with Histone H3 in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin required by all organisms, but only synthesized by plants and some bacterial and fungal species. As a cofactor, biotin is responsible for carbon dioxide transfer in all biotin-dependent carboxylases, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase, methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase, and pyruvate carboxylase. Adding biotin to carboxylases is catalyzed by the enzyme holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS. Biotin is also involved in gene regulation, and there is some indication that histones can be biotinylated in humans. Histone proteins and most histone modifications are highly conserved among eukaryotes. HCS1 is the only functional biotin ligase in Arabidopsis and has a high homology with human HCS. Therefore, we hypothesized that HCS1 also biotinylates histone proteins in Arabidopsis. A comparison of the catalytic domain of HCS proteins was performed among eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and archaea, and this domain is highly conserved across the selected organisms. Biotinylated histones could not be identified in vivo by using avidin precipitation or two-dimensional gel analysis. However, HCS1 physically interacts with Arabidopsis histone H3 in vitro, indicating the possibility of the role of this enzyme in the regulation of gene expression.

  4. Holocarboxylase Synthetase: A Moonlighting Transcriptional Coregulator of Gene Expression and a Cytosolic Regulator of Biotin Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Del-Río, Alfonso; Valadez-Graham, Viviana; Gravel, Roy A

    2017-08-21

    The vitamin biotin is an essential nutrient for the metabolism and survival of all organisms owing to its function as a cofactor of enzymes collectively known as biotin-dependent carboxylases. These enzymes use covalently attached biotin as a vector to transfer a carboxyl group between donor and acceptor molecules during carboxylation reactions. In human cells, biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze key reactions in gluconeogenesis, fatty acid synthesis, and amino acid catabolism. Biotin is attached to apocarboxylases by a biotin ligase: holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) in mammalian cells and BirA in microbes. Despite their evolutionary distance, these proteins share structural and sequence similarities, underscoring their importance across all life forms. However, beyond its role in metabolism, HCS participates in the regulation of biotin utilization and acts as a nuclear transcriptional coregulator of gene expression. In this review, we discuss the function of HCS and biotin in metabolism and human disease, a putative role for the enzyme in histone biotinylation, and its participation as a nuclear factor in chromatin dynamics. We suggest that HCS be classified as a moonlighting protein, with two biotin-dependent cytosolic metabolic roles and a distinct biotin-independent nuclear coregulatory function.

  5. APOBEC3B cytidine deaminase targets the non-transcribed strand of tRNA genes in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Natalie; Roberts, Steven A; Sterling, Joan F; Malc, Ewa P; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Gordenin, Dmitry A

    2017-05-01

    Variations in mutation rates across the genome have been demonstrated both in model organisms and in cancers. This phenomenon is largely driven by the damage specificity of diverse mutagens and the differences in DNA repair efficiency in given genomic contexts. Here, we demonstrate that the single-strand DNA-specific cytidine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B) damages tRNA genes at a 1000-fold higher efficiency than other non-tRNA genomic regions in budding yeast. We found that A3B-induced lesions in tRNA genes were predominantly located on the non-transcribed strand, while no transcriptional strand bias was observed in protein coding genes. Furthermore, tRNA gene mutations were exacerbated in cells where RNaseH expression was completely abolished (Δrnh1Δrnh35). These data suggest a transcription-dependent mechanism for A3B-induced tRNA gene hypermutation. Interestingly, in strains proficient in DNA repair, only 1% of the abasic sites formed upon excision of A3B-deaminated cytosines were not repaired leading to mutations in tRNA genes, while 18% of these lesions failed to be repaired in the remainder of the genome. A3B-induced mutagenesis in tRNA genes was found to be efficiently suppressed by the redundant activities of both base excision repair (BER) and the error-free DNA damage bypass pathway. On the other hand, deficiencies in BER did not have a profound effect on A3B-induced mutations in CAN1, the reporter for protein coding genes. We hypothesize that differences in the mechanisms underlying ssDNA formation at tRNA genes and other genomic loci are the key determinants of the choice of the repair pathways and consequently the efficiency of DNA damage repair in these regions. Overall, our results indicate that tRNA genes are highly susceptible to ssDNA-specific DNA damaging agents. However, increased DNA repair efficacy in tRNA genes can prevent their hypermutation and maintain both genome and proteome homeostasis. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Topological constraints are major determinants of tRNA tertiary structure and dynamics and provide basis for tertiary folding cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustoe, Anthony M; Brooks, Charles L; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that basic steric and connectivity constraints encoded at the secondary structure level are key determinants of 3D structure and dynamics in simple two-way RNA junctions. However, the role of these topological constraints in higher order RNA junctions remains poorly understood. Here, we use a specialized coarse-grained molecular dynamics model to directly probe the thermodynamic contributions of topological constraints in defining the 3D architecture and dynamics of transfer RNA (tRNA). Topological constraints alone restrict tRNA's allowed conformational space by over an order of magnitude and strongly discriminate against formation of non-native tertiary contacts, providing a sequence independent source of folding specificity. Topological constraints also give rise to long-range correlations between the relative orientation of tRNA's helices, which in turn provides a mechanism for encoding thermodynamic cooperativity between distinct tertiary interactions. These aspects of topological constraints make it such that only several tertiary interactions are needed to confine tRNA to its native global structure and specify functionally important 3D dynamics. We further show that topological constraints are conserved across tRNA's different naturally occurring secondary structures. Taken together, our results emphasize the central role of secondary-structure-encoded topological constraints in defining RNA 3D structure, dynamics and folding. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Examinations of tRNA Range of Motion Using Simulations of Cryo-EM Microscopy and X-Ray Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Caulfield

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined tRNA flexibility using a combination of steered and unbiased molecular dynamics simulations. Using Maxwell's demon algorithm, molecular dynamics was used to steer X-ray structure data toward that from an alternative state obtained from cryogenic-electron microscopy density maps. Thus, we were able to fit X-ray structures of tRNA onto cryogenic-electron microscopy density maps for hybrid states of tRNA. Additionally, we employed both Maxwell's demon molecular dynamics simulations and unbiased simulation methods to identify possible ribosome-tRNA contact areas where the ribosome may discriminate tRNAs during translation. Herein, we collected >500 ns of simulation data to assess the global range of motion for tRNAs. Biased simulations can be used to steer between known conformational stop points, while unbiased simulations allow for a general testing of conformational space previously unexplored. The unbiased molecular dynamics data describes the global conformational changes of tRNA on a sub-microsecond time scale for comparison with steered data. Additionally, the unbiased molecular dynamics data was used to identify putative contacts between tRNA and the ribosome during the accommodation step of translation. We found that the primary contact regions were H71 and H92 of the 50S subunit and ribosomal proteins L14 and L16.

  8. Anticodon domain modifications contribute order to tRNA for ribosome-mediated codon binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendeix, Franck A P; Dziergowska, Agnieszka; Gustilo, Estella M; Graham, William D; Sproat, Brian; Malkiewicz, Andrzej; Agris, Paul F

    2008-06-10

    The accuracy and efficiency with which tRNA decodes genomic information into proteins require posttranscriptional modifications in or adjacent to the anticodon. The modification uridine-5-oxyacetic acid (cmo (5)U 34) is found at wobble position 34 in a single isoaccepting tRNA species for six amino acids, alanine, leucine, proline, serine, threonine, and valine, each having 4-fold degenerate codons. cmo (5)U 34 makes possible the decoding of 24 codons by just six tRNAs. The contributions of this important modification to the structures and codon binding affinities of the unmodified and fully modified anticodon stem and loop domains of tRNA (Val3) UAC (ASL (Val3) UAC) were elucidated. The stems of the unmodified ASL (Val3) UAC and that with cmo (5)U 34 and N (6)-methyladenosine, m (6)A 37, adopted an A-form RNA conformation (rmsd approximately 0.6 A) as determined with NMR spectroscopy and torsion-angle molecular dynamics. However, the UV hyperchromicity, circular dichroism ellipticity, and structural analyses indicated that the anticodon modifications enhanced order in the loop. ASL (Val3) UAC-cmo (5)U 34;m (6)A 37 exhibited high affinities for its cognate and wobble codons GUA and GUG, and for GUU in the A-site of the programmed 30S ribosomal subunit, whereas the unmodified ASL (Val3) UAC bound less strongly to GUA and not at all to GUG and GUU. Together with recent crystal structures of ASL (Val3) UAC-cmo (5)U 34;m (6)A 37 bound to all four of the valine codons in the A-site of the ribosome's 30S subunit, these results clearly demonstrate that the xo (5)U 34-type modifications order the anticodon loop prior to A-site codon binding for an expanded codon reading, possibly reducing an entropic energy barrier to codon binding.

  9. Preparation of translationally competent tRNA by direct chemical acylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Noah H; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2010-09-03

    Nonsense codon suppression for unnatural amino acid incorporation requires the preparation of a suppressor aminoacyl-tRNA. Chemical acylation strategies are general but inefficient and arduous. A recent report (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 15848) showed acylation of RNA mediated by lanthanum(III) using amino acid phosphate esters. The successful implementation of this methodology to full-length suppressor tRNA is described, and it is shown that the derived aminoacyl-tRNA is translationally competent in Xenopus oocytes.

  10. A novel methyltransferase required for the formation of the hypermodified nucleoside wybutosine in eucaryotic tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhor, Hamid R; Penjwini, Mahmud; Clarke, Steven

    2005-08-26

    We demonstrate that the product of the yeast open reading frame YML005w is required for wybutosine (yW) formation in the phenylalanine-accepting tRNA of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. tRNA isolated from a deletion mutant of the YML005w gene accumulates 4-demethylwyosine (ImG-14), a precursor lacking three of the methyl groups of the yW hypermodified base. Since the amino acid sequence of the YML005w gene contains the signature motifs of the seven beta-strand methyltransferases, we now designate the gene TRM12 for tRNA methyltransferase. Using pulse-chase labeling of intact yeast cells with S-adenosyl-L-[methyl-(3)H]methionine, we show that the methylesterified form of yW is metabolically stable.

  11. Mouse Models Targeting Selenocysteine tRNA Expression for Elucidating the Role of Selenoproteins in Health and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolph L. Hatfield

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se deficiency has been known for many years to be associated with disease, impaired growth and a variety of other metabolic disorders in mammals. Only recently has the major role that Se-containing proteins, designated selenoproteins, play in many aspects of health and development begun to emerge. Se is incorporated into protein by way of the Se-containing amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec. The synthesis of selenoproteins is dependent on Sec tRNA for insertion of Sec, the 21st amino acid in the genetic code, into protein. We have taken advantage of this dependency to modulate the expression of Sec tRNA that in turn modulates the expression of selenoproteins by generating transgenic, conditional knockout, transgenic/standard knockout and transgenic/conditional knockout mouse models, all of which involve the Sec tRNA gene, to elucidate the intracellular roles of this protein class.

  12. Structural characterization of Helicobacter pylori dethiobiotin synthetase reveals differences between family members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Klimecka, Maria; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Nicholls, Robert A.; Murzyn, Krzysztof; Cuff, Marianne E.; Xu, Xiaohui; Cymborowski, Marcin; Murshudov, Garib N.; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek (MCSG); (UV); (MRC)

    2012-07-11

    Dethiobiotin synthetase (DTBS) is involved in the biosynthesis of biotin in bacteria, fungi, and plants. As humans lack this pathway, DTBS is a promising antimicrobial drug target. We determined structures of DTBS from Helicobacter pylori (hpDTBS) bound with cofactors and a substrate analog, and described its unique characteristics relative to other DTBS proteins. Comparison with bacterial DTBS orthologs revealed considerable structural differences in nucleotide recognition. The C-terminal region of DTBS proteins, which contains two nucleotide-recognition motifs, differs greatly among DTBS proteins from different species. The structure of hpDTBS revealed that this protein is unique and does not contain a C-terminal region containing one of the motifs. The single nucleotide-binding motif in hpDTBS is similar to its counterpart in GTPases; however, isothermal titration calorimetry binding studies showed that hpDTBS has a strong preference for ATP. The structural determinants of ATP specificity were assessed with X-ray crystallographic studies of hpDTBS-ATP and hpDTBS-GTP complexes. The unique mode of nucleotide recognition in hpDTBS makes this protein a good target for H. pylori-specific inhibitors of the biotin synthesis pathway.

  13. A cluster of transfer RNA genes (TRM1, TRR3, and TRAN) on the short arm of human chromosome 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckland, R.A.; Maule, J.C.; Sealey, P.G. [Western General Hospital, Ediniburgh (United Kingdom)

    1996-07-01

    We have isolated two lambda clones that contain three transfer RNA (tRNA) genes (TRM1, TRR3, and TRAN). Both clones map to the same region (6p21.2-p22.3) of the short arm of chromosome 6. One clone contains a methionine tRNA gene and also an arginine tRNA gene, the first such human gene to be described. The other clone contains an alanine tRNA gene, again the first such human gene to be reported, and it differs from the species of human alanine tRNA transcripts sequenced to date. These clones have been used to investigate the structure at this location. The other clone is not located within this domain and appears to be a unique segment of DNA. Nevertheless, we also show that at least half of the methionine tRNA genes are located on the short arm of this chromosome, and if these are also located at 6p21.2-p22.3, and if these are also located at 6p21.2-p22.3, this would constitute another major tRNA locus in human. 55 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. The predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus aspartyl-tRNA synthetase recognizes tRNAAsn as a substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Alperstein

    Full Text Available The predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus preys on other Gram-negative bacteria and was predicted to be an asparagine auxotroph. However, despite encoding asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase and glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase, B. bacteriovorus also contains the amidotransferase GatCAB. Deinococcus radiodurans, and Thermus thermophilus also encode both of these aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with GatCAB. Both also code for a second aspartyl-tRNA synthetase and use the additional aspartyl-tRNA synthetase with GatCAB to synthesize asparagine on tRNAAsn. Unlike those two bacteria, B. bacteriovorus encodes only one aspartyl-tRNA synthetase. Here we demonstrate the lone B. bacteriovorus aspartyl-tRNA synthetase catalyzes aspartyl-tRNAAsn formation that GatCAB can then amidate to asparaginyl-tRNAAsn. This non-discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase with GatCAB thus provides B. bacteriovorus a second route for Asn-tRNAAsn formation with the asparagine synthesized in a tRNA-dependent manner. Thus, in contrast to a previous prediction, B. bacteriovorus codes for a biosynthetic route for asparagine. Analysis of bacterial genomes suggests a significant number of other bacteria may also code for both routes for Asn-tRNAAsn synthesis with only a limited number encoding a second aspartyl-tRNA synthetase.

  15. Homology modeling and molecular docking studies of Bacillomycin and Iturin synthetases with novel ligands for the production of therapeutic lipopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswari, Jujjavarapu Satya; Dhagat, Swasti; Kaser, Shubham; Tiwari, Anoop

    2017-08-15

    Lipopeptide synthetases play an important role in the production of lipopeptides. Lipopeptides are molecules made up of peptides and fatty acid moieties and have shown to have a broad range of antimicrobial activity. As infectious diseases have caused severe health problems mainly resulting from the development of antibiotic resistant strains of disease causing microorganisms there is a need of alternatives to antibiotics. The lipopeptide synthetase of the corresponding lipopeptides can be used as templates to design these as drugs using computational techniques. The objective of this study was homology modeling and molecular docking of two lipopeptide synthetases, bacillomycin D synthetase and iturin A synthetase, with their ligands as a means of drug design. Schrödinger software was used for homology modeling and molecular docking. After the identification of ligands, molecular docking of these ligands with the lipopeptide (bacillomycin and iturin) synthetases was performed. The docking was tested on the parameters of docking score and glide energy. 5 out of 21 ligands were found to dock with bacillomycin D synthetase whereas 8 out of 20 ligands docked with the iturin A synthetase. The knowledge of the docking sites and docking characteristics of the lipopeptide synthetases mentioned in the paper with the ligands can provide advantages of high speed and reliability, reduced costs on chemicals and experiments and the ethical issues concerned with the use of animal models for screening of drug toxicity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. One-carbon metabolic pathway rewiring in Escherichia coli reveals an evolutionary advantage of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (Fhs) in survival under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Shivjee; Aluri, Srinivas; Rex, Kervin; Varshney, Umesh

    2015-02-15

    In cells, N(10)-formyltetrahydrofolate (N(10)-fTHF) is required for formylation of eubacterial/organellar initiator tRNA and purine nucleotide biosynthesis. Biosynthesis of N(10)-fTHF is catalyzed by 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase/cyclohydrolase (FolD) and/or 10-formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (Fhs). All eubacteria possess FolD, but some possess both FolD and Fhs. However, the reasons for possessing Fhs in addition to FolD have remained unclear. We used Escherichia coli, which naturally lacks fhs, as our model. We show that in E. coli, the essential function of folD could be replaced by Clostridium perfringens fhs when it was provided on a medium-copy-number plasmid or integrated as a single-copy gene in the chromosome. The fhs-supported folD deletion (ΔfolD) strains grow well in a complex medium. However, these strains require purines and glycine as supplements for growth in M9 minimal medium. The in vivo levels of N(10)-fTHF in the ΔfolD strain (supported by plasmid-borne fhs) were limiting despite the high capacity of the available Fhs to synthesize N(10)-fTHF in vitro. Auxotrophy for purines could be alleviated by supplementing formate to the medium, and that for glycine was alleviated by engineering THF import into the cells. The ΔfolD strain (harboring fhs on the chromosome) showed a high NADP(+)-to-NADPH ratio and hypersensitivity to trimethoprim. The presence of fhs in E. coli was disadvantageous for its aerobic growth. However, under hypoxia, E. coli strains harboring fhs outcompeted those lacking it. The computational analysis revealed a predominant natural occurrence of fhs in anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Epilepsy in glioblastoma multiforme: correlation with glutamine synthetase levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Anna; Marconi, Silvia; Pollo, Bianca; Tomassini, Alessia; Lovato, Laura; Maderna, Emanuela; Maier, Klaus; Schwartz, Andreas; Rizzuto, Nicolò; Padovani, Alessandro; Bonetti, Bruno

    2009-07-01

    The hypothesis addressed by this study is that a glutamine synthetase (GS) deficiency in neoplastic astrocytes is a possible molecular basis associated with seizure generation in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Quantitative Western blot analysis of GS was performed in 20 individuals operated for malignant glioma. The levels of GS in patients with GBM and epilepsy were significantly lower (range 0.04-1.15; mean 0.35 +/- 0.36; median 0.25) than in non-epileptic GBM individuals (range 0.78-3.97; mean 1.64 +/- 0.99; median 1.25; P = 0.002). No relationship has been found between histological features (i.e. necrosis, gliosis, stroma, inflammatory cells, giant cells, and haemosiderine) and GS expression or epilepsy. Even though the epileptogenesis in glioma is multifactorial, it is conceivable that a down-regulation of GS may have an important pro-epileptogenic role in GBM, through the slowing of glutamate-glutamine cycle. This study suggests that seizures in GBM are coupled with a highly localized enzyme deficiency. The manipulation of GS activity might constitute a novel principle for inhibiting seizures in patients with glioma epilepsy.

  18. Nitric oxide synthetase and Helicobacter pylori in patients undergoing appendicectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to determine whether Helicobacter pylori forms part of the normal microenvironment of the appendix, whether it plays a role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis, and whether it is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) in appendicular macrophages. METHODS: Serology for H. pylori was performed on 51 consecutive patients undergoing emergency appendicectomy. Appendix samples were tested for urease activity, cultured and stained for H. pylori, graded according to the degree of inflammatory infiltrate, and probed immunohistochemically for iNOS expression. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 21 (range 7-51) years. Seventeen patients (33 per cent) were seropositive for H. pylori but no evidence of H. pylori was found in any appendix specimen. However, an enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in seropositive patients (P < 0.04) and the expression of macrophage iNOS in the mucosa of normal and inflamed appendix specimens was increased (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: H. pylori does not colonize the appendix and is unlikely to be a pathogenic stimulus for appendicitis. Priming effects on mucosal immunology downstream from the foregut may occur after infection with H. pylori.

  19. Blockade of Glutamine Synthetase Enhances Inflammatory Response in Microglial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Erika M; Menga, Alessio; Lebrun, Aurore; Hooper, Douglas C; Butterfield, D Allan; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Castegna, Alessandra

    2017-03-10

    Microglial cells are brain-resident macrophages engaged in surveillance and maintained in a constant state of relative inactivity. However, their involvement in autoimmune diseases indicates that in pathological conditions microglia gain an inflammatory phenotype. The mechanisms underlying this change in the microglial phenotype are still unclear. Since metabolism is an important modulator of immune cell function, we focused our attention on glutamine synthetase (GS), a modulator of the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation in other cell types, which is expressed by microglia. GS inhibition enhances release of inflammatory mediators of LPS-activated microglia in vitro, leading to perturbation of the redox balance and decreased viability of cocultured neurons. GS inhibition also decreases insulin-mediated glucose uptake in microglia. In vivo, microglia-specific GS ablation enhances expression of inflammatory markers upon LPS treatment. In the spinal cords from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), GS expression levels and glutamine/glutamate ratios are reduced. Recently, metabolism has been highlighted as mediator of immune cell function through the discovery of mechanisms that (behind these metabolic changes) modulate the inflammatory response. The present study shows for the first time a metabolic mechanism mediating microglial response to a proinflammatory stimulus, pointing to GS activity as a master modulator of immune cell function and thus unraveling a potential therapeutic target. Our study highlights a new role of GS in modulating immune response in microglia, providing insights into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with inflammation and new strategies of therapeutic intervention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 351-363.

  20. Plant-Specific Preprotein and Amino Acid Transporter Proteins Are Required for tRNA Import into Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcha, Monika W; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Teixeira, Pedro F; Gügel, Irene L; Kmiec, Beata; Narsai, Reena; Ivanova, Aneta; Megel, Cyrille; Schock, Annette; Kraus, Sabrina; Berkowitz, Oliver; Glaser, Elzbieta; Philippar, Katrin; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Soll, Jürgen; Whelan, James

    2016-12-01

    A variety of eukaryotes, in particular plants, do not contain the required number of tRNAs to support the translation of mitochondria-encoded genes and thus need to import tRNAs from the cytosol. This study identified two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) proteins, Tric1 and Tric2 (for tRNA import component), which on simultaneous inactivation by T-DNA insertion lines displayed a severely delayed and chlorotic growth phenotype and significantly reduced tRNA import capacity into isolated mitochondria. The predicted tRNA-binding domain of Tric1 and Tric2, a sterile-α-motif at the C-terminal end of the protein, was required to restore tRNA uptake ability in mitochondria of complemented plants. The purified predicted tRNA-binding domain binds the T-arm of the tRNA for alanine with conserved lysine residues required for binding. T-DNA inactivation of both Tric proteins further resulted in an increase in the in vitro rate of in organello protein synthesis, which was mediated by a reorganization of the nuclear transcriptome, in particular of genes encoding a variety of proteins required for mitochondrial gene expression at both the transcriptional and translational levels. The characterization of Tric1/2 provides mechanistic insight into the process of tRNA import into mitochondria and supports the theory that the tRNA import pathway resulted from the repurposing of a preexisting protein import apparatus. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Induction of glutamine synthetase and transient co-expression with carbamoylphosphate synthetase in hepatocytes transplanted into fat pads of syngeneic hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebhardt, R.; Jirtle, R.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.; Michalopoulos, G.

    1989-01-01

    Isolated rat hepatocytes were transplanted into the interscapular and both anterior lateral fat pads of hepatectomized syngeneic rats. At various time points following transplantation, the fat pads were removed, fixed and embedded in paraffin. Serial sections were stained for glutamine synthetase

  2. The concept of RNA-assisted protein folding: representation of amino acid kinetics at the tRNA level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, Jan C; Biro, Josephine M K

    2013-01-21

    Transfer RNA molecules (tRNA) have the thermodynamic potential to interact with each other to form dimers (hybridization energy, dG=-33.2±6.7 kcal/mole, compared to the folding energy of the cloverleaf configuration, dG=-25±4.4 kcal/mole, p<0.0001). The dG values have a strong negative correlation with the frequency of co-locations and substitutions of associated amino acids. We suggest that tRNA interactions participate in determining amino acid interactions (co-locations) and consequently the 3D structures of peptides. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Diverse Mechanisms of Sulfur Decoration in Bacterial tRNA and Their Cellular Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chenkang; Black, Katherine A.; Dos Santos, Patricia C.

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur-containing transfer ribonucleic acids (tRNAs) are ubiquitous biomolecules found in all organisms that possess a variety of functions. For decades, their roles in processes such as translation, structural stability, and cellular protection have been elucidated and appreciated. These thionucleosides are found in all types of bacteria; however, their biosynthetic pathways are distinct among different groups of bacteria. Considering that many of the thio-tRNA biosynthetic enzymes are absent in Gram-positive bacteria, recent studies have addressed how sulfur trafficking is regulated in these prokaryotic species. Interestingly, a novel proposal has been given for interplay among thionucleosides and the biosynthesis of other thiocofactors, through participation of shared-enzyme intermediates, the functions of which are impacted by the availability of substrate as well as metabolic demand of thiocofactors. This review describes the occurrence of thio-modifications in bacterial tRNA and current methods for detection of these modifications that have enabled studies on the biosynthesis and functions of S-containing tRNA across bacteria. It provides insight into potential modes of regulation and potential evolutionary events responsible for divergence in sulfur metabolism among prokaryotes. PMID:28327539

  4. Tdd-3, a tRNA gene-associated poly(A) retrotransposon from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckler, T; Tschepke, C; de Hostos, E L; Jendretzke, A; Dingermann, T

    1998-04-01

    The full-length 5218-bp sequence of the mobile genetic element Tdd-3 from Dictyostelium discoideum is described. Tdd-3 encodes two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) flanked by non-redundant, untranslated regions. The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF2 is homologous to reverse transcriptases (RTs) encoded by the class of poly(A) retrotransposons. ORF2 also encodes a putative protein domain related to the family of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases, whose retroelement-encoded homologs have recently been proposed to represent the integrase function of poly(A) retrotransposons. Comparison of several genomic Tdd-3 copies revealed that element insertion is orientation specific and occurs about 100 bp downstream of tRNA genes in the D. discoideum genome. These properties of Tdd-3 suggest that the element is a tRNA gene-associated poly(A) retroelement present in the D. discoideum genome. Analysis of several cloned cDNAs derived from Tdd-3-specific plus strand RNAs indicate that the element is transcribed and polyadenylated during the growth of D. discoideum cells.

  5. Cross-Talk between Dnmt2-Dependent tRNA Methylation and Queuosine Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann E. Ehrenhofer-Murray

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes of the Dnmt2 family of methyltransferases have yielded a number of unexpected discoveries. The first surprise came more than ten years ago when it was realized that, rather than being DNA methyltransferases, Dnmt2 enzymes actually are transfer RNA (tRNA methyltransferases for cytosine-5 methylation, foremost C38 (m5C38 of tRNAAsp. The second unanticipated finding was our recent discovery of a nutritional regulation of Dnmt2 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Significantly, the presence of the nucleotide queuosine in tRNAAsp strongly stimulates Dnmt2 activity both in vivo and in vitro in S. pombe. Queuine, the respective base, is a hypermodified guanine analog that is synthesized from guanosine-5’-triphosphate (GTP by bacteria. Interestingly, most eukaryotes have queuosine in their tRNA. However, they cannot synthesize it themselves, but rather salvage it from food or from gut microbes. The queuine obtained from these sources comes from the breakdown of tRNAs, where the queuine ultimately was synthesized by bacteria. Queuine thus has been termed a micronutrient. This review summarizes the current knowledge of Dnmt2 methylation and queuosine modification with respect to translation as well as the organismal consequences of the absence of these modifications. Models for the functional cooperation between these modifications and its wider implications are discussed.

  6. Cross-Talk between Dnmt2-Dependent tRNA Methylation and Queuosine Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E

    2017-02-10

    Enzymes of the Dnmt2 family of methyltransferases have yielded a number of unexpected discoveries. The first surprise came more than ten years ago when it was realized that, rather than being DNA methyltransferases, Dnmt2 enzymes actually are transfer RNA (tRNA) methyltransferases for cytosine-5 methylation, foremost C38 (m5C38) of tRNAAsp. The second unanticipated finding was our recent discovery of a nutritional regulation of Dnmt2 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Significantly, the presence of the nucleotide queuosine in tRNAAsp strongly stimulates Dnmt2 activity both in vivo and in vitro in S. pombe. Queuine, the respective base, is a hypermodified guanine analog that is synthesized from guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP) by bacteria. Interestingly, most eukaryotes have queuosine in their tRNA. However, they cannot synthesize it themselves, but rather salvage it from food or from gut microbes. The queuine obtained from these sources comes from the breakdown of tRNAs, where the queuine ultimately was synthesized by bacteria. Queuine thus has been termed a micronutrient. This review summarizes the current knowledge of Dnmt2 methylation and queuosine modification with respect to translation as well as the organismal consequences of the absence of these modifications. Models for the functional cooperation between these modifications and its wider implications are discussed.

  7. Distinct kinetic determinants for the stepwise CCA addition to tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangbumn; Liu, Cuiping; Halkidis, Konstantine; Gamper, Howard B; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2009-10-01

    The universally conserved CCA sequence is present at the 3' terminal 74-76 positions of all active tRNA molecules as a functional tag to participate in ribosome protein synthesis. The CCA enzyme catalyzes CCA synthesis in three sequential steps of nucleotide addition at rapid and identical rates. However, the kinetic determinant of each addition is unknown, thus limiting the insights into the kinetic basis of CCA addition. Using our recently developed single turnover kinetics of Escherichia coli CCA enzyme as a model, we show here that the identical rate of the stepwise CCA addition is determined by distinct kinetic parameters. Specifically, the kinetics of C74 and C75 addition is controlled by the chemistry of nucleotidyl transfer, whereas the kinetics of A76 addition is controlled by a prechemistry conformational transition of the active site. In multiple turnover condition, all three steps are controlled by slow product release, indicating enzyme processivity from one addition to the next. However, the processivity decreases as the enzyme progresses to complete the CCA synthesis. Together, these results suggest the existence of a network of diverse kinetic parameters that determines the overall rate of CCA addition for tRNA maturation.

  8. Trm9-Catalyzed tRNA Modifications Regulate Global Protein Expression by Codon-Biased Translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Deng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional modifications of transfer RNAs (tRNAs have long been recognized to play crucial roles in regulating the rate and fidelity of translation. However, the extent to which they determine global protein production remains poorly understood. Here we use quantitative proteomics to show a direct link between wobble uridine 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl (mcm5 and 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl-2-thio (mcm5s2 modifications catalyzed by tRNA methyltransferase 9 (Trm9 in tRNAArg(UCU and tRNAGlu(UUC and selective translation of proteins from genes enriched with their cognate codons. Controlling for bias in protein expression and alternations in mRNA expression, we find that loss of Trm9 selectively impairs expression of proteins from genes enriched with AGA and GAA codons under both normal and stress conditions. Moreover, we show that AGA and GAA codons occur with high frequency in clusters along the transcripts, which may play a role in modulating translation. Consistent with these results, proteins subject to enhanced ribosome pausing in yeast lacking mcm5U and mcm5s2U are more likely to be down-regulated and contain a larger number of AGA/GAA clusters. Together, these results suggest that Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications play a significant role in regulating protein expression within the cell.

  9. Quantitative single cell monitoring of protein synthesis at subcellular resolution using fluorescently labeled tRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoom, Sima; Kaur, Jaskiran; Cooperman, Barry S.; Smorodinsky, Nechama I.; Smilansky, Zeev; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel technique of using fluorescent tRNA for translation monitoring (FtTM). FtTM enables the identification and monitoring of active protein synthesis sites within live cells at submicron resolution through quantitative microscopy of transfected bulk uncharged tRNA, fluorescently labeled in the D-loop (fl-tRNA). The localization of fl-tRNA to active translation sites was confirmed through its co-localization with cellular factors and its dynamic alterations upon inhibition of protein synthesis. Moreover, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals, generated when fl-tRNAs, separately labeled as a FRET pair occupy adjacent sites on the ribosome, quantitatively reflect levels of protein synthesis in defined cellular regions. In addition, FRET signals enable detection of intra-populational variability in protein synthesis activity. We demonstrate that FtTM allows quantitative comparison of protein synthesis between different cell types, monitoring effects of antibiotics and stress agents, and characterization of changes in spatial compartmentalization of protein synthesis upon viral infection. PMID:21795382

  10. The Pai-associated leuX specific tRNA5(Leu) affects type 1fimbriation in pathogenic Escherichia coli by control of FimB recombinase expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, A.; Gally, D.; Olsen, Peter Bjarke

    1997-01-01

    The uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain 536 (06:K15:H31) carries two large chromosomalpathogenicity islands (Pais). Both Pais are flanked by tRNA genes. Spontaneous deletion of Pai IIresults in truncation of the leuX tRNA5Leu gene. This tRNA is required for the expression of type 1fimbriae (Fim...

  11. Examining tRNA 3'-ends in Escherichia coli: A teamwork between CCA-adding enzyme, RNase T and RNase R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellner, Karolin; Czech, Andreas; Ignatova, Zoya; Betat, Heike; Mörl, Mario

    2017-11-27

    tRNA maturation and quality control are crucial for proper functioning of these transcripts in translation. In several organisms, defective tRNAs were shown to be tagged by poly(A) or CCACCA tails and subsequently degraded by 3'-exonucleases. In a deep sequencing analysis of tRNA 3'-ends, we detected the CCACCA tag also in Escherichia coli. However, this tag closely resembles several 3'-trailers of tRNA precursors targeted for maturation and not for degradation. Here, we investigate the ability of two important exonucleases, RNase R and RNase T, to distinguish tRNA precursors with native 3' trailer from tRNAs with CCACCA tag. Our results show that the degrading enzyme RNase R breaks down both tRNAs primed for degradation as well as precursor transcripts, indicating that it is a rather non-specific RNase. RNase T, a main processing exonuclease involved in trimming of 3'-trailers, is very inefficient in converting the CCACCA-tagged tRNA into a mature transcript. Hence, while both RNases compete for trailer-containing tRNA precursors, the inability of RNase T to process CCACCA tails ensures that defective tRNAs cannot re-enter the functional tRNA pool, representing a safeguard to avoid detrimental effects of tRNAs with erroneous integrity on protein synthesis. Furthermore, these data indicate that the RNase T-mediated end turnover of the CCA sequence represents a means to deliver a tRNA to a repeated quality control performed by the CCA-adding enzyme. Hence, originally described as a futile side reaction, the tRNA end turnover seems to fulfil an important function in the maintenance of the tRNA pool in the cell. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  12. When contemporary aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases invent their cognate amino acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Hervé; Becker, Hubert Dominique; Reinbolt, Joseph; Kern, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Faithful protein synthesis relies on a family of essential enzymes called aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, assembled in a piecewise fashion. Analysis of the completed archaeal genomes reveals that all archaea that possess asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS) also display a second ORF encoding an AsnRS truncated from its anticodon binding-domain (AsnRS2). We show herein that Pyrococcus abyssi AsnRS2, in contrast to AsnRS, does not sustain asparaginyl-tRNAAsn synthesis but is instead capable of converting aspartic acid into asparagine. Functional analysis and complementation of an Escherichia coli asparagine auxotrophic strain show that AsnRS2 constitutes the archaeal homologue of the bacterial ammonia-dependent asparagine synthetase A (AS-A), therefore named archaeal asparagine synthetase A (AS-AR). Primary sequence- and 3D-based phylogeny shows that an archaeal AspRS ancestor originated AS-AR, which was subsequently transferred into bacteria by lateral gene transfer in which it underwent structural changes producing AS-A. This study provides evidence that a contemporary aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase can be recruited to sustain amino acid metabolism. PMID:12874385

  13. Substrate activation and conformational dynamics of guanosine 5'-monophosphate synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Justin C; Linger, Rebecca S; Chittur, Sridar V; Davisson, V Jo

    2013-08-06

    Glutamine amidotransferases catalyze the amination of a wide range of molecules using the amide nitrogen of glutamine. The family provides numerous examples for study of multi-active-site regulation and interdomain communication in proteins. Guanosine 5'-monophosphate synthetase (GMPS) is one of three glutamine amidotransferases in de novo purine biosynthesis and is responsible for the last step in the guanosine branch of the pathway, the amination of xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). In several amidotransferases, the intramolecular path of ammonia from glutamine to substrate is understood; however, the crystal structure of GMPS only hinted at the details of such transfer. Rapid kinetics studies provide insight into the mechanism of the substrate-induced changes in this complex enzyme. Rapid mixing of GMPS with substrates also manifests absorbance changes that report on the kinetics of formation of a reactive intermediate as well as steps in the process of rapid transfer of ammonia to this intermediate. Isolation and use of the adenylylated nucleotide intermediate allowed the study of the amido transfer reaction distinct from the ATP-dependent reaction. Changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence upon mixing of enzyme with XMP suggest a conformational change upon substrate binding, likely the ordering of a highly conserved loop in addition to global domain motions. In the GMPS reaction, all forward rates before product release appear to be faster than steady-state turnover, implying that release is likely rate-limiting. These studies establish the functional role of a substrate-induced conformational change in the GMPS catalytic cycle and provide a kinetic context for the formation of an ammonia channel linking the distinct active sites.

  14. Long 5' leaders inhibit removal of a 3' trailer from a precursor tRNA by mammalian tRNA 3' processing endoribonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashimoto, M; Wesemann, D R; Geary, S; Tamura, M; Kaspar, R L

    1999-01-01

    Mammalian tRNA 3' processing endoribonuclease (3' tRNase) can remove a 3' trailer from various pre-tRNAs without 5' leader nucleotides. To examine how 5[prime] leader sequences affect 3' processing efficiency, we performed in vitro 3' processing reactions with purified pig 3' tRNase and pre-tRNAArgs containing a 13-nt 3' trailer and a 5[prime] leader of various lengths. The 3' processing was slightly stimulated by 5[prime] leaders containing up to 7 nt, whereas leaders of 9 nt or longer severely inhibited the reaction. Structure probing indicated that the 5' leader sequences had little effect on pre-tRNA folding. Similar results were obtained using pre-tRNA(Val)s containing a 5' leader of various lengths. We also investigated whether 3'tRNase can remove 3' trailers that are stably base-paired with 5' leaders to form an extended acceptor stem. Even such small 5' leaders as 3 and 6 nt, when base-paired with a 3' trailer, severely hindered removal of the 3' trailer by 3' tRNase. PMID:10373595

  15. Molecular mimicry between Mycobacterium leprae proteins (50S ribosomal protein L2 and Lysyl-tRNA synthetase) and myelin basic protein: a possible mechanism of nerve damage in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Itu; Yadav, Asha Ram; Mohanty, Keshar Kunja; Katoch, Kiran; Sharma, Prashant; Mishra, Bishal; Bisht, Deepa; Gupta, U D; Sengupta, Utpal

    2015-04-01

    Autoantibodies against various components of host are known to occur in leprosy. Nerve damage is the primary cause of disability associated with leprosy. The aim of this study was to detect the level of autoantibodies and lympho-proliferative response against myelin basic protein (MBP) in leprosy patients (LPs) and their correlation with clinical phenotypes of LPs. Further, probable role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage of LPs was investigated. We observed significantly high level of anti-MBP antibodies in LPs across the spectrum and a positive significant correlation between the level of anti-MBP antibodies and the number of nerves involved in LPs. We report here that 4 B cell epitopes of myelin A1 and Mycobacterium leprae proteins, 50S ribosomal L2 and lysyl tRNA synthetase are cross-reactive. Further, M. leprae sonicated antigen hyperimmunization was responsible for induction of autoantibody response in mice which could be adoptively transferred to naive mice. For the first time our findings suggest the role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage in leprosy. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Direct Regulation of tRNA and 5S rRNA Gene Transcription by Polo-like Kinase 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fairley, Jennifer A.; Mitchell, Louise E.; Berg, Tracy; Kenneth, Niall S.; von Schubert, Conrad; Sillje, Herman H. W.; Medema, Rene H.; Nigg, Erich A.; White, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Polo-like kinase Plk1 controls numerous aspects of cell-cycle progression. We show that it associates with tRNA and 5S rRNA genes and regulates their transcription by RNA polymerase Ill (pol Ill) through direct binding and phosphorylation of transcription factor Brit During interphase, Plk1 promotes

  17. An entropy based analysis of the relationship between the DOW JONES Index and the TRNA Sentiment series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); M.J. McAleer (Michael); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper features an analysis of the relationship between the DOW JONES Industrial Average Index (DJIA) and a sentiment news series using daily data obtained from the Thomson Reuters News Analytics (TRNA)1 provided by SIRCA (The Securities Industry Research Centre of the Asia Pacic).

  18. Archease from Pyrococcus abyssi improves substrate specificity and solubility of a tRNA m5C methyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auxilien, Sylvie; El Khadali, Fatima; Rasmussen, Anette

    2007-01-01

    reading frame (PAB1947), which is shown here to encode a tRNA m(5)C methyltransferase. In vitro, the purified recombinant methyltransferase catalyzes m(5)C formation at several cytosines within tRNAs with preference for C49. The specificity of the methyltransferase is increased by the archease...

  19. Combined tRNA modification defects impair protein homeostasis and synthesis of the yeast prion protein Rnq1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffrath, Raffael; Klassen, Roland

    2017-01-02

    Modified nucleosides in tRNA anticodon loops such as 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U) and pseuduridine (Ψ) are thought to be required for an efficient decoding process. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the simultaneous presence of mcm5s2U and Ψ38 in tRNAGlnUUG was shown to mediate efficient synthesis of the Q/N rich [PIN+] prion forming protein Rnq1. 1 In the absence of these two tRNA modifications, higher than normal levels of hypomodified tRNAGlnUUG, but not its isoacceptor tRNAGlnCUG can restore Rnq1 synthesis. Moroever, tRNA overexpression rescues pleiotropic phenotypes that associate with loss of mcm5s2U and Ψ38 formation. Notably, combined absence of different tRNA modifications are shown to induce the formation of protein aggregates which likely mediate severe cytological abnormalities, including cytokinesis and nuclear segregation defects. In support of this, overexpression of the aggregating polyQ protein Htt103Q, but not its non-aggregating variant Htt25Q phenocopies these cytological abnormalities, most pronouncedly in deg1 single mutants lacking Ψ38 alone. It is concluded that slow decoding of particular codons induces defects in protein homeostasis that interfere with key steps in cytokinesis and nuclear segregation.

  20. [Methionine sulfoximine and phosphinothricin--glutamine synthetase inhibitors and activators and their herbicidal activity (A review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstigneeva, Z G; Solov'eva, N A; Sidel'nikova, L I

    2003-01-01

    Derivatives of methionine sulfoximine (MSO) and phosphinothrycin (PPT), which are analogues of glutamate, exhibit selective herbicidal activity. This effect is accounted for by impairments of nitrogen metabolism, resulting from inhibition of its key enzyme in plants, glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2). Inhibition of the enzyme causes ammoniac nitrogen to accumulate and terminates the synthesis of glutamine. Changes in the content of these two metabolites (excess ammonium and glutamine deficiency) act in a concert to cause plant death. However, low concentrations of MSO, PPT, and their metabolites produce an opposite effect: glutamine synthetase is activated, with concomitant stimulation of plant growth and productivity. The mechanisms whereby MSO and PPT affect glutamine synthetase activity are discussed in the context of nitrogen metabolism in plants.

  1. Mechanistic Basis for ATP-Dependent Inhibition of Glutamine Synthetase by Tabtoxinine-β-lactam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Garrett J; Fang, Luting; Schaefer, Jacob; Singh, Sukrit; Bowman, Gregory R; Wencewicz, Timothy A

    2018-01-09

    Tabtoxinine-β-lactam (TβL), also known as wildfire toxin, is a time- and ATP-dependent inhibitor of glutamine synthetase produced by plant pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae. Here we demonstrate that recombinant glutamine synthetase from Escherichia coli phosphorylates the C3-hydroxyl group of the TβL 3-(S)-hydroxy-β-lactam (3-HβL) warhead. Phosphorylation of TβL generates a stable, noncovalent enzyme-ADP-inhibitor complex that resembles the glutamine synthetase tetrahedral transition state. The TβL β-lactam ring remains intact during enzyme inhibition, making TβL mechanistically distinct from traditional β-lactam antibiotics such as penicillin. Our findings could enable the design of new 3-HβL transition state inhibitors targeting enzymes in the ATP-dependent carboxylate-amine ligase superfamily with broad therapeutic potential in many disease areas.

  2. A bacterial ortholog of class II lysyl-tRNA synthetase activates lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrogelly, Alexandre; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter; Moses, Sarath

    2010-07-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases produce aminoacyl-tRNAs, essential substrates for accurate protein synthesis. Beyond their central role in translation some of these enzymes or their orthologs are recruited for alternative functions, not always related to their primary cellular role. We investigate here the enzymatic properties of GenX (also called PoxA and YjeA), an ortholog of bacterial class II lysyl-tRNA synthetase. GenX is present in most Gram-negative bacteria and is homologous to the catalytic core of lysyl-tRNA synthetase, but it lacks the amino terminal anticodon binding domain of the latter enzyme. We show that, in agreement with its well-conserved lysine binding site, GenX can activate in vitro l-lysine and lysine analogs, but does not acylate tRNA(Lys) or other cellular RNAs. Copyright 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli. Properties of the purified enzyme and primary structure of the prs gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Harlow, Kenneth W.; King, Cheryl J.

    1986-01-01

    Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (P-Rib-PP) synthetase of Escherichia coli has been purified to near homogeneity from a strain harboring the prs gene, encoding P-Rib-PP synthetase, on a multicopy plasmid. Analysis of the enzyme showed that it required inorganic phosphate for activity and for stability...

  4. Effects of polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors on S-adenosylmethionine synthetase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase activities in carrot cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.C. Minocha; R. Minocha; A. Komamine

    1991-01-01

    Changes in the activites of S-adcnosylmethionine (SAM) synthetase (methionine adenosyltransferase, EC 2.5.1.6.) and SAM decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.50) were studied in carrot (Daucus carota) cell cultures in response to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and several inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis. Activity of SAM synthetase increased...

  5. Continuous recording of long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity using fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Erland J.F.; Nystrøm, Birthe T.

    2001-01-01

    acyl-Coenzyme A, synthetase, activity assay, fluorescence recording, fatty acid probe, serum albumin, hydroxycoumarin, detergent, micelles, Pseudomonas fragi, rat liver microsomes......acyl-Coenzyme A, synthetase, activity assay, fluorescence recording, fatty acid probe, serum albumin, hydroxycoumarin, detergent, micelles, Pseudomonas fragi, rat liver microsomes...

  6. Brain and Liver Glutamine Synthetase of Rana catesbeiana and Rana cancrivora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    ammonia into urea in marine Chondrichthyes liver 7 Table 1--Liver and brain glutamine synthetase of urea-retaining and non-urea-retaining amphibians 8... Osteichthyes , is a marine fish that also retains urea as an osmolyte (3,12). It too has a relatively high level of glu- tamine synthetase in its liver (16...for assimilation of ammonia into urea in marine Chondrichthyes liver (from Webb (15)) C1 klA IWE LO, AT? VH3 tLt TKATICAkMUIYL PUOSPULArL I CflALLLINE

  7. A Bacterial Ortholog of Class II Lysyl-tRNA Synthetase Activates Lysine

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrogelly, Alexandre; O’Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter; Moses, Sharath

    2010-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases produce aminoacyl-tRNAs, essential substrates for accurate protein synthesis. Beyond their central role in translation some of these enzymes or their orthologs are recruited for alternative functions, not always related to their primary cellular role. We investigate here the enzymatic properties of GenX (also called PoxA and YjeA), an ortholog of bacterial class II lysyl-tRNA synthetase. GenX is present in most Gram-negative bacteria and is homologous to the catalyt...

  8. PPARδ activation induces hepatic long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 expression in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Dong, Bin; Shende, Vikram Ravindra; Liu, Jingwen

    2017-01-01

    The arachidonic acid preferred long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) is a key enzyme for fatty acid metabolism in various metabolic tissues. In this study, we utilized hamsters fed a normal chow diet, a high-fat diet or a high cholesterol and high fat diet (HCHFD) as animal models to explore novel transcriptional regulatory mechanisms for ACSL4 expression under hyperlipidemic conditions. Through cloning hamster ACSL4 homolog and tissue profiling ACSL4 mRNA and protein expressions we observed a selective upregulation of ACSL4 in testis and liver of HCHFD fed animals. Examination of transcriptional activators of the ACSL family revealed an increased hepatic expression of PPARδ but not PPARα in HCHFD fed hamsters. To explore a role of PPARδ in dietary cholesterol-mediated upregulation of ACSL4, we administered a PPARδ specific agonist L165041 to normolipidemic and dyslipidemic hamsters. We observed significant increases of hepatic ACSL4 mRNA and protein levels in all L165041-treated hamsters as compared to control animals. The induction of ACSL4 expression by L165041 in liver tissue in vivo was recapitulated in human primary hepatocytes and hepatocytes isolated from hamster and mouse. Moreover, employing the approach of adenovirus-mediated gene knockdown, we showed that depletion of PPARδ in hamster hepatocytes specifically reduced ACSL4 expression. Finally, utilizing HepG2 as a model system, we demonstrate that PPARδ activation leads to increased ACSL4 promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression, and consequently higher arachidonoyl-CoA synthetase activity. Taken together, we have discovered a novel PPARδ-mediated regulatory mechanism for ACSL4 expression in liver tissue and cultured hepatic cells. PMID:25645621

  9. Detection of microcystin synthetase genes in health food supplements containing the freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saker, M L; Jungblut, A-D; Neilan, B A; Rawn, D F K; Vasconcelos, V M

    2005-10-01

    In this study we investigated the presence of toxin-producing cyanobacterial contaminants in food supplements manufactured from blooms of the non-toxic freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. Previous reports investigating the contamination of health food supplements with toxin-producing cyanobacteria have used chemical and or biochemical methods such as HPLC, ELISA and protein phosphatase assays. Whilst these studies have drawn attention to the presence of hepatotoxic microcystins in some commercially available food supplements, the methods used do not provide any information on the source of the contaminant. Such information would be useful for the quality control of food supplements produced for human consumption. In this study we applied a molecular technique, involving the amplification of the 16s rRNA gene, the phycocyanin operon, and two genes of the microcystin synthetase gene cluster to show that all 12 food supplement samples, sourced from various internet distributors and containing non-toxic A. flos-aquae, also contained toxigenic cyanobacteria. Sequencing of the microcystin synthetase genes detected in all of the food supplements showed that M. aeruginosa was the organism responsible for the production of microcystins in the samples. The presence of microcystins in the food supplements was confirmed by ELISA, with concentrations within the range of 0.1--4.72 microgg(-1) (microcystin-LR equivalents). Given that the molecular methods applied here are highly sensitive, and show good agreement with the results obtained from ELISA, we believe that they could potentially be used as a quality control technique for food products that contain cyanobacteria.

  10. Limited diagnostic value of enzyme analysis in patients with mitochondrial tRNA mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibrand, Flemming; Jeppesen, Tina Dysgaard; Frederiksen, Anja L

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic value of respiratory chain (RC) enzyme analysis of muscle in adult patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM). RC enzyme activity was measured in muscle biopsies from 39 patients who carry either the 3243A>G mutation, other tRNA point mutations, or single, large......-scale deletions of mtDNA. Findings were compared with those obtained from asymptomatic relatives with the 3243A>G mutation, myotonic dystrophy patients, and healthy subjects. Plasma lactate concentration, maximal oxygen uptake, and ragged-red fibers/cytochrome c-negative fibers in muscle were also determined....... Only 10% of patients with the 3243A>G point mutation had decreased enzyme activity of one or more RC complexes, whereas this was the case for 83% of patients with other point mutations and 62% of patients with deletions. Abnormal muscle histochemistry was found in 65%, 100%, and 85% of patients...

  11. Insertion near the mitochondrial tyrosine tRNA gene in patients with mitochondrial diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Y.; Nonaka, I. [National Institute of Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan); Horai, S. [National Institute of Genetics, Mishima (Japan)

    1994-09-01

    The 3243 mutation commonly found in patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) has been occasionally detected in patients with chronic progressive external opthalmoplegia (CPEO). To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon, an extensive mitochondrial (mt) DNA study was performed on such a patient (3243-CPEO). The newly discovered insertion was located in the noncoding region between cytrochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and tyrosine tRNA. The insertion was not found in 58 or 22 CPEO patients with or without mtDNA large-scale deletion but in another 3243-CPEO patient. In addition, the insertion was present in 1 of 116 normal Japanese, who had no 3243 mutation, and in 3 of 68 3243-MELAS patients. These results raise the possibility that the phenotypic expression of the 3243 mutation could be modulated or arranged by additional mtDNA mutations.

  12. Limited diagnostic value of enzyme analysis in patients with mitochondrial tRNA mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibrand, Flemming; Jeppesen, Tina Dysgaard; Frederiksen, Anja L

    2010-01-01

    -scale deletions of mtDNA. Findings were compared with those obtained from asymptomatic relatives with the 3243A>G mutation, myotonic dystrophy patients, and healthy subjects. Plasma lactate concentration, maximal oxygen uptake, and ragged-red fibers/cytochrome c-negative fibers in muscle were also determined......We evaluated the diagnostic value of respiratory chain (RC) enzyme analysis of muscle in adult patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM). RC enzyme activity was measured in muscle biopsies from 39 patients who carry either the 3243A>G mutation, other tRNA point mutations, or single, large....... Only 10% of patients with the 3243A>G point mutation had decreased enzyme activity of one or more RC complexes, whereas this was the case for 83% of patients with other point mutations and 62% of patients with deletions. Abnormal muscle histochemistry was found in 65%, 100%, and 85% of patients...

  13. Side effects of extra tRNA supplied in a typical bacterial protein production scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Karina Marie; Nørholm, Morten H. H.

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant protein production is at the core of biotechnology and numerous molecular tools and bacterial strains have been developed to make the process more efficient. One commonly used generic solution is to supply extra copies of low-abundance tRNAs to compensate for the presence of complemen...... on the same plasmid and not the tRNAs per se. These phenomena seem to have been largely overlooked despite the huge popularity of the T7/pET-based systems for bacterial protein production....... of complementary rare codons in genes-of-interest. Here we show that such extra tRNA, supplied by the commonly used pLysSRARE2 plasmid, can cause two side effects: (1) growth and gene expression can be impaired, and (2) apparent positive effects can be caused by differential expression of the lysozyme gene encoded...

  14. Computational identification of the selenocysteine tRNA (tRNASec in genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didac Santesmasses

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Selenocysteine (Sec is known as the 21st amino acid, a cysteine analogue with selenium replacing sulphur. Sec is inserted co-translationally in a small fraction of proteins called selenoproteins. In selenoprotein genes, the Sec specific tRNA (tRNASec drives the recoding of highly specific UGA codons from stop signals to Sec. Although found in organisms from the three domains of life, Sec is not universal. Many species are completely devoid of selenoprotein genes and lack the ability to synthesize Sec. Since tRNASec is a key component in selenoprotein biosynthesis, its efficient identification in genomes is instrumental to characterize the utilization of Sec across lineages. Available tRNA prediction methods fail to accurately predict tRNASec, due to its unusual structural fold. Here, we present Secmarker, a method based on manually curated covariance models capturing the specific tRNASec structure in archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes. We exploited the non-universality of Sec to build a proper benchmark set for tRNASec predictions, which is not possible for the predictions of other tRNAs. We show that Secmarker greatly improves the accuracy of previously existing methods constituting a valuable tool to identify tRNASec genes, and to efficiently determine whether a genome contains selenoproteins. We used Secmarker to analyze a large set of fully sequenced genomes, and the results revealed new insights in the biology of tRNASec, led to the discovery of a novel bacterial selenoprotein family, and shed additional light on the phylogenetic distribution of selenoprotein containing genomes. Secmarker is freely accessible for download, or online analysis through a web server at http://secmarker.crg.cat.

  15. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    somewhat variable , all the cultures have exhibited a sustained 2 to 4-fold elevation subsequently, similar to that seen in 8X nonessential amino acids...queuine to mice relieves modified nucleoside queuosine deficiency in Ehrlich ascites tumor tRN1A, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Comnun. 96:313 (1980). TiPo ...conditions prescribed in this investigation. Although a significant elevation in saturation density was induced by TPA, some variability was observed in

  16. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-20

    According to the wobble hypothesis of codon-anticodon pairing proposed by Francis Crick , inosine in the first position of the anticodon of tRNAs could base...U,C,A *The purine and pyrimidine bases of the nucleosides listed in the table were predicted by Francis Crick to be able to base-pair in the tRNA...allopurinol proposed by Crick (2) states that inosine in the first position (Como n tof te aticdonof RN~, culdbas par wth ridne, DEAE-cellulose Column

  17. Characterizing Expression and Processing of Precursor and Mature Human tRNAs by Hydro-tRNAseq and PAR-CLIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasos Gogakos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The participation of tRNAs in fundamental aspects of biology and disease necessitates an accurate, experimentally confirmed annotation of tRNA genes and curation of tRNA sequences. This has been challenging because RNA secondary structure, nucleotide modifications, and tRNA gene multiplicity complicate sequencing and mapping efforts. To address these issues, we developed hydro-tRNAseq, a method based on partial alkaline RNA hydrolysis that generates fragments amenable for sequencing. To identify transcribed tRNA genes, we further complemented this approach with photoactivatable crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP of SSB/La, a conserved protein involved in pre-tRNA processing. Our results show that approximately half of all predicted tRNA genes are transcribed in human cells. We also report nucleotide modification sites and their order of introduction, and we identify tRNA leaders, trailers, and introns. By using complementary sequencing-based methodologies, we present a human tRNA atlas and determine expression levels of mature and processing intermediates of tRNAs in human cells.

  18. Molecular investigation of tRNA genes integrity and its relation to pathogenicity islands in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains

    OpenAIRE

    Novais,Rogério Carlos; Chaves,Marcela Cassin; Gonzalez,Alice Gonçalves Martins; Andrade,João Ramos Costa

    2004-01-01

    tRNA genes are known target sites for the integration of pathogenicity islands (PAI) and other genetic elements, such as bacteriophages, into bacterial genome. In most STEC (Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli), the PAI called LEE (locus of enterocyte effacement) is related to bacterial virulence and is mostly associated to the tRNA genes selC and pheU. In this work, we first investigated the relationship of LEE with tRNA genes selC and pheU in 43 STEC strains. We found that 28 strains (65...

  19. The Usher Syndrome Type IIIB Histidyl-tRNA Synthetase Mutation Confers Temperature Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jamie A; Guth, Ethan; Kim, Cindy; Regan, Cathy; Siu, Victoria M; Rupar, C Anthony; Demeler, Borries; Francklyn, Christopher S; Robey-Bond, Susan M

    2017-07-18

    Histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HARS) is a highly conserved translation factor that plays an essential role in protein synthesis. HARS has been implicated in the human syndromes Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Type 2W and Type IIIB Usher (USH3B). The USH3B mutation, which encodes a Y454S substitution in HARS, is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion and associated with childhood deafness, blindness, and episodic hallucinations during acute illness. The biochemical basis of the pathophysiologies linked to USH3B is currently unknown. Here, we present a detailed functional comparison of wild-type (WT) and Y454S HARS enzymes. Kinetic parameters for enzymes and canonical substrates were determined using both steady state and rapid kinetics. Enzyme stability was examined using differential scanning fluorimetry. Finally, enzyme functionality in a primary cell culture was assessed. Our results demonstrate that the Y454S substitution leaves HARS amino acid activation, aminoacylation, and tRNAHis binding functions largely intact compared with those of WT HARS, and the mutant enzyme dimerizes like the wild type does. Interestingly, during our investigation, it was revealed that the kinetics of amino acid activation differs from that of the previously characterized bacterial HisRS. Despite the similar kinetics, differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that Y454S is less thermally stable than WT HARS, and cells from Y454S patients grown at elevated temperatures demonstrate diminished levels of protein synthesis compared to those of WT cells. The thermal sensitivity associated with the Y454S mutation represents a biochemical basis for understanding USH3B.

  20. Identification of a novel human tRNA(Ser(CGA)) functional in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Schmitz, A; Pedersen, F S

    2000-01-01

    We have identified a human tRNA(Ser) isoacceptor matching the UCG codon. The tRNA was discovered via its ability to act in reverse transcription of a murine leukemia virus vector containing a complementary tRNA primer binding site (Lund et al., Nucleic Acids Res., 28 (2000) 791-799). The t....... The integrity and functionality of the cloned tRNA(Ser(CGA)) gene was verified by in vitro transcription analysis in HeLa nuclear extracts....

  1. Genetic association of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 variants with fasting glucose, diabetes, and subclinical atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Zhao, Wei; Wojczynski, Mary K; Siebenthall, Kyle; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Saleheen, Danish; Borecki, Ingrid B; Reilly, Muredach P; Rich, Stephen S; Bornfeldt, Karin E

    2016-03-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) converts free fatty acids into acyl-CoAs. Mouse studies have revealed that ACSL1 channels acyl-CoAs to β-oxidation, thereby reducing glucose utilization, and is required for diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis. The role of ACSL1 in humans is unknown. We therefore examined common variants in the human ACSL1 locus by genetic association studies for fasting glucose, diabetes status, and preclinical atherosclerosis by using the MAGIC and DIAGRAM consortia; followed by analyses in participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, the Penn-T2D consortium, and a meta-analysis of subclinical atherosclerosis in African Americans; and finally, expression quantitative trait locus analysis and identification of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHS). The results show that three SNPs in ACSL1 (rs7681334, rs735949, and rs4862423) are associated with fasting glucose or diabetes status in these large (>200,000 subjects) data sets. Furthermore, rs4862423 is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis and coincides with a DHS highly accessible in human heart. SNP rs735949 is in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs745805, significantly associated with ACSL1 levels in skin, suggesting tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms. This study provides evidence in humans of ACSL1 SNPs associated with fasting glucose, diabetes, and subclinical atherosclerosis and suggests links among these traits and acyl-CoA synthesis. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. ISOLEUCYL-tRNA-SYNTHETASE A FLUORESCENCE STUDY OP THE BINDINGPROPERTIES OF THE SYNTHETASE FROM ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzer, Geoffrey R.; Bennett, Edward L.; Calvin, Melvin.

    1970-11-01

    Fluorescence properties of purified isoleucyl-tRNA-synthetase isolated from E. coli B have been studied. No changes in the quantum yield, energy or polarization of the emission were detected in the presence (either individually or in combinations) of the substrates and cofactors required for activation of L-isoleucine. In 2.5 M urea enzyme activity and intrinsic fluorescence intensity (at 340 nm) each decrease with time, showing similar kinetics and rate constants. The rate of this decay is reduced in the presence of ligands which can bind to the enzyme and the effect has been used to measure dissociation constants for enzyme-ligand complexes. Values have been obtained for the complexes between enzyme and L-isoleucine (K{sub diss} = 2.5 x 10{sup -5} M), L-valine (K{sub diss} = 3.0 x 10{sup -4} M), ATP (K{sub diss} = 1.5 x 10{sup -4} M) and PP{sub i} (K{sub diss} = 2.0 x 10{sup -4} M) at 25{sup o}. The effects of ionic strength, and the temperature dependence and urea concentration dependence of L-isoleucine binding have also been studied. Magnesium ions, which are required for catalysis, do not greatly affect the binding of single substrates, but changes are seen in the presence of ATP and L-isoleucine together. The magnesium ion concentration dependence of this effect (half-point about 2 x 10{sup -4} M) and the equilibrium constant for L-isoleucine activation (2 x 10{sup -6} M) have both been measured. The reliability of the methods has been discussed. Results have been interpreted in terms of current theories of amino acid activation. The binding parameters are sufficient to explain the stability of enzyme bound L-isoleucylarenylate without invoking conformation changes. This is consistent with the absence of substrate induced fluorescence changes. Magnesium effects are explained in terms of reduced electrostatic repulsion between reactants bearing like charges.

  3. Association of IDDM and attenuated response of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase to yellow fever vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnevie-Nielsen, V; Larsen, M L; Frifelt, J J

    1989-01-01

    Basal and yellow fever vaccination-induced 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (2',5'A) activity was determined in blood mononuclear cells (peripheral blood lymphocytes [PBLs]) from insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and matched control subjects. The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine repre...

  4. The parallel and convergent universes of polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cane, D E; Walsh, C T

    1999-12-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) catalyze chain elongation from simple building blocks to create a diverse array of natural products. PKS and NRPS proteins share striking architectural and organizational similarities that can be exploited to generate entirely new natural products.

  5. Isolation and characterization of the rat glutamine synthetase-encoding gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Zande, L.; Labruyère, W. T.; Arnberg, A. C.; Wilson, R. H.; van den Bogaert, A. J.; Das, A. T.; van Oorschot, D. A.; Frijters, C.; Charles, R.; Moorman, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    From a rat genomic library in phage lambda Charon4A, a complete glutamine synthetase-encoding gene was isolated. The gene is 9.5-10 kb long, consists of seven exons, and codes for two mRNA species of 1375 nucleotides (nt) and 2787 nt, respectively. For both mRNAs, full-length cDNAs containing a

  6. Synthesis, accumulation and turnover of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in cultures of embryonic rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roon, M. A.; Charles, R.; Lamers, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroid, thyroid hormones and cyclic AMP can induce the synthesis of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in cultures of hepatocytes as soon as these cells differentiate from the embryonic foregut. The low levels of both enzymes that can accumulate in such

  7. Functions of Glutamine Synthetase Isoforms in the Nitrogen Metabolism of Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Miao

    ;2 which encode different isoforms of the key N-assimilatory enzyme cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1). In the single knockout mutant gln1;2 and in the double knockout mutant gln1;1:gln1;2, seed germination and seedling establishment were distinctly impaired. The negative effect of Gln1;2 deficiency...

  8. Regulation of the spatiotemporal pattern of expression of the glutamine synthetase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lie-Venema, H.; Hakvoort, T. B.; van Hemert, F. J.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase, the enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of glutamate and ammonia into glutamine, is expressed in a tissue-specific and developmentally controlled manner. The first part of this review focuses on its spatiotemporal pattern of expression, the factors that regulate

  9. Regulation of Amidase Formation in Mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO Lacking Glutamine Synthetase Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Herst, Patricia M.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    The formation of amidase was studied in mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO lacking glutamine synthetase activity. It appeared that catabolite repression of amidase synthesis by succinate was partially relieved when cellular growth was limited by glutamine. Under these conditions, a correlation

  10. Argininosuccinate synthetase and argininosuccinate lyase: two ornithine cycle enzymes from Agaricus bisporus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagemaker, M.J.M.; Eastwood, D.C.; Drift, van der C.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Burton, K.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.; Camp, op den H.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Accumulation of high quantities of urea in fruiting bodies is a known feature of larger basidiomycetes. Argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) and argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) are two ornithine cycle enzymes catalysing the last two steps in the arginine biosynthetic pathway. Arginine is the main

  11. Purification and properties of phosphoribosyl-diphosphate synthetase from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnvig, Kirsten; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Switzer, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Phosphoribosyl-diphosphate (PPRibP) synthetase from Bacillus subtiliis has been purified to near homogeneity from an Escherichia coli Δprs strain bearing the cloned B. subtilis prs gene, encoding PPRibP synthentase, on a plasmid. The Mr of the subunit (34,000) and its amino-terminal amino acid...

  12. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RAT GENE FOR CARBAMOYLPHOSPHATE SYNTHETASE-I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENHOFF, MJB; VANDEZANDE, LPWGM; DINGEMANSE, MA; DAS, AT; LABRUYERE, W; MOORMAN, AFM; CHARLES, R; LAMERS, WH; Jacobus Mgn Van De Zande, Louis

    1995-01-01

    Carbamoylphosphate synthetase I (CbmPS) is first expressed in rat hepatocytes shortly before birth. After birth, expression of CbmPS gradually becomes confined to the hepatocytes surrounding the portal veins. To obtain insight into the spatiotemporal regulation of its expression, the rat CbmPS gene

  13. Cytonuclear Interactions in the Evolution of Animal Mitochondrial tRNA Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett, Walker; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2015-06-27

    The evolution of mitochondrial information processing pathways, including replication, transcription and translation, is characterized by the gradual replacement of mitochondrial-encoded proteins with nuclear-encoded counterparts of diverse evolutionary origins. Although the ancestral enzymes involved in mitochondrial transcription and replication have been replaced early in eukaryotic evolution, mitochondrial translation is still carried out by an apparatus largely inherited from the α-proteobacterial ancestor. However, variation in the complement of mitochondrial-encoded molecules involved in translation, including transfer RNAs (tRNAs), provides evidence for the ongoing evolution of mitochondrial protein synthesis. Here, we investigate the evolution of the mitochondrial translational machinery using recent genomic and transcriptomic data from animals that have experienced the loss of mt-tRNAs, including phyla Cnidaria and Ctenophora, as well as some representatives of all four classes of Porifera. We focus on four sets of mitochondrial enzymes that directly interact with tRNAs: Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, glutamyl-tRNA amidotransferase, tRNA(Ile) lysidine synthetase, and RNase P. Our results support the observation that the fate of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins is influenced by the evolution of molecules encoded in mitochondrial DNA, but in a more complex manner than appreciated previously. The data also suggest that relaxed selection on mitochondrial translation rather than coevolution between mitochondrial and nuclear subunits is responsible for elevated rates of evolution in mitochondrial translational proteins. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. Maize glutamine synthetase cDNAs: isolation by direct genetic selection in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snustad, D P; Hunsperger, J P; Chereskin, B M; Messing, J

    1988-12-01

    Maize glutamine synthetase cDNA clones were isolated by genetic selection for functional rescue of an Escherichia coli delta glnA mutant growing on medium lacking glutamine. The Black Mexican Sweet cDNA library used in this study was constructed in pUC13 such that cDNA sense strands were transcribed under the control of the lac promoter. E. coli delta glnA cells were transformed with cDNA library plasmid DNA, grown briefly in rich medium to allow phenotypic expression of the cDNAs and the pUC13 ampr gene, and challenged to grow on agar medium lacking glutamine. Large numbers of glutamine synthetase cDNA clones have been identified in individual 150-mm Petri dishes; all characterized cDNA clones carry complete coding sequences. Two cDNAs identical except for different 5' and 3' termini have been sequenced. The major open reading frame predicts a protein with an amino acid sequence that exhibits striking similarity to the amino acid sequences of the predicted products of previously sequenced eukaryotic glutamine synthetase cDNAs and genes. In addition, the maize glutamine synthetase cDNAs were shown to contain a 5' mini-ORF of 29 codons separated by 37 nucleotide pairs from the major ORF. This mini-ORF was shown not to be essential for the functional rescue of the E. coli delta glnA mutant. Expression of the cDNAs in E. coli is presumed to be due to the function of a polycistronic hybrid lac messenger RNA or translational fusions encoded by the pUC plasmids. Proteins of the expected sizes encoded by two different pUC clones were shown to react with antibodies to tobacco glutamine synthetase.

  15. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis in the liver leads to S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, F; Ochoa, P; Rivas, C; Martin-Lomas, M; Mato, J M; Pajares, M A

    1991-09-01

    The hepatic levels of glutathione in rats treated with buthionine sulfoximine (4 mmol/kg), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, were 72.5% +/- 4.9% of those determined in control animals. This decrease in glutathione concentration was prevented by the administration of glutathione monoethyl ester (7.5 mmol/kg). S-Adenosyl-L-methionine-synthetase activity in the liver of rats treated with buthionine sulfoximine was 39.4% +/- 6.5% of that determined in control animals. Again, glutathione monoethyl ester prevented the effect of buthionine sulfoximine on S-adenosyl-L-methionine-synthetase activity. There was a close correlation (r = 0.936) between the hepatic levels of glutathione and S-adenosyl-L-methionine-synthetase activity. The hepatic concentration of S-adenosyl-L-methionine in buthionine sulfoximine-treated animals was 59.7% +/- 3.7% of that measured in control rats. Contrasting with the protective effects mentioned above, glutathione monoester had no preventive action on buthionine sulfoximine-induced S-adenosyl-L-methionine depletion. Electron microscopic examination of liver samples of rats after buthionine sulfoximine administration showed evidence of liver degeneration, which was attenuated by glutathione monoethyl ester treatment. Glutathione (7.5 mmol/kg) treatment was less effective than glutathione monoethyl ester in attenuating buthionine sulfoximine effects on hepatic S-adenosyl-L-methionine metabolism and morphology. The reduction of S-adenosyl-L-methionine-synthetase activity observed after treatment with buthionine sulfoximine and its prevention by glutathione monoethyl ester, as well as the correlation between the activity of this enzyme and glutathione levels, indicate that glutathione plays an important role in maintaining S-adenosyl-L-methionine-synthetase activity in the liver.

  16. Identification of a rhodanese-like protein involved in thiouridine biosynthesis in Thermus thermophilus tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigi, Naoki; Asai, Shin-Ichi; Watanabe, Kimitsuna

    2016-12-01

    Incorporation of a sulfur atom into 2-thioribothymidine (s(2) T or 5-methyl-2-thiouridine) at position 54 in thermophile tRNA is accomplished by an elaborate system composed of many proteins which confers thermostability to the translation system. We identified ttuD (tRNA-two-thiouridine D) as a gene for the synthesis of s(2) T54 in Thermus thermophilus. The rhodanese-like protein TtuD enhances the activity of cysteine desulfurases and receives the persulfide generated by cysteine desulfurases in vitro. TtuD also enhances the formation of thiocarboxylated TtuB, the sulfur donor for the tRNA sulfurtransferase TtuA. Since cysteine desulfurases are the first enzymes in the synthesis of s(2) T and other sulfur-containing compounds, TtuD has a role to direct sulfur flow to s(2) T synthesis. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Several RNase T2 enzymes function in induced tRNA and rRNA turnover in the ciliate Tetrahymena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Langebjerg; Collins, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    RNase T2 enzymes are produced by a wide range of organisms and have been implicated to function in diverse cellular processes, including stress-induced anticodon loop cleavage of mature tRNAs to generate tRNA halves. Here we describe a family of eight RNase T2 genes (RNT2A-RNT2H) in the ciliate...... by growth arrest that functions to recycle idle protein synthesis machinery....

  18. The role of Sep (O-phosphoserine) tRNA: Sec (selenocysteine) synthase (SEPSECS) in proliferation, apoptosis and hormone secretion of trophoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H-D; Zhang, W-G; Sun, M-N; Duan, Q-F; Li, F-L; Li, H

    2013-11-01

    To investigate whether Sep (O-phosphoserine) tRNA: Sec (selenocysteine) synthase (SEPSECS), which plays an essential role in the synthesis of selenoprotein, affects proliferation, apoptosis and hormone secretion of human trophoblast cells. Human trophoblast JEG-3 cells were divided into four groups: control group, SEPSECS silenced-expression group, empty vector group and SEPSECS over-expression group. Over-expression and silenced-expression were achieved by transfection with plasmid DNA or RNA oligonucleotide, respectively. 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl] -2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and colony formation assays were performed to investigate cell proliferation, while apoptosis was tested by annexin V-FITC, PI double staining and caspases-3 activation assays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine the level of progesterone (PG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). SEPSECS silenced-expression clearly inhibited proliferation of JEG-3 cells (p < 0.05), significantly induced cell apoptosis (p < 0.01) and reduced the production of PG and hCG (p < 0.05). On the contrary, SEPSECS over-expression significantly promoted both cell proliferation (p < 0.01) and secretion of PG and hCG (p < 0.05). SEPSECS significantly affects proliferation, apoptosis and hormone secretion of human trophoblast cells, suggesting that a potential relationship exists among SEPSECS, cell proliferation, apoptosis and hormone production of human placental trophoblast cells. Furthermore, this may provide a clue to uncover the relationship between selenium and human placental in association with an emphasis on the importance of selenium adequacy during pregnancy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Shared Sulfur Mobilization Routes for tRNA Thiolation and Molybdenum Cofactor Biosynthesis in Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Leimkühler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of transfer RNA (tRNA have been shown to play critical roles in the biogenesis, metabolism, structural stability and function of RNA molecules, and the specific modifications of nucleobases with sulfur atoms in tRNA are present in pro- and eukaryotes. Here, especially the thiomodifications xm5s2U at the wobble position 34 in tRNAs for Lys, Gln and Glu, were suggested to have an important role during the translation process by ensuring accurate deciphering of the genetic code and by stabilization of the tRNA structure. The trafficking and delivery of sulfur nucleosides is a complex process carried out by sulfur relay systems involving numerous proteins, which not only deliver sulfur to the specific tRNAs but also to other sulfur-containing molecules including iron–sulfur clusters, thiamin, biotin, lipoic acid and molybdopterin (MPT. Among the biosynthesis of these sulfur-containing molecules, the biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor (Moco and the synthesis of thio-modified tRNAs in particular show a surprising link by sharing protein components for sulfur mobilization in pro- and eukaryotes.

  20. Protein Translation Enzyme lysyl-tRNA Synthetase Presents a New Target for Drug Development against Causative Agents of Loiasis and Schistosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Sharma

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Helminth parasites are an assemblage of two major phyla of nematodes (also known as roundworms and platyhelminths (also called flatworms. These parasites are a major human health burden, and infections caused by helminths are considered under neglected tropical diseases (NTDs. These infections are typified by limited clinical treatment options and threat of drug resistance. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs are vital enzymes that decode genetic information and enable protein translation. The specific inhibition of pathogen aaRSs bores well for development of next generation anti-parasitics. Here, we have identified and annotated aaRSs and accessory proteins from Loa loa (nematode and Schistosoma mansoni (flatworm to provide a glimpse of these protein translation enzymes within these parasites. Using purified parasitic lysyl-tRNA synthetases (KRSs, we developed series of assays that address KRS enzymatic activity, oligomeric states, crystal structure and inhibition profiles. We show that L. loa and S. mansoni KRSs are potently inhibited by the fungal metabolite cladosporin. Our co-crystal structure of Loa loa KRS-cladosporin complex reveals key interacting residues and provides a platform for structure-based drug development. This work hence provides a new direction for both novel target discovery and inhibitor development against eukaryotic pathogens that include L. loa and S. mansoni.

  1. Connecting the kinetics and energy landscape of tRNA translocation on the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitford, Paul C; Blanchard, Scott C; Cate, Jamie H D; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2013-01-01

    Functional rearrangements in biomolecular assemblies result from diffusion across an underlying energy landscape. While bulk kinetic measurements rely on discrete state-like approximations to the energy landscape, single-molecule methods can project the free energy onto specific coordinates. With measures of the diffusion, one may establish a quantitative bridge between state-like kinetic measurements and the continuous energy landscape. We used an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the 70S ribosome (2.1 million atoms; 1.3 microseconds) to provide this bridge for specific conformational events associated with the process of tRNA translocation. Starting from a pre-translocation configuration, we identified sets of residues that collectively undergo rotary rearrangements implicated in ribosome function. Estimates of the diffusion coefficients along these collective coordinates for translocation were then used to interconvert between experimental rates and measures of the energy landscape. This analysis, in conjunction with previously reported experimental rates of translocation, provides an upper-bound estimate of the free-energy barriers associated with translocation. While this analysis was performed for a particular kinetic scheme of translocation, the quantitative framework is general and may be applied to energetic and kinetic descriptions that include any number of intermediates and transition states.

  2. tRNA Modification and Genetic Code Variations in Animal Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimitsuna Watanabe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In animal mitochondria, six codons have been known as nonuniversal genetic codes, which vary in the course of animal evolution. They are UGA (termination codon in the universal genetic code changes to Trp codon in all animal mitochondria, AUA (Ile to Met in most metazoan mitochondria, AAA (Lys to Asn in echinoderm and some platyhelminth mitochondria, AGA/AGG (Arg to Ser in most invertebrate, Arg to Gly in tunicate, and Arg to termination in vertebrate mitochondria, and UAA (termination to Tyr in a planaria and a nematode mitochondria, but conclusive evidence is lacking in this case. We have elucidated that the anticodons of tRNAs deciphering these nonuniversal codons (tRNATrp for UGA, tRNAMet for AUA, tRNAAsn for AAA, and tRNASer and tRNAGly for AGA/AGG are all modified; tRNATrp has 5-carboxymethylaminomethyluridine or 5-taurinomethyluridine, tRNAMet has 5-formylcytidine or 5-taurinomethyluridine, tRNASer has 7-methylguanosine and tRNAGly has 5-taurinomethyluridine in their anticodon wobble position, and tRNAAsn has pseudouridine in the anticodon second position. This review aims to clarify the structural relationship between these nonuniversal codons and the corresponding tRNA anticodons including modified nucleosides and to speculate on the possible mechanisms for explaining the evolutional changes of these nonuniversal codons in the course of animal evolution.

  3. A CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase purified from a marine bacterium, Photobacterium leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Hitomi; Mine, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    A cytidine 5'-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Neu5Ac) synthetase was found in a crude extract prepared from Photobacterium leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145, a marine bacterium that also produces a β-galactoside α2,6-sialyltransferase. The CMP-Neu5Ac synthetase was purified from the crude extract of the cells by a combination of anion-exchange and gel filtration column chromatography. The purified enzyme migrated as a single band (60 kDa) on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The activity of the enzyme was maximal at 35 °C at pH 9.0, and the synthetase required Mg(2+) for activity. Although these properties are similar to those of other CMP-Neu5Ac synthetases isolated from bacteria, this synthetase produced not only CMP-Neu5Ac from cytidine triphosphate and Neu5Ac, but also CMP-N-glycolylneuraminic acid from cytidine triphosphate and N-glycolylneuraminic acid, unlike CMP-Neu5Ac synthetase purified from Escherichia coli.

  4. Enzymes of Krebs-Henseleit Cycle in Vitis vinifera L: II. Arginosuccinate Synthetase and Lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubelakis, K A; Kliewer, W M

    1978-09-01

    Arginosuccinate (ASA) synthetase and lyase activities were detected in extracts from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Chenin blanc mature leaves and seedlings. Optimum reaction conditions for ASA synthetase were 10 millimolar l-citrulline, 7.5 millimolar l-aspartate, 3 to 4 millimolar ATP, 12 millimolar Mg(2+) (pH 7.5 to 8.0), enzyme extract up to equivalent of about 200 milligrams of fresh tissue, and incubation temperature of 38 to 40 C. Optimum reaction conditions for ASA lyase were 4 millimolar ASA-K salt (pH 7.3 to 7.8), amount of extract up to equivalent of about 180 milligrams of fresh tissue, and incubation temperature of 38 to 40 C.

  5. Fatty acid synthetase from Brevibacterium ammoniagenes: formation of monounsaturated fatty acids by a multienzyme complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, A; Okuda, S

    1977-01-01

    A multienzyme fatty acid synthetase complex isolated from Brevibacterium ammoniagenes has been purified to a specific activity of 1440 nmol of malonyl-CoA incorporated per min/mg. The enzyme is homogeneous, as judged by gel electrophoresis on agarose gels, and has a molecular weight of 1.2 X 10(6). Both NADPH and NADH are required for activity. In contrast to other fatty acid synthetase complexes, the enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of both long-chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids from malonyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA. The formation of unsaturated fatty acids is oxygen-independent and sharply reduced by 3-decynoyl-N-acetylcysteamine, a known inhibitor of Escherchia coli beta-hydroxydecanoyl thioester dehydrase (EC 4.2.1.60). PMID:20622

  6. A Survey of Glutamine Synthetase Activities in Tissues from Three Classes of Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    glutamine synthetase activity is defined as the production of one pmole of y-glutamyl hydroxamate per min at 25°C. Protein was determined by the biuret method ...content. P. is listed as at progein per g tissue ( biuret method ); nm ± standard deviation.’ Number of specimens examined is listed in parenthesis. 3 body...lamprey, coelacanth . AOSTRACT (Continue en revere., olde It necessary and Identify by block nuotbor) nzyme assays using the y-glutamyl transferase method

  7. Pasteurella multocida CMP-sialic acid synthetase and mutants of Neisseria meningitidis CMP-sialic acid synthetase with improved substrate promiscuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhong; Yu, Hai; Cao, Hongzhi; Muthana, Saddam; Chen, Xi

    2012-03-01

    Cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP)-sialic acid synthetases (CSSs) catalyze the formation of CMP-sialic acid from CTP and sialic acid, a key step for sialyltransferase-catalyzed biosynthesis of sialic acid-containing oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. More than 50 different sialic acid forms have been identified in nature. To facilitate the enzymatic synthesis of sialosides with diverse naturally occurring sialic acid forms and their non-natural derivatives, CMP-sialic acid synthetases with promiscuous substrate specificity are needed. Herein we report the cloning, characterization, and substrate specificity studies of a new CSS from Pasteurella multocida strain P-1059 (PmCSS) and a CSS from Haemophillus ducreyi (HdCSS). Based on protein sequence alignment and substrate specificity studies of these two CSSs and a Neisseria meningitidis CSS (NmCSS), as well as crystal structure modeling and analysis of NmCSS, NmCSS mutants (NmCSS_S81R and NmCSS_Q163A) with improved substrate promiscuity were generated. The strategy of combining substrate specificity studies of enzymes from different sources and protein crystal structure studies can be a general approach for designing enzyme mutants with improved activity and substrate promiscuity.

  8. Differential inactivation of alfalfa nodule glutamine synthetases by tabtoxinine-. beta. -lactam. [Pseudomonas syringae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, T.J.; Unkefer, P.J.

    1987-04-01

    The presence of the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci within the rhizosphere of nodulated alfalfa plants results in an increase in N/sub 2/-fixation potential and growth, but a 40-50% decrease in nodule glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, as compared to nodulated control plants. Tabtoxinine-..beta..-Lactam an exocellular toxin produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci irreversibly inhibits glutamine synthetase. Partial purification of nodule GS by DEAE-cellulose chromatography reveals two enzyme forms are present (GS/sub n1/ and GS/sub n2/). In vitro inactivation of the two glutamine synthetases associated with the nodule indicates a differential sensitivity to T-..beta..-L. The nodule specific GS/sub n1/ is much less sensitive to T-..beta..-L than the GS/sub n2/ enzyme, which was found to coelute with the root enzyme (GS/sub r/). However, both GS/sub n1/ and GS/sub n2/ are rapidly inactivated by methionine sulfoximine, another irreversible inhibitor of GS.

  9. Probing a CMP-Kdn synthetase by 1H, 31P, and STD NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselhorst, Thomas; Münster-Kühnel, Anja K; Stolz, Anita; Oschlies, Melanie; Tiralongo, Joe; Kitajima, Ken; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; von Itzstein, Mark

    2005-02-11

    CMP-Kdn synthetase catalyses the reaction of sialic acids (Sia) and cytidine-5'-triphosphate (CTP) to the corresponding activated sugar nucleotide CMP-Sia and pyrophosphate PP(i). STD NMR experiments of a recombinant nucleotide cytidine-5'-monophosphate-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galacto-nonulosonic acid synthetase (CMP-Kdn synthetase) were performed to map the binding epitope of the substrate CTP and the product CMP-Neu5Ac. The STD NMR analysis clearly shows that the anomeric proton of the ribose moiety of both investigated compounds is in close proximity to the protein surface and is likely to play a key role in the binding process. The relative rates of the enzyme reaction, derived from (1)H NMR signal integrals, show that Kdn is activated at a rate 2.5 and 3.1 faster than Neu5Ac and Neu5Gc, respectively. Furthermore, proton-decoupled (31)P NMR spectroscopy was successfully used to follow the enzyme reaction and clearly confirmed the appearance of CMP-Sia and the inorganic pyrophosphate by-product.

  10. Structure of the terminal PCP domain of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase in teicoplanin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslinger, Kristina; Redfield, Christina; Cryle, Max J

    2015-04-01

    The biosynthesis of the glycopeptide antibiotics, of which teicoplanin and vancomycin are representative members, relies on the combination of non-ribosomal peptide synthesis and modification of the peptide by cytochrome P450 (Oxy) enzymes while the peptide remains bound to the peptide synthesis machinery. We have structurally characterized the final peptidyl carrier protein domain of the teicoplanin non-ribosomal peptide synthetase machinery: this domain is believed to mediate the interactions with tailoring Oxy enzymes in addition to its function as a shuttle for intermediates between multiple non-ribosomal peptide synthetase domains. Using solution state NMR, we have determined structures of this PCP domain in two states, the apo and the post-translationally modified holo state, both of which conform to a four-helix bundle assembly. The structures exhibit the same general fold as the majority of known carrier protein structures, in spite of the complex biosynthetic role that PCP domains from the final non-ribosomal peptide synthetase module must play in glycopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis. These structures thus support the hypothesis that it is subtle rearrangements, rather than dramatic conformational changes, which govern carrier protein interactions and selectivity during non-ribosomal peptide synthesis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [High efficiency of L-glutamine production by coupling genetic engineered bacterial glutamine synthetase with yeast alcoholic fermentation system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun-Ying; Chen, Guo-An; Xue, Bin; Zhang, Xian-Jiu; Yin, Zhi-Min

    2004-05-01

    Glutamine is an important conditionally necessary amino acid in human body. The effort is to establish a new and high efficient L-glutamine production system instead of traditional fermentaion. In this paper, high efficiency of L-glutamine production is obtained by coupling genetic engineered bacterial glutamine synthetase (GS) with yeast alcoholic fermentation system. Glutamine Synthetase gene (glnA) was amplified from Bacillus subtilis genomic DNA with primers designed according to sequences reported in EMBL data bank, then it was inserted into expression vector PET28b, the sequence of glnA was proved to be the same as that reported in the data bank by DNA sequencing. After transformation of this recombinant plasmid PET28b-glnA into BL-21 (DE3) strain, Lactose and IPTG were used to induce GS expression at 37 degrees C separately. Both of them can induce GS expression efficiently. The induced protein is proved to be soluble and occupies about 80% of the total proteins by SDS-PAGE analysis. The soluble GS was purified by Ni2+ chelating sepharose colum. After purification, the purified enzyme was proved active. Results reveal that the optmum temperature of this enzyme is 60 degrees C and optmum pH is 6.5 in biosynthetic reaction by using glutamate, ammonium choloride and ATP as substrates. After induction, the enzyme activity in crude extract of BL-21/PET28b-glnA is 83 times higher than that of original BL-21 extract. Mn2+ can obviously increase the activity and stability of this enzyme. Experiments show that the transformation efficiency of glutamate to glutamine is more than 95%. Because of the high cost from ATP, a system coupling GS with yeast for ATP regenaration was established. In this system, GS utilizes ATP released by yeast fermentation to synthesize L-glutamine. Yeast was treated by 2% toluence to increase its permeability and a yeast named YC001 with high yield of glutamine by coupling with recombinant GS was obtained. The good efficiency was achieved

  12. Regulation of 3-Deoxy-d-arabino-Heptulosonic 7-Phosphate Acid Synthetase Activity in Relation to the Synthesis of the Aromatic Vitamins in Escherichia coli K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, B. J.; Pittard, J.

    1969-01-01

    Both in vivo and in vitro experiments on wild-type Escherichia coli K-12 and mutant strains possessing only single 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonic 7-phosphate acid (DAHP) synthetase isoenzymes indicated that, under conditions when all three isoenzymes are fully repressed, sufficient chorismate is still formed for the synthesis of aromatic vitamins. Under repressed conditions both DAHP synthetase (phe) and (trp), but not DAHP synthetase (tyr), were shown to contribute to vitamin production. PMID:4905534

  13. Acyl-CoA synthetase activity links wild-type but not mutant a-Synuclein to brain arachidonate metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golovko, Mikhail; Rosenberger, Thad; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2006-01-01

    Because alpha-synuclein (Snca) has a role in brain lipid metabolism, we determined the impact that the loss of alpha-synuclein had on brain arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) metabolism in vivo using Snca-/- mice. We measured [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 incorporation and turnover kinetics in brain phospholipids using...... an established steady-state kinetic model. Liver was used as a negative control, and no changes were observed between groups. In Snca-/- brains, there was a marked reduction in 20:4n-6-CoA mass and in microsomal acyl-CoA synthetase (Acsl) activity toward 20:4n-6. Microsomal Acsl activity was completely restored...... after the addition of exogenous wild-type mouse or human alpha-synuclein, but not by A30P, E46K, and A53T forms of alpha-synuclein. Acsl and acyl-CoA hydrolase expression was not different between groups. The incorporation and turnover of 20:4n-6 into brain phospholipid pools were markedly reduced...

  14. The U6 snRNA m6A Methyltransferase METTL16 Regulates SAM Synthetase Intron Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Kathryn E; Chen, Beibei; Liu, Kuanqing; Hunter, Olga V; Xie, Yang; Tu, Benjamin P; Conrad, Nicholas K

    2017-05-18

    Maintenance of proper levels of the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is critical for a wide variety of biological processes. We demonstrate that the N6-adenosine methyltransferase METTL16 regulates expression of human MAT2A, which encodes the SAM synthetase expressed in most cells. Upon SAM depletion by methionine starvation, cells induce MAT2A expression by enhanced splicing of a retained intron. Induction requires METTL16 and its methylation substrate, a vertebrate conserved hairpin (hp1) in the MAT2A 3' UTR. Increasing METTL16 occupancy on the MAT2A 3' UTR is sufficient to induce efficient splicing. We propose that, under SAM-limiting conditions, METTL16 occupancy on hp1 increases due to inefficient enzymatic turnover, which promotes MAT2A splicing. We further show that METTL16 is the long-unknown methyltransferase for the U6 spliceosomal small nuclear RNA (snRNA). These observations suggest that the conserved U6 snRNA methyltransferase evolved an additional function in vertebrates to regulate SAM homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Antiviral Mechanisms of the 2'-5' Oligoadenylate Synthetases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Helle

    During the course of her PhD studies, Helle Kristiansen carried out research into proteins that play a role in the defence against viral infection in humans and animals. All cells contain a considerable number of proteins that can directly or directly attack a virus and inhibit or completely stop...

  16. Functional assignment of KEOPS/EKC complex subunits in the biosynthesis of the universal t6A tRNA modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrochia, Ludovic; Guetta, Dorian; Hecker, Arnaud; Forterre, Patrick; Basta, Tamara

    2013-11-01

    N(6)-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t(6)A) is a universal tRNA modification essential for normal cell growth and accurate translation. In Archaea and Eukarya, the universal protein Sua5 and the conserved KEOPS/EKC complex together catalyze t(6)A biosynthesis. The KEOPS/EKC complex is composed of Kae1, a universal metalloprotein belonging to the ASHKA superfamily of ATPases; Bud32, an atypical protein kinase and two small proteins, Cgi121 and Pcc1. In this study, we investigated the requirement and functional role of KEOPS/EKC subunits for biosynthesis of t(6)A. We demonstrated that Pcc1, Kae1 and Bud32 form a minimal functional unit, whereas Cgi121 acts as an allosteric regulator. We confirmed that Pcc1 promotes dimerization of the KEOPS/EKC complex and uncovered that together with Kae1, it forms the tRNA binding core of the complex. Kae1 binds l-threonyl-carbamoyl-AMP intermediate in a metal-dependent fashion and transfers the l-threonyl-carbamoyl moiety to substrate tRNA. Surprisingly, we found that Bud32 is regulated by Kae1 and does not function as a protein kinase but as a P-loop ATPase possibly involved in tRNA dissociation. Overall, our data support a mechanistic model in which the final step in the biosynthesis of t(6)A relies on a strictly catalytic component, Kae1, and three partner proteins necessary for dimerization, tRNA binding and regulation.

  17. Accuracy of translation on ribosome could be provided by a resonance of intramolecular oscillations in tRNA molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Semyonov, Denis

    2013-01-01

    X-ray data indicate that complexes of ribosomes with cognate and near cognate tRNAs are very similar structurally, and this was the ground for a suggestion that the ribosome discriminates correct codon-anticodon pair because of its higher stability. Here an alternative explanation of kinetic proofreading is suggested, and intramolecular oscillations in tRNAs play a keystone role in it. Resonance of the oscillations allows the cognate codon-anticodon pair to be conserved due to fast energy transfer to other part of the tRNA molecule. This mechanism can potentially discriminate correct pair from an incorrect one even if they have similar stabilities.

  18. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreira, Eva; Seabra, Ana Rita; Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min; Llorca, Óscar; Robinson, Carol V; Carvalho, Helena G; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2014-04-01

    The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants.

  19. Targeting ribonucleic acids by toxic small molecules: structural perturbation and energetics of interaction of phenothiazinium dyes thionine and toluidine blue O to tRNA phe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Puja; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2013-12-15

    This study was designed to examine the toxic interaction of two phenothiazinium dyes thionine (TO) and toluidine blue O (TBO) with tRNA(phe) by spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques. While phenothiazinium dye complexation with DNA is known, their bindings to RNA are not fully investigated. The non cooperative binding of both the dyes to tRNA was revealed from absorbance and fluorescence studies. From absorption, steady-state emission, the effect of ferrocyanide ion-induced steady-state fluorescence quenching, circular dichroism, the mode of binding of these dyes into the tRNA helix has been substantiated to be principally by intercalative in nature. Both dyes enhanced the thermal stability of tRNA. Circular dichroism studies provided evidence for the structural perturbations associated with the tRNA structure with induction of optical activity in the CD inactive dye molecules. Results from isothermal titration calorimetry experiments suggested that the binding of both dyes was predominantly entropy driven with a smaller but favorable enthalpy term that increased with temperature. The binding was dependent on the Na(+) concentration, but had a larger non-electrostatic contribution to the Gibbs energy. A small heat capacity value and the enthalpy-entropy compensation in the energetics of the interaction characterized the binding of the dyes to tRNA. This study confirms that the tRNA(phe) binding affinity is greater for TO compared to TBO. The utility of the present work lies in understanding the potential binding and consequent damage to tRNA by these toxic dyes in their development as therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Why should cancer biologists care about tRNAs? tRNA synthesis, mRNA translation and the control of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Savraj S

    2015-07-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are essential for mRNA translation. They are transcribed in the nucleus by RNA polymerase III and undergo many modifications before contributing to cytoplasmic protein synthesis. In this review I highlight our understanding of how tRNA biology may be linked to the regulation of mRNA translation, growth and tumorigenesis. First, I review how oncogenes and tumour suppressor signalling pathways, such as the PI3 kinase/TORC1, Ras/ERK, Myc, p53 and Rb pathways, regulate Pol III and tRNA synthesis. In several cases, this regulation contributes to cell, tissue and body growth, and has implications for our understanding of tumorigenesis. Second, I highlight some recent work, particularly in model organisms such as yeast and Drosophila, that shows how alterations in tRNA synthesis may be not only necessary, but also sufficient to drive changes in mRNA translation and growth. These effects may arise due to both absolute increases in total tRNA levels, but also changes in the relative levels of tRNAs in the overall pool. Finally, I review some recent studies that have revealed how tRNA modifications (amino acid acylation, base modifications, subcellular shuttling, and cleavage) can be regulated by growth and stress cues to selectively influence mRNA translation. Together these studies emphasize the importance of the regulation of tRNA synthesis and modification as critical control points in protein synthesis and growth. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translation and Cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Mini-Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetase/Mini-Tryptophanyl-tRNA Synthetase on Angiogenesis in Rhesus Monkeys after Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rui; Wang, Mian; You, Gui-ying; Yue, Rong-zheng; Chen, Yu-cheng; Zeng, Zhi; Liu, Rui; Qiang, Ou; Zhang, Li

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of mini-tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase/mini-tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (mini-TyrRS/mini-TrpRS) in ischemic angiogenesis in rhesus monkeys with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A 27-gauge needle was incorporated percutaneously into the left ventricular myocardium of rhesus monkeys with AMI. All monkeys were randomized to receive adenoviral vector mini-TyrRS/mini-TrpRS, which was administered as five injections into the infarcted myocardium, or saline or ad-null (control groups). The injections were guided by EnSite NavX left ventricular electroanatomical mapping. Mini-TyrRS/mini-TrpRS proteins were detected by Western blot and immunoprecipitation analyses. Microvessel density (MVD) per section was measured using immunostaining with a CD34 monoclonal antibody. Proliferating cardiomyocytes were identified through histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Myocardial perfusion and cardiac function were estimated by G-SPECT. Infarction size was also measured. Western blot analyses showed that compared to the normal zone, the expression level of mini-TyrRS/mini-TrpRS was significantly different in the infarction zone. G-SPECT analysis indicated that the mini-TyrRS group had better cardiac function and myocardial perfusion after the injection of ad-mini-TyrRS than before, while mini-TrpRS injection had a totally opposite effect. After mini-TyrRS was administered, there was less of an infarction zone and more proliferating cardiomyocytes and capillaries in the mini-TyrRS group compared to both of the control groups, and the ad-mini-TrpRS group had a totally opposite effect. These results indicated that angiogenesis could be either stimulated by mini-TyrRS or inhibited by mini-TrpRS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Fluctuations between multiple EF-G-induced chimeric tRNA states during translocation on the ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adio, Sarah; Senyushkina, Tamara; Peske, Frank; Fischer, Niels; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2015-06-01

    The coupled translocation of transfer RNA and messenger RNA through the ribosome entails large-scale structural rearrangements, including step-wise movements of the tRNAs. Recent structural work has visualized intermediates of translocation induced by elongation factor G (EF-G) with tRNAs trapped in chimeric states with respect to 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. The functional role of the chimeric states is not known. Here we follow the formation of translocation intermediates by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Using EF-G mutants, a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue, and fusidic acid, we interfere with either translocation or EF-G release from the ribosome and identify several rapidly interconverting chimeric tRNA states on the reaction pathway. EF-G engagement prevents backward transitions early in translocation and increases the fraction of ribosomes that rapidly fluctuate between hybrid, chimeric and posttranslocation states. Thus, the engagement of EF-G alters the energetics of translocation towards a flat energy landscape, thereby promoting forward tRNA movement.

  3. GidA, a tRNA modification enzyme, contributes to the growth and virulence of Streptococcus suis serotype 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting eGao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-inhibited division protein (GidA, is a tRNA modification enzyme functioning together with MnmE in the addition of a carboxymethylaminomethyl group to position 5 of the anticodon wobble uridine of tRNA. Here, we report a GidA homologue from a Chinese isolate SC-19 of the zoonotic Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2. gidA disruption led to a defective growth, increased capsule thickness, and reduced hemolytic activity. Moreover, the gidA deletion mutant (ΔgidA displayed reduced mortality and bacterial loads in mice, reduced ability of adhesion to and invasion in epithelial cells, and increased sensitivity to phagocytosis. The iTRAQ analysis identified 372 differentially expressed (182 up- and 190 down-regulated proteins in ΔgidA and SC-19. Numerous DNA replication, cell division and virulence associated proteins were downregulated, whereas many capsule synthesis enzymes were upregulated by gidA disruption. This is consistent with the phenotypes of the mutant. Thus, GidA is a translational regulator that plays an important role in the growth, cell division, capsule biosynthesis, and virulence of SS2. Our findings provide new insight into the regulatory function of GidA in bacterial pathogens.

  4. GTP-independent tRNA delivery to the ribosomal P-site by a novel eukaryotic translation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Sergey E; Terenin, Ilya M; Andreev, Dmitri E; Ivanov, Pavel A; Dunaevsky, Jacov E; Merrick, William C; Shatsky, Ivan N

    2010-08-27

    During translation, aminoacyl-tRNAs are delivered to the ribosome by specialized GTPases called translation factors. Here, we report the tRNA binding to the P-site of 40 S ribosomes by a novel GTP-independent factor eIF2D isolated from mammalian cells. The binding of tRNA(i)(Met) occurs after the AUG codon finds its position in the P-site of 40 S ribosomes, the situation that takes place during initiation complex formation on the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site or on some other specific RNAs (leaderless mRNA and A-rich mRNAs with relaxed scanning dependence). Its activity in tRNA binding with 40 S subunits does not require the presence of the aminoacyl moiety. Moreover, the factor possesses the unique ability to deliver non-Met (elongator) tRNAs into the P-site of the 40 S subunit. The corresponding gene is found in all eukaryotes and includes an SUI1 domain present also in translation initiation factor eIF1. The versatility of translation initiation strategies in eukaryotes is discussed.

  5. Structure, Mechanism, and Specificity of a Eukaryal tRNA Restriction Enzyme Involved in Self-Nonself Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam K. Chakravarty

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available tRNA restriction by anticodon nucleases underlies cellular stress responses and self-nonself discrimination in a wide range of taxa. Anticodon breakage inhibits protein synthesis, which, in turn, results in growth arrest or cell death. The eukaryal ribotoxin PaT secreted by Pichia acaciae inhibits growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae via cleavage of tRNAGln(UUG. We find that recombinant PaT incises a synthetic tRNAGln(UUG stem-loop RNA by transesterification at a single site 3′ of the wobble uridine, yielding 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate and 5′-OH ends. Incision is suppressed by replacement of the wobble nucleobase with adenine or guanine. The crystal structure of PaT reveals a distinctive fold and active site, essential components of which are demonstrated by mutagenesis. Pichia acaciae evades self-toxicity via a distinctive intracellular immunity protein, ImmPaT, which binds PaT and blocks nuclease activity. Our results highlight the evolutionary diversity of tRNA restriction and immunity systems.

  6. Neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of adrenoleukodystrophy: the roles of the Bubblegum and Double bubble acyl-CoA synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sivachenko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Debilitating neurodegenerative conditions with metabolic origins affect millions of individuals worldwide. Still, for most of these neurometabolic disorders there are neither cures nor disease-modifying therapies, and novel animal models are needed for elucidation of disease pathology and identification of potential therapeutic agents. To date, metabolic neurodegenerative disease has been modeled in animals with only limited success, in part because existing models constitute analyses of single mutants and have thus overlooked potential redundancy within metabolic gene pathways associated with disease. Here, we present the first analysis of a very-long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS double mutant. We show that the Drosophila bubblegum (bgm and double bubble (dbb genes have overlapping functions, and that the consequences of double knockout of both bubblegum and double bubble in the fly brain are profound, affecting behavior and brain morphology, and providing the best paradigm to date for an animal model of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD, a fatal childhood neurodegenerative disease associated with the accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids. Using this more fully penetrant model of disease to interrogate brain morphology at the level of electron microscopy, we show that dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism via disruption of ACS function in vivo is causal of neurodegenerative pathologies that are evident in both neuronal cells and their supporting cell populations, and leads ultimately to lytic cell death in affected areas of the brain. Finally, in an extension of our model system to the study of human disease, we describe our identification of an individual with leukodystrophy who harbors a rare mutation in SLC27a6 (encoding a very-long-chain ACS, a human homolog of bgm and dbb.

  7. Neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of adrenoleukodystrophy: the roles of the Bubblegum and Double bubble acyl-CoA synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivachenko, Anna; Gordon, Hannah B; Kimball, Suzanne S; Gavin, Erin J; Bonkowsky, Joshua L; Letsou, Anthea

    2016-04-01

    Debilitating neurodegenerative conditions with metabolic origins affect millions of individuals worldwide. Still, for most of these neurometabolic disorders there are neither cures nor disease-modifying therapies, and novel animal models are needed for elucidation of disease pathology and identification of potential therapeutic agents. To date, metabolic neurodegenerative disease has been modeled in animals with only limited success, in part because existing models constitute analyses of single mutants and have thus overlooked potential redundancy within metabolic gene pathways associated with disease. Here, we present the first analysis of a very-long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) double mutant. We show that the Drosophila bubblegum(bgm) and double bubble(dbb) genes have overlapping functions, and that the consequences of double knockout of both bubblegum and double bubble in the fly brain are profound, affecting behavior and brain morphology, and providing the best paradigm to date for an animal model of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a fatal childhood neurodegenerative disease associated with the accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids. Using this more fully penetrant model of disease to interrogate brain morphology at the level of electron microscopy, we show that dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism via disruption of ACS function in vivois causal of neurodegenerative pathologies that are evident in both neuronal cells and their supporting cell populations, and leads ultimately to lytic cell death in affected areas of the brain. Finally, in an extension of our model system to the study of human disease, we describe our identification of an individual with leukodystrophy who harbors a rare mutation in SLC27a6(encoding a very-long-chain ACS), a human homolog of bgm and dbb. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of an S-adenosylmethionine synthetase gene from Chorispora bungeana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chenchen; Chen, Tao; Yang, Yu; Liu, Sha; Yan, Kan; Yue, Xiule; Zhang, Hua; Xiang, Yun; An, Lizhe; Chen, Shuyan

    2015-11-10

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) catalyzes the formation of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) which is a molecule essential for polyamines and ethylene biosynthesis, methylation modifications of protein, DNA and lipids. SAMS also plays an important role in abiotic stress response. Chorispora bungeana (C. bungeana) is an alpine subnival plant species which possesses strong tolerance to cold stress. Here, we cloned and characterized an S-adenosylmethionine synthetase gene, CbSAMS (C. bungeana S-adenosylmethionine synthetase), from C. bungeana, which encodes a protein of 393 amino acids containing a methionine binding motif GHPDK, an ATP binding motif GAGDQG and a phosphate binding motif GGGAFSGDK. Furthermore, an NES (nuclear export signal) peptide was identified through bioinformatics analysis. To explore the CbSAMS gene expression regulation, we isolated the promoter region of CbSAMS gene 1919bp upstream the ATG start codon, CbSAMSp, and analyzed its cis-acting elements by bioinformatics method. It was revealed that a transcription start site located at 320 bp upstream the ATG start codon and cis-acting elements related to light, ABA, auxin, ethylene, MeJA, low temperature and drought had been found in the CbSAMSp sequence. The gene expression pattern of CbSAMS was then analyzed by TR-qPCR and GUS assay method. The result showed that CbSAMS is expressed in all examined tissues including callus, roots, petioles, leaves, and flowers with a significant higher expression level in roots and flowers. Furthermore, the expression level of CbSAMS was induced by low temperature, ethylene and NaCl. Subcellular localization revealed that CbSAMS was located in the cytoplasm and nucleus but has a significant higher level in the nucleus. These results indicated a potential role of CbSAMS in abiotic stresses and plant growth in C. bungeana. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. ASN1-encoded asparagine synthetase in floral organs contributes to nitrogen filling in Arabidopsis seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaufichon, Laure; Marmagne, Anne; Belcram, Katia; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Sakakibara, Yukiko; Hase, Toshiharu; Grandjean, Olivier; Clément, Gilles; Citerne, Sylvie; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline; Chardon, Fabien; Soulay, Fabienne; Xu, Xiaole; Trassaert, Marion; Shakiebaei, Maryam; Najihi, Amina; Suzuki, Akira

    2017-08-01

    Despite a general view that asparagine synthetase generates asparagine as an amino acid for long-distance transport of nitrogen to sink organs, its role in nitrogen metabolic pathways in floral organs during seed nitrogen filling has remained undefined. We demonstrate that the onset of pollination in Arabidopsis induces selected genes for asparagine metabolism, namely ASN1 (At3g47340), GLN2 (At5g35630), GLU1 (At5g04140), AapAT2 (At5g19950), ASPGA1 (At5g08100) and ASPGB1 (At3g16150), particularly at the ovule stage (stage 0), accompanied by enhanced asparagine synthetase protein, asparagine and total amino acids. Immunolocalization confined asparagine synthetase to the vascular cells of the silique cell wall and septum, but also to the outer and inner seed integuments, demonstrating the post-phloem transport of asparagine in these cells to developing embryos. In the asn1 mutant, aberrant embryo cell divisions in upper suspensor cell layers from globular to heart stages assign a role for nitrogen in differentiating embryos within the ovary. Induction of asparagine metabolic genes by light/dark and nitrate supports fine shifts of nitrogen metabolic pathways. In transgenic Arabidopsis expressing promoterCaMV35S ::ASN1 fusion, marked metabolomics changes at stage 0, including a several-fold increase in free asparagine, are correlated to enhanced seed nitrogen. However, specific promoterNapin2S ::ASN1 expression during seed formation and a six-fold increase in asparagine toward the desiccation stage result in wild-type seed nitrogen, underlining that delayed accumulation of asparagine impairs the timing of its use by releasing amide and amino nitrogen. Transcript and metabolite profiles in floral organs match the carbon and nitrogen partitioning to generate energy via the tricarboxylic acid cycle, GABA shunt and phosphorylated serine synthetic pathway. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cylindrospermopsin and saxitoxin synthetase genes in Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii strains from Brazilian freshwater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Hoff-Risseti

    Full Text Available The Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii population from Brazilian freshwater is known to produce saxitoxin derivatives (STX, while cylindrospermopsin (CYN, which is commonly detected in isolates from Australia and Asia continents, has thus far not been detected in South American strains. However, during the investigation for the presence of cyrA, cyrB, cyrC and cyrJ CYN synthetase genes in the genomes of four laboratory-cultured C. raciborskii Brazilian strains, the almost complete cyrA gene sequences were obtained for all strains, while cyrB and cyrC gene fragments were observed in two strains. These nucleotide sequences were translated into amino acids, and the predicted protein functions and domains confirmed their identity as CYN synthetase genes. Attempts to PCR amplify cyrJ gene fragments from the four strains were unsuccessful. Phylogenetic analysis grouped the nucleotide sequences together with their homologues found in known CYN synthetase clusters of C. raciborskii strains with high bootstrap support. In addition, fragments of sxtA, sxtB and sxtI genes involved in STX production were also obtained. Extensive LC-MS analyses were unable to detect CYN in the cultured strains, whereas the production of STX and its analogues was confirmed in CENA302, CENA305 and T3. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the presence of cyr genes in South American strains of C. raciborskii and the presence of sxt and cyr genes in a single C. raciborskii strain. This discovery suggests a shift in the type of cyanotoxin production over time of South American strains of C. raciborskii and contributes to the reconstruction of the evolutionary history and diversification of cyanobacterial toxins.

  11. Characterisation of Drosophila CMP-sialic acid synthetase activity reveals unusual enzymatic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsalov, Ilya B.; Novikov, Boris N.; Scott, Hilary; Dangott, Lawrence; Panin, Vladislav M.

    2016-01-01

    CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSAS) is a key enzyme of the sialylation pathway. CSAS produces the activated sugar donor, CMP-sialic acid, which serves as a substrate for sialyltransferases to modify glycan termini with sialic acid. Unlike other animal CMP-Sia synthetases that normally localize in the nucleus, Drosophila melanogaster CSAS (DmCSAS) localizes in the cell secretory compartment, predominantly in the Golgi, which suggests that this enzyme has properties distinct from those of its vertebrate counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we purified recombinant DmCSAS and characterised its activity in vitro. Our experiments revealed several unique features of this enzyme. DmCSAS displays specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid as a substrate, shows preference for lower pH and can function with a broad range of metal cofactors. When tested at a pH corresponding to the Golgi compartment, the enzyme showed significant activity with several metal cations, including Zn2+, Fe2+, Co2+ and Mn2+, while the activity with Mg2+ was found to be low. Protein sequence analysis and site-specific mutagenesis identified an aspartic acid residue that is necessary for enzymatic activity and predicted to be involved in coordinating a metal cofactor. DmCSAS enzymatic activity was found to be essential in vivo for rescuing the phenotype of DmCSAS mutants. Finally, our experiments revealed a steep dependence of the enzymatic activity on temperature. Taken together, our results indicate that DmCSAS underwent evolutionary adaptation to pH and ionic environment different from that of counterpart synthetases in vertebrates. Our data also suggest that environmental temperatures can regulate Drosophila sialylation, thus modulating neural transmission. PMID:27114558

  12. A 1H STD NMR spectroscopic investigation of sialylnucleoside mimetics as probes of CMP-Kdn synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselhorst, Thomas; Oschlies, Melanie; Abu-Izneid, Tareq; Kiefel, Milton J; Tiralongo, Joe; Münster-Kühnel, Anja K; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; von Itzstein, Mark

    2006-07-01

    CMP-Kdn synthetase catalyses the reaction of sialic acids (Sia) and CTP to the corresponding activated sugar nucleotide CMP-Sia and pyrophosphate PP( i ). Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the sub-structural requirements of the enzyme's binding domain. Sialylnucleoside mimetics, where the sialic acid moiety has been replaced by a carboxyl group and a hydrophobic moiety, have been used in NMR experiments, to probe the tolerance of the CMP-Kdn synthetase to such replacements. From our data it would appear that unlike another sialylnucleotide-recognising protein, the CMP-Neu5Ac transport protein, either a phosphate group or other functional groups on the sialic acid framework may play important roles in recognition by the synthetase.

  13. Purification, gene cloning, and characterization of γ-butyrobetainyl CoA synthetase from Agrobacterium sp. 525a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimitsu, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Akira; Takubo, Sayaka; Fukui, Akiko; Okada, Kazuma; Mohamed Ahmed, Isam A; Arima, Jiro; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2016-08-01

    The report is the first of purification, overproduction, and characterization of a unique γ-butyrobetainyl CoA synthetase from soil-isolated Agrobacterium sp. 525a. The primary structure of the enzyme shares 70-95% identity with those of ATP-dependent microbial acyl-CoA synthetases of the Rhizobiaceae family. As distinctive characteristics of the enzyme of this study, ADP was released in the catalytic reaction process, whereas many acyl CoA synthetases are annotated as an AMP-forming enzyme. The apparent Km values for γ-butyrobetaine, CoA, and ATP were, respectively, 0.69, 0.02, and 0.24 mM.

  14. S-adenosylmethionine treatment prevents carbon tetrachloride-induced S-adenosylmethionine synthetase inactivation and attenuates liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, F; Giménez, A; Alvarez, L; Caballería, J; Pajares, M A; Andreu, H; Parés, A; Mato, J M; Rodés, J

    1992-10-01

    Administration of carbon tetrachloride to rats resulted in induction of hepatic fibrosis and a 60% reduction of hepatic S-adenosylmethionine synthetase activity without producing any significant modification of hepatic levels of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase messenger RNA. The reduction of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase activity was corrected by treatment with S-adenosylmethionine (3 mg/kg/day, intramuscularly). Administration of carbon tetrachloride also produced a 45% depletion of liver glutathione (reduced form) that was corrected by S-adenosylmethionine treatment. After the rats received carbon tetrachloride, a 2.3-fold increase in liver collagen was observed; prolyl hydroxylase activity was 2.5 times greater than that seen in controls. These increases were attenuated in animals treated with carbon tetrachloride and S-adenosylmethionine. The attenuation by S-adenosylmethionine treatment of the fibrogenic effect of carbon tetrachloride was associated with a decrease in the number of rats in which cirrhosis developed.

  15. Biochemical and genetic characterization of a carbamyl phosphate synthetase mutant of Escherichia coli K12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolivar, F; Galván, M; Martuscelli, J

    1976-05-01

    An unusual Escherichia coli K12 mutant for carbamyl phosphate synthetase is described. The mutation was generated by bacteriophage MUI insertion and left a 5% residual activity of the enzyme using either ammonia or glutamine as donors. The mutation is recessive to the wild-type allele and maps at or near the pyrA gene, but the mutant requires only arginine and not uracil for growth. By a second block in the pyrB gene it was possible to shift the accumulated carbamyl phosphate to arginine biosynthesis. The Km values and the levels of ornithine activation and inhibition by UMP were normal in the mutant enzyme.

  16. Diversity of nonribosomal peptide synthetase genes in the microbial metagenomes of marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel-Elardo, Sheila Marie; Grozdanov, Lubomir; Proksch, Sebastian; Hentschel, Ute

    2012-06-01

    Genomic mining revealed one major nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) phylogenetic cluster in 12 marine sponge species, one ascidian, an actinobacterial isolate and seawater. Phylogenetic analysis predicts its taxonomic affiliation to the actinomycetes and hydroxy-phenyl-glycine as a likely substrate. Additionally, a phylogenetically distinct NRPS gene cluster was discovered in the microbial metagenome of the sponge Aplysina aerophoba, which shows highest similarities to NRPS genes that were previously assigned, by ways of single cell genomics, to a Chloroflexi sponge symbiont. Genomic mining studies such as the one presented here for NRPS genes, contribute to on-going efforts to characterize the genomic potential of sponge-associated microbiota for secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  17. PRS1 is a key member of the gene family encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Andrew T.; Beiche, Flora; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1997-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the metabolite phosphoribosyl-pyrophosphate (PRPP) is required for purine, pyrimidine, tryptophan and histidine biosynthesis. Enzymes that can synthesize PRPP can be encoded by at least four genes. We have studied 5-phospho-ribosyl-1(α)-pyrophosphate synthetases (PRS......) genetically and biochemically. Each of the four genes, all of which are transcribed, has been disrupted in haploid yeast strains of each mating type and although all disruptants are able to grow on complete medium, differences in growth rate and enzyme activity suggest that disruption of PRS1 or PRS3 has...

  18. Changes in polyamines, inorganic ions and glutamine synthetase activity in response to nitrogen availability and form in red spruce (Picea rubens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle J. Serapiglia; Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed effects of nitrogen availability and form on growth rates, concentrations of polyamines and inorganic ions and glutamine synthetase activity in in-vitro-cultured red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) cells. Growth rates, concentrations of polyamines and glutamine synthetase activity declined when either the amount of nitrate or the total amount...

  19. Elevated levels of asparagine synthetase activity in physiologically and genetically derepressed Chinese hamster ovary cells are due to increased rates of enzyme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, J S; Arfin, S M

    1981-07-25

    The activity of asparagine synthetase in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells is increased in response to asparagine deprivation or decreased aminoacylation of several tRNAs (Andrulis, I. L., Hatfield, G. W., and Arfin, S. M. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 10629-10633). CHO cells resistant to beta-aspartylhydroxamate have up to 5-fold higher levels of asparagine synthetase than the parental line (Gantt, J. S., Chiang, C. S., Hatfield, G. W., and Arfin, S. M. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 4808-4813). We have investigated the basis for these differences in enzyme activity by combined radiochemical and immunological techniques. The asparagine synthetase of beef pancreas was purified to apparent homogeneity. Antibodies raised against the purified protein cross-react with the asparagine synthetase of CHO cells. Immunotitrations show that the amount of enzyme protein in physiologically or genetically derepressed CHO strains is proportional to the level of enzyme activity. Measurement of the relative rates of asparagine synthetase synthesis by pulse-labeling experiments demonstrate that the difference in the number of asparagine synthetase molecules is closely correlated with the rate of enzyme synthesis. In contrast, the half-life of asparagine synthetase in wild type cells and in physiologically or genetically derepressed cells is very similar. It appears that the increased levels of asparagine synthetase can be attributed solely to an increased rate of enzyme synthesis.

  20. Dicty_cDB: VHA513 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iarum ZAP II cDNA library Neocallimastix patriciarum cDN... to SW:SYM_HUMAN P56192 METHIONYL-TRNA SYNTHETASE ;, mRNA sequence. 68 7e-16 3 EH431684 |EH431684.1 NPE00000653 Neocallimastix patric

  1. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torreira, Eva [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Seabra, Ana Rita [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Llorca, Óscar [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Robinson, Carol V. [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Carvalho, Helena G. [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Fernández-Tornero, Carlos, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    The experimental models of dicotyledonous cytoplasmic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases unveil a conserved eukaryotic-type decameric architecture, with subtle structural differences in M. truncatula isoenzymes that account for their distinct herbicide resistance. The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants.

  2. Mutation in the phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase gene (prs) that results in simultaneous requirements for purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, nicotinamide nucleotide, histidine, and tryptophan in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1988-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli harboring a temperature-labile phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase was characterized. Despite the lack of a detectable PRPP pool or PRPP synthetase activity at 40 degrees C, the strain was fully viable at this temperature as long as guanosine, uridine, histi......-less strain and suggest that PRPP synthetase is dispensable for E. coli....

  3. Phosphorolytic activity of Escherichia coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase towards its cognate aminoacyl adenylate detected by 31P-NMR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Led, Jens Jørgen; Switon, Werner K.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1983-01-01

    The catalytic activity of highly purified Escherichia coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase has been studied by 31P-NMR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography on poly(ethyleneimine)-cellulose. It was found that this synthetase, besides the activation of its cognate amino acid and the syntheses of adeno......The catalytic activity of highly purified Escherichia coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase has been studied by 31P-NMR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography on poly(ethyleneimine)-cellulose. It was found that this synthetase, besides the activation of its cognate amino acid and the syntheses...... catalytic activities of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is discussed, as well as the biological significance of the reaction....

  4. Purification and characterization of delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase from Penicillium chrysogenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilgaard, Hanne Birgitte; Kristiansen, K.N.; Henriksen, Claus Maxel

    1997-01-01

    delta-(L-alpha-Aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) from Penicillium chrysogenum was purified to homogeneity by a combination of (NH4)(2)SO4 precipitation, protamine sulphate treatment, ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The mole......delta-(L-alpha-Aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) from Penicillium chrysogenum was purified to homogeneity by a combination of (NH4)(2)SO4 precipitation, protamine sulphate treatment, ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration and hydrophobic interaction chromatography...

  5. Neurospora crassa glutamine synthetase. Role of enzyme synthesis and degradation on the regulation of enzyme concentration during exponential growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinto, C; Mora, J; Palacios, R

    1977-12-10

    The specific activity of Neurospora crassa glutamine synthetase varies according to the nitrogen source in which the organism is grown. In a poor nitrogen source such as glutamate, the specific activity of the enzyme is higher than that found in good nitrogen sources such as ammonium or glutamine. These differences in specific enzyme activity correspond to differences in enzyme concentration. The relative rates of glutamine synthetase synthesis and degradation were measured in exponential cultures grown in different nitrogen sources. The differences in enzyme concentration are explained by differences in the relative rate of enzyme synthesis.

  6. Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes pesL and pes1 Are Essential for Fumigaclavine C Production in Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Gallagher, Lorna; Schrettl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    of the complex ergot alkaloid (EA) pathway in A. fumigatus. Deletion of either pesL (ΔpesL) or pes1 (Δpes1) resulted in complete loss of fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, relatively increased production of fumitremorgins such as TR-2, fumitremorgin C and verruculogen, increased sensitivity to H2O2, and increased......The identity of metabolites encoded by the majority of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in the opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, remains outstanding. We found that the nonribosomal peptide (NRP) synthetases PesL and Pes1 were essential for fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, the end product...

  7. A Modified Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Vaccine with Reduced Activity of Antioxidants and Glutamine Synthetase Exhibits Enhanced Protection of Mice despite Diminished in Vivo Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoen, Carolyn M.; DeStefano, Michelle S.; Hager, Cynthia C.; Tham, Kyi-Toe; Braunstein, Miriam; Allen, Alexandria D.; Gates, Hiriam O.; Cynamon, Michael H.; Kernodle, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    Early attempts to improve BCG have focused on increasing the expression of prominent antigens and adding recombinant toxins or cytokines to influence antigen presentation. One such modified BCG vaccine candidate has been withdrawn from human clinical trials due to adverse effects. BCG was derived from virulent Mycobacterium bovis and retains much of its capacity for suppressing host immune responses. Accordingly, we have used a different strategy for improving BCG based on reducing its immune suppressive capacity. We made four modifications to BCG Tice to produce 4dBCG and compared it to the parent vaccine in C57Bl/6 mice. The modifications included elimination of the oxidative stress sigma factor SigH, elimination of the SecA2 secretion channel, and reductions in the activity of iron co-factored superoxide dismutase and glutamine synthetase. After IV inoculation of 4dBCG, 95% of vaccine bacilli were eradicated from the spleens of mice within 60 days whereas the titer of BCG Tice was not significantly reduced. Subcutaneous vaccination with 4dBCG produced greater protection than vaccination with BCG against dissemination of an aerosolized challenge of M. tuberculosis to the spleen at 8 weeks post-challenge. At this time, 4dBCG-vaccinated mice also exhibited altered lung histopathology compared to BCG-vaccinated mice and control mice with less well-developed lymphohistiocytic nodules in the lung parenchyma. At 26 weeks post-challenge, 4dBCG-vaccinated mice but not BCG-vaccinated mice had significantly fewer challenge bacilli in the lungs than control mice. In conclusion, despite reduced persistence in mice a modified BCG vaccine with diminished antioxidants and glutamine synthetase is superior to the parent vaccine in conferring protection against M. tuberculosis. The targeting of multiple immune suppressive factors produced by BCG is a promising strategy for simultaneously improving vaccine safety and effectiveness. PMID:26343849

  8. Genetic Diversity of Dihydropteroate synthetase Gene (dhps Of Plasmodium vivax in Hormozgan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh MAGHSOODLOORAD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study was formulated in order to determine pol­ymorphism of dihydropteroate synthetase gene (dhps of Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax in Hormozgan Province, southern Iran and mutations at codons 382, 383, 512, 553, and 585 associated with resistance of P. vivax to sulfadoxine.Method: One-hundred eighteen isolates of P. vivax were prepared within 2007-2008 to determine dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (dhfr-ts gene. The isolates were determined in the study of genetic diversity of dihy­dropteroate synthetase gene (dhps of P. vivax. The study was performed via PCR test and nucleotide sequencing.Results: Of 118 blood samples infected by P. vivax, 46 and 72 samples be­longed to Minab and Jask, respectively. No mutation was detected at 5 target codons. However, among these 118 samples, three isolates (2.54% were found to have a mutation at the new codon 421.Conclusion: Since mutation was detected in dihydrofolate reductase (Pvdhfr gene in the same samples but no mutation was found at five main codons of Pvdhps gene, it can be concluded that P. vivax, considering their mutations in Pvdhfr, is still susceptible to sulfadoxine and therefore, to fansidar in Hor­mozgan Province, Southern Iran.

  9. Antipeptide antibodies that can distinguish specific subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X.; Henry, R. L.; Takemoto, L. J.; Guikema, J. A.; Wong, P. P.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the beta and gamma subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) root nodules are very similar. However, there are small regions within the sequences that are significantly different between the two polypeptides. The sequences between amino acids 2 and 9 and between 264 and 274 are examples. Three peptides (gamma 2-9, gamma 264-274, and beta 264-274) corresponding to these sequences were synthesized. Antibodies against these peptides were raised in rabbits and purified with corresponding peptide-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bean nodule proteins demonstrated that the anti-beta 264-274 antibodies reacted specifically with the beta polypeptide and the anti-gamma 264-274 and anti-gamma 2-9 antibodies reacted specifically with the gamma polypeptide of the native and denatured glutamine synthetase. These results showed the feasibility of using synthetic peptides in developing antibodies that are capable of distinguishing proteins with similar primary structures.

  10. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Glutamine synthetase in Medicago truncatula, unveiling new secrets of a very old enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Seabra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine Synthetase (GS catalyses the first step at which nitrogen is brought into cellular metabolism and is also involved in the reassimilation of ammonium released by a number of metabolic pathways. Due to its unique position in plant nitrogen metabolism, GS plays essential roles in all aspects of plant development, from germination to senescence, and is a key component of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE and plant yield. Understanding the mechanisms regulating GS activity is therefore of utmost importance and a great effort has been dedicated to understand how GS is regulated in different plant species. The present review summarizes exciting recent developments concerning the structure and regulation of glutamine synthetase isoenzymes, using the model legume Medicago truncatula. These include the understanding of the structural determinants of both the cytosolic and plastid located isoenzymes, the existence of a seed-specific GS gene unique to M. truncatula and closely related species and the discovery that GS isoenzymes are regulated by nitric oxide at the post-translational level. The data is discussed and integrated with the potential roles of the distinct GS isoenzymes within the whole plant context.

  12. Regulation of Nodule Glutamine Synthetase by CO2 Levels in Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, José-Luis; Sánchez, Federico; Soberón, Mario; Flores, Miguel Lara

    1992-01-01

    Nodulated bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants were grown for 17 days after infection in normal (0.02%) CO2 and from day 8 to 17 in high (0.1%) CO2 in order to increase nitrogen fixation and define how nodule glutamine synthetase (GS) isoforms are regulated by the ammonia derived from the bacteroid. Nitrogenase activity was detected by day 10, and by day 17 activity was over twofold higher in 0.1% of CO2 compared with plants grown in 0.02% CO2 and inoculated with Rhizobium wild-type strain CE3. Likewise, plant fresh weight increased in response to increased CO2, particularly in plants inoculated with the Rhizobium phaseoli mutant strain CFN037. Glutamine synthetase specific activity increased 2.5- to 6.5-fold from day 11 to 17. However, increased CO2 did not appear to have an effect on GS specific activity. Analysis of the nodule GS polypeptide composition revealed that the γ polypeptide was significantly reduced in response to high CO2, whereas the β polypeptide was not affected. The significance of this result in relation to the regulation of GS isoforms and their role in the assimilation of ammonia in the nodule is discussed in this paper. ImagesFigure 4 PMID:16668681

  13. Production of cyanophycin in Rhizopus oryzae through the expression of a cyanophycin synthetase encoding gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meussen, Bas J; Weusthuis, Ruud A; Sanders, Johan P M; Graaff, Leo H de

    2012-02-01

    Cyanophycin or cyanophycin granule peptide is a protein that results from non-ribosomal protein synthesis in microorganisms such as cyanobacteria. The amino acids in cyanophycin can be used as a feedstock in the production of a wide range of chemicals such as acrylonitrile, polyacrylic acid, 1,4-butanediamine, and urea. In this study, an auxotrophic mutant (Rhizopus oryzae M16) of the filamentous fungus R. oryzae 99-880 was selected to express cyanophycin synthetase encoding genes. These genes originated from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803, Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120, and a codon optimized version of latter gene. The genes were under control of the pyruvate decarboxylase promoter and terminator elements of R. oryzae. Transformants were generated by the biolistic transformation method. In only two transformants both expressing the cyanophycin synthetase encoding gene from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 was a specific enzyme activity detected of 1.5 mU/mg protein. In one of these transformants was both water-soluble and insoluble cyanophycin detected. The water-soluble fraction formed the major fraction and accounted for 0.5% of the dry weight. The water-insoluble CGP was produced in trace amounts. The amino acid composition of the water-soluble form was determined and constitutes of equimolar amounts of arginine and aspartic acid.

  14. Compound heterozygous mutations in glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS cause mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Nafisinia

    Full Text Available Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS; OMIM 600287 is one of thirty-seven tRNA-synthetase genes that catalyses the synthesis of glycyl-tRNA, which is required to insert glycine into proteins within the cytosol and mitochondria. To date, eighteen mutations in GARS have been reported in patients with autosomal-dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2D (CMT2D; OMIM 601472, and/or distal spinal muscular atrophy type V (dSMA-V; OMIM 600794. In this study, we report a patient with clinical and biochemical features suggestive of a mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC disorder including mild left ventricular posterior wall hypertrophy, exercise intolerance, and lactic acidosis. Using whole exome sequencing we identified compound heterozygous novel variants, c.803C>T; p.(Thr268Ile and c.1234C>T; p.(Arg412Cys, in GARS in the proband. Spectrophotometric evaluation of the MRC complexes showed reduced activity of Complex I, III and IV in patient skeletal muscle and reduced Complex I and IV activity in the patient liver, with Complex IV being the most severely affected in both tissues. Immunoblot analysis of GARS protein and subunits of the MRC enzyme complexes in patient fibroblast extracts showed significant reduction in GARS protein levels and Complex IV. Together these studies provide evidence that the identified compound heterozygous GARS variants may be the cause of the mitochondrial dysfunction in our patient.

  15. Formation of the chlorophyll precursor. gamma. -aminolevulinic acid in cyanobacteria requires aminoacylation of a tRNA sup Glu species. [Synechocystis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Nell, G.P.; Peterson, D.M.; Schoen, A., Chen, Minwei; Soell, D. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA))

    1988-09-01

    In the chloroplasts of higher plants and algae, the biosynthesis of the chlorophyll precursor {gamma}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) involves at least three enzymes and a tRNA species. Here we demonstrate that in cell extracts of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 ALA was formed from glutamate in a series of reactions in which activation of glutamate by glutamyl-tRNA{sup Glu} formation was the first step. The activated glutamate was reduced by a dehydrogenase which displayed tRNA sequence specificity. Fractionation of strain 6803 tRNA by reverse-phase chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis yielded two pure tRNA{sup Glu} species which stimulated ALA synthesis in vitro. These tRNAs had identical primary sequence but differed in the nucleotide modification of their anticodon. The 6803 tRNA{sup Glu} was similar to the sequence of tRNA{sup Glu} species or tRNA genes from Escherichia coli and from chloroplasts of Euglena gracilis and higher plants. Southern blot analysis revealed at least two tRNA{sup Glu} gene copies in the 6803 chromosome. A glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminotransferase, the terminal enzyme in the conversion of glutamate to ALA in chloroplasts, was detected in 6803 cell extracts by the conversion of glutamate-1-semialdehyde to ALA and by the inhibition of this reaction by gabaculin.

  16. A universal RNA structural motif docking the elbow of tRNA in the ribosome, RNAse P and T-box leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jean; Jossinet, Fabrice; Gautheret, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The structure and function of conserved motifs constituting the apex of Stem I in T-box mRNA leaders are investigated. We point out that this apex shares striking similarities with the L1 stalk (helices 76-78) of the ribosome. A sequence and structure analysis of both elements shows that, similarly to the head of the L1 stalk, the function of the apex of Stem I lies in the docking of tRNA through a stacking interaction with the conserved G19:C56 base pair platform. The inferred structure in the apex of Stem I consists of a module of two T-loops bound together head to tail, a module that is also present in the head of the L1 stalk, but went unnoticed. Supporting the analysis, we show that a highly conserved structure in RNAse P formerly described as the J11/12-J12/11 module, which is precisely known to bind the elbow of tRNA, constitutes a third instance of this T-loop module. A structural analysis explains why six nucleotides constituting the core of this module are highly invariant among all three types of RNA. Our finding that major RNA partners of tRNA bind the elbow with a same RNA structure suggests an explanation for the origin of the tRNA L-shape.

  17. Role of the primer activation signal in tRNA annealing onto the HIV-1 genome studied by single-molecule FRET microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Beerens (Nancy); M.D.E. Jepsen (Mette); V. Nechyporuk-Zloy (Volodymyr); A.C. Krüger (Asger); J.-L. Darlix (Jean-Luc); J. Kjems (Jørgen); V. Birkedal (Victoria)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHIV-1 reverse transcription is primed by a cellular tRNAlys3 molecule that binds to the primer binding site (PBS) in the genomic RNA. An additional interaction between the tRNA molecule and the primer activation signal (PAS) is thought to regulate the initiation of reverse transcription.

  18. Roles of Trm9- and ALKBH8-like proteins in the formation of modified wobble uridines in Arabidopsis tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leihne, Vibeke; Kirpekar, Finn; Vågbø, Cathrine B

    2011-01-01

    Uridine at the wobble position of tRNA is usually modified, and modification is required for accurate and efficient protein translation. In eukaryotes, wobble uridines are modified into 5-methoxycarbonylmethyluridine (mcm(5)U), 5-carbamoylmethyluridine (ncm(5)U) or derivatives thereof. Here, we d...

  19. Silencing of vacuolar invertase and asparagine synthetase genes and its impact on acrylamide formation of fried potato products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaobiao; Gong, Huiling; He, Qunyan; Zeng, Zixian; Busse, James S; Jin, Weiwei; Bethke, Paul C; Jiang, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Acrylamide is produced in a wide variety of carbohydrate-rich foods during high-temperature cooking. Dietary acrylamide is a suspected human carcinogen, and health concerns related to dietary acrylamide have been raised worldwide. French fries and potato chips contribute a significant proportion to the average daily intake of acrylamide, especially in developed countries. One way to mitigate health concerns related to acrylamide is to develop potato cultivars that have reduced contents of the acrylamide precursors asparagine, glucose and fructose in tubers. We generated a large number of silencing lines of potato cultivar Russet Burbank by targeting the vacuolar invertase gene VInv and the asparagine synthetase genes StAS1 and StAS2 with a single RNA interference construct. The transcription levels of these three genes were correlated with reducing sugar (glucose and fructose) and asparagine content in tubers. Fried potato products from the best VInv/StAS1/StAS2-triple silencing lines contained only one-fifteenth of the acrylamide content of the controls. Interestingly, the extent of acrylamide reduction of the best triple silencing lines was similar to that of the best VInv-single silencing lines developed previously from the same potato cultivar Russet Burbank. These results show that an acrylamide mitigation strategy focused on developing potato cultivars with low reducing sugars is likely to be an effective and sufficient approach for minimizing the acrylamide-forming potential of French fry processing potatoes. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Variation in the Spacer Regions Separating tRNA Genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum Distinguishes Recent Clinical Isolates from the Same Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Sarah M.; Grayson, T. Hilton; Chambers, Edel M.; Cooper, Lynne F.; Barker, Gavin A.; Gilpin, Martyn L.

    2001-01-01

    A means for distinguishing between clinical isolates of Renibacterium salmoninarum that is based on the PCR amplification of length polymorphisms in the tRNA intergenic spacer regions (tDNA-ILPs) was investigated. The method used primers specific to nucleotide sequences of R. salmoninarum tRNA genes and tRNA intergenic spacer regions that had been generated by using consensus tRNA gene primers. Twenty-one PCR products were sequenced from five isolates of R. salmoninarum from the United States, England, and Scotland, and four complete tRNA genes and spacer regions were identified. Sixteen specific PCR primers were designed and tested singly and in all possible pairwise combinations for their potential to discriminate between isolates from recent clinical outbreaks of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in the United Kingdom. Fourteen of the isolates were cultured from kidney samples taken from fish displaying clinical signs of BKD on five farms, and some of the isolates came from the same farm and at the same time. The tDNA-ILP profiles separated 22 clinical isolates into nine groups and highlighted that some farms may have had more than one source of infection. The grouping of isolates improved on the discriminatory power of previously reported typing methods based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and restriction fragment length profiles developed using insertion sequence IS994. Our method enabled us to make divisions between closely related clinical isolates of R. salmoninarum that have identical exact tandem repeat (ETR-A) loci, rRNA intergenic spacer sequences, and IS994 profiles. PMID:11136759

  1. Engineering and Validation of a Vector for Concomitant Expression of Rare Transfer RNA (tRNA and HIV-1 nef Genes in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Aisyah Mualif

    Full Text Available Relative ease in handling and manipulation of Escherichia coli strains make them primary candidate to express proteins heterologously. Overexpression of heterologous genes that contain codons infrequently used by E. coli is related with difficulties such as mRNA instability, early termination of transcription and/or translation, deletions and/or misincorporation, and cell growth inhibition. These codon bias -associated problems are addressed by co-expressing ColE1-compatible, rare tRNA expressing helper plasmids. However, this approach has inadequacies, which we have addressed by engineering an expression vector that concomitantly expresses the heterologous protein of interest, and rare tRNA genes in E. coli. The expression vector contains three (argU, ileY, leuW rare tRNA genes and a useful multiple cloning site for easy in-frame cloning. To maintain the overall size of the parental plasmid vector, the rare tRNA genes replaced the non-essential DNA segments in the vector. The cloned gene is expressed under the control of T7 promoter and resulting recombinant protein has a C-terminal 6His tag for IMAC-mediated purification. We have evaluated the usefulness of this expression vector by expressing three HIV-1 genes namely HIV-1 p27 (nef, HIV-1 p24 (ca, and HIV-1 vif in NiCo21(DE3 E.coli and demonstrated the advantages of using expression vector that concomitantly expresses rare tRNA and heterologous genes.

  2. In vitro substrate specificities of 3'-5' polymerases correlate with biological outcomes of tRNA 5'-editing reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yicheng; Jackman, Jane E

    2015-07-22

    Protozoan mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) are repaired by a process known as 5'-editing. Mt-tRNA sequencing revealed organism-specific patterns of editing G-U base pairs, wherein some species remove G-U base pairs during 5'-editing, while others retain G-U pairs in the edited tRNA. We tested whether 3'-5' polymerases that catalyze the repair step of 5'-editing exhibit organism-specific preferences that explain the treatment of G-U base pairs. Biochemical and kinetic approaches revealed that a 3'-5' polymerase from Acanthamoeba castellanii tolerates G-U wobble pairs in editing substrates much more readily than several other enzymes, consistent with its biological pattern of editing. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Global translational impacts of the loss of the tRNA modification t6A in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Thiaville

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The universal tRNA modification t6A is found at position 37 of nearly all tRNAs decoding ANN codons. The absence of t6A37 leads to severe growth defects in baker’s yeast, phenotypes similar to those caused by defects in mcm5s2U34 synthesis. Mutants in mcm5s2U34 can be suppressed by overexpression of tRNALysUUU, but we show t6A phenotypes could not be suppressed by expressing any individual ANN decoding tRNA, and t6A and mcm5s2U are not determinants for each other’s formation. Our results suggest that t6A deficiency, like mcm5s2U deficiency, leads to protein folding defects, and show that the absence of t6A led to stress sensitivities (heat, ethanol, salt and sensitivity to TOR pathway inhibitors. Additionally, L-homoserine suppressed the slow growth phenotype seen in t6A-deficient strains, and proteins aggregates and Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs were increased in the mutants. The global consequences on translation caused by t6A absence were examined by ribosome profiling. Interestingly, the absence of t6A did not lead to global translation defects, but did increase translation initiation at upstream non-AUG codons and increased frame-shifting in specific genes. Analysis of codon occupancy rates suggests that one of the major roles of t6A is to homogenize the process of elongation by slowing the elongation rate at codons decoded by high abundance tRNAs and I34:C3 pairs while increasing the elongation rate of rare tRNAs and G34:U3 pairs. This work reveals that the consequences of t6A absence are complex and multilayered and has set the stage to elucidate the molecular basis of the observed phenotypes.

  4. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J

    2016-08-01

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC); they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT) mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease.

  5. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshab Rijal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC; they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease.

  6. Weak mitochondrial targeting sequence determines tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase in liver and brain cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, G.D.; Gur, N.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Pines, O.; Vardimon, L.

    2010-01-01

    Evolution of the uricotelic system for ammonia detoxification required a mechanism for tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase (GS). In uricotelic vertebrates, GS is mitochondrial in liver cells and cytoplasmic in brain. Because these species contain a single copy of the GS

  7. Organ-specific activity of the 5' regulatory region of the glutamine synthetase gene in developing mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lie-Venema, H.; de Boer, P. A.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) converts ammonia and glutamate into glutamine. We assessed the activity of the 5' regulatory region of the GS gene in developing transgenic mice carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under the control of 3150 bp of the upstream sequence of the rat GS

  8. Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase single-nucleotide polymorphisms that lead to defects in refolding but not aminoacylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Rajat; Reynolds, Noah M; Yadavalli, Srujana S

    2011-01-01

    that mutations in nuclear-encoded components of the mitochondrial translation machinery, such as aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), can also lead to disease. In some cases, mutations can be directly linked to losses in enzymatic activity; however, for many, their effect is unknown. To investigate how aa...

  9. Organization and expression of genes in the genomic region surrounding the glutamine synthetase gene Gln1 from Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thykjaer, T; Danielsen, D; She, Q

    1997-01-01

    within the 23326-bp genomic region analysed. The LjGln1 gene encodes a cytosolic glutamine synthetase and the LjKrm (Kinesin repeat motif) gene encodes a polypeptide with similarity to a repeated motif present in the microtubule-associated kinesin light chain protein. Transcripts of the glutamine...

  10. Purification and Properties of a Prokaryote Type Glutamine Synthetase from the Bialaphos Producer Streptomyces hygroscopicus SF1293

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumada, Yoichi; Takano, Eriko; Nagaoka, Kozo

    1990-01-01

    A prokaryote type glutamine synthetase (GS) was purified from a bialaphos (BA)-producing organism, Streptomyces hygroscopicus SF1293 (SF1293). The GS (GS I) consisted of a 55,000 dalton subunit, and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was similar to that of S. coelicolor GS. GS I was highly sensitive

  11. Novel expression pattern of cytosolic gln synthetase in nitrogen-fixing root nodules of the actinorhizal host, Datisca glomerata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berry, A.M.; Murphy, T.M.; Okubara, P.A.; Jacobsen, K.R.; Swensen, S.M.; Pawlowski, K.

    2004-01-01

    Gln synthetase (GS) is the key enzyme of primary ammonia assimilation in nitrogen-fixing root nodules of legumes and actinorhizal (Frankia-nodulated) plants. In root nodules of Datisca glomerata (Datiscaceae), transcripts hybridizing to a conserved coding region of the abundant nodule isoform,

  12. The carB gene encoding the large subunit of carbamoylphosphate synthetase from Lactococcus lactis is transcribed monocistronically

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1998-01-01

    The biosynthesis of carbamoylphosphate is catalysed by the heterodimeric enzyme carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPSase). The genes encoding the two subunits in procaryotes are normally transcribed as an operon, whereas in Lactococcus lactis, the gene encoding the large subunit (carB) is shown to b...

  13. Modulation of 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylate synthetase by environmental stress in the marine sponge Geodia cydonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, H.C.; Wiens, M.; Mueller, W.E.G. [Abteilung Angewandte Molekularbiologie, Mainz (Germany). Inst. fuer Physiologische Chemie; Kuusksalu, A.; Kelve, M. [Inst. of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1997-07-01

    Recently the authors established the presence of relatively high amounts of 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylates (2{prime}-5{prime} A) and 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylate synthetase (2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase) in the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Here they determined by applying radioimmunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatographical methods that the concentration of 2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase change following exposure of G. cydonium tissue to environmental stress. The 2{prime}-5{prime} A content and the activity of 2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase, present in crude sponge extract, increase by up to three-fold after treating sponge cubes for 2 h with natural stressors including heat shock (26 C), cold shock (6 C), pH shock (pH 6), and hypertonic shock and subsequent incubation for 18 h under ambient conditions (16 C). No response was observed after exposure of sponges to an alkaline (pH 10) or hypotonic environment. Similar changes have been found for the expression of heat shock protein HSP70 in G. cydonium. These results show that 2{prime}-5{prime} A in sponges may be useful as a novel biomarker for environmental monitoring.

  14. Fatty acid biosynthesis VII. Substrate control of chain-length of products synthesised by rat liver fatty acid synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Carey, E.M.; Dils, R.

    1970-01-01

    - 1. Gas-liquid and paper chromatography have been used to determine the chain-lengths of fatty acids synthesised by purified rat liver fatty acid synthetase from [1-14C]acetyl-CoA, [1,3-14C2]malonyl-CoA and from [1-14C]acetyl-CoA plus partially purified rat liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase. - 2. A w...... of long-chain fatty acids was synthesised from carboxylated acetyl-CoA than from added malonyl-CoA. - 5. It is suggested that acetyl-CoA carboxylase may carboxylate acetate bound to fatty acid synthetase.......- 1. Gas-liquid and paper chromatography have been used to determine the chain-lengths of fatty acids synthesised by purified rat liver fatty acid synthetase from [1-14C]acetyl-CoA, [1,3-14C2]malonyl-CoA and from [1-14C]acetyl-CoA plus partially purified rat liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase. - 2....... A wide range (C4:0–C18:0) of fatty acids was synthesised and the proportions were modified by substrate concentrations in the same manner as for purified rabbit mammary gland fatty acid synthetase. - 3. The relative amount of radioactivity incorporated from added acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA depended...

  15. Interaction between succinyl CoA synthetase and the heme-biosynthetic enzyme ALAS-E is disrupted in sideroblastic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuyama, Kazumichi; Sassa, Shigeru

    2000-01-01

    The first and the rate-limiting enzyme of heme biosynthesis is δ-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS), which is localized in mitochondria. There are 2 tissue-specific isoforms of ALAS, erythroid-specific (ALAS-E) and nonspecific ALAS (ALAS-N). To identify possible mitochondrial factors that modulate ALAS-E function, we screened a human bone marrow cDNA library, using the mitochondrial form of human ALAS-E as a bait protein in the yeast 2-hybrid system. Our screening led to the isolation of the β subunit of human ATP-specific succinyl CoA synthetase (SCS-βA). Using transient expression and coimmunoprecipitation, we verified that mitochodrially expressed SCS-βA associates specifically with ALAS-E and not with ALAS-N. Furthermore, the ALAS-E mutants R411C and M426V associated with SCS-βA, but the D190V mutant did not. Because the D190V mutant was identified in a patient with pyridoxine-refractory X-linked sideroblastic anemia, our findings suggest that appropriate association of SCS-βA and ALAS-E promotes efficient use of succinyl CoA by ALAS-E or helps translocate ALAS-E into mitochondria. PMID:10727444

  16. Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance and biochemical characterization of fluorotyrosine-labeled-thymidylate-synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosson, Dan; Lewis, Charles A.; Ellis, Paul D.; Dunlap, R. Bruce

    1994-03-01

    Fluorotyrosine has been incorporated into thymidylate synthetase from Lactobacillus casei by growth of the bacterium in media containing 3-fluorotyrosine. The enzyme exhibited a specific activity 70% of that of the normal enzyme and formed a covalent binary complex with pyrimidine nucleotides, as well as a covalent ternary complex with 5-fluorodeoxyuridylate and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to follow the formation of these complexes. 5-Fluorodeoxyuridylate, dUMP, dTMP and dCMP produced identical conformational changes in the enzyme as monitored by the fluorotyrosyl resonances. Ternary complex formation of the fluorotyrosine-containing enzyme with 5-fluorodeoxyuridylate and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate resulted in further spectral changes.

  17. Glutamine Synthetase in Legumes: Recent Advances in Enzyme Structure and Functional Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Betti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase (GS is the key enzyme involved in the assimilation of ammonia derived either from nitrate reduction, N2 fixation, photorespiration or asparagine breakdown. A small gene family is encoding for different cytosolic (GS1 or plastidic (GS2 isoforms in legumes. We summarize here the recent advances carried out concerning the quaternary structure of GS, as well as the functional relationship existing between GS2 and processes such as nodulation, photorespiration and water stress, in this latter case by means of proline production. Functional genomic analysis using GS2-minus mutant reveals the key role of GS2 in the metabolic control of the plants and, more particularly, in carbon metabolism.

  18. CMP-Sialic Acid Synthetase: The Point of Constriction in the Sialylation Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellmeier, Melanie; Weinhold, Birgit; Münster-Kühnel, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Sialoglycoconjugates form the outermost layer of animal cells and play a crucial role in cellular communication processes. An essential step in the biosynthesis of sialylated glycoconjugates is the activation of sialic acid to the monophosphate diester CMP-sialic acid. Only the activated sugar is transported into the Golgi apparatus and serves as a substrate for the linkage-specific sialyltransferases. Interference with sugar activation abolishes sialylation and is embryonic lethal in mammals. In this chapter we focus on the enzyme catalyzing the activation of sialic acid, the CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CMAS), and compare the enzymatic properties of CMASs isolated from different species. Information concerning the reaction mechanism and active site architecture is included. Moreover, the unusual nuclear localization of vertebrate CMASs as well as the biotechnological application of bacterial CMAS enzymes is addressed.

  19. Role of asparagine and asparagine synthetase genes in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) germination and natural senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Rodríguez, María Begoña; Maldonado, José María; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael

    2006-10-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) contains three active asparagine synthetase (EC 6.3.5.4, AS) genes: HAS1, HAS1.1 and HAS2. Asparagine content and AS gene expression were determined during germination and leaf and cotyledon natural senescence to assess the role of asparagine as well as the extent of participation of each AS gene in different nitrogen mobilizing processes. Asparagine accumulated in the dry seed and was the predominant amide throughout germination. During cotyledon senescence, the asparagine level was slightly higher than that of glutamine. The opposite was true for leaf senescence. According to transcript accumulation data, most of the asparagine newly synthesized for germination and cotyledon expansion was due to HAS2 activity, with little contribution of the other AS genes. However, all three genes work together to synthesize asparagine for leaf senescence. The absence of significant AS gene expression in cotyledon senescence differentiates leaf and cotyledon senescence, and suggests a cotyledon-specific regulation.

  20. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes in the Microbial Metagenomes of Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Hentschel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Genomic mining revealed one major nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS phylogenetic cluster in 12 marine sponge species, one ascidian, an actinobacterial isolate and seawater. Phylogenetic analysis predicts its taxonomic affiliation to the actinomycetes and hydroxy-phenyl-glycine as a likely substrate. Additionally, a phylogenetically distinct NRPS gene cluster was discovered in the microbial metagenome of the sponge Aplysina aerophoba, which shows highest similarities to NRPS genes that were previously assigned, by ways of single cell genomics, to a Chloroflexi sponge symbiont. Genomic mining studies such as the one presented here for NRPS genes, contribute to on-going efforts to characterize the genomic potential of sponge-associated microbiota for secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  1. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains...... of healthy rats, inhibition of GS by methionine sulfoximine (MSO) reduced glutamine synthesis and increased alanine synthesis. Here, we investigate effects of MSO on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in sham and bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, alanine......, and aspartate and incorporation of (15)NH4(+) into these amino acids in brain, liver, muscle, kidney, and plasma were similar in sham and BDL rats treated with saline. Methionine sulfoximine reduced glutamine concentrations in liver, kidney, and plasma but not in brain and muscle; MSO reduced incorporation...

  2. Plant growth is influenced by glutamine synthetase-catalyzed nitrogen metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langston-Unkefer, P.J.

    1991-06-11

    Ammonia assimilation has been implicated as participating in regulation of nitrogen fixation in free-living bacteria. In fact, these simple organisms utilize an integrated regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism; we except to observe an integration of nitrogen and carbon fixation in plants; how could these complex systems grow efficiently and compete in the ecosystem without coordinating these two crucial activities We have been investigating the role of ammonia assimilation regulating the complex symbiotic nitrogen fixation of legumes. Just as is observed in the simple bacterial systems, perturbation of ammonia assimilation in legumes results in increased overall nitrogen fixation. The perturbed plants have increased growth and total nitrogen fixation capability. Because we have targeted the first enyzme in ammonia assimilation, glutamine synthetase, this provides a marker that could be used to assist selection or screening for increased biomass yield. 45 refs., 4 tabs.

  3. δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS): discovery and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahlan, Kapil; Moore, Marcus A; Jensen, Susan E

    2017-05-01

    The δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine (ACV) tripeptide is the first dedicated intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the penicillin and cephalosporin classes of β-lactam natural products in bacteria and fungi. It is synthesized nonribosomally by the ACV synthetase (ACVS) enzyme, which has been purified and partially characterized from many sources. Due to its large size and instability, many details regarding the reaction mechanism of ACVS are still not fully understood. In this review we discuss the chronology and associated methodology that led to the discovery of ACVS, some of the main findings regarding its activities, and some recent/current studies being conducted on the enzyme. In addition, we conclude with perspectives on what can be done to increase our understating of this very important protein in the future.

  4. Characterization of Drosophila CMP-sialic acid synthetase activity reveals unusual enzymatic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsalov, Ilya B; Novikov, Boris N; Scott, Hilary; Dangott, Lawrence; Panin, Vladislav M

    2016-07-01

    CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSAS) is a key enzyme of the sialylation pathway. CSAS produces the activated sugar donor, CMP-sialic acid, which serves as a substrate for sialyltransferases to modify glycan termini with sialic acid. Unlike other animal CSASs that normally localize in the nucleus, Drosophila melanogaster CSAS (DmCSAS) localizes in the cell secretory compartment, predominantly in the Golgi, which suggests that this enzyme has properties distinct from those of its vertebrate counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we purified recombinant DmCSAS and characterized its activity in vitro Our experiments revealed several unique features of this enzyme. DmCSAS displays specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid as a substrate, shows preference for lower pH and can function with a broad range of metal cofactors. When tested at a pH corresponding to the Golgi compartment, the enzyme showed significant activity with several metal cations, including Zn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+) and Mn(2+), whereas the activity with Mg(2+) was found to be low. Protein sequence analysis and site-specific mutagenesis identified an aspartic acid residue that is necessary for enzymatic activity and predicted to be involved in co-ordinating a metal cofactor. DmCSAS enzymatic activity was found to be essential in vivo for rescuing the phenotype of DmCSAS mutants. Finally, our experiments revealed a steep dependence of the enzymatic activity on temperature. Taken together, our results indicate that DmCSAS underwent evolutionary adaptation to pH and ionic environment different from that of counterpart synthetases in vertebrates. Our data also suggest that environmental temperatures can regulate Drosophila sialylation, thus modulating neural transmission. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. Purification, characterization, and expression of multiple glutamine synthetases from Prevotella ruminicola 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Nam; Cann, Isaac K O; Mackie, Roderick I

    2012-01-01

    The Prevotella ruminicola 23 genome encodes three different glutamine synthetase (GS) enzymes: glutamine synthetase I (GSI) (ORF02151), GSIII-1 (ORF01459), and GSIII-2 (ORF02034). GSI, GSIII-1, and GSIII-2 have each been heterologously expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli. The subunit molecular mass of GSI was 56 kDa, while GSIII-1 and GSIII-2 were both 83 kDa. Optimal conditions for γ-glutamyl transferase activity were found to be 35°C at pH 5.6 with 0.25 mM Mn(2+) ions (GSI) or 37°C at pH 6.0 (GSIII-1 and GSIII-2) with 0.50 to 1.00 mM Mn(2+) ions. GSIII biosynthetic activity was found to be optimal at 50 to 60°C and pH 6.8 to 7.0 with 10 mM Mn(2+) ions, while GSI displayed no GS biosynthetic activity. Kinetic analysis revealed K(m) values for glutamate and ammonium as well as for hydrolysis of ATP to be 8.58, 0.48, and 1.91 mM, respectively, for GSIII-1 and 1.72, 0.43, and 2.65 mM, respectively, for GSIII-2. A quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR assay (qRT-PCR) revealed GSIII-2 to be significantly induced by high concentrations of ammonia, and this corresponded with increases in measured GS activity. Collectively, these results show that both GSIII enzymes in P. ruminicola 23 are functional and indicate that GSIII-2, flanked by GOGAT (gltB and gltD genes), plays an important role in the acquisition and metabolism of ammonia, particularly under nonlimiting ammonia growth conditions.

  6. Molecular cloning, sequencing and expression in Escherichia coli cells Thermus thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalenko O. P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Cloning and sequencing of the T. thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRSTT followed by the creation of genetically engineered construct for protein expression in E.coli cells and its purification. Methods. Searching for the LeuRSTT gene was performed by Southern blot hybridization with chromosomal DNA, where digoxigenin-labeled PCR fragments of DNA were used as probes. Results. The gene of T. thermophilus HB27 leucyl-tRNA synthetase was cloned and sequenced. The open reading frame encodes a polypeptide chain of 878 amino acid residues in length (molecular mass 101 kDa. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of T. thermophilus LeuRS with that of the enzymes from other organisms showed that LeuRSTT was a part of the group of similar enzymes of prokaryotes, formed by the proteins of protobacteriae, rickettsia and mitochondria of eukaryotes. The resulting phylogenetic tree of LeuRSs reveals dichotomous branching into two lines: prokaryotic/eukaryotic mitochondrial and arhaeal/eukaryotic cytosolic proteins. Differences between prokaryotic and arhaeal branches of the LeuRSs phylogenetic tree are primarily due to the structure of two domains of the enzyme – the editing and the C-terminal. T. thermophilus LeuRS was expressed in E. coli cells by cloning the corresponding gene into pET29b vector. Conclusions. The cloned T. thermophilus leuS gene and expressed recombinant protein will be used for structural and functional studies on LeuRSTT, including X-ray analysis of the enzyme and its mutant forms in complex with different substrates

  7. Effects of GSH1 and GSH2 Gene Mutation on Glutathione Synthetases Activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen; Jia, Haiyan; Zhang, Longmei; Wang, Haiyan; Tang, Hui; Zhang, Liping

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, three mutants from wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae HBU2.558, called U2.558, UN2.558, and UNA2.558, were screened by UV, sodium nitrite, Atmospheric and room temperature plasma, respectively. Glutathione production of the three mutants increased by 41.86, 72.09 and 56.76%, respectively. We detected the activity of glutathione synthetases and found that its activity was improved. Amino acid sequences of three mutant colonies were compared with HBU2.558. Four mutants: Leu51→Pro51 (L51P), Glu62→Val62 (E62V), Ala332→Glu332 (A332E) and Ser653→Gly653 (S653G) were found in the analysis of γ-glutamylcysteine ligase. L51 is located adjacently to the two active sites of GCL/E/Mg2+/ADP complex in the overall GCL structure. L51P mutant spread distortion on the β-sheet due to the fact that the φ was changed from -50.4° to -40.2°. A mutant Leu54→Pro54 (L54P) was found in the analysis of glutathione synthetase, and L54 was an amino acid located between an α-helix and a β-sheet. The results confirm that introduction of proline located at the middle of the β-sheet or at the N- or C-terminal between α-helix and β-sheet or, i.e., L51P and L54P, changed the φ, rigidity, hydrophobicity and conformational entropy, thus increased protein stability and improved the enzyme activity.

  8. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Bacillus subtilis. Cloning, characterization and chromosomal mapping of the prs gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Dan; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1987-01-01

    The gene (prs) encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase has been cloned from a library of Bacillus subtilis DNA by complementation of an Escherichia coli prs mutation. Flanking DNA sequences were pruned away by restriction endonuclease and exonuclease BAL 31 digestions, resulting...

  9. Acyl-CoA Synthetase Is Located in the Outer Membrane and Acyl-CoA Thioesterase in the Inner Membrane of Pea Chloroplast Envelopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J; Keegstra, K

    1983-07-01

    Both acyl-CoA synthetase and acyl-CoA thioesterase activities are present in chloroplast envelope membranes. The functions of these enzymes in lipid metabolism remains unresolved, although the synthetase has been proposed to be involved in either plastid galactolipid synthesis or the export of plastid-synthesized fatty acids to the cytoplasm. We have examined the locations of both enzymes within the two envelope membranes of pea (Pisum sativum var Laxton's Progress No. 9) chloroplasts. Inner and outer envelope membranes were purified from unfractionated envelope preparations by linear density sucrose gradient centrifugation. Acyl-CoA synthetase was located in the outer envelope membrane while acyl-CoA thioesterase was located in the inner envelope membrane. Thus, it seems unlikely that the synthetase is directly involved in galactolipid assembly. Instead, its localization supports the hypothesis that it functions in the transport of plastid-synthesized fatty acids to the endoplasmic reticulum.

  10. RNA-Seq analyses reveal the order of tRNA processing events and the maturation of C/D box and CRISPR RNAs in the hyperthermophile Methanopyrus kandleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Andreas A H; Tripp, Vanessa; Randau, Lennart

    2013-07-01

    The methanogenic archaeon Methanopyrus kandleri grows near the upper temperature limit for life. Genome analyses revealed strategies to adapt to these harsh conditions and elucidated a unique transfer RNA (tRNA) C-to-U editing mechanism at base 8 for 30 different tRNA species. Here, RNA-Seq deep sequencing methodology was combined with computational analyses to characterize the small RNome of this hyperthermophilic organism and to obtain insights into the RNA metabolism at extreme temperatures. A large number of 132 small RNAs were identified that guide RNA modifications, which are expected to stabilize structured RNA molecules. The C/D box guide RNAs were shown to exist as circular RNA molecules. In addition, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats RNA processing and potential regulatory RNAs were identified. Finally, the identification of tRNA precursors before and after the unique C8-to-U8 editing activity enabled the determination of the order of tRNA processing events with termini truncation preceding intron removal. This order of tRNA maturation follows the compartmentalized tRNA processing order found in Eukaryotes and suggests its conservation during evolution.

  11. Concerted action of two novel tRNA mtDNA point mutations in chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblum, Cornelia; Zsurka, Gábor; Wiesner, Rudolf J; Schröder, Rolf; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2008-04-01

    CPEO (chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia) is a common mitochondrial disease phenotype in adults which is due to mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA) point mutations in a subset of patients. Attributing pathogenicity to novel tRNA mtDNA mutations still poses a challenge, particularly when several mtDNA sequence variants are present. In the present study we report a CPEO patient for whom sequencing of the mitochondrial genome revealed three novel tRNA mtDNA mutations: G5835A, del4315A, T1658C in tRNATyr, tRNAIle and tRNAVal genes. In skeletal muscle, the tRNAVal and tRNAIle mutations were homoplasmic, whereas the tRNATyr mutation was heteroplasmic. To address the pathogenic relevance, we performed two types of functional tests: (i) single skeletal muscle fibre analysis comparing G5835A mutation loads and biochemical phenotypes of corresponding fibres, and (ii) Northern-blot analyses of mitochondrial tRNATyr, tRNAIle and tRNAVal. We demonstrated that both the G5835A tRNATyr and del4315A tRNAIle mutation have serious functional consequences. Single-fibre analyses displayed a high threshold of the tRNATyr mutation load for biochemical phenotypic expression at the single-cell level, indicating a rather mild pathogenic effect. In contrast, skeletal muscle tissue showed a severe decrease in respiratory-chain activities, a reduced overall COX (cytochrome c oxidase) staining intensity and abundant COX-negative fibres. Northern-blot analyses showed a dramatic reduction of tRNATyr and tRNAIle levels in muscle, with impaired charging of tRNAIle, whereas tRNAVal levels were only slightly decreased, with amino-acylation unaffected. Our findings suggest that the heteroplasmic tRNATyr and homoplasmic tRNAIle mutation act together, resulting in a concerted effect on the biochemical and histological phenotype. Thus homoplasmic mutations may influence the functional consequences of pathogenic heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations.

  12. Identification and sequence analysis of metazoan tRNA 3'-end processing enzymes tRNase Zs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhikang Wang

    Full Text Available tRNase Z is the endonuclease responsible for removing the 3'-trailer sequences from precursor tRNAs, a prerequisite for the addition of the CCA sequence. It occurs in the short (tRNase Z(S and long (tRNase Z(L forms. Here we report the identification and sequence analysis of candidate tRNase Zs from 81 metazoan species. We found that the vast majority of deuterostomes, lophotrochozoans and lower metazoans have one tRNase Z(S and one tRNase Z(L genes, whereas ecdysozoans possess only a single tRNase Z(L gene. Sequence analysis revealed that in metazoans, a single nuclear tRNase Z(L gene is likely to encode both the nuclear and mitochondrial forms of tRNA 3'-end processing enzyme through mechanisms that include alternative translation initiation from two in-frame start codons and alternative splicing. Sequence conservation analysis revealed a variant PxKxRN motif, PxPxRG, which is located in the N-terminal region of tRNase Z(Ss. We also identified a previously unappreciated motif, AxDx, present in the C-terminal region of both tRNase Z(Ss and tRNase Z(Ls. The AxDx motif consisting mainly of a very short loop is potentially close enough to form hydrogen bonds with the loop containing the PxKxRN or PxPxRG motif. Through complementation analysis, we demonstrated the likely functional importance of the AxDx motif. In conclusion, our analysis supports the notion that in metazoans a single tRNase Z(L has evolved to participate in both nuclear and mitochondrial tRNA 3'-end processing, whereas tRNase Z(S may have evolved new functions. Our analysis also unveils new evolutionarily conserved motifs in tRNase Zs, including the C-terminal AxDx motif, which may have functional significance.

  13. A model for mis-sense error in protein synthesis: mis-charged cognate tRNA versus mis-reading of codon

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Annwesha

    2015-01-01

    The sequence of amino acid monomers in the primary structure of protein is decided by the corresponding sequence of codons (triplets of nucleic acid monomers) on the template messenger RNA (mRNA). The polymerization of a protein, by incorporation of the successive amino acid monomers, is carried out by a molecular machine called ribosome. Transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules, each species of which is "charged" with a specific amino acid, enters the ribosome and participates in the reading of the codon by the ribosome. Both mis-reading of mRNA codon and prior mis-charging of a tRNA can lead to "mis-sense" error, i.e,. erroneous substitution of a correct amino acid monomer by an incorrect one during the synthesis of a protein. We develop a theoretical model of protein synthesis that allows for both types of contributions to the "mis-sense" error. We report exact analytical formulae for several quantities that characterize the interplay of mis-charging of tRNA and mis-reading of mRNA. The average rate of elongation of ...

  14. Molecular investigation of tRNA genes integrity and its relation to pathogenicity islands in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Carlos Novais

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available tRNA genes are known target sites for the integration of pathogenicity islands (PAI and other genetic elements, such as bacteriophages, into bacterial genome. In most STEC (Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, the PAI called LEE (locus of enterocyte effacement is related to bacterial virulence and is mostly associated to the tRNA genes selC and pheU. In this work, we first investigated the relationship of LEE with tRNA genes selC and pheU in 43 STEC strains. We found that 28 strains (65% had a disrupted selC and/or pheU. Three of these strains (637/1, 650/5 and 654/3 were chosen to be submitted to a RAPD-PCR technique modified by the introduction of specific primers (corresponding to the 5'end of genes selC and pheU into the reaction, which we called "anchored RAPD-PCR". The PCR fragments obtained were transferred onto membranes, and those fragments which hybridized to selC and pheU probes were isolated. One of these fragments from strain 637/1 was partially sequenced. An 85-nucleotide sequence was found to be similar to the cfxA2 gene that encodes a beta-lactamase and is part of transposon Tn4555, a pathogenicity island originally integrated into the Bacteroides genome.

  15. Apple S-RNase triggers inhibition of tRNA aminoacylation by interacting with a soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase in growing self-pollen tubes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Meng, Dong; Gu, Zhaoyu; Yang, Qing; Yuan, Hui; Li, Yang; Chen, Qiuju; Yu, Jie; Liu, Chunsheng; Li, Tianzhong

    2018-02-09

    Apple exhibits S-RNase-based self-incompatibility (SI), in which S-RNase plays a central role in rejecting self-pollen. It has been proposed that the arrest of pollen growth in SI of Solanaceae plants is a consequence of the degradation of pollen rRNA by S-RNase; however, the underlying mechanism in Rosaceae is still unclear. Here, we used S 2 -RNase as a bait to screen an apple pollen cDNA library and characterized an apple soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase (MdPPa) that physically interacted with S-RNases. When treated with self S-RNases, apple pollen tubes showed a marked growth inhibition, as well as a decrease in endogenous soluble pyrophosphatase activity and elevated levels of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi). In addition, S-RNase was found to bind to two variable regions of MdPPa, resulting in a noncompetitive inhibition of its activity. Silencing of MdPPa expression led to a reduction in pollen tube growth. Interestingly, tRNA aminoacylation was inhibited in self S-RNase-treated or MdPPa-silenced pollen tubes, resulting in the accumulation of uncharged tRNA. Furthermore, we provide evidence showing that this disturbance of tRNA aminoacylation is independent of RNase activity. We propose an alternative mechanism differing from RNA degradation to explain the cytotoxicity of the S-RNase apple SI process. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Interferon titer and the 2',5'-oligoadenylate-synthetase activity in rat thymus lymphocytes in conditions of Omeprazol-caused hypergastrinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kompanets I. V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the determination of rat thymocytes response to hypergastrinemia evoked by hypoacidity and multiprobiotic «Symbiter® acidophilic concentrated» (symbiter treatment via the estimation of the interferon (IFN titer and 2', 5'-oligoadenylate (OA-synthetase activity in lymphocytes. 2', 5'-OA-synthetase is the IFN-induced enzyme. Methods. The micromethod of IFN titer determination by antiviral activity, spectrophotometrical method of 2', 5'-OA-synthetase activity determination. Results. It was shown that the IFN production by cultivated thymocytes is amplified while the 2', 5'-OA-synthetase activity decreases in these cells in conditions of hypoacidity caused by the 28-days omeprazol treatment. The treatment of animals by symbiter against a background of hypoacidity causes the augmentation of IFN production by thymocytes, but does not stimulate the 2', 5'-OA-synthetase activity. The IFN production by thymocytes in response to IFN inducers (PHA and cycloferone in vitro is intensified comparatively to the control at hypoacidity and symbiter treatment. Conclusions. The multiprobiotic symbiter exhibits interferonogenic properties. The IFN synthesis in response to induction in vitro is intensified in comparison with healthy animals at both hypoacidity and symbiter treatment while the 2', 5'-OA-synthetase acivity in thymocytes decreases.

  17. Rheb Protein Binds CAD (Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase 2, Aspartate Transcarbamoylase, and Dihydroorotase) Protein in a GTP- and Effector Domain-dependent Manner and Influences Its Cellular Localization and Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase (CPSase) Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J.; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-01

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis. PMID:25422319

  18. Rheb protein binds CAD (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase) protein in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner and influences its cellular localization and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase (CPSase) activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-09

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Investigating the mechanism of ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase from the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cheryl P; Khan, Kirin; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl

    2017-02-01

    ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACD) catalyzes the interconversion of acetyl-CoA and acetate. The related succinyl-CoA synthetase follows a three-step mechanism involving a single phosphoenzyme, but a novel four-step mechanism with two phosphoenzyme intermediates was proposed for Pyrococcus ACD. Characterization of enzyme variants of Entamoeba ACD in which the two proposed phosphorylated His residues were individually altered revealed that only His252 is essential for enzymatic activity. Analysis of variants altered at two residues proposed to interact with the phosphohistidine loop that swings between distinct parts of the active site are consistent with a mechanism involving a single phosphoenzyme intermediate. Our results suggest ACDs with different subunit structures may employ slightly different mechanisms to bridge the span between active sites I and II. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. Three-dimensional structure of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. coli at 2.71 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru, E-mail: tostars@mail.ru, E-mail: ugama@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Abramchik, Yu. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Zhukhlistova, N. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kuranova, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli was cloned, purified, and crystallized. Single crystals of the enzyme were grown under microgravity. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility and used to determine the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme by the molecular-replacement method at 2.71 Å resolution. The active and regulatory sites in the molecule of E. coli phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase were revealed by comparison with the homologous protein from Bacillus subtilis, the structure of which was determined in a complex with functional ligands. The conformations of polypeptide-chain fragments surrounding and composing the active and regulatory sites were shown to be identical in both proteins.

  1. Expression profile and down-regulation of argininosuccinate synthetase in hepatocellular carcinoma in a transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Shih-Chang; Huang, Miao-Zeng; Tsai, Ting-Fen; Chang, Alice Chien; Choo, Kong Bung; Huang, Chiu-Jung; Su, Tsung-Sheng

    2015-01-23

    Argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) participates in urea and nitric oxide production and is a rate-limiting enzyme in arginine biosynthesis. Regulation of ASS expression appears complex and dynamic. In addition to transcriptional regulation, a novel post-transcriptional regulation affecting nuclear precursor RNA stability has been reported. Moreover, many cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), have been found not to express ASS mRNA; therefore, they are auxotrophic for arginine. To study when and where ASS is expressed and whether post-transcriptional regulation is undermined in particular temporal and spatial expression and in pathological events such as HCC, we set up a transgenic mouse system with modified BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) carrying the human ASS gene tagged with an EGFP reporter. We established and characterized the transgenic mouse models based on the use of two BAC-based EGFP reporter cassettes: a transcription reporter and a transcription/post-transcription coupled reporter. Using such a transgenic mouse system, EGFP fluorescence pattern in E14.5 embryo was examined. Profiles of fluorescence and that of Ass RNA in in situ hybridization were found to be in good agreement in general, yet our system has the advantages of sensitivity and direct fluorescence visualization. By comparing expression patterns between mice carrying the transcription reporter and those carrying the transcription/post-transcription couple reporter, a post-transcriptional up-regulation of ASS was found around the ventricular zone/subventricular zone of E14.5 embryonic brain. In the EGFP fluorescence pattern and mRNA level in adult tissues, tissue-specific regulation was found to be mainly controlled at transcriptional initiation. Furthermore, strong EGFP expression was found in brain regions of olfactory bulb, septum, habenular nucleus and choroid plexus of the young transgenic mice. On the other hand, in crossing to hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx

  2. Investigation of protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions in type II non-ribosomal peptide synthetases

    OpenAIRE

    Jaremko, Matt J.

    2017-01-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are responsible for the biosynthesis of many pharmaceutically relavant compounds. Type II NRPSs are an emerging subfamily of NRPSs that form hybrid pathways with type I fatty acid synthases (FAS), polyketide synthases (PKS), type I NRPSs, or others. The type II NRPSs commonly contain tailoring enzymes that generate unique substrate modifications, such as dehydrogenations and halogenation. Unlike type I NRPSs, the type II systems consists of standalone...

  3. A non-radioactive assay for selenophosphate synthetase activity using recombinant pyruvate pyrophosphate dikinase from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Saho; Okugochi, Takahiro; Asano, Kaori; Tobe, Ryuta; Mihara, Hisaaki; Nemoto, Michiko; Inagaki, Kenji; Tamura, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    Biosynthesis of selenocysteine-containing proteins requires monoselenophosphate, a selenium-donor intermediate generated by selenophosphate synthetase (Sephs). A non-radioactive assay was developed as an alternative to the standard [8-(14)C] AMP-quantifying assay. The product, AMP, was measured using a recombinant pyruvate pyrophosphate dikinase from Thermus thermophilus HB8. The KM and kcat for Sephs2-Sec60Cys were determined to be 26 μM and 0.352 min(-1), respectively.

  4. Fatty Acid Elongation Is Independent of Acyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase Activities in Leek and Brassica napus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlousek-Radojcic, Alenka; Evenson, Kimberly J.; Jaworski, Jan G.; Post-Beittenmiller, Dusty

    1998-01-01

    In both animal and plant acyl elongation systems, it has been proposed that fatty acids are first activated to acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) before their elongation, and that the ATP dependence of fatty acid elongation is evidence of acyl-CoA synthetase involvement. However, because CoA is not supplied in standard fatty acid elongation assays, it is not clear if CoA-dependent acyl-CoA synthetase activity can provide levels of acyl-CoAs necessary to support typical rates of fatty acid elongation. Therefore, we examined the role of acyl-CoA synthetase in providing the primer for acyl elongation in leek (Allium porrum L.) epidermal microsomes and Brassica napus L. cv Reston oil bodies. As presented here, fatty acid elongation was independent of CoA and proceeded at maximum rates with CoA-free preparations of malonyl-CoA. We also showed that stearic acid ([1-14C]18:0)-CoA was synthesized from [1-14C]18:0 in the presence of CoA-free malonyl-CoA or acetyl-CoA, and that [1-14C]18:0-CoA synthesis under these conditions was ATP dependent. Furthermore, the appearance of [1-14C]18:0 in the acyl-CoA fraction was simultaneous with its appearance in phosphatidylcholine. These data, together with the s of a previous study (A. Hlousek-Radojcic, H. Imai, J.G. Jaworski [1995] Plant J 8: 803–809) showing that exogenous [14C]acyl-CoAs are diluted by a relatively large endogenous pool before they are elongated, strongly indicated that acyl-CoA synthetase did not play a direct role in fatty acid elongation, and that phosphatidylcholine or another glycerolipid was a more likely source of elongation primers than acyl-CoAs.

  5. Kinetic Basis for the Conjugation of Auxin by a GH3 Family Indole-acetic Acid-Amido Synthetase*

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qingfeng; Westfall, Corey S.; Hicks, Leslie M.; Wang, Shiping; Jez, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    The GH3 family of acyl-acid-amido synthetases catalyze the ATP-dependent formation of amino acid conjugates to modulate levels of active plant hormones, including auxins and jasmonates. Initial biochemical studies of various GH3s show that these enzymes group into three families based on sequence relationships and acyl-acid substrate preference (I, jasmonate-conjugating; II, auxin- and salicylic acid-conjugating; III, benzoate-conjugating); however, little is known about the kinetic and chemi...

  6. The highly conserved KEOPS/EKC complex is essential for a universal tRNA modification, t6A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Madhusudhan; Mehta, Preeti; Yu, Yao; Prugar, Evelyn; Koonin, Eugene V; Karzai, A Wali; Sternglanz, Rolf

    2011-03-02

    The highly conserved Kinase, Endopeptidase and Other Proteins of small Size (KEOPS)/Endopeptidase-like and Kinase associated to transcribed Chromatin (EKC) protein complex has been implicated in transcription, telomere maintenance and chromosome segregation, but its exact function remains unknown. The complex consists of five proteins, Kinase-Associated Endopeptidase (Kae1), a highly conserved protein present in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes, a kinase (Bud32) and three additional small polypeptides. We showed that the complex is required for a universal tRNA modification, threonyl carbamoyl adenosine (t6A), found in all tRNAs that pair with ANN codons in mRNA. We also showed that the bacterial ortholog of Kae1, YgjD, is required for t6A modification of Escherichia coli tRNAs. The ATPase activity of Kae1 and the kinase activity of Bud32 are required for the modification. The yeast protein Sua5 has been reported previously to be required for t6A synthesis. Using yeast extracts, we established an in vitro system for the synthesis of t6A that requires Sua5, Kae1, threonine, bicarbonate and ATP. It remains to be determined whether all reported defects of KEOPS/EKC mutants can be attributed to the lack of t6A, or whether the complex has multiple functions.

  7. Phylogenetic information from three mitochondrial genomes of Terebelliformia (Annelida) worms and duplication of the methionine tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Min; Struck, Torsten H; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2008-06-15

    Mitochondrial genomes have been useful for inferring animal phylogeny across a wide range of clades, however they are still poorly sampled in some animal taxa, limiting our knowledge of mtDNA evolution. For example, despite being one of the most diverse animal phyla, only 5 complete annelid mitochrondial genomes have been published. To address this paucity of information, we obtained complete mitochondrial genomic sequences from Pista cristata (Terebellidae) and Terebellides stroemi (Trichobranchidae) as well as one nearly complete mitochondrial genome from Eclysippe vanelli (Ampharetidae). These taxa are within Terebelliformia (Annelida), which include spaghetti worms, icecream cone worms and their relatives. In contrast to the 37 genes found in most bilaterian metazoans, we recover 38 genes in the mitochondrial genomes of T. stroemi and P. cristata due to the presence of a second methionine tRNA (trnM). Interestingly, the two trnMs are located next to each other and are possibly a synapomorphy of these two taxa. The E. vanelli partial mitochondrial genome lacks this additional trnM at the same position, but it may be present in the region not sampled. Compared to other annelids, gene orders of these three mitochondrial genomes are generally conserved except for the atp6-mSSU region. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that mtDNA data strongly supports a Trichobranchidae/Terebellidae clade.

  8. A novel pea mitochondrial in vitro transcription system recognizes homologous and heterologous mRNA and tRNA promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, S; Hatzack, F; Brennicke, A

    1995-09-22

    To elucidate the mechanism involved in the transcription initiation process in mitochondria of dicotyledonous plants, an in vitro transcription system was established for pea (Pisum sativum L.). The partially purified mitochondrial protein extract initiates transcription on homologous pea templates as well as on heterologous mitochondrial DNA from other dicot plant species. In vitro transcription begins within the nonanucleotide 5'-(-7)CRTAAGAGA(+2)-3' (transcription start site is underlined) conserved at most of the identified transcription initiation sites in dicot plant mitochondria. The in vitro initiation at promoters of protein as well as of tRNA coding genes indicates a common mode of transcription initiation for different types of RNA. The competent recognition of different heterologous templates supports a general functional role of the conserved nonanucleotide within mitochondrial promoters of dicotyledonous plants. Initial studies of the promoter structure by deletion analysis in the 5' region of the pea atp9 promoter show that in addition to the conserved nonanucleotide, which is essential for transcription initiation in vitro, sequences up to 25 nucleotides upstream of the transcription start site are necessary for an efficient initiation event.

  9. Fusion of the subunits α and β of succinyl-CoA synthetase as a phylogenetic marker for Pezizomycotina fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M. Koire

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene fusions, yielding the formation of multidomain proteins, are evolutionary events that can be utilized as phylogenetic markers. Here we describe a fusion gene comprising the α and β subunits of succinyl-coA synthetase, an enzyme of the TCA cycle, in Pezizomycotina fungi. This fusion is present in all Pezizomycotina with complete genome sequences and absent from all other organisms. Phylogenetic analysis of the α and β subunits of succinyl-CoA synthetase suggests that both subunits were duplicated and retained in Pezizomycotina while one copy was lost from other fungi. One of the duplicated copies was then fused in Pezizomycotina. Our results suggest that the fusion of the α and β subunits of succinyl-CoA synthetase can be used as a molecular marker for membership in the Pezizomycotina subphylum. If a species has the fusion it can be reliably classified as Pezizomycotina, while the absence of the fusion is suggestive that the species is not a member of this subphylum.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of recombinant phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase from the Thermophilic thermus thermophilus strain HB27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramchik, Yu. A.; Timofeev, V. I.; Muravieva, T. I.; Sinitsyna, E. V.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetases (PRPP synthetases) are among the key enzymes essential for vital functions of organisms and are involved in the biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, coenzymes, and the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. These enzymes are used in biotechnology for the combined chemoenzymatic synthesis of natural nucleotide analogs. Recombinant phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase I from the thermophilic strain HB27 of the bacterium Thermus thermophilus ( T. th HB27) has high thermal stability and shows maximum activity at 75°C, due to which this enzyme holds promise for biotechnological applications. In order to grow crystals and study them by X-ray crystallography, an enzyme sample, which was produced using a highly efficient producer strain, was purified by affinity and gel-filtration chromatography. The screening of crystallization conditions was performed by the vapor-diffusion technique. The crystals of the enzyme suitable for X-ray diffraction were grown by the counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. These crystals were used to collect the X-ray diffraction data set at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility (Japan) to 3-Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P21 and have the following unitcell parameters: a = 107.7 Å, b = 112.6 Å, c = 110.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 116.6°. The X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for determining the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme at 3.0-Å resolution.

  11. Dexamethasone enhances glutamine synthetase activity and reduces N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotoxicity in mixed cultures of neurons and astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Debroas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are claimed to protect neurons against excitotoxicity by clearing glutamate from the extracellular space and rapidly converting it into glutamine. Glutamine, is then released into the extracellular medium, taken up by neurons and transformed back into glutamate which is then stored into synaptic vesicles. Glutamine synthetase (GS, the key enzyme that governs this glutamate/glutamine cycle, is known to be upregulated by glucocorticoids. In the present work we have thus studied in parallel the effects of dexamethasone on glutamine synthetase activity and NMDA-induced neuronal death in cultures derived from the brain cortex of murine embryos. We showed that dexamethasone was able to markedly enhance GS activity in cultures of astrocytes but not in near pure neuronal cultures. The pharmacological characteristics of the dexamethasone action strongly suggest that it corresponds to a typical receptor-mediated effect. We also observed that long lasting incubation (72 h of mixed astrocyte-neuron cultures in the presence of 100 nM dexamethasone significantly reduced the toxicity of NMDA treatment. Furthermore we demonstrated that methionine sulfoximine, a selective inhibitor of GS, abolished the dexamethasone-induced increase in GS activity and also markedly potentiated NMDA toxicity. Altogether these results suggest that dexamethasone may promote neuroprotection through a stimulation of astrocyte glutamine synthetase.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of recombinant phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase from the Thermophilic thermus thermophilus strain HB27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramchik, Yu. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation); Muravieva, T. I.; Sinitsyna, E. V.; Esipov, R. S., E-mail: esipov@mx.ibch.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kuranova, I. P., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetases (PRPP synthetases) are among the key enzymes essential for vital functions of organisms and are involved in the biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, coenzymes, and the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. These enzymes are used in biotechnology for the combined chemoenzymatic synthesis of natural nucleotide analogs. Recombinant phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase I from the thermophilic strain HB27 of the bacterium Thermus thermophilus (T. th HB27) has high thermal stability and shows maximum activity at 75°Ð¡, due to which this enzyme holds promise for biotechnological applications. In order to grow crystals and study them by X-ray crystallography, an enzyme sample, which was produced using a highly efficient producer strain, was purified by affinity and gel-filtration chromatography. The screening of crystallization conditions was performed by the vapor-diffusion technique. The crystals of the enzyme suitable for X-ray diffraction were grown by the counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. These crystals were used to collect the X-ray diffraction data set at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility (Japan) to 3-Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P2{sub 1} and have the following unitcell parameters: a = 107.7 Å, b = 112.6 Å, c = 110.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 116.6°. The X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for determining the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme at 3.0-Å resolution.

  13. Differential Regulation of rRNA and tRNA Transcription from the rRNA-tRNA Composite Operon in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Hiraku; Shimada, Tomohiro; Dey, Debashish; Quyyum, M Zuhaib; Nakano, Masahiro; Ishiguro, Akira; Yoshida, Hideji; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Sen, Ranjan; Ishihama, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli contains seven rRNA operons, each consisting of the genes for three rRNAs (16S, 23S and 5S rRNA in this order) and one or two tRNA genes in the spacer between 16S and 23S rRNA genes and one or two tRNA genes in the 3' proximal region. All of these rRNA and tRNA genes are transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, into single large precursors that are afterward processed to individual rRNAs and tRNAs by a set of RNases. In the course of Genomic SELEX screening of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme containing RpoD sigma, a strong binding site was identified within 16S rRNA gene in each of all seven rRNA operons. The binding in vitro of RNAP RpoD holoenzyme to an internal promoter, referred to the promoter of riRNA (an internal RNA of the rRNA operon), within each 16S rRNA gene was confirmed by gel shift assay and AFM observation. Using this riRNA promoter within the rrnD operon as a representative, transcription in vitro was detected with use of the purified RpoD holoenzyme, confirming the presence of a constitutive promoter in this region. LacZ reporter assay indicated that this riRNA promoter is functional in vivo. The location of riRNA promoter in vivo as identified using a set of reporter plasmids agrees well with that identified in vitro. Based on transcription profile in vitro and Northern blot analysis in vivo, the majority of transcript initiated from this riRNA promoter was estimated to terminate near the beginning of 23S rRNA gene, indicating that riRNA leads to produce the spacer-coded tRNA. Under starved conditions, transcription of the rRNA operon is markedly repressed to reduce the intracellular level of ribosomes, but the levels of both riRNA and its processed tRNAGlu stayed unaffected, implying that riRNA plays a role in the continued steady-state synthesis of tRNAs from the spacers of rRNA operons. We then propose that the tRNA genes organized within the spacers of rRNA-tRNA composite operons are expressed

  14. Differential Regulation of rRNA and tRNA Transcription from the rRNA-tRNA Composite Operon in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraku Takada

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli contains seven rRNA operons, each consisting of the genes for three rRNAs (16S, 23S and 5S rRNA in this order and one or two tRNA genes in the spacer between 16S and 23S rRNA genes and one or two tRNA genes in the 3' proximal region. All of these rRNA and tRNA genes are transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, into single large precursors that are afterward processed to individual rRNAs and tRNAs by a set of RNases. In the course of Genomic SELEX screening of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase (RNAP holoenzyme containing RpoD sigma, a strong binding site was identified within 16S rRNA gene in each of all seven rRNA operons. The binding in vitro of RNAP RpoD holoenzyme to an internal promoter, referred to the promoter of riRNA (an internal RNA of the rRNA operon, within each 16S rRNA gene was confirmed by gel shift assay and AFM observation. Using this riRNA promoter within the rrnD operon as a representative, transcription in vitro was detected with use of the purified RpoD holoenzyme, confirming the presence of a constitutive promoter in this region. LacZ reporter assay indicated that this riRNA promoter is functional in vivo. The location of riRNA promoter in vivo as identified using a set of reporter plasmids agrees well with that identified in vitro. Based on transcription profile in vitro and Northern blot analysis in vivo, the majority of transcript initiated from this riRNA promoter was estimated to terminate near the beginning of 23S rRNA gene, indicating that riRNA leads to produce the spacer-coded tRNA. Under starved conditions, transcription of the rRNA operon is markedly repressed to reduce the intracellular level of ribosomes, but the levels of both riRNA and its processed tRNAGlu stayed unaffected, implying that riRNA plays a role in the continued steady-state synthesis of tRNAs from the spacers of rRNA operons. We then propose that the tRNA genes organized within the spacers of rRNA-tRNA composite operons

  15. Identification and Functional Characterization of Small Alarmone Synthetases in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Ruwe

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The hyperphosphorylated guanosine derivatives ppGpp and pppGpp represent global regulators of the bacterial stress response, as they act as central elements of the stringent response system. Although it was assumed that both, (pppGpp synthesis and hydrolysis, are catalyzed by one bifunctional RSH-protein in the actinobacterial model organism Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032, two putative short alarmone synthetases (SASs were identified by bioinformatic analyses. The predicted sequences of both enzymes, designated as RelP*Cg and RelSCg, exhibit high similarities to the conserved (pppGpp synthetase catalytic domain. In the context of sequence analysis, significant differences were found between the RelP variants of different C. glutamicum isolates. In contrast to the bifunctional RelA/SpoT homolog (RSH protein RelCg, whose gene deletion results in a reduced growth rate, no change in growth characteristics were observed for deletion mutants of the putative SAS proteins under standard growth conditions. The growth deficit of the Δrel strain could be restored by the additional deletion of the gene encoding RelSCg, which clearly indicates a functional relationship between both enzymes. The predicted pyrophosphokinase activity of RelSCg was demonstrated by means of genetic complementation of an Escherichia coli ΔrelAΔspoT strain. For the expression of RelP*Cg, as well as the slightly differing variant RelPCg from C. glutamicum AS1.542, no complementation was observed, concluding that both RelP versions possess no significant pyrophosphokinase activity in vivo. The results were confirmed by in vitro characterization of the corresponding proteins. In the course of this investigation, the additional conversion of GMP to pGpp was determined for the enzyme RelSCg. Since the SAS species analyzed extend both the network of stringent response related enzymes and the number of substances involved, the study of this class of enzymes is an important

  16. Dgroup: DG00402 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cin calcium (USAN); Mupirocin calcium hydrate (JP17) ... ATC code: D06AX09 R01AX06 t-RNA synthetase inhibition antibiotics isoleucine tRNA ligase, ptotein synthesis [KO:K01870] ...

  17. InterProScan Result: FS867702 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Threonyl/alanyl tRNA synthetase, SAD Molecular Function: ATP binding (GO:0005524)|Cellular Component: cytoplasm (GO:0005737)|Biolog...ical Process: translation (GO:0006412)|Biological Process: tRNA aminoacylation (GO:0043039) ...

  18. Mutations in PRPS1, which encodes the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase enzyme critical for nucleotide biosynthesis, cause hereditary peripheral neuropathy with hearing loss and optic neuropathy (cmtx5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Jin; Sohn, Kwang-Min; Shy, Michael E; Krajewski, Karen M; Hwang, Miok; Park, June-Hee; Jang, Sue-Yon; Won, Hong-Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Hong, Sung Hwa; Kim, Byoung-Joon; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Jong-Won

    2007-09-01

    We have identified missense mutations at conserved amino acids in the PRPS1 gene on Xq22.3 in two families with a syndromic form of inherited peripheral neuropathy, one of Asian and one of European descent. The disease is inherited in an X-linked recessive manner, and the affected male patients invariably develop sensorineural hearing loss of prelingual type followed by gating disturbance and visual loss. The family of European descent was reported in 1967 as having Rosenberg-Chutorian syndrome, and recently a Korean family with the same symptom triad was identified with a novel disease locus CMTX5 on the chromosome band Xq21.32-q24. PRPS1 (phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1) is an isoform of the PRPS gene family and is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues, including cochlea. The enzyme mediates the biochemical step critical for purine metabolism and nucleotide biosynthesis. The mutations identified were E43D, in patients with Rosenberg-Chutorian syndrome, and M115T, in the Korean patients with CMTX5. We also showed decreased enzyme activity in patients with M115T. PRPS1 is the first CMT gene that encodes a metabolic enzyme, shedding a new light on the understanding of peripheral nerve-specific metabolism and also suggesting the potential of PRPS1 as a target for drugs in prevention and treatment of peripheral neuropathy by antimetabolite therapy.

  19. Structural and Functional Characterization of Aerobactin Synthetase IucA from a Hypervirulent Pathotype of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Daniel C.; Drake, Eric J.; Grant, Thomas D.; Gulick, Andrew M. (Buffalo); (HWMRI)

    2016-06-28

    Iron is a vital mineral nutrient required by virtually all life forms to prosper; pathogenic bacteria are no exception. Despite the abundance of iron within the human host, highly regulated iron physiology can result in exceedingly low levels of iron bioavailable to prospective invading bacteria. To combat this scarcity of iron, many pathogenic bacteria have acquired specific and efficient iron acquisition systems, which allow them to thrive in iron-deficient host environments. One of the more prominent bacterial iron acquisition systems involves the synthesis, secretion, and reuptake of small-molecule iron chelators known as siderophores. Aerobactin, a citrate-hydroxamate siderophore originally isolated nearly 50 years ago, is produced by a number of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Aerobactin has recently been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in mediating the enhanced virulence of a particularly invasive pathotype of Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKP). Toward further understanding of this key virulence factor, we report the structural and functional characterization of aerobactin synthetase IucA from a strain of hvKP. The X-ray crystal structures of unliganded and ATP-bound forms of IucA were solved, forming the foundation of our structural analysis. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data suggest that, unlike its closest structurally characterized homologues, IucA adopts a tetrameric assembly in solution. Finally, we employed activity assays to investigate the substrate specificity and determine the apparent steady-state kinetic parameters of IucA.

  20. Regulation of hepatocyte-specific gene expression in cultures of human embryonic hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roon, M. A.; Zonneveld, D.; de Boer, P. A.; Moorman, A. F.; Charles, R.; Lamers, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this study was to see whether the rat embryo can serve as a model system for hepatocyte-specific gene expression in the human embryo. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase was used as a hepatocyte-specific marker molecule. Despite the earlier developmental appearance of this enzyme in human than

  1. Ornithine decarboxylase or gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase overexpression protects Leishmania (Vianna) guyanensis against antimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Maisa S; Comini, Marcelo A; Resende, Bethânia V; Santi, Ana Maria M; Zoboli, Antônio P; Moreira, Douglas S; Murta, Silvane M F

    2017-04-01

    Trypanosomatids present a unique mechanism for detoxification of peroxides that is dependent on trypanothione (bisglutathionylspermidine). Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) produce molecules that are direct precursors of trypanothione. In this study, Leishmania guyanensis odc and gsh1 overexpressor cell lines were generated to investigate the contribution of these genes to the trivalent antimony (Sb(III))-resistance phenotype. The ODC- or GSH1-overexpressors parasites presented an increase of two and four-fold in Sb(III)-resistance index, respectively, when compared with the wild-type line. Pharmacological inhibition of ODC and GSH1 with the specific inhibitors α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), respectively, increased the antileishmanial effect of Sb(III) in all cell lines. However, the ODC- and GSH1-overexpressor were still more resistant to Sb(III) than the parental cell line. Together, our data shows that modulation of ODC and GSH1 levels and activity is sufficient to affect L. guyanensis susceptibility to Sb(III), and confirms a role of these genes in the Sb(III)-resistance phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cannabidiol protects retinal neurons by preserving glutamine synthetase activity in diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Remessy, A.B.; Khalifa, Y.; Ibrahim, A.S.; Liou, G.I.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We have previously shown that non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD) protects retinal neurons in diabetic rats by inhibiting reactive oxygen species and blocking tyrosine nitration. Tyrosine nitration may inhibit glutamine synthetase (GS), causing glutamate accumulation and leading to further neuronal cell death. We propose to test the hypothesis that diabetes-induced glutamate accumulation in the retina is associated with tyrosine nitration of GS and that CBD treatment inhibits this process. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were made diabetic by streptozotocin injection and received either vehicle or CBD (10 mg/kg/2 days). After eight weeks, retinal cell death, Müller cell activation, GS tyrosine nitration, and GS activity were determined. Results Diabetes causes significant increases in retinal oxidative and nitrative stress compared with controls. These effects were associated with Müller cell activation and dysfunction as well as with impaired GS activity and tyrosine nitration of GS. Cannabidiol treatment reversed these effects. Retinal neuronal death was indicated by numerous terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-labeled cells in diabetic rats compared with untreated controls or CBD-treated rats. Conclusions These results suggest that diabetes-induced tyrosine nitration impairs GS activity and that CBD preserves GS activity and retinal neurons by blocking tyrosine nitration. PMID:20806080

  3. ACR11 is an Activator of Plastid-Type Glutamine Synthetase GS2 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Takashi; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Otsuki, Hitomi; Saito, Kazuki; Yokota Hirai, Masami

    2017-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an important enzyme for nitrogen assimilation, and GS2, encoded by GLN2, is the only plastid-type GS in Arabidopsis thaliana. A co-expression analysis suggested that the expression level of the gene encoding a uridylyltransferase-like protein, ACR11, is strongly correlated with GLN2 expression levels. Here we showed that the recombinant ACR11 protein increased GS2 activity in vitro by reducing the Km values of its substrate glutamine. A T-DNA insertion mutant of ACR11 exhibited a reduced GS activity under low nitrate conditions and reduced glutamine levels. Biochemical analyses revealed that ACR11 and GS2 interacted both in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that ACR11 is an activator of GS2, giving it a mechanistic role in the nitrogen assimilation of A. thaliana. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases Involved in the Biosynthesis of Lipopeptide Biosurfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niran Roongsawang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipopeptide biosurfactants (LPBSs consist of a hydrophobic fatty acid portion linked to a hydrophilic peptide chain in the molecule. With their complex and diverse structures, LPBSs exhibit various biological activities including surface activity as well as anti-cellular and anti-enzymatic activities. LPBSs are also involved in multi-cellular behaviors such as swarming motility and biofilm formation. Among the bacterial genera, Bacillus (Gram-positive and Pseudomonas (Gram-negative have received the most attention because they produce a wide range of effective LPBSs that are potentially useful for agricultural, chemical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. The biosynthetic mechanisms and gene regulation systems of LPBSs have been extensively analyzed over the last decade. LPBSs are generally synthesized in a ribosome-independent manner with megaenzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs. Production of active‑form NRPSs requires not only transcriptional induction and translation but also post‑translational modification and assemblage. The accumulated knowledge reveals the versatility and evolutionary lineage of the NRPSs system. This review provides an overview of the structural and functional diversity of LPBSs and their different biosynthetic mechanisms in Bacillus and Pseudomonas, including both typical and unique systems. Finally, successful genetic engineering of NRPSs for creating novel lipopeptides is also discussed.

  5. Biochemical and mutational analysis of glutamine synthetase type III from the rumen anaerobe Ruminococcus albus 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Kensey R; Kocherginskaya, Svetlana A; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O

    2005-11-01

    Two different genes encoding glutamine synthetase type I (GSI) and GSIII were identified in the genome sequence of R. albus 8. The identity of the GSIII protein was confirmed by the presence of its associated conserved motifs. The glnN gene, encoding the GSIII, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells. The recombinant protein was purified and subjected to biochemical and physical analyses. Subunit organization suggested a protein present in solution as both monomers and oligomers. Kinetic studies using the forward and the gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT) assays were carried out. Mutations that changed conserved glutamic acid residues to alanine in the four GSIII motifs resulted in drastic decreases in GS activity using both assays, except for an E380A mutation, which rather resulted in an increase in activity in the forward assay compared to the wild-type protein. Reduced GSIII activity was also exhibited by mutating, individually, two lysines (K308 and K318) located in the putative nucleotide-binding site to alanine. Most importantly, the presence of mRNA transcripts of the glnN gene in R. albus 8 cells grown under ammonia limiting conditions, whereas little or no transcript was detected in cells grown under ammonia sufficient conditions, suggested an important role for the GSIII in the nitrogen metabolism of R. albus 8. Furthermore, the mutational studies on the conserved GSIII motifs demonstrated, for the first time, their importance in the structure and/or function of a GSIII protein.

  6. Conformational changes involving ammonia tunnel formation and allosteric control in GMP synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Justin C; Gudihal, Ravidra; Burgner, John W; Pedley, Anthony M; Zwierko, Alexander T; Davisson, V Jo; Linger, Rebecca S

    2014-03-01

    GMP synthetase is the glutamine amidotransferase that catalyzes the final step in the guanylate branch of de novo purine biosynthesis. Conformational changes are required to efficiently couple distal active sites in the protein; however, the nature of these changes has remained elusive. Structural information derived from both limited proteolysis and sedimentation velocity experiments support the hypothesis of nucleotide-induced loop- and domain-closure in the protein. These results were combined with information from sequence conservation and precedents from other glutamine amidotransferases to develop the first structural model of GMPS in a closed, active state. In analyzing this Catalytic model, an interdomain salt bridge was identified residing in the same location as seen in other triad glutamine amidotransferases. Using mutagenesis and kinetic analysis, the salt bridge between H186 and E383 was shown to function as a connection between the two active sites. Mutations at these residues uncoupled the two half-reactions of the enzyme. The chemical events of nucleotide binding initiate a series of conformational changes that culminate in the establishment of a tunnel for ammonia as well as an activated glutaminase catalytic site. The results of this study provide a clearer understanding of the allostery of GMPS, where, for the first time, key substrate binding and interdomain contacts are modeled and analyzed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Selenophosphate synthetase in the male accessory glands of an insect without selenoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuessl, Marion; Reinders, Jörg; Oefner, Peter J; Heinze, Jürgen; Schrempf, Alexandra

    2014-12-01

    Selenoproteins (containing the 21st proteinogenic amino acid selenocysteine) play important roles throughout all domains of life. Surprisingly, a number of taxa have small selenoproteomes, and Hymenopteran insects appear to have fully lost selenoproteins. Nevertheless, their genomes contain genes for several proteins of the selenocysteine insertion machinery, including selenophosphate synthetase 1 (SELD/SPS1). At present, it is unknown whether this enzyme has a selenoprotein-independent function, and whether the gene is actually translated into a protein in Hymenoptera. Here, we report that SELD/SPS1 is present as a protein in the accessory glands of males of the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior. It appears to be more abundant in the glands of winged disperser males than in those of wingless, local fighter males. Mating increases the lifespan and fecundity of queens in C. obscurior, and mating with winged males has a stronger effect on queen fitness than mating with a wingless male. SELD/SPS 1 has been suggested to play an important role in oxidative stress defense, and might therefore be involved in the life-prolonging effect of mating. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita eGarcía-Calderón

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2 in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L .japonicus plants in response to stress.

  9. Dynamic QTL analysis of protein content and glutamine synthetase activity in recombinant inbred wheat lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H M; Liang, H; Li, Z; Tang, Z X; Fu, S L; Geng, Y Y; Yan, B J; Ren, Z L

    2015-07-31

    Protein content (PC) is a crucial factor that determines the end-use and nutritional quality of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Glutamine synthetase (GS), which is a major participant in nitrogen metabolism, can convert inorganic nitrogen into organic nitrogen. Although many studies have been conducted on PC and GS, a dynamic analysis of all of the filling stages has not been conducted. Therefore, 115 F9-10 recombinant inbred wheat lines of 'R131/R142' were used to analyze PC and GS activity during different developmental stages, using the conditional quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping method. Twenty-two and six conditional QTL were detected for PC and GS activily, respectively. More QTL in leaf PC were detected during the early filling stages than in the later filling stages. Grain PC QTL displayed different dynamic variations to leaf PC QTL during the entire grain-filling stages. All of the QTL were expressed differently over time, and nine conditional QTL were detected across two filling stages. QTL with similar functions may have tended to group in specific locales. This study provides dynamic genetic information on protein accumulation during grain-filling stages.

  10. 2'-phosphodiesterase and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activities in the lowest metazoans, sponge [porifera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saby, Emilie; Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Justesen, Just

    2009-01-01

    Sponges [porifera], the most ancient metazoans, contain modules related to the vertebrate immune system, including the 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS). The components of the antiviral 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2–5A) system (OAS, 2′-Phosphodiesterase (2′-PDE) and RNAse L) of vertebrates have...... not all been identified in sponges. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that in addition to the OAS activity, sponges possess a 2′-PDE activity, which highlights the probable existence of a premature 2–5A system. Indeed, Suberites domuncula and Crella elegans exhibited this 2–5A degrading activity....... Upon this finding, two out of three elements forming the 2–5A system have been found in sponges, only a endoribonuclease, RNAse L or similar, has to be found. We suspect the existence of a complex immune system in sponges, besides the self/non-self recognition system and the use of phagocytosis...

  11. Expression of asparagine synthetase genes in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) under various environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Rodríguez, María Begoña; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael; Maldonado, José-María

    2007-01-01

    In sunflower, asparagine synthetase (AS; EC 6.3.5.4) is encoded by a small family of three genes (HAS1, HAS1.1 and HAS2) that are differentially regulated by light, carbon and nitrogen availability. In this study, the response of each gene to various stress conditions was examined by Northern analysis with gene-specific probes in leaves and roots. The expression of HAS1 and HAS1.1 genes was induced by osmotic stress (300 mM mannitol), salt stress (150 mM NaCl), and heavy-metal stress (20 microM CuSO(4)), more in roots than in leaves. The expression of HAS2 was not significantly altered by stress treatments. The positive response of HAS1 and HAS1.1 genes to osmotic and salt stresses occurred in the light, in contrast to that previously found in unstressed plants. Measurements of sucrose and total free amino acid contents in leaves and roots indicate that the expression of root HAS1 and HAS1.1 genes in stressed plants is not under metabolic control by the intracellular C/N ratio, suggesting the involvement of some specific stress factor(s). Growth of plants at 40 degrees C for 12h negatively affected the expression of HAS1 and HAS1.1 but not that of HAS2.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru; Abramchik, Yu. A., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru; Zhukhlistova, N. E., E-mail: ugama@yandex.ru; Kuranova, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6{sub 3}22 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  13. Nuclear glutamine synthetase evolution in Nicotiana: phylogenetics and the origins of allotetraploid and homoploid (diploid) hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, James J; Kelly, Laura J; Leitch, Andrew R; Knapp, Sandra; Chase, Mark W

    2010-04-01

    Interspecies relationships in Nicotiana (Solanaceae) are complex because 40 species are diploid (two sets of chromosomes) and 35 species are allotetraploid (four sets of chromosomes, two from each progenitor diploid species). We sequenced a fragment (containing four introns) of the nuclear gene 'chloroplast-expressed glutamine synthetase' (ncpGS) in 65 species of Nicotiana. Here we present the first phylogenetic analysis based on a low-copy nuclear gene for this well studied and important genus. Diploid species have a single-copy of ncpGS, and allotetraploids as expected have two homeologous copies, each derived from their progenitor diploid. Results were particularly useful for determining the paternal lineage of previously enigmatic taxa (for which our previous analyses had revealed only the maternal progenitors). In particular, we were able to shed light on the origins of the two oldest and largest allotetraploid sections, N. sects. Suaveolentes and Repandae. All homeologues have an intact reading frame and apparently similar rates of divergence, suggesting both remain functional. Difficulties in fitting certain diploid species into the sectional classification of Nicotiana on morphological grounds, coupled with discordance between the ncpGS data and previous trees (i.e. plastid, nuclear ribosomal DNA), indicate a number of homoploid (diploid) hybrids in the genus. We have evidence for Nicotiana glutinosa and Nicotiana linearis being of hybrid origin and patterns of intra-allelic recombination also indicate the possibility of reticulate origins for other diploid species. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Drosophila selenophosphate synthetase 1 regulates vitamin B6 metabolism: prediction and confirmation

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    Park Jin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are two selenophosphate synthetases (SPSs in higher eukaryotes, SPS1 and SPS2. Of these two isotypes, only SPS2 catalyzes selenophosphate synthesis. Although SPS1 does not contain selenophosphate synthesis activity, it was found to be essential for cell growth and embryogenesis in Drosophila. The function of SPS1, however, has not been elucidated. Results Differentially expressed genes in Drosophila SL2 cells were identified using two-way analysis of variance methods and clustered according to their temporal expression pattern. Gene ontology analysis was performed against differentially expressed genes and gene ontology terms related to vitamin B6 biosynthesis were found to be significantly affected at the early stage at which megamitochondria were not formed (day 3 after SPS1 knockdown. Interestingly, genes related to defense and amino acid metabolism were affected at a later stage (day 5 following knockdown. Levels of pyridoxal phosphate, an active form of vitamin B6, were decreased by SPS1 knockdown. Treatment of SL2 cells with an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate synthesis resulted in both a similar pattern of expression as that found by SPS1 knockdown and the formation of megamitochondria, the major phenotypic change observed by SPS1 knockdown. Conclusions These results indicate that SPS1 regulates vitamin B6 synthesis, which in turn impacts various cellular systems such as amino acid metabolism, defense and other important metabolic activities.

  15. Overexpression of a glutamine synthetase gene affects growth and development in sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urriola, Jazmina; Rathore, Keerti S

    2015-06-01

    Nitrogen is a primary macronutrient in plants, and nitrogen fertilizers play a critical role in crop production and yield. In this study, we investigated the effects of overexpressing a glutamine synthetase (GS) gene on nitrogen metabolism, and plant growth and development in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L., Moench). GS catalyzes the ATP dependent reaction between ammonia and glutamate to produce glutamine. A 1,071 bp long coding sequence of a sorghum cytosolic GS gene (Gln1) under the control of the maize ubiquitin (Ubq) promoter was introduced into sorghum immature embryos by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Progeny of the transformants exhibited higher accumulation of the Gln1 transcripts and up to 2.2-fold higher GS activity compared to the non-transgenic controls. When grown under optimal nitrogen conditions, these Gln1 transgenic lines showed greater tillering and up to 2.1-fold increase in shoot vegetative biomass. Interestingly, even under greenhouse conditions, we observed a seasonal component to both these parameters and the grain yield. Our results, showing that the growth and development of sorghum Gln1 transformants are also affected by N availability and other environmental factors, suggest complexity of the relationship between GS activity and plant growth and development. A better understanding of other control points and the ability to manipulate these will be needed to utilize the transgenic technology to improve nitrogen use efficiency of crop plants.

  16. Engineering a promiscuous pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase by a high throughput FACS screen

    KAUST Repository

    Hohl, Adrian

    2017-12-06

    The Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNAPyl are used to facilitate the incorporation of non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) into the genetic code of bacterial and eukaryotic cells by orthogonally reassigning the amber codon. Currently, the incorporation of new ncAAs requires a cumbersome engineering process composed of several positive and negative selection rounds to select the appropriate PylRS/tRNAPyl pair. Our fast and sensitive engineering approach required only a single FACS selection round to identify 110 orthogonal PylRS variants for the aminoacylation of 20 ncAAs. Pocket-substrate relationship from these variants led to the design of a highly promiscuous PylRS (HpRS), which catalyzed the aminoacylation of 31 structurally diverse lysine derivatives bearing clickable, fluorinated, fluorescent, and biotinylated entities. The high speed and sensitivity of our approach provides a competitive alternative to existing screening methodologies, and delivers insights into the complex PylRS-substrate interactions to facilitate the generation of additional promiscuous variants.

  17. Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases: Identifying the cryptic gene clusters and decoding the natural product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mangal; Chaudhary, Sandeep; Sareen, Dipti

    2017-03-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) present in bacteria and fungi are the major multi-modular enzyme complexes which synthesize secondary metabolites like the pharmacologically important antibiotics and siderophores. Each of the multiple modules of an NRPS activates a different amino or aryl acid, followed by their condensation to synthesize a linear or cyclic natural product. The studies on NRPS domains, the knowledge of their gene cluster architecture and tailoring enzymes have helped in the in silico genetic screening of the ever-expanding sequenced microbial genomic data for the identification of novel NRPS/PKS clusters and thus deciphering novel non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs). Adenylation domain is an integral part of the NRPSs and is the substrate selecting unit for the final assembled NRP. In some cases, it also requires a small protein, the MbtH homolog, for its optimum activity. The presence of putative adenylation domain and MbtH homologs in a sequenced genome can help identify the novel secondary metabolite producers. The role of the adenylation domain in the NRPS gene clusters and its characterization as a tool for the discovery of novel cryptic NRPS gene clusters are discussed.

  18. Effect of bromochloromethane and fumarate on phylogenetic diversity of the formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase gene in bovine rumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumori, Makoto; Matsui, Hiroki; Tajima, Kiyoshi; Shinkai, Takumi; Takenaka, Akio; Denman, Stuart E; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2014-01-01

    Effect of the methane inhibitor, bromochloromethane (BCM) and dietary substrate, fumarate, on microbial community structure of acetogen bacteria in the bovine rumen was investigated through analysis of the formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase gene (fhs). The fhs sequences obtained from BCM-untreated, BCM-treated, fumarate-untreated and fumarate-treated bovine rumen were categorized into homoacetogens and nonhomoacetogenic bacteria by homoacetogen similarity scores. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that most of the fhs sequences categorized into homoacetogens were divided into nine clusters, which were in close agreement with a result shown in a self-organizing map. The diversity of the fhs sequences from the BCM-treated rumen was significantly different from those from BCM-non-treated rumen. Principal component analysis also showed that addition of BCM to the rumen altered the population structure of acetogenic bacteria significantly but the effect of fumarate was comparatively minor. These results indicate that BCM affects diversity of actogens in the bovine rumen, and changes in acetogenic community structure in response to methane inhibitors may be caused by different mechanisms. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  19. Glutamine Synthetase activity fuels nucleotide biosynthesis and supports growth of glutamine-restricted glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardito, Saverio; Oudin, Anaïs; Ahmed, Shafiq U.; Fack, Fred; Keunen, Olivier; Zheng, Liang; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Øystein; Weinstock, Adam; Wagner, Allon; Lindsay, Susan L.; Hock, Andreas K.; Barnett, Susan C.; Ruppin, Eytan; Mørkve, Svein Harald; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Chalmers, Anthony J.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Niclou, Simone P.; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    L-Glutamine (Gln) functions physiologically to balance tissue requirements of carbon and nitrogen. It has been proposed that in cancer cells undergoing aerobic glycolysis, accelerated anabolism is sustained by Gln-derived carbons, which replenish the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (anaplerosis). However, it is shown here that in glioblastoma (GBM) cells, almost half of the Gln-derived glutamate (Glu) is secreted and does not enter the TCA cycle and, that inhibiting glutaminolysis does not affect proliferation. Moreover, Gln-starved cells are not rescued by TCA cycle replenishment. Instead, the conversion of Glu to Gln by Glutamine Synthetase (GS) (cataplerosis) confers Gln prototrophy, and fuels de novo purine biosynthesis. In both orthotopic GBM models and in patients, 13C-glucose tracing showed that GS produces Gln from TCA cycle-derived carbons. Finally, while it is contributed only marginally by the circulation, the Gln required for the growth of GBM tumours is either autonomously synthesized by GS-positive glioma cells, or supplied by astrocytes. PMID:26595383

  20. A non-canonical peptide synthetase adenylates 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid for auriculamide biosynthesis

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    Daniel Braga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Auriculamide is the first natural product known from the predatory bacterium Herpetosiphon aurantiacus. It is composed of three unusual building blocks, including the non-proteinogenic amino acid 3-chloro-L-tyrosine, the α-hydroxy acid L-isoleucic acid, and a methylmalonyl-CoA-derived ethane unit. A candidate genetic locus for auriculamide biosynthesis was identified and encodes four enzymes. Among them, the non-canonical 199 kDa four-domain nonribosomal peptide synthetase, AulA, is extraordinary in that it features two consecutive adenylation domains. Here, we describe the functional characterization of the recombinantly produced AulA. The observed activation of 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid by the enzyme supports the hypothesis that it participates in the biosynthesis of auriculamide. An artificially truncated version of AulA that lacks the first adenylation domain activated this substrate like the full-length enzyme which shows that the first adenylation domain is dispensable. Additionally, we provide evidence that the enzyme tolerates structural variation of the substrate. α-Carbon substituents significantly affected the substrate turnover. While all tested aliphatic α-keto acids were accepted by the enzyme and minor differences in chain size and branches did not interfere with the enzymatic activity, molecules with methylene α-carbons led to low turnover. Such enzymatic plasticity is an important attribute to help in the perpetual search for novel molecules and to access a greater structural diversity by mutasynthesis.

  1. Characterization of a Bacillus subtilis surfactin synthetase knockout and antimicrobial activity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongxia; Qu, Xiaoxu; Gao, Ling; Zhao, Shengming; Lu, Zhaoxin; Zhang, Chong; Bie, Xiaomei

    2016-11-10

    Gene knockout is an important approach to improve the production of antimicrobial compounds. B. subtilis PB2-LS10, derived from B. subtilis PB2-L by a surfactin synthetase (srf) genes knockout, exhibits stronger inhibitory action than its parental strain against all tested pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The antimicrobial extracts produced by B. subtilis PB2-L and B. subtilis PB2-LS10 respectively were characterized by the high-resolution LC-ESI-MS. To provide further insight into the distinct antimicrobial activities, we investigated the impact of the srf genes deletion on the growth and gene transcriptional profile of the strains. The mutant strain grew quickly and reached stationary phase 2h earlier than the wild-type. Prominent expression changes in the modified strain involved genes that were essential to metabolic pathways and processes. Genes related to amino acid transport, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and protein export were up-regulated in strain PB2-LS10. However, amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and fatty acid metabolism were repressed. Because of its excellent antimicrobial activity, strain PB2-LS10 has potential for use in food preservation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Nitric oxide synthetase and carbon monoxide decrease in the penile corpus cavernous of hyper homocysteine rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing-Jun; Cao, Hui-Feng; Zhang, Dong-Sheng; Yang, Yu-Qi; Qin, Wen-Bo; Hu, Cun-Li; Hao, Peng

    2008-08-01

    To detect the levels of nitric oxide synthetase (NOS) and carbon monoxide (CO) in the penile corpus cavernous of adult male Wistar rats with high homocysteine (Hhcy) and to explore the relationship of NOS and CO levels with erectile dysfunction. Twenty Wistar rats were equally and randomly divided into a control and an Hhcy group and fed on normal diet and normal diet with 3.0% methionine respectively. Four weeks later, the levels of NOS and CO in the penile corpus cavernous were detected by ultraviolet spectrophotometry and that of serum homocysteine by the cycle enzyme method. Compared with the control group, the levels of NOS and CO in the penile corpus cavernous were significantly lower in the Hhcy group, (6.45 +/- 1.12) nmol/(g x min) vs (10.77 +/- 0.60) nmol/(g x min) and (10.60 +/- 0.92) micromol/L vs (13.36 +/- 0.44) micromol/L, while that of homocysteine was significantly higher, (22.32 +/- 1.65) micromol/L) vs (4.90 +/- 1.73) micromol/L. Four-week diet with methionine can cause Hhcy and significantly decreased levels of NOS and CO in the penile corpus cavernous in Wistar rats. Hhcy is an independent risk factor of erectile dysfunction.

  3. Pristinamycin I biosynthesis in Streptomyces pristinaespiralis: molecular characterization of the first two structural peptide synthetase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Crécy-Lagard, V; Blanc, V; Gil, P; Naudin, L; Lorenzon, S; Famechon, A; Bamas-Jacques, N; Crouzet, J; Thibaut, D

    1997-01-01

    Two genes involved in the biosynthesis of the depsipeptide antibiotics pristinamycins I (PI) produced by Streptomyces pristinaespiralis were cloned and sequenced. The 1.7-kb snbA gene encodes a 3-hydroxypicolinic acid:AMP ligase, and the 7.7-kb snbC gene encodes PI synthetase 2, responsible for incorporating L-threonine and L-aminobutyric acid in the PI macrocycle. snbA and snbC, which encode the two first structural enzymes of PI synthesis, are not contiguous. Both genes are located in PI-specific transcriptional units, as disruption of one gene or the other led to PI-deficient strains producing normal levels of the polyunsaturated macrolactone antibiotic pristinamycin II, also produced by S. pristinaespiralis. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences showed that the SnbA protein is a member of the adenylate-forming enzyme superfamily and that the SnbC protein contains two amino acid-incorporating modules and a C-terminal epimerization domain. A model for the initiation of PI synthesis analogous to the established model of initiation of fatty acid synthesis is proposed. PMID:9006024

  4. Functional identification of glutamate cysteine ligase and glutathione synthetase in the marine yeast Rhodosporidium diobovatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Min; Wang, Fengjuan; Tian, Liuying; Tang, Hui; Zhang, Liping

    2018-02-01

    Glutathione (GSH) fulfills a variety of metabolic functions, participates in oxidative stress response, and defends against toxic actions of heavy metals and xenobiotics. In this study, GSH was detected in Rhodosporidium diobovatum by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Then, two novel enzymes from R. diobovatum were characterized that convert glutamate, cysteine, and glycine into GSH. Based on reverse transcription PCR, we obtained the glutathione synthetase gene ( GSH2), 1866 bp, coding for a 56.6-kDa protein, and the glutamate cysteine ligase gene ( GSH1), 2469 bp, coding for a 90.5-kDa protein. The role of GSH1 and GSH2 for the biosynthesis of GSH in the marine yeast R. diobovatum was determined by deletions using the CRISPR-Cas9 nuclease system and enzymatic activity. These results also showed that GSH1 and GSH2 were involved in the production of GSH and are thus being potentially useful to engineer GSH pathways. Alternatively, pET- GSH constructed using vitro recombination could be used to detect the function of genes related to GSH biosynthesis. Finally, the fermentation parameters determined in the present study provide a reference for industrial GSH production in R. diobovatum.

  5. Phylogenetic Study of Polyketide Synthases and Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases Involved in the Biosynthesis of Mycotoxins

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    Massimo Ferrara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyketide synthase (PKSs and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPSs are large multimodular enzymes involved in biosynthesis of polyketide and peptide toxins produced by fungi. Furthermore, hybrid enzymes, in which a reducing PKS region is fused to a single NRPS module, are also responsible of the synthesis of peptide-polyketide metabolites in fungi. The genes encoding for PKSs and NRPSs have been exposed to complex evolutionary mechanisms, which have determined the great number and diversity of metabolites. In this study, we considered the most important polyketide and peptide mycotoxins and, for the first time, a phylogenetic analysis of both PKSs and NRPSs involved in their biosynthesis was assessed using two domains for each enzyme: β-ketosynthase (KS and acyl-transferase (AT for PKSs; adenylation (A and condensation (C for NRPSs. The analysis of both KS and AT domains confirmed the differentiation of the three classes of highly, partially and non-reducing PKSs. Hybrid PKS-NRPSs involved in mycotoxins biosynthesis grouped together in the phylogenetic trees of all the domains analyzed. For most mycotoxins, the corresponding biosynthetic enzymes from distinct fungal species grouped together, except for PKS and NRPS involved in ochratoxin A biosynthesis, for which an unlike process of evolution could be hypothesized in different species.

  6. Role of tRNAPro in pretransfer editing of alanine by prolyl-tRNA synthetase

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    Boyarshin K. S.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To characterize the process of tRNA-dependent pretransfer edi- ting of alanine by prolyl-tRNA synthetase of bacteria Enterococcus faecalis (ProRSEf. Methods. Velocity of the editing processes in vitro was determined by ATP hydrolysis by ProRSEf. Pretransfer and posttransfer editing were experimentally separated by site-directed mutagenesis. Results. tRNA-dependent pretransfer editing is characterized by three-fold larger velocity then tRNA-independent editing. Effectivity of the process depends on the presence of 2'-hydroxyle group of A76 tRNAPro. In the absence of tRNAPro selective release of alanyl-AMP occurs simultaneously with tRNA-independent pretransfer editing. Released alanyl-AMP can be re-bound and hydrolyzed. Conclusions. tRNA-dependent pretransfer editing of alanine by ProRSEf is the catalytic mechanism, mediated by 2'-hydroxyl group of A76 tRNAPro. In the absence of tRNAPro tRNA-independent pretransfer editing and selective release of alanyl-AMP occur.

  7. Two very long chain fatty acid acyl-CoA synthetase genes, acs-20 and acs-22, have roles in the cuticle surface barrier in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Eriko Kage-Nakadai

    Full Text Available In multicellular organisms, the surface barrier is essential for maintaining the internal environment. In mammals, the barrier is the stratum corneum. Fatty acid transport protein 4 (FATP4 is a key factor involved in forming the stratum corneum barrier. Mice lacking Fatp4 display early neonatal lethality with features such as tight, thick, and shiny skin, and a defective skin barrier. These symptoms are strikingly similar to those of a human skin disease called restrictive dermopathy. FATP4 is a member of the FATP family that possesses acyl-CoA synthetase activity for very long chain fatty acids. How Fatp4 contributes to skin barrier function, however, remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we characterized two Caenorhabditis elegans genes, acs-20 and acs-22, that are homologous to mammalian FATPs. Animals with mutant acs-20 exhibited defects in the cuticle barrier, which normally prevents the penetration of small molecules. acs-20 mutant animals also exhibited abnormalities in the cuticle structure, but not in epidermal cell fate or cell integrity. The acs-22 mutants rarely showed a barrier defect, whereas acs-20;acs-22 double mutants had severely disrupted barrier function. Moreover, the barrier defects of acs-20 and acs-20;acs-22 mutants were rescued by acs-20, acs-22, or human Fatp4 transgenes. We further demonstrated that the incorporation of exogenous very long chain fatty acids into sphingomyelin was reduced in acs-20 and acs-22 mutants. These findings indicate that C. elegans Fatp4 homologue(s have a crucial role in the surface barrier function and this model might be useful for studying the fundamental molecular mechanisms underlying human skin barrier and relevant diseases.

  8. Cardiac abnormalities in diabetic patients with mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA {sup Leu(UUR)}Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Hiroshi [Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan); Shiotani, Hideyuki

    1999-11-01

    An A-to-G transition at position 3243 of the mitochondrial DNA is known to be a pathogenic factor for mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), diabetes and cardiomyopathy. This mutation causes dysfunction of the central nervous system in MELAS. Because the heart, as well as the brain and nervous system, is highly dependent on the energy produced by mitochondrial oxidation, these tissues are more vulnerable to mitochondrial defects. Cardiac abnormalities were assessed in 10 diabetic patients associated with this mutation using echocardiography and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy, and compared with 19 diabetic patients without the mutation. Duration of diabetes, therapy, control of blood glucose and diabetic complications, such as diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, were not different between the 2 groups. Diabetic patients with the mutation had a significantly thicker interventricular septum (16.8{+-}3.7 vs 11.0{+-}1.6 mm, p<0.001) than those without the mutation. Fractional shortening was lower in diabetic patients with the mutation than those without it (30.7{+-}7.0 vs 42.5{+-}6.6, p<0.001). MIBG uptake on the delayed MIBG image was significantly lower in diabetic patients with the mutation than in those without the mutation (mean value of the heart to mediastinum ratio: 1.6{+-}0.2 vs 2.0{+-}0.4, p>0.05). In conclusion, left ventricular hypertrophy with or without abnormal wall motion and severely reduced MIBG uptake may be characteristic in diabetic patients with a mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA {sup Leu(UUR)} gene. (author)

  9. Hydrogenosomal succinyl-CoA synthetase from the rumen-dwelling fungus Neocallimastix patriciarum; an energy-producing enzyme of mitochondrial origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacks, Joel B; Dyal, Patricia L; Embley, T Martin; van der Giezen, Mark

    2006-05-24

    Hydrogenosomes are hydrogen-producing organelles that are related to mitochondria and found in a variety of evolutionarily unrelated anaerobic microbial eukaryotes. Similar to classic mitochondria, hydrogenosomes contain the enzyme catalyzing the only reaction of the citric acid cycle directly producing energy; succinyl-CoA synthetase. We have isolated and characterized the genes encoding both subunits of this enzyme from the anaerobic chytrid fungus Neocallimastix patriciarum, a model organism in hydrogenosome research. Both subunits contain all characteristic features of this enzyme, including predicted hydrogenosomal targeting signals. Phylogenetic analyses of succinyl-CoA synthetase clearly indicate its mitochondrial ancestry, both by affiliation with mitochondrially localized fungal homologues and by the sisterhood of the eukaryotic succinyl-CoA synthetase clade with alpha-proteobacteria. Our analyses of the Trichomonas vaginalis SCS sequences also confirmed the mitochondrial affiliation of these hydrogenosomal enzymes, in contrast to previous results. While both hydrogenosomal and mitochondrial succinyl-CoA synthetase homologues have been identified, no succinyl-CoA synthetase proteins were identifiable in taxa possessing another mitochondrially derived organelle, the mitosome. Our analyses further confirm the mitochondrial ancestry of the Neocallimastix hydrogenosome and sheds light upon the stepwise process by which mitochondria evolve into alternate forms of the organelle.

  10. MD SIMULATION STUDIES TO INVESTIGATE ISO-ENERGETIC CONFORMATIONAL BEHAVIOUR OF MODIFIED NUCLEOSIDES M2G AND M22G PRESENT IN tRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit S Bavi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Modified nucleic acid bases are most commonly found in tRNA. These may contain modifications from simple methylation to addition of bulky groups. Methylation of the four canonical nucleotide bases at a wide variety of positions is particularly prominent among the known modification. Methylation of N2 group of guanine is a relatively common modification in tRNA and rRNA. N2-methylguanosine (m2G is the second most often encountered nucleoside in E. coli tRNAs. N2, N2-dimethylguanosine (m22G is found in the majority of eukaryotic tRNAs and involved in forming base pair interactions with adjacent bases. Hence, in order to understand the structural significance of these methylated nucleic acid bases we have carried out molecular dynamics simulation to see the salvation effect. The results obtained shows iso-energetic conformational behaviors for m2G and m22G. The simulation trajectory of m2G shows regular periodical fluctuations suggesting that m2G is equally stable as either s-cis or s-trans rotamers. The two rotamers of m2G may interact canonically or non-canonically with opposite base as s-trans m2G26:C/A/U44 and s-cis m2G26:A/U44. The free rotations around the C-N bond could be the possible reason for these iso-energetic conformations. Dimethylation of G has almost no influence on base pairing with either A or U. Thus, these results reveal that modified nucleosides m2G and m22G may play an important role to prevent tRNA from adopting the unusual mitochondrial like conformation.

  11. Prevalence of the A1555G (12S rRNA and tRNA Ser(UCN mitochondrial mutations in hearing-impaired Brazilian patients

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    Abreu-Silva R.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial mutations are responsible for at least 1% of the cases of hereditary deafness, but the contribution of each mutation has not yet been defined in African-derived or native American genetic backgrounds. A total of 203 unselected hearing-impaired patients were screened for the presence of the mitochondrial mutation A1555G in the 12S rRNA gene and mutations in the tRNA Ser(UCN gene in order to assess their frequency in the ethnically admixed Brazilian population. We found four individuals with A1555G mutation (2%, which is a frequency similar to those reported for European-derived populations in unselected samples. On the other hand, complete sequencing of the tRNA Ser(UCN did not reveal reported pathogenic substitutions, namely A7445G, 7472insC, T7510C, or T7511C. Instead, other rare substitutions were found such as T1291C, A7569G, and G7444A. To evaluate the significance of these findings, 110 "European-Brazilians" and 190 "African-Brazilians" unrelated hearing controls were screened. The T1291C, A7569G and G7444A substitutions were each found in about 1% (2/190 of individuals of African ancestry, suggesting that they are probably polymorphic. Our results indicate that screening for the A1555G mutation is recommended among all Brazilian deaf patients, while testing for mutations in the tRNA Ser(UCN gene should be considered only when other frequent deafness-causing mutations have been excluded or in the presence of a maternal transmission pattern.

  12. Prevalence of the A1555G (12S rRNA and tRNA Ser(UCN mitochondrial mutations in hearing-impaired Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Abreu-Silva

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial mutations are responsible for at least 1% of the cases of hereditary deafness, but the contribution of each mutation has not yet been defined in African-derived or native American genetic backgrounds. A total of 203 unselected hearing-impaired patients were screened for the presence of the mitochondrial mutation A1555G in the 12S rRNA gene and mutations in the tRNA Ser(UCN gene in order to assess their frequency in the ethnically admixed Brazilian population. We found four individuals with A1555G mutation (2%, which is a frequency similar to those reported for European-derived populations in unselected samples. On the other hand, complete sequencing of the tRNA Ser(UCN did not reveal reported pathogenic substitutions, namely A7445G, 7472insC, T7510C, or T7511C. Instead, other rare substitutions were found such as T1291C, A7569G, and G7444A. To evaluate the significance of these findings, 110 "European-Brazilians" and 190 "African-Brazilians" unrelated hearing controls were screened. The T1291C, A7569G and G7444A substitutions were each found in about 1% (2/190 of individuals of African ancestry, suggesting that they are probably polymorphic. Our results indicate that screening for the A1555G mutation is recommended among all Brazilian deaf patients, while testing for mutations in the tRNA Ser(UCN gene should be considered only when other frequent deafness-causing mutations have been excluded or in the presence of a maternal transmission pattern.

  13. Isolation and Immunochemical Characterization of Plant Glutamine Synthetase in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Nodules 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groat, R. Gene; Schrader, Larry E.

    1982-01-01

    Host plant glutamine synthetase (GS) has been purified 100-fold from N2-fixing alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) nodules by a new procedure involving preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as a final step. An SDS-polypeptide fraction corresponding to plant GS was identified and consisted of two major polypeptides of 40,000 to 45,000 molecular weight. Antibodies to the SDS-polypeptide fraction were raised in mice by intraperitoneal injection, and antisera were collected as ascitic fluid. Crude extracts of soluble protein from the plant fraction of nodules were resolved by SDS-PAGE and then subjected to electrophoresis in the second dimension into antibody-containing agarose gel. A single immunochemically active protein species was observed using this crossed immunoelectrophoresis method, even though both major GS SDS-polypeptides were apparently resolved in the first (SDS-PAGE) dimension. Plant GS protein in crude nodule extracts was quantitated immunochemically by comparison with immunoprecipitin arcs of similarly treated amounts of pure antigen. Using this technique, it was determined that plant GS was present at 150 micrograms per gram fresh weight or 1.2% of total plant soluble protein in N2-fixing alfalfa nodules. Results suggest that alfalfa nodule plant GS consists of two major subunit polypeptides, but only a single immunochemically active native protein was observed. The crossed immunoelectrophoresis procedure described here should be generally applicable for immunochemical detection of lower abundance components of crude plant extracts. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16662757

  14. Expression and specific activities of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 in chronic hypoxic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uly A. Nikmah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urea biosynthesis is a very important process in the liver which needs ATP, CO2 and functional mitochondria or aerobic condition. Liver can adapt to hypoxic condition, generally and locally. This study aimed to analyze the effect of chronic hypoxia on liver urea biosynthesis as indicated by the level and specific activity of mRNA of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1, a key enzyme in urea biosynthesis in hypoxic rats.Methods: 20 male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed in hypoxic chamber supplied by a mixture of 10% O2 and 90% N2. Five rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after exposure. Liver homogenates were analyzed for HIF-1 (hypoxia inducible factor-1 by ELISA, CPS1 mRNA by real time RT-PCR and CPS1 enzymatic specific activities by Pierson method. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test and Pearson correlation.Results: The HIF-1 in liver increased significantly, as well as CPS1 mRNA and CPS1 enzymatic activities (p<0.05. There was a strong correlation (r=0.618; p<0.01 between the level of CPS1 mRNA and CPS1 enzymatic activities, moderate correlation between HIF-1 and CPS1 mRNA (r=0.419; p<0.05 but no correlation between HIF-1 and CPS1 enzymatic activities. The study indicated that urea biosynthesis in liver was affected by hypoxia and partially under HIF-1 regulation. The study also found increase of urea and NH3 biosynthesis related to proteolysis as indicated by the decrease of total body weight and liver weight.Conclusion: There was an increase in the expression and specific activities of CPS1 in urea biosynthesis as a result of increasing proteolysis  in chronic hypoxic condition.

  15. Identification of Novel Chemical Scaffolds Inhibiting Trypanothione Synthetase from Pathogenic Trypanosomatids.

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    Benítez, Diego; Medeiros, Andrea; Fiestas, Lucía; Panozzo-Zenere, Esteban A; Maiwald, Franziska; Prousis, Kyriakos C; Roussaki, Marina; Calogeropoulou, Theodora; Detsi, Anastasia; Jaeger, Timo; Šarlauskas, Jonas; Peterlin Mašič, Lucíja; Kunick, Conrad; Labadie, Guillermo R; Flohé, Leopold; Comini, Marcelo A

    2016-04-01

    The search for novel chemical entities targeting essential and parasite-specific pathways is considered a priority for neglected diseases such as trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis. The thiol-dependent redox metabolism of trypanosomatids relies on bis-glutathionylspermidine [trypanothione, T(SH)2], a low molecular mass cosubstrate absent in the host. In pathogenic trypanosomatids, a single enzyme, trypanothione synthetase (TryS), catalyzes trypanothione biosynthesis, which is indispensable for parasite survival. Thus, TryS qualifies as an attractive drug target candidate. A library composed of 144 compounds from 7 different families and several singletons was screened against TryS from three major pathogen species (Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania infantum). The screening conditions were adjusted to the TryS´ kinetic parameters and intracellular concentration of substrates corresponding to each trypanosomatid species, and/or to avoid assay interference. The screening assay yielded suitable Z' and signal to noise values (≥0.85 and ~3.5, respectively), and high intra-assay reproducibility. Several novel chemical scaffolds were identified as low μM and selective tri-tryp TryS inhibitors. Compounds displaying multi-TryS inhibition (N,N'-bis(3,4-substituted-benzyl) diamine derivatives) and an N5-substituted paullone (MOL2008) halted the proliferation of infective Trypanosoma brucei (EC50 in the nM range) and Leishmania infantum promastigotes (EC50 = 12 μM), respectively. A bis-benzyl diamine derivative and MOL2008 depleted intracellular trypanothione in treated parasites, which confirmed the on-target activity of these compounds. Novel molecular scaffolds with on-target mode of action were identified as hit candidates for TryS inhibition. Due to the remarkable species-specificity exhibited by tri-tryp TryS towards the compounds, future optimization and screening campaigns should aim at designing and detecting, respectively, more potent and broad

  16. Identification of Novel Chemical Scaffolds Inhibiting Trypanothione Synthetase from Pathogenic Trypanosomatids.

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    Diego Benítez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The search for novel chemical entities targeting essential and parasite-specific pathways is considered a priority for neglected diseases such as trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis. The thiol-dependent redox metabolism of trypanosomatids relies on bis-glutathionylspermidine [trypanothione, T(SH2], a low molecular mass cosubstrate absent in the host. In pathogenic trypanosomatids, a single enzyme, trypanothione synthetase (TryS, catalyzes trypanothione biosynthesis, which is indispensable for parasite survival. Thus, TryS qualifies as an attractive drug target candidate.A library composed of 144 compounds from 7 different families and several singletons was screened against TryS from three major pathogen species (Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania infantum. The screening conditions were adjusted to the TryS´ kinetic parameters and intracellular concentration of substrates corresponding to each trypanosomatid species, and/or to avoid assay interference. The screening assay yielded suitable Z' and signal to noise values (≥0.85 and ~3.5, respectively, and high intra-assay reproducibility. Several novel chemical scaffolds were identified as low μM and selective tri-tryp TryS inhibitors. Compounds displaying multi-TryS inhibition (N,N'-bis(3,4-substituted-benzyl diamine derivatives and an N5-substituted paullone (MOL2008 halted the proliferation of infective Trypanosoma brucei (EC50 in the nM range and Leishmania infantum promastigotes (EC50 = 12 μM, respectively. A bis-benzyl diamine derivative and MOL2008 depleted intracellular trypanothione in treated parasites, which confirmed the on-target activity of these compounds.Novel molecular scaffolds with on-target mode of action were identified as hit candidates for TryS inhibition. Due to the remarkable species-specificity exhibited by tri-tryp TryS towards the compounds, future optimization and screening campaigns should aim at designing and detecting, respectively, more potent

  17. Evolution of selenophosphate synthetases: emergence and relocation of function through independent duplications and recurrent subfunctionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Marco; Santesmasses, Didac; Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador; Mateo, Andrea; Arnan, Carme; Johnson, Rory; D'Aniello, Salvatore; Yim, Sun Hee; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Serras, Florenci; Corominas, Montserrat; Gabaldón, Toni; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-09-01

    Selenoproteins are proteins that incorporate selenocysteine (Sec), a nonstandard amino acid encoded by UGA, normally a stop codon. Sec synthesis requires the enzyme Selenophosphate synthetase (SPS or SelD), conserved in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes encoding selenoproteins. Here, we study the evolutionary history of SPS genes, providing a map of selenoprotein function spanning the whole tree of life. SPS is itself a selenoprotein in many species, although functionally equivalent homologs that replace the Sec site with cysteine (Cys) are common. Many metazoans, however, possess SPS genes with substitutions other than Sec or Cys (collectively referred to as SPS1). Using complementation assays in fly mutants, we show that these genes share a common function, which appears to be distinct from the synthesis of selenophosphate carried out by the Sec- and Cys- SPS genes (termed SPS2), and unrelated to Sec synthesis. We show here that SPS1 genes originated through a number of independent gene duplications from an ancestral metazoan selenoprotein SPS2 gene that most likely already carried the SPS1 function. Thus, in SPS genes, parallel duplications and subsequent convergent subfunctionalization have resulted in the segregation to different loci of functions initially carried by a single gene. This evolutionary history constitutes a remarkable example of emergence and evolution of gene function, which we have been able to trace thanks to the singular features of SPS genes, wherein the amino acid at a single site determines unequivocally protein function and is intertwined to the evolutionary fate of the entire selenoproteome. © 2015 Mariotti et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Generation of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 reporter cell lines for the assessment of ammonia metabolism.

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    Wang, Yi; Chang, Le; Zhai, Jiahui; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Donggen; Wang, Yunfang

    2017-12-01

    Both primary hepatocytes and stem cells-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) are major sources for bioartificial liver (BAL). Maintenance of hepatocellular functions and induction of functional maturity of HLCs are critical for BAL's support effect. It remains difficult to assess and improve detoxification functions inherent to hepatocytes, including ammonia clearance. Here, we aim to assess ammonia metabolism and identify ammonia detoxification enhancer by developing an imaging strategy. In hepatoma cell line HepG2, and immortalized hepatic cell line LO2, carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) gene, the first enzyme of ammonia-eliminating urea cycle, was labelled with fluorescence protein via CRISPR/Cas9 system. With the reporter-based screening approach, cellular detoxification enhancers were selected among a collection of 182 small molecules. In both CPS1 reporter cell lines, the fluorescence intensity is positively correlated with cellular CPS1 mRNA expression, ammonia elimination and secreted urea, and reflected ammonia detoxification in a dose-dependent manner. Surprisingly, high-level CPS1 reporter clones also reserved many other critical hepatocellular functions, for example albumin secretion and cytochrome 450 metabolic functions. Sodium phenylbutyrate and resveratrol were identified to enhance metabolism-related gene expression and liver-enriched transcription factors C/EBPα, HNF4α. In conclusion, the CPS1-reporter system provides an economic and effective platform for assessment of cellular metabolic function and high-throughput identification of chemical compounds that improve detoxification activities in hepatic lineage cells. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  19. Identification and biochemical characterization of two functional CMP-sialic acid synthetases in Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaper, Wiebke; Bentrop, Joachim; Ustinova, Jana; Blume, Linda; Kats, Elina; Tiralongo, Joe; Weinhold, Birgit; Bastmeyer, Martin; Münster-Kühnel, Anja-K

    2012-04-13

    Sialic acids (Sia) form the nonreducing end of the bulk of cell surface-expressed glycoconjugates. They are, therefore, major elements in intercellular communication processes. The addition of Sia to glycoconjugates requires metabolic activation to CMP-Sia, catalyzed by CMP-Sia synthetase (CMAS). This highly conserved enzyme is located in the cell nucleus in all vertebrates investigated to date, but its nuclear function remains elusive. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of two Cmas enzymes in Danio rerio (dreCmas), one of which is exclusively localized in the cytosol. We show that the two cmas genes most likely originated from the third whole genome duplication, which occurred at the base of teleost radiation. cmas paralogues were maintained in fishes of the Otocephala clade, whereas one copy got subsequently lost in Euteleostei (e.g. rainbow trout). In zebrafish, the two genes exhibited a distinct spatial expression pattern. The products of these genes (dreCmas1 and dreCmas2) diverged not only with respect to subcellular localization but also in substrate specificity. Nuclear dreCmas1 favored N-acetylneuraminic acid, whereas the cytosolic dreCmas2 showed highest affinity for 5-deamino-neuraminic acid. The subcellular localization was confirmed for the endogenous enzymes in fractionated zebrafish lysates. Nuclear entry of dreCmas1 was mediated by a bipartite nuclear localization signal, which seemed irrelevant for other enzymatic functions. With the current demonstration that in zebrafish two subfunctionalized cmas paralogues co-exist, we introduce a novel and unique model to detail the roles that CMAS has in the nucleus and in the sialylation pathways of animal cells.

  20. Diverse subcellular localizations of the insect CMP-sialic acid synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Wu; Fujita, Akiko; Hamaguchi, Kayo; Delannoy, Philippe; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The occurrence and biological importance of sialic acid (Sia) and its metabolic enzymes in insects have been studied using Drosophila melanogaster. The most prominent feature of D. melanogaster CMP-Sia synthetase (DmCSS) is its Golgi-localization, contrasted with nuclear localization of vertebrate CSSs. However, it remains unclear if the Golgi-localization is common to other insect CSSs and why it happens. To answer these questions, Aedes aegypti (mosquito) CSS (AaCSS) and Tribolium castaneum (beetle) CSS (TcCSS) were cloned and characterized for their activity and subcellular localization. Our new findings show: (1) AaCSS and TcCSS share a common overall structure with DmCSS in terms of evolutionarily conserved motifs and the absence of the C-terminal domain typical to vertebrate CSSs; (2) when expressed in mammalian and insect cells, AaCSS and TcCSS showed in vivo and in vitro CSS activities, similar to DmCSS. In contrast, when expressed in bacteria, they lacked CSS activity because the N-terminal hydrophobic region appeared to induce protein aggregation; (3) when expressed in Drosophila S2 cells, AaCSS and TcCSS were predominantly localized in the ER, but not in the Golgi. Surprisingly, DmCSS was mainly secreted into the culture medium, although partially detected in Golgi. Consistent with these results, the N-terminal hydrophobic regions of AaCSS and TcCSS functioned as a signal peptide to render them soluble in the ER, while the N-terminus of DmCSS functioned as a membrane-spanning region of type II transmembrane proteins whose cytosolic KLK sequence functioned as an ER export signal. Accordingly, the differential subcellular localization of insect CSSs are distinctively more diverse than previously recognized. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Characterization of a microcystin and detection of microcystin synthetase genes from a Brazilian isolate of Nostoc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; Silva-Stenico, Maria Estela; Welker, Martin; Beraldo Moraes, Luiz Alberto; Fiore, Marli Fátima

    2010-04-01

    A nostocalean nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium isolated from an eutrophic freshwater reservoir located in Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil, was evaluated for the production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins. Morphologically this new cyanobacterium strain appears closest to Nostoc, however, in the phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene it falls into a highly stable cluster distantly only related to the typical Nostoc cluster. Extracts of Nostoc sp. CENA88 cultured cells, investigated using ELISA assay, gave positive results and the microcystin profile revealed by ESI-Q-TOF/MS/MS analysis confirmed the production of [Dha(7)]MCYST-YR. Further, Nostoc sp. CENA88 genomic DNA was analyzed by PCR for sequences of mcyD, mcyE and mcyG genes of microcystin synthetase (mcy) cluster. The result revealed the presence of mcyD, mcyE and mcyG genes with similarities to those from mcy of Nostoc sp. strains 152 and IO-102-I and other cyanobacterial genera. The phylogenetic tree based on concatenated McyG, McyD and McyE amino acids clustered the sequences according to cyanobacterial genera, with exception of the Nostoc sp. CENA88 sequence, which was placed in a clade distantly related from other Nostoc strains, as previously observed also in the 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis. The present study describes for the first time a Brazilian Nostoc microcystin producer and also the occurrence of demethyl MCYST-YR variant in this genus. The sequenced Nostoc genes involved in the microcystin synthesis can contribute to a better understanding of the toxigenicity and evolution of this cyanotoxin. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A mathematical model for the adenylosuccinate synthetase reaction involved in purine biosynthesis

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    Likhoshvai Vitalii A

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of the mathematical models that adequately describe biochemical reactions and molecular-genetic mechanisms is one of the most important tasks in modern bioinformatics. Because the enzyme adenylosuccinate synthetase (AdSS has long been extensively studied, a wealth of kinetic data has been accumulated. Results We describe a mathematical model for the reaction catalyzed by AdSS. The model's parameters were fitted to experimental data obtained from published literature. The advantage of our model is that it includes relationships between the reaction rate, the concentrations of three substrates (GTP, IMP and ASP, the effects of five inhibitors (GMP, GDP, AMP, ASUC and SUCC, and the influence of Mg2+ ions. Conclusion Our model describes the reaction catalyzed by AdSS as a fully random process. The model structure implies that each of the inhibitors included in it is only competitive to one of the substrates. The model was tested for adequacy using experimental data published elsewhere. The values obtained for the parameters are as follows: Vmax = 1.35·10-3 mM/min, KmGTP = 0.023 mM, KmIMP = 0.02 mM, KmASP = 0.3 mM, KiGMP = 0.024 mM, KiGDP = 8·10-3 mM, KiAMP = 0.01 mM, KiASUC = 7.5·10-3 mM, KiSUCC = 8 mM, KmMg = 0.08 mM.

  3. Identification of Staphylococcus argenteus in Eastern China based on a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dao-Feng; Xu, Xuebin; Song, Qifa; Bai, Yalong; Zhang, Yi; Song, Minghui; Shi, Chunlei; Shi, Xianming

    2016-09-01

    To investigate whether the Staphylococcus argenteus is present in Eastern China and to verify the utility of a new screening process. Phenotype observation, PCR assay targeting a hypothetical nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene, phylogenetic analysis of rpoB and multilocus sequence typing were used to screen and identify strains of S. argenteus from 839 presumptive S. aureus isolates. Eighty-nine (89/839, 10.6%) of the presumptive S. aureus isolates produced white colonies on tryptone soya agar plates. Of the white-colony isolates, six (6/89, 7%) were S. argenteus, 75 (75/89, 84%) were S. aureus and eight (8/89, 9%) were other bacteria. The PCR-based method targeting the NRPS gene can simultaneously identify and distinguish S. argenteus and S. aureus. All representative sequences of rpoB generated in this study were deposited in GenBank under accession numbers SJTU F20002, KT767581; SJTU F20269, KT767582; SJTU F20419, KT767583; SJTU F20420, KT767584; SJTU F20124, KT767585; SJTU F21164, KT767586; SJTU F21285, KT767587; SJTU F21224, KT767588; SJTU F21155, KT767589; SJTU F21294, KT767590; SJTU F20030, KT767591; SJTU F20044, KT767592; SJTU F20135, KT767593; SJTU F20123, KT767594; SJTU F21319, KT767595, respectively. All the new sequence types (STs) were submitted to a multilocus sequence typing database and the assigned ST numbers are ST3261 (151-469-20-101-145-150-131), ST3262 (12-3-1-1-4-4-410) and ST3267 (2-471-2-2-6-3-2).

  4. A sensing role of the glutamine synthetase in the nitrogen regulation network in Fusarium fujikuroi.

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    Dominik Wagner

    Full Text Available In the plant pathogenic ascomycete Fusarium fujikuroi the synthesis of several economically important secondary metabolites (SM depends on the nitrogen status of the cells. Of these SMs, gibberellin and bikaverin synthesis is subject to nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR and is therefore only executed under nitrogen starvation conditions. How the signal of available nitrogen quantity and quality is sensed and transmitted to transcription factors is largely unknown. Earlier work revealed an essential regulatory role of the glutamine synthetase (GS in the nitrogen regulation network and secondary metabolism as its deletion resulted in total loss of SM gene expression. Here we present extensive gene regulation studies of the wild type, the Δgln1 mutant and complementation strains of the gln1 deletion mutant expressing heterologous GS-encoding genes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin or 14 different F. fujikuroi gln1 copies with site-directed mutations. All strains were grown under different nitrogen conditions and characterized regarding growth, expression of NCR-responsive genes and biosynthesis of SM. We provide evidence for distinct roles of the GS in sensing and transducing the signals to NCR-responsive genes. Three site directed mutations partially restored secondary metabolism and GS-dependent gene expression, but not glutamine formation, demonstrating for the first time that the catalytic and regulatory roles of GS can be separated. The distinct mutant phenotypes show that the GS (1 participates in NH4 (+-sensing and transducing the signal towards NCR-responsive transcription factors and their subsequent target genes; (2 affects carbon catabolism and (3 activates the expression of a distinct set of non-NCR GS-dependent genes. These novel insights into the regulatory role of the GS provide fascinating perspectives for elucidating regulatory roles of GS proteins of different organism in general.

  5. Proximal tubule glutamine synthetase expression is necessary for the normal response to dietary protein restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2017-07-01

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion changes in parallel during changes in dietary protein intake. Dietary protein restriction decreases endogenous acid production and decreases urinary ammonia excretion, a major component of net acid excretion. Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the reaction of [Formula: see text] and glutamate, which regenerates the essential amino acid glutamine and decreases net ammonia generation. Because renal proximal tubule GS expression increases during dietary protein restriction, this could contribute to the decreased ammonia excretion. The purpose of the current study was to determine the role of proximal tubule GS in the renal response to protein restriction. We generated mice with proximal tubule-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Cre-negative (Control) and PT-GS-KO mice in metabolic cages were provided 20% protein diet for 2 days and were then changed to low-protein (6%) diet for the next 7 days. Additional PT-GS-KO mice were maintained on 20% protein diet. Dietary protein restriction caused a rapid decrease in urinary ammonia excretion in both genotypes, but PT-GS-KO blunted this adaptive response significantly. This occurred despite no significant genotype-dependent differences in urinary pH or in serum electrolytes. There were no significant differences between Control and PT-GS-KO mice in expression of multiple other proteins involved in renal ammonia handling. We conclude that proximal tubule GS expression is necessary for the appropriate decrease in ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction.

  6. Function of a glutamine synthetase-like protein in bacterial aniline oxidation via γ-glutamylanilide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeo, Masahiro; Ohara, Akira; Sakae, Shinji; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Kitamura, Chitoshi; Kato, Dai-ichiro; Negoro, Seiji

    2013-10-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain YAA has five genes (atdA1 to atdA5) involved in aniline oxidation as a part of the aniline degradation gene cluster. From sequence analysis, the five genes were expected to encode a glutamine synthetase (GS)-like protein (AtdA1), a glutamine amidotransferase-like protein (AtdA2), and an aromatic compound dioxygenase (AtdA3, AtdA4, and AtdA5) (M. Takeo, T. Fujii, and Y. Maeda, J. Ferment. Bioeng. 85:17-24, 1998). A recombinant Pseudomonas strain harboring these five genes quantitatively converted aniline into catechol, demonstrating that catechol is the major oxidation product from aniline. To elucidate the function of the GS-like protein AtdA1 in aniline oxidation, we purified it from recombinant Escherichia coli harboring atdA1. The purified AtdA1 protein produced gamma-glutamylanilide (γ-GA) quantitatively from aniline and l-glutamate in the presence of ATP and MgCl2. This reaction was identical to glutamine synthesis by GS, except for the use of aniline instead of ammonia as the substrate. Recombinant Pseudomonas strains harboring the dioxygenase genes (atdA3 to atdA5) were unable to degrade aniline but converted γ-GA into catechol, indicating that γ-GA is an intermediate to catechol and a direct substrate for the dioxygenase. Unexpectedly, a recombinant Pseudomonas strain harboring only atdA2 hydrolyzed γ-GA into aniline, reversing the γ-GA formation by AtdA1. Deletion of atdA2 from atdA1 to atdA5 caused γ-GA accumulation from aniline in recombinant Pseudomonas cells and inhibited the growth of a recombinant Acinetobacter strain on aniline, suggesting that AtdA2 prevents γ-GA accumulation that is harmful to the host cell.

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase: biochemical features of a crucial enzyme for mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis.

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    Anna P Lucarelli

    Full Text Available The selection and soaring spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB and extensively drug-resistant strains (XDR-TB is a severe public health problem. Currently, there is an urgent need for new drugs for tuberculosis treatment, with novel mechanisms of action and, moreover, the necessity to identify new drug targets. Mycobacterial phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (MtbPRPPase is a crucial enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of decaprenylphosphoryl-arabinose, an essential precursor for the mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Moreover, phosphoribosylpyrophosphate, which is the product of the PRPPase catalyzed reaction, is the precursor for the biosynthesis of nucleotides and of some amino acids such as histidine and tryptophan. In this context, the elucidation of the molecular and functional features of MtbPRPPase is mandatory. MtbPRPPase was obtained as a recombinant form, purified to homogeneity and characterized. According to its hexameric form, substrate specificity and requirement of phosphate for activity, the enzyme proved to belong to the class I of PRPPases. Although the sulfate mimicked the phosphate, it was less effective and required higher concentrations for the enzyme activation. MtbPRPPase showed hyperbolic response to ribose 5-phosphate, but sigmoidal behaviour towards Mg-ATP. The enzyme resulted to be allosterically activated by Mg(2+ or Mn(2+ and inhibited by Ca(2+ and Cu(2+ but, differently from other characterized PRPPases, it showed a better affinity for the Mn(2+ and Cu(2+ ions, indicating a different cation binding site geometry. Moreover, the enzyme from M. tuberculosis was allosterically inhibited by ADP, but less sensitive to inhibition by GDP. The characterization of M. tuberculosis PRPPase provides the starting point for the development of inhibitors for antitubercular drug design.

  8. Interstitial lung disease in anti-synthetase syndrome: Initial and follow-up CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debray, Marie-Pierre, E-mail: marie-pierre.debray@bch.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital, Department of Radiology, 46, rue Henri Huchard, 75877 Paris Cedex 18 (France); Borie, Raphael, E-mail: raphael.borie@bch.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital, Department of Pneumology A and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, DHU Fire 46, rue Henri Huchard, 75877 Paris Cedex 18 (France); Inserm, U1152, Paris (France); Revel, Marie-Pierre, E-mail: marie-pierre.revel@htd.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Cochin Hospital, Department of Radiology, 27, Rue du Fg Saint Jacques, 75679 Paris Cedex 14 (France); Naccache, Jean-Marc, E-mail: jean-marc.naccache@tnn.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Avicenne Hospital, Department of Pneumology and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, Bobigny (France); AP-HP, Tenon Hospital, Department of Pneumology and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Khalil, Antoine, E-mail: antoine.khalil@tnn.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Tenon Hospital, Department of Radiology, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Toper, Cécile, E-mail: cecile.toper@gmail.com [AP-HP, Tenon Hospital, Department of Pneumology and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Israel-Biet, Dominique, E-mail: dominique.israel-biet@egp.aphp.fr [Université Paris Descartes and AP-HP, Department of Pneumology, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, 20, rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris (France); and others

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To describe the initial and follow-up CT features of interstitial lung disease associated with anti-synthetase syndrome (AS-ILD). Materials and methods: Two independent thoracic radiologists retrospectively analysed thin-section CT images obtained at diagnosis of AS-ILD in 33 patients (17 positive for anti-Jo1, 13 for anti-PL12, and three for anti-PL7 antibodies). They evaluated the pattern, distribution and extent of the CT abnormalities. They also evaluated the change in findings during follow-up (median 27 months; range 13–167 months) in 26 patients. Results: At diagnosis, ground-glass opacities (100%), reticulations (87%) and traction bronchiectasis (76%) were the most common CT findings. Consolidations were present in 45% of patients. A non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), organizing pneumonia (OP) or mixed NSIP-OP CT pattern were observed in 15 out of 33 (45%), seven out of 33 (21%) and eight out of 33 (24%) patients, respectively, whereas the CT pattern was indeterminate in three patients. During follow-up, consolidations decreased or disappeared in 11 out of 12 patients (92%), among which seven within the first 6 months, but honeycombing progressed or appeared in ten out of 26 patients (38%) and overall disease extent increased in nine out of 26 patients (35%). Conclusion: CT features at diagnosis of AS-ILD mainly suggest NSIP and OP, isolated or in combination. Consolidations decrease or disappear in most cases but the disease may progress to fibrosis in more than one third of patients.

  9. Stability Characteristics of "Aerobic" Acetyl-CoA Synthetase of Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, T.; Klein, Harold P.

    1976-01-01

    During the purification of the "aerobic" acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, strain LK2Gl2, it was noted that stronge at 4 C resulted in the loss of enzyme activity within 24 hr. Similar losses were observed during column chromatography. Addition of boiled extracts from either aerobic or anerobic cells completely prevents this. The stabilizing factor (SF) in these extracts is non-dialyzable and organic in nature. SF is excluded on G-25 and G-50 Sephadex columns and is slightly retarded on G-75 columns. On G-100 columns, SF elutes as a peak exactly coincident with that of cytochrome c, indicating a molecular weight of 13,000. SF activity was not destroyed by Pronase treatment, was adsorbed onto Norite, and absorbed in the UV with a single maximum at 260 nm. The action of SF could be replaced by a number of nucleotides. At 0.01 M, the order of effectiveness was: ATP>ADP>AMP>GTP>CTP>/=UTP>XTP. Even at 2 x 10(exp -4) M, ATP and ADP, but not AMP, cyclic AMP, adenosine or adenine, were effective in stabilizing this ACS. The mechanism of stabilization by ATP and AMP appears to be the same, since AMP competitively inhibited the ACS with respect to ATP in in vitro assays, while ADP gave a mixed type of inhibition, thus indicating a different mechanism. ACS from nonaerobic cells is also unstable in the absence of SF but, unlike aerobic ACS, is not affected by ATP or other nucleotides.

  10. Impact of P-Site tRNA and antibiotics on ribosome mediated protein folding: studies using the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surojit Mondal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ribosome, which acts as a platform for mRNA encoded polypeptide synthesis, is also capable of assisting in folding of polypeptide chains. The peptidyl transferase center (PTC that catalyzes peptide bond formation resides in the domain V of the 23S rRNA of the bacterial ribosome. Proper positioning of the 3' -CCA ends of the A- and P-site tRNAs via specific interactions with the nucleotides of the PTC are crucial for peptidyl transferase activity. This RNA domain is also the center for ribosomal chaperoning activity. The unfolded polypeptide chains interact with the specific nucleotides of the PTC and are released in a folding competent form. In vitro transcribed RNA corresponding to this domain (bDV RNA also displays chaperoning activity. RESULTS: The present study explores the effects of tRNAs, antibiotics that are A- and P-site PTC substrate analogs (puromycin and blasticidin and macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin and josamycin on the chaperoning ability of the E. coli ribosome and bDV RNA. Our studies using mRNA programmed ribosomes show that a tRNA positioned at the P-site effectively inhibits the ribosome's chaperoning function. We also show that the antibiotic blasticidin (that mimics the interaction between 3'-CCA end of P/P-site tRNA with the PTC is more effective in inhibiting ribosome and bDV RNA chaperoning ability than either puromycin or the macrolide antibiotics. Mutational studies of the bDV RNA could identify the nucleotides U2585 and G2252 (both of which interact with P-site tRNA to be important for its chaperoning ability. CONCLUSION: Both protein synthesis and their proper folding are crucial for maintenance of a functional cellular proteome. The PTC of the ribosome is attributed with both these abilities. The silencing of the chaperoning ability of the ribosome in the presence of P-site bound tRNA might be a way to segregate these two important functions.

  11. Localization of human RNase Z isoforms: dual nuclear/mitochondrial targeting of the ELAC2 gene product by alternative translation initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Rossmanith

    Full Text Available RNase Z is an endonuclease responsible for the removal of 3' extensions from tRNA precursors, an essential step in tRNA biogenesis. Human cells contain a long form (RNase Z(L encoded by ELAC2, and a short form (RNase Z(S; ELAC1. We studied their subcellular localization by expression of proteins fused to green fluorescent protein. RNase Z(S was found in the cytosol, whereas RNase Z(L localized to the nucleus and mitochondria. We show that alternative translation initiation is responsible for the dual targeting of RNase Z(L. Due to the unfavorable context of the first AUG of ELAC2, translation apparently also starts from the second AUG, whereby the mitochondrial targeting sequence is lost and the protein is instead routed to the nucleus. Our data suggest that RNase Z(L is the enzyme involved in both, nuclear and mitochondrial tRNA 3' end maturation.

  12. MS_RHII-RSD, a dual-function RNase HII-(p)ppGpp synthetase from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdeshwar, Maya S; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2012-08-01

    In the noninfectious soil saprophyte Mycobacterium smegmatis, intracellular levels of the stress alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate and guanosine pentaphosphate, together termed (p)ppGpp, are regulated by the enzyme Rel(Msm). This enzyme consists of a single, bifunctional polypeptide chain that is capable of both synthesizing and hydrolyzing (p)ppGpp. The rel(Msm) knockout strain of M. smegmatis (Δrel(Msm)) is expected to show a (p)ppGpp null [(p)ppGpp(0)] phenotype. Contrary to this expectation, the strain is capable of synthesizing (p)ppGpp in vivo. In this study, we identify and functionally characterize the open reading frame (ORF), MSMEG_5849, that encodes a second functional (p)ppGpp synthetase in M. smegmatis. In addition to (p)ppGpp synthesis, the 567-amino-acid-long protein encoded by this gene is capable of hydrolyzing RNA·DNA hybrids and bears similarity to the conventional RNase HII enzymes. We have classified this protein as actRel(Msm) in accordance with the recent nomenclature proposed and have named it MS_RHII-RSD, indicating the two enzymatic activities present [RHII, RNase HII domain, originally identified as domain of unknown function 429 (DUF429), and RSD, RelA_SpoT nucleotidyl transferase domain, the SYNTH domain responsible for (p)ppGpp synthesis activity]. MS_RHII-RSD is expressed and is constitutively active in vivo and behaves like a monofunctional (p)ppGpp synthetase in vitro. The occurrence of the RNase HII and (p)ppGpp synthetase domains together on the same polypeptide chain is suggestive of an in vivo role for this novel protein as a link connecting the essential life processes of DNA replication, repair, and transcription to the highly conserved stress survival pathway, the stringent response.

  13. Evidence for sugar signalling in the regulation of asparagine synthetase gene expressed in Phaseolus vulgaris roots and nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvente, Sonia; Reddy, Pallavolu M; Khandual, Sanghamitra; Blanco, Lourdes; Alvarado-Affantranger, Xochitl; Sanchez, Federico; Lara-Flores, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    A cDNA clone, designated as PvNAS2, encoding asparagine amidotransferase (asparagine synthetase) was isolated from nodule tissue of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Negro Jamapa). Southern blot analysis indicated that asparagine synthetase in bean is encoded by a small gene family. Northern analysis of RNAs from various plant organs demonstrated that PvNAS2 is highly expressed in roots, followed by nodules in which it is mainly induced during the early days of nitrogen fixation. Investigations with the PvNAS2 promoter gusA fusion revealed that the expression of PvNAS2 in roots is confined to vascular bundles and meristematic tissues, while in root nodules its expression is solely localized to vascular traces and outer cortical cells encompassing the central nitrogen-fixing zone, but never detected in either infected or non-infected cells located in the central region of the nodule. PvNAS2 is down-regulated when carbon availability is reduced in nodules, and the addition of sugars to the plants, mainly glucose, boosted its induction, leading to the increased asparagine production. In contrast to PvNAS2 expression and the concomitant asparagine synthesis, glucose supplement resulted in the reduction of ureide content in nodules. Studies with glucose analogues as well as hexokinase inhibitors suggested a role for hexokinase in the sugar-sensing mechanism that regulates PvNAS2 expression in roots. In light of the above results, it is proposed that, in bean, low carbon availability in nodules prompts the down-regulation of the asparagine synthetase enzyme and concomitantly asparagine production. Thereby a favourable environment is created for the efficient transfer of the amido group of glutamine for the synthesis of purines, and then ureide generation.

  14. A genome-wide analysis of nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters and their peptides in a Planktothrix rubescens strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nederbragt Alexander J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria often produce several different oligopeptides, with unknown biological functions, by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS. Although some cyanobacterial NRPS gene cluster types are well described, the entire NRPS genomic content within a single cyanobacterial strain has never been investigated. Here we have combined a genome-wide analysis using massive parallel pyrosequencing ("454" and mass spectrometry screening of oligopeptides produced in the strain Planktothrix rubescens NIVA CYA 98 in order to identify all putative gene clusters for oligopeptides. Results Thirteen types of oligopeptides were uncovered by mass spectrometry (MS analyses. Microcystin, cyanopeptolin and aeruginosin synthetases, highly similar to already characterized NRPS, were present in the genome. Two novel NRPS gene clusters were associated with production of anabaenopeptins and microginins, respectively. Sequence-depth of the genome and real-time PCR data revealed three copies of the microginin gene cluster. Since NRPS gene cluster candidates for microviridin and oscillatorin synthesis could not be found, putative (gene encoded precursor peptide sequences to microviridin and oscillatorin were found in the genes mdnA and oscA, respectively. The genes flanking the microviridin and oscillatorin precursor genes encode putative modifying enzymes of the precursor oligopeptides. We therefore propose ribosomal pathways involving modifications and cyclisation for microviridin and oscillatorin. The microviridin, anabaenopeptin and cyanopeptolin gene clusters are situated in close proximity to each other, constituting an oligopeptide island. Conclusion Altogether seven nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS gene clusters and two gene clusters putatively encoding ribosomal oligopeptide biosynthetic pathways were revealed. Our results demonstrate that whole genome shotgun sequencing combined with MS-directed determination of oligopeptides successfully

  15. Differential inhibition of adenylylated and deadenylylated forms of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase as a drug discovery platform

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, Anjo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Differential inhibition of adenylylated and deadenylylated forms of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase as a drug discovery platform A. Theron1, R. L. Roth1, H. Hoppe1¤, C. Parkinson2, C. W. van der Westhuyzen1, S. Stoychev1, I. Wiid3, R. D. Pietersen3, B... contributes directly to PLOS ONE | https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0185068 October 3, 2017 1 / 22 a1111111111 a1111111111 a1111111111 a1111111111 a1111111111 OPENACCESS Citation: Theron A, Roth RL, Hoppe H, Parkinson C, van der Westhuyzen CW, Stoychev S...

  16. The role of the C8 proton of ATP in the regulation of phosphoryl transfer within kinases and synthetases

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    Nkosi Thokozani C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kinome comprises functionally diverse enzymes, with the current classification indicating very little about the extent of conserved regulatory mechanisms associated with phosphoryl transfer. The apparent Km of the kinases ranges from less than 0.4 μM to in excess of 1000 μM for ATP. It is not known how this diverse range of enzymes mechanistically achieves the regulation of catalysis via an affinity range for ATP varying by three-orders of magnitude. Results We have demonstrated a previously undiscovered mechanism in kinase and synthetase enzymes where the overall rate of reaction is regulated via the C8-H of ATP. Using ATP deuterated at the C8 position (C8D-ATP as a molecular probe it was shown that the C8-H plays a direct role in the regulation of the overall rate of reaction in a range of kinase and synthetase enzymes. Using comparative studies on the effect of the concentration of ATP and C8D-ATP on the activity of the enzymes we demonstrated that not only did C8D-ATP give a kinetic isotope effect (KIE but the KIE's obtained are clearly not secondary KIE effects as the magnitude of the KIE in all cases was at least 2 fold and in most cases in excess of 7 fold. Conclusions Kinase and synthetase enzymes utilise C8D-ATP in preference to non-deuterated ATP. The KIE obtained at low ATP concentrations is clearly a primary KIE demonstrating strong evidence that the bond to the isotopically substituted hydrogen is being broken. The effect of the ATP concentration profile on the KIE was used to develop a model whereby the C8H of ATP plays a role in the overall regulation of phosphoryl transfer. This role of the C8H of ATP in the regulation of substrate binding appears to have been conserved in all kinase and synthetase enzymes as one of the mechanisms associated with binding of ATP. The induction of the C8H to be labile by active site residues coordinated to the ATP purine ring may play a significant role in explaining the

  17. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Jun; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Fujimoto, Zui; Momma, Mitsuru; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2005-11-01

    Hyperthermophilic archaeal tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein was purified by Cibacron Blue affinity chromatography following heat treatment at 363 K. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction studies were obtained under optimized crystallization conditions in the presence of 1.5 M ammonium sulfate using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.1, c = 196.2 A, and diffracted to beyond 2.15 A resolution at 100 K.

  18. Arabidopsis thaliana GH3.5 acyl acid amido synthetase mediates metabolic crosstalk in auxin and salicylic acid homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Westfall, Corey S.; Sherp, Ashley M.; Zubieta, Chloe; Alvarez, Sophie; Schraft, Evelyn; Marcellin, Romain; Ramirez, Loren; Jez, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the acyl acid amido synthetase Gretchen Hagen 3.5 (AtGH3.5) conjugates both indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and salicylic acid (SA) to modulate auxin and pathogen response pathways. To understand the molecular basis for the activity of AtGH3.5, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the enzyme in complex with IAA and AMP. Biochemical analysis demonstrates that the substrate preference of AtGH3.5 is wider than originally described and includes the natural auxin phenyl...

  19. Expanding the library and substrate diversity of the pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase to incorporate unnatural amino acids containing conjugated rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Vanessa K; Louie, Gordon V; Noel, Joseph P; Wang, Lei

    2013-11-04

    Unnatural amino acids (UAAs) containing conjugated ring systems are of interest for their optical properties. Until now, such bulky and planar UAAs could not be incorporated into proteins using the pyrrolysyl tRNA/synthetase shuttling system. Using the "small-intelligent" approach to construct a highly diverse library, we evolved novel synthetases specific for two such UAAs and incorporated them into proteins in E. coli and mammalian cells. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The nucleotide sequence of aroG, the gene for 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthetase (phe) in Escherichia coli K 12

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, W.David; Davidson, Barrie E.

    1982-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of aroG, the gene coding for 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthetase(phe), one of three isoenzymes that catalyse the first step of the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids and vitamins in Escherichia coli K12. The DNA sequence agrees with previously published data on the N-terminal sequence, amino acid composition, and subunit molecular weight of 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthetase(phe). There is significant identity i...