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Sample records for human thyroglobulin t-cell

  1. Self-reactive CD4+ T cells and B cells in the blood in health and autoimmune disease: increased frequency of thyroglobulin-reactive cells in Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Moeller, Ane Christine; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying activation of potentially self-reactive circulating B cells and T cells remain unclear. We measured the uptake of a self-antigen, thyroglobulin, by antigen presenting cells, and the subsequent proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and B cells from healthy controls and patients...... with autoimmune thyroiditis. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis, B cells bound increased amounts of thyroglobulin in a complement- and autoantibody-dependent manner, and the thyroglobulin-elicited proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and B cells was complement dependent. Increased proportions of Tg-responsive CD4(+) T cells...... and B cells were found in patients with Graves' disease. Notably, both patient groups and healthy controls exhibited higher proliferative responses to thyroglobulin than to a foreign recall antigen, tetanus toxoid. Our results suggest that self-tolerance can be broken by exposure of circulating...

  2. B-cell exposure to self-antigen induces IL-10 producing B cells as well as IL-6- and TNF-α-producing B-cell subsets in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Anina; Kristensen, Birte; Hansen, Bjarke E

    2012-01-01

    Human B cells are able to secrete IL-10 after stimulation with mitogens, but their ability to produce IL-10 and regulate T-cell responses after stimulation with self-antigens is unclear. We co-cultured thyroglobulin-pulsed B cells from healthy donors with autologous T cells and observed production...... of IL-10 and TGF-β, in addition to TNF-α and IL-6. Pulsing with foreign antigen, tetanus toxoid (TT), induced a Th1-response with minimal IL-10 production. After thyroglobulin-pulsing, 1.10±0.50% of B cells and 1.00±0.20% of CD4(+) T cells produced IL-10, compared to 0.29±0.19% of B cells (P=0.01) and 0.......13±0.15% of CD4(+) T cells (P=0.006) following TT-pulsing. Thyroglobulin-stimulated, IL-10-secreting B cells were enriched within CD5(+) and CD24(high) cells. While thyroglobulin-pulsed B cells induced only modest proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, B cells pulsed with TT induced vigorous proliferation. Thus, B...

  3. Hormonogenic donor Tyr2522 of bovine thyroglobulin. Insight into preferential T3 formation at thyroglobulin carboxyl terminus at low iodination level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cetrangolo, Giovanni Paolo, E-mail: giovanni.cetrangolo@unimol.it [Dipartimento di Medicina e Scienze della Salute, Università del Molise, Via De Sanctis, snc, Campobasso 86100 (Italy); Arcaro, Alessia, E-mail: alessia.arcaro@unimol.it [Dipartimento di Medicina e Scienze della Salute, Università del Molise, Via De Sanctis, snc, Campobasso 86100 (Italy); Lepore, Alessio, E-mail: alessiolepore@alice.it [Dipartimento di Medicina Molecolare e Biotecnologie Mediche, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via S. Pansini, 5, Napoli 80131 (Italy); Graf, Maria, E-mail: mariagraf@tiscali.it [Dipartimento di Medicina Molecolare e Biotecnologie Mediche, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via S. Pansini, 5, Napoli 80131 (Italy); Mamone, Gianfranco, E-mail: mamone@isa.cnr.it [Centro di Spettrometria di Massa Proteomica e Biomolecolare, ISA-CNR, Via Roma 52 a, Avellino 83100 (Italy); Ferranti, Pasquale, E-mail: ferranti@unina.it [Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Parco Gussone, Portici (Napoli) 80055 (Italy); Palumbo, Giuseppe, E-mail: palumbo@unina.it [Dipartimento di Medicina Molecolare e Biotecnologie Mediche, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via S. Pansini, 5, Napoli 80131 (Italy); Gentile, Fabrizio, E-mail: gentilefabrizio@unimol.it [Dipartimento di Medicina e Scienze della Salute, Università del Molise, Via De Sanctis, snc, Campobasso 86100 (Italy)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • A carboxy-terminal fragment (residues 2515–2750) was isolated from a low-iodine bTg. • Post-translational status of 8 tyrosines in bTg region 2515–2750 was assessed by MS. • Tyr2522 of bovine Tg is an interspecifically conserved hormonogenic donor site. • Propensities of Tyr residues to mono or diiodination optimize T3 yield from Tyr2748. - Abstract: A tryptic fragment (b5{sub TR,NR}), encompassing residues 2515–2750, was isolated from a low-iodine (0.26% by mass) bovine thyroglobulin, by limited proteolysis with trypsin and preparative, continuous-elution SDS–PAGE. The fragment was digested with Asp-N endoproteinase and analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, revealing the formation of: 3-monoiodotyrosine and dehydroalanine from Tyr2522; 3-monoiodotyrosine from Tyr2555 and Tyr2569; 3-monoiodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine from Tyr2748. The data presented document, by direct mass spectrometric identifications, efficient iodophenoxyl ring transfer from monoiodinated hormonogenic donor Tyr2522 and efficient mono- and diiodination of hormonogenic acceptor Tyr2748, under conditions which permitted only limited iodination of Tyr2555 and Tyr2569, in low-iodine bovine thyroglobulin. The present study thereby provides: (1) a rationale for the preferential synthesis of T3 at the carboxy-terminal end of thyroglobulin, at low iodination level; (2) confirmation for the presence of an interspecifically conserved hormonogenic donor site in the carboxy-terminal domain of thyroglobulin; (3) solution for a previous uncertainty, concerning the precise location of such donor site in bovine thyroglobulin.

  4. Hormonogenic donor Tyr2522 of bovine thyroglobulin. Insight into preferential T3 formation at thyroglobulin carboxyl terminus at low iodination level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetrangolo, Giovanni Paolo; Arcaro, Alessia; Lepore, Alessio; Graf, Maria; Mamone, Gianfranco; Ferranti, Pasquale; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Gentile, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A carboxy-terminal fragment (residues 2515–2750) was isolated from a low-iodine bTg. • Post-translational status of 8 tyrosines in bTg region 2515–2750 was assessed by MS. • Tyr2522 of bovine Tg is an interspecifically conserved hormonogenic donor site. • Propensities of Tyr residues to mono or diiodination optimize T3 yield from Tyr2748. - Abstract: A tryptic fragment (b5 TR,NR ), encompassing residues 2515–2750, was isolated from a low-iodine (0.26% by mass) bovine thyroglobulin, by limited proteolysis with trypsin and preparative, continuous-elution SDS–PAGE. The fragment was digested with Asp-N endoproteinase and analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, revealing the formation of: 3-monoiodotyrosine and dehydroalanine from Tyr2522; 3-monoiodotyrosine from Tyr2555 and Tyr2569; 3-monoiodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine from Tyr2748. The data presented document, by direct mass spectrometric identifications, efficient iodophenoxyl ring transfer from monoiodinated hormonogenic donor Tyr2522 and efficient mono- and diiodination of hormonogenic acceptor Tyr2748, under conditions which permitted only limited iodination of Tyr2555 and Tyr2569, in low-iodine bovine thyroglobulin. The present study thereby provides: (1) a rationale for the preferential synthesis of T3 at the carboxy-terminal end of thyroglobulin, at low iodination level; (2) confirmation for the presence of an interspecifically conserved hormonogenic donor site in the carboxy-terminal domain of thyroglobulin; (3) solution for a previous uncertainty, concerning the precise location of such donor site in bovine thyroglobulin

  5. Structure and expression of thyroglobulin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassart, G; Brocas, H; Christophe, D; de Martynoff, G; Leriche, A; Mercken, L; Pohl, V; van Heuverswyn, B [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire en Biologie Humaine et Nucleaire (IRIBHN), Faculte de Medecine, Universite libre de Bruxelles, Campus Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium)

    1982-01-01

    Thyroglobulin is composed of two 300000 dalton polypeptide chains, translated from an 8000 base mRNA. Preparation of a full length cDNA and its cloning in E. coli have lead to the demonstration that the polypeptides of thyroglobulin protomers were identical. Used as molecular probes, the cloned cDNA allowed the isolation of a fragment of thyroglobulin gene. Electron microscopic studies have demonstrated that this gene contains more than 90 % intronic material separating small size exons (<200 bp). Sequencing of bovine thyroglobulin structural gene is in progress. Preliminary results show evidence for the existence of repetitive segments. Availability of cloned DNA complementary to bovine and human thyroglobulin mRNA allows the study of genetic defects of thyroglobulin gene expression in the human and in various animal models.

  6. The human thyroglobulin gene: a polymorphic marker localized distal to C-MYC on chromosome 8 band q24

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, F.; Bikker, H.; Geurts van Kessel, A.; Melsert, R.; Pearson, P. L.; de Vijlder, J. J.; van Ommen, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    The human thyroglobulin (Tg) gene is localized to chromosome 8 and regionally to band q24 as shown independently by both in situ hybridization techniques and Southern blot analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. Analysis of hybrids derived from a Burkitt lymphoma, with a translocation

  7. Study of the immune response to thyroglobulin through a model of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Castro, M. dos.

    1981-01-01

    The cellular and humoral immune response to thyroglobulin of different species was studied in guinea pigs. The experiments described suggested that the immune system can be activated against self-determinants. Human and pork thyroglobulin were able to induce the experimental thyroiditis as well as some immune responses, such as in vitro proliferative response, delayed hypersensitivity and antibodies. Although guinea pig thyroglobulin was unable to induce specific T-lymphocyte proliferation in vitro, delayed hypersensitivity response and antibodies, it was very efficient in inducing the autoimmune thyroiditis. On the contrary, bovine thyroglobulin did not induce experimental autoimmune thyroiditis despite producing good responses as determined by similar in vitro proliferative response, delayed hypersensitivity and on the humoral level. These results suggest that the assays utilised were not able to evaluate the relevant immune response to genesis of the thyroiditis. The determinant selection mechanisms operating in these immune responses are probably selecting determinants not responsible for self-recognition in vivo. It was suggested that the macrophage could be the cell responsible for the presentation of these determinants to the lymphocyte in an immunogenic form. (Author) [pt

  8. The self-antigen, thyroglobulin, induces antigen-experienced CD4+ T cells from healthy donors to proliferate and promote production of the regulatory cytokine, interleukin-10, by monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Kim Hostein; Galdiers, Marcel P; Hedegaard, Chris Juul

    2010-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (TG), as autoantigen, induces in vitro proliferation of T and B cells from normal individuals, but the cytokine production differs from that in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. Here, we investigate whether normal T cells responding to TG are naive, or have previously....... Whereas TT induced pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin-2 (IL-2)/interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)/IL-4/IL-5], TG evoked persistent release of the regulatory IL-10. Some donors, however, also responded with late IFN-gamma production, suggesting that the regulation by IL-10 could be overridden. Although...... monocytes were prime producers of IL-10 in the early TG response, a few IL-10-secreting CD4(+) T cells, primarily with CD45RO(+) memory phenotype, were also detected. Furthermore, T-cell depletion from the mononuclear cell preparation abrogated monocyte IL-10 production. Our findings indicate active...

  9. Recent aspects of thyroglobulin in physiology and pathology; Aspects recents de la thyroglobuline en physiologie et pathologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassane Sidibe, E. [Centre Medical Marc Sankale - Fann, Dakar (Senegal); Dangou, J.M. [Laboratoire Anatomo-Pathologie, FMPO - UCAD, Dakar (Senegal); Mbodj, M. [Laboratoire de Biophysique, FMPO - UCAD, Dakar (Senegal)

    2004-06-01

    The thyroglobulin (tg), strongly concentrated in the colloid, through a recycling to the colloid or by transcytosis to the blood stream, (function attributed to an unidentified N -Acetylglucosamine ) is linked to megalin to avoid lysosomal pathway and is delivered by a transepithelial transport (transcytosis). The promoter of this human thyroglobulin is tightly dependent on TTF-1 factor (thyroid-specific transcription factor) and Pax 8. Human recombinant TSH can increase serum baseline levels of thyroglobulin in a study from 25 to 30,000 ng/ml reflecting in part the heterogeneity of the population studied. The 131 Iodide Scan diagnosis and the measurement of serum thyroglobulin are the follow-up cornerstone that offer the opportunity in the detection of recurrence or ongoing cancer in early stage. Until now the thyroglobulin has been used in the same time than nuclear imaging. The Fluorine-18-fluoro deoxyglucose tomography positron emission plays a supplementary role in the localization of thyroid cancer recurrence sites. A control after increased post therapeutic thyroglobulin triggers a 131 Iodide scan and nuclear magnetic resonance study. In the follow-up of thyroidectomized patients with ablative radio-iodide, it is reasonable to treat patients that have an progressive increase of thyroglobulin levels but also to continue tight surveillance in those that have thyroglobulin concentrations that decrease or are stable. Fluorine-18 fluoro deoxyglucose positron emission tomography is useful in the cases with negative 131 Iodide scan and increase thyroglobulin levels. But this method has limits to find minimal disease. It is noteworthy that increased level of thyroglobulin is observed in iodine deficiency with 28.9% of world population concerned with goiter and 2% (11.2 million) with cretinism or 43 millions with mental retardation. Anti-thyroglobulin antibodies affect all the continuum of the clinical phenotype of autoimmune thyroid diseases suggesting a common

  10. Somatostatin reduces 3H-thymidine incorporation and c-myc, but not thyroglobulin ribonucleic acid levels in human thyroid follicular cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    degli Uberti, E.C.; Hanau, S.; Rossi, R.; Piva, R.; Margutti, A.; Trasforini, G.; Pansini, G.; del Senno, L.

    1991-01-01

    The action of somatostatin (SRIH) on 3 H-thymidine (thy) incorporation and on c-myc and thyroglobulin RNA levels in a suspension of follicles from normal and goitrous human thyroid was examined. SRIH, at 10 - 7 M concentration, inhibited basal thy incorporation (maximally by 4 h lasting for up 24 h), which effect was greater in goiter than in normal thyroid and was also detected in growing adherent epithelial cells. Moreover, in a follicle suspension SRIH prevented TSH-stimulated thy incorporation, both in normal and in goitrous thyroid. Basal expression of c-myc RNA was not affected by SRIH in either tissue, whereas the TSH-stimulated c-myc RNA level was significantly reduced in goiter. No effect of SRIH was observed on basal or TSH-stimulated thyroglobulin RNA levels. SRIH did not alter basal cAMP concentrations in normal or goitrous follicles, but it significantly reduced TSH-stimulated cAMP accumulation both in normal thyroid and in goiter. Overall, our data indicate a direct inhibitory action of SRIH on growth, but not on differentiation, of human thyroid, probably by a mechanism not entirely cAMP dependent

  11. Self-reactive CD4+ T cells and B cells in the blood in health and autoimmune disease: increased frequency of thyroglobulin-reactive cells in Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Moeller, Ane Christine; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2006-01-01

    and B cells were found in patients with Graves' disease. Notably, both patient groups and healthy controls exhibited higher proliferative responses to thyroglobulin than to a foreign recall antigen, tetanus toxoid. Our results suggest that self-tolerance can be broken by exposure of circulating...

  12. Natural autoantibodies and complement promote the uptake of a self antigen, human thyroglobulin, by B cells and the proliferation of thyroglobulin-reactive CD4(+) T cells in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Leslie, R G; Jepsen, B S

    2001-01-01

    Serum from normal individuals contains substantial amounts of natural antibodies (NA) capable of recognizing self antigens. However, the physiological implications of this autoreactivity remain unclear. We have examined the role of self-reactive NA and complement in mediating the uptake of human...... cells are prerequisites for the proliferation of Tg-reactive CD4(+) T cells, suggesting a novel role for natural autoantibodies and complement in the regulation of autoreactivity under physiological conditions....

  13. Serum thyroglobulin in normal subjects and patients with hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease: effects of T3, iodide, 131I and antithyroid drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, D.F.; Rothman, J.; Utiger, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    A sensitive, reproducible radioimmunoassay for thyroglobulin (Tg) in unextracted human serum is described. The mean (+SD) serum thyroglobulin concentration in ninety-three normal subjects was 8.8 +- 5.1 ng/ml. The mean serum concentration in forty-seven patients with hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease was 162 +- 145 ng/ml, and in nine patients with subacute thyroiditis 140 +- 75 ng/ml. In normal subjects, the effects of T3 and inorganic iodide on the levels of serum Tg and T4 were measured. In hyperthyroid (Graves' disease) patients, the effects of iodide, radioactive iodine and antithyroid drugs on serum Tg, T3 and T4 levels were measured. The data suggested that; (1) Tg release by the thyroid is normally under TSH control; (2) iodide inhibits thyroidal T4 and T3 release without affecting Tg secretion; (3) thyroidal injury results in marked increases in serum Tg concentrations; and (4) initial and/or serial Tg determinations may be useful in predicting remission in patients with hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease treated with antithyroid drugs. (author)

  14. The human thyroglobulin gene is over 300 kb long and contains introns of up to 64 kb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, F.; van Ommen, G. J.; Bikker, H.; Arnberg, A. C.; de Vijlder, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg), the precursor of thyroid hormones, is a 660.000 Da dimeric glycoprotein synthesized exclusively in the thyroid gland. We have cloned the human thyroglobulin gene from cosmid and phage libraries and constructed a complete restriction map. The gene encodes an 8.7 kb mRNA, covers at

  15. Recent aspects of thyroglobulin in physiology and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassane Sidibe, E.; Dangou, J.M.; Mbodj, M.

    2004-01-01

    The thyroglobulin (tg), strongly concentrated in the colloid, through a recycling to the colloid or by transcytosis to the blood stream, (function attributed to an unidentified N -Acetylglucosamine ) is linked to megalin to avoid lysosomal pathway and is delivered by a transepithelial transport (transcytosis). The promoter of this human thyroglobulin is tightly dependent on TTF-1 factor (thyroid-specific transcription factor) and Pax 8. Human recombinant TSH can increase serum baseline levels of thyroglobulin in a study from 25 to 30,000 ng/ml reflecting in part the heterogeneity of the population studied. The 131 Iodide Scan diagnosis and the measurement of serum thyroglobulin are the follow-up cornerstone that offer the opportunity in the detection of recurrence or ongoing cancer in early stage. Until now the thyroglobulin has been used in the same time than nuclear imaging. The Fluorine-18-fluoro deoxyglucose tomography positron emission plays a supplementary role in the localization of thyroid cancer recurrence sites. A control after increased post therapeutic thyroglobulin triggers a 131 Iodide scan and nuclear magnetic resonance study. In the follow-up of thyroidectomized patients with ablative radio-iodide, it is reasonable to treat patients that have an progressive increase of thyroglobulin levels but also to continue tight surveillance in those that have thyroglobulin concentrations that decrease or are stable. Fluorine-18 fluoro deoxyglucose positron emission tomography is useful in the cases with negative 131 Iodide scan and increase thyroglobulin levels. But this method has limits to find minimal disease. It is noteworthy that increased level of thyroglobulin is observed in iodine deficiency with 28.9% of world population concerned with goiter and 2% (11.2 million) with cretinism or 43 millions with mental retardation. Anti-thyroglobulin antibodies affect all the continuum of the clinical phenotype of autoimmune thyroid diseases suggesting a common

  16. Radioimmunoassay for determination of thyroglobulin in human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Cabrera, M.E.; Blanca Fernandez, S.; Baldor Navarro, F.; Rodriguez Gonzalez, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    We described the development and analytical evaluation of a radioimmunoassay with double antibody in liquid phase for human serum thyroglobulin determination using a set of reagents produced in the National Institute of Endocrinology. The reference interval for normal population was 5.7 - 44 ng/ml (X± 2DS; n=170). The intra-assay precipision was 8.1 % (control serum A) and 7.0 (control serum B) and the inter-assay precision was 9.1 % (control serum A) and 9.2 % (control serum B). The sensibility was 4.7 ng/ml and the recovery was 95 %

  17. T-cell receptor transfer into human T cells with ecotropic retroviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koste, L; Beissert, T; Hoff, H; Pretsch, L; Türeci, Ö; Sahin, U

    2014-05-01

    Adoptive T-cell transfer for cancer immunotherapy requires genetic modification of T cells with recombinant T-cell receptors (TCRs). Amphotropic retroviral vectors (RVs) used for TCR transduction for this purpose are considered safe in principle. Despite this, TCR-coding and packaging vectors could theoretically recombine to produce replication competent vectors (RCVs), and transduced T-cell preparations must be proven free of RCV. To eliminate the need for RCV testing, we transduced human T cells with ecotropic RVs so potential RCV would be non-infectious for human cells. We show that transfection of synthetic messenger RNA encoding murine cationic amino-acid transporter 1 (mCAT-1), the receptor for murine retroviruses, enables efficient transient ecotropic transduction of human T cells. mCAT-1-dependent transduction was more efficient than amphotropic transduction performed in parallel, and preferentially targeted naive T cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that ecotropic TCR transduction results in antigen-specific restimulation of primary human T cells. Thus, ecotropic RVs represent a versatile, safe and potent tool to prepare T cells for the adoptive transfer.

  18. Radioimmunological proof of thyroglobulin antibodies in humans by the use of a double antibody method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waller, V.

    1982-01-01

    Thyroid antibodies, especially thyroglobulin antibodies, allow themselves to be proven with the double antibody method, in competitive radio binding assays and with the solid phase technique. These methods offer advantages relative to sensitivity and quantifiability. In this work a sensitive radioimmunoassay as a double antibody method was worked out whereby a 125 I-thyroglobulin/thyroglobulin antibody immune complex was precipitated out using anti-human immunoglobulin. The measured results from the radioimmunoassay show a good correlation with the results of the immune histological findings. A high to very high Tg antibody level occurs with autoimmune thyroiditis (80%), primary hypothyroidism (74%) and hyperthyroidism (70%). The control values with healthy people came to less than 5% specific binding. In correlation with the results of other authors this method is advantageous relative to test start and evaluation procedures. (orig.) [de

  19. Natural autoantibodies and complement promote the uptake of a self antigen, human thyroglobulin, by B cells and the proliferation of thyroglobulin-reactive CD4(+) T cells in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Leslie, R G; Jepsen, B S

    2001-01-01

    of complement receptor types 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21). T cell responsiveness to Tg was examined in a preparation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cultured in the presence of autologous serum. A subset of CD4(+) T cells exhibited a dose-dependent proliferative response to Tg, which...... cells are prerequisites for the proliferation of Tg-reactive CD4(+) T cells, suggesting a novel role for natural autoantibodies and complement in the regulation of autoreactivity under physiological conditions....... was strongly inhibited by complement inactivation and by immunoabsorption of Tg-reactive antibodies. Furthermore, this T cell response was abrogated by depletion of B cells from the PBMC culture. These data imply that uptake of complement-opsonized Tg / anti-Tg complexes and subsequent presentation of Tg by B...

  20. Cathepsin C and plasma glutamate carboxypeptidase secreted from Fischer rat thyroid cells liberate thyroxin from the N-terminus of thyroglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suban, Dejan; Zajc, Tajana; Renko, Miha; Turk, Boris; Turk, Vito; Dolenc, Iztok

    2012-03-01

    The release of a thyroid hormone from thyroglobulin is controlled by a complex regulatory system. We focused on the extracellular action of two lysosomal enzymes, cathepsin C (catC, dipeptidyl peptidase I) and PGCP (lysosomal dipeptidase), on thyroglobulin, and their ability to liberate the hormone thyroxin. Cathepsin C, an exopeptidase, removes dipeptides from the N-terminus of substrates, and PGCP hydrolyses dipeptides to amino acids. In vitro experiments proved that cathepsin C removes up to 12 amino acids from the N-terminus of porcine thyroglobulin, including a dipeptide with thyroxin on position 5. The newly formed N-terminus, Arg-Pro-, was not hydrolysed further by cathepsin C. Cell culture experiments with FRTL-5 cell line showed localization of cathepsin C and PGCP and their secretion into the medium. Secretion of the active cathepsin C from FRTL-5 cells is stimulated by TSH, insulin, and/or somatostatin. The released enzymes liberate thyroxin from porcine thyroglobulin added to media. The hormone liberation can be reduced by synthetic inhibitors of cysteine proteinases and metalloproteinases. Additionally, we show that TSH, insulin, and/or somatostatin induce up-regulation of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1, the enzyme responsible for the initiation of biosynthesis of hybrid and complex N-glycosylation of proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Importance of the content and localization of tyrosine residues for thyroxine formation within the N-terminal part of human thyroglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, M. T.; Sijmons, C. C.; Bakker, O.; Ris-Stalpers, C.; de Vijlder, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    Thyroxine (T4) is formed by coupling of iodinated tyrosine residues within thyroglobulin (TG). In mature TG, some iodinated tyrosine residues are involved preferentially in T4 formation. In order to investigate the specific role of various tyrosine residues in T4 formation, N-terminal TG fragments

  2. Thyroglobulin for hyperthyroidism and thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sijperda, A.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis describes the metabolism and the estimation of thyroglobulin in the circulation. The relations between the thyroglobulin and calcitonin level in the circulation of patients suffering from hyperthyroidism after treatment with radioactive iodine are discussed. The thyroglobulin level of patients suffering from thyroid carcinoma are considered

  3. CD1 and mycobacterial lipids activate human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Moody, D Branch

    2015-03-01

    For decades, proteins were thought to be the sole or at least the dominant source of antigens for T cells. Studies in the 1990s demonstrated that CD1 proteins and mycobacterial lipids form specific targets of human αβ T cells. The molecular basis by which T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize CD1-lipid complexes is now well understood. Many types of mycobacterial lipids function as antigens in the CD1 system, and new studies done with CD1 tetramers identify T-cell populations in the blood of tuberculosis patients. In human populations, a fundamental difference between the CD1 and major histocompatibility complex systems is that all humans express nearly identical CD1 proteins. Correspondingly, human CD1 responsive T cells show evidence of conserved TCRs. In addition to natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells), conserved TCRs define other subsets of human T cells, including germline-encoded mycolyl-reactive (GEM) T cells. The simple immunogenetics of the CD1 system and new investigative tools to measure T-cell responses in humans now creates a situation in which known lipid antigens can be developed as immunodiagnostic and immunotherapeutic reagents for tuberculosis disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Metabolic Adaptation of Human CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cells to T-Cell Receptor-Mediated Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Jones

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Linking immunometabolic adaptation to T-cell function provides insight for the development of new therapeutic approaches in multiple disease settings. T-cell activation and downstream effector functions of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells are controlled by the strength of interaction between the T-cell receptor (TCR and peptides presented by human leukocyte antigens (pHLA. The role of TCR–pHLA interactions in modulating T-cell metabolism is unknown. Here, for the first time, we explore the relative contributions of the main metabolic pathways to functional responses in human CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Increased expression of hexokinase II accompanied by higher basal glycolysis is demonstrated in CD4+ T-cells; cytokine production in CD8+ T-cells is more reliant on oxidative phosphorylation. Using antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones and altered peptide ligands, we demonstrate that binding affinity tunes the underlying metabolic shift. Overall, this study provides important new insight into how metabolic pathways are controlled during antigen-specific activation of human T-cells.

  5. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dedifferentiation of Human Primary Thyrocytes into Multilineage Progenitor Cells without Gene Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenko, Vladimir; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Matsuse, Michiko; Ohtsuru, Akira; Kumagai, Atsushi; Uga, Tatsuya; Yano, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Yuji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-01-01

    While identification and isolation of adult stem cells have potentially important implications, recent reports regarding dedifferentiation/reprogramming from differentiated cells have provided another clue to gain insight into source of tissue stem/progenitor cells. In this study, we developed a novel culture system to obtain dedifferentiated progenitor cells from normal human thyroid tissues. After enzymatic digestion, primary thyrocytes, expressing thyroglobulin, vimentin and cytokeratin-18, were cultured in a serum-free medium called SAGM. Although the vast majority of cells died, a small proportion (∼0.5%) survived and proliferated. During initial cell expansion, thyroglobulin/cytokeratin-18 expression was gradually declined in the proliferating cells. Moreover, sorted cells expressing thyroid peroxidase gave rise to proliferating clones in SAGM. These data suggest that those cells are derived from thyroid follicular cells or at least thyroid-committed cells. The SAGM-grown cells did not express any thyroid-specific genes. However, after four-week incubation with FBS and TSH, cytokeratin-18, thyroglobulin, TSH receptor, PAX8 and TTF1 expressions re-emerged. Moreover, surprisingly, the cells were capable of differentiating into neuronal or adipogenic lineage depending on differentiating conditions. In summary, we have developed a novel system to generate multilineage progenitor cells from normal human thyroid tissues. This seems to be achieved by dedifferentiation of thyroid follicular cells. The presently described culture system may be useful for regenerative medicine, but the primary importance will be as a tool to elucidate the mechanisms of thyroid diseases. PMID:21556376

  7. T-cell response in human leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Kemp, K; Ismail, A

    1999-01-01

    In the present communication we provide evidence for the existence of a Th1/Th2 dichotomy in the T-cell response to Leishmania antigens in human leishmaniasis. Our data suggest that the pattern of IL-4 and IFN-gamma response is polarised in these patients. Lymphocytes from individuals recovered...... from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) responded by IFN-gamma production following stimulation with Leishmania antigens whereas cells from patients recovered from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) showed a mixed pattern of IFN-gamma and IL-4 responses. The cells producing these cytokines were predominantly CD4......+. Furthermore, IL-10 plays an important role in the development of post kala azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) from VL. The balance between the parasitic-specific T-cell response plays an important regulatory role in determining the outcome of Leishmania infections in humans....

  8. Immunosuppressive Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Induce Human Regulatory T Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Clémence; Saviane, Gaëlle; Pini, Jonathan; Belaïd, Nourhène; Dhib, Gihen; Voha, Christine; Ibáñez, Lidia; Boutin, Antoine; Mazure, Nathalie M; Wakkach, Abdelilah; Blin-Wakkach, Claudine; Rouleau, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    Despite mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered as a promising source of cells to modulate immune functions on cells from innate and adaptive immune systems, their clinical use remains restricted (few number, limited in vitro expansion, absence of a full phenotypic characterization, few insights on their in vivo fate). Standardized MSCs derived in vitro from human-induced pluripotent stem (huIPS) cells, remediating part of these issues, are considered as well as a valuable tool for therapeutic approaches, but their functions remained to be fully characterized. We generated multipotent MSCs derived from huiPS cells (huiPS-MSCs), and focusing on their immunosuppressive activity, we showed that human T-cell activation in coculture with huiPS-MSCs was significantly reduced. We also observed the generation of functional CD4 + FoxP3 + regulatory T (Treg) cells. Further tested in vivo in a model of human T-cell expansion in immune-deficient NSG mice, huiPS-MSCs immunosuppressive activity prevented the circulation and the accumulation of activated human T cells. Intracytoplasmic labeling of cytokines produced by the recovered T cells showed reduced percentages of human-differentiated T cells producing Th1 inflammatory cytokines. By contrast, T cells producing IL-10 and FoxP3 + -Treg cells, absent in non-treated animals, were detected in huiPS-MSCs treated mice. For the first time, these results highlight the immunosuppressive activity of the huiPS-MSCs on human T-cell stimulation with a concomitant generation of human Treg cells in vivo . They may favor the development of new tools and strategies based on the use of huiPS cells and their derivatives for the induction of immune tolerance.

  9. Immunosuppressive Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Induce Human Regulatory T Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Roux

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are considered as a promising source of cells to modulate immune functions on cells from innate and adaptive immune systems, their clinical use remains restricted (few number, limited in vitro expansion, absence of a full phenotypic characterization, few insights on their in vivo fate. Standardized MSCs derived in vitro from human-induced pluripotent stem (huIPS cells, remediating part of these issues, are considered as well as a valuable tool for therapeutic approaches, but their functions remained to be fully characterized. We generated multipotent MSCs derived from huiPS cells (huiPS-MSCs, and focusing on their immunosuppressive activity, we showed that human T-cell activation in coculture with huiPS-MSCs was significantly reduced. We also observed the generation of functional CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T (Treg cells. Further tested in vivo in a model of human T-cell expansion in immune-deficient NSG mice, huiPS-MSCs immunosuppressive activity prevented the circulation and the accumulation of activated human T cells. Intracytoplasmic labeling of cytokines produced by the recovered T cells showed reduced percentages of human-differentiated T cells producing Th1 inflammatory cytokines. By contrast, T cells producing IL-10 and FoxP3+-Treg cells, absent in non-treated animals, were detected in huiPS-MSCs treated mice. For the first time, these results highlight the immunosuppressive activity of the huiPS-MSCs on human T-cell stimulation with a concomitant generation of human Treg cells in vivo. They may favor the development of new tools and strategies based on the use of huiPS cells and their derivatives for the induction of immune tolerance.

  10. Thyroglobulin Gene Mutation with Cold Nodule on Thyroid Scintigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Kahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroglobulin gene mutation is a rare cause of congenital hypothyroidism, but thyroglobulin gene mutations are thought to be associated with thyroid cancer development. A 21-year-old Japanese man treated with levothyroxine for congenital hypothyroidism had an enlarged thyroid gland with undetectable serum thyroglobulin despite elevated serum TSH level. The patient was diagnosed with thyroglobulin gene mutation, with compound heterozygosity for Gly304Cys missense mutation and Arg432X nonsense mutation. Ultrasonography showed a hypovascular large tumor in the left lobe that appeared as a cold nodule on thyroid scintigraphy. He underwent total thyroidectomy, but pathological study did not reveal findings of thyroid carcinoma, but rather a hyperplastic nodule with hemorrhage. Strong cytoplasmic thyroglobulin immunostaining was observed, but sodium iodide symporter immunostaining was hardly detected in the hyperplastic nodule. The clinical characteristics of patients with thyroglobulin gene mutations are diverse, and some patients are diagnosed by chance on examination of goiter in adults. The presence of thyroid tumors that appear as cold nodules on thyroid scintigraphy should consider the potential for thyroid carcinoma, if the patient has relatively low serum thyroglobulin concentration in relation to the degree of TSH without thyroglobulin autoantibody.

  11. Seric thyroglobulin behavior in thyroid carcinoma patients treated with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viterbo, B.G.

    1988-01-01

    The thyroid carcinomas, mainly the differentiated ones, for involving originally young patients and for showing relatively benign course, require a long term follow-up. So, every new available method that may be useful for the follow-up of these patients soon becomes very important. The advent of radioimmunoassay made the determination of thyroglobulin seric levels possible and this practice has been incorporated into medical routine in the past few years. The analysis of the results permit to conclude that the administration of 131 I therapeutic dose to differentiated and medular thyroid carcinoma patients is followed by imediate and transitory rise in circulating thyroglobulin levels. It denotes immediate effect of the 131 I that can be observed in a short period of time independently of L-T3 administration and endogen TSH levels. After this period the thyroglobulin is at least in a partial way, TSH-dependent. (author) [pt

  12. Optimization of methods for the genetic modification of human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Mahmood Y; Vacaflores, Aldo; Houtman, Jon Cd

    2015-11-01

    CD4(+) T cells are not only critical in the fight against parasitic, bacterial and viral infections, but are also involved in many autoimmune and pathological disorders. Studies of protein function in human T cells are confined to techniques such as RNA interference (RNAi) owing to ethical reasons and relative simplicity of these methods. However, introduction of RNAi or genes into primary human T cells is often hampered by toxic effects from transfection or transduction methods that yield cell numbers inadequate for downstream assays. Additionally, the efficiency of recombinant DNA expression is frequently low because of multiple factors including efficacy of the method and strength of the targeting RNAs. Here, we describe detailed protocols that will aid in the study of primary human CD4(+) T cells. First, we describe a method for development of effective microRNA/shRNAs using available online algorithms. Second, we illustrate an optimized protocol for high efficacy retroviral or lentiviral transduction of human T-cell lines. Importantly, we demonstrate that activated primary human CD4(+) T cells can be transduced efficiently with lentiviruses, with a highly activated population of T cells receiving the largest number of copies of integrated DNA. We also illustrate a method for efficient lentiviral transduction of hard-to-transduce un-activated primary human CD4(+) T cells. These protocols will significantly assist in understanding the activation and function of human T cells and will ultimately aid in the development or improvement of current drugs that target human CD4(+) T cells.

  13. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...... induced apoptosis in several activated T-cell populations and T-cell lines, including T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-CD3-negative T-cell lines. In contrast, RPE cells induced little or no apoptosis in resting peripheral T cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies, which...

  14. Human influenza viruses and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Emma J; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Clemens, E Bridie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite new strain-specific vaccines being available annually. As IAV-specific CD8(+) T cells promote viral control in the absence of neutralizing antibodies, and can mediate cross-reactive immunity toward distinct IAVs to drive rapid recovery from both mild and severe influenza disease, there is great interest in developing a universal T cell vaccine. However, despite detailed studies in mouse models of influenza virus infection, there is still a paucity of data on human epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to IAVs. This review focuses on our current understanding of human CD8(+) T cell immunity against distinct IAVs and discusses the possibility of achieving a CD8(+) T cell mediated-vaccine that protects against multiple, distinct IAV strains across diverse human populations. We also review the importance of CD8(+) T cell immunity in individuals highly susceptible to severe influenza infection, including those hospitalised with influenza, the elderly and Indigenous populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of radioimmunoassay of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourme, J.; Dessaint, J.P.; Capron, A.

    1985-01-01

    A statistical analysis is performed on the results of 881 determinations of thyroglobulin antibodies in humans. Antibodies were assayed comparatively by radioimmunoassay using a sandwich method and by tanned red cell haemagglutination. A very good concordance was found between the two techniques, apart from the low titer zone. A significant correlation was observed between on the one side, the radioactivity index of the diluted serum, defined as the increment of radioactivity bound by undiluted patient serum over the positive threshold, divided by this threshold, and, on the other side, the antibody titer, i.e. the reciprocal of the highest serum dilution superior to the positive threshold by radioimmunoassay. The corresponding linear regression allows to define a arbitrary unit system which associates values of the radioactivity index with an average antibody titer [fr

  16. Lactobacilli activate human dendritic cells that skew T cells toward T helper 1 polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadzadeh, Mansour; Olson, Scott; Kalina, Warren V; Ruthel, Gordon; Demmin, Gretchen L; Warfield, Kelly L; Bavari, Sina; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2005-02-22

    Professional antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) are critical in regulating T cell immune responses at both systemic and mucosal sites. Many Lactobacillus species are normal members of the human gut microflora and most are regarded as safe when administered as probiotics. Because DCs can naturally or therapeutically encounter lactobacilli, we investigated the effects of several well defined strains, representing three species of Lactobacillus on human myeloid DCs (MDCs) and found that they modulated the phenotype and functions of human MDCs. Lactobacillus-exposed MDCs up-regulated HLA-DR, CD83, CD40, CD80, and CD86 and secreted high levels of IL-12 and IL-18, but not IL-10. IL-12 was sustained in MDCs exposed to all three Lactobacillus species in the presence of LPS from Escherichia coli, whereas LPS-induced IL-10 was greatly inhibited. MDCs activated with lactobacilli clearly skewed CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells to T helper 1 and Tc1 polarization, as evidenced by secretion of IFN-gamma, but not IL-4 or IL-13. These results emphasize a potentially important role for lactobacilli in modulating immunological functions of DCs and suggest that certain strains could be particularly advantageous as vaccine adjuvants, by promoting DCs to regulate T cell responses toward T helper 1 and Tc1 pathways.

  17. Unique and Common Features of Innate-Like Human Vδ2+ γδT Cells and Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells

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    Nicholas M. Provine

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells are innate-like T cells abundant in humans that can be activated in a TCR-independent manner by inflammatory and antiviral cytokines. In humans, the capacity for TCR-independent activation is functionally linked to a transcriptional program that can be identified by the expression of the C-type lectin receptor, CD161. In addition to MAIT cells, it has been demonstrated that a subset of γδT cells expresses CD161 and can be activated by TCR-independent cytokine stimulation. In this study, we sought to clarify the nature of cytokine-responsive human γδT cells. We could link CD161 expression on Vδ2+ versus Vδ1+ γδT cells to the observation that Vδ2+ γδT cells, but not Vδ1+ γδT cells, robustly produced IFN-γ upon stimulation with a variety of cytokine combinations. Interestingly, both CD161+ and CD161− Vδ2+ γδT cells responded to these stimuli, with increased functionality within the CD161+ subset. This innate-like responsiveness corresponded to high expression of PLZF and IL-18Rα, analogous to MAIT cells. Vδ2+ γδT cells in human duodenum and liver maintained a CD161+ IL-18Rα+ phenotype and produced IFN-γ in response to IL-12 and IL-18 stimulation. In contrast to MAIT cells, we could not detect IL-17A production but observed higher steady-state expression of Granzyme B by Vδ2+ γδT cells. Finally, we investigated the frequency and functionality of γδT cells in the context of chronic hepatitis C virus infection, as MAIT cells are reduced in frequency in this disease. By contrast, Vδ2+ γδT cells were maintained in frequency and displayed unimpaired IFN-γ production in response to cytokine stimulation. In sum, human Vδ2+ γδT cells are a functionally distinct population of cytokine-responsive innate-like T cells that is abundant in blood and tissues with similarities to human MAIT cells.

  18. Serum thyroglobulin in the management of patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsano, C.P.; Skosey, C.; DeGroot, L.J.; Refetoff, S.

    1982-01-01

    We have reviewed our experience with the management of patients with thyroid cancer to assess the potential benefits of employing the serum thyroglobulin assay in patient management programs and to determine the optimal conditions for this application. Serum thyroglobulin levels were found to be more reliable when obtained from hypothyroid patients. Levels of thyroglobulin greater than 10 ng/mL appeared to be abnormally elevated in both thyroidectomized patients prior to radioactive iodine therapy (group 1) and in thyroidectomized patients after radioactive iodine therapy (group 2). Elevated thyroglobulin levels were found to be useful indicators of the presence of metastatic disease, whereas normal thyroglobulin levels were reliable indicators of the absence of metastases. In group 1 patients, elevated thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the presence of important total body scan uptake. In group 2 patients, normal thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the absence of total body scan uptake. The serum thyroglobulin assay can substantially reduce the need for repetitive total body scanning in the follow-up of group 2 patients with thyroid cancer

  19. Genetically-modified pig mesenchymal stromal cells: xenoantigenicity and effect on human T-cell xenoresponses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Ezzelarab, Corin; Wilhite, Tyler; Kumar, Goutham; Hara, Hidetaka; Ayares, David; Cooper, David K C

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are being investigated as immunomodulatory therapy in the field of transplantation, particularly islet transplantation. While MSC can regenerate across species barriers, the immunoregulatory influence of genetically modified pig MSC (pMSC) on the human and non-human primate T-cell responses has not been studied. Mesenchymal stromal cells from wild-type (WT), α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene knockout (GTKO) and GTKO pigs transgenic for the human complement-regulatory protein CD46 (GTKO/CD46) were isolated and tested for differentiation. Antibody binding and T-cell responses to WT and GTKO pMSC in comparison with GTKO pig aortic endothelial cells (pAEC) were investigated. The expression of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class II (SLA II) was tested. Costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 mRNA levels were measured. Human T-cell proliferation and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to GTKO and GTKO/CD46 pMSC in comparison with human MSC (hMSC) were evaluated. α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene knockout and GTKO/CD46 pMSC isolation and differentiation were achieved in vitro. Binding of human antibodies and T-cell responses were lower to GTKO than those to WT pMSC. Human and baboon (naïve and sensitized) antibody binding were significantly lower to GTKO pMSC than to GTKO pAEC. Before activation, human CD4(+) T-cell response to GTKO pMSC was significantly weaker than that to GTKO pAEC, even after pIFN-γ activation. More than 99% of GTKO/CD46 pMSC expressed hCD46. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and CD4(+) T-cell responses to GTKO and GTKO/CD46 pMSC were comparable with those to hMSC, and all were significantly lower than to GTKO pAEC. GTKO/CD46 pMSC downregulated human T-cell proliferation as efficiently as hMSC. The level of proinflammatory cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and sCD40L correlated with the downregulation of T-cell proliferation by all types of MSC. Genetically modified pMSC is significantly less

  20. Heterosybtypic T-cell immunity to influenza in humans: challenges for universal T-cell influenza vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranya eSridhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV remains a significant global health issue causing annual epidemics, pandemics and sporadic human infections with highly pathogenic avian or swine influenza viruses. Current inactivated and live vaccines are the mainstay of the public health response to influenza although vaccine efficacy is lower against antigenically distinct viral strains. The first pandemic of the 21st century underlined the urgent need to develop new vaccines capable of protection against a broad range of influenza strains. Such universal influenza vaccines are based on the idea of heterosubtypic immunity wherein immune responses to epitopes conserved across IAV strains can confer protection against subsequent infection and disease. T-cells recognising conserved antigens are a key contributor to reducing viral load and limiting disease severity during heterosubtypic infection in animal models. Recent studies undertaken during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic provided key insights into the role of cross-reactive T-cells in mediating heterosubtypic protection in humans. This review focuses on human influenza to discuss the epidemiological observations that underpin cross-protective immunity, the role of T-cells as key players in mediating heterosubtypic immunity including recent data from natural history cohort studies and the ongoing clinical development of T-cell inducing universal influenza vaccines. The challenges and knowledge gaps for developing vaccines to generate long-lived protective T-cell responses is discussed.

  1. Differential responses of human regulatory T cells (Treg and effector T cells to rapamycin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Strauss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The immunosuppressive drug rapamycin (RAPA promotes the expansion of CD4(+ CD25(highFoxp3(+ regulatory T cells via mechanisms that remain unknown. Here, we studied expansion, IL-2R-gamma chain signaling, survival pathways and resistance to apoptosis in human Treg responding to RAPA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CD4(+CD25(+ and CD4(+CD25(neg T cells were isolated from PBMC of normal controls (n = 21 using AutoMACS. These T cell subsets were cultured in the presence of anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies and 1000 IU/mL IL-2 for 3 to 6 weeks. RAPA (1-100 nM was added to half of the cultures. After harvest, the cell phenotype, signaling via the PI3K/mTOR and STAT pathways, expression of survival proteins and Annexin V binding were determined and compared to values obtained with freshly-separated CD4(+CD25(high and CD4(+CD25(neg T cells. Suppressor function was tested in co-cultures with autologous CFSE-labeled CD4(+CD25(neg or CD8(+CD25(neg T-cell responders. The frequency and suppressor activity of Treg were increased after culture of CD4(+CD25(+ T cells in the presence of 1-100 nM RAPA (p<0.001. RAPA-expanded Treg were largely CD4(+CD25(highFoxp3(+ cells and were resistant to apoptosis, while CD4(+CD25(neg T cells were sensitive. Only Treg upregulated anti-apoptotic and down-regulated pro-apoptotic proteins. Treg expressed higher levels of the PTEN protein than CD4(+CD25(neg cells. Activated Treg+/-RAPA preferentially phosphorylated STAT5 and STAT3 and did not utilize the PI3K/mTOR pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: RAPA favors Treg expansion and survival by differentially regulating signaling, proliferation and sensitivity to apoptosis of human effector T cells and Treg after TCR/IL-2 activation.

  2. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sandalova

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR, proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV. CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  3. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Schjerling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  4. Generation of mature T cells from human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in artificial thymic organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seet, Christopher S; He, Chongbin; Bethune, Michael T; Li, Suwen; Chick, Brent; Gschweng, Eric H; Zhu, Yuhua; Kim, Kenneth; Kohn, Donald B; Baltimore, David; Crooks, Gay M; Montel-Hagen, Amélie

    2017-05-01

    Studies of human T cell development require robust model systems that recapitulate the full span of thymopoiesis, from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) through to mature T cells. Existing in vitro models induce T cell commitment from human HSPCs; however, differentiation into mature CD3 + TCR-αβ + single-positive CD8 + or CD4 + cells is limited. We describe here a serum-free, artificial thymic organoid (ATO) system that supports efficient and reproducible in vitro differentiation and positive selection of conventional human T cells from all sources of HSPCs. ATO-derived T cells exhibited mature naive phenotypes, a diverse T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire and TCR-dependent function. ATOs initiated with TCR-engineered HSPCs produced T cells with antigen-specific cytotoxicity and near-complete lack of endogenous TCR Vβ expression, consistent with allelic exclusion of Vβ-encoding loci. ATOs provide a robust tool for studying human T cell differentiation and for the future development of stem-cell-based engineered T cell therapies.

  5. In vivo modelling of normal and pathological human T-cell development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiekmeijer, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes novel insights in human T-cell development by transplanting human HSPCs in severe immunodeficient NSG mice. First, an in vivo model was optimized to allow engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells derived from human bone marrow. This model was used to study aberrant human T-cell

  6. Cloning the interleukin 1 receptor from human T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, J.E.; Acres, R.B.; Grubin, C.E.; McMahan, C.J.; Wignall, J.M.; March, C.J.; Dower, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    cDNA clones of the interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptor expressed in a human T-cell clone have been isolated by using a murine IL-1 receptor cDNA as a probe. The human and mouse receptors show a high degree of sequence conservation. Both are integral membrane proteins possessing a single membrane-spanning segment. Similar to the mouse receptor, the human IL-1 receptor contains a large cytoplasmic region and an extracellular, IL-1 binding portion composed of three immunoglobulin-like domains. When transfected into COS cells, the human IL-1 receptor cDNA clone leads to expression of two different affinity classes of receptors, with K a values indistinguishable from those determined for IL-1 receptors in the original T-cell clone. An IL-1 receptor expressed in human dermal fibroblasts has also been cloned and sequenced and found to be identical to the IL-1 receptor expressed in T cells

  7. T cell ignorance is bliss: T cells are not tolerized by Langerhans cells presenting human papillomavirus antigens in the absence of costimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Woodham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 infections are intra-epithelial, and thus, HPV16 is known to interact with Langerhans cells (LCs, the resident epithelial antigen-presenting cells (APCs. The current paradigm for APC-mediated induction of T cell anergy is through delivery of T cell receptor signals via peptides on MHC molecules (signal 1, but without costimulation (signal 2. We previously demonstrated that LCs exposed to HPV16 in vitro present HPV antigens to T cells without costimulation, but it remained uncertain if such T cells would remain ignorant, become anergic, or in the case of CD4+ T cells, differentiate into Tregs. Here we demonstrate that Tregs were not induced by LCs presenting only signal 1, and through a series of in vitro immunizations show that CD8+ T cells receiving signal 1+2 from LCs weeks after consistently receiving signal 1 are capable of robust effector functions. Importantly, this indicates that T cells are not tolerized but instead remain ignorant to HPV, and are activated given the proper signals. Keywords: T cell anergy, T cell ignorance, Immune tolerance, Human papillomavirus, HPV16, Langerhans cells

  8. Effect of Thyroglobulin Autoantibodies on the Metabolic Clearance of Serum Thyroglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrofa, Francesco; Ricci, Debora; Bottai, Sara; Brozzi, Federica; Chiovato, Luca; Piaggi, Paolo; Marinò, Michele; Vitti, Paolo

    2018-03-01

    In order to establish whether thyroglobulin autoantibodies (TgAb) influence the metabolic clearance of thyroglobulin (Tg) in humans, serum Tg and TgAb were correlated shortly after radioiodine ( 131 I) treatment. Samples were collected from 30 consecutive patients undergoing 131 I activity for Graves' hyperthyroidism at the time of treatment and every 15 days thereafter, up to 90 days. Tg and TgAb were measured by immunometric assays (functional sensitivities: 0.1 ng/mL and 8 IU/mL). Tg was detectable in all patients at day 0. Tg concentrations rose from a mean of 33.2 ng/mL [confidence interval (CI) 17.8-61.0 ng/mL] at day 0 to a mean of 214.6 ng/mL [CI 116.9-393.4 ng/mL] at day 30 and then steadily decreased, reaching the lowest concentration at day 90 (M = 10.9 ng/mL [CI 5.5-20.9 ng/mL]). Compared to their levels at day 0 (M = 23.6 IU/mL [CI 10.5-52.9 IU/mL]), TgAb remained stable through day 15 and then gradually increased up to a mean of 116.6 IU/mL [CI 51.9-262.2 IU/mL] at day 90. Patients were then split into two groups according to their TgAb status at day 0: undetectable (metabolic clearance of Tg, supporting the concept that their interference in the measurement of Tg is mainly due to an in vivo effect.

  9. The Study on the Thyroglobulin in Thyroid Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suk Keun; Lim, Soo Duk; Lee, Mun Ho

    1970-01-01

    In recent with development of immuno-electrophoresis, more accurate analysis of the serum protein became possible. However, there is few reports in the literature which investigated the changes of the immunoglobulin compared with electrophoretically fractioned serum thyroglobulin in the patients with various thyroid diseases. The purpose of this report is to investigate the changes of thyroglobulin in various thyroid diseases by the method of immuno-electrophoresis and to compare the results with serum protein fractionated by the method of agar-gel micro-electrophoresis. Sera from 9 patients with diffuse toxic goiter, 2 nodular nontoxic goiter, 2 thyroiditis, 3 hypothyroidism, 1 thyroid cancer, 7 cystic degeneration of the thyroid gland, and 10 normal subject were taken. All cases were confirmed by various laboratory thyroid function tests and thyroid needle biopsy. Immuno-electrophoretic analysis of the serum were performed by Scheidegger's modified micro-immuno-electrophoretic method. The antiserum was obtained from the Travenol Laboratories International, Hyland Products Division and was rabbit anti-human thyroglobulin. Microscope slide agar-gel electrophoresis for serum protein fractionation was performed at 4 .deg. C using veronal buffer, pH 8.6 and ionic strength 0.05, with 54 volts and 2.8 mA for 60 minutes. The fractionated slide was stained with 0.1% thiazine red. The results were as follows: 1) Increase of immune-globulin macroglobulin (IgM), alphaglobulin, and immune-globulin A (IgA) by 95.8%, 100%, 29.2% respectively was found in the serum from various thyroid diseases. 2) Thyroglobulin fraction was found to be increased in 50%, no change in 41.7%, and no line in 8.3% with all of the various goiter patients. On the other hand, 10 normal control group showed only 2 cases of increase, 5 cases of no change and 3 cases of no line.

  10. Human immunodeficiencies related to APC/T cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinos eKallikourdis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary event for initiating adaptive immune responses is the encounter between T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells (APC in the T cell area of secondary lymphoid organs and the formation of highly organized inter-cellular junctions referred to as the immune synapses. In vivo live-cell imaging of APC-T cell interactions combined to functional studies unveiled that T cell fate is dictated, in large part, by the stability of the initial contact. Immune cell interaction is equally important during delivery of T cell help to B cells and for the killing of target cells by cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. The critical role of contact dynamics and synapse stability on the immune response is well illustrated by human immune deficiencies in which disease pathogenesis is linked to altered adhesion or defective cross-talk between the synaptic partners. Here we will discuss in details the mechanisms of defective APC-T cell communications in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS and in warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, myelokathexis syndrome (WHIM. In addition, we will summarize the evidences pointing to a compromised conjugate formation in WIP deficiency, DOCK8 deficiency and X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome.

  11. Control of treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma by measurement of thyroglobulin in serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, J.; Schneider, C.

    1978-01-01

    The presence of thyroglobulin in serum of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma was studied by a specific radioimmunoassay. Seventy-three patients with thyroid carcinomata were examined, 16 of whom had pulmonary or skeletal metastase, 11 local metastases, and the others no metastases. Patients with generalized metastases had very high serum thyroglobulin concentrations while those with local metastases had slightly elevated or normal concentrations. Those with remaining thyroid tissue had mainly normal thyroglobulin levels and patients with neither metastases nor remaining thyroid tissue had undetectable serum thyroglobulin. In seven patients with metastases it was possible to observe the development of serum thyroglobulin after 131 I treatment. In all cases the serum thyroglobulin concentration paralleled the development of the clinical status. Elevated serum thyroglobulin was also found in benign thyroid diseases such as hyperthyroidism and endemic goitre. Measurement of thyroglobulin in serum is therefore of little value in differentiating between benign and malignant thyroid diseases, but it is a good method for the follow-up control of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinomata. Because normal thyroglobulin levels do not exclude local metastases, additional examinations are necessary if normal thyroglobulin levels are found. When thyroglobulin is undetectable, metastases can be excluded and the measurement of thyroglobulin in serum can replace all other methods in the follow-up control. (author)

  12. Dynamics of human T-cell lymphotropic virus I (HTLV-I) infection of CD4+ T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katri, Patricia; Ruan, Shigui

    2004-11-01

    Stilianakis and Seydel (Bull. Math. Biol., 1999) proposed an ODE model that describes the T-cell dynamics of human T-cell lymphotropic virus I (HTLV-I) infection and the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Their model consists of four components: uninfected healthy CD4+ T-cells, latently infected CD4+ T-cells, actively infected CD4+ T-cells, and ATL cells. Mathematical analysis that completely determines the global dynamics of this model has been done by Wang et al. (Math. Biosci., 2002). In this note, we first modify the parameters of the model to distinguish between contact and infectivity rates. Then we introduce a discrete time delay to the model to describe the time between emission of contagious particles by active CD4+ T-cells and infection of pure cells. Using the results in Culshaw and Ruan (Math. Biosci., 2000) in the analysis of time delay with respect to cell-free viral spread of HIV, we study the effect of time delay on the stability of the endemically infected equilibrium. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the results.

  13. Regulation of IFN regulatory factor 4 expression in human T cell leukemia virus-I-transformed T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sonia; Grandvaux, Nathalie; Mamane, Yael; Genin, Pierre; Azimi, Nazli; Waldmann, Thomas; Hiscott, John

    2002-09-15

    IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-4 is a lymphoid/myeloid-restricted member of the IRF transcription factor family that plays an essential role in the homeostasis and function of mature lymphocytes. IRF-4 expression is tightly regulated in resting primary T cells and is transiently induced at the mRNA and protein levels after activation by Ag-mimetic stimuli such as TCR cross-linking or treatment with phorbol ester and calcium ionophore (PMA/ionomycin). However, IRF-4 is constitutively upregulated in human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) infected T cells as a direct gene target for the HTLV-I Tax oncoprotein. In this study we demonstrate that chronic IRF-4 expression in HTLV-I-infected T lymphocytes is associated with a leukemic phenotype, and we examine the mechanisms by which continuous production of IRF-4 is achieved in HTLV-I-transformed T cells. IRF-4 expression in HTLV-1-infected cells is driven through activation of the NF-kappaB and NF-AT pathways, resulting in the binding of p50, p65, and c-Rel to the kappaB1 element and p50, c-Rel, and NF-ATp to the CD28RE element within the -617 to -209 region of the IRF-4 promoter. Furthermore, mutation of either the kappaB1 or CD28RE sites blocks Tax-mediated transactivation of the human IRF-4 promoter in T cells. These experiments constitute the first detailed analysis of human IRF-4 transcriptional regulation within the context of HTLV-I infection and transformation of CD4(+) T lymphocytes.

  14. Neoantigen landscape dynamics during human melanoma-T cell interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdegaal, Els M. E.; De Miranda, Noel F. C. C.; Visser, Marten

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of neoantigens that are formed as a consequence of DNA damage is likely to form a major driving force behind the clinical activity of cancer immunotherapies such as T-cell checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell therapy. Therefore, strategies to selectively enhance T-cell reactivity...... against genetically defined neoantigens are currently under development. In mouse models, T-cell pressure can sculpt the antigenicity of tumours, resulting in the emergence of tumours that lack defined mutant antigens. However, whether the T-cell-recognized neoantigen repertoire in human cancers...... by overall reduced expression of the genes or loss of the mutant alleles. Notably, loss of expression of T-cell-recognized neoantigens was accompanied by development of neoantigen-specific T-cell reactivity in tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes. These data demonstrate the dynamic interactions between cancer...

  15. Src-family kinases negatively regulate NFAT signaling in resting human T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Baer

    Full Text Available T cell signaling is required for activation of both natural and therapeutic T cells including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells. Identification of novel factors and pathways regulating T cell signaling may aid in development of effective T cell therapies. In resting human T cells, the majority of Src-family of tyrosine kinases (SFKs are inactive due to phosphorylation of a conserved carboxy-terminal tyrosine residue. Recently, a pool of enzymatically active SFKs has been identified in resting T cells; however, the significance of these is incompletely understood. Here, we characterized the role of active SFKs in resting human T cells. Pharmacologic inhibition of active SFKs enhanced distal TCR signaling as measured by IL-2 release and CD25 surface expression following TCR-independent activation. Mechanistically, inhibition of the active pool of SFKs induced nuclear translocation of NFAT1, and enhanced NFAT1-dependent signaling in resting T cells. The negative regulation of NFAT1 signaling was in part mediated by the Src-kinase Lck as human T cells lacking Lck had increased levels of nuclear NFAT1 and demonstrated enhanced NFAT1-dependent gene expression. Inhibition of active SFKs in resting primary human T cells also increased nuclear NFAT1 and enhanced NFAT1-dependent signaling. Finally, the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 and Cyclosporin A reversed the effect of SFKs inhibition on NFAT1. Together, these data identified a novel role of SFKs in preventing aberrant NFAT1 activation in resting T cells, and suggest that maintaining this pool of active SFKs in therapeutic T cells may increase the efficacy of T cell therapies.

  16. The T-ALL related gene BCL11B regulates the initial stages of human T-cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, V L; Luong, A; Li, F; Casero, D; Malvar, J; Kim, Y M; Bhatia, R; Crooks, G M; Parekh, C

    2017-11-01

    The initial stages of T-cell differentiation are characterized by a progressive commitment to the T-cell lineage, a process that involves the loss of alternative (myelo-erythroid, NK, B) lineage potentials. Aberrant differentiation during these stages can result in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). However, the mechanisms regulating the initial stages of human T-cell differentiation are obscure. Through loss of function studies, we showed BCL11B, a transcription factor recurrently mutated T-ALL, is essential for T-lineage commitment, particularly the repression of NK and myeloid potentials, and the induction of T-lineage genes, during the initial stages of human T-cell differentiation. In gain of function studies, BCL11B inhibited growth of and induced a T-lineage transcriptional program in T-ALL cells. We found previously unknown differentiation stage-specific DNA binding of BCL11B at multiple T-lineage genes; target genes showed BCL11B-dependent expression, suggesting a transcriptional activator role for BCL11B at these genes. Transcriptional analyses revealed differences in the regulatory actions of BCL11B between human and murine thymopoiesis. Our studies show BCL11B is a key regulator of the initial stages of human T-cell differentiation and delineate the BCL11B transcriptional program, enabling the dissection of the underpinnings of normal T-cell differentiation and providing a resource for understanding dysregulations in T-ALL.

  17. Broad T-cell receptor repertoire in T-lymphocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Wei Chang

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs have enormous potential for the treatment of inherited and acquired disorders. Recently, antigen-specific T lymphocytes derived from hiPSCs have been reported. However, T lymphocyte populations with broad T cell receptor (TCR diversity have not been generated. We report that hiPSCs derived from skin biopsy are capable of producing T lymphocyte populations with a broad TCR repertoire. In vitro T cell differentiation follows a similar developmental program as observed in vivo, indicated by sequential expression of CD7, intracellular CD3 and surface CD3. The γδ TCR locus is rearranged first and is followed by rearrangement of the αβ locus. Both γδ and αβ T cells display a diverse TCR repertoire. Upon activation, the cells express CD25, CD69, cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-2 and cytolytic proteins (Perforin and Granzyme-B. These results suggest that most, if not all, mechanisms required to generate functional T cells with a broad TCR repertoire are intact in our in vitro differentiation protocol. These data provide a foundation for production of patient-specific T cells for the treatment of acquired or inherited immune disorders and for cancer immunotherapy.

  18. Gut microbiota modulate T cell trafficking into human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonesi, Eleonora; Governa, Valeria; Garzon, Jesus Francisco Glaus; Mele, Valentina; Amicarella, Francesca; Muraro, Manuele Giuseppe; Trella, Emanuele; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Oertli, Daniel; Däster, Silvio Raffael; Droeser, Raoul A; Weixler, Benjamin; Bolli, Martin; Rosso, Raffaele; Nitsche, Ulrich; Khanna, Nina; Egli, Adrian; Keck, Simone; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Terracciano, Luigi M; Zajac, Paul; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Borsig, Lubor; Iezzi, Giandomenica

    2018-02-06

    Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) favour survival in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Chemotactic factors underlying their recruitment remain undefined. We investigated chemokines attracting T cells into human CRCs, their cellular sources and microenvironmental triggers. Expression of genes encoding immune cell markers, chemokines and bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (16SrRNA) was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in fresh CRC samples and corresponding tumour-free tissues. Chemokine receptor expression on TILs was evaluated by flow cytometry on cell suspensions from digested tissues. Chemokine production by CRC cells was evaluated in vitro and in vivo, on generation of intraperitoneal or intracecal tumour xenografts in immune-deficient mice. T cell trafficking was assessed on adoptive transfer of human TILs into tumour-bearing mice. Gut flora composition was analysed by 16SrRNA sequencing. CRC infiltration by distinct T cell subsets was associated with defined chemokine gene signatures, including CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10 for cytotoxic T lymphocytes and T-helper (Th)1 cells; CCL17, CCL22 and CXCL12 for Th1 and regulatory T cells; CXCL13 for follicular Th cells; and CCL20 and CCL17 for interleukin (IL)-17-producing Th cells. These chemokines were expressed by tumour cells on exposure to gut bacteria in vitro and in vivo. Their expression was significantly higher in intracecal than in intraperitoneal xenografts and was dramatically reduced by antibiotic treatment of tumour-bearing mice. In clinical samples, abundance of defined bacteria correlated with high chemokine expression, enhanced T cell infiltration and improved survival. Gut microbiota stimulate chemokine production by CRC cells, thus favouring recruitment of beneficial T cells into tumour tissues. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Norovirus-specific memory T cell responses in adult human donors

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    Maria Malm

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Norovirus (NoV is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in people of all ages worldwide. NoV specific serum antibodies which block the binding of NoV virus-like particles (VLPs to the cell receptors have been thoroughly investigated. In contrast, only a few publications are available on the NoV capsid VP1 protein-specific T cell responses in humans naturally infected with the virus. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of eight healthy adult human donors previously exposed to NoV were stimulated with purified VLPs derived from NoV GII.4-1999, GII.4-2012 (Sydney, and GI.3, and IFN-g production was measured by an ELISPOT assay. In addition, 76 overlapping synthetic peptides spanning the entire 539 amino acid sequence of GII.4 VP1 were pooled into two-dimensional matrices and used to identify putative T cell epitopes. Seven of the eight subjects produced IFN-g in response to the peptides and five subjects produced IFN-g in response to the VLPs of the same origin. In general, stronger T cell responses were induced with the peptides in each donor compared to the VLPs. A CD8+ T cell epitope in the shell domain of the VP1 (134SPSQVTMFPHIIVDVRQL151 was identified in two subjects, both having human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A*02:01 allele. To our knowledge, this is the first report using synthetic peptides to study NoV-specific T cell responses in human subjects and identify T cell epitopes.

  20. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The immune privilege of the eye has been thought to be dependent on physical barriers and absence of lymphatic vessels. However, the immune privilege may also involve active immunologic processes, as recent studies have indicated. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether...... human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...

  1. Suppression of pro-inflammatory T-cell responses by human mesothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chan-Yu; Kift-Morgan, Ann; Moser, Bernhard; Topley, Nicholas; Eberl, Matthias

    2013-07-01

    Human γδ T cells reactive to the microbial metabolite (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMB-PP) contribute to acute inflammatory responses. We have previously shown that peritoneal dialysis (PD)-associated infections with HMB-PP producing bacteria are characterized by locally elevated γδ T-cell frequencies and poorer clinical outcome compared with HMB-PP negative infections, implying that γδ T cells may be of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic value in acute disease. The regulation by local tissue cells of these potentially detrimental γδ T-cell responses remains to be investigated. Freshly isolated γδ or αβ T cells were cultured with primary mesothelial cells derived from omental tissue, or with mesothelial cell-conditioned medium. Stimulation of cytokine production and proliferation by peripheral T cells in response to HMB-PP or CD3/CD28 beads was assessed by flow cytometry. Resting mesothelial cells were potent suppressors of pro-inflammatory γδ T cells as well as CD4+ and CD8+ αβ T cells. The suppression of γδ T-cell responses was mediated through soluble factors released by primary mesothelial cells and could be counteracted by SB-431542, a selective inhibitor of TGF-β and activin signalling. Recombinant TGF-β1 but not activin-A mimicked the mesothelial cell-mediated suppression of γδ T-cell responses to HMB-PP. The present findings indicate an important regulatory function of mesothelial cells in the peritoneal cavity by dampening pro-inflammatory T-cell responses, which may help preserve the tissue integrity of the peritoneal membrane in the steady state and possibly during the resolution of acute inflammation.

  2. Altered balance between self-reactive T helper (Th)17 cells and Th10 cells and between full-length forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) and FoxP3 splice variants in Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Madsen, H O

    2015-01-01

    cells from healthy donors and patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) or Graves' disease (GD) to polyclonal stimulation, or stimulation with human thyroglobulin (TG), human thyroid peroxidase (TPO), or Esherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). TPO and LPS induced increased differentiation of naive CD...

  3. Proteomic profiling of the human T-cell nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboui, Mohamed Ali; Wynne, Kieran; Elia, Giuliano; Hall, William W; Gautier, Virginie W

    2011-12-01

    The nucleolus, site of ribosome biogenesis, is a dynamic subnuclear organelle involved in diverse cellular functions. The size, number and organisation of nucleoli are cell-specific and while it remains to be established, the nucleolar protein composition would be expected to reflect lineage-specific transcriptional regulation of rDNA genes and have cell-type functional components. Here, we describe the first characterisation of the human T-cell nucleolar proteome. Using the Jurkat T-cell line and a reproducible organellar proteomic approach, we identified 872 nucleolar proteins. In addition to ribosome biogenesis and RNA processing networks, network modeling and topological analysis of nucleolar proteome revealed distinct macromolecular complexes known to orchestrate chromatin structure and to contribute to the regulation of gene expression, replication, recombination and repair, and chromosome segregation. Furthermore, among our dataset, we identified proteins known to functionally participate in T-cell biology, including RUNX1, ILF3, ILF2, STAT3, LSH, TCF-1, SATB1, CTCF, HMGB3, BCLAF1, FX4L1, ZAP70, TIAM1, RAC2, THEMIS, LCP1, RPL22, TOPK, RETN, IFI-16, MCT-1, ISG15, and 14-3-3τ, which support cell-specific composition of the Jurkat nucleolus. Subsequently, the nucleolar localisation of RUNX1, ILF3, STAT3, ZAP70 and RAC2 was further validated by Western Blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Overall, our T-cell nucleolar proteome dataset not only further expands the existing repertoire of the human nucleolar proteome but support a cell type-specific composition of the nucleolus in T cell and highlights the potential roles of the nucleoli in lymphocyte biology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluating Human T-Cell Therapy of Cytomegalovirus Organ Disease in HLA-Transgenic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV can cause severe disease in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although preclinical research in murine models as well as clinical trials have provided 'proof of concept' for infection control by pre-emptive CD8 T-cell immunotherapy, there exists no predictive model to experimentally evaluate parameters that determine antiviral efficacy of human T cells in terms of virus control in functional organs, prevention of organ disease, and host survival benefit. We here introduce a novel mouse model for testing HCMV epitope-specific human T cells. The HCMV UL83/pp65-derived NLV-peptide was presented by transgenic HLA-A2.1 in the context of a lethal infection of NOD/SCID/IL-2rg-/- mice with a chimeric murine CMV, mCMV-NLV. Scenarios of HCMV-seropositive and -seronegative human T-cell donors were modeled by testing peptide-restimulated and T-cell receptor-transduced human T cells, respectively. Upon transfer, the T cells infiltrated host tissues in an epitope-specific manner, confining the infection to nodular inflammatory foci. This resulted in a significant reduction of viral load, diminished organ pathology, and prolonged survival. The model has thus proven its potential for a preclinical testing of the protective antiviral efficacy of HCMV epitope-specific human T cells in the evaluation of new approaches to an immunotherapy of CMV disease.

  5. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells increase interleukin-9 production of CD4+ T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhou Xin; Chi, Ying; Ji, Yue Ru; Wang, You Wei; Zhang, Jing; Luo, Wei Feng; Li, Li Na; Hu, Cai Dong; Zhuo, Guang Sheng; Wang, Li Fang; Han, Zhi-Bo; Han, Zhong Chao

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to differentiate into cells of multiple lineage, and additionally act to modulate the immune response. Interleukin (IL)-9 is primarily produced by cluster of differentiation (CD)4+ T cells to regulate the immune response. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of human umbilical cord derived-MSC (UC-MSC) on IL-9 production of human CD4+ T cells. It was demonstrated that the addition of UC-MSC to the culture of CD4+ T cells significantly enhance...

  6. Identification of p53 unbound to T-antigen in human cells transformed by simian virus 40 T-antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, F J; Hu, Y; Chen, T; Carney, H

    1997-02-27

    In several clones of SV40-transformed human cells, we investigated the relative amounts of large T-Antigen (T-Ag) and p53 proteins, both unbound and associated within complexes, with the goal of identifying changes associated with transformation and immortalization. Cells were transformed by wild type (wt) T-Ag, a functionally temperature sensitive T-Ag (tsA58) and other T-Ag variants. Western analysis showed that while most of the T-Ag was ultimately bound by p53, most of the p53 remained unbound to T-Ag. Unbound p53 remained in the supernatant after a T-Ag immunoprecipitation and p53 was present in two to fourfold excess of T-Ag. In one transformant there was five to tenfold more p53 than T-Ag. p53 was present in transformants in amounts at least 200-fold greater than in untransformed human cells. In wt and variant T-Ag transformants, including those generated with tsA58 T-Ag, large amounts of unbound p53 were present in both pre-crisis and immortal cells and when the cells were grown at permissive or non-permissive temperatures. We also found that in transformants produced by tsA58, an SV40/JCV chimeric T-Ag and other variants, T-Ag appeared to form a complex with p53 slowly perhaps because one or both proteins matured slowly. The presence in transformed human cells of large amounts of unbound p53 and in excess of T-Ag suggests that sequestration of p53 by T-Ag, resulting from complex formation, is required neither for morphological transformation nor immortalization of human cells. Rather, these results support the proposal that high levels of p53, the T-Ag/p53 complexes, or other biochemical event(s), lead to transformation and immortalization of human cells by T-Ag.

  7. A Clinical Study of Serum Thyroglobulin Levels in Patients with Thyroid Tumor

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    Lee, Choong Kyu; Yu, Byung Hee; Lee, Woo Hyung; Yoo, Hyung Joon; Lee, Chong Suk [National Medical Canter, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-03-15

    Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) was measured by radioimmunoassay in 81 patients with thyroid tumor who were treated in the department of Internal medicine of National Medical Center from January, 1981 to June, 1982. The results were as follows: 1) The mean serum thyroglobulin level in thyroid tumor was significantly higher than normal subjects (p<0.001). 2) The mean serum thyroglobulin level in benign tumor was lower than malignant tumor (p<0.05). 3) The thyroid carcinoma with metastasis had significant high level of serum thyroglobulin than without metastasis (p<0.001). 4) The mean postoperative serum thyroglobulin level was significantly lower than preoperative level (p<0.001). Data from our study show that serum thyroglobulin determination is useful for assessing the presence of malignant thyroid tumor, metastasis and the extent of residual or recurrent thyroid cancer after surgery.

  8. A Clinical Study of Serum Thyroglobulin Levels in Patients with Thyroid Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choong Kyu; Yu, Byung Hee; Lee, Woo Hyung; Yoo, Hyung Joon; Lee, Chong Suk

    1983-01-01

    Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) was measured by radioimmunoassay in 81 patients with thyroid tumor who were treated in the department of Internal medicine of National Medical Center from January, 1981 to June, 1982. The results were as follows: 1) The mean serum thyroglobulin level in thyroid tumor was significantly higher than normal subjects (p<0.001). 2) The mean serum thyroglobulin level in benign tumor was lower than malignant tumor (p<0.05). 3) The thyroid carcinoma with metastasis had significant high level of serum thyroglobulin than without metastasis (p<0.001). 4) The mean postoperative serum thyroglobulin level was significantly lower than preoperative level (p<0.001). Data from our study show that serum thyroglobulin determination is useful for assessing the presence of malignant thyroid tumor, metastasis and the extent of residual or recurrent thyroid cancer after surgery.

  9. Th1-like human T-cell clones recognizing Leishmania gp63 inhibit Leishmania major in human macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, M; Hey, A S; Bendtzen, K

    1994-01-01

    The major surface protease of Leishmania major, gp63, has been suggested as a vaccine candidate for cutaneous leishmaniasis. In this study gp63 was purified from L. major promastigotes. A panel of human T-cell clones recognizing this protein were generated from individuals who had previously had...... resembling Th1 cells. Autologous mononuclear cells and Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cell lines were equally efficient in presenting the antigen to the T cells. The gp63 reactive T cells induced resistance to infection in cultured human macrophages by L. major. The data confirm that human CD4+ T cells...... recognizing gp63 can take part in the host defence against L. major infections....

  10. In situ depletion of CD4(+) T cells in human skin by Zanolimumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, L.S.; Skov, L.; Dam, T.N.

    2007-01-01

    CD4(+) T cells, in activated or malignant form, are involved in a number of diseases including inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis, and T cell lymphomas such as the majority of cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL). Targeting CD4 with an antibody that inhibits and/or eliminates disease......-driving T cells in situ may therefore be a useful approach in the treatment of inflammatory and malignant skin diseases. Depletion of CD4(+) T cells in intact inflamed human skin tissue by Zanolimumab, a fully human therapeutic monoclonal antibody (IgG1, kappa) against CD4, was studied in a human psoriasis......(+), but not CD8(+) CD3(+) T cells. The capacity of Zanolimumab to deplete the CD4(+) T cells in the skin may be of importance in diseases where CD4(+) T cells play a central role. Indeed, in a phase II clinical trial Zanolimumab has shown a dose-dependent clinical response in patients with CTCL and the antibody...

  11. Human CD8 T cells generated in vitro from hematopoietic stem cells are functionally mature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zúñiga-Pflücker Juan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T cell development occurs within the highly specialized thymus. Cytotoxic CD8 T cells are critical in adaptive immunity by targeting virally infected or tumor cells. In this study, we addressed whether functional CD8 T cells can be generated fully in vitro using human umbilical cord blood (UCB hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in coculture with OP9-DL1 cells. Results HSC/OP9-DL1 cocultures supported the differentiation of CD8 T cells, which were TCR/CD3hi CD27hi CD1aneg and thus phenotypically resembled mature functional CD8 single positive thymocytes. These in vitro-generated T cells also appeared to be conventional CD8 cells, as they expressed high levels of Eomes and low levels of Plzf, albeit not identical to ex vivo UCB CD8 T cells. Consistent with the phenotypic and molecular characterization, upon TCR-stimulation, in vitro-generated CD8 T cells proliferated, expressed activation markers (MHC-II, CD25, CD38, secreted IFN-γ and expressed Granzyme B, a cytotoxic T-cell effector molecule. Conclusion Taken together, the ability to direct human hematopoietic stem cell or T-progenitor cells towards a mature functional phenotype raises the possibility of establishing cell-based treatments for T-immunodeficiencies by rapidly restoring CD8 effector function, thereby mitigating the risks associated with opportunistic infections.

  12. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Kitchen

    Full Text Available There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR. Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  13. Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yong, E-mail: yongzhao@uic.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Zhang, Yongkang [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Jain, Sumit [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Skidgel, Randal A. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Prabhakar, Bellur S. [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Mazzone, Theodore [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Holterman, Mark J. [Department of Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

  14. Downregulation of proapoptotic Bim augments IL-2-independent T-cell transformation by human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Masaya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia, immortalizes and transforms primary human T cells in vitro in both an interleukin (IL)-2-dependent and IL-2-independent manner. Expression of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax transforms the growth of the mouse T-cell line CTLL-2 from being IL-2-dependent to IL-2-independent. Withdrawal of IL-2 from normal activated T cells induces apoptosis, which is mediated through the inducible expression of several proapoptotic proteins, including Bim. In this study, we found that Tax protects IL-2-depleted T cells against Bim-induced apoptosis. Withdrawal of IL-2 from CTLL-2 cells induced a prominent increase in the level of Bim protein in CTLL-2 cells, but not in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells. This inhibition of Bim in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells was mediated by two mechanisms: downregulation of Bim mRNA and posttranscriptional reduction of Bim protein. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also inhibited IL-2 depletion–induced expression of Bim, however, this decrease in Bim protein expression was not due to downregulation of Bim mRNA, thus indicating that Bim mRNA downregulation in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 occurs only after long-term expression of Tax. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also induced Erk activation, however, this was not involved in the reduction of Bim protein. Knockdown of Bim expression in CTLL-2 cells augmented Tax-induced IL-2-independent transformation. HTLV-1 infection of human T cells also reduced their levels of Bim protein, and restoring Bim expression in HTLV-1-infected cells reduced their proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that Tax-induced downregulation of Bim in HTLV-1-infected T cells promotes their IL-2-independent growth, thereby supporting the persistence of HTLV-1 infection in vivo

  15. Downregulation of proapoptotic Bim augments IL-2-independent T-cell transformation by human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Masaya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia, immortalizes and transforms primary human T cells in vitro in both an interleukin (IL)-2-dependent and IL-2-independent manner. Expression of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax transforms the growth of the mouse T-cell line CTLL-2 from being IL-2-dependent to IL-2-independent. Withdrawal of IL-2 from normal activated T cells induces apoptosis, which is mediated through the inducible expression of several proapoptotic proteins, including Bim. In this study, we found that Tax protects IL-2-depleted T cells against Bim-induced apoptosis. Withdrawal of IL-2 from CTLL-2 cells induced a prominent increase in the level of Bim protein in CTLL-2 cells, but not in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells. This inhibition of Bim in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells was mediated by two mechanisms: downregulation of Bim mRNA and posttranscriptional reduction of Bim protein. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also inhibited IL-2 depletion-induced expression of Bim, however, this decrease in Bim protein expression was not due to downregulation of Bim mRNA, thus indicating that Bim mRNA downregulation in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 occurs only after long-term expression of Tax. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also induced Erk activation, however, this was not involved in the reduction of Bim protein. Knockdown of Bim expression in CTLL-2 cells augmented Tax-induced IL-2-independent transformation. HTLV-1 infection of human T cells also reduced their levels of Bim protein, and restoring Bim expression in HTLV-1-infected cells reduced their proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that Tax-induced downregulation of Bim in HTLV-1-infected T cells promotes their IL-2-independent growth, thereby supporting the persistence of HTLV-1 infection in vivo. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Effects of PVA-coated nanoparticles on human T helper cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehl, Cindy; Schellmann, Saskia; Maurizi, Lionel; Hofmann-Amtenbrink, Margarethe; Häupl, Thomas; Hofmann, Heinrich; Buttgereit, Frank; Gaber, Timo

    2016-03-14

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are used as high-sensitive enhancer for magnetic resonance imaging, where they represent a promising tool for early diagnosis of destructive diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Since we could demonstrate that professional phagocytes are activated by amino-polyvinyl-alcohol-coated-SPION (a-PVA-SPION), the study here focuses on the influence of a-PVA-SPION on human T cells activity. Therefore, primary human CD4+ T cells from RA patients and healthy subjects were treated with varying doses of a-PVA-SPION for 20h or 72h. T cells were then analyzed for apoptosis, cellular energy, expression of the activation marker CD25 and cell proliferation. Although, we observed that T cells from RA patients are more susceptible to low-dose a-PVA-SPION-induced apoptosis than T cells from healthy subjects, in both groups a-PVA-SPION do not activate CD4+ T cells per se and do not influence mitogen-mediated T cells activation with regard to CD25 expression and cell proliferation. Nevertheless, our results demonstrate that CD4+ T cells from RA patients and healthy subjects differ in their response to mitogen stimulation and oxygen availability. We conclude from our data, that a-PVA-SPION do neither activate nor significantly influence mitogen-stimulated CD4+ T cells activation and have negligible influence on T cells apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Human retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibit proliferation and IL2R expression of activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, Charlotte G; Jørgensen, Annette; Nielsen, Mette

    2002-01-01

    -Thymidine incorporation assay, respectively. T cells and RPE cells were cultured directly together or in a transwell system for determination of the effect of cell contact. The importance of cell surface molecules was examined by application of a panel of blocking antibodies (CD2, CD18, CD40, CD40L, CD54, CD58......) in addition to use of TCR negative T cell lines. The expression of IL2R-alpha -beta and -gamma chains of activated T cells was analysed by flow cytometry after incubation of T cells alone or with RPE cells. Human RPE cells were found to inhibit the proliferation of activated T cells by a cell contact......-beta and -gamma chain expression within 24 hr after removal from the coculture. It is concluded that the cultured human adult and foetal RPE cells inhibit the proliferation of activated T cells by a process that does not involve apoptosis. It depends on cell contact but the involved surface molecules were...

  18. Recombinant expression of homodimeric 660 kDa human thyroglobulin in soybean seeds: an alternative source of human thyroglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Rebecca; Hudson, Laura C; Lambirth, Kevin C; Luth, Diane; Wang, Kan; Bost, Kenneth L; Piller, Kenneth J

    2011-07-01

    Soybean seeds possess many qualities that make them ideal targets for the production of recombinant proteins. However, one quality often overlooked is their ability to stockpile large amounts of complex storage proteins. Because of this characteristic, we hypothesized that soybean seeds would support recombinant expression of large and complex proteins that are currently difficult or impossible to express using traditional plant and non-plant-based host systems. To test this hypothesis, we transformed soybeans with a synthetic gene encoding human thyroglobulin (hTG)-a 660 kDa homodimeric protein that is widely used in the diagnostic industry for screening and detection of thyroid disease. In the absence of a recombinant system that can produce recombinant hTG, research and diagnostic grade hTG continues to be purified from cadaver and surgically removed thyroid tissue. These less-than-ideal tissue sources lack uniform glycosylation and iodination and therefore introduce variability when purified hTG is used in sensitive ELISA screens. In this study, we report the successful expression of recombinant hTG in soybean seeds. Authenticity of the soy-derived protein was demonstrated using commercial ELISA kits developed specifically for the detection of hTG in patient sera. Western analyses and gel filtration chromatography demonstrated that recombinant hTG and thyroid-purified hTG are biologically similar with respect to size, mass, charge and subunit interaction. The recombinant protein was stable over three generations and accumulated to ~1.5% of total soluble seed protein. These results support our hypothesis that soybeans represent a practical alternative to traditional host systems for the expression of large and complex proteins.

  19. Allopurinol reduces antigen-specific and polyclonal activation of human T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damián ePérez-Mazliah

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Allopurinol is the most popular commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor and it is widely used for treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Although, several anti-inflammatory actions of allopurinol have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, there have been few studies on the action of allopurinol on T cells. In the current study, we have assessed the effect of allopurinol on antigen-specific and mitogen-driven activation and cytokine production in human T cells. Allopurinol markedly decreased the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2-producing T cells, either after polyclonal or antigen-specific stimulation with Herpes Simplex virus 1, Influenza virus, tetanus toxoid and Trypanosoma cruzi-derived antigens. Allopurinol attenuated CD69 upregulation after CD3 and CD28 engagement and significantly reduced the levels of spontaneous and mitogen-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in T cells. The diminished T cell activation and cytokine production in the presence of allopurinol support a direct action of allopurinol on human T cells, offering a potential pharmacological tool for the management of cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  20. Human CD4+ T cells require exogenous cystine for glutathione and DNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levring, Trine B; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Rode, Anna Kathrine Obelitz

    2015-01-01

    . The aim of this study was to elucidate why activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 in order to proliferate. We activated purified naïve human CD4+ T cells and found that glutathione (GSH) levels and DNA synthesis were dependent on Cys2 and increased in parallel with increasing concentrations of Cys......Adaptive immune responses require activation and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. Whereas early T cell activation is independent of exogenous cystine (Cys2), T cell proliferation is dependent of Cys2. However, the exact roles of Cys2 in T cell proliferation still need to be determined...... for the activity of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the enzyme responsible for generation of the deoxyribonucleotide DNA building blocks. In conclusion, we show that activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 to proliferate and that this is partly explained by the fact that Cys2 is required for production...

  1. Bifenthrin activates homotypic aggregation in human T-cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Nataly; Tran, Van; Daniyan, Anthony; Ojugbele, Olutosin; Pryor, Stephen C; Bonventre, Josephine A; Flynn, Katherine; Weeks, Benjamin S

    2006-03-01

    Here, we addressed the concern that, despite the lack of overt toxicity, exposure to low levels of the common household pyrethroid pesticide, bifenthrin, could cause harm to the immune system. To do this, we measure the effect of bifenthrin on phytohemagglutinin (PHA) activation of homotypic aggregation in human T-cell lines. The human CD4+ H9, and Jurkat cell lines and the human promonocyte U937 cell line, were exposed to varying concentrations of bifenthrin. Cell viability was determined using the AlmarBlue Toxicity Assay. Concentrations of bifenthrin which did not reduce cell viability were determined and these concentrations were tested for the effect of bifenthrin on PHA-mediated homotypic aggregation. Blocking antibodies to ICAM and LFA-1 were used to disrupt aggregation and a nonspecific IgG was used as a control. Bifenthrin was found to be nontoxic at concentrations ranging from 10(-4) to 10(-13) M. Bifenthrin did not inhibit PHA induced cell aggregation in all cell lines tested. However, at 10(-4) M, bifenthrin to form aggregates stimulated homotypic aggregation in the H9 and Jurkat T-cell lines. The bifenthrin-induced aggregate formation, like that seen with PHA, was blocked by treating the cells with antibodies to either LFA-1 or ICAM. The results here show that bifenthrin activates T-cell function by stimulating ICAM/LFA-1 mediated homotypic aggregation. This data suggests that exposure to bifenthrin, even at "acceptable" limits, can increase the risk for and frequency of inflammatory responses and diseases such as asthma.

  2. Regulatory T Cells in Human Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Jun Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple layers of suppressive components including regulatory T (TReg cells, suppressive antigen-presenting cells, and inhibitory cytokines form suppressive networks in the ovarian cancer microenvironment. It has been demonstrated that as a major suppressive element, TReg cells infiltrate tumor, interact with several types of immune cells, and mediate immune suppression through different molecular and cellular mechanisms. In this paper, we focus on human ovarian cancer and will discuss the nature of TReg cells including their subsets, trafficking, expansion, and function. We will briefly review the development of manipulation of TReg cells in preclinical and clinical settings.

  3. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek C. Macallan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy.

  4. Healthy human T-Cell Responses to Aspergillus fumigatus antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelkamal Chaudhary

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with both invasive and allergic pulmonary diseases, in different hosts. The organism is inhaled as a spore, which, if not cleared from the airway, germinates into hyphal morphotypes that are responsible for tissue invasion and resultant inflammation. Hyphae secrete multiple products that function as antigens, evoking both a protective (T(H1-T(H17 and destructive allergic (T(H2 immunity. How Aspergillus allergens (Asp f proteins participate in the development of allergic sensitization is unknown.To determine whether Asp f proteins are strictly associated with T(H2 responses, or represent soluble hyphal products recognized by healthy hosts, human T cell responses to crude and recombinant products were characterized by ELISPOT. While responses (number of spots producing IFN-gamma, IL-4 or IL-17 to crude hyphal antigen preparations were weak, responses to recombinant Asp f proteins were higher. Recombinant allergens stimulated cells to produce IFN-gamma more so than IL-4 or IL-17. Volunteers exhibited a diverse CD4+ and CD8+ T cell antigen recognition profile, with prominent CD4 T(H1-responses to Asp f3 (a putative peroxismal membrane protein, Asp f9/16 (cell wall glucanase, Asp f11 (cyclophilin type peptidyl-prolyl isomerase and Asp f22 (enolase. Strong IFN-gamma responses were reproduced in most subjects tested over 6 month intervals.Products secreted after conidial germination into hyphae are differentially recognized by protective T cells in healthy, non-atopic individuals. Defining the specificity of the human T cell repertoire, and identifying factors that govern early responses may allow for development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for both invasive and allergic Aspergillus diseases.

  5. Human natural killer cell committed thymocytes and their relation to the T cell lineage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez, M. J.; Spits, H.; Lanier, L. L.; Phillips, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that mature natural killer (NK) cells can be grown from human triple negative (TN; CD3-, CD4-, CD8-) thymocytes, suggesting that a common NK/T cell precursor exists within the thymus that can give rise to both NK cells and T cells under appropriate conditions. In the

  6. Monitoring the initiation and kinetics of human dendritic cell-induced polarization of autologous naive CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy Oth

    Full Text Available A crucial step in generating de novo immune responses is the polarization of naive cognate CD4+ T cells by pathogen-triggered dendritic cells (DC. In the human setting, standardized DC-dependent systems are lacking to study molecular events during the initiation of a naive CD4+ T cell response. We developed a TCR-restricted assay to compare different pathogen-triggered human DC for their capacities to instruct functional differentiation of autologous, naive CD4+ T cells. We demonstrated that this methodology can be applied to compare differently matured DC in terms of kinetics, direction, and magnitude of the naive CD4+ T cell response. Furthermore, we showed the applicability of this assay to study the T cell polarizing capacity of low-frequency blood-derived DC populations directly isolated ex vivo. This methodology for addressing APC-dependent instruction of naive CD4+ T cells in a human autologous setting will provide researchers with a valuable tool to gain more insight into molecular mechanisms occurring in the early phase of T cell polarization. In addition, it may also allow the study of pharmacological agents on DC-dependent T cell polarization in the human system.

  7. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells increase interleukin-9 production of CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhou Xin; Chi, Ying; Ji, Yue Ru; Wang, You Wei; Zhang, Jing; Luo, Wei Feng; Li, Li Na; Hu, Cai Dong; Zhuo, Guang Sheng; Wang, Li Fang; Han, Zhi-Bo; Han, Zhong Chao

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to differentiate into cells of multiple lineage, and additionally act to modulate the immune response. Interleukin (IL)-9 is primarily produced by cluster of differentiation (CD)4+ T cells to regulate the immune response. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of human umbilical cord derived-MSC (UC-MSC) on IL-9 production of human CD4+ T cells. It was demonstrated that the addition of UC-MSC to the culture of CD4+ T cells significantly enhanced IL-9 production by CD4+ T cells. Transwell experiments suggested that UC-MSC promotion of IL-9 production by CD4+ T cells was dependent on cell-cell contact. Upregulated expression of CD106 was observed in UC-MSC co-cultured with CD4+ T cells, and the addition of a blocking antibody of CD106 significantly impaired the ability of UC-MSC to promote IL-9 production by CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the results of the present study demonstrated that UC-MSC promoted the generation of IL-9 producing cells, which may be mediated, in part by CD106. The findings may act to expand understanding and knowledge of the immune modulatory role of UC-MSC. PMID:29042945

  8. Regulatory B and T cell responses in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Birte; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    ). HT is primarily a T-cell mediated disease, and whether B cells play a pathogenic role in the pathogenesis is still unclear. Both GD and HT are characterized by infiltration of the thyroid gland by self-reactive T cells and B cells. In the first paper of this thesis, the role of regulatory B cells...... (Bregs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were investigated in the context of GD and HT. First, we studied the role of the thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin (TG) in healthy donors. The self-antigen TG, but not the foreign recall antigen tetanus toxoid (TT), was able to induce interleukin 10 (IL-10......Autoimmune diseases occur due to faulty self-tolerance. Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) are classic examples of organ-specific autoimmune diseases. GD is an auto-antibody-mediated disease where autoantibodies are produced against the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR...

  9. The PDL1-PD1 Axis Converts Human Th1 Cells Into Regulatory T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarnath, Shoba; Mangus, Courtney W.; Wang, James C.M.; Wei, Fang; He, Alice; Kapoor, Veena; Foley, Jason E.; Massey, Paul R.; Felizardo, Tania C.; Riley, James L.; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Medin, Jeffrey A.; Fowler, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Immune surveillance by T helper type 1 (Th1) cells is critical for the host response to tumors and infection, but also contributes to autoimmunity and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) after transplantation. The inhibitory molecule programmed death ligand-1 (PDL1) has been shown to anergize human Th1 cells, but other mechanisms of PDL1-mediated Th1 inhibition such as the conversion of Th1 cells to a regulatory phenotype have not been well characterized. We hypothesized that PDL1 may cause Th1 cells to manifest differentiation plasticity. Conventional T cells or irradiated K562 myeloid tumor cells overexpressing PDL1 converted TBET+ Th1 cells into FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (TREGS) in vivo, thereby preventing human-into-mouse xenogeneic GvHD (xGvHD). Either blocking PD1 expression on Th1 cells by siRNA targeting or abrogation of PD1 signaling by SHP1/2 pharmacologic inhibition stabilized Th1 cell differentiation during PDL1 challenge and restored the capacity of Th1 cells to mediate lethal xGVHD. PD1 signaling therefore induces human Th1 cells to manifest in vivo plasticity, resulting in a TREG phenotype that severely impairs cell-mediated immunity. Converting human Th1 cells to a regulatory phenotype with PD1 signaling provides a potential way to block GvHD after transplantation. Moreover, because this conversion can be prevented by blocking PD1 expression or pharmacologically inhibiting SHP1/2, this pathway provides a new therapeutic direction for enhancing T cell immunity to cancer and infection. PMID:22133721

  10. Markers of T Cell Senescence in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Xu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are facing the aging of their population, and many more will face a similar obstacle in the near future, which could be a burden to many healthcare systems. Increased susceptibility to infections, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease, cancer as well as reduced efficacy of vaccination are important matters for researchers in the field of aging. As older adults show higher prevalence for a variety of diseases, this also implies higher risk of complications, including nosocomial infections, slower recovery and sequels that may reduce the autonomy and overall quality of life of older adults. The age-related effects on the immune system termed as “immunosenescence” can be exemplified by the reported hypo-responsiveness to influenza vaccination of the elderly. T cells, which belong to the adaptive arm of the immune system, have been extensively studied and the knowledge gathered enables a better understanding of how the immune system may be affected after acute/chronic infections and how this matters in the long run. In this review, we will focus on T cells and discuss the surface and molecular markers that are associated with T cell senescence. We will also look at the implications that senescent T cells could have on human health and diseases. Finally, we will discuss the benefits of having these markers for investigators and the future work that is needed to advance the field of T cell senescence markers.

  11. Galectin-9 activates and expands human T-helper 1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marloes J M Gooden

    Full Text Available Galectin-9 (Gal-9 is known for induction of apoptosis in IFN-γ and IL-17 producing T-cells and amelioration of autoimmunity in murine models. On the other hand, Gal-9 induced IFN-γ positive T-cells in a sarcoma mouse model and in food allergy, suggesting that Gal-9 can have diametric effects on T-cell immunity. Here, we aimed to delineate the immunomodulatory effect of Gal-9 on human resting and ex vivo activated peripheral blood lymphocytes. Treatment of resting lymphocytes with low concentrations of Gal-9 (5-30 nM induced apoptosis in ∼60% of T-cells after 1 day, but activated the surviving T-cells. These viable T-cells started to expand after 4 days with up to 6 cell divisions by day 7 and an associated shift from naïve towards central memory and IFN-γ producing phenotype. In the presence of T-cell activation signals (anti-CD3/IL-2 Gal-9 did not induce T-cell expansion, but shifted the CD4/CD8 balance towards a CD4-dominated T-cell response. Thus, Gal-9 activates resting T-cells in the absence of typical T-cell activating signals and promotes their transition to a TH1/C1 phenotype. In the presence of T-cell activating signals T-cell immunity is directed towards a CD4-driven response by Gal-9. Thus, Gal-9 may specifically enhance reactive immunological memory.

  12. Characterization of two subsets of human T gamma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Griend, R. J.; ten Berge, I.; Tanke, H. J.; Roos, D.; Schellekens, P. T.; Melief, C. J.; Zeijlemaker, W. P.; Astaldi, A.

    1982-01-01

    Normal human E rosette-forming, Fc-IgG receptor-bearing cells (so-called T gamma cells) were separated into two functionally different subpopulations. Both subpopulations bind the monoclonal antibody OKM1 (directed against an antigen present also on monocytes and granulocytes). The first

  13. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein represses the expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor in T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takachi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takahashi-Yoshita, Manami; Higuchi, Masaya; Obata, Miki; Mishima, Yukio; Okuda, Shujiro; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Matsuoka, Masao; Saitoh, Akihiko; Green, Patrick L; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), which is an aggressive form of T-cell malignancy. HTLV-1 oncoproteins, Tax and HBZ, play crucial roles in the immortalization of T-cells and/or leukemogenesis by dysregulating the cellular functions in the host. Recent studies show that HTLV-1-infected T-cells have reduced expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor protein. In the present study, we explored whether Tax and/or HBZ play a role in downregulating BCL11B in HTLV-1-infected T-cells. Lentiviral transduction of Tax in a human T-cell line repressed the expression of BCL11B at both the protein and mRNA levels, whereas the transduction of HBZ had little effect on the expression. Tax mutants with a decreased activity for the NF-κB, CREB or PDZ protein pathways still showed a reduced expression of the BCL11B protein, thereby implicating a different function of Tax in BCL11B downregulation. In addition, the HTLV-2 Tax2 protein reduced the BCL11B protein expression in T-cells. Seven HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, including three ATL-derived cell lines, showed reduced BCL11B mRNA and protein expression relative to an uninfected T-cell line, and the greatest reductions were in the cells expressing Tax. Collectively, these results indicate that Tax is responsible for suppressing BCL11B protein expression in HTLV-1-infected T-cells; Tax-mediated repression of BCL11B is another mechanism that Tax uses to promote oncogenesis of HTLV-1-infected T-cells. PMID:25613934

  14. Derivation of transgene-free human induced pluripotent stem cells from human peripheral T cells in defined culture conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Kishino

    Full Text Available Recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs were established as promising cell sources for revolutionary regenerative therapies. The initial culture system used for iPSC generation needed fetal calf serum in the culture medium and mouse embryonic fibroblast as a feeder layer, both of which could possibly transfer unknown exogenous antigens and pathogens into the iPSC population. Therefore, the development of culture systems designed to minimize such potential risks has become increasingly vital for future applications of iPSCs for clinical use. On another front, although donor cell types for generating iPSCs are wide-ranging, T cells have attracted attention as unique cell sources for iPSCs generation because T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs have a unique monoclonal T cell receptor genomic rearrangement that enables their differentiation into antigen-specific T cells, which can be applied to novel immunotherapies. In the present study, we generated transgene-free human TiPSCs using a combination of activated human T cells and Sendai virus under defined culture conditions. These TiPSCs expressed pluripotent markers by quantitative PCR and immunostaining, had a normal karyotype, and were capable of differentiating into cells from all three germ layers. This method of TiPSCs generation is more suitable for the therapeutic application of iPSC technology because it lowers the risks associated with the presence of undefined, animal-derived feeder cells and serum. Therefore this work will lead to establishment of safer iPSCs and extended clinical application.

  15. Human T cell immunosenescence and inflammation in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Arsun; Schurman, Shepherd H; Sen, Ranjan; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2017-10-01

    The aging process is driven by a finite number of inter-related mechanisms that ultimately lead to the emergence of characteristic phenotypes, including increased susceptibility to multiple chronic diseases, disability, and death. New assays and analytical tools have become available that start to unravel some of these mechanisms. A prevailing view is that aging leads to an imbalance between stressors and stress-buffering mechanisms that causes loss of compensatory reserve and accumulation of unrepaired damage. Central to this paradigm are changes in the immune system and the chronic low-grade proinflammatory state that affect many older individuals, even when they are apparently healthy and free of risk factors. Independent of chronological age, high circulating levels of proinflammatory markers are associated with a high risk of multiple adverse health outcomes in older persons. In this review, we discuss current theories about causes and consequences of the proinflammatory state of aging, with a focus on changes in T cell function. We examine the role of NF-κB activation and its dysregulation and how NF-κB activity differs among subgroups of T cells. We explore emerging hypotheses about immunosenescence and changes in T cell behavior with age, including consideration of the T cell antigen receptor and regulatory T cells (T regs ). We conclude by illustrating how research using advanced technology is uncovering clues at the core of inflammation and aging. Some of the preliminary work in this field is already improving our understanding of the complex mechanisms by which immunosenescence of T cells is intertwined during human aging. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  16. Expression of GARP selectively identifies activated human FOXP3+ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Kozhaya, Lina; Mercer, Frances; Khaitan, Alka; Fujii, Hodaka; Unutmaz, Derya

    2009-08-11

    The molecules that define human regulatory T cells (Tregs) phenotypically and functionally remain to be fully characterized. We recently showed that activated human Tregs express mRNA for a transmembrane protein called glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP, or LRRC32). Here, using a GARP-specific mAb, we demonstrate that expression of GARP on activated Tregs correlates with their suppressive capacity. However, GARP was not induced on T cells activated in the presence of TGFbeta, which expressed high levels of FOXP3 and lacked suppressive function. Ectopic expression of FOXP3 in conventional T cells was also insufficient for induction of GARP expression in most donors. Functionally, silencing GARP in Tregs only moderately attenuated their suppressive activity. CD25+ T cells sorted for high GARP expression displayed more potent suppressive activity compared with CD25+GARP- cells. Remarkably, CD25+GARP- T cells expanded in culture contained 3-5 fold higher IL-17-secreting cells compared with either CD25+GARP+ or CD25-GARP- cells, suggesting that high GARP expression can potentially discriminate Tregs from those that have switched to Th17 lineage. We also determined whether GARP expression correlates with FOXP3-expressing T cells in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -infected subjects. A subset of HIV+ individuals with high percentages of FOXP3+ T cells did not show proportionate increase in GARP+ T cells. This finding suggests that higher FOXP3 levels observed in these HIV+ individuals is possibly due to immune activation rather than to an increase in Tregs. Our findings highlight the significance of GARP both in dissecting duality of Treg/Th17 cell differentiation and as a marker to identify bona fide Tregs during diseases with chronic immune activation.

  17. Cytotoxic lymphocytes in Hashimoto thyroiditis: an in vitro assay system using 51Cr-labelled chicken red blood cells coated with thyroglobulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Elizabeth A.; Penhale, W. J.; Barnes, E. W.; Irvine, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    An in vitro method is described to detect lymphocytes in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis that are cytotoxic to thyroglobulin-coated chicken red blood cells. Using this technique, the cytotoxic index of lymphocytes from patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis was 25·46±3·81 (SEM), which is significantly different from that obtained with lymphocytes from control subjects, 6·28±0·80. PMID:4740396

  18. Human memory CD8 T cell effector potential is epigenetically preserved during in vivo homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsamed, Hossam A; Moustaki, Ardiana; Fan, Yiping; Dogra, Pranay; Ghoneim, Hazem E; Zebley, Caitlin C; Triplett, Brandon M; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Youngblood, Ben

    2017-06-05

    Antigen-independent homeostasis of memory CD8 T cells is vital for sustaining long-lived T cell-mediated immunity. In this study, we report that maintenance of human memory CD8 T cell effector potential during in vitro and in vivo homeostatic proliferation is coupled to preservation of acquired DNA methylation programs. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing of primary human naive, short-lived effector memory (T EM ), and longer-lived central memory (T CM ) and stem cell memory (T SCM ) CD8 T cells identified effector molecules with demethylated promoters and poised for expression. Effector-loci demethylation was heritably preserved during IL-7- and IL-15-mediated in vitro cell proliferation. Conversely, cytokine-driven proliferation of T CM and T SCM memory cells resulted in phenotypic conversion into T EM cells and was coupled to increased methylation of the CCR7 and Tcf7 loci. Furthermore, haploidentical donor memory CD8 T cells undergoing in vivo proliferation in lymphodepleted recipients also maintained their effector-associated demethylated status but acquired T EM -associated programs. These data demonstrate that effector-associated epigenetic programs are preserved during cytokine-driven subset interconversion of human memory CD8 T cells. © 2017 Abdelsamed et al.

  19. Functional heterogeneity of human effector CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Hiroshi; Naruto, Takuya; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2012-02-09

    Effector CD8(+) T cells are believed to be terminally differentiated cells having cytotoxic activity and the ability to produce effector cytokines such as INF-γ and TNF-α. We investigated the difference between CXCR1(+) and CXCR1(-) subsets of human effector CD27(-)CD28(-)CD8(+) T cells. The subsets expressed cytolytic molecules similarly and exerted substantial cytolytic activity, whereas only the CXCR1(-) subset had IL-2 productivity and self-proliferative activity and was more resistant to cell death than the CXCR1(+) subset. These differences were explained by the specific up-regulation of CAMK4, SPRY2, and IL-7R in the CXCR1(-) subset and that of pro-apoptotic death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) in the CXCR1(+) subset. The IL-2 producers were more frequently found in the IL-7R(+) subset of the CXCR1(-) effector CD8(+) T cells than in the IL-7R(-) subset. IL-7/IL-7R signaling promoted cell survival only in the CXCR1(-) subset. The present study has highlighted a novel subset of effector CD8(+) T cells producing IL-2 and suggests the importance of this subset in the homeostasis of effector CD8(+) T cells.

  20. Human dendritic cells sequentially matured with CD4(+) T cells as a secondary signal favor CTL and long-term T memory cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Thomas; Tanguy-Royer, Séverine; Royer, Pierre-Joseph; Boisgerault, Nicolas; Frikeche, Jihane; Fonteneau, Jean-François; Grégoire, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells involved in the control and initiation of immune responses. In vivo, DCs exposed at the periphery to maturation stimuli migrate to lymph nodes, where they receive secondary signals from CD4+ T helper cells. These DCs become able to initiate CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. However, in vitro investigations concerning human monocyte-derived DCs have never focused on their functional properties after such sequential maturation. Here, we studied human DC phenotypes and functions according to this sequential exposure to maturation stimuli. As first signals, we used TNF-α/polyI:C mimicking inflammatory and pathogen stimuli and, as second signals, we compared activated CD4+ T helper cells to a combination of CD40-L/ IFN-γ. Our results show that a sequential activation with activated CD4+ T cells dramatically increased the maturation of DCs in terms of their phenotype and cytokine secretion compared to DCs activated with maturation stimuli delivered simultaneously. Furthermore, this sequential maturation led to the induction of CTL with a long-term effector and central memory phenotypes. Thus, sequential delivery of maturation stimuli, which includes CD4+ T cells, should be considered in the future to improve the induction of long-term CTL memory in DC-based immunotherapy.

  1. Trehalose improves cell proliferation and dehydration tolerance of human HaCaT cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kyung Eun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose is a disaccharide molecule that serves as a natural osmotic regulator in halophilic microorganisms and plants but not in mammals. We observed that human HaCaT cells supplied with trehalose improved cell proliferation and extended viability under dehydration. In HaCaT cells, in response to increasing concentrations of exogenous trehalose, the levels of heat shock protein (HSP 70 increased and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP 1 decreased. Proteome analysis of trehalose-treated HaCaT cells revealed remarkable increases in the levels of proteins involved in cell signaling and the cell cycle, including p21 activated kinase I, Sec I family domain protein and elongation factor G. Moreover, the proteins for cell stress resistance, tryptophan hydroxylase, serine/cysteine proteinase inhibitors and vitamin D receptors were also increased. In addition, the proteins responsible for the maintenance of the cytoskeleton and cellular structures including procollagen-lysine dioxygenase, vinculin and ezrin were increased. Proteomic data revealed that trehalose affected HaCaT cells by inducing the proteins involved in cell proliferation. These results suggest that trehalose improves the proliferation and dehydration tolerance of HaCaT cells by inducing proteins involved in cell growth and dehydration protection.

  2. TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 expression in human CD4+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, Hayley G.; Roostalu, Urmas; Walter, Gina J.; Gullick, Nicola J.; Frederiksen, Klaus S.; Roberts, Ceri A.; Sumner, Jonathan; Baeten, Dominique L.; Gerwien, Jens G.; Cope, Andrew P.; Geissmann, Frederic; Kirkham, Bruce W.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2014-01-01

    IL-17+ CD4+ T (Th17) cells contribute to the pathogenesis of several human inflammatory diseases. Here we demonstrate that TNF inhibitor (TNFi) drugs induce the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. TNFi-mediated induction of IL-10 in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells is

  3. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Alonso-Camino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs. The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR. We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2 bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR and the selection context (cell synapse, which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells.

  4. Humanized medium (h7H) allows long-term primary follicular thyroid cultures from human normal thyroid, benign neoplasm, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Susana B; Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E R; Garcia-Rendueles, Angela R; Rodrigues, Joana S; Perez-Romero, Sihara; Garcia-Lavandeira, Montserrat; Suarez-Fariña, Maria; Barreiro, Francisco; Czarnocka, Barbara; Senra, Ana; Lareu, Maria V; Rodriguez-Garcia, Javier; Cameselle-Teijeiro, Jose; Alvarez, Clara V

    2013-06-01

    Mechanisms of thyroid physiology and cancer are principally studied in follicular cell lines. However, human thyroid cancer lines were found to be heavily contaminated by other sources, and only one supposedly normal-thyroid cell line, immortalized with SV40 antigen, is available. In primary culture, human follicular cultures lose their phenotype after passage. We hypothesized that the loss of the thyroid phenotype could be related to culture conditions in which human cells are grown in medium optimized for rodent culture, including hormones with marked differences in its affinity for the relevant rodent/human receptor. The objective of the study was to define conditions that allow the proliferation of primary human follicular thyrocytes for many passages without losing phenotype. Concentrations of hormones, transferrin, iodine, oligoelements, antioxidants, metabolites, and ethanol were adjusted within normal homeostatic human serum ranges. Single cultures were identified by short tandem repeats. Human-rodent interspecies contamination was assessed. We defined an humanized 7 homeostatic additives medium enabling growth of human thyroid cultures for more than 20 passages maintaining thyrocyte phenotype. Thyrocytes proliferated and were grouped as follicle-like structures; expressed Na+/I- symporter, pendrin, cytokeratins, thyroglobulin, and thyroperoxidase showed iodine-uptake and secreted thyroglobulin and free T3. Using these conditions, we generated a bank of thyroid tumors in culture from normal thyroids, Grave's hyperplasias, benign neoplasms (goiter, adenomas), and carcinomas. Using appropriate culture conditions is essential for phenotype maintenance in human thyrocytes. The bank of thyroid tumors in culture generated under humanized humanized 7 homeostatic additives culture conditions will provide a much-needed tool to compare similarly growing cells from normal vs pathological origins and thus to elucidate the molecular basis of thyroid disease.

  5. Human T-cell responses to oral streptococci in human PBMC-NOD/SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, M A; Nakao, R; Yonezawa, H; Watanabe, H; Senpuku, H

    2006-06-01

    We investigated cellular and humoral immune responses to oral biofilm bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus sobrinus, and Streptococcus sanguinis, in NOD/SCID mice immunized with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hu-PBMC-NOD/SCID mice) to explore the pathogenicity of each of those organisms in dental and oral inflammatory diseases. hu-PBMC-NOD/SCID mice were immunized by intraperitoneal injections with the whole cells of the streptococci once a week for 3 weeks. FACS analyses were used to determine the percentages of various hu-T cell types, as well as intracellular cytokine production of interleukin-4 and interferon-gamma. Serum IgG and IgM antibody levels in response to the streptococci were also determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. S. anginosus induced a significant amount of the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in comparison with the other streptococci. However, there was no significant differences between the streptococci in interleukin-4 production by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells after inoculation. Further, S. mutans significantly induced human anti-S. mutans IgG, IgG(1), IgG(2), and IgM antibodies in comparison with the other organisms. In conclusion, S. anginosus up-regulated Th1 and Tc1 cells, and S. mutans led to increasing levels of their antibodies, which was associated with the induction of Th2 cells. These results may contribute to a better understanding of human lymphocyte interactions to biofilm bacteria, along with their impact on dental and mucosal inflammatory diseases, as well as endocarditis.

  6. HBsAg-redirected T cells exhibit antiviral activity in HBV-infected human liver chimeric mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Robert L; Shum, Thomas; Tashiro, Haruko; Barzi, Mercedes; Yi, Zhongzhen; Whitten-Bauer, Christina; Legras, Xavier; Bissig-Choisat, Beatrice; Garaigorta, Urtzi; Gottschalk, Stephen; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter

    2018-04-06

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains incurable. Although HBsAg-specific chimeric antigen receptor (HBsAg-CAR) T cells have been generated, they have not been tested in animal models with authentic HBV infection. We generated a novel CAR targeting HBsAg and evaluated its ability to recognize HBV+ cell lines and HBsAg particles in vitro. In vivo, we tested whether human HBsAg-CAR T cells would have efficacy against HBV-infected hepatocytes in human liver chimeric mice. HBsAg-CAR T cells recognized HBV-positive cell lines and HBsAg particles in vitro as judged by cytokine production. However, HBsAg-CAR T cells did not kill HBV-positive cell lines in cytotoxicity assays. Adoptive transfer of HBsAg-CAR T cells into HBV-infected humanized mice resulted in accumulation within the liver and a significant decrease in plasma HBsAg and HBV-DNA levels compared with control mice. Notably, the fraction of HBV core-positive hepatocytes among total human hepatocytes was greatly reduced after HBsAg-CAR T cell treatment, pointing to noncytopathic viral clearance. In agreement, changes in surrogate human plasma albumin levels were not significantly different between treatment and control groups. HBsAg-CAR T cells have anti-HBV activity in an authentic preclinical HBV infection model. Our results warrant further preclinical exploration of HBsAg-CAR T cells as immunotherapy for HBV. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Phosphoproteomics Reveals Regulatory T Cell-Mediated DEF6 Dephosphorylation That Affects Cytokine Expression in Human Conventional T Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Joshi, Rubin N.

    2017-09-25

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) control key events of immune tolerance, primarily by suppression of effector T cells. We previously revealed that Tregs rapidly suppress T cell receptor (TCR)-induced calcium store depletion in conventional CD4CD25 T cells (Tcons) independently of IP levels, consequently inhibiting NFAT signaling and effector cytokine expression. Here, we study Treg suppression mechanisms through unbiased phosphoproteomics of primary human Tcons upon TCR stimulation and Treg-mediated suppression, respectively. Tregs induced a state of overall decreased phosphorylation as opposed to TCR stimulation. We discovered novel phosphosites (T595_S597) in the DEF6 (SLAT) protein that were phosphorylated upon TCR stimulation and conversely dephosphorylated upon coculture with Tregs. Mutation of these DEF6 phosphosites abrogated interaction of DEF6 with the IP receptor and affected NFAT activation and cytokine transcription in primary Tcons. This novel mechanism and phosphoproteomics data resource may aid in modifying sensitivity of Tcons to Treg-mediated suppression in autoimmune disease or cancer.

  8. Preferential killing of cancer cells and activated human T cells using ZnO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanley, Cory; Layne, Janet; Feris, Kevin; Wingett, Denise [Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Punnoose, Alex; Reddy, K M; Coombs, Isaac; Coombs, Andrew [Department of Physics, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States)], E-mail: denisewingett@boisestate.edu

    2008-07-23

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being recognized for their potential utility in biological applications including nanomedicine. Here we examine the response of normal human cells to ZnO nanoparticles under different signaling environments and compare it to the response of cancerous cells. ZnO nanoparticles exhibit a strong preferential ability to kill cancerous T cells ({approx}28-35 x) compared to normal cells. Interestingly, the activation state of the cell contributes toward nanoparticle toxicity, as resting T cells display a relative resistance while cells stimulated through the T cell receptor and CD28 costimulatory pathway show greater toxicity in direct relation to the level of activation. Mechanisms of toxicity appear to involve the generation of reactive oxygen species, with cancerous T cells producing higher inducible levels than normal T cells. In addition, nanoparticles were found to induce apoptosis and the inhibition of reactive oxygen species was found to be protective against nanoparticle induced cell death. The novel findings of cell selective toxicity, towards potential disease causing cells, indicate a potential utility of ZnO nanoparticles in the treatment of cancer and/or autoimmunity.

  9. Preferential killing of cancer cells and activated human T cells using ZnO nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanley, Cory; Layne, Janet; Feris, Kevin; Wingett, Denise; Punnoose, Alex; Reddy, K M; Coombs, Isaac; Coombs, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being recognized for their potential utility in biological applications including nanomedicine. Here we examine the response of normal human cells to ZnO nanoparticles under different signaling environments and compare it to the response of cancerous cells. ZnO nanoparticles exhibit a strong preferential ability to kill cancerous T cells (∼28-35 x) compared to normal cells. Interestingly, the activation state of the cell contributes toward nanoparticle toxicity, as resting T cells display a relative resistance while cells stimulated through the T cell receptor and CD28 costimulatory pathway show greater toxicity in direct relation to the level of activation. Mechanisms of toxicity appear to involve the generation of reactive oxygen species, with cancerous T cells producing higher inducible levels than normal T cells. In addition, nanoparticles were found to induce apoptosis and the inhibition of reactive oxygen species was found to be protective against nanoparticle induced cell death. The novel findings of cell selective toxicity, towards potential disease causing cells, indicate a potential utility of ZnO nanoparticles in the treatment of cancer and/or autoimmunity

  10. Autoantibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease promote immune complex formation with self antigens and increase B cell and CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to self antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2004-01-01

    's thyroiditis (HT), Graves' disease (GD) and healthy controls were incubated with human thyroglobulin (Tg) before adding normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The deposition of immunoglobulins and C3 fragments on B cells was then assessed. Inclusion of Tg in serum from HT patients promoted B cell capture......B cells are centrally involved as antigen-presenting cells in certain autoimmune diseases. To establish whether autoantibodies form immune complexes (IC) with self-antigens in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and promote B cell uptake of self-antigen, sera from patients with Hashimoto...

  11. Autoantibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease promote immune complex formation with self antigens and increase B cell and CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to self antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2004-01-01

    B cells are centrally involved as antigen-presenting cells in certain autoimmune diseases. To establish whether autoantibodies form immune complexes (IC) with self-antigens in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and promote B cell uptake of self-antigen, sera from patients with Hashimoto......'s thyroiditis (HT), Graves' disease (GD) and healthy controls were incubated with human thyroglobulin (Tg) before adding normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The deposition of immunoglobulins and C3 fragments on B cells was then assessed. Inclusion of Tg in serum from HT patients promoted B cell capture...

  12. A Combined Omics Approach to Generate the Surface Atlas of Human Naive CD4+ T Cells during Early T-Cell Receptor Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graessel, Anke; Hauck, Stefanie M; von Toerne, Christine; Kloppmann, Edda; Goldberg, Tatyana; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schindler, Michael; Knapp, Bettina; Krause, Linda; Dietz, Katharina; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Suttner, Kathrin

    2015-08-01

    Naive CD4(+) T cells are the common precursors of multiple effector and memory T-cell subsets and possess a high plasticity in terms of differentiation potential. This stem-cell-like character is important for cell therapies aiming at regeneration of specific immunity. Cell surface proteins are crucial for recognition and response to signals mediated by other cells or environmental changes. Knowledge of cell surface proteins of human naive CD4(+) T cells and their changes during the early phase of T-cell activation is urgently needed for a guided differentiation of naive T cells and may support the selection of pluripotent cells for cell therapy. Periodate oxidation and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation technology was applied with subsequent quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem MS to generate a data set describing the surface proteome of primary human naive CD4(+) T cells and to monitor dynamic changes during the early phase of activation. This led to the identification of 173 N-glycosylated surface proteins. To independently confirm the proteomic data set and to analyze the cell surface by an alternative technique a systematic phenotypic expression analysis of surface antigens via flow cytometry was performed. This screening expanded the previous data set, resulting in 229 surface proteins, which were expressed on naive unstimulated and activated CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we generated a surface expression atlas based on transcriptome data, experimental annotation, and predicted subcellular localization, and correlated the proteomics result with this transcriptional data set. This extensive surface atlas provides an overall naive CD4(+) T cell surface resource and will enable future studies aiming at a deeper understanding of mechanisms of T-cell biology allowing the identification of novel immune targets usable for the development of therapeutic treatments. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Ta1, a novel 105 KD human T cell activation antigen defined by a monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, D A; Hussey, R E; Fitzgerald, K A; Acuto, O; Poole, C; Palley, L; Daley, J F; Schlossman, S F; Reinherz, E L

    1984-09-01

    By using a murine monoclonal antibody produced against an IL 2-dependent human T cell line, we defined a T lineage-specific molecule, termed Ta1, that is expressed strongly on activated T lymphocytes of both the T4 and T8 subsets, as well as on T cell lines and clones, but only weakly on a fraction of resting T cells. SDS-PAGE analysis of immunoprecipitates from 125I-labeled, activated T cells demonstrates a single major band of apparent m.w. 105 KD under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Unlike anti-IL 2 receptor antibodies, anti-Ta1 does not inhibit T cell proliferative responses to mitogen, antigen, or IL 2-containing medium. Moreover, anti-Ta1 has no effect on T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Ta1 appears to be a novel human T cell-specific activation antigen that may serve as a useful marker of T cell activation in human disease.

  14. Identity and Diversity of Human Peripheral Th and T Regulatory Cells Defined by Single-Cell Mass Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunicki, Matthew A; Amaya Hernandez, Laura C; Davis, Kara L; Bacchetta, Rosa; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2018-01-01

    Human CD3 + CD4 + Th cells, FOXP3 + T regulatory (Treg) cells, and T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells are essential for ensuring peripheral immune response and tolerance, but the diversity of Th, Treg, and Tr1 cell subsets has not been fully characterized. Independent functional characterization of human Th1, Th2, Th17, T follicular helper (Tfh), Treg, and Tr1 cells has helped to define unique surface molecules, transcription factors, and signaling profiles for each subset. However, the adequacy of these markers to recapitulate the whole CD3 + CD4 + T cell compartment remains questionable. In this study, we examined CD3 + CD4 + T cell populations by single-cell mass cytometry. We characterize the CD3 + CD4 + Th, Treg, and Tr1 cell populations simultaneously across 23 memory T cell-associated surface and intracellular molecules. High-dimensional analysis identified several new subsets, in addition to the already defined CD3 + CD4 + Th, Treg, and Tr1 cell populations, for a total of 11 Th cell, 4 Treg, and 1 Tr1 cell subsets. Some of these subsets share markers previously thought to be selective for Treg, Th1, Th2, Th17, and Tfh cells, including CD194 (CCR4) + FOXP3 + Treg and CD183 (CXCR3) + T-bet + Th17 cell subsets. Unsupervised clustering displayed a phenotypic organization of CD3 + CD4 + T cells that confirmed their diversity but showed interrelation between the different subsets, including similarity between Th1-Th2-Tfh cell populations and Th17 cells, as well as similarity of Th2 cells with Treg cells. In conclusion, the use of single-cell mass cytometry provides a systems-level characterization of CD3 + CD4 + T cells in healthy human blood, which represents an important baseline reference to investigate abnormalities of different subsets in immune-mediated pathologies. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Regulatory B and T cell responses in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur due to faulty self-tolerance. Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) are classic examples of organ-specific autoimmune diseases. GD is an auto-antibody-mediated disease where autoantibodies are produced against the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR...... (Bregs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were investigated in the context of GD and HT. First, we studied the role of the thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin (TG) in healthy donors. The self-antigen TG, but not the foreign recall antigen tetanus toxoid (TT), was able to induce interleukin 10 (IL-10......) secretion by B cells and CD4+ T cells. These IL-10 producing B cells (B10 cells) from healthy donors were enriched with the CD5+ and CD24hi phenotype. In addition, TG was able to induce IL-6 production by B cells. In contrast, TT induced production of Th1-type pro-inflammatory cytokines including interferon...

  16. Human dendritic cells sequentially matured with CD4+ T cells as a secondary signal favor CTL and long-term T memory cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Simon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells involved in the control and initiation of immune responses. In vivo, DCs exposed at the periphery to maturation stimuli migrate to lymph nodes, where they receive secondary signals from CD4+ T helper cells. These DCs become able to initiate CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses. However, in vitro investigations concerning human monocyte-derived DCs have never focused on their functional properties after such sequential maturation. Here, we studied human DC phenotypes and functions according to this sequential exposure to maturation stimuli. As first signals, we used TNF-α/polyI:C mimicking inflammatory and pathogen stimuli and, as second signals, we compared activated CD4+ T helper cells to a combination of CD40-L/ IFN-γ. Our results show that a sequential activation with activated CD4+ T cells dramatically increased the maturation of DCs in terms of their phenotype and cytokine secretion compared to DCs activated with maturation stimuli delivered simultaneously. Furthermore, this sequential maturation led to the induction of CTL with a long-term effector and central memory phenotypes. Thus, sequential delivery of maturation stimuli, which includes CD4+ T cells, should be considered in the future to improve the induction of long-term CTL memory in DC-based immunotherapy.

  17. Combined analysis of circulating epithelial cells and serum thyroglobulin for distinguishing disease status of the patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hung-Chih; Liou, Miaw-Jene; Hsu, Hsung-Ling; Hsieh, Jason Chia-Hsun; Chen, Yi-An; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Lin, Jen-Der

    2015-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) accounts for about 80% of the cases in thyroid cancer. Routine surveillance by serum thyroglobulin (Tg) and medical imaging is the current practice to monitor disease progression of the patients. Whether enumeration of circulating epithelial cells (CECs) helps to define disease status of PTC patients was investigated. CECs were enriched from the peripheral blood of the healthy control subjects (G1, n = 17) and the patients at disease-free status (G2, n = 26) ...

  18. CD83 Antibody Inhibits Human B Cell Responses to Antigen as well as Dendritic Cell-Mediated CD4 T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kuan Y; Baron, Rebecca; Seldon, Therese A; Jones, Martina L; Rice, Alison M; Munster, David J

    2018-05-15

    Anti-CD83 Ab capable of Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity can deplete activated CD83 + human dendritic cells, thereby inhibiting CD4 T cell-mediated acute graft-versus-host disease. As CD83 is also expressed on the surface of activated B lymphocytes, we hypothesized that anti-CD83 would also inhibit B cell responses to stimulation. We found that anti-CD83 inhibited total IgM and IgG production in vitro by allostimulated human PBMC. Also, Ag-specific Ab responses to immunization of SCID mice xenografted with human PBMC were inhibited by anti-CD83 treatment. This inhibition occurred without depletion of all human B cells because anti-CD83 lysed activated CD83 + B cells by Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and spared resting (CD83 - ) B cells. In cultured human PBMC, anti-CD83 inhibited tetanus toxoid-stimulated B cell proliferation and concomitant dendritic cell-mediated CD4 T cell proliferation and expression of IFN-γ and IL-17A, with minimal losses of B cells (80% of B cells but had no effect on CD4 T cell proliferation and cytokine expression. By virtue of the ability of anti-CD83 to selectively deplete activated, but not resting, B cells and dendritic cells, with the latter reducing CD4 T cell responses, anti-CD83 may be clinically useful in autoimmunity and transplantation. Advantages might include inhibited expansion of autoantigen- or alloantigen-specific B cells and CD4 T cells, thus preventing further production of pathogenic Abs and inflammatory cytokines while preserving protective memory and regulatory cells. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Identification of proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6-infected human T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, N.; Amelse, R.E.; Zhou, W.W.; Chang, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6)-infected human T cells (HSB-2) were examined by using polyclonal rabbit antibodies and monoclonal antibodies against HHV-6-infected cells and human sera. More than 20 proteins and six glycoproteins specific for HHV-6-infected cells were identified from [ 35 S]methionine- and [ 3 H]glucosamine-labeled total-cell extracts. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies immunoprecipitated 33 [ 35 S]methionine-labeled HHV-6-specific polypeptides with approximate molecular weights ranging from 180,000 to 31,000. In immunoprecipitation and Western immunoblot reactions, a patient's serum also recognized more than 30 HHV-6-specific proteins and seven glycoproteins. In contrast, sera from individuals with high-titered antibodies against other human herpesviruses reacted with fewer HHV-6-infected cell proteins, and only a 135,000-M r polypeptide was prominent. Monoclonal antibodies to HHV-6-infected cells reacted with single and multiple polypeptides specific for virus-infected cells and immunoprecipitated three distinct sets of glycoproteins, which were designated gp105k and gp82k, gp116k, gp64k, and gp54k, and gp102k

  20. Identification of proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6-infected human T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, N.; Amelse, R.E.; Zhou, W.W.; Chang, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Proteins specific for human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6)-infected human T cells (HSB-2) were examined by using polyclonal rabbit antibodies and monoclonal antibodies against HHV-6-infected cells and human sera. More than 20 proteins and six glycoproteins specific for HHV-6-infected cells were identified from [ 35 S]methionine- and [ 3 H]glucosamine-labeled total-cell extracts. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies immunoprecipitated 33 [ 35 S]methionine-labeled HHV-6-specific polypeptides with approximate molecular weights ranging from 180,000 to 31,000. In immunoprecipitation and Western immunoblot reactions, a patient's serum also recognized more than 30 HHV-6-specific proteins and seven glycoproteins. In contrast, sera from individuals with high-titered antibodies against other human herpes viruses reacted with few HHV-6-infected cell proteins, and only a 135,000-M/sub r/ polypeptide was prominent. Monoclonal antibodies to HHV-6-infected cells reacted with single and multiple polypeptides specific for virus-infected cells and immunoprecipitated three distinct sets of glycoproteins, which were designated gp105K and gp92k, gp116k, gp64k, and gp54k, and gp102k

  1. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  2. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Jones, David R.; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1–mediated (PD-1–mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB–based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies. PMID:27454297

  3. The T alpha 2 nuclear protein binding site from the human T cell receptor alpha enhancer functions as both a T cell-specific transcriptional activator and repressor

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    T cell-specific expression of the human T cell receptor alpha (TCR- alpha) gene is regulated by the interaction of variable region promoter elements with a transcriptional enhancer that is located 4.5 kb 3' of the TCR-alpha constant region (C alpha) gene segment. The minimal TCR- alpha enhancer is composed of two nuclear protein binding sites, T alpha 1 and T alpha 2, that are both required for the T cell-specific activity of the enhancer. The T alpha 1 binding site contains a consensus cAMP ...

  4. Sustained CD8+ T-cell responses induced after acute parvovirus B19 infection in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norbeck, Oscar; Isa, Adiba; Pöhlmann, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Murine models have suggested that CD8+ T-cell responses peak early in acute viral infections and are not sustained, but no evidence for humans has been available. To address this, we longitudinally analyzed the CD8+ T-cell response to human parvovirus B19 in acutely infected individuals. We...... observed striking CD8+ T-cell responses, which were sustained or even increased over many months after the resolution of acute disease, indicating that CD8+ T cells may play a prominent role in the control of parvovirus B19 and other acute viral infections of humans, including potentially those generated...

  5. Determination of thyroglobulin in the cytology needle lavage for diagnosis of the thyroid nodule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrero Rodríguez, María Teresa; Turcios Tristá, Silvia Elena

    2016-01-01

    The determination of thyroglobulin in the lavage of the biopsy needle has been incorporated as a new tool for the diagnosis of thyroid lymphadenopathy. Objective: To determine the value of thyroglobulin quantification in the biopsy needle lavage in the diagnosis of the thyroid nodule. Material and Method: The biological material obtained from the rinsing of the needles used in the biopsy of the patients with diagnosis of thyroid nodule was taken as the study sample. An Immunoradiometric method was used to determine thyroglobulin. The Mann-Whitney non-parametric test was used to compare the median values of the thyroglobulin variable between malignant and benign lesions according to histopathological diagnosis. Significant differences (p <0.01) were found between mean thyroglobulin levels between benign nodules (502.6 ng / mL) and malignant nodules (11.9 ng / mL). Conclusion: The determination of thyroglobulin in the lavage of the needle used in the biopsy proved to be a useful procedure for the differential diagnosis of the thyroid nodule, so it would be very useful as a support for cytology.

  6. Human leucocyte antigen class I-redirected anti-tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M P; Dolton, G M; Gerry, A B; Brewer, J E; Bennett, A D; Pumphrey, N J; Jakobsen, B K; Sewell, A K

    2017-01-01

    CD4 + T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour-specific CD4 + T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low-affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4 + T cells with tumour-specific HLA class I-restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co-receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4 + cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4 + and CD8 + T cells expressing wild-type and a range of affinity-enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201-restricted NY-ESO-1- and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4 + T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4 + T cells than CD8 + T cells. These results indicate that the CD4 + T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8 + T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical & Experimental Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Society for Immunology.

  7. Concentration of plasma thyroglobulin and urinary excretion of iodinated material in the diagnosis of thyroid disorders in congenital hypothyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gons, M. H.; Kok, J. H.; Tegelaers, W. H.; de Vijlder, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we describe methods for the early aetiological diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism, using beside the classical T4, T3 and TSH plasma concentrations, four additional parameters in plasma and urine. The first one is thyroglobulin (Tg). In normal children of more than one year of age

  8. Type 1 Responses of Human Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells to Influenza A Viruses▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Gang; Liu, Yinping; Zheng, Jian; Ng, Iris H. Y.; Xiang, Zheng; Lam, Kwok-Tai; Mao, Huawei; Li, Hong; Peiris, J. S. Malik; Lau, Yu-Lung; Tu, Wenwei

    2011-01-01

    γδ T cells are essential constituents of antimicrobial and antitumor defenses. We have recently reported that phosphoantigen isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP)-expanded human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells participated in anti-influenza virus immunity by efficiently killing both human and avian influenza virus-infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) in vitro. However, little is known about the noncytolytic responses and trafficking program of γδ T cells to influenza virus. In this study, we found that Vγ9Vδ2 T cells expressed both type 1 cytokines and chemokine receptors during influenza virus infection, and IPP-expanded cells had a higher capacity to produce gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Besides their potent cytolytic activity against pandemic H1N1 virus-infected cells, IPP-activated γδ T cells also had noncytolytic inhibitory effects on seasonal and pandemic H1N1 viruses via IFN-γ but had no such effects on avian H5N1 or H9N2 virus. Avian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses induced significantly higher CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5 production in Vγ9Vδ2 T cells than human seasonal H1N1 virus. CCR5 mediated the migration of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells toward influenza virus-infected cells. Our findings suggest a novel therapeutic strategy of using phosphoantigens to boost the antiviral activities of human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells against influenza virus infection. PMID:21752902

  9. Human Epidermal Langerhans Cells Maintain Immune Homeostasis in Skin by Activating Skin Resident Regulatory T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneschal, Julien; Clark, Rachael A.; Gehad, Ahmed; Baecher-Allan, Clare M.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries indicate that the skin of a normal individual contains 10-20 billion resident memory T cells ( which include various T helper, T cytotoxic, and T regulatory subsets, that are poised to respond to environmental antigens. Using only autologous human tissues, we report that both in vitro and in vivo, resting epidermal Langerhan cells (LC) selectively and specifically induced the activation and proliferation of skin resident regulatory T cells (Treg), a minor subset of skin resident memory T cells. In the presence of foreign pathogen, however, the same LC activated and induced proliferation of effector memory T (Tem) cells and limited Treg cells activation. These underappreciated properties of LC: namely maintenance of tolerance in normal skin, and activation of protective skin resident memory T cells upon infectious challenge, help clarify the role of LC in skin. PMID:22560445

  10. MUC1 in human milk blocks transmission of human immunodeficiency virus from dendritic cells to T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeland, E.; Jong, de M.A.W.P.; Nabatov, A.; Kalay, H.; Kooijk, van Y.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.

    2009-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) occurs frequently via breast-feeding. HIV-1 targets DC-SIGN+ dendritic cells (DCs) in mucosal areas that allow efficient transmission of the virus to T cells. Here, we demonstrate that the epithelial mucin MUC1, abundant in milk,

  11. A promising sword of tomorrow: Human γδ T cell strategies reconcile allo-HSCT complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongxian; Cui, Qu; Luo, Chao; Luo, Yi; Shi, Jimin; Huang, He

    2016-05-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is potentially a curative therapeutic option for hematological malignancies. In clinical practice, transplantation associated complications greatly affected the final therapeutical outcomes. Currently, primary disease relapse, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and infections remain the three leading causes of a high morbidity and mortality in allo-HSCT patients. Various strategies have been investigated in the past several decades including human γδ T cell-based therapeutical regimens. In different microenvironments, human γδ T cells assume features reminiscent of classical Th1, Th2, Th17, NKT and regulatory T cells, showing diverse biological functions. The cytotoxic γδ T cells could be utilized to target relapsed malignancies, and recently regulatory γδ T cells are defined as a novel implement for GVHD management. In addition, human γδ Τ cells facilitate control of post-transplantation infections and participate in tissue regeneration and wound healing processes. These features potentiate γδ T cells a versatile therapeutical agent to target transplantation associated complications. This review focuses on insights of applicable potentials of human γδ T cells reconciling complications associated with allo-HSCT. We believe an improved understanding of pertinent γδ T cell functions would be further exploited in the design of innovative immunotherapeutic approaches in allo-HSCT, to reduce mortality and morbidity, as well as improve quality of life for patients after transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Regression of established renal cell carcinoma in nude mice using lentivirus-transduced human T cells expressing a human anti-CAIX chimeric antigen receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Shuk-Yee Lo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX is a tumor-associated antigen and marker of hypoxia that is overexpressed on > 90% of clear-cell type renal cell carcinoma (RCC but not on neighboring normal kidney tissue. Here, we report on the construction of two chimeric antigen receptors (CARs that utilize a carbonic anhydrase (CA domain mapped, human single chain antibody (scFv G36 as a targeting moiety but differ in their capacity to provide costimulatory signaling for optimal T cell proliferation and tumor cell killing. The resulting anti-CAIX CARs were expressed on human primary T cells via lentivirus transduction. CAR-transduced T cells (CART cells expressing second-generation G36-CD28-TCRζ exhibited more potent in vitro antitumor effects on CAIX+ RCC cells than first-generation G36-CD8-TCRζ including cytotoxicity, cytokine secretion, proliferation, and clonal expansion. Adoptive G36-CD28-TCRζ CART cell therapy combined with high-dose interleukin (IL-2 injection also lead to superior regression of established RCC in nude mice with evidence of tumor cell apoptosis and tissue necrosis. These results suggest that the fully human G36-CD28-TCRζ CARs should provide substantial improvements over first-generation mouse anti-CAIX CARs in clinical use through reduced human anti-mouse antibody responses against the targeting scFv and administration of lower doses of T cells during CART cell therapy of CAIX+ RCC.

  13. Roles of calpain-calpastatin system (CCS) in human T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikosik, Anna; Jasiulewicz, Aleksandra; Daca, Agnieszka; Henc, Izabella; Frąckowiak, Joanna E; Ruckemann-Dziurdzińska, Katarzyna; Foerster, Jerzy; Le Page, Aurelie; Bryl, Ewa; Fulop, Tamas; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2016-11-22

    The immune response is determined by the speed of the T cell reaction to antigens assured by a state of readiness for proliferation and cytokine secretion. Proliferation, apoptosis and motion of many cell types are controlled by cytoplasmic proteases - µ- and m-calpain - and their inhibitor calpastatin, together forming the "calpain-calpastatin system" (CCS), assumed to modify their targets only upon activation-dependent cytoplasmic Ca2+ increase. Contrastingly to this notion, using quantitative real time PCR and semiquantitative flow cytometry respectively, we show here that the CCS genes are constitutively expressed, and that both calpains are constitutively active in resting, circulating human CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that calpain inhibition in the resting T cells prevents them from proliferation in vitro and greatly reduces secretion of multiple cytokines. The mechanistic reason for these effects of calpain inhibition on T cell functions might be the demonstrated significant reduction of the expression of active (phosphorylated) upstream signalling molecules, including the phospholipase C gamma, p56Lck and NFκB, in the inhibitor-treated cells. Thus, we propose that the constitutive, self-regulatory calpain-calpastatin system activity in resting human T cells is a necessary, controlling element of their readiness for complex and effective response to antigenic challenge.

  14. Rapid alterations of cell cycle control proteins in human T lymphocytes in microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiel Cora S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In our study we aimed to identify rapidly reacting gravity-responsive mechanisms in mammalian cells in order to understand if and how altered gravity is translated into a cellular response. In a combination of experiments using "functional weightlessness" provided by 2D-clinostats and real microgravity provided by several parabolic flight campaigns and compared to in-flight-1g-controls, we identified rapid gravity-responsive reactions inside the cell cycle regulatory machinery of human T lymphocytes. In response to 2D clinorotation, we detected an enhanced expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1 protein within minutes, less cdc25C protein expression and enhanced Ser147-phosphorylation of cyclinB1 after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Additionally, during 2D clinorotation, Tyr-15-phosphorylation occurred later and was shorter than in the 1 g controls. In CD3/CD28-stimulated primary human T cells, mRNA expression of the cell cycle arrest protein p21 increased 4.1-fold after 20s real microgravity in primary CD4+ T cells and 2.9-fold in Jurkat T cells, compared to 1 g in-flight controls after CD3/CD28 stimulation. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT inhibitor curcumin was able to abrogate microgravity-induced p21 mRNA expression, whereas expression was enhanced by a histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor. Therefore, we suppose that cell cycle progression in human T lymphocytes requires Earth gravity and that the disturbed expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins could contribute to the breakdown of the human immune system in space.

  15. PDZ domain-binding motif of Tax sustains T-cell proliferation in HTLV-1-infected humanized mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artesi, Maria; Jalinot, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), an aggressive malignant proliferation of activated CD4+ T lymphocytes. The viral Tax oncoprotein is critically involved in both HTLV-1-replication and T-cell proliferation, a prerequisite to the development of ATLL. In this study, we investigated the in vivo contribution of the Tax PDZ domain-binding motif (PBM) to the lymphoproliferative process. To that aim, we examined T-cell proliferation in humanized mice (hu-mice) carrying a human hemato-lymphoid system infected with either a wild type (WT) or a Tax PBM-deleted (ΔPBM) provirus. We observed that the frequency of CD4+ activated T-cells in the peripheral blood and in the spleen was significantly higher in WT than in ΔPBM hu-mice. Likewise, human T-cells collected from WT hu-mice and cultivated in vitro in presence of interleukin-2 were proliferating at a higher level than those from ΔPBM animals. We next examined the association of Tax with the Scribble PDZ protein, a prominent regulator of T-cell polarity, in human T-cells analyzed either after ex vivo isolation or after in vitro culture. We confirmed the interaction of Tax with Scribble only in T-cells from the WT hu-mice. This association correlated with the presence of both proteins in aggregates at the leading edge of the cells and with the formation of long actin filopods. Finally, data from a comparative genome-wide transcriptomic analysis suggested that the PBM-PDZ association is implicated in the expression of genes regulating proliferation, apoptosis and cytoskeletal organization. Collectively, our findings suggest that the Tax PBM is an auxiliary motif that contributes to the sustained growth of HTLV-1 infected T-cells in vivo and in vitro and is essential to T-cell immortalization. PMID:29566098

  16. PDZ domain-binding motif of Tax sustains T-cell proliferation in HTLV-1-infected humanized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérès, Eléonore; Blin, Juliana; Ricci, Emiliano P; Artesi, Maria; Hahaut, Vincent; Van den Broeke, Anne; Corbin, Antoine; Gazzolo, Louis; Ratner, Lee; Jalinot, Pierre; Duc Dodon, Madeleine

    2018-03-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), an aggressive malignant proliferation of activated CD4+ T lymphocytes. The viral Tax oncoprotein is critically involved in both HTLV-1-replication and T-cell proliferation, a prerequisite to the development of ATLL. In this study, we investigated the in vivo contribution of the Tax PDZ domain-binding motif (PBM) to the lymphoproliferative process. To that aim, we examined T-cell proliferation in humanized mice (hu-mice) carrying a human hemato-lymphoid system infected with either a wild type (WT) or a Tax PBM-deleted (ΔPBM) provirus. We observed that the frequency of CD4+ activated T-cells in the peripheral blood and in the spleen was significantly higher in WT than in ΔPBM hu-mice. Likewise, human T-cells collected from WT hu-mice and cultivated in vitro in presence of interleukin-2 were proliferating at a higher level than those from ΔPBM animals. We next examined the association of Tax with the Scribble PDZ protein, a prominent regulator of T-cell polarity, in human T-cells analyzed either after ex vivo isolation or after in vitro culture. We confirmed the interaction of Tax with Scribble only in T-cells from the WT hu-mice. This association correlated with the presence of both proteins in aggregates at the leading edge of the cells and with the formation of long actin filopods. Finally, data from a comparative genome-wide transcriptomic analysis suggested that the PBM-PDZ association is implicated in the expression of genes regulating proliferation, apoptosis and cytoskeletal organization. Collectively, our findings suggest that the Tax PBM is an auxiliary motif that contributes to the sustained growth of HTLV-1 infected T-cells in vivo and in vitro and is essential to T-cell immortalization.

  17. Pre-existing hypertension dominates γδT cell reduction in human ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz G Adamski

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes may play an important role in the evolution of ischemic stroke. Depletion of γδT cells has been found to abrogate ischemia reperfusion injury in murine stroke. However, the role of γδT cells in human ischemic stroke is unknown. We aimed to determine γδT cell counts and γδT cell interleukin 17A (IL-17A production in the clinical setting of ischemic stroke. We also aimed to determine the associations of γδT cell counts with ischemic lesion volume, measures of clinical severity and with major stroke risk factors. Peripheral blood samples from 43 acute ischemic stroke patients and 26 control subjects matched on race and gender were used for flow cytometry and complete blood count analyses. Subsequently, cytokine levels and gene expression were measured in γδT cells. The number of circulating γδT cells was decreased by almost 50% (p = 0.005 in the stroke patients. γδT cell counts did not correlate with lesion volume on magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging or with clinical severity in the stroke patients, but γδT cells showed elevated levels of IL-17A (p = 0.048. Decreased γδT cell counts were also associated with older age (p = 0.004, pre-existing hypertension (p = 0.0005 and prevalent coronary artery disease (p = 0.03, with pre-existing hypertension being the most significant predictor of γδT cell counts in a multivariable analysis. γδT cells in human ischemic stroke are reduced in number and show elevated levels of IL-17A. A major reduction in γδT lymphocytes also occurs in hypertension and may contribute to the development of hypertension-mediated stroke and vascular disease.

  18. Langerhans cells from human oral epithelium are more effective at stimulating allogeneic T cells in vitro than Langerhans cells from skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasséus, B; Jontell, M; Bergenholtz, G; Dahlgren, U I

    2004-06-01

    This report is focused on the functional capacity of Langerhans cells (LC) in the epithelium of skin and oral mucosa, which both meet different antigenic challenges. The capacity of LC from human oral and skin epithelium to provide co-stimulatory signals to T cells in vitro was compared. LC in a crude suspension of oral epithelial cells had a significantly enhanced T cell co-stimulatory capacity compared to skin epithelial cells. This applied both to cultures with concanavalin A (con-A)-stimulated syngeneic T cells and to a mixed epithelial cell lymphocyte reaction involving allogeneic T cells. The co-stimulatory capacity of oral and skin epithelial cells was reduced by >70% if monoclonal antibodies against HLA-DR, -DP and -DQ were added to the cultures with allogeneic T cells, indicating the involvement of HLA class II expressing LC. Immunohistochemistry revealed that 6% of the epithelial cells were CD1a + LC in sections from both oral and skin epithelium. Interleukin (IL)-8 production was higher in cultures of oral epithelial cells and con-A stimulated T cells than in corresponding cultures with skin epithelial cells as accessory cells. The results suggest that LC in human oral epithelium are more efficient at stimulating T cells than those of skin.

  19. A novel dendritic cell-based direct ex vivo assay for detection and enumeration of circulating antigen-specific human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrio, Roberto; Zhang, Ge; Drake, Donald R; Schanen, Brian C

    2018-05-07

    Although a variety of assays have been used to examine T cell responses in vitro, standardized ex vivo detection of antigen-specific CD4 + T cells from human circulatory PBMCs remains constrained by low-dimensional characterization outputs and the need for polyclonal, mitogen-induced expansion methods to generate detectable response signals. To overcome these limitations, we developed a novel methodology utilizing antigen-pulsed autologous human dendritic target cells in a rapid and sensitive assay to accurately enumerate antigen-specific CD4 + T cell precursor frequency by multiparametric flow cytometry. With this approach, we demonstrate the ability to reproducibly quantitate poly-functional T cell responses following both primary and recall antigenic stimulation. Furthermore, this approach enables more comprehensive phenotypic profiling of circulating antigen-specific CD4 + T cells, providing valuable insights into the pre-existing polarization of antigen-specific T cells in humans. Combined, this approach permits sensitive and detailed ex vivo detection of antigen-specific CD4 + T cells delivering an important tool for advancing vaccine, immune-oncology and other therapeutic studies.

  20. Human skin is protected by four functionally and phenotypically discrete populations of resident and recirculating memory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Rei; Gehad, Ahmed; Yang, Chao; Campbell, Laura; Teague, Jessica E.; Schlapbach, Christoph; Elco, Christopher; Huang, Victor; Matos, Tiago R.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Clark, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    The skin of an adult human contains approximately 20 billion memory T cells. Epithelial barrier tissues are infiltrated by a combination of resident and recirculating T cells in mice but the relative proportions and functional activities of resident versus recirculating T cells have not been evaluated in human skin. We discriminated resident from recirculating T cells in human engrafted mice and lymphoma patients using alemtuzumab, a medication that depletes recirculating T cells from skin, and then analyzed these T cell populations in healthy human skin. All non-recirculating resident memory T cells (TRM) expressed CD69, but the majority were CD4+, CD103− and located in the dermis, in contrast to studies in mice. Both CD4+ and CD8+ CD103+ TRM were enriched in the epidermis, had potent effector functions and had a limited proliferative capacity compared to CD103− TRM. TRM of both types had more potent effector functions than recirculating T cells. Induction of CD103 on human T cells was enhanced by keratinocyte contact, depended on TGFβ and was independent of T cell keratinocyte adhesive interactions. We observed two distinct populations of recirculating T cells, CCR7+/L-selectin+ central memory T cells (TCM) and CCR7+/L-selectin− T cells, which we term migratory memory T cells (TMM). Circulating skin-tropic TMM were intermediate in cytokine production between TCM and effector memory T cells. In patients with cutaneous T cell lymphoma, malignant TCM and TMM induced distinct inflammatory skin lesions and TMM were depleted more slowly from skin after alemtuzumab, suggesting TMM may recirculate more slowly. In summary, human skin is protected by four functionally distinct populations of T cells, two resident and two recirculating, with differing territories of migration and distinct functional activities. PMID:25787765

  1. CP-25 Attenuates the Activation of CD4+ T Cells Stimulated with Immunoglobulin D in Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Jing; Chen, Heng-Shi; Chen, Wen-Sheng; Dong, Jin; Dong, Xiao-Jie; Dai, Xing; Huang, Qiong; Wei, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Researchers have shown that the level of immunoglobulin D (IgD) is often elevated in patients with autoimmune diseases. The possible roles of IgD on the function of human T cell activation are still unclear. Paeoniflorin-6'- O -benzene sulfonate (code: CP-25), the chemistry structural modifications of paeoniflorin, was a novel drug of anti-inflammation and immunomodulation. The aims of this study were to determine if human CD4 + T cells could be activated by IgD via the IgD receptor (IgDR)-Lck pathway and whether the novel compound CP-25 could affect the activation of T cells by regulating Lck. Human CD4 + T cells were purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells using microbeads. T cell viability and proliferation were detected by Cell Counting Kit-8 and CFSE Cell Proliferation Kit. Cytokines secreted by T cells were assessed with the Quantibody Human Inflammation Array. The binding affinity and expression of IgDR on T cells were detected by flow cytometry, and protein expression of IgDR, Lck, and P-Lck were analyzed by western blot. IgD was shown to bind to IgDR on CD4 + T cells in a concentration-dependent manner and stimulate the activation and proliferation of these cells by enhancing phosphorylation of the activating tyrosine residue of Lck (Tyr 394 ). CP-25 inhibited the IgD-stimulated activation and proliferation of CD4 + T cells, as well as the production of inflammatory cytokines; it was thus suggested that this process might be related to the downregulation of Lck (Tyr 394 ) phosphorylation. These results demonstrate that IgD amplifies the activation of CD4 + T cells, which could be mediated by Lck phosphorylation. Further, CP-25, via its ability to modulate Lck, is a novel potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of human autoimmune diseases.

  2. Isolation of a new herpes virus from human CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenkel, N.; Schirmer, E.C.; Wyatt, L.S.; Katsafanas, G.; Roffman, E.; Danovich, R.M.; June, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    A new human herpes virus has been isolated from CD4 + T cells purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy individual (RK), following incubation of the cells under conditions promoting T-cell activation. The virus could not be recovered from nonactivated cells. Cultures of lymphocytes infected with the RK virus exhibited a cytopathic effect, and electron microscopic analyses revealed a characteristic herpes virus structure. RK virus DNA did not hybridize with large probes derived from herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus, varicella-zoster virus, and human cytomegalovirus. The genetic relatedness of the RK virus to the recently identified T-lymphotropic human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) was investigated by restriction enzyme analyses using 21 different enzymes and by blot hydridization analyses using 11 probes derived from two strains of HHV-6 (Z29 and U1102). Whereas the two HHV-6 strains exhibited only limited restriction enzyme polymorphism, cleavage of the RK virus DNA yielded distinct patterns. Of the 11 HHV-6 DNA probes tested, only 6 cross-hybridized with DNA fragments derived from the RK virus. Taken together, the maximal homology amounted to 31 kilobases of the 75 kilobases tested. The authors conclude that the RK virus is distinct from previously characterized human herpesviruses. The authors propose to designate it as the prototype of a new herpes virus, the seventh human herpes virus identified to date

  3. Limitaciones técnicas de los métodos para cuantificar tiroglobulina sérica y su repercusión clínica Technical limitations of methods to quantify the serum thyroglobulin and its clinical repercussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio César Rodríguez González

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available La determinación de tiroglobulina sérica se emplea, sobre todo, como marcador tumoral en el seguimiento posoperatorio de pacientes con cáncer diferenciado del tiroides. Lamentablemente, los métodos de tiroglobulina sérica presentan gran variabilidad en sus cualidades analíticas y padecen problemas técnicos que repercuten sobre la utilidad clínica de esta prueba. Para cuantificar tiroglobulina sérica se emplean 2 tecnologías diferentes: los iniciales radioinmunoensayos competitivos y los más recientes métodos inmunométricos no competitivos. Estos últimos son más propensos a sufrir las interferencias provocadas por la presencia de autoanticuerpos tiroglobulina y anticuerpos heterofílicos, a pesar de brindar los beneficios técnicos relativos al uso de reactivos no isotópicos, menor volumen de muestra, tiempos de incubación más cortos, así como mejor sensibilidad y facilidad de automatización. Resulta esencial que los clínicos conozcan y comprendan las limitaciones técnicas inherentes a la determinación de tiroglobulina sérica y su repercusión sobre la utilidad clínica de esta, con la finalidad de hacer un uso efectivo y eficiente de esta prueba en el seguimiento posoperatorio de pacientes con cáncer diferenciado del tiroides.The serum thyroglobulin assessment is used mainly as tumor marker during the postoperative follow-up of patients presenting with thyroid differentiated cancer. Progressively, the serum thyroglobulin methods have much variability in its analytical qualities and also have technical problems affecting on the technical usefulness of this test. To quantify the serum thyroglobulin we used two different technologies: the initial competitive radioimmunoassays and the most recent non competitive inmunometrical methods. These latter are more prone to have interferences provoked by presence of thyroglobulin antibodies and heterophilic antibodies despite to offer technical beneficial relative to use of non

  4. Thyroglobulin is a more sensitive indicator of iodine deficiency than thyrotropin: development and evaluation of dry blood spot assays for thyrotropin and thyroglobulin in iodine-deficient geographical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missler, U; Gutekunst, R; Wood, W G

    1994-03-01

    Immunometric assays were developed for thyrotropin and thyroglobulin using time-resolved fluorescence as the measurement signal. The assays were suitable for measurements in serum/plasma or in dry blood spots (3 mm diameter). Both assays have acceptable coefficients of variation for dry blood spots (intra-assay median CV dry blood spot samples could be transported without special precautions for up to 5-6 weeks without significant loss in immunoreactivity. This agrees with other findings. The results showed that serum thyroglobulin levels are a more sensitive indicator of iodine deficiency than thyrotropin; elevated thyroglobulin levels were found in 182/304 children in Zimbabwe compared with elevated thyrotropin level in 28/304 cases. 213/304 children had enlarged thyroid glands. The cut-off levels used here were 4.5 mU/l thyrotropin and 20 micrograms/l for thyroglobulin, both in whole blood. The assays proved useful for assessing the efficacy of iodine therapy, either by oral dosage or intramuscularly (iodised oil).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells inhibit T-cell lymphoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin-Ok; Chae, Ji-Sang; Coh, Ye-Rin; Jung, Woo-Sung; Lee, Hee-Woo; Shin, Il-Seob; Kang, Sung-Keun; Youn, Hwa-Young

    2014-09-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are thought to be one of the most reliable stem cell sources for a variety of cell therapies. This study investigated the anti-tumor effect of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAT-MSCs) on EL4 murine T-cell lymphoma in vitro and in vivo. The growth-inhibitory effect of hAT-MSCs on EL4 tumor cells was evaluated using a WST-1 cell proliferation assay. Cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated by flow cytometry and western blot. To evaluate an anti-tumor effect of hAT-MSCs on T-cell lymphoma in vivo, CM-DiI-labeled hAT-MSCs were circumtumorally injected in tumor-bearing nude mice, and tumor size was measured. hAT-MSCs inhibited T-cell lymphoma growth by altering cell-cycle progression and inducing apoptosis in vitro. hAT-MSCs inhibited tumor growth in tumor-bearing nude mice and prolonged survival time. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that hAT-MSCs migrated to tumor sites. hAT-MSCs suppress the growth of T-cell lymphoma, suggesting a therapeutic option for T-cell lymphoma. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Serum-thyroglobulin in women with cirrhosis of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, R.; Kopp, L.; Kaffarnik, H.

    1985-01-01

    In 68 women with liver cirrhosis of different origin (alcoholic n=34, cryptogenetic n=18, post hepatitic B n=9, PBC n=5, Morbus Wilson n=2) the median concentration of serum thyroglobulin (TG) was slightly but significantly elevated (31,7 ng/ml versus 22,1 ng/ml in controls). No difference could be found between TG levels in alcoholic and non alcoholic cirrhosis. The TG-concentrations overlapped to a large extent with the data of a control group and showed no significant correlation to other parameters of thyroid function (T 4 , T 3 , TBG, T 4 /TBG-quotient, TSH). The missing correlation to the concentrations of estradiol and estrone argues against a significant influence of estrogen concentrations on TG-concentrations. The increase in serum TG was highest in the subgroup with decompensated liver cirrhosis and is possibly caused by the reduced metabolic capacity of the liver. (orig.) [de

  7. High-throughput gene expression profiling of memory differentiation in primary human T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Kate

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The differentiation of naive T and B cells into memory lymphocytes is essential for immunity to pathogens. Therapeutic manipulation of this cellular differentiation program could improve vaccine efficacy and the in vitro expansion of memory cells. However, chemical screens to identify compounds that induce memory differentiation have been limited by 1 the lack of reporter-gene or functional assays that can distinguish naive and memory-phenotype T cells at high throughput and 2 a suitable cell-line representative of naive T cells. Results Here, we describe a method for gene-expression based screening that allows primary naive and memory-phenotype lymphocytes to be discriminated based on complex genes signatures corresponding to these differentiation states. We used ligation-mediated amplification and a fluorescent, bead-based detection system to quantify simultaneously 55 transcripts representing naive and memory-phenotype signatures in purified populations of human T cells. The use of a multi-gene panel allowed better resolution than any constituent single gene. The method was precise, correlated well with Affymetrix microarray data, and could be easily scaled up for high-throughput. Conclusion This method provides a generic solution for high-throughput differentiation screens in primary human T cells where no single-gene or functional assay is available. This screening platform will allow the identification of small molecules, genes or soluble factors that direct memory differentiation in naive human lymphocytes.

  8. Engineering human T cells for resistance to methotrexate and mycophenolate mofetil as an in vivo cell selection strategy.

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    Mahesh Jonnalagadda

    Full Text Available Gene transfer and drug selection systems that enforce ongoing transgene expression in vitro and in vivo which are compatible with human pharmaceutical drugs are currently underdeveloped. Here, we report on the utility of incorporating human enzyme muteins that confer resistance to the lymphotoxic/immunosuppressive drugs methotrexate (MTX and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF in a multicistronic lentiviral vector for in vivo T lymphocyte selection. We found that co-expression of human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR(FS; L22F, F31S and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase II (IMPDH2(IY; T333I, S351Y conferred T cell resistance to the cytocidal and anti-proliferative effects of these drugs at concentrations that can be achieved clinically (up to 0.1 µM MTX and 1.0 µM MPA. Furthermore, using a immunodeficient mouse model that supports the engraftment of central memory derived human T cells, in vivo selection studies demonstrate that huEGFRt(+DHFR(FS+IMPDH2(IY+ T cells could be enriched following adoptive transfer either by systemic administration of MTX alone (4.4 -fold, MMF alone (2.9-fold, or combined MTX and MMF (4.9-fold. These findings demonstrate the utility of both DHFR(FS/MTX and IMPDH2(IY/MMF for in vivo selection of lentivirally transduced human T cells. Vectors incorporating these muteins in combination with other therapeutic transgenes may facilitate the selective engraftment of therapeutically active cells in recipients.

  9. Engineering human T cells for resistance to methotrexate and mycophenolate mofetil as an in vivo cell selection strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnalagadda, Mahesh; Brown, Christine E; Chang, Wen-Chung; Ostberg, Julie R; Forman, Stephen J; Jensen, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Gene transfer and drug selection systems that enforce ongoing transgene expression in vitro and in vivo which are compatible with human pharmaceutical drugs are currently underdeveloped. Here, we report on the utility of incorporating human enzyme muteins that confer resistance to the lymphotoxic/immunosuppressive drugs methotrexate (MTX) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in a multicistronic lentiviral vector for in vivo T lymphocyte selection. We found that co-expression of human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR(FS); L22F, F31S) and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase II (IMPDH2(IY); T333I, S351Y) conferred T cell resistance to the cytocidal and anti-proliferative effects of these drugs at concentrations that can be achieved clinically (up to 0.1 µM MTX and 1.0 µM MPA). Furthermore, using a immunodeficient mouse model that supports the engraftment of central memory derived human T cells, in vivo selection studies demonstrate that huEGFRt(+)DHFR(FS+)IMPDH2(IY+) T cells could be enriched following adoptive transfer either by systemic administration of MTX alone (4.4 -fold), MMF alone (2.9-fold), or combined MTX and MMF (4.9-fold). These findings demonstrate the utility of both DHFR(FS)/MTX and IMPDH2(IY)/MMF for in vivo selection of lentivirally transduced human T cells. Vectors incorporating these muteins in combination with other therapeutic transgenes may facilitate the selective engraftment of therapeutically active cells in recipients.

  10. Analysis of the paired TCR α- and β-chains of single human T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-Min Kim

    Full Text Available Analysis of the paired i.e. matching TCR α- and β-chain rearrangements of single human T cells is required for a precise investigation of clonal diversity, tissue distribution and specificity of protective and pathologic T-cell mediated immune responses. Here we describe a multiplex RT-PCR based technology, which for the first time allows for an unbiased analysis of the complete sequences of both α- and β-chains of TCR from single T cells. We validated our technology by the analysis of the pathologic T-cell infiltrates from tissue lesions of two T-cell mediated autoimmune diseases, psoriasis vulgaris (PV and multiple sclerosis (MS. In both disorders we could detect various T cell clones as defined by multiple T cells with identical α- and β-chain rearrangements distributed across the tissue lesions. In PV, single cell TCR analysis of lesional T cells identified clonal CD8(+ T cell expansions that predominated in the epidermis of psoriatic plaques. An MS brain lesion contained two dominant CD8(+ T-cell clones that extended over the white and grey matter and meninges. In both diseases several clonally expanded T cells carried dual TCRs composed of one Vβ and two different Vα-chain rearrangements. These results show that our technology is an efficient instrument to analyse αβ-T cell responses with single cell resolution in man. It should facilitate essential new insights into the mechanisms of protective and pathologic immunity in many human T-cell mediated conditions and allow for resurrecting functional TCRs from any αβ-T cell of choice that can be used for investigating their specificity.

  11. Cytotoxic human CD4(+) T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Berg, Pablo J.; van Leeuwen, Ester M.; ten Berge, Ineke J.; van Lier, Rene

    2008-01-01

    The induction of adaptive immune responses critically depends on helper signals provided by CD4(+) T cells. These signals not only license antigen presenting cells (APC) to activate naïve CD8(+) T cells leading to the formation of vast numbers of cytotoxic T lymphocytes but also support the

  12. Automated Expansion of Primary Human T Cells in Scalable and Cell-Friendly Hydrogel Microtubes for Adoptive Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haishuang; Li, Qiang; Wang, Ou; Rauch, Jack; Harm, Braden; Viljoen, Hendrik J; Zhang, Chi; Van Wyk, Erika; Zhang, Chi; Lei, Yuguo

    2018-05-11

    Adoptive immunotherapy is a highly effective strategy for treating many human cancers, such as melanoma, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and leukemia. Here, a novel cell culture technology is reported for expanding primary human T cells for adoptive immunotherapy. T cells are suspended and cultured in microscale alginate hydrogel tubes (AlgTubes) that are suspended in the cell culture medium in a culture vessel. The hydrogel tubes protect cells from hydrodynamic stresses and confine the cell mass less than 400 µm (in radial diameter) to ensure efficient mass transport, creating a cell-friendly microenvironment for growing T cells. This system is simple, scalable, highly efficient, defined, cost-effective, and compatible with current good manufacturing practices. Under optimized culture conditions, the AlgTubes enable culturing T cells with high cell viability, low DNA damage, high growth rate (≈320-fold expansion over 14 days), high purity (≈98% CD3+), and high yield (≈3.2 × 10 8 cells mL -1 hydrogel). All offer considerable advantages compared to current T cell culturing approaches. This new culture technology can significantly reduce the culture volume, time, and cost, while increasing the production. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The role of T and B cells in human atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammirati, E; Moroni, F; Magnoni, M; Camici, P G

    2015-02-01

    Far from being merely a passive cholesterol accumulation within the arterial wall, the development of atherosclerosis is currently known to imply both inflammation and immune effector mechanisms. Adaptive immunity has been implicated in the process of disease initiation and progression interwined with traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Although the body of knowledge regarding the correlation between atherosclerosis and immunity in humans is growing rapidly, a relevant proportion of it derives from studies carried out in animal models of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, while the mouse is a well-suited model, the results obtained therein are not fully transferrable to the human setting due to intrinsic genomic and environmental differences. In the present review, we will discuss mainly human findings, obtained either by examination of post-mortem and surgical atherosclerotic material or through the analysis of the immunological profile of peripheral blood cells. In particular, we will discuss the findings supporting a pro-atherogenic role of T cell subsets, such as effector memory T cells or the potential protective function of regulatory T cells. Recent studies suggest that traditional T cell-driven B2 cell responses appear to be atherogenic, while innate B1 cells appear to exert a protective action through the secretion of naturally occurring antibodies. The insights into the immune pathogenesis of atherosclerosis can provide new targets in the quest for novel therapeutic targets to abate CVD morbidity and mortality. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  14. Human T cell leukemia virus reactivation with progression of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ratner

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus-associated adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL has a very poor prognosis, despite trials of a variety of different treatment regimens. Virus expression has been reported to be limited or absent when ATLL is diagnosed, and this has suggested that secondary genetic or epigenetic changes are important in disease pathogenesis.We prospectively investigated combination chemotherapy followed by antiretroviral therapy for this disorder. Nineteen patients were prospectively enrolled between 2002 and 2006 at five medical centers in a phase II clinical trial of infusional chemotherapy with etoposide, doxorubicin, and vincristine, daily prednisone, and bolus cyclophosphamide (EPOCH given for two to six cycles until maximal clinical response, and followed by antiviral therapy with daily zidovudine, lamivudine, and alpha interferon-2a for up to one year. Seven patients were on study for less than one month due to progressive disease or chemotherapy toxicity. Eleven patients achieved an objective response with median duration of response of thirteen months, and two complete remissions. During chemotherapy induction, viral RNA expression increased (median 190-fold, and virus replication occurred, coincident with development of disease progression.EPOCH chemotherapy followed by antiretroviral therapy is an active therapeutic regimen for adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, but viral reactivation during induction chemotherapy may contribute to treatment failure. Alternative therapies are sorely needed in this disease that simultaneously prevent virus expression, and are cytocidal for malignant cells.

  15. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-03-31

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells.

  16. Effect of irradiation on human T-cell proliferation: low dose irradiation stimulates mitogen-induced proliferation and function of the suppressor/cytotoxic T-cell subset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualde, N.; Goodwin, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Unfractionated human T cells exposed to 10-50 rad of X irradiation incorporated less [ 3 H]thymidine than nonirradiated T cells when subsequently cultured with PHA or Con A. The cytotoxic/suppressor T-cell subset, isolated as either OKT8(+) or OKT4(-) cells, demonstrated significantly enhanced [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation in PHA- or Con A-stimulated cultures after exposure to 10-50 rad, compared to unirradiated cells, while the proliferation of the OKT4(+) helper/inducer subset was inhibited by low dose irradiation. It has been previously reported that approximately 30% of the cytotoxic/suppressor subset also stains with OKM1. When the cytotoxic/suppressor subset was further subdivided into OKT4(-), OKM1(+), and OKT4(-), OKM1(-) cells, proliferation of the OKT4(-), OKM1(+) population was inhibited by exposure to 25 rad while proliferation of the OKT4(-), OKM1(-) population was stimulated. The increase in proliferation of the cytotoxic/suppressor T-cell subset after low dose irradiation is paralleled by an increase in suppressor activity of these cells. T cells exposed to 25 rad and then cultured with Con A for 48 hr caused greater inhibition of IgG production when added to fresh autologous lymphocytes stimulated by pokeweed mitogen than did unirradiated cells. Thus, low dose irradiation enhances both the proliferation and function of the human suppressor T-cell subset

  17. Effect of cell phone-like electromagnetic radiation on primary human thyroid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Veronica; Hilly, Ohad; Strenov, Yulia; Tzabari, Cochava; Hauptman, Yirmi; Feinmesser, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the potential carcinogenic effects of radiofrequency energy (RFE) emitted by cell phones on human thyroid primary cells. Primary thyroid cell culture was prepared from normal thyroid tissue obtained from patients who underwent surgery at our department. Subconfluent thyroid cells were irradiated under different conditions inside a cell incubator using a device that simulates cell phone-RFE. Proliferation of control and irradiated cells was assessed by the immunohistochemical staining of antigen Kiel clone-67 (Ki-67) and tumor suppressor p53 (p53) expression. DNA ploidy and the stress biomarkers heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Our cells highly expressed thyroglobulin (Tg) and sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) confirming the origin of the tissue. None of the irradiation conditions evaluated here had an effect neither on the proliferation marker Ki-67 nor on p53 expression. DNA ploidy was also not affected by RFE, as well as the expression of the biomarkers HSP70 and ROS. Our conditions of RFE exposure seem to have no potential carcinogenic effect on human thyroid cells. Moreover, common biomarkers usually associated to environmental stress also remained unchanged. We failed to find an association between cell phone-RFE and thyroid cancer. Additional studies are recommended.

  18. Selective Expansion of Memory CD4+ T cells By Mitogenic Human CD28 Generates Inflammatory Cytokines and Regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manisha; Basu, Sreemanti; Camell, Christina; Couturier, Jacob; Nudelman, Rodolfo J.; Medina, Miguel A.; Rodgers, John R.; Lewis, Dorothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Co-stimulatory signals are important for development of effector and regulatory T cells. In this case, CD28 signaling is usually considered inert in the absence of signaling through the TCR. By contrast, mitogenic rat CD28 mAbs reportedly expand regulatory T cells without TCR stimulation. We found that a commercially available human CD28 mAb (ANC28) stimulated PBMCs without TCR co-ligation or cross-linking; ANC28 selectively expanded CD4+CD25+FoxP3−(T effector) and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ (Treg) cells. ANC28 stimulated the CD45RO+ CD4+ (memory) population whereas CD45RA+CD4+ (naïve) cells did not respond. ANC28 also induced inflammatory cytokines. Treg induced by ANC28 retain the Treg phenotype longer than did co-stimulated Treg. Treg induced by ANC28 suppressed CD25− T cells through a contact-dependent mechanism. Purity influenced the response of CD4+CD25+ cells because bead-purified CD4+CD25+ cells (85–90% pure) responded strongly to ANC28, whereas 98% pure FACS-sorted CD4+CD25 bright (T-reg) did not respond. Purified CD4+CD25int cells responded similarly to the bead-purified CD4+CD25+ cells. Thus, pre-activated CD4+ T cells (CD25int) respond to ANC28 rather than Treg (CD25bright). The ability of ANC28 to expand both effectors producing inflammatory cytokines as well as suppressive regulatory T cells might be useful for ex vivo expansion of therapeutic T cells. PMID:18446791

  19. Evidence for a stepwise program of extrathymic T cell development within the human tonsil

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClory, Susan; Hughes, Tiffany; Freud, Aharon G.; Briercheck, Edward L.; Martin, Chelsea; Trimboli, Anthony J.; Yu, Jianhua; Zhang, Xiaoli; Leone, Gustavo; Nuovo, Gerard; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of a broad repertoire of T cells, which is essential for effective immune function, occurs in the thymus. Although some data suggest that T cell development can occur extrathymically, many researchers remain skeptical that extrathymic T cell development has an important role in generating the T cell repertoire in healthy individuals. However, it may be important in the setting of poor thymic function or congenital deficit and in the context of autoimmunity, cancer, or regenerative medicine. Here, we report evidence that a stepwise program of T cell development occurs within the human tonsil. We identified 5 tonsillar T cell developmental intermediates: (a) CD34+CD38dimLin– cells, which resemble multipotent progenitors in the bone marrow and thymus; (b) more mature CD34+CD38brightLin– cells; (c) CD34+CD1a+CD11c– cells, which resemble committed T cell lineage precursors in the thymus; (d) CD34–CD1a+CD3–CD11c– cells, which resemble CD4+CD8+ double-positive T cells in the thymus; and (e) CD34–CD1a+CD3+CD11c– cells. The phenotype of each subset closely resembled that of its thymic counterpart. The last 4 populations expressed RAG1 and PTCRA, genes required for TCR rearrangement, and all 5 subsets were capable of ex vivo T cell differentiation. TdT+ cells found within the tonsillar fibrous scaffold expressed CD34 and/or CD1a, indicating that this distinct anatomic region contributes to pre–T cell development, as does the subcapsular region of the thymus. Thus, we provide evidence of a role for the human tonsil in a comprehensive program of extrathymic T cell development. PMID:22378041

  20. Immortalization of human neural stem cells with the c-myc mutant T58A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia De Filippis

    Full Text Available Human neural stem cells (hNSC represent an essential source of renewable brain cells for both experimental studies and cell replacement therapies. Their relatively slow rate of proliferation and physiological senescence in culture make their use cumbersome under some experimental and pre-clinical settings. The immortalization of hNSC with the v-myc gene (v-IhNSC has been shown to generate stem cells endowed with enhanced proliferative capacity, which greatly facilitates the study of hNSCs, both in vitro and in vivo. Despite the excellent safety properties displayed by v-IhNSCs--which do not transform in vitro and are not tumorigenic in vivo--the v-myc gene contains several mutations and recombination elements, whose role(s and effects remains to be elucidated, yielding unresolved safety concerns. To address this issue, we used a c-myc T58A retroviral vector to establish an immortal cell line (T-IhNSC from the same hNSCs used to generate the original v-IhNSCs and compared their characteristics with the latter, with hNSC and with hNSC immortalized using c-myc wt (c-IhNSC. T-IhNSCs displayed an enhanced self-renewal ability, with their proliferative capacity and clonogenic potential being remarkably comparable to those of v-IhNSC and higher than wild type hNSCs and c-IhNSCs. Upon growth factors removal, T-IhNSC promptly gave rise to well-differentiated neurons, astrocytes and most importantly, to a heretofore undocumented high percentage of human oligodendrocytes (up to 23%. Persistent growth-factor dependence, steady functional properties, lack of ability to generate colonies in soft-agar colony-forming assay and to establish tumors upon orthotopic transplantation, point to the fact that immortalization by c-myc T58A does not bring about tumorigenicity in hNSCs. Hence, this work describes a novel and continuous cell line of immortalized human multipotent neural stem cells, in which the immortalizing agent is represented by a single gene which, in

  1. Human invariant NKT cell subsets differentially promote differentiation, antibody production, and T cell stimulation by B cells in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    O'REILLY, VINCENT

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED Invariant NK T (iNKT) cells can provide help for B cell activation and Ab production. Because B cells are also capable of cytokine production, Ag presentation, and T cell activation, we hypothesized that iNKT cells will also influence these activities. Furthermore, subsets of iNKT cells based on CD4 and CD8 expression that have distinct functional activities may differentially affect B cell functions. We investigated the effects of coculturing expanded human CD4(+), CD8α(+), and ...

  2. Low CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio associated with inflammatory arthropathy in human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Ohsugi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1 can cause an aggressive malignancy known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL as well as inflammatory diseases such as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. A transgenic mouse that expresses HTLV-1 Tax also develops T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and an inflammatory arthropathy that resembles rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this study was to identify the primary T-cell subsets involved in the development of arthropathy in Tax transgenic mice. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By 24 months of age, Tax transgenic mice developed severe arthropathy with a cumulative incidence of 22.8%. The pathological findings of arthropathy in Tax transgenic mice were similar to those seen in human rheumatoid arthritis or mouse models of rheumatoid arthritis, with synovial proliferation and a positive rheumatoid factor. Before the onset of spontaneous arthropathy, young and old Tax transgenic mice were not sensitive to collagen and did not develop arthritis after immunization with type II collagen. The arthropathic Tax transgenic mice showed a significantly decreased proportion of splenic CD4(+ T cells, whereas the proportion of splenic CD8(+ T cells was increased. Regulatory T cells (CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ were significantly decreased and CD8(+ T cells that expressed the chemokine receptor CCR4 (CD8(+CCR4(+ were significantly increased in arthropathic Tax transgenic mice. The expression of tax mRNA was strong in the spleen and joints of arthropathic mice, with a 40-fold increase compared with healthy transgenic mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings reveal that Tax transgenic mice develop rheumatoid-like arthritis with proliferating synovial cells in the joints; however, the proportion of different splenic T-cell subsets in these mice was completely different from other commonly used animal models of rheumatoid arthritis. The crucial T-cell subsets in arthropathic Tax transgenic mice appear to resemble

  3. Generation of Functional Thymic Epithelium from Human Embryonic Stem Cells that Supports Host T Cell Development

    OpenAIRE

    Parent, Audrey V.; Russ, Holger A.; Khan, Imran S.; LaFlam, Taylor N.; Metzger, Todd C.; Anderson, Mark S.; Hebrok, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Inducing immune tolerance to prevent rejection is a key step toward successful engraftment of stem-cell-derived tissue in a clinical setting. Using human pluripotent stem cells to generate thymic epithelial cells (TECs) capable of supporting T cell development represents a promising approach to reach this goal; however, progress toward generating functional TECs has been limited. Here, we describe a robust in vitro method to direct differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into th...

  4. From Hayflick to Walford: the role of T cell replicative senescence in human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effros, Rita B

    2004-06-01

    The immunologic theory of aging, proposed more than 40 years ago by Roy Walford, suggests that the normal process of aging in man and in animals is pathogenetically related to faulty immunological processes. Since that time, research on immunological aging has undergone extraordinary expansion, leading to new information in areas spanning from molecular biology and cell signaling to large-scale clinical studies. Investigation in this area has also provided unexpected insights into HIV disease, many aspects of which represent accelerated immunological aging. This article describes the initial insights and vision of Roy Walford into one particular facet of human immunological aging, namely, the potential relevance of the well-studied human fibroblast replicative senescence model, initially developed by Leonard Hayflick, to cells of the immune system. Extensive research on T cell senescence in cell culture has now documented changes in vitro that closely mirror alterations occurring during in vivo aging in humans, underscoring the biological significance of T cell replicative senescence. Moreover, the inclusion of high proportions of putatively senescent T cells in the 'immune risk phenotype' that is associated with early mortality in octogenarians provides initial clinical confirmation of both the immunologic theory of aging and the role of the T cell Hayflick Limit in human aging, two areas of gerontological research pioneered by Roy Walford.

  5. Application of Adoptive T-Cell Therapy Using Tumor Antigen-Specific T-Cell Receptor Gene Transfer for the Treatment of Human Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Ochi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen great strides in the field of cancer immunotherapy, especially the treatment of melanoma. Beginning with the identification of cancer antigens, followed by the clinical application of anti-cancer peptide vaccination, it has now been proven that adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT using cancer antigen-specific T cells is the most effective option. Despite the apparent clinical efficacy of ACT, the timely preparation of a sufficient number of cancer antigen-specific T cells for each patient has been recognized as its biggest limitation. Currently, therefore, attention is being focused on ACT with engineered T cells produced using cancer antigen-specific T-cell receptor (TCR gene transfer. With regard to human leukemia, ACT using engineered T cells bearing the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene still remains in its infancy. However, several reports have provided preclinical data on TCR gene transfer using Wilms' tumor gene product 1 (WT1, and also preclinical and clinical data on TCR gene transfer involving minor histocompatibility antigen, both of which have been suggested to provide additional clinical benefit. In this review, we examine the current status of anti-leukemia ACT with engineered T cells carrying the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene, and discuss the existing barriers to progress in this area.

  6. Visualization of the human CD4+ T-cell response in humanized HLA-DR4-expressing NOD/Shi-scid/γcnull (NOG) mice by retrogenic expression of the human TCR gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Takeshi; Katano, Ikumi; Ito, Ryoji; Ito, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) specific TCR genes were introduced to human HSC by retrovirus. • Human HSC with BLG-specific TCR were transplanted into NOG-HLA-DR4 I-A −/− mice. • BLG-specific TCR induced positive selection of thymocytes. • BLG-specific TCR positive CD4 + T cells mediated immune responses in humanized mice. - Abstract: The development of severe immunodeficient mouse strains containing various human genes, including cytokines or HLA, has enabled the reconstitution of functional human immune systems after transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Accumulating evidence has suggested that HLA-restricted antigen-specific human T-cell responses can be generated in these humanized mice. To directly monitor immune responses of human CD4 + T cells, we introduced β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-specific T cell receptor (TCR) genes derived from CD4 + T-cell clones of cow-milk allergy patients into HSCs, and subsequently transplanted them into NOG-HLA-DR4 transgenic/I-Aβ deficient mice (NOG-DR4/I-A o ). In the thymus, thymocytes with BLG-specific TCR preferentially differentiated into CD4 + CD8 − single-positive cells. Adoptive transfer of mature CD4 + T cells expressing the TCR into recipient NOG-DR4/I-A o mice demonstrated that human CD4 + T cells proliferated in response to antigenic stimulation and produced IFN-γ in vivo, suggesting that functional T-cell reactions (especially Th1-skewed responses) were induced in humanized mice

  7. Advances in the Characterization of the T-Cell Response to Human Herpesvirus-6

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    Derek J. Hanson

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus (HHV 6 is thought to remain clinically latent in most individuals after primary infection and to reactivate to cause disease in persons with severe immunosuppression. In allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, reactivation of HHV-6 species B is a considerable cause of morbidity and mortality. HHV-6B reactivation is the most frequent cause of infectious meningoencephalitis in this setting and has been associated with a variety of other complications such as graft rejection and acute graft versus host disease. This has inspired efforts to develop HHV-6-targeted immunotherapies. Basic knowledge of HHV-6-specific adaptive immunity is crucial for these endeavors, but remains incomplete. Many studies have focused on specific HHV-6 antigens extrapolated from research on human cytomegalovirus, a genetically related betaherpesvirus. Challenges to the study of HHV-6-specific T-cell immunity include the very low frequency of HHV-6-specific memory T cells in chronically infected humans, the large genome size of HHV-6, and the lack of an animal model. This review will focus on emerging techniques and methodological improvements that are beginning to overcome these barriers. Population-prevalent antigens are now becoming clear for the CD4+ T-cell response, while definition and ranking of CD8+ T-cell antigens and epitopes is at an earlier stage. This review will discuss current knowledge of the T-cell response to HHV-6, new research approaches, and translation to clinical practice.

  8. Paucity of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells in human neuromyelitis optica lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadoun, Samira; Bridges, Leslie R.; Verkman, A. S.; Papadopoulos, Marios C.

    2013-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica is a severe inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Most patients with neuromyelitis optica have circulating immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the astrocytic water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which are pathogenic. Anti-AQP4 IgG-mediated complement-dependent astrocyte toxicity is a key mechanism of central nervous system damage in neuromyelitis optica, but the role of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells is unknown. Our objective was to determine whether natural killer and cytotoxic T cells play a role in human neuromyelitis optica lesions. We immunostained four actively demyelinating lesions, obtained from patients with anti-AQP4 IgG positive neuromyelitis optica, for Granzyme B and Perforin. The inflammatory cells were perivascular neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages, with only occasional Granzyme B+ or Perforin + cells. Greater than 95% of inflamed vessels in each lesion had no surrounding Granzyme B+ or Perforin + cells. Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells were abundant in human spleen (positive control). Although natural killer cells produce central nervous system damage in mice injected with anti-AQP4 IgG, our findings here indicate that natural killer-mediated and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity are probably not involved in central nervous system damage in human neuromyelitis optica. PMID:23108041

  9. Profiling calcium signals of in vitro polarized human effector CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, Sarah; Merino-Wong, Maylin; Niemeyer, Barbara A; Alansary, Dalia

    2018-06-01

    Differentiation of naïve CD4 + T cells into effector subtypes with distinct cytokine profiles and physiological roles is a tightly regulated process, the imbalance of which can lead to an inadequate immune response or autoimmune disease. The crucial role of Ca 2+ signals, mainly mediated by the store operated Ca 2+ entry (SOCE) in shaping the immune response is well described. However, it is unclear if human effector CD4 + T cell subsets show differential Ca 2+ signatures in response to different stimulation methods. Herein, we provide optimized in vitro culture conditions for polarization of human CD4 + effector T cells and characterize their SOCE following both pharmacological store depletion and direct T-cell receptor (TCR) activation. Moreover, we measured whole cell Ca 2+ release activated Ca 2+ currents (I CRAC ) and investigated whether the observed differences correlate to the expression of CRAC genes. Our results show that Ca 2+ profiles of helper CD4 + Th1, Th2 and Th17 are distinct and in part shaped by the intensity of stimulation. Regulatory T cells (Treg) are unique being the subtype with the most prominent SOCE response. Analysis of in vivo differentiated Treg unraveled the role of differential expression of ORAI2 in fine-tuning signals in Treg vs. conventional CD4 + T cells. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Plumbagin exerts an immunosuppressive effect on human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 cells

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    Bae, Kyoung Jun; Lee, Yura [Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, Daejeon 34824 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soon Ae [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Daejeon 34824 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jiyeon, E-mail: yeon@eulji.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, Daejeon 34824 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-22

    Of the hematological disorders typified by poor prognoses and survival rates, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is one of the most commonly diagnosed. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents, the treatment options for this cancer remain limited. In this manuscript, we investigated the anti-proliferative effects of plumbagin, mediated by the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and inhibition of NF-κB signaling; the human T-ALL MOLT-4 cell line was used as our experimental system. Plumbagin is a natural, plant derived compound, which exerts an anti-proliferative activity against many types of human cancer. Our experiments confirm that plumbagin induces a caspase-dependent apoptosis of MOLT-4 cells, with no significant cytotoxicity seen for normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Plumbagin also inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of p65, and the transcription of NF-κB target genes. Our results now show that plumbagin is a potent inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and suppressor of T-ALL cell proliferation. - Highlights: • Plumbagin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in T-ALL MOLT-4 cells. • Plumbagin activates phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) JNK and p38. • Plumbagin inhibits LPS-mediated NF-κB signaling cascade. • Plumbagin inhibits LPS-mediated transcriptional activity of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  11. Cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a T cell- and natural killer cell-specific trypsin-like serine protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershenfeld, H.K.; Hershberger, R.J.; Shows, T.B.; Weissman, I.L.

    1988-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human T cell- and natural killer cell-specific serine protease was obtained by screening a phage λgt10 cDNA library from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with the mouse Hanukah factor cDNA clone. In an RNA blot-hybridization analysis, this human Hanukah factor cDNA hybridized with a 1.3-kilobase band in allogeneic-stimulated cytotoxic T cells and the Jurkat cell line, but this transcript was not detectable in normal muscle, liver, tonsil, or thymus. By dot-blot hybridization, this cDNA hybridized with RNA from three cytolytic T-cell clones and three noncytolytic T-cell clones grown in vitro as well as with purified CD16 + natural killer cells and CD3 + , CD16 - T-cell large granular lymphocytes from peripheral blood lymphocytes (CD = cluster designation). The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA clone encodes a predicted serine protease of 262 amino acids. The active enzyme is 71% and 77% similar to the mouse sequence at the amino acid and DNA level, respectively. The human and mouse sequences conserve the active site residues of serine proteases--the trypsin-specific Asp-189 and all 10 cysteine residues. The gene for the human Hanukah factor serine protease is located on human chromosome 5. The authors propose that this trypsin-like serine protease may function as a common component necessary for lysis of target cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells

  12. TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 expression in human CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Hayley G.; Roostalu, Urmas; Walter, Gina J.; Gullick, Nicola J.; Frederiksen, Klaus S.; Roberts, Ceri A.; Sumner, Jonathan; Baeten, Dominique L.; Gerwien, Jens G.; Cope, Andrew P.; Geissmann, Frederic; Kirkham, Bruce W.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2014-02-01

    IL-17+ CD4+ T (Th17) cells contribute to the pathogenesis of several human inflammatory diseases. Here we demonstrate that TNF inhibitor (TNFi) drugs induce the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. TNFi-mediated induction of IL-10 in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells is Treg-/Foxp3-independent, requires IL-10 and is overcome by IL-1β. TNFi-exposed IL-17+ CD4+ T cells are molecularly and functionally distinct, with a unique gene signature characterized by expression of IL10 and IKZF3 (encoding Aiolos). We show that Aiolos binds conserved regions in the IL10 locus in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, IKZF3 and IL10 expression levels correlate in primary CD4+ T cells and Aiolos overexpression is sufficient to drive IL10 in these cells. Our data demonstrate that TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including Th17 cells and suggest a role for the transcription factor Aiolos in the regulation of IL-10 in CD4+ T cells.

  13. Genome-wide RNA profiling of long-lasting stem cell-like memory CD8 T cells induced by Yellow Fever vaccination in humans

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    Silvia A. Fuertes Marraco

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The live-attenuated Yellow Fever (YF vaccine YF-17D induces a broad and polyfunctional CD8 T cell response in humans. Recently, we identified a population of stem cell-like memory CD8 T cells induced by YF-17D that persists at stable frequency for at least 25 years after vaccination. The YF-17D is thus a model system of human CD8 T cell biology that furthermore allows to track and study long-lasting and antigen-specific human memory CD8 T cells. Here, we describe in detail the sample characteristics and preparation of a microarray dataset acquired for genome-wide gene expression profiling of long-lasting YF-specific stem cell-like memory CD8 T cells, compared to the reference CD8 T cell differentiation subsets from total CD8 T cells. We also describe the quality controls, annotations and exploratory analyses of the dataset. The microarray data is available from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO public repository with accession number GSE65804.

  14. Non-Catalytic Functions of Pyk2 and Fyn Regulate Late Stage Adhesion in Human T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtman, Jon C. D.

    2012-01-01

    T cell activation drives the protective immune response against pathogens, but is also critical for the development of pathological diseases in humans. Cytoskeletal changes are required for downstream functions in T cells, including proliferation, cytokine production, migration, spreading, and adhesion. Therefore, investigating the molecular mechanism of cytoskeletal changes is crucial for understanding the induction of T cell-driven immune responses and for developing therapies to treat immune disorders related to aberrant T cell activation. In this study, we used a plate-bound adhesion assay that incorporated near-infrared imaging technology to address how TCR signaling drives human T cell adhesion. Interestingly, we observed that T cells have weak adhesion early after TCR activation and that binding to the plate was significantly enhanced 30–60 minutes after receptor activation. This late stage of adhesion was mediated by actin polymerization but was surprisingly not dependent upon Src family kinase activity. By contrast, the non-catalytic functions of the kinases Fyn and Pyk2 were required for late stage human T cell adhesion. These data reveal a novel TCR-induced signaling pathway that controls cellular adhesion independent of the canonical TCR signaling cascade driven by tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:23300847

  15. Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei B21060 suppresses human T-cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Ilaria; Fina, Daniele; Caruso, Roberta; Stolfi, Carmine; Caprioli, Flavio; Fantini, Massimo Claudio; Caspani, Giorgio; Grossi, Enzo; Di Iorio, Laura; Paone, Francesco Maria; Pallone, Francesco; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2007-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that probiotics are beneficial in T-cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. The molecular mechanism by which probiotics work remains elusive, but accumulating evidence indicates that probiotics can modulate immune cell responses. Since T cells express receptors for bacterial products or components, we examined whether different strains of lactobacilli directly regulate the functions of human T cells. CD4(+) T cells were isolated from blood and intestinal lamina propria (LP) of normal individuals and patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Mononuclear cells were also isolated from Peyer's patches. Cells were activated with anti-CD3/CD2/CD28 in the presence or absence of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei B21060, L. paracasei subsp. paracasei F19, or L. casei subsp. casei DG. Cell proliferation and death, Foxp3, intracellular pH, and cytokine production were evaluated by flow cytometry. We showed that L. paracasei subsp. paracasei B21060 but neither L. paracasei subsp. paracasei F19 nor L. casei subsp. casei DG inhibited blood CD4(+) T-cell growth. This effect was associated with no change in cell survival, expression of Foxp3, or production of gamma interferon, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, and IL-10. L. paracasei subsp. paracasei B21060-mediated blockade of CD4(+) T-cell proliferation required a viable bacterium and was associated with decreased MCT-1 expression and low intracellular pH. L. paracasei subsp. paracasei B21060 also inhibited the growth of Peyer's patch mononuclear cells, normal lymphocytes, and IBD CD4(+) LP lymphocytes without affecting cytokine production. The data show that L. paracasei subsp. paracasei B21060 blocks T-cell growth, thus suggesting a mechanism by which these probiotics could interfere with T-cell-driven immune responses.

  16. HIV-1 Resistant CDK2-Knockdown Macrophage-Like Cells Generated from 293T Cell-Derived Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Teh Jeang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in studies of human diseases involving macrophages is low yield and heterogeneity of the primary cells and limited ability of these cells for transfections and genetic manipulations. To address this issue, we developed a simple and efficient three steps method for somatic 293T cells reprogramming into monocytes and macrophage-like cells. First, 293T cells were reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs through a transfection-mediated expression of two factors, Oct-4 and Sox2, resulting in a high yield of iPSC. Second, the obtained iPSC were differentiated into monocytes using IL-3 and M-CSF treatment. And third, monocytes were differentiated into macrophage-like cells in the presence of M-CSF. As an example, we developed HIV-1-resistant macrophage-like cells from 293T cells with knockdown of CDK2, a factor critical for HIV-1 transcription. Our study provides a proof-of-principle approach that can be used to study the role of host cell factors in HIV-1 infection of human macrophages.

  17. γ/δ T cell subsets in human aging using the classical α/β T cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudev, Anusha; Ying, Crystal Tan Tze; Ayyadhury, Shamini; Puan, Kia Joo; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Nyunt, Ma Shwe Zin; Shadan, Nurhidaya Binte; Mustafa, Seri; Low, Ivy; Rotzschke, Olaf; Fulop, Tamas; Ng, Tze Pin; Larbi, Anis

    2014-10-01

    Aging is associated with an increased susceptibility to infections and diseases. It has also been associated with reduced functionality and altered distribution of immune cells, especially T cells. Whereas classical α/β T cells, especially CD8(+) T cells, were shown to be highly susceptible to aging, the effects of viral persistent stimulations on the fate of γ/δ T cells are much less documented. Healthy, elderly individuals of Chinese ethnical background were recruited under the aegis of SLAS-II. In this observational study, γ/δ T cell populations were characterized by flow cytometry and compared with the α/β CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in elderly and young controls. In our study, we identified a reduced frequency of γ/δ T cells but not α/β T cells with aging. The classical markers of α/β T cell aging, including CD28, CD27, and CD57, did not prove significant for γ/δ T cells. The extreme range of expression of these markers in γ/δ T cells was responsible for the lack of relationship between γ/δ T cell subsets, CD4/CD8 ratio, and anti-CMV titers that was significant for α/β T cells and, especially, CD8(+) T cells. Although markers of aging for γ/δ T cells are not clearly identified, our data collectively suggest that the presence of CD27 γ/δ T cells is associated with markers of α/β T cell aging. © 2014 Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  18. Sericeous thyroglobulin and whole body thyroid scan in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, G.; Cano, R.; Morales, R.; Huanca, M.; Postigo, J.; Farfan, J.

    1994-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor among endocrine diseases. it has an incidence of 1,87 cases per hundred thousand habitants. Thyroglobulin is an iodo glycoprotein useful in the follow-up of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Total body scan is a well established method to localize distant functioning metastases. We report the concordance of this two methods in 22 patients attending to the Nuclear Medicine Center and proceeding from the Head and Neck Department of INEN, which had undergone total thyroidectomy, received a I-131 ablative dose, performed a total body scan and determined the thyroglobulin concentration fourteen were female patients and the same number were accounted as high risk patients. We conclude for the studied population, that an excellent correlation between thyroglobulin and scans was noted and that 6,5 ng/ml will be used as a cut-off point for the thyroglobulin determination. (authors). 40 refs., 5 tabs

  19. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells secreting anti-PD-L1 antibodies more effectively regress renal cell carcinoma in a humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Eloah Rabello; Chang, De Kuan; Sun, Jiusong; Sui, Jianhua; Freeman, Gordon J; Signoretti, Sabina; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A

    2016-06-07

    Advances in the treatment of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) have led to improved progression-free survival of many patients; however the therapies are toxic, rarely achieve durable long-term complete responses and are not curative. Herein we used a single bicistronic lentiviral vector to develop a new combination immunotherapy that consists of human anti-carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX)-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells engineered to secrete human anti-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) antibodies at the tumor site. The local antibody delivery led to marked immune checkpoint blockade. Tumor growth diminished 5 times and tumor weight reduced 50-80% when compared with the anti-CAIX CAR T cells alone in a humanized mice model of ccRCC. The expression of PD-L1 and Ki67 in the tumors decreased and an increase in granzyme B levels was found in CAR T cells. The anti-PD-L1 IgG1 isotype, which is capable of mediating ADCC, was also able to recruit human NK cells to the tumor site in vivo. These armed second-generation CAR T cells empowered to secrete human anti-PD-L1 antibodies in the ccRCC milieu to combat T cell exhaustion is an innovation in this field that should provide renewed potential for CAR T cell immunotherapy of solid tumors where limited efficacy is currently seen.

  20. p53 functional impairment and high p21waf1/cip1 expression in human T-cell lymphotropic/leukemia virus type I-transformed T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereseto, A; Diella, F; Mulloy, J C; Cara, A; Michieli, P; Grassmann, R; Franchini, G; Klotman, M E

    1996-09-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic/leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is associated with T-cell transformation both in vivo and in vitro. Although some of the mechanisms responsible for transformation remain unknown, increasing evidence supports a direct role of viral as well as dysregulated cellular proteins in transformation. We investigated the potential role of the tumor suppressor gene p53 and of the p53-regulated gene, p21waf1/cip1 (wild-type p53 activated fragment 1/cycling dependent kinases [cdks] interacting protein 1), in HTLV-I-infected T cells. We have found that the majority of HTLV-I-infected T cells have the wild-type p53 gene. However, its function in HTLV-I-transformed cells appears to be impaired, as shown by the lack of appropriate p53-mediated responses to ionizing radiation (IR). Interestingly, the expression of the p53 inducible gene, p21waf1/cip1, is elevated at the messenger ribonucleic acid and protein levels in all HTLV-I-infected T-cell lines examined as well as in Taxl-1, a human T-cell line stably expressing Tax. Additionally, Tax induces upregulation of a p21waf1/cip1 promoter-driven luciferase gene in p53 null cells, and increases p21waf1/cip1 expression in Jurkat T cells. These findings suggest that the Tax protein is at least partially responsible for the p53-independent expression of p21waf1/cip1 in HTLV-I-infected cells. Dysregulation of p53 and p21waf1/cip1 proteins regulating cell-cycle progression, may represent an important step in HTLV-I-induced T-cell transformation.

  1. Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 p30 alters cell cycle G2 regulation of T lymphocytes to enhance cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman Lee

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and is linked to a number of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 contains both regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13 and p30, whose roles are still being defined in the virus life cycle and in HTLV-1 virus-host cell interactions. Proviral clones of HTLV-1 with pX ORF-II mutations diminish the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads in vivo. p30 expressed exogenously differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein/p300 and while acting as a repressor of many genes including Tax, in part by blocking tax/rex RNA nuclear export, selectively enhances key gene pathways involved in T-cell signaling/activation. Results Herein, we analyzed the role of p30 in cell cycle regulation. Jurkat T-cells transduced with a p30 expressing lentivirus vector accumulated in the G2-M phase of cell cycle. We then analyzed key proteins involved in G2-M checkpoint activation. p30 expression in Jurkat T-cells resulted in an increase in phosphorylation at serine 216 of nuclear cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25C, had enhanced checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1 serine 345 phosphorylation, reduced expression of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1, diminished phosphorylation of PLK1 at tyrosine 210 and reduced phosphorylation of Cdc25C at serine 198. Finally, primary human lymphocyte derived cell lines immortalized by a HTLV-1 proviral clone defective in p30 expression were more susceptible to camptothecin induced apoptosis. Collectively these data are consistent with a cell survival role of p30 against genotoxic insults to HTLV-1 infected lymphocytes. Conclusion Collectively, our data are the first to indicate that HTLV-1 p30 expression results in activation of the G2-M cell cycle checkpoint, events that would promote early viral spread and T-cell

  2. A sensitive radio-immunoassay for serum thyroglobulin -including a correct screening for thyroglobulin autoantibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurberg, Peter; Pedersen, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    A new thyroglobulin (Tg) assay employing polyethylene glycol (PEG) for separation of free and antibody bound : 125 I:Tg is described. By choosing a suitable PEG concentration the non-specific precipitation of free [ 125 I]Tg was kept low while both [ 125 I]Tg bound to rabbit anti-Tg immunoglobulins and to human Tg autoantibodies were precipitated. For all sera a 'blank' incubation with no rabbit anti-Tg immunoglobulins was run in parallel with the assay tubes. Hence any interference of Tg autoantibodies would be detected. A two-phase incubation gave a very low detection limit of 0.2 μg/l. The inter-assay coefficient of variation was 9.4% and the intra-assay coefficient of variation was 5.6%. Dilution curves of normal sera were parallel to the standard curve and Tg standards added to normal sera were recovered quantitatively. Twelve out of 60 normal sera from the Randers area contained Tg autoantibodies. The average serum Tg in the 48 sera without antibody was 44.6 ± 5.2 μg/l. (author)

  3. A T-cell specific transcriptional enhancer element 3' of Cα in the human T-cell receptor α locus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Icheng; Yang, Lihsuan; Morle, G.; Leiden, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A transcriptional enhancer element has been identified 4.5 kilobases 3' of C α (constant region α chain) in the human T-cell receptor (TCR) α-chain locus. This enhancer is active on both a TCR V α (variable region α chain) promoter and the minimal simian virus 40 promoter in TCR α/β Jurkat and EL4 cells but is inactive on a V α promoter TCR γ/δ PEER and Molt-13 cells, clone 13 B cells, and HeLa fibroblasts. The enhancer has been localized to a 116-base-pair BstXI/Dra I restriction enzyme fragment, which lacks immunoglobulin octamer and κB enhancer motifs but does contain a consensus cAMP-response element (CRE). DNase I footprint analyses demonstrated that the minimal enhancer contains two binding sites for Jurkat nuclear proteins. One of these sites corresponds to the CRE, while the other does not correspond to a known transcriptional enhancer motif. These data support a model in which TCR α gene transcription is regulated by a unique set of cis-acting sequences and trans-acting factors, which are differentially active in cells of the TCR α/β lineage. In addition, the TCR α enhancer may play a role in activating oncogene expression in T-lymphoblastoid tumors that have previously been shown to display chromosomal translocations into the human TCR α locus

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat responds to T-cell activation signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong-Starksen, S.E.; Luciw, P.A.; Peterlin, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of AIDS, infects and kills lymphoid cells bearing the CD4 antigen. In an infected cell, a number of cellular as well as HIV-encoded gene products determine the levels of viral gene expression and HIV replication. Efficient HIV replication occurs in activated T cells. Utilizing transient expression assays, the authors show that gene expression directed by the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR) increases in response to T-cell activation signals. The effects of T-cell activation and of the HIV-encoded trans-activator (TAT) are multiplicative. Analysis of mutations and deletions in the HIV LTR reveals that the region responding to T-cell activation signals is located at positions -105 to -80. These sequences are composed of two direct repeats, which are homologous to the core transcriptional enhancer elements in the simian virus 40 genome. The studies reveal that these elements function as the HIV enhancer. By acting directly on the HIV LTR, T-cell activation may play an important role in HIV gene expression and in the activation of latent HIV

  5. Expression of members of immunoglobulin gene family in somatic cell hybrids between human B and T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozbor, D.; Burioni, R.; Ar-Rushdi, A.; Zmijewski, C.; Croce, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Somatic cell hybrids were obtained between human T and B cells and tested for the expression of differentiated traits of both cell lineages. The T-cell parent SUP-T1 is CD3 - , CD4 + , CD1 + , CD8 + , is weakly positive for HLA class I determinants, and has an inversion of chromosome 14 due to a site-specific recombination event between an immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable gene and the joining segment of the T-cell receptor α chain. The B-cell parent, the 6-thioguanine- and ouabain-resistant mutant GM1500, is a lymphoblastoid cell line that secretes IgG2, K chains, and expresses B1, B532, and HLA class I and II antigens. All hybrids expressed characteristics of B cells (Ig + , B1 + , B532 + , EBNA + , HLA antigens), whereas only CD4 among the T-cell markers was expressed. The level of T-cell receptor β-chain transcript was greatly reduced and no RNA of the chimeric T-cell receptor α-chain joining segment-immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region was detected. Southern blot analysis indicated that absence of T-cell differentiation markers in the hybrids was not due to chromosomal loss. Rather, some B-cell-specific factor present in the hybrids may account for the suppression

  6. ArtinM Mediates Murine T Cell Activation and Induces Cell Death in Jurkat Human Leukemic T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Brito, Patrícia Kellen Martins; Gonçalves, Thiago Eleutério; Vendruscolo, Patrícia Edivânia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The recognition of cell surface glycans by lectins may be critical for the innate and adaptive immune responses. ArtinM, a d-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, activates antigen-presenting cells by recognizing TLR2 N-glycans and induces Th1 immunity. We recently demonstrated that ArtinM stimulated CD4+ T cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we further studied the effects of ArtinM on adaptive immune cells. We showed that ArtinM activates murine CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, augmenting their positivity for CD25, CD69, and CD95 and showed higher interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ production. The CD4+ T cells exhibited increased T-bet expression in response to ArtinM, and IL-2 production by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells depended on the recognition of CD3εγ-chain glycans by ArtinM. The ArtinM effect on aberrantly-glycosylated neoplastic lymphocytes was studied in Jurkat T cells, in which ArtinM induced IL-2, IFN-γ, and IL-1β production, but decreased cell viability and growth. A higher frequency of AnnexinV- and propidium iodide-stained cells demonstrated the induction of Jurkat T cells apoptosis by ArtinM, and this apoptotic response was reduced by caspases and protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The ArtinM effects on murine T cells corroborated with the immunomodulatory property of lectin, whereas the promotion of Jurkat T cells apoptosis may reflect a potential applicability of ArtinM in novel strategies for treating lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:28665310

  7. Human mesenchymal stem cells suppress donor CD4(+) T cell proliferation and reduce pathology in a humanized mouse model of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, L M; Healy, M E; English, K; Mahon, B P

    2013-05-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a life-threatening complication following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), occurring in up to 30-50% of patients who receive human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling transplants. Current therapies for steroid refractory aGVHD are limited, with the prognosis of patients suboptimal. Mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC), a heterogeneous cell population present in many tissues, display potent immunomodulatory abilities. Autologous and allogeneic ex-vivo expanded human MSC have been utilized to treat aGVHD with promising results, but the mechanisms of therapeutic action remain unclear. Here a robust humanized mouse model of aGVHD based on delivery of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to non-obese diabetic (NOD)-severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) interleukin (IL)-2rγ(null) (NSG) mice was developed that allowed the exploration of the role of MSC in cell therapy. MSC therapy resulted in the reduction of liver and gut pathology and significantly increased survival. Protection was dependent upon the timing of MSC therapy, with conventional MSC proving effective only after delayed administration. In contrast, interferon (IFN)-γ-stimulated MSC were effective when delivered with PBMC. The beneficial effect of MSC therapy in this model was not due to the inhibition of donor PBMC chimerism, as CD45(+) and T cells engrafted successfully in this model. MSC therapy did not induce donor T cell anergy, FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells or cause PBMC apoptosis in this model; however, it was associated with the direct inhibition of donor CD4(+) T cell proliferation and reduction of human tumour necrosis factor-α in serum. © 2012 British Society for Immunology.

  8. Repertoire Development and the Control of Cytotoxic/Effector Function in Human γδ T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Urban

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available T cells develop into two major populations distinguished by their T cell receptor (TCR chains. Cells with the αβ TCR generally express CD4 or CD8 lineage markers and mostly fall into helper or cytotoxic/effector subsets. Cells expressing the alternate γδ TCR in humans generally do not express lineage markers, do not require MHC for antigen presentation, and recognize nonpeptidic antigens. We are interested in the dominant Vγ2Vδ2+ T cell subset in human peripheral blood and the control of effector function in this population. We review the literature on γδ T cell generation and repertoire selection, along with recent work on CD56 expression and defining a cytotoxic/effector lineage within the phosphoantigen-reactive Vγ2Vδ2 cells. A unique mechanism for MHC-independent repertoire selection is linked to the control of effector function that is vital to the role for γδ T cells in tumor surveillance. Better understanding of these mechanisms will improve our ability to exploit this population for tumor immunotherapy.

  9. [gammadelta T cells stimulated by zoledronate kill osteosarcoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Yang, Chao; Cao, Zhen-Guo; Li, Zhao-Xu; Ye, Zhao-Ming

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the cytotoxicity of human γδT cells from PBMCs stimulated by zoledronate against osteosarcoma cell line HOS in vitro and in vivo and evaluate the relavent pathways. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)of healthy donors were stimulated by single dose zoledronate and cultured in the present of IL-2 for two weeks, analysising the percentage of γδT cells on a FACSCalibur cytometer.Study the cytotoxicity of γδT cells against the osteosarcoma line HOS using LDH release assay kit. Pre-treatment of γδT cells with anti-human γδTCR antibody, anti-human NKG2D antibody and concanamycin A to bolck the relavent pathways for evaluating the mechenisms of its cytotoxicity. In vivo, BALB/c mice were inoculated subcutaneously osteosarcoma cell HOS for developing hypodermal tumors. And they were randomized into two groups: unteated group, γδT cell therapy group. Tumor volume and weight of the two groups were compared. After two weeks of culture, γδT cells from zoledronate-stimulated PBMCs could reach (95±3)%. When the E:T as 6:1, 12:1, 25:1, 50:1, the percentage of osteosarcoma cell HOS killed by γδT cells was 26.8%, 31.5%, 37.8%, 40.9%, respectively.When anti-huma γδTCR antibody, anti-human NKG2D antibody and concanamycin A blocked the relavent pathways, the percentage was 32.3%, 4.7%, 16.7% ( E:T as 25:1), respectively. In vivo, the tumor inhibition rate of the group of γδT cell therapy was 42.78%. γδT cells derived from PBMCs stimulated by zoledronate can acquired pure γδT cells. And they show strong cytoxicity against osteosarcoma cell line HOS in vitro and in vivo.

  10. TLR5 signaling enhances the proliferation of human allogeneic CD40-activated B cell induced CD4hiCD25+ regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Lung Chan

    Full Text Available Although diverse functions of different toll-like receptors (TLR on human natural regulatory T cells have been demonstrated recently, the role of TLR-related signals on human induced regulatory T cells remain elusive. Previously our group developed an ex vivo high-efficient system in generating human alloantigen-specific CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells from naïve CD4(+CD25(- T cells using allogeneic CD40-activated B cells as stimulators. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR5-related signals on the generation and function of these novel CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells. It was found that induced CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells expressed an up-regulated level of TLR5 compared to their precursors. The blockade of TLR5 using anti-TLR5 antibodies during the co-culture decreased CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells proliferation by induction of S phase arrest. The S phase arrest was associated with reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. However, TLR5 blockade did not decrease the CTLA-4, GITR and FOXP3 expressions, and the suppressive function of CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells. In conclusion, we discovered a novel function of TLR5-related signaling in enhancing the proliferation of CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells by promoting S phase progress but not involved in the suppressive function of human CD40-activated B cell-induced CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells, suggesting a novel role of TLR5-related signals in the generation of induced regulatory T cells.

  11. Transcriptome analysis of the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON): New mechanistic insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katika, Madhumohan R. [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Hendriksen, Peter J.M. [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Shao, Jia [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Loveren, Henk van [Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Peijnenburg, Ad, E-mail: ad.peijnenburg@wur.nl [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands)

    2012-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) or vomitoxin is a commonly encountered type-B trichothecene mycotoxin, produced by Fusarium species predominantly found in cereals and grains. DON is known to exert toxic effects on the gastrointestinal, reproductive and neuroendocrine systems, and particularly on the immune system. Depending on dose and exposure time, it can either stimulate or suppress immune function. The main objective of this study was to obtain a deeper insight into DON-induced effects on lymphoid cells. For this, we exposed the human T-lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to various concentrations of DON for various times and examined gene expression changes by DNA microarray analysis. Jurkat cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.5 μM DON for 3, 6 and 24 h. Biological interpretation of the microarray data indicated that DON affects various processes in these cells: It upregulates genes involved in ribosome structure and function, RNA/protein synthesis and processing, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium-mediated signaling, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, the NFAT and NF-κB/TNF-α pathways, T cell activation and apoptosis. The effects of DON on the expression of genes involved in ER stress, NFAT activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Other biochemical experiments confirmed that DON activates calcium-dependent proteins such as calcineurin and M-calpain that are known to be involved in T cell activation and apoptosis. Induction of T cell activation was also confirmed by demonstrating that DON activates NFATC1 and induces its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. For the gene expression profiling of PBMCs, cells were exposed to 2 and 4 μM DON for 6 and 24 h. Comparison of the Jurkat microarray data with those obtained with PBMCs showed that most of the processes affected by DON in the Jurkat cell line were also affected in the PBMCs. -- Highlights: ► The human T cell line Jurkat and human

  12. IMMUNOGENICITY OF HUMAN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS IN HLA-CLASS I RESTRICTED T CELL RESPONSES AGAINST VIRAL OR TUMOR-ASSOCIATED ANTIGENS

    OpenAIRE

    Morandi, Fabio; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Bianchi, Giovanna; Meloni, Francesca; Salis, Annalisa; Millo, Enrico; Ferrone, Soldano; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Pistoia, Vito

    2008-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are immunosuppressive and poorly immunogenic, but may act as antigen-presenting cells (APC) for CD4+ T cell responses; here we have investigated their ability to serve as APC for in vitro CD8+ T cell responses.

  13. Lack of T cell dysfunction and programmed cell death in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected chimpanzees correlates with absence of monocytotropic variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuitemaker, H.; Meyaard, L.; Kootstra, N. A.; Dubbes, R.; Otto, S. A.; Tersmette, M.; Heeney, J. L.; Miedema, F.

    1993-01-01

    In asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in humans, disturbed T cell functions such as anergy and programmed cell death, thought to result from inappropriate signaling by antigen-presenting cells due to HIV infection, precede increase in virus load, decline in CD4+ T cell

  14. The effect of stem cell from human exfoliated deciduous teeth on T lymphocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Razieh; Adib, Minoo; Hashemi-Beni, Batool; Sadeghi, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), a specific type of adult tissue stem cell; have the immunosuppressive effects that make them valuable targets for regenerative medicine and treatment of many human illnesses. Hence, MSC have been the subject of numerous studies. The classical source of MSC is adult bone marrow (BM). Due to many shortcomings of harvesting MSC from BM, finding the alternative sources for MSC is an urgent. Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) are relative new MSC populations that fulfill these criteria but their potential immunosuppressive effect has not been studied enough yet. Thus, in this work the effect of SHED on the proliferation of in vitro activated T lymphocytes were explored. In this study, both mitogen and alloantigen activated T cells were cultured in the presence of different numbers of SHED. In some co-cultures, activated T cells were in direct contact to MSCs and in other co-cultures; they were separated from SHED by a permeable membrane. In all co-cultures, the proliferation of T cells was measured by ELISA Bromodeoxyuridine proliferation assay. In general, our results showed that SHED significantly suppress the proliferation of activated T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the suppression was slightly stronger when MSCs were in physical contact to activated T cells. This study showed that SHED likewise other MSC populations can suppress the activation of T lymphocytes, which can be used instead of BM derived MSCs in many investigational and clinical applications.

  15. CD4+CD62L+ Central Memory T Cells Can Be Converted to Foxp3+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Chang Li, Xian; Xiao, Xiang; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2013-01-01

    The peripheral Foxp3+ Treg pool consists of naturally arising Treg (nTreg) and adaptive Treg cells (iTreg). It is well known that naive CD4+ T cells can be readily converted to Foxp3+ iTreg in vitro, and memory CD4+ T cells are resistant to conversion. In this study, we investigated the induction of Foxp3+ T cells from various CD4+ T-cell subsets in human peripheral blood. Though naive CD4+ T cells were readily converted to Foxp3+ T cells with TGF-β and IL-2 treatment in vitro, such Foxp3+ T cells did not express the memory marker CD45RO as do Foxp3+ T cells induced in the peripheral blood of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) patients. Interestingly, a subset of human memory CD4+ T cells, defined as CD62L+ central memory T cells, could be induced by TGF-β to differentiate into Foxp3+ T cells. It is well known that Foxp3+ T cells derived from human CD4+CD25- T cells in vitro are lack suppressive functions. Our data about the suppressive functions of CD4+CD62L+ central memory T cell-derived Foxp3+ T cells support this conception, and an epigenetic analysis of these cells showed a similar methylation pattern in the FOXP3 Treg-specific demethylated region as the naive CD4+ T cell-derived Foxp3+ T cells. But further research showed that mouse CD4+ central memory T cells also could be induced to differentiate into Foxp3+ T cells, such Foxp3+ T cells could suppress the proliferation of effector T cells. Thus, our study identified CD4+CD62L+ central memory T cells as a novel potential source of iTreg. PMID:24155942

  16. Meningeal mast cell-T cell crosstalk regulates T cell encephalitogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russi, Abigail E; Walker-Caulfield, Margaret E; Guo, Yong; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Brown, Melissa A

    2016-09-01

    GM-CSF is a cytokine produced by T helper (Th) cells that plays an essential role in orchestrating neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a rodent model of multiple sclerosis. Yet where and how Th cells acquire GM-CSF expression is unknown. In this study we identify mast cells in the meninges, tripartite tissues surrounding the brain and spinal cord, as important contributors to antigen-specific Th cell accumulation and GM-CSF expression. In the absence of mast cells, Th cells do not accumulate in the meninges nor produce GM-CSF. Mast cell-T cell co-culture experiments and selective mast cell reconstitution of the meninges of mast cell-deficient mice reveal that resident meningeal mast cells are an early source of caspase-1-dependent IL-1β that licenses Th cells to produce GM-CSF and become encephalitogenic. We also provide evidence of mast cell-T cell co-localization in the meninges and CNS of recently diagnosed acute MS patients indicating similar interactions may occur in human demyelinating disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Transfer of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis with T cell clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romball, C.G.; Weigle, W.O.

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated three T lymphocyte clones isolated from CBA/CaJ mice primed with mouse thyroid extract (MTE) in adjuvant. All three clones are L3T4+, Ig-, and Lyt2- and proliferate to MTE, mouse thyroglobulin (MTG) and rat thyroid extract. Clones A7 and B7 transfer thyroiditis to irradiated (475 rad) syngeneic mice, but not to normal recipients. The thyroid lesion induced by the B7 clone is characterized by the infiltration of both mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells. The thyroiditis is transient in that lesions are apparent 7 and 14 days after transfer, but thyroids return to normal by day 21. Clone B7 showed helper activity for trinitrophenyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin-primed B cells in vitro when stimulated with trinitrophenyl-MTG and also stimulated the production of anti-MTG antibody in recipient mice. Clone A7 induced thyroid lesions characterized by infiltration of the thyroid with mononuclear cells, with virtually no polymorphonuclear cell infiltration. This clone has shown no helper activity following stimulation with trinitrophenyl-MTG. The third clone (D2) proliferates to and shows helper activity to MTG, but fails to transfer thyroiditis to syngeneic, irradiated mice. On continuous culture, clone B7 lost its surface Thy. The loss of Thy appears unrelated to the ability to transfer thyroiditis since subclones of B7 with markedly different percentages of Thy+ cells transferred disease equally well

  18. Analysis of close associations of uropod-associated proteins in human T-cells using the proximity ligation assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy Baumann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We have shown previously that the raft-associated proteins flotillin-1 and -2 are rapidly recruited to the uropods of chemoattractant-stimulated human neutrophils and T-cells and are involved in cell polarization. Other proteins such as the adhesion receptor PSGL-1, the actin-membrane linker proteins ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM and the signaling enzyme phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ90 (PIPKIγ90 also accumulate in the T-cell uropod. Using the in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA we now have investigated putative close associations of these proteins in human freshly isolated T-cells before and after chemokine addition. The PLA allows in situ subcellular localization of close proximity of endogenous proteins at single-molecule resolution in fixed cells. It allows detection also of weaker and transient complexes that would not be revealed with co-immunoprecipitation approaches. We previously provided evidence for heterodimer formation of tagged flotillin-1 and -2 in T-cells before and after chemokine addition using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET. We now confirm these findings using PLA for the endogenous flotillins in fixed human T-cells. Moreover, in agreement with the literature, our PLA findings confirm a close association of endogenous PSGL-1 and ERM proteins both in resting and chemokine-activated human T-cells. In addition, we provide novel evidence using the PLA for close associations of endogenous activated ERM proteins with PIPKIγ90 and of endogenous flotillins with PSGL-1 in human T-cells, before and after chemokine addition. Our findings suggest that preformed clusters of these proteins coalesce in the uropod upon cell stimulation.

  19. Estimation by limiting dilution analysis of human IL 2-secreting T cells: detection of IL 2 produced by single lymphokine-secreting T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vie, H.; Miller, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    We present here a culture method for the estimation, in human blood, of the number of lymphocytes that can respond to mitogen by producing interleukin 2 (IL 2). T cells are cultured at limiting dilutions with PHA or Con A in the presence of Epstein Barr virus-transformed human lymphoblastoid cells (EB-LCL), and supernatants are tested 3 days later for IL 2 content by a cell proliferation assay. The distribution of negative wells follows the expected Poisson single-hit relationship, suggesting that the assay is sensitive to single cells of a single limiting cell type. On average, 16.3% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells can produce IL 2 in such clonal cultures (mean of 12 determinations; SD = 5.6%). Surprisingly, irradiation (up to 2000 rad) of the titrated responder cell population diminishes the estimated frequencies by less than 50%. The ability to detect IL 2 levels in cultures containing only a single, nonproliferating T lymphocyte allows us to estimate the amount of IL 2 generated by an individual effector cell during a 3-day culture interval after mitogen stimulation. The average responding, irradiated T cell generates 0.92 pg of IL 2 (median) within 3 days. The method presented provides a straightforward way to provide independent estimates of responding cell number and of lymphokine production per cell in a variety of clinical situations

  20. Induction of non-responsiveness in human allergen-specific type 2 T helper cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yssel, H; Fasler, S; Lamb, J; de Vries, J E

    1994-12-01

    Activation of allergen-reactive human T helper (Th)2 cells in the absence of professional antigen-presenting cells, induces non-responsiveness or anergy in these cells in vitro. This induction of anergy is accompanied by phenotypic modulation and altered cytokine production. Furthermore, peptide-treated Th2 cells fail to provide B-cell help for IgE synthesis. Recent studies indicate that impaired signal transduction via the T-cell receptor may account for the lack of responsiveness to antigenic stimulation. Here, we review present knowledge on the cell biology of non-responsive or anergic Th2 cells.

  1. Aberrant TAL1 activation is mediated by an interchromosomal interaction in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, B; Kang, Y; Cui, K; Litt, M; Riberio, M S J; Deng, C; Salz, T; Casada, S; Fu, X; Qiu, Y; Zhao, K; Huang, S

    2014-02-01

    Long-range chromatin interactions control metazoan gene transcription. However, the involvement of intra- and interchromosomal interactions in development and oncogenesis remains unclear. TAL1/SCL is a critical transcription factor required for the development of all hematopoietic lineages; yet, aberrant TAL1 transcription often occurs in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here, we report that oncogenic TAL1 expression is regulated by different intra- and interchromosomal loops in normal hematopoietic and leukemic cells, respectively. These intra- and interchromosomal loops alter the cell-type-specific enhancers that interact with the TAL1 promoter. We show that human SET1 (hSET1)-mediated H3K4 methylations promote a long-range chromatin loop, which brings the +51 enhancer in close proximity to TAL1 promoter 1 in erythroid cells. The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) facilitates this long-range enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in erythroid cells while blocking the same enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in human T-cell leukemia. In human T-ALL, a T-cell-specific transcription factor c-Maf-mediated interchromosomal interaction brings the TAL1 promoter into close proximity with a T-cell-specific regulatory element located on chromosome 16, activating aberrant TAL1 oncogene expression. Thus, our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism involving changes in three-dimensional chromatin interactions that activate the TAL1 oncogene in human T-cell leukemia.

  2. Evaluation of the impact of chitosan/DNA nanoparticles on the differentiation of human naive CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanxia; Bai, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Dunwan; Song, Liping; Wang, Hai; Dong, Xia; Zhang, Hailing; Leng, Xigang

    2011-06-01

    Chitosan (CS) is one of the most widely studied polymers in non-viral gene delivery since it is a cationic polysaccharide that forms nanoparticles with DNA and hence protects the DNA against digestion by DNase. However, the impact of CS/DNA nanoparticle on the immune system still remains poorly understood. Previous investigations did not found CS/DNA nanoparticles had any significant impact on the function of human and murine macrophages. To date, little is known about the interaction between CS/DNA nanoparticles and naive CD4+ T cells. This study was designed to investigate whether CS/DNA nanoparticles affect the initial differentiation direction of human naive CD4+ T cells. The indirect impact of CS/DNA nanoparticles on naive CD4+ T cell differentiation was investigated by incubating the nanoparticles with human macrophage THP-1 cells in one chamber of a transwell co-incubation system, with the enriched human naive CD4+ T cells being placed in the other chamber of the transwell. The nanoparticles were also co-incubated with the naive CD4+ T cells to explore their direct impact on naive CD4+ T cell differentiation by measuring the release of IL-4 and IFN-γ from the cells. It was demonstrated that CS/DNA nanoparticles induced slightly elevated production of IL-12 by THP-1 cells, possibly owing to the presence of CpG motifs in the plasmid. However, this macrophage stimulating activity was much less significant as compared with lipopolysaccharide and did not impact on the differentiation of the naive CD4+ T cells. It was also demonstrated that, when directly exposed to the naive CD4+ T cells, the nanoparticles induced neither the activation of the naive CD4+ T cells in the absence of recombinant cytokines (recombinant human IL-4 or IFN-γ) that induce naive CD4+ T cell polarization, nor any changes in the differentiation direction of naive CD4+ T cells in the presence of the corresponding cytokines.

  3. Evaluation of the impact of chitosan/DNA nanoparticles on the differentiation of human naive CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lanxia; Bai Yuanyuan; Zhu Dunwan; Song Liping; Wang Hai; Dong Xia; Zhang Hailing; Leng Xigang

    2011-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) is one of the most widely studied polymers in non-viral gene delivery since it is a cationic polysaccharide that forms nanoparticles with DNA and hence protects the DNA against digestion by DNase. However, the impact of CS/DNA nanoparticle on the immune system still remains poorly understood. Previous investigations did not found CS/DNA nanoparticles had any significant impact on the function of human and murine macrophages. To date, little is known about the interaction between CS/DNA nanoparticles and naive CD4 + T cells. This study was designed to investigate whether CS/DNA nanoparticles affect the initial differentiation direction of human naive CD4 + T cells. The indirect impact of CS/DNA nanoparticles on naive CD4 + T cell differentiation was investigated by incubating the nanoparticles with human macrophage THP-1 cells in one chamber of a transwell co-incubation system, with the enriched human naive CD4 + T cells being placed in the other chamber of the transwell. The nanoparticles were also co-incubated with the naive CD4 + T cells to explore their direct impact on naive CD4 + T cell differentiation by measuring the release of IL-4 and IFN-γ from the cells. It was demonstrated that CS/DNA nanoparticles induced slightly elevated production of IL-12 by THP-1 cells, possibly owing to the presence of CpG motifs in the plasmid. However, this macrophage stimulating activity was much less significant as compared with lipopolysaccharide and did not impact on the differentiation of the naive CD4 + T cells. It was also demonstrated that, when directly exposed to the naive CD4 + T cells, the nanoparticles induced neither the activation of the naive CD4 + T cells in the absence of recombinant cytokines (recombinant human IL-4 or IFN-γ) that induce naive CD4 + T cell polarization, nor any changes in the differentiation direction of naive CD4 + T cells in the presence of the corresponding cytokines.

  4. Dose {sup 131}I radioactivity interfere with thyroglobulin measurement in patients undergoing radioactive iodine therapy with recombinant human TSH?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Hyun; Bang, Ji In; Lee, Ho Young; Kim, Sang Eun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) is widely used in radioactive iodine therapy (RIT) to avoid side effects caused by hypothyroidism during the therapy. Owing to RIT with rhTSH, serum thyroglobulin (Tg) is measured with high 131I concentrations. It is of concern that the relatively high energy of 131I could interfere with Tg measurement using the immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). We investigated the effect of 131I administration on Tg measurement with IRMA after RIT. A total of 67 patients with thyroid cancer were analysed retrospectively. All patients had undergone rhTSH stimulation for RIT. The patients’ sera were sampled 2 days after 131I administration and divided into two portions: for Tg measurements on days 2 and 32 after 131I administration. The count per minute (CPM) of whole serum (200 μl) was also measured at each time point. Student’s paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation analyses were performed for statistical analysis. Serum Tg levels were significantly concordant between days 2 and 32, irrespective of the serum CPM. Subgroup analysis was performed by classification based on the 131I dose. No difference was noted between the results of the two groups. IRMA using 125I did not show interference from 131I in the serum of patients stimulated by rhTSH.

  5. Effects of immunosuppression on circulating adeno-associated virus capsid-specific T cells in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzych, Elizabeth M; Li, Hua; Yin, Xiangfan; Liu, Qin; Wu, Te-Lang; Podsakoff, Gregory M; High, Katherine A; Levine, Matthew H; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2013-04-01

    In humans adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene transfer is followed by expansion of AAV capsid-specific T cells, evidence of cell damage, and loss of transgene product expression, implicating immunological rejection of vector-transduced cells, which may be prevented by immunosuppressive drugs. We undertook this study to assess the effect of immunosuppression (IS) used for organ transplantation on immune responses to AAV capsid antigens. Recipients of liver or kidney transplants were tested before and 4 weeks after induction of IS in comparison with matched samples from healthy human adults and an additional cohort with comorbid conditions similar to those of the transplant patients. Our data show that transplant patients and comorbid control subjects have markedly higher frequencies of circulating AAV capsid-specific T cells compared with healthy adults. On average, IS resulted in a reduction of AAV-specific CD4⁺ T cells, whereas numbers of circulating CD8⁺ effector and central memory T cells tended to increase. Independent of the type of transplant or the IS regimens, the trend of AAV capsid-specific T cell responses after drug treatment varied; in some patients responses were unaffected whereas others showed decreases or even pronounced increases, casting doubt on the usefulness of prophylactic IS for AAV vector recipients.

  6. Impact of nicotine on the interplay between human periodontal ligament cells and CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xin; Liu, Ying-Feng; Wong, Yong; Wu, Li-Zheng; Tan, Ling; Liu, Fen; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Periodontitis is a common infectious disease associated with destruction of periodontal ligaments and alveolar bones. CD4(+) T cell-mediated immune response is involved in the progression of periodontitis. Tobacco consumption increases the risk of periodontal disease. However, the impact of nicotine on the interaction between human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and CD4(+) T cells remains unrevealed. Our study aims to investigate the effect of nicotine on PDL cells and the cocultured CD4(+) T cells. The PDL cell cultures were established by explants from healthy individuals, exposed to nicotine or α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX), and incubated solely or in combination with CD4(+) T cells. Afterwards, cell viability, secreted cytokines, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were evaluated. In monoculture of PDL cells, nicotine dramatically repressed cell viability and increased apoptosis. Meanwhile, α-BTX largely reversed the nicotine-induced apoptosis and increased viability of PDL cells. Compared with the monoculture, MMP-1, MMP-3, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, and IL-21 in supernatant of cocultures were markedly elevated after treatment with nicotine. Moreover, α-BTX significantly attenuated nicotine-triggered production of these components either in mono- or co-cultures. In addition, PDL cell-derived CXCL12 following nicotine treatment recruited CD4(+) T cells. Above all, nicotine deteriorated periodontitis partially by promoting PDL cell-CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory response and matrix degradation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Tumor-Targeted Human T Cells Expressing CD28-Based Chimeric Antigen Receptors Circumvent CTLA-4 Inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud Condomines

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy represents a promising treatment for cancer. Human T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR recognize and kill tumor cells in a MHC-unrestricted manner and persist in vivo when the CAR includes a CD28 costimulatory domain. However, the intensity of the CAR-mediated CD28 activation signal and its regulation by the CTLA-4 checkpoint are unknown. We investigated whether T cells expressing an anti-CD19, CD3 zeta and CD28-based CAR (19-28z displayed the same proliferation and anti-tumor abilities than T cells expressing a CD3 zeta-based CAR (19z1 costimulated through the CD80/CD28, ligand/receptor pathway. Repeated in vitro antigen-specific stimulations indicated that 19-28z+ T cells secreted higher levels of Th1 cytokines and showed enhanced proliferation compared to those of 19z1+ or 19z1-CD80+ T cells. In an aggressive pre-B cell leukemia model, mice treated with 19-28z+ T cells had 10-fold reduced tumor progression compared to those treated with 19z1+ or 19z1-CD80+ T cells. shRNA-mediated CTLA-4 down-regulation in 19z1-CD80+ T cells significantly increased their in vivo expansion and anti-tumor properties, but had no effect in 19-28z+ T cells. Our results establish that CTLA-4 down-regulation may benefit human adoptive T cell therapy and demonstrate that CAR design can elude negative checkpoints to better sustain T cell function.

  8. Interleukin-12 promotes activation of effector cells that induce a severe destructive granulomatous form of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Braley-Mullen, H.; Sharp, G. C.; Tang, H.; Chen, K.; Kyriakos, M.; Bickel, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    Granulomatous inflammatory lesions are a major histopathological feature of a wide spectrum of human infectious and autoimmune diseases. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) with granulomatous histopathological features can be induced by mouse thyroglobulin (MTg)-sensitized spleen cells activated in vitro with MTg and anti-interleukin-2 receptor (anti-IL-2R), anti-IL-2, or anti-interferon-gamma (anti-IFN-gamma) monoclonal antibody (MAb). These studies suggested that IFN-gamma-producing T...

  9. Preoperative Serum Thyrotropin to Thyroglobulin Ratio Is Effective for Thyroid Nodule Evaluation in Euthyroid Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lina; Li, Hao; Yang, Zhongyuan; Guo, Zhuming; Zhang, Quan

    2015-07-01

    This study was designed to assess the efficiency of the serum thyrotropin to thyroglobulin ratio for thyroid nodule evaluation in euthyroid patients. Cross-sectional study. Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China. Retrospective analysis was performed for 400 previously untreated cases presenting with thyroid nodules. Thyroid function was tested with commercially available radioimmunoassays. The receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to determine cutoff values. The efficacy of the thyrotropin:thyroglobulin ratio and thyroid-stimulating hormone for thyroid nodule evaluation was evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and odds ratio. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the area under the curve was 0.746 for the thyrotropin:thyroglobulin ratio and 0.659 for thyroid-stimulating hormone. With a cutoff point value of 24.97 IU/g for the thyrotropin:thyroglobulin ratio, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio were 78.9%, 60.8%, 75.5%, 2.01, and 0.35, respectively. The odds ratio for the thyrotropin:thyroglobulin ratio indicating malignancy was 5.80. With a cutoff point value of 1.525 µIU/mL for thyroid-stimulating hormone, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio were 74.0%, 53.2%, 70.8%, 1.58, and 0.49, respectively. The odds ratio indicating malignancy for thyroid-stimulating hormone was 3.23. Increasing preoperative serum thyrotropin:thyroglobulin ratio is a risk factor for thyroid carcinoma, and the correlation of the thyrotropin:thyroglobulin ratio to malignancy is higher than that for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  10. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Cong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM and dendritic cells (MoDC from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease.

  11. Human T cell leukemia virus type I prevents cell surface expression of the T cell receptor through down-regulation of the CD3-gamma, -delta, -epsilon, and -zeta genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal Malefyt, R.; Yssel, H.; Spits, H.; de Vries, J. E.; Sancho, J.; Terhorst, C.; Alarcon, B.

    1990-01-01

    Infection and transformation by human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) up-regulates expression of several inducible genes including those coding for cytokines involved in the proliferation of normal and leukemic T cells. We demonstrate that HTLV-I can also shut off expression of the CD3-gamma,

  12. Functional and genomic analyses of FOXP3-transduced Jurkat-T cells as regulatory T (Treg)-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joon-Young; Kim, Han-Jong; Hurt, Elaine M.; Chen, Xin; Howard, O.M. Zack; Farrar, William L.

    2007-01-01

    FOXP3, a forkhead transcription factor is essential for the development and function of CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells (Tregs). In contrast to conversion of murine naive T cells to Tregs by transduction of Foxp3, it is controversial whether ectopic expression of FOXP3 in human CD4 + T cells is sufficient for acquisition of suppressive activity. Here, we show that retroviral transduction of FOXP3 induces a Treg phenotype in human leukemic CD4 + Jurkat-T cells, evidenced by increased expression of Treg-associated cell surface markers as well as inhibition of cytokine production. Furthermore, FOXP3-transduced Jurkat-T cells suppress the proliferation of human CD4 + CD25 - T cells. Additionally, DNA microarray analysis identifies Treg-related genes regulated by FOXP3. Our study demonstrates that enforced expression of FOXP3 confers Treg-like properties on Jurkat-T cells, which can be a convenient and efficient Treg-like cell model for further study to identify Treg cell surface markers and target genes regulated by FOXP3

  13. Identification and apoptotic potential of T-2 toxin metabolites in human cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weidner, M.; Welsch, T.; Hübner, F.; Schwerdt, G.; Gekle, M.; Humpf, H.U.

    2012-01-01

    The mycotoxin T-2 toxin, produced by various Fusarium species, is a widespread contaminant of grain and grain products. Knowledge about its toxicity and metabolism in the human body is crucial for any risk assessment as T-2 toxin can be detected in processed and unprocessed food samples. Cell

  14. Role of serum thyroglobulin levels in the assessment of thyroid disease (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, H.G.; Khan, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg), a glycoprotein, is the principal iodoprotein of the thyroid gland and is the major component of the thyroid mass. As Tg is specific to thyroid gland and thyroid related-cells, its measurement in the circulation is potentially useful to study the pathogenesis, establish the diagnosis and follow the course of thyroid disorders. Serum Tg is a suitable marker for the differentiated thyroid carcinoma after total thyroid ablation by surgery and /sup 131/I treatment. Radioimmunoassay (RIA) and immunoradiometric (IRMA) methodologies are important to measure hormones for diagnosis of various diseases. In addition to /sup 131/I uptake, /sup 131/I whole body scintigraphy and estimation of T3, T4 and TSH levels, serum Tg levels in euthyroids (n=42), hyper thyroids (n=55) and treated cases (thyroidectomy and /sup 131/I ablation) of carcinoma (CA) thyroid were 9.7 - +9.96, 109.9 - +160.3 and 2.2 - + 4.2 respectively. Serum Tg levels were significantly higher (P < 0.005) in hyper thyroids and significantly lower (P < 0.025) in treated CA thyroids when compared with those of euthyroids. In treated patients (surgery and /sup 131/I ablation) serum Tg assay is an excellent method to assess the treatment and recurrence of disease. (author)

  15. Accessory signals in T-T cell interactions between antigen- and alloantigen-specific, human memory T cells generated in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, N; Ryder, L P; Georgsen, J

    1990-01-01

    The potential of activated HLA class II-positive T cells as antigen-/alloantigen-presenting cells remains controversial. In our model system we use in vitro-primed, HLA class II-specific T cells of the memory T-cell phenotype, CD4+, CD29+ (4B4+), and CD45RO+ (UCHL-1). We have previously shown......), or a calcium ionophore (A23187) enabled Ta to elicit alloantigen-specific memory T-cell responses and to present purified protein derivative (PPD) to PPD-specific T-cell lines. The addition of irradiated, Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cell lines (EBV-LCL) (but not their supernatants) had a similar but less...

  16. Abundant tax protein expression in CD4+ T cells infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is prevented by cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, E; Hall, S; Taylor, G P; Saito, M; Davis, R; Tanaka, Y; Usuku, K; Osame, M; Weber, J N; Bangham, C R

    2000-02-15

    The role of the cellular immune response in human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) infection is not fully understood. A persistently activated cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to HTLV-I is found in the majority of infected individuals. However, it remains unclear whether this CTL response is protective or causes tissue damage. In addition, several observations paradoxically suggest that HTLV-I is transcriptionally silent in most infected cells and, therefore, not detectable by virus-specific CTLs. With the use of a new flow cytometric procedure, we show here that a high proportion of naturally infected CD4+ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) (between 10% and 80%) are capable of expressing Tax, the immunodominant target antigen recognized by virus-specific CTLs. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence that autologous CD8+ T cells rapidly kill CD4+ cells naturally infected with HTLV-I and expressing Tax in vitro by a perforin-dependent mechanism. Consistent with these observations, we observed a significant negative correlation between the frequency of Tax(11-19)-specific CD8+ T cells and the percentage of CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood of patients infected with HTLV-I. Those results are in accordance with the view that virus-specific CTLs participate in a highly efficient immune surveillance mechanism that persistently destroys Tax-expressing HTLV-I-infected CD4+ T cells in vivo. (Blood. 2000;95:1386-1392)

  17. Human mesenchymal stromal cells transiently increase cytokine production by activated T cells before suppressing T-cell proliferation: effect of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuerquis, Jessica; Romieu-Mourez, Raphaëlle; François, Moïra; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Young, Yoon Kow; Zhao, Jing; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta

    2014-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) suppress T-cell proliferation, especially after activation with inflammatory cytokines. We compared the dynamic action of unprimed and interferon (IFN)-γ plus tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-pretreated human bone marrow-derived MSCs on resting or activated T cells. MSCs were co-cultured with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at high MSC-to-PBMC ratios in the absence or presence of concomitant CD3/CD28-induced T-cell activation. The kinetic effects of MSCs on cytokine production and T-cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis were assessed. Unprimed MSCs increased the early production of IFN-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 by CD3/CD28-activated PBMCs before suppressing T-cell proliferation. In non-activated PBMC co-cultures, low levels of IL-2 and IL-10 synthesis were observed with MSCs in addition to low levels of CD69 expression by T cells and no T-cell proliferation. MSCs also decreased apoptosis in resting and activated T cells and inhibited the transition of these cells into the sub-G0/G1 and the S phases. With inhibition of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase, MSCs increased CD3/CD28-induced T-cell proliferation. After priming with IFN-γ plus TNF-α, MSCs were less potent at increasing cytokine production by CD3/CD28-activated PBMCs and more effective at inhibiting T-cell proliferation but had preserved anti-apoptotic functions. Unprimed MSCs induce a transient increase in IFN-γ and IL-2 synthesis by activated T cells. Pre-treatment of MSCs with IFN-γ plus TNF-α may increase their effectiveness and safety in vivo. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The human Vδ2+ T-cell compartment comprises distinct innate-like Vγ9+ and adaptive Vγ9- subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Martin S; Willcox, Carrie R; Hunter, Stuart; Kasatskaya, Sofya A; Remmerswaal, Ester B M; Salim, Mahboob; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Bemelman, Frederike J; Chudakov, Dmitriy M; Oo, Ye H; Willcox, Benjamin E

    2018-05-02

    Vδ2 + T cells form the predominant human γδ T-cell population in peripheral blood and mediate T-cell receptor (TCR)-dependent anti-microbial and anti-tumour immunity. Here we show that the Vδ2 + compartment comprises both innate-like and adaptive subsets. Vγ9 + Vδ2 + T cells display semi-invariant TCR repertoires, featuring public Vγ9 TCR sequences equivalent in cord and adult blood. By contrast, we also identify a separate, Vγ9 - Vδ2 + T-cell subset that typically has a CD27 hi CCR7 + CD28 + IL-7Rα + naive-like phenotype and a diverse TCR repertoire, however in response to viral infection, undergoes clonal expansion and differentiation to a CD27 lo CD45RA + CX 3 CR1 + granzymeA/B + effector phenotype. Consistent with a function in solid tissue immunosurveillance, we detect human intrahepatic Vγ9 - Vδ2 + T cells featuring dominant clonal expansions and an effector phenotype. These findings redefine human γδ T-cell subsets by delineating the Vδ2 + T-cell compartment into innate-like (Vγ9 + ) and adaptive (Vγ9 - ) subsets, which have distinct functions in microbial immunosurveillance.

  19. Human HMGA2 protein overexpressed in mice induces precursor T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efanov, A; Zanesi, N; Coppola, V; Nuovo, G; Bolon, B; Wernicle-Jameson, D; Lagana, A; Hansjuerg, A; Pichiorri, F; Croce, C M

    2014-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a neoplasia of thymocytes characterized by the rapid accumulation of the precursors of T lymphocytes. HMGA2 (high-mobility group AT-hook 2) gene expression is extremely low in normal adult tissues, but it is overexpressed in many tumors. To identify the biological function of HMGA2, we generated transgenic mice carrying the human HMGA2 gene under control of the V H promoter/Eμ enhancer. Approximately 90% of Eμ-HMGA2 transgenic mice became visibly sick between 4 and 8 months due to the onset and progression of a T-ALL-like disease. Characteristic features included severe alopecia (30% of mice); enlarged lymph nodes and spleen; and profound immunological abnormalities (altered cytokine levels, hypoimmunoglobulinemia) leading to reduced immune responsiveness. Immunophenotyping showed accumulation of CD5+CD4+, CD5+CD8+ or CD5+CD8+CD4+ T-cell populations in the spleens and bone marrow of sick animals. These findings show that HMGA2-driven leukemia in mice closely resembles spontaneous human T-ALL, indicating that HMGA2 transgenic mice should serve as an important model for investigating basic mechanisms and potential new therapies of relevance to human T-ALL

  20. Epigenomic analysis of primary human T cells reveals enhancers associated with TH2 memory cell differentiation and asthma susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seumois, Grégory; Chavez, Lukas; Gerasimova, Anna; Lienhard, Matthias; Omran, Nada; Kalinke, Lukas; Vedanayagam, Maria; Ganesan, Asha Purnima V; Chawla, Ashu; Djukanović, Ratko; Ansel, K Mark; Peters, Bjoern; Rao, Anjana; Vijayanand, Pandurangan

    2014-01-01

    A characteristic feature of asthma is the aberrant accumulation, differentiation or function of memory CD4+ T cells that produce type 2 cytokines (TH2 cells). By mapping genome-wide histone modification profiles for subsets of T cells isolated from peripheral blood of healthy and asthmatic individuals, we identified enhancers with known and potential roles in the normal differentiation of human TH1 cells and TH2 cells. We discovered disease-specific enhancers in T cells that differ between healthy and asthmatic individuals. Enhancers that gained the histone H3 Lys4 dimethyl (H3K4me2) mark during TH2 cell development showed the highest enrichment for asthma-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which supported a pathogenic role for TH2 cells in asthma. In silico analysis of cell-specific enhancers revealed transcription factors, microRNAs and genes potentially linked to human TH2 cell differentiation. Our results establish the feasibility and utility of enhancer profiling in well-defined populations of specialized cell types involved in disease pathogenesis. PMID:24997565

  1. [CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells and their importance to human illnesses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Jens; Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Agnholt, Jørgen; Dahlerup, Jens F

    2006-01-03

    Regulatory T cells ensure a balanced immune response that is competent both to fight pathogens, at the same time, to recognize self-antigens and commensals as harmless. Regulatory mechanisms are essential in preventing autoimmune disorders but may also facilitate the progression of malignant diseases and the establishment of latent infections via suppression of the host immune response. Regulatory T cells arise in the thymus, and regulatory T cell function can be induced in the periphery, so-called infectious tolerance. An absolute or relative defect in regulatory T cell function may contribute to the development of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis and chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Regulatory T cell therapy is a tempting strategy for reestablishing the immune balance and thus preventing or reversing these disorders. Reestablishment of the immune balance may be accomplished by adoptive transfer of ex vivo-propagated regulatory T cells or by induction of regulatory functions locally in the organs, although such strategies are in their infancy in human research.

  2. The immune privilege of the eye: human retinal pigment epithelial cells selectively modulate T-cell activation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, Charlotte G; Lovato, Paola; Ødum, Niels

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the effect of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells on phytohemagglutinin (PHA) activation of T cells. METHODS: Resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were stimulated with PHA with or without the presence of gamma-irradiated RPE cells. Proliferation and the cell...... in cell culture supernatant was measured by ELISA. RESULTS: Human RPE cells were found to suppress PHA-induced proliferation, cyclin A, IL-2R-alpha and -gamma, and CD71 expression and decrease the production of IL-2; but RPE cells do not inhibit the PHA-induced expression of early activation markers CD69......, MHC class I and II, and of cyclin D of the PBLs. CONCLUSIONS: These results are the first to indicate that RPE cells impede generation of activated T cells by interfering with the induction of high-affinity IL-2R-alphabetagamma, IL-2 production, and the expression of CD71 and cyclin A....

  3. Sulfated N-linked carbohydrate chains in porcine thyroglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Kamerling, J.P.; Rijkse, I.; Maas, A.A.M.; Kuik, J.A. van

    1988-01-01

    N-linked carbohydrate chains of porcine thyroglobulin were released by the hydrazinolysis procedure. The resulting mixture of oligosaccharide-alditols was fractionated by high-voltage paper electrophoresis, the acidic fractions were further separated by high-performance liquid chromatography on

  4. Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1 and Regulatory T Cells in HTLV-1-Associated Neuroinflammatory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Yamano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a retrovirus that is the causative agent of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL and associated with multiorgan inflammatory disorders, including HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP and uveitis. HTLV-1-infected T cells have been hypothesized to contribute to the development of these disorders, although the precise mechanisms are not well understood. HTLV-1 primarily infects CD4+ T helper (Th cells that play a central role in adaptive immune responses. Based on their functions, patterns of cytokine secretion, and expression of specific transcription factors and chemokine receptors, Th cells that are differentiated from naïve CD4+ T cells are classified into four major lineages: Th1, Th2, Th17, and T regulatory (Treg cells. The CD4+CD25+CCR4+ T cell population, which consists primarily of suppressive T cell subsets, such as the Treg and Th2 subsets in healthy individuals, is the predominant viral reservoir of HTLV-1 in both ATL and HAM/TSP patients. Interestingly, CD4+CD25+CCR4+ T cells become Th1-like cells in HAM/TSP patients, as evidenced by their overproduction of IFN-γ, suggesting that HTLV-1 may intracellularly induce T cell plasticity from Treg to IFN-γ+ T cells. This review examines the recent research into the association between HTLV-1 and Treg cells that has greatly enhanced understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying immune dysregulation in HTLV-1-associated neuroinflammatory disease.

  5. The Repeated Administration of Resveratrol Has Measurable Effects on Circulating T-Cell Subsets in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Luis Espinoza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies have shown that resveratrol exerts immunomodulatory effects with potential clinical value in the amelioration of autoimmune disorders and cancer prevention; however, little is known about the in vivo effects of this naturally occurring polyphenol on human immune cells. We assessed the effects of repeated doses of resveratrol (1000 mg/day for 28 days on circulating immune cells in healthy Japanese individuals. Resveratrol was safe and well tolerated and was associated with significant increases in the numbers of circulating γδ T cells and regulatory T cells and resulted in small, yet significant, decreases in the plasma levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and MCP-1 and a significant increase in the plasma antioxidant activity compared with the corresponding antioxidant baseline activity and with that in four control individuals. In in vitro studies, resveratrol significantly improved the growth of γδ T cells and regulatory T cells. These findings demonstrate that resveratrol has some clear biological effects on human circulating immune cells. Further studies are necessary to interpret the long-term immunological changes associated with resveratrol treatment.

  6. Activated human T cells secrete exosomes that participate in IL-2 mediated immune response signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Wahlgren

    Full Text Available It has previously been shown that nano-meter sized vesicles (30-100 nm, exosomes, secreted by antigen presenting cells can induce T cell responses thus showing the potential of exosomes to be used as immunological tools. Additionally, activated CD3⁺ T cells can secrete exosomes that have the ability to modulate different immunological responses. Here, we investigated what effects exosomes originating from activated CD3⁺ T cells have on resting CD3⁺ T cells by studying T cell proliferation, cytokine production and by performing T cell and exosome phenotype characterization. Human exosomes were generated in vitro following CD3⁺ T cell stimulation with anti-CD28, anti-CD3 and IL-2. Our results show that exosomes purified from stimulated CD3⁺ T cells together with IL-2 were able to generate proliferation in autologous resting CD3⁺ T cells. The CD3⁺ T cells stimulated with exosomes together with IL-2 had a higher proportion of CD8⁺ T cells and had a different cytokine profile compared to controls. These results indicate that activated CD3⁺ T cells communicate with resting autologous T cells via exosomes.

  7. The Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Variable Region of Llama Heavy Chain-Only Antibody JM4 Efficiently Blocks both Cell-Free and T Cell-T Cell Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lihong; Wang, Weiming; Matz, Julie; Ye, Chaobaihui; Bracq, Lucie; Delon, Jerome; Kimata, Jason T; Chen, Zhiwei; Benichou, Serge; Zhou, Paul

    2016-12-01

    The variable regions (VHHs) of two heavy chain-only antibodies, JM2 and JM4, from llamas that have been immunized with a trimeric gp140 bound to a CD4 mimic have been recently isolated (here referred to as VHH JM2 and VHH JM4, respectively). JM2 binds the CD4-binding site of gp120 and neutralizes HIV-1 strains from subtypes B, C, and G. JM4 binds gp120 and neutralizes HIV-1 strains from subtypes A, B, C, A/E, and G in a CD4-dependent manner. In the present study, we constructed glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored VHH JM2 and JM4 along with an E4 control and transduced them into human CD4 + cell lines and primary CD4 T cells. We report that by genetically linking the VHHs with a GPI attachment signal, VHHs are targeted to the lipid rafts of the plasma membranes. Expression of GPI-VHH JM4, but not GPI-VHH E4 and JM2, on the surface of transduced TZM.bl cells potently neutralizes multiple subtypes of HIV-1 isolates, including tier 2 or 3 strains, transmitted founders, quasispecies, and soluble single domain antibody (sdAb) JM4-resistant viruses. Moreover, transduction of CEMss-CCR5 cells with GPI-VHH JM4, but not with GPI-VHH E4, confers resistance to both cell-free and T cell-T cell transmission of HIV-1 and HIV-1 envelope-mediated fusion. Finally, GPI-VHH JM4-transduced human primary CD4 T cells efficiently resist both cell-free and T cell-T cell transmission of HIV-1. Thus, we conclude that VHH JM4, when targeted to the lipid rafts of the plasma membrane, efficiently neutralizes HIV-1 infection via both cell-free and T cell-T cell transmission. Our findings should have important implications for GPI-anchored antibody-based therapy against HIV-1. Lipid rafts are specialized dynamic microdomains of the plasma membrane and have been shown to be gateways for HIV-1 budding as well as entry into T cells and macrophages. In nature, many glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins localize in the lipid rafts. In the present study, we developed GPI

  8. Membranes of activated CD4+ T cells expressing T cell receptor (TcR) alpha beta or TcR gamma delta induce IgE synthesis by human B cells in the presence of interleukin-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gascan, H.; Aversa, G. G.; Gauchat, J. F.; van Vlasselaer, P.; Roncarolo, M. G.; Yssel, H.; Kehry, M.; Spits, H.; de Vries, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    In the present study it is demonstrated that human B cells can be induced to switch to IgE production following a contact-mediated signal provided by activated T cell receptor (TcR) gamma delta+, CD4+ and TcR alpha beta+, CD4+ T cell clones and interleukin (IL)-4. The signal provided by these T cell

  9. Distinct Transcriptional and Alternative Splicing Signatures of Decidual CD4+ T Cells in Early Human Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihong Zeng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Decidual CD4+ T (dCD4 T cells are crucial for the maternal-fetal immune tolerance required for a healthy pregnancy outcome. However, their molecular and functional characteristics are not well elucidated. In this study, we performed the first analysis of transcriptional and alternative splicing (AS landscapes for paired decidual and peripheral blood CD4+ T (pCD4 T cells in human early pregnancy using high throughput mRNA sequencing. Our data showed that dCD4 T cells are endowed with a unique transcriptional signature when compared to pCD4 T cells: dCD4 T cells upregulate 1,695 genes enriched in immune system process whereas downregulate 1,011 genes mainly related to mRNA catabolic process and the ribosome. Moreover, dCD4 T cells were observed to be at M phase, and show increased activation, proliferation, and cytokine production, as well as display an effector-memory phenotype and a heterogenous nature containing Th1, Th17, and Treg cell subsets. However, dCD4 T cells undergo a comparable number of upregulated and downregulated AS events, both of which are enriched in the genes related to cellular metabolic process. And the changes at the AS event level do not reflect measurable differences at the gene expression level in dCD4 T cells. Collectively, our findings provide a comprehensive portrait of the unique transcriptional signature and AS profile of CD4+ T cells in human decidua and help us gain more understanding of the functional characteristic of these cells during early pregnancy.

  10. Visualization of the human CD4{sup +} T-cell response in humanized HLA-DR4-expressing NOD/Shi-scid/γc{sup null} (NOG) mice by retrogenic expression of the human TCR gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takeshi, E-mail: takeshi-takahashi@ciea.or.jp; Katano, Ikumi; Ito, Ryoji; Ito, Mamoru

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) specific TCR genes were introduced to human HSC by retrovirus. • Human HSC with BLG-specific TCR were transplanted into NOG-HLA-DR4 I-A{sup −/−} mice. • BLG-specific TCR induced positive selection of thymocytes. • BLG-specific TCR positive CD4{sup +} T cells mediated immune responses in humanized mice. - Abstract: The development of severe immunodeficient mouse strains containing various human genes, including cytokines or HLA, has enabled the reconstitution of functional human immune systems after transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Accumulating evidence has suggested that HLA-restricted antigen-specific human T-cell responses can be generated in these humanized mice. To directly monitor immune responses of human CD4{sup +} T cells, we introduced β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-specific T cell receptor (TCR) genes derived from CD4{sup +} T-cell clones of cow-milk allergy patients into HSCs, and subsequently transplanted them into NOG-HLA-DR4 transgenic/I-Aβ deficient mice (NOG-DR4/I-A{sup o}). In the thymus, thymocytes with BLG-specific TCR preferentially differentiated into CD4{sup +}CD8{sup −} single-positive cells. Adoptive transfer of mature CD4{sup +} T cells expressing the TCR into recipient NOG-DR4/I-A{sup o} mice demonstrated that human CD4{sup +} T cells proliferated in response to antigenic stimulation and produced IFN-γ in vivo, suggesting that functional T-cell reactions (especially Th1-skewed responses) were induced in humanized mice.

  11. Hypoxia promotes Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific up-regulation of granulysin in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenk, Sebastian F; Vollmer, Michael; Schercher, Esra; Kallert, Stephanie; Kubis, Jan; Stenger, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen tension affects local immune responses in inflammation and infection. In tuberculosis mycobacteria avoid hypoxic areas and preferentially persist and reactivate in the oxygen-rich apex of the lung. Oxygen restriction activates antimicrobial effector mechanisms in macrophages and restricts growth of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.Tb). The effect of oxygen restriction on T cell-mediated antimicrobial effector mechanisms is unknown. Therefore we determined the influence of hypoxia on the expression of granulysin, an antimicrobial peptide of lymphocytes. Hypoxia increased the antigen-specific up-regulation of granulysin mRNA and protein in human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. This observation was functionally relevant, because oxygen restriction supported the growth-limiting effect of antigen-specific T cells against virulent M.Tb residing in primary human macrophages. Our results provide evidence that oxygen restriction promotes the expression of granulysin and suggest that this effect-in conjunction with additional T cell-mediated immune responses-supports protection against mycobacteria. The therapeutic modulation of oxygen availability may offer a new strategy for the host-directed therapy of infectious diseases with intracellular pathogens.

  12. Cognate CD4 T-cell licensing of dendritic cells heralds anti-CMV CD8 T-cell immunity after human allogeneic umbilical cord blood transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flinsenberg, T W H; Spel, Lotte; Jansen, M; Koning, D; de Haar, C; Plantinga, M; Scholman, R; van Loenen, M M; Nierkens, S; Boon, L; van Baarle, D; Heemskerk, M H M; Boelens, J J; Boes, M

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is hazardous to patients undergoing allogeneic cord-blood transplantation (CBT), lowering survival rates by approximately 25%. While antiviral treatment ameliorates viremia, complete viral control requires CD8(+) T-cell-driven immunity. Mouse studies

  13. Curtailed T-cell activation curbs effector differentiation and generates CD8+ T cells with a naturally-occurring memory stem cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon, Veronica; Pilipow, Karolina; Scamardella, Eloise; De Paoli, Federica; De Simone, Gabriele; Price, David A; Martinez Usatorre, Amaia; Romero, Pedro; Mavilio, Domenico; Roberto, Alessandra; Lugli, Enrico

    2017-09-01

    Human T memory stem (T SCM ) cells with superior persistence capacity and effector functions are emerging as important players in the maintenance of long-lived T-cell memory and are thus considered an attractive population to be used in adoptive transfer-based immunotherapy of cancer. However, the molecular signals regulating their generation remain poorly defined. Here we show that curtailed T-cell receptor stimulation curbs human effector CD8 + T-cell differentiation and allows the generation of CD45RO - CD45RA + CCR7 + CD27 + CD95 + -phenotype cells from highly purified naïve T-cell precursors, resembling naturally-occurring human T SCM . These cells proliferate extensively in vitro and in vivo, express low amounts of effector-associated genes and transcription factors and undergo considerable self-renewal in response to IL-15 while retaining effector differentiation potential. Such a phenotype is associated with a lower number of mitochondria compared to highly-activated effector T cells committed to terminal differentiation. These results shed light on the molecular signals that are required to generate long-lived memory T cells with potential application in adoptive cell transfer immunotherapy. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co.KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Human xenospecific T suppressor cells inhibit T helper cell proliferation to porcine aortic endothelial cells, and NF-kappaB activity in porcine APC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciubotariu, R; Li, J; Colovai, A I; Platt, J L; Cortesini, R; Suciu Foca Cortesini, N

    2001-05-01

    Human T suppressor cells (Ts), capable of preventing autologous T helper cells (Th) from reacting against xenogeneic pig endothelial cells and pig APC can be generated in vitro. Ts derive from a population of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) T lymphocytes and specifically recognize the MHC class I antigens of the APC used for in vitro immunization. To study the mechanism that underlies suppression, we investigated whether Ts inhibit the expression of costimulatory molecules in xenogeneic professional and semiprofessional APC. We found that Ts down-regulate Th-induced expression of CD86 in pig APC, and that this effect occurs at the level of transcription, as indicated by nuclear run-on and Northern blot assays. EMSA results revealed that inhibition of CD86 expression is mediated by inactivation of transcription factor NF-kappaB. Furthermore, transfection of pig APC with a vector expressing NF-kappaB p65 partially rescued Th-induced expression of the CD86 molecule. These results strongly support the concept that xenospecific Ts inhibit the APC function of xenogeneic cells by preventing activation of NF-kappaB.

  15. Requirements for growth and IL-10 expression of highly purified human T regulatory cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bonacci, Benedetta; Edwards, Brandon; Jia, Shuang; Williams, Calvin; Hessner, Martin J.; Gauld, Stephen; Verbsky, James

    2012-01-01

    Human regulatory T cells (TR) cells have potential for the treatment of a variety of immune mediated diseases but the anergic phenotype of these cells makes them difficult to expand in vitro. We have examined the requirements for growth and cytokine expression from highly purified human TR cells, and correlated these findings with the signal transduction events of these cells. We demonstrate that these cells do not proliferate or secrete IL-10 even in the presence of high doses of IL-2. Stimu...

  16. Immunological aspects of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), a possible neoplasm of regulatory T-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Yasuaki; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2008-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a distinct disease caused by the first discovered human oncogenic retrovirus, human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1). The peculiarity of this disease is not only in its causative agent HTLV-1 but also in the character of leukemia cells. ATLL cells express the mature helper/inducer T-cell antigens, CD2, CD3, CD4 and CD5 but usually lacking CD8. Despite CD4 expression, it has long been known that ATLL cells exhibit strong immunosuppressive activity ...

  17. Curcumin induces apoptotic cell death of activated human CD4+ T cells via increasing endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Min; Zhang, Qinggao; Joe, Yeonsoo; Lee, Bong Hee; Ryu, Do Gon; Kwon, Kang Beom; Ryter, Stefan W; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2013-03-01

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic antioxidant compound, exerts well-known anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects, the latter which can influence the activation of immune cells including T cells. Furthermore, curcumin can inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, through suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway. The beneficial effects of curcumin in diseases such as arthritis, allergy, asthma, atherosclerosis, diabetes and cancer may be due to its immunomodulatory properties. We studied the potential of curcumin to modulate CD4+ T cells-mediated autoimmune disease, by examining the effects of this compound on human CD4+ lymphocyte activation. Stimulation of human T cells with PHA or CD3/CD28 induced IL-2 mRNA expression and activated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. The treatment of T cells with curcumin induced the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway, initiated by the phosphorylation of PERK and IRE1. Furthermore, curcumin increased the expression of the ER stress associated transcriptional factors XBP-1, cleaved p50ATF6α and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in human CD4+ and Jurkat T cells. In PHA-activated T cells, curcumin further enhanced PHA-induced CHOP expression and reduced the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Finally, curcumin treatment induced apoptotic cell death in activated T cells via eliciting an excessive ER stress response, which was reversed by the ER-stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid or transfection with CHOP-specific siRNA. These results suggest that curcumin can impact both ER stress and mitochondria functional pathways, and thereby could be used as a promising therapy in the context of Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Demonstration of a novel HIV-1 restriction phenotype from a human T cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxing Han

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Although retroviruses may invade host cells, a productive infection can be established only after the virus counteracts inhibition from different types of host restriction factors. Fv1, APOBEC3G/F, TRIM5alpha, ZAP, and CD317 inhibit the replication of different retroviruses by interfering with viral uncoating, reverse transcription, nuclear import, RNA stability, and release. In humans, although APOBEC3G/3F and CD317 block HIV-1 replication, their antiviral activities are neutralized by viral proteins Vif and Vpu. So far, no human gene has been found to effectively block wild type HIV-1 replication under natural condition. Thus, identification of such a gene product would be of great medical importance for the development of HIV therapies.In this study, we discovered a new type of host restriction against the wild type HIV-1 from a CD4/CXCR4 double-positive human T cell line. We identified a CEM-derived cell line (CEM.NKR that is highly resistant to productive HIV-1 infection. Viral production was reduced by at least 1000-fold when compared to the other permissive human T cell lines such as H9, A3.01, and CEM-T4. Importantly, this resistance was evident at extremely high multiplicity of infection. Further analyses demonstrated that HIV-1 could finish the first round of replication in CEM.NKR cells, but the released virions were poorly infectious. These virions could enter the target cells, but failed to initiate reverse transcription. Notably, this restriction phenotype was also present in CEM.NKR and 293T heterokaryons.These results clearly indicate that CEM.NKR cells express a HIV inhibitory gene(s. Further characterization of this novel gene product(s will reveal a new antiretroviral mechanism that directly inactivates wild type HIV-1.

  19. HIV-1 infection, response to treatment and establishment of viral latency in a novel humanized T cell-only mouse (TOM) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Jenna B; Wahl, Angela; Archin, Nancie; Choudhary, Shailesh; Margolis, David; Garcia, J Victor

    2013-10-24

    The major targets of HIV infection in humans are CD4⁺ T cells. CD4⁺ T cell depletion is a hallmark of AIDS. Previously, the SCID-hu thy/liv model was used to study the effect of HIV on thymopoeisis in vivo. However, these mice did not develop high levels of peripheral T cell reconstitution and required invasive surgery for infection and analysis. Here, we describe a novel variant of this model in which thy/liv implantation results in systemic reconstitution with human T cells in the absence of any other human hematopoietic lineages. NOD/SCID-hu thy/liv and NSG-hu thy/liv mice were created by implanting human fetal thymus and liver tissues under the kidney capsule of either NOD/SCID or NSG mice. In contrast to NOD/SCID-hu thy/liv mice that show little or no human cells in peripheral blood or tissues, substantial systemic human reconstitution occurs in NSG-hu thy/liv. These mice are exclusively reconstituted with human T cells (i.e. T-cell only mice or TOM). Despite substantial levels of human T cells no signs of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were noted in these mice over a period of 14 months. TOM are readily infected after parenteral exposure to HIV-1. HIV replication is sustained in peripheral blood at high levels and results in modest reduction of CD4⁺ T cells. HIV-1 replication in TOM responds to daily administration of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) resulting in strong suppression of virus replication as determined by undetectable viral load in plasma. Latently HIV infected resting CD4⁺ T cells can be isolated from suppressed mice that can be induced to express HIV ex-vivo upon activation demonstrating the establishment of latency in vivo. NSG-hu thy/liv mice are systemically reconstituted with human T cells. No other human lymphoid lineages are present in these mice (i.e. monocytes/macrophages, B cells and DC are all absent). These T cell only mice do not develop GVHD, are susceptible to HIV-1 infection and can efficiently maintain virus

  20. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and its oncogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan-lan ZHANG; Jing-yun WEI; Long WANG; Shi-le HUANG; Ji-long CHEN

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL),a rapidly progressing clonal malignancy of CD4+ T lymphocytes.Exploring the host-HTLV-1 interactions and the molecular mechanisms underlying HTLV-1-mediated tumorigenesis is critical for developing efficient therapies against the viral infection and associated leukemia/lymphoma.It has been demonstrated to date that several HTLV-1 proteins play key roles in the cellular transformation and immortalization of infected T lymphocytes.Of note,the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax inhibits the innate IFN response through interaction with MAVS,STING and RIP1,causing the suppression of TBK1-mediated phosphorylation of IRF3/IRF7.The HTLV-1 protein HBZ disrupts genomic integrity and inhibits apoptosis and autophagy of the target cells.Furthermore,it is revealed that HBZ enhances the proliferation of ATL cells and facilitates evasion of the infected cells from immunosurveillance.These studies provide insights into the molecular mechanisms by which HTLV-1 mediates the formation of cancer as well as useful strategies for the development of new therapeutic interventions against ATL.In this article,we review the recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis,the underlying mechanisms,clinical diagnosis and treatment of the disease caused by HTLV-1 infection.In addition,we discuss the future direction for targeting HTLV-1-associated cancers and strategies against HTLV-1.

  1. Evaluation of the impact of chitosan/DNA nanoparticles on the differentiation of human naive CD4{sup +} T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Lanxia; Bai Yuanyuan; Zhu Dunwan; Song Liping; Wang Hai; Dong Xia; Zhang Hailing; Leng Xigang, E-mail: lengxg@bme.org.cn [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Lab of Bioengineering, Institute of Biomedical Engineering (China)

    2011-06-15

    Chitosan (CS) is one of the most widely studied polymers in non-viral gene delivery since it is a cationic polysaccharide that forms nanoparticles with DNA and hence protects the DNA against digestion by DNase. However, the impact of CS/DNA nanoparticle on the immune system still remains poorly understood. Previous investigations did not found CS/DNA nanoparticles had any significant impact on the function of human and murine macrophages. To date, little is known about the interaction between CS/DNA nanoparticles and naive CD4{sup +} T cells. This study was designed to investigate whether CS/DNA nanoparticles affect the initial differentiation direction of human naive CD4{sup +} T cells. The indirect impact of CS/DNA nanoparticles on naive CD4{sup +} T cell differentiation was investigated by incubating the nanoparticles with human macrophage THP-1 cells in one chamber of a transwell co-incubation system, with the enriched human naive CD4{sup +} T cells being placed in the other chamber of the transwell. The nanoparticles were also co-incubated with the naive CD4{sup +} T cells to explore their direct impact on naive CD4{sup +} T cell differentiation by measuring the release of IL-4 and IFN-{gamma} from the cells. It was demonstrated that CS/DNA nanoparticles induced slightly elevated production of IL-12 by THP-1 cells, possibly owing to the presence of CpG motifs in the plasmid. However, this macrophage stimulating activity was much less significant as compared with lipopolysaccharide and did not impact on the differentiation of the naive CD4{sup +} T cells. It was also demonstrated that, when directly exposed to the naive CD4{sup +} T cells, the nanoparticles induced neither the activation of the naive CD4{sup +} T cells in the absence of recombinant cytokines (recombinant human IL-4 or IFN-{gamma}) that induce naive CD4{sup +} T cell polarization, nor any changes in the differentiation direction of naive CD4{sup +} T cells in the presence of the corresponding

  2. Resistance to asbestos-induced apoptosis with continuous exposure to crocidolite on a human T cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Megumi [Department of Biofunctional Chemistry, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima-Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Yamamoto, Shoko [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Chen, Ying [Division of Pneumoconiosis, School of Public Health, China Medical University, 92 North 2nd, Heping District, Shenyang 110001 (China); Kumagai-Takei, Naoko [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Hayashi, Hiroaki [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Department of Dermatology, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Hatayama, Tamayo; Miyahara, Naomi; Katoh, Minako [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Hiratsuka, Juni-ichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumitsu [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Otsuki, Takemi, E-mail: takemi@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    We have been investigating the immunological effects of asbestos. The establishment of a low-dose and continuously exposed human T cell line, HTLV-1 immortalized MT-2, to chrysotile (CB) revealed reduction of CXCR3 chemokine receptor and production of IFN-{gamma} that caused a decline of tumor immunity. These effects were coupled with upregulation of IL-10, TGF-{beta}, and BCL-2 in asbestos-exposed patients. To observe the immunological effects of crocidolite (CR) on human T cells, a trial to establish a low-dose and continuously exposed model was conducted and compared with a previously reported CB-exposed model (MT-2CB). Transient exposure of MT-2 original cells to CB or CR induced a similar level of apoptosis and growth inhibition. The establishment of a continuously exposed subline to CR (MT-2CR) revealed resistance against CR-induced apoptosis and upregulation of the BCL-2/BAX ratio similar to that recorded for MT-2CB. Both sublines showed reduced production of IFN-{gamma}, TNF-{alpha}, and IL-6 with increased IL-10. cDNA microarray with network/pathway analyses focusing on transcription factors revealed that many similar factors related to cell proliferation were involved following continuous exposure to asbestos in both MT-2CB and MT-2CR. These results indicate that both CB and CR fibers affect human T cells with similar degrees even though the carcinogenic activity of these substances differs due to their chemical and physical forms. Trials to identify early detection markers for asbestos exposure or the occurrence of asbestos-inducing malignancies using these findings may lead to the development of clinical tools for asbestos-related diseases and chemoprevention that modifies the reduced tumor immunity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of effects of chrysotile and crocidolite on human T cell was done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both fibers caused apoptosis of T cells by transient exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells

  3. Deletional rearrangement in the human T-cell receptor α-chain locus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Villartay, J.P.; Lewis, D.; Hockett, R.; Waldmann, T.A.; Korsmeyer, S.J.; Cohen, D.I.

    1987-01-01

    The antigen-specific receptor on the surface of mature T lymphocytes is a heterodimer consisting of polypeptides termed α and β. In the course of characterizing human T-cell tumors with an immature (CD4 - , CD8 - ) surface phenotype, the authors detected a 2-kilobase α-related transcript. Analysis of cDNA clones corresponding to this transcript established that a genetic element (which they call TEA, for T early α) located between the α-chain variable- and joining-region genes had been spliced to the α constant region. The TEA transcript is present early in thymocyte ontogeny, and its expression declines during T-cell maturation. More important, the TEA area functions as an active site for rearrangement within the α gene locus. Blot hybridization of restriction enzyme-digested DNA with a TEA probe revealed a narrowly limited pattern of rearrangement in polyclonal thymic DNA, surprisingly different from the pattern expected for the mature α gene with its complex diversity. These DNA blots also showed that TEA is generally present in the germ-line configuration in cells expressing the γδ heterodimeric receptor and is deleted from mature (αβ-expressing) T-lymphocyte tumors and lines. Moreover, the TEA transcript lacked a long open reading frame for protein but instead possessed multiple copies of a repetitive element resembling those utilized in the heavy-chain class switch of the immunoglobulin genes. The temporal nature of the rearrangements and expression detected by TEA suggests that this recombination could mediate a transition between immature (γδ-expressing) T cells and mature (αβ-expressing) T cells

  4. Major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted cytolytic activity of human T cells: analysis of precursor frequency and effector phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, S.S.; Thiele, D.L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    The frequency and phenotype of human T cells that mediate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted cytolysis were analyzed. T cell clones were generated by culturing adherent cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a density of 0.3 cell/well with phytohemagglutinin, recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2), and irradiated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and/or Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. All of the 198 clones generated by this method were T cells (CD2 + , CD3 + , CD4 + or CD2 + , CD3 + , CD8 + ) that possessed potent lytic activity against K562, an erythroleukemia line sensitive to lysis by human natural killer cells, and Cur, a renal carcinoma cell line resistant to human natural killer activity. Cytolysis, measured by 51 Cr release, was MHC-unrestricted, since the clones were able to lyse MHC class I or class II negative targets, as well as MHC class I and class II negative targets. Although the clones produced tissue necrosis factor/lymphotoxin-like molecules, lysis of Cur of K562 was not mediated by a soluble factor secreted by the clones. These data indicate that the capacity for MHC-unrestricted tumoricidal activity and expression of NKH1 and CD11b, but not CD 16, are properties common to all or nearly all human peripheral blood-derived T cell clones regardless of CD4 or CD8 phenotype

  5. Human T cell colony formation in microculture: analysis of growth requirements and functional activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, E W; Lee, J W; Dosch, H M; Price, G B

    1981-03-01

    A microculture method in methylcellulose has been developed for the study of human T cell colony formation. The technique is simple, reliable, does not require preincubation with lectin and requires small numbers of cells. Colony formation was dependent on the presence of phytohemagglutin-conditioned medium, a T colony precursor cell (TCPC), and a "helper" or accessory T cell. Plating efficiency was increased 10-fold in the presence of irradiated feeder cells. Progenitors of the T colony cells were identified in peripheral blood, tonsil, and spleen but not in thymus or thoracic duct. They were isolated in the E-rosetting, theophylline-resistant, Fc-IgG-negative cell populations. In peripheral blood the frequency of TCPC and accessory cells, the T colony forming unit, was estimated to be 8 X 10(-3). Colony cells proliferated in response to lectins and allogeneic cells. Forty to 80% of the cells were Ia-positive and stimulated both autologous and allogeneic mixed lymphocyte responses. They were incapable of mediating antibody-dependent cytotoxicity. In contrast, they were effective in assays of spontaneous cytotoxicity but only against certain target cells. This method for the analysis of T colony formation should prove valuable in the functional analysis of T cell subsets in immunodeficiency states or the transplant recipient.

  6. Autoreactive lymphocytes in thyroid disorders. 2. Comparison of anti-thyroglobulin antibody production by plaque-forming cell, radio-immunological and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, J; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Siersbaek-Nielsen, K; Hoeier-Madsen, M; Larsen, F; Husby, S

    1986-01-01

    Blood mononuclear cells (MNC) from 9 randomly selected patients with autoimmune thyroiditis were stimulated in vitro with pokeweed mitogen (PWM), a polyclonal B lymphocyte activator. The secretion of immunoglobulins (Ig) and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) was assayed by means of haemolytic plaque-forming cell (PFC) assays, radioimmune assay (RIA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Total Ig and TgAb production was maximal using MNC cultured at 1.0 x 10/sup 6//ml as estimated by PFC, RIA and ELISA. The Ig and TgAb production as measured by RIA and ELISA was 1.5 - 3 times higher after 12 days' culture compared to 6 days' culture. Ig and TgAb production measured by PFC-assays at day 6 correlated positively to the results obtained by RIA and ELISA at day 12. PWM-induced TgAb secretion correlated positively to TgAb titres in serum. As judged by PFC, TgAb production was found in 8/9 patients; about 5% (range 0 - 7.9%) of the total PWM-stimulated IgG-secreting cells were involved in TgAb secretion. TgAb production as measured by ELISA and RIA was found in 6/9 patients. By reference to an affinity-purified human TgAb preparation, the TgAb secretion was about 0.7% (range 0 - 21.3%) of the total PWM-induced IgG secretion.

  7. Lower numbers of circulating natural killer T (NK T) cells in individuals with human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) associated neurological disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndhlovu, L C; Snyder-Cappione, J E; Carvalho, K I; Leal, F E; Loo, C P; bruno, F R; Jha, A R; Devita, D; Hasenkrug, A M; Barbosa, H M R; Segurado, A C; Nixon, D F; Murphy, E L; Kallas, E G

    2009-01-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infects 10–20 million people worldwide. The majority of infected individuals are asymptomatic; however, approximately 3% develop the debilitating neurological disease HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). There is also currently no cure, vaccine or effective therapy for HTLV-1 infection, and the mechanisms for progression to HAM/TSP remain unclear. NK T cells are an immunoregulatory T cell subset whose frequencies and effector functions are associated critically with immunity against infectious diseases. We hypothesized that NK T cells are associated with HAM/TSP progression. We measured NK T cell frequencies and absolute numbers in individuals with HAM/TSP infection from two cohorts on two continents: São Paulo, Brazil and San Francisco, CA, USA, and found significantly lower levels when compared with healthy subjects and/or asymptomatic carriers. Also, the circulating NK T cell compartment in HAM/TSP subjects is comprised of significantly more CD4+ and fewer CD8+ cells than healthy controls. These findings suggest that lower numbers of circulating NK T cells and enrichment of the CD4+ NK T subset are associated with HTLV-1 disease progression. PMID:19778295

  8. Bidirectional enhancing activities between human T cell leukemia-lymphoma virus type I and human cytomegalovirus in human term syncytiotrophoblast cells cultured in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, F D; Aboagye-Mathiesen, G; Szabó, J; Liu, X; Mosborg-Petersen, P; Kiss, J; Hager, H; Zdravkovic, M; Andirkó, I; Aranyosi, J

    1995-12-01

    The syncytiotrophoblast layer of the human placenta has an important role in limiting transplacental viral spread from mother to fetus. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is capable of establishing a latent infection in syncytiotrophoblast cells, with restriction of gene expression to immediate-early and early proteins. We analyzed the extent of replication of human T cell leukemia-lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) in human term syncytiotrophoblasts infected with HTLV-I alone or coinfected with HTLV-I and HCMV. Although syncytiotrophoblasts could be infected with cell-free HTLV-I, no viral protein expression was found in the singly infected cells. On the contrary, coinfection of the cells with HTLV-I and HCMV resulted in simultaneous replication of both viruses. Bidirectional enhancing activities between HTLV-I and HCMV were mediated primarily by the Tax and immediate-early proteins, respectively. The stimulatory effect of HTLV-I Tax on HCMV replication appeared to be mediated partly by tumor necrosis factor beta and transforming growth factor beta-1. We observed formation of pseudotypes with HTLV-I nucleocapsids within HCMV envelopes, whereas HCMV was not pseudotyped by HTLV-I envelopes in dually infected syncytiotrophoblast cells. Our data suggest that in vivo dual infection of syncytiotrophoblast cells with HTLV-I and HCMV may facilitate the transplacental transmission of both viruses.

  9. Human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II exhibit different DNase I protection patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, R.; Harrich, D.; Garcia, J.A.; Gaynor, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus types I (HTLV-I) and II (HTLV-II) are human retroviruses which normally infect T-lymphoid cells. HTLV-I infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, and HTLV-II is associated with an indolent form of hairy-cell leukemia. To identify potential transcriptional regulatory elements of these two related human retroviruses, the authors performed DNase I footprinting of both the HTLV-I and HTLV-II long terminal repeats (LTRs) by using extracts prepared from uninfected T cells, HTLV-I and HTLV-II transformed T cells, and HeLa cells. Five regions of the HTLV-I LTR and three regions of the HTLV-II LTR showed protection by DNase I footprinting. All three of the 21-base-pair repeats previously shown to be important in HTLV transcriptional regulation were protected in the HTLV-I LTR, whereas only one of these repeats was protected in the HTLV-II LTR. Several regions exhibited altered protection in extracts prepared from lymphoid cells as compared with HeLa cells, but there were minimal differences in the protection patterns between HTLV-infected and uninfected lymphoid extracts. A number of HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTR fragments which contained regions showing protection in DNase I footprinting were able to function as inducible enhancer elements in transient CAT gene expression assays in the presence of the HTLV-II tat protein. The alterations in the pattern of the cellular proteins which bind to the HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTRs may in part be responsible for differences in the transcriptional regulation of these two related viruses

  10. Thyroglobulin assay in fluids from lymph node fine needle-aspiration washout: influence of pre-analytical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Florence Boux de; Moal, Valérie; Gauchez, Anne-Sophie; Moineau, Marie-Pierre; Sault, Corinne; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Massart, Catherine

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the pre-analytical factors contributing to uncertainty in thyroglobulin measurement in fluids from fine-needle aspiration (FNA) washout of cervical lymph nodes. We studied pre-analytical stability, in different conditions, of 41 samples prepared with concentrated solutions of thyroglobulin (FNA washout or certified standard) diluted in physiological saline solution or buffer containing 6% albumin. In this buffer, over time, no changes in thyroglobulin concentrations were observed in all storage conditions tested. In albumin free saline solution, thyroglobulin recovery rates depended on initial sample concentrations and on modalities of their conservation (in conventional storage tubes, recovery mean was 56% after 3 hours-storage at room temperature and 19% after 24 hours-storage for concentrations ranged from 2 to 183 μg/L; recovery was 95%, after 3 hours or 24 hours-storage at room temperature, for a concentration of 5,656 μg/L). We show here that these results are due to non-specific adsorption of thyroglobulin in storage tubes, which depends on sample protein concentrations. We also show that possible contamination of fluids from FNA washout by plasma proteins do not always adequately prevent this adsorption. In conclusion, non-specific adsorption in storage tubes strongly contributes to uncertainty in thyroglobulin measurement in physiological saline solution. It is therefore recommended, for FNA washout, to use a buffer containing proteins provided by the laboratory.

  11. Influence of low dose irradiation on differentiation, maturation and T-cell activation of human dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahns, Jutta [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Anderegg, Ulf; Saalbach, Anja [Department for Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, University of Leipzig, Johannisallee 30, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Rosin, Britt; Patties, Ina; Glasow, Annegret [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Kamprad, Manja [Institute for Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, University of Leipzig, Johannisallee 30, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Scholz, Markus [Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology, University of Leipzig, Haertelstr. 16-18, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Hildebrandt, Guido, E-mail: Guido.Hildebrandt@uni-rostock.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Rostock, Suedring 75, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-05-10

    Ionizing irradiation could act directly on immune cells and may induce bystander effects mediated by soluble factors that are released by the irradiated cells. This is the first study analyzing both the direct effect of low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) on the maturation and cytokine release of human dendritic cells (DCs) and the functional consequences for co-cultured T-cells. We showed that irradiation of DC-precursors in vitro does not influence surface marker expression or cytokine profile of immature DCs nor of mature DCs after LPS treatment. There was no difference of single dose irradiation versus fractionated irradiation protocols on the behavior of the mature DCs. Further, the low dose irradiation did not change the capacity of the DCs to stimulate T-cell proliferation. But the irradiation of the co-culture of DCs and T-cells revealed significantly lower proliferation of T-cells with higher doses. Summarizing the data from approx. 50 DC preparations there is no significant effect of low dose ionizing irradiation on the cytokine profile, surface marker expression and maturation of DCs in vitro although functional consequences cannot be excluded.

  12. Role of dendritic cells infected with human herpesvirus 6 in virus transmission to CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Masaya; Imasawa, Takayoshi; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2009-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a ubiquitous betaherpesvirus that predominantly infects and replicates in CD4 + T lymphocytes. However, the mechanism of HHV-6 transmission to T cells from the peripheral mucosa is unknown. Here we found that dendritic cells (DCs) can transmit HHV-6 to T cells, resulting in productive infection. In immature monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) infected with HHV-6, viral early and late antigens were expressed, and nucleocapsids containing a DNA core were observed, although few virions were detected in the cytoplasm by electron microscopy, indicating that the maturation of HHV-6 virions may be incomplete in MDDCs. However, HHV-6 transmission from MDDCs to stimulated CD4 + T cells occurred efficiently in coculture of these cells, but not from MDDCs culture supernatants. This transmission was partially inhibited by treating the DCs with a viral DNA synthesis blocker, indicating that viral replication in MDDCs is required for this transmission. Furthermore, myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs infected with HHV-6 could also transmit the virus to stimulated T cells. Thus, DCs may be the first cell population targeted by HHV-6 and could play an important role in the virus' transmission to T cells for their further propagation

  13. The Generation of Human γδT Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Whole Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Koyanagi-Aoi, Michiyo; Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Yoshida, Yukiko; Azuma, Takeshi; Aoi, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    γδT cells constitute a small proportion of lymphocytes in peripheral blood. Unlike αβT cells, the anti-tumor activities are exerted through several different pathways in a MHC-unrestricted manner. Thus, immunotherapy using γδT cells is considered to be effective for various types of cancer. Occasionally, however, ex vivo expanded cells are not as effective as expected due to cell exhaustion. To overcome the issue of T-cell exhaustion, researchers have generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that harbor the same T-cell receptor (TCR) genes as their original T-cells, which provide nearly limitless sources for antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, these technologies have focused on αβT cells and require a population of antigen-specific CTLs, which are purified by cell sorting with HLA-peptide multimer, as the origin of iPS cells. In the present study, we aimed to develop an efficient and convenient system for generating iPSCs that harbor rearrangements of the TCRG and TCRD gene regions (γδT-iPSCs) without cell-sorting. We stimulated human whole peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) culture using Interleukin-2 and Zoledronate to activate γδT cells. Gene transfer into those cells with the Sendai virus vector resulted in γδT cell-dominant expression of exogenous genes. The introduction of reprogramming factors into the stimulated PBMC culture allowed us to establish iPSC lines. Around 70% of the established lines carried rearrangements at the TCRG and TCRD gene locus. The γδT-iPSCs could differentiate into hematopoietic progenitors. Our technology will pave the way for new avenues toward novel immunotherapy that can be applied for various types of cancer. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2018;7:34-44. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  14. CXCL5 knockdown expression inhibits human bladder cancer T24 cells proliferation and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jiajia [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Zhu, Xi [Department of Urology, Beijing Friendship Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Jie, E-mail: zhangjiebjmu@163.com [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • We first demonstrated CXCL5 is highly expressed in human bladder tumor tissues and cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits proliferation, migration and promotes apoptosis in T24 cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in T24 cells. • CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression. - Abstract: CXCL5 (epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78) which acts as a potent chemoattractant and activator of neutrophil function was reported to play a multifaceted role in tumorigenesis. To investigate the role of CXCL5 in bladder cancer progression, we examined the CXCL5 expression in bladder cancer tissues by real-time PCR and Western blot, additionally, we used shRNA-mediated silencing to generate stable CXCL5 silenced bladder cancer T24 cells and defined its biological functions. Our results demonstrated that mRNA and protein of CXCL5 is increased in human bladder tumor tissues and cell lines, down-regulation of CXCL5 in T24 cells resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration and increased cell apoptosis in vitro through Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. These data suggest that CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression, it may represent a potential application in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  15. CXCL5 knockdown expression inhibits human bladder cancer T24 cells proliferation and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Jiajia; Zhu, Xi; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We first demonstrated CXCL5 is highly expressed in human bladder tumor tissues and cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits proliferation, migration and promotes apoptosis in T24 cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in T24 cells. • CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression. - Abstract: CXCL5 (epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78) which acts as a potent chemoattractant and activator of neutrophil function was reported to play a multifaceted role in tumorigenesis. To investigate the role of CXCL5 in bladder cancer progression, we examined the CXCL5 expression in bladder cancer tissues by real-time PCR and Western blot, additionally, we used shRNA-mediated silencing to generate stable CXCL5 silenced bladder cancer T24 cells and defined its biological functions. Our results demonstrated that mRNA and protein of CXCL5 is increased in human bladder tumor tissues and cell lines, down-regulation of CXCL5 in T24 cells resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration and increased cell apoptosis in vitro through Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. These data suggest that CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression, it may represent a potential application in cancer diagnosis and therapy

  16. Impact of alemtuzumab treatment on the survival and function of human regulatory T cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havari, Evis; Turner, Michael J; Campos-Rivera, Juanita; Shankara, Srinivas; Nguyen, Tri-Hung; Roberts, Bruce; Siders, William; Kaplan, Johanne M

    2014-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody specific for the CD52 protein present at high levels on the surface of B and T lymphocytes. In clinical trials, alemtuzumab has shown a clinical benefit superior to that of interferon-β in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Treatment with alemtuzumab leads to the depletion of circulating lymphocytes followed by a repopulation process characterized by alterations in the number, proportions and properties of lymphocyte subsets. Of particular interest, an increase in the percentage of T cells with a regulatory phenotype (Treg cells) has been observed in multiple sclerosis patients after alemtuzumab. Since Treg cells play an important role in the control of autoimmune responses, the effect of alemtuzumab on Treg cells was further studied in vitro. Alemtuzumab effectively mediated complement-dependent cytolysis of human T lymphocytes and the remaining population was enriched in T cells with a regulatory phenotype. The alemtuzumab-exposed T cells displayed functional regulatory characteristics including anergy to stimulation with allogeneic dendritic cells and ability to suppress the allogeneic response of autologous T cells. Consistent with the observed increase in Treg cell frequency, the CD25hi T-cell population was necessary for the suppressive activity of alemtuzumab-exposed T cells. The mechanism of this suppression was found to be dependent on both cell–cell contact and interleukin-2 consumption. These findings suggest that an alemtuzumab-mediated increase in the proportion of Treg cells may play a role in promoting the long-term efficacy of alemtuzumab in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:24116901

  17. Modulation of nuclear T3 binding by T3 in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver) - T3 stimulation of cell growth but not of malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphatdehydrogenase or 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Kristensen, S R; Kvetny, J

    1991-01-01

    The T3 modulation of nuclear T3 binding (NBT3), the T3 effect on cell growth, and the T3 and insulin effects on malic enzyme (ME), glucose-6-phosphat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) were studied in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver). T3 was bound to a high ...

  18. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells and Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells Differentially Facilitate Leukocyte Recruitment and Utilize Chemokines for T Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumei Man

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells that functionally express blood brain barrier (BBB properties are useful surrogates for studying leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions at the BBB. In this study, we compared two different endothelial cellular models: transfected human brain microvascular endothelial cells (THBMECs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. With each grow under optimal conditions, confluent THBMEC cultures showed continuous occludin and ZO-1 immunoreactivity, while HUVEC cultures exhibited punctate ZO-1 expression at sites of cell-cell contact only. Confluent THBMEC cultures on 24-well collagen-coated transwell inserts had significantly higher transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER and lower solute permeability than HUVECs. Confluent THBMECs were more restrictive for mononuclear cell migration than HUVECs. Only THBMECs utilized abluminal CCL5 to facilitate T-lymphocyte migration in vitro although both THBMECs and HUVECs employed CCL3 to facilitate T cell migration. These data establish baseline conditions for using THBMECs to develop in vitro BBB models for studying leukocyte-endothelial interactions during neuroinflammation.

  19. Human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I infection of a CD4+ proliferative/cytotoxic T cell clone progresses in at least two distinct phases based on changes in function and phenotype of the infected cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yssel, H.; de Waal Malefyt, R.; Duc Dodon, M. D.; Blanchard, D.; Gazzolo, L.; de Vries, J. E.; Spits, H.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) infection on the function and the phenotype of a human proliferating/cytotoxic T cell clone, specific for tetanus toxin, was investigated. During the period after infection, two distinct phases were observed, based on growth

  20. Ex vivo generation of human alloantigen-specific regulatory T cells from CD4(posCD25(high T cells for immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorieke H Peters

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cell (Treg based immunotherapy is a potential treatment for several immune disorders. By now, this approach proved successful in preclinical animal transplantation and auto-immunity models. In these models the success of Treg based immunotherapy crucially depends on the antigen-specificity of the infused Treg population. For the human setting, information is lacking on how to generate Treg with direct antigen-specificity ex vivo to be used for immunotherapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we demonstrate that in as little as two stimulation cycles with HLA mismatched allogeneic stimulator cells and T cell growth factors a very high degree of alloantigen-specificity was reached in magnetic bead isolated human CD4(posCD25(high Treg. Efficient increases in cell numbers were obtained. Primary allogeneic stimulation appeared a prerequisite in the generation of alloantigen-specific Treg, while secondary allogeneic or polyclonal stimulation with anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies enriched alloantigen-specificity and cell yield to a similar extent. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ex vivo expansion protocol that we describe will very likely increase the success of clinical Treg-based immunotherapy, and will help to induce tolerance to selected antigens, while minimizing general immune suppression. This approach is of particular interest for recipients of HLA mismatched transplants.

  1. Human T cell aging and the impact of persistent viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamas eFulop

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with a dysregulation of the immune response, loosely termed immunosenescence. Each part of the immune system is influenced to some extent by the aging process. However, adaptive immunity seems more extensively affected and among all participating cells it is the T cells that are most altered. There is a large body of experimental work devoted to the investigation of age-associated differences in T cell phenotypes and functions in young and old individuals, but few longitudinal studies in humans actually delineating changes at the level of the individual. In most studies, the number and proportion of late-differentiated T cells, especially CD8+ T cells, is reported to be higher in the elderly than in the young. Limited longitudinal studies suggest that accumulation of these cells is a dynamic process and does indeed represent an age-associated change. Accumulations of such late-stage cells may contribute to the enhanced systemic pro-inflammatory milieu commonly seen in older people. We do not know exactly what causes these observed changes, but an understanding of the possible causes is now beginning to emerge. A favored hypothesis is that these events are at least partly due to the effects of the maintenance of essential immune surveillance against persistent viral infections, notably Cytomegalovirus (CMV, which may exhaust the immune system over time. It is still a matter of debate as to whether these changes are compensatory and beneficial or pathological and detrimental to the proper functioning of the immune system and whether they impact longevity. Here, we will review present knowledge of T cell changes with aging and their relation to chronic viral and possibly other persistent infections.

  2. Dynamic gene expression response to altered gravity in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Cora S; Hauschild, Swantje; Huge, Andreas; Tauber, Svantje; Lauber, Beatrice A; Polzer, Jennifer; Paulsen, Katrin; Lier, Hartwin; Engelmann, Frank; Schmitz, Burkhard; Schütte, Andreas; Layer, Liliana E; Ullrich, Oliver

    2017-07-12

    We investigated the dynamics of immediate and initial gene expression response to different gravitational environments in human Jurkat T lymphocytic cells and compared expression profiles to identify potential gravity-regulated genes and adaptation processes. We used the Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 containing 44,699 protein coding genes and 22,829 non-protein coding genes and performed the experiments during a parabolic flight and a suborbital ballistic rocket mission to cross-validate gravity-regulated gene expression through independent research platforms and different sets of control experiments to exclude other factors than alteration of gravity. We found that gene expression in human T cells rapidly responded to altered gravity in the time frame of 20 s and 5 min. The initial response to microgravity involved mostly regulatory RNAs. We identified three gravity-regulated genes which could be cross-validated in both completely independent experiment missions: ATP6V1A/D, a vacuolar H + -ATPase (V-ATPase) responsible for acidification during bone resorption, IGHD3-3/IGHD3-10, diversity genes of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus participating in V(D)J recombination, and LINC00837, a long intergenic non-protein coding RNA. Due to the extensive and rapid alteration of gene expression associated with regulatory RNAs, we conclude that human cells are equipped with a robust and efficient adaptation potential when challenged with altered gravitational environments.

  3. Serum Thyroglobulin Doubling Time in Progressive Thyroid Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossing, R.M.; Jentzen, W.; Nagarajah, J.; Bockisch, A.; Gorges, R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumor marker doubling time (DT) has been proposed as a prognostic marker for various types of cancer. The present study analyzed the DT of the thyroid-specific tumor marker thyroglobulin (Tg), focusing on patients with progressive differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). METHODS: A total of

  4. Problems of primary T-cell lymphoma of the thyroid gland -A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama Junkichi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the following report we discuss a very rare case of malignant T-cell lymphoma of the thyroid gland that developed in a 70-year-old woman with a past history of hypothyroidism due to chronic thyroiditis. The chief complaint was a rapidly growing neck mass. CT and ultrasonographic examination revealed a diffuse large thyroid gland without a nodule extending up to 13 cm. Although presence of abnormal lymphoid cells in the peripheral blood was not found, the sIL-2 Receptor antibody and thyroglobulin measured as high as 970 U/ml and 600 ng/mL respectively. Fine needle aspiration cytology diagnosed chronic thyroiditis. A preoperative diagnosis of suspicious malignant lymphoma of the thyroid gland accompanied by Hashimoto’s thyroiditis was made, and a right hemithyroidectomy was performed to definite diagnosis. Histological examination revealed diffuse small lymphocytic infiltration in the thyroid gland associated with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Immunohistochemical examination showed that the small lymphocytes were positive for T-cell markers with CD3 and CD45RO. The pathological diagnosis was chronic thyroiditis with atypical lymphocytes infiltration. However, Southern blot analysis of tumor specimens revealed only a monoclonal T-cell receptor gene rearrangement. Finally, peripheral T cell lymphoma was diagnosed. Therefore, the left hemithyroidectomy was also performed one month later. No adjuvant therapy was performed due to the tumor stage and its subtype. The patient is well with no recurrence or metastasis 22 months after the surgical removal of the thyroid. As malignant T-cell lymphoma of the thyroid gland with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis was difficult to diagnose, gene rearrangement examination needed to be performed concurrently.

  5. Differentiation of human B lymphocyte subpopulations induced by an alloreactive helper T-cell clone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.J.; Hummell, D.S.; Lawton, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    We have used cloned alloreactive helper T cells to determine if direct T cell-B cell interaction can induce differentiation of human peripheral blood B cells which do not respond to pokeweed mitogen (PWM). T-cell clone 2F8 was derived from a one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction. 2F8 cells are T3+T4+T8-IL-2R+ and proliferate in response to irradiated stimulator cells, but not autologous cells, in the absence of exogenous interleukin-2. 2F8 cells provide allospecific help for polyclonal proliferation and differentiation of B cells in the absence of any other stimulus. The magnitude of this response is comparable to that of the response of the same B cells to PWM and fresh autologous T cells. 2F8 cells could also provide nonspecific help for unrelated donor B cells in the presence of PWM, with no requirement for costimulation by irradiated stimulator cells. Allospecific stimulation of B cells was completely inhibited by antibodies to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) framework determinants and was abrogated by 1000-rad irradiation. Cloned 2F8 T cells stimulated differentiation of both small, high-density B cells and larger B cells, generating up to 30% plasma cells with either fraction. B cells forming rosettes with mouse erythrocytes were also induced to differentiate by the helper T cell clone. As found previously, neither small, high-density B cells nor mouse rosette+ B cells responded well to PWM. Direct interaction with allospecific T cells induces differentiation of a broader spectrum of B cells than soluble growth and differentiation factors in conjunction with polyclonal activators such as PWM and protein A containing staphylococci

  6. Clinical significance of combined determination of serum TPO-Ab and TGA levels and T lymphocyte subsets in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jialin; Chen Daqiang; Li Ming; Xiao Yunzhen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the possible relationship between serum thyroglobulin antibody, thyroid peroxidase antibody levels and the development of AITD. Methods: Thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) level was determined with electrochemilu-minescence assay, the thyroglobulin antibody (TGA) was detected by radiolmmunoassay and peripheral T-cells subsets were examined with monoclonal antibody technic in 87 patients with hyperthyroidism, 83 patients with hypothyroidism and 80 controls. Results: The thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody levels in AITD patients (including both hyper and hypothyroid patients) were significantly higher than those in the controls (P<0.01). Conclusion: It is proposed that increase of TPO-Ab and TGA is the cause of the development of AITD. (authors)

  7. Evaluation of the highly sensitive Roche thyroglobulin II assay and establishment of a reference limit for thyroglobulin-negative patient samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorien M. Rotteveel-de Groot

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Thyroglobulin (Tg measurements are used to monitor for residual thyroid tissue in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC after thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablative therapy. In recent years highly sensitive Tg assays have been developed. In this study the analytical performance of the new Roche Elecsys Tg II assay was evaluated and compared with the well documented Access2 Tg assay (Beckman–Coulter. Design and methods: Analytical performance was examined using various Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI evaluation protocols. Tg negative patient sera were used to establish an upper reference limit (URL for the Elecsys Tg II assay. Results: Non-linearity, drift and carry-over according to CLSI EP10 and EP6 in a measuring range of 0.04–500 ng/mL were non-significant. Total precision according to CLSI EP5 was 10% at a Tg concentration of 0.08 ng/mL. A patient serum comparison performed according to a modified CLSI EP9 protocol showed a significant difference of a factor of approximately 1.4, despite using an identical CRM calibrator. The Elecsys Tg II assay measured Tg with a two-fold higher sensitivity than the Access2 assay. Finally, using human sera without Tg, an URL of 0.05 ng/mL was determined. Conclusions: In our hands the highly sensitive Elecsys Tg II assay shows a good analytical performance and a higher sensitivity compared to the Access2 Tg assay. An URL of 0.05 ng/mL for the Elecsys Tg II assay was determined which may improve the clinical utility of the assay for the detection of residual DTC or disease recurrence. Keywords: Thyroglobulin, Roche Elecsys Tg II assay, validation, reporting limit

  8. Perspectives on Regulatory T Cell Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst-Kepper, Michael; Kröger, Andrea; Garritsen, Henk S P; Buer, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Adoptive transfer in animal models clearly indicate an essential role of CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ regulatory T (T(reg)) cells in prevention and treatment of autoimmune and graft-versus-host disease. Thus, T(reg) cell therapies and development of drugs that specifically enhance T(reg) cell function and development represent promising tools to establish dominant tolerance. So far, lack of specific markers to differentiate human T(reg) cells from activated CD4+ CD25+ effector T cells, which also express FOXP3 at different levels, hampered such an approach. Recent identification of the orphan receptor glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant (GARP or LRRC32) as T(reg) cell-specific key molecule that dominantly controls FOXP3 via a positive feedback loop opens up new perspectives for molecular and cellular therapies. This brief review focuses on the role of GARP as a safeguard of a complex regulatory network of human T(reg) cells and its implications for regulatory T cell therapies in autoimmunity and graft-versus-host disease.

  9. Anti-regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    responses to tumours or inhibiting autoimmunity development. However, recent studies report the discovery of self-reactive pro-inflammatory T cells—termed anti-regulatory T cells (anti-Tregs)—that target immune-suppressive cells. Thus, regulatory cells can now be defined as both cells that suppress immune...... reactions as well as effector cells that counteract the effects of suppressor cells and support immune reactions. Self-reactive anti-Tregs have been described that specifically recognize human leukocyte antigen-restricted epitopes derived from proteins that are normally expressed by regulatory immune cells......Our initial understanding of immune-regulatory cells was based on the discovery of suppressor cells that assure peripheral T-cell tolerance and promote immune homeostasis. Research has particularly focused on the importance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) for immune modulation, e.g. directing host...

  10. Altered development of NKT cells, γδ T cells, CD8 T cells and NK cells in a PLZF deficient patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie Eidson

    Full Text Available In mice, the transcription factor, PLZF, controls the development of effector functions in invariant NKT cells and a subset of NKT cell-like, γδ T cells. Here, we show that in human lymphocytes, in addition to invariant NKT cells, PLZF was also expressed in a large percentage of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, PLZF was also found to be expressed in all γδ T cells and in all NK cells. Importantly, we show that in a donor lacking functional PLZF, all of these various lymphocyte populations were altered. Therefore, in contrast to mice, PLZF appears to control the development and/or function of a wide variety of human lymphocytes that represent more than 10% of the total PBMCs. Interestingly, the PLZF-expressing CD8+ T cell population was found to be expanded in the peripheral blood of patients with metastatic melanoma but was greatly diminished in patients with autoimmune disease.

  11. Unbiased analysis of TCRα/β chains at the single-cell level in human CD8+ T-cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoming; Saito, Masumichi; Sato, Yoshinori; Chikata, Takayuki; Naruto, Takuya; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Kobayashi, Eiji; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) α/β chains are expressed on the surface of CD8(+) T-cells and have been implicated in antigen recognition, activation, and proliferation. However, the methods for characterization of human TCRα/β chains have not been well established largely because of the complexity of their structures owing to the extensive genetic rearrangements that they undergo. Here we report the development of an integrated 5'-RACE and multiplex PCR method to amplify the full-length transcripts of TCRα/β at the single-cell level in human CD8(+) subsets, including naive, central memory, early effector memory, late effector memory, and effector phenotypic cells. Using this method, with an approximately 47% and 62% of PCR success rate for TCRα and for TCRβ chains, respectively, we were able to analyze more than 1,000 reads of transcripts of each TCR chain. Our comprehensive analysis revealed the following: (1) chimeric rearrangements of TCRδ-α, (2) control of TCRα/β transcription with multiple transcriptional initiation sites, (3) altered utilization of TCRα/β chains in CD8(+) subsets, and (4) strong association between the clonal size of TCRα/β chains and the effector phenotype of CD8(+) T-cells. Based on these findings, we conclude that our method is a useful tool to identify the dynamics of the TCRα/β repertoire, and provides new insights into the study of human TCRα/β chains.

  12. Bee venom enhances the differentiation of human regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramalho, I; Melo, A; Pedro, E; Barbosa, M M P; Victorino, R M M; Pereira Santos, M C; Sousa, A E

    2015-10-01

    Venom-specific immunotherapy (VIT) is well recognized by its efficacy, and compelling evidence implicates regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the underlying tolerogenic mechanisms. Additionally, hymenoptera venom has for a long time been claimed to modulate immunity. Here, we investigated the putative role of bee venom (Bv) in human FOXP3-expressing Treg homeostasis and differentiation, irrespective of the donors' allergic status. We found that Bv significantly enhanced the differentiation of FOXP3-expressing cells both from conventional naïve CD4 T cells and mature CD4 thymocytes, a property that may contribute to the VIT's capacity to expand circulating Tregs in allergic individuals. We expect that our data enlightening the Treg-mediated immunomodulatory properties of Bv regardless of TCR specificity, to have application in other allergies, as well as in other clinical settings, such as autoimmunity and transplantation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effective antigen presentation to helper T cells by human eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Ruhaifah K; Vickers, Mark A; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Hall, Andrew M; Barker, Robert N; Walsh, Garry M

    2016-12-01

    Although eosinophils are inflammatory cells, there is increasing attention on their immunomodulatory roles. For example, murine eosinophils can present antigen to CD4 + T helper (Th) cells, but it remains unclear whether human eosinophils also have this ability. This study determined whether human eosinophils present a range of antigens, including allergens, to activate Th cells, and characterized their expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules required for effective presentation. Human peripheral blood eosinophils purified from non-allergic donors were pulsed with the antigens house dust mite extract (HDM), Timothy Grass extract (TG) or Mycobacterium tuberculosis purified protein derivative (PPD), before co-culture with autologous CD4 + Th cells. Proliferative and cytokine responses were measured, with eosinophil expression of HLA-DR/DP/DQ and the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86 determined by flow cytometry. Eosinophils pulsed with HDM, TG or PPD drove Th cell proliferation, with the response strength dependent on antigen concentration. The cytokine responses varied with donor and antigen, and were not biased towards any particular Th subset, often including combinations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Eosinophils up-regulated surface expression of HLA-DR/DP/DQ, CD80, CD86 and CD40 in culture, increases that were sustained over 5 days when incubated with antigens, including HDM, or the major allergens it contains, Der p I or Der p II. Human eosinophils can, therefore, act as effective antigen-presenting cells to stimulate varied Th cell responses against a panel of antigens including HDM, TG or PPD, an ability that may help to determine the development of allergic disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. In vivo evidence for CD4+ and CD8+ suppressor T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, J.C.; Kong, Y.C.

    1991-01-01

    In several experimental autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), vaccination with attenuated autoantigen-specific T cells has provided protection against subsequent induction of disease. However, the mechanism(s) of vaccination-induced suppression remains to be clarified. Since the authors have previously shown that suppression generated by pretreatment with mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) or thyroid-stimulating hormone in EAT is mediated by CD4+, not CD8+, suppressor T cells, they examined the role of T cell subsets in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT. Mice were vaccinated with irradiated, MTg-primed, and MTg-activated spleen cells and then challenged. Pretreatment with these cells suppressed EAT induced by immunization with MTg and adjuvant, but not by adoptive transfer of thyroiditogenic cells, suggesting a mechanism of afferent suppression. The activation of suppressor mechanisms did not require CD8+ cells, since mice depleted of CD8+ cells before vaccination showed reduced EAT comparable to control vaccinated mice. Furthermore, depletion of either the CD4+ or the CD8+ subset after vaccination did not significantly abrogate suppression. However, suppression was eliminated by the depletion of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice. These results provide evidence for the cooperative effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT

  15. Microgravity modifies protein kinase C isoform translocation in the human monocytic cell line U937 and human peripheral blood T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Jason P.; Gaubert, Francois; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Schmitt, Didier; Hashemi, B. B. (Principal Investigator); Hughes-Fulford, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Individual protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms fulfill distinct roles in the regulation of the commitment to differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in both monocytes and T-cells. The human monocyte like cell line U937 and T-cells were exposed to microgravity, during spaceflight and the translocation (a critical step in PKC signaling) of individual isoforms to cell particulate fraction examined. PKC activating phorbol esters induced a rapid translocation of several PKC isoforms to the particulate fraction of U937 monocytes under terrestrial gravity (1 g) conditions in the laboratory. In microgravity, the translocation of PKC beta II, delta, and epsilon in response to phorbol esters was reduced in microgravity compared to 1 g, but was enhanced in weak hypergravity (1.4 g). All isoforms showed a net increase in particulate PKC following phorbol ester stimulation, except PKC delta which showed a net decrease in microgravity. In T-cells, phorbol ester induced translocation of PKC delta was reduced in microgravity, compared to 1 g, while PKC beta II translocation was not significantly different at the two g-levels. These data show that microgravity differentially alters the translocation of individual PKC isoforms in monocytes and T-cells, thus providing a partial explanation for the modifications previously observed in the activation of these cell types under microgravity.

  16. Leukemia-Initiating Cells in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Shi Hao; Bertulfo, Fatima Carla; Sanda, Takaomi

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of immature T-cell precursors. T-ALL has many similar pathophysiological features to acute myeloid leukemia, which has been extensively studied in the establishment of the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, but the CSC concept in T-ALL is still debatable. Although leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), which can generate leukemia in a xenograft setting, have been found in both human T-AL...

  17. GM-CSF production allows the identification of immunoprevalent antigens recognized by human CD4+ T cells following smallpox vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Judkowski

    Full Text Available The threat of bioterrorism with smallpox and the broad use of vaccinia vectors for other vaccines have led to the resurgence in the study of vaccinia immunological memory. The importance of the role of CD4+ T cells in the control of vaccinia infection is well known. However, more CD8+ than CD4+ T cell epitopes recognized by human subjects immunized with vaccinia virus have been reported. This could be, in part, due to the fact that most of the studies that have identified human CD4+ specific protein-derived fragments or peptides have used IFN-γ production to evaluate vaccinia specific T cell responses. Based on these findings, we reasoned that analyzing a large panel of cytokines would permit us to generate a more complete analysis of the CD4 T cell responses. The results presented provide clear evidence that TNF-α is an excellent readout of vaccinia specificity and that other cytokines such as GM-CSF can be used to evaluate the reactivity of CD4+ T cells in response to vaccinia antigens. Furthermore, using these cytokines as readout of vaccinia specificity, we present the identification of novel peptides from immunoprevalent vaccinia proteins recognized by CD4+ T cells derived from smallpox vaccinated human subjects. In conclusion, we describe a "T cell-driven" methodology that can be implemented to determine the specificity of the T cell response upon vaccination or infection. Together, the single pathogen in vitro stimulation, the selection of CD4+ T cells specific to the pathogen by limiting dilution, the evaluation of pathogen specificity by detecting multiple cytokines, and the screening of the clones with synthetic combinatorial libraries, constitutes a novel and valuable approach for the elucidation of human CD4+ T cell specificity in response to large pathogens.

  18. Histone methylation mediates plasticity of human FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells by modulating signature gene expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haiqi; Ni, Bing; Tian, Yi; Tian, Zhiqiang; Chen, Yanke; Liu, Zhengwen; Yang, Xiaomei; Lv, Yi; Zhang, Yong

    2014-03-01

    CD4(+) FOXP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells constitute a heterogeneous and plastic T-cell lineage that plays a pivotal role in maintaining immune homeostasis and immune tolerance. However, the fate of human Treg cells after loss of FOXP3 expression and the epigenetic mechanisms contributing to such a phenotype switch remain to be fully elucidated. In the current study, we demonstrate that human CD4(+) CD25(high) CD127(low/-) Treg cells convert to two subpopulations with distinctive FOXP3(+) and FOXP3(-) phenotypes following in vitro culture with anti-CD3/CD28 and interleukin-2. Digital gene expression analysis showed that upon in vitro expansion, human Treg cells down-regulated Treg cell signature genes, such as FOXP3, CTLA4, ICOS, IKZF2 and LRRC32, but up-regulated a set of T helper lineage-associated genes, especially T helper type 2 (Th2)-associated, such as GATA3, GFI1 and IL13. Subsequent chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing of these subpopulations yielded genome-wide maps of their H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 profiles. Surprisingly, reprogramming of Treg cells was associated with differential histone modifications, as evidenced by decreased abundance of permissive H3K4me3 within the down-regulated Treg cell signature genes, such as FOXP3, CTLA4 and LRRC32 loci, and increased abundance of H3K4me3 within the Th2-associated genes, such as IL4 and IL5; however, the H3K27me3 modification profile was not significantly different between the two subpopulations. In conclusion, this study revealed that loss of FOXP3 expression from human Treg cells during in vitro expansion can induce reprogramming to a T helper cell phenotype with a gene expression signature dominated by Th2 lineage-associated genes, and that this cell type conversion may be mediated by histone methylation events. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Histone methylation mediates plasticity of human FOXP3+ regulatory T cells by modulating signature gene expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haiqi; Ni, Bing; Tian, Yi; Tian, Zhiqiang; Chen, Yanke; Liu, Zhengwen; Yang, Xiaomei; Lv, Yi; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    CD4+ FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells constitute a heterogeneous and plastic T-cell lineage that plays a pivotal role in maintaining immune homeostasis and immune tolerance. However, the fate of human Treg cells after loss of FOXP3 expression and the epigenetic mechanisms contributing to such a phenotype switch remain to be fully elucidated. In the current study, we demonstrate that human CD4+ CD25high CD127low/− Treg cells convert to two subpopulations with distinctive FOXP3+ and FOXP3− phenotypes following in vitro culture with anti-CD3/CD28 and interleukin-2. Digital gene expression analysis showed that upon in vitro expansion, human Treg cells down-regulated Treg cell signature genes, such as FOXP3, CTLA4, ICOS, IKZF2 and LRRC32, but up-regulated a set of T helper lineage-associated genes, especially T helper type 2 (Th2)-associated, such as GATA3, GFI1 and IL13. Subsequent chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing of these subpopulations yielded genome-wide maps of their H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 profiles. Surprisingly, reprogramming of Treg cells was associated with differential histone modifications, as evidenced by decreased abundance of permissive H3K4me3 within the down-regulated Treg cell signature genes, such as FOXP3, CTLA4 and LRRC32 loci, and increased abundance of H3K4me3 within the Th2-associated genes, such as IL4 and IL5; however, the H3K27me3 modification profile was not significantly different between the two subpopulations. In conclusion, this study revealed that loss of FOXP3 expression from human Treg cells during in vitro expansion can induce reprogramming to a T helper cell phenotype with a gene expression signature dominated by Th2 lineage-associated genes, and that this cell type conversion may be mediated by histone methylation events. PMID:24152290

  20. FOXP3 renders activated human regulatory T cells resistant to restimulation-induced cell death by suppressing SAP expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Gil; Voss, Kelsey; Yan, Toria F; Kim, Yong Chan; Kortum, Robert L; Scott, David W; Snow, Andrew L

    2018-05-01

    Restimulation-induced cell death (RICD) is an apoptotic program that regulates effector T cell expansion, triggered by repeated stimulation through the T cell receptor (TCR) in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2). Although CD4 + regulatory T cells (Tregs) consume IL-2 and experience frequent TCR stimulation, they are highly resistant to RICD. Resistance in Tregs is dependent on the forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) transcription factor, although the mechanism remains unclear. T cells from patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP-1), that lack the adaptor molecule SLAM-associated protein (SAP), are also resistant to RICD. Here we demonstrate that normal Tregs express very low levels of SAP compared to conventional T cells. FOXP3 reduces SAP expression by directly binding to and repressing the SH2D1A (SAP) promoter. Indeed, ectopic SAP expression restores RICD sensitivity in human FOXP3 + Tregs. Our findings illuminate the mechanism behind FOXP3-mediated RICD resistance in Tregs, providing new insight into their long-term persistence. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Presentation of an immunodominant immediate-early CD8+ T cell epitope resists human cytomegalovirus immunoevasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Ameres

    Full Text Available Control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV depends on CD8+ T cell responses that are shaped by an individual's repertoire of MHC molecules. MHC class I presentation is modulated by a set of HCMV-encoded proteins. Here we show that HCMV immunoevasins differentially impair T cell recognition of epitopes from the same viral antigen, immediate-early 1 (IE-1, that are presented by different MHC class I allotypes. In the presence of immunoevasins, HLA-A- and HLA-B-restricted T cell clones were ineffective, but HLA-C*0702-restricted T cell clones recognized and killed infected cells. Resistance of HLA-C*0702 to viral immunoevasins US2 and US11 was mediated by the alpha3 domain and C-terminal region of the HLA heavy chain. In healthy donors, HLA-C*0702-restricted T cells dominated the T cell response to IE-1. The same HLA-C allotype specifically protected infected cells from attack by NK cells that expressed a corresponding HLA-C-specific KIR. Thus, allotype-specific viral immunoevasion allows HCMV to escape control by NK cells and HLA-A- and HLA-B-restricted T cells, while the virus becomes selectively vulnerable to an immunodominant population of HLA-C-restricted T cells. Our work identifies a T cell population that may be of particular efficiency in HCMV-specific immunotherapy.

  2. Human CD3+ T-Cells with the Anti-ERBB2 Chimeric Antigen Receptor Exhibit Efficient Targeting and Induce Apoptosis in ERBB2 Overexpressing Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munisvaradass, Rusheni; Kumar, Suresh; Govindasamy, Chandramohan; Alnumair, Khalid S.; Mok, Pooi Ling

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a common malignancy among women. The innate and adaptive immune responses failed to be activated owing to immune modulation in the tumour microenvironment. Decades of scientific study links the overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (ERBB2) antigen with aggressive tumours. The Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) coding for specific tumour-associated antigens could initiate intrinsic T-cell signalling, inducing T-cell activation, and cytotoxic activity without the need for major histocompatibility complex recognition. This renders CAR as a potentially universal immunotherapeutic option. Herein, we aimed to establish CAR in CD3+ T-cells, isolated from human peripheral blood mononucleated cells that could subsequently target and induce apoptosis in the ERBB2 overexpressing human breast cancer cell line, SKBR3. Constructed CAR was inserted into a lentiviral plasmid containing a green fluorescent protein tag and produced as lentiviral particles that were used to transduce activated T-cells. Transduced CAR-T cells were then primed with SKBR3 cells to evaluate their functionality. Results showed increased apoptosis in SKBR3 cells co-cultured with CAR-T cells compared to the control (non–transduced T-cells). This study demonstrates that CAR introduction helps overcome the innate limitations of native T-cells leading to cancer cell apoptosis. We recommend future studies should focus on in vivo cytotoxicity of CAR-T cells against ERBB2 expressing tumours. PMID:28885562

  3. Estimating immunoregulatory gene networks in human herpesvirus type 6-infected T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaku, Tomoiku; Ohyashiki, Junko H.; Zhang, Yu; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2005-01-01

    The immune response to viral infection involves complex network of dynamic gene and protein interactions. We present here the dynamic gene network of the host immune response during human herpesvirus type 6 (HHV-6) infection in an adult T-cell leukemia cell line. Using a pathway-focused oligonucleotide DNA microarray, we found a possible association between chemokine genes regulating Th1/Th2 balance and genes regulating T-cell proliferation during HHV-6B infection. Gene network analysis using an integrated comprehensive workbench, VoyaGene, revealed that a gene encoding a TEC-family kinase, ITK, might be a putative modulator in the host immune response against HHV-6B infection. We conclude that Th2-dominated inflammatory reaction in host cells may play an important role in HHV-6B-infected T cells, thereby suggesting the possibility that ITK might be a therapeutic target in diseases related to dysregulation of Th1/Th2 balance. This study describes a novel approach to find genes related with the complex host-virus interaction using microarray data employing the Bayesian statistical framework

  4. Dichotomy in the human CD4+ T-cell response to Leishmania parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, M; Kurtzhals, J A; Kharazmi, A

    1994-01-01

    Leishmania parasites cause human diseases ranging from self-healing cutaneous ulcers to fatal systemic infections. In addition, many individuals become infected without developing disease. In mice the two subsets of CD4+ T cells, Th1 and Th2, have different effects on the outcome of experimental...... in humans, and that the balance between subsets of parasite-specific T cells may play an important regulatory role in determining the outcome of the infections....

  5. Human skin is protected by four functionally and phenotypically discrete populations of resident and recirculating memory T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watanabe, Rei; Gehad, Ahmed; Yang, Chao; Scott, Laura L.; Teague, Jessica E.; Schlapbach, Christoph; Elco, Christopher P.; Huang, Victor; Matos, Tiago R.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Clark, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    The skin of an adult human contains about 20 billion memory T cells. Epithelial barrier tissues are infiltrated by a combination of resident and recirculating T cells in mice, but the relative proportions and functional activities of resident versus recirculating T cells have not been evaluated in

  6. GADS is required for TCR-mediated calcium influx and cytokine release, but not cellular adhesion, in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Mahmood Y; Zhang, Elizabeth Y; Dinkel, Brittney; Hardy, Daimon; Yankee, Thomas M; Houtman, Jon C D

    2015-04-01

    GRB2 related adaptor protein downstream of Shc (GADS) is a member of the GRB2 family of adaptors and is critical for TCR-induced signaling. The current model is that GADS recruits SLP-76 to the LAT complex, which facilitates the phosphorylation of SLP-76, the activation of PLC-γ1, T cell adhesion and cytokine production. However, this model is largely based on studies of disruption of the GADS/SLP-76 interaction and murine T cell differentiation in GADS deficient mice. The role of GADS in mediating TCR-induced signals in human CD4+ T cells has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we have suppressed the expression of GADS in human CD4+ HuT78 T cells. GADS deficient HuT78 T cells displayed similar levels of TCR-induced SLP-76 and PLC-γ1 phosphorylation but exhibited substantial decrease in TCR-induced IL-2 and IFN-γ release. The defect in cytokine production occurred because of impaired calcium mobilization due to reduced recruitment of SLP-76 and PLC-γ1 to the LAT complex. Surprisingly, both GADS deficient HuT78 and GADS deficient primary murine CD8+ T cells had similar TCR-induced adhesion when compared to control T cells. Overall, our results show that GADS is required for calcium influx and cytokine production, but not cellular adhesion, in human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that the current model for T cell regulation by GADS is incomplete. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional dichotomy between NKG2D and CD28-mediated co-stimulation in human CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalakannan Rajasekaran

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Both CD28 and NKG2D can function as co-stimulatory receptors in human CD8+ T cells. However, their independent functional contributions in distinct CD8+ T cell subsets are not well understood. In this study, CD8+ T cells in human peripheral blood- and lung-derived lymphocytes were analyzed for CD28 and NKG2D expression and function. We found a higher level of CD28 expression in PBMC-derived naïve (CD45RA+CD27+ and memory (CD45RA-CD27+ CD8+ T cells (CD28Hi, while its expression was significantly lower in effector (CD45RA+CD27- CD8+ T cells (CD28Lo. Irrespective of the differences in the CD28 levels, NKG2D expression was comparable in all three CD8+ T cell subsets. CD28 and NKG2D expressions followed similar patterns in human lung-resident GILGFVFTL/HLA-A2-pentamer positive CD8+ T cells. Co-stimulation of CD28Lo effector T cells via NKG2D significantly increased IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. On the contrary, irrespective of its comparable levels, NKG2D-mediated co-stimulation failed to augment IFN-γ and TNF-α production in CD28Hi naïve/memory T cells. Additionally, CD28-mediated co-stimulation was obligatory for IL-2 generation and thereby its production was limited only to the CD28Hi naïve/memory subsets. MICA, a ligand for NKG2D was abundantly expressed in the tracheal epithelial cells, validating the use of NKG2D as the major co-stimulatory receptor by tissue-resident CD8+ effector T cells. Based on these findings, we conclude that NKG2D may provide an expanded level of co-stimulation to tissue-residing effector CD8+ T cells. Thus, incorporation of co-stimulation via NKG2D in addition to CD28 is essential to activate tumor or tissue-infiltrating effector CD8+ T cells. However, boosting a recall immune response via memory CD8+ T cells or vaccination to stimulate naïve CD8+ T cells would require CD28-mediated co-stimulation.

  8. Asymptomatic memory CD8+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif Azam; Srivastava, Ruchi; Lopes, Patricia Prado; Wang, Christine; Pham, Thanh T; Cochrane, Justin; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Gutierrez, Lucas; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    Generation and maintenance of high quantity and quality memory CD8+ T cells determine the level of protection from viral, bacterial, and parasitic re-infections, and hence constitutes a primary goal for T cell epitope-based human vaccines and immunotherapeutics. Phenotypically and functionally characterizing memory CD8+ T cells that provide protection against herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infections, which cause blinding ocular herpes, genital herpes, and oro-facial herpes, is critical for better vaccine design. We have recently categorized 2 new major sub-populations of memory symptomatic and asymptomatic CD8+ T cells based on their phenotype, protective vs. pathogenic function, and anatomical locations. In this report we are discussing a new direction in developing T cell-based human herpes vaccines and immunotherapeutics based on the emerging new concept of “symptomatic and asymptomatic memory CD8+ T cells.” PMID:24499824

  9. Humanized Mouse Model of Skin Inflammation Is Characterized by Disturbed Keratinocyte Differentiation and Influx of IL-17A Producing T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Vivian L.; Keijsers, Romy R. M. C.; van de Kerkhof, Peter C. M.; Seyger, Marieke M. B.; Fasse, Esther; Svensson, Lars; Latta, Markus; Norsgaard, Hanne; Labuda, Tord; Hupkens, Pieter; van Erp, Piet E. J.; Joosten, Irma; Koenen, Hans J. P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Humanized mouse models offer a challenging possibility to study human cell function in vivo. In the huPBL-SCID-huSkin allograft model human skin is transplanted onto immunodeficient mice and allowed to heal. Thereafter allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells are infused intra peritoneally to induce T cell mediated inflammation and microvessel destruction of the human skin. This model has great potential for in vivo study of human immune cells in (skin) inflammatory processes and for preclinical screening of systemically administered immunomodulating agents. Here we studied the inflammatory skin response of human keratinocytes and human T cells and the concomitant systemic human T cell response. As new findings in the inflamed human skin of the huPBL-SCID-huSkin model we here identified: 1. Parameters of dermal pathology that enable precise quantification of the local skin inflammatory response exemplified by acanthosis, increased expression of human β-defensin-2, Elafin, K16, Ki67 and reduced expression of K10 by microscopy and immunohistochemistry. 2. Induction of human cytokines and chemokines using quantitative real-time PCR. 3. Influx of inflammation associated IL-17A-producing human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as immunoregulatory CD4+Foxp3+ cells using immunohistochemistry and -fluorescence, suggesting that active immune regulation is taking place locally in the inflamed skin. 4. Systemic responses that revealed activated and proliferating human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells that acquired homing marker expression of CD62L and CLA. Finally, we demonstrated the value of the newly identified parameters by showing significant changes upon systemic treatment with the T cell inhibitory agents cyclosporine-A and rapamycin. In summary, here we equipped the huPBL-SCID-huSkin humanized mouse model with relevant tools not only to quantify the inflammatory dermal response, but also to monitor the peripheral immune status. This combined approach will gain our

  10. Phenotypic and functional characterization of human memory T cell responses to Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patcharaporn Tippayawat

    Full Text Available Infection with the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important cause of community-acquired lethal sepsis in endemic regions in southeast Asia and northern Australia and is increasingly reported in other tropical areas. In animal models, production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma is critical for resistance, but in humans the characteristics of IFN-gamma production and the bacterial antigens that are recognized by the cell-mediated immune response have not been defined.Peripheral blood from 133 healthy individuals who lived in the endemic area and had no history of melioidosis, 60 patients who had recovered from melioidosis, and 31 other patient control subjects were stimulated by whole bacteria or purified bacterial proteins in vitro, and IFN-gamma responses were analyzed by ELISPOT and flow cytometry.B. pseudomallei was a potent activator of human peripheral blood NK cells for innate production of IFN-gamma. In addition, healthy individuals with serological evidence of exposure to B. pseudomallei and patients recovered from active melioidosis developed CD4(+ (and CD8(+ T cells that recognized whole bacteria and purified proteins LolC, OppA, and PotF, members of the B. pseudomallei ABC transporter family. This response was primarily mediated by terminally differentiated T cells of the effector-memory (T(EMRA phenotype and correlated with the titer of anti-B. pseudomallei antibodies in the serum.Individuals living in a melioidosis-endemic region show clear evidence of T cell priming for the ability to make IFN-gamma that correlates with their serological status. The ability to detect T cell responses to defined B. pseudomallei proteins in large numbers of individuals now provides the opportunity to screen candidate antigens for inclusion in protein or polysaccharide-conjugate subunit vaccines against this important but neglected disease.

  11. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (T FH ) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of T FH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on T FH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate T FH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing T FH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138 + plasma and IgD - CD27 + memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented T FH cell development. Added to T FH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3 + CXCR5 + PD-1 + follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on T FH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control T FH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the T FH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the T FH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Murine leukemia virus vector integration favors promoter regions and regional hot spots in a human T-cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukahara, Tomonori; Agawa, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Sayori; Matsuda, Mizuho; Ueno, Shuichi; Yamashita, Yuki; Yamada, Koichiro; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Kojima, Katsuhiko; Takeshita, Toshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Genomic analysis of integration will be important in evaluating the safety of human gene therapy with retroviral vectors. Here, we investigated MLV vector integration sites in human T-cells, since they are amenable to gene transfer studies, and have been used therapeutically in clinical trials. We mapped 340 MLV vector integration sites in the infected human T-cell clones we established. The data showed that MLV preferred integration near the transcription start sites (±5 kb), near CpG islands (±1 kb), and within the first intron of RefSeq genes. We also identified MLV integration hot spots that contained three or more integrations within a 100 kb region. RT-PCR revealed that mRNA-levels of T-cell clones that contained MLV integrations near transcription start sites or introns were dysregulated compared to the uninfected cells. These studies help define the profile of MLV integration in T-cells and the risks associated with MLV-based gene therapy

  13. RUNX1 promotes cell growth in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia by transcriptional regulation of key target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Catherine E; Gusscott, Samuel; Wong, Rachel J; Shevchuk, Olena O; Rana, Gurneet; Giambra, Vincenzo; Tyshchenko, Kateryna; Islam, Rashedul; Hirst, Martin; Weng, Andrew P

    2018-05-04

    RUNX1 is frequently mutated in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). The spectrum of RUNX1 mutations has led to the notion that it acts as a tumor suppressor in this context; however, other studies have placed RUNX1 along with transcription factors TAL1 and NOTCH1 as core drivers of an oncogenic transcriptional program. To reconcile these divergent roles, we knocked down RUNX1 in human T-ALL cell lines and deleted Runx1 or Cbfb in primary mouse T-cell leukemias. RUNX1 depletion consistently resulted in reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. RUNX1 upregulated variable sets of target genes in each cell line, but consistently included a core set of oncogenic effectors including IGF1R and NRAS. Our results support the conclusion that RUNX1 has a net positive effect on cell growth in the context of established T-ALL. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. γδ T Cells Support Pancreatic Oncogenesis by Restraining αβ T Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Donnele; Zambirinis, Constantinos Pantelis; Seifert, Lena; Akkad, Neha; Mohan, Navyatha; Werba, Gregor; Barilla, Rocky; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu Raj Kumar; Avanzi, Antonina; Tippens, Daniel; Narayanan, Rajkishen; Jang, Jung-Eun; Newman, Elliot; Pillarisetty, Venu Gopal; Dustin, Michael Loran; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Hajdu, Cristina; Miller, George

    2016-09-08

    Inflammation is paramount in pancreatic oncogenesis. We identified a uniquely activated γδT cell population, which constituted ∼40% of tumor-infiltrating T cells in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Recruitment and activation of γδT cells was contingent on diverse chemokine signals. Deletion, depletion, or blockade of γδT cell recruitment was protective against PDA and resulted in increased infiltration, activation, and Th1 polarization of αβT cells. Although αβT cells were dispensable to outcome in PDA, they became indispensable mediators of tumor protection upon γδT cell ablation. PDA-infiltrating γδT cells expressed high levels of exhaustion ligands and thereby negated adaptive anti-tumor immunity. Blockade of PD-L1 in γδT cells enhanced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell infiltration and immunogenicity and induced tumor protection suggesting that γδT cells are critical sources of immune-suppressive checkpoint ligands in PDA. We describe γδT cells as central regulators of effector T cell activation in cancer via novel cross-talk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Unbiased analysis of TCRα/β chains at the single-cell level in human CD8+ T-cell subsets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Sun

    Full Text Available T-cell receptor (TCR α/β chains are expressed on the surface of CD8(+ T-cells and have been implicated in antigen recognition, activation, and proliferation. However, the methods for characterization of human TCRα/β chains have not been well established largely because of the complexity of their structures owing to the extensive genetic rearrangements that they undergo. Here we report the development of an integrated 5'-RACE and multiplex PCR method to amplify the full-length transcripts of TCRα/β at the single-cell level in human CD8(+ subsets, including naive, central memory, early effector memory, late effector memory, and effector phenotypic cells. Using this method, with an approximately 47% and 62% of PCR success rate for TCRα and for TCRβ chains, respectively, we were able to analyze more than 1,000 reads of transcripts of each TCR chain. Our comprehensive analysis revealed the following: (1 chimeric rearrangements of TCRδ-α, (2 control of TCRα/β transcription with multiple transcriptional initiation sites, (3 altered utilization of TCRα/β chains in CD8(+ subsets, and (4 strong association between the clonal size of TCRα/β chains and the effector phenotype of CD8(+ T-cells. Based on these findings, we conclude that our method is a useful tool to identify the dynamics of the TCRα/β repertoire, and provides new insights into the study of human TCRα/β chains.

  16. T helper-independent activation of human CD8+ cells: the role of CD28 costimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gool, S W; Zhang, Y; Kasran, A; de Boer, M; Ceuppens, J L

    1996-07-01

    The concept that activation of MHC class I-restricted CD8+ cells entirely depends on help from MHC class II-restricted CD4+ T cells has recently been supplemented with an alternative model in which CD8+ cells can directly be activated by MHC class I-expressing professional antigen-presenting cells (APC), which are able to deliver an accessory signal. The authors analysed the role of CD28-mediated costimulation for T helper cell-independent activation of purified human CD8+ T cells in two different in vitro models. Freshly isolated CD8+ cells could be activated (proliferation, IL-2 production and cytotoxic activity) by anti-CD3-presenting Fc gamma R+ mouse cells transfected with the human CD28 ligand, CD80, as the only accessory signal. On the other hand, activation of CD8+ cells by allogeneic MHC class I on EBV-transformed B cells, which express two different CD28 ligands, CD80 and CD86, also proceeded very efficiently (proliferation, cytotoxic activity and CD25 expression), but was either not, or only partially, blocked by anti-CD80 and anti-CD86 MoAb or CTLA-4Ig. This indicates that other costimulatory signals are also effective, and that CD28 triggering is not absolutely required for initial T-cell activation. CsA and CD80/CD86-blocking agents were synergistic in completely inhibiting activation of CD8+ cells in the MLR with allogeneic B-cell lines. This combination also induced non-responsiveness of CD8+ cells upon restimulation in the absence of blocking agents. Therefore, although professional APC can apparently provide multiple costimulatory signals for direct activation of CD8+ T cells, the signal derived from CD80/CD86 is unique in providing CsA-resistance.

  17. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax and cell cycle progression: role of cyclin D-cdk and p110Rb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuveut, C; Low, K G; Maldarelli, F; Schmitt, I; Majone, F; Grassmann, R; Jeang, K T

    1998-06-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 is etiologically linked to the development of adult T-cell leukemia and various human neuropathies. The Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I has been implicated in cellular transformation. Like other oncoproteins, such as Myc, Jun, and Fos, Tax is a transcriptional activator. How it mechanistically dysregulates the cell cycle is unclear. Previously, it was suggested that Tax affects cell-phase transition by forming a direct protein-protein complex with p16(INK4a), thereby inactivating an inhibitor of G1-to-S-phase progression. Here we show that, in T cells deleted for p16(INK4a), Tax can compel an egress of cells from G0/G1 into S despite the absence of serum. We also show that in undifferentiated myocytes, expression of Tax represses cellular differentiation. In both settings, Tax expression was found to increase cyclin D-cdk activity and to enhance pRb phosphorylation. In T cells, a Tax-associated increase in steady-state E2F2 protein was also documented. In searching for a molecular explanation for these observations, we found that Tax forms a protein-protein complex with cyclin D3, whereas a point-mutated and transcriptionally inert Tax mutant failed to form such a complex. Interestingly, expression of wild-type Tax protein in cells was also correlated with the induction of a novel hyperphosphorylated cyclin D3 protein. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tax might directly influence cyclin D-cdk activity and function, perhaps by a route independent of cdk inhibitors such as p16(INK4a).

  18. Human multipotent adult progenitor cells are nonimmunogenic and exert potent immunomodulatory effects on alloreactive T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Sandra A; Pinxteren, Jef; Roobrouck, Valerie D; Luyckx, Ariane; van't Hof, Wouter; Deans, Robert; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Waer, Mark; Billiau, An D; Van Gool, Stefaan W

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) are bone marrow-derived nonhematopoietic stem cells with a broad differentiation potential and extensive expansion capacity. A comparative study between human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human MAPCs (hMAPCs) has shown that hMAPCs have clearly distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics from hMSCs. In particular, hMAPCs express lower levels of MHC class I than hMSCs and cannot only differentiate into typical mesenchymal cell types but can also differentiate in vitro and in vivo into functional endothelial cells. The use of hMSCs as cellular immunomodulatory stem cell products gained much interest since their immunomodulatory capacities in vitro became evident over the last decade. Currently, the clinical grade stem cell product of hMAPCs is already used in clinical trials to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), as well as for the treatment of acute myocardial infarct, ischemic stroke, and Crohn's disease. Therefore, we studied the immune phenotype, immunogenicity, and immunosuppressive effect of hMAPCs in vitro. We demonstrated that hMAPCs are nonimmunogenic for T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. In addition, hMAPCs exert strong immunosuppressive effects on T-cell alloreactivity and on T-cell proliferation induced by mitogens and recall antigens. This immunomodulatory effect was not MHC restricted, which makes off-the-shelf use promising. The immunosuppressive effect of hMAPCs is partially mediated via soluble factors and dependent on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity. At last, we isolated hMAPCs, the clinical grade stem cell product of hMAPCs, named MultiStem, and hMSCs from one single donor and observed that both the immunogenicity and the immunosuppressive capacities of all three stem cell products are comparable in vitro. In conclusion, hMAPCs have potent immunomodulatory properties in vitro and can serve as a valuable cell source for the clinical use of immunomodulatory cellular

  19. Lysis of cells infected with typhus group rickettsiae by a human cytotoxic T cell clone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, M.; Robbins, F.; Hartzman, R.J.; Dasch, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Cytolytic human T cells clones generated in response to the intracellular bacterium Rickettsia typhi were characterized. Growing clones were tested for their ability to proliferate specifically in response to antigens derived from typhus group rickettsiae or to lyse targets infected with R. typhi or Rickettsia prowazekii, as measured by 51 Cr-release from target cells. Two clones were able to lyse targets infected with typhus group rickettsiae. One of these clones was more fully characterized because of its rapid growth characteristics. This cytolytic clone was capable of lysing an autologous infected target as well as a target matched for class I and II histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA). It was not capable, however, of lysing either a target mismatched for both class I and II HLA or a target partially matched for class I HLA. In addition, the clone exhibited specificity in that it was able to lyse an autologous target infected with typhus group rickettsiae, but did not lyse an autologous target infected with an antigenically distinct rickettsial species, Rickettsia tsutsugamushi. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that cells infected with intracellular bacteria can be lysed by human cytotoxic T lymphocytes

  20. Antigen-specific T8+ human clone of cells with a nonspecific augmenting function on the T4 cell-B cell helper interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brines, R.D.; Sia, D.Y.; Lehner, T.

    1987-01-01

    The authors isolated a T8 + T3 + Ia + clone of cells from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy subject. The clone was expanded and maintained with autologous feed cells, interleukin 2, and a streptococcal antigen. The T8 + clone of cells responded specifically to the streptococcal antigen, in the absence of accessory cells,and released a soluble factor. Both the cloned cells and the corresponding soluble factor expressed augmenting helper but not suppressor activity. The augmenting helper activity for B cell antibody synthesis was demonstrable only in the presence of autologous T 4 cells. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure antibodies. Although stimulation of the T8 + cloned cells was antigen-specific, the resulting soluble factor elicited nonspecific antibody synthesis in the presence of T4 and B cells. The T8 + cloned cell-derived factor was adsorbed by B cells but not by T4 cells. Preliminary studies suggest that the factor has the properties of a B cell growth factor. They suggest that the T8 + population consists of functionally heterogeneous cell subsets, some that have suppressor function and others that augment the T4 + helper-inducer activity in B cell antibody synthesis

  1. Engineering HIV-resistant human CD4+ T cells with CXCR4-specific zinc-finger nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig B Wilen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 entry requires the cell surface expression of CD4 and either the CCR5 or CXCR4 coreceptors on host cells. Individuals homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 polymorphism do not express CCR5 and are protected from infection by CCR5-tropic (R5 virus strains. As an approach to inactivating CCR5, we introduced CCR5-specific zinc-finger nucleases into human CD4+ T cells prior to adoptive transfer, but the need to protect cells from virus strains that use CXCR4 (X4 in place of or in addition to CCR5 (R5X4 remains. Here we describe engineering a pair of zinc finger nucleases that, when introduced into human T cells, efficiently disrupt cxcr4 by cleavage and error-prone non-homologous DNA end-joining. The resulting cells proliferated normally and were resistant to infection by X4-tropic HIV-1 strains. CXCR4 could also be inactivated in ccr5Δ32 CD4+ T cells, and we show that such cells were resistant to all strains of HIV-1 tested. Loss of CXCR4 also provided protection from X4 HIV-1 in a humanized mouse model, though this protection was lost over time due to the emergence of R5-tropic viral mutants. These data suggest that CXCR4-specific ZFNs may prove useful in establishing resistance to CXCR4-tropic HIV for autologous transplant in HIV-infected individuals.

  2. Vaccination targeting human HER3 alters the phenotype of infiltrating T cells and responses to immune checkpoint inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Morse, Michael A; Hobeika, Amy; Diniz, Marcio A; Gwin, William R; Hartman, Zachary; Wei, Junping; Guo, Hongtao; Yang, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Cong-Xiao; Kaneko, Kensuke; Broadwater, Gloria; Lyerly, H Kim

    2017-01-01

    Expression of human epidermal growth factor family member 3 (HER3), a critical heterodimerization partner with EGFR and HER2, promotes more aggressive biology in breast and other epithelial malignancies. As such, inhibiting HER3 could have broad applicability to the treatment of EGFR- and HER2-driven tumors. Although lack of a functional kinase domain limits the use of receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, HER3 contains antigenic targets for T cells and antibodies. Using novel human HER3 transgenic mouse models of breast cancer, we demonstrate that immunization with recombinant adenoviral vectors encoding full length human HER3 (Ad-HER3-FL) induces HER3-specific T cells and antibodies, alters the T cell infiltrate in tumors, and influences responses to immune checkpoint inhibitions. Both preventative and therapeutic Ad-HER3-FL immunization delayed tumor growth but were associated with both intratumoral PD-1 expressing CD8 + T cells and regulatory CD4 + T cell infiltrates. Immune checkpoint inhibition with either anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies increased intratumoral CD8 + T cell infiltration and eliminated tumor following preventive vaccination with Ad-HER3-FL vaccine. The combination of dual PD-1/PD-L1 and CTLA4 blockade slowed the growth of tumor in response to Ad-HER3-FL in the therapeutic model. We conclude that HER3-targeting vaccines activate HER3-specific T cells and induce anti-HER3 specific antibodies, which alters the intratumoral T cell infiltrate and responses to immune checkpoint inhibition.

  3. Tributyltin (TBT) and Dibutyltin (DBT) Alter Secretion of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNFα) from Human Natural Killer (NK) Cells and a Mixture of T cells and NK Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Kelsi; Hurd-Brown, Tasia; Whalen, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Butyltins (BTs) have been in widespread use. Tributyltin (TBT) has been used as a biocide in a variety of applications and is found in human blood samples. Dibutyltin (DBT) has been used as a stabilizer in polyvinyl chloride plastics and as a de-worming agent in poultry. DBT, like TBT, is found in human blood. Human natural killer (NK) cells are the earliest defense against tumors and viral infections and secrete the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha (α). TNFα is an important regulator of adaptive and innate immune responses. TNFα promotes inflammation and an association between malignant transformation and inflammation has been established. Previously, we have shown that TBT and DBT were able to interfere with the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor target cells. Here we show that BTs alter cytokine secretion by NK cells as well as a mixture of T and NK lymphocytes (T/NK cells). We examined 24 h, 48 h, and 6 day exposures to TBT (200- 2.5 nM) and DBT (5- 0.05 µM) on TNFα secretion by highly enriched human NK cells and T/NK cells. The results indicate that TBT (200 - 2.5 nM) decreased TNFα secretion from NK cells. In the T/NK cells 200 nM TBT decreased secretion while 100-5 nM TBT increased secretion of TNFα. NK cells or T/NK cells exposed to higher concentrations of DBT showed decreased TNFα secretion while lower concentrations showed increased secretion. The effects of BTs on TNFα secretion are seen at concentrations present in human blood. PMID:23047847

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus-positive secondary syphilis mimicking cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Michiko; Fujii, Yoshiyuki; Ozaki, Keiji; Urano, Yoshio; Iwasa, Masami; Nakamura, Shingen; Fujii, Shiro; Abe, Masahiro; Sato, Yasuharu; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2015-10-08

    Malignant syphilis or lues maligna is a severe form of secondary syphilis that was commonly reported in the pre-antibiotic era, and has now reemerged with the advent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. However, the characteristic histopathological findings of malignant syphilis remain controversial. The aim of this case report was to clarify the clinical and histopathological findings of HIV-positive malignant secondary syphilis. A Japanese man in his forties complained of fever, skin lesions, headache, and myalgia without lymphadenopathy during the previous 4 weeks. The skin lesions manifested as erythematous, nonhealing, ulcerated papules scattered on his trunk, extremities, palm, and face. Although the skin lesions were suspected to be cutaneous T-cell lymphomas on histological analyses, they lacked T-cell receptor Jγ rearrangement; moreover, immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the presence of spirochetes. The patient was administered antibiotics and anti-retroviral therapy, which dramatically improved the symptoms. On the basis of these observations of the skin lesions, we finally diagnosed the patient with HIV-associated secondary syphilis that mimicked cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The patient's systemic CD4+ lymphocyte count was very low, and the infiltrate was almost exclusively composed of CD8+ atypical lymphocytes; therefore, the condition was easily misdiagnosed as cutaneous lymphoma. Although the abundance of plasma cells is a good indicator of malignant syphilis on skin histological analyses, in some cases, the plasma cell count may be very low. Therefore, a diagnosis of malignant secondary syphilis should be considered before making a diagnosis of primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma or lymphoma associated with HIV infection.

  5. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K

    1994-01-01

    MHC-class-II-positive T cells are found in tissues involved in autoimmune disorders. Stimulation of class II molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or bacterial superantigens induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation through activation of protein tyrosine kinases in T cells, and class II signals...... lines tested. Only one of three CD4+, CD45RAhigh, ROhigh T cells responded to class II costimulation. There was no correlation between T cell responsiveness to class II and the cytokine production profile of the T cell in question. Thus, T cell lines producing interferon (IFN)-gamma but not IL-4 (TH1...... modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell...

  6. CD147 (Basigin/Emmprin) identifies FoxP3+CD45RO+CTLA4+-activated human regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solstad, Therese; Bains, Simer Jit; Landskron, Johannes; Aandahl, Einar Martin; Thiede, Bernd; Taskén, Kjetil; Torgersen, Knut Martin

    2011-11-10

    Human CD4(+)FoxP3(+) T cells are functionally and phenotypically heterogeneous providing plasticity to immune activation and regulation. To better understand the functional dynamics within this subset, we first used a combined strategy of subcellular fractionation and proteomics to describe differences at the protein level between highly purified human CD4(+)CD25(+) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T-cell populations. This identified a set of membrane proteins highly expressed on the cell surface of human regulatory T cells (Tregs), including CD71, CD95, CD147, and CD148. CD147 (Basigin or Emmprin) divided CD4(+)CD25(+) cells into distinct subsets. Furthermore, CD147, CD25, FoxP3, and in particular CTLA-4 expression correlated. Phenotypical and functional analyses suggested that CD147 marks the switch between resting (CD45RA(+)) and activated (CD45RO(+)) subsets within the FoxP3(+) T-cell population. Sorting of regulatory T cells into CD147(-) and CD147(+) populations demonstrated that CD147 identifies an activated and highly suppressive CD45RO(+) Treg subset. When analyzing CD4(+) T cells for their cytokine producing potential, CD147 levels grouped the FoxP3(+) subset into 3 categories with different ability to produce IL-2, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-17. Together, this suggests that CD147 is a direct marker for activated Tregs within the CD4(+)FoxP3(+) subset and may provide means to manipulate cells important for immune homeostasis.

  7. CCL22-specific T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinenaite, Evelina; Munir Ahmad, Shamaila; Hansen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating macrophages produce the chemokine CCL22, which attracts regulatory T cells (Tregs) into the tumor microenvironment, decreasing anticancer immunity. Here, we investigated the possibility of targeting CCL22-expressing cells by activating specific T cells. We...... analyzed the CCL22 protein signal sequence, identifying a human leukocyte antigen A2- (HLA-A2-) restricted peptide epitope, which we then used to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBCs) to expand populations of CCL22-specific T cells in vitro. T cells recognizing an epitope derived from...... the signal-peptide of CCL22 will recognize CCL22-expressing cells even though CCL22 is secreted out of the cell. CCL22-specific T cells recognized and killed CCL22-expressing cancer cells. Furthermore, CCL22-specific T cells lysed acute monocytic leukemia cells in a CCL22 expression-dependent manner. Using...

  8. Pneumococcal infections in humans are associated with increased apoptosis and trafficking of type 1 cytokine-producing T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, Kåre; Bruunsgaard, Helle; Skinhøj, Peter

    2002-01-01

    , little is known regarding the T-cell response during in vivo infections in humans. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that activated T cells producing type 1 cytokines were engaged in the host response to pneumococcal infections. The phenotype and function of T cells were studied in 22...

  9. Identification and Functional Characterization of Human Cd4+Cd25+ T Cells with Regulatory Properties Isolated from Peripheral Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Stassen, Michael; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Knop, Jurgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2001-01-01

    A subpopulation of peripheral human CD4+CD25+ T cells that expresses CD45RO, histocompatibility leukocyte antigen DR, and intracellular cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen (CTLA) 4 does not expand after stimulation and markedly suppresses the expansion of conventional T cells in a contact-dependent manner. After activation, CD4+CD25+ T cells express CTLA-4 on the surface detectable for several weeks. These cells show a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest and no production of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, or interferon (IFN)-γ on either protein or mRNA levels. The anergic state of CD4+CD25+ T cells is not reversible by the addition of anti-CD28, anti–CTLA-4, anti–transforming growth factor β, or anti–IL-10 antibody. However, the refractory state of CD4+CD25+ T cells was partially reversible by the addition of IL-2 or IL-4. These data demonstrate that human blood contains a resident T cell population with potent regulatory properties. PMID:11390435

  10. Engineering HIV-1-resistant T-cells from short-hairpin RNA-expressing hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in humanized BLT mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene-Errol E Ringpis

    Full Text Available Down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 holds significant potential for long-term protection against HIV-1 in patients. Using the humanized bone marrow/liver/thymus (hu-BLT mouse model which allows investigation of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC transplant and immune system reconstitution as well as HIV-1 infection, we previously demonstrated stable inhibition of CCR5 expression in systemic lymphoid tissues via transplantation of HSPCs genetically modified by lentiviral vector transduction to express short hairpin RNA (shRNA. However, CCR5 down-regulation will not be effective against existing CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 and emergence of resistant viral strains. As such, combination approaches targeting additional steps in the virus lifecycle are required. We screened a panel of previously published shRNAs targeting highly conserved regions and identified a potent shRNA targeting the R-region of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR. Here, we report that human CD4(+ T-cells derived from transplanted HSPC engineered to co-express shRNAs targeting CCR5 and HIV-1 LTR are resistant to CCR5- and CXCR4- tropic HIV-1-mediated depletion in vivo. Transduction with the combination vector suppressed CXCR4- and CCR5- tropic viral replication in cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. No obvious cytotoxicity or interferon response was observed. Transplantation of combination vector-transduced HSPC into hu-BLT mice resulted in efficient engraftment and subsequent stable gene marking and CCR5 down-regulation in human CD4(+ T-cells within peripheral blood and systemic lymphoid tissues, including gut-associated lymphoid tissue, a major site of robust viral replication, for over twelve weeks. CXCR4- and CCR5- tropic HIV-1 infection was effectively inhibited in hu-BLT mouse spleen-derived human CD4(+ T-cells ex vivo. Furthermore, levels of gene-marked CD4(+ T-cells in peripheral blood increased despite systemic infection with either

  11. Indirect presentation in the thymus limits naive and regulatory T-cell differentiation by promoting deletion of self-reactive thymocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Jin Yan; Wirasinha, Rushika C; Chan, Anna; Howard, Debbie R; Goodnow, Christopher C; Daley, Stephen R

    2018-02-07

    Acquisition of T-cell central tolerance involves distinct pathways of self-antigen presentation to thymocytes. One pathway termed indirect presentation requires a self-antigen transfer step from thymic epithelial cells (TECs) to bone marrow-derived cells before the self-antigen is presented to thymocytes. The role of indirect presentation in central tolerance is context-dependent, potentially due to variation in self-antigen expression, processing and presentation in the thymus. Here, we report experiments in mice in which TECs expressed a membrane-bound transgenic self-antigen, hen egg lysozyme (HEL), from either the insulin (insHEL) or thyroglobulin (thyroHEL) promoter. Intrathymic HEL expression was less abundant and more confined to the medulla in insHEL mice compared with thyroHEL mice. When indirect presentation was impaired by generating mice lacking MHC class II expression in bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells, insHEL-mediated thymocyte deletion was abolished, whereas thyroHEL-mediated deletion occurred at a later stage of thymocyte development and Foxp3 + regulatory T-cell differentiation increased. Indirect presentation increased the strength of T-cell receptor signalling that both self-antigens induced in thymocytes, as assessed by Helios expression. Hence, indirect presentation limits the differentiation of naive and regulatory T cells by promoting deletion of self-reactive thymocytes. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Identification of a novel proinflammatory human skin-homing Vγ9Vδ2 T cell subset with a potential role in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laggner, Ute; Di Meglio, Paola; Perera, Gayathri K; Hundhausen, Christian; Lacy, Katie E; Ali, Niwa; Smith, Catherine H; Hayday, Adrian C; Nickoloff, Brian J; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-09-01

    γδ T cells mediate rapid tissue responses in murine skin and participate in cutaneous immune regulation including protection against cancer. The role of human γδ cells in cutaneous homeostasis and pathology is characterized poorly. In this study, we show in vivo evidence that human blood contains a distinct subset of proinflammatory cutaneous lymphocyte Ag and CCR6-positive Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, which is rapidly recruited into perturbed human skin. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells produced an array of proinflammatory mediators including IL-17A and activated keratinocytes in a TNF-α- and IFN-γ-dependent manner. Examination of the common inflammatory skin disease psoriasis revealed a striking reduction of circulating Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in psoriasis patients compared with healthy controls and atopic dermatitis patients. Decreased numbers of circulating Vγ9Vδ2 T cells normalized after successful treatment with psoriasis-targeted therapy. Taken together with the increased presence of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in psoriatic skin, these data indicate redistribution of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells from the blood to the skin compartment in psoriasis. In summary, we report a novel human proinflammatory γδ T cell involved in skin immune surveillance with immediate response characteristics and with potential clinical relevance in inflammatory skin disease.

  13. The exhausted CD4+CXCR5+ T cells involve the pathogenesis of human tuberculosis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Munyemana Jean; Wei, Ming; Hou, Hongyan; Yu, Jing; Lin, Qun; Luo, Ying; Sun, Ziyong; Wang, Feng

    2018-06-21

    The CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells have been previously established. However, their decreased frequency during tuberculosis (TB) disease is partially understood. The aim of this study was to explore the depletion of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells in human TB. The frequency and function of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells were evaluated in active TB (ATB) patients and healthy control (HC) individuals. The function of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells was determined after blockade of inhibitory receptors. The frequency of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells was decreased in ATB patients. The expression of activation markers (HLA-DR and ICOS) and inhibitory receptors (Tim-3 and PD-1) on CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells was increased in ATB group. TB-specific antigen stimulation induced higher expression of inhibitory receptors than phytohemagglutinin stimulation in ATB group. In contrast, TB antigen stimulation did not induce a significantly increased expression of IL-21 and Ki-67 on CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells. However, blockade of inhibitory receptors Tim-3 and PD-1 not only increased the frequency of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells, but also restored their proliferation and cytokine secretion potential. An increased expression of inhibitory receptors involves the depletion of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells, and blockade of inhibitory receptors can restore the function of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells in ATB patients. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Aging and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection differentially and jointly affect distinct circulating T cell subsets in humans1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheimer, Anne M.; Bennett, Michael S.; Park, Byung; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L.; Martinez, Carmine; Pulko, Vesna; Currier, Noreen L.; Nikolich-Zugich, Dragana; Kaye, Jeffrey; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2014-01-01

    The impact of intrinsic aging upon human peripheral blood T-cell subsets remains incompletely quantified and understood. This impact must be distinguished from the influence of latent persistent microorganisms, particularly cytomegalovirus (CMV), which has been associated with age-related changes in the T cell pool. In a cross-sectional cohort of 152 CMV-negative individuals, aged 21–101 years, we found that aging correlated strictly to an absolute loss of naïve CD8, but not CD4, T cells, but, contrary to many reports, did not lead to an increase in memory T cell numbers. The loss of naïve CD8 T cells was not altered by CMV in 239 subjects (range 21–96 years) but the decline in CD4+ naïve cells showed significance in CMV+ individuals. These individuals also exhibited an absolute increase in the effector/effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ cells with age. That increase was seen mainly, if not exclusively, in older subjects with elevated anti-CMV Ab titers, suggesting that efficacy of viral control over time may determine the magnitude of CMV impact upon T cell memory, and perhaps upon immune defense. These findings provide important new insights into the age-related changes in the peripheral blood pool of older adults, demonstrating that aging and CMV exert both distinct and joint influence upon blood T cell homeostasis in humans. PMID:24501199

  15. Tolerogenic dendritic cells for regulatory T cell induction in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena eRaker

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are (DC highly specialized professional antigen-presenting cells (APC that regulate immune responses, maintaining the balance between tolerance and immunity. Mechanisms via which they can promote central and peripheral tolerance include clonal deletion, inhibition of memory T cell responses, T cell anergy and induction of regulatory T cells. These properties have led to the analysis of human tolerogenic DC as a therapeutic strategy for induction or re-establishment of tolerance. In the recent years, numerous protocols for the generation of human tolerogenic DC have been developed and their tolerogenic mechanisms, including induction of regulatory T cells, are relatively well understood. Phase I trials have been conducted in autoimmune disease, with results that emphasize the feasibility and safety of treatments with tolerogenic DC. Therefore, the scientific rationale for the use of tolerogenic DC therapy in the fields of transplantation medicine and allergic and autoimmune diseases is strong. This review will give an overview on efforts and protocols to generate human tolerogenic DC with focus on IL-10-modulated DC as inducers of regulatory T cells and discuss their clinical applications and challenges faced in further developing this form of immunotherapy.

  16. Thyroglobulin recovery test of sera containing elevated levels of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hervas, I.; Gonzalez-Cabezas, P.; Flores, D.; Perez-Pastor, J.L.; Bello, P.; Rivas, A.; Alonso, J.; Olivas, C.; Mateo, A.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Thyroglobulin (Tg) is a macro-molecule synthesized exclusively in the thyroid gland for the synthesis of thyroid hormones. In differentiated thyroid carcinoma, after radical thyroidectomy, the discovering of measurable quantities of Tg can be indicator of relapse y/or spread of disease but Thyroglobulin antibodies can alter the determination of Tg. The aim of this study is to assess and measure the interference of Tg antibodies on the Tg determination. Methods: We have selected 50 consecutive serum whose Tg-antibodies levels were higher than the normality values (0-100 UI/mL). Tg-antibodies were measured using a 'sandwich' radioimmunometric assay on solid phase. We have performed a recovery test on these sera. This test consists on adding a known quantity (50 UI) of Tg on that sera and then measure the Tg values to find out the percentage of Tg that is recuperated. Tg was measured using a radioimmunometric assay on solid phase. Results: Sera were divided in two groups: A.- 15 sera with Tg-antibodies levels between 100-250 UI/mL: 85% of them presented a Tg recovery percentage higher than 90% (Tg-antibodies did not interfere on Tg values due to Tg was recovered almost in its totality). B.- 53 sera with Tg-antibodies levels higher than 250 UI/mL: Only 10% of them presented a Tg recovery percentage higher than >90% . (90% of sera interfered on Tg values). 70% of that sera presented percentages under 50%. The Pearson's correlation coefficient between Tg-antibodies and Tg recovery percentage was -0.34. Conclusions: The majority (90%)of sera with Tg-antibodies higher than 250 UI/mL presented an high interference on Tg determination. However the majority of sera with Tg-antibodies between 100-250 did not show any interference on Tg determination. There are not linear correlation between highest values and lowest percentages of Tg recovered. We recommend the realization of Tg recovery test on sera with elevated Tg antibodies specially when are higher than 250 UI/mL

  17. Inflammation-Induced Changes in Circulating T-Cell Subsets and Cytokine Production During Human Endotoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronit, Andreas; Plovsing, Ronni R; Gaardbo, Julie C

    2017-01-01

    administration. The frequency of anti-inflammatory Tregs increased (P = .033), whereas the frequency of proinflammatory CD4(+)CD161(+) cells decreased (P = .034). Endotoxemia was associated with impaired whole-blood production of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-10, IL-6, IL-17, IL-2, and interferon......Observational clinical studies suggest the initial phase of sepsis may involve impaired cellular immunity. In the present study, we investigated temporal changes in T-cell subsets and T-cell cytokine production during human endotoxemia. Endotoxin (Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide 4 ng......, HLA-DR(+)CD38(+) T cells were determined. Ex vivo whole-blood cytokine production and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 expression on Tregs were measured. Absolute number of CD3(+)CD4(+) (P = .026), CD3(+)CD8(+) (P = .046), Tregs (P = .023), and CD4(+)CD161(+) cells (P = .042) decreased after endotoxin...

  18. Spread of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I) in the Dutch homosexual community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, J.; de Wolf, F.; van de Wiel, B.; Smit, L.; Bakker, M.; Albrecht-van Lent, N.; Coutinho, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Sequential sera of 697 homosexual men, participating in a prospective study (1984-1986) of the risk to acquire human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or AIDS, were tested for antibodies to human T-cell leukaemia virus (HTLV-I) by particle agglutination and immunoblotting. No intravenous drug users were

  19. Effect of cell density and HLA-DR incompatibility on T-cell proliferation and forkhead box P3 expression in human mixed lymphocyte reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, E Y; Han, S; Yang, B; Morris, G P; Bui, J D

    2015-04-01

    The proliferation rates of human T cells in vitro are affected by some factors such as initial T-cell number, dose of stimulating cells, and duration of culture. The transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) has been used to identify regulatory T cells in humans and is thought to correlate with tolerance to allogeneic organ transplant. Thus, it is important to optimize conditions to expand FoxP3 cell proliferation to improve engraftment of allogeneic organ transplants. We studied proliferative responses and FoxP3 expression in divided T cells with the use of flow cytometric analysis of Ki-67 in culture of different concentrations of responding cells (6 × 10(6), 4 × 10(6), 2 × 10(6), 1 × 10(6), and 0.5 × 10(6)cells/mL), different types of stimulating cells (lymphocytes and low density cells), and different numbers of HLA mismatches. The proportion of CD3(+) cells, CD4(+)CD25(+) cells, and CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) cells among mononuclear cells were highest at initial cell concentration of 2 × 10(6) responder cells/mL with lymphocytes as stimulators at day-5 mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). They were highest at a concentration of 4 × 10(6) responder cells/mL with low density cells as stimulators. The recovery (%), proportion of CD3(+) cells, CD4(+)CD25(+) cells, and CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) cells with 2 HLA-DR incompatibility were significantly higher than those of 1 HLA-DR incompatibility at day-5 MLR. Initial cell concentration and HLA-DR incompatibility can affect the generation of FoxP3+ T cells in human MLR. These factors could be considered for efficient generation of Tregs for clinical trials in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Human T cell responses to the ESAT-6 antigen from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P; Demissie, A; Eguale, T

    1999-01-01

    Human T cell responses to ESAT-6 and eight synthetic overlapping peptides were investigated in tuberculosis (TB) patients and control subjects from regions of high and low endemicity for TB. ESAT-6 was recognized by 65% of all tuberculin purified protein derivative-responsive TB patients, whereas...

  1. Deficient regulatory T cell activity and low frequency of IL-17-producing T cells correlate with the extent of cardiomyopathy in human Chagas' disease.

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    Paulo Marcos Matta Guedes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myocardium damage during Chagas' disease results from the immunological imbalance between pro- and production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and has been explained based on the Th1-Th2 dichotomy and regulatory T cell activity. Recently, we demonstrated that IL-17 produced during experimental T. cruzi infection regulates Th1 cells differentiation and parasite induced myocarditis. Here, we investigated the role of IL-17 and regulatory T cell during human Chagas' disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First, we observed CD4(+IL-17(+ T cells in culture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from Chagas' disease patients and we evaluated Th1, Th2, Th17 cytokine profile production in the PBMC cells from Chagas' disease patients (cardiomyopathy-free, and with mild, moderate or severe cardiomyopathy cultured with T. cruzi antigen. Cultures of PBMC from patients with moderate and severe cardiomyopathy produced high levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ and low levels of IL-10, when compared to mild cardiomyopathy or cardiomyopathy-free patients. Flow cytometry analysis showed higher CD4(+IL-17(+ cells in PBMC cultured from patients without or with mild cardiomyopathy, in comparison to patients with moderate or severe cardiomyopathy. We then analyzed the presence and function of regulatory T cells in all patients. All groups of Chagas' disease patients presented the same frequency of CD4(+CD25(+ regulatory T cells. However, CD4(+CD25(+ T cells from patients with mild cardiomyopathy or cardiomyopathy-free showed higher suppressive activity than those with moderate and severe cardiomyopathy. IFN-γ levels during chronic Chagas' disease are inversely correlated to the LVEF (P = 0.007, r = -0.614, while regulatory T cell activity is directly correlated with LVEF (P = 0.022, r = 0.500. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that reduced production of the cytokines IL-10 and IL-17 in association with high levels of IFN-γ and TNF

  2. Response of sensitive human ataxia and resistant T-1 cell lines to accelerated heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Roots, R.

    1983-07-01

    The radiation dose responses of fibroblast from a patient with Ataxia telangiectasis (AT-2SF) and an established line of human T-1 cells were studied. Nearly monoenergetic accelerated neon and argon ions were used at the Berkeley Bevalac with various residual range values. The LET of the particles varied from 30 keV/μm to over 1000 keV/μm. All Ataxia survival curves were exponential functions of the dose. Their radiosensitivity reached peak values at 100 to 200 keV/μm. Human T-1 cells have effective sublethal damage repair as has been evidenced by split dose experiments, and they are much more resistant to low LET than to high LET radiation. The repair-misrepair model has been used to interpret these results. We have obtained mathematical expressions that describe the cross sections and inactivation coefficients for both human cell lines as a function of the LET and the type of particle used. The results suggest either that high-LET particles induce a greater number of radiolesions per track or that heavy-ions at high LET induce lesions that kill cells more effectively and that are different from those produced at low LET. We assume that the lesions induced in T-1 and Ataxia cells are qualitatively similar and that each cell line attempts to repair these lesions. The result in most irradiated Ataxia cells, however, is either lethal misrepair or incomplete repair leading to cell death. 63 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  3. Selective induction of DNA repair pathways in human B cells activated by CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaosheng Wu

    Full Text Available Greater than 75% of all hematologic malignancies derive from germinal center (GC or post-GC B cells, suggesting that the GC reaction predisposes B cells to tumorigenesis. Because GC B cells acquire expression of the highly mutagenic enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, GC B cells may require additional DNA repair capacity. The goal of this study was to investigate whether normal human B cells acquire enhanced expression of DNA repair factors upon AID induction. We first demonstrated that several DNA mismatch repair, homologous recombination, base excision repair, and ATR signaling genes were overexpressed in GC B cells relative to naïve and memory B cells, reflecting activation of a process we have termed somatic hyperrepair (SHR. Using an in vitro system, we next characterized activation signals required to induce AID expression and SHR. Although AID expression was induced by a variety of polyclonal activators, SHR induction strictly required signals provided by contact with activated CD4+ T cells, and B cells activated in this manner displayed reduced levels of DNA damage-induced apoptosis. We further show the induction of SHR is independent of AID expression, as GC B cells from AID-/-mice retained heightened expression of SHR proteins. In consideration of the critical role that CD4+ T cells play in inducing the SHR process, our data suggest a novel role for CD4+ T cells in the tumor suppression of GC/post-GC B cells.

  4. T-cell epitopes from viral and tumor associated antigens: induction and analysis of antigen-specific T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nastke, Maria-Dorothea

    2005-01-01

    T cells are important effectors in the defense of human pathogens entering the organism. CD8+ T cells recognize peptides which are presented by MHC class I molecules and lyse cells which are infected by virus or intracellular pathogens. Moreover, they are able to destroy cancer cells. CD4+ T cells recognize peptides from exogenous proteins acquired by endocytosis or from internalized plasma membrane proteins which are presented on MHC class II. CD4+ T cells play an important role in the defen...

  5. T Cell Subset and Stimulation Strength-Dependent Modulation of T Cell Activation by Kv1.3 Blockers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Ping Fung-Leung

    Full Text Available Kv1.3 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed on T cells that plays an important role in T cell activation. Previous studies have shown that blocking Kv1.3 channels in human T cells during activation results in reduced calcium entry, cytokine production, and proliferation. The aim of the present study was to further explore the effects of Kv1.3 blockers on the response of different human T cell subsets under various stimulation conditions. Our studies show that, unlike the immune suppressor cyclosporine A, the inhibitory effect of Kv1.3 blockers was partial and stimulation strength dependent, with reduced inhibitory efficacy on T cells under strengthened anti-CD3/CD28 stimulations. T cell responses to allergens including house dust mites and ragweed were partially reduced by Kv1.3 blockers. The effect of Kv1.3 inhibition was dependent on T cell subsets, with stronger effects on CCR7- effector memory compared to CCR7+ central memory CD4 T cells. Calcium entry studies also revealed a population of CD4 T cells resistant to Kv1.3 blockade. Activation of CD4 T cells was accompanied with an increase in Kv1.3 currents but Kv1.3 transcripts were found to be reduced, suggesting a posttranscriptional mechanism in the regulation of Kv1.3 activities. In summary, Kv1.3 blockers inhibit T cell activation in a manner that is highly dependent on the T cell identity and stimulation strength, These findings suggest that Kv1.3 blockers inhibit T cells in a unique, conditional manner, further refining our understanding of the therapeutic potential of Kv1.3 blockers.

  6. Regulatory T Cells Protect Fine Particulate Matter-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

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    Wen-cai Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the role of CD4+CD25+ T cells (Tregs in protecting fine particulate matter (PM- induced inflammatory responses, and its potential mechanisms. Methods. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were treated with graded concentrations (2, 5, 10, 20, and 40 µg/cm2 of suspension of fine particles for 24h. For coculture experiment, HUVECs were incubated alone, with CD4+CD25− T cells (Teff, or with Tregs in the presence of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies for 48 hours, and then were stimulated with or without suspension of fine particles for 24 hours. The expression of adhesion molecules and inflammatory cytokines was examined. Results. Adhesion molecules, including vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL- 6 and IL-8, were increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the adhesion of human acute monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1 to endothelial cells was increased and NF-κB activity was upregulated in HUVECs after treatment with fine particles. However, after Tregs treatment, fine particles-induced inflammatory responses and NF-κB activation were significantly alleviated. Transwell experiments showed that Treg-mediated suppression of HUVECs inflammatory responses impaired by fine particles required cell contact and soluble factors. Conclusions. Tregs could attenuate fine particles-induced inflammatory responses and NF-κB activation in HUVECs.

  7. Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-Specific CD4+ T Cells Are Polyfunctional and Can Respond to HCMV-Infected Dendritic Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sarah E; Sedikides, George X; Mason, Gavin M; Okecha, Georgina; Wills, Mark R

    2017-03-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection and periodic reactivation are generally well controlled by the HCMV-specific T cell response in healthy people. While the CD8 + T cell response to HCMV has been extensively studied, the HCMV-specific CD4 + T cell effector response is not as well understood, especially in the context of direct interactions with HCMV-infected cells. We screened the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) responses to 6 HCMV peptide pools (pp65, pp71, IE1, IE2, gB, and US3, selected because they were the peptides most frequently responded to in our previous studies) in 84 donors aged 23 to 74 years. The HCMV-specific CD4 + T cell response to pp65, IE1, IE2, and gB was predominantly Th1 biased, with neither the loss nor the accumulation of these responses occurring with increasing age. A larger proportion of donors produced an IL-10 response to pp71 and US3, but the IFN-γ response was still dominant. CD4 + T cells specific to the HCMV proteins studied were predominantly effector memory cells and produced both cytotoxic (CD107a expression) and cytokine (macrophage inflammatory protein 1β secretion) effector responses. Importantly, when we measured the CD4 + T cell response to cytomegalovirus (CMV)-infected dendritic cells in vitro , we observed that the CD4 + T cells produced a range of cytotoxic and secretory effector functions, despite the presence of CMV-encoded immune evasion molecules. CD4 + T cell responses to HCMV-infected dendritic cells were sufficient to control the dissemination of virus in an in vitro assay. Together, the results show that HCMV-specific CD4 + T cell responses, even those from elderly individuals, are highly functional and are directly antiviral. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is carried for a lifetime and in healthy people is kept under control by the immune system. HCMV has evolved many mechanisms to evade the immune response, possibly explaining why the virus is never eliminated

  8. Multiple injections of electroporated autologous T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor mediate regression of human disseminated tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yangbing; Moon, Edmund; Carpenito, Carmine; Paulos, Chrystal M; Liu, Xiaojun; Brennan, Andrea L; Chew, Anne; Carroll, Richard G; Scholler, John; Levine, Bruce L; Albelda, Steven M; June, Carl H

    2010-11-15

    Redirecting T lymphocyte antigen specificity by gene transfer can provide large numbers of tumor-reactive T lymphocytes for adoptive immunotherapy. However, safety concerns associated with viral vector production have limited clinical application of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR). T lymphocytes can be gene modified by RNA electroporation without integration-associated safety concerns. To establish a safe platform for adoptive immunotherapy, we first optimized the vector backbone for RNA in vitro transcription to achieve high-level transgene expression. CAR expression and function of RNA-electroporated T cells could be detected up to a week after electroporation. Multiple injections of RNA CAR-electroporated T cells mediated regression of large vascularized flank mesothelioma tumors in NOD/scid/γc(-/-) mice. Dramatic tumor reduction also occurred when the preexisting intraperitoneal human-derived tumors, which had been growing in vivo for >50 days, were treated by multiple injections of autologous human T cells electroporated with anti-mesothelin CAR mRNA. This is the first report using matched patient tumor and lymphocytes showing that autologous T cells from cancer patients can be engineered to provide an effective therapy for a disseminated tumor in a robust preclinical model. Multiple injections of RNA-engineered T cells are a novel approach for adoptive cell transfer, providing flexible platform for the treatment of cancer that may complement the use of retroviral and lentiviral engineered T cells. This approach may increase the therapeutic index of T cells engineered to express powerful activation domains without the associated safety concerns of integrating viral vectors. Copyright © 2010 AACR.

  9. Human rotavirus specific T cells: quantification by ELISPOT and expression of homing receptors on CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Olga Lucia; Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Gonzalez, Rosabel; Perez-Schael, Irene; Greenberg, Harry B.; Franco, Manuel A.; Angel, Juana

    2003-01-01

    Using an intracellular cytokine assay, we recently showed that the frequencies of rotavirus (RV)-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cells secreting INFγ, circulating in RV infected and healthy adults, are very low compared to the frequencies of circulating cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactive T cells in comparable individuals. In children with acute RV infection, these T cells were barely or not detectable. In the present study, an ELISPOT assay enabled detection of circulating RV-specific INFγ-secreting cells in children with RV diarrhea but not in children with non-RV diarrhea without evidence of a previous RV infection. Using microbead-enriched CD4 + and CD8 + T cell subsets, IFNγ-secreting RV-specific CD8 + but not CD4 + T cells were detected in recently infected children. Using the same approach, both CD4 + and CD8 + RV-specific T cells were detected in healthy adults. Furthermore, stimulation of purified subsets of PBMC that express lymphocyte homing receptors demonstrated that RV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4 + T cells from adult volunteers preferentially express the intestinal homing receptor α4β7, but not the peripheral lymph node homing receptor L-selectin. In contrast, CMV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4 + T cells preferentially express L-selectin but not α4β7. These results suggest that the expression of homing receptors on virus-specific T cells depends on the organ where these cells were originally stimulated and that their capacity to secrete INFγ is independent of the expression of these homing receptors

  10. Definition of reference ranges for free T4, TSH, and thyroglobulin levels in healthy subjects of the Jaén Health District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo Carrillo, Pablo; Santiago Fernández, Piedad; García Fuentes, Eduardo; Ureña Fernández, Tomás; Gutiérrez Alcántara, Carmen; Sánchez-Malo, Carolina; Gassó Campos, Manuela; Martínez Ramírez, María José

    2017-10-01

    The treatment guidelines for thyroid dysfunction recommend defining reference ranges for thyroid hormones in each area through assessment of local population data considering the iodine nutritional status. The aim of this study was to define the reference ranges of free thyroxine (FT4), TSH, and thyroglobulin levels in a general population from Jaen, an area of southern Spain with an adequate iodine nutritional status, and whether they were associated with urinary iodine levels. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1,003 subjects of the general population of the Jaen Health District. Levels of urinary iodine, FT4, TSH, thyroglobulin, and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies were measured according to age and sex. Median and mean urinary iodine levels were 110.59μg/L and 130.11μg/L respectively. Median TSH level was 1.83μIU/mL (p2.5=0.56μIU/mL, p97.5=4.66μIU/mL). Median FT4 level was 0.84ng/dL (p2.5=0.62ng/dL, p97.5=1.18ng/dL). TPO antibodies were detected in 5.7% of subjects. There was no correlation between urinary iodine levels and FT4, TSH or TPO antibodies. Subjects with positive TPO antibodies had higher TSH levels (3.34μIU/L versus 2.14μIU/mL, P=.001; odds ratio=2.42). Urinary iodine levels in Jaen are optimal according to World Health Organization standards. Reference ranges of FT4, TSH, and thyroglobulin do not differ from those reported in the literature and are no associated to urinary iodine levels. The prevalence of positive TPO antibodies was similar to that reported in other Spanish areas. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. The regulated secretory pathway in CD4(+ T cells contributes to human immunodeficiency virus type-1 cell-to-cell spread at the virological synapse.

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    Clare Jolly

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct cell-cell spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1 at the virological synapse (VS is an efficient mode of dissemination between CD4(+ T cells but the mechanisms by which HIV-1 proteins are directed towards intercellular contacts is unclear. We have used confocal microscopy and electron tomography coupled with functional virology and cell biology of primary CD4(+ T cells from normal individuals and patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome and report that the HIV-1 VS displays a regulated secretion phenotype that shares features with polarized secretion at the T cell immunological synapse (IS. Cell-cell contact at the VS re-orientates the microtubule organizing center (MTOC and organelles within the HIV-1-infected T cell towards the engaged target T cell, concomitant with polarization of viral proteins. Directed secretion of proteins at the T cell IS requires specialized organelles termed secretory lysosomes (SL and we show that the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env localizes with CTLA-4 and FasL in SL-related compartments and at the VS. Finally, CD4(+ T cells that are disabled for regulated secretion are less able to support productive cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread. We propose that HIV-1 hijacks the regulated secretory pathway of CD4(+ T cells to enhance its dissemination.

  12. Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Tax-Induced IκB-ζ Modulates Tax-Dependent and Tax-Independent Gene Expression in T Cells

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    Ryuichiro Kimura

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I is the etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL and various inflammatory disorders including HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. HTLV-I oncoprotein Tax is known to cause permanent activation of many cellular transcription factors including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate response element-binding protein, and activator protein 1 (AP-1. Here, we show that NF-κB-binding cofactor inhibitor of NF-κB-ζ (IκB-ζ is constitutively expressed in HTLV-I-infected T cell lines and ATL cells, and Tax transactivates the IκB-ζ gene, mainly through NF-κB. Microarray analysis of IκB-ζ-expressing uninfected T cells demonstrated that IκB-ζ induced the expression of NF-κB. and interferon-regulatory genes such as B cell CLL/lymphoma 3 (Bcl3, guanylate-binding protein 1, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. The transcriptional activation domain, nuclear localization signal, and NF-κB-binding domain of IκB-ζ were required for Bcl3 induction, and IκB-ζ synergistically enhanced Tax-induced Bcl3 transactivation in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Interestingly, IκB-ζ inhibited Tax-induced NF-κB, AP-1 activation, and HTLV-I transcription. Furthermore, IκB-ζ interacted with Tax in vitro and this interaction was also observed in an HTLV-I-transformed T cell line. These results suggest that IκB-ζ modulates Tax-dependent and Tax-independent gene transcription in T cells. The function of IκB-ζ may be of significance in ATL genesis and pathogenesis of HTLV-I-associated diseases.

  13. Resident CD141 (BDCA3)+ dendritic cells in human skin produce IL-10 and induce regulatory T cells that suppress skin inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chung-Ching; Ali, Niwa; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Di Meglio, Paola; Skowera, Ania; Napolitano, Luca; Barinaga, Guillermo; Grys, Katarzyna; Sharif-Paghaleh, Ehsan; Karagiannis, Sophia N; Peakman, Mark; Lombardi, Giovanna; Nestle, Frank O

    2012-05-07

    Human skin immune homeostasis, and its regulation by specialized subsets of tissue-residing immune sentinels, is poorly understood. In this study, we identify an immunoregulatory tissue-resident dendritic cell (DC) in the dermis of human skin that is characterized by surface expression of CD141, CD14, and constitutive IL-10 secretion (CD141(+) DDCs). CD141(+) DDCs possess lymph node migratory capacity, induce T cell hyporesponsiveness, cross-present self-antigens to autoreactive T cells, and induce potent regulatory T cells that inhibit skin inflammation. Vitamin D(3) (VitD3) promotes certain phenotypic and functional properties of tissue-resident CD141(+) DDCs from human blood DCs. These CD141(+) DDC-like cells can be generated in vitro and, once transferred in vivo, have the capacity to inhibit xeno-graft versus host disease and tumor alloimmunity. These findings suggest that CD141(+) DDCs play an essential role in the maintenance of skin homeostasis and in the regulation of both systemic and tumor alloimmunity. Finally, VitD3-induced CD141(+) DDC-like cells have potential clinical use for their capacity to induce immune tolerance.

  14. Inhibition of primary human T cell proliferation by Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin (VacA) is independent of VacA effects on IL-2 secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Sundrud, Mark S.; Torres, Victor J.; Unutmaz, Derya; Cover, Timothy L.

    2004-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the secreted Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin (VacA) inhibits the activation of T cells. VacA blocks IL-2 secretion in transformed T cell lines by suppressing the activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). In this study, we investigated the effects of VacA on primary human CD4+ T cells. VacA inhibited the proliferation of primary human T cells activated through the T cell receptor (TCR) and CD28. VacA-treated Jurkat T cells secreted markedly ...

  15. Efficient procedure for transferring specific human genes into Chinese hamster cell mutants: interspecific transfer of the human genes encoding leucyl- and asparaginyl-tRNA synthetases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirullo, R.E.; Dana, S.; Wasmuth, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    A simple and efficient procedure for transferring specific human genes into mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell recipients has been developed that does not rely on using calcium phosphate-precipitated high-molecular-weight DNA. Interspecific cell hybrids between human leukocytes and temperature-sensitive Chinese hamster cell mutants with either a thermolabile leucyl-tRNA synthetase or a thermolabile asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase were used as the starting material in these experiments. These hybrids contain only one or a few human chromosomes and require expression of the appropriate human aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene to grow at 39 degrees C. Hybrids were exposed to very high doses of gamma-irradiation to extensively fragment the chromosomes and re-fused immediately to the original temperature-sensitive Chinese hamster mutant, and secondary hybrids were isolated at 39 degrees C. Secondary hybrids, which had retained small fragments of the human genome containing the selected gene, were subjected to another round of irradiation, refusion, and selection at 39 degrees C to reduce the amount of human DNA even further. Using this procedure, Chinese hamster cell lines have been constructed that express the human genes encoding either asparaginyl- or leucyl-tRNA synthetase, yet less than 0.1% of their DNA is derived from the human genome, as quantitated by a sensitive dot-blot nucleic acid hybridization procedure

  16. An improved microculture-hemolytic spot assay for the study of carrier-specific antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotkes, P; Weisman, Z; Mozes, E; Bentwich, Z

    1984-11-30

    A microculture system based on limiting dilution and a hemolytic spot assay was adapted for study of the carrier-specific anti-hapten response in vitro. Spleen or lymph node cells from normal mice or mice immunized with NIP-ovalbumin (NIP-OVA) or NIP-human thyroglobulin (NIP-Tg) were cultured for 5 days by the microculture technique. The anti-hapten (anti-NIP) response was measured by assaying the supernatants of the microcultures in a hemolytic spot test with NIP coupled to sheep red blood cells. A micro-ELISA reader was adapted to read the degree of lysis in the spot assay which gives an objective quantitation of the degree of lysis and thus reduces the number of culture replicates. In vivo induced specific helper cells in mice immunized with the carrier protein, human thyroglobulin, as well as carrier-specific T cell factors, gave rise to carrier-specific anti-NIP responses. The microculture system may enhance the expression of T-cell helper function when suppressor cells or their precursors are present in the initial cell preparation.

  17. Antibodies to the human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type I in Dutch haemophiliacs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, J.; Miedema, F.; Breederveld, C.; Terpstra, F.; Roos, M.; Schellekens, P.; Melief, C.

    1986-01-01

    95 Dutch haemophiliacs were tested for antibodies to membrane antigens on cells infected with human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I-MA) by indirect immunofluorescence and to purified HTLV-I by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibodies to HTLV-I-MA were present in 8 of 95 (8%) haemophiliacs,

  18. Towards immunotherapy with redirected T cells in a large animal model: Ex vivo activation, expansion, and genetic modification of canine T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Melinda; Vera, Juan; Gerken, Claudia; Rooney, Cliona M.; Miller, Tasha; Pfent, Catherine; Wang, Lisa L.; Wilson-Robles, Heather M.; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown promising anti-tumor activity in early phase clinical studies, especially for hematological malignancies. However, most preclinical models do not reliably mimic human disease. We reasoned that developing an adoptive T-cell therapy approach for spontaneous osteosarcoma (OS) occurring in dogs would more closely reproduce the condition in human cancer. To generate CAR-expressing canine T cells we developed expansion and transduction protocols that allow for the generation of sufficient numbers of CAR-expressing canine T cells for future clinical studies in dogs within 2 weeks of ex vivo culture. To evaluate the functionality of CAR-expressing canine T cells we targeted HER2-positive OS. We demonstrate that canine OS is positive for HER2, and that canine T cells expressing a HER2-specific CAR with human-derived transmembrane and CD28.ζ signaling domains recognize and kill HER2-positive canine OS cell lines in an antigen-dependent manner. To reduce the potential immunogenicity of the CAR we evaluated a CAR with canine-derived transmembrane and signaling domains, and found no functional difference between human and canine CARs. Hence, we have successfully developed a strategy to generate CAR-expressing canine T cells for future preclinical studies in dogs. Testing T-cell therapies in an immunocompetent, outbred animal model may improve our ability to predict their safety and efficacy prior to conducting studies in humans. PMID:25198528

  19. Immunoregulatory effects of human dental pulp-derived stem cells on T cells: comparison of transwell co-culture and mixed lymphocyte reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircan, Pinar Cetinalp; Sariboyaci, Ayla Eker; Unal, Zehra Seda; Gacar, Gulcin; Subasi, Cansu; Karaoz, Erdal

    2011-11-01

    BACKGROUND AIMS. Studies performed using human and animal models have indicated the immunoregulatory capability of mesenchymal stromal cells in several lineages. We investigated whether human dental pulp-derived stem cells (hDP-SC) have regulatory effects on phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated CD3(+) T cells. We aimed to define the regulatory mechanisms associated with hDP-SC that occur in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and transwell systems with PHA-CD3(+) T cells and hDP-SC at a ratio of 1:1. METHODS. Proliferation, apoptosis and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines of PHA-CD3(+)T cells, the expression of Regulatory T cells (Treg) markers and some regulatory factors related to hDP-SC, were studied in Both transwell and MLR are co-cultures systems. RESULTS. Anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of hDP-SC were determined in co-culture systems. Elevated expression levels of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-β1, intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1)-1, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, vascular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by hDP-SC were detected in the co-culture systems. We observed decreased expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-2, IL-6 receptor (R), IL-12, Interleukin-17A (IL-17A), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α] and increased expression levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine [inducible protein (IP)-10] from PHA-CD3(+) T cells in the transwell system. Expression of Treg (CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+)) markers was significantly induced by hDP-SC in both co-culture systems. We observed apoptosis of PHA-CD3(+) T cells with 24 h using time-lapse camera photographs and active caspase labeling; it is likely that paracrine soluble factors and molecular signals secreted by hDP-SC led this apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS. We suggest that hDP-SC have potent immunoregulatory functions because of their soluble factors and cytokines via paracrine

  20. Antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell and antigen-specific proliferating T cell clones can be induced to cytolytic activity by monoclonal antibodies against T3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, H.; Yssel, H.; Leeuwenberg, J.; de Vries, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    T3 is a human differentiation antigen expressed exclusively on mature T cells. In this study it is shown that anti-T3 monoclonal antibodies, in addition to their capacity to induce T cells to proliferate, are able to induce antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones to mediate antigen

  1. Identification of a novel pro-inflammatory human skin-homing Vγ9Vδ2 T cell subset with a potential role in psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LAGGNER, Ute; DI MEGLIO, Paola; PERERA, Gayathri K.; HUNDHAUSEN, Christian; LACY, Katie E.; ALI, Niwa; SMITH, Catherine H.; HAYDAY, Adrian C.; NICKOLOFF, Brian J.; NESTLE, Frank O.

    2011-01-01

    γδ T cells mediate rapid tissue responses in murine skin and participate in cutaneous immune regulation including protection against cancer. The role of human γδ cells in cutaneous homeostasis and pathology is poorly characterized. In this study we show in vivo evidence that human blood contains a distinct subset of pro-inflammatory cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA) and C-C chemokine receptor (CCR) 6 positive Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, which is rapidly recruited into perturbed human skin. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells produced an array of pro-inflammatory mediators including IL-17A and activated keratinocytes in a TNF-α and IFN-γ dependent manner. Examination of the common inflammatory skin disease psoriasis revealed a striking reduction of circulating Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in psoriasis patients compared to healthy controls and atopic dermatitis patients. Decreased numbers of circulating Vγ9Vδ2 T cells normalized after successful treatment with psoriasis-targeted therapy. Together with the increased presence of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in psoriatic skin, this data indicates redistribution of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells from the blood to the skin compartment in psoriasis. In summary, we report a novel human pro-inflammatory γδ T cell involved in skin immune surveillance with immediate response characteristics and with potential clinical relevance in inflammatory skin disease. PMID:21813772

  2. Transfer of mRNA Encoding Invariant NKT Cell Receptors Imparts Glycolipid Specific Responses to T Cells and γδT Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kanako; Shinga, Jun; Yamasaki, Satoru; Kawamura, Masami; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels; Sato, Yusuke; Iyoda, Tomonori; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapies using genetically engineered lymphocytes expressing antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) hold promise for the treatment of several types of cancers. Almost all studies using this modality have focused on transfer of TCR from CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). The transfer of TCR from innate lymphocytes to other lymphocytes has not been studied. In the current study, innate and adaptive lymphocytes were transfected with the human NKT cell-derived TCRα and β chain mRNA (the Vα24 and Vβ11 TCR chains). When primary T cells transfected with NKT cell-derived TCR were subsequently stimulated with the NKT ligand, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), they secreted IFN-γ in a ligand-specific manner. Furthermore when γδT cells were transfected with NKT cell-derived TCR mRNA, they demonstrated enhanced proliferation, IFN-γ production and antitumor effects after α-GalCer stimulation as compared to parental γδT cells. Importantly, NKT cell TCR-transfected γδT cells responded to both NKT cell and γδT cell ligands, rendering them bi-potential innate lymphocytes. Because NKT cell receptors are unique and universal invariant receptors in humans, the TCR chains do not yield mispaired receptors with endogenous TCR α and β chains after the transfection. The transfection of NKT cell TCR has the potential to be a new approach to tumor immunotherapy in patients with various types of cancer.

  3. The human CD8β M-4 isoform dominant in effector memory T cells has distinct cytoplasmic motifs that confer unique properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepshi Thakral

    Full Text Available The CD8 co-receptor influences T cell recognition and responses in both anti-tumor and anti-viral immunity. During evolution in the ancestor of humans and chimpanzees, the CD8B gene acquired two additional exons. As a result, in humans, there are four CD8β splice variants (M1 to M4 that differ in their cytoplasmic tails. The M-1 isoform which is the equivalent of murine CD8β, is predominantly expressed in naïve T cells, whereas, the M-4 isoform is predominantly expressed in effector memory T cells. The characteristics of the M-4 isoform conferred by its unique 36 amino acid cytoplasmic tail are not known. In this study, we identified a dihydrophobic leucine-based receptor internalization motif in the cytoplasmic tail of M-4 that regulated its cell surface expression and downregulation after activation. Further the M-4 cytoplasmic tail was able to associate with ubiquitinated targets in 293T cells and mutations in the amino acids NPW, a potential EH domain binding site, either enhanced or inhibited the interaction. In addition, the M-4 tail was itself mono-ubiquitinated on a lysine residue in both 293T cells and a human T cell line. When peripheral blood human T cells expressed CD8αβ M-4, the frequency of MIP-1β secreting cells responding to antigen presenting cells was two-fold higher as compared to CD8αβ M-1 expressing T cells. Thus, the cytoplasmic tail of the CD8β M-4 isoform has unique characteristics, which likely contributed to its selective expression and function in human effector memory T cells.

  4. Human CD134 (OX40) expressed on T cells plays a key role for human herpesvirus 6B replication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamata, Satoshi; Nagasaka, Miwako; Kawabata, Akiko; Kishimoto, Kenji; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Mori, Takeshi; Morioka, Ichiro; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Iijima, Kazumoto; Yamada, Hideto; Kawamoto, Shinichiro; Yakushijin, Kimikazu; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Mori, Yasuko

    2018-05-01

    CD134 (OX40), which is a cellular receptor for human herpesvirus-6B (HHV-6B) and expresses on activated T cells, may play a key role for HHV-6B replication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Therefore, we examined the CD134 expression on T cells and HHV-6B replication after allo-HSCT, and analyzed the correlation between them. Twenty-three patients after allo-HSCT were enrolled. The percentages of CD134-positive cells within the CD4 + and CD8 + cell populations were measured by flow cytometry, and the viral copy number of HHV-6B was simultaneously quantified by real-time PCR. The correlation between CD134 and HHV-6B viral load was then statistically analyzed. HHV-6B reactivation occurred in 11 of 23 patients (47.8%). CD134 expression was seen on T cells and was coincident with the time of peak viral load. The percentage of CD134-positive cells decreased significantly when HHV-6B DNA disappeared (p = .005 in CD4 + T cells, p = .02 in CD8 + T cells). In the 4 patients who underwent umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT), the viral load varied with the percentage of CD134-positive cells. In the comparison between the HHV-6B reactivation group and non-reactivation group, maximum percentages of CD134-positive cells among CD4 + T cells in reactivation group were significantly higher than those in non-reactivation group (p = .04). This is the first study to show that a correlation of CD134 expression on T cells with HHV-6B replication after allo-HSCT, especially in UCBT. The results possibly indicate that CD134 on T cells plays a key role for HHV-6B replication after allo-HSCT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel mutation in the thyroglobulin gene that causes goiter and dwarfism in Wistar Hannover GALAS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Akira; Abe, Kuniya; Yuzuriha, Misako; Fujii, Sakiko; Takahashi, Naofumi; Hojo, Hitoshi; Teramoto, Shoji; Aoyama, Hiroaki

    2014-04-01

    Outbred stocks of rats have been used extensively in biomedical, pharmaceutical and/or toxicological studies as a model of genetically heterogeneous human populations. One of such stocks is the Wistar Hannover GALAS rat. However, the colony of Wistar Hannover GALAS rat has been suspected of keeping a problematic mutation that manifests two distinct spontaneous abnormalities, goiter and dwarfism, which often confuses study results. We have successfully identified the responsible mutation, a guanine to thymine transversion at the acceptor site (3' end) of intron 6 in the thyroglobulin (Tg) gene (Tgc.749-1G>T), that induces a complete missing of exon 7 from the whole Tg transcript by mating experiments and subsequent molecular analyses. The following observations confirmed that Tgc.749-1G>T/Tgc.749-1G>T homozygotes manifested both dwarfism and goiter, while Tgc.749-1G>T/+ heterozygotes had only a goiter with normal appearance, suggesting that the mutant phenotypes inherit as an autosomal semi-dominant trait. The mutant phenotypes, goiter and dwarfism, mimicked those caused by typical endocrine disrupters attacking the thyroid. Hence a simple and reliable diagnostic methodology has been developed for genomic DNA-based genotyping of animals. The diagnostic methodology reported here would allow users of Wistar Hannover GALAS rats to evaluate their study results precisely by carefully interpreting the data obtained from Tgc.749-1G>T/+ heterozygotes having externally undetectable thyroidal lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Progesterone promotes maternal-fetal tolerance by reducing human maternal T-cell polyfunctionality and inducing a specific cytokine profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissauer, David; Eldershaw, Suzy A; Inman, Charlotte F; Coomarasamy, Aravinthan; Moss, Paul A H; Kilby, Mark D

    2015-10-01

    Progesterone is a steroid hormone essential for the maintenance of human pregnancy, and its actions are thought to include promoting maternal immune tolerance of the semiallogenic fetus. We report that exposure of maternal T cells to progesterone at physiological doses induced a unique skewing of the cytokine production profile of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, with reductions not only in potentially deleterious IFN-γ and TNF-α production but also in IL-10 and IL-5. Conversely, production of IL-4 was increased. Maternal T cells also became less polyfunctional, focussing cytokine production toward profiles including IL-4. This was accompanied by reduced T-cell proliferation. Using fetal and viral antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell clones, we confirmed that this as a direct, nonantigen-specific effect. Yet human T cells lacked conventional nuclear progesterone receptors, implicating a membrane progesterone receptor. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells responded to progesterone in a dose-dependent manner, with subtle effects at concentrations comparable to those in maternal blood, but profound effects at concentrations similar to those at the maternal-fetal interface. This characterization of how progesterone modulates T-cell function is important in understanding the normal biology of pregnancy and informing the rational use of progesterone therapy in pregnancies at risk of fetal loss. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Direct anti-inflammatory effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on activation and functional properties of human T cell subpopulations in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malashchenko, Vladimir Vladimirovich; Meniailo, Maxsim Evgenievich; Shmarov, Viacheslav Anatolievich; Gazatova, Natalia Dinislamovna; Melashchenko, Olga Borisovna; Goncharov, Andrei Gennadievich; Seledtsova, Galina Victorovna; Seledtsov, Victor Ivanovich

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the direct effects of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on functionality of human T-cell subsets. CD3 + T-lymphocytes were isolated from blood of healthy donors by positive magnetic separation. T cell activation with particles conjugated with antibodies (Abs) to human CD3, CD28 and CD2 molecules increased the proportion of cells expressing G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR, CD114) in all T cell subpopulations studied (CD45RA + /CD197 + naive T cells, CD45RA - /CD197 + central memory T cells, CD45RA - /CD197 - effector memory T cells and CD45RA + /CD197 - terminally differentiated effector T cells). Upon T-cell activation in vitro, G-CSF (10.0 ng/ml) significantly and specifically enhanced the proportion of CD114 + T cells in central memory CD4 + T cell compartment. A dilution series of G-CSF (range, 0.1-10.0 ng/ml) was tested, with no effect on the expression of CD25 (interleukin-2 receptor α-chain) on activated T cells. Meanwhile, G-CSF treatment enhanced the proportion of CD38 + T cells in CD4 + naïve T cell, effector memory T cell and terminally differentiated effector T cell subsets, as well as in CD4 - central memory T cells and terminally differentiated effector T cells. G-CSF did not affect IL-2 production by T cells; relatively low concentrations of G-CSF down-regulated INF-γ production, while high concentrations of this cytokine up-regulated IL-4 production in activated T cells. The data obtained suggests that G-CSF could play a significant role both in preventing the development of excessive and potentially damaging inflammatory reactivity, and in constraining the expansion of potentially cytodestructive T cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Endogenous Nur77 Is a Specific Indicator of Antigen Receptor Signaling in Human T and B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashouri, Judith F; Weiss, Arthur

    2017-01-15

    Distinguishing true Ag-stimulated lymphocytes from bystanders activated by the inflammatory milieu has been difficult. Nur77 is an immediate early gene whose expression is rapidly upregulated by TCR signaling in murine T cells and human thymocytes. Nur77-GFP transgenes serve as specific TCR and BCR signaling reporters in murine transgenic models. In this study, we demonstrate that endogenous Nur77 protein expression can serve as a reporter of TCR and BCR specific signaling in human PBMCs. Nur77 protein amounts were assessed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry in T and B cells isolated from human PBMCs obtained from healthy donors that had been stimulated by their respective Ag receptors. We demonstrate that endogenous Nur77 is a more specific reporter of Ag-specific signaling events than the commonly used CD69 activation marker in both human T and B cells. This is reflective of the disparity in signaling pathways that regulate the expression of Nur77 and CD69. Assessing endogenous Nur77 protein expression has great potential to identify Ag-activated lymphocytes in human disease. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. IL-2 receptor γ-chain molecule is critical for intestinal T-cell reconstitution in humanized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, P W; Nochi, T; Lim, A; Krisko, J F; Martinez-Torres, F; Choudhary, S K; Wahl, A; Olesen, R; Zou, W; Di Santo, J P; Margolis, D M; Garcia, J V

    2012-09-01

    Intestinal immune cells are important in host defense, yet the determinants for human lymphoid homeostasis in the intestines are poorly understood. In contrast, lymphoid homeostasis has been studied extensively in mice, where the requirement for a functional common γ-chain molecule has been established. We hypothesized that humanized mice could offer insights into human intestinal lymphoid homeostasis if generated in a strain with an intact mouse common γ-chain molecule. To address this hypothesis, we used three mouse strains (non-obese diabetic (NOD)/severe-combined immunodeficient (SCID) (N/S); NOD/SCID γ-chain(-/-) (NSG); and Rag2(-/-) γ-chain(-/-) (DKO)) and two humanization techniques (bone marrow liver thymus (BLT) and human CD34(+) cell bone marrow transplant of newborn mice (hu)) to generate four common types of humanized mice: N/S-BLT, NSG-BLT, NSG-hu, and DKO-hu mice. The highest levels of intestinal human T cells throughout the small and large intestines were observed in N/S-BLT mice, which have an intact common γ-chain molecule. Furthermore, the small intestine lamina propria T-cell populations of N/S-BLT mice exhibit a human intestine-specific surface phenotype. Thus, the extensive intestinal immune reconstitution of N/S-BLT mice was both quantitatively and qualitatively better when compared with the other models tested such that N/S-BLT mice are well suited for the analysis of human intestinal lymphocyte trafficking and human-specific diseases affecting the intestines.

  10. Transcriptional Repressor HIC1 Contributes to Suppressive Function of Human Induced Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubaid Ullah

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells are critical in regulating the immune response. In vitro induced Treg (iTreg cells have significant potential in clinical medicine. However, applying iTreg cells as therapeutics is complicated by the poor stability of human iTreg cells and their variable suppressive activity. Therefore, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms of human iTreg cell specification. We identified hypermethylated in cancer 1 (HIC1 as a transcription factor upregulated early during the differentiation of human iTreg cells. Although FOXP3 expression was unaffected, HIC1 deficiency led to a considerable loss of suppression by iTreg cells with a concomitant increase in the expression of effector T cell associated genes. SNPs linked to several immune-mediated disorders were enriched around HIC1 binding sites, and in vitro binding assays indicated that these SNPs may alter the binding of HIC1. Our results suggest that HIC1 is an important contributor to iTreg cell development and function.

  11. In silico and cell-based analyses reveal strong divergence between prediction and observation of T-cell-recognized tumor antigen T-cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Julien; Guillaume, Philippe; Dojcinovic, Danijel; Karbach, Julia; Coukos, George; Luescher, Immanuel

    2017-07-14

    Tumor exomes provide comprehensive information on mutated, overexpressed genes and aberrant splicing, which can be exploited for personalized cancer immunotherapy. Of particular interest are mutated tumor antigen T-cell epitopes, because neoepitope-specific T cells often are tumoricidal. However, identifying tumor-specific T-cell epitopes is a major challenge. A widely used strategy relies on initial prediction of human leukocyte antigen-binding peptides by in silico algorithms, but the predictive power of this approach is unclear. Here, we used the human tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 (ESO) and the human leukocyte antigen variant HLA-A*0201 (A2) as a model and predicted in silico the 41 highest-affinity, A2-binding 8-11-mer peptides and assessed their binding, kinetic complex stability, and immunogenicity in A2-transgenic mice and on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from ESO-vaccinated melanoma patients. We found that 19 of the peptides strongly bound to A2, 10 of which formed stable A2-peptide complexes and induced CD8 + T cells in A2-transgenic mice. However, only 5 of the peptides induced cognate T cells in humans; these peptides exhibited strong binding and complex stability and contained multiple large hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids. These results were not predicted by in silico algorithms and provide new clues to improving T-cell epitope identification. In conclusion, our findings indicate that only a small fraction of in silico -predicted A2-binding ESO peptides are immunogenic in humans, namely those that have high peptide-binding strength and complex stability. This observation highlights the need for improving in silico predictions of peptide immunogenicity. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Caspase-1 from Human Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Can Promote T Cell-Independent Tumor Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qi; Fu, Juan; Korrer, Michael; Gorbounov, Mikhail; Murray, Peter J; Pardoll, Drew; Masica, David L; Kim, Young J

    2018-05-01

    Immunosuppressive myeloid-derived suppressive cells (MDSCs) are characterized by their phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. To better define their T cell-independent functions within the tumor, sorted monocytic CD14 + CD11b + HLA-DR low/- MDSCs (mMDSC) from squamous cell carcinoma patients showed upregulated caspase-1 activity, which was associated with increased IL1β and IL18 expression. In vitro studies demonstrated that mMDSCs promoted caspase-1-dependent proliferation of multiple squamous carcinoma cell lines in both human and murine systems. In vivo , growth rates of B16, MOC1, and Panc02 were significantly blunted in chimeric mice adoptively transferred with caspase-1 null bone marrow cells under T cell-depleted conditions. Adoptive transfer of wild-type Gr-1 + CD11b + MDSCs from tumor-bearing mice reversed this antitumor response, whereas caspase-1 inhibiting thalidomide-treated MDSCs phenocopied the antitumor response found in caspase-1 null mice. We further hypothesized that MDSC caspase-1 activity could promote tumor-intrinsic MyD88-dependent carcinogenesis. In mice with wild-type caspase-1, MyD88-silenced tumors displayed reduced growth rate, but in chimeric mice with caspase-1 null bone marrow cells, MyD88-silenced tumors did not display differential tumor growth rate. When we queried the TCGA database, we found that caspase-1 expression is correlated with overall survival in squamous cell carcinoma patients. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that caspase-1 in MDSCs is a direct T cell-independent mediator of tumor proliferation. Cancer Immunol Res; 6(5); 566-77. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Direct analysis of viral-specific CD8+ T cells with soluble HLA-A2/Tax11-19 tetramer complexes in patients with human T cell lymphotropic virus-associated myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieganowska, K; Höllsberg, P; Buckle, G J; Lim, D G; Greten, T F; Schneck, J; Altman, J D; Jacobson, S; Ledis, S L; Hanchard, B; Chin, J; Morgan, O; Roth, P A; Hafler, D A

    1999-02-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus-I (HTLV-I)-associated myelopathy is a slowly progressive neurologic disease characterized by inflammatory infiltrates in the central nervous system accompanied by clonal expansion of HTLV-I-reactive CD8+ T-cells. In patients carrying the HLA-A2 allele, the immune response is primarily directed to the Tax11-19 peptide. The frequency, activation state, and TCR usage of HLA-A2/Tax11-19 binding T cells in patients with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy was determined using MHC class I tetramers loaded with the Tax11-19 peptide. Circulating Tax11-19-reactive T cells were found at very high frequencies, approaching 1:10 circulating CD8+ T cells. T cells binding HLA-A2/Tax11-19 consisted of heterogeneous populations expressing different chemokine receptors and the IL-2R beta-chain but not the IL-2R alpha-chain. Additionally, Tax11-19-reactive CD8+ T cells used one predominant TCR Vbeta-chain for the recognition of the HLA-A2/Tax11-19 complex. These data provide direct evidence for high frequencies of circulating Tax11-19-reactive CD8+ T cells in patients with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy.

  14. Exposure of Human CD8+ T Cells to Type-2 Cytokines Impairs Division and Differentiation and Induces Limited Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Fox

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Effector CD8+ T cells generally produce type-1 cytokines and mediators of the perforin/granzyme cytolytic pathway, yet type-2-polarized CD8+ cells (Tc2 are detected in type-2 (T2 cytokine-driven diseases such as asthma. It is unclear whether T2 cytokine exposure during activation is sufficient to polarize human CD8+ T cells. To address this question, a protocol was developed for high-efficiency activation of human CD8+ T cells in which purified single cells or populations were stimulated with plate-bound anti-CD3 and anti-CD11a mAb for up to 8 days in T2 polarizing or neutral conditions, before functional analysis. Activation of CD8+ naïve T cells (TN in T2 compared with neutral conditions decreased the size of single-cell clones, although early division kinetics were equivalent, indicating an effect on overall division number. Activation of TN in T2 conditions followed by brief anti-CD3 mAb restimulation favored expression of T2 cytokines, GATA3 and Eomes, and lowered expression of type-1 cytokines, Prf1, Gzmb, T-BET, and Prdm1. However, IL-4 was only weakly expressed, and PMA and ionomycin restimulation favored IFN-γ over IL-4 expression. Activation of TN in T2 compared with neutral conditions prevented downregulation of costimulatory (CD27, CD28 and lymph-node homing receptors (CCR7 and CD95 acquisition, which typically occur during differentiation into effector phenotypes. CD3 was rapidly and substantially induced after activation in neutral, but not T2 conditions, potentially contributing to greater division and differentiation in neutral conditions. CD8+ central memory T cells (TCM were less able to enter division upon reactivation in T2 compared with neutral conditions, and were more refractory to modulating IFN-γ and IL-4 production than CD8+ TN. In summary, while activation of TN in T2 conditions can generate T2 cytokine-biased cells, IL-4 expression is weak, T2 bias is lost upon strong restimulation, differentiation, and division

  15. Tax Protein-induced Expression of Antiapoptotic Bfl-1 Protein Contributes to Survival of Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected T-cells*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaire, Héloïse; Riquet, Aurélien; Moncollin, Vincent; Biémont-Trescol, Marie-Claude; Duc Dodon, Madeleine; Hermine, Olivier; Debaud, Anne-Laure; Mahieux, Renaud; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Pierre, Marlène; Gazzolo, Louis; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Valentin, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). ATLL is a severe malignancy with no effective treatment. HTLV-1 regulatory proteins Tax and HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ) play a major role in ATLL development, by interfering with cellular functions such as CD4+ T-cell survival. In this study, we observed that the expression of Bfl-1, an antiapoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family, is restricted to HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines and to T-cells expressing both Tax and HBZ proteins. We showed that Tax-induced bfl-1 transcription through the canonical NF-κB pathway. Moreover, we demonstrated that Tax cooperated with c-Jun or JunD, but not JunB, transcription factors of the AP-1 family to stimulate bfl-1 gene activation. By contrast, HBZ inhibited c-Jun-induced bfl-1 gene activation, whereas it increased JunD-induced bfl-1 gene activation. We identified one NF-κB, targeted by RelA, c-Rel, RelB, p105/p50, and p100/p52, and two AP-1, targeted by both c-Jun and JunD, binding sites in the bfl-1 promoter of T-cells expressing both Tax and HBZ. Analyzing the potential role of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins in HTLV-1-infected T-cell survival, we demonstrated that these cells are differentially sensitive to silencing of Bfl-1, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-2. Indeed, both Bfl-1 and Bcl-xL knockdowns decreased the survival of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, although no cell death was observed after Bcl-2 knockdown. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Bfl-1 knockdown sensitizes HTLV-1-infected T-cells to ABT-737 or etoposide treatment. Our results directly implicate Bfl-1 and Bcl-xL in HTLV-1-infected T-cell survival and suggest that both Bfl-1 and Bcl-xL represent potential therapeutic targets for ATLL treatment. PMID:22553204

  16. X-ray radiation induced bystander effects of human glioblastoma T98G cells under hypoxia condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianghong; Jin Yizun; Shao Chunlin; Prise, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    Non-irradiated bystander human glioblastoma T98G cells were co-cultured (CC) with irradiated cells or treated with conditioned medium (CM) from irradiated cells under hypoxic condition, then micronucleus (MN) of both irradiated cells and bystander cells were measured for the investigation of radiation induced bystander effect and its mechanism. It has been found that the MN yield (Y MN ) of non-irradiated bystander T98G cells is obviously enhanced after the cell co-culture, or CM treatment, but this increment is diminished by free radical scavenger, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). When hypoxic or normoxic T98G cells are treated with CM obtained from irradiated cells under either hypoxic or normoxic condition, the biggest bystander response has been observed in the group of hypoxic by- stander cells treated with CM from irradiated normoxic cells. However, all of these increments of bystander Y MN could be eliminated by aminoguanidine, an iNOS inhibitor. Therefore, under hypoxic condition, free radicals, especially reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, are involved in the bystander response induced by irradiated T98G cells. (authors)

  17. T-cell receptor repertoire of human peripheral CD161hiTRAV1-2+ MAIT cells revealed by next generation sequencing and single cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Kathrin; Beltrán, Eduardo; Moser, Markus; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Dornmair, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a T-cell subset that expresses a conserved TRAV1-2 (Vα7.2) T-cell receptor (TCR) chain and the surface marker CD161. They are involved in the defence against microbes as they recognise small organic molecules of microbial origin that are presented by the non-classical MHC molecule 1 (MR1). MAIT cells express a semi-restricted TCR α chain with TRAV1-2 preferentially linked to TRAJ33, TRAJ12, or TRAJ20 which pairs with a limited set of β chains. To investigate the TCR repertoire of human CD161(hi)TRAV1-2(+) T cells in depth we analysed the α and β chains of this T-cell subset by next generation sequencing. Concomitantly we analysed 132 paired α and β chains from single cells to assess the αβ pairing preferences. We found that the CD161(hi)TRAV1-2(+) TCR repertoire in addition to the typical MAIT TCRs further contains polyclonal elements reminiscent of classical αβ T cells. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Tax-Induced IκB-ζ Modulates Tax-Dependent and Tax-Independent Gene Expression in T Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Ryuichiro; Senba, Masachika; Cutler, Samuel J; Ralph, Stephen J; Xiao, Gutian; Mori, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is the etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and various inflammatory disorders including HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. HTLV-I oncoprotein Tax is known to cause permanent activation of many cellular transcription factors including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate response element-binding protein, and activator protein 1 (AP-1). Here, we show that NF-κB-binding cofactor inhibitor of NF-κB-ζ (IκB-ζ) is constitutively expressed in HTLV-I-infected T cell lines and ATL cells, and Tax transactivates the IκB-ζ gene, mainly through NF-κB. Microarray analysis of IκB-ζ-expressing uninfected T cells demonstrated that IκB-ζ induced the expression of NF-κB. and interferon-regulatory genes such as B cell CLL/lymphoma 3 (Bcl3), guanylate-binding protein 1, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. The transcriptional activation domain, nuclear localization signal, and NF-κB-binding domain of IκB-ζ were required for Bcl3 induction, and IκB-ζ synergistically enhanced Tax-induced Bcl3 transactivation in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Interestingly, IκB-ζ inhibited Tax-induced NF-κB, AP-1 activation, and HTLV-I transcription. Furthermore, IκB-ζ interacted with Tax in vitro and this interaction was also observed in an HTLV-I-transformed T cell line. These results suggest that IκB-ζ modulates Tax-dependent and Tax-independent gene transcription in T cells. The function of IκB-ζ may be of significance in ATL genesis and pathogenesis of HTLV-I-associated diseases. PMID:24027435

  19. T Cell Genesis: In Vitro Veritas Est?

    OpenAIRE

    Brauer, Patrick M.; Singh, Jastaranpreet; Xhiku, Sintia; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    T cells, as orchestrators of the adaptive immune response, serve important physiological and potentially therapeutic roles, for example in cancer immunotherapy. T cells are readily isolated from patients; however, the yield of antigen-specific T cells is limited, thus making their clinical use challenging. Therefore, the generation of T lymphocytes from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) and human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in vitro provides an attractive method for large-scale pr...

  20. Identification and Functional Characterization of Human Cd4+Cd25+ T Cells with Regulatory Properties Isolated from Peripheral Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Stassen, Michael; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Knop, Jurgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2001-01-01

    A subpopulation of peripheral human CD4+CD25+ T cells that expresses CD45RO, histocompatibility leukocyte antigen DR, and intracellular cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen (CTLA) 4 does not expand after stimulation and markedly suppresses the expansion of conventional T cells in a contact-dependent manner. After activation, CD4+CD25+ T cells express CTLA-4 on the surface detectable for several weeks. These cells show a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest and no production of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-...

  1. The Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Immuno-suppression by Human Type 1 Regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eGregori

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The immuno-regulatory mechanisms of IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1 cells have been widely studied over the years. However, several recent discoveries have shed new light on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that human Tr1 cells use to control immune responses and induce tolerance. In this review we outline the well-known and newly discovered regulatory properties of human Tr1 cells and provide an in-depth comparison of the known suppressor mechanisms of Tr1 cells with FOXP3+ Treg. We also highlight the role that Tr1 cells play in promoting and maintaining tolerance in autoimmunity, allergy, and transplantation.

  2. Innate-like behavior of human invariant natural killer T cells during herpes simplex virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Lucie; Nevoralova, Zuzana; Novak, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, CD1d restricted T cells, are involved in the immune responses against various infection agents. Here we describe their behavior during reactivation of human herpes simplex virus (HSV). iNKT cells exhibit only discrete changes, which however, reached statistically significant level due to the relatively large patient group. Higher percentage of iNKT cells express NKG2D. iNKT cells down-regulate NKG2A in a subset of patients. Finally, iNKT cells enhance their capacity to produce TNF-α. Our data suggests that iNKT cells are involved in the immune response against HSV and contribute mainly to its early, innate phase. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Preferential Th1 cytokine profile of phosphoantigen-stimulated human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunne, Margaret R

    2010-01-01

    Human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells recognise pyrophosphate-based antigens (phosphoantigens) and have multiple functions in innate and adaptive immunity, including a unique ability to activate other cells of the immune system. We used flow cytometry and ELISA to define the early cytokine profiles of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells stimulated in vitro with isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2 enyl pyrophosphate (HMB-PP) in the absence and presence of IL-2 and IL-15. We show that fresh Vγ9Vδ2 T cells produce interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) within 4 hours of stimulation with phosphoantigen, but neither IL-10, IL-13, nor IL-17 was detectable up to 72 hours under these conditions. Cytokine production was not influenced by expression or lack, thereof, of CD4 or CD8. Addition of IL-2 or IL-15 caused expansion of IFN-γ-producing Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, but did not enhance IFN-γ secretion after 24-72 hours. Thus, phosphoantigen-stimulated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells have potential as Th1-biasing adjuvants for immunotherapy.

  4. Preferential Th1 Cytokine Profile of Phosphoantigen-Stimulated Human Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R. Dunne

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells recognise pyrophosphate-based antigens (phosphoantigens and have multiple functions in innate and adaptive immunity, including a unique ability to activate other cells of the immune system. We used flow cytometry and ELISA to define the early cytokine profiles of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells stimulated in vitro with isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP and (E-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2 enyl pyrophosphate (HMB-PP in the absence and presence of IL-2 and IL-15. We show that fresh Vγ9Vδ2 T cells produce interferon-γ (IFN-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α within 4 hours of stimulation with phosphoantigen, but neither IL-10, IL-13, nor IL-17 was detectable up to 72 hours under these conditions. Cytokine production was not influenced by expression or lack, thereof, of CD4 or CD8. Addition of IL-2 or IL-15 caused expansion of IFN-γ-producing Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, but did not enhance IFN-γ secretion after 24–72 hours. Thus, phosphoantigen-stimulated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells have potential as Th1-biasing adjuvants for immunotherapy.

  5. Maternal T-Cell Engraftment Interferes With Human Leukocyte Antigen Typing in Severe Combined Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Duffy, Brian; Bednarski, Jeffrey J; Calhoun, Cecelia; Lay, Lindsay; Rundblad, Barrett; Payton, Jacqueline E; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour

    2016-02-01

    To report the laboratory investigation of a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with maternal T-cell engraftment, focusing on the interference of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing by blood chimerism. HLA typing was performed with three different methods, including sequence-specific primer (SSP), sequence-specific oligonucleotide, and Sanger sequencing on peripheral blood leukocytes and buccal cells, from a 3-month-old boy and peripheral blood leukocytes from his parents. Short tandem repeat (STR) testing was performed in parallel. HLA typing of the patient's peripheral blood leukocytes using the SSP method demonstrated three different alleles for each of the HLA-B and HLA-C loci, with both maternal alleles present at each locus. Typing results from the patient's buccal cells showed a normal pattern of inheritance for paternal and maternal haplotypes. STR enrichment testing of the patient's CD3+ T lymphocytes and CD15+ myeloid cells confirmed maternal T-cell engraftment, while the myeloid cell profile matched the patient's buccal cells. Maternal T-cell engraftment may interfere with HLA typing in patients with SCID. Selection of the appropriate typing methods and specimens is critical for accurate HLA typing and immunologic assessment before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Broadly reactive human CD8 T cells that recognize an epitope conserved between VZV, HSV and EBV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Chiu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesviruses are important causes of potentially severe chronic infections for which T cells are believed to be necessary for control. In order to examine the role of virus-specific CD8 T cells against Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV, we generated a comprehensive panel of potential epitopes predicted in silico and screened for T cell responses in healthy VZV seropositive donors. We identified a dominant HLA-A*0201-restricted epitope in the VZV ribonucleotide reductase subunit 2 and used a tetramer to analyze the phenotype and function of epitope-specific CD8 T cells. Interestingly, CD8 T cells responding to this VZV epitope also recognized homologous epitopes, not only in the other α-herpesviruses, HSV-1 and HSV-2, but also the γ-herpesvirus, EBV. Responses against these epitopes did not depend on previous infection with the originating virus, thus indicating the cross-reactive nature of this T cell population. Between individuals, the cells demonstrated marked phenotypic heterogeneity. This was associated with differences in functional capacity related to increased inhibitory receptor expression (including PD-1 along with decreased expression of co-stimulatory molecules that potentially reflected their stimulation history. Vaccination with the live attenuated Zostavax vaccine did not efficiently stimulate a proliferative response in this epitope-specific population. Thus, we identified a human CD8 T cell epitope that is conserved in four clinically important herpesviruses but that was poorly boosted by the current adult VZV vaccine. We discuss the concept of a "pan-herpesvirus" vaccine that this discovery raises and the hurdles that may need to be overcome in order to achieve this.

  7. From interleukin-23 to T-helper 17 cells: human T-helper cell differentiation revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boniface, Katia; Blom, Bianca; Liu, Yong-Jun; de Waal Malefyt, René

    2008-01-01

    Protracted inflammation leading to dysregulation of effector T-cell responses represents a common feature of a wide range of autoimmune diseases. The interleukin-12 (IL-12)/T-helper 1 (Th1) pathway was thought to be responsible for the pathogenesis of multiple chronic inflammatory diseases,

  8. Palindromic nucleotide analysis in human T cell receptor rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K Srivastava

    Full Text Available Diversity of T cell receptor (TCR genes is primarily generated by nucleotide insertions upon rearrangement from their germ line-encoded V, D and J segments. Nucleotide insertions at V-D and D-J junctions are random, but some small subsets of these insertions are exceptional, in that one to three base pairs inversely repeat the sequence of the germline DNA. These short complementary palindromic sequences are called P nucleotides. We apply the ImmunoSeq deep-sequencing assay to the third complementarity determining region (CDR3 of the β chain of T cell receptors, and use the resulting data to study P nucleotides in the repertoire of naïve and memory CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells. We estimate P nucleotide distributions in a cross section of healthy adults and different T cell subtypes. We show that P nucleotide frequency in all T cell subtypes ranges from 1% to 2%, and that the distribution is highly biased with respect to the coding end of the gene segment. Classification of observed palindromic sequences into P nucleotides using a maximum conditional probability model shows that single base P nucleotides are very rare in VDJ recombination; P nucleotides are primarily two bases long. To explore the role of P nucleotides in thymic selection, we compare P nucleotides in productive and non-productive sequences of CD8(+ naïve T cells. The naïve CD8(+ T cell clones with P nucleotides are more highly expanded.

  9. Captopril increases the intensity of monocyte infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and induces human T helper type 17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho dos Santos, J S; Menezes, C A S; Villani, F N A; Magalhães, L M D; Scharfstein, J; Gollob, K J; Dutra, W O

    2010-12-01

    The anti-hypertensive drug captopril is used commonly to reduce blood pressure of patients with severe forms of Chagas disease, a cardiomyopathy caused by chronic infection with the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Captopril acts by inhibiting angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), the vasopressor metallopeptidase that generates angiotensin II and promotes the degradation of bradykinin (BK). Recent studies in mice models of Chagas disease indicated that captopril can potentiate the T helper type 1 (Th1)-directing natural adjuvant property of BK. Equipped with kinin-releasing cysteine proteases, T. cruzi trypomastigotes were shown previously to invade non-professional phagocytic cells, such as human endothelial cells and murine cardiomyocytes, through the signalling of G protein-coupled bradykinin receptors (B(2) KR). Monocytes are also parasitized by T. cruzi and these cells are known to be important for the host immune response during infection. Here we showed that captopril increases the intensity of T. cruzi infection of human monocytes in vitro. The increased parasitism was accompanied by up-regulated expression of ACE in human monocytes. While T. cruzi infection increased the expression of interleukin (IL)-10 by monocytes significantly, compared to uninfected cells, T. cruzi infection in association with captopril down-modulated IL-10 expression by the monocytes. Surprisingly, studies with peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed that addition of the ACE inhibitor in association with T. cruzi increased expression of IL-17 by CD4(+) T cells in a B(2) KR-dependent manner. Collectively, our results suggest that captopril might interfere with host-parasite equilibrium by enhancing infection of monocytes, decreasing the expression of the modulatory cytokine IL-10, while guiding development of the proinflammatory Th17 subset. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2010 British Society for Immunology.

  10. Human herpesvirus 8-associated lymphoma mimicking cutaneous anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Fang; Hsiao, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Lin; Huang, Wen-Ya; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Huang, Hsien-Neng; Lien, Huang-Chun

    2012-02-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma, a human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8)-associated lymphoma, is uncommon, and it is usually seen in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. It presents as a body cavity-based lymphomatous effusion, but several cases of the so-called solid primary effusion lymphoma presenting as solid tumors without associated lymphomatous effusion have been reported. They have similar clinical, histopathological and immunophenotypical features. Most of them have a B-cell genotype. This suggests the solid variant may represent a clinicopathological spectrum of primary effusion lymphoma. We report a case of HHV8-associated lymphoma histopathologically and immunophenotypically mimicking cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The patient was a 31-year-old HIV-seropositive man presenting with skin nodules over his right thigh. Biopsy of the nodules showed anaplastic large cells infiltrating the dermis. These malignant cells strongly expressed CD3, CD30 and CD43. Cutaneous anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma was initially diagnosed, but further tests, including immunoreactivity for HHV8 protein and clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin genes, confirmed the diagnosis of HHV8-associated B-cell lymphoma with aberrant T-cell marker expression. This case provides an example of solid primary effusion lymphoma mimicking cutaneous anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma and highlights the importance of HHV8 immunohistochemistry and molecular tests in the diagnosis of HHV8-associated lymphoma with a cutaneous presentation. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Ryu; Mizuno, Rie; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ijiri, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. ► tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. ► tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA Met (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA Met was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  12. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, Ryu [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Mizuno, Rie [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Watanabe, Kazunori, E-mail: watanabe@ric.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Ijiri, Kenichi [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  13. Dual Role of miR-21 in CD4+T-Cells : Activation-Induced miR-21 Supports Survival of Memory T-Cells and Regulates CCR7 Expression in Naive T-Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smigielska-Czepiel, Katarzyna; van den Berg, Anke; Jellema, Pytrick; Slezak-Prochazka, Izabella; Maat, Henny; van den Bos, Hilda; van der Lei, Roelof Jan; Kluiver, Joost; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Boots, Anne Mieke H.; Kroesen, Bart-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Immune cell-type specific miRNA expression patterns have been described but the detailed role of single miRNAs in the function of T-cells remains largely unknown. We investigated the role of miR-21 in the function of primary human CD4+ T-cells. MiR-21 is substantially expressed in T-cells with a

  14. T-cell receptor gamma delta bearing cells in normal human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J. D.; Teunissen, M. B.; Cairo, I.; Krieg, S. R.; Kapsenberg, M. L.; Das, P. K.; Borst, J.

    1990-01-01

    T-cell antigen receptors (TCR) are divided into common alpha beta and less common gamma delta types. In the murine skin, TCR gamma delta+ cells have been reported to form the great majority of epidermal T lymphocytes. We have examined the relative contribution of TCR alpha beta+ and TCR gamma delta+

  15. Is a Human CD8 T-Cell Vaccine Possible, and if So, What Would It Take? CD8 T-Cell Vaccines: To B or Not to B?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beura, Lalit K; Jameson, Stephen C; Masopust, David

    2017-12-18

    Although CD8 T-cell vaccines do not have the record of success of humoral-mediated vaccines, they do not receive the same degree of effort. Many diseases, including malaria, tuberculosis, and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) have not yielded to vaccines, and intrinsic barriers may impede approaches limited solely to generating antibodies. Moreover, population growth and modernization are driving an increased pace of new emerging global health threats (human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] is a recent example), which will create unpredictable challenges for vaccinologists. Vaccine-elicited CD8 T cells may contribute to protective modalities, although their development will require a more thorough understanding of CD8 T-cell biology, practices for manufacturing and delivering CD8 T-cell-eliciting vectors that have acceptable safety profiles, and, ultimately, the political will and faith of those that make vaccine research funding decisions. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  16. Usefulness of radioiodine scanning in patients with moderate/high risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma in whom thyroglobulin after thyroxin withdrawal is undetectable after initial treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosario, Pedro Weslley S.; Cardoso, Ludmilla David; Fagundes, Tales Alvarenga; Reis, Janice Sepulveda; Maia, Frederico F. Ribeiro; Purisch, Saulo

    2004-01-01

    We selected 92 patients without anti thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb), in whom thyroglobulin (Tg) after L-thyroxin withdrawal was undetectable ( 1.5 cm; and lymph nodes metastases in 43 (46.7%), local invasion in 26 (28.2%) or distant metastases in 23 (25%). Control whole-body scanning was negative in 78.2% of the cases and showed cervical uptake in the others. Cases presenting thyroid bed uptake in the absence of tumor recurrence did not receive radioiodine and Tg remained undetectable one year after the initial evaluation in all. Cervical uptake was not observed in 4/13 cases on repeated scan. In contrast, even in the absence of uptake and with undetectable Tg, 7 patients with recurrence confirmed by ultrasound (US) received surgical treatment. US showed 92.8% sensitivity for the detection of local-regional disease. The present study suggests that even moderate/high-risk patients without TgAb and with undetectable T g levels (off T 4 ) do not require radioiodine scanning after initial treatment and can be evaluated by cervical US. (author)

  17. Human T Lymphocytes Are Permissive for Dengue Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Guilherme F; Wowk, Pryscilla F; Cataneo, Allan H D; Dos Santos, Paula F; Delgobo, Murilo; Stimamiglio, Marco A; Lo Sarzi, Maria; Thomazelli, Ana Paula F S; Conchon-Costa, Ivete; Pavanelli, Wander R; Antonelli, Lis R V; Báfica, André; Mansur, Daniel S; Dos Santos, Claudia N Duarte; Bordignon, Juliano

    2018-05-15

    Dengue virus (DV) infection can cause either a self-limiting flu-like disease or a threatening hemorrhage that may evolve to shock and death. A variety of cell types, such as dendritic cells, monocytes, and B cells, can be infected by DV. However, despite the role of T lymphocytes in the control of DV replication, there remains a paucity of information on possible DV-T cell interactions during the disease course. In the present study, we have demonstrated that primary human naive CD4 + and CD8 + T cells are permissive for DV infection. Importantly, both T cell subtypes support viral replication and secrete viable virus particles. DV infection triggers the activation of both CD4 + and CD8 + T lymphocytes, but preactivation of T cells reduces the susceptibility of T cells to DV infection. Interestingly, the cytotoxicity-inducing protein granzyme A is highly secreted by human CD4 + but not CD8 + T cells after exposure to DV in vitro Additionally, using annexin V and polycaspase assays, we have demonstrated that T lymphocytes, in contrast to monocytes, are resistant to DV-induced apoptosis. Strikingly, both CD4 + and CD8 + T cells were found to be infected with DV in acutely infected dengue patients. Together, these results show that T cells are permissive for DV infection in vitro and in vivo , suggesting that this cell population may be a viral reservoir during the acute phase of the disease. IMPORTANCE Infection by dengue virus (DV) causes a flu-like disease that can evolve to severe hemorrhaging and death. T lymphocytes are important cells that regulate antibody secretion by B cells and trigger the death of infected cells. However, little is known about the direct interaction between DV and T lymphocytes. Here, we show that T lymphocytes from healthy donors are susceptible to infection by DV, leading to cell activation. Additionally, T cells seem to be resistant to DV-induced apoptosis, suggesting a potential role as a viral reservoir in humans. Finally, we show

  18. Highly efficient elimination of colorectal tumor-initiating cells by an EpCAM/CD3-bispecific antibody engaging human T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Herrmann

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available With their resistance to genotoxic and anti-proliferative drugs and potential to grow tumors and metastases from very few cells, cancer stem or tumor-initiating cells (TICs are a severe limitation for the treatment of cancer by conventional therapies. Here, we explored whether human T cells that are redirected via an EpCAM/CD3-bispecific antibody called MT110 can lyse colorectal TICs and prevent tumor growth from TICs. MT110 recognizes EpCAM, a cell adhesion molecule expressed on TICs from diverse human carcinoma, which was recently shown to promote tumor growth through engagement of elements of the wnt pathway. MT110 was highly potent in mediating complete redirected lysis of KRAS-, PI3 kinase- and BRAF-mutated colorectal TICs, as demonstrated in a soft agar assay. In immunodeficient mice, MT110 prevented growth of tumors from a 5,000-fold excess of a minimally tumorigenic TIC dose. T cells engaged by MT110 may provide a potent therapeutic means to eradicate TICs and bulk tumor cells derived thereof.

  19. Impact of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and epigallocatechin-3-gallate for induction of human regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrmann, Jan; Tatura, Roman; Zeschnigk, Michael; Probst-Kepper, Michael; Geffers, Robert; Steinmann, Joerg; Buer, Jan

    2014-07-01

    The epigenetic regulation of transcription factor genes is critical for T-cell lineage specification. A specific methylation pattern within a conserved region of the lineage specifying transcription factor gene FOXP3, the Treg-specific demethylated region (TSDR), is restricted to regulatory T (Treg) cells and is required for stable expression of FOXP3 and suppressive function. We analysed the impact of hypomethylating agents 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and epigallocatechin-3-gallate on human CD4(+)  CD25(-) T cells for generating demethylation within FOXP3-TSDR and inducing functional Treg cells. Gene expression, including lineage-specifying transcription factors of the major T-cell lineages and their leading cytokines, functional properties and global transcriptome changes were analysed. The FOXP3-TSDR methylation pattern was determined by using deep amplicon bisulphite sequencing. 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine induced FOXP3-TSDR hypomethylation and expression of the Treg-cell-specific genes FOXP3 and LRRC32. Proliferation of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-treated cells was reduced, but the cells did not show suppressive function. Hypomethylation was not restricted to FOXP3-TSDR and expression of master transcription factors and leading cytokines of T helper type 1 and type 17 cells were induced. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate induced global DNA hypomethylation to a lesser extent than 5-aza-2'-deoxycitidine, but no relevant hypomethylation within FOXP3-TSDR or expression of Treg-cell-specific genes. Neither of the DNA methyltransferase inhibitors induced fully functional human Treg cells. 5-aza-2'-deoxycitidine-treated cells resembled Treg cells, but they did not suppress proliferation of responder cells, which is an essential capability to be used for Treg cell transfer therapy. Using a recently developed targeted demethylation technology might be a more promising approach for the generation of functional Treg cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. No evidence for dualism in function and receptors: PD-L2/B7-DC is an inhibitory regulator of human T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfistershammer, Katharina; Klauser, Christoph; Pickl, Winfried F; Stöckl, Johannes; Leitner, Judith; Zlabinger, Gerhard; Majdic, Otto; Steinberger, Peter

    2006-05-01

    The B7 family member programmed-death-1-ligand 2 (PD-L2/B7-DC) is a ligand for programmed-death-receptor 1 (PD-1), a receptor involved in negative regulation of T cell activation. Several independent studies have reported that PD-L2, however, can also potently costimulate murine T cells via an additional yet unidentified receptor. In this study, we evaluated the contribution of PD-L2 to the activation of human T cells using a novel system of engineered T cell stimulators that expresses membrane-bound anti-CD3 antibodies. Analyzing early activation markers, cytokine production and proliferation, we found PD-L2 to consistently inhibit T cell activation. PD-L2 inhibition affected CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and was not abrogated by costimulation via CD28. Blocking PD-1 reverted the inhibitory effect of PD-L2, demonstrating involvement of this pathway. In human T cells, we found no evidence for any of the costimulatory effects described for PD-L2 in murine systems. In line with our functional data that do not point to stimulatory PD-L2-ligands, we show that binding of PD-L2-immunoglobulin to activated human T cells is abrogated by PD-1 antibodies. Our results demonstrate that PD-L2 negatively regulates human T cell activation and thus might be a candidate molecule for immunotherapeutic approaches aimed to attenuate pathological immune responses.

  1. Leukemia-Initiating Cells in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shi Hao; Bertulfo, Fatima Carla; Sanda, Takaomi

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of immature T-cell precursors. T-ALL has many similar pathophysiological features to acute myeloid leukemia, which has been extensively studied in the establishment of the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, but the CSC concept in T-ALL is still debatable. Although leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), which can generate leukemia in a xenograft setting, have been found in both human T-ALL patients and animal models, the nature and origin of LICs are largely unknown. In this review, we discuss recent studies on LICs in T-ALL and the potential mechanisms of LIC emergence in this disease. We focus on the oncogenic transcription factors TAL1, LMO2 , and NOTCH1 and highlight the significance of the transcriptional regulatory programs in normal hematopoietic stem cells and T-ALL.

  2. Leukemia-Initiating Cells in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Hao Tan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL is a hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of immature T-cell precursors. T-ALL has many similar pathophysiological features to acute myeloid leukemia, which has been extensively studied in the establishment of the cancer stem cell (CSC theory, but the CSC concept in T-ALL is still debatable. Although leukemia-initiating cells (LICs, which can generate leukemia in a xenograft setting, have been found in both human T-ALL patients and animal models, the nature and origin of LICs are largely unknown. In this review, we discuss recent studies on LICs in T-ALL and the potential mechanisms of LIC emergence in this disease. We focus on the oncogenic transcription factors TAL1, LMO2, and NOTCH1 and highlight the significance of the transcriptional regulatory programs in normal hematopoietic stem cells and T-ALL.

  3. Human atopic dermatitis skin-derived T cells can induce a reaction in mouse keratinocytes in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Britta C; Blom, Lars; Dyring-Andersen, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    . In comparison, blood -derived in vitro differentiated Th2 cells only induced a weak response in a few of the mice. Thus, we conclude that human AD skin-derived T cells can induce a reaction in mouse skin through induction of a proliferative response in the mouse keratinocytes. This article is protected......In atopic dermatitis (AD), the inflammatory response between skin infiltrating T cells and keratinocytes is fundamental to the development of chronic lesional eczema. The aim of this study was to investigate whether skin-derived T cells from AD patients could induce an inflammatory response in mice...... through keratinocyte activation and consequently cause development of eczematous lesions. Punch biopsies of lesional skin from AD patients were used to establish skin-derived T cell cultures and which were transferred into NOD.Cg-Prkd(scid) Il2rg(tm1Sug) /JicTac (NOG) mice. We found that subcutaneous...

  4. High-level expression of human insulin receptor cDNA in mouse NIH 3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittaker, J.; Okamoto, A.K.; Thys, R.; Bell, G.I.; Steiner, D.F.; Hofmann, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    In order to develop a simple, efficient system for the high-level expression of human insulin receptors in eukaryotic cells, a full-length human kidney insulin receptor cDNA was inserted into a bovine papilloma virus vector under the control of the mouse metallothionein promoter. After transfection of mouse NIH 3T3 cells with this construct, seven cell lines expressing insulin receptors were isolated; two cell lines had more than 10 6 receptors per cell. The cell line with the highest 125 I-insulin binding (NIH 3T3 HIR3.5) had 6 x 10 6 receptors with a K/sub d/ of 10 -9 M. This level was not dependent on exposure to metals but could be increased further to 2 x 10 7 receptors per cell by addition of sodium butyrate to the culture medium. The α and β subunits had apparent molecular weights of 147,000 and 105,000, respectively (compared to 135,000 and 95,000 in IM-9 human lymphocytes), values identical to those of the α and β subunits of the insulin receptors of nontransformed NIH 3T3 cells. This size difference was due to altered carbohydrate composition, as N-glycanase digestion reduced the apparent receptor subunit size of the transfected cells and IM-9 lymphocytes to identical values. The alteration in N-linked oligosaccharide composition could not be ascribed to differences in the kinetics of posttranslational processing of the insulin receptors, which was comparable to that of other cells studied. The basal rate of glycogen synthesis in the cells overexpressing insulin receptors was increased 4- to 5-fold compared with controls. Low levels of added insulin (0.1 nM) caused a 50% increase in the rate of glycogen synthesis

  5. The Transcription Factor Hobit Identifies Human Cytotoxic CD4(+) T Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oja, Anna E.; Vieira Braga, Felipe A.; Remmerswaal, Ester B. M.; Kragten, Natasja A. M.; Hertoghs, Kirsten M. L.; Zuo, Jianmin; Moss, Paul A.; van Lier, René A. W.; van Gisbergen, Klaas P. J. M.; Hombrink, Pleun

    2017-01-01

    The T cell lineage is commonly divided into CD4-expressing helper T cells that polarize immune responses through cytokine secretion and CD8-expressing cytotoxic T cells that eliminate infected target cells by virtue of the release of cytotoxic molecules. Recently, a population of CD4(+) T cells that

  6. Regulation and Gene Expression Profiling of NKG2D Positive Human Cytomegalovirus-Primed CD4+ T-Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Helle; Folkersen, Lasse; Skov, Søren

    2012-01-01

    NKG2D is a stimulatory receptor expressed by natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ T-cells, and γδ T-cells. NKG2D expression is normally absent from CD4+ T-cells, however recently a subset of NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells has been found, which is specific for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). This particular subset of HCMV-specific NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells possesses effector-like functions, thus resembling the subsets of NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells found in other chronic inflammations. However, the precise mechanism leading to NKG2D expression on HCMV-specific CD4+ T-cells is currently not known. In this study we used genome-wide analysis of individual genes and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) to investigate the gene expression profile of NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells, generated from HCMV-primed CD4+ T-cells. We show that the HCMV-primed NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells possess a higher differentiated phenotype than the NKG2D– CD4+ T-cells, both at the gene expression profile and cytokine profile. The ability to express NKG2D at the cell surface was primarily determined by the activation or differentiation status of the CD4+ T-cells and not by the antigen presenting cells. We observed a correlation between CD94 and NKG2D expression in the CD4+ T-cells following HCMV stimulation. However, knock-down of CD94 did not affect NKG2D cell surface expression or signaling. In addition, we show that NKG2D is recycled at the cell surface of activated CD4+ T-cells, whereas it is produced de novo in resting CD4+ T-cells. These findings provide novel information about the gene expression profile of HCMV-primed NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells, as well as the mechanisms regulating NKG2D cell surface expression. PMID:22870231

  7. Regulation and gene expression profiling of NKG2D positive human cytomegalovirus-primed CD4+ T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle Jensen

    Full Text Available NKG2D is a stimulatory receptor expressed by natural killer (NK cells, CD8(+ T-cells, and γδ T-cells. NKG2D expression is normally absent from CD4(+ T-cells, however recently a subset of NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells has been found, which is specific for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. This particular subset of HCMV-specific NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells possesses effector-like functions, thus resembling the subsets of NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells found in other chronic inflammations. However, the precise mechanism leading to NKG2D expression on HCMV-specific CD4(+ T-cells is currently not known. In this study we used genome-wide analysis of individual genes and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA to investigate the gene expression profile of NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells, generated from HCMV-primed CD4(+ T-cells. We show that the HCMV-primed NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells possess a higher differentiated phenotype than the NKG2D(- CD4(+ T-cells, both at the gene expression profile and cytokine profile. The ability to express NKG2D at the cell surface was primarily determined by the activation or differentiation status of the CD4(+ T-cells and not by the antigen presenting cells. We observed a correlation between CD94 and NKG2D expression in the CD4(+ T-cells following HCMV stimulation. However, knock-down of CD94 did not affect NKG2D cell surface expression or signaling. In addition, we show that NKG2D is recycled at the cell surface of activated CD4(+ T-cells, whereas it is produced de novo in resting CD4(+ T-cells. These findings provide novel information about the gene expression profile of HCMV-primed NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells, as well as the mechanisms regulating NKG2D cell surface expression.

  8. Effects of vitamin K3 and K5 on proliferation, cytokine production, and regulatory T cell-frequency in human peripheral-blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Hiroshige; Ishizawa, Hitomi; Nakamura, Yurie; Tadokoro, Hiroko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Sugiyama, Kentaro; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2014-03-18

    The effects of vitamin K (VK) derivatives VK3 and VK5 on human immune cells have not been extensively investigated. We examined the effects of VK3 and VK5 on proliferation, apoptosis, cytokine production, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cell-frequency in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) activated by T cell mitogen in vitro. Anti-proliferative effects of VK3 and VK5 on T-cell mitogen activated PBMCs were assessed by WST assay procedures. Apoptotic cells were determined as Annexin V positive/propidium iodide (PI) negative cells. Cytokine concentrations in the supernatant of the culture medium were measured with bead-array procedures followed by analysis with flow cytometry. The CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cells in mitogen-activated PBMCs were stained with fluorescence-labeled specific antibodies followed by flow cytometry. VK3 and VK5 suppressed the mitogen-activated proliferation of PBMCs significantly at 10-100μM (p<0.05). The data also suggest that VK3 and VK5 promote apoptosis in the mitogen-activated T cells. VK3 and VK5 significantly inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, interleukin (IL)-4, -6, and -10 from the activated PBMCs at 10-100μM (p<0.05). In contrast, VK3 and VK5 significantly increased Treg cell-frequency in the activated PBMCs at concentrations more than 10μM (p<0.001). Our data suggest that VK3 and VK5 attenuate T cell mediated immunity by inhibiting the proliferative response and inducing apoptosis in activated T cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Human T Cells Exhibit Specific and Efficient Antitumor Activity against Human Ovarian Cancer in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hong

    Full Text Available New therapeutic modalities are needed for ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the impressive therapeutic potential of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells to target hematological cancers, and emerging studies suggest a similar impact may be achieved for solid cancers. We sought determine whether genetically-modified T cells targeting the CE7-epitope of L1-CAM, a cell adhesion molecule aberrantly expressed in several cancers, have promise as an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer, first demonstrating that L1-CAM was highly over-expressed on a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, primary ovarian tumor tissue specimens, and ascites-derived primary cancer cells. Human central memory derived T cells (TCM were then genetically modified to express an anti-L1-CAM CAR (CE7R, which directed effector function upon tumor antigen stimulation as assessed by in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. We also found that CE7R+ T cells were able to target primary ovarian cancer cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of CE7R+ TCM induced a significant regression of i.p. established SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors in mice, inhibited ascites formation, and conferred a significant survival advantage compared with control-treated animals. Taken together, these studies indicate that adoptive transfer of L1-CAM-specific CE7R+ T cells may offer a novel and effective immunotherapy strategy for advanced ovarian cancer.

  10. The protein pheromone Er-1 of the ciliate Euplotes raikovi stimulates human T-cell activity: Involvement of interleukin-2 system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervia, Davide, E-mail: d.cervia@unitus.it [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, “Luigi Sacco” University Hospital, University of Milan, Milano (Italy); Catalani, Elisabetta; Belardinelli, Maria Cristina [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Perrotta, Cristiana [Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, “Luigi Sacco” University Hospital, University of Milan, Milano (Italy); Picchietti, Simona [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Alimenti, Claudio [Department of Environmental and Natural Sciences, University of Camerino, Camerino (Italy); Casini, Giovanni; Fausto, Anna Maria [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Vallesi, Adriana [Department of Environmental and Natural Sciences, University of Camerino, Camerino (Italy)

    2013-02-01

    Water-soluble protein signals (pheromones) of the ciliate Euplotes have been supposed to be functional precursors of growth factors and cytokines that regulate cell–cell interaction in multi-cellular eukaryotes. This work provides evidence that native preparations of the Euplotes raikovi pheromone Er-1 (a helical protein of 40 amino acids) specifically increases viability, DNA synthesis, proliferation, and the production of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, and IL-13 in human Jurkat T-cells. Also, Er-1 significantly decreases the mRNA levels of the β and γ subunits of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), while the mRNA levels of the α subunit appeared to be not affected. Jurkat T-cell treatments with Er-1 induced the down-regulation of the IL-2Rα subunit by a reversible and time-dependent endocytosis, and increased the levels of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The cell-type specificity of these effects was supported by the finding that Er-1, although unable to directly influence the growth of human glioma U-373 cells, induced Jurkat cells to synthesize and release factors that, in turn, inhibited the U-373 cell proliferation. Overall, these findings imply that Er-1 coupling to IL-2R and ERK immuno-enhances T-cell activity, and that this effect likely translates to an inhibition of glioma cell growth. -- Highlights: ► Euplotes pheromone Er-1 increases the growth of human Jurkat T-cells. ► Er-1 increases the T-cell production of specific cytokines. ► Er-1 activates interleukin-2 receptor and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. ► The immuno-enhancing effect of Er-1 on Jurkat cells translates to an inhibition of human glioma cell growth.

  11. Human CD4+ T cells lyse target cells via granzyme/perforin upon circumvention of MHC class II restriction by an antibody-like immunoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach, Andreas; Köhler, Heike; Rappl, Gunter; Abken, Hinrich

    2006-10-15

    Immune elimination of tumor cells requires the close cooperation between CD8+ CTL and CD4+ Th cells. We circumvent MHC class II-restriction of CD4+ T cells by expression of a recombinant immunoreceptor with an Ab-derived binding domain redirecting specificity. Human CD4+ T cells grafted with an immunoreceptor specific for carcinoembryonic Ag (CEA) are activated to proliferate and secrete cytokines upon binding to CEA+ target cells. Notably, redirected CD4+ T cells mediate cytolysis of CEA+ tumor cells with high efficiencies. Lysis by redirected CD4+ T cells is independent of death receptor signaling via TNF-alpha or Fas, but mediated by perforin and granzyme because cytolysis is inhibited by blocking the release of cytotoxic granules, but not by blocking of Fas ligand or TNF-alpha. CD4+ T cells redirected by Ab-derived immunoreceptors in a MHC class II-independent fashion substantially extend the power of an adoptive, Ag-triggered immunotherapy not only by CD4+ T cell help, but also by cytolytic effector functions. Because cytolysis is predominantly mediated via granzyme/perforin, target cells that are resistant to death receptor signaling become sensitive to a cytolytic attack by engineered CD4+ T cells.

  12. The immunodominant influenza matrix t cell epitope recognized in human induces influenza protection in HLA-A2/Kb transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnicky, H.; Cyblat-Chanal, D.; Aubry, J.-P.; Derouet, F.; Klinguer-Hamour, C.; Beck, A.; Bonnefoy, J.-Y.; Corvaiea, N.

    2003-01-01

    The protective efficacy of the influenza matrix protein epitope 58-66 (called M1), recognized in the context of human HLA-A2 molecules, was evaluated in a HLA-A2/K b transgenic mouse model of lethal influenza infection. Repeated subcutaneous immunizations with M1 increased the percentage of survival. This effect was mediated by T cells since protection was abolished following in vivo depletion of all T lymphocytes, CD8 + , or CD4 + T cells. The survival correlated with the detection of memory CD8 + splenocytes able to proliferate in vitro upon stimulation with M1 and to bind M1-loaded HLA-A2 dimers, as well as with M1-specific T cells in the lungs, which were directly cytotoxic to influenza-infected cells following influenza challenge. These results demonstrated for the first time that HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T cells specific for the major immunodominant influenza matrix epitope are protective against the infection. They encourage further in vivo evaluation of T cell epitopes recognized in the context of human MHC molecules

  13. {sup 89}Zr-labeled nivolumab for imaging of T-cell infiltration in a humanized murine model of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    England, Christopher G.; Ehlerding, Emily B.; Ellison, Paul A.; Hernandez, Reinier; Barnhart, Todd E. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Jiang, Dawei [Health Science Center, Shenzhen University, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, School of Biomedical Engineering, Guangzhou (China); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Rekoske, Brian T. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); McNeel, Douglas G. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Huang, Peng [Health Science Center, Shenzhen University, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, School of Biomedical Engineering, Guangzhou (China); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Nivolumab is a human monoclonal antibody specific for programmed cell death-1 (PD-1), a negative regulator of T-cell activation and response. Acting as an immune checkpoint inhibitor, nivolumab binds to PD-1 expressed on the surface of many immune cells and prevents ligation by its natural ligands. Nivolumab is only effective in a subset of patients, and there is limited evidence supporting its use for diagnostic, monitoring, or stratification purposes. {sup 89}Zr-Df-nivolumab was synthesized to map the biodistribution of PD-1-expressing tumor infiltrating T-cells in vivo using a humanized murine model of lung cancer. The tracer was developed by radiolabeling the antibody with the positron emitter zirconium-89 ({sup 89}Zr). Imaging results were validated by ex vivo biodistribution studies, and PD-1 expression was validated by immunohistochemistry. Data obtained from PET imaging were used to determine human dosimetry estimations. The tracer showed elevated binding to stimulated PD-1 expressing T-cells in vitro and in vivo. PET imaging of {sup 89}Zr-Df-nivolumab allowed for clear delineation of subcutaneous tumors through targeting of localized activated T-cells expressing PD-1 in the tumors and salivary glands of humanized A549 tumor-bearing mice. In addition to tumor uptake, salivary and lacrimal gland infiltration of T-cells was noticeably visible and confirmed via histological analysis. These data support our claim that PD-1-targeted agents allow for tumor imaging in vivo, which may assist in the design and development of new immunotherapies. In the future, noninvasive imaging of immunotherapy biomarkers may assist in disease diagnostics, disease monitoring, and patient stratification. (orig.)

  14. Towards Deciphering the Hidden Mechanisms That Contribute to the Antigenic Activation Process of Human Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lola Boutin; Lola Boutin; Emmanuel Scotet; Emmanuel Scotet

    2018-01-01

    Vγ9Vδ2 T cells represent a major unconventional γδ T cell subset located in the peripheral blood of adults in humans and several non-human primates. Lymphocytes that constitute this transitional subset can sense subtle level changes of intracellular phosphorylated intermediates of the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway (phosphoantigens, pAg), such as isopentenyl pyrophosphate, during cell stress events. This unique antigenic activation process operates in a rigorous framework that requires the e...

  15. SENIEUR status of the originating cell donor negates certain 'anti-immunosenescence' effects of ebselen and N-acetyl cysteine in human T cell clone cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthandan, Shiva; Freeburn, Robin; Steinbrecht, Susanne; Pawelec, Graham; Barnett, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Damage to T cells of the immune system by reactive oxygen species may result in altered cell function or cell death and thereby potentially impact upon the efficacy of a subsequent immune response. Here, we assess the impact of the antioxidants Ebselen and N-acetyl cysteine on a range of biological markers in human T cells derived from a SENIEUR status donor. In addition, the impact of these antioxidants on different MAP kinase pathways in T cells from donors of different ages was also examined. T cell clones were derived from healthy 26, 45 and SENIEUR status 80 year old people and the impact of titrated concentrations of Ebselen or N-acetyl cysteine on their proliferation and in vitro lifespan, GSH:GSSG ratio as well as levels of oxidative DNA damage and on MAP kinase signaling pathways was examined. In this investigation neither Ebselen nor N-acetyl cysteine supplementation had any impact on the biological endpoints examined in the T cells derived from the SENIEUR status 80 year old donor. This is in contrast to the anti-immunosenescent effects of these antioxidants on T cells from donors of 26 or 45 years of age. The analysis of MAP kinases showed that pro-apoptotic pathways become activated in T cells with increasing in vitro age and that Ebselen or N-acetyl cysteine could decrease activation (phosphorylation) in T cells from 26 or 45 year old donors, but not from the SENIEUR status 80 year old donor. The results of this investigation demonstrate that the biological phenotype of SENIEUR status derived human T cells negates the anti-immunosenescence effects of Ebselen and also N-acetyl cysteine. The results highlight the importance of pre-antioxidant intervention evaluation to determine risk-benefit.

  16. Evidence That Androgens Modulate Human Thymic T Cell Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Nancy J.; Kovacs, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The thymus has long been recognized as a target for the actions of androgenic hormones, but it has only been recently recognized that alterations in circulating levels of gonadal steroids might affect thymic output of T cells. We had the opportunity to examine parameters of thymic cellular output in several hypogonadal men undergoing androgen replacement therapy. Methods Circulating naive (CD4+CD45RA+) T cells were quantitated by flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Cells bearing T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) were quantitated using real-time PCR amplification of DNA isolated from PBMCs from normal men and from hypogonadal men before and after testosterone replacement therapy. Results CD4+CD45+ (“naïve”) T cells comprised 10.5% of lymphocytes in normal males; this proportion was greatly increased in two hypogonadal men (35.5% and 44.4%). One man was studied sequentially during treatment with physiologic doses of testosterone. CD4+CD45RA+ cells fell from 37.36% to 20.05% after one month and to 12.51% after 7 months of normalized androgen levels. In two hypogonadal patients TREC levels fell by 83% and 78% after androgen replacement therapy. Conclusions Our observations indicate that the hypogonadal state is associated with increased thymic output of T cells and that this increase in recent thymic emigrants in peripheral blood is reversed by androgen replacement. PMID:21218609

  17. Upregulation of Glucose Uptake and Hexokinase Activity of Primary Human CD4+ T Cells in Response to Infection with HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Kavanagh Williamson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of primary CD4+ T cells with HIV-1 coincides with an increase in glycolysis. We investigated the expression of glucose transporters (GLUT and glycolytic enzymes in human CD4+ T cells in response to infection with HIV-1. We demonstrate the co-expression of GLUT1, GLUT3, GLUT4, and GLUT6 in human CD4+ T cells after activation, and their concerted overexpression in HIV-1 infected cells. The investigation of glycolytic enzymes demonstrated activation-dependent expression of hexokinases HK1 and HK2 in human CD4+ T cells, and a highly significant increase in cellular hexokinase enzyme activity in response to infection with HIV-1. HIV-1 infected CD4+ T cells showed a marked increase in expression of HK1, as well as the functionally related voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC protein, but not HK2. The elevation of GLUT, HK1, and VDAC expression in HIV-1 infected cells mirrored replication kinetics and was dependent on virus replication, as evidenced by the use of reverse transcription inhibitors. Finally, we demonstrated that the upregulation of HK1 in HIV-1 infected CD4+ T cells is independent of the viral accessory proteins Vpu, Vif, Nef, and Vpr. Though these data are consistent with HIV-1 dependency on CD4+ T cell glucose metabolism, a cellular response mechanism to infection cannot be ruled out.

  18. Genome-Based In Silico Identification of New Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens Activating Polyfunctional CD8+ T Cells in Human Tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Sheila Tuyet; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Caccamo, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    8(+) T cell proliferation assays (CFSE dilution) in 41 M. tuberculosis-responsive donors identified 70 new M. tuberculosis epitopes. Using HLA/peptide tetramers for the 18 most prominently recognized HLA-A*0201-binding M. tuberculosis peptides, recognition by cured TB patients' CD8(+) T cells......-epitope/Ag repertoire for human CD8(+) T cells is much broader than hitherto suspected, and the newly identified M. tuberculosis Ags are recognized by (poly) functional CD8(+) T cells during control of infection. These results impact on TB-vaccine design and biomarker identification. The Journal of Immunology, 2011...

  19. Differentiation, distribution and gammadelta T cell-driven regulation of IL-22-producing T cells in tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyu Yao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation, distribution and immune regulation of human IL-22-producing T cells in infections remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated in a nonhuman primate model that M. tuberculosis infection resulted in apparent increases in numbers of T cells capable of producing IL-22 de novo without in vitro Ag stimulation, and drove distribution of these cells more dramatically in lungs than in blood and lymphoid tissues. Consistently, IL-22-producing T cells were visualized in situ in lung tuberculosis (TB granulomas by confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry, indicating that mature IL-22-producing T cells were present in TB granuloma. Surprisingly, phosphoantigen HMBPP activation of Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells down-regulated the capability of T cells to produce IL-22 de novo in lymphocytes from blood, lung/BAL fluid, spleen and lymph node. Up-regulation of IFNgamma-producing Vgamma2Vdelta2 T effector cells after HMBPP stimulation coincided with the down-regulated capacity of these T cells to produce IL-22 de novo. Importantly, anti-IFNgamma neutralizing Ab treatment reversed the HMBPP-mediated down-regulation effect on IL-22-producing T cells, suggesting that Vgamma2Vdelta2 T-cell-driven IFNgamma-networking function was the mechanism underlying the HMBPP-mediated down-regulation of the capability of T cells to produce IL-22. These novel findings raise the possibility to ultimately investigate the function of IL-22 producing T cells and to target Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells for balancing potentially hyper-activating IL-22-producing T cells in severe TB.

  20. Deep Surveying of the Transcriptional and Alternative Splicing Signatures for Decidual CD8+ T Cells at the First Trimester of Human Healthy Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihong Zeng

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Decidual CD8+ (dCD8 T cells have been proposed to play important roles in immune protection against the invading pathogens and in tolerance toward the growing semi-allogeneic fetus during early pregnancy. However, their phenotypic and functional characteristics remain poorly defined. Here, we performed the first analysis of the transcriptional and alternative splicing (AS signatures for human first-trimester dCD8 T cells using high-throughput mRNA sequencing. Our data revealed that dCD8 T cells have distinct transcriptional and AS landscapes when compared with their autologous peripheral blood CD8+ (pCD8 T counterparts. Furthermore, human dCD8 T cells were observed to contain CD8-Treg and effector-memory T-cell subsets, and display enhanced functionality in terms of degranulation and cytokine production on a per-cell basis. Additionally, we have identified the novel splice junctions that use a high ratio of the non-canonical splicing motif GC-AG and found that AS is not a major contributor to the gene expression-level changes between paired pCD8 and dCD8 T cells. Together, our findings not only provide a comprehensive framework of the transcriptional and AS landscapes but also reveal the functional feature of human dCD8 T cells, which are of great importance in understanding the biology of these cells and the physiology of human healthy pregnancy.

  1. The role of CD4 and CD8 T cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ida Brodskyn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis, caused by infection with parasites of the Leishmania genus, affects millions of individuals worldwide. This disease displays distinct clinical manifestations ranging from self-healing skin lesions to severe tissue damage. The control of Leishmania infection is dependent on cellular immune mechanisms, and evidence has shown that CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes play different roles in the outcome of leishmaniasis. Although the presence of CD4 T cells is important for controlling parasite growth, the results in the literature suggest that the inflammatory response elicited by these cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of lesions. However, recent studies on CD8 T lymphocytes show that these cells are mainly involved in tissue damage through cytotoxic mechanisms. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the study of the human adaptive immunological response in the pathogenesis of tegumentary leishmaniasis.

  2. Characterisation of the Immunomodulatory Effects of Meningococcal Opa Proteins on Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and CD4+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Jones

    Full Text Available Opa proteins are major surface-expressed proteins located in the Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane, and are potential meningococcal vaccine candidates. Although Opa proteins elicit high levels of bactericidal antibodies following immunisation in mice, progress towards human clinical trials has been delayed due to previous findings that Opa inhibits T cell proliferation in some in vitro assays. However, results from previous studies are conflicting, with different Opa preparations and culture conditions being used. We investigated the effects of various Opa+ and Opa- antigens from N. meningitidis strain H44/76 in a range of in vitro conditions using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and purified CD4+ T cells, measuring T cell proliferation by CFSE dilution using flow cytometry. Wild type recombinant and liposomal Opa proteins inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation after stimulation with IL-2, anti-CD3 and anti-CD28, and these effects were reduced by mutation of the CEACAM1-binding region of Opa. These effects were not observed in culture with ex vivo PBMCs. Opa+ and Opa- OMVs did not consistently exert a stimulatory or inhibitory effect across different culture conditions. These data do not support a hypothesis that Opa proteins would be inhibitory to T cells if given as a vaccine component, and T cell immune responses to OMV vaccines are unlikely to be significantly affected by the presence of Opa proteins.

  3. T-dependence of human B lymphocyte proliferative response to mitogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochier, J; Samarut, C; Gueho, J P; Revillard, J P

    1976-01-01

    Human peripheral blood and tonsil lymphocytes were fractionated on anti-Ig-coated Sephadex columns or by centrifugation after rosetting with native sheep erythrocytes. Both methods allowed the recovery of B and T-enriched populations the purity of which was checked by fluorescein-labelled anti-Ig serum, E and EAC rosette formation, and heterologous antisera specific for B or T lymphocytes. The proliferative response of T cells to PHA, Con A, PWM, and ALS was not found different from that of unfractionated cells, whereas no response of the B cells could be observed to these mitogens providing that no contaminating T cells were present. Addition of T lymphocytes to these unresponsive B cells allowed them to respond to phytomitogens, but not to ALS. X-irradiated T cells could, to some extent, replace the diving T lymphocytes; no T-replacing factor could be found in cell-free supernatants from T cells, whether or not they had been activated by mitrogens. This model of B-T cooperation appears useful for studying the differentiation and maturation of human B lymphocytes.

  4. Inhibition of apoptosis in T cells expressing human T cell leukemia virus type I Tax

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copeland, K. F.; Haaksma, A. G.; Goudsmit, J.; Krammer, P. H.; Heeney, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    This study set out to determine whether T cell dysfunction associated with HTLV-I led to increased sensitivity of infected cells to apoptosis or, owing to their potential to develop ATL, if infected cells would become resistant to this process. To test this hypothesis we utilized the monoclonal

  5. Regulatory activity of azabisphosphonate-capped dendrimers on human CD4+ T cell proliferation enhances ex-vivo expansion of NK cells from PBMCs for immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caminade Anne-Marie

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adoptive cell therapy with allogenic NK cells constitutes a promising approach for the treatment of certain malignancies. Such strategies are currently limited by the requirement of an efficient protocol for NK cell expansion. We have developed a method using synthetic nanosized phosphonate-capped dendrimers allowing such expansion. We are showing here that this is due to a specific inhibitory activity towards CD4+ T cell which could lead to further medical applications of this dendrimer. Methods Mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood were used to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of nanosized phosphonate-capped dendrimers on interleukin-2 driven CD4+T cell expansion. Proliferation status was investigated using flow cytometry analysis of CFSE dilution and PI incorporation experiments. Magnetic bead cell sorting was used to address activity towards individual or mixed cell sub-populations. We performed equilibrium binding assay to assess the interaction of fluorescent dendrimers with pure CD4+ T cells. Results Phosphonate-c