WorldWideScience

Sample records for human spine imaging

  1. 7T Human Spine Imaging Arrays With Adjustable Inductive Decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bing; Wang, Chunsheng; Krug, Roland; Kelley, Douglas A.; Xu, Duan; Pang, Yong; Banerjee, Suchandrima; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2010-01-01

    Ultrahigh-field human spine RF transceiver coil arrays face daunting technical challenges in achieving large imaging coverage with sufficient B1 penetration and sensitivity, and in attaining robust decoupling among coil elements. In this paper, human spine coil arrays for ultrahigh field were built and studied. Transceiver arrays with loop-shaped microstrip transmission line were designed, fabricated, and tested for 7-tesla (7T)MRI. With the proposed adjustable inductive decoupling technique, the isolation between adjacent coil elements is easily addressed. Preliminary results of human spine images acquired using the transceiver arrays demonstrate the feasibility of the design for ultrahigh-field MR applications and its robust performance for parallel imaging. PMID:19709956

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine ... limitations of MRI of the Spine? What is MRI of the Spine? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  3. Imaging the human spine using ultrasound : a preliminary study to follow scoliosis progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purnama, I Ketut Eddy

    2007-01-01

    Scoliosis is a three-dimensional deformation of the spine which is recognized in the frontal view by the presence of a lateral curvature. This curvature is characterized by an axial rotation of the vertebrae. The axial rotation in the thoracic region will move and deform the attached ribs resulting

  4. Imaging of cervical spine injuries of childhood

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    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, Georges Y. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, 3951 JPP, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Cervical spine injuries of children, though rare, have a high morbidity and mortality. The pediatric cervical spine is anatomically and biomechanically different from that of adults. Hence, the type, level and outcome of cervical spine injuries in children are different from those seen in adults. Normal developmental variants seen in children can make evaluation of the pediatric cervical spine challenging. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric cervical spine trauma, normal variants seen in children and specific injuries that are more common in the pediatric population. We also propose an evidence-based imaging protocol to avoid unnecessary imaging studies and minimize radiation exposure in children. (orig.)

  5. Automatic lumbar spine measurement in CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yunxiang; Zheng, Dong; Liao, Shu; Peng, Zhigang; Yan, Ruyi; Liu, Junhua; Dong, Zhongxing; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Zhan, Yiqiang; Fei, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Accurate lumbar spine measurement in CT images provides an essential way for quantitative spinal diseases analysis such as spondylolisthesis and scoliosis. In today's clinical workflow, the measurements are manually performed by radiologists and surgeons, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Therefore, automatic and accurate lumbar spine measurement algorithm becomes highly desirable. In this study, we propose a method to automatically calculate five different lumbar spine measurements in CT images. There are three main stages of the proposed method: First, a learning based spine labeling method, which integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information, is used to detect lumbar and sacrum vertebrae in CT images. Then, a multiatlases based image segmentation method is used to segment each lumbar vertebra and the sacrum based on the detection result. Finally, measurements are derived from the segmentation result of each vertebra. Our method has been evaluated on 138 spinal CT scans to automatically calculate five widely used clinical spine measurements. Experimental results show that our method can achieve more than 90% success rates across all the measurements. Our method also significantly improves the measurement efficiency compared to manual measurements. Besides benefiting the routine clinical diagnosis of spinal diseases, our method also enables the large scale data analytics for scientific and clinical researches.

  6. Imaging of current spinal hardware: lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Alice S; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle M

    2014-09-01

    The purposes of this article are to review the indications for and the materials and designs of hardware more commonly used in the lumbar spine; to discuss alternatives for each of the types of hardware; to review normal postoperative imaging findings; to describe the appropriateness of different imaging modalities for postoperative evaluation; and to show examples of hardware complications. Stabilization and fusion of the lumbar spine with intervertebral disk replacement, artificial ligaments, spinous process distraction devices, plate-and-rod systems, dynamic posterior fusion devices, and newer types of material incorporation are increasingly more common in contemporary surgical practice. These spinal hardware devices will be seen more often in radiology practice. Successful postoperative radiologic evaluation of this spinal hardware necessitates an understanding of fundamental hardware design, physiologic objectives, normal postoperative imaging appearances, and unique complications. Radiologists may have little training and experience with the new and modified types of hardware used in the lumbar spine.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine What's in this article? What ...

  8. Pediatric spine imaging post scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharief, Alaa N; El-Hawary, Ron; Schmit, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Many orthopedic articles describe advances in surgical techniques and implants used in pediatric scoliosis surgery. However, even though postoperative spine imaging constitutes a large portion of outpatient musculoskeletal pediatric radiology, few, if any, radiology articles discuss this topic. There has been interval advancement over the last decades of the orthopedic procedures used in the treatment of spinal scoliosis in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. The goal of treatment in these patients is to stop the progression of the curve by blocking the spinal growth and correcting the deformity as much as possible. To that end, the authors in this paper discuss postoperative imaging findings of Harrington rods, Luque rods, Luque-Galveston implants and segmental spinal fusion systems. Regarding early onset scoliosis, the guiding principles used for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis do not apply to a growing spine because they would impede lung development. As a result, other devices have been developed to correct the curve and to allow spinal growth. These include spine-based growing rods, vertically expandable prosthetic titanium rods (requiring repetitive surgeries) and magnetically controlled growing rods (with a magnetic locking/unlocking system). Other more recent systems are Shilla and thoracoscopic anterior vertebral body tethering, which allow guided growth of the spine without repetitive interventions. In this paper, we review the radiologic appearances of different orthopedic implants and techniques used to treat adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and early onset scoliosis. Moreover, we present the imaging findings of the most frequent postoperative complications.

  9. Repeat spine imaging in transferred emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; Kadakia, Rishin J; Kay, Harrison F; Zhang, Chi E; Casimir, Geoffrey E; Devin, Clinton J

    2014-02-15

    Retrospective study. Assess frequency of repeat spine imaging in patients transferred with known spine injuries from outside hospital (OSH) to tertiary receiving institution (RI). Unnecessary repeat imaging after transfer has started to become a recognized problem with the obvious issues related to repeat imaging along with potential for iatrogenic injury with movement of patients with spine problems. Consecutive adult patients presenting to a single 1-level trauma center with spine injuries during a 51-month period were reviewed (n = 4500), resulting in 1427 patients transferred from OSH emergency department. All imaging and radiology reports from the OSH were reviewed, as well as studies performed at RI. A repeat was the same imaging modality used on the same spine region as OSH imaging. The overall rate of repeat spine imaging for both OSH imaging sent and not sent was 23%, and 6% if repeat spine imaging via traumagram (partial/full-body computed tomography [CT]) was excluded as a repeat. The overall rate of repeat CT was 29% (7% dedicated spine CT scans and 22% part of nondedicated spine CT scan).An observation of only those patients with OSH imaging that was sent and viewable revealed that 23% underwent repeat spine imaging with 23% undergoing repeat spine CT and 41% repeat magnetic resonance imaging.In those patients with sent and viewable OSH imaging, a lack of reconstructions prompted 14% of repeats, whereas inadequate visualization of injury site prompted 8%. In only 8% of the repeats did it change management or provide necessary surgical information. This study is the first to investigate the frequency of repeat spine imaging in transfers with known spine injuries and found a substantially high rate of repeat spine CT with minimal alteration in care. Potential solutions include only performing scans at the OSH necessary to establish a diagnosis requiring transfer and improving communication between OSH and RI physicians. 4.

  10. MR imaging of acute cervical spine injuries

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    Kim, Kyu Hwa; Lee, Jung Hyung; Joo, Yang Goo [School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-15

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the patients with acute cervical spinal injury and to assess the usefulness of the MR imagings. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 32 patients with acute cervical spinal injury. MR images were obtained with a 2.0 T superconductive MR imaging units (Spectro-20000, Gold-Star, Seoul), using spin-echo and gradient-echo technique. Most of patients were in their 3rd-4th decades and motor vehicle accident was the most frequent cause of acute cervical trauma. We assessed the MR findings with respect to the spinal cord, ligaments, paravertebral soft tissues, intervertebral disk, and bony spine. Spinal cord injury was the most common (65%), where cord swelling, edema, and/or hematoma were demonstrated most frequently at C5-6 level. Traumatic intervertebral disk herniations were the second most common (62.5%) and frequently occurred at the lower cervical levels, mostly at C5-6. Paravertebral soft tissue injury, vertebral body fracture, bone marrow edema and displacement were also well shown on MR images. MR imaging appears to be essential for the evaluation of traumatic disk herniations, spinal cord abnormalities, and injury of paravertebral soft tissue in the acute injury of the cervical spine.

  11. A method for articulating and displaying the human spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Robert W

    2009-11-01

    An inexpensive and effective method for articulating a dry human spine is described. By constructing a Styrofoam spine tray, analysts can now accurately position and align each vertebra in correct anatomical order, allow for gaps because of missing vertebrae, and lay out the spine for documentation and photography. The spine tray provides analysts with a quick, easy, and professional quality method for aligning and orienting the human spine in the field and laboratory.

  12. Developmental biomechanics of the human cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuckley, David J; Linders, David R; Ching, Randal P

    2013-04-05

    Head and neck injuries, the leading cause of death for children in the U.S., are difficult to diagnose, treat, and prevent because of a critical void in our understanding of the biomechanical response of the immature cervical spine. The objective of this study was to investigate the functional and failure biomechanics of the cervical spine across multiple axes of loading throughout maturation. A correlational study design was used to examine the relationships governing spinal maturation and biomechanical flexibility curves and tolerance data using a cadaver human in vitro model. Eleven human cadaver cervical spines from across the developmental spectrum (2-28 years) were dissected into segments (C1-C2, C3-C5, and C6-C7) for biomechanical testing. Non-destructive flexibility tests were performed in tension, compression, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. After measuring their intact biomechanical responses, each segment group was failed in different modes to measure the tissue tolerance in tension (C1-C2), compression (C3-C5), and extension (C5-C6). Classical injury patterns were observed in all of the specimens tested. Both the functional (pspine throughout maturation and elucidated age, spinal level, and mode of loading specificity. These data support our understanding of the child cervical spine from a developmental perspective and facilitate the generation of injury prevention or management schema for the mitigation of child spine injuries and their deleterious effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rheumatic diseases of the spine: imaging diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, J A; Hernández-Gañán, J; Isern, J; Sánchez-Fernández, J J

    2016-04-01

    Spinal involvement is common both in the spondyloarthritides and in rheumatoid arthritis, in which the cervical segment is selectively affected. Rheumatoid involvement of the cervical spine has characteristic radiologic manifestations, fundamentally different patterns of atlantoaxial instability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for evaluating the possible repercussions of atlantoaxial instability on the spinal cord and/or nerve roots in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as for evaluating parameters indicative of active inflammation, such as bone edema and synovitis. Axial involvement is characteristic in the spondyloarthritides and has distinctive manifestations on plain-film X-rays, which reflect destructive and reparative phenomena. The use of MRI has changed the conception of spondyloarthritis because it is able to directly detect the inflammatory changes that form part of the disease, making it possible to establish the diagnosis early in the disease process, when plain-film X-ray findings are normal (non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis), to assess the prognosis of the disease, and to contribute to treatment planning. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Cervical spine injury in the elderly: imaging features

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    Ehara, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan); Shimamura, Tadashi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    An increase in the elderly population has resulted in an increased incidence of cervical spine injury in this group. No specific type of cervical spine trauma is seen in the elderly, although dens fractures are reported to be common. Hyperextension injuries due to falling and the resultant central cord syndrome in the mid and lower cervical segments due to decreased elasticity as a result of spondylosis may be also characteristic. The imaging features of cervical spine injury are often modified by associated spondylosis deformans, DISH and other systemic disorders. The value of MR imaging in such cases is emphasized. (orig.)

  15. Comparative anatomical dimensions of the complete human and porcine spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Iris; Ploegmakers, Joris J. W.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus J.; Veldhuizen, Albert G.

    New spinal implants and surgical procedures are often tested pre-clinically on human cadaver spines. However, the availability of fresh frozen human cadaver material is very limited and alternative animal spines are more easily available in all desired age groups, and have more uniform geometrical

  16. Pediatric cervical spine trauma imaging: a practical approach

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    Egloff, Alexia M.; Kadom, Nadja; Vezina, Gilbert; Bulas, Dorothy [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Cervical spine trauma in children is rare and the diagnosis can be challenging due to anatomical and biomechanical differences as compared to adults. A variety of algorithms have been used in adults to accurately diagnose injuries, but have not been fully studied in pediatric patients. In this article we review suggested imaging protocols and the general characteristics, types of injuries, and measurements used to diagnose cervical spine injuries in children. (orig.)

  17. Imaging of benign tumors of the osseous spine

    OpenAIRE

    Riahi, Hend; Mechri, Meriem; Barsaoui, Maher; Bouaziz, Mouna; Vanhoenacker, Filip; Ladeb, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the imaging features of the most prevalent benign bone tumors involving the spine. Benign tumors of the osseous spine account approximately for 1% of all primary skeletal tumors. Many lesions exhibit characteristic radiologic features. In addition to age and location of the lesion, radiographs are an essential step in the initial detection and characterization but are limited to complex anatomy and superposition. CT and MR imagi...

  18. Concomitant lower thoracic spine disc disease in lumbar spine MR imaging studies

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    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Dosda, Rosa; Molla, Enrique [Department of Radiology, Quiron Clinic, Avd. Blasco Ibanez, 14, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2002-11-01

    Our objective was to study the coexistence of lower thoracic-spine disc changes in patients with low back pain using a large field of view (FOV) in lumbar spine MR imaging. One hundred fifty patients with low back pain were referred to an MR examination. All patients were studied with a large FOV (27 cm), covering from the coccyx to at least the body of T11. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion, and extrusion (either epiphyseal or intervertebral). The relationship between disc disease and level was established with the Pearson {chi}{sup 2} test. The T11-12 was the most commonly affected level of the lower thoracic spine with 58 disc cases rated as abnormal. Abnormalities of T11-12 and T12-L1 discs were significantly related only to L1-L2 disease (p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively) but unrelated to other disc disease, patient's gender, and age. No correlation was found between other discs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine can detect a great amount of lower thoracic disease, although its clinical significance remains unknown. A statistically significant relation was found within the thoracolumbar junctional region (T11-L2), reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation with lower lumbar spine discs is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  19. Imaging current spine hardware: part 1, cervical spine and fracture fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle M; Ha, Alice S

    2014-08-01

    The goals of this article are to review the indications for use, the materials, and the designs of hardware more commonly used in the cervical spine; to discuss alternatives for each of the different types of hardware; to review normal postoperative imaging findings; to describe the appropriateness of different imaging modalities for postoperative evaluation; and to illustrate examples of hardware complications. This article will also review vertebral body fracture fixation. Stabilization and fusion of the spine with intervertebral disk replacement, artificial ligaments, spinous process distraction devices, plate-and-rod systems, dynamic posterior fusion devices, and implants composed of new types of material are increasingly more common in the contemporary surgical practice. These spinal hardware devices will be seen more often in radiology practice. Successful postoperative radiologic evaluation of spinal hardware necessitates an understanding of the fundamental design of the hardware, the physiologic objective of the hardware, normal and abnormal postoperative imaging appearances, and complications unique to the hardware.

  20. Anatomy of large animal spines and its comparison to the human spine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Hua-Zi; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Zhou, Yi-Fei

    2010-01-01

    Animal models have been commonly used for in vivo and in vitro spinal research. However, the extent to which animal models resemble the human spine has not been well known. We conducted a systematic review to compare the morphometric features of vertebrae between human and animal species, so as to give some suggestions on how to choose an appropriate animal model in spine research. A literature search of all English language peer-reviewed publications was conducted using PubMed, OVID, Springer and Elsevier (Science Direct) for the years 1980-2008. Two reviewers extracted data on the anatomy of large animal spines from the identified articles. Each anatomical study of animals had to include at least three vertebral levels. The anatomical data from all animal studies were compared with the existing data of the human spine in the literature. Of the papers retrieved, seven were included in the review. The animals in the studies involved baboon, sheep, porcine, calf and deer. Distinct anatomical differences of vertebrae were found between the human and each large animal spine. In cervical region, spines of the baboon and human are more similar as compared to other animals. In thoracic and lumbar regions, the mean pedicle height of all animals was greater than the human pedicles. There was similar mean pedicle width between animal and the human specimens, except in thoracic segments of sheep. The human spinal canal was wider and deeper in the anteroposterior plane than any of the animals. The mean human vertebral body width and depth were greater than that of the animals except in upper thoracic segments of the deer. However, the mean vertebral body height was lower than that of all animals. This paper provides a comprehensive review to compare vertebrae geometries of experimental animal models to the human vertebrae, and will help for choosing animal model in vivo and in vitro spine research. When the animal selected for spine research, the structural similarities and

  1. Comparison of Cervical Spine Anatomy in Calves, Pigs and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Xu, Hua-Zi; Wang, Yong-Li; Zhu, Qing-An; Mao, Fang-Min; Lin, Yan; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Animals are commonly used to model the human spine for in vitro and in vivo experiments. Many studies have investigated similarities and differences between animals and humans in the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae. However, a quantitative anatomic comparison of calf, pig, and human cervical spines has not been reported. To compare fundamental structural similarities and differences in vertebral bodies from the cervical spines of commonly used experimental animal models and humans. Anatomical morphometric analysis was performed on cervical vertebra specimens harvested from humans and two common large animals (i.e., calves and pigs). Multiple morphometric parameters were directly measured from cervical spine specimens of twelve pigs, twelve calves and twelve human adult cadavers. The following anatomical parameters were measured: vertebral body width (VBW), vertebral body depth (VBD), vertebral body height (VBH), spinal canal width (SCW), spinal canal depth (SCD), pedicle width (PW), pedicle depth (PD), pedicle inclination (PI), dens width (DW), dens depth (DD), total vertebral width (TVW), and total vertebral depth (TVD). The atlantoaxial (C1-2) joint in pigs is similar to that in humans and could serve as a human substitute. The pig cervical spine is highly similar to the human cervical spine, except for two large transverse processes in the anterior regions ofC4-C6. The width and depth of the calf odontoid process were larger than those in humans. VBW and VBD of calf cervical vertebrae were larger than those in humans, but the spinal canal was smaller. Calf C7 was relatively similar to human C7, thus, it may be a good substitute. Pig cervical vertebrae were more suitable human substitutions than calf cervical vertebrae, especially with respect to C1, C2, and C7. The biomechanical properties of nerve vascular anatomy and various segment functions in pig and calf cervical vertebrae must be considered when selecting an animal model for research on the spine.

  2. Anatomic and functional imaging in the diagnosis of spine metastases and response assessment after spine radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Moaaz; Taunk, Neil K; Simons, Robert E; Osborne, Joseph R; Kim, Michelle M; Szerlip, Nicholas J; Spratt, Daniel E

    2017-01-01

    Spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SSRS) has recently emerged as an increasingly effective treatment for spinal metastases. Studies performed over the past decade have examined the role of imaging in the diagnosis of metastases, as well as treatment response following SSRS. In this paper, the authors describe and review the utility of several imaging modalities in the diagnosis of spinal metastases and monitoring of their response to SSRS. Specifically, we review the role of CT, MRI, and positron emission tomography (PET) in their ability to differentiate between osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions, delineation of initial bony pathology, detection of treatment-related changes in bone density and vertebral compression fracture after SSRS, and tumor response to therapy. Validated consensus guidelines defining the imaging approach to SSRS are needed to standardize the diagnosis and treatment response assessment after SSRS. Future directions of spinal imaging, including advances in targeted tumor-specific molecular imaging markers demonstrate early promise for advancing the role of imaging in SSRS.

  3. Comparison of the immature sheep spine and the growing human spine: a spondylometric database for growth modulating research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Carol; Sprecher, Christoph Martin; Milz, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    A comparative study on growth of the sheep and human spine. To validate the immature sheep spine as model for the growing human spine and to yield a database for planning and interpretation of future animal experiments. With the current change of paradigm to nonfusion strategies for pediatric spine deformities, experimental surgery on spines of growing goats, sheep, and pigs has gained importance as preclinical proof-of-concept test. However, despite the proceeding use of animals, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the growth of the sheep spine and the relation to the human spine. Thoracic and lumbar cadaver spines were harvested from 50 Swiss alpine sheep. Specimens were obtained from newborn, 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12, 15 and 18 months old female sheep. Direct spondylometry yielded vertebral body heights, widths, and depths and spinal canal size, which were compared to pooled data on human spine growth retrieved from the literature. Sheep spine growth ceases at age 15 to 18 months, which corresponds to a time-lapse model of human growth. Main growth occurs within the first 3 to 6 months of life, as opposed to human spines with maximal growth during the first 4 years and puberty. The relation between sheep and human vertebral shape is continuously changing with growth: at birth, sheep vertebrae are twice as tall, but equally wide and deep. At skeletal maturity, height is 15% to 25% bigger in sheep, but width 15% to 30% and depth 30% to 50% are smaller. The immature sheep spine offers fast effects if growth-modulating interventions are performed within the first 3 to 6 months of age. The differences in vertebral shapes and further distinctions between human and sheep spines such as biomechanics, facet anatomy, and rib cage morphology have to be considered when interpreting results after experimental surgery.

  4. Computer assisted quantitative analysis of deformities of the human spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonck, B; Nijlunsing, R; Gerritsen, FA; Cheung, J; Veldhuizen, A; Devillers, S; Makram-Ebeid, S; Wells, WM; Colchester, A; Delp, S

    1998-01-01

    Nowadays, conventional X-ray radiographs are still the images of choice for evaluating spinal deformaties such as scoliosis. However, digital translation reconstruction gives easy access to high quality, digital overview images of the entire spine. This work aims at improving the description of the

  5. Cervical human spine loads during traumatomechanical investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallieris, D.; Rizzetti, A.; Mattern. R.; Thunnissen, J.G.M.; Philippens, M.M.G.M.

    1996-01-01

    The last decade's improvements in automotive safety resulted into a significant decrease of fatal injuries. However, due to the use of belts and airbags it can be observed that cervical spine injuries, non-severe and severe, have become more important. It seems that inertial loading of the neck by

  6. I-SPINE: a software package for advances in image-guided and minimally invasive spine procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Jeong; Cleary, Kevin R.; Zeng, Jianchao; Gary, Kevin A.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Watson, Vance; Lindisch, David; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-05-01

    While image guidance is now routinely used in the brain in the form of frameless stereotaxy, it is beginning to be more widely used in other clinical areas such as the spine. At Georgetown University Medical Center, we are developing a program to provide advanced visualization and image guidance for minimally invasive spine procedures. This is a collaboration between an engineering-based research group and physicians from the radiology, neurosurgery, and orthopaedics departments. A major component of this work is the ISIS Center Spine Procedures Imaging and Navigation Engine, which is a software package under development as the base platform for technical advances.

  7. High speed two-photon imaging of calcium dynamics in dendritic spines: consequences for spine calcium kinetics and buffer capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Niels Cornelisse

    Full Text Available Rapid calcium concentration changes in postsynaptic structures are crucial for synaptic plasticity. Thus far, the determinants of postsynaptic calcium dynamics have been studied predominantly based on the decay kinetics of calcium transients. Calcium rise times in spines in response to single action potentials (AP are almost never measured due to technical limitations, but they could be crucial for synaptic plasticity. With high-speed, precisely-targeted, two-photon point imaging we measured both calcium rise and decay kinetics in spines and secondary dendrites in neocortical pyramidal neurons. We found that both rise and decay kinetics of changes in calcium-indicator fluorescence are about twice as fast in spines. During AP trains, spine calcium changes follow each AP, but not in dendrites. Apart from the higher surface-to-volume ratio (SVR, we observed that neocortical dendritic spines have a markedly smaller endogenous buffer capacity with respect to their parental dendrites. Calcium influx time course and calcium extrusion rate were both in the same range for spines and dendrites when fitted with a dynamic multi-compartment model that included calcium binding kinetics and diffusion. In a subsequent analysis we used this model to investigate which parameters are critical determinants in spine calcium dynamics. The model confirmed the experimental findings: a higher SVR is not sufficient by itself to explain the faster rise time kinetics in spines, but only when paired with a lower buffer capacity in spines. Simulations at zero calcium-dye conditions show that calmodulin is more efficiently activated in spines, which indicates that spine morphology and buffering conditions in neocortical spines favor synaptic plasticity.

  8. High speed two-photon imaging of calcium dynamics in dendritic spines: consequences for spine calcium kinetics and buffer capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelisse, L Niels; van Elburg, Ronald A J; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Yuste, Rafael; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2007-10-24

    Rapid calcium concentration changes in postsynaptic structures are crucial for synaptic plasticity. Thus far, the determinants of postsynaptic calcium dynamics have been studied predominantly based on the decay kinetics of calcium transients. Calcium rise times in spines in response to single action potentials (AP) are almost never measured due to technical limitations, but they could be crucial for synaptic plasticity. With high-speed, precisely-targeted, two-photon point imaging we measured both calcium rise and decay kinetics in spines and secondary dendrites in neocortical pyramidal neurons. We found that both rise and decay kinetics of changes in calcium-indicator fluorescence are about twice as fast in spines. During AP trains, spine calcium changes follow each AP, but not in dendrites. Apart from the higher surface-to-volume ratio (SVR), we observed that neocortical dendritic spines have a markedly smaller endogenous buffer capacity with respect to their parental dendrites. Calcium influx time course and calcium extrusion rate were both in the same range for spines and dendrites when fitted with a dynamic multi-compartment model that included calcium binding kinetics and diffusion. In a subsequent analysis we used this model to investigate which parameters are critical determinants in spine calcium dynamics. The model confirmed the experimental findings: a higher SVR is not sufficient by itself to explain the faster rise time kinetics in spines, but only when paired with a lower buffer capacity in spines. Simulations at zero calcium-dye conditions show that calmodulin is more efficiently activated in spines, which indicates that spine morphology and buffering conditions in neocortical spines favor synaptic plasticity.

  9. Ultrasound Imaging of Spine: State of the Art and Utility for Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Bouffard, Antonio J.; Garcia, Kathleen; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Ebert, Douglas J. W.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Ultrasound imaging (sonography) has been increasingly used for both primary diagnosis and monitoring of musculoskeletal injury, including fractures. In certain injuries, sonography has been shown to equal or surpass Magnetic Resonance Imaging in accuracy. Long-term exposure to reduced gravity may be expected to cause physiological and anatomical changes of the musculoskeletal system, which are not fully described or understood. In a limited-resource environment like space flight, sonography will likely remain the only imaging modality; therefore, further attention to its potential is warranted, including its ability to image anatomical deviations as well as irregularities of vertebrae and the spinal column. Methods: A thorough review of literature was conducted on the subject. A multipurpose ultrasound system was used to identify specific vertebrae, intervertebral disks, and other structures of the cervical spine in healthy volunteers, selected to represent various age, gender, and Body Mass Index (BMI) groups. Sonographic views were sought that would parallel radiographic views and signs used in the diagnosis of cervical spine injuries. Results: While using widely accepted radiographic signs of cervical spine injury, this sonographic protocol development effort resulted in successful identification of scanning planes and imaging protocols that could serve as alternatives for radiography. Some of these views are also applicable to diagnosing degenerative disk and bone disease, and other non-traumatic spine pathology. Strong, preliminary correlation has been demonstrated in a number of clinical cases between sonography and other imaging modalities. Conclusion: In the absence of radiography, sonography can be used to diagnose or rule out certain common types of cervical spine conditions including injury. Clinical validation of the findings appears to be realistic and would facilitate establishment of new sonographic protocols for special environments

  10. Relevant Anatomic and Morphological Measurements of the Rat Spine: Considerations for Rodent Models of Human Spine Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumard, Nicolas V; Leung, Jennifer; Gokhale, Akhilesh J; Guarino, Benjamin B; Welch, William C; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2015-10-15

    Basic science study measuring anatomical features of the cervical and lumbar spine in rat with normalized comparison with the human. The goal of this study is to comprehensively compare the rat and human cervical and lumbar spines to investigate whether the rat is an appropriate model for spine biomechanics investigations. Animal models have been used for a long time to investigate the effects of trauma, degenerative changes, and mechanical loading on the structure and function of the spine. Comparative studies have reported some mechanical properties and/or anatomical dimensions of the spine to be similar between various species. However, those studies are largely limited to the lumbar spine, and a comprehensive comparison of the rat and human spines is lacking. Spines were harvested from male Holtzman rats (n = 5) and were scanned using micro- computed tomography and digitally rendered in 3 dimensions to quantify the spinal bony anatomy, including the lateral width and anteroposterior depth of the vertebra, vertebral body, and spinal canal, as well as the vertebral body and intervertebral disc heights. Normalized measurements of the vertebra, vertebral body, and spinal canal of the rat were computed and compared with corresponding measurements from the literature for the human in the cervical and lumbar spinal regions. The vertebral dimensions of the rat spine vary more between spinal levels than in humans. Rat vertebrae are more slender than human vertebrae, but the width-to-depth axial aspect ratios are very similar in both species in both the cervical and lumbar regions, especially for the spinal canal. The similar spinal morphology in the axial plane between rats and humans supports using the rat spine as an appropriate surrogate for modeling axial and shear loading of the human spine.

  11. MR imaging of the spine in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duthoy, M.J.; Lund, G.

    1988-08-01

    MR imaging was reviewed in 66 pediatric spinal cord patients with diagnoses of posterior fossa tumor, primary spinal cord tumor, metastatic disease, neuroectodermal disorder, congenital malformation, trauma, and demyelinating, neurodegenerative, or metabolic disorders. MR proved to be useful in delineating the extent of posterior fossa and cord tumor including metastasis to the cord. MR was of limited value in demyelinating and metabolic disorders. Arnold Chiari malformations, syringomyelia, tethered cord and meningoceles were all easily evaluated using MR.

  12. Imaging in spine and spinal cord malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Andrea E-mail: a.rossi@panet.itandrearossi@ospedale-gaslini.ge.it; Biancheri, Roberta; Cama, Armando; Piatelli, Gianluca; Ravegnani, Marcello; Tortori-Donati, Paolo

    2004-05-01

    Spinal and spinal cord malformations are collectively named spinal dysraphisms. They arise from defects occurring in the early embryological stages of gastrulation (weeks 2-3), primary neurulation (weeks 3-4), and secondary neurulation (weeks 5-6). Spinal dysraphisms are categorized into open spinal dysraphisms (OSDs), in which there is exposure of abnormal nervous tissues through a skin defect, and closed spinal dysraphisms (CSD), in which there is a continuous skin coverage to the underlying malformation. Open spinal dysraphisms basically include myelomeningocele and other rare abnormalities such as myelocele and hemimyelo(meningo)cele. Closed spinal dysraphisms are further categorized based on the association with low-back subcutaneous masses. Closed spinal dysraphisms with mass are represented by lipomyelocele, lipomyelomeningocele, meningocele, and myelocystocele. Closed spinal dysraphisms without mass comprise simple dysraphic states (tight filum terminale, filar and intradural lipomas, persistent terminal ventricle, and dermal sinuses) and complex dysraphic states. The latter category further comprises defects of midline notochordal integration (basically represented by diastematomyelia) and defects of segmental notochordal formation (represented by caudal agenesis and spinal segmental dysgenesis). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the preferred modality for imaging these complex abnormalities. The use of the aforementioned classification scheme is greatly helpful to make the diagnosis.

  13. Role of imaging in spine, hand, and wrist osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feydy, Antoine; Pluot, Etienne; Guerini, Henri; Drapé, Jean-Luc

    2009-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the wrist is mainly secondary to traumatic ligamentous or bone injuries. Involvement of the radiocarpal joint occurs early on in the disease, whereas the mediocarpal joint is involved at a later stage. Metabolic diseases may also involve the wrist and affect specific joints such as the scapho-trapezio-trapezoid joint. Although OA of the wrist is routinely diagnosed on plain films, a thorough assessment of cartilage injuries on computed tomographic arthrography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or MR arthrography remains necessary before any surgical procedure. OA of the fingers is frequently encountered in postmenopausal women. Distal interphalangeal joints and trapezio-metacarpal joint are the most frequently involved joints. Whereas the clinical diagnosis of OA of the wrist and hand is straightforward, the therapeutic management of symptomatic forms remains unclear, with no clear guidelines. OA of the spine is related to degenerative changes of the spine involving the disc space, vertebral endplates, the facet joints, or the supportive and surrounding soft tissues. The sequelae of disc degeneration are among the leading causes of functional incapacity in both sexes, and are a common source of chronic disability in the working years. Disc degeneration involves structural disruption and cell-mediated changes in composition. Radiography remains usually the first-line imaging method. MRI is ideally suited for delineating the presence, extent, and complications of degenerative spinal disease. Other imaging modalities such as computed tomography, dynamic radiography, myelography, and discography may provide complementary information in selected cases, especially before an imaging-guided percutaneous treatment or spinal surgery. The presence of degenerative changes on imaging examinations is by no means an indicator of symptoms, and there is a high prevalence of lesions in asymptomatic individuals. This article focuses on imaging of OA of the

  14. General Computational Model for Human Musculoskeletal System of Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungsoo Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A general computational model of the human lumbar spine and trunk muscles including optimization formulations was provided. For a given condition, the trunk muscle forces could be predicted considering the human physiology including the follower load concept. The feasibility of the solution could be indirectly validated by comparing the compressive force, the shear force, and the joint moment. The presented general computational model and optimization technology can be fundamental tools to understand the control principle of human trunk muscles.

  15. [Research on the range of motion measurement system for spine based on LabVIEW image processing technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofang; Deng, Linhong; Lu, Hu; He, Bin

    2014-08-01

    A measurement system based on the image processing technology and developed by LabVIEW was designed to quickly obtain the range of motion (ROM) of spine. NI-Vision module was used to pre-process the original images and calculate the angles of marked needles in order to get ROM data. Six human cadaveric thoracic spine segments T7-T10 were selected to carry out 6 kinds of loads, including left/right lateral bending, flexion, extension, cis/counterclockwise torsion. The system was used to measure the ROM of segment T8-T9 under the loads from 1 Nm to 5 Nm. The experimental results showed that the system is able to measure the ROM of the spine accurately and quickly, which provides a simple and reliable tool for spine biomechanics investigators.

  16. A visco-hyperelastic constitutive model for human spine ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yugang; Wang, Yu; Peng, Xiongqi

    2015-03-01

    Human spine ligaments show a highly non-linear, strain rate dependent biomechanical behavior under tensile tests. A visco-hyperelastic fiber-reinforced constitutive model was accordingly developed for human ligaments, in which the energy density function is decomposed into two parts. The first part represents the elastic strain energy stored in the soft tissue, and the second part denotes the energy dissipated due to its inherent viscous characteristics. The model is applied to various human spinal ligaments including the anterior and posterior longitudinal ligaments, ligamentum flavum, capsular ligament, and interspinous ligament. Material parameters for each type of ligament were obtained by curve-fitting with corresponding experimental data available in the literature. The results indicate that the model presented here can properly characterize the visco-hyperelastic biomechanical behavior of human spine ligaments.

  17. Imaging of acute cervical spine injuries: review and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tins, B.J. [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry (United Kingdom); Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Victor.Pullicino@rjah.nhs.uk

    2004-10-01

    Advances in imaging technology have been successfully applied in the emergency trauma setting with great benefit providing early, accurate and efficient diagnoses. Gaps in the knowledge of imaging acute spinal injury remain, despite a vast wealth of useful research and publications on the role of CT and MRI. This article reviews in a balanced manner the main questions that still face the attending radiologist by embracing the current and evolving concepts to help define and provide answers to the following; Imaging techniques - strengths and weaknesses; what are the implications of a missed cervical spine injury?; who should be imaged?; how should they be imaged?; spinal immobilisation - help or hazard?; residual open questions; what does all this mean?; and what are the implications for the radiologist? Although there are many helpful guidelines, the residual gaps in the knowledge base result in incomplete answers to the questions posed. The identification of these gaps in knowledge however should act as the initiating stimulus for further research. All too often there is a danger that the performance and productivity of the imaging modalities is the main research focus and not enough attention is given to the two fundamental prerequisites to the assessment of any imaging technology - the clinical selection criteria for imaging and the level of expertise of the appropriate clinician interpreting the images.

  18. ISSLS PRIZE IN BIOENGINEERING SCIENCE 2017: Automation of reading of radiological features from magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of the lumbar spine without human intervention is comparable with an expert radiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaludin, Amir; Lootus, Meelis; Kadir, Timor; Zisserman, Andrew; Urban, Jill; Battié, Michele C; Fairbank, Jeremy; McCall, Iain

    2017-05-01

    Investigation of the automation of radiological features from magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of the lumbar spine. To automate the process of grading lumbar intervertebral discs and vertebral bodies from MRIs. MR imaging is the most common imaging technique used in investigating low back pain (LBP). Various features of degradation, based on MRIs, are commonly recorded and graded, e.g., Modic change and Pfirrmann grading of intervertebral discs. Consistent scoring and grading is important for developing robust clinical systems and research. Automation facilitates this consistency and reduces the time of radiological analysis considerably and hence the expense. 12,018 intervertebral discs, from 2009 patients, were graded by a radiologist and were then used to train: (1) a system to detect and label vertebrae and discs in a given scan, and (2) a convolutional neural network (CNN) model that predicts several radiological gradings. The performance of the model, in terms of class average accuracy, was compared with the intra-observer class average accuracy of the radiologist. The detection system achieved 95.6% accuracy in terms of disc detection and labeling. The model is able to produce predictions of multiple pathological gradings that consistently matched those of the radiologist. The model identifies 'Evidence Hotspots' that are the voxels that most contribute to the degradation scores. Automation of radiological grading is now on par with human performance. The system can be beneficial in aiding clinical diagnoses in terms of objectivity of gradings and the speed of analysis. It can also draw the attention of a radiologist to regions of degradation. This objectivity and speed is an important stepping stone in the investigation of the relationship between MRIs and clinical diagnoses of back pain in large cohorts. Level 3.

  19. Automated 3-D Detection of Dendritic Spines from In Vivo Two-Photon Image Stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P K; Hernandez-Herrera, P; Labate, D; Papadakis, M

    2017-10-01

    Despite the significant advances in the development of automated image analysis algorithms for the detection and extraction of neuronal structures, current software tools still have numerous limitations when it comes to the detection and analysis of dendritic spines. The problem is especially challenging in in vivo imaging, where the difficulty of extracting morphometric properties of spines is compounded by lower image resolution and contrast levels native to two-photon laser microscopy. To address this challenge, we introduce a new computational framework for the automated detection and quantitative analysis of dendritic spines in vivo multi-photon imaging. This framework includes: (i) a novel preprocessing algorithm enhancing spines in a way that they are included in the binarized volume produced during the segmentation of foreground from background; (ii) the mathematical foundation of this algorithm, and (iii) an algorithm for the detection of spine locations in reference to centerline trace and separating them from the branches to whom spines are attached to. This framework enables the computation of a wide range of geometric features such as spine length, spatial distribution and spine volume in a high-throughput fashion. We illustrate our approach for the automated extraction of dendritic spine features in time-series multi-photon images of layer 5 cortical excitatory neurons from the mouse visual cortex.

  20. [Magnetic resonance imaging versus DR for whole spine imaging in patients with degenerative spinal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shao-Yong; Cui, Yun-Neng; Zhao, Yin-Xia; Lu, Ming; Li, Shao-Lin

    2017-09-20

    To assess the quality of whole spine images obtained by DR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyze the whole spinal imaging sagittal parameters for standing DR and supine MRI. Sixty-one patients aged 49.9∓17.6 years with degenerative spinal disease underwent both standing DR and supine MRI of the whole spine from November, 2010 to March, 2016. The image quality was retrospectively reviewed, and the cervical lordosis (CL), thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), sacral slope (SS), and sagittal vertical axis (SVA) were measured on the whole spinal lateral DR and middle sagittal MR images. Both the DR and MR whole spine images had a high quality (100%). The CL, TK, LL, SS, and SVA measured were 28.37mnplus;10.91 °, 29.98mnplus;8.96 °, 45.61mnplus;12.46 °, 34.38mnplus;9.05 °, and 17.20mnplus;26.39 mm on DR images and were 24.34mnplus;9.01 °, 21.22mnplus;8.13 °, 41.45mnplus;12.17 °, 37.45mnplus;8.19 °, and 36.51mnplus;12.44mm on MR images, respectively, showing significant differences in the measurements between the two modalities (P=0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.001, and 0.007, respectively). The correlation coefficient between DR and MR images for CL, TK, LL, SS, and SVA were 0.69, 0.68, 0.72, 0.51, and 0.27 (P=0.000, 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, and 0.034, respectively). Both standing DR and supine MR whole spine imaging can provide high-quality images. The CL, TK, LL, SS, and SVA measured on supine MR whole spine images are correlated with those on standing DR images but differ obviously. Supine MR imaging can not substitute standing DR examinations, and comprehensive assessment of degenerative spinal disease needs the combination of the two imaging techniques.

  1. Human cervical spine ligaments exhibit fully nonlinear viscoelastic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Kevin L; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2011-02-01

    Spinal ligaments provide stability and contribute to spinal motion patterns. These hydrated tissues exhibit time-dependent behavior during both static and dynamic loading regimes. Therefore, accurate viscoelastic characterization of these ligaments is requisite for development of computational analogues that model and predict time-dependent spine behavior. The development of accurate viscoelastic models must be preceded by rigorous, empirical evidence of linear viscoelastic, quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) or fully nonlinear viscoelastic behavior. This study utilized multiple physiological loading rates (frequencies) and strain amplitudes via cyclic loading and stress relaxation experiments in order to determine the viscoelastic behavior of the human lower cervical spine anterior longitudinal ligament, the posterior longitudinal ligament and the ligamentum flavum. The results indicated that the cyclic material properties of these ligaments were dependent on both strain amplitude and frequency. This strain amplitude-dependent behavior cannot be described using a linear viscoelastic formulation. Stress relaxation experiments at multiple strain magnitudes indicated that the shape of the relaxation curve was strongly dependent on strain magnitude, suggesting that a QLV formulation cannot adequately describe the comprehensive viscoelastic response of these ligaments. Therefore, a fully nonlinear viscoelastic formulation is requisite to model these lower cervical spine ligaments during activities of daily living. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. MR imaging of the spine: trauma and degenerative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmink, J.T. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands)

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the capabilities and drawbacks of MR imaging in patients with trauma to the spine and degenerative spinal conditions. In spinal trauma MR imaging is secondary to plain X-ray films and CT because of the greater availability and ease of performance of these techniques and their superior capability for detecting vertebral fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful for detecting ligamentous ruptures and intraspinal mass lesions such as hematoma, and for assessing the state of the spinal cord and prognosis of a cord injury. In degenerative spinal disease the necessity is emphasized of critically evaluating the clinical relevance of any abnormal feature detected, as findings of degenerative pathology are common in individuals without symptoms. Magnetic resonance myelography permits rapid and accurate assessment of the state of the lumbar nerve roots (compressed or not). In the cervical region the quality of the myelographic picture is often degraded in patients with a narrow spinal canal. (orig.) With 10 figs., 14 refs.

  3. Additional merit of coronal STIR imaging for MR imaging of lumbar spine

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjana Gupta; Puneet Mittal; Amit Mittal; Kapish Mittal; Sharad Gupta; Ravleen Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Back pain is a common clinical problem and is the frequent complaint for referral of lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Coronal short tau inversion recovery sequence (STIR) can provide diagnostically significant information in small percentage of patients. Materials and Methods: MRI examinations of a total of 350 patients were retrospectively included in the study. MR sequences were evaluated in two settings. One radiologist evaluated sagittal and axial images only, ...

  4. Additional merit of coronal STIR imaging for MR imaging of lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Back pain is a common clinical problem and is the frequent complaint for referral of lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Coronal short tau inversion recovery sequence (STIR can provide diagnostically significant information in small percentage of patients. Materials and Methods: MRI examinations of a total of 350 patients were retrospectively included in the study. MR sequences were evaluated in two settings. One radiologist evaluated sagittal and axial images only, while another radiologist evaluated all sequences, including coronal STIR sequence. After recording the diagnoses, we compared the MRI findings in two subsets of patients to evaluate additional merit of coronal STIR imaging. Results: With addition of coronal STIR imaging, significant findings were observed in 24 subjects (6.8%. Twenty-one of these subjects were considered to be normal on other sequences and in three subjects diagnosis was changed with the addition of coronal STIR. Additional diagnoses on STIR included sacroiliitis, sacroiliac joint degenerative disease, sacral stress/insufficiency fracture/Looser′s zones, muscular sprain and atypical appendicitis. Conclusion: Coronal STIR imaging can provide additional diagnoses in a small percentage of patients presenting for lumbar spine MRI for back pain. Therefore, it should be included in the routine protocol for MR imaging of lumbar spine.

  5. Additional merit of coronal STIR imaging for MR imaging of lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ranjana; Mittal, Puneet; Mittal, Amit; Mittal, Kapish; Gupta, Sharad; Kaur, Ravleen

    2015-01-01

    Back pain is a common clinical problem and is the frequent complaint for referral of lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Coronal short tau inversion recovery sequence (STIR) can provide diagnostically significant information in small percentage of patients. MRI examinations of a total of 350 patients were retrospectively included in the study. MR sequences were evaluated in two settings. One radiologist evaluated sagittal and axial images only, while another radiologist evaluated all sequences, including coronal STIR sequence. After recording the diagnoses, we compared the MRI findings in two subsets of patients to evaluate additional merit of coronal STIR imaging. With addition of coronal STIR imaging, significant findings were observed in 24 subjects (6.8%). Twenty-one of these subjects were considered to be normal on other sequences and in three subjects diagnosis was changed with the addition of coronal STIR. Additional diagnoses on STIR included sacroiliitis, sacroiliac joint degenerative disease, sacral stress/insufficiency fracture/Looser's zones, muscular sprain and atypical appendicitis. Coronal STIR imaging can provide additional diagnoses in a small percentage of patients presenting for lumbar spine MRI for back pain. Therefore, it should be included in the routine protocol for MR imaging of lumbar spine.

  6. Following Scoliosis Progression in the Spine using Ultrasound Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purnama, Ketut; Wilkinson, M.H.F.; Veldhuizen, A.G.; Ooijen, P.M.A. van; Sardjono, T.A.; Lubbers, Jacob; Verkerke, G.J.; Dossel, O; Schlegel, WC

    2009-01-01

    Scoliosis is a three-dimensional deformation of the spine which is characterized by a lateral deviation of the spine and axial rotation of the vertebrae. It must be monitored frequently to be in time to start the treatment in case of progression. Nowadays, X-ray is used, but has a detrimental effect

  7. Clinical practice of image-guided spine radiosurgery - results from an international research consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guckenberger Matthias

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal radiosurgery is a quickly evolving technique in the radiotherapy and neurosurgical communities. However, the methods of spine radiosurgery have not been standardized. This article describes the results of a survey about the methods of spine radiosurgery at five international institutions. Methods All institutions are members of the Elekta Spine Radiosurgery Research Consortium and have a dedicated research and clinical focus on image-guided radiosurgery. The questionnaire consisted of 75 items covering all major steps of spine radiosurgery. Results Strong agreement in the methods of spine radiosurgery was observed. In particular, similarities were observed with safety and quality assurance playing an important role in the methods of all institutions, cooperation between neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists in case selection, dedicated imaging for target- and organ-at-risk delineation, application of proper safety margins for the target volume and organs-at-risk, conformal planning and precise image-guided treatment delivery, and close clinical and radiological follow-up. In contrast, three major areas of uncertainty and disagreement were identified: 1 Indications and contra-indications for spine radiosurgery; 2 treatment dose and fractionation and 3 tolerance dose of the spinal cord. Conclusions Results of this study reflect the current practice of spine radiosurgery in large academic centers. Despite close agreement was observed in many steps of spine radiosurgery, further research in form of retrospective and especially prospective studies is required to refine the details of spinal radiosurgery in terms of safety and efficacy.

  8. Cervical spine instability in the course of rheumatoid arthritis - imaging methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mańczak, Małgorzata; Gasik, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Cervical spine is affected in more than a half of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Depending on the degree of damage to the individual joints and ligaments RA-related cervical spine instability takes the form of atlanto-axial subluxation, subaxial subluxation or cranial settling. In the advanced cases spinal stenosis can occur as well as spinal cord injuries with typical neurological symptoms. The identification of patients with cervical spine instability before the occurrence of neurological complications still constitutes a diagnostic challenge. The article presents the methods of cervical spine imaging with the use of plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). We discuss the advantages and disadvantages associated with each method and the possibility of its application in the diagnosis of cervical spine instability in RA. The knowledge of the above mentioned issues is indispensable to select an appropriate time for surgical intervention.

  9. Cervical spine instability in the course of rheumatoid arthritis – imaging methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Mańczak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spine is affected in more than a half of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Depending on the degree of damage to the individual joints and ligaments RA-related cervical spine instability takes the form of atlanto-axial subluxation, subaxial subluxation or cranial settling. In the advanced cases spinal stenosis can occur as well as spinal cord injuries with typical neurological symptoms. The identification of patients with cervical spine instability before the occurrence of neurological complications still constitutes a diagnostic challenge. The article presents the methods of cervical spine imaging with the use of plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages associated with each method and the possibility of its application in the diagnosis of cervical spine instability in RA. The knowledge of the above mentioned issues is indispensable to select an appropriate time for surgical intervention.

  10. The biomechanics of the pediatric and adult human thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Valdes, Francisco J; Lau, Sabrina; Riley, Patrick; Lamp, John; Kent, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of literature points out the relevance of the thoracic spine dynamics in understanding the thorax-restraint interaction as well as in determining the kinematics of the head and cervical spine. This study characterizes the dynamic response in bending of eight human spinal specimens (4 pediatric: ages 7 and 15 years, 4 adult: ages 48 and 52 years) from two sections along the thoracic spine (T2-T4 and T7-T9). Each specimen consisted of three vertebral bodies connected by the corresponding intervertebral discs. All ligaments were preserved in the preparation with the exception of the inter-transverse ligament. Specimens were exposed to a series of five dynamic bending ramp-and-hold tests with varying amplitudes at a nominal rate of 2 rad/s. After this battery of tests, failure experiments were conducted. The 7-year-old specimen showed the lowest tolerance to a moment (T2-T4: 12.1 Nm; T7-T9: 11.6 Nm) with no significant reduction of the relative rotation between the vertebrae. The 15-year-old failure tolerance was comparable to that of the adult specimens. Failure of the adult specimens occurred within a wide range at the T2-T4 thoracic section (23.3 Nm- 53.0 Nm) while it was circumscribed to the interval 48.3 Nm-52.5 Nm for the T7-T9 section. The series of dynamic ramp-and-hold were used to assess two different scaling methods (mass scaling and SAE scaling). Neither method was able to capture the stiffness, peak moment and relaxation characteristics exhibited by the pediatric specimens.

  11. Appropriateness of lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, Francisco M. [Spanish Back Pain Research Network (REIDE), Fundación Kovacs, Paseo de Mallorca 36, 07012 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Research Department, Fundación Kovacs, Paseo de Mallorca 36, 07012 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Arana, Estanislao, E-mail: aranae@uv.es [Spanish Back Pain Research Network (REIDE), Fundación Kovacs, Paseo de Mallorca 36, 07012 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Servicio de Radiología, Fundación Instituto Valenciano de Oncología, Valencia (Spain); Fundación Instituto de Investigación en Servicios de Salud, Valencia (Spain); Royuela, Ana [Spanish Back Pain Research Network (REIDE), Fundación Kovacs, Paseo de Mallorca 36, 07012 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) (Spain); Unidad de Bioestadística Clínica, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, IRYCIS, Ctra. Colmenar Km. 9.1, 28034 Madrid (Spain); Cabrera, Alberto [Spanish Back Pain Research Network (REIDE), Fundación Kovacs, Paseo de Mallorca 36, 07012 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Hospital de Galdakao, Barrio Labeaga, 48960 Galdakao, Vizcaya (Spain); Casillas, Carlos [Spanish Back Pain Research Network (REIDE), Fundación Kovacs, Paseo de Mallorca 36, 07012 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Instituto de Traumatología Unión de Mutuas, Av. del Lledó, C/Juan de Herrera, 27 12004 Castellón (Spain); and others

    2013-06-15

    Objectives: To determine the minimum percentage of lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (LSMRI) which are inappropriately prescribed in routine practice. Methods: LSMRI performed prospectively on 602 patients in 12 Radiology Services across 6 regions in Spain, were classified as “appropriate”, “uncertain” or “inappropriate” based on the indication criteria established by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence, the American College of Physicians and Radiology, and current evidence-based clinical guidelines. Studies on patients reporting at least one “red flag” were classified as “appropriate”. A logistic regression model was developed to identify factors associated with a higher likelihood of inappropriate LSMRI, including gender, reporting of referred pain, health care setting (private/public), and specialty of prescribing physician. Before performing the LSMRI, the radiologists also assessed the appropriateness of the prescription. Results: Eighty-eight percent of LSMRI were appropriate, 1.3% uncertain and 10.6% inappropriate. The agreement of radiologists’ assessment with this classification was substantial (k = 0.62). The odds that LSMRI prescriptions were inappropriate were higher for patients without referred pain [OR (CI 95%): 13.75 (6.72; 28.16)], seen in private practice [2.25 (1.20; 4.22)], by orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons or primary care physicians [2.50 (1.15; 5.56)]. Conclusion: Efficiency of LSMRI could be improved in routine practice, without worsening clinical outcomes.

  12. Fluorescence imaging of dendritic spines of Golgi-Cox-stained neurons using brightening background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Min; Xiong, Hanqing; Yang, Tao; Shang, Zhenhua; Chen, Muqing; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel fluorescence imaging approach to imaging nonfluorescence-labeled biological tissue samples. The method was demonstrated by imaging neurons in Golgi-Cox-stained and epoxy-resin-embedded samples through the excitation of the background fluorescence of the specimens. The dark neurons stood out clearly against background fluorescence in the images, enabling the tracing of a single dendritic spine using both confocal and wide-field fluorescence microscopy. The results suggest that the reported fluorescence imaging method would provide an effective alternative solution to image nonfluorescence-labeled samples, and it allows tracing the dendritic spine structure of neurons.

  13. Evaluation of the MR imaging findings of ankylosing spondylitis involving the thoracolumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Kyoon; Choi, Jeong Yeol [Chosun Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Park, Jin Gyoon [Chonnam Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-02-01

    To evaluate the MR imaging findings of ankylosing spondylitis involving the thoracolumbar spine. We retrospectively analyzed MR imaging findings in ten patients with ankylosing spondylitis involving the thoracolumbar spine. All were male and ranged in age from 24 to 47 (mean, 33) years. MR images were obtained using a 1.5T imager, and signal intensity changes of vertebral bodies were evaluated on sagittal T1- and T2-weighted images. Plain radiographic findings were also evaluated. Characteristics MR imaging findings of ankylosing spondylitis involving the thoracolumbar vertebral bodies were focal signal intensity changes at the corners and along the anterior borders of the vertebral bodies. (author). 19 refs., 4 figs.

  14. A case of dialysis-related amyloidosis of the hip and cervical spine: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyung Kyu; Kang, Ik Won; Min, Seon Jung; Cho, Seong Whi; Kim, Seok Woo; Jang, Woo Young [Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seon Joo [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kyung Jin [Dankook University College of Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-05-15

    Dialysis-related amyloidosis is a complication of long-term hemodialysis and it is characterized by the accumulation of {beta} 2-microglobulin in the osteoarticular structures. We describe here the imaging findings of a case of dialysis-related amyloidosis involving the hip and cervical spine in a 62-year-old woman who received long-term dialysis. We focus here on the CT and MR imaging findings of the cervical spine and we include a review of the relevant literatures.

  15. Determination of the human spine curve based on laser triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poredoš, Primož; Čelan, Dušan; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2015-02-05

    The main objective of the present method was to automatically obtain a spatial curve of the thoracic and lumbar spine based on a 3D shape measurement of a human torso with developed scoliosis. Manual determination of the spine curve, which was based on palpation of the thoracic and lumbar spinous processes, was found to be an appropriate way to validate the method. Therefore a new, noninvasive, optical 3D method for human torso evaluation in medical practice is introduced. Twenty-four patients with confirmed clinical diagnosis of scoliosis were scanned using a specially developed 3D laser profilometer. The measuring principle of the system is based on laser triangulation with one-laser-plane illumination. The measurement took approximately 10 seconds at 700 mm of the longitudinal translation along the back. The single point measurement accuracy was 0.1 mm. Computer analysis of the measured surface returned two 3D curves. The first curve was determined by manual marking (manual curve), and the second was determined by detecting surface curvature extremes (automatic curve). The manual and automatic curve comparison was given as the root mean square deviation (RMSD) for each patient. The intra-operator study involved assessing 20 successive measurements of the same person, and the inter-operator study involved assessing measurements from 8 operators. The results obtained for the 24 patients showed that the typical RMSD between the manual and automatic curve was 5.0 mm in the frontal plane and 1.0 mm in the sagittal plane, which is a good result compared with palpatory accuracy (9.8 mm). The intra-operator repeatability of the presented method in the frontal and sagittal planes was 0.45 mm and 0.06 mm, respectively. The inter-operator repeatability assessment shows that that the presented method is invariant to the operator of the computer program with the presented method. The main novelty of the presented paper is the development of a new, non-contact method

  16. Volumetric Image Guidance Using Carina vs Spine as Registration Landmarks for Conventionally Fractionated Lung Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavoie, Caroline; Higgins, Jane; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Le, Lisa W. [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Sun, Alexander; Brade, Anthony; Hope, Andrew; Cho, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Bezjak, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.bezjak@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative accuracy of 2 image guided radiation therapy methods using carina vs spine as landmarks and then to identify which landmark is superior relative to tumor coverage. Methods and Materials: For 98 lung patients, 2596 daily image-guidance cone-beam computed tomography scans were analyzed. Tattoos were used for initial patient alignment; then, spine and carina registrations were performed independently. A separate analysis assessed the adequacy of gross tumor volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume coverage on cone-beam computed tomography using the initial, middle, and final fractions of radiation therapy. Coverage was recorded for primary tumor (T), nodes (N), and combined target (T+N). Three scenarios were compared: tattoos alignment, spine registration, and carina registration. Results: Spine and carina registrations identified setup errors {>=}5 mm in 35% and 46% of fractions, respectively. The mean vector difference between spine and carina matching had a magnitude of 3.3 mm. Spine and carina improved combined target coverage, compared with tattoos, in 50% and 34% (spine) to 54% and 46% (carina) of the first and final fractions, respectively. Carina matching showed greater combined target coverage in 17% and 23% of fractions for the first and final fractions, respectively; with spine matching, this was only observed in 4% (first) and 6% (final) of fractions. Carina matching provided superior nodes coverage at the end of radiation compared with spine matching (P=.0006), without compromising primary tumor coverage. Conclusion: Frequent patient setup errors occur in locally advanced lung cancer patients. Spine and carina registrations improved combined target coverage throughout the treatment course, but carina matching provided superior combined target coverage.

  17. MIND Demons for MR-to-CT deformable image registration in image-guided spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Khanna, A. J.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Prince, J. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Localization of target anatomy and critical structures defined in preoperative MR images can be achieved by means of multi-modality deformable registration to intraoperative CT. We propose a symmetric diffeomorphic deformable registration algorithm incorporating a modality independent neighborhood descriptor (MIND) and a robust Huber metric for MR-to-CT registration. Method: The method, called MIND Demons, solves for the deformation field between two images by optimizing an energy functional that incorporates both the forward and inverse deformations, smoothness on the velocity fields and the diffeomorphisms, a modality-insensitive similarity function suitable to multi-modality images, and constraints on geodesics in Lagrangian coordinates. Direct optimization (without relying on an exponential map of stationary velocity fields used in conventional diffeomorphic Demons) is carried out using a Gauss-Newton method for fast convergence. Registration performance and sensitivity to registration parameters were analyzed in simulation, in phantom experiments, and clinical studies emulating application in image-guided spine surgery, and results were compared to conventional mutual information (MI) free-form deformation (FFD), local MI (LMI) FFD, and normalized MI (NMI) Demons. Result: The method yielded sub-voxel invertibility (0.006 mm) and nonsingular spatial Jacobians with capability to preserve local orientation and topology. It demonstrated improved registration accuracy in comparison to the reference methods, with mean target registration error (TRE) of 1.5 mm compared to 10.9, 2.3, and 4.6 mm for MI FFD, LMI FFD, and NMI Demons methods, respectively. Validation in clinical studies demonstrated realistic deformation with sub-voxel TRE in cases of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. Conclusions: A modality-independent deformable registration method has been developed to estimate a viscoelastic diffeomorphic map between preoperative MR and intraoperative CT

  18. MIND Demons for MR-to-CT Deformable Image Registration In Image-Guided Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaungamornrat, S; De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Wolinsky, J-P; Khanna, A J; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Prince, J L; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-02-27

    Localization of target anatomy and critical structures defined in preoperative MR images can be achieved by means of multi-modality deformable registration to intraoperative CT. We propose a symmetric diffeomorphic deformable registration algorithm incorporating a modality independent neighborhood descriptor (MIND) and a robust Huber metric for MR-to-CT registration. The method, called MIND Demons, solves for the deformation field between two images by optimizing an energy functional that incorporates both the forward and inverse deformations, smoothness on the velocity fields and the diffeomorphisms, a modality-insensitive similarity function suitable to multi-modality images, and constraints on geodesics in Lagrangian coordinates. Direct optimization (without relying on an exponential map of stationary velocity fields used in conventional diffeomorphic Demons) is carried out using a Gauss-Newton method for fast convergence. Registration performance and sensitivity to registration parameters were analyzed in simulation, in phantom experiments, and clinical studies emulating application in image-guided spine surgery, and results were compared to conventional mutual information (MI) free-form deformation (FFD), local MI (LMI) FFD, and normalized MI (NMI) Demons. The method yielded sub-voxel invertibility (0.006 mm) and nonsingular spatial Jacobians with capability to preserve local orientation and topology. It demonstrated improved registration accuracy in comparison to the reference methods, with mean target registration error (TRE) of 1.5 mm compared to 10.9, 2.3, and 4.6 mm for MI FFD, LMI FFD, and NMI Demons methods, respectively. Validation in clinical studies demonstrated realistic deformation with sub-voxel TRE in cases of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. A modality-independent deformable registration method has been developed to estimate a viscoelastic diffeomorphic map between preoperative MR and intraoperative CT. The method yields registration

  19. The Use of Lumbar Spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Eastern China: Appropriateness and Related Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liedao; Wang, Xuanwei; Lin, Xiangjin; Wang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Back pain is common and costly. While a general scene of back pain related practice in China remains unknown, there are signs of excessive use of lumbar spine magnetic resonance (MR). We retrospectively studied 3107 lumbar spine MRIs in Eastern China to investigate the appropriateness of lumbar spine MR use. Simple back pain is the most common chief complaint for ordering a lumbar MR study. Only 41.3% of lumbar spine MR studies identified some findings that may have potential clinical significance. Normal lumbar spine is the most common diagnosis (32.7%), followed by lumbar disc bulging and lumbar disc herniation. Walk difficulties, back injury and referred leg pain as chief complaints were associated with greater chance of detecting potentially clinically positive lumbar MR image findings, as compare with simple back pain. There was no difference in positive rates among orthopedic surgeon and specialists of other disciplines. Lumbar spine MR imaging was generally overused in Eastern China by various specialists, particularly at health assessment centers. For appropriate use of lumbar spine MR, orthopedic surgeons are no better than physicians of other disciplines. Professional training and clinical guidelines are needed to facilitate evidence-based back pain practice in China. PMID:26731106

  20. Diagnostic utility of candidate definitions for demonstrating axial spondyloarthritis on magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Ulrich; Zhao, Zheng; Rufibach, Kaspar

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A recent consensus statement has suggested ≥3 corner inflammatory lesions (CILs) or several corner fatty lesions (CFLs) as candidate criteria indicative of axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic...... on results of clinical examination and pelvic radiography as having nonradiographic axial SpA (n = 50), AS (n = 33), or nonspecific back pain (n = 47). Cohort A also included 20 age-matched healthy controls. Four blinded readers assessed MRIs of the spine using the standardized Canada-Denmark module. Readers...... of the spine alone....

  1. Imaging the spine in arthritis-a pictorial review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurik, Anne Grethe

    2011-01-01

    radiographic features of spinal changes in RA and SpA in addition to the advantages of MRI and CT, respectively. RA changes are usually located in the cervical spine and can result in serious joint instability. Subluxation is diagnosed by radiography, but supplementary MRI and/or CT is always indicated...... to visualise the spinal cord and canal in patients with vertical subluxation, neck pain and/or neurological symptoms. SpA may involve all parts of the spine. Ankylosing spondylitis is the most frequent form of SpA and has rather characteristic radiographic features. In early stages it is characterised...

  2. Recent advances in computational methods and clinical applications for spine imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Glocker, Ben; Klinder, Tobias; Li, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    This book contains the full papers presented at the MICCAI 2014 workshop on Computational Methods and Clinical Applications for Spine Imaging. The workshop brought together scientists and clinicians in the field of computational spine imaging. The chapters included in this book present and discuss the new advances and challenges in these fields, using several methods and techniques in order to address more efficiently different and timely applications involving signal and image acquisition, image processing and analysis, image segmentation, image registration and fusion, computer simulation, image based modeling, simulation and surgical planning, image guided robot assisted surgical and image based diagnosis. The book also includes papers and reports from the first challenge on vertebra segmentation held at the workshop.

  3. Deformable image registration with local rigidity constraints for cone-beam CT-guided spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; Wang, A. S.; Uneri, A.; Otake, Y.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-07-01

    Image-guided spine surgery (IGSS) is associated with reduced co-morbidity and improved surgical outcome. However, precise localization of target anatomy and adjacent nerves and vessels relative to planning information (e.g., device trajectories) can be challenged by anatomical deformation. Rigid registration alone fails to account for deformation associated with changes in spine curvature, and conventional deformable registration fails to account for rigidity of the vertebrae, causing unrealistic distortions in the registered image that can confound high-precision surgery. We developed and evaluated a deformable registration method capable of preserving rigidity of bones while resolving the deformation of surrounding soft tissue. The method aligns preoperative CT to intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) using free-form deformation (FFD) with constraints on rigid body motion imposed according to a simple intensity threshold of bone intensities. The constraints enforced three properties of a rigid transformation—namely, constraints on affinity (AC), orthogonality (OC), and properness (PC). The method also incorporated an injectivity constraint (IC) to preserve topology. Physical experiments involving phantoms, an ovine spine, and a human cadaver as well as digital simulations were performed to evaluate the sensitivity to registration parameters, preservation of rigid body morphology, and overall registration accuracy of constrained FFD in comparison to conventional unconstrained FFD (uFFD) and Demons registration. FFD with orthogonality and injectivity constraints (denoted FFD+OC+IC) demonstrated improved performance compared to uFFD and Demons. Affinity and properness constraints offered little or no additional improvement. The FFD+OC+IC method preserved rigid body morphology at near-ideal values of zero dilatation ({ D} = 0.05, compared to 0.39 and 0.56 for uFFD and Demons, respectively) and shear ({ S} = 0.08, compared to 0.36 and 0.44 for uFFD and Demons

  4. Aetiology and Imaging Findings in Traumatic Spine Injury among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paraplegia (33.3%) and quadriplegia (10.3%) were the common clinical presentations. Fifty six percent of patients had associated injuries Conclusion: Traumatic spine injury is common at our settings. Young individuals below 30 years of age are most affected and the most common cause is motor traffic accident (MTA).

  5. Age-Based Comparison of Human Dendritic Spine Structure Using Complete Three-Dimensional Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Robles, Victor; Yuste, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons are targets of most excitatory synapses in the cerebral cortex. Recent evidence suggests that the morphology of the dendritic spine could determine its synaptic strength and learning rules. However, unfortunately, there are scant data available regarding the detailed morphology of these structures for the human cerebral cortex. In the present study, we analyzed over 8900 individual dendritic spines that were completely 3D reconstructed along the length of apical and basal dendrites of layer III pyramidal neurons in the cingulate cortex of 2 male humans (aged 40 and 85 years old), using intracellular injections of Lucifer Yellow in fixed tissue. We assembled a large, quantitative database, which revealed a major reduction in spine densities in the aged case. Specifically, small and short spines of basal dendrites and long spines of apical dendrites were lost, regardless of the distance from the soma. Given the age difference between the cases, our results suggest selective alterations in spines with aging in humans and indicate that the spine volume and length are regulated by different biological mechanisms. PMID:22710613

  6. [Disc alterations of lumbar spine on magnetic resonance images in asymptomatic workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz-Moreno, Rocío; Lezama-Suárez, Gabriel; Gómez-Jiménez, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    to determine abnormal findings of the lumbar spine on magnetic resonance images in asymptomatic subjects. prospective, transverse and descriptive study, in workers of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social without low back pain; they were invited to be observed with magnetic resonance images of lumbar spine. A total of 105 cases was interpreted by a radiologist, who did not know the patients' clinical conditions. 107 lumbar spine alterations studies were mixed in order to not influence in the results, and they were not included in the statistic analysis. 55 % of the cases had discal alterations, 38 % presented bulging disk and 17 % presented protrusion. Other alterations were Schmorl's nodule, osteocondrosis, espondilolistesis, and annular tears. bulging disk and discal protrusion frequency have high prevalence in magnetic resonance images in healthy individuals, so its presence in symptomatic patients is not necessarily cause of low back pain.

  7. Comparison of image quality and radiation exposure from C-arm fluoroscopes when used for imaging the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasarn, Mark L; Coyne, Ellen; Schreck, Michael; Rodgers, Jamie D; Rechtine, Glenn R

    2013-07-15

    Cadaveric imaging study. We sought to compare the fluoroscopic images produced by 4 different fluoroscopes for image quality and radiation exposure when used for imaging the spine. There are no previous published studies comparing mobile C-arm machines commonly used in clinical practice for imaging the spine. Anterior-posterior and lateral images of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine were obtained from a cadaver placed supine on a radiolucent table. The fluoroscopy units used for the study included (1) GE OEC 9900 Elite (2010 model; General Electric Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), (2) Philips BV Pulsera (2009 model; Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA), (3) Philips BV Pulsera (2010 model; Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA), and (4) Siemens Arcadis Avantic (2010 model; Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, PA). The images were then downloaded, placed into a randomizer program, and evaluated by a group of spine surgeons and neuroradiologists independently. The reviewers, who were blinded to the fluoroscope the images were from, ranked them from best to worst using a numeric system. In addition, the images were rated according to a quality scale from 1 to 5, with 1 representing the best image quality. The radiation exposure level for the fluoroscopy units was also compared and was based on energy emission. According to the mean values for rank, the following order of best to worst was observed: (1) GE OEC > (2) Philips 2010 > (3) Philips 2009 > (4) Siemans. The exact same order was found when examining the image quality ratings. When comparing the radiation exposure level difference, it was observed that the OEC was the lowest, and there was a minimum 30% decrease in energy emission from the OEC versus the other C-arms studied. This is the first time that the spine image quality and radiation exposure of commonly used C-arm machines have been compared. The OEC was ranked the best, produced the best quality images, and had the least amount of radiation.

  8. Scoring inflammatory activity of the spine by magnetic resonance imaging in ankylosing spondylitis: a multireader experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Cédric; Braun, Jürgen; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine is increasingly important in the assessment of inflammatory activity in clinical trials with patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We investigated feasibility, inter-reader reliability, sensitivity to change, and discriminatory ability...... the Ankylosing Spondylitis spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging-activity [ASspiMRI-a, grading activity (0-6) per vertebral unit in 23 units]; the Berlin modification of the ASspiMRI-a; and the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) scoring system, which scores the 6 vertebral units considered...

  9. Spine surface detection from local phase-symmetry enhanced ridges in ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shajudeen, Peer Mohamed S; Righetti, Raffaella

    2017-11-01

    Improper administration of epidural anesthesia can result in nerve complications. This problem is exacerbated for obese patients whose vertebrae cannot be palpated. Ultrasound (US) has recently emerged as an attractive imaging modality for accurate epidural placement. However, anesthesiologists untrained in US have difficulty interpreting the anatomy in noisy spinal US images. Furthermore, the complex geometry in spinal US images is characterized by a discontinuous intensity profile because the transducer is often not perpendicularly oriented to spine surface regions such as laminae, articular and transverse processes. This makes the interpretation of spinal images more challenging than typical long bone surface images. In this article, we propose a new method to segment the spine anatomy in US images obtained in both the transverse and paramedian planes. A set of 108 B-mode images were randomly chosen from 35 cine loops obtained from scanning the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae of 17 healthy volunteers with a BMI ranging from 19.5 to 27.9. A local phase-symmetry technique was applied to the B-mode images for enhancement of bone-like ridges, and the spine blobs were subsequently classified. The segmented spine surface from the blobs was compared against a radiologist's manual delineation of the spine surface. For the performance of the spine blob classifier, we obtain a Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 0.77 and a geometric mean (G-mean) of 0.96. The mean absolute error between the manual delineation of the laminae by the radiologist and the automatic laminae segmentation is found to be 0.26 mm with a maximum possible absolute error of 2.01 mm for spinal US images of 70 mm depth. Our proposed technique successfully performs automatic segmentation of the spine surface - specifically the laminae, ligamentum flava, spinous, transverse, and articular processes - and can be extended to any bone anatomy present in an US image. This has implications for 3D

  10. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the spine in children. MRI imaging at 0. 5 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, P.A.; Mandell, G.A. (Alfred I. duPont Inst., Wilmington, DE (USA). Dept. of Medical Imaging); Stanton, R.P. (Alfred I. duPont Inst., Wilmington, DE (USA). Dept. of Orthopedics)

    1991-02-01

    Two patients with aneurysmal bone cysts of the spine demonstrate striking similarities when examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), while the plain radiographs and images on computed tomography (CT) are quite different. Gadolinium DTPA enhanced T1W images were especially helpful in the definition of the lesion by showing enhancement of the septations of the aneurysmal bone cysts. The septations represent the fibrous walls inherent to these lesions. (orig.).

  11. Stereotactic radiosurgery for intradural spine tumors using cone-beam CT image guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrate, Andrés; Zussman, Benjamin; Ozpinar, Alp; Niranjan, Ajay; Flickinger, John C; Gerszten, Peter C

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance technology has been widely adopted for spine radiosurgery delivery. There is relatively little experience with spine radiosurgery for intradural tumors using CBCT image guidance. This study prospectively evaluated a series of intradural spine tumors treated with radiosurgery. Patient setup accuracy for spine radiosurgery delivery using CBCT image guidance for intradural spine tumors was determined. METHODS Eighty-two patients with intradural tumors were treated and prospectively evaluated. The positioning deviations of the spine radiosurgery treatments in patients were recorded. Radiosurgery was delivered using a linear accelerator with a beam modulator and CBCT image guidance combined with a robotic couch that allows positioning correction in 3 translational and 3 rotational directions. To measure patient movement, 3 quality assurance CBCTs were performed and recorded in 30 patients: before, halfway, and after the radiosurgery treatment. The positioning data and fused images of planning CT and CBCT from the treatments were analyzed to determine intrafraction patient movements. From each of 3 CBCTs, 3 translational and 3 rotational coordinates were obtained. RESULTS The radiosurgery procedure was successfully completed for all patients. Lesion locations included cervical (22), thoracic (17), lumbar (38), and sacral (5). Tumor histologies included schwannoma (27), neurofibromas (18), meningioma (16), hemangioblastoma (8), and ependymoma (5). The mean prescription dose was 17 Gy (range 12-27 Gy) delivered in 1-3 fractions. At the halfway point of the radiation, the translational variations and standard deviations were 0.4 ± 0.5, 0.5 ± 0.8, and 0.4 ± 0.5 mm in the lateral (x), longitudinal (y), and anteroposterior (z) directions, respectively. Similarly, the variations immediately after treatment were 0.5 ± 0.4, 0.5 ± 0.6, and 0.6 ± 0.5 mm along x, y, and z directions, respectively. The mean rotational angles were 0

  12. Giant cell tumours of the mobile spine: characteristic imaging features and differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Ming-Jue; Wang, Chen-Guang; Wang, Cheng-Sheng; Du, Lian-Jun; Ding, Xiao-Yi; Zhang, Wei-Bin; Lu, Yong; Zu, Jin-Yan

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristic imaging features of giant cell tumours (GCTs) of the mobile spine. Thirty pathologically proven GCTs of the mobile spine were reviewed. X-ray (n = 18), computed tomography (CT) (n = 24) and magnetic resonance (MR) (n = 21) images were retrospectively evaluated. Five tumours were located in the cervical spine, 15 tumours were located in the thoracic spine and 10 tumours in the lumbar spine. The characteristic X-ray findings included an osteolytic and expansile lesion with a "soap bubble" or purely lytic appearance. Cortical destruction was commonly seen. Margin sclerosis was seen in two lesions. No mineralised tumour matrix or periosteal reaction appeared. The CT findings were similar but outlined the cortical alterations in a more accurate way. The characteristic MR findings included a well-defined and expansile mass with heterogeneous low-to-iso signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Cystic areas were commonly seen in 17 cases. Five cases presented fluid-fluid levels, suggesting the development of aneurysmal bone cyst. The solid portions of the tumours were enhanced with a very heterogeneous signal pattern reflecting high blood supply after contrast-enhanced scan. Tumour involvement in the epidural space occurred in 12 cases, causing spinal cord and/or nerve root compression. Involvement of intervertebral discs and/or adjacent vertebrae appeared in two cases. Although rare, GCT can occur in the mobile spine as a kind of benign but locally aggressive tumour. Radiologists should be familiar with its characteristic imaging features in order to make a correct diagnosis and to help preoperative evaluations.

  13. Three-dimensional imaging of the spine using the EOS system: is it reliable? A comparative study using computed tomography imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Aubaidi, Z.; Lebel, D.; Oudjhane, K.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the precision of three-dimensional geometry compared with computed tomography (CT) images. This retrospective study included patients who had undergone both imaging of the spine using the EOS imaging system and CT scanning of the spine. The apical vertebral o...

  14. Fracture and Viscoelastic Characteristics of the Human Cervical Spine,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Myocard . infarct . a C2-C4 53852 N 69 120 Ryocard. infarct . Table:7 Test Specimen Information .1% 4. .oU -d ,’ A§.Q. QK:£>:*~ Shear Stiffness (N1=U) Axial...65, Rowe found that 56% of workers experience low back pain sufficient to require medical treatment [301. Drivers, material handlers and office...of the normal spine are required to define the tolerance of the cervical spine to injury and to determine when and if surgery or other treatment is

  15. A penile spine/vibrissa enhancer sequence is missing in modern and extinct humans but is retained in multiple primates with penile spines and sensory vibrissae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip L Reno

    Full Text Available Previous studies show that humans have a large genomic deletion downstream of the Androgen Receptor gene that eliminates an ancestral mammalian regulatory enhancer that drives expression in developing penile spines and sensory vibrissae. Here we use a combination of large-scale sequence analysis and PCR amplification to demonstrate that the penile spine/vibrissa enhancer is missing in all humans surveyed and in the Neandertal and Denisovan genomes, but is present in DNA samples of chimpanzees and bonobos, as well as in multiple other great apes and primates that maintain some form of penile integumentary appendage and facial vibrissae. These results further strengthen the association between the presence of the penile spine/vibrissa enhancer and the presence of penile spines and macro- or micro- vibrissae in non-human primates as well as show that loss of the enhancer is both a distinctive and characteristic feature of the human lineage.

  16. MRI of degenerative lumbar spine disease: comparison of non-accelerated and parallel imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noelte, Ingo; Gerigk, Lars; Brockmann, Marc A.; Kemmling, Andre; Groden, Christoph [Medical Faculty Mannheim of the University of Heidelberg, Department of Neuroradiology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    Parallel imaging techniques such as GRAPPA have been introduced to optimize image quality and acquisition time. For spinal imaging in a clinical setting no data exist on the equivalency of conventional and parallel imaging techniques. The purpose of this study was to determine whether T1- and T2-weighted GRAPPA sequences are equivalent to conventional sequences for the evaluation of degenerative lumbar spine disease in terms of image quality and artefacts. In patients with clinically suspected degenerative lumbar spine disease two neuroradiologists independently compared sagittal GRAPPA (acceleration factor 2, time reduction approximately 50%) and non-GRAPPA images (25 patients) and transverse GRAPPA (acceleration factor 2, time reduction approximately 50%) and non-GRAPPA images (23 lumbar segments in six patients). Comparative analyses included the minimal diameter of the spinal canal, disc abnormalities, foraminal stenosis, facet joint degeneration, lateral recess, nerve root compression and osteochondrotic vertebral and endplate changes. Image inhomogeneity was evaluated by comparing the nonuniformity in the two techniques. Image quality was assessed by grading the delineation of pathoanatomical structures. Motion and aliasing artefacts were classified from grade 1 (severe) to grade 5 (absent). There was no significant difference between GRAPPA and non-accelerated MRI in the evaluation of degenerative lumbar spine disease (P > 0.05), and there was no difference in the delineation of pathoanatomical structures. For inhomogeneity there was a trend in favour of the conventional sequences. No significant artefacts were observed with either technique. The GRAPPA technique can be used effectively to reduce scanning time in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease while preserving image quality. (orig.)

  17. A new method of MR total spine imaging for showing the brace effect in scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, A.; Kandyba, J.; Koenig, R.; Jaeger, U.E.; Gieseke, J.; Schmitt, O. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Bracing is a method of early, nonsurgical treatment for scoliosis, but a hypokyphotic effect on the thoracic spine is reported. We developed a magnetic resonance tomography (MR) procedure presenting an image of the whole spine in the coronal and sagittal planes (MR total spine imaging), and studied the brace effect, using this technique. We examined 26 female patients with idiopathic scoliosis treated with a Cheneau brace (mean age, 13.2 years; mean duration of brace treatment at the time of investigation, 1.5 years). The MR examinations were performed with the patient in the supine position with and without the brace in direct sequence. As measured on the coronal MR images, the thoracic curve was corrected, on average, from 29 deg to 22 deg (mean correction, 24%). There was a slight reduction in the sagittal Cobb angle measured between T4 and T12 (mean sagittal Cobb angle without brace, 14 deg ; with brace, 12 deg), which was still a significant change. MR total spine imaging could be a useful tool for studying the brace effect in scoliosis in two planes. Using this technique, we found reduced sagittal Cobb angles for the thoracic kyphosis with brace. Because there is no radiation exposure, the MR procedure has a potential use in the monitoring of brace treatment. (author)

  18. Image quality in the anteroposterior cervical spine radiograph: Comparison between moving, stationary and non-grid techniques in a lamb neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, Michelle [School of Health and Social Care, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Stapleton, Bristol BS16 1DD (United Kingdom); Grange, Stuart, E-mail: Stuart2.Grange@uwe.ac.u [School of Health and Social Care, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Stapleton, Bristol BS16 1DD (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Background: Cervical spine radiography is a commonly employed examination for degenerative disease and trauma in the cervical spine. Traditionally, the anteroposterior projection is undertaken with the use of an anti-scatter grid. Some practitioners appear to have rejected this practice in favour of a non-grid technique, possibly because of the dose saving it affords. It is necessary to determine if image quality in the cervical spine is significantly degraded and whether the omission of the grid is justified. Method: Using a slaughtered lamb neck as a model of the human neck triplicate radiographs were obtained using a non-grid, a stationary grid and a moving grid technique. Entrance surface dose and dose area product was measured for these techniques. Image quality in terms of contrast, sharpness and overall acceptability was evaluated by 9 independent and blinded observers. Results: A significant reduction in measured dose was observed when the non-grid technique was compared to stationary or moving grid techniques. A statistically significant reduction in image contrast, sharpness and acceptability was also seen in the non-grid compared to grid techniques. Conclusion: These results show evidence of significantly greater image quality in the presence of either a moving or stationary grid in the lamb model. As such they support the continued use of scatter rejection methods such as the anti-scatter grid in AP radiography of the human cervical spine, to optimise radiographic image quality in this critical structure.

  19. Three-Dimensional Mechanical Model of the Human Spine and the Versatility of its Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Milan; Velísková, Petra; Rehák, Ľuboš; Žabka, Martin

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the work is oriented towards the simulation or modeling of the lumbar and thoracic human spine as a load-bearing 3D system in a computer program (ANSYS). The human spine model includes a determination of the geometry based on X-ray pictures of frontal and lateral projections. For this reason, another computer code, BMPCOORDINATES, was developed as an aid to obtain the most precise and realistic model of the spine. Various positions, deformations, scoliosis, rotation and torsion can be modelled. Once the geometry is done, external loading on different spinal segments is entered; consequently, the response could be analysed. This can contribute a lot to medical practice as a tool for diagnoses, and developing implants or other artificial instruments for fixing the spine.

  20. Three-Dimensional Mechanical Model of the Human Spine and the Versatility of its Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokol Milan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work is oriented towards the simulation or modeling of the lumbar and thoracic human spine as a load-bearing 3D system in a computer program (ANSYS. The human spine model includes a determination of the geometry based on X-ray pictures of frontal and lateral projections. For this reason, another computer code, BMPCOORDINATES, was developed as an aid to obtain the most precise and realistic model of the spine. Various positions, deformations, scoliosis, rotation and torsion can be modelled. Once the geometry is done, external loading on different spinal segments is entered; consequently, the response could be analysed. This can contribute a lot to medical practice as a tool for diagnoses, and developing implants or other artificial instruments for fixing the spine.

  1. Stability of the human spine: a biomechanical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, P.J.M.; Veldhuizen, A.G.; Grootenboer, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The influences of curvatures and of physical properties on the mechanical stability of the spine were analysed by means of a three-dimensional, geometrical, nonlinear biomechanical model. According to the model, the initial buckling load decreases with increasing lordotic and kyphotic curvatures.

  2. Functional MR imaging of the cervical spine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allmann, K.H.; Uhl, M.; Uhrmeister, P.; Neumann, K.; Langer, M. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Universitaetsklinik; Kempis, J. von [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Rheumatologie und Klinische Immunologie

    1998-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate functional MR imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) involving the cervical spine. Material and Methods: We used a device that allows MR examination to be made of the cervical spine in infinitely variable degrees of flexion and extension. Dynamic functional MR imaging was performed on 25 patients with RA. Results: Functional MR imaging was able to show the degree of vertebral instability of the occipito-atlantal or atlanto-axial level as well as the subaxial level. By performing functional MR imaging, we were able to demonstrate the extent of synovial tissue around the dens, and the impingement and displacement of the spinal cord during flexion and extension. The basilar impression, the cord impingement into the foramen magnum, the cord compression, the slipping of vertebrae, and the angulation of the cord were all much more evident in functional than in static MR imaging. Conclusion: Functional MR imaging provided additional information in patients with RA, and is valuable in patients who have a normal MR study in the neutral position and yet have signs of a neurological deficit. Functional MR imaging is important in the planning of stabilizing operations of the cervical spine. (orig.)

  3. [New progress on three-dimensional movement measurement analysis of human spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiao-wen; He, Xi-jing; Huang, Si-hua; Liang, Bao-bao; Yu, Zi-rui

    2015-05-01

    Spinal biomechanics, especially the range of spine motion,has close connection with spinal surgery. The change of the range of motion (ROM) is an important indicator of diseases and injuries of spine, and the essential evaluating standards of effect of surgeries and therapies to spine. The analysis of ROM can be dated to the time of the invention of X-ray and even that before it. With the development of science and technology as well as the optimization of various types of calculation methods, diverse measuring methods have emerged, from imaging methods to non-imaging methods, from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, from measuring directly on the X-ray films to calculating automatically by computer. Analysis of ROM has made great progress, but there are some older methods cannot meet the needs of the times and disappear, some classical methods such as X-ray still have vitality. Combining different methods, three dimensions and more vivo spine research are the trend of analysis of ROM. And more and more researchers began to focus on vivo spine research. In this paper, the advantages and disadvantages of the methods utilized recently are presented through viewing recent literatures, providing reference and help for the movement analysis of spine.

  4. Lumbar spine joint synovial cysts of intraspinal development. CT scan imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallee, C.; Chevrot, A.; Benhamouda, M. and others

    CT scan imaging findings are described in 22 patients with lumbar spine joint synovial cysts, of intraspinal development, provoking sciatica or lumbosciatica from nerve compression in spinal canal. Diagnosis was suggested by a mass at the posterior joint level, of variable density, sometimes with peripheral calcification, presenting a vacuum appearance on occasions, and with enhanced image with contrast. Differential diagnosis is from excluded hernia and postoperative fibrosis. Posterior intra-articular arthrography can confirm diagnosis and allow treatment with prolonged action corticoid infiltrations.

  5. Comparison of spine, carina, and tumor as registration landmarks for volumetric image-guided lung radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Jane; Bezjak, Andrea; Franks, Kevin; Le, Lisa W; Cho, B C; Payne, David; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre

    2009-04-01

    To assess the feasibility, reproducibility, and accuracy of volumetric lung image guidance using different thoracic landmarks for image registration. In 30 lung patients, four independent observers conducted automated and manual image registrations on Day 1 cone-beam computed tomography data sets using the spine, carina, and tumor (720 image registrations). The image registration was timed, and the couch displacements were recorded. The intraclass correlation was used to assess reproducibility, and the Bland-Altman analysis was used to compare the automatic and manual matching methods. Tumor coverage (accuracy) was assessed through grading the tumor position after image matching against the internal target volume and planning target volume. The image-guided process took an average of 1 min for all techniques, with the exception of manual tumor matching, which took 4 min. Reproducibility was greatest for automatic carina matching (intraclass correlation, 0.90-0.93) and lowest for manual tumor matching (intraclass correlation, 0.07-0.43) in the left-right, superoinferior, and anteroposterior directions, respectively. The Bland-Altman analysis showed no significant difference between the automatic and manual registration methods. The tumor was within the internal target volume 62% and 60% of the time and was outside the internal target volume, but within the planning target volume, 38% and 40% of the time after automatic spine and automatic carina matching, respectively. For advanced lung cancer, the spine or carina can be used equally for cone-beam computed tomography image registration without compromising target coverage. The carina was more reproducible than the spine, but additional analysis is required to confirm its validation as a tumor surrogate. Soft-tissue registration is unsuitable at present, given the limitations in contrast resolution and the high interobserver variability.

  6. Biomechanical properties of human thoracic spine disc segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B D Stemper

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The objective was to determine the age-dependent compressive and tensile properties of female and male thoracic spine segments using postmortem human subjects (PMHS. Materials and Methods : Forty-eight thoracic disc segments at T4-5, T6-7, T8-9, and T10-11 levels from 12 PMHS T3-T11 spinal columns were divided into groups A and B based on specimen age and loaded in compression and tension. Stiffness and elastic modulus were computed. Stiffness was defined as the slope in the linear region of the force-displacement response. Elastic modulus was defined as the slope of the stress strain curve. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA was used to determine significant differences (P< 0.05 in the disc cross-sectional area, stiffness, and elastic modulus based on gender, spinal level, and group. Results : Specimen ages in group A (28 ± 8 years were significantly lower than in group B (70 ± 7 years. Male discs had significantly greater area (7.2 ± 2.0 sq cm than female discs (5.9 ± 1.8 sq cm. Tensile and compressive stiffness values were significantly different between the two age groups, but not between gender and level. Specimens in group A had greater tensile (486 ± 108 N/mm and compressive (3300 ± 642 N/mm stiffness values compared to group B specimens (tension: 397 ± 124 N/mm, compression: 2527 ± 734 N/mm. Tensile and compressive elastic modulus values depended upon age group and gender, but not on level. Group A specimens had significantly greater tensile and compressive moduli (2.9 ± 0.8 MPa, 19.5 ± 4.1 MPa than group B specimens (1.7 ± 0.6 MPa, 10.6 ± 3.4 MPa. Female specimens showed significantly greater tensile and compressive moduli (2.6 ± 1.0 MPa, 16.6 ± 6.4 MPa than male specimens (2.0 ± 0.7 MPa, 13.7 ± 5.0 MPa. Discussion: Using the two groups to represent "young" and "old" specimens, this study showed that the mechanical response decreases in older specimens, and the decrease is greater in compressive than distractive

  7. MR Imaging Findings of a Leiomyosarcoma of the Thoracic Spine: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, K; Yamashita, K; Hiwatashi, A; Togao, O; Kikuchi, K; Endo, M; Otsuka, H; Oda, Y; Honda, H

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of leiomyosarcoma of the thoracic spine. Primary leiomyosarcoma is a malignant connective tissue tumor originating from smooth muscle cells. Leiomyosarcoma frequently occurs in the uterus, retroperitoneal space, gastrointestinal tract, and deep soft tissues; primary leiomyosarcoma of the bone is rare. The MR imaging including intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging findings of the current case indicated a low diffusion coefficient and high blood flow, which were in concurrence with high cell density on histology and increased vascularity by angiography. Although some benign tumors such as osteoblastoma and giant cell tumor would show similar findings on IVIM imaging, these additional imaging features may narrow the differential diagnosis of spinal tumors.

  8. Tomographic imaging of the cervical spine of horses; Aspectos tomograficos da coluna cervical de equinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, L.P.; Machado, V.M.V.; Santos, R.V.; Evangelista, F.C.; Vulcano, L.C. [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia

    2012-09-15

    The anatomy of the cervical spine of mature horses based on images obtained with a helical computed tomography examination performed on anatomic specimens was studied. Computed tomography was the diagnostic imaging method of choice and allowed three-dimensional reconstructions of images and other anatomical planes, such as coronal and sagittal. All images were acquired and evaluated in the filter and window to bone tissue. It was possible to demonstrate the anatomical differences and peculiarities of the normal vertebrae, particularly the occipito-atlantoaxial region, which has a higher incidence of changes to assist in the visualization of any change of the bone pattern on CT studies. (author)

  9. Functional turbo spin echo magnetic resonance imaging versus tomography for evaluating cervical spine involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostveen, JCM; Roozeboom, AR; van de Laar, MAFJ; Heeres, J; den Boer, JA; Lindeboom, Sibke F.

    1998-01-01

    Study Design. Comparison of findings in plain radiography and conventional tomography with findings in plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging of the upper cervical spine in consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis and with known or suspected abnormalities of the cervical spine.

  10. Diagnostic imaging of cervical spine injuries following blunt trauma: A review of the literature and practical guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saltzherr, T. P.; Fung Kon Jin, P. H. P.; Beenen, L. F. M.; Vandertop, W. P.; Goslings, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    - Patients with a (potential) cervical spine injury can be subdivided into low-risk and high-risk patients. - With a detailed history and physical examination the cervical spine of patients in the 'low-risk' group can be 'cleared' without further radiographic examinations. - X-ray imaging (3-view

  11. Deformable registration for image-guided spine surgery: preserving rigid body vertebral morphology in free-form transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; Wang, A. S.; Uneri, A.; Otake, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Deformable registration of preoperative and intraoperative images facilitates accurate localization of target and critical anatomy in image-guided spine surgery. However, conventional deformable registration fails to preserve the morphology of rigid bone anatomy and can impart distortions that confound high-precision intervention. We propose a constrained registration method that preserves rigid morphology while allowing deformation of surrounding soft tissues. Method: The registration method aligns preoperative 3D CT to intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) using free-form deformation (FFD) with penalties on rigid body motion imposed according to a simple intensity threshold. The penalties enforced 3 properties of a rigid transformation - namely, constraints on affinity (AC), orthogonality (OC), and properness (PC). The method also incorporated an injectivity constraint (IC) to preserve topology. Physical experiments (involving phantoms, an ovine spine, and a human cadaver) as well as digital simulations were performed to evaluate the sensitivity to registration parameters, preservation of rigid body morphology, and overall registration accuracy of constrained FFD in comparison to conventional unconstrained FFD (denoted uFFD) and Demons registration. Result: FFD with orthogonality and injectivity constraints (denoted FFD+OC+IC) demonstrated improved performance compared to uFFD and Demons. Affinity and properness constraints offered little or no additional improvement. The FFD+OC+IC method preserved rigid body morphology at near-ideal values of zero dilatation (D = 0.05, compared to 0.39 and 0.56 for uFFD and Demons, respectively) and shear (S = 0.08, compared to 0.36 and 0.44 for uFFD and Demons, respectively). Target registration error (TRE) was similarly improved for FFD+OC+IC (0.7 mm), compared to 1.4 and 1.8 mm for uFFD and Demons. Results were validated in human cadaver studies using CT and CBCT images, with FFD+OC+IC providing excellent preservation

  12. Evaluation on organ dose and image quality of lumber spine radiography using glass dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Kyeom [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Koo [Dept. of Radiology, The Catholic University of Korea Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to provide resources for medical exposure reduction through evaluation of organ dose and image resolution for lumbar spine around according to the size of the collimator in DR system. The size of the collimator were varied from 8″×17″ to 14″×17″ by 1″ in AP and lateral projection for the lumbar spine radiography with RANDO phantom. The organ dose measured for liver, stomach, pancreas, kidney and gonad by the glass dosimeter. The image resolution was analyzed using the Image J program. The organ dose of around lumbar spine were reduced as the size of the collimator is decreased in AP projection. There were no significant changes decreasing rate whenever the size of the collimator were reduced 1″ in the gonad. The organ dose showed higher on liver and kidney near the surface in lateral projection. There were decreasing rate of less than 5% in liver and kidney, but decreasing rate was 24.34% in the gonad whenever the size of the collimator were reduced 1″. Organ dose difference for internal and external of collimator measured 549.8 μGy in the liver and 264.6 μGy in the stomach. There were no significant changes organ dose difference that measured 1,135.1 μG in the gonad. Image Quality made no difference because SNR and PSNR were over than 30 dB when the collimator size is less than 9″×17″ on AP projection and 10″×17″ on lateral projection. Therefore, we are considered that the recommendations criterion for control of collimator were suggested in order to reduce unnecessary X-ray exposure and to obtain good image quality because lumbar spine radiography contains a lot of peripheral organs rather than other area radiography.

  13. Atlas of postsurgical neuroradiology. Imaging of the brain, spine, and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Harvard Medical School; Westesson, Per-Lennart A. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States). Div. of Neuroradiology

    2012-11-01

    Covers the normal appearances and complications that may be encountered on neuroradiological examinations following surgery to the head, neck, and spine. Contains numerous images and to-the-point case descriptions. Serves as an invaluable and convenient resource for both neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons. The number of surgical procedures performed on the brain, head, neck, and spine has increased markedly in recent decades. As a result, postoperative changes are being encountered more frequently on neuroradiological examinations and constitute an important part of the workflow. However, the imaging correlates of postsurgical changes can be unfamiliar to neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons and are sometimes difficult to interpret. This book is written by experts in the field and contains an abundance of high-quality images and concise descriptions, which should serve as a useful guide to postsurgical neuroradiology. It will familiarize the reader with the various types of surgical procedure, implanted hardware, and complications. Indeed, this work represents the first text dedicated to the realm of postoperative neuroimaging. Topics reviewed include imaging after facial cosmetic surgery; orbital and oculoplastic surgery; sinus surgery; scalp and cranial surgery; brain tumor treatment; psychosurgery, neurodegenerative surgery, and epilepsy surgery; skull base surgery including transsphenoidal pituitary resection; temporal bone surgery including various ossicular prostheses; orthognathic surgery; surgery of the neck including the types of dissection and flap reconstruction; CSF diversion procedures and devices; spine surgery; and vascular and endovascular neurosurgery.

  14. Spine radiosurgery for the local treatment of spine metastases: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance, clinical aspects and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Fabio Ynoe de; Neves-Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Taunk, Neil Kanth; Yamada, Yoshiya [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Laufer, Ilya, E-mail: fymoraes@gmail.com [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurosurgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Many cancer patients will develop spinal metastases. Local control is important for preventing neurologic compromise and to relieve pain. Stereotactic body radiotherapy or spinal radiosurgery is a new radiation therapy technique for spinal metastasis that can deliver a high dose of radiation to a tumor while minimizing the radiation delivered to healthy, neighboring tissues. This treatment is based on intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance and rigid immobilization. Spinal radiosurgery is an increasingly utilized treatment method that improves local control and pain relief after delivering ablative doses of radiation. Here, we present a review highlighting the use of spinal radiosurgery for the treatment of metastatic tumors of the spine. The data used in the review were collected from both published studies and ongoing trials. We found that spinal radiosurgery is safe and provides excellent tumor control (up to 94% local control) and pain relief (up to 96%), independent of histology. Extensive data regarding clinical outcomes are available; however, this information has primarily been generated from retrospective and non randomized prospective series. Currently, two randomized trials are enrolling patients to study clinical applications of fractionation schedules spinal Radiosurgery. Additionally, a phase I clinical trial is being conducted to assess the safety of concurrent stereotactic body radiotherapy and ipilimumab for spinal metastases. Clinical trials to refine clinical indications and dose fractionation are ongoing. The concomitant use of targeted agents may produce better outcomes in the future. (author)

  15. Spine radiosurgery for the local treatment of spine metastases: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance, clinical aspects and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Ynoe de Moraes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many cancer patients will develop spinal metastases. Local control is important for preventing neurologic compromise and to relieve pain. Stereotactic body radiotherapy or spinal radiosurgery is a new radiation therapy technique for spinal metastasis that can deliver a high dose of radiation to a tumor while minimizing the radiation delivered to healthy, neighboring tissues. This treatment is based on intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance and rigid immobilization. Spinal radiosurgery is an increasingly utilized treatment method that improves local control and pain relief after delivering ablative doses of radiation. Here, we present a review highlighting the use of spinal radiosurgery for the treatment of metastatic tumors of the spine. The data used in the review were collected from both published studies and ongoing trials. We found that spinal radiosurgery is safe and provides excellent tumor control (up to 94% local control and pain relief (up to 96%, independent of histology. Extensive data regarding clinical outcomes are available; however, this information has primarily been generated from retrospective and nonrandomized prospective series. Currently, two randomized trials are enrolling patients to study clinical applications of fractionation schedules spinal Radiosurgery. Additionally, a phase I clinical trial is being conducted to assess the safety of concurrent stereotactic body radiotherapy and ipilimumab for spinal metastases. Clinical trials to refine clinical indications and dose fractionation are ongoing. The concomitant use of targeted agents may produce better outcomes in the future.

  16. Impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality of low-dose CT of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Mats; Norrman, Eva; Lidén, Mats; Krauss, Wolfgang; Jendeberg, Johan; Magnuson, Anders; Geijer, Håkan

    2017-06-01

    Background Iterative reconstruction (IR) is a recent reconstruction algorithm for computed tomography (CT) that can be used instead of the standard algorithm, filtered back projection (FBP), to reduce radiation dose and/or improve image quality. Purpose To evaluate and compare the image quality of low-dose CT of the lumbar spine reconstructed with IR to conventional FBP, without further reduction of radiation dose. Material and Methods Low-dose CT on 55 patients was performed on a Siemens scanner using 120 kV tube voltage, 30 reference mAs, and automatic dose modulation. From raw CT data, lumbar spine CT images were reconstructed with a medium filter (B41f) using FBP and four levels of IR (levels 2-5). Five reviewers scored all images on seven image quality criteria according to the European guidelines on quality criteria for CT, using a five-grade scale. A side-by-side comparison was also performed. Results There was significant improvement in image quality for IR (levels 2-4) compared to FBP. According to visual grading regression, odds ratios of all criteria with 95% confidence intervals for IR2, IR3, IR4, and IR5 were: 1.59 (1.39-1.83), 1.74 (1.51-1.99), 1.68 (1.46-1.93), and 1.08 (0.94-1.23), respectively. In the side-by-side comparison of all reconstructions, images with IR (levels 2-4) received the highest scores. The mean overall CTDIvol was 1.70 mGy (SD 0.46; range, 1.01-3.83 mGy). Image noise decreased in a linear fashion with increased strength of IR. Conclusion Iterative reconstruction at levels 2, 3, and 4 improves image quality of low-dose CT of the lumbar spine compared to FPB.

  17. Strain rate dependent properties of younger human cervical spine ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattucci, Stephen F E; Moulton, Jeffrey A; Chandrashekar, Naveen; Cronin, Duane S

    2012-06-01

    The cervical spine ligaments play an essential role in limiting the physiological ranges of motion in the neck; however, traumatic loading such as that experienced in automotive crash scenarios can lead to ligament damage and result in neck injury. The development of detailed neck models to evaluate the response and the potential for injury requires accurate ligament mechanical properties at relevant loading rates. The objective of this study was to measure the mechanical properties of the cervical spine ligaments, by performing tensile tests at elongation rates relevant to car crash scenarios, using younger specimens (≤50 years), in simulated in vivo conditions, and to provide a comprehensive investigation of gender and spinal level effects. The five ligaments investigated were the anterior longitudinal ligament, posterior longitudinal ligament, capsular ligament, ligamentum flavum, and interspinous ligament. Ligaments were tested in tension at quasi-static (0.5 s(-1)), medium (20 s(-1)) and high (150-250 s(-1)) strain rates. The high strain rates represented typical car crash scenarios as determined using an existing cervical spine finite element model. In total, 261 ligament tests were performed, with approximately even distribution within elongation rate, spinal level, and gender. The measured force-displacement data followed expected trends compared to previous studies. The younger ligaments investigated in this study demonstrated less scatter, and were both stiffer and stronger than comparable data from older specimens reported in previous studies. Strain rate effects were most significant, while spinal level effects were limited. Gender effects were not significant, but consistent trends were identified, with male ligaments having a higher stiffness and failure force than female ligaments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. O-Arm-based image guidance in minimally invasive spine surgery: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaj, Ali A; Beckman, Joshua; Smith, Donald A

    2013-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) image guidance technology is gaining popularity in spine surgery. The O-Arm navigation platform, which relies on cone-beam CT images acquired in the operative position, represents the most recent advancement in this field. We report our technique for MIS pedicle screw insertion using the O-Arm system and present two illustrative cases. We used percutaneous technique for short construct cases and "transfascial" technique for long-construct cases. O-Arm based navigation in minimally invasive spine surgery is safe and feasible. This technology may improve surgical accuracy and clinical outcomes but long term prospective studies are needed to validate this. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Spine imaging after lumbar disc replacement: pitfalls and current recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandén Bengt

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most lumbar artificial discs are still composed of stainless steel alloys, which prevents adequate postoperative diagnostic imaging of the operated region when using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Thus patients with postoperative radicular symptoms or claudication after stainless steel implants often require alternative diagnostic procedures. Methods Possible complications of lumbar total disc replacement (TDR are reviewed from the available literature and imaging recommendations given with regard to implant type. Two illustrative cases are presented in figures. Results Access-related complications, infections, implant wear, loosening or fracture, polyethylene inlay dislodgement, facet joint hypertrophy, central stenosis, and ankylosis of the operated segment can be visualised both in titanium and stainless steel implants, but require different imaging modalities due to magnetic artifacts in MRI. Conclusion Alternative radiographic procedures should be considered when evaluating patients following TDR. Postoperative complications following lumbar TDR including spinal stenosis causing radiculopathy and implant loosening can be visualised by myelography and radionucleotide techniques as an adjunct to plain film radiographs. Even in the presence of massive stainless steel TDR implants lumbar radicular stenosis and implant loosening can be visualised if myelography and radionuclide techniques are applied.

  20. Role of Anatomical Landmarks in Identifying Normal and Transitional Vertebra in Lumbar Spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Devimeenal; Indiran, Venkatraman; Hithaya, Fouzal; Alamelu, M; Padmanaban, S

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective study. Identification of transitional vertebra is important in spine imaging, especially in presurgical planning. Pasted images of the whole spine obtained using high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are helpful in counting vertebrae and identifying transitional vertebrae. Counting vertebrae and identifying transitional vertebrae is challenging in isolated studies of lumbar spine and in studies conducted in low-field MRI. An incorrect evaluation may lead to wrong-level treatment. Here, we identify the location of different anatomical structures that can help in counting and identifying vertebrae. Many studies have assessed the vertebral segments using various anatomical structures such as costal facets (CF), aortic bifurcation (AB), inferior vena cava confluence (IC), right renal artery (RRA), celiac trunk (CT), superior mesenteric artery root (SR), iliolumbar ligament (ILL) psoas muscle (PM) origin, and conus medullaris. However, none have yielded any consistent results. We studied the locations of the anatomical structures CF, AB, IC, RRA, CT, SR, ILL, and PM in patients who underwent whole spine MRI at our department. In our study, 81.4% patients had normal spinal segmentation, 14.7% had sacralization, and 3.8% had lumbarization. Vascular landmarks had variable origin. There were caudal and cranial shifts with respect to lumbarization and sacralization. In 93.8% of cases in the normal group, ILL emerged from either L5 alone or the adjacent disc. In the sacralization group, ILL was commonly seen in L5. In the lumbarization group, ILL emerged from L5 and the adjacent disc (66.6%). CFs were identified at D12 in 96.9% and 91.7% of patients in the normal and lumbarization groups, respectively. The PM origin was observed from D12 or D12-L1 in most patients in the normal and sacralization groups. CF, PM, and ILL were good identification markers for D12 and L5, but none were 100% accurate.

  1. Development of the myocardium of the atrioventricular canal and the vestibular spine in the human heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, J. S.; Virágh, S.; Moorman, A. F.; Anderson, R. H.; Lamers, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    To establish the morphogenetic mechanisms underlying formation and separation of the atrioventricular connections, we studied the remodeling of the myocardium of the atrioventricular canal and the extracardiac mesenchymal tissue of the vestibular spine in human embryonic hearts from 4.5 to 10 weeks

  2. Computing human image annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channin, David S; Mongkolwat, Pattanasak; Kleper, Vladimir; Rubin, Daniel L

    2009-01-01

    An image annotation is the explanatory or descriptive information about the pixel data of an image that is generated by a human (or machine) observer. An image markup is the graphical symbols placed over the image to depict an annotation. In the majority of current, clinical and research imaging practice, markup is captured in proprietary formats and annotations are referenced only in free text radiology reports. This makes these annotations difficult to query, retrieve and compute upon, hampering their integration into other data mining and analysis efforts. This paper describes the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid's (caBIG) Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) project, focusing on how to use AIM to query for annotations. The AIM project delivers an information model for image annotation and markup. The model uses controlled terminologies for important concepts. All of the classes and attributes of the model have been harmonized with the other models and common data elements in use at the National Cancer Institute. The project also delivers XML schemata necessary to instantiate AIMs in XML as well as a software application for translating AIM XML into DICOM S/R and HL7 CDA. Large collections of AIM annotations can be built and then queried as Grid or Web services. Using the tools of the AIM project, image annotations and their markup can be captured and stored in human and machine readable formats. This enables the inclusion of human image observation and inference as part of larger data mining and analysis activities.

  3. Modeling and Measurement of 3D Deformation of Scoliotic Spine Using 2D X-ray Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Leow, Wee Kheng; Huang, Chao-Hui; Howe, Tet Sen

    Scoliosis causes deformations such as twisting and lateral bending of the spine. To correct scoliotic deformation, the extents of 3D spinal deformation need to be measured. This paper studies the modeling and measurement of scoliotic spine based on 3D curve model. Through modeling the spine as a 3D Cosserat rod, the 3D structure of a scoliotic spine can be recovered by obtaining the minimum potential energy registration of the rod to the scoliotic spine in the x-ray image. Test results show that it is possible to obtain accurate 3D reconstruction using only the landmarks in a single view, provided that appropriate boundary conditions and elastic properties are included as constraints.

  4. Extraforaminal stenosis in the lumbosacral spine. Efficacy of MR imaging in the coronal plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, M. [Yamamoto General Hospital, Akita (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Watanabe, O. [Yamamoto General Hospital, Akita (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Hirano, H. [Yamamoto General Hospital, Akita (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-09-01

    Purpose: To review experience with MR images of extraforaminal (EF) stenosis in the lumbosacral spine. Material: MR images from 9 patients with 10 EF stenoses were reviewed. The diagnosis was confirmed in 6 patients at surgery, and in 4 on the basis of findings of nerve root injection combined with nerve block. Results and Conclusion: All patients had congenital lumbosacral anomalies with various degrees of fixation between the last formed level and the pelvis. In all cases, affected roots were compressed between the transverse process of the last lumbar segment and the sacral ala. MR using coronal plane imaging demonstrated the root impingement directly in the far lateral zone in all patients. However, sagittal and axial images were unable to define the EF stenoses in all patients. The results of this study show that a transitional vertebra is a cause of EF stenosis and that MR images using coronal plane are useful in the assessment of EF stenosis. (orig.).

  5. Scoring inflammatory activity of the spine by magnetic resonance imaging in ankylosing spondylitis: a multireader experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Cédric; Braun, Jürgen; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine is increasingly important in the assessment of inflammatory activity in clinical trials with patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We investigated feasibility, inter-reader reliability, sensitivity to change, and discriminatory ability...... of 3 different scoring methods for MRI activity and change in activity of the spine in patients with AS. METHODS: Thirty sets of spinal MRI at baseline and after 24 weeks of followup, derived from a randomized clinical trial comparing a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-blocking drug (n = 20) with placebo (n...... = 10) and selected to cover a wide range of activity at baseline and change in activity, were presented electronically in a partial latin-square design to 9 experienced readers from different countries (Europe, Canada). Readers scored each set of MRI 3 times, using 3 different methods including...

  6. Parametric modelling and segmentation of vertebral bodies in 3D CT and MR spine images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Darko; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2011-12-07

    Accurate and objective evaluation of vertebral deformations is of significant importance in clinical diagnostics and therapy of pathological conditions affecting the spine. Although modern clinical practice is focused on three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques, the established methods for evaluation of vertebral deformations are limited to measuring deformations in two-dimensional (2D) x-ray images. In this paper, we propose a method for quantitative description of vertebral body deformations by efficient modelling and segmentation of vertebral bodies in 3D. The deformations are evaluated from the parameters of a 3D superquadric model, which is initialized as an elliptical cylinder and then gradually deformed by introducing transformations that yield a more detailed representation of the vertebral body shape. After modelling the vertebral body shape with 25 clinically meaningful parameters and the vertebral body pose with six rigid body parameters, the 3D model is aligned to the observed vertebral body in the 3D image. The performance of the method was evaluated on 75 vertebrae from CT and 75 vertebrae from T(2)-weighted MR spine images, extracted from the thoracolumbar part of normal and pathological spines. The results show that the proposed method can be used for 3D segmentation of vertebral bodies in CT and MR images, as the proposed 3D model is able to describe both normal and pathological vertebral body deformations. The method may therefore be used for initialization of whole vertebra segmentation or for quantitative measurement of vertebral body deformations.

  7. Occupational and patient exposure as well as image quality for full spine examinations with the EOS imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damet, J., E-mail: jerome.damet@chuv.ch; Fournier, P.; Monnin, P.; Sans-Merce, M.; Verdun, F. R.; Baechler, S. [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne 1007 (Switzerland); Ceroni, D. [Department of Paediatrics, Division of paediatric orthopaedic, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva 1205 (Switzerland); Zand, T. [Department of Radiology, Division of paediatric radiology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva 1205 (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: EOS (EOS imaging S.A, Paris, France) is an x-ray imaging system that uses slot-scanning technology in order to optimize the trade-off between image quality and dose. The goal of this study was to characterize the EOS system in terms of occupational exposure, organ doses to patients as well as image quality for full spine examinations. Methods: Occupational exposure was determined by measuring the ambient dose equivalents in the radiological room during a standard full spine examination. The patient dosimetry was performed using anthropomorphic phantoms representing an adolescent and a five-year-old child. The organ doses were measured with thermoluminescent detectors and then used to calculate effective doses. Patient exposure with EOS was then compared to dose levels reported for conventional radiological systems. Image quality was assessed in terms of spatial resolution and different noise contributions to evaluate the detector's performances of the system. The spatial-frequency signal transfer efficiency of the imaging system was quantified by the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Results: The use of a protective apron when the medical staff or parents have to stand near to the cubicle in the radiological room is recommended. The estimated effective dose to patients undergoing a full spine examination with the EOS system was 290μSv for an adult and 200 μSv for a child. MTF and NPS are nonisotropic, with higher values in the scanning direction; they are in addition energy-dependent, but scanning speed independent. The system was shown to be quantum-limited, with a maximum DQE of 13%. The relevance of the DQE for slot-scanning system has been addressed. Conclusions: As a summary, the estimated effective dose was 290μSv for an adult; the image quality remains comparable to conventional systems.

  8. Twente spine model: A complete and coherent dataset for musculo-skeletal modeling of the thoracic and cervical regions of the human spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayoglu, Riza; Geeraedts, Leo; Groenen, Karlijn H J; Verdonschot, Nico; Koopman, Bart; Homminga, Jasper

    2017-06-14

    Musculo-skeletal modeling could play a key role in advancing our understanding of the healthy and pathological spine, but the credibility of such models are strictly dependent on the accuracy of the anatomical data incorporated. In this study, we present a complete and coherent musculo-skeletal dataset for the thoracic and cervical regions of the human spine, obtained through detailed dissection of an embalmed male cadaver. We divided the muscles into a number of muscle-tendon elements, digitized their attachments at the bones, and measured morphological muscle parameters. In total, 225 muscle elements were measured over 39 muscles. For every muscle element, we provide the coordinates of its attachments, fiber length, tendon length, sarcomere length, optimal fiber length, pennation angle, mass, and physiological cross-sectional area together with the skeletal geometry of the cadaver. Results were consistent with similar anatomical studies. Furthermore, we report new data for several muscles such as rotatores, multifidus, levatores costarum, spinalis, semispinalis, subcostales, transversus thoracis, and intercostales muscles. This dataset complements our previous study where we presented a consistent dataset for the lumbar region of the spine (Bayoglu et al., 2017). Therefore, when used together, these datasets enable a complete and coherent dataset for the entire spine. The complete dataset will be used to develop a musculo-skeletal model for the entire human spine to study clinical and ergonomic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Usefulness of dynamic contrast enhanced lumbar spine MR imaging postoperative herniated lumbar disc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Eun; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Young Soo; Cho, Yong Eun; Park, Mi Suk [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    To compare the usefulness of dynamic contrast enhanced lumbar spine MR imaging with that of conventional delayed contrast enhanced MR imaging in the assessment of postoperative herniated lumbar disc. Forty-one postoperative herniated lumbar disc (HLD) lesions of 32 patients with back pain were examined with MR imaging (1.5T, Vision, Siemens, Germany). Five-phase dynamic 2D FLASH sagittal images (TR/TE = 118.1msec/4.1msec) were obtained every 19 seconds with a 4 minutes delayed image after contrast injection. As seen on delayed images, the discs were assessed as recurred, fibrosis, or no change. On dynamic images, the pattern of enhancement was evaluated as follows : Type 1 (no change in peripheral disc enhancement between the early and late phases) ; or Type 2 (minimal internal extension of marginal smooth enhancement during the late phase) ; or Type 3 (marked internal extension of peripheral irregular enhancement). Dynamic and delayed imaging were compared, and early epidural space enhancement with rapid wash-out was also evaluated. Of 41 postoperative HLDs, 39 lesions showed peripheral contrast enhancement. Evaluation depended on delayed imaging, and was as follows : recurred HLD (n=27) ; fibrosis (n=5) ; no change in postoperative disc (n=7). On dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, enhancement patterns were Type 1 (n=29), Type 2 (n=7), and Type 3 (n=3). In 29 Type 1 lesions, there were no significant differences in image findings between dynamic and delayed images. However, in ten lesions (type 2 : n=7, type 3 : n=3), findings additional to those revealed by delayed images were demonstrated by dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. Nine of the ten Type 2 and 3 lesions were diagnosed as recurred HLD. On dynamic images, five lesions showed early epidural space enhancement. Dynamic contrast-enhanced lumbar spine MR imaging provided additional findings such as increased peripheral disc enhancement, and epidural space enhancement, which cannot be detected on

  10. High speed two-photon imaging of calcium dynamics in dendritic spines: consequences for spine calcium kinetics and buffer capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelisse, L.N.; van Elburg, R.A.J.; Meredith, R.M.; Yuste, R.; Mansvelder, H.D.

    2007-01-01

    Rapid calcium concentration changes in postsynaptic structures are crucial for synaptic plasticity. Thus far, the determinants of postsynaptic calcium dynamics have been studied predominantly based on the decay kinetics of calcium transients. Calcium rise times in spines in response to single action

  11. High Speed Two-Photon Imaging of Calcium Dynamics in Dendritic Spines: : Consequences for Spine Calcium Kinetics and Buffer Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, R.A.J.; Cornelisse, L.N; Meredith, R.M; Yuste, R; Mansvelder, H.D

    2007-01-01

    Rapid calcium concentration changes in postsynaptic structures are crucial for synaptic plasticity. Thus far, the determinants of postsynaptic calcium dynamics have been studied predominantly based on the decay kinetics of calcium transients. Calcium rise times in spines in response to single action

  12. Cervical spine imaging in trauma: Does the use of grid and filter combination improve visualisation of the cervicothoracic junction?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Nimit, E-mail: nimitgoyal@doctors.org.u [University Hospital of Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XW (United Kingdom); Rachapalli, Vamsidhar; Burns, Helen; Lloyd, David C.F. [University Hospital of Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XW (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of filter and anti-scatter grid combination in demonstrating the cervicothoracic junction in lateral cervical spine radiographs performed for trauma patients. Methods: Following a change in departmental protocol in our hospital, anti-scatter grid and filter are routinely used for lateral cervical spine radiograph in all trauma patients with immobilised cervical spine. A retrospective study was done to compare the efficacy of lateral cervical spine radiographs in demonstrating the cervicothoracic junction for a period of three months before and after the implementation of the change. All images were independently evaluated by two observers. Results: 253 trauma patients had a lateral cervical spine radiograph done in January to March 2003 without using the anti-scatter grid and filter while 309 patients in January to March 2007, using filter and grid. Inter-observer variability between the two observers was calculated using Cohen's Kappa which showed good and very good agreement for 2003 and 2007 respectively. 126 (49.8%) images adequately demonstrated the cervicothoracic junction without using filter and grid while 189 (61.1%) were adequate following their use. This was statistically significant (Fischer exact test, p value = 0.0081). Conclusion: The use of filter and anti-scatter grids improves the visualisation of cervicothoracic junction in lateral cervical spine imaging and reduces the need to repeat exposure.

  13. Intensity-based 2D-3D spine image registration incorporating a single fiducial marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russakoff, Daniel B; Rohlfing, Torsten; Adler, John R; Maurer, Calvin R

    2005-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2D)-three dimensional (3D) registration of a computed tomography image to one or more x-ray projection images has a number of image-guided therapy applications. In general, fiducial marker-based methods are fast, accurate, and robust, but marker implantation is not always possible, often is considered too invasive to be clinically acceptable, and entails risk. There also is the unresolved issue of whether it is acceptable to leave markers permanently implanted. Intensity-based registration methods do not require the use of markers and can be automated because such geometric features as points and surfaces do not need to be segmented from the images. However, for spine images, intensity-based methods are susceptible to local optima in the cost function and thus need initial transformations that are close to the correct transformation. In this report, we propose a hybrid similarity measure for 2D-3D registration that is a weighted combination of an intensity-based similarity measure (mutual information) and a point-based measure using one fiducial marker. We evaluate its registration accuracy and robustness by using gold-standard clinical spine image data from four patients. Mean registration errors for successful registrations for the four patients were 1.3 and 1.1 mm for the intensity-based and hybrid similarity measures, respectively. Whereas the percentage of successful intensity-based registrations (registration error registrations more than 99% of the time independent of the initial transformation. The use of one fiducial marker reduces 2D-3D spine image registration error slightly and improves robustness substantially. The findings are potentially relevant for image-guided therapy. If one marker is sufficient to obtain clinically acceptable registration accuracy and robustness, as the preliminary results using the proposed hybrid similarity measure suggest, the marker can be placed on a spinous process, which could be accomplished without

  14. Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and his depictions of the human spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Garvin; Gonzales, Jocelyn; Iwanaga, Joe; Fisahn, Christian; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-12-01

    Few individuals in history have exerted so great an influence and made such extensive contributions to so many disciplines as Leonardo da Vinci. Da Vinci's inquisitive, experimental mentality led him to many discoveries, such as spinal cord function and the proper anatomy of several organ systems. Respected not only as an artist but also as an anatomist, he made many significant contributions to the field. This article explores da Vinci's drawings, in relation to the anatomy of the human spine.

  15. Extensive Mirror-Image Neurofibromas of Entire Spine Resulting in Spastic Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigder, Mark; Szelemej, Paul; Berrington, Neil

    2017-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is associated with increased incidence of spinal tumors including neurofibromas. The majority of NF1-associated spine neurofibromas are asymptomatic; however, a minority of patients will experience neurologic symptoms that can range from mild paresthesia, radiculopathy, myelopathy, and focal weakness to quadriplegia in extreme cases. We present a 21-year-old male diagnosed with NF1 in infancy and followed for multiple mirror-image neurofibromas involving the entire spine. He was asymptomatic until age 14 when he developed neck pain and progressive tetraplegia with magnetic resonance imaging showing severe cord compression secondary to bilateral C2 neurofibromas. Emergent cervical decompression was performed at C1-C3 along with debulking of bilateral neurofibromas. Postoperatively he regained full strength with no signs of myelopathy several years postoperatively. This case demonstrates a dramatic neuroimaging finding and emphasizes the potential for significant neurologic deterioration in previously asymptomatic NF1 patients, highlighting the need for long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Limitations of indium leukocyte imaging for the diagnosis of spine infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whalen, J.L.; Brown, M.L.; McLeod, R.; Fitzgerald, R.H. Jr. (Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The usefulness of indium-111 white blood cell (WBC) scintigraphy in the detection of spine sepsis was studied in 22 patients who had open or percutaneous biopsies for microbiologic diagnosis. The indium images in 18 patients with vertebral infection were falsely negative in 15 (83%) and truly positive in 3 (17%). All four patients with negative cultures and histology had true-negative scans. The indium-111 WBC imaging results yielded a sensitivity of 17%, a specificity of 100%, and an accuracy rate of 31%. Prior antibiotic therapy was correlated with a high incidence of false-negative scans and photon-deficient indium-111 WBC uptake. The usefulness of indium-111 WBC scintigraphy for the diagnosis of vertebral infection may be limited to those patients who have not been treated with antibiotics previously.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute trauma of the cervical spine: spectrum of findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, B.B.; Koopmans, R.A. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectrum of acute injury to the cervical spine was illustrated in this pictorial essay. The appearance of the traumatized cord was discussed, including intramedullary hemorrhage, and the causes of spinal cord compression, such as disk herniation, epidural hematoma, fracture, dislocation and underlying spinal stenosis. The ability of MRI to directly reveal the severity of cord injury and simultaneously indicate the cause of cord compression proved particularly useful in the management of incomplete injury, for which surgical intervention may prevent further deterioration. The protocol for MRI of cervical spinal trauma included sagittal T1-weighted and T2-weighted conventional spin-echo sequences. In addition, transverse T2-weighted gradient-echo images were obtained. MRI`s ability to directly reveal the extent of cord injury was said to be a powerful tool in the management of incomplete injuries where further deterioration could be prevented by timely surgical intervention. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Sequential biomechanics of the human upper thoracic spine and pectoral girdle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stammen, Jason A; Herriott, Rodney; Kang, Yun-Seok; Bolte, John; Dupaix, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Thoracic spine flexibility affects head motion, which is critical to control in motor vehicle crashes given the frequency and severity of head injuries. The objective of this study is to investigate the dynamic response of the human upper thoracic region. An original experimental/analytical approach, Isolated Segment Manipulation (ISM), is introduced to quantify the intact upper thoracic spine-pectoral girdle (UTS-PG) dynamic response of six adult post-mortem human subjects (PMHS). A continuous series of small displacement, frontal perturbations were applied to the human UTS-PG using fifteen combinations of speed and constraint per PMHS. The non-parametric response of the T1-T6 lumped mass segment was obtained using a system identification technique. A parametric mass-damper-spring model was used to fit the non-parametric system response. Mechanical parameters of the upper thoracic spine were determined from the experimental model and analyzed in each speed/constraint configuration. The natural frequencies of the UTS-PG were 22.9 ± 7.1 rad/sec (shear, n=58), 32.1 ± 7.4 rad/sec (axial, n=58), and 27.8 ± 7.7 rad/sec (rotation, n=65). The damping ratios were 0.25 ± 0.20 (shear), 0.42 ± 0.24 (axial), and 0.58± 0.32 (rotation). N-way analysis of variance (Type III constrained sum of squares, no interaction effects) revealed that the relative effects of test speed, pectoral girdle constraint, and PMHS anthropometry on the UTS-PG dynamic properties varied per property and direction. While more work is needed to verify accuracy in realistic crash scenarios, the UTS-PG model system dynamic properties could eventually aid in developing integrated anthropomorphic test device (ATD) thoracic spine and shoulder components to provide improved head kinematics and belt interaction.

  19. Is there a preferred method for scoring activity of the spine by magnetic resonance imaging in ankylosing spondylitis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Heijde, Désirée; Landewé, Robert; Hermann, Kay-Geert

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the discussion during a module update at OMERACT 8 on scoring methods for activity in the spine on magnetic resonance imaging. The conclusion was that the 3 available scoring methods are all very good with respect to discrimination and feasibility: the Ankylosing Spondylitis...... spine MRI score for activity (ASspiMRI-a), the Berlin method (a modification of the ASspiMRI-a), and the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada Magnetic Resonance Imaging Index for Assessment of Spinal Inflammation in AS (SPARCC). All 3 methods were judged to be similar with respect...

  20. Medical validation and CBIR of spine x-ray images over the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antani, Sameer; Cheng, Jing; Long, Jonathan; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2006-01-01

    As found in the literature, most Internet-based prototype Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) systems focus on stock photo collections and do not address challenges of large specialized image collections and topics such as medical information retrieval by image content. Even fewer have medically validated data to evaluate retrieval quality in terms of precision and relevance. To date, our research has reported over 75% relevant spine X-ray image retrieval tested on 888 validated vertebral shapes from 207 images using our prototype CBIR system operating within our local network. As a next step, we have designed and developed an Internet-based medical validation tool and a CBIR retrieval tool in MATLAB and JAVA that can remotely connect to our database. The retrieval tool supports hybrid text and image queries and also provides partial shape annotation for pathology-specific querying. These tools are initially developed for domain experts, such as radiologists and educators, to identify design issues for improved workflow. This article describes the tools and design considerations in their development.

  1. Clinical use of dual image-guided localization system for spine radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ning; Walls, Nicole; Kim, Jinkoo; Jin, Jian-Yue; Kim, Sangroh; Nurushev, Teamour; Chetty, Indrin J; Movsas, Benjamin; Ryu, Samuel

    2012-04-01

    The recently released Novalis TX linac platform provides various image guided localization methods including a stereoscopic X-ray imaging technique (ExacTrac) and a volumetric cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging technique. The ExacTrac combined with the robotic six dimensional (6D) couch provides fast and accurate patient setup based on bony structures and offers "snap shot" imaging at any point during the treatment to detect patient motion. The CBCT offers a three dimensional (3D), volumetric image of the patient's setup with visualization of anatomic structures. However, each imaging system has a separate isocenter, which may not coincide with each other or with the linac isocenter. The aim of this paper was to compare the localization accuracy between Exactrac and CBCT for single fraction spine radiosurgery treatments. The study was performed for both phantom and patients (96 clinical treatments of 57 patients). The discrepancies between the isocenter between the ExacTrac and CBCT in four dimensions (three translations and one rotation) were recorded and statistically analyzed using two-tailed t-test.

  2. The rib cage stabilizes the human thoracic spine: An in vitro study using stepwise reduction of rib cage structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebsch, Christian; Graf, Nicolas; Appelt, Konrad; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2017-01-01

    The stabilizing effect of the rib cage on the human thoracic spine is still not sufficiently analyzed. For a better understanding of this effect as well as the calibration and validation of numerical models of the thoracic spine, experimental biomechanics data is required. This study aimed to determine (1) the stabilizing effect of the single rib cage structures on the human thoracic spine as well as the effect of the rib cage on (2) the flexibility of the single motion segments and (3) coupled motion behavior of the thoracic spine. Six human thoracic spine specimens including the entire rib cage were loaded quasi-statically with pure moments of ± 2 Nm in flexion/extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR) using a custom-built spine tester. Motion analysis was performed using an optical motion tracking system during load application to determine range of motion (ROM) and neutral zone (NZ). Specimens were tested (1) in intact condition, (2) after removal of the intercostal muscles, (3) after median sternotomy, after removal of (4) the anterior rib cage up to the rib stumps, (5) the right sixth to eighth rib head, and (6) all rib heads. Significant (p spine rigidity, especially in axial rotation by a factor of more than two, and should therefore be considered in clinical scenarios, in vitro, and in silico.

  3. Osteoradionecrosis of the upper cervical spine: MR imaging following radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Ann D. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: king2015@cuhk.edu.hk; Griffith, James F.; Abrigo, Jill M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Leung Singfai [Department of Clinical Oncology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Yau Fungkwai [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Tse, Gary M.K. [Department of Anatomical and Cellular Pathology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Ahuja, Anil T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To document the MRI appearances of radiation-induced abnormalities in the cervical spine following treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: Patients with radiation-induced abnormalities in the upper cervical spine were identified from a retrospective analysis of reports from patients undergoing MRI follow-up. Imaging and clinical records of these patients were reviewed. Symmetrical distribution of abnormalities at C1 (anterior arch {+-} adjacent aspect of the lateral masses) and C2 (dens {+-} body especially with a characteristic horizontal rim of marrow preservation above the inferior endplate) were considered typical for osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Results: Abnormalities of C1/2 were identified in 9/884 (1%) patients. The MRI distribution of abnormalities was typical for ORN in four and atypical in five patients. Abnormal soft tissue was present in the atlantoaxial joint in eight patients, forming a florid mass in six. This soft tissue was in direct continuity with the posterior nasopharyngeal wall ulceration via the retropharyngeal region. The final clinical diagnosis was ORN in eight, five of whom had clinical factors which suggested infection could have played a contributory role, and osteomyelitis in one patient. All patients had undergone additional radiotherapy treatment comprising of brachytherapy (7), stereotactic radiotherapy (1) or radiotherapy boost (2) and three had undergone nasopharyngectomy. Conclusion: ORN of the upper cervical spine following radiotherapy for NPC is more common than previously suspected and is seen in patients with additional treatment, especially brachytherapy. MRI features are often atypical and a contributory role of infection in the development of some cases of ORN is postulated.

  4. Evaluation of Traumatic Spine by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Correlation with Neurological Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magu, Sarita; Singh, Deepak; Yadav, Rohtas Kanwar; Bala, Manju

    2015-10-01

    Prospective study. To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings with clinical profile and neurological status of the patient and to correlate the MRI findings with neurological recovery of the patients and predict the outcome. Previous studies have reported poor neurological recovery in patients with cord hemorrhage, as compared to cord edema in spine injury patients. High canal compromise, cord compression along with higher extent of cord injury also carries poor prognostic value. Neurological status of patients was assessed at the time of admission and discharge in as accordance with the American Spine Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale. Mean stay in hospital was 14.11±5.74 days. Neurological status at admission and neurological recovery at discharge was compared with various qualitative cord findings and quantitative parameters on MRI. In 27 patients, long-term follow-up was done at mean time of 285.9±43.94 days comparing same parameters. Cord edema and normal cord was associated with favorable neurological outcome. Cord contusion showed lesser neurological recovery, as compared to cord edema. Cord hemorrhage was associated with worst neurological status at admission and poor neurological recovery. Mean canal compromise (MCC), mean spinal cord compression (MSCC) and lesion length values were higher in patients presenting with ASIA A impairment scale injury and showed decreasing trends towards ASIA E impairment scale injury. Patients showing neurological recovery had lower mean MCC, MSCC, and lesion length, as compared to patients showing no neurological recovery (p<0.05). Cord hemorrhage, higher MCC, MSCC, and lesion length values have poor prognostic value in spine injury patients.

  5. Partial shape matching for CBIR of spine x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antani, Sameer K.; Xu, Xiaoqian; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2003-12-01

    Efficient content-based image retrieval (CBIR) of biomedical images is a challenging problem. Feature representation algorithms used in indexing medical images on the pathology of interest have to address conflicting goals of reducing feature dimensionality while retaining important and often subtle biomedical features. In case of the vertebra, its shape effectively describes various pathologies identified by medical experts as being consistently and reliably found in x-rays in the image collection. A suitable shape method must enable retrieval relevant to the pathology in question. An approach to enabling pathology based retrieval is to use partial shape matching techniques. This paper describes our research in the development of such methods and initial retrieval results and related issues. The research is a part of our ongoing effort in developing CBIR for digitized images of a collection of 17,000 cervical and lumbar spine x-rays taken as a part of the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II) at the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, an intramural R&D division of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography in stress fractures of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganiyusufoglu, A.K., E-mail: kursady33@yahoo.co [Department of Radiology, Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Onat, L. [Department of Radiology, Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Karatoprak, O.; Enercan, M.; Hamzaoglu, A. [Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with computed tomography (CT) in stress fractures of the lumbar spine. Materials and methods: Radiological and clinical data from 57 adolescents and young adults with a diagnosis of stress injury of the lumbar spine were retrospectively reviewed. All cases had undergone both 1.5 T MRI and 16-section CT examinations. All MRI and CT images were retrospectively reviewed and evaluated in separate sessions. The fracture morphology (complete/incomplete, localization) and vertebral levels were noted at both the CT and MRI examinations. Bone marrow/peri-osseous soft-tissue oedema was also determined at MRI. Results: In total, 73 complete and 32 incomplete stress fractures were detected with CT. Sixty-seven complete, 24 incomplete fractures and eight stress reactions were detected using MRI in the same study group. Marrow oedema was also seen in eight of the complete and 20 of the incomplete fractures. The specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy of MRI in detecting fracture lines were 99.6, 86.7, and 97.2%, respectively. MRI was more accurate at the lower lumbar levels in comparison to upper lumbar levels. Conclusion: MRI has a similar diagnostic accuracy to CT in determining complete fractures with or without accompanying marrow oedema and incomplete fractures with accompanying marrow oedema, especially at the lower lumbar levels, which constitutes 94% of all fractures. At upper lumbar levels and in the incomplete fractures of the pars interarticularis with marked surrounding sclerosis, MRI has apparent limitations compared to CT imaging.

  7. Comparative Study of C-arms for Intraoperative 3-dimensional Imaging and Navigation in Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery Part I: Applicability and Image Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Jan-Helge; Sircar, Ronen; Scheiwe, Christian; Kogias, Evangelos; Volz, Florian; Krüger, Marie T; Hubbe, Ulrich

    2017-07-01

    This was a retrospective analysis. This study compares 2 different 3-dimensional (3D) C-arm devices for intraoperative imaging and navigation with regard to clinical applicability and image quality. Minimally invasive spine surgery requires intraoperative imaging techniques to adequately visualize the unexposed spine. For this purpose, mobile 3D C-arms became available along with the evolution of intraoperative navigation techniques. The C-arm devices Siremobil Iso-C 3D (Siemens) and Vision FD Vario 3D (Ziehm) perform an automated orbital rotation around the patient acquiring a 3D image set out of multiple successive fluoroscopic images. We report on technical specifications of the C-arms and our daily experience regarding clinical applicability. Furthermore, 5 spine surgeons evaluated blinded triplanar planes of 40 cervical, thoracic, and lumbar 3D scans that were obtained during routine surgery regarding usability for navigation. We assessed the delineation of cortical bone, artifacts, and overall image quality using a 0-10 numeric rating scale. The Siremobil Iso-C 3D requires 128 seconds for its 190-degree scanning arc with equidistant isocenter. The Vision FD Vario 3D performs an elliptical scanning arc and completes its 135-degree scan in 64 seconds; furthermore, it features a flat panel detector and fully digital imaging. The smaller dimensions of the Vision FD Vario 3D made it easier to maneuver in the operating room compared with the more bulky Siremobil Iso-C 3D. With respect to image quality in cervical 3D scans, the Siremobil Iso-C 3D reached significantly higher scores in all categories. The Vision FD Vario 3D revealed less artifacts in lumbar 3D scans. The Siremobil Iso-C 3D provides high-quality 3D scans in slender spine regions (eg, cervical spine), whereas the Vision FD Vario 3D appears to have advantages in the lumbar spine. Further evolution and novel devices are needed to optimize image quality and handling.

  8. Whole-body vibration: is there a causal relationship to specific imaging findings of the spine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; Choemprayong, Songphan; O'Neill, Kevin R; Devin, Clinton J; Spengler, Dan M

    2012-10-01

    Systematic review. To perform a systematic review of the available literature for those studies that evaluated the role of whole-body vibration (WBV) on the spine, using imaging modalities as well as an estimation of WBV exposure. Numerous comparative studies have reported a possible association between the occurrence of spinal symptoms and exposure to WBV. These exposures have commonly been examined in the work environment largely through self-reported questionnaires only. From a scientific perspective, the majority of studies emphasize symptoms and lack objective medical evidence, such as spinal imaging, to help establish a specific spinal disorder. Because both neck and low back pain comprise symptoms that can arise from a host of factors including age, a casual link between spinal disorders and WBV cannot be affirmed. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for studies related to WBV and spinal symptoms, diagnosis, and/or disorders. Our searches were limited to studies published prior to August 2011. The resulting 700 citations (after excluding 354 duplicates) were then screened by 3 independent reviewers on the basis of the following predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria: inclusion-clinical studies with imaging evaluation (radiographs, computed tomographic scans, and/or magnetic resonance images) and documented WBV exposure (occupation, amount of WBV, and/or duration); exclusion-reliance solely on self-reporting of symptoms (neck pain, low back pain, and/or sciatica), those articles based on a clinical diagnosis without use of imaging, and in vitro/animal/biomechanical studies. Only 7 studies met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. Included were 5 retrospective cohort and 2 cross-sectional studies. Although mixed results and conclusions were found, the majority of studies did not identify an association between WBV exposure and an abnormal spinal imaging finding indicating damage of the spine. We should also stress that each included study has

  9. Static and dynamic CT imaging of the cervical spine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederman, Tomas; Shalabi, Adel; Sundin, Anders [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Olerud, Claes; Alavi, Kamran [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-09-18

    To compare CR with CT (static and dynamic) to evaluate upper spine instability and to determine if CT in flexion adds value compared to MR imaging in neutral position to assess compression of the subarachnoid space and of the spinal cord. Twenty-one consecutive patients with atlantoaxial subluxation due to rheumatoid arthritis planned for atlantoaxial fusion were included. CT and MRI were performed with the neck in the neutral position and CT also in flexion. CR in neutral position and flexion were obtained in all patients except for one subject who underwent examination in flexion and extension. CR and CT measurements of atlantoaxial subluxation correlated but were larger by CR than CT in flexion, however, the degree of vertical dislocation was similar with both techniques irrespective of the position of the neck. Cervical motion was larger at CR than at CT. The spinal cord compression was significantly worse at CT obtained in the flexed position as compared to MR imaging in the neutral position. Functional CR remains the primary imaging method but CT in the flexed position might be useful in the preoperative imaging work-up, as subarachnoid space involvement may be an indicator for the development of neurologic dysfunction. (orig.)

  10. Is there a preferred method for scoring activity of the spine by magnetic resonance imaging in ankylosing spondylitis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Heijde, Désirée; Landewé, Robert; Hermann, Kay-Geert

    2007-01-01

    spine MRI score for activity (ASspiMRI-a), the Berlin method (a modification of the ASspiMRI-a), and the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada Magnetic Resonance Imaging Index for Assessment of Spinal Inflammation in AS (SPARCC). All 3 methods were judged to be similar with respect...

  11. Is there a preferred method for scoring activity of the spine by magnetic resonance imaging in ankylosing spondylitis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Heijde, Désirée; Landewé, Robert; Hermann, Kay-Geert

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the discussion during a module update at OMERACT 8 on scoring methods for activity in the spine on magnetic resonance imaging. The conclusion was that the 3 available scoring methods are all very good with respect to discrimination and feasibility: the Ankylosing Spondylitis...

  12. Frequent Computed Tomography Scanning Due to Incomplete Three-View X-Ray Imaging of the Cervical Spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saltzherr, Teun Peter; Beenen, Ludo F. M.; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Luitse, Jan S. K.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Goslings, J. Carel

    2010-01-01

    Background: Conventional C-spine imaging (3-view series) is still widely used in trauma patients, although the utilization of computed tomography (CT) scanning is increasing. The aim of this study was to analyze the value of conventional radiography and the frequency of subsequent CT scanning due to

  13. Posterior Lumbar Subcutaneous Edema on Spine Magnetic Resonance Images: What Is the Cause?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ga Jin; Lee, In Sook; Han, In Ho; Lee, Jung Sub [Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Tae Yong [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jong Woon [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Posterior lumbar subcutaneous (PLS) edema on spine magnetic resonance (MR) images is a common incidental, though neglected finding. This study was undertaken to investigate the relations between PLS edema and pathologic conditions. Between January and December 2009, 138 patients with PLS edema, but without a spinal tumor or a history of recent surgery or trauma, and 80 infectious spondylitis patients without PLS edema were enrolled in this retrospective study. Available medical records and lumbar spine MR images were evaluated. The degree of edema was quantified using an arbitrary scoring system. Further, the correlations between the degree of edema and age, sex, body mass index (BMI), degeneration of posterior spinal structures (PSS) and infectious spondylitis were analyzed. Of the 93 cases with a calculable BMI, 61 (66%) had a BMI of > 23 kg/m2. Correlations between the degree of edema and sex, age and BMI grade were all statistically non-significant. Thirty-three cases (24%) had an underlying disease, such as heart problem, diabetes mellitus, liver cirrhosis, chronic renal failure, extra-spinal tumor or connective tissue disorder. The numbers of cases with infectious spondylitis and an idiopathic condition was 61 (44%) and 44 (32%), respectively. The grade of infectious spondylitis was not found to be significantly associated with the degree of edema (p = 0.084). In cases with an idiopathic condition, the correlation between the degree of edema and PSS degeneration was statistically significant (p = 0.042). Radiologists should not disregard PLS edema, because it is related to an underlying disease and thus may be of clinical significance.

  14. Utility of 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of postoperative pain following surgical spine fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouldar, D; Bakshian, S; Matthews, R; Rao, V; Manzano, M; Dardashti, S

    2017-08-01

    A retrospective case review of patients who underwent 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging of the spine with postoperative pain following vertebral fusion. To determine the benefit of 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of persistent pain in the postoperative spine. The diagnosis of pain generators in the postoperative spine has proven to be a diagnostic challenge. The conventional radiologic evaluation of persistent pain after spine surgery with the use of plain radiographs, MRI, and CT can often fall short of diagnosis in the complex patient. 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging is an alternative tool to accurately identify a patient's source of pain in the difficult patient. This retrospective study looked at 25 adult patients who had undergone 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging. All patients had persistent or recurrent back pain over the course of a 15-month period after having undergone spinal fusion surgery. All patients had inconclusive dedicated MRI. The clinical accuracy of PET/CT in identifying the pain generator and contribution to altering the decision making process was compared to the use of CT scan alone. Of the 25 patients studied, 17 patients had increased uptake on the 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT fusion images. There was a high-level correlation of radiotracer uptake to the patients' pain generator. Overall 88% of the studies were considered beneficial with either PET/CT altering the clinical diagnosis and treatment plan of the patient or confirming unnecessary surgery. 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT proves to be a useful tool in the diagnosis of complex spine pathology of the postoperative patients. In varied cases, a high correlation of metabolic activity to the source of the patient's pain was observed.

  15. Sagittal whole-spine magnetic resonance imaging in 750 consecutive outpatients: accurate determination of the number of lumbar vertebral bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Eric H; Mishra, Rahul K; Chang, David S; Perkins, Thomas G; Bonifield, Daniel R; Tandy, Richard D; Cartwright, Peter E; Peoples, Randal R; Orrison, William W

    2010-01-01

    When the number of lumbar and sacral vertebrae is being assessed, variations from typical lumbosacral anatomy may confuse the practitioner, potentially leading to significant clinical errors. In this study, the authors describe the statistical variation in lumbar spine anatomy in an outpatient imaging setting, evaluate the potential implications for clinical practice based on the variation in the number of lumbar-type vertebrae identified, and recommend a method for rapidly determining the number of lumbar spine vertebral bodies (VBs) in outpatients referred for lumbar spine MR imaging. A total of 762 patients (male and female) who presented with low back-related medical conditions underwent whole-spine MR imaging in an outpatient setting. The high-speed whole-spine evaluation was successful for determining the number of lumbar-type VBs in 750 (98%) of 762 consecutive patients. The sagittal whole-spine 3-T MR imaging system images obtained between the beginning of January 2005 and the end of February 2007 were reviewed. The VBs were counted successively from the level of C-2 inferiorly to the intervertebral disc below the most inferior lumbar-type VB. Numbers of disc herniations were also evaluated in the context of the number of VBs. One in 5 of these outpatients did not have 5 lumbar-type vertebrae: 14.5% had 6; 5.3% had 4; and 1 (0.13%) had the rare finding of 3 lumbar-type vertebrae. Two-thirds of the individuals with 6 lumbar-type vertebrae were male and two-thirds of the individuals with 4 lumbar-type vertebrae were female. Sagittal whole-spine MR imaging can be performed rapidly and efficiently in the majority of patients (98%), and provides improved accuracy for the determination of the number of lumbar-type VBs. A supplementary coronal MR, Ferguson view radiograph or intraoperative fluoroscopic determination for the presence of lumbosacral transitional vertebrae may add additional information when indicated for clinical treatment or surgical planning.

  16. Torsion biomechanics of the spine following lumbar laminectomy: a human cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisschop, Arno; van Dieën, Jaap H; Kingma, Idsart; van der Veen, Albert J; Jiya, Timothy U; Mullender, Margriet G; Paul, Cornelis P L; de Kleuver, Marinus; van Royen, Barend J

    2013-08-01

    Lumbar laminectomy affects spinal stability in shear loading. However, the effects of laminectomy on torsion biomechanics are unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of laminectomy on torsion stiffness and torsion strength of lumbar spinal segments following laminectomy and whether these biomechanical parameters are affected by disc degeneration and bone mineral density (BMD). Ten human cadaveric lumbar spines were obtained (age 75.5, range 59-88). Disc degeneration (MRI) and BMD (DXA) were assessed. Disc degeneration was classified according to Pfirrmann and dichotomized in mild or severe. BMD was defined as high BMD (≥median BMD) or low BMD (biomechanical effects of a lumbar laminectomy.

  17. Automatic exposure control calibration and optimisation for abdomen, pelvis and lumbar spine imaging with an Agfa computed radiography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C. S.; Wood, T. J.; Avery, G.; Balcam, S.; Needler, L.; Joshi, H.; Saunderson, J. R.; Beavis, A. W.

    2016-11-01

    The use of three physical image quality metrics, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean effective noise equivalent quanta (eNEQm) have recently been examined by our group for their appropriateness in the calibration of an automatic exposure control (AEC) device for chest radiography with an Agfa computed radiography (CR) imaging system. This study uses the same methodology but investigates AEC calibration for abdomen, pelvis and spine CR imaging. AEC calibration curves were derived using a simple uniform phantom (equivalent to 20 cm water) to ensure each metric was held constant across the tube voltage range. Each curve was assessed for its clinical appropriateness by generating computer simulated abdomen, pelvis and spine images (created from real patient CT datasets) with appropriate detector air kermas for each tube voltage, and grading these against reference images which were reconstructed at detector air kermas correct for the constant detector dose indicator (DDI) curve currently programmed into the AEC device. All simulated images contained clinically realistic projected anatomy and were scored by experienced image evaluators. Constant DDI and CNR curves did not provide optimized performance but constant eNEQm and SNR did, with the latter being the preferred calibration metric given that it is easier to measure in practice. This result was consistent with the previous investigation for chest imaging with AEC devices. Medical physicists may therefore use a simple and easily accessible uniform water equivalent phantom to measure the SNR image quality metric described here when calibrating AEC devices for abdomen, pelvis and spine imaging with Agfa CR systems, in the confidence that clinical image quality will be sufficient for the required clinical task. However, to ensure appropriate levels of detector air kerma the advice of expert image evaluators must be sought.

  18. Image Segmentation and Analysis of Flexion-Extension Radiographs of Cervical Spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eniko T. Enikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new analysis tool for cervical flexion-extension radiographs based on machine vision and computerized image processing. The method is based on semiautomatic image segmentation leading to detection of common landmarks such as the spinolaminar (SL line or contour lines of the implanted anterior cervical plates. The technique allows for visualization of the local curvature of these landmarks during flexion-extension experiments. In addition to changes in the curvature of the SL line, it has been found that the cervical plates also deform during flexion-extension examination. While extension radiographs reveal larger curvature changes in the SL line, flexion radiographs on the other hand tend to generate larger curvature changes in the implanted cervical plates. Furthermore, while some lordosis is always present in the cervical plates by design, it actually decreases during extension and increases during flexion. Possible causes of this unexpected finding are also discussed. The described analysis may lead to a more precise interpretation of flexion-extension radiographs, allowing diagnosis of spinal instability and/or pseudoarthrosis in already seemingly fused spines.

  19. Imaging suspected cervical spine injury: Plain radiography or computed tomography? Systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, Gavin [Diagnostic Radiographer, Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust, Colchester General Hospital, Turner Road, Colchester, CO4 5JL Essex (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gavincain8@hotmail.com; Shepherdson, Jane; Elliott, Vicki; Svensson, Jon [Faculty of Health and Social Care, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge, CB1 9PT Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom); Brennan, Patrick [UCD School of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Health Science Building, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2010-02-15

    Aim: (1) to establish which modality offers the greatest accuracy in the detection of cervical spine injury (CSI) Following trauma: plain radiography or computed tomography (CT), and (2) make an evidence-based recommendation for the initial imaging modality of choice. Method: A systematic literature review was performed to identify primary research studies which compare the diagnostic accuracy of plain radiography and CT with the results of a reference standard in the detection of CSI. A search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Science Direct and Pubmed Central databases was conducted. Results: Ten studies were identified. Critical appraisal identified limitations among all studies. There was heterogeneity in the sensitivity estimates for plain radiography, whereas estimates for CT were consistently high. Examination of the reported sensitivities shows that CT outperforms plain radiography in the detection of CSI. Conclusion: CT is superior to plain radiography in the detection of CSI. However, the optimal imaging strategy depends on the patients' relative risk of injury. If at high-risk cervical CT is indicated. If at low-risk the increased cost and radiation exposure mean that screening CT may not be warranted, good-quality plain radiographs are sufficient.

  20. Applying vertebral boundary semantics to CBIR of digitized spine x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antani, Sameer K.; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing research interest in reliable content-based image retrieval (CBIR) techniques specialized for biomedical image retrieval. Applicable feature representation and similarity algorithms have to balance conflicting goals of efficient and effective retrieval while allowing queries on important and often subtle biomedical features. In a collection of digitized X-rays of the spine, such as that from the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II) maintained by the National Library of Medicine, a typical user may be interested in only a small region of the vertebral boundary pertinent to the pathology: for this experiment, the Anterior Osteophyte (AO). A previous experiment in pathology-based retrieval using partial shape matching (PSM) on a subset from the above collection; about 89% normal vertebrae were correctly retrieved. In contrast only 45% of moderate and severe cases were correctly retrieved, and on the average only 46% of the pathology classes were correctly determined. Further analysis revealed that mere shape matching is insufficient for semantically correct retrieval of pathological cases. This paper describes an automatic 9 point localization algorithm that incorporates reasoning about boundary semantics equivalent to that applied by the content-expert as a step in our enhancements to PSM, and results from initial experiments.

  1. Structural lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging in the spine of patients with spondyloarthritis - definitions, assessment system, and reference image set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Maksymowych, Walter P; Pedersen, Susanne J

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is no reliable and sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment system for structural lesions in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). We sought to develop and illustrate a detailed anatomy-based set of MRI definitions and an assessment system for structural lesions...... in the spine of patients with SpA. METHODS: MRI definitions of different structural ("chronic") lesions at various anatomical locations in the spine, and an accompanying assessment system, were agreed by consensus within the Canada-Denmark MRI working group. Subsequently, a reference image set...... with SpA were developed and illustrated. The system is designed to study the spatial pattern of the lesions and their relation to spine inflammation and clinical and radiographic outcomes....

  2. Effect of the Degenerative State of the Intervertebral Disc on the Impact Characteristics of Human Spine Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eWilson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Models of the dynamic response of the lumbar spine have been used to examine vertebral fractures during falls and whole body vibration transmission in the occupational setting. Although understanding the viscoelastic stiffness or damping characteristics of the lumbar spine are necessary for modeling the dynamics of the spine, little is known about the effect of intervertebral disc degeneration on these characteristics at high loading rates. We hypothesize that disc degeneration significantly affects the viscoelastic response of spinal segments to high loading rate. We additionally hypothesize the lumbar spine stiffness and damping characteristics are a function of the degree of preload. A custom, pendulum impact tester was used to impact 19 L1-L3 human spine segments with an end mass of 20.9kg under increasing preloads with the resulting force response measured. A Kelvin–Voigt model, fitted to the frequency and decay response of the post-impact oscillations was used to compute stiffness and damping constants. The spine segments exhibited a second-order, underdamped response with stiffness and damping values of 17.9 - 754.5kN/m and 133.6 - 905.3Ns/m respectively. Regression models demonstrated that stiffness, but not damping, significantly correlated with preload (p

  3. Sexual dimorphism of medium-sized neurons with spines in human nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazdanović Маја

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus accumbens is a limbic nucleus, representing part of the striatum body, and together with the caudate nucleus and putamen, it lies on the septum. The aim of this study was to examine morphological sexual dimorphism in spine density and also to undertake an immunohistochemical study of expression for estrogen and progesterone receptors in the medium-sized neurons in the nucleus accumbens. The research was conducted on twenty human brains of persons of both sexes, between the age of 20-75 years. The Golgi method was applied to determine the types and subtypes of neurons, morphologies of soma, dendrites and axons, as well as the relations between the cells and glial elements. The following were quantitatively examined: the maximum diameter of the neurons, the minimal diameter of the neurons, and the total length of the dendrites. The expression of receptors for estrogen and progesterone, their distribution and intensity were defined immunohistochemically. The parameters of the bodies of neurons in the shell and core of the nucleus accumbens were studied in both men and women. No statistically significant differences were found. Examination of the spine density showed statistical significance in terms of a higher density of spines in women. Immunohistochemically, in the female brain estrogen expression is diffusely spread in a large number of neurons; it is extra nuclear, of granular appearance and high intensity. In the male brain, expression of estrogen is visible and distributed over about one half of different types of neurons; it is extra nuclear, of granular appearance, mostly of middle and low staining intensity. Expression of progesterone in the female brain was very discreet and on a very small number of neurons; it was extra nuclear and with a weak staining intensity. Expression of progesterone in the male brain was distributed on a small number of neurons. It had a granular appearance, it was extra nuclear, with a very low

  4. [Morphological changes in scoliosis during growth. Study in the human spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duart Clemente, J; Llombart Blanco, R; Beguiristain Gurpide, J L

    2012-01-01

    To analyse the pathological substrate of human scoliotic spine during growth. We studied two spines obtained at the autopsy of two patients suffering from untreated scoliosis. Sample A (a girl of 13 years and 2 months) and sample B (a boy of 14 years and one month). On the conventional radiological study the curves were measured using the method of Cobb, and the vertebral rotation with the Pedriolle method. A CT scan and analysis of the posterior asymmetry were also performed. The bone structure, growth plate, subchondral bone were evaluated in the histological study, as well as the presence and distribution of fibrous tissue. Levels from C7 to L5 were studied in sample A, and levels from T2 to L4 in sample B. There was no evidence of vertebral deformity in the frontal, sagittal or axial planes, except for T5 in sample A, where wedging into the concavity in the frontal plane was observed. The deformity originated in the intervertebral discs. Endochondral ossification of the epiphyseal cartilage showed increased activity on the side of the convexity of the curve. Neurocentral cartilage was present at thoracic and cervical level, having disappeared at lumbar level. No asymmetry was observed in the neurocentral cartilage. The deformity begins in the intervertebral discs, producing distortions in the epiphyseal cartilage. Those changes may influence the end of growth and therefore the deformity of the scoliotic vertebrae, basically resulting in wedging and rotation of the vertebrae. Copyright © 2012 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantification of intervertebral disc volume properties below spine fusion, using magnetic resonance imaging, in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violas, Philippe; Estivalezes, Erik; Briot, Jérome; Sales de Gauzy, Jérome; Swider, Pascal

    2007-07-01

    Prospective clinical study. A quantification of volume and hydration variation of the intervertebral discs, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in the lumbar spine before and after surgery performed in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). To evaluate an objective quantification of volume and hydration of intervertebral discs below spine fusion in scoliosis surgery. Repercussion of long spine fusion on the free lower lumbar spine is one of the major concerns of scoliosis surgery. However, the evolution of lumbar intervertebral disc below thoracolumbar fusions remains unknown. MRI performed in the clinical protocol, concerned 28 patients having an idiopathic scoliosis. They underwent posterior instrumentations. MRI was obtained before surgery, after surgery at 3 months and for 15 patients at 1 year. MRI data were posttreated using a custom-made image processing software to semiautomatically derive volume properties of disc, anulus fibrosus, and nucleus pulposus. The nucleus-disc volume ratio was also an indicator of the hydration level. The reliability of the three-dimensional reconstruction process was initially verified using an intraoperator reproducibility test. Original preoperative data on disc volume properties were then derived. Postoperative volume variations were quantified in discs below spine fusion taking into account the level of the arthrodesis and the disc location. It showed that the postoperative volume criteria increased significantly for nucleus, disc, and nucleus-disc volume ratio and some magnitude modulation could be conditioned by the location of surgical instrumentation. Some stabilization or reduction depending on disc level and arthrodesis size between 3 months and 1 year is observed in the follow-up. It tended to prove that the recovery of balance physiologic positioning and inherent biomechanical loads could induce a restored hydration of disc, which should favor the remodeling of free segments. This work was the first report

  6. Human diversity in images

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    A photo contest is being jointly organized by the CERN Equal Opportunities team and the CERN Photo Club. All you need to do is submit a photo or quotation. The contest is open to everyone.   Diversity at CERN You don’t need to be a photographer or to have sophisticated photographic equipment to capture CERN’s diversity of working styles, gender, age, ethnic, origin and physical ability. Its many facets are all around you! The emphasis of the initiative is on capturing this diversity in an image using creativity, intuition and cultural empathy. You can also contribute with a quotation (whether or not you specify who said it is optional) telling the organizers what strikes you about diversity at CERN. The photo entries and a collection of the quotations will be displayed in an exhibition to be held in May in the Main Building, as well as on the CERN Photo Club website. The best photos will be awarded prizes. So over to you: dig deep inside human nature, explore individual tal...

  7. An image-based method to automatically propagate bony landmarks: application to computational spine biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcelo E; Netto, Luiz M G; Kistler, Michael; Brandenberger, Daniel; Büchler, Philippe; Hasler, Carol-C

    2015-01-01

    In attempts to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of spinal injuries and spinal deformities, several experimental and numerical studies have been conducted to understand the biomechanical behavior of the spine. However, numerical biomechanical studies suffer from uncertainties associated with hard- and soft-tissue anatomies. Currently, these parameters are identified manually on each mesh model prior to simulations. The determination of soft connective tissues on finite element meshes can be a tedious procedure, which limits the number of models used in the numerical studies to a few instances. In order to address these limitations, an image-based method for automatic morphing of soft connective tissues has been proposed. Results showed that the proposed method is capable to accurately determine the spatial locations of predetermined bony landmarks. The present method can be used to automatically generate patient-specific models, which may be helpful in designing studies involving a large number of instances and to understand the mechanical behavior of biomechanical structures across a given population.

  8. Development of the Korean Spine Database and Automatic Surface Mesh Intersection Algorithm for Constructing e-Spine Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmin Seo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By 2026, Korea is expected to surpass the UN’s definition of an aged society and reach the level of a superaged society. With an aging population come increased disorders involving the spine. To prevent unnecessary spinal surgery and support scientific diagnosis of spinal disease and systematic prediction of treatment outcomes, we have been developing e-Spine, which is a computer simulation model of the human spine. In this paper, we present the Korean spine database and automatic surface mesh intersection algorithm to construct e-Spine. To date, the Korean spine database has collected spine data from 77 cadavers and 298 patients. The spine data consists of 2D images from CT, MRI, or X-ray, 3D shapes, geometry data, and property data. The volume and quality of the Korean spine database are now the world’s highest ones. In addition, our triangular surface mesh intersection algorithm automatically remeshes the spine-implant intersection model to make it valid for finite element analysis (FEA. This makes it possible to run the FEA using the spine-implant mesh model without any manual effort. Our database and surface mesh intersection algorithm will offer great value and utility in the diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of patients suffering from spinal diseases.

  9. Cervical spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the body area, called slices. These images can be stored, viewed on a monitor, or printed on film. Three-dimensional models of the cervical spine can ...

  10. [Tomodensitometric image of the lumbar spine. Study of 150 patients hospitalized for discal sciatica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, J M; Guillot, P; Glémarec, J; Lopes, L; Bertrand-Vasseur, A; Maugars, Y; Prost, A

    1998-01-17

    There would be some discordance between patient expectations and expert recommendations concerning computed tomography (CT) of the spine for discal disorders. We analyzed patient opinion. At admission, a 25-item questionnaire was given to 150 patients hospitalized in a rheumatology unit for discal sciatica. Patients were asked to express their expectations concerning the CT exploration. Seventy percent of the patients had already undergone CT explorations requested by a general practitioner (55%) or a specialist (45%), 20% had had two CT explorations and 20% magnetic resonance imaging. Seventy-five percent felt they should have had a CT scan earlier, 85% thought a CT should be performed for back pain of less than one month duration and 96% in case of sciatica for 2 months or more. Patients felt their exploration came "late" because the physician was under financial pressure (52%), had incorrectly appreciated the patient's need (28%) or was incompetent in the matter (22%). Nevertheless, 15% of the patients recognized that the CT scan could be useless and 89% knew that all cases of hernia are not operable. Thirty percent recognized that hernias can go undetected on the CT scan and 78% that they may remain asymptomatic. Finally, 56% of the patients thought that the CT scan would not change their treatment and only 23% expected to undergo surgery sooner because of the CT exploration. Several factors would explain what patients expect from CT exploration of the spine: patient understanding that causes other than discal hernia can cause back pain (98%) or sciatic (77%); their fear of having another disorder (56% wanted to be reassured, which would explain in part why 27% hoped the CT would improve pain, 50% wanted to "see" their discal hernia, and 30 wanted to eliminate another cause of their pain); patient distrust of clinical diagnosis which they felt was less pertinent than CT (80% of the patients for generalists and 70% for specialists). Patient expectations did not

  11. Upright magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine: Back pain and radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Son Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar back pain and radiculopathy are common diagnoses. Unfortunately, conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings and clinical symptoms do not necessarily correlate in the lumbar spine. With upright imaging, disc pathologies or foraminal stenosis may become more salient, leading to improvements in diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Seventeen adults (10 asymptomatic and 7 symptomatic volunteers provided their informed consent and participated in the study. A 0.6T upright MRI scan was performed on each adult in the seated position. Parameters were obtained from the L2/3 level to the L5/S1 level including those pertaining to the foramen [cross-sectional area (CSA, height, mid-disc width, width, thickness of ligamentum flavum], disc (bulge, height, width, vertebral body (height and width, and alignment (lordosis angle, wedge angle, lumbosacral angle. Each parameter was compared based on the spinal level and volunteer group using two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA. Bonferroni post hoc analysis was used to assess the differences between individual spinal levels. Results: Mid-disc width accounted for 56% of maximum foramen width in symptomatic volunteers and over 63% in asymptomatic volunteers. Disc bulge was 48% greater in symptomatic volunteers compared to asymptomatic volunteers. CSA was generally smaller in symptomatic volunteers compared to asymptomatic volunteers, particularly at the L4-L5 and L5-S1 spinal levels. Thickness of ligamentum flavum (TLF generally increased from the cranial to caudal spinal levels where the L4-L5 and L5-S1 spinal levels were significantly thicker than the L1-L2 spinal level. Conclusions: The data implied that upright MRI could be a useful diagnostic option, as it can delineate pertinent differences between symptomatic volunteers and asymptomatic volunteers, especially with respect to foraminal geometry.

  12. [Research of joint-robotics-based design of biomechanics testing device on human spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Guoyong; Tian, Lianfang; Mao, Zongyuan

    2009-12-01

    This paper introduces the hardware and software of a biomechanical robot-based testing device. The bottom control orders, posture and torque data transmission, and the control algorithms are integrated in a unified visual control platform by Visual C+ +, with easy control and management. By using hybrid force-displacement control method to load the human spine, we can test the organizational structure and the force state of the FSU (Functional spinal unit) well, which overcomes the shortcomings due to the separation of the force and displacement measurement, thus greatly improves the measurement accuracy. Also it is esay to identify the spinal degeneration and the load-bearing impact on the organizational structure of the FSU after various types of surgery.

  13. Union Rate and Complications in Spine Fusion with Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-7: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Vavken, Julia; Vavken, Patrick; Mameghani, Alexander; Schaeren, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Objective: The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the current best evidence to assess effectiveness and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-7 (rhBMP-7) as a biological stimulant in spine fusion. Methods: Studies were included if they reported on outcomes after spine fusion with rhBMP-7. The data was synthesized using Mantel-Haenszel pooled risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Main end points we...

  14. Human bites (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  15. Human body modeling method to simulate the biodynamic characteristics of spine in vivo with different sitting postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Rui-Chun; Guo, Li-Xin

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study is to model the computational model of seated whole human body including skeleton, muscle, viscera, ligament, intervertebral disc, and skin to predict effect of the factors (sitting postures, muscle and skin, buttocks, viscera, arms, gravity, and boundary conditions) on the biodynamic characteristics of spine. Two finite element models of seated whole body and a large number of finite element models of different ligamentous motion segments were developed and validated. Static, modal, and transient dynamic analyses were performed. The predicted vertical resonant frequency of seated body model was in the range of vertical natural frequency of 4 to 7 Hz. Muscle, buttocks, viscera, and the boundary conditions of buttocks have influence on the vertical resonant frequency of spine. Muscle played a very important role in biodynamic response of spine. Compared with the vertical posture, the posture of lean forward or backward led to an increase in stress on anterior or lateral posterior of lumbar intervertebral discs. This indicated that keeping correct posture could reduce the injury of vibration on lumbar intervertebral disc under whole-body vibration. The driving posture not only reduced the load of spine but also increased the resonant frequency of spine. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Measurement of angular and linear segmental lumbar spine flexion-extension motion by means of image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, L; Irwan, R; Oudkerk, M

    2005-03-01

    The presently available method of measuring segmental lumbar spine mobility by means of superimposition of lumbar spine radiographs in flexion and extension lacks precision due to differences in the cortical outline of the vertebral bodies in flexed and extended position. The introduction of digital image processing has opened the possibility of computerised superimposition ('matching') of digital vertebral body images by means of image registration. Theoretically this technique allows more accurate image matching and, consequently, greater precision of measurement because the whole vertebral body image (not only its cortical outline) can be chosen as region of interest, with registration of all available digital information within this region. To check accuracy and convenience of the new method, two computer program experts performed five image registration measurements of the five lumbar motion segments in five consecutive flexion-extension studies of old lumbar fracture, spondylolytic spondylolisthesis and degenerative anterolisthesis. For comparison an experienced radiologist performed the same repeated measurements with the manual superimposition method. Measurement error of the image registration method proved to be significantly smaller than that of the manual superimposition method. There was no overlap between the 95% confidence intervals of the mean standard deviations of experts A and B using the image registration method and the 95% confidence interval of the mean standard deviations of the experienced radiologist using the manual superimposition method. Besides, the image registration method proved to be more convenient because the whole procedure from import of the image data to display of the measurement outcomes lasted 2-3 min compared to 3-6 min for the superimposition method.

  17. Known-Component 3D-2D Registration for Image Guidance and Quality Assurance in Spine Surgery Pedicle Screw Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uneri, A; Stayman, J W; De Silva, T; Wang, A S; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Khanna, A J; Wolinsky, J-P; Gokaslan, Z L; Siewerdsen, J H

    2015-02-21

    To extend the functionality of radiographic/fluoroscopic imaging systems already within standard spine surgery workflow to: 1) provide guidance of surgical device analogous to an external tracking system; and 2) provide intraoperative quality assurance (QA) of the surgical product. Using fast, robust 3D-2D registration in combination with 3D models of known components (surgical devices), the 3D pose determination was solved to relate known components to 2D projection images and 3D preoperative CT in near-real-time. Exact and parametric models of the components were used as input to the algorithm to evaluate the effects of model fidelity. The proposed algorithm employs the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) to maximize gradient correlation (GC) between measured projections and simulated forward projections of components. Geometric accuracy was evaluated in a spine phantom in terms of target registration error at the tool tip (TRE x ), and angular deviation (TRE ϕ ) from planned trajectory. Transpedicle surgical devices (probe tool and spine screws) were successfully guided with TRE x 30° (easily accommodated on a mobile C-arm). QA of the surgical product based on 3D-2D registration demonstrated the detection of pedicle screw breach with TRE x correlated to the fidelity of the component model employed. 3D-2D registration combined with 3D models of known surgical components provides a novel method for near-real-time guidance and quality assurance using a mobile C-arm without external trackers or fiducial markers. Ongoing work includes determination of optimal views based on component shape and trajectory, improved robustness to anatomical deformation, and expanded preclinical testing in spine and intracranial surgeries.

  18. Surgical Navigation Technology Based on Augmented Reality and Integrated 3D Intraoperative Imaging: A Spine Cadaveric Feasibility and Accuracy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmi-Terander, Adrian; Skulason, Halldor; Söderman, Michael; Racadio, John; Homan, Robert; Babic, Drazenko; van der Vaart, Nijs; Nachabe, Rami

    2016-11-01

    A cadaveric laboratory study. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and accuracy of thoracic pedicle screw placement using augmented reality surgical navigation (ARSN). Recent advances in spinal navigation have shown improved accuracy in lumbosacral pedicle screw placement but limited benefits in the thoracic spine. 3D intraoperative imaging and instrument navigation may allow improved accuracy in pedicle screw placement, without the use of x-ray fluoroscopy, and thus opens the route to image-guided minimally invasive therapy in the thoracic spine. ARSN encompasses a surgical table, a motorized flat detector C-arm with intraoperative 2D/3D capabilities, integrated optical cameras for augmented reality navigation, and noninvasive patient motion tracking. Two neurosurgeons placed 94 pedicle screws in the thoracic spine of four cadavers using ARSN on one side of the spine (47 screws) and free-hand technique on the contralateral side. X-ray fluoroscopy was not used for either technique. Four independent reviewers assessed the postoperative scans, using the Gertzbein grading. Morphometric measurements of the pedicles axial and sagittal widths and angles, as well as the vertebrae axial and sagittal rotations were performed to identify risk factors for breaches. ARSN was feasible and superior to free-hand technique with respect to overall accuracy (85% vs. 64%, P < 0.05), specifically significant increases of perfectly placed screws (51% vs. 30%, P < 0.05) and reductions in breaches beyond 4 mm (2% vs. 25%, P < 0.05). All morphometric dimensions, except for vertebral body axial rotation, were risk factors for larger breaches when performed with the free-hand method. ARSN without fluoroscopy was feasible and demonstrated higher accuracy than free-hand technique for thoracic pedicle screw placement. N/A.

  19. Automatic localization of target vertebrae in spine surgery using fast CT-to-fluoroscopy (3D-2D) image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Localization of target vertebrae is an essential step in minimally invasive spine surgery, with conventional methods relying on "level counting" - i.e., manual counting of vertebrae under fluoroscopy starting from readily identifiable anatomy (e.g., the sacrum). The approach requires an undesirable level of radiation, time, and is prone to counting errors due to the similar appearance of vertebrae in projection images; wrong-level surgery occurs in 1 of every ~3000 cases. This paper proposes a method to automatically localize target vertebrae in x-ray projections using 3D-2D registration between preoperative CT (in which vertebrae are preoperatively labeled) and intraoperative fluoroscopy. The registration uses an intensity-based approach with a gradient-based similarity metric and the CMA-ES algorithm for optimization. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) and a robust similarity metric are computed on GPU to accelerate the process. Evaluation in clinical CT data included 5,000 PA and LAT projections randomly perturbed to simulate human variability in setup of mobile intraoperative C-arm. The method demonstrated 100% success for PA view (projection error: 0.42mm) and 99.8% success for LAT view (projection error: 0.37mm). Initial implementation on GPU provided automatic target localization within about 3 sec, with further improvement underway via multi-GPU. The ability to automatically label vertebrae in fluoroscopy promises to streamline surgical workflow, improve patient safety, and reduce wrong-site surgeries, especially in large patients for whom manual methods are time consuming and error prone.

  20. Thoracic spine morphology of a pseudo-biped animal model (kangaroo) and comparisons with human and quadruped animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Sriram; Peters, James R; Robinson, Lucy F; Singh, Anita; Kent, Richard W

    2016-12-01

    Based on the structural anatomy, loading condition and range of motion (ROM), no quadruped animal has been shown to accurately mimic the structure and biomechanical function of the human spine. The objective of this study is to quantify the thoracic vertebrae geometry of the kangaroo, and compare with adult human, pig, sheep, and deer. The thoracic vertebrae (T1-T12) from whole body CT scans of ten juvenile kangaroos (ages 11-14 months) were digitally reconstructed and geometric dimensions of the vertebral bodies, endplates, pedicles, spinal canal, processes, facets and intervertebral discs were recorded. Similar data available in the literature on the adult human, pig, sheep, and deer were compared to the kangaroo. A non-parametric trend analysis was performed. Thoracic vertebral dimensions of the juvenile kangaroo were found to be generally smaller than those of the adult human and quadruped animals. The most significant (p human and kangaroo were in vertebrae and endplate dimensions (0.951 ≤ Rho ≤ 0.963), pedicles (0.851 ≤ Rho ≤ 0.951), and inter-facet heights (0.891 ≤ Rho ≤ 0.967). The deer displayed the least similar trends across vertebral levels. Similarities in thoracic spine vertebral geometry, particularly of the vertebrae, pedicles and facets may render the kangaroo a more clinically relevant human surrogate for testing spinal implants. The pseudo-biped kangaroo may also be a more suitable model for the human thoracic spine for simulating spine deformities, based on previously published similarities in biomechanical loading, posture and ROM.

  1. Automated detection, 3D segmentation and analysis of high resolution spine MR images using statistical shape models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, A; Fripp, J; Engstrom, C; Schwarz, R; Lauer, L; Salvado, O; Crozier, S

    2012-12-21

    Recent advances in high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine provide a basis for the automated assessment of intervertebral disc (IVD) and vertebral body (VB) anatomy. High resolution three-dimensional (3D) morphological information contained in these images may be useful for early detection and monitoring of common spine disorders, such as disc degeneration. This work proposes an automated approach to extract the 3D segmentations of lumbar and thoracic IVDs and VBs from MR images using statistical shape analysis and registration of grey level intensity profiles. The algorithm was validated on a dataset of volumetric scans of the thoracolumbar spine of asymptomatic volunteers obtained on a 3T scanner using the relatively new 3D T2-weighted SPACE pulse sequence. Manual segmentations and expert radiological findings of early signs of disc degeneration were used in the validation. There was good agreement between manual and automated segmentation of the IVD and VB volumes with the mean Dice scores of 0.89 ± 0.04 and 0.91 ± 0.02 and mean absolute surface distances of 0.55 ± 0.18 mm and 0.67 ± 0.17 mm respectively. The method compares favourably to existing 3D MR segmentation techniques for VBs. This is the first time IVDs have been automatically segmented from 3D volumetric scans and shape parameters obtained were used in preliminary analyses to accurately classify (100% sensitivity, 98.3% specificity) disc abnormalities associated with early degenerative changes.

  2. [MR Imaging of the spine and sacroiliac joints in ankylosing spondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feydy, A; Gossec, L; Bazeli, R; Pluot, E; Rousseau, J; Campagna, R; Guerini, H; Dougados, M; Drapé, J-L

    2010-01-01

    The new diagnostic criteria for spondyloarthropathy include MRI. MRI frequently allows early diagnosis of inflammatory lesions of the spine and sacroiliac joints in patients with normal plain films. Moreover, MRI is useful for the detection and quantification of inflammatory and structural lesions, and to assess disease activity.

  3. The reliability of quantitative analysis on digital images of the scoliotic spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, J; Veldhuizen, AG; Klein, JP; Verdonck, B; Nijlunsing, R; Cool, JC; Van Horn, [No Value

    2002-01-01

    Although analysis of scoliotic deformity is still studied extensively by means of conventional roentgenograms, computer-assisted digital analysis may allow a faster, more accurate and more complete evaluation of the scoliotic spine. In this study, a new computer-assisted measurement method was

  4. Human synaptic plasticity gene expression profile and dendritic spine density changes in HIV-infected human CNS cells: role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Subba Rao Atluri

    Full Text Available HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND is characterized by development of cognitive, behavioral and motor abnormalities, and occur in approximately 50% of HIV infected individuals. Our current understanding of HAND emanates mainly from HIV-1 subtype B (clade B, which is prevalent in USA and Western countries. However very little information is available on neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 subtype C (clade C that exists in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Therefore, studies to identify specific neuropathogenic mechanisms associated with HAND are worth pursuing to dissect the mechanisms underlying this modulation and to prevent HAND particularly in clade B infection. In this study, we have investigated 84 key human synaptic plasticity genes differential expression profile in clade B and clade C infected primary human astrocytes by using RT(2 Profile PCR Array human Synaptic Plasticity kit. Among these, 31 and 21 synaptic genes were significantly (≥3 fold down-regulated and 5 genes were significantly (≥3 fold up-regulated in clade B and clade C infected cells, respectively compared to the uninfected control astrocytes. In flow-cytometry analysis, down-regulation of postsynaptic density and dendrite spine morphology regulatory proteins (ARC, NMDAR1 and GRM1 was confirmed in both clade B and C infected primary human astrocytes and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells. Further, spine density and dendrite morphology changes by confocal microscopic analysis indicates significantly decreased spine density, loss of spines and decreased dendrite diameter, total dendrite and spine area in clade B infected SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells compared to uninfected and clade C infected cells. We have also observed that, in clade B infected astrocytes, induction of apoptosis was significantly higher than in the clade C infected astrocytes. In conclusion, this study suggests that down-regulation of synaptic plasticity genes, decreased dendritic spine density and induction of

  5. Protracted dendritic growth in the typically developing human amygdala and increased spine density in young ASD brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, R K; Bauman, M D; Jacobs, B; Schumann, C M

    2018-02-01

    The amygdala is a medial temporal lobe structure implicated in social and emotional regulation. In typical development (TD), the amygdala continues to increase volumetrically throughout childhood and into adulthood, while other brain structures are stable or decreasing in volume. In autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the amygdala undergoes rapid early growth, making it volumetrically larger in children with ASD compared to TD children. Here we explore: (a) if dendritic arborization in the amygdala follows the pattern of protracted growth in TD and early overgrowth in ASD and (b), if spine density in the amygdala in ASD cases differs from TD from youth to adulthood. The amygdala from 32 postmortem human brains (7-46 years of age) were stained using a Golgi-Kopsch impregnation. Ten principal neurons per case were selected in the lateral nucleus and traced using Neurolucida software in their entirety. We found that both ASD and TD individuals show a similar pattern of increasing dendritic length with age well into adulthood. However, spine density is (a) greater in young ASD cases compared to age-matched TD controls (ASD age into adulthood, a phenomenon not found in TD. Therefore, by adulthood, there is no observable difference in spine density in the amygdala between ASD and TD age-matched adults (≥18 years old). Our findings highlight the unique growth trajectory of the amygdala and suggest that spine density may contribute to aberrant development and function of the amygdala in children with ASD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Navigation of Pedicle Screws in the Thoracic Spine with a New Electromagnetic Navigation System: A Human Cadaver Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Hahn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Posterior stabilization of the spine is a standard procedure in spinal surgery. In addition to the standard techniques, several new techniques have been developed. The objective of this cadaveric study was to examine the accuracy of a new electromagnetic navigation system for instrumentation of pedicle screws in the spine. Material and Method. Forty-eight pedicle screws were inserted in the thoracic spine of human cadavers using EMF navigation and instruments developed especially for electromagnetic navigation. The screw position was assessed postoperatively by a CT scan. Results. The screws were classified into 3 groups: grade 1 = ideal position; grade 2 = cortical penetration <2 mm; grade 3 = cortical penetration ≥2 mm. The initial evaluation of the system showed satisfied positioning for the thoracic spine; 37 of 48 screws (77.1%, 95% confidence interval [62.7%, 88%] were classified as group 1 or 2. Discussion. The screw placement was satisfactory. The initial results show that there is room for improvement with some changes needed. The ease of use and short setup times should be pointed out. Instrumentation is achieved without restricting the operator’s mobility during navigation. Conclusion. The results indicate a good placement technique for pedicle screws. Big advantages are the easy handling of the system.

  7. Simulation of movement in three-dimensional musculoskeletal human lumbar spine using directional encoding-based neurocontrollers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseroleslami, Bahman; Vossoughi, Gholamreza; Boroushaki, Mehrdad; Parnianpour, Mohamad

    2014-09-01

    Despite development of accurate musculoskeletal models for human lumbar spine, the methods for prediction of muscle activity patterns in movements lack proper association with corresponding sensorimotor integrations. This paper uses the directional information of the Jacobian of the musculoskeletal system to orchestrate adaptive critic-based fuzzy neural controller modules for controlling a complex nonlinear redundant musculoskeletal system. The proposed controller is used to control a 3D 3-degree of freedom (DOF) musculoskeletal model of trunk, actuated by 18 muscles. The controller is capable of learning to control from sensory information, without relying on pre-assumed model parameters. Simulation results show satisfactory tracking of movements and the simulated muscle activation patterns conform to previous EMG experiments and optimization studies. The proposed controller can be used as a computationally inexpensive muscle activity generator to distinguish between neural and mechanical contributions to movement and for study of sensory versus motor origins of motor function and dysfunction in human spine.

  8. Intrathecal magnetic drug targeting using gold-coated magnetite nanoparticles in a human spine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueshen, Eric; Venugopal, Indu; Kanikunnel, Joseph; Soni, Tejen; Alaraj, Ali; Linninger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to magnetically guide and locally confine nanoparticles in desired locations within the spinal canal to achieve effective drug administration for improved treatment of chronic pain, cancers, anesthesia and spasticity. We developed a physiologically and anatomically consistent in vitro human spine model to test the feasibility of intrathecal magnetic drug targeting. Gold-coated magnetite nanoparticles were infused into the model and targeted to specific regions using external magnetic fields. Experiments and simulations aiming to determine the effect of key parameters, such as magnet strength, duration of magnetic field exposure, magnet location and ferrous implants, on the collection efficiency of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in targeted regions were performed. An 891% increase in nanoparticle collection efficiency within the target region was achieved using intrathecal magnetic drug targeting when compared with the control. Nanoparticle collection efficiency at the target region increased with time and reached a steady value within 15 min. Ferrous epidural implants generated sufficiently high-gradient magnetic fields, even when magnets were placed at a distance equal to the space between a patient's epidermis and spinal canal. Our experiments indicate that intrathecal magnetic drug targeting is a promising technique for concentrating and localizing drugs at targeted sites within the spinal canal for treating diseases affecting the CNS.

  9. Improved image quality and reduced power deposition in the spine at 3 T using extremely high permittivity materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolstra, Kirsten; Börnert, Peter; Brink, Wyger; Webb, Andrew

    2018-02-01

    To explore the effect of using extremely high permittivity (εr ∼1,000) materials on image quality and power requirements of spine imaging at 3 T. A linear array of high permittivity dielectric blocks made of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) was designed and characterized by electromagnetic simulations and experiments. Their effect on the transmit efficiency, receive sensitivity, power deposition, and diagnostic image quality was analyzed in vivo in 10 healthy volunteers. Simulation results showed that for quadrature mode excitation, the PZT blocks improve the transmit efficiency by 75% while reducing the maximum 10g average specific absorption rate (SAR10 ) by 20%. In vivo experiments in 10 healthy volunteers showed statistically significant improvements for the transmit efficiency, and image quality. Compared to active radiofrequency shimming, image quality was similar, but the required system input power was significantly lower for quadrature excitation using the PZT blocks. For single-channel transmit systems, using high permittivity PZT blocks offer a way to improve transmit efficiency and image quality in the spine. Results show that the effect, and therefore optimal design, is body mass index and sex specific. Magn Reson Med 79:1192-1199, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. CDK10 Mutations in Humans and Mice Cause Severe Growth Retardation, Spine Malformations, and Developmental Delays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windpassinger, Christian; Piard, Juliette; Bonnard, Carine; Alfadhel, Majid; Lim, Shuhui; Bisteau, Xavier; Blouin, Stéphane; Ali, Nur'Ain B.; Ng, Alvin Yu Jin; Lu, Hao; Tohari, Sumanty; Talib, S. Zakiah A.; van Hul, Noémi; Caldez, Matias J.; van Maldergem, Lionel; Yigit, Gökhan; Kayserili, Hülya; Youssef, Sameh A.; Coppola, Vincenzo; de Bruin, Alain; Tessarollo, Lino; Choi, Hyungwon; Rupp, Verena; Roetzer, Katharina; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Altmüller, Janine; Roy, Sudipto; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Ganger, Rudolf; Grill, Franz; Ben Chehida, Farid; Wollnik, Bernd; Altunoglu, Umut; Al Kaissi, Ali; Reversade, Bruno; Kaldis, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    In five separate families, we identified nine individuals affected by a previously unidentified syndrome characterized by growth retardation, spine malformation, facial dysmorphisms, and developmental delays. Using homozygosity mapping, array CGH, and exome sequencing, we uncovered bi-allelic

  11. The yield of a positive MRI of the spine as imaging criterion in the ASAS classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis: results from the SPACE and DESIR cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ez-Zaitouni, Zineb; Bakker, Pauline Ac; van Lunteren, Miranda; de Hooge, Manouk; van den Berg, Rosaline; Reijnierse, Monique; Fagerli, Karen Minde; Landewé, Robert Bm; Ramonda, Roberta; Jacobsson, Lennart Th; Saraux, Alain; Lenczner, Gregory; Feydy, Antoine; Pialat, Jean Baptiste; Thévenin, Fabrice; van Gaalen, Floris A; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2017-10-01

    To assess the prevalence of spinal inflammation on MRI in patients with chronic back pain (CBP) of maximally 3 years duration and to evaluate the yield of adding a positive MRI-spine as imaging criterion to the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). Baseline imaging of the sacroiliac joints (X-SI), MRI of the sacroiliac joints (MRI-SI) and MRI-spine were scored by ≥2 experienced central readers per modality in the SPondyloArthritis Caught Early (SPACE) and DEvenir des Spondylarthropathies Indifférenciées Récentes (DESIR) cohorts. Inflammation suggestive of axSpA was assessed in the entire spine. A positive MRI-spine was defined by the presence of ≥5 inflammatory lesions. Alternative less strict definitions were also tested. In this study, 541 and 650 patients with CBP from the SPACE and DESIR cohorts were included. Sacroiliitis on X-SI and MRI-SI was found in 40/541 (7%) and 76/541 (14%) patients in SPACE, and in DESIR in 134/650 (21%) and 231/650 (36%) patients, respectively. In SPACE and DESIR, a positive MRI-spine was seen in 4/541 (1%) and 48/650 (7%) patients. Of the patients without sacroiliitis on imaging, 3/447 (1%) (SPACE) and 8/382 (2%) (DESIR) patients had a positive MRI-spine. Adding positive MRI-spine as imaging criterion led to new classification in only one patient in each cohort, as the other patients already fulfilled the clinical arm. Other definitions of a positive MRI-spine yielded similar results. In two cohorts of patients with CBP with a maximum symptom duration of 3 years, a positive MRI-spine was rare in patients without sacroiliitis on MRI-SI and X-SI. Addition of MRI-spine as imaging criterion to the ASAS axSpA criteria had a low yield of newly classified patients and is therefore not recommended. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is

  12. Imaging skeletal anatomy of injured cervical spine specimens: comparison of single-slice vs multi-slice helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obenauer, S.; Alamo, L.; Herold, T.; Funke, M.; Kopka, L.; Grabbe, E. [Department of Radiology, Georg August-University Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Our objective was to compare a single-slice CT (SS-CT) scanner with a multi-slice CT (MS-CT) scanner in the depiction of osseous anatomic structures and fractures of the upper cervical spine. Two cervical spine specimens with artificial trauma were scanned with a SS-CT scanner (HighSpeed, CT/i, GE, Milwaukee, Wis.) by using various collimations (1, 3, 5 mm) and pitch factors (1, 1.5, 2, 3) and a four-slice helical CT scanner (LightSpeed, QX/i, GE, Milwaukee, Wis.) by using various table speeds ranging from 3.75 to 15 mm/rotation for a pitch of 0.75 and from 7.5 to 30 mm/rotation for a pitch of 1.5. Images were reconstructed with an interval of 1 mm. Sagittal and coronal multiplanar reconstructions of the primary and reconstructed data set were performed. For MS-CT a tube current resulting in equivalent image noise as with SS-CT was used. All images were judged by two observers using a 4-point scale. The best image quality for SS-CT was achieved with the smallest slice thickness (1 mm) and a pitch smaller than 2 resulting in a table speed of up to 2 mm per gantry rotation (4 points). A reduction of the slice thickness rather than of the table speed proved to be beneficial at MS-CT. Therefore, the optimal scan protocol in MS-CT included a slice thickness of 1.25 mm with a table speed of 7.5 mm/360 using a pitch of 1.5 (4 points), resulting in a faster scan time than when a pitch of 0.75 (4 points) was used. This study indicates that MS-CT could provide equivalent image quality at approximately four times the volume coverage speed of SS-CT. (orig.)

  13. Design, synthesis, imaging, and biomechanics of a softness-gradient hydrogel nucleus pulposus prosthesis in a canine lumbar spine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranenburg, Hendrik-Jan C; Meij, Björn P; Onis, David; van der Veen, Albert J; Saralidze, Ketie; Smolders, Luc A; Huizinga, Julie G; Knetsch, Menno L W; Luijten, Peter R; Visser, Fredy; Voorhout, George; Dhert, Wouter J A; Hazewinkel, Herman A W; Koole, Leo H

    2012-11-01

    A hydrogel nucleus pulposus prosthesis (NPP) was designed to swell in situ, have intrinsic radiopacity, and restore intervertebral disc height and biomechanical functionality. These features were examined using an ex vivo canine lumbar model. Nine NPPs were implanted in five spines and their visibility was assessed on radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The NPPs were visible on all imaging modalities and 8/9 NPPs stayed intact and in situ. Six other NPPs were tested biomechanically in six canine lumbar spines. Removal of the nucleus pulposus (nuclectomy) caused significant changes in biomechanical parameters. After implantation and swelling of the NPP, values were not significantly different from the native state for range of motion (ROM) of flexion-extension (FE) and lateral bending (LB), the neutral zone (NZ) of all motion directions, and the NZ stiffness (NZS) of FE. Biomechanical restoration by the NPP compared with the nuclectomized state was significant for the ROM of FE and axial rotation, the NZ of FE and LB, and the NZS of FE and LB. Disc height was significantly restored and 6/6 NPPs stayed intact and in situ. In conclusion, the NPPs swell in situ, have intrinsic radiopacity and restored disc height and aforementioned biomechanical properties. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Self-calibration of biplanar radiographic images through geometric spine shape descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoury, Samuel; Cheriet, Farida; Labelle, Hubert

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a novel self-calibration method of an X-ray scene applied for the 3-D reconstruction of the scoliotic spine. Current calibration techniques either use a cumbersome calibration apparatus or depend on manually identified landmarks to determine the geometric configuration, thus limiting routine clinical evaluation. The proposed approach uses high-level information automatically extracted from biplanar X-rays to solve the radiographic scene parameters. We first present a segmentation method that takes into account the variable appearance and geometry of a scoliotic spine in order to isolate and extract the silhouettes of the anterior vertebral body. By incorporating prior anatomical information through a Bayesian formulation of the morphological distribution, a multiscale spine segmentation framework is proposed for scoliotic patients. An iterative nonlinear optimization procedure, integrating a 3-D visual hull reconstruction and geometrical torsion properties of the spine, is then applied to globally refine the geometrical parameters of the 3-D viewing scene and obtain the optimal 3-D reconstruction. An experimental comparison with data provided from reference synthetic models yields similar accuracy on the retroprojection of low-level primitives such as anatomical landmarks identified on each vertebra (2.2 mm). Results obtained from a clinical validation on 60 pairs of uncalibrated digitized X-rays of adolescents with scoliosis show that the 3-D reconstructions from the new system offer geometrically accurate models with insignificant differences for 3-D clinical indexes commonly used in the evaluation of spinal deformities. The reported experiments demonstrate a viable and accurate alternative to previous reconstruction techniques, offering the first automatic approach for routine 3-D clinical assessment in radiographic suites.

  15. Cervical Spine Motion During Airway Management Using Two Manual In-line Immobilization Techniques: A Human Simulator Model Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Clarines Rosa; García Peña, Barbara M; Lozano, Juan Manuel; Maniaci, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate cervical spine motion using 2 manual inline immobilization techniques with the use of a human simulator model. Medical students, pediatric and family practice residents, and pediatric emergency medicine fellows were recruited to maintain cervical manual in line immobilization above the head of the bed and across the chest of a human simulator while orotracheal intubation was performed. Participants were then instructed on appropriate holding techniques after the initial session took place. Orotracheal intubation followed. A tilt sensor measured time to intubation and cervical extension and rotation angle. Seventy-one subjects participated in a total of 284 successful orotracheal intubations. No change in cervical spine movement or time to intubation was observed when using 2 different inline manual immobilization techniques with no training. However, a statistically significant difference with assistants above the head versus across the chest was observed after training in: extension 2.1° (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.15 to 3.00; P < 0.0001); rotation 0.7° (95% CI, 0.26 to 1.19; P = 0.003) and intubation time of -1.9 seconds (95% CI, -3.45 to -0.13; P = 0.035) after training. Cervical spine movement did not change when maintaining cervical spine immobilization from above the head versus across the chest before training. There was a statistically significant change in extension and rotation when assistants were above the head and in time to intubation when assistants were across the chest after training. The clinical significance of these results is unclear.

  16. Assessment of nerve involvement in the lumbar spine: agreement between magnetic resonance imaging, physical examination and pain drawing findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertilson, Bo C; Brosjö, Eva; Billing, Hans; Strender, Lars-Erik

    2010-09-10

    Detection of nerve involvement originating in the spine is a primary concern in the assessment of spine symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the diagnostic method of choice for this detection. However, the agreement between MRI and other diagnostic methods for detecting nerve involvement has not been fully evaluated. The aim of this diagnostic study was to evaluate the agreement between nerve involvement visible in MRI and findings of nerve involvement detected in a structured physical examination and a simplified pain drawing. Sixty-one consecutive patients referred for MRI of the lumbar spine were - without knowledge of MRI findings - assessed for nerve involvement with a simplified pain drawing and a structured physical examination. Agreement between findings was calculated as overall agreement, the p value for McNemar's exact test, specificity, sensitivity, and positive and negative predictive values. MRI-visible nerve involvement was significantly less common than, and showed weak agreement with, physical examination and pain drawing findings of nerve involvement in corresponding body segments. In spine segment L4-5, where most findings of nerve involvement were detected, the mean sensitivity of MRI-visible nerve involvement to a positive neurological test in the physical examination ranged from 16-37%. The mean specificity of MRI-visible nerve involvement in the same segment ranged from 61-77%. Positive and negative predictive values of MRI-visible nerve involvement in segment L4-5 ranged from 22-78% and 28-56% respectively. In patients with long-standing nerve root symptoms referred for lumbar MRI, MRI-visible nerve involvement significantly underestimates the presence of nerve involvement detected by a physical examination and a pain drawing. A structured physical examination and a simplified pain drawing may reveal that many patients with "MRI-invisible" lumbar symptoms need treatment aimed at nerve involvement. Factors other than present

  17. Intraoperative evaluation of device placement in spine surgery using known-component 3D-2D image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uneri, A.; De Silva, T.; Goerres, J.; Jacobson, M. W.; Ketcha, M. D.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Khanna, A. J.; Osgood, G. M.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-04-01

    Intraoperative x-ray radiography/fluoroscopy is commonly used to assess the placement of surgical devices in the operating room (e.g. spine pedicle screws), but qualitative interpretation can fail to reliably detect suboptimal delivery and/or breach of adjacent critical structures. We present a 3D-2D image registration method wherein intraoperative radiographs are leveraged in combination with prior knowledge of the patient and surgical components for quantitative assessment of device placement and more rigorous quality assurance (QA) of the surgical product. The algorithm is based on known-component registration (KC-Reg) in which patient-specific preoperative CT and parametric component models are used. The registration performs optimization of gradient similarity, removes the need for offline geometric calibration of the C-arm, and simultaneously solves for multiple component bodies, thereby allowing QA in a single step (e.g. spinal construct with 4-20 screws). Performance was tested in a spine phantom, and first clinical results are reported for QA of transpedicle screws delivered in a patient undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery. Simultaneous registration of ten pedicle screws (five contralateral pairs) demonstrated mean target registration error (TRE) of 1.1  ±  0.1 mm at the screw tip and 0.7  ±  0.4° in angulation when a prior geometric calibration was used. The calibration-free formulation, with the aid of component collision constraints, achieved TRE of 1.4  ±  0.6 mm. In all cases, a statistically significant improvement (p  data in spine surgery demonstrated TRE of 2.7  ±  2.6 mm and 1.5  ±  0.8°. The KC-Reg algorithm offers an independent check and quantitative QA of the surgical product using radiographic/fluoroscopic views acquired within standard OR workflow. Such intraoperative assessment could improve quality and safety, provide the opportunity to revise suboptimal constructs in the OR, and

  18. Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery in Small Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettlich, Bianca F

    2018-01-01

    Minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) seems to have many benefits for human patients and is currently used for various minor and major spine procedures. For MISS, a change in access strategy to the target location is necessary and it requires intraoperative imaging, special instrumentation, and magnification. Few veterinary studies have evaluated MISS for canine patients for spinal decompression procedures. This article discusses the general requirements for MISS and how these can be applied to veterinary spinal surgery. The current veterinary MISS literature is reviewed and suggestions are made on how to apply MISS to different spinal locations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry of the lumbar spine in professional wrestlers and untrained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, M; Sheng, J; Kang, Z; Zou, L; Guo, J; Sun, P

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relation between bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) and bone mineral density (BMD) of lumbar spine in male professional wrestlers and healthy untrained men. A total of 14 wrestlers (22.9±3.4 years) and 11 controls (24.4±1.6 years) were studied cross-sectionally. Body composition and BMD were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine was examined in a sagittal T1-weighted (T1-w) spin-echo (SE) sequence. The averaged bone marrow signal intensity (SI) of L2-L4 was related to the signal of an adjacent nondegenerative disk. Mean SI of T1-w SE in wrestlers was lower than controls (P=0.001), indicating L2-L4 BMAT in wrestlers was lower compared to controls. L2-L4 BMD in wrestlers was higher than controls (Ptraining is an important determinant of this association.

  20. Changes in the lumbar spine of athletes from supine to the true-standing position in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauch, Frieder; Jung, Christian; Huth, Jochen; Bauer, Gerhard

    2010-04-20

    Case-control observational study. Determination of dimensional changes in the lumbar spines of athletes between supine and stand-up position in MRI, concerning the lordosis, spinal canal cross-sectional area (SCCA), dural sac cross-sectional area (DSCA), sagittal dural sac diameter (SDSD), the lateral recess and the neural foramina. The development of positional MRI allows the examination of spine segments under a true weight-bearing situation. About 35 athletes (20m/15f, Ø: 28a) were examined using a 0.25 T open MRI-Scanner (G-Scan, ESAOTE, Italy). In all cases, axial and sagittal SE-T1 + SSE-T2 images were recorded in supine and true standing position. All measurements were performed using MEDIMAGE software (Vepro AG, Germany). The blinded measurements were performed 3 times by 2 independent examiners. Sagittal images were used to determine the lordosis and the narrowing of the left/right foramen at all levels between L1/2 and L5/S1. Axial images were used to determine the SDSD, the SCCA and the DSCA at L3/4, L4/5, L5/S1, and narrowing of the left/right recessus lateralis of L4, L5 and S1. The lordosis showed a significant increase of 6.3 degrees (14%) from supine to true standing position (P SDSD is significantly smaller in true standing position, than in supine position at the level of L3/4 and L4/5 (P SDSD.

  1. Digital Images and Human Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Processing of digital images destined for visual consumption raises many interesting questions regarding human visual sensitivity. This talk will survey some of these questions, including some that have been answered and some that have not. There will be an emphasis upon visual masking, and a distinction will be drawn between masking due to contrast gain control processes, and due to processes such as hypothesis testing, pattern recognition, and visual search.

  2. Robust 3D-2D image registration: application to spine interventions and vertebral labeling in the presence of anatomical deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otake, Yoshito; Wang, Adam S.; Webster Stayman, J.; Uneri, Ali; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Vogt, Sebastian; Khanna, A. Jay; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2013-12-01

    We present a framework for robustly estimating registration between a 3D volume image and a 2D projection image and evaluate its precision and robustness in spine interventions for vertebral localization in the presence of anatomical deformation. The framework employs a normalized gradient information similarity metric and multi-start covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy optimization with local-restarts, which provided improved robustness against deformation and content mismatch. The parallelized implementation allowed orders-of-magnitude acceleration in computation time and improved the robustness of registration via multi-start global optimization. Experiments involved a cadaver specimen and two CT datasets (supine and prone) and 36 C-arm fluoroscopy images acquired with the specimen in four positions (supine, prone, supine with lordosis, prone with kyphosis), three regions (thoracic, abdominal, and lumbar), and three levels of geometric magnification (1.7, 2.0, 2.4). Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of projection distance error (PDE) between the estimated and true target points in the projection image, including 14 400 random trials (200 trials on the 72 registration scenarios) with initialization error up to ±200 mm and ±10°. The resulting median PDE was better than 0.1 mm in all cases, depending somewhat on the resolution of input CT and fluoroscopy images. The cadaver experiments illustrated the tradeoff between robustness and computation time, yielding a success rate of 99.993% in vertebral labeling (with ‘success’ defined as PDE deformation and poor initialization (99.535% success for the same data registered in 13.1 s), but given good initialization (e.g., ±5 mm, assuming a robust initial run) the same registration could be solved with 99.993% success in 6.3 s. The ability to register CT to fluoroscopy in a manner robust to patient deformation could be valuable in applications such as radiation therapy, interventional

  3. Positional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for People With Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome or Suspected Craniovertebral or Cervical Spine Abnormalities: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an inherited disorder affecting the connective tissue. EDS can manifest with symptoms attributable to the spine or craniovertebral junction (CVJ). In addition to EDS, numerous congenital, developmental, or acquired disorders can increase ligamentous laxity in the CVJ and cervical spine. Resulting abnormalities can lead to morbidity and serious neurologic complications. Appropriate imaging and diagnosis is needed to determine patient management and need for complex surgery. Some spinal abnormalities cause symptoms or are more pronounced while patients sit, stand, or perform specific movements. Positional magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) allows imaging of the spine or CVJ with patients in upright, weight-bearing positions and can be combined with dynamic maneuvers, such as flexion, extension, or rotation. Imaging in these positions could allow diagnosticians to better detect spinal or CVJ abnormalities than recumbent MRI or even a combination of other available imaging modalities might allow. Objectives To determine the diagnostic impact and clinical utility of pMRI for the assessment of (a) craniovertebral or spinal abnormalities among people with EDS and (b) major craniovertebral or cervical spine abnormalities among symptomatic people. Data Sources A literature search was performed using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid Embase, and EBM Reviews, for studies published from January 1, 1998, to September 28, 2014. Review Methods Studies comparing pMRI to recumbent MRI or other available imaging modalities for diagnosis and management of spinal or CVJ abnormalities were reviewed. All studies of spinal or CVJ imaging in people with EDS were included as well as studies among people with suspected major CVJ or cervical spine abnormalities (cervical or craniovertebral spine instability, basilar invagination, cranial settling, cervical stenosis, spinal cord compression, Chiari

  4. Scoring inflammatory activity of the spine by magnetic resonance imaging in ankylosing spondylitis: a multireader experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Cédric; Braun, Jürgen; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2007-01-01

    of 3 different scoring methods for MRI activity and change in activity of the spine in patients with AS. METHODS: Thirty sets of spinal MRI at baseline and after 24 weeks of followup, derived from a randomized clinical trial comparing a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-blocking drug (n = 20) with placebo (n...... = 10) and selected to cover a wide range of activity at baseline and change in activity, were presented electronically in a partial latin-square design to 9 experienced readers from different countries (Europe, Canada). Readers scored each set of MRI 3 times, using 3 different methods including...... by the reader as the most abnormal, with additional scores for "depth" and "intensity." Both the order of the methods used by each reader and the timepoints (before/after treatment) were randomized. Feasibility of each scoring system was evaluated by measuring the mean time needed to score each set of MRI...

  5. Multi-stage 3D-2D registration for correction of anatomical deformation in image-guided spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcha, M D; De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Jacobson, M W; Goerres, J; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2017-06-07

    A multi-stage image-based 3D-2D registration method is presented that maps annotations in a 3D image (e.g. point labels annotating individual vertebrae in preoperative CT) to an intraoperative radiograph in which the patient has undergone non-rigid anatomical deformation due to changes in patient positioning or due to the intervention itself. The proposed method (termed msLevelCheck) extends a previous rigid registration solution (LevelCheck) to provide an accurate mapping of vertebral labels in the presence of spinal deformation. The method employs a multi-stage series of rigid 3D-2D registrations performed on sets of automatically determined and increasingly localized sub-images, with the final stage achieving a rigid mapping for each label to yield a locally rigid yet globally deformable solution. The method was evaluated first in a phantom study in which a CT image of the spine was acquired followed by a series of 7 mobile radiographs with increasing degree of deformation applied. Second, the method was validated using a clinical data set of patients exhibiting strong spinal deformation during thoracolumbar spine surgery. Registration accuracy was assessed using projection distance error (PDE) and failure rate (PDE  >  20 mm-i.e. label registered outside vertebra). The msLevelCheck method was able to register all vertebrae accurately for all cases of deformation in the phantom study, improving the maximum PDE of the rigid method from 22.4 mm to 3.9 mm. The clinical study demonstrated the feasibility of the approach in real patient data by accurately registering all vertebral labels in each case, eliminating all instances of failure encountered in the conventional rigid method. The multi-stage approach demonstrated accurate mapping of vertebral labels in the presence of strong spinal deformation. The msLevelCheck method maintains other advantageous aspects of the original LevelCheck method (e.g. compatibility with standard clinical workflow, large

  6. Multi-stage 3D-2D registration for correction of anatomical deformation in image-guided spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcha, M. D.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Jacobson, M. W.; Goerres, J.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-06-01

    A multi-stage image-based 3D-2D registration method is presented that maps annotations in a 3D image (e.g. point labels annotating individual vertebrae in preoperative CT) to an intraoperative radiograph in which the patient has undergone non-rigid anatomical deformation due to changes in patient positioning or due to the intervention itself. The proposed method (termed msLevelCheck) extends a previous rigid registration solution (LevelCheck) to provide an accurate mapping of vertebral labels in the presence of spinal deformation. The method employs a multi-stage series of rigid 3D-2D registrations performed on sets of automatically determined and increasingly localized sub-images, with the final stage achieving a rigid mapping for each label to yield a locally rigid yet globally deformable solution. The method was evaluated first in a phantom study in which a CT image of the spine was acquired followed by a series of 7 mobile radiographs with increasing degree of deformation applied. Second, the method was validated using a clinical data set of patients exhibiting strong spinal deformation during thoracolumbar spine surgery. Registration accuracy was assessed using projection distance error (PDE) and failure rate (PDE  >  20 mm—i.e. label registered outside vertebra). The msLevelCheck method was able to register all vertebrae accurately for all cases of deformation in the phantom study, improving the maximum PDE of the rigid method from 22.4 mm to 3.9 mm. The clinical study demonstrated the feasibility of the approach in real patient data by accurately registering all vertebral labels in each case, eliminating all instances of failure encountered in the conventional rigid method. The multi-stage approach demonstrated accurate mapping of vertebral labels in the presence of strong spinal deformation. The msLevelCheck method maintains other advantageous aspects of the original LevelCheck method (e.g. compatibility with standard clinical workflow, large

  7. Applications and limitations of micro-XCT imaging in the studies of Permian radiolarians: A new genus with bi-polar main spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Xiao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microfocus X-ray Computed Tomography (micro-XCT has been employed recently in radiolarian studies, though so far primarily to generate high quality tomographic images. Although micro-XCT technique cannot always produce high-quality tomographic images, it frequently can provide valuable information on the internal structure of spongy polycystines. Here we employ micro-XCT to understand internal skeletal structures of several Permian specimens of polycystine radiolarians. Structural inferences from micro-XCT images are compared to images of the same specimens made with SEM and transmitted light microscopy (TLM. The utility of micro-XCT for imaging internal structures is first confirmed by examining the spongy, flat, four-spined species Tetraspongodiscus stauracanthus. Micro-XCT method is then used to examine the internal structures of a spherical to elliptical polycystine with two bi-polar main spines, Dalongicaepa bipolaris Xiao and Suzuki gen. et sp. nov., from the Dalong Formation (Changhsingian of South China. The new genus is characterized by four to seven densely concentric shells with a large spherical hollow in the center and two cylindrical spines at both poles of the cortical shell, and belongs to the family Spongotortilispinidae. Spherical to elliptical polycystines with bi-polar main spines are similar in external appearance, and their phylogenetic relationships are only determinable by examination of the internal structures. We therefore analyzed all Permian and Mesozoic spherical to elliptical polycystines with bi-polar main spines showing internal structures, using cluster analysis to measure similarity. The results show distinctive differences in internal structures and suggest that family level relationships should be revised in the future.

  8. A New Electromagnetic Navigation System for Pedicle Screws Placement: A Human Cadaver Study at the Lumbar Spine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Hahn

    Full Text Available Technical developments for improving the safety and accuracy of pedicle screw placement play an increasingly important role in spine surgery. In addition to the standard techniques of free-hand placement and fluoroscopic navigation, the rate of complications is reduced by 3D fluoroscopy, cone-beam CT, intraoperative CT/MRI, and various other navigation techniques. Another important aspect that should be emphasized is the reduction of intraoperative radiation exposure for personnel and patient. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of a new navigation system for the spine based on an electromagnetic field.Twenty pedicle screws were placed in the lumbar spine of human cadavers using EMF navigation. Navigation was based on data from a preoperative thin-slice CT scan. The cadavers were positioned on a special field generator and the system was matched using a patient tracker on the spinous process. Navigation was conducted using especially developed instruments that can be tracked in the electromagnetic field. Another thin-slice CT scan was made postoperatively to assess the result. The evaluation included the position of the screws in the direction of trajectory and any injury to the surrounding cortical bone. The results were classified in 5 groups: grade 1: ideal screw position in the center of the pedicle with no cortical bone injury; grade 2: acceptable screw position, cortical bone injury with cortical penetration ≤ 2 mm; grade 3: cortical bone injury with cortical penetration 2,1-4 mm, grad 4: cortical bone injury with cortical penetration 4,1-6 mm, grade 5: cortical bone injury with cortical penetration >6 mm.The initial evaluation of the system showed good accuracy for the lumbar spine (65% grade 1, 20% grade 2, 15% grade 3, 0% grade 4, 0% grade 5. A comparison of the initial results with other navigation techniques in literature (CT navigation, 2D fluoroscopic navigation shows that the accuracy of this system is

  9. Histological Osteoarthritic Changes in the Human Cervical Spine Facet Joints Related to Age and Gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrenholt, Lars; Charles, Annie Vesterby; Gregersen, Markil

    2018-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional autopsy study. OBJECTIVE: Quantify histological changes in the lower cervical spine facet joints with regard to age and gender using systematic random sampling of entire joints. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Neck pain is a common debilitating musculoskeletal condition...... and one of the highest ranked causes of years lived with disability. The cause of neck pain is multifactorial and osteoarthritis is one potential cause. The cervical spine facet joints have been implicated in the aetiology of chronic neck pain. Hence, a detailed description of their anatomy and age...... and sliced into 3-mm thick sections from where 10 μm thick histological sections were produced. Morphological variables were evaluated microscopically and histomorphometric variables were retrieved using random sampling methods. Data were analysed with a linear regression model. RESULTS: Significant...

  10. Low-field MR imaging of the spine. A comparative study of a traditional and a new, completely balanced gradient-echo sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drejer, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Herlev Hospital, Univ. Copenhagen (Denmark); Thomsen, H.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Herlev Hospital, Univ. Copenhagen (Denmark); Tanttu, J. [Picker Nordstar, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-09-01

    49 patients underwent 53 examinations with both a traditional T1-weighted gradient-echo (PS) sequence and a new completely balanced steady-state 3-D (CBASS3D) sequence; 20 examinations included the cervical spine, 8 the thoracic spine and 25 the lumbar spine. All 106 examinations were reviewed twice regarding visibility of selected structures in the spinal region and diagnostic usefulness. The CBASS3D sequence delineated the medulla, nerve roots, CSF, the intervertebral discs and the posterior longitudinal ligament significantly better than the PS sequence. Disc hernia was also better visualised (p<0.01). There were significantly more artefacts on images obtained with the CBASS3D sequence, but they were usually outside the region of interest and occurred less frequently over time due to increased experience of the staff. Both reviewers found the diagnostic usefulness of CBASS3D to be superior compared to that of PS and excellent for diagnostic purposes. (orig./MG).

  11. Imaging characteristic analysis of metastatic spine lesions from breast, prostate, lung, and renal cell carcinomas for surgical planning: Osteolytic versus osteoblastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddington, Justin A; Mendez, Gustavo A; Ching, Alex; Kubicky, Charlotte Dai; Klimo, Paul; Ragel, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    Surgeons treating metastatic spine disease can use computed tomography (CT) imaging to determine whether lesions are osteolytic, osteoblastic, or mixed. This enables treatment that considers the structural integrity of the vertebral body (VB), which is impaired with lytic lesions but not blastic lesions. The authors analyzed CT imaging characteristics of spine metastasis from breast, lung, prostate, and renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) to determine the metastasis patterns of each of these common tumors. The authors identified patients with metastatic spine disease treated during a 3-year period. Variables studied included age, sex, and cancer type. Lesions from breast, lung, prostate, and RCC primary lesions were selected for imaging analysis. Sixty-six patients were identified: 17 had breast metastasis, 14 prostate, 18 lung, and 17 RCC. Breast cancer metastasis involved 33% of VBs with 56%, 20%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Prostate cancer metastasis involved 35% of VBs with 14%, 62%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Lung cancer metastasis involved 13% of VBs with 64%, 33%, and 3% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. RCC metastasis involved 11% of VBs with 91%, 7%, and 2% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed lesions, respectively. To improve surgical planning, we advocate the use of CT prior to surgery to evaluate whether spine metastases are osteolytic or osteoblastic. In cases of osteolytic lesions, the concern is of segmental instability requiring reconstruction and the risk for screw pull out should instrumentation be considered. In cases of osteoblastic lesions, surgeons should consider debulking dense bone.

  12. A DXA Whole Body Composition Cross-Calibration Experience: Evaluation With Humans, Spine, and Whole Body Phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Diane; Libber, Jessie; Sanfilippo, Jennifer; Yu, Hui Jing; Horvath, Blaine; Miller, Colin G; Binkley, Neil

    2016-01-01

    New densitometer installation requires cross-calibration for accurate longitudinal assessment. When replacing a unit with the same model, the International Society for Clinical Densitometry recommends cross-calibrating by scanning phantoms 10 times on each instrument and states that spine bone mineral density (BMD) should be within 1%, whereas total body lean, fat, and %fat mass should be within 2% of the prior instrument. However, there is limited validation that these recommendations provide adequate total body cross-calibration. Here, we report a total body cross-calibration experience with phantoms and humans. Cross-calibration between an existing and new Lunar iDXA was performed using 3 encapsulated spine phantoms (GE [GE Lunar, Madison, WI], BioClinica [BioClinica Inc, Princeton, NJ], and Hologic [Hologic Inc, Bedford, MA]), 1 total body composition phantom (BioClinica), and 30 human volunteers. Thirty scans of each phantom and a total body scan of human volunteers were obtained on each instrument. All spine phantom BMD means were similar (within 1%; phantom (BBCP) BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) values were within 2% with biases of 0.005 g/cm2 and -3.4 g. However, lean and fat mass and %fat differed by 4.6%-7.7% with biases of +463 g, -496 g, and -2.8%, respectively. In vivo comparison supported BBCP data; BMD and BMC were within ∼2%, but lean and fat mass and %fat differed from 1.6% to 4.9% with biases of +833 g, -860 g, and -1.1%. As all body composition comparisons exceeded the recommended 2%, the new densitometer was recalibrated. After recalibration, in vivo bias was lower (phantoms, despite good BMD and BMC agreement, did not detect substantial lean and fat differences observed using BBCP and in vivo assessments. Consequently, spine phantoms are inadequate for dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry whole body composition cross-calibration. Copyright © 2016 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Outcomes and Toxicity for Hypofractionated and Single-Fraction Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Sarcomas Metastasizing to the Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkert, Michael R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bilsky, Mark H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Tom, Ashlyn K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Oh, Jung Hun [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Laufer, Ilya [Department of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Tap, William D. [Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya, E-mail: yamadaj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation treatment (20-40 Gy in 5-20 fractions, 2-5 Gy per fraction) for sarcoma metastatic to the spine provides subtherapeutic doses, resulting in poor durable local control (LC) (50%-77% at 1 year). Hypofractionated (HF) and/or single-fraction (SF) image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery (IG-SRS) may provide a more effective means of managing these lesions. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically proven high-grade sarcoma metastatic to the spine treated with HF and SF IG-SRS were included. LC and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the use of Kaplan-Meier statistics. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed by the use of Cox regression with competing-risks analysis; all confidence intervals are 95%. Toxicities were assessed according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Results: From May 2005 to November 11, 2012, 88 patients with 120 discrete metastases received HF (3-6 fractions; median dose, 28.5 Gy; n=52, 43.3%) or SF IG-SRS (median dose, 24 Gy; n=68, 56.7%). The median follow-up time was 12.3 months. At 12 months, LC was 87.9% (confidence interval [CI], 81.3%-94.5%), OS was 60.6% (CI, 49.6%-71.6%), and median survival was 16.9 months. SF IG-SRS demonstrated superior LC to HF IG-SRS (12-month LC of 90.8% [CI, 83%-98.6%] vs 84.1% [CI, 72.9%-95.3%] P=.007) and retained significance on multivariate analysis (P=.030, hazard ratio 0.345; CI, 0.132-0.901]. Treatment was well tolerated, with 1% acute grade 3 toxicity, 4.5% chronic grade 3 toxicity, and no grade >3 toxicities. Conclusions: In the largest series of metastatic sarcoma to the spine to date, IG-SRS provides excellent LC in the setting of an aggressive disease with low radiation sensitivity and poor prognosis. Single-fraction IG-SRS is associated with the highest rates of LC with minimal toxicity.

  14. Utility of Adding Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Computed Tomography Alone in the Evaluation of Cervical Spine Injury: A Propensity-Matched Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Tobert, Daniel G; Le, Hai V; Leonard, Dana A; Yau, Allan L; Rajan, Prashant; Cho, Charles H; Kang, James D; Bono, Christopher M; Harris, Mitchel B

    2018-02-01

    Adult patients who received computed tomography (CT) alone or CT-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the evaluation of cervical spine injury. To evaluate the utility of CT-MRI in the diagnosis of cervical spine injury using propensity-matched techniques. The optimal evaluation (CT alone vs. CT and MRI) for patients with suspected cervical spine injury in the setting of blunt trauma remains controversial. The primary outcome was the identification of a cervical spine injury, with decision for surgery and change in management considered secondarily. A propensity score was developed based on the likelihood of receiving evaluation with CT-MRI, and this score was used to balance the cohorts and develop two groups of patients around whom there was a degree of clinical equipoise in terms of the imaging protocol. Logistic regression was used to evaluate for significant differences in injury detection in patients evaluated with CT alone as compared to those receiving CT-MRI. Between 2007 and 2014, 8060 patients were evaluated using CT and 693 with CT-MRI. Following propensity-score matching, each cohort contained 668 patients. There were no significant differences between the two groups in baseline characteristics. The odds of identifying a cervical spine injury were significantly higher in the CT-MRI group, even after adjusting for prior injury recognition on CT (odds ratios 2.6; 95% confidence interval 1.7-4.0; P < 0.001). However, only 53/668 patients (8%) in the CT-MRI group had injuries identified on MRI not previously recognized by CT. Only a minority of these patients (n = 5/668, 1%) necessitated surgical intervention. In this propensity-matched cohort, the addition of MRI to CT alone identified missed injuries at a rate of 8%. Only a minority of these were serious enough to warrant surgery. This speaks against the standard addition of MRI to CT-alone protocols in cervical spine evaluation after trauma. 3.

  15. Twente spine model : A complete and coherent dataset for musculo-skeletal modeling of the lumbar region of the human spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayoglu, Riza; Geeraedts, Leo; Groenen, Karlijn; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Homminga, Jasper Johan

    Musculo-skeletal modeling can greatly help in understanding normal and pathological functioning of the spine. For such models to produce reliable muscle and joint force estimations, an adequate set of musculo-skeletal data is necessary. In this study, we present a complete and coherent dataset for

  16. Twente spine model: A complete and coherent dataset for musculo-skeletal modeling of the lumbar region of the human spine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayoglu, R.; Geeraedts, L.; Groenen, K.H.J.; Verdonschot, N.J.; Koopman, B.; Homminga, J.

    2017-01-01

    Musculo-skeletal modeling can greatly help in understanding normal and pathological functioning of the spine. For such models to produce reliable muscle and joint force estimations, an adequate set of musculo-skeletal data is necessary. In this study, we present a complete and coherent dataset for

  17. Twente spine model: A complete and coherent dataset for musculo-skeletal modeling of the lumbar region of the human spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayoglu, R.; Geeraedts, L.; Groenen, K.H.J.; Verdonschot, N.J.; Koopman, B.; Homminga, J.

    2017-01-01

    Musculo-skeletal modeling can greatly help in understanding normal and pathological functioning of the spine. For such models to produce reliable muscle and joint force estimations, an adequate set of musculo-skeletal data is necessary. In this study, we present a complete and coherent dataset for

  18. Twente spine model : A complete and coherent dataset for musculo-skeletal modeling of the thoracic and cervical regions of the human spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayoglu, Riza; Geeraedts, Leo; Groenen, Karlijn H.J.; Verdonschot, Nico; Koopman, Bart; Homminga, Jasper

    2017-01-01

    Musculo-skeletal modeling could play a key role in advancing our understanding of the healthy and pathological spine, but the credibility of such models are strictly dependent on the accuracy of the anatomical data incorporated. In this study, we present a complete and coherent musculo-skeletal

  19. Twente spine model: A complete and coherent dataset for musculo-skeletal modeling of the thoracic and cervical regions of the human spine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayoglu, R.; Geeraedts, L.; Groenen, K.H.J.; Verdonschot, N.J.; Koopman, B.; Homminga, J.

    2017-01-01

    Musculo-skeletal modeling could play a key role in advancing our understanding of the healthy and pathological spine, but the credibility of such models are strictly dependent on the accuracy of the anatomical data incorporated. In this study, we present a complete and coherent musculo-skeletal

  20. Understanding how axial loads on the spine influence segmental biomechanics for idiopathic scoliosis patients: A magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, J P; Pearcy, M J; Izatt, M T; Boom, K; Labrom, R D; Askin, G N; Adam, C J

    2016-02-01

    Segmental biomechanics of the scoliotic spine are important since the overall spinal deformity is comprised of the cumulative coronal and axial rotations of individual joints. This study investigates the coronal plane segmental biomechanics for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients in response to physiologically relevant axial compression. Individual spinal joint compliance in the coronal plane was measured for a series of 15 idiopathic scoliosis patients using axially loaded magnetic resonance imaging. Each patient was first imaged in the supine position with no axial load, and then again following application of an axial compressive load. Coronal plane disc wedge angles in the unloaded and loaded configurations were measured. Joint moments exerted by the axial compressive load were used to derive estimates of individual joint compliance. The mean standing major Cobb angle for this patient series was 46°. Mean intra-observer measurement error for endplate inclination was 1.6°. Following loading, initially highly wedged discs demonstrated a smaller change in wedge angle, than less wedged discs for certain spinal levels (+2,+1,-2 relative to the apex, (pspine, for analysis of deformity progression and surgical planning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Union Rate and Complications in Spine Fusion with Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-7: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavken, Julia; Vavken, Patrick; Mameghani, Alexander; Schaeren, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Objective The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the current best evidence to assess effectiveness and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-7 (rhBMP-7) as a biological stimulant in spine fusion. Methods Studies were included if they reported on outcomes after spine fusion with rhBMP-7. The data was synthesized using Mantel-Haenszel pooled risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Main end points were union rate, overall complications, postoperative back and leg pain, revision rates, and new-onset cancer. Results Our search produced 796 studies, 6 of which were eligible for inclusion. These studies report on a total of 442 patients (328 experimental, 114 controls) with a mean age of 59 ± 11 years. Our analysis showed no statistically significant differences in union rates (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.11, p = 0.247), overall complications (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.20, p = 0.545), postoperative back and leg pain (RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.48 to 2.19, p = 0.941), or revision rate (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.47 to 1.40, p = 0.449). There was a mathematical indicator of increased tumor rates, but with only one case, the clinical meaningfulness of this finding is questionable. Conclusion We were not able to find data in support of the use of rhBMP-7 for spine fusion. We found no evidence for increased complication or revision rates with rhBMP-7. On the other hand, we also found no evidence in support of improved union rates. PMID:26933613

  2. Increased detection rate of syringomyelia by whole spine sagittal magnetic resonance images: Based on the data from military conscription of Korean young males

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Seok; Oh, Chang Hyun [Seoul Regional Military Manpower Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seung Hwan; Park, Hyeong Chun; Park, Chong Oon; Kim, Yeo Ju [Inha Univ. Hospital/College of Medicine/Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    We compared the detection rate of syringomyelia according to the type of magnetic resonance (MR) images among the Korean military conscription. Among the total of 238910 examinees (males aged 18 to 32 years old) from January 2008 to December 2011, the examinees with conventional single lesion MR images (cervical, thoracic, and lumbar) with and without whole spine sagittal T2 weighted MR images (WSST2I) totaled 1206 cases, and syringomyelia was observed in 24 cases. The detection rate of syringomyelia according to the MR protocol (the presence of WSST2I or not) was done through analysis by annually and the clinical characters of syringomyelia was reviewed. The estimated prevalence of syringomyelia was approximately 10.0 cases per 100000 people. The detection rate was increased annually when the WSST2I proportion was increased (from 3.4 to 14.9 cases per 100000 persons, r = 0.939, p = 0.018). Clinical character of syringomyelia was ambiguous with other spinal diseases. The most affected spinal level was C5 to C7 (83%), and most cases were non communicating syringomyelia with benign central canal widening (79%). Whole spine sagittal MR image is useful to detect coexisting spinal diseases such as syringomyelia, and most syringomyelia in young males was benign hydromyelia. A whole spine sagittal MR image is recommended to increase the detection of syringomyelia.

  3. Subject-specific 2D/3D image registration and kinematics-driven musculoskeletal model of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, A H; Arjmand, N; Shirazi-Adl, A; Farahmand, F

    2017-05-24

    An essential input to the musculoskeletal (MS) trunk models that estimate muscle and spine forces is kinematics of the thorax, pelvis, and lumbar vertebrae. While thorax and pelvis kinematics are usually measured via skin motion capture devices (with inherent errors on the proper identification of the underlying bony landmarks and the relative skin-sensor-bone movements), those of the intervening lumbar vertebrae are commonly approximated at fixed proportions based on the thorax-pelvis kinematics. This study proposes an image-based kinematics measurement approach to drive subject-specific (musculature, geometry, mass, and center of masses) MS models. Kinematics of the thorax, pelvis, and individual lumbar vertebrae as well as disc inclinations, gravity loading, and musculature were all measured via different imaging techniques. The model estimated muscle and lumbar forces in various upright and flexed postures in which kinematics were obtained using upright fluoroscopy via 2D/3D image registration. Predictions of this novel image-kinematics-driven model (Img-KD) were compared with those of the traditional kinematics-driven (T-KD) model in which individual lumbar vertebral rotations were assumed based on thorax-pelvis orientations. Results indicated that while differences between Img-KD and T-KD models remained small for the force in the global muscles (attached to the thoracic cage) (muscles (attached to the lumbar vertebrae). Assuming that the skin-based measurements of thorax and pelvis kinematics are accurate enough, the T-KD model predictions of spinal forces remain reliable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pocket atlas of sectional anatomy: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Vol. 3. Spine, extremities, joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, T.B.; Reif, E. [Caritas Hospital, Dillingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2007-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the musculoskeletal system is an established and important component in the diagnosis of diseases of the joints, soft tissues, bones, and bone marrow. We are therefore pleased to collect together images of the joints and the spinal column in a separate volume on the musculoskeletal system. Demonstrating the growing importance of new developments in MRI in recent years, with ever-increasing resolution, many images were acquired with 3-tesla units. We are deeply grateful to the manufacturers, Siemens and Philips, for making this possible. We believe that colored atlases are the ideal medium to represent the highly detailed images achieved nowadays with improved resolution techniques. Volume 3 of the Pocket Atlas of Sectional Anatomay provides a color illustration facing each magnetic resonance image, as in the preceding volumes on the skull, thorax, and abdomen. To ensure the greatest possible precision in details, we still produce these illustrations ourselves. Each is accompanied by a sectional image and an orientation aid. Uniform color schemes ensure optimal clarity, as similar structures, such as arteries, veins, nerves, tendons, etc., are consistently represented in the same color. Individual muscle groups are represented uniformly, but differentiated from other muscle groups, so that classification is possible even when numerous groups of muscles are shown in the same image. Maximal lucidity prevails even in highly detailed representations. This is made possible by the high quality of the production and printing process that are characteristic of Thieme International. (orig.)

  5. [Mechanics of the characteristic geometry of the human spine undergoing vertical pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, M; Fournier, J; Scheye, T; Escande, G; Chazal, J; Tanguy, A; Vanneuville, G

    1990-06-01

    Since MAGENDIE in 1816, it has been a common assertion in books of Anatomie that curves of the spine increase its strength. This increase in strength has been estimated by a formula attributed to EULER: R = nc2 + 1 in which R is the strength and nc2 stands for the square of the number of curves. Applying the actual law of Euler on the strength of beams submitted to a vertical effort, the authors conclude that strength is increased by about 30% and not multiplied by 10, 16 or even 17 as is often falsely written.

  6. Osteoporosis and Your Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Movement › Osteoporosis and Your Spine Osteoporosis and Your Spine Your spine is made up of small bones ... called kyphosis. Kyphosis and Bone Breaks in the Spine The bones in the spine are called vertebrae. ...

  7. Relationship between alterations of the lumbar spine, visualized with magnetic resonance imaging, and occupational variables

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mariconda, Massimo; Galasso, Olimpio; Imbimbo, Luigi; Lotti, Giovanni; Milano, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Although the effect of physical workload on the occurrence of low back pain (LBP) has been extensively investigated, few quantitative studies have examined the morphological changes visualized via magnetic resonance imaging...

  8. Measurement of angular and linear segmental lumbar spine flexion-extension motion by means of image registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning, L; Irwan, R; Oudkerk, M

    Background The presently available method of measuring segmental lumbar spine mobility by means of superimposition of lumbar spine radiographs in flexion and extension lacks precision due to differences in the cortical outline of the vertebral bodies in flexed and extended position. The introduction

  9. Comparison of a fluoroscopic 3-dimensional imaging system and conventional CT in detection of pars fractures in the cadaveric lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, Christopher K; Pavlov, Helene; Herzog, Richard J; Rawlins, Bernard A; Endo, Yoshimi; Green, Daniel W

    2012-12-01

    Cadaveric Study. To compare a fluoroscopic imaging system with computed tomography (CT) and radiographs in detection of spondylolysis and radiation exposure in a cadaver model. Lumbar spondylolysis is defined as a defect or fracture of the pars interarticularis and occurs with or without anterior spondylolisthesis. CT scan is the gold standard imaging study for spondylolysis but is limited by the supine position, which may cause reduction of anterolisthesis and by ionizing radiation, which limits the frequency of follow-up scans. Thirteen intact cadaveric lumbar spine segments with 26 pars were randomized to be left intact or to undergo simulated fracture using a 1.3 mm oscillating microsurgical saw. Fifteen pars underwent simulated fracture and 11 pars were left intact. Lumbar spine segments were imaged using plain radiographs, multiplanar fluoroscopic imaging, and conventional CT scan. The images were interpreted by 3 observers blinded to the number and location of defects. Radiation exposure and doses were recorded from all imaging units. Average radiation doses were 0.0025 mSv for each radiograph, 0.23 mSv (low dose) and 0.47 mSv (high dose) for fluoroscopic imaging, and 1.5 mSv for conventional CT imaging (pediatric dose setting). Evaluation of radiographs for spondylolysis had sensitivity of 98% and specificity of 97%. Evaluation using low-dose fluoroscopic images, high-dose fluoroscopic images, and CT scan images correctly identified the status of all pars based on multiplanar images; sensitivity and specificity were 100%. Kappa analysis demonstrated a value of 0.89 for radiographic interpretation indicating excellent agreement. Kappa values describing agreement for image interpretation for fluoroscopic imaging and CT scan were equal to 1.0, representing perfect agreement. Three-dimensional fluoroscopic imaging provides comparable diagnostic imaging with CT scan in an experimental cadaveric model of spondylolysis using up to 85% less radiation than

  10. Health technology assessment of magnetic resonance imaging of the spine and bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verstraete, K.L. [Department of Radiology, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: Koenraad.verstraete@ugent.be; Huysse, W.C.J. [Department of Radiology, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: Wouter.huysse@ugent.be

    2008-02-15

    The high spatial resolution and the lack of ionizing radiation, makes magnetic resonance imaging the method of choice for imaging most spinal pathology, especially if associated with neurological symptoms. However, due to the high sensitivity of MR imaging, careful correlation between imaging findings and clinical findings is important to ensure appropriate treatment. Substituting radiographic evaluations for rapid MRI in the primary care setting may offer little additional benefit to patients. It may even increase the costs of care but the decisions about the use of imaging depend on judgments concerning whether the small observed improvement in outcome justifies additional cost. Because the presence of an abscess is a major factor in deciding between conservative and surgical treatment, MRI plays an essential role in the decision-making process concerning the treatment of spondylodiscitis. MR is also the method of choice for quantitative evaluation of bone marrow in lymphoma patients when a crucial therapeutic decision has to be made or for the qualitative evaluation of the spinal cord if compression is suspected in primary spinal malignancy or metastatic disease.

  11. 3-D MRI/CT fusion imaging of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Yuki; Kamogawa, Junji; Misaki, Hiroshi; Kamada, Kazuo; Okuda, Shunsuke; Morino, Tadao; Ogata, Tadanori; Yamamoto, Haruyasu [Ehime University, Department of Bone and Joint Surgery, Toon-shi, Ehime (Japan); Katagi, Ryosuke; Kodama, Kazuaki [Katagi Neurological Surgery, Imabari-shi, Ehime (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    The objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of MRI/CT fusion in demonstrating lumbar nerve root compromise. We combined 3-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography (CT) imaging of bone with 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of neural architecture (cauda equina and nerve roots) for two patients using VirtualPlace software. Although the pathological condition of nerve roots could not be assessed using MRI, myelography or CT myelography, 3-D MRI/CT fusion imaging enabled unambiguous, 3-D confirmation of the pathological state and courses of nerve roots, both inside and outside the foraminal arch, as well as thickening of the ligamentum flavum and the locations, forms and numbers of dorsal root ganglia. Positional relationships between intervertebral discs or bony spurs and nerve roots could also be depicted. Use of 3-D MRI/CT fusion imaging for the lumbar vertebral region successfully revealed the relationship between bone construction (bones, intervertebral joints, and intervertebral disks) and neural architecture (cauda equina and nerve roots) on a single film, three-dimensionally and in color. Such images may be useful in elucidating complex neurological conditions such as degenerative lumbar scoliosis(DLS), as well as in diagnosis and the planning of minimally invasive surgery. (orig.)

  12. Reliability of standing weight-bearing (0.25T) MR imaging findings and positional changes in the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Bjarke B; Hansen, Philip; Christensen, Anders F; Trampedach, Charlotte; Rasti, Zoreh; Bliddal, Henning; Boesen, Mikael

    2018-01-01

    To test the reliability and absolute agreement of common degenerative findings in standing positional magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI). Low back pain patients with and without sciatica were consecutively enrolled to undergo a supine and standing pMRI. Three readers independently evaluated the standing pMRI for herniation, spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, HIZ lesions and facet joint effusion. The evaluation included a semi-quantitative grading of spinal stenosis, foraminal stenosis and spinal nerve root compression. The standing pMRI images were evaluated with full access to supine MRI. In case lower grades or the degenerative findings were not present in the supine images, this was reported separately as position-dependent changes. A subsample of 20 pMRI examinations was reevaluated after two months. The reproducibility was assessed by inter- and intra-reader reliability (kappa statistic) and absolute agreement between readers. Fifty-six patients were included in this study. There was fair-to-substantial inter-reader reliability (κ 0.47 to 0.82) and high absolute agreement (72.3% to 99.1%) for the pMRI findings. The intra-reader assessment showed similar reliability and agreement (κ 0.36 to 0.85; absolute agreement: 62.5% to 98.8%). Positional changes between the supine and standing position showed a fair-to-moderate inter- and intra-reader reliability (κ 0.25 to 0.52; absolute agreement: 97.0% to 99.1). Evaluation of the lumbar spine for degenerative findings by standing pMRI has acceptable reproducibility; however, positional changes from the supine to the standing position as an independent outcome should be interpreted with caution because of lower reliability, which calls for further standardisation.

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of Lumbosacral Spine Magnetic Resonance Image Reading by Chiropractors, Chiropractic Radiologists, and Medical Radiologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zoete, A.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Knol, D.L.; Algra, P.R.; Wilmink, J.T.; van Tulder, M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. A cross-sectional diagnostic accuracy study was conducted in 2 sessions. Objective. It is important to know whether it is possible to accurately detect "specific findings" on lumbosacral magnetic resonance (MR) images and whether the results of different observers are comparable.

  14. Real-time ultrasound image classification for spine anesthesia using local directional Hadamard features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesteie, Mehran; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Ashab, Hussam Al-Deen; Lessoway, Victoria A; Massey, Simon; Gunka, Vit; Rohling, Robert N

    2015-06-01

    Injection therapy is a commonly used solution for back pain management. This procedure typically involves percutaneous insertion of a needle between or around the vertebrae, to deliver anesthetics near nerve bundles. Most frequently, spinal injections are performed either blindly using palpation or under the guidance of fluoroscopy or computed tomography. Recently, due to the drawbacks of the ionizing radiation of such imaging modalities, there has been a growing interest in using ultrasound imaging as an alternative. However, the complex spinal anatomy with different wave-like structures, affected by speckle noise, makes the accurate identification of the appropriate injection plane difficult. The aim of this study was to propose an automated system that can identify the optimal plane for epidural steroid injections and facet joint injections. A multi-scale and multi-directional feature extraction system to provide automated identification of the appropriate plane is proposed. Local Hadamard coefficients are obtained using the sequency-ordered Hadamard transform at multiple scales. Directional features are extracted from local coefficients which correspond to different regions in the ultrasound images. An artificial neural network is trained based on the local directional Hadamard features for classification. The proposed method yields distinctive features for classification which successfully classified 1032 images out of 1090 for epidural steroid injection and 990 images out of 1052 for facet joint injection. In order to validate the proposed method, a leave-one-out cross-validation was performed. The average classification accuracy for leave-one-out validation was 94 % for epidural and 90 % for facet joint targets. Also, the feature extraction time for the proposed method was 20 ms for a native 2D ultrasound image. A real-time machine learning system based on the local directional Hadamard features extracted by the sequency-ordered Hadamard transform for

  15. Comparison between 2D ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging for assessing brain and spine parameters in fetuses with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo Júnior, Edward; Nakano, Mayra Lemos; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Haratz, Karina Krajden; Oliveira, Patrícia Soares; Martins, Wellington P; Ajzen, Sérgio Aron; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2013-05-01

    To compare two-dimensional ultrasonography (2DUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessing brain and spine parameters in fetuses with spina bifida. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 15 fetuses with spina bifida (one with encephalocele, four with rachischisis and 10 with myelomeningocele). The size of the atrium of the lateral ventricle, percentage shortening of the cerebellum, degree of compromising of the first vertebra and total number of vertebras affected by herniation were assessed. The MRI examination was performed not more than 7 days after the 2DUS. To compare and correlate the parameters from the two techniques, the paired Student's t test and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used. To assess the correlations of atrium measurements from 2DUS and MRI with other parameters, Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) was used. No significant difference was observed in any of the means of the parameters assessed using the two techniques (p > 0.05). Both 2DUS and MRI seemed to present satisfactory reliability in measurements on the size of the atrium of the lateral ventricle and the first vertebra affected (ICC = 0.88 and 0.75, respectively). Measurements on the atrium of the lateral ventricle from 2DUS correlated better with the other parameters than did measurements from MRI. In fetuses with spina bifida, 2DUS and MRI present similar results, but measurements on the atrium of the lateral ventricle from 2DUS correlated better with the other parameters.

  16. A software program to measure the three-dimensional length of the spine from radiographic images: Validation and reliability assessment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Steve; Hasler, Carol-Claudius; Grant, Caroline A; Zheng, Guoyan; Schumann, Steffen; Büchler, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a new program which aims at measuring the three-dimensional length of the spine's midline based on two calibrated orthogonal radiographic images. The traditional uniplanar T1-S1 measurement method is not reflecting the actual three dimensional curvature of a scoliotic spine and is therefore not accurate. The Spinal Measurement Software (SMS) is an alternative to conveniently measure the true spine's length. The validity, inter- and intra-observer variability and usability of the program were evaluated. The usability was quantified based on a subjective questionnaire filled by eight participants using the program for the first time. The validity and variability were assessed by comparing the length of five phantom spines measured based on CT-scan data and on radiographic images with the SMS. The lengths were measured independently by each participant using both techniques. The SMS is easy and intuitive to use, even for non-clinicians. The SMS measured spinal length with an error below 2 millimeters compared to length obtained using CT scan datasets. The inter- and intra-observer variability of the SMS measurements was below 5 millimeters. The SMS provides accurate measurement of the spinal length based on orthogonal radiographic images. The software is easy to use and could easily integrate the clinical workflow and replace current approximations of the spinal length based on a single radiographic image such as the traditional T1-S1 measurement. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Agreement in the Interpretation of Magnetic Resonance Images of the Lumbar Spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, F M; Royuela, A; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2009-01-01

    Background: Correlation between clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings is essential in low-back-pain patients. Most previous studies have analyzed concordance in the interpretation of lumbar MRI among a few radiologists who worked together. This may have overestimated...... concordance. Purpose: To evaluate intra- and interobserver agreement in the interpretation of lumbar MRI performed in an open 0.2T system. Material and Methods: Seven radiologists from two different geographic settings in Spain interpreted the lumbar MRIs of 50 subjects representative of the general Danish...... population aged 40 years. The radiologists interpreted the images in routine clinical practice, having no knowledge of the clinical and demographic characteristics of the subjects and blinded to their colleagues' assessments. Six of the radiologists evaluated the same MRIs 14 days later, having no knowledge...

  18. Gradient-echo MR imaging of the cervical spine: evaluation of extradural disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDyke, C; Ross, J S; Tkach, J; Masaryk, T J; Modic, M T

    1989-08-01

    A prospective study was undertaken on 204 consecutive patients comparing low flip angle gradient-echo and T1-weighted spin-echo techniques in the MR evaluation of cervical extradural disease. Four patient groups were studied with varying gradient-echo TEs (6 or 13 msec) and flip angles (10 degrees or 60 degrees). Images were evaluated independently for contrast behavior and anatomy, then directly compared for conspicuity of lesions. The FLASH sequences (especially with a 10 degrees flip angle) produced better conspicuity of disease in half the imaging time. T1-weighted spin-echo sequences were more sensitive to marrow changes and intradural disease. The short TE sequence (6 msec) did not produce any diagnostic advantage over the longer TE sequence (13 msec). A fast and sensitive MR examination for cervical extradural disease combines a sagittal T1-weighted spin-echo acquisition with sagittal and axial FLASH 10 degrees sequences.

  19. Cervical spine degenerative diseases: An evaluation of clinical and imaging features in surgical decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soo, M.; Tran-Dinh, H.D.; Quach, T.; Downey, J.; Pohlmann, S. [Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW (Australia). Department of Radiology; Dorsch, N.W.C. [Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW (Australia). Department of Neurosurgery

    1997-11-01

    In clinically severe cervical spondylosis, imaging plays a vital role in surgical decisions. A prime factor is acquired canal stenosis with cord compression. To validate this concept, the clinical and imaging features of 20 patients with spondylitic myelopathy and 24 with radiculopathy were retrospectively reviewed. All had computed tomographic myelography (CTM) as part of their clinical work-up. The patients` clinical severity was graded as mild, moderate and severe; the age, length of illness and a history of eventual surgery or otherwise were recorded. At the level of maximum compression the following parameters were obtained from the axial CTM images: surface area and ratio of the anteroposterior to the transverse diameter of the cord; subarachnoid space and vertebral canal areas. Data were statistically analysed. A significant association exists between surgery and increasing severity of symptoms (P=0.04), and advancing age (P=0.01). These associations hold true for myelopathy and radiculopathy. A strong association is present between surgery and the surface area of the cord (P=0.01), being applicable to myelopathy only. The other parameters show no association with surgical decisions. It is concluded that with myelopathy a narrow cord area at the level of maximum compression, and moderate-severe functional impairment are indicators for surgical intervention. (authors). 22 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spine disc diseases. Frequency of false negatives; Imagerie par resonance magnetique pour pathologie discale lombaire. Frequence des faux-negatifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthelot, J.M.; Maugars, Y.; Delecrin, Y.; Caillon, F.; Prost, A. [Hopital Hotel-Dieu de Nantes, 44 (France)

    1995-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has had an impressive impact on evaluation of degenerative diseases of the spine. Nevertheless, false negatives can occur on images involving lumbar discs. Degenerative disc diseases documented on discography and/or pathology examination of the discs can go unrecognized. Likewise sensitivity for the detection of protruding disc hernias is not totally satisfactory (20% false negatives). Finally, a magnetic resonance image visualizing displacement of the disc is not specific (10 to 15% false positives); images showing protrusion or hernia can be seen in 30% of asymptomatic patients. Although MRI gives slightly more information than other imaging techniques, false images do exist. Moreover, the usefulness of MRI to demonstrate disc disease in case of a negative CT-scan remains to be demonstrated. (authors). 26 refs.

  1. Agreement in the Interpretation of Magnetic Resonance Images of the Lumbar Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, F.M. (Dept. Cientfico, Fundacin Kovacs, Palma de Majorca (Spain)); Royuela, A. (Spanish Back Pain Research Network, Fundacin Kovacs, Palma de Majorca (Spain)); Jensen, T.S. (Back Research Center, Backcenter Funen, Ringe (Denmark)) (and others)

    2009-06-15

    Background: Correlation between clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings is essential in low-back-pain patients. Most previous studies have analyzed concordance in the interpretation of lumbar MRI among a few radiologists who worked together. This may have overestimated concordance. Purpose: To evaluate intra- and interobserver agreement in the interpretation of lumbar MRI performed in an open 0.2T system. Material and Methods: Seven radiologists from two different geographic settings in Spain interpreted the lumbar MRIs of 50 subjects representative of the general Danish population aged 40 years. The radiologists interpreted the images in routine clinical practice, having no knowledge of the clinical and demographic characteristics of the subjects and blinded to their colleagues' assessments. Six of the radiologists evaluated the same MRIs 14 days later, having no knowledge of the previous results. Data on the existence of disc degeneration, high-intensity zones, disc contour, Schmorl nodes, Modic changes, osteophytes, spondylolisthesis, and spinal stenosis were collected in the Nordic Modic Consensus Group Classification form. Intra- and interobserver agreement was analyzed for variables with a prevalence =10% and =90% by means of the kappa statistic. Results: Intra- and interobserver agreement was excellent for variables related to Modic changes, and fair to good for disc contour, high-intensity zones, and Schmorl nodes. The evaluations for disc degeneration and osteophytes were found to have fair to good intraobserver agreement and poor interobserver agreement. The agreement for the evaluations of spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis was not analyzed because they were observed in <10% of reports. Conclusion: Images from 0.2T MRIs appear to lead to good agreement in the reporting of disc contour, high-intensity zones, Schmorl nodes, and, in particular, Modic changes, suggesting that they can possibly be reliably used for clinical

  2. Analysis of the clinical picture in patients with osteoarthritis of the spine depending on the type and severity of lesions on magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Lachman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Spondyloarthritis is the most common pathological change in the spine. In a significant number of cases, it leads to compression of the nervous structures of the spinal canal, causing pain and neurological symptoms. Intervertebral disc pathology is a common cause of root deficits in neurological examination of all types of degenerative changes of the spine structures. Disc herniation is pathologically divided into 4 stages of herniated nucleus pulposus: 1 bulging, 2 protrusion, 3 extrusion, 4 sequestration. The aim of this study is to analyze the correlation between the type and severity of degenerative changes in the spine and the incidence of neurological deficits. Material and methods: The study included 100 patients: 74 men and 26 women aged 50.2 ±10.43 years with pain of the spine in the cervical and/or lumbosacral segments and with degenerative changes in the plain radiographs. The mean value of body mass index (BMI was 27.8 ±3.95 kg/m 2 . Each patient underwent neurological examinations and 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging MRI of the cervical and/or lumbar spine. Results : Every patient was diagnosed with herniated nucleus pulposus affecting on average 4 ±2 segments of the spine. The most frequently observed degree of severity of disc herniation was the second (protrusion, 71.9% of all disc disease in 89 patients. Much less frequently found was the third degree (extrusion, 45 patients, 20.1% slipped disc, the first (bulging, 14 patients, 6.3% slipped disc, and least often only a small percentage of fourth degree (sequestration, 4 patients, 1.7% slipped disc. Neurological symptoms (deficits were observed in 34 patients. They were accompanied by disc herniations in 23.7% of patients. In remaining patients with neurological deficits there was spinal stenosis. No correlation was observed between neurological deficits and stage 1 of disc herniation. Conclusions : The incidence rate of neurological deficits is correlated with

  3. Ultra low field MR imaging of cervical spine involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagerlund, M.; Bjoernebrink, J.; Ekelund, L.; Toolanen, G. (Umeaa Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Depts. of Diagnostic Radiology and Orthopedic Surgery)

    1992-03-01

    In a study of 30 patients with longstanding rheumatoid arthritis the diagnostic usefulness of ultra low field MR equipment was analyzed in assessing lesions of the craniocervical junction. It was found that at 0.04 T all the examinations were diagnostic and that in combination with plain radiography the diagnostic information obtained was valuable in further planning of the treatment strategies. The neurologic findings were related to the degree and severity of atlantoaxial luxation, either horizontal or vertical, and to the periodontoid pannus formation. The correlation between the degree of cord compression shown with MR imaging and the clinical symptoms, especially long tract symptoms, was poor. The only correlating factor was the duration of the disease. (orig.).

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging showed no signs of overuse or permanent injury to the lumbar sacral spine during a Special Forces training course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharony, Shachar; Milgrom, Charles; Wolf, Tamir; Barzilay, Yair; Applbaum, Yaakov H; Schindel, Yair; Finestone, Aharon; Liram, Nimrod

    2008-01-01

    Special Forces training is even more demanding than that of elite athletes. The training includes grueling physical activity and periods of sleep deprivation. The soldiers routinely carry heavy loads up to 40% of their body weight on their backs while running and marching for distances up to 90 km. Our purpose was to find out if Special Forces recruits are able to complete the preparatory Navy Seals training program without sustaining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs of overuse or irreversible injury to their backs. Prospective cohort study. We performed MRI scans before and after 14 weeks of Navy Seals preparatory training course. Ten soldiers underwent MRI of their lumbar sacral spines and right knees before and after the completion of Navy Seals preparatory training. Physiologic measures. Lumbar sacral spine and knee MRI tests were performed before and after the training to identify changes in the spinal discs, facet joints, pars interarticularis, vertebral bodies, knee articular cartilage, ligaments, knee menisci, and the presence or absence of soft tissue and/or bone edema. We investigated the difference in spine and knee pathology before and after a 14-week Navy Seals preparatory training course by using MRI criteria. The recruits participating in the study were monitored for acute and overuse injuries every 3 to 4 weeks. Before the training, seven out of ten spine MRI scans were normal. Two showed small L5-S1 disc bulges, one of them with concomitant Scheuermann's disease. Another soldier's MRI showed L1-L4 mild Scheuermann's disease. Follow-up MRI showed no spinal changes. Before the training, one knee had a small lateral femoral condyle cartilage lesion. Nine of ten knees had prepatellar swelling, five had increased joint fluid, and two bone edema. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed improvement in the prepatellar swelling in eight soldiers, no change in one soldier, and increased knee effusion and a new medial femoral condyle bone edema in

  5. MR imaging of the lumber spine; Visualization capability of the nerve root

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishibashi, Kazumasa; Hieda, Hiroshi; Goto, Takeshi; Goto, Hiroshi; Koga, Hiromichi; Hiraoka, Kouji (Moji Rousai Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    We studied visualization capability of the nerve root in mainly coronary section pattern using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI was carried out in 91 patients with lumbago and sciatica. Coronary section was additionally photographed in 58 cases of these patients (32 with intervertebral hernia, 20 with spinal canal stenosis, 2 with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, 2 with compression fracture and the other 2 patients). The visualization capability of the nerve root was studied with photographing 2 pulse systems of the coronary section by using spin echo and field echo methods. The high signal area of the cerebrospinal fluid and nerve root in the normal lumbar vertebra was noted by field echo method, and pattern that is visualized by myelogram was obtained. The coincidence of the main foci (disturbed lesions of the nerve root) in the intervertebral hernia and coronary section pattern was noted in 21 of 32 cases (64.5%) with considerably high ratio. The condition of the nerve root in the blocked lesion was visualized in the spinal canal stenosis. (author).

  6. Limited magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine has high sensitivity for detection of acute fractures, infection, and malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Benjamin; Fintelmann, Florian J.; Kamath, Ravi S.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Rosenthal, Daniel I. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study is to determine how a limited protocol MR examination compares to a full conventional MR examination for the detection of non-degenerative pathology such as acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. A sample of 349 non-contrast MR exams was selected retrospectively containing a 3:1:1:1 distribution of negative/degenerative change only, acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. This resulted in an even distribution of pathology and non-pathology. A limited protocol MR exam was simulated by extracting T1-weighted sagittal and T2-weighted fat-saturated (or STIR) sagittal sequences from each exam and submitting them for blinded review by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The exams were evaluated for the presence or absence of non-degenerative pathology. Interpretation of the limited exam was compared to the original report of the full examination. If either reader disagreed with the original report, the case was submitted for an unblinded adjudication process with the participation of a third musculoskeletal radiologist to establish a consensus diagnosis. There were five false negatives for a sensitivity of 96.9 % for the limited protocol MR exam. Infection in the psoas, paraspinal muscles, and sacroiliac joint, as well as acute fractures in transverse processes and sacrum were missed by one or more readers. No cases of malignancy were missed. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 96.0 % (335/349). MR imaging of the lumbar spine limited to sagittal T1-weighted and sagittal T2 fat-saturated (or STIR) sequences has high sensitivity for the detection of acute fracture, infection, or malignancy compared to a conventional MR examination. (orig.)

  7. A finite element model of the L4-L5-S1 human spine segment including the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Hector E; Gómez, Lessby; García, Jose J

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to study disc degeneration and the risk of injury during occupational activities, a new finite element (FE) model of the L4-L5-S1 segment of the human spine was developed based on the anthropometry of a typical Colombian worker. Beginning with medical images, the programs CATIA and SOLIDWORKS were used to generate and assemble the vertebrae and create the soft structures of the segment. The software ABAQUS was used to run the analyses, which included a detailed model calibration using the experimental step-wise reduction data for the L4-L5 component, while the L5-S1 segment was calibrated in the intact condition. The range of motion curves, the intradiscal pressure and the lateral bulging under pure moments were considered for the calibration. As opposed to other FE models that include the L5-S1 disc, the model developed in this study considered the regional variations and anisotropy of the annulus as well as a realistic description of the nucleus geometry, which allowed an improved representation of experimental data during the validation process. Hence, the model can be used to analyze the stress and strain distributions in the L4-L5 and L5-S1 discs of workers performing activities such as lifting and carrying tasks.

  8. The use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) technique in evaluation of patients with cervical spine trauma: impact on radiation dose reduction and image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro, Satya N; Chakraborty, Santanu; Sheikh, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) technique on the image quality and radiation dose reduction. The comparison was made with the traditional filtered back projection (FBP) technique. We retrospectively reviewed 78 patients, who underwent cervical spine CT for blunt cervical trauma between 1 June 2010 and 30 November 2010. 48 patients were imaged using traditional FBP technique and the remaining 30 patients were imaged using the ASiR technique. The patient demographics, radiation dose, objective image signal and noise were recorded; while subjective noise, sharpness, diagnostic acceptability and artefacts were graded by two radiologists blinded to the techniques. We found that the ASiR technique was able to reduce the volume CT dose index, dose-length product and effective dose by 36%, 36.5% and 36.5%, respectively, compared with the FBP technique. There was no significant difference in the image noise (p = 0.39), signal (p = 0.82) and signal-to-noise ratio (p = 0.56) between the groups. The subjective image quality was minimally better in the ASiR group but not statistically significant. There was excellent interobserver agreement on the subjective image quality and diagnostic acceptability for both groups. The use of ASiR technique allowed approximately 36% radiation dose reduction in the evaluation of cervical spine without degrading the image quality. The present study highlights that the ASiR technique is extremely helpful in reducing the patient radiation exposure while maintaining the image quality. It is highly recommended to utilize this novel technique in CT imaging of different body regions.

  9. Amyloid plaque formation precedes dendritic spine loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Tobias; Burgold, Steffen; Dorostkar, Mario M; Fuhrmann, Martin; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M; Schmidt, Boris; Kretzschmar, Hans; Herms, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    Amyloid-beta plaque deposition represents a major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. While numerous studies have described dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques, much less is known about the kinetics of these processes. In particular, the question as to whether synapse loss precedes or follows plaque formation remains unanswered. To address this question, and to learn more about the underlying kinetics, we simultaneously imaged amyloid plaque deposition and dendritic spine loss by applying two-photon in vivo microscopy through a cranial window in double transgenic APPPS1 mice. As a result, we first observed that the rate of dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques is the same in both young and aged animals. However, plaque size only increased significantly in the young cohort, indicating that spine loss persists even many months after initial plaque appearance. Tracking the fate of individual spines revealed that net spine loss is caused by increased spine elimination, with the rate of spine formation remaining constant. Imaging of dendritic spines before and during plaque formation demonstrated that spine loss around plaques commences at least 4 weeks after initial plaque formation. In conclusion, spine loss occurs, shortly but with a significant time delay, after the birth of new plaques, and persists in the vicinity of amyloid plaques over many months. These findings hence give further hope to the possibility that there is a therapeutic window between initial amyloid plaque deposition and the onset of structural damage at spines.

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a ... the Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  11. Humanity in God's Image: An Interdisciplinary Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welz, Claudia

    . Claudia Welz offers an interdisciplinary exploration of theological and ethical 'visions' of the invisible. By analysing poetry and art, Welz exemplifies human self-understanding in the interface between the visual and the linguistic. The content of the imago Dei cannot be defined apart from the image......How can we, in our times, understand the biblical concept that human beings have been created in the image of an invisible God? This is a perennial but increasingly pressing question that lies at the heart of theological anthropology. Humanity in God's Image: An Interdisciplinary Exploration...

  12. Radiation dose reduction in scoliosis patients: low-dose full-spine radiography with digital flat panel detector and image stitching system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieser, T; Baldauf, A Q; Ludwig, K

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate the exposure dose reduction with a digital flat panel detector (FPD) and an image stitching system (ISS) in full-spine radiography for scoliosis patients. During a 6-month period, all consecutive scoliosis patients with a clinical indication for full-spine radiography (n = 50) were examined with an FPD and ISS. Automatic exposure control adjusted to speed class 1600 was used together with age-adjusted tube voltage and filtration. Dose area products were recorded for all images (antero-posterior n = 50, lateral n = 18). Images were evaluated by two radiologists for the possibility (possible, impossible) of typical scoliosis measurements (Cobb angle, Stagnara angle, lateral deviation, Risser stage). All measurements assessed as impossible underwent a second evaluation categorizing the reason why a measurement was impossible (underlying pathology, projection, image quality). Patient characteristics influencing exposure were recorded (sex, age, weight, height). Mean dose area products were compared to the literature with consideration of patient group and image quality. The mean dose area product was 16.8 µGy m (2) for antero-posterior images and 26.6 µGy m (2) for lateral images. A comparison to published values showed an exposure dose reduction of 47 % to 93 %. Measurement of the Cobb and Stagnara angle, lateral deviation and Risser stage was possible in 96 % (n = 50), 83 % (n = 18), 100 % (n = 50) and 100 % (n = 50) of cases. The reasons for impossible measurements were independent of image quality (underlying pathologies, projection). When imaging scoliosis patients, an FPD combined with an ISS can substantially reduce the exposure dose. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Radiation dose reduction in scoliosis patients. Low-dose full-spine radiography with digital flat panel detector and image stitching system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieser, T. [Klinikum Augsburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Baldauf, A.Q. [Theresienkrankenhaus Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologie; Ludwig, K. [Klinikum Herford (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the exposure dose reduction with a digital flat panel detector (FPD) and an image stitching system (ISS) in full-spine radiography for scoliosis patients. Materials and Methods: During a 6-month period, all consecutive scoliosis patients with a clinical indication for full-spine radiography (n = 50) were examined with an FPD and ISS. Automatic exposure control adjusted to speed class 1600 was used together with age-adjusted tube voltage and filtration. Dose area products were recorded for all images (antero-posterior n = 50, lateral n = 18). Images were evaluated by two radiologists for the possibility (possible, impossible) of typical scoliosis measurements (Cobb angle, Stagnara angle, lateral deviation, Risser stage). All measurements assessed as impossible underwent a second evaluation categorizing the reason why a measurement was impossible (underlying pathology, projection, image quality). Patient characteristics influencing exposure were recorded (sex, age, weight, height). Mean dose area products were compared to the literature with consideration of patient group and image quality. Results: The mean dose area product was 16.8 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for antero-posterior images and 26.6 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for lateral images. A comparison to published values showed an exposure dose reduction of 47 % to 93 %. Measurement of the Cobb and Stagnara angle, lateral deviation and Risser stage was possible in 96 % (n = 50), 83 % (n = 18), 100 % (n = 50) and 100 % (n = 50) of cases. The reasons for impossible measurements were independent of image quality (underlying pathologies, projection). Conclusion: When imaging scoliosis patients, an FPD combined with an ISS can substantially reduce the exposure dose. (orig.)

  14. Improved fat-suppression homogeneity with mDIXON turbo spin echo (TSE) in pediatric spine imaging at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorney, Amber L; Chia, Jonathan M; Pfeifer, Cory M; Miller, Jeffrey H; Hu, Houchun H

    2017-11-01

    Background Robust fat suppression remains essential in clinical MRI to improve tissue signal contrast, minimize fat-related artifacts, and enhance image quality. Purpose To compare fat suppression between mDIXON turbo spin echo (TSE) and conventional frequency-selective and inversion-recovery methods in pediatric spine MRI. Material and Methods Images from T1-weighted (T1W) and T2-weighted (T2W) TSE sequences coupled with conventional methods and the mDIXON technique were compared in 36 patients (5.8 ± 5.4 years) at 3.0 T. Images from 42 pairs of T1W (n = 16) and T2W (n = 26) scans were acquired. Two radiologists reviewed the data and rated images using a three-point scale in two categories, including the uniformity of fat suppression and overall diagnostic image quality. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare the scores. Results The Cohen's kappa coefficient for inter-rater agreement was 0.69 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.56-0.83). Images from mDIXON TSE were considered superior in fat suppression ( P fat suppression was superior using inversion-recovery and likewise in one case mDIXON had poorer image diagnostic quality. Lastly, mDIXON and conventional fat-suppression methods performed similarly in 17 (rater 1) and 14 (rater 2) cases, and yielded equal diagnostic image quality in 28 (rater 1) and 30 (rater 2) cases. Conclusion Robust fat suppression can be achieved with mDixon TSE pediatric spine imaging at 3.0 T and should be considered as a permanent replacement of traditional methods, in particular frequency-selective techniques.

  15. SU-E-J-34: Setup Accuracy in Spine SBRT Using CBCT 6D Image Guidance in Comparison with 6D ExacTrac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Z; Yip, S; Lewis, J; Mannarino, E; Friesen, S; Wagar, M; Hacker, F [Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Volumetric information of the spine captured on CBCT can potentially improve the accuracy in spine SBRT setup that has been commonly performed through 2D radiographs. This work evaluates the setup accuracy in spine SBRT using 6D CBCT image guidance that recently became available on Varian systems. Methods ExacTrac radiographs have been commonly used for Spine SBRT setup. The setup process involves first positioning patients with lasers followed by localization imaging, registration, and repositioning. Verification images are then taken providing the residual errors (ExacTracRE) before beam on. CBCT verification is also acquired in our institute. The availability of both ExacTrac and CBCT verifications allows a comparison study. 41 verification CBCT of 16 patients were retrospectively registered with the planning CT enabling 6D corrections, giving CBCT residual errors (CBCTRE) which were compared with ExacTracRE. Results The RMS discrepancies between CBCTRE and ExacTracRE are 1.70mm, 1.66mm, 1.56mm in vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions and 0.27°, 0.49°, 0.35° in yaw, roll and pitch respectively. The corresponding mean discrepancies (and standard deviation) are 0.62mm (1.60mm), 0.00mm (1.68mm), −0.80mm (1.36mm) and 0.05° (0.58°), 0.11° (0.48°), −0.16° (0.32°). Of the 41 CBCT, 17 had high-Z surgical implants. No significant difference in ExacTrac-to-CBCT discrepancy was observed between patients with and without the implants. Conclusion Multiple factors can contribute to the discrepancies between CBCT and ExacTrac: 1) the imaging iso-centers of the two systems, while calibrated to coincide, can be different; 2) the ROI used for registration can be different especially if ribs were included in ExacTrac images; 3) small patient motion can occur between the two verification image acquisitions; 4) the algorithms can be different between CBCT (volumetric) and ExacTrac (radiographic) registrations.

  16. No association between excessive wound complications and preoperative high-dose, hypofractionated, image-guided radiation therapy for spine metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keam, Jennifer; Bilsky, Mark H; Laufer, Ilya; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Tam, Moses; Zatcky, Joan; Lovelock, Dale M; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2014-04-01

    Radiation therapy is known to impair wound healing. Higher dose per fraction is believed to increase this risk. This study sought to quantify rates of wound complication in patients receiving preoperative conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (XRT) or high-dose hypofractionated image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for spinal metastasis, and to identify predictors of wound complication. The records of 165 consecutive patients who underwent spine surgery for metastasis at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1999 and 2010, with a history of prior radiation therapy, were reviewed. Patients with primary spine tumors, 2 courses of prior radiation therapy to the surgical site, total dose 3 Gy/fraction). The total dose prescribed to the 100% isodose line to treat the planning target volume was 18-30 Gy in 1-5 fractions. Clinical factors evaluated included age, Karnofsky Performance Scale score, body mass index, presence of diabetes, smoking, ambulatory status, prior surgery at same spinal site, preoperative laboratory results (hemoglobin, lymphocyte count, and albumin), perioperative chemotherapy or steroids, estimated blood loss, extent of stabilization hardware, time between radiation therapy and surgery, number of vertebral bodies irradiated, total radiation dose, and dose per fraction of radiation therapy. Wound complication was defined as poor healing, dehiscence, or infection. Potential predictors of wound complication were assessed by univariate analyses using competing-risk methods to adjust for risk of death. results: For XRT patients, median dose was 30 Gy (range 11.5-70 Gy) with 72% of them receiving 3 Gy × 10 fractions. For IGRT patients, 66% received 18-24 Gy × 1 fraction and 23% received 6 Gy × 5 fractions. Groups differed only by the mean number of vertebral bodies treated (4.6 XRT and 1.8 IGRT, p complications occurred at a median of 0.95 months (range 0.4-3.9 months). A total of 22 wound events occurred in the XRT group and 2 in the IGRT

  17. Prevalence of degenerative and spondyloarthritis-related magnetic resonance imaging findings in the spine and sacroiliac joints in patients with persistent low back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnbak, Bodil; Jensen, Tue S.; Manniche, Claus [Hospital Lillebaelt, Research Department, Spine Centre of Southern Denmark, Middelfart (Denmark); University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Regional Health Research, Odense C (Denmark); Egund, Niels; Zejden, Anna [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aarhus C (Denmark); Hoerslev-Petersen, Kim [University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Regional Health Research, Odense C (Denmark); King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Graasten, Graasten (Denmark); Jurik, Anne G. [Hospital Lillebaelt, Research Department, Spine Centre of Southern Denmark, Middelfart (Denmark); University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Regional Health Research, Odense C (Denmark); Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2016-04-15

    To estimate the prevalence of degenerative and spondyloarthritis (SpA)-related magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in the spine and sacroiliac joints (SIJs) and analyse their association with gender and age in persistent low back pain (LBP) patients. Degenerative and SpA-related MRI findings in the whole spine and SIJs were evaluated in Spine Centre patients aged 18-40 years with LBP. Among the 1,037 patients, the prevalence of disc degeneration, disc contour changes and vertebral endplate signal (Modic) changes were 87 % (±SEM 1.1), 82 % (±1.2) and 48 % (±1.6). All degenerative spinal findings were most frequent in men and patients aged 30-40 years. Spinal SpA-related MRI findings were rare. In the SIJs, 28 % (±1.4) had at least one MRI finding, with bone marrow oedema being the most common (21 % (±1.3)). SIJ erosions were most prevalent in patients aged 18-29 years and bone marrow oedema in patients aged 30-40 years. SIJ sclerosis and fatty marrow deposition were most common in women. SIJ bone marrow oedema, sclerosis and erosions were most frequent in women indicating pregnancy-related LBP. The high prevalence of SIJ MRI findings associated with age, gender, and pregnancy-related LBP need further investigation of their clinical importance in LBP patients. (orig.)

  18. Human Expertise Helps Computer Classify Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rorvig, Mark E.

    1991-01-01

    Two-domain method of computational classification of images requires less computation than other methods for computational recognition, matching, or classification of images or patterns. Does not require explicit computational matching of features, and incorporates human expertise without requiring translation of mental processes of classification into language comprehensible to computer. Conceived to "train" computer to analyze photomicrographs of microscope-slide specimens of leucocytes from human peripheral blood to distinguish between specimens from healthy and specimens from traumatized patients.

  19. [Precise minimally invasive surgery of lower lumbar spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi-Min; Cheng, Xi-Gao; Gao, Gui-Cheng; Cheng, Lian-Zhi

    2014-11-01

    The fast development of minimally invasive spine surgery in recent years is based on the advance of endoscopic microsurgery techniques, computer science and medical imaging, as well as the growing concerning of medical humanities. The concept of minimally invasive and precise targeting therapy has been penetrating into various areas of surgery, and minimal tissue damage and fewer complications are the new directions of minimally invasive spine surgery. In this article we review some advances in precise spinal surgery including percutaneous lumbar discectomy, microendoscopic discectomy, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery and robot surgery.

  20. Observer agreement in the reporting of knee and lumbar spine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations: Selectively trained MR radiographers and consultant radiologists compared with an index radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brealey, S., E-mail: stephen.brealey@york.ac.uk [Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Piper, K., E-mail: keith.piper@canterbury.ac.uk [Department of Allied Health Professions, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent CT1 1QU (United Kingdom); King, D., E-mail: david.g.king@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Bland, M., E-mail: martin.bland@york.ac.uk [Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Caddick, J., E-mail: Julie.Caddick@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Campbell, P., E-mail: peter.campbell@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Gibbon, A., E-mail: anthony.j.gibbon@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Highland, A., E-mail: Adrian.Highland@sth.nhs.uk [Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Herries Road, Sheffield S5 7AU (United Kingdom); Jenkins, N., E-mail: neil.jenkins@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Petty, D., E-mail: daniel.petty@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Warren, D., E-mail: david.warren@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To assess agreement between trained radiographers and consultant radiologists compared with an index radiologist when reporting on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of the knee and lumbar spine and to examine the subsequent effect of discordant reports on patient management and outcome. Methods: At York Hospital two MR radiographers, two consultant radiologists and an index radiologist reported on a prospective, random sample of 326 MRI examinations. The radiographers reported in clinical practice conditions and the radiologists during clinical practice. An independent consultant radiologist compared these reports with the index radiologist report for agreement. Orthopaedic surgeons then assessed whether the discordance between reports was clinically important. Results: Overall observer agreement with the index radiologist was comparable between observers and ranged from 54% to 58%; for the knee it was 46–57% and for the lumbar spine was 56–66%. There was a very small observed difference of 0.6% (95% CI −11.9 to 13.0) in mean agreement between the radiographers and radiologists (P = 0.860). For the knee, lumbar spine and overall, radiographers’ discordant reports, when compared with the index radiologist, were less likely to have a clinically important effect on patient outcome than the radiologists’ discordant reports. Less than 10% of observer's reports were sufficiently discordant with the index radiologist's reports to be clinically important. Conclusion: Carefully selected MR radiographers with postgraduate education and training reported in clinical practice conditions on specific MRI examinations of the knee and lumbar spine to a level of agreement comparable with non-musculoskeletal consultant radiologists.

  1. Use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 to achieve posterolateral lumbar spine fusion in humans: a prospective, randomized clinical pilot trial: 2002 Volvo Award in clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Scott D; Kang, James; Sandhu, Harvinder; Heller, John G

    2002-12-01

    A prospective randomized clinical study was conducted. To determine whether the dose and carrier that were successful in rhesus monkeys could induce consistent radiographic spine fusion in humans. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), an osteoinductive bone morphogenetic protein, is successful at generating spine fusion in rabbits and rhesus monkeys. For this study, 25 patients undergoing lumbar arthrodesis were randomized (1:2:2 ratio) based on the arthrodesis technique: autograft/Texas Scottish Rite Hospital (TSRH) pedicle screw instrumentation (n = 5), rhBMP-2/TSRH (n = 11), and rhBMP-2 only without internal fixation (n = 9). On each side, 20 mg of rhBMP-2 were delivered on a carrier consisting of 60% hydroxyapatite and 40% tricalcium phosphate granules (10 cm /side). The patients had single-level disc degeneration, Grade 1 or less spondylolisthesis, mechanical low back pain with or without leg pain, and at least 6 months failure of nonoperative treatment. All 25 patients were available for follow-up evaluation (mean, 17 months; range 12-27 months). The radiographic fusion rate was 40% (2/5) in the autograft/TSRH group and 100% (20/20) with rhBMP-2 group with or without TSRH internal fixation ( = 0.004). A statistically significant improvement in Oswestry score was seen at 6 weeks in the rhBMP-2 only group (-17.6; = 0.009), and at 3 months in the rhBMP-2/TSRH group (-17.0; = 0.003), but not until 6 months in the autograft/TSRH group (-17.3; = 0.041). At the final follow-up assessment, Oswestry improvement was greatest in the rhBMP-2 only group (-28.7, < 0.001). The SF-36 Pain Index and PCS subscales showed similar changes. This pilot study is the first with at least 1 year of follow-up evaluation to demonstrate successful posterolateral spine fusion using a BMP-based bone graft substitute, with radiographs and CT scans as the determinant. Consistently, rhBMP-2 was able to induce bone in the

  2. Spine venom of crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) induces antiproliferation and apoptosis of human melanoma cells (A375.S2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Chiu; Hsieh, Hernyi Justin; Hsieh, Cheng-Hong; Hwang, Deng-Fwu

    2014-12-01

    The crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) is a venomous starfish. In this study, the extraction of A. planci spine venom (ASV) was performed by phosphate saline buffer, followed by assaying the cytotoxicity on human normal and tumor cells. It was found that human melanoma cells (A375.S2) were the most sensitive to the ASV solution. The cells, after incubation with ASV, significantly appeared to decrease cell viability and increase lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release with a dose-dependent relationship. The extract of spine promoted loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and induced inter-nucleosomal DNA fragmentation in human melanoma cells. The cells exhibited apoptosis by using propidium iodide (PI) staining of DNA fragmentation; it was then determined by flow cytometry (sub-G1 peak). The molecular cytotoxicity of ASV was tested through evaluation of the apoptosis/necrosis ratio by double staining with annexin V and PI assay. The A. planci spine venom showed significant antiproliferation. The human melanoma cells revealed apoptosis at low dose (1.25 μg/ml), and necrosis occurred at high dose (5 μg/ml). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Interventional spine procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelekis, A.D. [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department, University of Athens, Rimini 1, 124 61 Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: akelekis@cc.uoa.gr; Somon, T. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Yilmaz, H. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Bize, P. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Brountzos, E.N. [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department, University of Athens, Rimini 1, 124 61 Athens (Greece); Lovblad, K. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Ruefenacht, D. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Martin, J.B. [Clinique Generale Beaulieu 12 chemin Beau Soleil 1206 Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: jbmartin@beaulieu.ch

    2005-09-01

    Minimally invasive techniques for the treatment of some spinal diseases are percutaneous treatments, proposed before classic surgery. By using imaging guidance, one can significantly increase accuracy and decrease complication rates. This review report physiopathology and discusses indications, methods, complications and results of performing these techniques on the spine, including different level (cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacroiliac) and different kind of treatments (nerve block, disc treatment and bone treatment). Finally the present article also reviews current literature on the controversial issues involved.

  4. Peripheral nervous system injury after high-dose single-fraction image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery for spine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubblefield, Michael D; Ibanez, Katarzyna; Riedel, Elyn R; Barzilai, Ori; Laufer, Ilya; Lis, Eric; Yamada, Yoshiya; Bilsky, Mark H

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE The object of this study was to determine the percentage of high-dose (1800-2600 cGy) single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SF-SRS) treatments to the spine that result in peripheral nervous system (PNS) injury. METHODS All patients treated with SF-SRS for primary or metastatic spine tumors between January 2004 and May 2013 and referred to the Rehabilitation Medicine Service for evaluation and treatment of neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, or functional impairments or pain were retrospectively identified. RESULTS Five hundred fifty-seven SF-SRS treatments in 447 patients resulted in 14 PNS injuries in 13 patients. All injures resulted from SF-SRS delivered to the cervical or lumbosacral spine at 2400 cGy. The overall percentage of SF-SRS treatments resulting in PNS injury was 2.5%, increasing to 4.5% when the thoracic spine was excluded from analysis. The median time to symptom onset following SF-SRS was 10 months (range 4-32 months). The plexus (cervical, brachial, and/or lumbosacral) was affected clinically and/or electrophysiologically in 12 (86%) of 14 cases, the nerve root in 2 (14%) of 14, and both in 6 (43%) of 14 cases. All patients experienced pain and most (93%) developed weakness. Peripheral nervous system injuries were CTCAE Grade 1 in 14% of cases, 2 in 64%, and 3 in 21%. No dose relationship between SF-SRS dose and PNS injury was detected. CONCLUSIONS Single-fraction SRS to the spine can result in PNS injury with major implications for function and quality of life.

  5. Navigation of Pedicle Screws in the Thoracic Spine with a New Electromagnetic Navigation System: A Human Cadaver Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hahn, Patrick; Oezdemir, Semih; Komp, Martin; Giannakopoulos, Athanasios; Kasch, Richard; Merk, Harry; Liermann, Dieter; Godolias, Georgios; Ruetten, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    .... In addition to the standard techniques, several new techniques have been developed. The objective of this cadaveric study was to examine the accuracy of a new electromagnetic navigation system for instrumentation of pedicle screws in the spine...

  6. The degenerative cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. WE-AB-BRA-01: 3D-2D Image Registration for Target Localization in Spine Surgery: Comparison of Similarity Metrics Against Robustness to Content Mismatch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Silva, T; Ketcha, M; Siewerdsen, J H [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Uneri, A; Reaungamornrat, S [Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Vogt, S; Kleinszig, G [Siemens Healthcare XP Division, Erlangen, DE (Germany); Lo, S F; Wolinsky, J P; Gokaslan, Z L [Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Aygun, N [Department of Raiology and Radiological Sciences, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In image-guided spine surgery, mapping 3D preoperative images to 2D intraoperative images via 3D-2D registration can provide valuable assistance in target localization. However, the presence of surgical instrumentation, hardware implants, and soft-tissue resection/displacement causes mismatches in image content, confounding existing registration methods. Manual/semi-automatic methods to mask such extraneous content is time consuming, user-dependent, error prone, and disruptive to clinical workflow. We developed and evaluated 2 novel similarity metrics within a robust registration framework to overcome such challenges in target localization. Methods: An IRB-approved retrospective study in 19 spine surgery patients included 19 preoperative 3D CT images and 50 intraoperative mobile radiographs in cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine regions. A neuroradiologist provided truth definition of vertebral positions in CT and radiography. 3D-2D registration was performed using the CMA-ES optimizer with 4 gradient-based image similarity metrics: (1) gradient information (GI); (2) gradient correlation (GC); (3) a novel variant referred to as gradient orientation (GO); and (4) a second variant referred to as truncated gradient correlation (TGC). Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) of the vertebral levels. Results: Conventional similarity metrics were susceptible to gross registration error and failure modes associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation: for GI, the median PDE and interquartile range was 33.0±43.6 mm; similarly for GC, PDE = 23.0±92.6 mm respectively. The robust metrics GO and TGC, on the other hand, demonstrated major improvement in PDE (7.6 ±9.4 mm and 8.1± 18.1 mm, respectively) and elimination of gross failure modes. Conclusion: The proposed GO and TGC similarity measures improve registration accuracy and robustness to gross failure in the presence of strong image content mismatch. Such

  8. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Ketcha, M D; Reaungamornrat, S; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Aygun, N; Lo, S-F; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-21

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE registration to fail at a rate of >14%; however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric improved the registration accuracy and robustness in the presence of strong image content mismatch. This capability could offer valuable assistance and decision support in spine level localization in a manner consistent with

  9. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Ketcha, M. D.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Aygun, N.; Lo, S.-F.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE  14% however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric improved the registration accuracy and robustness in the presence of strong image content mismatch. This capability could offer valuable assistance and decision support in spine level localization in a manner consistent with clinical workflow.

  10. Diagnostic Approach to Pediatric Spine Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Martinetti, Carola; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the developmental features of the pediatric spine and spinal cord, including embryologic steps and subsequent growth of the osteocartilaginous spine and contents is necessary for interpretation of the pathologic events that may affect the pediatric spine. MR imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients suspected of harboring spinal abnormalities, whereas computed tomography and ultrasonography play a more limited, complementary role. This article discusses the embryologic and developmental anatomy features of the spine and spinal cord, together with some technical points and pitfalls, and the most common indications for pediatric spinal MR imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Easily missed thoracolumbar spine fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Mark [NYU Langone Medical Center/Bellevue Hospital, 550 1st Avenue, IRM-234, New York, NY 10016 (United States)], E-mail: mark.bernstein@nyumc.org

    2010-04-15

    Thoracolumbar spine fractures are common and can be difficult to diagnose. Many of these fractures are associated with extraspinal injuries and are subtle on imaging further contributing to diagnostic delay or misdiagnosis. Missed fractures are associated with increased neurologic injury and resulting morbidity. Careful and thorough workup of the multitrauma patient with dedicated spinal imaging is necessary to identify these injuries. This article reviews the major thoracolumbar spine fractures and imaging findings with attention drawn to subtle and easily overlooked features of these injuries.

  12. Imaging's insights into human violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    Following every well-publicized act of incomprehensible violence, the news media rush to interview neighbors, family members, and experts in an attempt to discover what could have led an individual to commit such a barbarous act. Certain stock answers are reiterated: video games, bullying, violent films, mental illness, the availability of guns, and a society that is increasingly both anonymous and callous. Might imaging be one of the more valuable keys to unlocking the mysteries of violent, aggressive people? This article explores these questions and their complex answers in the context of violent individuals.

  13. Investigation of suspected Guillain-Barre syndrome in childhood: what is the role for gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the spine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas; Pereira, John; Grattan-Smith, Padraic

    2014-10-01

    To review the role of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the spine in the diagnosis of paediatric Guillain-Barre syndrome and compare it with nerve conduction studies and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. A retrospective review of investigations undertaken in children admitted to our institution with acute Guillain-Barre syndrome over a 10-year period was performed. Seven of eight children (88%) displayed post-gadolinium nerve root enhancement consistent with Guillain-Barre syndrome. This compared with supportive nerve conduction studies in 21/24 children (88%) and cerebrospinal fluid protein analysis consistent with the diagnosis in 16/20 children (80%). Nerve conduction studies are the recognised 'gold standard' technique for confirming a clinical diagnosis of Guillain-Barre syndrome. In this study, a high positive rate was demonstrated. While more experience is necessary, this study and the literature support gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the spine as a valuable, although not necessarily superior, investigation in the diagnosis of Guillain-Barre syndrome. It may be of particular benefit when specialist neurophysiology expertise is unavailable. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  14. The six degrees of freedom motion of the human head, spine, and pelvis in a frontal impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Valdes, F J; Riley, P O; Lessley, D J; Arbogast, K B; Seacrist, T; Balasubramanian, S; Maltese, M; Kent, R

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize the in situ 6-degree-of-freedom kinematics of the head, 3 vertebrae (T1, T8, and L2), and the pelvis in a 40 km/h frontal impact. Three postmortem human surrogates (PMHS) were exposed to a deceleration of 15 g over 125 ms and the motion of selected anatomical structures (head, T1, T8, L2, and pelvis) was tracked at 1000 Hz using an optoelectric stereophotogrammetric system. Displacements of the analyzed structures are reported in the sagittal and the transverse planes. Rotations of the structures are described using the finite helical axis of the motion. Anterior displacements were 530.5 ± 39.4 mm (head), 434.7 ± 20.0 mm (T1), 353.3 ± 29.6 mm (T8), 219.9 ± 19.3 mm (L2), and 78.9 ± 22.1 mm (pelvis). The ratio between peak anterior and lateral displacement was up to 19 percent (T1) and 26 percent (head). Magnitudes of the rotation of the head (69.9 ± 1.5°), lumbar (66.5 ± 9.1°), and pelvis (63.8 ± 11.8°) were greater than that of the thoracic vertebrae (T1: 49.1 ± 7.8°; T8: 47.7 ± 6.3°). Thoracic vertebrae exhibited a complex rotation behavior caused by the asymmetric loading of the shoulder belt. Rotation of the lumbar vertebra and pelvis occurred primarily within the sagittal plane (flexion). Despite the predominance of the sagittal motion of the occupant in a pure (12 o'clock) frontal impact, the asymmetry of belt loading induced other relevant displacements and rotations of the head and thoracic spine. Attempts to model occupant kinematics in a frontal impact should consider these results to biofidelically describe the interaction of the torso with the belt.

  15. Efficiency of a model human image code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1987-01-01

    Hypothetical schemes for neural representation of visual information can be expressed as explicit image codes. Here, a code modeled on the simple cells of the primate striate cortex is explored. The Cortex transform maps a digital image into a set of subimages (layers) that are bandpass in spatial frequency and orientation. The layers are sampled so as to minimize the number of samples and still avoid aliasing. Samples are quantized in a manner that exploits the bandpass contrast-masking properties of human vision. The entropy of the samples is computed to provide a lower bound on the code size. Finally, the image is reconstructed from the code. Psychophysical methods are derived for comparing the original and reconstructed images to evaluate the sufficiency of the code. When each resolution is coded at the threshold for detection artifacts, the image-code size is about 1 bit/pixel.

  16. A study of cervical spine kinematics and joint capsule strain in rear impacts using a human FE model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yuichi; Yasuki, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Junji

    2006-11-01

    Many efforts have been made to understand the mechanism of whiplash injury. Recently, the cervical facet joint capsules have been focused on as a potential site of injury. An experimental approach has been taken to analyze the vertebral motion and to estimate joint capsule stretch that was thought to be a potential cause of pain. The purpose of this study is to analyze the kinematics of the cervical facet joint using a human FE model in order to better understand the injury mechanism. The Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) was used to visually analyze the local and global kinematics of the spine. Soft tissues in the neck were newly modeled and introduced into THUMS for estimating the loading level in rear impacts. The model was first validated against human test data in the literature by comparing vertebrae motion as well as head and neck responses. Joint capsule strain was estimated from a maximum principal strain output from the elements representing the capsule tissues. A rear-end collision was then simulated using THUMS and a prototype seat model, assuming a delta-V of 25 km/h. The trajectory of the vertebrae was analyzed in a local coordinate system defined along the joint surface. Strain growth in the joint capsules was explained, as related to contact events between the occupant and the seat. A new seat concept was proposed to help lessen the loading level to the neck soft tissues. The foam material of the seat back was softened, the initial gap behind the head was reduced and the head restraint was stiffened for firm support. The lower seat back frame was also reinforced to withstand the impact severity at the given delta-V. Another rear impact simulation was conducted using the new seat concept model to examine the effectiveness of the new concept. The joint capsule strain was found to be relatively lower with the new seat concept. The study also discusses the influence of seat parameters to the vertebral motion and the resultant strain in the joint

  17. Lumbar spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower ... The lumbar CT scan is good for evaluating large herniated disks, ... smaller ones. This test can be combined with a myelogram to get ...

  18. Anatomy of the Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Resources Anatomy of the Spine Bones Vertebrae Each individual vertebra has unique features ... or "extensor". The muscles and ligaments in the spine work to hold the spine upright, and to ...

  19. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Affairs and Humanitarian Efforts Log In Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Your spine surgeon has determined that you ...

  20. Thoracic spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAT scan - thoracic spine; Computed axial tomography scan - thoracic spine; Computed tomography scan - thoracic spine; CT scan - ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013:chap 44. US Food and Drug Administration. Computed tomography (CT). Updated August ...

  1. Comparative Study of C-Arms for Intraoperative 3-dimensional Imaging and Navigation in Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery Part II: Radiation Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Jan-Helge; Sircar, Ronen; Scheiwe, Christian; Kogias, Evangelos; Krüger, Marie T; Scholz, Christoph; Hubbe, Ulrich

    2017-07-01

    A radiation exposure study in vitro. This study aimed to compare the radiation exposure of 2 different 3-dimensional (3D) C-arm devices on an anthropomorphic phantom. Minimally invasive pedicle screw placement requires intraoperative imaging techniques for visualization of the unexposed spine. Mobile 3D C-arms compose a 3D image data set out of multiple successive fluoroscopic images. We compared the 3D C-arm devices Siremobil Iso-C 3D (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) and Vision FD Vario 3D (Ziehm Imaging, Nuremberg, Germany) regarding their radiation exposure. For this purpose, dosimeters were attached on an anthropomorphic phantom at various sites (eye lenses, thyroid gland, female, and male gonads). With each C-arm, 10 automated 3D scans as well as 400 fluoroscopic images were performed on the cervical and lumbar spine, respectively. The Vision FD Vario 3D generally causes higher radiation exposures than the Siremobil Iso-C 3D. Significantly higher radiation exposures were assessed at the eye lenses performing cervical (294.1 vs. 84.6 μSv) and lumbar 3D scans (22.5 vs. 11.2 μSv) as well as at the thyroid gland performing cervical 3D scans (4405.2 vs. 2761.9 μSv). Moreover, the Vision FD Vario 3D caused significantly higher radiation exposure at the eye lenses for standard cervical fluoroscopic images (3.2 vs. 0.4 μSv). 3D C-arms facilitate minimally invasive and accurate pedicle screw placement by providing 3D image datasets for intraoperative 3D imaging and navigation. However, the hereby potentially increased radiation exposure has to be considered. In particular, the Vision FD Vario 3D appears to generally evoke higher radiation exposures than the Siremobil Iso-C 3D. Well-indicated application of ionizing radiation and compliance with radiation protection principles remain mandatory to keep radiation exposure to patient and staff as low as reasonably achievable.

  2. Integrating Patient-Reported Outcomes into Spine Surgical Care through Visual Dashboards: Lessons Learned from Human-Centered Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, Andrea L; Chaudhuri, Shomir; Fey, Brett C; Flum, David R; Lavallee, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The collection of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) draws attention to issues of importance to patients-physical function and quality of life. The integration of PRO data into clinical decisions and discussions with patients requires thoughtful design of user-friendly interfaces that consider user experience and present data in personalized ways to enhance patient care. Whereas most prior work on PROs focuses on capturing data from patients, little research details how to design effective user interfaces that facilitate use of this data in clinical practice. We share lessons learned from engaging health care professionals to inform design of visual dashboards, an emerging type of health information technology (HIT). We employed human-centered design (HCD) methods to create visual displays of PROs to support patient care and quality improvement. HCD aims to optimize the design of interactive systems through iterative input from representative users who are likely to use the system in the future. Through three major steps, we engaged health care professionals in targeted, iterative design activities to inform the development of a PRO Dashboard that visually displays patient-reported pain and disability outcomes following spine surgery. Design activities to engage health care administrators, providers, and staff guided our work from design concept to specifications for dashboard implementation. Stakeholder feedback from these health care professionals shaped user interface design features, including predefined overviews that illustrate at-a-glance trends and quarterly snapshots, granular data filters that enable users to dive into detailed PRO analytics, and user-defined views to share and reuse. Feedback also revealed important considerations for quality indicators and privacy-preserving sharing and use of PROs. Our work illustrates a range of engagement methods guided by human-centered principles and design recommendations for optimizing PRO Dashboards for patient

  3. SSH-EPI diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the spine with low b values: is it useful in differentiating malignant metastatic tumor infiltration from benign fracture edema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztekin, Ozgur; Ozan, Ebru; Hilal Adibelli, Zehra; Unal, Gökhan; Abali, Yusuf

    2009-07-01

    Conventional MR sequences are sometimes not helpful in differentiating benign from pathologic fractures. Our aim was to evaluate the usefulness of single-shot echo-planar imaging sequences (diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)/SSH-EPI) with low b value in differentiating malignant metastatic tumor infiltration of vertebral bone marrow from benign vertebral fracture edema. A total of 47 patients, 20 with benign fractures and 27 with tumor infiltration, were included in this prospective study. Diffusion-weighted MR images were obtained by single-shot echo-planar imaging technique with diffusion gradient (b = 300 s/mm2; TR/TE, 1,400/100), using a 1.5 T MR scanner. T1- and T2-weighted images and short inversion time inversion-recovery images were available for all 64 lesions. The lesions on DWI/SSH-EPI were categorized as having hypo-, iso-, or hyperintense signal intensity relative to normal vertebrae by two experienced radiologists. We evaluated signal intensity patterns on DWI/SSH-EPI in 64 lesions, which showed low signal intensity on T1-weighted images in both benign fractures and metastasis. With the exception of sclerotic metastases in two patients, malignant metastatic tumor infiltration was hyperintense with respect to normal bone marrow on diffusion-weighted images; all but four benign vertebral fractures were isointense with respect to normal bone marrow. Single-shot echo-planar imaging sequences (DWI/SSH-EPI) with low b value provided excellent distinction between metastatic tumor infiltration and benign vertebral fracture edema. Hyperintense signal intensity on DWI/SSH-EPI was highly specific for the diagnosis of metastatic tumor infiltration of the spine.

  4. Classification of the normal variation in the sagittal alignment of the human lumbar spine and pelvis in the standing position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussouly, Pierre; Gollogly, Sohrab; Berthonnaud, Eric; Dimnet, Johanes

    2005-02-01

    A prospective radiographic study of 160 volunteers without symptoms of spinal disease was conducted. The objective of this study was to describe, quantify, and classify common variations in the sagittal alignment of the spine, sacrum, and pelvis. Previous publications have documented the high degree of variability in the sagittal alignment of the spine. Other studies have suggested that specific changes in alignment and the characteristics of the lumbar lordosis are responsible for degenerative changes and symptomatic back pain. In the course of this study, anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of 160 volunteers in a standardized standing position were taken. A custom computer application was used to analyze the alignment of the spine and pelvis on the lateral radiographs. A four-part classification scheme of sagittal morphology was used to classify each patient. Reciprocal relationships between the orientation of the sacrum, the sacral slope, the pelvic incidence, and the characteristics of the lumbar lordosis were evident. The global lordotic curvature, lordosis tilt angle, position of the apex, and number or lordotic vertebrae were determined by the angle of the superior endplate of S1 with respect to the horizontal axis. Understanding the patterns of variation in sagittal alignment may help to discover the association between spinal balance and the development of degenerative changes in the spine.

  5. An image-intensive ePR for image-guided minimally invasive spine surgery applications including real-time intra-operative image acquisition, archival, and display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documet, Jorge R.; Le, Anh; Liu, Brent; Huang, H. K.; Chiu, John

    2009-02-01

    Recent developments in medical imaging informatics have improved clinical workflow in Radiology enterprise but gaps remain in the clinical workflow from diagnosis to surgical treatment through post-operative follow-up. One solution to bridge this gap is the development of an electronic patient record (ePR) that integrates key imaging and informatics data during the pre, intra, and post-operative phases of clinical workflow. We present an ePR system based on standards and tailored to the clinical application for image-guided minimally invasive spinal surgery (MISS). The ePR system has been implemented in a clinical environment for a half-year.

  6. Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy utilizing cone-beam CT image-guidance with a robotic couch: intrafraction motion analysis accounting for all six degrees of freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Derek; Lochray, Fiona; Korol, Renee; Davidson, Melanie; Wong, C Shun; Ma, Lijun; Sahgal, Arjun

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the residual setup error and intrafraction motion following kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance, for immobilized spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients, with positioning corrected for in all six degrees of freedom. Analysis is based on 42 consecutive patients (48 thoracic and/or lumbar metastases) treated with a total of 106 fractions and 307 image registrations. Following initial setup, a CBCT was acquired for patient alignment and a pretreatment CBCT taken to verify shifts and determine the residual setup error, followed by a midtreatment and posttreatment CBCT image. For 13 single-fraction SBRT patients, two midtreatment CBCT images were obtained. Initially, a 1.5-mm and 1° tolerance was used to reposition the patient following couch shifts which was subsequently reduced to 1 mm and 1° degree after the first 10 patients. Small positioning errors after the initial CBCT setup were observed, with 90% occurring within 1 mm and 97% within 1°. In analyzing the impact of the time interval for verification imaging (10 ± 3 min) and subsequent image acquisitions (17 ± 4 min), the residual setup error was not significantly different (p > 0.05). A significant difference (p = 0.04) in the average three-dimensional intrafraction positional deviations favoring a more strict tolerance in translation (1 mm vs. 1.5 mm) was observed. The absolute intrafraction motion averaged over all patients and all directions along x, y, and z axis (± SD) were 0.7 ± 0.5 mm and 0.5 ± 0.4 mm for the 1.5 mm and 1 mm tolerance, respectively. Based on a 1-mm and 1° correction threshold, the target was localized to within 1.2 mm and 0.9° with 95% confidence. Near-rigid body immobilization, intrafraction CBCT imaging approximately every 15-20 min, and strict repositioning thresholds in six degrees of freedom yields minimal intrafraction motion allowing for safe spine SBRT delivery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Utilizing Cone-Beam CT Image-Guidance With a Robotic Couch: Intrafraction Motion Analysis Accounting for all Six Degrees of Freedom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, Derek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); British Columbia Cancer Agency, The Sindi Hawkins Cancer Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna (Canada); Lochray, Fiona; Korol, Renee; Davidson, Melanie; Wong, C. Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ma, Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: Arjun.sahgal@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the residual setup error and intrafraction motion following kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance, for immobilized spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients, with positioning corrected for in all six degrees of freedom. Methods and Materials: Analysis is based on 42 consecutive patients (48 thoracic and/or lumbar metastases) treated with a total of 106 fractions and 307 image registrations. Following initial setup, a CBCT was acquired for patient alignment and a pretreatment CBCT taken to verify shifts and determine the residual setup error, followed by a midtreatment and posttreatment CBCT image. For 13 single-fraction SBRT patients, two midtreatment CBCT images were obtained. Initially, a 1.5-mm and 1 Degree-Sign tolerance was used to reposition the patient following couch shifts which was subsequently reduced to 1 mm and 1 Degree-Sign degree after the first 10 patients. Results: Small positioning errors after the initial CBCT setup were observed, with 90% occurring within 1 mm and 97% within 1 Degree-Sign . In analyzing the impact of the time interval for verification imaging (10 {+-} 3 min) and subsequent image acquisitions (17 {+-} 4 min), the residual setup error was not significantly different (p > 0.05). A significant difference (p = 0.04) in the average three-dimensional intrafraction positional deviations favoring a more strict tolerance in translation (1 mm vs. 1.5 mm) was observed. The absolute intrafraction motion averaged over all patients and all directions along x, y, and z axis ({+-} SD) were 0.7 {+-} 0.5 mm and 0.5 {+-} 0.4 mm for the 1.5 mm and 1 mm tolerance, respectively. Based on a 1-mm and 1 Degree-Sign correction threshold, the target was localized to within 1.2 mm and 0.9 Degree-Sign with 95% confidence. Conclusion: Near-rigid body immobilization, intrafraction CBCT imaging approximately every 15-20 min, and strict repositioning thresholds in six degrees of freedom yields minimal intrafraction motion

  8. Effects of whole spine alignment patterns on neck responses in rear end impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Fusako; Odani, Mamiko; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Kunio; Östh, Jonas; Svensson, Mats

    2017-02-17

    The aim of this study was to investigate the whole spine alignment in automotive seated postures for both genders and the effects of the spinal alignment patterns on cervical vertebral motion in rear impact using a human finite element (FE) model. Image data for 8 female and 7 male subjects in a seated posture acquired by an upright open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system were utilized. Spinal alignment was determined from the centers of the vertebrae and average spinal alignment patterns for both genders were estimated by multidimensional scaling (MDS). An occupant FE model of female average size (162 cm, 62 kg; the AF 50 size model) was developed by scaling THUMS AF 05. The average spinal alignment pattern for females was implemented in the model, and model validation was made with respect to female volunteer sled test data from rear end impacts. Thereafter, the average spinal alignment pattern for males and representative spinal alignments for all subjects were implemented in the validated female model, and additional FE simulations of the sled test were conducted to investigate effects of spinal alignment patterns on cervical vertebral motion. The estimated average spinal alignment pattern was slight kyphotic, or almost straight cervical and less-kyphotic thoracic spine for the females and lordotic cervical and more pronounced kyphotic thoracic spine for the males. The AF 50 size model with the female average spinal alignment exhibited spine straightening from upper thoracic vertebra level and showed larger intervertebral angular displacements in the cervical spine than the one with the male average spinal alignment. The cervical spine alignment is continuous with the thoracic spine, and a trend of the relationship between cervical spine and thoracic spinal alignment was shown in this study. Simulation results suggested that variations in thoracic spinal alignment had a potential impact on cervical spine motion as well as cervical spinal alignment in rear

  9. Spine biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael A; Dolan, Patricia

    2005-10-01

    Current trends in spine research are reviewed in order to suggest future opportunities for biomechanics. Recent studies show that psychosocial factors influence back pain behaviour but are not important causes of pain itself. Severe back pain most often arises from intervertebral discs, apophyseal joints and sacroiliac joints, and physical disruption of these structures is strongly but variably linked to pain. Typical forms of structural disruption can be reproduced by severe mechanical loading in-vitro, with genetic and age-related weakening sometimes leading to injury under moderate loading. Biomechanics can be used to quantify spinal loading and movements, to analyse load distributions and injury mechanisms, and to develop therapeutic interventions. The authors suggest that techniques for quantifying spinal loading should be capable of measurement "in the field" so that they can be used in epidemiological surveys and ergonomic interventions. Great accuracy is not required for this task, because injury risk depends on tissue weakness as much as peak loading. Biomechanical tissue testing and finite-element modelling should complement each other, with experiments establishing proof of concept, and models supplying detail and optimising designs. Suggested priority areas for future research include: understanding interactions between intervertebral discs and adjacent vertebrae; developing prosthetic and tissue-engineered discs; and quantifying spinal function during rehabilitation. "Mechanobiology" has perhaps the greatest future potential, because spinal degeneration and healing are both mediated by the activity of cells which are acutely sensitive to their local mechanical environment. Precise characterisation and manipulation of this environment will be a major challenge for spine biomechanics.

  10. Cooperation through image scoring in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedekind, C; Milinski, M

    2000-05-05

    The "tragedy of the commons," that is, the selfish exploitation of resources in the public domain, is a reason for many of our everyday social conflicts. However, humans are often more helpful to others than evolutionary theory would predict, unless indirect reciprocity takes place and is based on image scoring (which reflects the way an individual is viewed by a group), as recently shown by game theorists. We tested this idea under conditions that control for confounding factors. Donations were more frequent to receivers who had been generous to others in earlier interactions. This shows that image scoring promotes cooperative behavior in situations where direct reciprocity is unlikely.

  11. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of postoperative lumbar spine; Wartosc badania rezonansu magnetycznego w ocenie powiklan pooperacyjnych dyskow ledzwiowych

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakomiec, B.; Samson, B.; Zabek, M.; Walecki, J.; Krolicki, L. [Wojewodzki Szpital Zespolony, Warsaw (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    Extruded lumbar discs are common reasons of lumbar pain and required appropriate surgical treatment. In 10-40% patients appear postoperative complications (e.g. recurrent lumbar disc on the same or different level, scar tissues involving nerve roots, arachnoiditis, discitis, postoperative pseudomeningocele, wrong level laminectomy) resulting recurrent lumbar pain and neurological symptoms. In our study 20 out of 216 patients have suffered recurrent back pain: 12 patients due to scar tissues, 6 patients due to recurrent discs, 2 patients due to postoperative discitis. Authors try to show the role of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of postoperative lumbar spine, result of surgical treatment, analyze the reasons of recurrent back pain. (author) 5 refs, 3 figs

  12. The ‘addicted’ spine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saturnino eSpiga

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Units of dendritic branches called dendritic spines represent more than simply decorative appendages of the neuron and actively participate in integrative functions of ‘spinous’ nerve cells thereby contributing to the general phenomenon of synaptic plasticity. In animal models of drug addiction, spines are profoundly affected by treatments with drugs of abuse and represent important sub cellular markers which interfere deeply into the physiology of the neuron thereby providing an example of the burgeoning and rapidly increasing interest in ‘structural plasticity.’Medium Spiny Neurons of the Nucleus Accumbens show a reduced number of dendritic spines and a decrease in TH-positive terminals upon withdrawal from opiates, cannabinoids and alcohol. The reduction is localized ‘strictly’ to second order dendritic branches where, dopamine-containing terminals impinging upon spines, make synaptic contacts. In addition, long-thin spines seems preferentially affected raising the possibility that cellular learning of these neurons may be selectively hampered. These findings suggest that dendritic spines are affected by drugs widely abused by humans and provide yet another example of drug-induced aberrant neural plasticity with marked reflections on the physiology of synapses, system structural organization, and neuronal circuitry remodeling.

  13. Successful treatment of a T4 lung tumor with vertebral body invasion using fiducial markers in the thoracic spine for image-guided radiation therapy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solin Lawrence J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Paravertebral and paraspinal tumors pose a significant challenge in radiation therapy because of the radiation sensitivity of the spinal cord and the need for maximum treatment accuracy. Implantation of fiducial markers into vertebral bodies has been described as a method of increasing the accuracy of radiation treatment for single-dose stereotactic radiosurgery for spinal and paraspinal primary tumors and metastases. However, utilization of this technique has not been described for conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. This report is the first of its kind in the literature and describes successful treatment of a T4 primary lung tumor with vertebral body invasion with conventionally fractionated, image-guided radiotherapy using fiducial markers implanted in the thoracic spine. Case presentation Our patient was a 47-year-old African-American man who presented to our hospital with a history of several months of increasing left arm pain, chest pain, dyspnea on exertion, occasional dry cough, and weight loss. He was found to have stage IIIA T4, N0, M0 lung cancer with vertebral body invasion. He had fiducial markers placed in the thoracic spine for image-guided radiation treatment set-up. The patient received 74 Gy radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy, and daily matching of the fiducial markers on the treatment machine allowed for treatment of the tumor while sparing the dose to the adjacent spinal cord. With one year of clinical follow-up, the patient has had regression of the tumor with only asymmetric soft-tissue thickening seen on a computed tomographic scan and grade 1 dyspnea on exertion as the only side effects of the treatment. Conclusion Fiducial marker placement is a safe and effective technique for maximizing the accuracy and reproducibility for radiation treatment of lesions near the spinal cord. This technique may be used in conventionally fractionated radiation treatment regimens, such as those

  14. Correction for Patient Sway in Radiographic Biplanar Imaging for Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of the Spine: In Vitro Study of a New Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legaye, J. (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Univ. of Louvain - Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium)); Saunier, P.; Dumas, R. (Univ. of Lyon 1 - INRETS, Villeurbanne (France)); Vallee, C. (Radiology Dept., Hpital Raymond Poincare, Garches (France))

    2009-08-15

    Background: Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the spine in the upright position are classically obtained using two-dimensional, non-simultaneous radiographic imaging. However, a subject's sway between exposures induces inaccuracy in the 3D reconstructions. Purpose: To evaluate the impact of patient sway between successive radiographic exposures, and to test if 3D reconstruction accuracy can be improved by a corrective method with simultaneous Moire-X-ray imaging. Material and Methods: Using a calibrated deformable phantom perceptible by both techniques (Moire and X-ray), the 3D positional and rotational vertebral data from 3D reconstructions with and without the corrective procedure were compared to the corresponding data of computed tomography (CT) scans, considered as a reference. All were expressed in the global axis system, as defined by the Scoliosis Research Society. Results: When a sagittal sway of 10 deg occurred between successive biplanar X-rays, the accuracy of the 3D reconstruction without correction was 8.8 mm for the anteroposterior vertebral locations and 6.4 deg for the sagittal orientations. When the corrective method was applied, the accuracy was improved to 1.3 mm and 1.5 deg, respectively. Conclusion: 3D accuracy improved significantly by using the corrective method, whatever the subject's sway. This technique is reliable for clinical appraisal of the spine, if the subject's sway does not exceed 10 deg. For greater sway, improvement persists, but a risk of lack of accuracy exists

  15. Surgical Disorders of the Spine in Adults: Aetiology and Outcome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There has been steady and progressive advancement in spine surgery in Nigeria with the increase in spine surgeons, availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intraoperative fluoroscopy and some spinal titanium implants. We decided to study the frequency of various spine pathologies requiring ...

  16. Pathophysiology and biomechanics of the aging spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Sapkas, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Elias C; Katonis, Pavlos

    2011-01-01

    AGING OF THE SPINE IS CHARACTERIZED BY TWO PARALLEL BUT INDEPENDENT PROCESSES: the reduction of bone mineral density and the development of degenerative changes. The combination of degeneration and bone mass reduction contribute, to a different degree, to the development of a variety of lesions. This results in a number of painful and often debilitating disorders. The present review constitutes a synopsis of the pathophysiological processes that take place in the aging spine as well as of the consequences these changes have on the biomechanics of the spine. The authors hope to present a thorough yet brief overview of the process of aging of the human spine.

  17. Image quality assessment and human visual system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xinbo; Lu, Wen; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong

    2010-07-01

    This paper summaries the state-of-the-art of image quality assessment (IQA) and human visual system (HVS). IQA provides an objective index or real value to measure the quality of the specified image. Since human beings are the ultimate receivers of visual information in practical applications, the most reliable IQA is to build a computational model to mimic the HVS. According to the properties and cognitive mechanism of the HVS, the available HVS-based IQA methods can be divided into two categories, i.e., bionics methods and engineering methods. This paper briefly introduces the basic theories and development histories of the above two kinds of HVS-based IQA methods. Finally, some promising research issues are pointed out in the end of the paper.

  18. Decreased CSF-flow artefacts in T2 imaging of the cervical spine with periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER/BLADE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragoschke-Schumm, Andreas; Schmidt, Peter; Mayer, Thomas E. [Friedrich-Schiller-University, Department of Neuroradiology, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Clinic, Jena (Germany); Schumm, Julia [Friedrich-Schiller-University, Clinic of Internal Medicine I, Jena (Germany); Reimann, Georg; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Kaiser, Werner A. [Friedrich-Schiller-University, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Clinic, Jena (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    The cervical spine is prone to artefacts in T2 MR-imaging due to patient movements and cerebrospinal fluid flow. The periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER/BLADE) acquisition method was developed to reduce motion artefacts. We sought to determine if T2-BLADE is superior to T2-TSE with conventional k-space reading. Twenty-five patients were examined using a 1.5 T MR-scanner. T2-weighted imaging of the cervical spine in sagittal and axial orientation using conventional or BLADE k-space reading was performed. Spinal cord, subarachnoid space, vertebrae and discs were evaluated by two independent observers using a scale from 0 (non-diagnostic) to 3 (excellent). Interobserver correlation was assessed as Cohen's kappa. Results of Mann-Whitney U test with p < 0.05 were regarded as significant. Furthermore, the investigators were asked for subjective evaluation in consensus. Overall interobserver accuracy of {kappa} = 0.91 was obtained. Comparison of sagittal images showed better values for all investigated structures in T2-BLADE: spinal cord (TSE/BLADE: 1.52/2.04; p < 0.001), subarachnoid space (1.36/2.06; p < 0.001) and vertebrae/discs (1.66/2.86; p < 0.001). Comparison of axial images showed better values in T2-BLADE for spinal cord (1.68/1.86; p = 0.149) and vertebrae/discs (1.0/1.96: p < 0.001) while subarachnoid space was better to be evaluated in conventional T2-TSE (1.94/1.12; p < 0.001). In sagittal orientation, motion- and CSF-flow artefacts were reduced in T2-BLADE. In axial orientation, however, CSF-flow artefacts were pronounced in T2-BLADE. The image quality of the sagittal T2-BLADE sequences was significantly better than the T2-TSE and acquired in less time. In axial orientation, increased CSF-flow artefacts may reduce accuracy of structures in the subarachnoid space. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enzmann, D.R.; De La Paz, R.L.; Rubin, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Three chapters discuss principles of cerebrospinal fluid flow, spinal imaging techniques, and the physical basis and anatomic correlates of signal intensity in the spine. There are chapters on normal anatomy, congenital anomalies, trauma, tumors, infection, demyelinating disease, degenerative disease, vascular conditions, and syringomyelia.

  20. Lumbar Spine X-Ray as a Standard Investigation for all Low back ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) has a prevalence of 84% in Africa. The commonest form of imaging is plain lumbar spine x-ray. It gives a radiation dose equivalent to 65 times a chest x-ray dose and sends one of the highest doses to the human reproductive organs. The commonest cause of LBP in Africa is degenerative ...

  1. Imaging of human T-lymphotropic virus type I-associated chronic progressive myeloneuropathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcindor, F. (Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of New York, Health Science Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States)); Valderrama, R. (Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of New York, Health Science Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States)); Canavaggio, M. (Abbott Labs., North Chicago, IL (United States)); Lee, H. (Abbott Labs., North Chicago, IL (United States)); Katz, A. (Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of New York, Health Science Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States)); Montesinos, C. (Beth Israel Medical Center, Dept. of Neurology and Clinical Electrophysiology, New York, NY (United States)); Madrid, R.E. (New York State Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, Inst. for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, NY (United States)); Merino, R.R. (Beth Israel Medical Center, Dept. of Neurology and Clinical Electrophysiology, New York, NY (United States)); Pipia, P.A. (Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of New York, Health Science Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States))

    1992-12-01

    We studied magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head and cervical spine and CT of the head in 46 patients (14 men, 32 women) with chronic progressive myeloneuropathy. The findings were correlated with human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) serology, race, country of origin, and age. We found a female predominance of 2:1. Most patients were aged between 30 and 50 years, and most were Caribbean immigrants and black. There were 9 men and 17 women with blood antibody titers to HTLV-I and 7 mem and 15 women with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) titers. All patients with virus or antibodies in blood or CSF were Caribbean immigrants or black. T2-weighted cranial MRI showed scattered areas of high signal intensity in the cerebral white matter, usually in the periventricular and subcortical areas, but not in the posterior cranial fossa. Cranial CT revealed periventricular low density areas, ventricular enlargement, and atrophy MRI of the cervical spine showed atrophy of the cord. Myelography was normal in all 15 patients examined. No imaging differences were observed between the HTLV-I-positive and -negative patients. These findings, although consistent with demyelination, are not specific. (orig.)

  2. MAGNETIC RESONANCE TOMOGRAPHY OF SPINE AFTER DISKECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kholin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The author lists then possible immediate and remote complications after diskectomy and describes clinical presentations and methods of diagnostics at this pathology. Detailed MR-imaging of spine in 6 months after operation is presented.

  3. Subjective and objective image qualities: a comparison of sagittal T2 weighted spin-echo and turbo-spin-eco sequences in magnetic resonance imaging of the spine by use of a subjective ranking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerres, G. [Institut fuer diagnostische Radiologie, Departement Radiologie, Universitaetskliniken, Kantonsspital Basel (Switzerland); Mader, I. [Radiologische Gemeinschaftspraxis Dres. Siems, Grossmann, Bayreuth (Germany); Proske, M. [Klinikum Rosenheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    1998-12-31

    We evaluated the subjective image impression of two different magnetic resonance (MR) sequences by using a subjective ranking system. This ranking system was based on 20 criteria describing several tissue characteristics such as the signal intensity of normal anatomical structures and the changes of signal intensities and shape of lesions as well as artefacts. MR of the vertebral spine was performed in 48 female and 52 male patients (mean age 44.8 years) referred consecutively for investigation of a back problem. Ninety-six pathologies were found in 82 patients. Sagittal and axial T1 weighted spin-echo before and after administration of Gadolinium (Gd-DOTA), and sagittal T2 weighted spin-echo (T2wSE) and Turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequences were performed by means of surface coils. Using the subjective ranking system the sagittal T2wSE and sagittal TSE were compared. Both sequences were suitable for identification of normal anatomy and pathologic changes and there was no trend for increased detection of disease by one imaging sequence over the other. We found that sagittal TSE sequences can replace sagittal T2wSE sequences in spinal MR and that artefacts at the cervical and lumbar spine are less frequent using TSE, thus confirming previous studies. In this study, our ranking system reveiled, that there are differences between the subjective judgement of image qualities and objective measurement of SNR. However, this approach may not be helpful to compare two different MR sequences as it is limited to the anatomical area investigated and is time consuming. The subjective image impression, i.e. the quality of images, may not always be represented by physical parameters such as a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), radiologists should try to define influences of image quality also by subjective parameters. (orig.)

  4. Mobile C-arm cone-beam CT for guidance of spine surgery: Image quality, radiation dose, and integration with interventional guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, S.; Nithiananthan, S.; Mirota, D. J.; Uneri, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Schmidgunst, C.; Kleinszig, G.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 (United States); Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 (United States); Siemens Healthcare XP Division, Erlangen (Germany); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21239 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 and Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: A flat-panel detector based mobile isocentric C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been developed to allow intraoperative 3D imaging with sub-millimeter spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility. Image quality and radiation dose were evaluated in spinal surgery, commonly relying on lower-performance image intensifier based mobile C-arms. Scan protocols were developed for task-specific imaging at minimum dose, in-room exposure was evaluated, and integration of the imaging system with a surgical guidance system was demonstrated in preclinical studies of minimally invasive spine surgery. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed as a function of kilovolt (peak) (80-120 kVp) and milliampere second using thoracic and lumbar spine dosimetry phantoms. In-room radiation exposure was measured throughout the operating room for various CBCT scan protocols. Image quality was assessed using tissue-equivalent inserts in chest and abdomen phantoms to evaluate bone and soft-tissue contrast-to-noise ratio as a function of dose, and task-specific protocols (i.e., visualization of bone or soft-tissues) were defined. Results were applied in preclinical studies using a cadaveric torso simulating minimally invasive, transpedicular surgery. Results: Task-specific CBCT protocols identified include: thoracic bone visualization (100 kVp; 60 mAs; 1.8 mGy); lumbar bone visualization (100 kVp; 130 mAs; 3.2 mGy); thoracic soft-tissue visualization (100 kVp; 230 mAs; 4.3 mGy); and lumbar soft-tissue visualization (120 kVp; 460 mAs; 10.6 mGy) - each at (0.3 x 0.3 x 0.9 mm{sup 3}) voxel size. Alternative lower-dose, lower-resolution soft-tissue visualization protocols were identified (100 kVp; 230 mAs; 5.1 mGy) for the lumbar region at (0.3 x 0.3 x 1.5 mm{sup 3}) voxel size. Half-scan orbit of the C-arm (x-ray tube traversing under the table) was dosimetrically advantageous (prepatient attenuation) with a nonuniform dose distribution ({approx}2 x higher at the entrance side than at isocenter

  5. Mobile C-arm cone-beam CT for guidance of spine surgery: Image quality, radiation dose, and integration with interventional guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, S.; Nithiananthan, S.; Mirota, D. J.; Uneri, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Schmidgunst, C.; Kleinszig, G.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A flat-panel detector based mobile isocentric C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been developed to allow intraoperative 3D imaging with sub-millimeter spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility. Image quality and radiation dose were evaluated in spinal surgery, commonly relying on lower-performance image intensifier based mobile C-arms. Scan protocols were developed for task-specific imaging at minimum dose, in-room exposure was evaluated, and integration of the imaging system with a surgical guidance system was demonstrated in preclinical studies of minimally invasive spine surgery.Methods: Radiation dose was assessed as a function of kilovolt (peak) (80–120 kVp) and milliampere second using thoracic and lumbar spine dosimetry phantoms. In-room radiation exposure was measured throughout the operating room for various CBCT scan protocols. Image quality was assessed using tissue-equivalent inserts in chest and abdomen phantoms to evaluate bone and soft-tissue contrast-to-noise ratio as a function of dose, and task-specific protocols (i.e., visualization of bone or soft-tissues) were defined. Results were applied in preclinical studies using a cadaveric torso simulating minimally invasive, transpedicular surgery.Results: Task-specific CBCT protocols identified include: thoracic bone visualization (100 kVp; 60 mAs; 1.8 mGy); lumbar bone visualization (100 kVp; 130 mAs; 3.2 mGy); thoracic soft-tissue visualization (100 kVp; 230 mAs; 4.3 mGy); and lumbar soft-tissue visualization (120 kVp; 460 mAs; 10.6 mGy) – each at (0.3  ×  0.3  ×  0.9 mm3) voxel size. Alternative lower-dose, lower-resolution soft-tissue visualization protocols were identified (100 kVp; 230 mAs; 5.1 mGy) for the lumbar region at (0.3  ×  0.3  ×  1.5 mm3) voxel size. Half-scan orbit of the C-arm (x-ray tube traversing under the table) was dosimetrically advantageous (prepatient attenuation) with a nonuniform dose distribution (∼2 ×  higher at the entrance side

  6. Selective Loss of Smaller Spines in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Matthew L; Alhassan, Jamil; Newman, Jason T; Richard, Michelle; Gu, Hong; Kelly, Ryan M; Sampson, Alan R; Fish, Kenneth N; Penzes, Peter; Wills, Zachary P; Lewis, David A; Sweet, Robert A

    2017-06-01

    Decreased density of dendritic spines in adult schizophrenia subjects has been hypothesized to result from increased pruning of excess synapses in adolescence. In vivo imaging studies have confirmed that synaptic pruning is largely driven by the loss of large or mature synapses. Thus, increased pruning throughout adolescence would likely result in a deficit of large spines in adulthood. Here, the authors examined the density and volume of dendritic spines in deep layer 3 of the auditory cortex of 20 schizophrenia and 20 matched comparison subjects as well as aberrant voltage-gated calcium channel subunit protein expression linked to spine loss. Primary auditory cortex deep layer 3 spine density and volume was assessed in 20 pairs of schizophrenia and matched comparison subjects in an initial and replication cohort (12 and eight pairs) by immunohistochemistry-confocal microscopy. Targeted mass spectrometry was used to quantify postsynaptic density and voltage-gated calcium channel protein expression. The effect of increased voltage-gated calcium channel subunit protein expression on spine density and volume was assessed in primary rat neuronal culture. Only the smallest spines are lost in deep layer 3 of the primary auditory cortex in subjects with schizophrenia, while larger spines are retained. Levels of the tryptic peptide ALFDFLK, found in the schizophrenia risk gene CACNB4, are inversely correlated with the density of smaller, but not larger, spines in schizophrenia subjects. Consistent with this observation, CACNB4 overexpression resulted in a lower density of smaller spines in primary neuronal cultures. These findings require a rethinking of the overpruning hypothesis, demonstrate a link between small spine loss and a schizophrenia risk gene, and should spur more in-depth investigations of the mechanisms that govern new or small spine generation and stabilization under normal conditions as well as how this process is impaired in schizophrenia.

  7. Identifying factors likely to influence compliance with diagnostic imaging guideline recommendations for spine disorders among chiropractors in North America: a focus group study using the Theoretical Domains Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussières André E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF was developed to investigate determinants of specific clinical behaviors and inform the design of interventions to change professional behavior. This framework was used to explore the beliefs of chiropractors in an American Provider Network and two Canadian provinces about their adherence to evidence-based recommendations for spine radiography for uncomplicated back pain. The primary objective of the study was to identify chiropractors’ beliefs about managing uncomplicated back pain without x-rays and to explore barriers and facilitators to implementing evidence-based recommendations on lumbar spine x-rays. A secondary objective was to compare chiropractors in the United States and Canada on their beliefs regarding the use of spine x-rays. Methods Six focus groups exploring beliefs about managing back pain without x-rays were conducted with a purposive sample. The interview guide was based upon the TDF. Focus groups were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by two independent assessors using thematic content analysis based on the TDF. Results Five domains were identified as likely relevant. Key beliefs within these domains included the following: conflicting comments about the potential consequences of not ordering x-rays (risk of missing a pathology, avoiding adverse treatment effects, risks of litigation, determining the treatment plan, and using x-ray-driven techniques contrasted with perceived benefits of minimizing patient radiation exposure and reducing costs; beliefs about consequences; beliefs regarding professional autonomy, professional credibility, lack of standardization, and agreement with guidelines widely varied ( social/professional role & identity; the influence of formal training, colleagues, and patients also appeared to be important factors ( social influences; conflicting comments regarding levels of confidence and comfort in managing patients

  8. Imaging retinotopic maps in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandell, Brian A.; Winawer, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    A quarter-century ago visual neuroscientists had little information about the number and organization of retinotopic maps in human visual cortex. The advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a non-invasive, spatially-resolved technique for measuring brain activity, provided a wealth of data about human retinotopic maps. Just as there are differences amongst nonhuman primate maps, the human maps have their own unique properties. Many human maps can be measured reliably in individual subjects during experimental sessions lasting less than an hour. The efficiency of the measurements and the relatively large amplitude of functional MRI signals in visual cortex make it possible to develop quantitative models of functional responses within specific maps in individual subjects. During this last quarter century, there has also been significant progress in measuring properties of the human brain at a range of length and time scales, including white matter pathways, macroscopic properties of gray and white matter, and cellular and molecular tissue properties. We hope the next twenty-five years will see a great deal of work that aims to integrate these data by modeling the network of visual signals. We don’t know what such theories will look like, but the characterization of human retinotopic maps from the last twenty-five years is likely to be an important part of future ideas about visual computations. PMID:20692278

  9. Bone dosimetry using synthetic images to represent trabecular bones of five regions of the human body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Filho, Jose de M. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose W. [Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco (POLI). Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Vanildo J. de M., E-mail: vjr@ufpe.br [Departamento de Anatomia. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Lindeval F., E-mail: lindeval@dmat.ufrr.br [Departamento de Matematica (DMAT). Universidade Federal de Roraima (UFRR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN/NE-CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vasconcelos, Wagner E. de [Departamento de Energia Nuclear (DEN). Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    One of the greatest challenges in numerical dosimetry of ionizing radiation is to estimate the absorbed dose by bone tissue in the human body. The bone tissues of greater radiosensitivity are the red bone marrow (RBM), that consist of the hematopoietic cells, located within the trabecular bones, and the bone surface cells (BSC), called osteogenic cells. The report 70 of the ICRP lists five spongiosa regions with their respective volume percent of trabecular bone: ribs (also contemplating the clavicles and sternum), spine, long bones, pelvis and skull (also contemplating mandible). The Grupo de Pesquisa em Dosimetria Numerica (GDN/CNPq) has been built exposure computational models (ECMs) based on voxel phantoms and EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. To estimate the energy deposited in the RBM and in the BSC of a phantom, the GDN/CNPq has used a method based on micro-CT images of the five trabecular regions mentioned above. These images were provided by other research institutes and were obtained from scan of bone samples of adult. Here is the greatest difficulty in reproducing this method: besides the need for bone images of real people with micrometer resolution, the distribution of bone marrow in the human body, according to ICRP 70, varies with age. This article presents some proposals of the GDN/CNPQ for replacing in the ECMs the micro-CT images by images synthesized by the computer, based on Monte Carlo sampling. (author)

  10. Posteroanterior versus anteroposterior lumbar spine radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuno, M.M.; Shu, G.J. (Cleveland Chiropractic College, Los Angeles, CA (USA))

    1990-03-01

    The posteroanterior view of the lumbar spine has important features including radiation protection and image quality; these have been studied by various investigators. Investigators have shown that sensitive tissues receive less radiation dosage in the posteroanterior view of the spine for scoliosis screening and intracranial tomography without altering the image quality. This paper emphasizes the importance of the radiation safety aspect of the posteroanterior view and shows the improvement in shape distortion in the lumbar vertebrae.

  11. Hyperspectral imaging of the human iris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cecilia, Luca; Marazzi, Francesco; Rovati, Luigi

    2017-07-01

    We describe an optical system and a method for measuring the human iris spectral reflectance in vivo by hyperspectral imaging analysis. It is important to monitor age-related changes in the reflectance properties of the iris as they are a prognostic factor for several eye pathologies. In this paper, we report the outcomes of our most recent research, resulting from the improvement of our imaging system. In particular, a custom tunable light source was developed: the images are now acquired in the spectral range 440 - 900 nm. With this system, we are able to obtain a spectral resolution of 20nm, while each image of 2048 x 1536 pixels has a spatial resolution of 10.7 μm. The results suggest that the instrument could be exploited for measuring iris pigmentation changes over time. These measurements could provide new diagnostic capabilities in ophthalmology. Further studies are required to determine the measurements' repeatability and to develop a spectral library for results evaluation and to detect differences among subsequent screenings of the same subject.

  12. Artifacts in spine magnetic resonance imaging due to different intervertebral test spacers: an in vitro evaluation of magnesium versus titanium and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers as biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernstberger, Thorsten [Klinikum Bad Bramstedt, Center for Spinal Surgery, Bad Bramstedt (Germany); Buchhorn, Gottfried [University of Gottingen, Biomaterial Laboratory, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Heidrich, Gabert [University of Gottingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Intervertebral spacers are made of different materials, which can affect the postfusion magnetic imaging (MRI) scans. Susceptibility artifacts especially for metallic implants can decrease the image quality. This study aimed to determine whether magnesium as a lightweight and biocompatible metal is suitable as a biomaterial for spinal implants based on its MRI artifacting behavior. To compare artifacting behaviors, we implanted into one porcine cadaveric spine different test spacers made of magnesium, titanium, and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP). All test spacers were scanned using two T1-TSE MRI sequences. The artifact dimensions were traced on all scans and statistically analyzed. The total artifact volume and median artifact area of the titanium spacers were statistically significantly larger than magnesium spacers (p < 0.001), while magnesium and CFRP spacers produced almost identical artifacting behaviors (p > 0.05). Our results suggest that spinal implants made with magnesium alloys will behave more like CFRP devices in MRI scans. Given its osseoconductive potential as a metal, implant alloys made with magnesium would combine the advantages to the two principal spacer materials currently used but without their limitations, at least in terms of MRI artifacting. (orig.)

  13. Manually defining regions of interest when quantifying paravertebral muscles fatty infiltration from axial magnetic resonance imaging: a proposed method for the lumbar spine with anatomical cross-reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Rebecca J; Cornwall, Jon; Abbott, Rebecca; Elliott, James M

    2017-01-19

    There is increasing interest in paravertebral muscle composition as a potential prognostic and diagnostic element in lumbar spine health. As a consequence, it is becoming popular to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine muscle volume and fatty infiltration in lumbar paravertebral muscles to assess both age-related change and their clinical relevance in low back pain (LBP). A variety of imaging methods exist for both measuring key variables (fat, muscle) and for defining regions of interest, making pooled comparisons between studies difficult and rendering post-production analysis of MRIs confusing. We therefore propose and define a method as an option for use as a standardized MRI procedure for measuring lumbar paravertebral muscle composition, and to stimulate discussion towards establishing consensus for the analysis of skeletal muscle composition amongst clinician researchers. In this descriptive methodological study we explain our method by providing an examination of regional lumbar morphology, followed by a detailed description of the proposed technique. Identification of paravertebral muscles and vertebral anatomy includes axial E12 sheet-plastinates from cadaveric material, combined with a series of axial MRIs that encompass sequencing commonly used for investigations of muscle quality (fat-water DIXON, T1-, and T2-weighted) to illustrate regional morphology; these images are shown for L1 and L4 levels to highlight differences in regional morphology. The method for defining regions of interest (ROI) for multifidus (MF), and erector spinae (ES) is then described. Our method for defining ROIs for lumbar paravertebral muscles on axial MRIs is outlined and discussed in relation to existing literature. The method provides a foundation for standardising the quantification of muscle quality that particularly centres on examining fatty infiltration and composition. We provide recommendations relating to imaging parameters that should additionally inform a

  14. Minimally invasive spine surgery in spinal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú-López, F; Vanaclocha-Vanaclocha, V; Gozalbes-Esterelles, L; Sánchez-Pardo, M

    2014-06-01

    Infections of the spine have been a constant throughout history. At present there are infections in the spine fostered in part by the same advances in medicine: there are a lot of immunocompromised patients, the life expectancy of patients with chronic diseases is augmented and the increasing number of complex spinal surgeries can result in secondary infection. In this review the main types of infection of the spine and its treatment highlighting techniques in minimally invasive surgery are discussed. Spontaneous pyogenic and nonpyogenic spine infections as well as iatrogenic infections can be treated in a different manner depending on its extension, location and microorganism involved. We will review the use and the indication of percutaneous image-guided techniques, endoscopic and microsurgical techniques with or without use of tubular retractors. We conclude that techniques in minimally invasive surgery in spine infections are safe, effective and have benefits in morbidity of the approach and subsequent patient recovery.

  15. Development of the Korean Spine Database and Automatic Surface Mesh Intersection Algorithm for Constructing e-Spine Simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Dongmin; Jung, Hanmin; Sung, Won-Kyung; Nam, Dukyun

    2014-01-01

    By 2026, Korea is expected to surpass the UN’s definition of an aged society and reach the level of a superaged society. With an aging population come increased disorders involving the spine. To prevent unnecessary spinal surgery and support scientific diagnosis of spinal disease and systematic prediction of treatment outcomes, we have been developing e-Spine, which is a computer simulation model of the human spine. In this paper, we present the Korean spine database and automatic surface mes...

  16. Spine Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your backbone, or spine, is made up of 26 bone discs called vertebrae. The vertebrae protect your spinal cord and allow you to ... of problems can change the structure of the spine or damage the vertebrae and surrounding tissue. They ...

  17. Development of Ontology and 3D Software for the Diseases of Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungbock Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available KISTI is carrying out an e-Spine project for spinal diseases to prepare for the aged society, so-called NAP. The purpose of the study is to build a spine ontology that represents the anatomical structure and disease information which is compatible with simulation model of KISTI. The final use of the ontology includes diagnosis of diseases and setting treatment directions by the clinicians. The ontology was represented using 3D software. Twenty diseases were selected to be represented after discussions with a spine specialist. Several ontology studies were reviewed, reference books were selected for each disease and were organized in MS Excel. All the contents were then reviewed by the specialists. Altova SemanticWorks and Protégé were used to code spine ontology with OWL Full model. Links to the images from KISTI and sample images of diseases were included in the ontology. The OWL ontology was also reviewed by the specialists again with Protégé. We represented unidirectional ontology from anatomical structure to disease, images, and treatment. The ontology was human understandable. It would be useful for the education of medical students or residents studying diseases of spine. But in order for the computer to understand the ontology, a new model with OWL DL or Lite is needed.

  18. Postoperative spine; Postoperative Wirbelsaeule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaeger, R. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Basel (Switzerland); Lieb, J.M. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland); Shariat, K. [Neurochirurgie Koeln-Merheim, Koeln (Germany); Ahlhelm, F.J. [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Abteilung Neuroradiologie, Institut fuer Radiologie, Baden (Switzerland)

    2014-11-15

    Approximately 15-30 % of surgical procedures involving the lumbar spine are associated with complications that require further diagnostic work-up. The choice of imaging modality for postoperative complications depends on the extent, pattern and temporal evolution of the postoperative neurological signs and symptoms as well as on the preoperative clinical status, the surgical procedure itself and the underlying pathology. The interpretation of imaging findings, in particular the distinction between postoperative complications and normally expected nonspecific postoperative imaging alterations can be challenging and requires the integration of clinical neurological information and the results of laboratory tests. The combination of different imaging techniques might help in cases of equivocal imaging results. (orig.) [German] Etwa 15-30 % der operativen Eingriffe im Bereich der lumbalen Wirbelsaeule verlaufen nicht komplikationsfrei und erfordern weiterfuehrende Abklaerungen. Die Auswahl des bildgebenden Verfahrens im Rahmen postoperativer Komplikationen haengt dabei wesentlich von der zeitlichen Entwicklung, dem Ausmass und Verteilungsmuster der neuaufgetretenen klinisch-neurologischen bzw. orthopaedischen Symptome sowie von den Ausfaellen vor dem Eingriff, der zugrundeliegenden Pathologie und der Lokalisation und Art des Eingriffs ab. Die Interpretation der bildgebenden Befunde, insbesondere die Abgrenzung postoperativer Komplikationen von natuerlicherweise zu erwartenden postoperativen Veraenderungen kann dabei eine Herausforderung darstellen. Bei unklaren Befunden kann ergaenzend zur eingehend klinisch-neurologischen und laborchemischen Bestandsaufnahme auch der kombinierte Einsatz mehrerer bildgebender Modalitaeten diagnostisch weiterhelfen. (orig.)

  19. Radiology illustrated. Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Joon Woo [Seoul National Univ. Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Kyonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Kwon, Jong Won [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Offers a practical approach to image interpretation for spinal disorders. Includes numerous high-quality radiographic images and schematic illustrations. Will serve as a self-learning book covering daily routine cases from the basic to the advanced. Radiology Illustrated: Spine is an up-to-date, superbly illustrated reference in the style of a teaching file that has been designed specifically to be of value in clinical practice. Common, critical, and rare but distinctive spinal disorders are described succinctly with the aid of images highlighting important features and informative schematic illustrations. The first part of the book, on common spinal disorders, is for radiology residents and other clinicians who are embarking on the interpretation of spinal images. A range of key disorders are then presented, including infectious spondylitis, cervical trauma, spinal cord disorders, spinal tumors, congenital disorders, uncommon degenerative disorders, inflammatory arthritides, and vascular malformations. The third part is devoted to rare but clinically significant spinal disorders with characteristic imaging features, and the book closes by presenting practical tips that will assist in the interpretation of confusing cases.

  20. Long-term changes in the density and structure of the human hip and spine after long-duration spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana Carpenter, R.; LeBlanc, Adrian D.; Evans, Harlan; Sibonga, Jean D.; Lang, Thomas F.

    2010-07-01

    To determine the long-term effects of long-duration spaceflight, we measured bone mineral density and bone geometry of International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers using quantitative computed tomography (QCT) before launch, immediately upon their return, one year after return, and 2-4.5 years after return from the ISS. Eight crew members (7 male, 1 female, mean age 45±4 years at start of mission) who spent an average of 181 days (range 161-196 days) aboard the ISS took part in the study. Integral bone mineral density (iBMD), trabecular BMD (tBMD), bone mineral content (BMC), and vertebral cross-sectional area (CSA) were measured in the lumbar spine, and iBMD, tBMD, cortical BMD (cBMD), BMC, CSA, volume, and femoral neck section modulus were measured in the hip. Spine iBMD was 95% of the average preflight value upon return from the ISS and reached its preflight value over the next 2-4.5 years. Spine tBMD was 97% of the average preflight value upon return from the ISS and tended to decrease throughout the course of the study. Vertebral CSA remained essentially unchanged throughout the study. Hip iBMD was 91% of the preflight value upon return from the ISS and was 95% of the preflight value after 2-4.5 years of recovery. Hip tBMD was 88% of the preflight value upon return and recovered to only 93% of the preflight value after 1 year. At the 2- to 4.5-year time point, average tBMD was 88% of the preflight value. During the recovery period the total volume and cortical bone volume in the hip reached values of 114% and 110% of their preflight values, respectively. The combination of age-related bone loss, long-duration spaceflight, and re-adaptation to the 1-g terrestrial environment presumably produced these changes. These long-term data suggest that skeletal changes that occur during long-duration spaceflight persist even after multiple years of recovery. These changes have important implications for the skeletal health of crew members, especially those who make

  1. Imaging of congenital anomalies and variations of the caudal spine and back in neonates and small infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenk, Jens-Peter [Department of Pediatric Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 153, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: Jens-Peter_Schenk@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Herweh, Christian [Department of Pediatric Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 153, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Neuroradiology, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Guenther, Patrick [Department of Pediatric Surgery, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Rohrschneider, Wiltrud [Department of Pediatric Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 153, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Zieger, Birgit [Department of Pediatric Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 153, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Troeger, Jochen [Department of Pediatric Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 153, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    Spinal dysraphisms are categorized in open dysraphisms with prominent abnormal nervous tissue above the skinlevel and closed dysraphisms with a skin covered malformation. Especially the occult dysraphisms are marked by suspect skin masses and other dermal anomalies. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the indications and spectrum of spinal sonography in neonates and infants. In comparison typical dysraphisms are demonstrated in sonography and MR Imaging. We demonstrate the value of ultrasound in comparison to MRI and describe a useful handling of the methods in neonates and infants. The differentiation between the potentially dangerous dimples associated with dermal sinus, which can lead to meningitis and the harmless coccygeal dimple in the cranial gluteal cleft is presented. An inconspicious examination does not need a further imaging, but suspicious results of sonography need an MR imaging dependent of clinical conditions. Neurologically conspicious infants need MR imaging completed by sonography. Great advantages of sonography are the real time examination and the potential to show oscillations of the conus, filum and cauda equina in M-mode-imaging.

  2. Imaging of Herniated Discs of the Cervical Spine: Inter-Modality Differences between 64-Slice Multidetector CT and 1.5-T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ji Sook; Cha, Jang Gyu [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jong Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    To assess inter-modality variability when evaluating cervical intervertebral disc herniation using 64-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three musculoskeletal radiologists independently reviewed cervical spine 1.5-T MRI and 64-slice MDCT data on C2-3 though C6-7 of 51 patients in the context of intervertebral disc herniation. Interobserver and inter-modality agreements were expressed as unweighted kappa values. Weighted kappa statistics were used to assess the extents of agreement in terms of the number of involved segments (NIS) in disc herniation and epicenter measurements collected using MDCT and MRI. The interobserver agreement rates upon evaluation of disc morphology by the three radiologists were in fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.39-0.53 for MDCT images; k = 0.45-0.56 for MRIs). When the disc morphology was categorized into two and four grades, the inter-modality agreement rates were moderate (k-value, 0.59) and substantial (k-value, 0.66), respectively. The inter-modality agreements for evaluations of the NIS (k-value, 0.78) and the epicenter (k-value, 0.79) were substantial. Also, the interobserver agreements for the NIS (CT; k-value, 0.85 and MRI; k-value, 0.88) and epicenter (CT; k-value, 0.74 and MRI; k-value, 0.70) evaluations by two readers were substantial. MDCT tended to underestimate the extent of herniated disc lesions compared with MRI. Multidetector-row computed tomography and MRI showed a moderate-to-substantial degree of inter-modality agreement for the assessment of herniated cervical discs. MDCT images have a tendency to underestimate the anterior/posterior extent of the herniated disc compared with MRI.

  3. Cervical spine injury in child abuse: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooks, V.J.; Sisler, C.; Burton, B. [Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-03-01

    Pediatric cervical spine injuries have rarely been reported in the setting of child abuse. We report two cases of unsuspected lower cervical spine fracture-dislocation in twin infant girls who had no physical examination findings to suggest cervical spine injury. Classic radio-graphic findings of child abuse were noted at multiple other sites in the axial and appendicular skeleton. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging proved to be valuable in both the initial evaluation of the extent of cervical spine injury and in following postoperative changes. The unexpected yet devastating findings in these two cases further substantiate the importance of routine evaluation of the cervical spine in cases of suspected child abuse. (orig.)

  4. Long-term magnetic resonance imaging follow-up demonstrates minimal transitional level lumbar disc degeneration after posterior spine fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel W; Lawhorne, Thomas W; Widmann, Roger F; Kepler, Christopher K; Ahern, Caitlin; Mintz, Douglas N; Rawlins, Bernard A; Burke, Stephen W; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba

    2011-11-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To describe long-term clinical and imaging results focusing on the uninstrumented lumbar spine after posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Although previous studies found rates of low back pain after long fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis which are comparable to rates found in the general population, many surgeons believe that the long lever arm associated with the fusion mass will result in increased stress at uninstrumented caudal intervertebral discs and accelerated degenerative changes. This is a retrospective chart and imaging review of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients treated with posterior fusion and segmental instrumentation. Patients completed follow-up examination, outcome questionnaires, radiographs, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. MR images were scored for evidence of degeneration of lumbar discs below the level of the fusion. Twenty patients participated in the study, providing 90 discs below fusions for evaluation. The average follow-up was 11.8 years. The distal level of fixation was at L1 on average. The major curve averaged 55° ± 11° before surgery and was corrected to 25° ± 10° at follow-up. Follow-up MR imaging demonstrated new disc pathology in 85% of patients enrolled. Only one patient demonstrated significant degenerative disc disease at the junctional level, whereas most pathology was seen at the L5-S1 disc. The average Pfirrmann grade at uninstrumented levels deteriorated from 1.1 before surgery to 1.8 at follow-up. The greatest degree of degeneration was seen at the L5-S1 disc space where average degenerative scores increased from 1.2 before surgery to 2.3 after surgery. Three patients with severe disc disease were taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain, but no narcotics. Only mild scoliosis research society (SRS) and Oswestry changes were noted in this severe degeneration group. Despite demonstrating an accelerated rate of L5-S1 disc degeneration

  5. The role of posteriorly directed shear loads acting on a pre-rotated growing spine: a hypothesis on the pathogenesis of idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Michiel M A; Kouwenhoven, Jan-Willem M; Castelein, René M

    2010-01-01

    Despite years of extensive research, the etiology of idiopathic scoliosis still has not been resolved. A hypothesis on the role of posteriorly directed shear loads was studied in several biomechanical and imaging studies. So far, it has been shown that: on the human erect spine these posteriorly directed shear loads act; these loads decrease the rotational stability of the spine vitro and in vivo; once rotation occurs, it logically follows an already built-in vertebral rotational pattern, that is pre-existent in the human spine; this pre-existent rotational pattern is related to organ anatomy, and not to handedness; certain areas in the female spine are more subject to posteriorly directed shear loads as certain areas in the female spine are more backwardly inclined. Although it is appreciated that the cause of idiopathic scoliosis is multi-factorial, we believe that the delicate upright spinal sagittal balance and the unique posteriorly directed shear loads acting on the erect human spine play a crucial role in the rotational stability of the human spine, and thus in the pathogenesis of idiopathic scoliosis.

  6. Reliability of standing weight-bearing (0.25T) MR imaging findings and positional changes in the lumbar spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke B; Hansen, Philip; Christensen, Anders F

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the reliability and absolute agreement of common degenerative findings in standing positional magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Low back pain patients with and without sciatica were consecutively enrolled to undergo a supine and standing pMRI. Three...

  7. MR imaging findings of a sequestered disc in the lumbar spine: a comparison with an extruded disc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Su Youn; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Wook [Kyung Hee University East-west Neo Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    To compare the MR findings of a sequestered disc with an extruded disc. MR images of 28 patients with a sequestered disc and 18 patients with an extruded disc were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with sequestered discs were divided into two groups whether definite separation from the parent disc was or was not seen. In the latter group (definite separation not seen) and the extruded disc group of patients, the signal intensities of the herniated discs were compared with the signal intensities of the parent discs and were evaluated on T1-and T2-weighted images. We also assessed the presence of a notch within the herniated disc. In the sequestered disc group of patients (28 discs), only 5 discs (18%) showed obvious separation from the parent disc. Among the remaining 23 discs with indefinite separation, the notch was visible in 14 discs (61%) and 9 discs (39%) had no notch. In the extruded disc group (18 discs), the notch was visible in 2 (11%) discs and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant ({rho} 0.0002). The signal intensities of the herniated discs on T1-weighted images were isointense in both the sequestered and extruded discs. The difference of incidence of high signal intensities on T2-weighted images was not statistically significant ({rho} = 0.125). It is necessary to consider the possibility of the presence of a sequestered disc when a herniated disc material shows a notch.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with 3D T1 VIBE versus computer tomography in pars stress fracture of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, E C; Robertson, A F; Malara, F A; O'Shea, T; Roebert, J K; Schneider, M E; Rotstein, A H

    2016-11-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE sequence to 128-slice computer tomography (CT) in pars stress fractures of the lumbar spine. 3-T MRI and CT of 24 patients involving 70 pars interarticularis were retrospectively reviewed by four blinded radiologists. The fracture morphology (complete, incomplete, or normal) was assessed on MRI and CT at different time points. Pars interarticularis bone marrow edema (present or absent) was also evaluated on MRI. In total, 14 complete fractures, 31 incomplete fractures and 25 normal pars were detected by CT. Bone marrow edema was seen in seven of the complete and 25 of the incomplete fractures. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI in detecting fractures (complete and incomplete) were 97.7, 92.3, and 95.7 %, respectively. MRI was 100 % accurate in detecting complete fractures. For incomplete fractures, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRI were 96.7, 92.0, and 94.6 %, respectively. 3-T MRI with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE is 100 % accurate in diagnosing complete pars fractures and has excellent diagnostic ability in the detection and characterization of incomplete pars stress fractures compared to CT. MRI has the added advantages of detecting bone marrow edema and does not employ ionizing radiation.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with 3D T1 VIBE versus computer tomography in pars stress fracture of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, E.C.; Robertson, A.F.; Malara, F.A.; O' Shea, T.; Roebert, J.K.; Rotstein, A.H. [Victoria House Medical Imaging, Prahran, Victoria (Australia); Schneider, M.E. [Monash University, Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)

    2016-11-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE sequence to 128-slice computer tomography (CT) in pars stress fractures of the lumbar spine. 3-T MRI and CT of 24 patients involving 70 pars interarticularis were retrospectively reviewed by four blinded radiologists. The fracture morphology (complete, incomplete, or normal) was assessed on MRI and CT at different time points. Pars interarticularis bone marrow edema (present or absent) was also evaluated on MRI. In total, 14 complete fractures, 31 incomplete fractures and 25 normal pars were detected by CT. Bone marrow edema was seen in seven of the complete and 25 of the incomplete fractures. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI in detecting fractures (complete and incomplete) were 97.7, 92.3, and 95.7 %, respectively. MRI was 100 % accurate in detecting complete fractures. For incomplete fractures, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRI were 96.7, 92.0, and 94.6 %, respectively. 3-T MRI with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE is 100 % accurate in diagnosing complete pars fractures and has excellent diagnostic ability in the detection and characterization of incomplete pars stress fractures compared to CT. MRI has the added advantages of detecting bone marrow edema and does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  10. Computed tomography of the postoperative lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplick, J.G.; Haskin, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    In the postoperative patient ordinary radiographs of the spine generally add very little information, revealing the usual postoperative bone changes and often postoperative narrowing of the intervertebral space. Myelography may sometimes be informative, showing evidence of focal arachnoiditis or a focal defect at the surgical site. However, the latter finding is difficult to interpret. As experience with high-resolution CT scanning of the lumbar spine has been increasing, it is becoming apparent that this noninvasive and easily performed study can give considerably more information about the postoperative spine than any of the other current imaging methods. About 750 patients with previous lumbar laminectomies had CT scanning within a 28 month period.

  11. The postsurgical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Armentia, E; Prada González, R; Silva Priegue, N

    2016-04-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome is the persistence or reappearance of pain after surgery on the spine. This term encompasses both mechanical and nonmechanical causes. Imaging techniques are essential in postoperative follow-up and in the evaluation of potential complications responsible for failed back surgery syndrome. This review aims to familiarize radiologists with normal postoperative changes and to help them identify the pathological imaging findings that reflect failed back surgery syndrome. To interpret the imaging findings, it is necessary to know the type of surgery performed in each case and the time elapsed since the intervention. In techniques used to fuse the vertebrae, it is essential to evaluate the degree of bone fusion, the material used (both its position and its integrity), the bone over which it lies, the interface between the implant and bone, and the vertebral segments that are adjacent to metal implants. In decompressive techniques it is important to know what changes can be expected after the intervention and to be able to distinguish them from peridural fibrosis and the recurrence of a hernia. It is also crucial to know the imaging findings for postoperative infections. Other complications are also reviewed, including arachnoiditis, postoperative fluid collections, and changes in the soft tissues adjacent to the surgical site. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Fully automatic algorithm for segmenting full human diaphragm in non-contrast CT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Elham; Gaede, Stewart; Lee, Ting-Yim; Samani, Abbas

    2015-03-01

    The diaphragm is a sheet of muscle which separates the thorax from the abdomen and it acts as the most important muscle of the respiratory system. As such, an accurate segmentation of the diaphragm, not only provides key information for functional analysis of the respiratory system, but also can be used for locating other abdominal organs such as the liver. However, diaphragm segmentation is extremely challenging in non-contrast CT images due to the diaphragm's similar appearance to other abdominal organs. In this paper, we present a fully automatic algorithm for diaphragm segmentation in non-contrast CT images. The method is mainly based on a priori knowledge about the human diaphragm anatomy. The diaphragm domes are in contact with the lungs and the heart while its circumference runs along the lumbar vertebrae of the spine as well as the inferior border of the ribs and sternum. As such, the diaphragm can be delineated by segmentation of these organs followed by connecting relevant parts of their outline properly. More specifically, the bottom surface of the lungs and heart, the spine borders and the ribs are delineated, leading to a set of scattered points which represent the diaphragm's geometry. Next, a B-spline filter is used to find the smoothest surface which pass through these points. This algorithm was tested on a noncontrast CT image of a lung cancer patient. The results indicate that there is an average Hausdorff distance of 2.96 mm between the automatic and manually segmented diaphragms which implies a favourable accuracy.

  13. Fetal evaluation of spine dysraphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulas, Dorothy [George Washington University Medical Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Spinal dysraphism or neural tube defects (NTD) encompass a heterogeneous group of congenital spinal anomalies that result from the defective closure of the neural tube early in gestation with anomalous development of the caudal cell mass. Advances in ultrasound and MRI have dramatically improved the diagnosis and therapy of spinal dysraphism and caudal spinal anomalies both prenatally and postnatally. Advances in prenatal US including high frequency linear transducers and three dimensional imaging can provide detailed information concerning spinal anomalies. MR imaging is a complementary tool that can further elucidate spine abnormalities as well as associated central nervous system and non-CNS anomalies. Recent studies have suggested that 3-D CT can help further assess fetal spine anomalies in the third trimester. With the advent of fetal therapy including surgery, accurate prenatal diagnosis of open and closed spinal dysraphism becomes critical in appropriate counselling and perinatal management. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging analysis of the upper cervical spine extensor musculature in an asymptomatic cohort: an index of fat within muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, J.M. [Division of Physiotherapy, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia)]. E-mail: jimelliott@plbb.net; Galloway, G.J. [Center for Magnetic Resonance, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Jull, G.A. [Division of Physiotherapy, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Noteboom, J.T. [Department of Physical Therapy, Regis University, Denver, CO, USA (United States); Centeno, C.J. [Centeno Clinic, Westminster, CO, USA (United States); Gibbon, W.W. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia)

    2005-03-01

    AIM: To establish a simple method to quantify muscle/fat constituents in cervical muscles of asymptomatic women using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to determine whether there is an age effect within a defined age range. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MRI of the upper cervical spine was performed for 42 asymptomatic women aged 18-45 years. The muscle and fat signal intensities on axial spin echo T1-weighted images were quantitatively classified by taking a ratio of the pixel intensity profiles of muscle against those of intermuscular fat for the rectus capitis posterior major and minor and inferior obliquus capitis muscles bilaterally. Inter- and intra-examiner agreement was scrutinized. RESULTS: The average relative values of fat within the upper cervical musculature compared with intermuscular fat indicated that there were only slight variations in indices between the three sets of muscles. There was no significant correlation between age and fat indices. There were significant differences for the relative fat within the muscle compared with intermuscular fat and body mass index for the right rectus capitis posterior major and right and left inferior obliquus capitis muscles (p=0.032). Intraclass correlation coefficients for intraobserver agreement ranged from 0.94 to 0.98. Inter-rater agreement of the measurements ranged from 0.75 to 0.97. CONCLUSION: A quantitative measure of muscle/fat constituents has been developed, and results of this study indicate that relative fatty infiltration is not a feature of age in the upper cervical extensor muscles of women aged 18-45 years.

  15. MRI of the fetal spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Erin M. [Departement of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal spine is a vital complement to fetal sonographic examination. Assessing the wide spectrum of spinal dysraphism, as well as spinal neoplasia, allows for more correct prenatal diagnoses, patient care planning, and patient counselling. Proper appraisal of the value of experimental procedures, such as fetal myelomeningocoele repair, requires a high level of diagnostic accuracy for the selection and follow-up of appropriate candidates. (orig.)

  16. PET imaging of human cardiac opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villemagne, Patricia S.R.; Dannals, Robert F. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ravert, Hayden T. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Frost, James J. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Neuroscience, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2002-10-01

    The presence of opioid peptides and receptors and their role in the regulation of cardiovascular function has been previously demonstrated in the mammalian heart. The aim of this study was to image {mu} and {delta} opioid receptors in the human heart using positron emission tomography (PET). Five subjects (three females, two males, 65{+-}8 years old) underwent PET scanning of the chest with [{sup 11}C]carfentanil ([{sup 11}C]CFN) and [{sup 11}C]-N-methyl-naltrindole ([{sup 11}C]MeNTI) and the images were analyzed for evidence of opioid receptor binding in the heart. Either [{sup 11}C]CFN or [{sup 11}C]MeNTI (20 mCi) was injected i.v. with subsequent dynamic acquisitions over 90 min. For the blocking studies, either 0.2 mg/kg or 1 mg/kg of naloxone was injected i.v. 5 min prior to the injection of [{sup 11}C]CFN and [{sup 11}C]MeNTI, respectively. Regions of interest were placed over the left ventricle, left ventricular chamber, lung and skeletal muscle. Graphical analysis demonstrated average baseline myocardial binding potentials (BP) of 4.37{+-}0.91 with [{sup 11}C]CFN and 3.86{+-}0.60 with [{sup 11}C]MeNTI. Administration of 0.2 mg/kg naloxone prior to [{sup 11}C]CFN produced a 25% reduction in BP in one subject in comparison with baseline values, and a 19% decrease in myocardial distribution volume (DV). Administration of 1 mg/kg of naloxone before [{sup 11}C]MeNTI in another subject produced a 14% decrease in BP and a 21% decrease in the myocardial DV. These results demonstrate the ability to image these receptors in vivo by PET. PET imaging of cardiac opioid receptors may help to better understand their role in cardiovascular pathophysiology and the effect of abuse of opioids and drugs on heart function. (orig.)

  17. Low field magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine: Reliability of qualitative evaluation of disc and muscle parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Joan Solgaard; Kjaer, Per; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the intra- and interobserver reliability in grading disc and muscle parameters using low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIAL AND METHODS: MRI scans of 100 subjects representative of the general population were evaluated blindly by two radiologists. Criteria...... for grading lumbar discs were based on the spinal nomenclature of the Combined Task Force and the literature. Consensus in rating was achieved by evaluating 50 MRI examinations in tandem. The remaining 50 examinations were evaluated independently by the observers to determine interobserver agreement and re...

  18. Impact of Human like Cues on Human Trust in Machines: Brain Imaging and Modeling Studies for Human-Machine Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-05

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2018-0006 Impact of Human like Cues on Human Trust in Machines: Brain Imaging and Modeling Studies for Human -Machine Interactions...AND SUBTITLE Impact of Human like Cues on Human Trust in Machines: Brain Imaging and Modeling Studies for Human -Machine Interactions 5a.  CONTRACT...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED: PB Public Release 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT When a human and an intelligent machine work together as a team, human

  19. Image Visual Realism: From Human Perception to Machine Computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shaojing; Ng, Tian-Tsong; Koenig, Bryan L; Herberg, Jonathan S; Jiang, Ming; Shen, Zhiqi; Zhao, Qi

    2017-08-30

    Visual realism is defined as the extent to which an image appears to people as a photo rather than computer generated. Assessing visual realism is important in applications like computer graphics rendering and photo retouching. However, current realism evaluation approaches use either labor-intensive human judgments or automated algorithms largely dependent on comparing renderings to reference images. We develop a reference-free computational framework for visual realism prediction to overcome these constraints. First, we construct a benchmark dataset of 2520 images with comprehensive human annotated attributes. From statistical modeling on this data, we identify image attributes most relevant for visual realism. We propose both empirically-based (guided by our statistical modeling of human data) and CNN-learned features to predict visual realism of images. Our framework has the following advantages: (1) it creates an interpretable and concise empirical model that characterizes human perception of visual realism; (2) it links computational features to latent factors of human image perception.

  20. Hierarchical imaging of the human knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Georg; Götz, Christian; Deyhle, Hans; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Zanette, Irene; Zdora, Marie-Christine; Khimchenko, Anna; Thalmann, Peter; Rack, Alexander; Müller, Bert

    2016-10-01

    Among the clinically relevant imaging techniques, computed tomography (CT) reaches the best spatial resolution. Sub-millimeter voxel sizes are regularly obtained. For investigations on true micrometer level lab-based μCT has become gold standard. The aim of the present study is the hierarchical investigation of a human knee post mortem using hard X-ray μCT. After the visualization of the entire knee using a clinical CT with a spatial resolution on the sub-millimeter range, a hierarchical imaging study was performed using a laboratory μCT system nanotom m. Due to the size of the whole knee the pixel length could not be reduced below 65 μm. These first two data sets were directly compared after a rigid registration using a cross-correlation algorithm. The μCT data set allowed an investigation of the trabecular structures of the bones. The further reduction of the pixel length down to 25 μm could be achieved by removing the skin and soft tissues and measuring the tibia and the femur separately. True micrometer resolution could be achieved after extracting cylinders of several millimeters diameters from the two bones. The high resolution scans revealed the mineralized cartilage zone including the tide mark line as well as individual calcified chondrocytes. The visualization of soft tissues including cartilage, was arranged by X-ray grating interferometry (XGI) at ESRF and Diamond Light Source. Whereas the high-energy measurements at ESRF allowed the simultaneous visualization of soft and hard tissues, the low-energy results from Diamond Light Source made individual chondrocytes within the cartilage visual.

  1. Improved Accuracy of Minimally Invasive Transpedicular Screw Placement in the Lumbar Spine With 3-Dimensional Stereotactic Image Guidance: A Comparative Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Austin C; Faulkner, Austin R; Bradley, Yong C; Pasciak, Alexander S; Barlow, Patrick B; Gash, Judson R; Reid, William S

    2015-11-01

    This study compares the accuracy rates of lumbar percutaneous pedicle screw placement (PPSP) using either 2-dimensional (2-D) fluoroscopic guidance or 3-dimensional (3-D) stereotactic navigation in the setting of minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS). This represents the largest single-operator study of its kind and first comprehensive review of 3-D stereotactic navigation in the setting of MISS. To examine differences in accuracy of lumbar pedicle screw placement using 2-D fluoroscopic navigation and 3-D stereotaxis in the setting of MISS. Surgeons increasingly rely upon advanced image guidance systems to guide minimally invasive PPSP. Three-dimensional stereotactic navigation with intraoperative computed tomography offers well-documented benefit in open surgical approaches. However, the utility of 3-D stereotaxis in the setting of MISS remains incompletely explored by few studies with limited patient numbers. A total of 599 consecutive patients underwent minimally invasive lumbar PPSP aided by 3-D stereotactic navigation. Postoperative imaging and medical records were analyzed for patient demographics, incidence and degree of pedicle breach, and other surgical complications. A total of 2132 screw were reviewed and compared with a meta-analysis created from published data regarding the placement of 4248 fluoroscopically navigated pedicle screws in the setting of MISS. In the 3-D navigation group, a total of 7 pedicle breaches occurred in 6 patients, corresponding to a per-person breach rate of 1.15% (6/518) and a per-screw breach rate of 0.33% (7/2132). Meta-analysis comprised of data from 10 independent studies showed overall breach risk of 13.1% when 2-D fluoroscopic navigation was utilized in MISS. This translates to a 99% decrease in odds of breach in the 3-D navigation technique versus the traditional 2-D-guided technique, with an odds ratio of 0.01, (95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.03), P<0.001. Three-dimensional stereotactic navigation based upon

  2. Volume of Lytic Vertebral Body Metastatic Disease Quantified Using Computed Tomography-Based Image Segmentation Predicts Fracture Risk After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Isabelle; Whyne, Cari M; Zhou, Stephanie; Campbell, Mikki; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Myrehaug, Sten; Soliman, Hany; Lee, Young K; Ebrahimi, Hamid; Yee, Albert J M; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    To determine a threshold of vertebral body (VB) osteolytic or osteoblastic tumor involvement that would predict vertebral compression fracture (VCF) risk after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), using volumetric image-segmentation software. A computational semiautomated skeletal metastasis segmentation process refined in our laboratory was applied to the pretreatment planning CT scan of 100 vertebral segments in 55 patients treated with spine SBRT. Each VB was segmented and the percentage of lytic and/or blastic disease by volume determined. The cumulative incidence of VCF at 3 and 12 months was 14.1% and 17.3%, respectively. The median follow-up was 7.3 months (range, 0.6-67.6 months). In all, 56% of segments were determined lytic, 23% blastic, and 21% mixed, according to clinical radiologic determination. Within these 3 clinical cohorts, the segmentation-determined mean percentages of lytic and blastic tumor were 8.9% and 6.0%, 0.2% and 26.9%, and 3.4% and 15.8% by volume, respectively. On the basis of the entire cohort (n=100), a significant association was observed for the osteolytic percentage measures and the occurrence of VCF (Pconfidence interval 9.4-148.9). On multivariable analysis, ≥11.6% lytic disease (P<.001), baseline VCF (P<.001), and SBRT with ≥20 Gy per fraction (P=.014) were predictive. Pretreatment lytic VB disease volumetric measures, independent of the blastic component, predict for SBRT-induced VCF. Larger-scale trials evaluating our software are planned to validate the results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Image-Guided Cryoablation of the Spine in a Swine Model: Clinical, Radiological, and Pathological Findings with Light and Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Costa de, E-mail: ricardomcfreitas@gmail.com; Andrade, Celi Santos, E-mail: celis.andrade@hotmail.com; Caldas, José Guilherme Mendes Pereira, E-mail: jgmpcaldas@uol.com.br [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Unit of the Instituto de Radiologia (Brazil); Tsunemi, Miriam Harumi, E-mail: miharumi@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho, Department of Biostatistics, Biosciences Institute (Brazil); Ferreira, Lorraine Braga, E-mail: lorraine.braga@gmail.com; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias, E-mail: vearana@usp.br [Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo, Department of Oral Pathology (Brazil); Cury, Patrícia Maluf, E-mail: pmcury@hotmail.com [Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto, Department of Pathology and Forensic Medicine (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to present the feasibility of an in vivo image-guided percutaneous cryoablation of the porcine vertebral body.MethodsThe institutional animal care committee approved this study. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided vertebral cryoablations (n = 22) were performed in eight pigs with short, 2-min, single or double-freezing protocols. Protective measures to nerves included dioxide carbon (CO{sub 2}) epidural injections and spinal canal temperature monitoring. Clinical, radiological, and pathological data with light (n = 20) or transmission electron (n = 2) microscopic analyses were evaluated after 6 days of clinical follow-up and euthanasia.ResultsCBCT/fluoroscopic-guided transpedicular vertebral body cryoprobe positioning and CO{sub 2} epidural injection were successful in all procedures. No major complications were observed in seven animals (87.5 %, n = 8). A minor complication was observed in one pig (12.5 %, n = 1). Logistic regression model analysis showed the cryoprobe-spinal canal (Cp-Sc) distance as the most efficient parameter to categorize spinal canal temperatures lower than 19 °C (p < 0.004), with a significant Pearson’s correlation test (p < 0.041) between the Cp-Sc distance and the lowest spinal canal temperatures. Ablation zones encompassed pedicles and the posterior wall of the vertebral bodies with an inflammatory rim, although no inflammatory infiltrate was depicted in the surrounding neural structures at light microscopy. Ultrastructural analyses evidenced myelin sheath disruption in some large nerve fibers, although neurological deficits were not observed.ConclusionsCBCT-guided vertebral cryoablation of the porcine spine is feasible under a combination of a short freezing protocol and protective measures to the surrounding nerves. Ultrastructural analyses may be helpful assess the early modifications of the nerve fibers.

  4. Volume of Lytic Vertebral Body Metastatic Disease Quantified Using Computed Tomography–Based Image Segmentation Predicts Fracture Risk After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibault, Isabelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de L' Universite de Québec–Université Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Whyne, Cari M. [Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zhou, Stephanie; Campbell, Mikki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Atenafu, Eshetu G. [Department of Biostatistics, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Myrehaug, Sten; Soliman, Hany; Lee, Young K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ebrahimi, Hamid [Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yee, Albert J.M. [Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine a threshold of vertebral body (VB) osteolytic or osteoblastic tumor involvement that would predict vertebral compression fracture (VCF) risk after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), using volumetric image-segmentation software. Methods and Materials: A computational semiautomated skeletal metastasis segmentation process refined in our laboratory was applied to the pretreatment planning CT scan of 100 vertebral segments in 55 patients treated with spine SBRT. Each VB was segmented and the percentage of lytic and/or blastic disease by volume determined. Results: The cumulative incidence of VCF at 3 and 12 months was 14.1% and 17.3%, respectively. The median follow-up was 7.3 months (range, 0.6-67.6 months). In all, 56% of segments were determined lytic, 23% blastic, and 21% mixed, according to clinical radiologic determination. Within these 3 clinical cohorts, the segmentation-determined mean percentages of lytic and blastic tumor were 8.9% and 6.0%, 0.2% and 26.9%, and 3.4% and 15.8% by volume, respectively. On the basis of the entire cohort (n=100), a significant association was observed for the osteolytic percentage measures and the occurrence of VCF (P<.001) but not for the osteoblastic measures. The most significant lytic disease threshold was observed at ≥11.6% (odds ratio 37.4, 95% confidence interval 9.4-148.9). On multivariable analysis, ≥11.6% lytic disease (P<.001), baseline VCF (P<.001), and SBRT with ≥20 Gy per fraction (P=.014) were predictive. Conclusions: Pretreatment lytic VB disease volumetric measures, independent of the blastic component, predict for SBRT-induced VCF. Larger-scale trials evaluating our software are planned to validate the results.

  5. Imaging in anatomy: a comparison of imaging techniques in embalmed human cadavers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A large variety of imaging techniques is an integral part of modern medicine. Introducing radiological imaging techniques into the dissection course serves as a basis for improved learning of anatomy and multidisciplinary learning in pre-clinical medical education. Methods Four different imaging techniques (ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) were performed in embalmed human body donors to analyse possibilities and limitations of the respective techniques in this peculiar setting. Results The quality of ultrasound and radiography images was poor, images of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were of good quality. Conclusion Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have a superior image quality in comparison to ultrasound and radiography and offer suitable methods for imaging embalmed human cadavers as a valuable addition to the dissection course. PMID:24156510

  6. Microwave Imaging of Human Forearms: Pilot Study and Image Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Gilmore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a pilot study using a microwave tomography system in which we image the forearms of 5 adult male and female volunteers between the ages of 30 and 48. Microwave scattering data were collected at 0.8 to 1.2 GHz with 24 transmitting and receiving antennas located in a matching fluid of deionized water and table salt. Inversion of the microwave data was performed with a balanced version of the multiplicative-regularized contrast source inversion algorithm formulated using the finite-element method (FEM-CSI. T1-weighted MRI images of each volunteer’s forearm were also collected in the same plane as the microwave scattering experiment. Initial “blind” imaging results from the utilized inversion algorithm show that the image quality is dependent on the thickness of the arm’s peripheral adipose tissue layer; thicker layers of adipose tissue lead to poorer overall image quality. Due to the exible nature of the FEM-CSI algorithm used, prior information can be readily incorporated into the microwave imaging inversion process. We show that by introducing prior information into the FEM-CSI algorithm the internal anatomical features of all the arms are resolved, significantly improving the images. The prior information was estimated manually from the blind inversions using an ad hoc procedure.

  7. Variational adaptive image denoising model based on human visual system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjun; Liu, Chanjuan; Zou, Hailin

    2011-11-01

    A variational image adaptive denoising model based on human visual system is proposed by introducing control parameter p which can determine the diffusion intensity to Total Variation (TV) model. The model can adaptively select the value of parameter p according to human visual system noise visibility value of each pixel which makes diffusion intensity close to edges smaller than those far away from edges. For this method is more consistent with human perception, human eyes can perceive the improvement of image quality intuitively. Numerical experiments show that the proposed method can overcome staircase effect, remove the noise while preserving significant image details and better performance has been achieved.

  8. Multiplanner spine computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. K.; Jeon, H. J.; Hong, K. C.; Chung, K. B.; Suh, W. H. [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-06-15

    The computed tomography is useful in evaluation of bony structures and adjacent soft tissues of the spine. Recently, the multiplanar spine CT scan is highly superior than usual axial scan, because of easily demonstrable longitudinal dimension, level of spine and spinal canal. We evaluated 62 cases of spine CT, whom complains of spinal symptoms, from July, 1982 to January, 1983. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 45 male and 17 female, ages were from 15 years to 76 years, and sites were 15 cervical spine, 7 thoracic spine, 42 lumbar spine and 21 sacral spine. 2. Sixty two cases of the CT diagnosis were reviewed and shows 19 cases of herniated intervertebral disc, 7 cases of spine fracture, 5 cases of degenerative disease, 4 cases of metastatic cancer, 2 cases of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, 1 case of cord injury and 24 cases of normal. 3. The CT findings of herniated intervertebral disc were protruding disc, obliteration of anterior epidural fat, with or without indentation of dural sac and calcification within posterior disc margin. In cases of trauma, the multiplanar spine CT scan detects more specific extension of the fracture sites, and it is able to demonstrate relationship between fracture fragment and spinal cord, therefore operability can be decided. In case of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, it is easy to demonstrate linear high density along posterior margin of vertebral bodies on sagittal reconstruction scan. 4. The computed tomography is diagnostic in detection of spinal disease. However, multiplanar spine CT is more diagnostic than axial computed tomography such as detecting the longitudinal dimension and demonstration of spinal canal.

  9. Thoracic spine pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Ivanovich Isaikin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic spine pain, or thoracalgia, is one of the common reasons for seeking for medical advice. The epidemiology and semiotics of pain in the thoracic spine unlike in those in the cervical and lumbar spine have not been inadequately studied. The causes of thoracic spine pain are varied: diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and renal systems, injuries to the musculoskeletal structures of the cervical and thoracic portions, which require a thorough differential diagnosis. Facet, costotransverse, and costovertebral joint injuries and myofascial syndrome are the most common causes of musculoskeletal (nonspecific pain in the thoracic spine. True radicular pain is rarely encountered. Traditionally, treatment for thoracalgia includes a combination of non-drug and drug therapies. The cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor meloxicam (movalis may be the drug of choice in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

  10. Neurenteric cysts of the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J J Savage

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurenteric cysts account for 0.7-1.3% of spinal axis tumors. These rare lesions result from the inappropriate partitioning of the embryonic notochordal plate and presumptive endoderm during the third week of human development. Heterotopic rests of epithelium reminiscent of gastrointestinal and respiratory tissue lead to eventual formation of compressive cystic lesions of the pediatric and adult spine. Histopathological analysis of neurenteric tissue reveals a highly characteristic structure of columnar or cuboidal epithelium with or without cilia and mucus globules. Patients with symptomatic neurenteric cysts typically present in the second and third decades of life with size-dependent myelopathic and/or radicular signs. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are essential diagnostic tools for the delineation of cyst form and overlying osseous architecture. A variety of approaches have been employed in the treatment of neurenteric cysts each with a goal of total surgical resection. Although long-term outcome analyses are limited, data available indicate that surgical intervention in the case of neurenteric cysts results in a high frequency of resolution of neurological deficit with minimal morbidity. However, recurrence rates as high as 37% have been reported with incomplete resection secondary to factors such as cyst adhesion to surrounding structure and unclear dissection planes. Here we present a systematic review of English language literature from January 1966 to December 2009 utilizing MEDLINE with the following search terminology: neurenteric cyst, enterogenous cyst, spinal cord tumor, spinal dysraphism, intraspinal cyst, intramedullary cyst, and intradural cyst. In addition, the references of publications returned from the MEDLINE search criteria were surveyed in order to examine other pertinent reports.

  11. A Constitutive Model for the Annulus of Human Intervertebral Disc: Implications for Developing a Degeneration Model and Its Influence on Lumbar Spine Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cegoñino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the mechanical properties of the annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral discs is significant to the study on the diseases of lumbar intervertebral discs in terms of both theoretical modelling and clinical application value. The annulus fibrosus tissue of the human intervertebral disc (IVD has a very distinctive structure and behaviour. It consists of a solid porous matrix, saturated with water, which mainly contains proteoglycan and collagen fibres network. In this work a mathematical model for a fibred reinforced material including the osmotic pressure contribution was developed. This behaviour was implemented in a finite element (FE model and numerical characterization and validation, based on experimental results, were carried out for the normal annulus tissue. The characterization of the model for a degenerated annulus was performed, and this was capable of reproducing the increase of stiffness and the reduction of its nonlinear material response and of its hydrophilic nature. Finally, this model was used to reproduce the degeneration of the L4L5 disc in a complete finite element lumbar spine model proving that a single level degeneration modifies the motion patterns and the loading of the segments above and below the degenerated disc.

  12. Meninges of the spine (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by 3 connective tissue layers collectively called the meninges. Consisting of the pia mater (closest to the ... the dura mater (farthest from the CNS), the meninges also support blood vessels and contain cerebrospinal fluid. ...

  13. The Management of Unstable Cervical Spine Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venu M. Nemani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries to the cervical spine can cause potentially devastating morbidity and even mortality. In this review we discuss the anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine. The evaluation and treatment of cervical spine injuries begins with the prompt immobilization of suspected injuries in the field. Once an assessment of the patient's neurological status is made, imaging studies are obtained, which can include X-rays, CT, and MRI. Careful scrutiny of the imaging studies for bony and/or ligamentous injury allows the physician to determine the mechanism of injury, which guides treatment. The ultimate treatment plan can consist of non-operative or operative management, and depends on patient specific factors (medical condition and neurological status, the mechanism of injury, and the resultant degree of instability. With prompt diagnosis and appropriate management, the morbidity of these injuries can be minimized.

  14. Stress - Strain Response of the Human Spine Intervertebral Disc As an Anisotropic Body. Mathematical Modeling and Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minárová Mária

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the biomechanical investigation on the human lumbar intervertebral disc under the static load. The disc is regarded as a two - phased ambient consisting of a fibrous outer part called annulus fibrosis and a liquid inner part nucleus pulposus. Due to the fibrous structure, the annulus fibrosis can be treated by using a special case of anisotropy - transversal isotropy.

  15. SPECT/CT for imaging of the spine and pelvis in clinical routine: a physician's perspective of the adoption of SPECT/CT in a clinical setting with a focus on trauma surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheyerer, Max J.; Zimmermann, Stefan M.; Osterhoff, Georg; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Werner, Clement M.L. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma Surgery, Zuerich (Switzerland); Pietsch, Carsten [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-05-15

    Injuries of the axial skeleton are an important field of work within orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. Most lesions following trauma may be diagnosed by means of conventional plain radiography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. However, for some aspects SPECT/ CT can be helpful even in a trauma setting. In particular, the combination of highly sensitive but nonspecific scintigraphy with nonsensitive but highly specific computed tomography makes it particularly useful in anatomically complex regions such as the pelvis and spine. From a trauma surgeon's point of view, the four main indications for nuclear medicine imaging are the detection of (occult) fractures, and the imaging of inflammatory bone and joint diseases, chronic diseases and postoperative complications such as instability of instrumentation or implants. The aim of the present review was to give an overview of the adoption of SPECT/CT in a clinical setting. (orig.)

  16. SPECT/CT for imaging of the spine and pelvis in clinical routine: a physician's perspective of the adoption of SPECT/CT in a clinical setting with a focus on trauma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheyerer, Max J; Pietsch, Carsten; Zimmermann, Stefan M; Osterhoff, Georg; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Werner, Clement M L

    2014-05-01

    Injuries of the axial skeleton are an important field of work within orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. Most lesions following trauma may be diagnosed by means of conventional plain radiography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. However, for some aspects SPECT/ CT can be helpful even in a trauma setting. In particular, the combination of highly sensitive but nonspecific scintigraphy with nonsensitive but highly specific computed tomography makes it particularly useful in anatomically complex regions such as the pelvis and spine. From a trauma surgeon's point of view, the four main indications for nuclear medicine imaging are the detection of (occult) fractures, and the imaging of inflammatory bone and joint diseases, chronic diseases and postoperative complications such as instability of instrumentation or implants. The aim of the present review was to give an overview of the adoption of SPECT/CT in a clinical setting.

  17. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  18. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletsov, Andrey; Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated.

  19. Imaging of human urothelial carcinoma samples using multimodal multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baria, E.; Barone, A.; Nesi, G.; Pavone, F. S.; Cicchi, R.

    2017-07-01

    We combined Second Harmonic Generation and Two-Photon Fluorescence for imaging ex vivo tissue sections of human bladder affected by urothelial carcinoma. We studied different grades of the tumor, and compared them to healthy bladder mucosa.

  20. Image enhancement using thermal-visible fusion for human detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaihidee, Ezrinda Mohd; Hawari Ghazali, Kamarul; Zuki Saleh, Mohd

    2017-09-01

    An increased interest in detecting human beings in video surveillance system has emerged in recent years. Multisensory image fusion deserves more research attention due to the capability to improve the visual interpretability of an image. This study proposed fusion techniques for human detection based on multiscale transform using grayscale visual light and infrared images. The samples for this study were taken from online dataset. Both images captured by the two sensors were decomposed into high and low frequency coefficients using Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT). Hence, the appropriate fusion rule was used to merge the coefficients and finally, the final fused image was obtained by using inverse SWT. From the qualitative and quantitative results, the proposed method is more superior than the two other methods in terms of enhancement of the target region and preservation of details information of the image.

  1. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING IN THE EVALUATION OF MORPHOLOGICAL AND STRUCTURAL CHANGES OF THE VERTEBRAL BODIES OF THE LUMBAR SPINE WITH BONE MINERAL DENSITY REDUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Myagkov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to study the morphological and structural changes of the vertebral bodies in patients with different bone mineral density by MRI. Materials and methods. 81 patients with different bone mineral density (BMD of the vertebral bodies of the lumbar spine (LS had taken part in the study. Osteopenia was diagnosed in 33 patients, 28 have osteoporosis and 20 patients without evidence of osteoporosis (according to the DXA, which was made all the investigated were in the control group. 69 of them were women and 12 men with a mean age 49,6 ± 7,6 years (control group, 56,5 ± 9,8 years (patients with osteopenia, 66,0 ± 9,4 years (with osteoporosis. All patients underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. DXA has been made on the unit «Lunar PRODIGY Primo DHA» (analysis version: 11.40 manufacture GE Healthcare, according to the standard protocol with the definition of osteoporosis by WHO (1994. In this case, average bone mineral density BMD (g/cm2 in the bodies of L1-L4 were: in healthy ones -1,232 ± 0,06; when osteopenia - 1,032 ± 0,07; osteoporosis - 0,757 ± 0,08. The average T -test was consistent, respectively: T - 1,27 ± 0,71; T - 1,40 ± 011 , T - 3,09 ± 1,73. The difference in BMD between I and II groups was 16,2 % , between I and III groups - 25%. MRI morphometry in patients with osteopenia changes of the vertebral bodies were accompanied by POP: marked reduction in the average height of the vertebral bodies, more pronounced than in osteoporosis, a slight drop height of the front body, reducing of the Barnett-Nordin index (B/N - 0,84. Osteopenia significantly correlated with BMD of vertebral body height rear L1, the index of B/N in the body of L4. In osteoporosis MRI morphometry data were characterized by the fact that the front and the average height of the vertebral bodies were not changed significantly. In patients with osteoporosis BMD was significantly correlated with rear

  2. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... be placed over the lower part of your spine. You will be asked to hold your breath ... x-ray. The most common reason for lumbosacral spine x-ray is to look for the cause ...

  3. The bent spine syndrome: myopathy + biomechanics = symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haig, Andrew J; Tong, Henry C; Kendall, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The bent spine syndrome, which mimics spinal stenosis, is thought to be a focal paraspinal myopathy, but because paraspinal fatigue with ambulation is not a feature of more severe myopathies, the cause of symptoms is not clear. To evaluate electromyographic and biomechanical aspects of the bent spine syndrome. University spine clinic. A patient with severe disability from the bent spine syndrome was compared with a fortuitously discovered asymptomatic research subject with the syndrome, in terms of physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, and electrodiagnostic testing. Both subjects had fatty paraspinal replacement on magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography. More detailed electromyography of the patient showed abnormalities medially and caudally, but changes including apparent myopathic motor units up to the high thoracic region. The research subject had no hip flexion contracture, whereas the patient had severe contracture. Correction of contracture increased ambulation from 20 to 300 meters. Bent spine syndrome is likely a paraspinal myopathy, but symptoms do not occur unless there is also a hip flexion contracture.

  4. Management of thoracolumbar spine trauma An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rajasekaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracolumbar spine fractures are common injuries that can result in significant disability, deformity and neurological deficit. Controversies exist regarding the appropriate radiological investigations, the indications for surgical management and the timing, approach and type of surgery. This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, biomechanical principles, radiological and clinical evaluation, classification and management principles. Literature review of all relevant articles published in PubMed covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with or without neurologic deficit was performed. The search terms used were thoracolumbar, thoracic, lumbar, fracture, trauma and management. All relevant articles and abstracts covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with and without neurologic deficit were reviewed. Biomechanically the thoracolumbar spine is predisposed to a higher incidence of spinal injuries. Computed tomography provides adequate bony detail for assessing spinal stability while magnetic resonance imaging shows injuries to soft tissues (posterior ligamentous complex [PLC] and neurological structures. Different classification systems exist and the most recent is the AO spine knowledge forum classification of thoracolumbar trauma. Treatment includes both nonoperative and operative methods and selected based on the degree of bony injury, neurological involvement, presence of associated injuries and the integrity of the PLC. Significant advances in imaging have helped in the better understanding of thoracolumbar fractures, including information on canal morphology and injury to soft tissue structures. The ideal classification that is simple, comprehensive and guides management is still elusive. Involvement of three columns, progressive neurological deficit, significant kyphosis and canal compromise with neurological deficit are accepted indications for surgical stabilization through anterior, posterior or combined approaches.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine: comparison of 2D T2-weighted turbo spin echo, 2D T2*weighted gradient-recalled echo and 3D T2-weighted variable flip-angle turbo spin echo sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meindl, T.; Wirth, S.; Dietrich, O.; Reiser, M. [University Hospitals Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Weckbach, S.; Schoenberg, S.O. [University Hospital Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim-University of Heidelberg, Department of Clinical Radiology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    To compare an isotropic three-dimensional (3D) high-resolution T2-weighted (w) MR sequence and its reformations with conventional sequences for imaging of the cervical spine. Fifteen volunteers were examined at 1.5 T using sagittal and axial 3D T2-w, sagittal and axial 2D T2w, and axial 2D T2*w MR sequences. Axial reformations of the sagittal 3D dataset were generated (3D MPR T2w). Signal-to-noise and image homogeneity were evaluated in a phantom and in vivo. Visibility of ten anatomical structures of the cervical spine was evaluated. Artifacts were assessed. For statistical analysis, Cohen's kappa, Wilcoxon matched pairs, and t-testing were utilized. There were no significant differences in homogeneity between the sequences. Sagittal 3D T2w enabled better delineation of nerve roots, neural foramina, and intraforaminal structures compared to sagittal 2D T2w. Axial 3D T2w and axial 3D MPR T2w resulted in superior visibility of most anatomical structures compared to axial 2D T2w and comparable results to 2D T2*w concerning the spinal cord, nerve roots, intraforaminal structures, and fat. Artifacts were most pronounced in axial 2D T2w and axial 3D T2w. Acquisition of a 3D T2w data set is feasible in the cervical spine with superior delineation of anatomical structures compared to 2D sequences. (orig.)

  6. SpineData

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Kongsted, Alice; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2015-01-01

    Background: Large-scale clinical registries are increasingly recognized as important resources for quality assurance and research to inform clinical decision-making and health policy. We established a clinical registry (SpineData) in a conservative care setting where more than 10,000 new cases...... of spinal pain are assessed each year. This paper describes the SpineData registry, summarizes the characteristics of its clinical population and data, and signals the availability of these data as a resource for collaborative research projects. Methods: The SpineData registry is an Internet-based system...... that captures patient data electronically at the point of clinical contact. The setting is the government-funded Medical Department of the Spine Centre of Southern Denmark, Hospital Lillebaelt, where patients receive a multidisciplinary assessment of their chronic spinal pain. Results: Started in 2011...

  7. [Accident analytics for structural traumas of the cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, E; Elbel, M; Schultheiss, M; Kettler, A; Kinzl, L; Kramer, M

    2004-12-01

    The differentiation between degenerative syndromes of the cervical spine and post-traumatic symptoms requires accident analysis. Experiments with human subjects yield data only in the low-energy range, and there are still no accident analyses of structural traumas of the cervical spine. From 1 January 2000 to 30 April 2002, 15 patients with structural injuries to the cervical spine due to car accidents were treated in the Department of Trauma Surgery of the University of Ulm. In 11 of these cases, the DEKRA Ulm completed an appraisal of the accident process.With lateral impacts, structural injuries to the cervical spine can occur even at speeds of only ca 10 km/h. Injuries to the alar ligaments are produced by frontal collisions with substantial differences in speed. Data from accident analysis of structural injuries to the cervical spine must be taken into consideration in causality examinations of distortions of the cervical spine.

  8. Internal morphology of human facet joints: comparing cervical and lumbar spine with regard to age, gender and the vertebral core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Zanker, Daniel; Wolfram, Uwe

    2012-03-01

    Back pain constitutes a major problem in modern societies. Facet joints are increasingly recognised as a source of such pain. Knowledge about the internal morphology and its changes with age may make it possible to include the facets more in therapeutic strategies, for instance joint replacements or immobilisation. In total, 168 facets from C6/7 and L4/5 segments were scanned in a micro-computed tomography. Image analysis was used to investigate the internal morphology with regard to donor age and gender. Additional data from trabecular bone of the vertebral core allowed a semi-quantitative comparison of the morphology of the vertebral core and the facets. Porosity and pore spacing of the cortical sub-chondral bone does not appear to change with age for either males or females. In contrast, bone volume fraction decreases in females from approximately 0.4 to 0.2 , whereas it is constant in males. Trabecular thickness decreases during the ageing process in females and stays constant in males , whereas trabecular separation increases during the ageing process in both genders. The results of this study may help to improve the understanding of pathophysiological changes in the facet joints. Such results could be of value for understanding back pain and its treatment. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2012 Anatomical Society.

  9. Scalp dysesthesia related to cervical spine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornsberry, Laura A; English, Joseph C

    2013-02-01

    Scalp dysesthesia is characterized by abnormal sensations of the scalp in the absence of any other unusual physical examination findings. The pathogenesis of this condition is unknown but has been reported in the setting of underlying psychiatric disorders. Other localized pruritic syndromes, including brachioradial pruritus and notalgia paresthetica, have been associated with pathologic conditions of the spine and have been successfully treated with gabapentin. Among 15 women identified in a retrospective review of medical records as having been seen with scalp dysesthesia, 14 patients had cervical spine disease confirmed by imaging. The most common finding on imaging was degenerative disk disease, with 10 of 14 patients having these changes at C5-C6. Other abnormal imaging findings included anterolisthesis, osteophytic spurring, lordosis, kyphosis, and nerve root impingement. A gabapentin regimen (topical or oral) had been recommended to 14 patients; of 7 patients who were followed up, 4 patients noted improvement in symptoms when taking gabapentin. Patients with scalp dysesthesia also had abnormal cervical spine images. Chronic muscle tension placed on the pericranial muscles and scalp aponeurosis secondary to the underlying cervical spine disease may lead to the symptoms of scalp dysesthesia.

  10. Beyond the spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, James; Cassidy, J David; Cancelliere, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, clinical research within the chiropractic profession has focused on the spine and spinal conditions, specifically neck and low back pain. However, there is now a small group of chiropractors with clinical research training that are shifting their focus away from...... highlight recent research in these new areas and discuss how clinical research efforts in musculoskeletal areas beyond the spine can benefit patient care and the future of the chiropractic profession....

  11. Monte Carlo modeling of human tooth optical coherence tomography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Boya; Meng, Zhuo; Wang, Longzhi; Liu, Tiegen

    2013-07-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of human tooth. The model is implemented by combining the simulation of a Gaussian beam with simulation for photon propagation in a two-layer human tooth model with non-parallel surfaces through a Monte Carlo method. The geometry and the optical parameters of the human tooth model are chosen on the basis of the experimental OCT images. The results show that the simulated OCT images are qualitatively consistent with the experimental ones. Using the model, we demonstrate the following: firstly, two types of photons contribute to the information of morphological features and noise in the OCT image of a human tooth, respectively. Secondly, the critical imaging depth of the tooth model is obtained, and it is found to decrease significantly with increasing mineral loss, simulated as different enamel scattering coefficients. Finally, the best focus position is located below and close to the dental surface by analysis of the effect of focus positions on the OCT signal and critical imaging depth. We anticipate that this modeling will become a powerful and accurate tool for a preliminary numerical study of the OCT technique on diseases of dental hard tissue in human teeth.

  12. Human eye visual hyperacuity: Controlled diffraction for image resolution improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunas, A.; Domínguez, O.; Martinez-Conde, S.; Macknik, S. L.; Del-Río, C.

    2017-09-01

    The Human Visual System appears to be using a low number of sensors for image capturing, and furthermore, regarding the physical dimensions of cones—photoreceptors responsible for the sharp central vision—we may realize that these sensors are of a relatively small size and area. Nonetheless, the human eye is capable of resolving fine details thanks to visual hyperacuity and presents an impressive sensitivity and dynamic range when set against conventional digital cameras of similar characteristics. This article is based on the hypothesis that the human eye may be benefiting from diffraction to improve both image resolution and acquisition process. The developed method involves the introduction of a controlled diffraction pattern at an initial stage that enables the use of a limited number of sensors for capturing the image and makes possible a subsequent post-processing to improve the final image resolution.

  13. Human low vision image warping - Channel matching considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, Richard D.; Smith, Alan T.; Loshin, David S.

    1992-01-01

    We are investigating the possibility that a video image may productively be warped prior to presentation to a low vision patient. This could form part of a prosthesis for certain field defects. We have done preliminary quantitative studies on some notions that may be valid in calculating the image warpings. We hope the results will help make best use of time to be spent with human subjects, by guiding the selection of parameters and their range to be investigated. We liken a warping optimization to opening the largest number of spatial channels between the pixels of an input imager and resolution cells in the visual system. Some important effects are not quantified that will require human evaluation, such as local 'squashing' of the image, taken as the ratio of eigenvalues of the Jacobian of the transformation. The results indicate that the method shows quantitative promise. These results have identified some geometric transformations to evaluate further with human subjects.

  14. Image cytometer method for automated assessment of human spermatozoa concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, D L; Kjaerulff, S; Hansen, C

    2013-01-01

    to investigator bias. Here we show that image cytometry can be used to accurately measure the sperm concentration of human semen samples with great ease and reproducibility. The impact of several factors (pipetting, mixing, round cell content, sperm concentration), which can influence the read-out as well...... as inter-operator and -cytometer variation on two different image cytometers (NC-3000 and SP-100) were evaluated. Furthermore, 725 semen samples were assessed both by manual assessment (WHO recommended method) and by image cytometry and tight correlations between the measured concentrations were shown....... Moreover, by evaluation of repeated measurements it appeared that image cytometry produced more consistent and accurate measurements than manual counting of human spermatozoa concentration. In conclusion, image cytometry provides an appealing substitute of manual counting by providing reliable, robust...

  15. Upright positional MRI of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alyas, F.; Connell, D. [London Upright MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [London Upright MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)], E-mail: asif.saifuddin@rnoh.nhs.uk

    2008-09-15

    Supine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely used in the assessment of low back pain and radiculopathy. However, imaging findings often correlate poorly with clinical findings. This is partly related to the positional dependence of spinal stenosis, which reflects dynamic changes in soft-tissue structures (ligaments, disc, dural sac, epidural fat, and nerve roots). Upright MRI in the flexed, extended, rotated, standing, and bending positions, allows patients to reproduce the positions that bring about their symptoms and may uncover MRI findings that were not visible with routine supine imaging. Assessment of the degree of spinal stability in the degenerate and postoperative lumbar spine is also possible. The aim of this review was to present the current literature concerning both the normal and symptomatic spine as imaged using upright MRI and to illustrate the above findings using clinical examples.

  16. Human Pose Estimation from Monocular Images: A Comprehensive Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wenjuan; Zhang, Xuena; Gonzàlez, Jordi; Sobral, Andrews; Bouwmans, Thierry; Tu, Changhe; Zahzah, El-hadi

    2016-01-01

    Human pose estimation refers to the estimation of the location of body parts and how they are connected in an image. Human pose estimation from monocular images has wide applications (e.g., image indexing). Several surveys on human pose estimation can be found in the literature, but they focus on a certain category; for example, model-based approaches or human motion analysis, etc. As far as we know, an overall review of this problem domain has yet to be provided. Furthermore, recent advancements based on deep learning have brought novel algorithms for this problem. In this paper, a comprehensive survey of human pose estimation from monocular images is carried out including milestone works and recent advancements. Based on one standard pipeline for the solution of computer vision problems, this survey splits the problem into several modules: feature extraction and description, human body models, and modeling methods. Problem modeling methods are approached based on two means of categorization in this survey. One way to categorize includes top-down and bottom-up methods, and another way includes generative and discriminative methods. Considering the fact that one direct application of human pose estimation is to provide initialization for automatic video surveillance, there are additional sections for motion-related methods in all modules: motion features, motion models, and motion-based methods. Finally, the paper also collects 26 publicly available data sets for validation and provides error measurement methods that are frequently used. PMID:27898003

  17. Investigating Human Evolution Using Digital Imaging & Craniometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Human evolution is an important and intriguing area of biology. The significance of evolution as a component of biology curricula, at all levels, can not be overstated; the need to make the most of opportunities to effectively educate students in evolution as a central and unifying realm of biology is paramount. Developing engaging laboratory or…

  18. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-11-10

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets.

  19. Multilevel depth and image fusion for human activity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bingbing; Pei, Yong; Moulin, Pierre; Yan, Shuicheng

    2013-10-01

    Recognizing complex human activities usually requires the detection and modeling of individual visual features and the interactions between them. Current methods only rely on the visual features extracted from 2-D images, and therefore often lead to unreliable salient visual feature detection and inaccurate modeling of the interaction context between individual features. In this paper, we show that these problems can be addressed by combining data from a conventional camera and a depth sensor (e.g., Microsoft Kinect). We propose a novel complex activity recognition and localization framework that effectively fuses information from both grayscale and depth image channels at multiple levels of the video processing pipeline. In the individual visual feature detection level, depth-based filters are applied to the detected human/object rectangles to remove false detections. In the next level of interaction modeling, 3-D spatial and temporal contexts among human subjects or objects are extracted by integrating information from both grayscale and depth images. Depth information is also utilized to distinguish different types of indoor scenes. Finally, a latent structural model is developed to integrate the information from multiple levels of video processing for an activity detection. Extensive experiments on two activity recognition benchmarks (one with depth information) and a challenging grayscale + depth human activity database that contains complex interactions between human-human, human-object, and human-surroundings demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed multilevel grayscale + depth fusion scheme. Higher recognition and localization accuracies are obtained relative to the previous methods.

  20. [Human physiology: images and practices of the reflex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wübben, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    The essay examines the function of visualizations and practices in the formation of the reflex concept from Thomas Willis to Marshall Hall. It focuses on the specific form of reflex knowledge that images and practices can contain. In addition, the essay argues that it is through visual representations and experimental practices that technical knowledge is transferred to the field of human reflex physiology. When using technical metaphors in human physiology authors often seem to feel obliged to draw distinctions between humans, machines and animals. On closer scrutiny, these distinctions sometimes fail to establish firm borders between the human and the technical.

  1. Neuronavigation in minimally invasive spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Ziev B; Mayer, Rory R; Strickland, Benjamin A; Kretzer, Ryan M; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Baaj, Ali A

    2013-08-01

    Parallel advancements in image guidance technology and minimal access techniques continue to push the frontiers of minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS). While traditional intraoperative imaging remains widely used, newer platforms, such as 3D-fluoroscopy, cone-beam CT, and intraoperative CT/MRI, have enabled safer, more accurate instrumentation placement with less radiation exposure to the surgeon. The goal of this work is to provide a review of the current uses of advanced image guidance in MISS. The authors searched PubMed for relevant articles concerning MISS, with particular attention to the use of image-guidance platforms. Pertinent studies published in English were further compiled and characterized into relevant analyses of MISS of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral regions. Fifty-two studies were included for review. These describe the use of the iso-C system for 3D navigation during C1-2 transarticular screw placement, the use of endoscopic techniques in the cervical spine, and the role of navigation guidance at the occipital-cervical junction. The authors discuss the evolving literature concerning neuronavigation during pedicle screw placement in the thoracic and lumbar spine in the setting of infection, trauma, and deformity surgery and review the use of image guidance in transsacral approaches. Refinements in image-guidance technologies and minimal access techniques have converged on spinal pathology, affording patients the ability to undergo safe, accurate operations without the associated morbidities of conventional approaches. While percutaneous transpedicular screw placement is among the most common procedures to benefit from navigation, other areas of spine surgery can benefit from advances in neuronavigation and further growth in the field of image-guided MISS is anticipated.

  2. Silhouette extraction from human gait images sequence using cosegmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyan; Zhang, Yi

    2012-11-01

    Gait based human identification is very useful for automatic person recognize through visual surveillance and has attracted more and more researchers. A key step in gait based human identification is to extract human silhouette from images sequence. Current silhouette extraction methods are mainly based on simple color subtraction. These methods have a very poor performance when the color of some body parts is similar to the background. In this paper a cosegmentation based human silhouette extraction method is proposed. Cosegmentation is typically defined as the task of jointly segmenting "something similar" in a given set of images. We can divide the human gait images sequence into several step cycles and every step cycle consist of 10-15 frames. The frames in human gait images sequence have following similarity: every frame is similar to the next or previous frame; every frame is similar to the corresponding frame in the next or previous step cycle; every pixel can find similar pixel in other frames. The progress of cosegmentation based human silhouette extraction can be described as follows: Initially only points which have high contrast to background are used as foreground kernel points, the points in the background are used as background kernel points, then points similar to foreground points will be added to foreground points set and the points similar to background points will be added to background points set. The definition of the similarity consider the context of the point. Experimental result shows that our method has a better performance comparing to traditional human silhouette extraction methods. Keywords: Human gait

  3. Comparison of Helical tomotherapy and Cyberknife in Spine Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Nam; Yoon, Se Chul; Chi, Byung Ok; Jng, Hong Suk; Sohn, Suk Hyun [Seoul ST.Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Gee Young; Shin, Heon Ju; Choi, Ilbong; Gea, Cheol Seong [Incheon ST.Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Jong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this study is planning comparison of helicaltomotherapy and Cyber knife in spine radiosurgery. Spine radiosurgery is an alternative to invasive spine surgery. The tomotherapy is megavoltage CT(MVCT) based image guided helical IMRT delivery system. The cyberknife using robotic arm and image guided based fiducial marker killo voltage X-ray image. The helical tomotherapy is modulated by a 64-multileaf collimator that has paired, pneumatically driven, 6.25-mm-wide leaves calculated to open or close at approximately every 7 .deg. of LINAC rotation, or 51 times per gantry rotation. But cyber knife use 100 or more than bean path. Although, cord maximum dose in CKP is lower than HTP, target homogeneity in HTP is better than CKP. Target coverage is 85% in CKP, 92% in HTP. It was benefit of helical radiation therapy. Tomotheapy and cyberknife are useful equipment to spine radiosurgery.

  4. Image Fusion Algorithms Using Human Visual System in Transform Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadhi, Radhika; Swamy Kilari, Veera; Samayamantula, Srinivas Kumar

    2017-08-01

    The endeavor of digital image fusion is to combine the important visual parts from various sources to advance the visibility eminence of the image. The fused image has a more visual quality than any source images. In this paper, the Human Visual System (HVS) weights are used in the transform domain to select appropriate information from various source images and then to attain a fused image. In this process, mainly two steps are involved. First, apply the DWT to the registered source images. Later, identify qualitative sub-bands using HVS weights. Hence, qualitative sub-bands are selected from different sources to form high quality HVS based fused image. The quality of the HVS based fused image is evaluated with general fusion metrics. The results show the superiority among the state-of-the art resolution Transforms (MRT) such as Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT), Contourlet Transform (CT), and Non Sub Sampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT) using maximum selection fusion rule.

  5. Hippocrates. The father of spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marketos, S G; Skiadas, P

    1999-07-01

    Hippocrates (5th-4th century B. C.), the founder of scientific medicine, left a valuable heritage of knowledge and methodology, which extends to almost all branches of modern medicine. Among the many fields of medicine he explored, he devoted much of his scientific interest to the study of orthopedics. In fact, some of the principles found in the Hippocratic treatises On Fractures and On Joints are still valid today. This great physician also was the first to deal with the anatomy and the pathology of human spine. In his books, he provides a precise description of the segments and the normal curves of the spine, the structure of the vertebrae, the tendons attached to them, the blood supply to the spine, and even its anatomic relations to adjacent vessels. The Hippocratic list of spinal diseases includes tuberculous spondylitis, post-traumatic kyphosis, scoliosis, concussion, dislocations of the vertebrae, and fractures of the spinous processes. Hippocrates devised two apparatuses, known as the Hippocratic ladder and the Hippocratic board, to reduce displaced vertebrae. Those pioneer methods are deemed to be the precursors to the sophisticated techniques used in spine surgery today. Because of his thorough study of spinal diseases and their management, which was the first such study in orthopedics in the history of medicine, Hippocrates should be regarded as the father of spine surgery.

  6. Imaging Cytometry of Human Leukocytes with Third Harmonic Generation Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Ham; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Huang, Shih-Hung; Lin, Jong-Wei; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Wu, Hau-Tieng; Wu, Yao-Ming; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Based on third-harmonic-generation (THG) microscopy and a k-means clustering algorithm, we developed a label-free imaging cytometry method to differentiate and determine the types of human leukocytes. According to the size and average intensity of cells in THG images, in a two-dimensional scatter plot, the neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes in peripheral blood samples from healthy volunteers were clustered into three differentiable groups. Using these features in THG images, we could count the number of each of the three leukocyte types both in vitro and in vivo. The THG imaging-based counting results agreed well with conventional blood count results. In the future, we believe that the combination of this THG microscopy-based imaging cytometry approach with advanced texture analysis of sub-cellular features can differentiate and count more types of blood cells with smaller quantities of blood.

  7. Processed images in human perception: A case study in ultrasound breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Moi Hoon [Department of Computer Science, Loughborough University, FH09, Ergonomics and Safety Research Institute, Holywell Park (United Kingdom)], E-mail: M.H.Yap@lboro.ac.uk; Edirisinghe, Eran [Department of Computer Science, Loughborough University, FJ.05, Garendon Wing, Holywell Park, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Bez, Helmut [Department of Computer Science, Loughborough University, Room N.2.26, Haslegrave Building, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    Two main research efforts in early detection of breast cancer include the development of software tools to assist radiologists in identifying abnormalities and the development of training tools to enhance their skills. Medical image analysis systems, widely known as Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CADx) systems, play an important role in this respect. Often it is important to determine whether there is a benefit in including computer-processed images in the development of such software tools. In this paper, we investigate the effects of computer-processed images in improving human performance in ultrasound breast cancer detection (a perceptual task) and classification (a cognitive task). A survey was conducted on a group of expert radiologists and a group of non-radiologists. In our experiments, random test images from a large database of ultrasound images were presented to subjects. In order to gather appropriate formal feedback, questionnaires were prepared to comment on random selections of original images only, and on image pairs consisting of original images displayed alongside computer-processed images. We critically compare and contrast the performance of the two groups according to perceptual and cognitive tasks. From a Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) analysis, we conclude that the provision of computer-processed images alongside the original ultrasound images, significantly improve the perceptual tasks of non-radiologists but only marginal improvements are shown in the perceptual and cognitive tasks of the group of expert radiologists.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging localization with cod liver oil capsules for the minimally invasive approach to small intradural extramedullary tumors of the thoracolumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turel, Mazda K; Rajshekhar, Vedantam

    2014-12-01

    Accurate intraoperative localization of small intradural extramedullary thoracolumbar (T-1 to L-3 level) spinal cord tumors is vital when minimally invasive techniques, such as hemilaminectomy, are used to excise these lesions. In this study, the authors describe a simple and effective method of preoperative MRI localization of small intradural extramedullary tumors using cod liver oil capsules. Thirty-five patients with intradural tumors underwent preoperative MRI localization the evening prior to surgery. Patients were positioned prone in the MRI gantry, mimicking the intraoperative position. Nine capsules were placed in 3 rows to cover the lesion. This localization was used to guide the level for a minimally invasive approach using a hemilaminectomy to excise these tumors. The mean patient age was 51.5 ± 14.3 years, and the mean body mass index was 24.1 ± 3.5 kg/m(2). Twenty-two tumors involved the thoracic spine, and 13 involved the upper lumbar spine from L-1 to L-3. The mean tumor size was 2.2 ± 1.0 cm. Localization was accurate in 34 patients (97.1%). Accurate localization with the described method is quick, safe, cost-effective, and noninvasive with no exposure to radiation. It also reduces operating time by eliminating the need for intraoperative fluoroscopy.

  9. Asymptomatic cervical spine fractures: Current guidelines can fail older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Christopher D; Spilman, Sarah K; King, Bradley D; Sherrill, Joseph E; Pelaez, Carlos A

    2017-07-01

    Older adults represent a growing proportion of trauma patients treated in the United States, and cervical spine (c-spine) fracture is an injury that is increasingly common in this population. Neck pain is a major component of current clinical clearance guidelines, but some older adults with c-spine fractures report no neck pain after injury. The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency at which c-spine fractures were unassociated with neck pain in an aging population. A retrospective review was performed for patients 55 years or older with a c-spine fracture during a 4-year study period. All patients had a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15 and were considered asymptomatic if they did not complain of neck pain on initial presentation, denied tenderness to palpation of the c-spine on examination, and were without neurologic deficit. Differences between groups were assessed with Kruskal-Wallis and χ tests. Of 173 patients with c-spine fractures, 36 (21%) were asymptomatic and reported no neck pain on presentation or on examination. The group without neck pain had higher median injury severity scores (15 vs 10; p guidelines, denial of pain may lead to missed injury. We recommend liberal c-spine imaging for older trauma patients with significant mechanism of trauma. Therapeutic study, level III.

  10. Tuberculosis of the cervical spine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis of the cervical spine is rare, comprising 3 -. 5% of cases of tuberculosis of the spine. Eight patients with tuberculosis of the cervicaJ spine seen during 1989 -. 1992 were reviewed. They all presented with neck pain. The 4 children presented with a kyphotic deformity. In all the children the disease was extensive, ...

  11. A human visual based binarization technique for histological images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreyas, Kamath K. M.; Rajendran, Rahul; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos

    2017-05-01

    In the field of vision-based systems for object detection and classification, thresholding is a key pre-processing step. Thresholding is a well-known technique for image segmentation. Segmentation of medical images, such as Computed Axial Tomography (CAT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), X-Ray, Phase Contrast Microscopy, and Histological images, present problems like high variability in terms of the human anatomy and variation in modalities. Recent advances made in computer-aided diagnosis of histological images help facilitate detection and classification of diseases. Since most pathology diagnosis depends on the expertise and ability of the pathologist, there is clearly a need for an automated assessment system. Histological images are stained to a specific color to differentiate each component in the tissue. Segmentation and analysis of such images is problematic, as they present high variability in terms of color and cell clusters. This paper presents an adaptive thresholding technique that aims at segmenting cell structures from Haematoxylin and Eosin stained images. The thresholded result can further be used by pathologists to perform effective diagnosis. The effectiveness of the proposed method is analyzed by visually comparing the results to the state of art thresholding methods such as Otsu, Niblack, Sauvola, Bernsen, and Wolf. Computer simulations demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method in segmenting critical information.

  12. Computer simulation and image guidance for individualised dynamic spinal stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantelhardt, S R; Hausen, U; Kosterhon, M; Amr, A N; Gruber, K; Giese, A

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic implants for the human spine are used to re-establish regular segmental motion. However, the results have often been unsatisfactory and complications such as screw loosening are common. Individualisation of appliances and precision implantation are needed to improve the outcome of this procedure. Computer simulation, virtual implant optimisation and image guidance were used to improve the technique. A human lumbar spine computer model was developed using multi-body simulation software. The model simulates spinal motion under load and degenerative changes. After virtual degeneration of a L4/5 segment, virtual pedicle screw-based implants were introduced. The implants' positions and properties were iteratively optimised. The resulting implant positions were used as operative plan for image guidance and finally implemented in a physical spine model. In the simulation, the introduction and optimisation of virtually designed dynamic implants could partly compensate for the effects of virtual lumbar segment degeneration. The optimised operative plan was exported to two different image-guidance systems for transfer to a physical spine model. Three-dimensional computer graphic simulation is a feasible means to develop operative plans for dynamic spinal stabilization. These operative plans can be transferred to commercially available image-guidance systems for use in implantation of physical implants in a spine model. This concept has important potential in the design of operative plans and implants for individualised dynamic spine stabilization surgery.

  13. Human movement analysis with image processing in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvet, Eric; Paindavoine, Michel; Cannard, F.

    1991-04-01

    In the field of the human sciences, a lot of applications needs to know the kinematic characteristics of the human movements Psycology is associating the characteristics with the control mechanism, sport and biomechariics are associating them with the performance of the sportman or of the patient. So the trainers or the doctors can correct the gesture of the subject to obtain a better performance if he knows the motion properties. Roherton's studies show the children motion evolution2 . Several investigations methods are able to measure the human movement But now most of the studies are based on image processing. Often the systems are working at the T.V. standard (50 frame per secund ). they permit only to study very slow gesture. A human operator analyses the digitizing sequence of the film manually giving a very expensive, especially long and unprecise operation. On these different grounds many human movement analysis systems were implemented. They consist of: - markers which are fixed to the anatomical interesting points on the subject in motion, - Image compression which is the art to coding picture data. Generally the compression Is limited to the centroid coordinates calculation tor each marker. These systems differ from one other in image acquisition and markers detection.

  14. MRI of cervical spine injuries complicating ankylosing spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivikko, Mika P.; Koskinen, Seppo K. [Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Toeoeloe Hospital, Department of Radiology, Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-09-15

    The objective was to study characteristic MRI findings in cervical spine fractures complicating ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Technical issues related to MRI are also addressed. A review of 6,774 consecutive cervical spine multidetector CT (MDCT) scans obtained during 6.2 years revealed 33 ankylosed spines studied for suspected acute cervical spine injury complicating AS. Of these, 20 patients also underwent MRI. On MRI, of these 20 patients, 19 had a total of 29 cervical and upper thoracic spine fractures. Of 20 transverse fractures traversing both anterior and posterior columns, 7 were transdiskal and exhibited less bone marrow edema than did those traversing vertebral bodies. One Jefferson's, 1 atlas posterior arch (Jefferson's on MDCT), 2 odontoid process, and 5 non-contiguous spinous process fractures were detectable. MRI showed 2 fractures that were undetected by MDCT, and conversely, MDCT detected 6 fractures not seen on MRI; 16 patients had spinal cord findings ranging from impingement and contusion to complete transection. Magnetic resonance imaging can visualize unstable fractures of the cervical and upper thoracic spine. Paravertebral hemorrhages and any ligamentous injuries should alert radiologists to seek transverse fractures. Multiple fractures are common and often complicated by spinal cord injuries. Diagnostic images can be obtained with a flexible multipurpose coil if the use of standard spine array coil is impossible due to a rigid collar or excessive kyphosis. (orig.)

  15. Monitoring human melanocytic cell responses to piperine using multispectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatham, Ravikant; Phillips, Kevin G.; Sonka, Julia; Yelma, Aznegashe; Reddy, Neha; Vanka, Meenakshi; Thuillier, Philippe; Soumyanath, Amala; Jacques, Steven

    2011-03-01

    Vitiligo is a depigmentary disease characterized by melanocyte loss attributed most commonly to autoimmune mechanisms. Currently vitiligo has a high incidence (1% worldwide) but a poor set of treatment options. Piperine, a compound found in black pepper, is a potential treatment for the depigmentary skin disease vitiligo, due to its ability to stimulate mouse epidermal melanocyte proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The present study investigates the use of multispectral imaging and an image processing technique based on local contrast to quantify the stimulatory effects of piperine on human melanocyte proliferation in reconstructed epidermis. We demonstrate the ability of the imaging method to quantify increased pigmentation in response to piperine treatment. The quantization of melanocyte stimulation by the proposed imaging technique illustrates the potential use of this technology to quickly assess therapeutic responses of vitiligo tissue culture models to treatment non-invasively.

  16. Spinal imaging and image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    This book is instrumental to building a bridge between scientists and clinicians in the field of spine imaging by introducing state-of-the-art computational methods in the context of clinical applications.  Spine imaging via computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and other radiologic imaging modalities, is essential for noninvasively visualizing and assessing spinal pathology. Computational methods support and enhance the physician’s ability to utilize these imaging techniques for diagnosis, non-invasive treatment, and intervention in clinical practice. Chapters cover a broad range of topics encompassing radiological imaging modalities, clinical imaging applications for common spine diseases, image processing, computer-aided diagnosis, quantitative analysis, data reconstruction and visualization, statistical modeling, image-guided spine intervention, and robotic surgery. This volume serves a broad audience as  contributions were written by both clinicians and researchers, which reflects the inte...

  17. Tryptophan autofluorescence imaging of neoplasms of the human colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Bhaskar; Renkoski, Timothy; Graves, Logan R.; Rial, Nathaniel S.; Tsikitis, Vassiliki Liana; Nfonsom, Valentine; Pugh, Judith; Tiwari, Piyush; Gavini, Hemanth; Utzinger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Detection of flat neoplasia is a major challenge in colorectal cancer screening, as missed lesions can lead to the development of an unexpected `incident' cancer prior to the subsequent endoscopy. The use of a tryptophan-related autofluorescence has been reported to be increased in murine intestinal dysplasia. The emission spectra of cells isolated from human adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa of the colon were studied and showed markedly greater emission intensity from cancerous cells compared to cells obtained from the surrounding normal mucosa. A proto-type multispectral imaging system optimized for ultraviolet macroscopic imaging of tissue was used to obtain autofluorescence images of surgical specimens of colonic neoplasms and normal mucosa after resection. Fluorescence images did not display the expected greater emission from the tumor as compared to the normal mucosa, most probably due to increased optical absorption and scattering in the tumors. Increased fluorescence intensity in neoplasms was observed however, once fluorescence images were corrected using reflectance images. Tryptophan fluorescence alone may be useful in differentiating normal and cancerous cells, while in tissues its autofluorescence image divided by green reflectance may be useful in displaying neoplasms.

  18. Ratio images and ultraviolet C excitation in autofluorescence imaging of neoplasms of the human colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkoski, Timothy E.; Banerjee, Bhaskar; Graves, Logan R.; Rial, Nathaniel S.; Reid, Sirandon A. H.; Tsikitis, Vassiliki Liana; Nfonsam, Valentine N.; Tiwari, Piyush; Gavini, Hemanth; Utzinger, Urs

    2013-01-01

    The accepted screening technique for colon cancer is white light endoscopy. While most abnormal growths (lesions) are detected by this method, a significant number are missed during colonoscopy, potentially resulting in advanced disease. Missed lesions are often flat and inconspicuous in color. A prototype ultraviolet spectral imager measuring autofluorescence (AF) and reflectance has been developed and applied in a study of 21 fresh human colon surgical specimens. Six excitation wavelengths from 280 to 440 nm and formulaic ratio imaging were utilized to increase lesion contrast and cause neoplasms to appear bright compared to normal tissue. It was found that in the subset of lesions which were most difficult to visualize in standard color photographs [low contrast lesions, (LCLs)] a ratio image (F340/F440) of AF images excited at 340 and 440 nm produced extraordinary images and was effective in about 70% of these difficult cases. Contrast may be due to increased levels of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, increased hemoglobin absorption, and reduced signal from submucosal collagen. A second successful ratio image (R480/R555) combined two reflectance images to produce exceptional images especially in particular LCLs where F340/F440 was ineffective. The newly discovered ratio images can potentially improve detection rate in screening with a novel AF colonoscope.

  19. The equine cervical spine: comparing MRI and contrast-enhanced CT images with anatomic slices in the sagittal, dorsal, and transverse plane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleutjens, J.; Cooley, A.J.; Sampson, S.N.; Wijnberg, Inge; Back, Wim; Kolk, van der, J.H.; .Swiderski, , C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The impact of cervical pathology on performance is of great importance to the horse industry. Accurate diagnosis of cervical disease with imaging modalities, including computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires thorough appreciation of normal cervical

  20. Adding Image Constraints to Inverse Kinematics for Human Motion Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaume-i-Capó, Antoni; Varona, Javier; González-Hidalgo, Manuel; Perales, Francisco J.

    2009-12-01

    In order to study human motion in biomechanical applications, a critical component is to accurately obtain the 3D joint positions of the user's body. Computer vision and inverse kinematics are used to achieve this objective without markers or special devices attached to the body. The problem of these systems is that the inverse kinematics is "blinded" with respect to the projection of body segments into the images used by the computer vision algorithms. In this paper, we present how to add image constraints to inverse kinematics in order to estimate human motion. Specifically, we explain how to define a criterion to use images in order to guide the posture reconstruction of the articulated chain. Tests with synthetic images show how the scheme performs well in an ideal situation. In order to test its potential in real situations, more experiments with task specific image sequences are also presented. By means of a quantitative study of different sequences, the results obtained show how this approach improves the performance of inverse kinematics in this application.

  1. Structural health monitoring (vibration) as a tool for identifying structural alterations of the lumbar spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawchuk, Gregory N; Hartvigsen, Jan; Edgecombe, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an engineering technique used to identify mechanical abnormalities not readily apparent through other means. Recently, SHM has been adapted for use in biological systems, but its invasive nature limits its clinical application. As such, the purpose of this pr......Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an engineering technique used to identify mechanical abnormalities not readily apparent through other means. Recently, SHM has been adapted for use in biological systems, but its invasive nature limits its clinical application. As such, the purpose...... of this project was to determine if a non-invasive form of SHM could identify structural alterations in the spines of living human subjects. Lumbar spines of 10 twin pairs were visualized by magnetic resonance imaging then assessed by a blinded radiologist to determine whether twin pairs were structurally...

  2. [MRT diagnosis for degenerative changes in the spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, T; Quäschling, U; Engelbrecht, V

    2004-08-01

    MRT is very well suited to the diagnosis of degenerative alterations in the spine. The option of imaging in multiple planes, the excellent soft-tissue contrast offering tissue differentiation, the absence of hardening artefacts and the avoidance of exposure to radiation have led to a shift in favour of MRT for diagnosis. In the present paper the MRT characteristics of the most important degenerative alterations that affect the spine are discussed.

  3. Visualization of scoliotic spine using ultrasound-accessible skeletal landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Ben; Lasso, Andras; Schlenger, Christopher; Borschneck, Daniel P.; Mousavi, Parvin; Fichtinger, Gabor; Ungi, Tamas

    2017-03-01

    PURPOSE: Ultrasound imaging is an attractive alternative to X-ray for scoliosis diagnosis and monitoring due to its safety and inexpensiveness. The transverse processes as skeletal landmarks are accessible by means of ultrasound and are sufficient for quantifying scoliosis, but do not provide an informative visualization of the spine. METHODS: We created a method for visualization of the scoliotic spine using a 3D transform field, resulting from thin-spline interpolation of a landmark-based registration between the transverse processes that we localized in both the patient's ultrasound and an average healthy spine model. Additional anchor points were computationally generated to control the thin-spline interpolation, in order to gain a transform field that accurately represents the deformation of the patient's spine. The transform field is applied to the average spine model, resulting in a 3D surface model depicting the patient's spine. We applied ground truth CT from pediatric scoliosis patients in which we reconstructed the bone surface and localized the transverse processes. We warped the average spine model and analyzed the match between the patient's bone surface and the warped spine. RESULTS: Visual inspection revealed accurate rendering of the scoliotic spine. Notable misalignments occurred mainly in the anterior-posterior direction, and at the first and last vertebrae, which is immaterial for scoliosis quantification. The average Hausdorff distance computed for 4 patients was 2.6 mm. CONCLUSIONS: We achieved qualitatively accurate and intuitive visualization to depict the 3D deformation of the patient's spine when compared to ground truth CT.

  4. Microstructure imaging of human rectal mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, N R; Chen, J X; Zhuo, S M; Zheng, L Q; Jiang, X S [Institute of Laser and Optoelectronics Technology, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine of Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou (China); Chen, G [Department of Pathology, Fujian Provincial Tumor Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Yan, J, E-mail: chenjianxin@fjnu.edu.cn, E-mail: ynjun@yahoo.com [Department of Surgery, Fujian Provincial Tumor Hospital, Fuzhou (China)

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has high resolution and sensitivity. In this study, MPM was used to image microstructure of human rectal mucosa. The morphology and distribution of the main components in mucosa layer, absorptive cells and goblet cells in the epithelium, abundant intestinal glands in the lamina propria and smooth muscle fibers in the muscularis mucosa were clearly monitored. The variations of these components were tightly relevant to the pathology in gastrointestine system, especially early rectal cancer. The obtained images will be helpful for the diagnosis of early colorectal cancer.

  5. Three-dimensional microtomographic imaging of human brain cortex

    CERN Document Server

    Mizutania, Ryuta; Uesugi, Kentaro; Ohyama, Masami; Takekoshi, Susumu; Osamura, R Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an x-ray microtomographic technique for imaging the three-dimensional structure of the human cerebral cortex. Neurons in the brain constitute a neural circuit as a three-dimensional network. The brain tissue is composed of light elements that give little contrast in a hard x-ray transmission image. The contrast was enhanced by staining neural cells with metal compounds. The obtained structure revealed the microarchitecture of the gray and white matter regions of the frontal cortex, which is responsible for the higher brain functions.

  6. How does image noise affect actual and predicted human gaze allocation in assessing image quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrbein, Florian; Goddard, Peter; Schneider, Michael; James, Georgina; Guo, Kun

    2015-07-01

    A central research question in natural vision is how to allocate fixation to extract informative cues for scene perception. With high quality images, psychological and computational studies have made significant progress to understand and predict human gaze allocation in scene exploration. However, it is unclear whether these findings can be generalised to degraded naturalistic visual inputs. In this eye-tracking and computational study, we methodically distorted both man-made and natural scenes with Gaussian low-pass filter, circular averaging filter and Additive Gaussian white noise, and monitored participants' gaze behaviour in assessing perceived image qualities. Compared with original high quality images, distorted images attracted fewer numbers of fixations but longer fixation durations, shorter saccade distance and stronger central fixation bias. This impact of image noise manipulation on gaze distribution was mainly determined by noise intensity rather than noise type, and was more pronounced for natural scenes than for man-made scenes. We furthered compared four high performing visual attention models in predicting human gaze allocation in degraded scenes, and found that model performance lacked human-like sensitivity to noise type and intensity, and was considerably worse than human performance measured as inter-observer variance. Furthermore, the central fixation bias is a major predictor for human gaze allocation, which becomes more prominent with increased noise intensity. Our results indicate a crucial role of external noise intensity in determining scene-viewing gaze behaviour, which should be considered in the development of realistic human-vision-inspired attention models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The top 100 classic papers in lumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Jeremy; Skovrlj, Branko; Caridi, John M; Cho, Samuel K

    2015-05-15

    Bibliometric review of the literature. To analyze and quantify the most frequently cited papers in lumbar spine surgery and to measure their impact on the entire lumbar spine literature. Lumbar spine surgery is a dynamic and complex field. Basic science and clinical research remain paramount in understanding and advancing the field. While new literature is published at increasing rates, few studies make long-lasting impacts. The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all papers relevant to lumbar spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each paper. The most cited paper was found to be the classic paper from 1990 by Boden et al that described magnetic resonance imaging findings in individuals without back pain, sciatica, and neurogenic claudication showing that spinal stenosis and herniated discs can be incidentally found when scanning patients. The second most cited study similarly showed that asymptomatic patients who underwent lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging frequently had lumbar pathology. The third most cited paper was the 2000 publication of Fairbank and Pynsent reviewing the Oswestry Disability Index, the outcome-measure questionnaire most commonly used to evaluate low back pain. The majority of the papers originate in the United States (n=58), and most were published in Spine (n=63). Most papers were published in the 1990s (n=49), and the 3 most common topics were low back pain, biomechanics, and disc degeneration. This report identifies the top 100 papers in lumbar spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the lumbar spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in lumbar spine surgery today. 3.

  8. Contextual Learning Induces Dendritic Spine Clustering in Retrosplenial Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular and electrophysiological studies find convergent evidence suggesting that plasticity within a dendritic tree is not randomly dispersed, but rather clustered into functional groups. Further, results from in silico neuronal modeling show that clustered plasticity is able to increase storage capacity 45 times compared to dispersed plasticity. Recent in vivo work utilizing chronic 2-photon microscopy tested the clustering hypothesis and showed that repetitive motor learning is able to induce clustered addition of new dendritic spines on apical dendrites of L5 neurons in primary motor cortex; moreover, clustered spines were found to be more stable than non-clustered spines, suggesting a physiological role for spine clustering. To further test this hypothesis we used in vivo 2-photon imaging in Thy1-YFP-H mice to chronically examine dendritic spine dynamics in retrosplenial cortex (RSC during spatial learning. RSC is a key component of an extended spatial learning and memory circuit that includes hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. Importantly, RSC is known from both lesion and immediate early gene studies to be critically involved in spatial learning and more specifically in contextual fear conditioning. We utilized a modified contextual fear conditioning protocol wherein animals received a mild foot shock each day for five days; this protocol induces gradual increases in context freezing over several days before the animals reach a behavioral plateau. We coupled behavioral training with four separate in vivo imaging sessions, two before training begins, one early in training, and a final session after training is complete. This allowed us to image spine dynamics before training as well as early in learning and after animals had reached behavioral asymptote. We find that this contextual learning protocol induces a statistically significant increase in the formation of clusters of new dendritic spines in trained animals when compared to home

  9. Experience With Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging Of Human Atherosclerotic Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallery, John A.; Gessert, James M.; Maciel, Mario; Tobis, John M.; Griffith, James M.; Berns, Michael W.; Henry, Walter L.

    1989-08-01

    Normal human arteries have a well-defined structure on intravascular images. The intima appears very thin and is most likely represented by a bright reflection arising from the internal elastic lamina. The smooth muscle tunica media is echo-lucent on the ultrasound image and appears as a dark band separating the intima from the adventitia. The adventitia is a brightly reflective layer of variable thickness. The thickness of the intima, and therefore of the atherosclerotic plaque can be accurately measured from the ultrasound images and correlates well with histology. Calcification within the wall of arteries is seen as bright echo reflection with shadowing of the peripheral wall. Fibrotic regions are highly reflective but do not shadow. Necrotic liquid regions within advanced atherosclerotic plaques are seen on ultrasound images as large lucent zones surrounded by echogenic tissue. Imaging can be performed before and after interventional procedures, such as laser angioplasty, balloon angioplasty and atherectomy. Intravascular ultrasound appears to provide an imaging modality for identifying the histologic characteristics of diseased arteries and for quantifying plaque thickness. It might be possible to perform such quantification to evaluate the results of interventional procedures.

  10. Cactus spine granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkan, Vandana K; Abraham, Tonya; Lesher, Jack L

    2007-03-01

    We describe the case of a 45-year-old woman with a 2-week history of painful erythematous papules on the palmar aspect of the fingertips of her right hand, resulting from contact with a cholla cactus 3 weeks prior in Arizona. The patient initially was given clobetasol propionate ointment, resulting in some improvement; however, the lesions resolved only after punch biopsies were performed to confirm the diagnosis of cactus spine granuloma.

  11. Rendering the Topological Spines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieves-Rivera, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Many tools to analyze and represent high dimensional data already exits yet most of them are not flexible, informative and intuitive enough to help the scientists make the corresponding analysis and predictions, understand the structure and complexity of scientific data, get a complete picture of it and explore a greater number of hypotheses. With this in mind, N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization (ND²AV) is being developed to serve as an interactive visual analysis platform with the purpose of coupling together a number of these existing tools that range from statistics, machine learning, and data mining, with new techniques, in particular with new visualization approaches. My task is to create the rendering and implementation of a new concept called topological spines in order to extend ND²AV's scope. Other existing visualization tools create a representation preserving either the topological properties or the structural (geometric) ones because it is challenging to preserve them both simultaneously. Overcoming such challenge by creating a balance in between them, the topological spines are introduced as a new approach that aims to preserve them both. Its render using OpenGL and C++ and is currently being tested to further on be implemented on ND²AV. In this paper I will present what are the Topological Spines and how they are rendered.

  12. High-resolution ZTE imaging of human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiger, Markus; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Bracher, Anna-Katinka; Köhler, Sascha; Lehmann, Volker; Wolfram, Uwe; Hennel, Franciszek; Rasche, Volker

    2012-10-01

    MRI with zero echo time (ZTE) is achieved by 3D radial centre-out encoding and hard-pulse RF excitation while the projection gradient is already on. Targeting short-T(2) samples, the efficient, robust and silent ZTE approach was implemented for high-bandwidth high-resolution imaging requiring particularly rapid transmit-receive switching and algebraic image reconstruction. The ZTE technique was applied to image extracted human teeth at 11.7T field strength, yielding detailed depictions with very good delineation of the mineralised dentine and enamel layers. ZTE results are compared with UTE (ultra-short echo time) MRI and micro-computed tomography (μCT), revealing significant differences in SNR and CNR yields. Compared to μCT, ZTE MRI appears to be less susceptible to artefacts caused by dental fillings and to offer superior sensitivity for the detection of early demineralisation and caries lesions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Netupitant PET imaging and ADME studies in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Spinelli, Tulla; Calcagnile, Selma; Giuliano, Claudio; Rossi, Giorgia; Lanzarotti, Corinna; Mair, Stuart; Stevens, Lloyd; Nisbet, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Netupitant is a new, selective NK1 receptor antagonist under development for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Two studies were conducted to evaluate the brain receptor occupancy (RO) and disposition (ADME) of netupitant in humans. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with the NK1 receptor-binding?selective tracer [11C]-GR205171 was used to evaluate the brain penetration of different doses of netupitant (100, 300, and 450?mg) and to determine the NK1-RO duratio...

  14. Structural health monitoring (vibration) as a tool for identifying structural alterations of the lumbar spine: a twin control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawchuk, Gregory N; Hartvigsen, Jan; Edgecombe, Tiffany; Prasad, Narasimha; van Dieen, Jaap H

    2016-03-11

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an engineering technique used to identify mechanical abnormalities not readily apparent through other means. Recently, SHM has been adapted for use in biological systems, but its invasive nature limits its clinical application. As such, the purpose of this project was to determine if a non-invasive form of SHM could identify structural alterations in the spines of living human subjects. Lumbar spines of 10 twin pairs were visualized by magnetic resonance imaging then assessed by a blinded radiologist to determine whether twin pairs were structurally concordant or discordant. Vibration was then applied to each subject's spine and the resulting response recorded from sensors overlying lumbar spinous processes. The peak frequency, area under the curve and the root mean square were computed from the frequency response function of each sensor. Statistical analysis demonstrated that in twins whose structural appearance was discordant, peak frequency was significantly different between twin pairs while in concordant twins, no outcomes were significantly different. From these results, we conclude that structural changes within the spine can alter its vibration response. As such, further investigation of SHM to identify spinal abnormalities in larger human populations is warranted.

  15. Simulator/planner for CT-directed needle biopsy of the spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Kevin R.; Lathan, Corinna E.; Carignan, Craig R.

    1998-06-01

    Minimally invasive spine procedures can spare the patient the trauma associated with open surgery. However, these procedures can be difficult to learn and require extensive training for proficiency. At Georgetown University Medical Center, spine biopsies are often done under computed tomography (CT) guidance. While this technique is effective, it is time consuming since the biopsy needle must be advanced slowly and its position checked several times to ensure vital organs are not damaged. A research project is being conducted to develop a computer-guided, image-based minimally invasive system for therapy and surgical techniques. As an initial step, a needle biopsy simulator for training is being developed. In the next phase, this simulator could also be used for preoperative planning. The simulator consists of two major modules: a visual module to display the medical images and biopsy tools and a haptic module to provide force feedback based on the needle position. The haptic module incorporates a robotic device that provides force feedback in three translational directions. In the future, it is anticipated that semi- autonomous robotic systems, in which the human controls some degrees of freedom and the robot the other degrees of freedom, will be developed for interventional tasks such as needle spine biopsy. The simulator described here can then be used as a 'master arm' to control the robotic system that actually performs the intervention.

  16. Recognizing age-separated face images: humans and machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Daksha; Singh, Richa; Vatsa, Mayank; Noore, Afzel

    2014-01-01

    Humans utilize facial appearance, gender, expression, aging pattern, and other ancillary information to recognize individuals. It is interesting to observe how humans perceive facial age. Analyzing these properties can help in understanding the phenomenon of facial aging and incorporating the findings can help in designing effective algorithms. Such a study has two components--facial age estimation and age-separated face recognition. Age estimation involves predicting the age of an individual given his/her facial image. On the other hand, age-separated face recognition consists of recognizing an individual given his/her age-separated images. In this research, we investigate which facial cues are utilized by humans for estimating the age of people belonging to various age groups along with analyzing the effect of one's gender, age, and ethnicity on age estimation skills. We also analyze how various facial regions such as binocular and mouth regions influence age estimation and recognition capabilities. Finally, we propose an age-invariant face recognition algorithm that incorporates the knowledge learned from these observations. Key observations of our research are: (1) the age group of newborns and toddlers is easiest to estimate, (2) gender and ethnicity do not affect the judgment of age group estimation, (3) face as a global feature, is essential to achieve good performance in age-separated face recognition, and (4) the proposed algorithm yields improved recognition performance compared to existing algorithms and also outperforms a commercial system in the young image as probe scenario.

  17. Imaging synaptic density in the living human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnema, Sjoerd J; Nabulsi, Nabeel B; Eid, Tore; Detyniecki, Kamil; Lin, Shu-Fei; Chen, Ming-Kai; Dhaher, Roni; Matuskey, David; Baum, Evan; Holden, Daniel; Spencer, Dennis D; Mercier, Joël; Hannestad, Jonas; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E

    2016-07-20

    Chemical synapses are the predominant neuron-to-neuron contact in the central nervous system. Presynaptic boutons of neurons contain hundreds of vesicles filled with neurotransmitters, the diffusible signaling chemicals. Changes in the number of synapses are associated with numerous brain disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. However, all current approaches for measuring synaptic density in humans require brain tissue from autopsy or surgical resection. We report the use of the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) radioligand [(11)C]UCB-J combined with positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify synaptic density in the living human brain. Validation studies in a baboon confirmed that SV2A is an alternative synaptic density marker to synaptophysin. First-in-human PET studies demonstrated that [(11)C]UCB-J had excellent imaging properties. Finally, we confirmed that PET imaging of SV2A was sensitive to synaptic loss in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Thus, [(11)C]UCB-J PET imaging is a promising approach for in vivo quantification of synaptic density with several potential applications in diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Heritability of Thoracic Spine Curvature and Genetic Correlations With Other Spine Traits: The Framingham Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Michelle S; Demissie, Serkalem; Zhou, Yanhua; Anderson, Dennis E; Lorbergs, Amanda L; Kiel, Douglas P; Allaire, Brett T; Yang, Laiji; Cupples, L Adrienne; Travison, Thomas G; Bouxsein, Mary L; Karasik, David; Samelson, Elizabeth J

    2016-12-01

    Hyperkyphosis is a common spinal disorder in older adults, characterized by excessive forward curvature of the thoracic spine and adverse health outcomes. The etiology of hyperkyphosis has not been firmly established, but may be related to changes that occur with aging in the vertebrae, discs, joints, and muscles, which function as a unit to support the spine. Determining the contribution of genetics to thoracic spine curvature and the degree of genetic sharing among co-occurring measures of spine health may provide insight into the etiology of hyperkyphosis. The purpose of our study was to estimate heritability of thoracic spine curvature using T4 -T12 kyphosis (Cobb) angle and genetic correlations between thoracic spine curvature and vertebral fracture, intervertebral disc height narrowing, facet joint osteoarthritis (OA), lumbar spine volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), and paraspinal muscle area and density, which were all assessed from computed tomography (CT) images. Participants included 2063 women and men in the second and third generation offspring of the original cohort of the Framingham Study. Heritability of kyphosis angle, adjusted for age, sex, and weight, was 54% (95% confidence interval [CI], 43% to 64%). We found moderate genetic correlations between kyphosis angle and paraspinal muscle area (ρˆG , -0.46; 95% CI, -0.67 to -0.26), vertebral fracture (ρˆG , 0.39; 95% CI, 0.18 to 0.61), vBMD (ρˆG , -0.23; 95% CI, -0.41 to -0.04), and paraspinal muscle density (ρˆG , -0.22; 95% CI, -0.48 to 0.03). Genetic correlations between kyphosis angle and disc height narrowing (ρˆG , 0.17; 95% CI, -0.05 to 0.38) and facet joint OA (ρˆG , 0.05; 95% CI, -0.15 to 0.24) were low. Thoracic spine curvature may be heritable and share genetic factors with other age-related spine traits including trunk muscle size, vertebral fracture, and bone mineral density. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2016 American Society for Bone and

  19. Hyperpolarized Xe MR imaging of alveolar gas uptake in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zackary I Cleveland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One of the central physiological functions of the lungs is to transfer inhaled gases from the alveoli to pulmonary capillary blood. However, current measures of alveolar gas uptake provide only global information and thus lack the sensitivity and specificity needed to account for regional variations in gas exchange. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we exploit the solubility, high magnetic resonance (MR signal intensity, and large chemical shift of hyperpolarized (HP (129Xe to probe the regional uptake of alveolar gases by directly imaging HP (129Xe dissolved in the gas exchange tissues and pulmonary capillary blood of human subjects. The resulting single breath-hold, three-dimensional MR images are optimized using millisecond repetition times and high flip angle radio-frequency pulses, because the dissolved HP (129Xe magnetization is rapidly replenished by diffusive exchange with alveolar (129Xe. The dissolved HP (129Xe MR images display significant, directional heterogeneity, with increased signal intensity observed from the gravity-dependent portions of the lungs. CONCLUSIONS: The features observed in dissolved-phase (129Xe MR images are consistent with gravity-dependent lung deformation, which produces increased ventilation, reduced alveolar size (i.e., higher surface-to-volume ratios, higher tissue densities, and increased perfusion in the dependent portions of the lungs. Thus, these results suggest that dissolved HP (129Xe imaging reports on pulmonary function at a fundamental level.

  20. Laparoscopic optical coherence tomographic imaging of human ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Bonnema, Garret T.; Schmidt, Kathy; Korde, Vrushali; Winkler, Amy M.; Hatch, Kenneth; Brewer, Molly; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2009-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death among women. If diagnosed at early stages, 5-year survival rate is 94%, but drops to 68% for regional disease and 29% for distant metastasis; only 19% of cases are diagnosed at early, localized stages. Optical coherence tomography is a recently emerging non-destructive imaging technology, achieving high axial resolutions (10-20 µm) at imaging depths up to 2 mm. Previously, we studied OCT in normal and diseased human ovary ex vivo. Changes in collagen were suggested with several images that correlated with changes in collagen seen in malignancy. Areas of necrosis and blood vessels were also visualized using OCT, indicative of an underlying tissue abnormality. We recently developed a custom side-firing laparoscopic OCT (LOCT) probe fabricated for in vivo imaging. The LOCT probe, consisting of a 38 mm diameter handpiece terminated in a 280 mm long, 4.6 mm diameter tip for insertion into the laparoscopic trocar, is capable of obtaining up to 9.5 mm image lengths at 10 µm axial resolution. In this pilot study, we utilize the LOCT probe to image one or both ovaries of 17 patients undergoing laparotomy or transabdominal endoscopy and oophorectomy to determine if OCT is capable of differentiating normal and neoplastic ovary. We have laparoscopically imaged the ovaries of seventeen patients with no known complications. Initial data evaluation reveals qualitative distinguishability between the features of undiseased post-menopausal ovary and the cystic, non-homogenous appearance of neoplastic ovary such as serous cystadenoma and endometroid adenocarcinoma.

  1. Digital image database processing to simulate image formation in ideal lighting conditions of the human eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Santos, Jessica; Santiago-Alvarado, Agustin; Cruz-Félix, Angel S.; Hernández-Méndez, Arturo

    2015-09-01

    The pupil size of the human eye has a large effect in the image quality due to inherent aberrations. Several studies have been performed to calculate its size relative to the luminance as well as considering other factors, i.e., age, size of the adapting field and mono and binocular vision. Moreover, ideal lighting conditions are known, but software suited to our specific requirements, low cost and low computational consumption, in order to simulate radiation adaptation and image formation in the retina with ideal lighting conditions has not yet been developed. In this work, a database is created consisting of 70 photographs corresponding to the same scene with a fixed target at different times of the day. By using this database, characteristics of the photographs are obtained by measuring the luminance average initial threshold value of each photograph by means of an image histogram. Also, we present the implementation of a digital filter for both, image processing on the threshold values of our database and generating output images with the threshold values reported for the human eye in ideal cases. Some potential applications for this kind of filters may be used in artificial vision systems.

  2. Live cell imaging of in vitro human trophoblast syncytialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Dang, Yan-Li; Zheng, Ru; Li, Yue; Li, Weiwei; Lu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Li-Juan; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Hai-Yan; Wang, Hongmei

    2014-06-01

    Human trophoblast syncytialization, a process of cell-cell fusion, is one of the most important yet least understood events during placental development. Investigating the fusion process in a placenta in vivo is very challenging given the complexity of this process. Application of primary cultured cytotrophoblast cells isolated from term placentas and BeWo cells derived from human choriocarcinoma formulates a biphasic strategy to achieve the mechanism of trophoblast cell fusion, as the former can spontaneously fuse to form the multinucleated syncytium and the latter is capable of fusing under the treatment of forskolin (FSK). Live-cell imaging is a powerful tool that is widely used to investigate many physiological or pathological processes in various animal models or humans; however, to our knowledge, the mechanism of trophoblast cell fusion has not been reported using a live- cell imaging manner. In this study, a live-cell imaging system was used to delineate the fusion process of primary term cytotrophoblast cells and BeWo cells. By using live staining with Hoechst 33342 or cytoplasmic dyes or by stably transfecting enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and DsRed2-Nuc reporter plasmids, we observed finger-like protrusions on the cell membranes of fusion partners before fusion and the exchange of cytoplasmic contents during fusion. In summary, this study provides the first video recording of the process of trophoblast syncytialization. Furthermore, the various live-cell imaging systems used in this study will help to yield molecular insights into the syncytialization process during placental development. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  3. Towards whole-body fluorescence imaging in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie K Piper

    Full Text Available Dynamic near-infrared fluorescence (DNIF whole-body imaging of small animals has become a popular tool in experimental biomedical research. In humans, however, the field of view has been limited to body parts, such as rheumatoid hands, diabetic feet or sentinel lymph nodes. Here we present a new whole-body DNIF-system suitable for adult subjects. We explored whether this system (i allows dynamic whole-body fluorescence imaging and (ii can detect modulations in skin perfusion. The non-specific fluorescent probe indocyanine green (ICG was injected intravenously into two subjects, and fluorescence images were obtained at 5 Hz. The in- and out-flow kinetics of ICG have been shown to correlate with tissue perfusion. To validate the system, skin perfusion was modulated by warming and cooling distinct areas on the chest and the abdomen. Movies of fluorescence images show a bolus passage first in the face, then in the chest, abdomen and finally in the periphery (~10, 15, 20 and 30 seconds, respectively. When skin perfusion is augmented by warming, bolus arrives about 5 seconds earlier than when the skin is cooled and perfusion decreased. Calculating bolus arrival times and spatial fitting of basis time courses extracted from different regions of interest allowed a mapping of local differences in subcutaneous skin perfusion. This experiment is the first to demonstrate the feasibility of whole-body dynamic fluorescence imaging in humans. Since the whole-body approach demonstrates sensitivity to circumscribed alterations in skinperfusion, it may be used to target autonomous changes in polyneuropathy and to screen for peripheral vascular diseases.

  4. Spine segmentation from C-arm CT data sets: application to region-of-interest volumes for spinal interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerger, C.; Lorenz, C.; Babic, D.; Hoppenbrouwers, J.; Homan, R.; Nachabe, R.; Racadio, J. M.; Grass, M.

    2017-03-01

    Spinal fusion is a common procedure to stabilize the spinal column by fixating parts of the spine. In such procedures, metal screws are inserted through the patients back into a vertebra, and the screws of adjacent vertebrae are connected by metal rods to generate a fixed bridge. In these procedures, 3D image guidance for intervention planning and outcome control is required. Here, for anatomical guidance, an automated approach for vertebra segmentation from C-arm CT images of the spine is introduced and evaluated. As a prerequisite, 3D C-arm CT images are acquired covering the vertebrae of interest. An automatic model-based segmentation approach is applied to delineate the outline of the vertebrae of interest. The segmentation approach is based on 24 partial models of the cervical, thoracic and lumbar vertebrae which aggregate information about (i) the basic shape itself, (ii) trained features for image based adaptation, and (iii) potential shape variations. Since the volume data sets generated by the C-arm system are limited to a certain region of the spine the target vertebra and hence initial model position is assigned interactively. The approach was trained and tested on 21 human cadaver scans. A 3-fold cross validation to ground truth annotations yields overall mean segmentation errors of 0.5 mm for T1 to 1.1 mm for C6. The results are promising and show potential to support the clinician in pedicle screw path and rod planning to allow accurate and reproducible insertions.

  5. Review of cervical spine anomalies in genetic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Scott D; Al-Omari, Ali; Tomlinson, Lauren A; Dormans, John P

    2012-03-01

    Focused review of the literature. Assist spine specialists in diagnosis and treatment of cervical spine anomalies found in selected genetic syndromes. Cervical spine instability and/or stenosis are potentially debilitating problems in many genetic syndromes. These problems can be overlooked among the other systemic issues more familiar to clinicians and radiologists evaluating these syndromes. It is imperative that spine specialists understand the relevant issues associated with these particular syndromes. The literature was reviewed for cervical spine issues in 10 specific syndromes. The information is presented in the following order: First, the identification and treatment of midcervical kyphosis in Larsen syndrome and diastrophic dysplasia (DD). Next, the upper cervical abnormalities seen in Down syndrome, 22q11.2 Deletion syndrome, pseudoachondroplasia, Morquio syndrome, Goldenhar syndrome, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita, and Kniest dysplasia. Finally, the chin-on-chest deformity of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva. Midcervical kyphosis in patients with Larsen syndrome and DD needs to be evaluated and imaged often to track deformity progression. Upper cervical spine instability in Down syndrome is most commonly caused by ligamentous laxity at C1 to C2 and occiput-C1 levels. Nearly 100% of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have cervical spine abnormalities, but few are symptomatic. Patients with pseudoachondroplasia and Morquio syndrome have C1 to C2 instability related to odontoid dysplasia (hypoplasia and os odontoideum). Morquio patients also have soft tissue glycosaminoglycan deposits, which cause stenosis and lead to myelopathy. Severely affected patients with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita are at high risk of myelopathy because of atlantoaxial instability in addition to underlying stenosis. Kniest syndrome is associated with atlantoaxial instability. Cervical spine anomalies in Goldenhar syndrome are varied and can be severe

  6. Sheep cervical spine biomechanics: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries Watson, Nicole A; Gandhi, Anup A; Fredericks, Doug C; Smucker, Joseph D; Grosland, Nicole M

    2014-01-01

    Animal models are often used to make the transition from scientific concepts to clinical applications. The sheep model has emerged as an important model in spine biomechanics. Although there are several experimental biomechanical studies of the sheep cervical spine, only a limited number of computational models have been developed. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop and validate a C2-C7 sheep cervical spine finite element (FE) model to study the biomechanics of the normal sheep cervical spine. The model was based on anatomy defined using medical images and included nonlinear material properties to capture the high flexibility and large neutral zone of the sheep cervical spine. The model was validated using comprehensive experimental flexibility testing. Ten adult sheep cervical spines, from C2-C7, were used to experimentally ascertain overall and segmental flexibility to ±2 Nm in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The ranges of motion predicted by the computational model were within one standard deviation of the respective experimental motions throughout the load cycle, with the exception of extension and lateral bending. The model over- and under predicted the peak motions in extension and lateral bending, respectively. Nevertheless, the model closely represents the range of motion and flexibility of the sheep cervical spine. This is the first multilevel model of the sheep cervical spine. The validated model affords additional biomechanical insight into the intact sheep cervical spine that cannot be easily determined experimentally. The model can be used to study various surgical techniques, instrumentation, and device placement, providing researchers and clinicians insight that is difficult, if not impossible, to gain experimentally.

  7. Laser triangulation measurements of scoliotic spine curvatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čelan, Dušan; Jesenšek Papež, Breda; Poredoš, Primož; Možina, Janez

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this research was to develop a new method for differentiating between scoliotic and healthy subjects by analysing the curvatures of their spines in the cranio-caudal view. The study included 247 subjects with physiological curvatures of the spine and 28 subjects with clinically confirmed scoliosis. The curvature of the spine was determined by a computer analysis of the surface of the back, measured with a non-invasive, 3D, laser-triangulation system. The determined spinal curve was represented in the transversal plane, which is perpendicular to the line segment that was defined by the initial point and the end point of the spinal curve. This was achieved using a rotation matrix. The distances between the extreme points in the antero-posterior (AP) and left-right (LR) views were calculated in relation to the length of the spine as well as the quotient of these two values LR/AP. All the measured parameters were compared between the scoliotic and control groups using the Student's t-Test in case of normal data and Kruskal-Wallis test in case of non-normal data. Besides, a comprehensive diagram representing the distances between the extreme points in the AP and LR views was introduced, which clearly demonstrated the direction and the size of the thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures for each individual subject. While the distances between the extreme points of the spine in the AP view were found to differ only slightly between the groups (p = 0.1), the distances between the LR extreme points were found to be significantly greater in the scoliosis group, compared to the control group (p < 0.001). The quotient LR/AP was statistically significantly different in both groups (p < 0.001). The main innovation of the presented method is the ability to differentiate a scoliotic subject from a healthy subject by assessing the curvature of the spine in the cranio-caudal view. Therefore, the proposed method could be useful for human posture

  8. Hyperspectral imaging for detection of cholesterol in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanič, Matija; Bjorgan, Asgeir; Larsson, Marcus; Marraccini, Paolo; Strömberg, Tomas; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2015-03-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is characterized by high levels of cholesterol in the blood and is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Early detection of hypercholesterolemia is necessary to prevent onset and progress of cardiovascular disease. Optical imaging techniques might have a potential for early diagnosis and monitoring of hypercholesterolemia. In this study, hyperspectral imaging was investigated for this application. The main aim of the study was to identify spectral and spatial characteristics that can aid identification of hypercholesterolemia in facial skin. The first part of the study involved a numerical simulation of human skin affected by hypercholesterolemia. A literature survey was performed to identify characteristic morphological and physiological parameters. Realistic models were prepared and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain hyperspectral images. Based on the simulations optimal wavelength regions for differentiation between normal and cholesterol rich skin were identified. Minimum Noise Fraction transformation (MNF) was used for analysis. In the second part of the study, the simulations were verified by a clinical study involving volunteers with elevated and normal levels of cholesterol. The faces of the volunteers were scanned by a hyperspectral camera covering the spectral range between 400 nm and 720 nm, and characteristic spectral features of the affected skin were identified. Processing of the images was done after conversion to reflectance and masking of the images. The identified features were compared to the known cholesterol levels of the subjects. The results of this study demonstrate that hyperspectral imaging of facial skin can be a promising, rapid modality for detection of hypercholesterolemia.

  9. Stabilization of the spine in patients with suspected cervical spine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stabilization of the spine in patients with suspected cervical spine injury in Mulago Hospital. BM Ndeleva, T Beyeza. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eaoj.v5i1.67487 · AJOL African Journals ...

  10. Beyond the spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, James; Cassidy, J David; Cancelliere, Carol

    2015-01-01

    traditional research pursuits towards new and innovative areas. Specifically, these researchers are now delving into areas such as brain injury, work disability prevention, undifferentiated chest pain, hip osteoarthritis, and prevention of pain in children and adolescents to name a few. In this paper, we......Over the past two decades, clinical research within the chiropractic profession has focused on the spine and spinal conditions, specifically neck and low back pain. However, there is now a small group of chiropractors with clinical research training that are shifting their focus away from...

  11. Aneurysmal bone cyst of thoracic spine mimicking spinal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobhit Mathur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 22-year-old female presented to our services with back pain and paraparesis for 11 months. She was earlier diagnosed with tuberculosis of spine, and antitubercular chemotherapy was started. However her condition had worsened. Plain and contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans of the thorax and magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracic spine showed heterogenous, lytic, expansile lesion involving third thoracic vertebra with epidural extension and large bilateral paraspinal and mediastinal components. Multiple variably sized loculations with fluid-fluid levels were seen within the lesion. These imaging findings suggestive of aneurysmal bone cyst of thoracic spine were compared with the findings seen 11 months earlier, which were mistaken for spinal tuberculosis. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of aneurysmal bone cyst. The imaging features, diagnostic challenges and the lessons learned have been briefly discussed.

  12. Practical human abdominal fat imaging utilizing electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T; Maki, K; Katashima, M

    2010-07-01

    The fundamental cause of metabolic syndrome is thought to be abdominal obesity. Accurate diagnosis of abdominal obesity can be done by an x-ray computed tomography (CT) scan. But CT is expensive, bulky and entails the risks involved with radiation. To overcome such disadvantages, we attempted to develop a measuring device that could apply electrical impedance tomography to abdominal fat imaging. The device has 32 electrodes that can be attached to a subject's abdomen by a pneumatic mechanism. That way, electrode position data can be acquired simultaneously. An applied alternating current of 1.0 mArms was used at a frequency of 500 kHz. Sensed voltage data were carefully filtered to remove noise and processed to satisfy the reciprocal theorem. The image reconstruction software was developed concurrently, applying standard finite element methods and the Marquardt method to solve the mathematical inverse problem. The results of preliminary experiments showed that abdominal subcutaneous fat and the muscle surrounding the viscera could be imaged in humans. While our imaging of visceral fat was not of sufficient quality, it was suggested that we will be able to develop a safe and practical abdominal fat scanner through future improvements.

  13. Rigid Spine Syndrome among Children in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Koul

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Rigidity of the spine is common in adults but is rarely observed in children. The aim of this study was to report on rigid spine syndrome (RSS among children in Oman. Methods: Data on children diagnosed with RSS were collected consecutively at presentation between 1996 and 2014 at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH in Muscat, Oman. A diagnosis of RSS was based on the patient’s history, clinical examination, biochemical investigations, electrophysiological findings, neuro-imaging and muscle biopsy. Atrophy of the paraspinal muscles, particularly the erector spinae, was the diagnostic feature; this was noted using magnetic resonance imaging of the spine. Children with disease onset in the paraspinal muscles were labelled as having primary RSS or rigid spinal muscular dystrophy. Secondary RSS was classified as RSS due to the late involvement of other muscle diseases. Results: Over the 18-year period, 12 children were included in the study, with a maleto- female ratio of 9:3. A total of 10 children were found to have primary RSS or rigid spinal muscular dystrophy syndrome while two had secondary RSS. Onset of the disease ranged from birth to 18 months of age. A family history was noted, with two siblings from one family and three siblings from another (n = 5. On examination, children with primary RSS had typical features of severe spine rigidity at onset, with the rest of the neurological examination being normal. Conclusion: RSS is a rare disease with only 12 reported cases found at SQUH during the study period. Cases of primary RSS should be differentiated from the secondary type.

  14. A comparative biomechanical study of a novel integrated plate spacer for stabilization of cervical spine: an in vitro human cadaveric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Kamran; Chinthakunta, Suresh; Muzumdar, Aditya; Khalil, Saif

    2012-07-01

    Integrated plate-spacer may provide adequate construct stability while potentially lowering operative time, decreasing complications, and providing less mechanical obstruction. The purpose of the current study was to compare the biomechanical stability of an anatomically profiled 2-screw integrated plate-spacer to a traditional spacer only and to a spacer and anterior cervical plate construct. In addition, the biomechanical stability of 2-screw integrated plate-spacer was compared to a commercially available 4-screw integrated plate-spacer. Two groups, each of nine cervical cadaver spines (C2-C7), were tested under pure moments of 1.5Nm. Range of motion was recorded at C5-C6 in all loading conditions (flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation) for the following constructs: 1) Intact; 2) 2-screw or 4-screw integrated plate-spacer; 3) spacer and anterior cervical plate; and 4) spacer only. All fusion constructs significantly reduced motion compared to the intact condition. Within the instrumented constructs, spacer and anterior cervical plate, 2-screw and 4-screw integrated plate-spacer resulted in reduced motion compared to the spacer only construct. No significant differences were found in motion between any of the instrumented conditions in any of the loading conditions. The application of integrated plate-spacer for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is based on several factors including surgical ease-of-use, biomechanical characteristics, and surgeon preference. The study suggests that integrated plate-spacer provide biomechanical stability comparable to traditional spacer and plate constructs in the cervical spine. Clinical studies on integrated plate spacer devices are necessary to understand the performance of these devices in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sodium-23 MRI of whole spine at 3 Tesla using a 5-channel receive-only phased-array and a whole-body transmit resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malzacher, Matthias; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Haneder, Stefan [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; University Hospital of Cologne, Koeln (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2016-05-01

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging ({sup 23}Na MRI) is a unique and non-invasive imaging technique which provides important information on cellular level about the tissue of the human body. Several applications for {sup 23}Na MRI were investigated with regard to the examination of the tissue viability and functionality for example in the brain, the heart or the breast. The {sup 23}Na MRI technique can also be integrated as a potential monitoring instrument after radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The main contribution in this work was the adaptation of {sup 23}Na MRI for spine imaging, which can provide essential information on the integrity of the intervertebral disks with respect to the early detection of disk degeneration. In this work, a transmit-only receive-only dual resonator system was designed and developed to cover the whole human spine using {sup 23}Na MRI and increase the receive sensitivity. The resonator system consisted of an already presented {sup 23}Na whole-body resonator and a newly developed 5-channel receive-only phased-array. The resonator system was first validated using bench top and phantom measurements. A threefold SNR improvement at the depth of the spine (∝7 cm) over the whole-body resonator was achieved using the spine array. {sup 23}Na MR measurements of the human spine using the transmit-only receive-only resonator system were performed on a healthy volunteer within an acquisition time of 10 minutes. A density adapted 3D radial sequence was chosen with 6 mm isotropic resolution, 49 ms repetition time and a short echo time of 540 μs. Furthermore, it was possible to quantify the tissue sodium concentration in the intervertebral discs in the lumbar region (120 ms repetition time) using this setup.

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ... the bones of the skull and spine without radiation. MRI of the brain and spine is used ...

  17. Anatomy and biomechanics of the back muscles in the lumbar spine with reference to biomechanical modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L.; Zee, M. de; Rasmussen, J.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the development of a musculoskeletal model of the human lumbar spine with focus on back muscles. It includes data from literature in a structured form.......This article describes the development of a musculoskeletal model of the human lumbar spine with focus on back muscles. It includes data from literature in a structured form....

  18. The effect of multispectral image fusion enhancement on human efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Jennifer L; Schill, M Trent; Mohd-Zaid, Fairul; Blaha, Leslie M

    2017-01-01

    The visual system can be highly influenced by changes to visual presentation. Thus, numerous techniques have been developed to augment imagery in an attempt to improve human perception. The current paper examines the potential impact of one such enhancement, multispectral image fusion, where imagery captured in varying spectral bands (e.g., visible, thermal, night vision) is algorithmically combined to produce an output to strengthen visual perception. We employ ideal observer analysis over a series of experimental conditions to (1) establish a framework for testing the impact of image fusion over the varying aspects surrounding its implementation (e.g., stimulus content, task) and (2) examine the effectiveness of fusion on human information processing efficiency in a basic application. We used a set of rotated Landolt C images captured with a number of individual sensor cameras and combined across seven traditional fusion algorithms (e.g., Laplacian pyramid, principal component analysis, averaging) in a 1-of-8 orientation task. We found that, contrary to the idea of fused imagery always producing a greater impact on perception, single-band imagery can be just as influential. Additionally, efficiency data were shown to fluctuate based on sensor combination instead of fusion algorithm, suggesting the need for examining multiple factors to determine the success of image fusion. Our use of ideal observer analysis, a popular technique from the vision sciences, provides not only a standard for testing fusion in direct relation to the visual system but also allows for comparable examination of fusion across its associated problem space of application.

  19. Variational image segmentation for endoscopic human colonic aberrant crypt foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Isabel N; Figueiredo, Pedro N; Stadler, Georg; Ghattas, Omar; Araujo, Adérito

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a variational image segmentation method for assessing the aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the human colon captured in vivo by endoscopy. ACF are thought to be precursors for colorectal cancer, and therefore their early detection may play an important clinical role. We enhance the active contours without edges model of Chan and Vese to account for the ACF's particular structure. We employ level sets to represent the segmentation boundaries and discretize in space by finite elements and in (artificial) time by finite differences. The approach is able to identify the ACF, their boundaries, and some of the internal crypts' orifices.

  20. [Leonardo da Vinci the first human body imaging specialist. A brief communication on the thorax oseum images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Raúl; Criales, José Luis; Cardoso, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The impressive development of computed tomography (CT) techniques such as the three dimensional helical CT produces a spatial image of the thoracic skull. At the beginning of the 16th century Leonardo da Vinci drew with great precision the thorax oseum. These drawings show an outstanding similarity with the images obtained by three dimensional helical CT. The cumbersome task of the Renaissance genius is a prime example of the careful study of human anatomy. Modern imaging techniques require perfect anatomic knowledge of the human body in order to generate exact interpretations of images. Leonardo's example is alive for anybody devoted to modern imaging studies.

  1. Micromechanics of Sea Urchin spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Tsafnat

    Full Text Available The endoskeletal structure of the Sea Urchin, Centrostephanus rodgersii, has numerous long spines whose known functions include locomotion, sensing, and protection against predators. These spines have a remarkable internal microstructure and are made of single-crystal calcite. A finite-element model of the spine's unique porous structure, based on micro-computed tomography (microCT and incorporating anisotropic material properties, was developed to study its response to mechanical loading. Simulations show that high stress concentrations occur at certain points in the spine's architecture; brittle cracking would likely initiate in these regions. These analyses demonstrate that the organization of single-crystal calcite in the unique, intricate morphology of the sea urchin spine results in a strong, stiff and lightweight structure that enhances its strength despite the brittleness of its constituent material.

  2. Micromechanics of Sea Urchin spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsafnat, Naomi; Fitz Gerald, John D; Le, Hai N; Stachurski, Zbigniew H

    2012-01-01

    The endoskeletal structure of the Sea Urchin, Centrostephanus rodgersii, has numerous long spines whose known functions include locomotion, sensing, and protection against predators. These spines have a remarkable internal microstructure and are made of single-crystal calcite. A finite-element model of the spine's unique porous structure, based on micro-computed tomography (microCT) and incorporating anisotropic material properties, was developed to study its response to mechanical loading. Simulations show that high stress concentrations occur at certain points in the spine's architecture; brittle cracking would likely initiate in these regions. These analyses demonstrate that the organization of single-crystal calcite in the unique, intricate morphology of the sea urchin spine results in a strong, stiff and lightweight structure that enhances its strength despite the brittleness of its constituent material.

  3. The lumbar spine in Neanderthals shows natural kyphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusch, Carsten Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, lumbar spondylosis is one of the most frequent causes of lower back pain. In order to improve our understanding of the lumbar spine anatomy and functionality over time, we compared the lumbar vertebrae of Neanderthals with those of anatomically modern humans. The fossil record reports on only two Neanderthal skeletons (i.e., Kebara 2 and Shanidar 3, both predating the appearance of modern humans) with full preservation of the entire lumbar spine. Examination of these early hominids showed that they display natural lumbar kyphosis, with only mild degenerative changes of the lumbar spine (ages at death: 30–35 years, Kebara 2; and 35–50 years, Shanidar 3). This finding is highly unexpected since Neanderthals are known to have had extraordinary physical activity due to demanding living conditions. The adult lumbar spines discussed here therefore show no correlation between high physical activity and degenerative spine disease as known from recent times. We speculate that both the kyphosis itself and the massive and heavily muscled skeleton of Neanderthals are causative for the minimal bone degeneration. We conclude that a kyphotic lumbar spine is the natural anatomy in these two Neanderthal individuals. Future research will reveal if this holds true for the entire Neanderthal species. PMID:18301930

  4. Helical tomotherapy for spine oligometastases from gastrointestinal malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Seon; Kim, Jun Won; Lee, Ik Jae; Han, Hee Ji; Baek, Jong Geal; Seong, Jin Sil [Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    This study evaluated the treatment effectiveness and proper radiation dose of helical tomotherapy (HT) in spine oligometastases from gastrointestinal cancers. From 2006 to 2010, 20 gastrointestinal cancer patients were treated with HT for spine oligometastases (31 spine lesions). The gross tumor volume (GTV) was the tumor evident from magnetic resonance imaging images fused with simulation computed tomography images. Clinical target volume (CTV) encompassed involved vertebral bodies or dorsal elements. We assumed that the planning target volume was equal to the CTV. We assessed local control rate after HT for 31 spine metastases. Pain response was scored by using a numeric pain intensity scale (NPIS, from 0 to 10). Spine metastatic lesions were treated with median dose of 40 Gy (range, 24 to 51 Gy) and median 5 Gy per fraction (range, 2.5 to 8 Gy) to GTV with median 8 fractions (range, 3 to 20 fraction). Median biologically equivalent dose (BED, {alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy) was 52 Gy10 (range, 37.5 to 76.8 Gy10) to GTV. Six month local control rate for spine metastasis was 90.3%. Overall infield failure rate was 15% and outfield failure rate was 75%. Most patients showed pain relief after HT (93.8%). Median local recurrence free survival was 3 months. BED over 57 Gy10 and oligometastases were identified as prognostic factors associated with improved local progression free survival (p = 0.012, p = 0.041). HT was capable of delivering higher BED to metastatic lesions in close proximity of the spinal cord. Spine metastases from gastrointestinal tumors were sensitive to high dose radiation, and BED ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy) higher than 57 Gy10 could improve local control.

  5. RF Device for Acquiring Images of the Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, Todd C.; McGrath, William R.

    2010-01-01

    A safe, non-invasive method for forming images through clothing of large groups of people, in order to search for concealed weapons either made of metal or not, has been developed. A millimeter wavelength scanner designed in a unique, ring-shaped configuration can obtain a full 360 image of the body with a resolution of less than a millimeter in only a few seconds. Millimeter waves readily penetrate normal clothing, but are highly reflected by the human body and concealed objects. Millimeter wave signals are nonionizing and are harmless to human tissues when used at low power levels. The imager (see figure) consists of a thin base that supports a small-diameter vertical post about 7 ft (=2.13 m) tall. Attached to the post is a square-shaped ring 2 in. (=5 cm) wide and 3 ft (=91 cm) on a side. The ring is oriented horizontally, and is supported halfway along one side by a connection to a linear bearing on the vertical post. A planar RF circuit board is mounted to the inside of each side of the ring. Each circuit board contains an array of 30 receivers, one transmitter, and digitization electronics. Each array element has a printed-circuit patch antenna coupled to a pair of mixers by a 90 coupler. The mixers receive a reference local oscillator signal to a subharmonic of the transmitter frequency. A single local oscillator line feeds all 30 receivers on the board. The resulting MHz IF signals are amplified and carried to the edge of the board where they are demodulated and digitized. The transmitted signal is derived from the local oscillator at a frequency offset determined by a crystal oscillator. One antenna centrally located on each side of the square ring provides the source illumination power. The total transmitted power is less than 100 mW, resulting in an exposure level that is completely safe to humans. The output signals from all four circuit boards are fed via serial connection to a data processing computer. The computer processes the approximately 1-MB

  6. EFFECTUAL HUMAN AUTHENTICATION FOR CRITICAL SECURITY APPLICATIONS USING RETINAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Latha

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A robust method of human authentication based on the retinal blood vessel pattern is presented in this paper. This method entails a segmentation process to identify retinal blood vessel pattern, template generation consisting of the bifurcation points in the retina and matching of the intersection points in the template patterns. The number of matched blood vessel intersection points between the two patterns compared is used as a measure of similarity. As Liveness detection is a highly desirable anti-spoofing measure in biometric authentication, it is ensured while acquiring retinal images in realtime. The validity of our approach is verified with experimental results obtained from 603 comparisons made using 303 retinal images from three different publicly available databases, namely DRIVE, VARIA and STARE. We found that the proposed retinal recognition method gives 100%, 96.3% and 91.1% recognition rates respectively for the above databases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that uses a large number of retinal images from different retinal databases for the authentication purpose.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Human Tissue-Engineered Adipose Substitutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, Maryse; Aubin, Kim; Lagueux, Jean; Audet, Pierre; Auger, Michèle

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) substitutes are being developed to answer the strong demand in reconstructive surgery. To facilitate the validation of their functional performance in vivo, and to avoid resorting to excessive number of animals, it is crucial at this stage to develop biomedical imaging methodologies, enabling the follow-up of reconstructed AT substitutes. Until now, biomedical imaging of AT substitutes has scarcely been reported in the literature. Therefore, the optimal parameters enabling good resolution, appropriate contrast, and graft delineation, as well as blood perfusion validation, must be studied and reported. In this study, human adipose substitutes produced from adipose-derived stem/stromal cells using the self-assembly approach of tissue engineering were implanted into athymic mice. The fate of the reconstructed AT substitutes implanted in vivo was successfully followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is the imaging modality of choice for visualizing soft ATs. T1-weighted images allowed clear delineation of the grafts, followed by volume integration. The magnetic resonance (MR) signal of reconstructed AT was studied in vitro by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). This confirmed the presence of a strong triglyceride peak of short longitudinal proton relaxation time (T1) values (200±53 ms) in reconstructed AT substitutes (total T1=813±76 ms), which establishes a clear signal difference between adjacent muscle, connective tissue, and native fat (total T1 ∼300 ms). Graft volume retention was followed up to 6 weeks after implantation, revealing a gradual resorption rate averaging at 44% of initial substitute's volume. In addition, vascular perfusion measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI confirmed the graft's vascularization postimplantation (14 and 21 days after grafting). Histological analysis of the grafted tissues revealed the persistence of numerous adipocytes without evidence of cysts or tissue necrosis. This study

  8. Detailed examination of the lower cervical spine facet joints in a road traffic crash fatality - a case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrenholt, Lars; Nielsen, Edith; Vesterby, Annie

    2005-01-01

    The lower cervical spine facet joints of a road traffic crash fatality were examined using diagnostic imaging and histological techniques. No injuries to the cervical spine facet joints could be identified with diagnostic imaging including conventional radiology, CT and MRI. Examination of stained...... histological sections visualised the morphology and integrity of the facet joints in detail. Occult injuries to and in close proximity of the cervical spine facet joints were identified only on histological examination....

  9. Detailed examination of the lower cervical spine facet joints in a road traffic crash fatality - a case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrenholt, Lars; Nielsen, Edith; Vesterby, Annie

    2005-01-01

    The lower cervical spine facet joints of a road traffic crash fatality were examined using diagnostic imaging and histological techniques. No injuries to the cervical spine facet joints could be identified with diagnostic imaging including conventional radiology, CT and MRI. Examination of staine...... histological sections visualised the morphology and integrity of the facet joints in detail. Occult injuries to and in close proximity of the cervical spine facet joints were identified only on histological examination....

  10. SLIDE: automatic spine level identification system using a deep convolutional neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetherington, Jorden; Lessoway, Victoria; Gunka, Vit; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Rohling, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Percutaneous spinal needle insertion procedures often require proper identification of the vertebral level to effectively and safely deliver analgesic agents. The current clinical method involves "blind" identification of the vertebral level through manual palpation of the spine, which has only 30% reported accuracy. Therefore, there is a need for better anatomical identification prior to needle insertion. A real-time system was developed to identify the vertebral level from a sequence of ultrasound images, following a clinical imaging protocol. The system uses a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) to classify transverse images of the lower spine. Several existing CNN architectures were implemented, utilizing transfer learning, and compared for adequacy in a real-time system. In the system, the CNN output is processed, using a novel state machine, to automatically identify vertebral levels as the transducer moves up the spine. Additionally, a graphical display was developed and integrated within 3D Slicer. Finally, an augmented reality display, projecting the level onto the patient's back, was also designed. A small feasibility study [Formula: see text] evaluated performance. The proposed CNN successfully discriminates ultrasound images of the sacrum, intervertebral gaps, and vertebral bones, achieving 88% 20-fold cross-validation accuracy. Seventeen of 20 test ultrasound scans had successful identification of all vertebral levels, processed at real-time speed (40 frames/s). A machine learning system is presented that successfully identifies lumbar vertebral levels. The small study on human subjects demonstrated real-time performance. A projection-based augmented reality display was used to show the vertebral level directly on the subject adjacent to the puncture site.

  11. MRI of infections and neoplasms of the spine and spinal cord in 55 patients with AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurnher, M.M. [Neuroradiology Section, Department of Radiology, University Hospital Vienna (Austria); Post, M.J.D. [Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Section, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Jinkins, J.R. [Neuroimaging Research, Department of Radiology, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Our purpose was to describe the range of MRI findings in infectious and neoplastic involvement of the spine and spinal cord in symptomatic patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). MRI studies in 55 patients with AIDS and neurological signs and symptoms thought to be related to the spine or spinal cord were reviewed. We categorized the findings according to the spinal compartment involved. There were 29 patients with extradural, 11 with intradural-extramedullary and 9 with intramedullary disease. In 6 patients more than one compartment was involved simultaneously, and patients presented with multiple lesions in the same compartment. The most common causes of extradural disease were bone lesions (28); an epidural mass was seen in 14 and spondylodiscitis in 4 patients. Cytomegalovirus polyradiculitis was the most common cause of intradural-extramedullary disease (in 10 cases); herpes radiculitis was seen in two, and tuberculous infection in another two. In three cases leptomeningeal contrast enhancement was due to lymphoma. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) myelitis was seen in two patients, presumed vacuolar myelopathy in two, toxoplasma myelitis in four, intramedullary lymphoma in one, and herpes myelitis in one. Familiarity with the various potential pathological entities that can affect the spine and spinal cord in the AIDS population and their imaging characteristics is crucial for initiation of further diagnostic tests and appropriate medical or surgical treatment. (orig.)

  12. Spine injuries in dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschlich, Laura M; Young, Craig C

    2011-01-01

    Care of a dancer calls for a unique balance between athlete and artist. The physician must familiarize himself or herself with dance terminology, common moves, correct technique, and dancer's mentality. The goal is to work intimately with the dancer to care for the injury and, if possible, continue to participate in portions of dance class to limit anxiety and increase compliance to treatment. The spine is the second most injured area of the body in dancers, and many issues stem from poor technique and muscle imbalance. This often leads to hyperlordosis, spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, lumbar facet sprain, discogenic back pain, and muscle spasm and piriformis syndrome. This article reviews these causes of low back pain with a focus on dance-related presentation and treatment issues.

  13. Physiopathology of Spine Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Maccauro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The metastasis is the spread of cancer from one part of the body to another. Two-thirds of patients with cancer will develop bone metastasis. Breast, prostate and lung cancer are responsible for more than 80% of cases of metastatic bone disease. The spine is the most common site of bone metastasis. A spinal metastasis may cause pain, instability and neurological injuries. The diffusion through Batson venous system is the principal process of spinal metastasis, but the dissemination is possible also through arterial and lymphatic system or by contiguity. Once cancer cells have invaded the bone, they produce growth factors that stimulate osteoblastic or osteolytic activity resulting in bone remodeling with release of other growth factors that lead to a vicious cycle of bone destruction and growth of local tumour.

  14. Dendritic spines provide cognitive resilience against Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Benjamin D; Greathouse, Kelsey M; Gentry, Erik G; Curtis, Kendall A; Birchall, Elizabeth L; Gearing, Marla; Herskowitz, Jeremy H

    2017-10-01

    Neuroimaging and other biomarker assays suggest that the pathological processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) begin years prior to clinical dementia onset. However, some 30 to 50% of older individuals who harbor AD pathology do not become symptomatic in their lifetime. It is hypothesized that such individuals exhibit cognitive resilience that protects against AD dementia. We hypothesized that in cases with AD pathology, structural changes in dendritic spines would distinguish individuals who had or did not have clinical dementia. We compared dendritic spines within layer II and III pyramidal neuron dendrites in Brodmann area 46 dorsolateral prefrontal cortex using the Golgi-Cox technique in 12 age-matched pathology-free controls, 8 controls with AD pathology (CAD), and 21 AD cases. We used highly optimized methods to trace impregnated dendrites from bright-field microscopy images that enabled accurate 3-dimensional digital reconstruction of dendritic structure for morphologic analyses. Spine density was similar among control and CAD cases but was reduced significantly in AD. Thin and mushroom spines were reduced significantly in AD compared to CAD brains, whereas stubby spine density was decreased significantly in CAD and AD compared to controls. Increased spine extent distinguished CAD cases from controls and AD. Linear regression analysis of all cases indicated that spine density was not associated with neuritic plaque score but did display negative correlation with Braak staging. These observations provide cellular evidence to support the hypothesis that dendritic spine plasticity is a mechanism of cognitive resilience that protects older individuals with AD pathology from developing dementia. Ann Neurol 2017;82:602-614. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  15. Rapid regulation of endoplasmic reticulum dynamics in dendritic spines by NMDA receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ai Na; Doherty, Andrew J; Lombroso, Paul J; Emptage, Nigel J; Collingridge, Graham L

    2014-08-19

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is motile within dendritic spines, but the mechanisms underlying its regulation are poorly understood. To address this issue, we have simultaneously imaged morphology and ER content of dendritic spines in cultured dissociated mouse hippocampal neurons. Over a 10 min period, spines were highly dynamic, with spines both increasing and decreasing in volume. ER was present in approximately 50% of spines and was also highly dynamic, with a net increase over this period of time. Inhibition of the endogenous activation of NMDA receptors resulted in a reduction in ER growth. Conversely, augmentation of the synaptic activation of NMDA receptors, by elimination of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), resulted in enhanced ER growth. Therefore, NMDA receptors rapidly regulate spine ER dynamics.

  16. MR manifestations of vertebral artery injuries in cervical spine trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jeong Sik; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Young Soo; Cho, Yong Eun; Kang, Byung Chul; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    To assess the diagnostic efficacy of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of a vertebral artery injury occurring from major cervical spine trauma. Conventional MR findings of 63 patients and 63 control subjects were compared to detect a possible change in the vertebral arteries resulted from trauma. Plain films, CT and clinical records were also reviewed to correlate the degree of cervical spine injury with vascular change. Nine cases of absent flow signals in vessel lumen were observed in eight patients and one was observed in the control group. Patients more frequently demonstrated other abnormalities such as intraluminal linear signals (n=3) or focal luminal narrowing (n=9) but there was no statistical significance. There was a close relationship between degree of cord damage and occlusion of the vertebral artery. Conventional MR imaging is useful in the detection of vertebral artery occlusion resulting from cervical spine trauma.

  17. Imaging Proteolysis by Living Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Sameni

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant progression is accompanied by degradation of extracellular matrix proteins. Here we describe a novel confocal assay in which we can observe proteolysis by living human breast cancer cells (BT20 and BT549 through the use of quenchedfluorescent protein substrates. Degradation thus was imaged, by confocal optical sectioning, as an accumulation of fluorescent products. With the BT20 cells, fluorescence was localized to pericellular focal areas that coincide with pits in the underlying matrix. In contrast, fluorescence was localized to intracellular vesicles in the BT549 cells, vesicles that also label for lysosomal markers. Neither intracellular nor pericellular fluorescence was observed in the BT549 cells in the presence of cytochalasin B, suggesting that degradation occurred intracellularly and was dependent on endocytic uptake of substrate. In the presence of a cathepsin 13-selective cysteine protease inhibitor, intracellular fluorescence was decreased ~90% and pericellular fluorescence decreased 67% to 96%, depending on the protein substrate. Matrix metallo protease inhibitors reduced pericellular fluorescence ~50%, i.e., comparably to a serine and a broad spectrum cysteine protease inhibitor. Our results suggest that: 1 a proteolytic cascade participates in pericellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells, and 2 the cysteine protease cathepsin B participates in both pericellular and intracellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells.

  18. Biphasic synaptic Ca influx arising from compartmentalized electrical signals in dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda L Bloodgood

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Excitatory synapses on mammalian principal neurons are typically formed onto dendritic spines, which consist of a bulbous head separated from the parent dendrite by a thin neck. Although activation of voltage-gated channels in the spine and stimulus-evoked constriction of the spine neck can influence synaptic signals, the contribution of electrical filtering by the spine neck to basal synaptic transmission is largely unknown. Here we use spine and dendrite calcium (Ca imaging combined with 2-photon laser photolysis of caged glutamate to assess the impact of electrical filtering imposed by the spine morphology on synaptic Ca transients. We find that in apical spines of CA1 hippocampal neurons, the spine neck creates a barrier to the propagation of current, which causes a voltage drop and results in spatially inhomogeneous activation of voltage-gated Ca channels (VGCCs on a micron length scale. Furthermore, AMPA and NMDA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs and NMDARs, respectively that are colocalized on individual spine heads interact to produce two kinetically and mechanistically distinct phases of synaptically evoked Ca influx. Rapid depolarization of the spine triggers a brief and large Ca current whose amplitude is regulated in a graded manner by the number of open AMPARs and whose duration is terminated by the opening of small conductance Ca-activated potassium (SK channels. A slower phase of Ca influx is independent of AMPAR opening and is determined by the number of open NMDARs and the post-stimulus potential in the spine. Biphasic synaptic Ca influx only occurs when AMPARs and NMDARs are coactive within an individual spine. These results demonstrate that the morphology of dendritic spines endows associated synapses with specialized modes of signaling and permits the graded and independent control of multiple phases of synaptic Ca influx.

  19. Lumbar spine injuries in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Ian F; Proctor, Mark R; Day, Arthur L

    2006-10-15

    Lumbar spine injuries in athletes are not uncommon and usually take the form of a mild muscle strain or sprain. More severe injuries sustained by athletes include disc herniations, spondylolistheses, and various types of fracture. The recognition and management of these injuries in athletes involve the additional consideration that to return to play, the lumbar spine must be able to withstand forces similar to those that were injurious. The authors consider common lumbar spine injuries in athletes and discuss management principles for neurosurgeons that are relevant to this population.

  20. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging artifact with cobalt-chromium versus titanium spinal instrumentation: presented at the 2013 Joint Spine Section Meeting. Clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faiz U; Sidani, Charif; Fourzali, Roberto; Wang, Michael Y

    2013-11-01

    Cobalt-chromium alloy (CoCr) rods haves some preferred biomechanical properties over titanium rods for spinal fixation. The use of CoCr rods in spinal fusion is relatively new, and there is no study in the existing world literature assessing the artifact caused by these rods in patients undergoing postoperative MRI. The purpose of this study is to compare the amount of imaging artifact caused by these implants and to assess its impact on the visualization of neighboring neural structures. This study investigated MR images in patients who underwent implantation of thoracolumbar instrumentation using 5.5-mm-diameter CoCr rods between November 2009 and March 2011 and images obtained in a comparison group of patients who had 5.5-mm titanium rods implanted during the same time period. Axial measurements of the artifact created by the rods between the screw heads were compared between the groups. Two blinded board-certified radiologists performed the measurements independently. They scored the visualization of the spinal canal using a subjective scoring system of 1-3, with 1 representing very good visualization and 2 and 3 representing reduced (good or suboptimal, respectively) visualization as a result of rod-related artifact. All measurements and scores were independently provided for T1-weighted and T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences (1.5-T magnet, 5-mm slice thickness). A total of 40 levels from the CoCr group (6 patients) and 30 levels from the titanium group (9 patients) were included in the analysis. Visualization of the canal at all levels was rated a score of 1 (very good) by both evaluators for both the CoCr and titanium groups. The average artifact on T1-weighted images measured 11.8 ± 1.8 mm for the CoCr group and 8.5 ± 1.2 mm for the titanium group (p < 0.01). The corresponding measurements on T2-weighted images were 11.0 ± 2.3 mm and 8.3 ± 1.7 mm (p < 0.01), respectively. In a mixed regression model, the mean artifact measurement for the CoCr group

  1. A study on uncertainty by passage of time of stereotactic body radiation therapy for spine metastasis cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Wan; Kim, Joo Ho; Ahn, Seung Kwon; Lee, Sang Kyoo; Cho, Jeong Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the proper treatment time of stereotactic body radiation therapy for spine metastasis cancer by using the image guidance system of CyberKnife(Accuracy Incorporated, USA) which is able to correct movements of patients during the treatment. Fifty seven spine metastasis cancer patients who have stereotactic body radiation therapy of CyberKnife participate, 8 of them with cervical spine cancer, 26 of them with thoracic spine cancer, and 23 of them with lumbar spine cancer. X-ray images acquired during the treatment were classified by treatment site. From the starting point of treatment, motion tendency of patients is analyzed in each section which is divided into every 5 minutes. In case of cervical spine, there is sudden increase of variation in 15 minutes after the treatment starts in rotational direction. In case of thoracic spine, there is no significantly variable section. However, variation increases gradually with the passage of time so that it is assumed that noticeable value comes up in approximately 40 minutes. In case of lumbar spine, sharp increase of variation is seen in 20 minutes in translational and rotational direction. Without having corrections during the treatment, proper treatment time is considered as less than 15 minutes for cervical spine, 40 minutes for thoracic spine, and 20 minutes for lumbar spine. If treatment time is longer than these duration, additional patient alignments are required or PTV margin should be enlarged.

  2. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine. 572.187 Section 572.187... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.187 Lumbar spine. (a) The lumbar spine assembly consists of parts shown in drawing 175-5500. For purposes of this test, the lumbar spine is mounted within the...

  3. Osteoarthritis of the wrist and hand, and spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feydy, Antoine; Pluot, Etienne; Guerini, Henri; Drapé, Jean-Luc

    2009-07-01

    Although osteoarthritis (OA) of the wrist and fingers is routinely diagnosed using plain film, a thorough assessment of cartilage injuries using CT-arthrography, MR imaging, or MR-arthrography remains necessary before any surgical procedure. MR imaging is ideally suited for delineating the presence, extent, and complications of degenerative spinal disease, including OA of the spine involving the disk space, vertebral endplates, facet joints, or supportive and surrounding soft tissues. Other imaging modalities such as CT, dynamic radiography, myelography, and discography may provide complimentary information in selected cases. This article focuses on imaging of OA of the wrist and hand and the lumbar spine, with an emphasis on current MR imaging grading systems available for the assessment of discovertebral lesions.

  4. The effect of human image in B2C website design: an eye-tracking study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuzhen; Yang, Yi; Wang, Qi; Ma, Qingguo

    2014-09-01

    On B2C shopping websites, effective visual designs can bring about consumers' positive emotional experience. From this perspective, this article developed a research model to explore the impact of human image as a visual element on consumers' online shopping emotions and subsequent attitudes towards websites. This study conducted an eye-tracking experiment to collect both eye movement data and questionnaire data to test the research model. Questionnaire data analysis showed that product pictures combined with human image induced positive emotions among participants, thus promoting their attitudes towards online shopping websites. Specifically, product pictures with human image first produced higher levels of image appeal and perceived social presence, thus stimulating higher levels of enjoyment and subsequent positive attitudes towards the websites. Moreover, a moderating effect of product type was demonstrated on the relationship between the presence of human image and the level of image appeal. Specifically, human image significantly increased the level of image appeal when integrated in entertainment product pictures while this relationship was not significant in terms of utilitarian products. Eye-tracking data analysis further supported these results and provided plausible explanations. The presence of human image significantly increased the pupil size of participants regardless of product types. For entertainment products, participants paid more attention to product pictures integrated with human image whereas for utilitarian products more attention was paid to functional information of products than to product pictures no matter whether or not integrated with human image.

  5. Imaging of convection enhanced delivery of toxins in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ankit I; Choi, Bryan D; Raghavan, Raghu; Brady, Martin; Friedman, Allan H; Bigner, Darell D; Pastan, Ira; Sampson, John H

    2011-03-01

    Drug delivery of immunotoxins to brain tumors circumventing the blood brain barrier is a significant challenge. Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) circumvents the blood brain barrier through direct intracerebral application using a hydrostatic pressure gradient to percolate therapeutic compounds throughout the interstitial spaces of infiltrated brain and tumors. The efficacy of CED is determined through the distribution of the therapeutic agent to the targeted region. The vast majority of patients fail to receive a significant amount of coverage of the area at risk for tumor recurrence. Understanding this challenge, it is surprising that so little work has been done to monitor the delivery of therapeutic agents using this novel approach. Here we present a review of imaging in convection enhanced delivery monitoring of toxins in humans, and discuss future challenges in the field.

  6. Human Posture Recognition Based on Images Captured by the Kinect Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Wen-June; Chang, Jun-Wei; Haung, Shih-Fu; Wang, Rong-Jyue

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we combine several image processing techniques with the depth images captured by a Kinect sensor to successfully recognize the five distinct human postures of sitting, standing, stooping...

  7. Second Harmonic Generation Imaging Analysis of Collagen Arrangement in Human Cornea

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Choul Yong; Lee, Jimmy K.; Chuck, Roy S.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we imaged human cornea using a second harmonic generation imaging technique. The horizontal collagen bundle arrangement of corneal stroma as a function of depth and location was analyzed.

  8. What is feasible with imaging human brain function and connectivity using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugurbil, Kamil

    2016-10-05

    When we consider all of the methods we employ to detect brain function, from electrophysiology to optical techniques to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we do not really have a 'golden technique' that meets all of the needs for studying the brain. We have methods, each of which has significant limitations but provide often complimentary information. Clearly, there are many questions that need to be answered about fMRI, which unlike other methods, allows us to study the human brain. However, there are also extraordinary accomplishments or demonstration of the feasibility of reaching new and previously unexpected scales of function in the human brain. This article reviews some of the work we have pursued, often with extensive collaborations with other co-workers, towards understanding the underlying mechanisms of the methodology, defining its limitations, and developing solutions to advance it. No doubt, our knowledge of human brain function has vastly expanded since the introduction of fMRI. However, methods and instrumentation in this dynamic field have evolved to a state that discoveries about the human brain based on fMRI principles, together with information garnered at a much finer spatial and temporal scale through other methods, are poised to significantly accelerate in the next decade.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. What is feasible with imaging human brain function and connectivity using functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    When we consider all of the methods we employ to detect brain function, from electrophysiology to optical techniques to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we do not really have a ‘golden technique’ that meets all of the needs for studying the brain. We have methods, each of which has significant limitations but provide often complimentary information. Clearly, there are many questions that need to be answered about fMRI, which unlike other methods, allows us to study the human brain. However, there are also extraordinary accomplishments or demonstration of the feasibility of reaching new and previously unexpected scales of function in the human brain. This article reviews some of the work we have pursued, often with extensive collaborations with other co-workers, towards understanding the underlying mechanisms of the methodology, defining its limitations, and developing solutions to advance it. No doubt, our knowledge of human brain function has vastly expanded since the introduction of fMRI. However, methods and instrumentation in this dynamic field have evolved to a state that discoveries about the human brain based on fMRI principles, together with information garnered at a much finer spatial and temporal scale through other methods, are poised to significantly accelerate in the next decade. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience’. PMID:27574313

  10. Thermal imaging to detect physiological indicators of stress in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Carl B.; Skipper, Julie A.; Petkie, Douglas T.

    2013-05-01

    Real-time, stand-off sensing of human subjects to detect emotional state would be valuable in many defense, security and medical scenarios. We are developing a multimodal sensor platform that incorporates high-resolution electro-optical and mid-wave infrared (MWIR) cameras and a millimeter-wave radar system to identify individuals who are psychologically stressed. Recent experiments have aimed to: 1) assess responses to physical versus psychological stressors; 2) examine the impact of topical skin products on thermal signatures; and 3) evaluate the fidelity of vital signs extracted from thermal imagery and radar signatures. Registered image and sensor data were collected as subjects (n=32) performed mental and physical tasks. In each image, the face was segmented into 29 non-overlapping segments based on fiducial points automatically output by our facial feature tracker. Image features were defined that facilitated discrimination between psychological and physical stress states. To test the ability to intentionally mask thermal responses indicative of anxiety or fear, subjects applied one of four topical skin products to one half of their face before performing tasks. Finally, we evaluated the performance of two non-contact techniques to detect respiration and heart rate: chest displacement extracted from the radar signal and temperature fluctuations at the nose tip and regions near superficial arteries to detect respiration and heart rates, respectively, extracted from the MWIR imagery. Our results are very satisfactory: classification of physical versus psychological stressors is repeatedly greater than 90%, thermal masking was almost always ineffective, and accurate heart and respiration rates are detectable in both thermal and radar signatures.

  11. Advanced human machine interaction for an image interpretation workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, S.; Martin, M.; van de Camp, F.; Peinsipp-Byma, E.; Beyerer, J.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, many new interaction technologies have been developed that enhance the usability of computer systems and allow for novel types of interaction. The areas of application for these technologies have mostly been in gaming and entertainment. However, in professional environments, there are especially demanding tasks that would greatly benefit from improved human machine interfaces as well as an overall improved user experience. We, therefore, envisioned and built an image-interpretation-workstation of the future, a multi-monitor workplace comprised of four screens. Each screen is dedicated to a complex software product such as a geo-information system to provide geographic context, an image annotation tool, software to generate standardized reports and a tool to aid in the identification of objects. Using self-developed systems for hand tracking, pointing gestures and head pose estimation in addition to touchscreens, face identification, and speech recognition systems we created a novel approach to this complex task. For example, head pose information is used to save the position of the mouse cursor on the currently focused screen and to restore it as soon as the same screen is focused again while hand gestures allow for intuitive manipulation of 3d objects in mid-air. While the primary focus is on the task of image interpretation, all of the technologies involved provide generic ways of efficiently interacting with a multi-screen setup and could be utilized in other fields as well. In preliminary experiments, we received promising feedback from users in the military and started to tailor the functionality to their needs

  12. Quantification of confocal images of human corneal endothelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Jeffery A.; Beuerman, Roger W.; Kaufman, Stephen C.

    1996-05-01

    Real-time, in vivo, confocal microscopic examination permits visualization of human corneal endothelium cells as bright bodies organized into a densely packed hexagonal arrangement. Quantification of endothelial cell number would be useful in assessing the condition of this cell layer in various disease states. In this study, we sought to use an image analysis method developed in this laboratory that utilizes digital filtering techniques and morphological operations to determine the boundaries of each cell. Images were corrected to establish a uniform luminance level, and then convolved by various matrices until distinct peaks in luminance value were identified. These peaks were used as seed points from which cell boundaries were recursively expanded until they collided with other cell boundaries. This method automatically counts the number of cells and determines the size and position of each cell. The resulting histograms of cell size are readily indicative of changes in cellular density, cell loss, and deviation from uniform arrangement. The numbers of cells counted by this method are consistently within 3% of the numbers counted manually. Results relating cell counts obtained by manual and computerized methods are as follows: 200/184; 276/262; 87/87; 234/232; 236/232; 299/297; 145/147; 119/122; 237/243; 119/119; 245/253; 189/193. Thus, confocal microscopy coupled with these image analysis and statistical procedures provides an accurate quantitative approach to monitoring the endothelium under normal, pathological, and experimental conditions, such as those following surgery and trauma or in the evaluation of the efficacy of topical therapeutic agents.

  13. Imaging and tracking HIV viruses in human cervical mucus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukari, Fatima; Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Nossal, Ralph; Boukari, Hacène

    2016-09-01

    We describe a systematic approach to image, track, and quantify the movements of HIV viruses embedded in human cervical mucus. The underlying motivation for this study is that, in HIV-infected adults, women account for more than half of all new cases and most of these women acquire the infection through heterosexual contact. The endocervix is believed to be a susceptible site for HIV entry. Cervical mucus, which coats the endocervix, should play a protective role against the viruses. Thus, we developed a methodology to apply time-resolved confocal microscopy to examine the motion of HIV viruses that were added to samples of untreated cervical mucus. From the images, we identified the viruses, tracked them over time, and calculated changes of the statistical mean-squared displacement (MSD) of each virus. Approximately half of tracked viruses appear constrained while the others show mobility with MSDs that are proportional to τα+ν2τ2, over time range τ, depicting a combination of anomalous diffusion (0viruses. Although a more extensive study is warranted, these results support the assumption of mucus being a barrier against the motion of these viruses.

  14. Bone structure of the distal radius and the calcaneus vs BMD of the spine and proximal femur in the prediction of osteoporotic spine fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, Thomas M. [Department of Clinical Radiology, University of Muenster (Germany); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Technical University Munich (Germany); Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Vieth, Volker; Matheis, Julia [Department of Clinical Radiology, University of Muenster (Germany); Newitt, David; Lu, Ying; Majumdar, Sharmila [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rummeny, Ernst J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Technical University Munich (Germany)

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare structure measures obtained from high-resolution MR images of the calcaneus and the distal radius with bone mineral density (BMD) of the spine and hip in the prediction of osteoporotic spine fracture status. High-resolution MR images of the calcaneus and radius were obtained in 24 post-menopausal women with spine fractures and 22 age-matched controls. Imaging was performed at 1.5 T using a T1-weighted spin-echo sequence (slice thickness 1 mm, in-plane spatial resolution 195 x 195 {mu}m{sup 2}). Structure analysis was performed using parameters analogous to standard histomorphometry. Bone mineral density of the spine was obtained using quantitative CT and of the hip with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Significant differences between both patient groups were obtained with BMD and all structure parameters (p<0.05). Using receiver operating characteristic analysis to determine the diagnostic performance in differentiating both groups, the best results were found for BMD of the spine, one of the radial structure measures and a combination of the calcaneal structure measures. In this study BMD of the spine and structure measures of the distal radius were best suited to predict the osteoporotic fracture status of the spine. A combination of BMD and structure measures did not yield any additional information on fracture status. (orig.)

  15. Design and development of spine phantom to verify dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic body radiation therapy using 3D prnter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seu Ran; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Min Joo; Park, So Hyun; Song Ji Hye; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Jason W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study is to verify dosimetric accuracy of delivered dose in spine SBRT as highly precise radiotherapy depending on cancer position using dedicated spine phantom based on 3D printer. Radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) 0631 suggest different planning method in spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) according to location of cancer owing to its distinct shape. The developed phantom especially using DLP method can be utilized as spine SBRT dosimetry research. Our study was able to confirm that the phantom was indeed similar with HU value of human spine as well as its shape.

  16. Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and break.How are spinal fractures treated?Most fractures of the spine are treated with bed rest until the pain goes away. Pain medicines, back braces and physical therapy may also be used. For some patients, doctors ...

  17. Typhoid spine - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Salmonella typhi isolated from L4-L5 spine is reported here. The causative organism was not suspected preoperatively. The patient responded favourably to surgical drainage and appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  18. Spine Tango annual report 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukamp, M; Perler, G; Pigott, T; Munting, E; Aebi, M; Röder, C

    2013-09-01

    Since the Spine Tango registry was founded over a decade ago it has become established internationally. An annual report has been produced using the same format as the SWEspine group to allow for first data comparisons between the two registries. Data was captured with the latest generation of surgery and follow-up forms. Also, the Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) from interventions performed in the year 2012 with follow-up to June 2013 was analyzed. Groups of patients with the most common degenerative lumbar spine diseases and a single group of patients with degenerative cervical spine diseases were created. The demographics, risk factors, previous treatments, current treatment, short-term outcomes, patient satisfaction and complications were analyzed. Pre- and postoperative pain and function scores were derived from the COMI. About 6,500 procedures were captured with Spine Tango in 2012. The definitions and composition of all the degenerative groups could not completely be matched between the two registries with the consequence that the age and sex distributions were partially different. Preoperative pain levels were similar. The short-term outcomes available did not allow for evaluation of the final result of surgical intervention. This will be possible with the longer term data in the next annual report. There was a distinct disparity in reported complication rates between surgeons and patients. This is a valuable first step in creating comparable reports for SWEspine and Spine Tango. The German spine registry may be able to collaborate in the future because of similar items and data structure as Spine Tango. There needs to be more work on understanding the harmonization of the different degenerative subgroups. The Spine Tango report is weakened by the short and incomplete follow-up. The visual presentation of data may be a useful model for aiding decision making for surgeons and patients in the future.

  19. Hypnosis and imaging of the living human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Mathieu; Raz, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Over more than two decades, studies using imaging techniques of the living human brain have begun to explore the neural correlates of hypnosis. The collective findings provide a gripping, albeit preliminary, account of the underlying neurobiological mechanisms involved in hypnotic phenomena. While substantial advances lend support to different hypotheses pertaining to hypnotic modulation of attention, control, and monitoring processes, the complex interactions among the many mediating variables largely hinder our ability to isolate robust commonalities across studies. The present account presents a critical integrative synthesis of neuroimaging studies targeting hypnosis as a function of suggestion. Specifically, hypnotic induction without task-specific suggestion is examined, as well as suggestions concerning sensation and perception, memory, and ideomotor response. The importance of carefully designed experiments is highlighted to better tease apart the neural correlates that subserve hypnotic phenomena. Moreover, converging findings intimate that hypnotic suggestions seem to induce specific neural patterns. These observations propose that suggestions may have the ability to target focal brain networks. Drawing on evidence spanning several technological modalities, neuroimaging studies of hypnosis pave the road to a more scientific understanding of a dramatic, yet largely evasive, domain of human behavior.

  20. Measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube in the lumbar spine on magnetic resonance imaging. Comparison between normal, pre- and post-discectomy conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubayashi, Yasutomo [Juntendo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-07-01

    This study evaluated the usefulness of pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lumbar disc hernia with special attention to measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube. Twenty-five patients (20 men and 5 women; 25 discs) who underwent posterior lumbar discectomy and 73 normal individuals (44 men and 29 women; 219 discs) of a similar age distribution were studied. Axial MRI was mainly used for the measurement of the dural tube. In the patient group, MRI examination was performed 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Assessment of the clinical symptoms was also included and used for comparison with the MRI evaluation. The cross-sectional area was significantly reduced to about 50% of the normal preoperatively. One month postoperatively, there was no significant increase in the size of the area, but after three months, the area increased significantly and progressed to the normal size within a year. One-month postoperatively, MRI examination was not considered useful because of postoperative hematoma and/or edema at the surgical site. The increase in the size of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube correlated well with the improvement in clinical symptoms. Three-months postoperatively, MRI evaluation of the lumbar disc seemed useful and measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube appeared to serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of the surgery. (author)

  1. Augmented reality visualization for thoracoscopic spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Frank; Vogt, Sebastian; Khamene, Ali; Heining, Sandro; Euler, Ekkehard; Schneberger, Marc; Zuerl, Konrad; Mutschler, Wolf

    2006-03-01

    We are developing an augmented reality (AR) image guidance system in which information derived from medical images is overlaid onto a video view of the patient. The centerpiece of the system is a head-mounted display custom fitted with two miniature color video cameras that capture the stereo view of the scene. Medical graphics is overlaid onto the video view and appears firmly anchored in the scene, without perceivable time lag or jitter. We have been testing the system for different clinical applications. In this paper we discuss minimally invasive thoracoscopic spine surgery as a promising new orthopedic application. In the standard approach, the thoracoscope - a rigid endoscope - provides visual feedback for the minimally invasive procedure of removing a damaged disc and fusing the two neighboring vertebrae. The navigation challenges are twofold. From a global perspective, the correct vertebrae on the spine have to be located with the inserted instruments. From a local perspective, the actual spine procedure has to be performed precisely. Visual feedback from the thoracoscope provides only limited support for both of these tasks. In the augmented reality approach, we give the surgeon additional anatomical context for the navigation. Before the surgery, we derive a model of the patient's anatomy from a CT scan, and during surgery we track the location of the surgical instruments in relation to patient and model. With this information, we can help the surgeon in both the global and local navigation, providing a global map and 3D information beyond the local 2D view of the thoracoscope. Augmented reality visualization is a particularly intuitive method of displaying this information to the surgeon. To adapt our augmented reality system to this application, we had to add an external optical tracking system, which works now in combination with our head-mounted tracking camera. The surgeon's feedback to the initial phantom experiments is very positive.

  2. Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide Pedersen, Peter; Eiskjær, Søren Peter; Petersen, Asger Greval

    2016-01-01

    Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery. A study on anthropomorphic phantoms describing patient radiation exposure in full spine examinations. Authors: Peter Heide Pedersen, Asger Greval Petersen, Søren Peter Eiskjær. Background: Ionizing radiation potentially...... leads to tissue damage. It has been documented in large cohort studies that radiographic imaging during childhood for spinal deformities eg. scoliosis, increases the lifetime risk of breast cancer. The EOS biplane x-ray imaging system (EOS Imaging S.A, Paris France) has been developed to produce high...... quality images while at the same time reducing radiation dose. At our institution we use the EOS for pre- and postoperative full spine examinations. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to make first time organ dose and effective dose evaluations with micro-dose settings in full spine examinations. Our...

  3. Spinal hyperostosis as an important sign indicating spine injuries on postmortem computed tomography.

    Science.gov (