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Sample records for human sperm nucleus

  1. Orientation of sea urchin sperms in static magnetic fields: Compared to human sperms

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    Sakhnini, Lama; Dairi, Maheen

    In this study we report on magnetic orientation of sea urchin and human sperms. The sea urchin and human sperms became oriented parallel to the magnetic field (1 T maximum). The human sperms were totally oriented with magnetic field at about 600 mT. However, the sea urchin sperms show different behavior due to morphological differences between them and the human sperms.

  2. Tenacity of Exogenous Human Papillomavirus DNA in Sperm Washing

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    Brossfield, Jeralyn E.; Philip J. Chan; Patton, William C.; King, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Purpose:Sperm cells have been shown to take up exogenous DNA readily. The hypothesis was that sperm washing would remove exogenous viral DNA infecting sperm cells. The objective was to compare three types of sperm washing procedures for their capacity to remove exogenous human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from infected sperm.

  3. Automatic classification of human sperm head morphology.

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    Chang, Violeta; Heutte, Laurent; Petitjean, Caroline; Härtel, Steffen; Hitschfeld, Nancy

    2017-05-01

    Infertility is a problem that affects up to 15% of couples worldwide with emotional and physiological implications and semen analysis is the first step in the evaluation of an infertile couple. Indeed the morphology of human sperm cells is considered to be a clinical tool dedicated to the fertility prognosis and serves, mainly, for making decisions regarding the options of assisted reproduction technologies. Therefore, a complete analysis of not only normal sperm but also abnormal sperm turns out to be critical in this context. This paper sets out to develop, implement and calibrate a novel methodology to characterize and classify sperm heads towards morphological sperm analysis. Our work is aimed at focusing on a depth analysis of abnormal sperm heads for fertility diagnosis, prognosis, reproductive toxicology, basic research or public health studies. We introduce a morphological characterization for human sperm heads based on shape measures. We also present a pipeline for sperm head classification, according to the last Laboratory Manual for the Examination and Processing of Human Semen of the World Health Organization (WHO). In this sense, we propose a two-stage classification scheme that permits to classify sperm heads among five different classes (one class for normal sperm heads and four classes for abnormal sperm heads) combining an ensemble strategy for feature selection and a cascade approach with several support vector machines dedicated to the verification of each class. We use Fisher's exact test to demonstrate that there is no statistically significant differences between our results and those achieved by domain experts. Experimental evaluation shows that our two-stage classification scheme outperforms some state-of-the-art monolithic classifiers, exhibiting 58% of average accuracy. More interestingly, on the subset of data for which there is a total agreement between experts for the label of the samples, our system is able to provide 73% of average

  4. Endocannabinoids and Human Sperm Cells

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    Giovanna Zolese

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available N-acylethanolamides (NAEs are naturally occurring signaling lipids consisting of amides and esters of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Usually they are present in a very small amounts in many mammalian tissues and cells, including human reproductive tracts and fluids. Recently, the presence of N-arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA, the most characterised member of endocannabinoids, and its congeners palmitoylethanolamide (PEA and oleylethanolamide (OEA in seminal plasma, oviductal fluid, and follicular fluids was demonstrated. AEA has been shown to bind not only type-1 (CB1 and type-2 (CB2 cannabinoid receptors, but also type-1 vanilloid receptor (TRPV1, while PEA and OEA are inactive with respect to classical cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 but activate TRPV1 or peroxisome proliferator activate receptors (PPARs. This review concerns the most recent experimental data on PEA and OEA, endocannabinoid-like molecules which appear to exert their action exclusively on sperm cells with altered features, such as membrane characteristics and kinematic parameters. Their beneficial effects on these cells could suggest a possible pharmacological use of PEA and OEA on patients affected by some forms of idiopathic infertility.

  5. Human papillomavirus found in sperm head of young adult males affects the progressive motility.

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    Foresta, Carlo; Garolla, Andrea; Zuccarello, Daniela; Pizzol, Damiano; Moretti, Afra; Barzon, Luisa; Palù, Giorgio

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) sperm infection and its correlation with sperm parameters in a cohort of young adult males. Cross-sectional clinical study. Andrology and Microbiology sections at a university hospital. A cohort of 200 young adult male volunteers (18 years old), 100 with previous sexual intercourse and 100 without previous sexual intercourse. Seminal parameters, sperm culture for HPV and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for HPV detection in the sperm head. Statistical analysis was performed with a two-tailed Student's t-test. Results of HPV investigation were compared to sperm parameters and results of FISH analysis. HPV infection was present in sperm cells of 10 subjects among those 100 young adults who already had unprotected intercourse and its presence was associated with reduced sperm motility. Furthermore, infected samples showed that about 25% of sperm had an HPV DNA positivity at the head site, but it is unclear whether it was integrated in the nucleus or not. This is the first report estimating the percentage of HPV-positive sperm in infected subjects and the association between HPV infection and sperm motility. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Human papillomavirus gene sequences in washed human sperm deoxyribonucleic acid.

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    Chan, P J; Su, B C; Kalugdan, T; Seraj, I M; Tredway, D R; King, A

    1994-05-01

    The present study demonstrated the presence of HPV gene sequences in Percoll-washed sperm cells using polymerase chain reaction primers targeting smaller gene regions. Up to 64% of the sperm specimens were shown to contain gene sequences indicative of the presence of HPV. Human papillomavirus type 16 was detected about twice as often as HPV type 18. The results suggest the possible role of sperm as a vector for HPV.

  7. Tenacity of exogenous human papillomavirus DNA in sperm washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossfield, J E; Chan, P J; Patton, W C; King, A

    1999-07-01

    Sperm cells have been shown to take up exogenous DNA readily. The hypothesis was that sperm washing would remove exogenous viral DNA infecting sperm cells. The objective was to compare three types of sperm washing procedures for their capacity to remove exogenous human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from infected sperm. Prewashed sperm were equally divided and sperm in one portion were exposed to L1 HPV DNA fragments for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Untreated washed sperm served as the control. After transfection, the sperm were washed by either centrifuge, two-layer Isolate colloid wash, or test-yolk buffer procedures. Sperm parameters were measured on a Hamilton Thorn HTM-C analyzer. Sperm DNA were extracted and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out targeting the L1 consensus gene of HPV and the designated sentinel gene, 17q21 spanning the D17S855 gene. Amplified products were analyzed in 2% agarose gel electrophoresis. PCR analyses detected the consensus L1 HPV gene in sperm after they were processed through either of the three procedures. Controls were negative for the L1 gene. Extracted DNA were verified by PCR amplification of 17q21 spanning the D17S855 gene. Transfected sperm had higher percentages of total motility and progression compared with the control. Centrifuged, washed, transfected sperm exhibited a greater curvilinear velocity and hyperactivation. The data showed that washing would not remove exogenous HPV DNA from sperm cells. The viral DNA was tenaciously bound to the sperm, suggesting an internalization into the sperm. The viral DNA also increased the motility of the sperm by affecting the velocity and progression of the sperm, which suggested either an increase in metabolism, an enhancement of the calcium-regulated motility mechanism, or an artifact of PCR reagents. More studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of DNA stimulated sperm motility.

  8. Assessment of sperm nucleus integrity in infertile men: a novel research field for anthropology in the molecular era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavranos, Giagkos; Manolakou, Panagiota; Katsiki, Evangelia; Angelopoulou, Roxani

    2013-12-01

    Anthropology has always been particularly interested in the origin of human life and the development towards adulthood. Although originally working with skeletal measurements and bio-morphological markers in modern populations, it has now entered the growing field of applied molecular biology. This relatively recent advance allows the detailed study of major events in human development and senescence. For instance, sperm DNA integrity and chromatin re-organization are crucial factors for fertilization and embryo development. Clinical researchers have developed improved methods for the evaluation of DNA integrity and protaminosis in sperm nuclei, such as the TUNEL and the CMA3 assays. DNA damage in spermatozoal nuclei is detected using the TUNEL assay which depends on the specific enzymatic reaction of TdT with the end strand breaks of DNA. Protaminosis in spermatozoal nucleus is evaluated using CMA3 assay, which is based on the in situ competition between CMA3 and protamines. Such measurements may provide useful data on human reproductive health, aiding the explanation of demographic differences across the world.

  9. Metal ions and human sperm mannose receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoff, S; Cooper, G W; Centola, G M; Jacob, A; Hershlag, A; Hurley, I R

    2000-09-01

    Zinc and lead concentrations were measured in seminal plasma from fertile donors, infertile men with varicocoele and men undergoing work-ups for in vitro fertilization. Ejaculated spermatozoa from these subjects were incubated in vitro with various metal ions and/or dibromoethane and dibromochloropropane. Mannose receptor expression was correlated with metal and toxicant levels. Sperm distributions of potassium channels were compared with lead ions and calcium channels with zinc ions. Mannose receptor expression by capacitated spermatozoa increased linearly with seminal plasma zinc levels, and correlated inversely with lead levels. Cobalt had no effect on mannose receptor expression, but nickel had a concentration-dependent biphasic effect. Mannose receptor expression was not affected by dibromoethane and dibromochloropropane if the cholesterol content of the sperm membrane was high, but mannose receptor expression was decreased in low cholesterol spermatozoa by exposures below estimated permissive exposure limits. Potassium channels and lead ions co-localized over the entire head of human spermatozoa, while both calcium channels and zinc ions were confined to the equatorial segment of the head. Mannose receptor expression on the external surface of the human sperm plasma membrane is a biomarker for the effects of transition and heavy metals and organic toxicants on sperm fertility potential.

  10. Effect of Astaxanthin on Human Sperm Capacitation

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    Luciana Bordin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to be able to fertilize oocytes, human sperm must undergo a series of morphological and structural alterations, known as capacitation. It has been shown that the production of endogenous sperm reactive oxygen species (ROS plays a key role in causing cells to undergo a massive acrosome reaction (AR. Astaxanthin (Asta, a photo-protective red pigment belonging to the carotenoid family, is recognized as having anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory properties and is present in many dietary supplements. This study evaluates the effect of Asta in a capacitating buffer which induces low ROS production and low percentages of acrosome-reacted cells (ARC. Sperm cells were incubated in the presence or absence of increasing concentrations of Asta or diamide (Diam and analyzed for their ROS production, Tyr-phosphorylation (Tyr-P pattern and percentages of ARC and non-viable cells (NVC. Results show that Asta ameliorated both sperm head Tyr-P and ARC values without affecting the ROS generation curve, whereas Diam succeeded in enhancing the Tyr-P level but only of the flagellum without increasing ARC values. It is suggested that Asta can be inserted in the membrane and therefore create capacitation-like membrane alteration which allow Tyr-P of the head. Once this has occurred, AR can take place and involves a higher numbers of cells.

  11. Effect of astaxanthin on human sperm capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donà, Gabriella; Kožuh, Ivana; Brunati, Anna Maria; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Bonanni, Guglielmo; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Armanini, Decio; Clari, Giulio; Bordin, Luciana

    2013-06-03

    In order to be able to fertilize oocytes, human sperm must undergo a series of morphological and structural alterations, known as capacitation. It has been shown that the production of endogenous sperm reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a key role in causing cells to undergo a massive acrosome reaction (AR). Astaxanthin (Asta), a photo-protective red pigment belonging to the carotenoid family, is recognized as having anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory properties and is present in many dietary supplements. This study evaluates the effect of Asta in a capacitating buffer which induces low ROS production and low percentages of acrosome-reacted cells (ARC). Sperm cells were incubated in the presence or absence of increasing concentrations of Asta or diamide (Diam) and analyzed for their ROS production, Tyr-phosphorylation (Tyr-P) pattern and percentages of ARC and non-viable cells (NVC). Results show that Asta ameliorated both sperm head Tyr-P and ARC values without affecting the ROS generation curve, whereas Diam succeeded in enhancing the Tyr-P level but only of the flagellum without increasing ARC values. It is suggested that Asta can be inserted in the membrane and therefore create capacitation-like membrane alteration which allow Tyr-P of the head. Once this has occurred, AR can take place and involves a higher numbers of cells.

  12. Adsorption of human papillomavirus 16 to live human sperm.

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    Pérez-Andino, Julio; Buck, Christopher B; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2009-06-09

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a diverse group of viruses that infect the skin and mucosal tissues of humans. A high-risk subgroup of HPVs is associated with virtually all cases of cervical cancer [1]-[3]. High-risk HPVs are transmitted sexually; however, the exact mechanisms by which sexual contact promotes virus infection remain uncertain. To study this question we asked whether capsids of HPV type 16 (a high-risk HPV) specifically interact with sperm cells. We tested if purified HPV16 virions directly adsorb to live human sperm cells in native semen and in conditions that resemble the female genital tract. We found that HPV16 capsids bind efficiently to two distinct sites at the equatorial region of the sperm head surface. Moreover, we observed that the interaction of virus with sperm can be reduced by two HPV infection inhibitors, heparin and carrageenan. Our findings suggest that 1) sperm cells may serve as motile carriers that promote virus dispersal and mucosal penetration, and 2) blocking interactions between HPV16 and sperm cells may be an important strategy for the development of antiviral therapies.

  13. Adsorption of human papillomavirus 16 to live human sperm.

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    Julio Pérez-Andino

    Full Text Available Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs are a diverse group of viruses that infect the skin and mucosal tissues of humans. A high-risk subgroup of HPVs is associated with virtually all cases of cervical cancer [1]-[3]. High-risk HPVs are transmitted sexually; however, the exact mechanisms by which sexual contact promotes virus infection remain uncertain. To study this question we asked whether capsids of HPV type 16 (a high-risk HPV specifically interact with sperm cells. We tested if purified HPV16 virions directly adsorb to live human sperm cells in native semen and in conditions that resemble the female genital tract. We found that HPV16 capsids bind efficiently to two distinct sites at the equatorial region of the sperm head surface. Moreover, we observed that the interaction of virus with sperm can be reduced by two HPV infection inhibitors, heparin and carrageenan. Our findings suggest that 1 sperm cells may serve as motile carriers that promote virus dispersal and mucosal penetration, and 2 blocking interactions between HPV16 and sperm cells may be an important strategy for the development of antiviral therapies.

  14. Quercetin inhibits human sperm functions by reducing sperm [Ca2+]i and tyrosine phosphorylation.

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    Liang, Xiaolei; Xia, Zhili; Yan, Jiexi; Wang, Yiqing; Xue, Shilong; Zhang, Xuehong

    2016-11-01

    Quercetin is widely known as potent natural antioxidant and scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide both in vitro and in vivo. Quercetin has a wide range of biological functions and health-promoting effects. There are more and more interests in the addition of this flavonol to various traditional food products. However, the in vitro toxicity of quercetin to mature human sperm remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the in vitro effects of quercetin on human sperm functions. The results showed that the total sperm motility were significantly inhibited compared to the controls following exposure to 100, 200 and 400µM quercetin for 6 and 12h; quercetin did not affect human sperm viability. The acrosome reaction and capacitation induced by progesterone were dose-dependently inhibited by quercetin. Furthermore, quercetin induced a significantly decrease of human sperm [Ca2+]i after 2 min above 50 μM, and dose-dependently decreased the protein-tyrosine phosphorylation of human sperm. Our results indicated that quercetin may decrease sperm [Ca2+]i, suppresse tyrosine phosphorylation, and subsequently inhibit sperm functions.

  15. The effect of human papillomavirus infection on sperm cell motility.

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    Lai, Y M; Lee, J F; Huang, H Y; Soong, Y K; Yang, F P; Pao, C C

    1997-06-01

    To investigate the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in human sperm cells and to evaluate potential effects of HPV on the sperm functions. A descriptive clinical study. Specimens of semen were collected from 24 randomly selected patients who attended the fertility clinics at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. The presence of HPV DNA and RNA were examined by polymerase chain reaction. Semen quality and sperm cell function were analyzed by computer-aided autoanalyzer. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA and RNA were found in 6 (25%) and 2 (8%) of the sperm cells specimens, respectively. Human papillomavirus type 18 DNA and RNA were present in 11 (46%) and 5 (21%) of the same sperm cells specimens, respectively. Incidence of asthenozoospermia among patients infected with either HPV was significantly higher than in those without HPV in their sperm cells (75% versus 8%). Although performance of curvilinear velocity, straight-line velocity, and mean amplitude of lateral head displacement was significantly lower in HPV-infected specimens, the differences of linearity, beat cross frequency, and straightness were not statistically significant. These results suggest that human papillomavirus can be found in human sperm cells and that certain HPV-specific genes are actively transcribed. Sperm motility parameters seem to be affected by the presence of HPV in the sperm cells, and also the incidence of asthenozoospermia may be associated with HPV infection.

  16. Human sperm chromosome analysis after subzonal sperm insemination of hamster oocytes

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    Cozzi, J. [Medical School of Grenoble (France)

    1994-09-01

    Sperm microinjection techniques, subzonal sperm insemination (SUZI) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), have achieved a wide spread clinical application for the treatment of male infertility. To date, only one study has focused on sperm karyotypes after microinjection. Martin et al. reported a very high incidence of abnormal human sperm complements after ICSI into hamster oocytes. In the present study, are reported the first human sperm karyotypes after SUZI of hamster oocytes. Spermatozoa from two control donors were treated by calcium ionophore A23187 and injected under the zona of hamster eggs. The microinjected eggs were then cultured for cytogenetic analysis of the pronuclei. Out of 47 analyzed sperm chromosome metaphases, 5 (10.6%) were abnormal, 4 (8.5%) were hypohaploid and 1 (2.1%) had a structural abnormality. The sex ratio was not significantly different from the expected 1:1 ratio. Rates of chromosomal abnormalities in microinjected spermatozoa were similar to those observed in spermatozoa inseminated with zona free eggs, suggesting that SUZI procedure per se does not increase sperm chromosomal abnormalities.

  17. DGCR8 Localizes to the Nucleus as well as Cytoplasmic Structures in Mammalian Spermatogenic Cells and Epididymal Sperm

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    Akane Nakano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The localization of DGCR8 in spermatogenic cells and sperm from rat and mouse was studied by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Spermatogenic cells from these species yielded similar DGCR8 localization pattern. Immunofluorescence microscopy results showed that DGCR8 localized to both the cytoplasm and nucleus. In the cytoplasm, diffuse cytosolic and discrete granular staining was observed. Dual staining showed that DGCR8 colocalized to the granules with MAEL (a nuage marker. In the nucleus of spermatocytes, both the nucleoli and nucleoplasm were stained, whereas in the nucleus of early spermatids small spots were stained. In late spermatids, DGCR8 localized to the tip of their head and to small granules (neck granules of the neck cytoplasm. The neck granules were also observed in the neck of epididymal sperm. Immunoelectron microscopy results showed that DGCR8 localized to nuage structures. Moreover, DGCR8 localized to nonnuage structures in late spermatids. DGCR8 also localized to the nucleolus and euchromatin in spermatocytes and round spermatids and to small granules in the nucleus of late spermatids. The results suggest that in spermatogenic cells DGCR8 localizes not only to the nuclei but also to the cytoplasmic structures such as nuage and nonnuage structures. Furthermore, DGCR8 seems to be imported into the egg with neck granules in sperm during fertilization.

  18. A dictionary learning approach for human sperm heads classification.

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    Shaker, Fariba; Monadjemi, S Amirhassan; Alirezaie, Javad; Naghsh-Nilchi, Ahmad Reza

    2017-12-01

    To diagnose infertility in men, semen analysis is conducted in which sperm morphology is one of the factors that are evaluated. Since manual assessment of sperm morphology is time-consuming and subjective, automatic classification methods are being developed. Automatic classification of sperm heads is a complicated task due to the intra-class differences and inter-class similarities of class objects. In this research, a Dictionary Learning (DL) technique is utilized to construct a dictionary of sperm head shapes. This dictionary is used to classify the sperm heads into four different classes. Square patches are extracted from the sperm head images. Columnized patches from each class of sperm are used to learn class-specific dictionaries. The patches from a test image are reconstructed using each class-specific dictionary and the overall reconstruction error for each class is used to select the best matching class. Average accuracy, precision, recall, and F-score are used to evaluate the classification method. The method is evaluated using two publicly available datasets of human sperm head shapes. The proposed DL based method achieved an average accuracy of 92.2% on the HuSHeM dataset, and an average recall of 62% on the SCIAN-MorphoSpermGS dataset. The results show a significant improvement compared to a previously published shape-feature-based method. We have achieved high-performance results. In addition, our proposed approach offers a more balanced classifier in which all four classes are recognized with high precision and recall. In this paper, we use a Dictionary Learning approach in classifying human sperm heads. It is shown that the Dictionary Learning method is far more effective in classifying human sperm heads than classifiers using shape-based features. Also, a dataset of human sperm head shapes is introduced to facilitate future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Response of midpiece vesicles on human sperm to osmotic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abraham-Peskir, Joanna V; Chantler, Eric; Uggerhøj, Erik

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the osmotic response of midpiece vesicles (MPV) on human sperm. METHODS: Light microscopy, transmission X-ray microscopy and computer-aided semen analysis was used to investigate sperm in normozoospermic semen from healthy donors, separated from semen and suspended...

  20. Kinetics of human sperm acrosomal exocytosis.

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    Sosa, C M; Pavarotti, M A; Zanetti, M N; Zoppino, F C M; De Blas, G A; Mayorga, L S

    2015-03-01

    The acrosome reaction is a unique event in the lifespan of sperm characterized by the exocytosis of the acrosomal content and the release of hybrid vesicles formed by patches of the outer acrosomal membrane and the plasma membrane. This unique regulated exocytosis is mediated by essentially the same membrane fusion machinery present in neuroendocrine cells. However, whereas secretion in neuroendocrine cells occurs in less than a second, the acrosome reaction is normally assessed after several minutes of incubation with inducers. In this report, we measured the kinetics of human sperm exocytosis triggered by two stimuli (calcium ionophore and progesterone) by using electron microscopy and three different approaches based on the incorporation of fluorescent Pisum sativum agglutinin into the acrosome upon opening of fusion pores connecting the extracellular medium with the acrosomal lumen. The results with the different methods are consistent with a slow kinetics (t½ = 14 min). We also manipulated the system to measure different steps of the process. We observed that cytosolic calcium increased with a relatively fast kinetics (t½ = 0.1 min). In contrast, the swelling of the acrosomal granule that precedes exocytosis was a slow process (t½ = 13 min). When swelling was completed, the fusion pore opening was fast (t½ = 0.2 min). The results indicate that acrosomal swelling is the slowest step and it determines the kinetics of the acrosome reaction. After the swelling is completed, the efflux of calcium from intracellular stores triggers fusion pores opening and the release of hybrid vesicles in seconds. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. TRPM8, a versatile channel in human sperm.

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    Gerardo A De Blas

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The transient receptor potential channel (TRP family includes more than 30 proteins; they participate in various Ca(2+ dependent processes. TRPs are functionally diverse involving thermal, chemical and mechanical transducers which modulate the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+]i. Ca(2+ triggers and/or regulates principal sperm functions during fertilization such as motility, capacitation and the acrosome reaction. Nevertheless, the presence of the TRPM subfamily in sperm has not been explored.Here we document with RT-PCR, western blot and immunocitochemistry analysis the presence of TRPM8 in human sperm. We also examined the participation of this channel in sperm function using specific agonists (menthol and temperature and antagonists (BCTC and capsazepine. Computer-aided sperm analysis revealed that menthol did not significantly alter human sperm motility. In contrast, menthol induced the acrosome reaction in human sperm. This induction was inhibited about 70% by capsazepine (20 microM and 80% by BCTC (1.6 microM. Activation of TRPM8 either by temperature or menthol induced [Ca(2+]i increases in human sperm measured by fluorescence in populations or individual sperm cells, effect that was also inhibited by capsazepine (20 microM and BCTC (1.6 microM. However, the progesterone and ZP3-induced acrosome reaction was not inhibited by capsazepine or BCTC, suggesting that TRPM8 activation triggers this process by a different signaling pathway.This is the first report dealing with the presence of a thermo sensitive channel (TRPM8 in human sperm. This channel could be involved in cell signaling events such as thermotaxis or chemotaxis.

  2. Human sperm swimming in a high viscosity mucus analogue.

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    Ishimoto, Kenta; Gadêlha, Hermes; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Smith, David J; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson

    2018-02-17

    Remarkably, mammalian sperm maintain a substantive proportion of their progressive swimming speed within highly viscous fluids, including those of the female reproductive tract. Here, we analyse the digital microscopy of a human sperm swimming in a highly viscous, weakly elastic mucus analogue. We exploit principal component analysis to simplify its flagellar beat pattern, from which boundary element calculations are used to determine the time-dependent flow field around the sperm cell. The sperm flow field is further approximated in terms of regularized point forces, and estimates of the mechanical power consumption are determined, for comparison with analogous low viscosity media studies. This highlights extensive differences in the structure of the flows surrounding human sperm in different media, indicating how the cell-cell and cell-boundary hydrodynamic interactions significantly differ with the physical microenvironment. The regularized point force decomposition also provides cell-level information that may ultimately be incorporated into sperm population models. We further observe indications that the core feature in explaining the effectiveness of sperm swimming in high viscosity media is the loss of cell yawing, which is related with a greater density of regularized point force singularities along the axis of symmetry of the flagellar beat to represent the flow field. In turn this implicates a reduction of the wavelength of the distal beat pattern - and hence dynamical wavelength selection of the flagellar beat - as the dominant feature governing the effectiveness of sperm swimming in highly viscous media. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Artificial oocyte activation in intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles using testicular sperm in human in vitro fertilization.

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    Kang, Hee Jung; Lee, Sun-Hee; Park, Yong-Seog; Lim, Chun Kyu; Ko, Duck Sung; Yang, Kwang Moon; Park, Dong-Wook

    2015-06-01

    Artificial oocyte activation (AOA) is an effective method to avoid total fertilization failure in human in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) cycles. AOA performed using a calcium ionophore can induce calcium oscillation in oocytes and initiate the fertilization process. We evaluated the usefulness of AOA with a calcium ionophore in cases of total fertilization failure in previous cycles and in cases of severe male factor infertility patients with non-motile spermatozoa after pentoxifylline (PF) treatment. The present study describes 29 intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)-AOA cycles involving male factor infertility at Cheil General Hospital from January 2006 to June 2013. Patients were divided into two groups (control, n=480; AOA, n=29) depending on whether or not AOA using a calcium ionophore (A23187) was performed after testicular sperm extraction-ICSI (TESE-ICSI). The AOA group was further split into subgroups according to sperm motility after PF treatment: i.e., motile sperm-injected (n=12) and non-motile sperm-injected (n=17) groups (total n=29 cycles). The good embryo rate (52.3% vs. 66.9%), pregnancy rate (20.7% vs. 52.1%), and delivery rate (10.3% vs. 40.8%) were lower in the PF/AOA group than in the control group. When evaluating the effects of restoration of sperm motility after PF treatment on clinical outcomes there was no difference in fertilization rate (66.6% vs. 64.7% in non-motile and motile sperm, respectively), pregnancy rate (17.6% vs. 33.3%), or delivery rate (5.9% vs. 16.7%) between the two groups. We suggest that oocyte activation is a useful method to ensure fertilization in TESE-ICSI cycles regardless of restoration of sperm motility after PF treatment. AOA may be useful in selected patients who have a low fertilization rate or total fertilization failure.

  4. Human papilloma virus in the sperm cryobank: an emerging problem?

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    Foresta, C; Ferlin, A; Bertoldo, A; Patassini, C; Zuccarello, D; Garolla, A

    2011-06-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is very common worldwide, but the actual incidence and significance of HPV infection in sperm are poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the presence of HPV in spermatozoa from thawed semen samples previously stored in our sperm bank. We performed polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization for HPV detection in cryovials belonging to 98 oncology patients and in 60 semen samples from healthy controls. Statistical analysis was performed by two-tailed Student's t-test and Fisher's exact test. The frequency of HPV semen infection was 6.1% in thawed cryovials from patients and 3.3% in semen samples from controls. Among the patients, four were found positive for high-risk HPV, one for medium-risk HPV and another for low-risk HPV. Patients had a significantly higher percentage of infected sperm than controls. In conclusion, this report shows the presence of HPV in sperm cells from cryovials of a sperm bank. It is still unclear if HPV-infected sperm are able to cross-contaminate cryovials and impair the outcome of assisted reproduction techniques or to infect partners. Further studies are needed to understand whether screening for HPV should be performed in all semen samples before sperm banking or before intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection procedures. © 2010 The Authors. International Journal of Andrology © 2011 European Academy of Andrology.

  5. Human sperm chromatin epigenetic potential: genomics, proteomics, and male infertility

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    Judit Castillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The classical idea about the function of the mammalian sperm chromatin is that it serves to transmit a highly protected and transcriptionally inactive paternal genome, largely condensed by protamines, to the next generation. In addition, recent sperm chromatin genome-wide dissection studies indicate the presence of a differential distribution of the genes and repetitive sequences in the protamine-condensed and histone-condensed sperm chromatin domains, which could be potentially involved in regulatory roles after fertilization. Interestingly, recent proteomic studies have shown that sperm chromatin contains many additional proteins, in addition to the abundant histones and protamines, with specific modifications and chromatin affinity features which are also delivered to the oocyte. Both gene and protein signatures seem to be altered in infertile patients and, as such, are consistent with the potential involvement of the sperm chromatin landscape in early embryo development. This present work reviews the available information on the composition of the human sperm chromatin and its epigenetic potential, with a particular focus on recent results derived from high-throughput genomic and proteomic studies. As a complement, we provide experimental evidence for the detection of phosphorylations and acetylations in human protamine 1 using a mass spectrometry approach. The available data indicate that the sperm chromatin is much more complex than what it was previously thought, raising the possibility that it could also serve to transmit crucial paternal epigenetic information to the embryo.

  6. Adsorption of Human Papillomavirus 16 to Live Human Sperm

    OpenAIRE

    Julio Pérez-Andino; Buck, Christopher B.; Katharina Ribbeck

    2009-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a diverse group of viruses that infect the skin and mucosal tissues of humans. A high-risk subgroup of HPVs is associated with virtually all cases of cervical cancer [1]-[3]. High-risk HPVs are transmitted sexually; however, the exact mechanisms by which sexual contact promotes virus infection remain uncertain. To study this question we asked whether capsids of HPV type 16 (a high-risk HPV) specifically interact with sperm cells. We tested if purified HPV16 v...

  7. Digital holographic microscopy for the evaluation of human sperm structure

    CERN Document Server

    Coppola, Gianluca; Wilding, Martin; Ferraro, Pietro; Esposito, Giusy; Di Matteo, Loredana; Dale, Roberta; Coppola, Giuseppe; Dale, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The morphology of the sperm head has often been correlated with the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF), and has been shown to be the sole parameter in semen of value in predicting the success of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI). In this paper, we have studied whether Digital Holographic (DH) microscopy may be useful to obtain quantitative data on human sperm head structure and compared this technique to high power digitally enhanced Nomarski microscope. The main advantage of DH is that a high resolution 3-D quantitative sample imaging may be obtained thorugh numerical refocusing at different object planes without any mechanical scanning. We show that DH can furnish useful information on the dimensions and structure of human spermatozoo, that cannot be revealed by conventional phase contrast microscopy. In fact, in this paper DH has been used to evaluate volume and indicate precise location of vacuoles, thus suggesting its use as ...

  8. Regulation of human sperm motility by opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agirregoitia, E; Subiran, N; Valdivia, A; Gil, J; Zubero, J; Irazusta, J

    2012-05-01

    The endogenous opioid system has been reported to have important functions in human reproduction. Practically all the components of this peptide system have been discovered in human sperm cells, but their functions in these cells are far from being well understood. In the present work, we report the effects of opioid agonism and antagonism on human sperm motility, a parameter which is crucially associated with male fertility. Morphine (10(-7) M), a μ- opioid receptor agonist, decreased both the percentage of motile progressive sperm and three measured velocities without altering the linearity, straightness or vigour of sperm cells. This effect was reversed by naloxone. Higher doses of morphine did not have further effects on the measured parameters. The incubation of sperm cells with the δ-opioid receptor agonist D-penicillamine (2,5)-enkephalin did not affect sperm cell motility. However, naltrindole, a specific δ-receptor antagonist, reduced the linear and curvilinear velocities, as well as linearity, straightness and the amplitude of head displacement, and beat frequency. In summary, our results indicate that the endogenous opioid system may regulate opioid motility in vitro. These finding suggest that the endogenous opioid system could be useful as a biochemical tool for the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Not all sperm are equal: functional mitochondria characterize a subpopulation of human sperm with better fertilization potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Sousa

    Full Text Available Human sperm samples are very heterogeneous and include a low amount of truly functional gametes. Distinct strategies have been developed to characterize and isolate this specific subpopulation. In this study we have used fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to determine if mitochondrial function, as assessed using mitochondrial-sensitive probes, could be employed as a criterion to obtain more functional sperm from a given ejaculate. We first determined that mitochondrial activity correlated with the quality of distinct human samples, from healthy donors to patients with decreased semen quality. Furthermore, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to separate sperm with active and inactive mitochondria we found that this was also true within samples. Indeed, sperm with active mitochondria defined a more functional subpopulation, which contained more capacitated and acrosome intact cells, sperm with lower chromatin damage, and, crucially, sperm more able to decondense and participate in early development using both chemical induction and injection into mature bovine oocytes. Furthermore, cell sorting using mitochondrial activity produced a more functional sperm subpopulation than classic swim-up, both in terms of improvement in a variety of functional sperm parameters and in statistical significance. In conclusion, whatever the true biological role of sperm mitochondria in fertilization, mitochondrial activity is a clear hallmark of human sperm functionality.

  10. Single-cell pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to detect the early stage of DNA fragmentation in human sperm nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Satoru; Yoshida, Joji; Ishikawa, Hiromichi; Takamatsu, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Single-cell pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (SCPFGE) with dual electrode pairs was developed to detect the early stage of DNA fragmentation in human sperm. The motile sperm were purified by the commonly used density-gradient centrifugation technique and subsequent swim-up. The sperm were embedded in a thin film of agarose containing bovine trypsin (20 µg/mL) and were then lysed. Prior to SCPFGE, proteolysis of DNA-binding components, such as protamine and the nuclear matrix was essential to separate the long chain fibers from the fibrous and granular fragments derived from a single nucleus. The overall electrophoretic profiles elucidated the course of DNA fragmentation. A few large fibrous fragments were observed at the beginning of the process, however, as the fragmentation advanced, the long chain fibers decreased and shortened, and, conversely, the granular fragments increased until finally almost all the DNA was shredded. Although the ejaculate contained sperm with heterogeneous stages, the purified motile sperm exhibited several dozens of uniformly elongated fibers arising from the tangled DNA at the origin, whereas a part of these fibers gave rise to fibrous fragments beyond the tip of the elongated fibers, and their numbers and sizes varied among the sperm. Conventional intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) usually depends on intra-operative light microscopic observation to select a sperm for injection. The present results revealed that sperm motility could not give full assurance of DNA integrity. SCPFGE is likely to serve an important role in the preoperative differential diagnosis to determine the competence of the sperm population provided for injection.

  11. Single-cell pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to detect the early stage of DNA fragmentation in human sperm nuclei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Kaneko

    Full Text Available Single-cell pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (SCPFGE with dual electrode pairs was developed to detect the early stage of DNA fragmentation in human sperm. The motile sperm were purified by the commonly used density-gradient centrifugation technique and subsequent swim-up. The sperm were embedded in a thin film of agarose containing bovine trypsin (20 µg/mL and were then lysed. Prior to SCPFGE, proteolysis of DNA-binding components, such as protamine and the nuclear matrix was essential to separate the long chain fibers from the fibrous and granular fragments derived from a single nucleus. The overall electrophoretic profiles elucidated the course of DNA fragmentation. A few large fibrous fragments were observed at the beginning of the process, however, as the fragmentation advanced, the long chain fibers decreased and shortened, and, conversely, the granular fragments increased until finally almost all the DNA was shredded. Although the ejaculate contained sperm with heterogeneous stages, the purified motile sperm exhibited several dozens of uniformly elongated fibers arising from the tangled DNA at the origin, whereas a part of these fibers gave rise to fibrous fragments beyond the tip of the elongated fibers, and their numbers and sizes varied among the sperm. Conventional intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI usually depends on intra-operative light microscopic observation to select a sperm for injection. The present results revealed that sperm motility could not give full assurance of DNA integrity. SCPFGE is likely to serve an important role in the preoperative differential diagnosis to determine the competence of the sperm population provided for injection.

  12. Traditional intracytoplasmic sperm injection provides equivalent outcomes compared with human zona pellucida-bound selected sperm injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciani, Valentina; Minasi, Maria Giulia; Fabozzi, Gemma; Scarselli, Filomena; Colasante, Alessandro; Lobascio, Anna Maria; Greco, Ermanno

    2014-11-01

    The capability of human zona pellucida (ZP) to bind selectively to normal functional sperm with normal chromatin has been reported widely in the literature. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ZP-binding sperm selection may represent a method to retrieve superior spermatozoa for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Patients were divided into two groups: a ZP-ICSI and a conventional ICSI group. In the ZP-ICSI group, spermatozoa for injection were selected after ZP-sperm incubation and spermatozoa that were tightly bound to the ZP were used for ICSI (ZP-ICSI). Clinical outcomes of ZP-ICSI were compared with the outcomes of traditional scientist-selected sperm injection (conventional ICSI). Results did not show any significant difference in fertilization, pregnancy, implantation and take-home-baby rates between conventional ICSI and ZP-ICSI. However, when data relative to patients who received ZP-ICSI were analyzed, an interesting result was observed: higher sperm concentration and morphology correlated with higher ZP-sperm binding. Additionally, patients with higher ZP-sperm binding seem to have improved pregnancy and take-home-baby rates. In conclusion, this study shows that ZP-ICSI is not a superior method compared with conventional ICSI. However, clinical ICSI outcomes were apparently improved in the presence of good ZP-sperm binding. We therefore speculate that sperm competence to ICSI could be reduced when the sperm's ability to bind the ZP is impaired.

  13. The role of human papillomavirus on sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garolla, Andrea; Pizzol, Damiano; Foresta, Carlo

    2011-08-01

    To review the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) on sperm parameters, fertility and implication of the use of infected sperm cells in assisted reproduction. HPVs are agents of the most common sexually transmitted disease and can lead to warts and cancers both in men and women.A high incidence of HPV infection has been demonstrated in sperm from sexually active men with and without risk factors for HPV and from infertile patients. Semen infection is associated to an impairment of sperm parameters suggesting a possible role in male infertility. Interestingly, it has been demonstrated that when HPV is present in semen only a percentage of total cells are infected and the virus can be localized in sperm or in exfoliated cells with different impact on sperm motility. Moreover, infected sperm are able to penetrate the oocyte, to deliver HPV genome in the oocyte and HPV genes can be actively transcribed by the fertilized oocyte. Recently an increased risk of pregnancy loss has been demonstrated in couples undergoing in-vitro fertilization and particularly when HPV DNA was present in semen samples of male partners. To date, no effective treatment, control strategy and prevention is provided for men despite the reported high incidence of HPV semen infection. Because this infection in men is also a problem for partners, and because growing evidence suggests that semen infection may cause infertility and early miscarriage, more attention should be paid to male HPV infection. This study reviews the more recent literature about the role of HPV infection on sperm function and human reproduction.

  14. Reliability of the comet assay in cryopreserved human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duty, S M; Singh, N P; Ryan, L; Chen, Z; Lewis, C; Huang, T; Hauser, R

    2002-05-01

    Although the comet assay has potential value for measuring DNA damage in large epidemiological human sperm studies, it is impractical to perform the assay daily on fresh semen samples. Therefore, before its use in epidemiological studies, the reliability of the comet assay in measuring DNA damage in cryopreserved sperm should be compared with that in fresh human sperm. Semen samples from 16 men were cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen (LN) using four methods: flash freezing with and without cryopreservative, and programmable freezing with and without cryopreservative. Neutral microgel electrophoresis was performed and comets were stained with YOYO-1. Comet length was measured using an eyepiece micrometer at x400 magnification. The highest correlation was between comet assay results obtained from fresh human semen compared with semen flash frozen without cryopreservative (R = 0.88). However, the method of cryopreservation, as compared with other sources of variability, accounted for only 6% of the variability. Inter-individual variability accounted for 20%, and individual sperm-to-sperm variability within an ejaculate accounted for 65%. Flash-freezing in LN without cryopreservative most closely reproduced the results obtained using fresh human semen samples, and thereby represents the most appropriate cryopreservation method for human semen in epidemiological studies utilizing the neutral comet assay.

  15. Mass spectrometry profiling of oxysterols in human sperm identifies 25-hydroxycholesterol as a marker of sperm function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Zerbinati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is a main lipid component of sperm cell that is essential for sperm membrane fluidity, capacitation, and acrosomal reaction. Recent data obtained in bovine sperm showed that sperm capacitation is associated to the formation of oxysterols, oxidized products of cholesterol. The aim of this study was to profile oxysterol content in human semen, and to investigate their potential role in sperm pathophysiology. Among the 12 oxysterols analyzed, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC resulted the most represented in normozoospermic samples, and its concentration positively correlated with spermatozoa number. We detected Cholesterol 25-hydroxylase, the enzyme responsible for 25-HC production, in human spermatozoa at the level of the neck and the post acrosomal area. Upon incubation with spermatozoa, 25-HC induced calcium and cholesterol transients in connection with the acrosomal reaction. Our results support a role for 25-HC in sperm function.

  16. Chemical UV filters can affect human sperm function in a progesterone-like manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Anders; Egeberg, Dorte; Almstrup, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    Human sperm cell function must be precisely regulated to achieve natural fertilization. Progesterone released by the cumulus cells surrounding the egg induces a Ca2+-influx into human sperm cells via the CatSper Ca2+-channel and thereby controls sperm function. Multiple chemical UV filters have...... the effect of progesterone on Ca2+-signaling in human sperm cells, can similarly mimic the effect of progesterone on acrosome reaction and sperm penetration. Human exposure to these chemical UV filters may impair fertility by interfering with sperm function, e.g. through induction of premature acrosome...

  17. Sperm DNA fragmentation affects epigenetic feature in human male pronucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, H; Mohseni-Kouchesfehani, H; Eslami-Arshaghi, T; Salehi, M

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate whether the sperm DNA fragmentation affects male pronucleus epigenetic factors, semen analysis was performed and DNA fragmentation was assessed by the method of sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). Human-mouse interspecies fertilisation was used to create human male pronucleus. Male pronucleus DNA methylation and H4K12 acetylation were evaluated by immunostaining. Results showed a significant positive correlation between the level of sperm DNA fragmentation and DNA methylation in male pronuclei. In other words, an increase in DNA damage caused an upsurge in DNA methylation. In the case of H4K12 acetylation, no correlation was detected between DNA damage and the level of histone acetylation in the normal group, but results for the group in which male pronuclei were derived from sperm cells with DNA fragmentation, increased DNA damage led to a decreased acetylation level. Sperm DNA fragmentation interferes with the active demethylation process and disrupts the insertion of histones into the male chromatin in the male pronucleus, following fertilisation. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Neurochemical organization of the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis in the human

    OpenAIRE

    Baizer, Joan S.; Baker, James F.; Haas, Kristin; Lima, Raquel

    2007-01-01

    We have characterized the neurochemical organization of a small brainstem nucleus in the human brain, the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis (PMD). PMD is located adjacent and medial to the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (PH) in the dorsal medulla, and is distinguished by the pattern of immunoreactivity of cells and fibers to several markers including calcium-binding proteins, a synthetic enzyme for nitric oxide (neuronal nitric oxide synthase, nNOS) and a nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (a...

  19. Sperm fractions obtained following density gradient centrifugation in human ejaculates show differences in sperm DNA longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gosálvez

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: 1 Unnecessary incubation of spermatozoa prior to artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization, should be avoided, since sperm DNA longevity is significantly reduced after ex vivo sperm handling and 2 Although sperm selection by DCG significantly reduces the baseline levels of SDF of sperm in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity in this fraction was ultimately lower following 24 h incubation when compared to sperm recovered from non-centrifuged NSS.

  20. Dynamic resolution of acrosomal exocytosis in human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Claire V; Cummerson, Joanne A; White, Michael R H; Publicover, Stephen J; Johnson, Peter M

    2008-07-01

    An essential step in mammalian fertilisation is the sperm acrosome reaction (AR) - exocytosis of a single large vesicle (the acrosome) that surrounds the nucleus at the apical sperm head. The acrosomal and plasma membranes fuse, resulting in both the release of factors that might facilitate penetration of the zona pellucida (which invests the egg) and the externalisation of membrane components required for gamete fusion. Exocytosis in somatic cells is a rapid process - typically complete within milliseconds - yet acrosomal enzymes are required throughout zona penetration - a period of minutes. Here, we present the first studies of this crucial and complex event occurring in real-time in individual live sperm using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. Simultaneous imaging of separate probes for acrosomal content and inner acrosomal membrane show that rapid membrane fusion, initiated at the cell apex, is followed by exceptionally slow dispersal of acrosomal content (up to 12 minutes). Cells that lose their acrosome prematurely (spontaneous AR), compromising their ability to penetrate the egg vestments, are those that are already subject to a loss of motility and viability. Cells undergoing stimulus-induced AR (progesterone or A23187) remain viable, with a proportion remaining motile (progesterone). These findings suggest that the AR is a highly adapted form of exocytosis.

  1. Use of laptop computers connected to internet through Wi-Fi decreases human sperm motility and increases sperm DNA fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño, Conrado; Mata, Ariela; Sanchez Sarmiento, César A; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of laptop computers connected to local area networks wirelessly (Wi-Fi) on human spermatozoa. Prospective in vitro study. Center for reproductive medicine. Semen samples from 29 healthy donors. Motile sperm were selected by swim up. Each sperm suspension was divided into two aliquots. One sperm aliquot (experimental) from each patient was exposed to an internet-connected laptop by Wi-Fi for 4 hours, whereas the second aliquot (unexposed) was used as control, incubated under identical conditions without being exposed to the laptop. Evaluation of sperm motility, viability, and DNA fragmentation. Donor sperm samples, mostly normozoospermic, exposed ex vivo during 4 hours to a wireless internet-connected laptop showed a significant decrease in progressive sperm motility and an increase in sperm DNA fragmentation. Levels of dead sperm showed no significant differences between the two groups. To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the direct impact of laptop use on human spermatozoa. Ex vivo exposure of human spermatozoa to a wireless internet-connected laptop decreased motility and induced DNA fragmentation by a nonthermal effect. We speculate that keeping a laptop connected wirelessly to the internet on the lap near the testes may result in decreased male fertility. Further in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to prove this contention. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Human papillomavirus DNA detection in sperm using polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunbosun, O; Deneer, H; Pierson, R

    2001-03-01

    To detect human papillomavirus (HPV) in semen and find if sperm washing removes HPV DNA. Amplification by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect viral DNA sequences in semen samples from 85 volunteers. Forty-five men had historical or clinical evidence of genital HPV infection (study group) and 40 were healthy, clinically HPV-negative semen donors. We detected HPV DNA in the sperm cells of 24 of 45 subjects (53%) with past or current HPV infections in contrast to three of 40 healthy subjects (8%) (P HPV in 21 of 32 subjects (66%) with identifiable lesions and six of 53 (11%) without them (P sperm cells with HPV reduced cellular HPV DNA below detectable levels in only two cases. HPV is present in sperm cells from infected and apparently healthy subjects, and sperm washing does not eliminate the risk of HPV transmission to recipients. We suggest that HPV DNA testing should be done on the semen of prospective donors, and those with positive tests should be excluded from donation.

  3. Post-Translational Modifications of Histones in Human Sperm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Jana; Stixová, Lenka; Legartová, Soňa; Kozubek, Stanislav; Lochmanová, G.; Zdráhal, Z.; Sehnalová, Petra; Dabravolski, S.; Hejatko, J.; Bártová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 10 (2015), s. 2195-2209 ISSN 0730-2312 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : HUMAN SPERM * HISTONES * PROTAMINE P2 Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.446, year: 2015

  4. No increased sperm DNA fragmentation index in semen containing human papillomavirus or herpesvirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Maja Døvling; Bungum, Mona; Fedder, Jens

    2013-01-01

    It remains unknown whether human papillomaviruses (HPVs) or human herpesviruses (HHVs) in semen affect sperm DNA integrity. We investigated whether the presence of these viruses in semen was associated with an elevated sperm DNA fragmentation index. Semen from 76 sperm donors was examined by a PCR......-based hybridization array that identifies all HHVs and 35 of the most common HPVs. Sperm DNA integrity was determined by the sperm chromatin structure assay. HPVs or HHVs, or both, were found in 57% of semen samples; however, sperm DNA fragmentation index was not increased in semen containing these viruses....

  5. Semen Displacement as a Sperm Competition Strategy in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon G. Gallup

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine some of the implications of the possibility that the human penis may have evolved to compete with sperm from other males by displacing rival semen from the cervical end of the vagina prior to ejaculation. The semen displacement hypothesis integrates considerable information about genital morphology and human reproductive behavior, and can be used to generate a number of interesting predictions.

  6. Human sperm sex chromosome disomy and sperm DNA damage assessed by the neutral comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, M E; Williams, P L; Korrick, S A; Dadd, R; Marchetti, F; Martenies, S E; Perry, M J

    2014-10-10

    Is there an association between human sperm sex chromosome disomy and sperm DNA damage? An increase in human sperm XY disomy was associated with higher comet extent; however, there was no other consistent association of sex chromosome disomies with DNA damage. There is limited published research on the association between sex chromosome disomy and sperm DNA damage and the findings are not consistent across studies. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 190 men (25% ever smoker, 75% never smoker) from subfertile couples presenting at the Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Clinic from January 2000 to May 2003. Multiprobe fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosomes X, Y and 18 was used to determine XX, YY, XY and total sex chromosome disomy in sperm nuclei using an automated scoring method. The neutral comet assay was used to measure sperm DNA damage, as reflected by comet extent, percentage DNA in the comet tail, and tail distributed moment. Univariate and multiple linear regression models were constructed with sex chromosome disomy (separate models for each of the four disomic conditions) as the independent variable, and DNA damage parameters (separate models for each measure of DNA damage) as the dependent variable. Men with current or past smoking history had significantly greater comet extent (µm: regression coefficients with 95% CI) [XX18: 15.17 (1.98, 28.36); YY18: 14.68 (1.50, 27.86); XY18: 15.41 (2.37, 28.45); Total Sex Chromosome Disomy: 15.23 (2.09, 28.38)], and tail distributed moment [XX18: 3.01 (0.30, 5.72); YY18: 2.95 (0.24, 5.67); XY18: 3.04 (0.36, 5.72); Total Sex Chromosome Disomy: 3.10 (0.31, 5.71)] than men who had never smoked. In regression models adjusted for age and smoking, there was a positive association between XY disomy and comet extent. For an increase in XY disomy from 0.56 to 1.47% (representing the 25th to 75th percentile), there was a mean increase of 5.08 µm in comet extent. No other statistically significant

  7. Peroxiredoxins prevent oxidative stress during human sperm capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghyun; Moawad, Adel R; Morielli, Tania; Fernandez, Maria C; O'Flaherty, Cristian

    2017-02-10

    Do peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) control reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels during human sperm capacitation? PRDXs are necessary to control the levels of ROS generated during capacitation allowing spermatozoa to achieve fertilizing ability. Sperm capacitation is an oxidative event that requires low and controlled amounts of ROS to trigger phosphorylation events. PRDXs are antioxidant enzymes that not only act as scavengers but also control ROS action in somatic cells. Spermatozoa from infertile men have lower levels of PRDXs (particularly of PRDX6), which are thiol-oxidized and therefore inactive. Semen samples were obtained from a cohort of 20 healthy nonsmoker volunteers aged 22-30 years old over a period of 1 year. Sperm from healthy donors was capacitated with fetal cord serum ultrafiltrate (FCSu) in the absence or presence of thiostrepton (TSP), inhibitor of 2-Cys PRDXs or 1-Hexadecyl-3-(trifluoroethyl)-sn-glycero-2-phosphomethanol lithium (MJ33), inhibitor of calcium independent-phospholipase A2 (Ca2+-iPLA2) activity of PRDX6, added at different times of incubation. Capacitation was also induced by the dibutyryl cAMP+3-isobuty1-1-methylxanthine system. Sperm viability and motility were determined by the hypo-osmotic swelling test and computer-assisted semen analysis system, respectively. Capacitation was determined by the ability of spermatozoa to undergo the acrosome reaction triggered by lysophosphatidylcholine. Percentages of acrosome reaction were obtained using the FITC-conjugated Pisum sativum agglutinin assay. Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues and of protein kinase A (PKA) substrates were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis immunoblotting with specific antibodies. Actin polymerization was determined by phalloidin labeling. TSP and MJ33 prevented sperm capacitation and its associated actin polymerization in spermatozoa incubated with 10% FCSu (capacitation inducer) compared to non-capacitated controls (P sperm viability

  8. The toxic effect of opioid analgesics on human sperm motility in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bo; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Yan-Juan; Lu, Pei-Hua; Wang, Li-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Hai

    2013-04-01

    Opioid analgesics are the most common therapeutic analgesic for acute pain. In this study, the toxicological and pharmacological features of a group of opioid analgesics were characterized by the motility of human sperm. Aliquots of sperm were incubated with various concentrations of opioid analgesics in vitro. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to assess sperm motility at 15 minutes, 2 hours, and 4 hours after drug addition to the medium. Butorphanol and dezocine showed marked reduction of motility after incubation with sperm for 15 minutes. Butorphanol was more effective than dezocine in immobilizing sperm. Other opioids studied, such as fentanyl, alfentanil, and sufentanil, showed only partial inhibitory activity. Based on the data reported herein, we have found that butorphanol and dezocine exert a sperm-immobilizing effect. However, fentanyl, alfentanil, and sufentanil exhibit only partial inhibition of sperm motility. Given the increasing use of opioids and their potential effect on sperm motility, these findings are greatly relevant to male reproductive health.

  9. Environmental car exhaust pollution damages human sperm chromatin and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogero, A E; La Vignera, S; Condorelli, R A; Perdichizzi, A; Valenti, D; Asero, P; Carbone, U; Boggia, B; De Rosa, N; Lombardi, G; D'Agata, R; Vicari, L O; Vicari, E; De Rosa, M

    2011-06-01

    The adverse role of traffic pollutants on male fertility is well known. Aim of this study was to evaluate their effects on sperm chromatin/DNA integrity. To accomplish this, 36 men working at motorway tollgates and 32 unexposed healthy men (controls) were enrolled. All of them were interviewed about their lifestyle. Hormone, semen samples, and environmental and biological markers of pollution were evaluated. Sperm chromatin and DNA integrity were evaluated by flow cytometry following propidium iodide staining and TUNEL assay, respectively. LH, FSH, and testosterone serum levels were within the normal range in tollgate workers. Sperm concentration, total sperm count, total and progressive motility, and normal forms were significantly lower in these men compared with controls. Motorway tollgate workers had a significantly higher percentage of spermatozoa with damaged chromatin and DNA fragmentation, a late sign of apoptosis, compared with controls. A significant direct correlation was found between spermatozoa with damaged chromatin or fragmented DNA and the length of occupational exposure, suggesting a time-dependent relationship. This study showed that car exhaust exposure has a genotoxic effect on human spermatozoa. This may be of relevant importance not only for the reproductive performance of the men exposed, but also for the offspring health.

  10. Qualitative analysis neurons in the adult human dentate nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Dušica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although many relevant findings regarding to the morphology and cytoarchitectural development of the dentate nucleus have been presented so far, very little qualitative information has been collected on neuronal morphology in the adult human dentate nucleus. The neurons were labelled by Golgi staining from thirty human cerebella, obtained from medico-legal forensic autopsies of adult human bodies and free of significant brain pathology. The human dentate neurons were qualitatively analyzed and these cells were classified into two main classes: the small and the large multipolar neurons. Considering the shape of the cell body, number of the primary dendrites, shape of the dendritic tree and their position within the dentate nucleus, three subclasses of the large multipolar neurons have been recognized. The classification of neurons from the human dentate nucleus has been qualitatively confirmed in fetuses and premature infants. This study represents the first qualitative analysis and classification of the large multipolar neurons in the dentate nucleus of the adult human.

  11. Methods for evaluating the effects of environmental chemicals on human sperm production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A.J.

    1982-04-20

    Sperm tests provide a direct and effective way of identifying chemical agents that induce spermatogenic damage in man. Four human sperm tests are available: sperm count, motility, morphology (seminal cytology), and the Y-body test. These sperm tests have numerous advantages over other approaches for assessing spermatogenic damage, and they have already been used to assess the effects of at least 85 different occupational, envionmental, and drug-related chemical exposures. When carefully controlled, seminal cytology appears to be statistically more sensitive than the other human sperm tests and should be considered an integral part of semen analysis when assessing induced spermatogenic damage.

  12. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  13. Chromosome distribution in human sperm – a 3D multicolor banding-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrasek Kristin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear architecture studies in human sperm are sparse. By now performed ones were practically all done on flattened nuclei. Thus, studies close at the in vivo state of sperm, i.e. on three-dimensionally conserved interphase cells, are lacking by now. Only the position of 14 chromosomes in human sperm was studied. Results Here for the first time a combination of multicolor banding (MCB and three-dimensional analysis of interphase cells was used to characterize the position and orientation of all human chromosomes in sperm cells of a healthy donor. The interphase nuclei of human sperm are organized in a non-random way, driven by the gene density and chromosome size. Conclusion Here we present the first comprehensive results on the nuclear architecture of normal human sperm. Future studies in this tissue type, e.g. also in male patients with unexplained fertility problems, may characterize yet unknown mechanisms of infertility.

  14. Production of ROS and its effects on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, human spermatozoa, and sperm function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardi Darmawan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades many researchers studying the causes of male infertility have recently focused on the role played by reactive oxygen species (ROS – highly reactive oxidizing agents belonging to the class of free radicals. If ROS levels rise, oxidative stress (OS occurs, which results in oxygen and oxygen derived oxidants, and in turn increases the rates of cellular damage. In human, ROS are produced by a variety of semen components, and antioxidants in the seminal fluid keep their level balance. Small amounts of ROS help spermatozoa acquire their necessary fertilizing capabilities. Many researches showed that ROS attack DNA integrity in the sperm nucleus by causing base modification, DNA strand breaks, and chromatin cross linking. The DNA damage induced excessive levels of ROS and might accelerate the process of germ cell apoptosis leading to a decline in sperm counts associated with male infertility. This paper will review the molecular (cellular origins of ROS in human semen, how ROS damage sperm nuclear DNA, and how such DNA damage contributes to male infertility. Increased ROS production by spermatozoa is associated with a decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, which is an important indicator of functional integrity of the spermatozoa. Germ cell apoptosis is essential for normal spermatogenesis and its dysregulation may lead to male infertility. Thus, understanding the causes and mechanisms of germ cell apoptosis is of major importance in preventing male reproductive problems. Levels of apoptosis in mature spermatozoa that were significantly correlated with levels of seminal ROS determined by chemiluminescence assay indicate the linkage between ROS and male fertility problems. (Med J Indones 2007; 16:127-33 Keywords: Apoptosis, infertility, free radicals

  15. CASA derived human sperm abnormalities: correlation with chromatin packing and DNA fragmentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sivanarayana, T; Krishna, Ch Ravi; Prakash, G Jaya; Krishna, K Murali; Madan, K; Rani, B Sireesha; Sudhakar, G; Raju, G A. Rama

    2012-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of morphokinetic abnormalities of human spermatozoa on chromatin packing and DNA integrity and possible beneficial effects of sperm selection...

  16. [Effects of semen analysis on human sperm movement parameters at different times after semen collection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yong; Ge, Yi-Feng; Zhao, Xiao-Feng; Yao, Bing; Lu, Jin-Chun; Cui, Ying-Xia; Shang, Xue-Jun; Xia, Xin-Yi; Huang, Yu-Feng

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the effects of the computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) on human sperm movement parameters at different times after semen collection. Ninety-two semen samples with sperm density > or = 20 x 10(6)/ml and sperm liquefaction time semen analysis (CASA) system at 20, 30, 60 and 90 min after semen collection. The percentages of grade a and b sperm were significantly lower at 30, 60 and 90 min than at 20 min (P 0.05). The percentages of grade a + b and a + b + c sperm were also significantly lower at 30, 60 and 90 min than at 20 min (P 0.05). The interval between semen collection and sperm routine analysis needs to be standardized. The results of this study suggest that sperm movement parameters of normal liquefied semen samples are relatively constant at 30 -60 min after semen collection.

  17. The human granulocyte nucleus: Unusual nuclear envelope and heterochromatin composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olins, Ada L; Zwerger, Monika; Herrmann, Harald; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Simon, Amos J; Monestier, Marc; Olins, Donald E

    2008-05-01

    The human blood granulocyte (neutrophil) is adapted to find and destroy infectious agents. The nucleus of the human neutrophil has a segmented appearance, consisting of a linear or branched array of three or four lobes. Adequate levels of lamin B receptor (LBR) are necessary for differentiation of the lobulated nucleus. The levels of other components of the nuclear envelope may also be important for nuclear shape determination. In the present study, immunostaining and immunoblotting procedures explored the levels of various components of the nuclear envelope and heterochromatin, comparing freshly isolated human neutrophils with granulocytic forms of HL-60 cells, a tissue culture model system. In comparison to granulocytic HL-60 cells, blood neutrophil nuclear envelopes contain low-to-negligible amounts of LBR, lamins A/C, B1 and B2, LAP2beta and emerin. Surprisingly, a "mitotic" chromosome marker, H3(S10)phos, is elevated in neutrophil nuclei, compared to granulocytic HL-60 cells. Furthermore, neutrophil nuclei appear to be more fragile to methanol fixation, than observed with granulocytic HL-60 cells. Thus, the human neutrophil nucleus appears to be highly specialized, possessing a paucity of nuclear envelope-stabilizing proteins. In consequence, the neutrophil nucleus appears to be very malleable, supporting rapid migration through tight tissue spaces.

  18. Glucocorticoids suppress vasopressin gene expression in human suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, R.-Y.; Unmehopa, U.A.; Zhou, J.-N.; Swaab, D.F.

    2006-01-01

    Sleep impairment is one of the major side effects of glucocorticoid therapy. The mechanism responsible for this circadian disorder is unknown, but alterations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the biological clock of the human brain, are presumed to play a major role. In the present study, the

  19. Glucocorticoids suppress vasopressin gene expression in human suprachiasmatic nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Rong-Yu; Unmehopa, Unga A.; Zhou, Jiang-Ning; Swaab, Dick F.

    2006-01-01

    Sleep impairment is one of the major side effects of glucocorticoid therapy. The mechanism responsible for this circadian disorder is unknown, but alterations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the biological clock of the human brain, are presumed to play a major role. In the present study, the

  20. Intrinsically disordered proteins in the nucleus of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frege, Telma; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are known to perform a variety of important functions such as macromolecular recognition, promiscuous binding, and signaling. They are crucial players in various cellular pathway and processes, where they often have key regulatory roles. Among vital cellular processes intimately linked to the intrinsically disordered proteins is transcription, an intricate biological performance predominantly developing inside the cell nucleus. With this work, we gathered information about proteins that exist in various compartments and sub-nuclear bodies of the nucleus of the human cells, with the goal of identifying which ones are highly disordered and which functions are ascribed to the disordered nuclear proteins.

  1. Carbonic anhydrases and their functional differences in human and mouse sperm physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, O; Torres-Rodríguez, P; Forero-Quintero, L S; Chávez, J C; De la Vega-Beltrán, J L; Carta, F; Supuran, C T; Deitmer, J W; Treviño, C L

    2015-12-25

    Fertilization is a key reproductive event in which sperm and egg fuse to generate a new individual. Proper regulation of certain parameters (such as intracellular pH) is crucial for this process. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are among the molecular entities that control intracellular pH dynamics in most cells. Unfortunately, little is known about the function of CAs in mammalian sperm physiology. For this reason, we re-explored the expression of CAI, II, IV and XIII in human and mouse sperm. We also measured the level of CA activity, determined by mass spectrometry, and found that it is similar in non-capacitated and capacitated mouse sperm. Importantly, we found that CAII activity accounts for half of the total CA activity in capacitated mouse sperm. Using the general CA inhibitor ethoxyzolamide, we studied how CAs participate in fundamental sperm physiological processes such as motility and acrosome reaction in both species. We found that capacitated human sperm depend strongly on CA activity to support normal motility, while capacitated mouse sperm do not. Finally, we found that CA inhibition increases the acrosome reaction in capacitated human sperm, but not in capacitated mouse sperm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Tyrosine phosphorylation on capacitated human sperm tail detected by immunofluorescence correlates strongly with sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) binding but not with the ZP-induced acrosome reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D Y; Clarke, G N; Baker, H W G

    2006-04-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation (TP) of human sperm is related to sperm capacitation and zona pellucida (ZP) binding. The aim of this study was to determine whether the TP of capacitated sperm is a useful marker for the ability of sperm to bind to the ZP and undergo the ZP-induced acrosome reaction (AR). Semen samples were obtained from 115 subfertile men with sperm count > or =20 x 10(6)/ml, motility > or =25% and variable morphology. Motile sperm (2 x 10(6)/ml) selected by swim-up were incubated with four oocytes for 2 h, and the number of sperm bound to the ZP and the ZP-induced AR was examined. TP of sperm tail was assessed by immunofluorescence (IF) with anti-phosphotyrosine monoclonal antibody. The time course and effects of dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dbcAMP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) on TP were also studied. TP was stimulated more by dbcAMP (P ZP binding but not with the ZP-induced AR. Sperm TP detected by IF correlates strongly with sperm-ZP binding capacity but not with the ZP-induced AR. This simple IF assay of TP may be a clinically useful test of sperm function that is predictive of normal sperm ZP-binding capacity.

  3. Aggregation of human sperm at higher temperature is due to hyperactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppler, E L; Chan, P J; Patton, W C; King, A

    1999-01-01

    Chemotaxis of sperm cells to chemicals and hormones, such as progesterone, helps us to understand the concept of sperm transport. Here, the hypothesis was that heat increased sperm hyperactive motility, which caused the sperm to aggregate at the higher temperature. The objectives were (1) to determine the concentration of sperm at both halves of an artificial female reproductive tract made from a hermetically sealed cryopreservation straw filled with culture medium and placed with each end at different temperatures, and (2) to analyze the motility or kinematic parameters and hyperactivation of sperm found at the different temperatures. Cryopreserved-thawed human donor sperm (N = 6) were pooled and processed through 2-layer colloid solution. Analyses of the motile sperm were carried out and the washed sperm were homogeneously mixed and pipetted into several 0.5-mL French cryopreservation straws and heat-sealed. The control substance, consisting of acid-treated sperm, was also placed in several straws. The plastic straws of sperm were placed half at 23 degrees C and half was at either 37 or 40 degrees C. After 4 h, sperm at different sections of the straws were analyzed using the Hamilton Thorn motility analyzer (HTM-C). After 4 h of incubation, the concentration of sperm was doubled at the 40 degrees C heated half of the straw when compared with the other half of the straw at 23 degrees C. There were no differences in sperm concentration in the straw kept half at 37 degrees C and half at 23 degrees C. There were significantly higher percent motility, mean average path velocity, straight line velocity, lateral head displacement, and percent hyperactivation in sperm at the 40 degrees C temperature. The aggregation of sperm at the higher temperature of 40 degrees C may be due to enhanced motility, increased sperm velocities, and a 10-fold increase in hyperactivation at that temperature. The 37 degrees C temperature was not sufficient to attract sperm. Sperm cells

  4. Role of human- and animal-sperm studies in the evaluation of male reproductive hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Gordon, L.; Watchmaker, G.

    1982-04-07

    Human sperm tests provide a direct means of assessing chemically induced spermatogenic dysfunction in man. Available tests include sperm count, motility, morphology (seminal cytology), and Y-body analyses. Over 70 different human exposures have been monitored in various groups of exposed men. The majority of exposures studied showed a significant change from control in one or more sperm tests. When carefully controlled, the sperm morphology test is statistically the most sensitive of these human sperm tests. Several sperm tests have been developed in nonhuman mammals for the study of chemical spermatotoxins. The sperm morphology test in mice has been the most widely used. Results with this test seem to be related to germ-cell mutagenicity. In general, animal sperm tests should play an important role in the identification and assessment of potential human reproductive hazards. Exposure to spermatotoxins may lead to infertility, and more importantly, to heritable genetic damage. While there are considerable animal and human data suggesting that sperm tests may be used to detect agents causing infertility, the extent to which these tests detect heritable genetic damage remains unclear. (ERB)

  5. Direct action of endocrine disrupting chemicals on human sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Müller, Astrid; Egeberg, Dorte L

    2014-01-01

    sperm. We show that structurally diverse EDCs activate the sperm-specific CatSper channel and, thereby, evoke an intracellular Ca(2+) increase, a motility response, and acrosomal exocytosis. Moreover, EDCs desensitize sperm for physiological CatSper ligands and cooperate in low-dose mixtures to elevate...

  6. Vitamin D is positively associated with sperm motility and increases intracellular calcium in human spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Bjerrum, Poul J; Jessen, Torben E

    2011-01-01

    motility and acrosome reaction. All men delivered samples for routine semen analysis and blood for measurements of follicle stimulating hormone, Inhibin B, 25-hydroxy-VD, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH). RESULTS In the association study, 44% were VD insufficient (75 n...... concentration, sperm motility and induced the acrosome reaction in mature spermatozoa, and VD serum levels were positively associated with sperm motility, suggesting a role for VD in human sperm function....

  7. Polyclonal VDAC3 antibody decreases human sperm motility: a novel approach to male contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmarinah Asmarinah

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Voltage dependent anion channels (VDAC mediate transport of anions, cations and ATP which play an important role in sperm motility. This study was aimed to examine the effect of polyclonal VDAC3 antiserum to human sperm motility.Methods: Polyclonal VDAC3 antiserum used in this study was produced in rabbits by immunization of VDAC3-specific synthetic peptides.  Preimmunserum was collected before immunization and used for control experiment. Recognition of VDAC3 antiserum to antigen in human sperm was performed by western blot. Thirty sperm samples obtained from fertile men which had high quality of sperm motility were washed and collected by Percoll gradient. Sperm motility was assessed by means of evaluation of sperm velocity (seconds per 0.1 mm distance and the number of unmoved sperm (million per ml which were observed 0 minute, 30 minutes and 60 minutes after addition of VDAC3 antiserum and preimmunserum as a control. Both data were analyzed by SPSS 13.0 software.Results: VDAC3 antiserum recognized VDAC3 protein in human sperm. Statistical analysis demonstrated that there were increasing numbers of unmoved spermatozoa after addition of anti-VDAC3 antiserum in vitro for 60 minutes observation compared with preimmunserum (control. We found also that sperm velocity decreased signifi cantly after giving anti-VDAC3 antiserum in vitro for 0 minute, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes compared with pre-immunee serum (control.Conclusion: VDAC3 antiserum can decrease motility of human sperm. and may provide a novel principle of male contraception in the future. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:5-10Keywords: VDAC3 antiserum, sperm, motility, contraception

  8. Identification of Multiple HPV Types on Spermatozoa from Human Sperm Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Kaspersen, Maja D; Peter B Larsen; Hans Jakob Ingerslev; Jens Fedder; Gert Bruun Petersen; Jesper Bonde; Per Höllsberg

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) may cause sexually transmitted disease. High-risk types of HPV are involved in the development of cervical cell dysplasia, whereas low-risk types may cause genital condyloma. Despite the association between HPV and cancer, donor sperm need not be tested for HPV according to European regulations. Consequently, the potential health risk of HPV transmission by donor bank sperm has not been elucidated, nor is it known how HPV is associated with sperm. The presence of ...

  9. Numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities detected in human sperm with a combination of multicolor FISH assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, A; Van Hummelen, P; Lowe, X R; Adler, I D; Wyrobek, A J

    1999-01-01

    A pair of multicolor FISH assays (X-Y-21 and A-M-16) was developed for human sperm to simultaneously measure sex ratios; aneuploidies involving chromosomes 1, 16, 21, X, and Y; meiotic diploidies; and structural aberrations involving chromosome 1p. Sex ratios in sperm were not significantly different from unity among healthy men. Baseline frequencies of disomic sperm for chromosomes 1, 8, and 21 were similar (6.7 per 10(4) sperm, 95% CI of 5.6-8.1), suggesting that among these three chromosomes, chromosome 21 was not especially prone to nondisjunction. Frequencies of disomy 16 sperm were significantly lower, however (3.5 per 10(4) sperm, 95% CI of 2.0-6.2; P chromosomes 16 and 21 were validated against aneuploidy data obtained by the hamster-egg technique for human sperm cytogenetics. The frequencies of X-X, Y-Y, X-Y ("Klinefelter") sperm and sex-null ("Turner") sperm were 5.5, 5.1, 5.5, and 7.8 per 10(4) sperm, respectively. For chromosomes 16 and 21, the frequencies of nullisomic and disomic sperm were similar, suggesting that gain and loss events occurred symmetrically. However, more gain than loss was reported for chromosomes 1, X, and Y. The frequency of MI and MII diploid sperm (with flagella) was approximately 12 per 10(4) (range 8.3-16.7 per 10(4) sperm). Based on flagella data, the frequency of somatic cells in the semen was estimated to be approximately 1.8 per 10(4) sperm. Loss or gain of a portion of chromosome-arm 1p occurred in 5.5 per 10(4) sperm, and the percentage of sperm carrying structural aberrations within the haploid genome as calculated from FISH (1.4%), was similar to that obtained with the hamster-egg technique. These complementary sperm FISH assays have promising applications in studies of chromosomally abnormal sperm after exposure to occupational, medical, and environmental toxicants.

  10. Identification of calcium-binding proteins associated with the human sperm plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westbrook Anne

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The precise composition of the human sperm plasma membrane, the molecular interactions that define domain specific functions, and the regulation of membrane associated proteins during the capacitation process, still remain to be fully understood. Here, we investigated the repertoire of calcium-regulated proteins associated with the human sperm plasma membrane. Methods Surface specific radioiodination was combined with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, a 45Ca-overlay assay, computer assisted image analysis and mass spectrometry to identify calcium-binding proteins exposed on the human sperm surface. Results Nine acidic 45Ca-binding sperm proteins were excised from stained preparative 2D gels and identified by mass spectrometry. Five of the calcium binding proteins; HSPA2 (HSP70-1, HSPA5 (Bip, HYOU1 (ORP150, serum amyloid P-component (SAP and protein kinase C substrate 80K-H (80K-H were found to be accessible to Iodo-Bead catalyzed 125I-labelling on the surface of intact human sperm. Agglutination and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that SAP is situated on the plasma membrane of intact, motile sperm as well as permeabilized cells. Western blot analysis showed increased phosphorylation of human sperm 80K-H protein following in vitro capacitation. This is the first demonstration of the 80K-H protein in a mammalian sperm. Conclusion The presence of SAP on the surface of mature sperm implies that SAP has a physiological role in reproduction, which is thought to be in the removal of spermatozoa from the female genital tract via phagocytosis. Since 80K-H is a Ca2+-sensor recently implicated in the regulation of both inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor and transient receptor potential (TRP cation channel activities, its detection in sperm represents the first direct signaling link between PKC and store-operated calcium channels identified in human sperm.

  11. Equatorial segment protein (ESP) is a human alloantigen involved in sperm-egg binding and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkowicz, M J; Digilio, L; Klotz, K; Shetty, J; Flickinger, C J; Herr, J C

    2008-01-01

    The equatorial segment of the sperm head is known to play a role in fertilization; however, the specific sperm molecules contributing to the integrity of the equatorial segment and in binding and fusion at the oolemma remain incomplete. Moreover, identification of molecular mediators of fertilization that are also immunogenic in humans is predicted to advance both the diagnosis and treatment of immune infertility. We previously reported the cloning of Equatorial Segment Protein (ESP), a protein localized to the equatorial segment of ejaculated human sperm. ESP is a biomarker for a subcompartment of the acrosomal matrix that can be traced through all stages of acrosome biogenesis (Wolkowicz et al, 2003). In the present study, ESP immunoreacted on Western blots with 4 (27%) of 15 antisperm antibody (ASA)-positive serum samples from infertile male patients and 2 (40%) of 5 ASA-positive female sera. Immunofluorescent studies revealed ESP in the equatorial segment of 89% of acrosome-reacted sperm. ESP persisted as a defined equatorial segment band on 100% of sperm tightly bound to the oolemma of hamster eggs. Antisera to recombinant human ESP inhibited both oolemmal binding and fusion of human sperm in the hamster egg penetration assay. The results indicate that ESP is a human alloantigen involved in sperm-egg binding and fusion. Defined recombinant sperm immunogens, such as ESP, may offer opportunities for differential diagnosis of immune infertility.

  12. Identification of multiple HPV types on spermatozoa from human sperm donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Maja D; Larsen, Peter B; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) may cause sexually transmitted disease. High-risk types of HPV are involved in the development of cervical cell dysplasia, whereas low-risk types may cause genital condyloma. Despite the association between HPV and cancer, donor sperm need not be tested for HPV...... according to European regulations. Consequently, the potential health risk of HPV transmission by donor bank sperm has not been elucidated, nor is it known how HPV is associated with sperm. The presence of 35 types of HPV was examined on DNA from semen samples of 188 Danish sperm donors using a sensitive...

  13. Expression of human protamine P1 in sperm of transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Keith, C.; Stilwell, J.; Lowe, X. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States); Anderson, G. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Transgenic mice were produced by pronuclear injection with DNA constructs containing human protamine P1 cDNA recombined with a murine protamine P1 promoter, and were identified by PCR. Expression of human P1 was investigated using huplm, a monoclonal antibody specific for human P1, applied to murine testicular cells, smears of epididymal sperm, and smears of detergent-isolated sperm nuclei. Various antibodies and nontransgenic littermates were used as controls. Two male founders (T3 and T7) sired more than five generations of transgenic offspring each with continued expression of human P1 in their sperm. Transgenic animals appear of normal fertility with sperm of typical nuclear morphology. The human P1 transgene was expressed postmeioticly in both lines, as expected. Nearly 100% of sperm of T3 and T7 hemizygotes labeled with huplm, consistent with complete diffusion of human P1 protein through the intercellular bridge of spermatogenic cells. Human P1 labeling of sperm nuclei was not visibly affected by sonication or by treatment with the detergent MATAB or the reducing agent DTT. A third founder female (T5) showed a transmission pattern consistent with insertion of the transgene into an X chromosome; her transgenic offspring expressed human P1 in only a small fraction of sperm. Human P1 transgenes may serve as efficient targets for germinal mutations and transgenicmice may provide promising models for investigating the DNA complexes.

  14. Molecular and functional characterization of voltage-gated sodium channels in human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Francisco M; Ravina, Cristina G; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel; Gallardo-Castro, Manuel; Cejudo-Román, Antonio; Candenas, Luz

    2009-07-16

    We have investigated the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels in human spermatozoa and characterized their role in sperm motility. Freshly ejaculated semen was collected from thirty normozoospermic human donors, with each donor supplying 2 different samples. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence techniques were used to detect the mRNAs and proteins of interest. Sperm motility was measured by a computer-assisted sperm analysis system (CASA). Cytosolic free calcium was determined by fluorimetry in cells loaded with the fluorescent calcium indicator Fura-2. The mRNAs that encode the different Nav alpha subunits (Nav1.1-1.9) were all expressed in capacitated human spermatozoa. The mRNAs of the auxiliary subunits beta1, beta3 and beta4 were also present. Immunofluorescence studies showed that, with the exception of Nav1.1 and Nav1.3, the Nav channel proteins were present in sperm cells and show specific and different sites of localization. Veratridine, a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, caused time- and concentration-dependent increases in progressive sperm motility. In sperm suspensions loaded with Fura-2, veratridine did not modify intracellular free calcium levels. This research shows the presence of voltage-gated sodium channels in human sperm and supports a role for these channels in the regulation of mature sperm function.

  15. Molecular and functional characterization of voltage-gated sodium channels in human sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cejudo-Román Antonio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have investigated the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels in human spermatozoa and characterized their role in sperm motility. Methods Freshly ejaculated semen was collected from thirty normozoospermic human donors, with each donor supplying 2 different samples. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and immunofluorescence techniques were used to detect the mRNAs and proteins of interest. Sperm motility was measured by a computer-assisted sperm analysis system (CASA. Cytosolic free calcium was determined by fluorimetry in cells loaded with the fluorescent calcium indicator Fura-2. Results The mRNAs that encode the different Nav alpha subunits (Nav1.1-1.9 were all expressed in capacitated human spermatozoa. The mRNAs of the auxiliary subunits beta1, beta3 and beta4 were also present. Immunofluorescence studies showed that, with the exception of Nav1.1 and Nav1.3, the Nav channel proteins were present in sperm cells and show specific and different sites of localization. Veratridine, a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, caused time- and concentration-dependent increases in progressive sperm motility. In sperm suspensions loaded with Fura-2, veratridine did not modify intracellular free calcium levels. Conclusion This research shows the presence of voltage-gated sodium channels in human sperm and supports a role for these channels in the regulation of mature sperm function.

  16. Evolutionary conservation of mammalian sperm proteins associates with overall, not tyrosine, phosphorylation in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Julia; Ramljak, Sanja; Asif, Abdul R; Schaffrath, Michael; Zischler, Hans; Herlyn, Holger

    2013-12-06

    We investigated possible associations between sequence evolution of mammalian sperm proteins and their phosphorylation status in humans. As a reference, spermatozoa from three normozoospermic men were analyzed combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry. We identified 99 sperm proteins (thereof 42 newly described) and determined the phosphorylation status for most of them. Sequence evolution was studied across six mammalian species using nonsynonymous/synonymous rate ratios (dN/dS) and amino acid distances. Site-specific purifying selection was assessed employing average ratios of evolutionary rates at phosphorylated versus nonphosphorylated amino acids (α). According to our data, mammalian sperm proteins do not show statistically significant sequence conservation difference, no matter if the human ortholog is a phosphoprotein with or without tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation. In contrast, overall phosphorylation of human sperm proteins, i.e., phosphorylation at serine (S), threonine (T), and/or Y residues, associates with above-average conservation of sequences. Complementary investigations suggest that numerous protein-protein interactants constrain sequence evolution of sperm phosphoproteins. Although our findings reject a special relevance of Y phosphorylation for sperm functioning, they still indicate that overall phosphorylation substantially contributes to proper functioning of sperm proteins. Hence, phosphorylated sperm proteins might be considered as prime candidates for diagnosis and treatment of reduced male fertility.

  17. in human sperm motility and level of calcium and magnesium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J. Valsa

    2015-11-06

    Nov 6, 2015 ... Abstract A detailed sperm motility study for 24 h after collection was done. The level of calcium and magnesium in seminal plasma during this period was also seen to understand the role of these electrolytes on sperm motility. Good care was taken in selection of subjects (young and healthy), collection and ...

  18. Neurochemical organization of the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis in the human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baizer, Joan S; Baker, James F; Haas, Kristin; Lima, Raquel

    2007-10-24

    We have characterized the neurochemical organization of a small brainstem nucleus in the human brain, the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis (PMD). PMD is located adjacent and medial to the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (PH) in the dorsal medulla and is distinguished by the pattern of immunoreactivity of cells and fibers to several markers including calcium-binding proteins, a synthetic enzyme for nitric oxide (neuronal nitric oxide synthase, nNOS) and a nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (antibody SMI-32). In transverse sections, PMD is oval with its long axis aligned with the dorsal border of the brainstem. We identified PMD in eight human brainstems, but found some variability both in its cross-sectional area and in its A-P extent among cases. It includes calretinin immunoreactive large cells with oval or polygonal cell bodies. Cells in PMD are not immunoreactive for either calbindin or parvalbumin, but a few fibers immunoreactive to each protein are found within its central region. Cells in PMD are also immunoreactive to nNOS, and immunoreactivity to a neurofilament protein shows many labeled cells and fibers. No similar region is identified in atlases of the cat, mouse, rat or monkey brain, nor does immunoreactivity to any of the markers that delineate it in the human reveal a comparable region in those species. The territory that PMD occupies is included in PH in other species. Since anatomical and physiological data in animals suggest that PH may have multiple subregions, we suggest that the PMD in human may be a further differentiation of PH and may have functions related to the vestibular control of eye movements.

  19. [Relationships among human follicular fluid-induced acrosome reaction, sperm morphology and in vitro fertilization rates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-ping; Zhong, Ying; Wu, Dong; Ai, Ling; Wang, Sheng; Tan, Chao; Zeng, Wei-qian; Liu, Jing; Ma, Guang-ping

    2006-07-01

    To assess the relationships among human follicular fluid-induced acrosome reaction, sperm morphology and in vitro fertilization rates. The relationships among human follicular fluid-induced acrosome reaction, sperm morphology and in vitro fertilization rates were investigated by Spearman rank correlation in 79 infertile couples. And the sperm morphology analysis was performed by crystal violet staining and based on strict criteria. A significant positive correlation was found between the percentage of human follicular fluid-induced acrosome reaction and that of normal sperm morphology (n = 49, r = 0.3763, P reaction and in vitro fertilization rates or between that of normal sperm morphology and in vitro fertilization rates (n = 21, r = 0.2666, P > 0.05 and n = 50, r = 0.0018, P > 0.05, respectively). There is a significant positive correlation between the percentage of human follicular fluid-induced acrosome reaction and that of normal sperm morphology, but no such correlation either between the percentage of human follicular fluid-induced acrosome reaction and in vitro fertilization rates or between that of normal sperm morphology and in vitro fertilization rates.

  20. Human papillomavirus sperm infection and assisted reproduction: a dangerous hazard with a possible safe solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garolla, Andrea; Lenzi, Andrea; Palù, Giorgio; Pizzol, Damiano; Bertoldo, Alessandro; De Toni, Luca; Foresta, Carlo

    2012-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been demonstrated in the sperm of a large percentage of sexually active males and is associated with an impairment of sperm parameters, with a particular negative impact on sperm motility, suggesting a possible role in male infertility. Conventional sperm selection techniques have a low efficiency in removing HPV. Evaluation of sperm parameters, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling test to evaluate DNA fragmentation and fluorescence in situ hybridization or immunohistochemistry for HPV were performed on semen samples from infected patients (n= 22), control subjects (n= 13) and on pooled control sperm samples incubated with HPV16-L1 (HPV capsid), before and after direct swim-up and modified swim-up (with added Heparinase-III). Moreover, cytofluorimetry for HPV detection was performed in pooled sperm pre- and post-incubation with HPV 16-L1 before and after direct and modified swim-up. Statistical analysis was performed with a two-tailed Student's t-test. Direct swim-up reduces the number of HPV-infected sperm by ~24% (PHPV DNA both from naturally and artificially infected sperm. Enzymatic treatment with Heparinase-III tended to decrease sperm motility, viability and DNA integrity but the effects were not significant. This study shows that Heparinase-III treatment seems not to affect spermatozoa in vitro and suggests that this treatment should be investigated further as a means of preparing sperm from patients who are infected with HPV in order to reduce the risk of HPV infection when using assisted reproduction techniques.

  1. The presence of human papillomavirus in semen does not affect the integrity of sperm DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, E I; Dávila-Rodríguez, M I; Fernández, J L; de la O-Pérez, L O; Garza-Flores, M E; Eguren-Garza, R; Gosálvez, J

    2017-03-06

    It remains unknown whether human papillomaviruses (HPVs) in semen affect sperm DNA integrity. We investigated whether the presence of these viruses in semen was associated with an elevated sperm DNA fragmentation index. Semen samples of 22 normozoospermic patients undergoing infertility treatment, nine fertile donors and seven fertile men with a risk of HPV infection (genital warts or condylomas) were included in the study. The samples were examined by an INNO-LiPA test PCR-based reverse hybridisation array that identifies 28 types of HPVs as simple or multiple infections. Sperm DNA integrity was determined by sperm chromatin dispersion assay (SCD). Our preliminary findings demonstrate an increase in HPV infection in infertile men with respect to fertile men. However, the sperm DNA fragmentation index was not increased in semen containing these viruses. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Chemical UV Filters Mimic the Effect of Progesterone on Ca(2+) Signaling in Human Sperm Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, A; Dissing, S; Skakkebæk, N E

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone released by cumulus cells surrounding the egg induces a Ca(2+) influx into human sperm cells via the cationic channel of sperm (CatSper) Ca(2+) channel and controls multiple Ca(2+)-dependent responses essential for fertilization. We hypothesized that chemical UV filters may mimic...... competitively inhibited progesterone-induced Ca(2+) signals. In vivo exposure studies are needed to investigate whether UV filter exposure affects human fertility....

  3. Automatic Tracking and Motility Analysis of Human Sperm in Time-Lapse Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Leonardo F; Masson, Puneet; VerMilyea, Matthew; Kam, Moshe

    2017-03-01

    We present a fully automated multi-sperm tracking algorithm. It has the demonstrated capability to detect and track simultaneously hundreds of sperm cells in recorded videos while accurately measuring motility parameters over time and with minimal operator intervention. Algorithms of this kind may help in associating dynamic swimming parameters of human sperm cells with fertility and fertilization rates. Specifically, we offer an image processing method, based on radar tracking algorithms, that detects and tracks automatically the swimming paths of human sperm cells in timelapse microscopy image sequences of the kind that is analyzed by fertility clinics. Adapting the well-known joint probabilistic data association filter (JPDAF), we automatically tracked hundreds of human sperm simultaneously and measured their dynamic swimming parameters over time. Unlike existing CASA instruments, our algorithm has the capability to track sperm swimming in close proximity to each other and during apparent cell-to-cell collisions. Collecting continuously parameters for each sperm tracked without sample dilution (currently impossible using standard CASA systems) provides an opportunity to compare such data with standard fertility rates. The use of our algorithm thus has the potential to free the clinician from having to rely on elaborate motility measurements obtained manually by technicians, speed up semen processing, and provide medical practitioners and researchers with more useful data than are currently available.

  4. The role of oxidative phosphorylation in the mechanism of human sperm motility regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudjarwo Sudjarwo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Energy synthesis for sperm motility in the mitochondria with enzymatic reactions in nucleus and mitochondria is called Oxidative Phosphorylation (OXPHOS, in which the respiratory process is coordinated in nucleus and mitochondria. Enzymes in OXPHOS process are complex enzymes I, III, IV and V in the mitochondria and complex enzyme II in the nucleus. If there is OXPHOS dysfunction, the mutation of mitochondria DNA (mtDNA will decrease energy (ATP, Adenosine Triphosphate production and increase Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS. The characteristics of ROS are oxidant for lipid, protein and DNA, and all these reactions lead to the dysfunction of OXPHOS and, in the spermatozoa, they will decrease motility. The detection of ROS, Malondialdehyde (MDA, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG, and sperm motility can use Chemiluminicense method, Spectroflourometric method, High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC method and Markler method, respectively, as World Health Organization (WHO Procedures Laboratory. These results indicated there was significant indirect correlation between ROS with sperm motility and direct correlation between ROS with MDA, 8-OH-dG.

  5. The voltage-gated sodium channel nav1.8 is expressed in human sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cejudo-Roman

    Full Text Available The role of Na(+ fluxes through voltage-gated sodium channels in the regulation of sperm cell function remains poorly understood. Previously, we reported that several genes encoding voltage-gated Na(+ channels were expressed in human testis and mature spermatozoa. In this study, we analyzed the presence and function of the TTX-resistant VGSC α subunit Nav1.8 in human capacitated sperm cells. Using an RT-PCR assay, we found that the mRNA of the gene SCN10A, that encode Na v1.8, was abundantly and specifically expressed in human testis and ejaculated spermatozoa. The Na v1.8 protein was detected in capacitated sperm cells using three different specific antibodies against this channel. Positive immunoreactivity was mainly located in the neck and the principal piece of the flagellum. The presence of Na v1.8 in sperm cells was confirmed by Western blot. Functional studies demonstrated that the increases in progressive motility produced by veratridine, a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, were reduced in sperm cells preincubated with TTX (10 μM, the Na v1.8 antagonist A-803467, or a specific Na v1.8 antibody. Veratridine elicited similar percentage increases in progressive motility in sperm cells maintained in Ca(2+-containing or Ca(2+-free solution and did not induce hyperactivation or the acrosome reaction. Veratridine caused a rise in sperm intracellular Na(+, [Na(+]i, and the sustained phase of the response was inhibited in the presence of A-803467. These results verify that the Na(+ channel Na v1.8 is present in human sperm cells and demonstrate that this channel participates in the regulation of sperm function.

  6. The Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Nav1.8 Is Expressed in Human Sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejudo-Roman, Antonio; Pinto, Francisco M.; Subirán, Nerea; Ravina, Cristina G.; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel; Pérez-Hernández, Natalia; Pérez, Ricardo; Pacheco, Alberto; Irazusta, Jon; Candenas, Luz

    2013-01-01

    The role of Na+ fluxes through voltage-gated sodium channels in the regulation of sperm cell function remains poorly understood. Previously, we reported that several genes encoding voltage-gated Na+ channels were expressed in human testis and mature spermatozoa. In this study, we analyzed the presence and function of the TTX-resistant VGSC α subunit Nav1.8 in human capacitated sperm cells. Using an RT-PCR assay, we found that the mRNA of the gene SCN10A, that encode Na v1.8, was abundantly and specifically expressed in human testis and ejaculated spermatozoa. The Na v1.8 protein was detected in capacitated sperm cells using three different specific antibodies against this channel. Positive immunoreactivity was mainly located in the neck and the principal piece of the flagellum. The presence of Na v1.8 in sperm cells was confirmed by Western blot. Functional studies demonstrated that the increases in progressive motility produced by veratridine, a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, were reduced in sperm cells preincubated with TTX (10 μM), the Na v1.8 antagonist A-803467, or a specific Na v1.8 antibody. Veratridine elicited similar percentage increases in progressive motility in sperm cells maintained in Ca2+-containing or Ca2+-free solution and did not induce hyperactivation or the acrosome reaction. Veratridine caused a rise in sperm intracellular Na+, [Na+]i, and the sustained phase of the response was inhibited in the presence of A-803467. These results verify that the Na+ channel Na v1.8 is present in human sperm cells and demonstrate that this channel participates in the regulation of sperm function. PMID:24086692

  7. EDC IMPACT: Reduced sperm counts in rats exposed to human relevant mixtures of endocrine disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelstad Petersen, Marta; Hass, Ulla; Scholze, M.

    2018-01-01

    and the high doses of the total and the anti-androgenic mixture, compared to controls. In all dose groups, epididymal sperm counts were reduced several months after end of exposure, i.e. at 10 months of age. Interestingly, the same pattern of effects was seen for paracetamol as for mixtures with diverse modes......Human semen quality is declining in many parts of the world, but the causes are ill defined. In rodents, impaired sperm production can be seen with early life exposure to certain endocrine-disrupting chemicals, but the effects of combined exposures are not properly investigated. In this study, we...... of action. Reduced sperm count was seen at a dose level reflecting human therapeutic exposure to paracetamol. Environmental chemical mixtures affected sperm count at the lowest mixture dose indicating an insufficient margin of safety for the most exposed humans. This causes concern for exposure of pregnant...

  8. Comparative analysis of human reproductive proteomes identifies candidate proteins of sperm maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu-Jun, Liu; Xiao-Fang, Shen

    2012-12-01

    Male reproductive proteomes provide basis for studying gene products and its involvement or regulation in sperm physiology. Here, a comparative study between these proteomes was performed to find potential proteins and functions associated with human sperm maturation. Seven reproductive proteomes associated with human sperm physiology were integrated. Gene ontology analysis were performed using DAVID and Panther tools to determine enriched functions. Total of 270 proteins overlapped between epididymal, prostatic milieu and sperm proteome were thought to be candidate proteins involved in sperm maturation, and they showed enriched functions of proteasomal protein catabolic process and protein folding. 34 epididymal milieu proteins and 274 prostatic milieu proteins were contributed to the composition of seminal fluids proteome. Literatures have confirmed the involvements in sperm maturation of many of these proteins The spatial expressions of 24 epididymal milieu proteins involved in chaperone and antioxidant activity were authenticated by real-time RT-PCR. These proteins may serve as candidate molecules for future studies of sperm maturation and male infertility.

  9. Identification of multiple HPV types on spermatozoa from human sperm donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspersen, Maja D; Larsen, Peter B; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob; Fedder, Jens; Petersen, Gert Bruun; Bonde, Jesper; Höllsberg, Per

    2011-03-29

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) may cause sexually transmitted disease. High-risk types of HPV are involved in the development of cervical cell dysplasia, whereas low-risk types may cause genital condyloma. Despite the association between HPV and cancer, donor sperm need not be tested for HPV according to European regulations. Consequently, the potential health risk of HPV transmission by donor bank sperm has not been elucidated, nor is it known how HPV is associated with sperm. The presence of 35 types of HPV was examined on DNA from semen samples of 188 Danish sperm donors using a sensitive HPV array. To examine whether HPV was associated with the sperm, in situ hybridization were performed with HPV-6, HPV-16 and -18, and HPV-31-specific probes. The prevalence of HPV-positive sperm donors was 16.0% and in 66.7% of these individuals high-risk types of HPV were detected. In 5.3% of sperm donors, two or more HPV types were detected. Among all identified HPV types, 61.9% were high-risk types. In situ hybridization experiments identified HPV genomes particularly protruding from the equatorial segment and the tail of the sperm. Semen samples from more than one in seven healthy Danish donors contain HPV, most of them of high-risk types binding to the equatorial segment of the sperm cell. Most HPV-positive sperm showed decreased staining with DAPI, indicative of reduced content of DNA. Our data demonstrate that oncogenic HPV types are frequent in men.

  10. Identification of multiple HPV types on spermatozoa from human sperm donors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja D Kaspersen

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPV may cause sexually transmitted disease. High-risk types of HPV are involved in the development of cervical cell dysplasia, whereas low-risk types may cause genital condyloma. Despite the association between HPV and cancer, donor sperm need not be tested for HPV according to European regulations. Consequently, the potential health risk of HPV transmission by donor bank sperm has not been elucidated, nor is it known how HPV is associated with sperm. The presence of 35 types of HPV was examined on DNA from semen samples of 188 Danish sperm donors using a sensitive HPV array. To examine whether HPV was associated with the sperm, in situ hybridization were performed with HPV-6, HPV-16 and -18, and HPV-31-specific probes. The prevalence of HPV-positive sperm donors was 16.0% and in 66.7% of these individuals high-risk types of HPV were detected. In 5.3% of sperm donors, two or more HPV types were detected. Among all identified HPV types, 61.9% were high-risk types. In situ hybridization experiments identified HPV genomes particularly protruding from the equatorial segment and the tail of the sperm. Semen samples from more than one in seven healthy Danish donors contain HPV, most of them of high-risk types binding to the equatorial segment of the sperm cell. Most HPV-positive sperm showed decreased staining with DAPI, indicative of reduced content of DNA. Our data demonstrate that oncogenic HPV types are frequent in men.

  11. Semen washing procedures do not eliminate human papilloma virus sperm infection in infertile patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresta, Carlo; Pizzol, Damiano; Bertoldo, Alessandro; Menegazzo, Massimo; Barzon, Luisa; Garolla, Andrea

    2011-11-01

    To determine the effectiveness of three sperm washing protocols for removing human papillomavirus (HPV)-infected cells from semen samples of infertile patients. Cross-sectional clinical study. Andrology and microbiology sections at a university hospital. A group of 32 infertile patients positive for semen HPV, detected with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and in-situ hybridization in sperm and exfoliated cells. Semen analysis and in-situ hybridization for HPV detection were performed before and after sperm washing, discontinuous Ficoll gradients, and swim-up protocols. Statistical analysis was performed with a two-tailed Student's t-test. Evaluation of sperm parameters and presence of HPV, performed in semen samples before and after procedures of sperm selection. All native samples showed the presence of infected sperm with a mean percentage of positivity (24.7% ± 8.9%) higher than exfoliated cells (13.8% ± 4.3%). Fifteen samples had HPV DNA on sperm and exfoliated cells. Sperm washing centrifugation showed no changes in the number of infected samples and in the percentage of infected cells. Ficoll and swim-up protocols induced a slight reduction in the number of infected samples (30 and 26, respectively). This study demonstrated that conventional sperm selection rarely eliminates HPV sperm infection. More attention should be paid to the reproductive health of infected patients because, not only can HPV be transmitted, but it may also have a negative effect on development of the fetus. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid in seminal plasma and sperm cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Y M; Yang, F P; Pao, C C

    1996-05-01

    To investigate the possible presence and expression of human papillomavirus viruses (HPV) in human plasma and sperm cells. Controlled clinical study. A major medical center affiliated with a medical college. Twenty-four randomly selected patients who attended Fertility Clinics at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Specimens of semen were collected from volunteered patients The presence of HPV types 16 and 18 DNA and RNA sequences were examined by polymerase chain reaction. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 DNA and RNA sequences were found in two and zero seminal plasma specimens, respectively, and in six and two sperm cells specimens, respectively. Deoxyribonucleic acid and RNA sequences of HPV type 18 were found in eight and two seminal specimens and in 11 and 5 sperm cells specimens, respectively. These results seem to suggest that HPV cannot only infect human sperm cells, certain HPV genes are expressed actively in infected sperm cells. The virus-infected sperm cells conceivably can behave as vectors or carriers for the transmission of HPV, to sexual partner during sexual contact, to fetuses through fertilized eggs, or both.

  13. Characterization of Mammalian ADAM2 and Its Absence from Human Sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heejin Choi

    Full Text Available The members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease family are membrane-anchored multi-domain proteins that play prominent roles in male reproduction. ADAM2, which was one of the first identified ADAMs, is the best studied ADAM in reproduction. In the male germ cells of mice, ADAM2 and other ADAMs form complexes that contribute to sperm-sperm adhesion, sperm-egg interactions, and the migration of sperm in the female reproductive tract. Here, we generated specific antibodies against mouse and human ADAM2, and investigated various features of ADAM2 in mice, monkeys and humans. We found that the cytoplasmic domain of ADAM2 might enable the differential association of this protein with other ADAMs in mice. Western blot analysis with the anti-human ADAM2 antibodies showed that ADAM2 is present in the testis and sperm of monkeys. Monkey ADAM2 was found to associate with chaperone proteins in testis. In humans, we identified ADAM2 as a 100-kDa protein in the testis, but failed to detect it in sperm. This is surprising given the results in mice and monkeys, but it is consistent with the failure of ADAM2 identification in the previous proteomic analyses of human sperm. These findings suggest that the reproductive functions of ADAM2 differ between humans and mice. Our protein analysis showed the presence of potential ADAM2 complexes involving yet-unknown proteins in human testis. Taken together, our results provide new information regarding the characteristics of ADAM2 in mammalian species, including humans.

  14. Human Sperm Quality and Metal Toxicants: Protective Effects of some Flavonoids on Male Reproductive Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffari Mohammad Ali

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Metals can cause male infertility through affection of spermatogenesis and sperm quality. Strong evidences confirm that male infertility in metal-exposed humans is mediated via various mechanisms such as production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Flavonoids have antioxidant and metal chelating properties which make them suitable candidates for neutralizing adverse effects of metals on semen quality. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of five types of flavonoids (rutin, naringin, kaempferol, quercetin, and catechin on recovery of sperm motility and prevention of membrane oxidative damage from aluminum chloride (AlCl3, cadmium chloride (CdCl2, and lead chloride (PbCl4. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, motility and lipid peroxidation of metalexposed sperm was investigated in the presence of different concentrations of five kinds of flavonoids. Malondialdehyde (MDA production was assessed as a lipid peroxidation marker. Results Aluminum chloride (AlCl3, cadmium chloride (CdCl2, and lead chloride (PbCl4 diminished sperm motility. Treatment of metal-exposed sperm with rutin, naringin, and kaempferol attenuated the negative effects of the metals on sperm motility. Quercetin and catechin decreased the motility of metal-exposed sperm. Conclusion Based on the MDA production results, only AlCl3 significantly induced lipid peroxidation. Treatment with rutin, naringin, and kaempferol significantly decreased MDA production.

  15. Human Sperm Quality and Metal Toxicants: Protective Effects of some Flavonoids on Male Reproductive Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalan, Mostafa; Ghaffari, Mohammad Ali; Hoseinzadeh, Pooneh; Hashemitabar, Mahmoud; Zeinali, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Metals can cause male infertility through affection of spermatogenesis and sperm quality. Strong evidences confirm that male infertility in metal-exposed humans is mediated via various mechanisms such as production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Flavonoids have antioxidant and metal chelating properties which make them suitable candidates for neutralizing adverse effects of metals on semen quality. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of five types of flavonoids (rutin, naringin, kaempferol, quercetin, and catechin) on recovery of sperm motility and prevention of membrane oxidative damage from aluminum chloride (AlCl3), cadmium chloride (CdCl2), and lead chloride (PbCl4). In this experimental study, motility and lipid peroxidation of metalexposed sperm was investigated in the presence of different concentrations of five kinds of flavonoids. Malondialdehyde (MDA) production was assessed as a lipid peroxidation marker. Aluminum chloride (AlCl3), cadmium chloride (CdCl2), and lead chloride (PbCl4) diminished sperm motility. Treatment of metal-exposed sperm with rutin, naringin, and kaempferol attenuated the negative effects of the metals on sperm motility. Quercetin and catechin decreased the motility of metal-exposed sperm. Based on the MDA production results, only AlCl3 significantly induced lipid peroxidation. Treatment with rutin, naringin, and kaempferol significantly decreased MDA production.

  16. Human Sperm Quality and Metal Toxicants: Protective Effects of some Flavonoids on Male Reproductive Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalan, Mostafa; Ghaffari, Mohammad Ali; Hoseinzadeh, Pooneh; Hashemitabar, Mahmoud; Zeinali, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background Metals can cause male infertility through affection of spermatogenesis and sperm quality. Strong evidences confirm that male infertility in metal-exposed humans is mediated via various mechanisms such as production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Flavonoids have antioxidant and metal chelating properties which make them suitable candidates for neutralizing adverse effects of metals on semen quality. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of five types of flavonoids (rutin, naringin, kaempferol, quercetin, and catechin) on recovery of sperm motility and prevention of membrane oxidative damage from aluminum chloride (AlCl3), cadmium chloride (CdCl2), and lead chloride (PbCl4). Materials and Methods In this experimental study, motility and lipid peroxidation of metalexposed sperm was investigated in the presence of different concentrations of five kinds of flavonoids. Malondialdehyde (MDA) production was assessed as a lipid peroxidation marker. Results Aluminum chloride (AlCl3), cadmium chloride (CdCl2), and lead chloride (PbCl4) diminished sperm motility. Treatment of metal-exposed sperm with rutin, naringin, and kaempferol attenuated the negative effects of the metals on sperm motility. Quercetin and catechin decreased the motility of metal-exposed sperm. Conclusion Based on the MDA production results, only AlCl3 significantly induced lipid peroxidation. Treatment with rutin, naringin, and kaempferol significantly decreased MDA production. PMID:27441055

  17. Comparison of three different techniques of human sperm DNA isolation for methylation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hong-fang; Kuete, Martin; Su, Li; Yang, Fan; Hu, Zhi-yong; Tian, Bo-zhen; Zhang, Hui-ping; Zhao, Kai

    2015-12-01

    Human sperm DNA is an important genetic and epigenetic material, whose chromatin structure differs from that of somatic cells. As such, conventional methods for DNA extraction of somatic cells may not be suitable for obtaining sperm DNA. In this study, we evaluated and compared three sperm DNA extraction techniques, namely, modified guanidinium thiocyanate method (method A), traditional phenol-chloroform method (method B), and TianGen kit method (method C). Spectrophotometry and agarose gel electrophoresis analyses showed that method A produced DNA with higher quantity and purity than those of methods B and C (Psperm DNA methylation assay further indicated that methods A and B were effective, and the former yielded higher quantitative accuracy. In conclusion, the modified guanidinium thiocyanate method provided high quality and reliable results and could be an optimal technique for extracting sperm DNA for methylation assay.

  18. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is present in human spermatozoa and is related with sperm motility. The use of recombinant FGF2 to improve motile sperm recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino Azúa, D J; Saucedo, L; Giordana, S; Magri, M L; Buffone, M G; Neuspiller, F; Vazquez-Levin, M H; Marín-Briggiler, C I

    2017-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) regulate several functions of somatic cells. In a previous work, we reported FGFR expression in human spermatozoa and their involvement in motility. This study aimed to evaluate the presence and localization of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) in human spermatozoa, to determine the relationship of FGF2 levels with conventional semen parameters and to assess the effect of recombinant FGF2 (rFGF2) on sperm recovery in a selection procedure. Western immunoblotting analysis using an antibody against FGF2 revealed an 18-kDa band in sperm protein extracts. The protein was immunolocalized in the sperm flagellum and acrosomal region, as well as in all germ cells. Sperm FGF2 levels, assessed by flow cytometry, showed a positive (p recoveries, and increased (p recovery in selection techniques. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  19. Concentration-dependent Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) effects on ROS production, energy status, and human sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Maria Inês; Amaral, Sandra; Tavares, Renata Santos; Paiva, Carla; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2014-04-01

    Literature regarding the effects of sildenafil citrate on sperm function remains controversial. In the present study, we specifically wanted to determine if mitochondrial dysfunction, namely membrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, and changes in energy content, are involved in in vitro sildenafil-induced alterations of human sperm function. Sperm samples of healthy men were incubated in the presence of 0.03, 0.3, and 3 μM sildenafil citrate in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-based medium for 2, 3, 12, and 24 hours. Sperm motility and viability were evaluated and mitochondrial function, i.e., mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial superoxide production were assessed using flow-cytometry. Additionally, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Results show a decrease in sperm motility correlated with the level of mitochondria-generated superoxide, without a visible effect on mitochondrial membrane potential or viability upon exposure to sildenafil. The effect on both motility and superoxide production was higher for the intermediate concentration of sildenafil (0.3 µM) indicating that the in vitro effects of sildenafil on human sperm do not vary linearly with drug concentration. Adenosine triphosphate levels also decreased following sildenafil exposure, but this decrease was only detected after a decrease in motility was already evident. These results suggest that along with the level of ATP and mitochondrial function other factors are involved in the early sildenafil-mediated decline in sperm motility. However, the further decrease in ATP levels and increase in mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species after 24 hours of exposure might further contribute towards declining sperm motility.

  20. INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN THE FREQUENCY OF SPERM ANEUPLOIDY IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To examine interindividual differences in sperm chromosome aneuploidy, repeated semen specimens were obtained from a group of ten healthy men, aged 20-21 at the start of the study, and analyzed by multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis to determine the fre...

  1. Identification of putative drug targets for human sperm-egg interaction defect using protein network approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabetian, Soudabeh; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir

    2015-07-18

    Sperm-egg interaction defect is a significant cause of in-vitro fertilization failure for infertile cases. Numerous molecular interactions in the form of protein-protein interactions mediate the sperm-egg membrane interaction process. Recent studies have demonstrated that in addition to experimental techniques, computational methods, namely protein interaction network approach, can address protein-protein interactions between human sperm and egg. Up to now, no drugs have been detected to treat sperm-egg interaction disorder, and the initial step in drug discovery research is finding out essential proteins or drug targets for a biological process. The main purpose of this study is to identify putative drug targets for human sperm-egg interaction deficiency and consider if the detected essential proteins are targets for any known drugs using protein-protein interaction network and ingenuity pathway analysis. We have created human sperm-egg protein interaction networks with high confidence, including 106 nodes and 415 interactions. Through topological analysis of the network with calculation of some metrics, such as connectivity and betweenness centrality, we have identified 13 essential proteins as putative drug targets. The potential drug targets are from integrins, fibronectins, epidermal growth factor receptors, collagens and tetraspanins protein families. We evaluated these targets by ingenuity pathway analysis, and the known drugs for the targets have been detected, and the possible effective role of the drugs on sperm-egg interaction defect has been considered. These results showed that the drugs ocriplasmin (Jetrea©), gefitinib (Iressa©), erlotinib hydrochloride (Tarceva©), clingitide, cetuximab (Erbitux©) and panitumumab (Vectibix©) are possible candidates for efficacy testing for the treatment of sperm-egg interaction deficiency. Further experimental validation can be carried out to confirm these results. We have identified the first potential list of

  2. HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN AND PROLACTIN INDUCIBLE PROTEIN COMPLEX ENHANCES SPERM CAPACITATION IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Tomar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Prolactin inducible protein (PIP is a 17 kDa protein expressed in human body fluids. It interacts with several other proteins including fibrinogen, IgG, actin, CD4, ZAG, etc. and their association contributes to multifaceted molecular functions of PIP in diverse classes of biological processes. The roles of PIP are reported in immunoregulation, tumor progression, apoptosis and fertility. Recently, PIP was purified in complex with human serum albumin (HSA from human semen. Here, we have reported comparative expression analysis of this complex in human seminal plasma samples of various categories of infertility conditions (oligozoospermia, azoospermia and asthenozoospermia and fertile controls (normozoospermia. We have also evaluated sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction in presence of varying concentrations of this complex. Comparative expression analysis was performed under same experimental conditions by co-immunoprecipitation followed by western blot analysis and results highlighted that HSA-PIP complex is down-regulated in azoospermia as depicted by the intensity of protein bands on the blot. Assessment of sperm functions in presence or absence of this complex revealed that this complex acts as an inducer of in vitro sperm capacitation. It was observed that 87% sperm were capacitated after 4h incubation with HSA-PIP complex (100 µg/mL in comparison to 60.33% in +ve control. On the basis of our findings, we conclude that this complex might be a positive regulator of sperm motility and capacitation in vivo.

  3. Sex hormone receptors are present in the human suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijver, Frank P M; Swaab, Dick F

    2002-05-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the clock of the brain that orchestrates circadian and circannual biological rhythms, such as the rhythms of hormones, body temperature, sleep and mood. These rhythms are frequently disturbed in menopause and even more so in dementia and can be restored in postmenopausal women by sex hormone replacement therapy (SHRT). Although it seems clear, both from clinical and experimental studies, that sex hormones influence circadian rhythms, it is not known whether this is by a direct or an indirect effect on the SCN. Therefore, using immunocytochemistry in the present study, we investigated whether the human SCN expresses sex hormone receptors in 5 premenopausal women and 5 young men. SCN neurons appeared to contain estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha), estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) and progesterone receptors. Median ratings of ER immunoreactivity per individual and per gender group revealed a statistically significantly stronger nuclear ERalpha expression pattern in female SCN neurons (p sexual dimorphic tendency was observed for nuclear ERbeta (p > 0.1) and progesterone receptors (p > 0.7). These data seem to support previously reported functional and structural SCN differences in relation to sex and sexual orientation and indicate for the first time that estrogen and progesterone may act directly on neurons of the human biological clock. In addition, the present findings provide a potential neuroendocrine mechanism by which SHRT can act to improve or restore SCN-related rhythm disturbances, such as body temperature, sleep and mood. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Human sperm immobilization effect of Carica papaya seed extracts: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohiya, N K; Kothari, L K; Manivannan, B; Mishra, P K; Pathak, N

    2000-06-01

    To examine if the seed extracts of Carica papaya, which showed antispermatogenic/sperm immobilization properties in animal models, could cause human sperm immobilization in vitro. Chloroform extract, benzene chromatographic fraction of the chloroform extract, its methanol and ethyl acetate sub-fractions and the isolated compounds from the sub-fractions i.e., ECP 1 & 2 and MCP 1 &2, of the seeds of Carica papaya were used at concentrations of 0.1%, 0.5%, 1% and 2%. Sperm motility was assessed immediately after addition of extracts and every 5 minutes thereafter for 30 minutes. There were dose-dependent spermicidal effects showing an instant fall in the sperm motility to less than 20% at 2% concentration. Isolated compounds ECP 1 & 2 were more effective inducing a motility of less than 10%. Many of the spermatozoa became vibratory on the spot. Total inhibition of motility was observed within 20-25 min at all concentrations of all products. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed deleterious changes in the plasma membrane of the head and mid-piece of spermatozoa. Sperm viability test and the number of abnormal spermatozoa after completion of incubation suggested that the spermatozoa were infertile. The effects were spermicidal but not spermiostatic as revealed by the sperm revival test. The results reveal spermicidal activity in vitro of the seed extracts of Carica papaya.

  5. Involvement of mitochondrial activity in mediating ELF-EMF stimulatory effect on human sperm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Roberto; Delle Monache, Simona; Bennato, Francesca; Di Bartolomeo, Claudia; Scrimaglio, Renato; Cinque, Benedetta; Colonna, Rosella Cardigno

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been reported that the exposure of human spermatozoa to an extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic field (EMF) with a square waveform of 5 mT amplitude and frequency of 50 Hz improves sperm motility. The functional relationship between the energy metabolism and the enhancement of human sperm motility induced by ELF-EMF was investigated. Sperm exposure to ELF-EMF resulted in a progressive and significant increase of mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of ATP, ADP and NAD(+) that was associated with a progressive and significant increase in the sperm kinematic parameters. No significant effects were detected on other parameters such as ATP/ADP ratio and energy charge. When carbamoyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CICCP) was applied to inhibit the oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria, the values of energy parameters and motility in the sperm incubated in the presence of glucose and exposed to ELF-EMF did not change, thus indicating that the glycolysis was not involved in mediating ELF-EMF stimulatory effect on motility. By contrast, when pyruvate and lactate were provided instead of glucose, the energy status and motility increased significantly in ELF-EMF-treated sperm. Under these culture conditions, the inhibition of glycolitic metabolism by 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DOG) again resulted in increased values of energy and kinematic parameters, indicating that gluconeogenesis was not involved in producing glucose for use in glycolysis. We concluded that the key role in mediating the stimulatory effects exerted by ELF-EMF on human sperm motility is played by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation rather than glycolysis. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Role of C-type natriuretic peptide in the function of normal human sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP is a newly discovered type of local regulatory factor that mediates its biological effects through the specific, membrane-bound natriuretic peptide receptor-B (NPR-B. Recent studies have established that CNP is closely related to male reproductive function. The aims of this study were to determine the distribution of CNP/NPR-B in human ejaculated spermatozoa through different methods (such as immunolocalization, real time polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot, and then to evaluate the influence of CNP on sperm function i n vitro, such as motility and acrosome reaction. Human semen samples were collected from consenting donors who met the criteria of the World Health Organization for normozoospermia. Our results show that the specific receptor NPR-B of CNP is localized in the acrosomal region of the head and the membrane of the front-end tail of the sperm, and there is no signal of CNP in human sperm. Compared with the control, CNP can induce a significant dose-dependent increase in spermatozoa motility and acrosome reaction. In summary, CNP/NPR-B can affect sperm motility and acrosome reaction, thus regulating the reproductive function of males. CNP may be a new key factor in regulating sperm function.

  7. Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and 4 on human sperm recognize bacterial endotoxins and mediate apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Youko; Mihara, Toshihiro; Okazaki, Tetsuji; Shitanaka, Manami; Kushino, Rena; Ikeda, Chiaki; Negishi, Hiroaki; Liu, Zhilin; Richards, JoAnne S; Shimada, Masayuki

    2011-10-01

    Bacterial infections of the genital tract are one of the most serious causes of infertility in males. In some human patients with poor semen quality, leukocytospermia has been observed. Because leukocytes express the bacterial-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responsive Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling cascade and secrete tumor necrosis factor-α, secreted cytokines comprise one, but probably not the only, class of factors that can impact sperm motility. In this study, we documented that bacterial endotoxins, LPS and peptidoglycan, can be detected in human semen. Furthermore, the addition of endotoxins in the absence of leukocytes directly and significantly reduced the motility and increased the apoptotic rate of both human and mouse sperm and suppressed fertilization by mouse sperm both in vivo and in vitro. The well-known LPS receptor, TLR4, and peptidoglycan receptor, TLR2, were expressed in human and mouse sperm. In Tlr2/4(-/-) double-mutant mice, the negative effects of endotoxins on sperm functions were blocked, suggesting that the bacterial endotoxins mediated activation of TLR-dependent pathways in sperm leading to apoptosis. Sperm can recognize bacterial endotoxins by TLRs present in their membranes. The activated TLRs reduce sperm motility, induce sperm apoptosis and significantly impair the potential for fertilization.

  8. Cross-species fertilization: the hamster egg receptor, Juno, binds the human sperm ligand, Izumo1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Enrica; Wright, Gavin J

    2015-02-05

    Fertilization is the culminating event in sexual reproduction and requires the recognition and fusion of the haploid sperm and egg to form a new diploid organism. Specificity in these recognition events is one reason why sperm and eggs from different species are not normally compatible. One notable exception is the unusual ability of zona-free eggs from the Syrian golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) to recognize and fuse with human sperm, a phenomenon that has been exploited to assess sperm quality in assisted fertility treatments. Following our recent finding that the interaction between the sperm and egg recognition receptors Izumo1 and Juno is essential for fertilization, we now demonstrate concordance between the ability of Izumo1 and Juno from different species to interact, and the ability of their isolated gametes to cross-fertilize each other in vitro. In particular, we show that Juno from the golden hamster can directly interact with human Izumo1. These data suggest that the interaction between Izumo1 and Juno plays an important role in cross-species gamete recognition, and may inform the development of improved prognostic tests that do not require the use of animals to guide the most appropriate fertility treatment for infertile couples.

  9. HT-COMET: a novel automated approach for high throughput assessment of human sperm chromatin quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Océane; Reintsch, Wolfgang E; Chan, Peter; Robaire, Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Can we make the comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis) for human sperm a more accurate and informative high throughput assay? We developed a standardized automated high throughput comet (HT-COMET) assay for human sperm that improves its accuracy and efficiency, and could be of prognostic value to patients in the fertility clinic. The comet assay involves the collection of data on sperm DNA damage at the level of the single cell, allowing the use of samples from severe oligozoospermic patients. However, this makes comet scoring a low throughput procedure that renders large cohort analyses tedious. Furthermore, the comet assay comes with an inherent vulnerability to variability. Our objective is to develop an automated high throughput comet assay for human sperm that will increase both its accuracy and efficiency. The study comprised two distinct components: a HT-COMET technical optimization section based on control versus DNAse treatment analyses ( ITALIC! n = 3-5), and a cross-sectional study on 123 men presenting to a reproductive center with sperm concentrations categorized as severe oligozoospermia, oligozoospermia or normozoospermia. Sperm chromatin quality was measured using the comet assay: on classic 2-well slides for software comparison; on 96-well slides for HT-COMET optimization; after exposure to various concentrations of a damage-inducing agent, DNAse, using HT-COMET; on 123 subjects with different sperm concentrations using HT-COMET. Data from the 123 subjects were correlated to classic semen quality parameters and plotted as single-cell data in individual DNA damage profiles. We have developed a standard automated HT-COMET procedure for human sperm. It includes automated scoring of comets by a fully integrated high content screening setup that compares well with the most commonly used semi-manual analysis software. Using this method, a cross-sectional study on 123 men showed no significant correlation between sperm concentration and sperm DNA

  10. The effect of environmental exposure to pyrethroids and DNA damage in human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurewicz, Joanna; Radwan, Michał; Wielgomas, Bartosz; Sobala, Wojciech; Piskunowicz, Marta; Radwan, Paweł; Bochenek, Michał; Hanke, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether environmental exposure to pyrethroids was associated with sperm DNA damage. Between January 2008 and April 2011 286 men under 45 years of age with a normal sperm concentration of 15-300 10(6)/ml [WHO 2010] were recruited from an infertility clinic in Lodz, Poland. Participants were interviewed and provided urine, saliva, and semen samples. The pyrethroids metabolites: 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA), cis-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (CDCCA), trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (TDCCA), and cis-2,2-dibromovinyl-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-carboxylic acid (DBCA) were analyzed in the urine using a validated gas chromatography ion-tap mass spectrometry method. Sperm DNA damage was assessed using a flow cytometry based on sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). A positive association was observed between CDCCA >50th percentile and the percentage of medium DNA fragmentation index (M DFI) and percentage of immature sperms (HDS) (p = 0.04, p = 0.04 respectively). The level of 3PBA >50th percentile in urine was positively related to the percentage of high DNA fragmentation index (H DFI) (p = 0.03). The TDCCA, DBCA levels, and the sum of pyrethroid metabolites were not associated with any sperm DNA damage measures. Our results suggest that environmental pyrethroid exposure may affect sperm DNA damage measures index indicated the reproductive effects of pyrethroid exposure on adult men. In view of the importance of human reproductive health and the widespread usage of pyrethroids, it is important to further investigate these correlations.

  11. Choline dehydrogenase polymorphism rs12676 is a functional variation and is associated with changes in human sperm cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R Johnson

    Full Text Available Approximately 15% of couples are affected by infertility and up to half of these cases arise from male factor infertility. Unidentified genetic aberrations such as chromosomal deletions, translocations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs may be the underlying cause of many cases of idiopathic male infertility. Deletion of the choline dehydrogenase (Chdh gene in mice results in decreased male fertility due to diminished sperm motility; sperm from Chdh(-/- males have decreased ATP concentrations likely stemming from abnormal sperm mitochondrial morphology and function in these cells. Several SNPs have been identified in the human CHDH gene that may result in altered CHDH enzymatic activity. rs12676 (G233T, a non-synonymous SNP located in the CHDH coding region, is associated with increased susceptibility to dietary choline deficiency and risk of breast cancer. We now report evidence that this SNP is also associated with altered sperm motility patterns and dysmorphic mitochondrial structure in sperm. Sperm produced by men who are GT or TT for rs12676 have 40% and 73% lower ATP concentrations, respectively, in their sperm. rs12676 is associated with decreased CHDH protein in sperm and hepatocytes. A second SNP located in the coding region of IL17BR, rs1025689, is linked to altered sperm motility characteristics and changes in choline metabolite concentrations in sperm.

  12. The mouse gamete adhesin, SED1, is expressed on the surface of acrosome-intact human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copland, Susannah D; Murphy, Ana A; Shur, Barry D

    2009-12-01

    To determine whether SED1, a protein secreted by the mouse epididymis that coats sperm and participates in sperm adhesion to the zona pellucida, is present on human sperm and in human epididymal tissue. SED1 expression was analyzed by immunoblot and indirect immunofluorescence assays. Academic clinical and research laboratories. Human breast milk was donated. Unused semen was donated by men presenting for semen analysis or in vitro fertilization (IVF). Cadaveric epididymal tissue was obtained from the institutional body donor program. Human milk fat globule membranes and human seminal plasma proteins were analyzed by immunoblot. Human sperm and epididymis were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Acrosomal status was determined by staining with fluorescein isothiocyanate-Pisum sativum agglutinin. Immunoblot and indirect immunofluorescence assays. Human SED1 is recognized by two different polyclonal anti-SED1 antisera. SED1 is localized to the plasma membrane of human sperm overlying the intact acrosome. In acrosome-reacted sperm, SED1 is localized to the equatorial segment. SED1 is expressed by the epithelium of the anterior caput epididymis. SED1 is expressed on the surface of acrosome-intact human sperm and in the anterior caput of the human epididymis, similar to that seen in mouse.

  13. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories in the Human Interphase Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractDespite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its three-dimensional structure is widely unknown. The regulation of genes has been shown to be connected closely to the three-dimensional organization of the genome in the cell nucleus. The nucleus of the cell has for a long

  14. HT-COMET: a novel automated approach for high throughput assessment of human sperm chromatin quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Océane; Reintsch, Wolfgang E.; Chan, Peter; Robaire, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can we make the comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis) for human sperm a more accurate and informative high throughput assay? SUMMARY ANSWER We developed a standardized automated high throughput comet (HT-COMET) assay for human sperm that improves its accuracy and efficiency, and could be of prognostic value to patients in the fertility clinic. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The comet assay involves the collection of data on sperm DNA damage at the level of the single cell, allowing the use of samples from severe oligozoospermic patients. However, this makes comet scoring a low throughput procedure that renders large cohort analyses tedious. Furthermore, the comet assay comes with an inherent vulnerability to variability. Our objective is to develop an automated high throughput comet assay for human sperm that will increase both its accuracy and efficiency. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The study comprised two distinct components: a HT-COMET technical optimization section based on control versus DNAse treatment analyses (n = 3–5), and a cross-sectional study on 123 men presenting to a reproductive center with sperm concentrations categorized as severe oligozoospermia, oligozoospermia or normozoospermia. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Sperm chromatin quality was measured using the comet assay: on classic 2-well slides for software comparison; on 96-well slides for HT-COMET optimization; after exposure to various concentrations of a damage-inducing agent, DNAse, using HT-COMET; on 123 subjects with different sperm concentrations using HT-COMET. Data from the 123 subjects were correlated to classic semen quality parameters and plotted as single-cell data in individual DNA damage profiles. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE We have developed a standard automated HT-COMET procedure for human sperm. It includes automated scoring of comets by a fully integrated high content screening setup that compares well with the most commonly used semi

  15. Processing of emotional information in the human subthalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buot, Anne; Welter, Marie-Laure; Karachi, Carine; Pochon, Jean-Baptiste; Bardinet, Eric; Yelnik, Jérôme; Mallet, Luc

    2013-12-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an efficient target for treating patients with Parkinson's disease as well as patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) using high frequency stimulation (HFS). In both Parkinson's disease and OCD patients, STN-HFS can trigger abnormal behaviours, such as hypomania and impulsivity. To investigate if this structure processes emotional information, and whether it depends on motor demands, we recorded subthalamic local field potentials in 16 patients with Parkinson's disease using deep brain stimulation electrodes. Recordings were made with and without dopaminergic treatment while patients performed an emotional categorisation paradigm in which the response varied according to stimulus valence (pleasant, unpleasant and neutral) and to the instruction given (motor, non-motor and passive). Pleasant, unpleasant and neutral stimuli evoked an event related potential (ERP). Without dopamine medication, ERP amplitudes were significantly larger for unpleasant compared with neutral pictures, whatever the response triggered by the stimuli; and the magnitude of this effect was maximal in the ventral part of the STN. No significant difference in ERP amplitude was observed for pleasant pictures. With dopamine medication, ERP amplitudes were significantly increased for pleasant compared with neutral pictures whatever the response triggered by the stimuli, while ERP amplitudes to unpleasant pictures were not modified. These results demonstrate that the ventral part of the STN processes the emotional valence of stimuli independently of the motor context and that dopamine enhances processing of pleasant information. These findings confirm the specific involvement of the STN in emotional processes in human, which may underlie the behavioural changes observed in patients with deep brain stimulation.

  16. Delineation of motoneuron subgroups supplying individual eye muscles in the human oculomotor nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Che Ngwa, Emmanuel; Zeeh, Christina; Messoudi, Ahmed; Büttner-Ennever, Jean A.; Horn, Anja K. E.

    2014-01-01

    The oculomotor nucleus (nIII) contains the motoneurons of medial, inferior, and superior recti (MR, IR, and SR), inferior oblique (IO), and levator palpebrae (LP) muscles. The delineation of motoneuron subgroups for each muscle is well-known in monkey, but not in human. We studied the transmitter inputs to human nIII and the trochlear nucleus (nIV), which innervates the superior oblique muscle (SO), to outline individual motoneuron subgroups. Parallel series of sections from human brainstems ...

  17. Delineation of motoneuron subgroups supplying individual eye muscles in the human oculomotor nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel eChe-Ngwa; Christina eZeeh; Christina eZeeh; Ahmed eMessoudi; Jean Alice Büttner-Ennever; Anja Kerstin Ellen Horn; Anja Kerstin Ellen Horn

    2014-01-01

    The oculomotor nucleus (nIII) contains the motoneurons of medial, inferior and superior recti (MR, IR, SR), inferior oblique (IO) and levator palpebrae (LP) muscles. The delineation of motoneuron subgroups for each muscle is well-known in monkey, but not in human. We studied the transmitter inputs to human nIII and the trochlear nucleus (nIV), which innervates the superior oblique muscle (SO), to outline individual motoneuron subgroups. Parallel series of sections from human brainstems were i...

  18. [The establishment and application of network human sperm bank management information system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Wenhong; Hu, Ronggui; Jiang, Hong

    2004-01-01

    To build network human sperm bank management information system. The system was developed with SQL Server 2000 and Power Builders 8.0. The system consisted of 4 modules: file management, physical check-up and laboratory examination management, sperm examination and freezing management, supply and follows-up management. The system worked by long-distance transmission and real time supervision. The system possesses the advantages of huge information content, great safety and high confidentiality, as well as the functions of long-distance transmission and real time supervision.

  19. Human Sperm Cryopreservation: Update on Techniques, Effect on DNA Integrity, and Implications for ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlea Di Santo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryopreservation of human spermatozoa—introduced in the 1960's—has been recognized as an efficient procedure for management of male fertility before therapy for malignant diseases, vasectomy or surgical infertility treatments, to store donor and partner spermatozoa before assisted reproduction treatments and to ensure the recovery of a small number of spermatozoa in severe male factor infertility. Despite the usefulness of it, cryopreservation may lead to deleterious changes of sperm structure and function: while the effects of cryopreservation on cells are well documented, to date there is no agreement in the literature on whether or not cryopreservation affects sperm chromatin integrity or on the use of a unique and functional protocol for the freezing-thawing procedure. Therefore, sperm cryopreservation is an important component of fertility management and much of its successful application seems to affect the reproductive outcome of assisted reproduction technologies (ART: appropriate use of cryoprotectants before and sperm selection technologies after cryopreservation seem to have the greatest impact on preventing DNA fragmentation, thus improving sperm cryosurvival rates.

  20. Linear increase of structural and numerical chromosome 9 abnormalities in human sperm regarding age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Mercè; Rajmil, Osvaldo; Egozcue, Josep; Templado, Cristina

    2003-10-01

    A simultaneous four-colour fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) assay was used in human sperm in order to search for a paternal age effect on: (1) the incidence of structural aberrations and aneuploidy of chromosome 9, and (2) the sex ratio in both normal spermatozoa and spermatozoa with a numerical or structural abnormality of chromosome 9. The sperm samples were collected from 18 healthy donors, aged 24-74 years (mean 48.8 years old). Specific probes for the subtelomeric 9q region (9qter), centromeric regions of chromosomes 6 and 9, and the satellite III region of the Y chromosome were used for FISH analysis. A total of 190,117 sperms were evaluated with a minimum of 10,000 sperm scored from each donor. A significant linear increase in the overall level of duplications and deletions for the centromeric and subtelomeric regions of chromosome 9 (Pchromosome 9 disomy (Pchromosome 9 disomy, 18.8% for diploidy, and ranged from 14.6 to 28% for structural aberrations. Our results indicate a linear increase in structural aberrations and disomy for chromosome 9 in sperm with respect to age.

  1. Perfringolysin O as a useful tool to study human sperm physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocognoni, Cristián A; De Blas, Gerardo A; Heuck, Alejandro P; Belmonte, Silvia A; Mayorga, Luis S

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate perfringolysin O, a cholesterol-dependent pore-forming cytolysin, as a tool to study several aspects of human sperm physiology. Prospective study. Basic research laboratory. Human semen samples with normal parameters obtained from healthy donors. Interaction of recombinant perfringolysin O with human spermatozoa. Assessment of perfringolysin O binding to spermatozoa, tests for acrosome and plasma membrane integrity, and acrosomal exocytosis assays. Perfringolysin O associated with human spermatozoa at 4°C. The binding was sensitive to changes in cholesterol concentrations and distribution occurring in the plasma membrane of these cells during capacitation. When perfringolysin O-treated sperm were incubated at 37°C, the plasma membrane became permeable, whereas the acrosome membrane remained intact. Permeabilized spermatozoa were able to respond to exocytic stimuli. The process was inhibited by proteins that interfere with membrane fusion, indicating that large molecules, including antibodies, were able to permeate into the spermatozoa. PFO is a useful probe to assess changes in the amount and distribution of the active sterol fraction present in the sperm plasma membrane. The toxin can be used for the efficient and selective permeabilization of this membrane, rendering a flexible experimental model suitable for studying molecular processes occurring in the sperm cytoplasm. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection: state of the art in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Neill, C L; Chow, S; Cheung, S; Parrella, A; Pereira, N; Rosenwaks, Z

    2017-01-01

    Among infertile couples, 25% involve both male and female factors, while male factor alone accounts for another 25% due to oligo-, astheno-, teratozoospermia, a combination of the three, or even a complete absence of sperm cells in the ejaculate and can lead to a poor prognosis even with the help of assisted reproductive technology (ART). Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has been with us now for a quarter of a century and in spite of the controversy generated since its inception, it remains in the forefront of the techniques utilized in ART. The development of ICSI in 1992 has drastically decreased the impact of male factor, resulting in millions of pregnancies worldwide for couples who, without ICSI, would have had little chance of having their own biological child. This review focuses on the state of the art of ICSI regarding utility of bioassays that evaluate male factor infertility beyond the standard semen analysis and describes the current application and advances in regard to ICSI, particularly the genetic and epigenetic characteristics of spermatozoa and their impact on reproductive outcome. PMID:29158352

  3. Human Sperm Interaction with Staphylococcus aureus: A Molecular Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm immobilization factor (SIF causing 100% immobilization of spermatozoa isolated from Staphylococcus aureus when characterized using LC-MS (Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that this 20 kDa protein had peptide sequence similarity with hsp-70 protein. It was found to completely (100% inhibit Mg++ ATPase activity of spermatozoa at concentration of 100 μg mL−1. Sperm samples treated with SIF also showed reduction in calcium ionophore-induced acrosome reaction as compared to control samples (treated with calcium ionophore alone. Binding studies of FITC labelled SIF with spermatozoa using fluorescent microscopy showed binding of SIF to the surface of spermatozoa indicating the presence of SIF binding receptor. The receptor was extracted by 3M NaCl and purified by gel permeation chromatography. Characterization of the receptor by MALDI-TOF (Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight indicated that the receptor shared sequence similarity with MHC class II antigen. A calorimetric study showed that the receptor moiety on spermatozoa was specific for the purified ligand as binding of the receptor to ligand was enthalpically (−11.9 kJ mole−1 as well as entropically (21.53 J mole−1 K−1 favored resulting in the Gibb's free energy of −18.57 kJ mole−1.

  4. Investigation of the mechanisms by which the molecular chaperone HSPA2 regulates the expression of sperm surface receptors involved in human sperm-oocyte recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redgrove, Kate A; Anderson, Amanda L; McLaughlin, Eileen A; O'Bryan, Moira K; Aitken, R John; Nixon, Brett

    2013-03-01

    A unique characteristic of mammalian spermatozoa is that, upon ejaculation, they are unable to recognize and bind to an ovulated oocyte. These functional attributes are only realized following the cells' ascent of the female reproductive tract whereupon they undergo a myriad of biochemical and biophysical changes collectively referred to as 'capacitation'. We have previously shown that this functional transformation is, in part, engineered by the modification of the sperm surface architecture leading to the assembly and/or presentation of multimeric sperm-oocyte receptor complexes. In this study, we have extended our findings through the characterization of one such complex containing arylsulfatase A (ARSA), sperm adhesion molecule 1 (SPAM1) and the molecular chaperone, heat shock 70kDa protein 2 (HSPA2). Through the application of flow cytometry we revealed that this complex undergoes a capacitation-associated translocation to facilitate the repositioning of ARSA to the apical region of the human sperm head, a location compatible with a role in the mediation of sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) interactions. Conversely, SPAM1 appears to reorient away from the sperm surface, possibly reflecting its primary role in cumulus matrix dispersal preceding sperm-ZP recognition. The dramatic relocation of the complex was completely abolished by incubation of capacitating spermatozoa in exogenous cholesterol or broad spectrum protein kinase A (PKA) and tyrosine kinase inhibitors suggesting that it may be driven by alterations in membrane fluidity characteristics and concurrently by the activation of a capacitation-associated signal transduction pathway. Collectively these data afford novel insights into the sub-cellular localization and potential functions of multimeric protein complexes in human spermatozoa.

  5. Human sperm antigens and antisperm antibodies I. Studies on vasectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, K S

    1975-01-01

    This study documents the types and incidence of antisperm antibody, detectable by indirect immunofluorescence, in 114 patients before vasectomy, 112 at 2 months and 71 patients at 6-9 months after vasectomy. Indirect immunofluorescence techniques revealed antibodies to seven distinct sperm antigens. Five of these antigens were readily accessible to antibody in vitro, and the remaining two were accessible only after treatment of spermatozoa with dithiothreitol and trypsin. Antisperm antibodies were detected in 61% of patients before vasectomy. The incidence rose to 77% at 2 months and 90% at 6-9 months after vasectomy. These antibodies were distinguishable into two groups based on their incidence before vasectomy. The first group included antibodies to antigens in the acrosome with a diffuse distribution, the equatorial region, the postacrosomal region and the midpiece of the tail. Its incidence was 61% before vasectomy; increased to 73% at 2 months and 80% at 6-9 months after vasectomy. The second group included antibodies to the sperm nucleus, the tail and to discrete antigens over the acrosome. They were found rarely (3%) in patients before vasectomy; increased in incidence to 25% at 2 months and 55% at 6-9 months after vasectomy. Antisperm antibodies of both groups existed as IgG and IgM classes; an exception being antibodies to sperm nucleus which were almost exclusively IgG. Of the antibodies, 14% were found to fix complement in vitro. Other autoantibodies, including antinuclear, antimitochondrial and antismooth muscle antibodies, did not develop following vasectomy. Images FIG. 1 PMID:1106922

  6. DNA flow cytometry of human spermatozoa: consistent stoichiometric staining of sperm DNA using a novel decondensation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Tamás; Békési, Gyöngyi; Fábián, Akos; Rákosy, Zsuzsa; Horváth, Gábor; Mátyus, László; Balázs, Margit; Jenei, Attila

    2008-10-01

    Rapid flow cytometric measurement of the frequency of aneuploid human sperms is in increasing demand but development of an exploitable method is hindered by difficulties of stoichiometric staining of sperm DNA. An aggressive decondensation protocol is needed after which cell integrity still remains intact. We used flow cytometry to examine the effect of lithium diiodosalicylate (LIS, chaotropic agent) on fluorescence intensity of propidium iodide-treated human spermatozoa from 10 normozoospermic men. When flow cytometric identification of diploid spermatozoa was achieved, validation was performed after sorting by three-color FISH. In contrast with the extremely variable histograms of nondecondensed sperms, consistent identification of haploid and diploid spermatozoa was possible if samples were decondensed with LIS prior to flow cytometry. A 76-fold enrichment of diploid sperms was observed in the sorted fractions by FISH. A significant correlation was found between the proportion of sorted cells and of diploid sperms by FISH. Application of LIS during the preparation of sperm for flow cytometry appears to ensure the stoichiometric staining of sperm DNA, making quantification of aneuploid sperm percentage possible. To our knowledge this is the first report in terms of separating spermatozoa with confirmedly abnormal chromosomal content. High correlation between the proportion of cells identified as having double DNA content by flow cytometry and diploid sperm by FISH allows rapid calculation of diploidy rate. Copyright 2008 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  7. Comparison of the external physical damages between laser-assisted and mechanical immobilized human sperm using scanning electronic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David Y L; Li, Tin Chiu

    2017-01-01

    We aim to visualize the external physical damages and distinct external phenotypic effects between mechanical and laser-assisted immobilized human spermatozoa using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Human spermatozoa were immobilized mechanically or with laser assistance for SEM examination and the membrane integrities were checked on both types of immobilized spermatozoa. We found evidence of external damages at SEM level on mechanically kinked sperm, but not on laser-assisted immobilized sperm. Although no external damage was found on laser-assist immobilized sperm, there were two distinct types of morphological changes when spermatozoa were stricken by infra-red laser. Coiled tails were immediately formed when Laser pulse was applied to the sperm end piece area, whereas laser applied to the sperm principal piece area resulted in a sharp bend of sperm tails. Sperm immobilized by laser did not exhibit any morphological change if the laser did not hit within the on-screen central target zone or if the laser hit the sperm mid piece or head. Our modified membrane integrity assay revealed that the external membrane of more than half of the laser-assisted immobilized sperm remained intact. In conclusion, mechanical immobilization produced membrane damages whilst laser-assisted immobilization did not result in any external membrane damages besides morphological changes at SEM level.

  8. Astaxanthin Improves Human Sperm Capacitation by Inducing Lyn Displacement and Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Andrisani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin (Asta, a photo-protective red pigment of the carotenoid family, is known for its multiple beneficial properties. In this study, the effects of Asta on isolated human sperm were evaluated. Capacitation involves a series of transformations to let sperm acquire the correct features for potential oocyte fertilization, including the generation of a controlled amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS, cholesterol depletion of the sperm outer membrane, and protein tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr-P process in the head region. Volunteers, with normal spermiogram values, were divided in two separate groups on the basis of their ability to generate the correct content of endogenous ROS. Both patient group (PG and control group (CG were analysed for Tyr-phosphorylation (Tyr-P pattern and percentages of acrosome-reacted cells (ARC and non-viable cells (NVC, in the presence or absence of Asta. In addition, the involvement of ROS on membrane reorganization and the presence of Lyn, a Src family kinase associated with lipid rafts, were investigated. Results show that Lyn is present in the membranes of human sperm, mainly confined in midpiece in resting conditions. Following capacitation, Lyn translocated to the head concomitantly with raft relocation, thus allowing the Tyr-P of head proteins. Asta succeeded to trigger Lyn translocation in PG sperm thus bypassing the impaired ROS-related mechanism for rafts and Lyn translocation. In this study, we showed an interdependence between ROS generation and lipid rafts and Lyn relocation leading the cells to undergo the successive acrosome reaction (AR. Asta, by ameliorating PG sperm functioning, may be utilised to decrease male idiopathic infertility.

  9. Astaxanthin Improves Human Sperm Capacitation by Inducing Lyn Displacement and Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrisani, Alessandra; Donà, Gabriella; Tibaldi, Elena; Brunati, Anna Maria; Sabbadin, Chiara; Armanini, Decio; Alvisi, Gualtiero; Gizzo, Salvatore; Ambrosini, Guido; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Bordin, Luciana

    2015-08-25

    Astaxanthin (Asta), a photo-protective red pigment of the carotenoid family, is known for its multiple beneficial properties. In this study, the effects of Asta on isolated human sperm were evaluated. Capacitation involves a series of transformations to let sperm acquire the correct features for potential oocyte fertilization, including the generation of a controlled amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), cholesterol depletion of the sperm outer membrane, and protein tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr-P) process in the head region. Volunteers, with normal spermiogram values, were divided in two separate groups on the basis of their ability to generate the correct content of endogenous ROS. Both patient group (PG) and control group (CG) were analysed for Tyr-phosphorylation (Tyr-P) pattern and percentages of acrosome-reacted cells (ARC) and non-viable cells (NVC), in the presence or absence of Asta. In addition, the involvement of ROS on membrane reorganization and the presence of Lyn, a Src family kinase associated with lipid rafts, were investigated. Results show that Lyn is present in the membranes of human sperm, mainly confined in midpiece in resting conditions. Following capacitation, Lyn translocated to the head concomitantly with raft relocation, thus allowing the Tyr-P of head proteins. Asta succeeded to trigger Lyn translocation in PG sperm thus bypassing the impaired ROS-related mechanism for rafts and Lyn translocation. In this study, we showed an interdependence between ROS generation and lipid rafts and Lyn relocation leading the cells to undergo the successive acrosome reaction (AR). Asta, by ameliorating PG sperm functioning, may be utilised to decrease male idiopathic infertility.

  10. PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70-KILODALTON HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    Science.gov (United States)

    THE PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70 kDa HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2* Gabor Huszar1, Kathryn Stone2, David Dix3 and Lynne Vigue11The Sperm Physiology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 W.M. Keck Foundatio...

  11. Sex hormone receptors are present in the human suprachiasmatic nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijver, Frank P. M.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2002-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the clock of the brain that orchestrates circadian and circannual biological rhythms, such as the rhythms of hormones, body temperature, sleep and mood. These rhythms are frequently disturbed in menopause and even more so in dementia and can be restored in

  12. Cortically evoked potentials in the human subthalamic nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwartjes - de Klerk, D.G.M; Janssen, M.L.F; Heida, Tjitske; van Kranen-Mastenbroek, V.; Bour, L.; Temel, Y.; Visser-Vandewalle, V.; Martens, H.C.F.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) alleviates motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. However, in a substantial number of patients the beneficial effects of STN DBS are overshadowed by psychiatric side effects. We hypothesize that stimulation of the STN motor

  13. Evaluation of Protamine Level in Human Sperm Samples Using Chromomycin A3 and Aniline Blue Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durdi Qujeq

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current microscopic experimental methods cannot diagnose DNA damages present in spermatozoa .Therefore, some methods are needed to address the abnormality of the genetic material status on the sperm samples. As reported by many investigators aniline blue staining technique has been used for identifying sperm chromatin condensation. Also, chromomycin A3 is used for evaluation of the degree of protamination of spermatozoa. This study aimed at evaluating these two different staining techniques on human sperm protamine status. Materials and Methods: Sperm samples were collected from 72 males [including 37 infertile men: (seven asetenotratospermic, two trato-espermic, and one azo-spermic and 35 healthy fertile men]   attending the research and clinical center for infertility affiliated with Babol University of Medical Sciences. Measurement of sperm motility, volume and density of semen samples were carried out in andrology laboratory. In estimation with light microscopy aniline blue tool, in each slide, blue stained were assumed as normal spermatozoa, but dark blue stained were regarded as abnormal spermatozoa. Bright yellow stained chromomycin-reacted spermatozoa (CMA3+ were observed under fluorescent microscope with 460 nm filter considered as normal and yellowish green were assumed as abnormal. Statistical analysis results were expressed as mean ± SD. Results: The rate of reacted spermatozoa to aniline blue in the infertile group was higher than that of the healthy control group 42.8% ±8.7 vs. 17.9% ±6.4. Also, the rate of reacted spermatozoa to CMA3 in infertile and normal group was [53.6 ± 8.7 and 24.7% ±5.1], respectively. Conclusion: Infertility status could be assessed by staining the spermatozoa via aniline blue and CMA3 techniques. Combination of these two staining methods had the best predictive values for semen analysis compared to using just one method. Our results showed that both CMA3 and AB staining methods were

  14. Evidence that anandamide-signaling regulates human sperm functions required for fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuel, Herbert; Burkman, Lani J; Lippes, Jack; Crickard, Kent; Mahony, Mary C; Giuffrida, Andrea; Picone, Robert P; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2002-11-01

    Ejaculated mammalian sperm require several hours exposure to secretions in female reproductive tracts, or incubation in appropriate culture medium in vitro, before acquiring the capacity to fertilize eggs. Arachidonylethanolamide (AEA), also known as anandamide, is a novel lipid-signal molecule that is an endogenous agonist (endocannabinoid) for cannabinoid receptors. We now report that AEA is present in human seminal plasma, mid-cycle oviductal fluid, and follicular fluid analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Sperm are sequentially exposed to these reproductive fluids as they move from the vagina to the site of fertilization in the oviduct. Specific binding of the potent cannabinoid agonist [(3)H]CP-55,940 to human sperm was saturable (K(D) 9.71 +/- 1.04 nM), suggesting that they express cannabinoid receptors. R-methanandamide [AM-356], a potent and metabolically stable AEA analog, and (-)delta(9) tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive constituent of Cannabis, modulated capacitation and fertilizing potential of human sperm in vitro. AM-356 elicited biphasic effects on the incidence of hyperactivated sperm motility (HA) between 1 and 6 hr of incubation: at (2.5 nM) it inhibited HA, while at (0.25 nM) it stimulated HA. Both AM-356 and THC inhibited morphological alterations over acrosomal caps between 2 and 6 hr (IC(50) 5.9 +/- 0.6 pM and 3.5 +/- 1.5 nM, respectively). Sperm fertilizing capacity, measured in the Hemizona Assay, was reduced 50% by (1 nM) AM-356. These findings suggest that AEA-signaling may regulate sperm functions required for fertilization in human reproductive tracts, and imply that smoking of marijuana could impact these processes. This study has potential medical and public policy ramifications because of the incidence of marijuana abuse by adults in our society, previously documented reproductive effects of marijuana, and the ongoing debate about medicinal use of marijuana and cannabinoids. Copyright

  15. An in vitro study of the effect of mifepristone and ulipristal acetate on human sperm functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, J K Y; Huang, V W; Li, R H W; Yeung, W S B; Ho, P C; Chiu, P C N

    2014-11-01

    Ulipristal acetate (UPA) and mifepristone are currently well-established agents for emergency contraception. Both drugs are selective progestogen receptor modulators which have been shown to have better efficacy than the widely used levonorgestrel in prevention of pregnancy. However, there is only limited information on the action of UPA on sperm function. The present study compared the in vitro biological effects of mifepristone and UPA on human sperm functions. Spermatozoa from semen samples with normal semen parameters were isolated. Capacitated spermatozoa were pre-incubated with 0.04, 0.4, 4 and 40 μM mifepristone or UPA for 1 h. Sperm motility, viability, DNA integrity, capacitation, spontaneous acrosome reaction, spontaneous hyperactivation, zona pellucida (ZP) binding capability and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) were determined. The effects of mifepristone and UPA on progesterone-induced acrosome reaction, hyperactivation and [Ca(2+)]i were also studied. Our results showed that mifepristone and UPA dose-dependently suppressed progesterone-induced acrosome reaction, hyperactivation and [Ca(2+)]i at concentrations ≥0.4 μM in human spermatozoa. Both compounds did not affect sperm motility, viability, DNA integrity, capacitation, spontaneous acrosome reaction, spontaneous hyperactivation, ZP binding capability and [Ca(2+)]i. This study demonstrated that UPA and mifepristone modulate human sperm functions by acting as progesterone antagonists. The results enable us to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms by which mifepristone and UPA work for emergency contraception, and provide a scientific basis for their clinical application. © 2014 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  16. The observed human sperm mutation frequency cannot explain the achondroplasia paternal age effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemann-Boege, Irene; Navidi, William; Grewal, Raji; Cohn, Dan; Eskenazi, Brenda; Wyrobek, Andrew J.; Arnheim, Norman

    2002-01-01

    The lifelong spermatogonial stem cell divisions unique to male germ cell production are thought to contribute to a higher mutation frequency in males. The fact that certain de novo human genetic conditions (e.g., achondroplasia) increase in incidence with the age of the father is consistent with this idea. Although it is assumed that the paternal age effect is the result of an increasing frequency of mutant sperm as a man grows older, no direct molecular measurement of the germ-line mutation frequency has been made to confirm this hypothesis. Using sperm DNA from donors of different ages, we determined the frequency of the nucleotide substitution in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene that causes achondroplasia. Surprisingly, the magnitude of the increase in mutation frequency with age appears insufficient to explain why older fathers have a greater chance of having a child with this condition. A number of alternatives may explain this discrepancy, including selection for sperm that carry the mutation or an age-dependent increase in premutagenic lesions that remain unrepaired in sperm and are inefficiently detected by the PCR assay. PMID:12397172

  17. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R; Peters, Antoine H F M; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. © 2016 Teperek et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Chromatin organization in sperm may be the major functional consequence of base composition variation in the human genome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vavouri, Tanya; Lehner, Ben

    2011-01-01

    .... It is not understood how this retention is specified. Here we show that base composition is the major determinant of nucleosome retention in human sperm, predicting retention very well in both genic and non-genic regions of the genome...

  19. Spontaneous fertility and in vitro fertilization outcome: new evidence of human papillomavirus sperm infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garolla, Andrea; Engl, Bruno; Pizzol, Damiano; Ghezzi, Marco; Bertoldo, Alessandro; Bottacin, Alberto; Noventa, Marco; Foresta, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the reproductive outcome of infertile couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques (ART) with or without human papillomavirus (HPV) semen infection. Cross-sectional clinical study. Units of andrology, reproductive medicine, and gynecology. A total of 226 infertile couples. Male partners were evaluated by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for HPV on semen. After a diagnostic period, female partners underwent intrauterine insemination (IUI) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Seminal parameters and FISH analysis for HPV in sperm head. Spontaneous or assisted pregnancies, live births, and miscarriages were recorded. Statistical analysis included unpaired Student t test and chi-square test. Fifty-four male partners (23.9%) had HPV semen infection confined to sperm, confined to exfoliated cells, or in both cells. During the diagnostic period, noninfected couples showed spontaneous pregnancies. IUI and ICSI treatments were performed in, respectively, 60 and 98 noninfected and in 21 and 33 infected couples, with 38.4% and 14.2% cumulative pregnancy rates, respectively. The follow-up of pregnancies showed a higher miscarriage rate in infected couples (62.5% vs. 16.7%). Ongoing pregnancies of the latter group were characterized by HPV infection confined to exfoliated cells. A reduction in natural and assisted cumulative pregnancy rate and an increase in miscarriage rate are related to the presence of HPV at sperm level. Although the exact mechanism by which sperm infection is able to impair fertility remains unclear, this aspect is worthy of further investigations. If confirmed, these results could change the clinical and diagnostic approach to infertile couples. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. EDC IMPACT: Reduced sperm counts in rats exposed to human relevant mixtures of endocrine disrupters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Axelstad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human semen quality is declining in many parts of the world, but the causes are ill defined. In rodents, impaired sperm production can be seen with early life exposure to certain endocrine-disrupting chemicals, but the effects of combined exposures are not properly investigated. In this study, we examined the effects of early exposure to the painkiller paracetamol and mixtures of human relevant endocrine-disrupting chemicals in rats. One mixture contained four estrogenic compounds; another contained eight anti-androgenic environmental chemicals and a third mixture contained estrogens, anti-androgens and paracetamol. All exposures were administered by oral gavage to time-mated Wistar dams rats (n = 16–20 throughout gestation and lactation. In the postnatal period, testicular histology was affected by the total mixture, and at the end of weaning, male testis weights were significantly increased by paracetamol and the high doses of the total and the anti-androgenic mixture, compared to controls. In all dose groups, epididymal sperm counts were reduced several months after end of exposure, i.e. at 10  months of age. Interestingly, the same pattern of effects was seen for paracetamol as for mixtures with diverse modes of action. Reduced sperm count was seen at a dose level reflecting human therapeutic exposure to paracetamol. Environmental chemical mixtures affected sperm count at the lowest mixture dose indicating an insufficient margin of safety for the most exposed humans. This causes concern for exposure of pregnant women to paracetamol as well as environmental endocrine disrupters.

  1. Human Sperm Quality and Metal Toxicants: Protective Effects of some Flavonoids on Male Reproductive Function

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaffari Mohammad Ali; Hoseinzadeh Pooneh; Hashemitabar Mahmoud; Zeinali Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background Metals can cause male infertility through affection of spermatogenesis and sperm quality. Strong evidences confirm that male infertility in metal-exposed humans is mediated via various mechanisms such as production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Flavonoids have antioxidant and metal chelating properties which make them suitable candidates for neutralizing adverse effects of metals on semen quality. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of five types of flavonoid...

  2. Human Sperm Quality and Metal Toxicants: Protective Effects of some Flavonoids on Male Reproductive Function

    OpenAIRE

    Jamalan, Mostafa; Ghaffari, Mohammad Ali; Hoseinzadeh, Pooneh; Hashemitabar, Mahmoud; Zeinali, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background Metals can cause male infertility through affection of spermatogenesis and sperm quality. Strong evidences confirm that male infertility in metal-exposed humans is mediated via various mechanisms such as production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Flavonoids have antioxidant and metal chelating properties which make them suitable candidates for neutralizing adverse effects of metals on semen quality. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of five types of flavonoids (...

  3. Advanced forensic validation for human spermatozoa identification using SPERM HY-LITER™ Express with quantitative image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Ayari; Watanabe, Ken; Akutsu, Tomoko

    2017-07-01

    Identification of human semen is indispensable for the investigation of sexual assaults. Fluorescence staining methods using commercial kits, such as the series of SPERM HY-LITER™ kits, have been useful to detect human sperm via strong fluorescence. These kits have been examined from various forensic aspects. However, because of a lack of evaluation methods, these studies did not provide objective, or quantitative, descriptions of the results nor clear criteria for the decisions reached. In addition, the variety of validations was considerably limited. In this study, we conducted more advanced validations of SPERM HY-LITER™ Express using our established image analysis method. Use of this method enabled objective and specific identification of fluorescent sperm's spots and quantitative comparisons of the sperm detection performance under complex experimental conditions. For body fluid mixtures, we examined interference with the fluorescence staining from other body fluid components. Effects of sample decomposition were simulated in high humidity and high temperature conditions. Semen with quite low sperm concentrations, such as azoospermia and oligospermia samples, represented the most challenging cases in application of the kit. Finally, the tolerance of the kit against various acidic and basic environments was analyzed. The validations herein provide useful information for the practical applications of the SPERM HY-LITER™ Express kit, which were previously unobtainable. Moreover, the versatility of our image analysis method toward various complex cases was demonstrated.

  4. Single-Cell Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis to Detect the Early Stage of DNA Fragmentation in Human Sperm Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Satoru Kaneko; Joji Yoshida; Hiromichi Ishikawa; Kiyoshi Takamatsu

    2012-01-01

    Single-cell pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (SCPFGE) with dual electrode pairs was developed to detect the early stage of DNA fragmentation in human sperm. The motile sperm were purified by the commonly used density-gradient centrifugation technique and subsequent swim-up. The sperm were embedded in a thin film of agarose containing bovine trypsin (20 µg/mL) and were then lysed. Prior to SCPFGE, proteolysis of DNA-binding components, such as protamine and the nuclear matrix was essential to ...

  5. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories and the Human Cell Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models, which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte

  6. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories and the Human Interphase Cell Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte

  7. Three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories in the human interphase cell nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1999-01-01

    markdownabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte

  8. Exposure to CB-153 and p,p'-DDE and human sperm chromatin integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rignell-Hydbom, A.; Rylander, L.; Joensson, B.A.G.; Hagmar, L. [Dept. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund Univ. Hospital (Sweden); Giwercman, A. [Fertility Centre, Malmoe Univ. hospital (Sweden); Spano, M. [Section of Toxicology and Biomedical Sciences, ENEA Casaccia Research Centre, Rome (Italy)

    2004-09-15

    In Sweden, the consumption of fatty fish from the Baltic Sea (off the Swedish east coast) is the single most important source of exposure to persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs). Fishermen from the east coast have averagely higher plasma levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and total POP derived TEQ in plasma than both west coast fishermen and men from the general population. Dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethene (p,p'-DDE), a relevant biomarker for POP is still present in relatively high serum concentrations in men consuming fish from the Baltic Sea. Several studies have shown that POPs are capable of interfering with reproductive and endocrine function in animals. Human studies have shown that exposure to PCBs and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) has a negative effect on male reproductive function, and especially sperm motility seems vulnerable. However, studies relating to human sperm genetic integrity are few. The aim of the study was to investigate whether exposure to POP using 2,2',4,4',5,5'- hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and p,p'-DDE as biomarkers, are associated with sperm chromatin integrity. In order to ensure a sufficient variation in POP exposure fishermen from both the Swedish east (''more exposed'') and west coasts (''less exposed'') formed the study base.

  9. The effect of Tribulus terrestris extract on motility and viability of human sperms after cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadmobini, Atefeh; Bakhtiari, Mitra; Khaleghi, Sara; Esmaeili, Farzaneh; Mostafaei, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Semen cryopreservation produces significant amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may lead to impairment of sperm morphology, function, and ultimately, male fertility. Since Tribulus terrestris has antioxidant and free-radical-scavenging properties, this study aims to reveal the effect of the Tribulus terrestris extract on motility and vitality of human sperms after cryopreservation. Semen specimens from 80 healthy volunteers were divided into eight groups: fresh control (group I), freeze control (group II), groups III, IV, and V, which had 20, 40, and 50 μg/mL doses of Tribulus terrestris extract added before cryopreservation, and groups VI, VII, and VIII, which were supplemented by these extract doses after the freeze-thaw process. To evaluate the effects of the Tribulus terrestris extract, the semen samples were incubated with the extract and evaluated with a light microscope for motility and viability. After cryopreservation, a significant improvement in spermatozoa viability was observed in group VII. In groups VII and VIII, motility, according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, increased considerably (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference among groups III, IV, and V. The present study demonstrated that the protective effects of Tribulus terrestris, which improves human sperm motility and viability, may be due to its antioxidant properties. On the basis of the results, the researchers concluded that Tribulus terrestris can be used as a safe therapeutic alternative to current modalities for the management of motility dysfunction in males. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling in human sperm physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Li; Xian, Hua; Cao, Jing-Chen; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Chen, Miao-Miao; Qian, Yi; Jiang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a member of the PPARs, which are transcription factors of the steroid receptor superfamily. PPARγ acts as an important molecule for regulating energy homeostasis, modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and is reciprocally regulated by HPG. In the human, PPARγ protein is highly expressed in ejaculated spermatozoa, implying a possible role of PPARγ signaling in regulating sperm energy dissipation. PPARγ protein is also expressed in Sertoli cells and germ cells (spermatocytes). Its activation can be induced during capacitation and the acrosome reaction. This mini-review will focus on how PPARγ signaling may affect fertility and sperm quality and the potential reversibility of these adverse effects.

  11. Stability of the human sperm DNA methylome to folic acid fortification and short-term supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, D; McGraw, S; Klein, K; Wallock, L M; Konermann, C; Plass, C; Chan, P; Robaire, B; Jacob, R A; Greenwood, C M T; Trasler, J M

    2017-02-01

    Do short-term and long-term exposures to low-dose folic acid supplementation alter DNA methylation in sperm? No alterations in sperm DNA methylation patterns were found following the administration of low-dose folic acid supplements of 400 μg/day for 90 days (short-term exposure) or when pre-fortification of food with folic acid and post-fortification sperm samples (long-term exposure) were compared. Excess dietary folate may be detrimental to health and DNA methylation profiles due to folate's role in one-carbon metabolism and the formation of S-adenosyl methionine, the universal methyl donor. DNA methylation patterns are established in developing male germ cells and have been suggested to be affected by high-dose (5 mg/day) folic acid supplementation. This is a control versus treatment study where genome-wide sperm DNA methylation patterns were examined prior to fortification of food (1996-1997) in men with no history of infertility at baseline and following 90-day exposure to placebo (n = 9) or supplement containing 400 μg folic acid/day (n = 10). Additionally, pre-fortification sperm DNA methylation profiles (n = 19) were compared with those of a group of post-fortification (post-2004) men (n = 8) who had been exposed for several years to dietary folic acid fortification. Blood and seminal plasma folate levels were measured in participants before and following the 90-day treatment with placebo or supplement. Sperm DNA methylation was assessed using the whole-genome and genome-wide techniques, MassArray epityper, restriction landmark genomic scanning, methyl-CpG immunoprecipitation and Illumina HumanMethylation450 Bead Array. Following treatment, supplemented individuals had significantly higher levels of blood and seminal plasma folates compared to placebo. Initial first-generation genome-wide analyses of sperm DNA methylation showed little evidence of changes when comparing pre- and post-treatment samples. With Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip arrays

  12. Short-Term Storage of Human Spermatozoa in Electrolyte-Free Medium Without Freezing Maintains Sperm Chromatin Integrity Better Than Cryopreservation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riel, Jonathan M.; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Huang, Thomas T.F.; Grove, John; Ward, Monika A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous attempts to maintain human spermatozoa without freezing were based on short-term storage in component-rich medium and led to fast decline in motility and increased incidence of chromosome breaks. Here we report a new method in which sperm are maintained without freezing in an electrolyte-free medium (EFM) composed of glucose and bovine serum albumin. Human sperm were stored in EFM or human tubal fluid medium (HTFM) or were cryopreserved, and their motility, viability, and DNA integrity were examined at different intervals. Cryopreservation led to significant decline in sperm motility and viability and induced DNA fragmentation. Sperm stored in EFM maintained motility and viability for up to 4 and 7 wk, respectively, much longer than sperm stored in HTFM (comet assay, was also maintained significantly better in EFM than in HTFM. One-week storage in EFM yielded motility and viability similar to that of cryopreserved sperm, but DNA integrity was significantly higher, resembling that of fresh sperm. After several weeks of storage in EFM, sperm were able to activate oocytes, undergo chromatin remodeling, and form normal zygotic chromosomes after intracytoplasmic sperm injection. This study demonstrated that human spermatozoa can be stored in EFM without freezing for several weeks while maintaining motility, viability, and chromatin integrity and that 1-wk storage in EFM offers better protection of sperm DNA integrity than cryopreservation. Sperm storage in EFM may become a viable option for the physicians working in assisted reproduction technology clinics, which would avoid cryodamage. PMID:21593474

  13. Crossreactivity of boar sperm monoclonal antibodies with human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Monoclonal antibodies against the head (H mabs) and tail (Tmabs) of boar spermatozoa were produced. Spermatozoa from boar, stallion, bull, human, ram, goat and rabbit were independently incubated with the monoclonal antibodies and later stained by immunofluorescence method. There were positive reactions of the ...

  14. Human semen cryopreservation: a sperm DNA fragmentation study with alkaline and neutral Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas-Maynou, J; Fernández-Encinas, A; García-Peiró, A; Prada, E; Abad, C; Amengual, M J; Navarro, J; Benet, J

    2014-01-01

    Sperm cryopreservation is widely used for both research and reproduction purposes, but its effect on sperm DNA damage remains controversial. Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) has become an important biomarker to assess male infertility. In particular, the differentiation between single- and double-stranded DNA fragmentation (ssSDF and dsSDF) has clinical implications for male infertility where ssSDF is associated with reduced fertility, whereas dsSDF is associated with increased risk of miscarriage. In this study, semen samples from 30 human males have been analysed in both fresh and cryopreserved using the alkaline and neutral Comet assays. Results show an increase of about 10% of ssSDF, assessed by the alkaline Comet assay, regardless of the male fertility status. Neutral Comet analysis of dsSDF does not show any statistical increase when comparing fresh and cryopreserved samples in any of the patient groups. Results support previous reports that oxidative stress is the major effector in DNA damage during sample cryopreservation, as, on one hand, ssSDF has previously been related to oxidative damage and, on the other hand, we have not found any effect on dsSDF. Therefore, there might be a slight risk of decreased fertility after using a freezed sample, but no evidence for increased miscarriage risk from cryopreserved spermatozoa should be expected. © 2013 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  15. ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport) Machinery Is Essential for Acrosomal Exocytosis in Human Sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocognoni, Cristian A; Berberián, María Victoria; Mayorga, Luis S

    2015-11-01

    The sperm acrosome reaction is a unique, regulated exocytosis characterized by the secretion of the acrosomal content and the release of hybrid vesicles formed by patches of the outer acrosomal and plasma membranes. In previous reports, we have shown that inward invaginations of the acrosomal membrane delineate ring-shaped membrane microdomains that contact the plasma membrane. We have postulated that the opening and expansion of fusion pores along these rings trigger acrosomal exocytosis. The invaginations of the acrosomal membrane topologically resemble the deformations of the endosomal membrane leading to the assembly of luminal vesicles in multivesicular bodies. In fact, intra-acrosomal vesicles are also formed during acrosomal exocytosis. Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) participates in the organization of membrane microdomains that are invaginated and released as intraluminal vesicles in endosomes. We report here that members of ESCRT I (TSG101), ESCRT III (CHMP4), and the AAA ATPase VPS4 are present in the acrosomal region of the human sperm. Perturbing the function of these factors with antibodies or recombinant proteins inhibited acrosomal exocytosis in permeabilized cells. A similar effect was observed with a dominant-negative mutant of VPS4A cross-linked to a cell-penetrating peptide in nonpermeabilized sperm stimulated with a calcium ionophore. When the function of ESCRTs was inhibited, acrosomes showed abnormal deformation of the acrosomal membrane, and SNARE proteins that participate in acrosomal exocytosis failed to be stabilized in neurotoxin-resistant complexes. However, the growing of membrane invaginations was not blocked, and numerous intra-acrosomal vesicles were observed. These observations indicate that ESCRT-mediated processes are essential for acrosomal secretion, implicating these multifunctional complexes in an exocytic event crucial for sperm-egg fusion. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  16. The role of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2 in regulating human sperm-egg recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Nixon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common lesions present in the spermatozoa of human infertility patients is an idiopathic failure of sperm-egg recognition. Although this unique cellular interaction can now be readily by-passed by assisted reproductive strategies such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, recent large-scale epidemiological studies have encouraged the cautious use of this technology and highlighted the need for further research into the mechanisms responsible for defective sperm-egg recognition. Previous work in this field has established that the sperm domains responsible for oocyte interaction are formed during spermatogenesis prior to being dynamically modified during epididymal maturation and capacitation in female reproductive tract. While the factors responsible for the regulation of these sequential maturational events are undoubtedly complex, emerging research has identified the molecular chaperone, heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2, as a key regulator of these events in human spermatozoa. HSPA2 is a testis-enriched member of the 70 kDa heat shock protein family that promotes the folding, transport, and assembly of protein complexes and has been positively correlated with in vitro fertilization (IVF success. Furthermore, reduced expression of HSPA2 from the human sperm proteome leads to an impaired capacity for cumulus matrix dispersal, sperm-egg recognition and fertilization following both IVF and ICSI. In this review, we consider the evidence supporting the role of HSPA2 in sperm function and explore the potential mechanisms by which it is depleted in the spermatozoa of infertile patients. Such information offers novel insights into the molecular mechanisms governing sperm function.

  17. Patterns of hypoglossal nucleus development in the prenatal period of human ontogenesis: a morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Tyholaz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Better understanding the origin and differentiation of neurons in the medulla oblongata will promote comprehension of different neural systems functional importance, including the hypoglossal nucleus. There are a few studies addressing histostructure and morphometric parameters of hypoglossal nucleus in human embryos and fetuses in the scientific literature. Aim. To establish the structure, morphometric parameters of the hypoglossal nucleus and the nerve cells that go to form it in the embryos and human fetuses of different gestational age. Materials and Methods. A morphological and histological study of 230 human embryos and fetuses from 6–7 to 39–40 weeks of prenatal development was carried out. Results. In the prenatal development of the hypoglossal nucleus from 17–18 weeks of gestation neuroblasts are changed from spherical to oval shape, during the 20–21 weeks polygonal nerve cells are showing in nucleus composition, and polygonal nerve cells become dominated from the 37 week. The biggest area of the hypoglossal nucleus has been determined in human fetuses at gestational age of 39–40 weeks – 0.82±0.04 mm2. The mean values of the nerve cells area are the largest in the 33–34 weeks gestational–age human fetuses – 301,2±9,3 µm2, and the mean values of the nerve cells nuclei are the largest in the 39–40 weeks gestational–age human fetuses – 101,2±3,2 µm2. Conclusions. The most intensive increase in the area of the hypoglossal nucleus identified in human fetuses at gestational age of 10–11 weeks – by 66.7 %, 12–13 weeks – by 45.4 %, 20–21 weeks – 31.2 %, 22–23 weeks – 36 %, 37–38 weeks – by 45.1 %, 39–40 weeks – by 42.7 % (p<0.01. Intensive increase in the mean neuroblasts area was detected in human fetuses at gestational age of 10–11 weeks – by 40.1 %, 17–18 weeks – 48.4 %, and decrease – in human fetuses at gestational age of 37–38 weeks – by 29.9 % (p<0.01. The most intensive

  18. Neuroelectric signatures of reward learning and decision-making in the human nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael X; Axmacher, Nikolai; Lenartz, Doris; Elger, Christian E; Sturm, Volker; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2009-06-01

    Learning that certain actions lead to risky rewards is critical for biological, social, and economic survival, but the precise neural mechanisms of such reward-guided learning remain unclear. Here, we show that the human nucleus accumbens plays a key role in learning about risks by representing reward value. We recorded electrophysiological activity directly from the nucleus accumbens of five patients undergoing deep brain stimulation for treatment of refractory major depression. Patients engaged in a simple reward-learning task in which they first learned stimulus-outcome associations (learning task), and then were able to choose from among the learned stimuli (choosing task). During the learning task, nucleus accumbens activity reflected potential and received reward values both during the cue stimulus and during the feedback. During the choosing task, there was no nucleus accumbens activity during the cue stimulus, but feedback-related activity was pronounced and similar to that during the learning task. This pattern of results is inconsistent with a prediction error response. Finally, analyses of cross-correlations between the accumbens and simultaneous recordings of medial frontal cortex suggest a dynamic interaction between these structures. The high spatial and temporal resolution of these recordings provides novel insights into the timing of activity in the human nucleus accumbens, its functions during reward-guided learning and decision-making, and its interactions with medial frontal cortex.

  19. High resolution DNA content measurements of mammalian sperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkel, D.; Lake, S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Stephenson, D.; Watchmaker, G.

    1982-01-01

    The high condensation and flat shape of the mammalian sperm nucleus present unique difficulties to flow cytometric measurement of DNA content. Chromatin compactness makes quantitative fluorescent staining for DNA difficult and causes a high index of refraction. The refractive index makes optical measurements sensitive to sperm head orientation. We demonstrate that the optical problems can be overcome using the commercial ICP22 epiillumination flow cytometer (Ortho Instruments, Westwood, MA) or a specially built cell orientating flow cytometer (OFCM). The design and operation of the OFCM are described. Measurements of the angular dependence of fluorescence from acriflavine stained rabbit sperm show that it is capable of orienting flat sperm with a tolerance of +-7/sup 0/. Differences in the angular dependence for the similarly shaped bull and rabbit sperm allow discrimination of these cells. We show that DNA staining with 4-6 diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) or an ethidium bromide mithramycin combination allows resolution of the X and Y populations in mouse sperm. They have also been successful with sperm from the bull, ram, rabbit, and boar. Reliable results with human sperm are not obtained. The accuracy of the staining and measurement techniques are verified by the correct determination of the relative content of these two populations in sperm from normal mice and those with the Cattanach (7 to X) translocation. Among the potential uses of these techniques are measurement of DNA content errors induced in sperm due to mutagen exposure, and assessment of the fractions of X and Y sperm in semen that may have one population artifically enriched.

  20. In vitro assessment of some sperm function following exposure to levonorgestrel in human fallopian tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermanny Alexia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism of action of levonorgestrel (LNG as emergency contraception (EC remains a subject of debate and its effect on sperm function has been only partially explained. The aim of this study was to assess whether LNG at a similar dose to those found in serum following oral intake for EC could affect spermatozoa when exposed to human fallopian tubes in vitro. Methods Fifteen mini-laparotomies were performed, the side on which ovulation occurred was recorded, and both tubes were removed and perfused with a suspension containing 1 × 10(6 motile spermatozoa, with or without LNG. Following 4-hour incubation, the tubes were sectioned to separate the isthmus and the ampulla. Each segment was flushed and the material was evaluated to quantify the number of motile sperm, the number of spermatozoa adhering to the oviductal epithelium and the acrosome reaction (AR rate. Results The addition of LNG did not significantly alter the number of recovered motile spermatozoa either at the isthmus or at the ampulla, nor did it have any effect on the number of recovered spermatozoa adhered to the human tubal epithelium. Furthermore, LNG did not affect the AR rate. No significant differences were found even when the side on which ovulation occurred was taken into account. Conclusions In a similar dose to that observed in serum following oral intake for EC, LNG had no effect on the number of motile spermatozoa recovered from the human fallopian tubes in vitro, on their adhesion to the tubal epithelium, distribution or AR rate. The possible effect of LNG as EC on sperm function remains poorly understood.

  1. Activity of vasopressinergic neurones of the human supraoptic nucleus is age- and sex-dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishunina, T. A.; Salehi, A.; Hofman, M. A.; Swaab, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    In the human hypothalamus, arginine-vasopressin (AVP) is produced for a major part by the neurones of the supraoptic nucleus (SON). Since plasma AVP levels in men were reported to be higher than those of women and we did not find a sex difference in the neurone number, a higher vasopressinergic

  2. Delineation of motoneuron subgroups supplying individual eye muscles in the human oculomotor nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Ngwa, Emmanuel; Zeeh, Christina; Messoudi, Ahmed; Büttner-Ennever, Jean A; Horn, Anja K E

    2014-01-01

    The oculomotor nucleus (nIII) contains the motoneurons of medial, inferior, and superior recti (MR, IR, and SR), inferior oblique (IO), and levator palpebrae (LP) muscles. The delineation of motoneuron subgroups for each muscle is well-known in monkey, but not in human. We studied the transmitter inputs to human nIII and the trochlear nucleus (nIV), which innervates the superior oblique muscle (SO), to outline individual motoneuron subgroups. Parallel series of sections from human brainstems were immunostained for different markers: choline acetyltransferase combined with glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), calretinin (CR) or glycine receptor. The cytoarchitecture was visualized with cresyl violet, Gallyas staining and expression of non-phosphorylated neurofilaments. Apart from nIV, seven subgroups were delineated in nIII: the central caudal nucleus (CCN), a dorsolateral (DL), dorsomedial (DM), central (CEN), and ventral (VEN) group, the nucleus of Perlia (NP) and the non-preganglionic centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWcp). DL, VEN, NP, and EWcp were characterized by a strong supply of GAD-positive terminals, in contrast to DM, CEN, and nIV. CR-positive terminals and fibers were confined to CCN, CEN, and NP. Based on location and histochemistry of the motoneuron subgroups in monkey, CEN is considered as the SR and IO motoneurons, DL and VEN as the B- and A-group of MR motoneurons, respectively, and DM as IR motoneurons. A good correlation between monkey and man is seen for the CR input, which labels only motoneurons of eye muscles participating in upgaze (SR, IO, and LP). The CCN contained LP motoneurons, and nIV those of SO. This study provides a map of the individual subgroups of motoneurons in human nIII for the first time, and suggests that NP may contain upgaze motoneurons. Surprisingly, a strong GABAergic input to human MR motoneurons was discovered, which is not seen in monkey and may indicate a functional oculomotor specialization.

  3. Sperm penetration through the human zona pellucida as a predictor of in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, P; Vantman, D; Madariaga, M

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the predictive value of sperm penetration into the perivitelline space of human cadaveric oocytes on in vitro fertilization outcome. Forty-two patients with tubal infertility undergoing ovarian stimulation with gonadotropin for in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer participated in the study. The number of spermatozoa bound to the human zona pellucida, the percentage of cadaveric oocytes with one or more spermatozoa in the perivitelline space, and the in vitro fertilization outcome were evaluated. Spermatozoa from 37 of 42 patients were able to penetrate the perivitelline space of cadaveric oocytes as well as to fertilize human oocytes in vitro. In three individuals, no penetration of the perivitelline space of cadaveric oocytes was observed and no in vitro fertilization was detected. Only two patients were able to fertilize the couple's oocytes without penetration of the cadaveric oocytes. Based on these results the specificity and the sensitivity of the assay to predict in vitro fertilization was 100% and 94.1%, respectively. Accordingly, these results suggest that sperm-zona penetration is a useful bioassay to predict male fertility potential in IVF outcome.

  4. Differential transcriptome expression in human nucleus accumbens as a function of loneliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canli, T; Wen, R; Wang, X; Mikhailik, A; Yu, L; Fleischman, D; Wilson, R S; Bennett, D A

    2017-07-01

    Loneliness is associated with impaired mental and physical health. Studies of lonely individuals reported differential expression of inflammatory genes in peripheral leukocytes and diminished activation in brain reward regions such as nucleus accumbens, but could not address gene expression in the human brain. Here, we examined genome-wide RNA expression in post-mortem nucleus accumbens from donors (N=26) with known loneliness measures. Loneliness was associated with 1710 differentially expressed transcripts and genes from 1599 genes (DEGs; false discovery rate Ploneliness in this sample, although gene expression analyses controlled for AD diagnosis). These results identify novel targets for future mechanistic studies of gene networks in nucleus accumbens and gene regulatory mechanisms across a variety of diseases exacerbated by loneliness.

  5. Influence of extended incubation time on Human sperm chromatin condensation, sperm DNA strand breaks and their effect on fertilisation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, I; Abdelateef, S; Laqqan, M; Amor, H; Abdel-Lah, M A; Hammadeh, M E

    2018-02-14

    The purpose of this study was to determine influence of extended incubation time on sperm chromatin condensation and DNA strand breaks and their effect on fertilisation rate. Forty couples undergoing ICSI therapy were included. Semen was prepared by PureSperm gradient centrifugation and divided into two parts. The first part (G1) was used immediately for ICSI, whereas the second part (G2) was kept in the incubator at 37°C, 5% and 90% Humidity for 5 hr, and thereafter, the capacitated spermatozoa were used for ICSI. The TUNEL test and chromomycin CMA3 were used to evaluate the DNA strand breaks and chromatin condensation respectively. The percentage of condensed chromatin was 73.92 ± 12.70 in the group 1 and 81.13 ± 10.31% in group 2 (p = .001). However, the double-strand breaks were 11.15 ± 8.67% in G.1 and 16.30 ± 11.12% in G.2. (p = .001). Fertilisation rate in the (Group 1) was 62.45% and 69.17% in (Group 2). There was a positive correlation between condensed chromatin and fertilisation rate (r = 0.846, p = .001) and a negative correlation with DNA double-strand breaks (r = -0.802; p = .001). In conclusion, the prolonged sperm incubation (5 hr) leads to a higher chromatin condensation and to a significantly increased number of DNA strands double breaks with no influence on fertilisation rates. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Abnormal lateral geniculate nucleus and optic chiasm in human albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcketton, Larissa; Kelly, Krista R; Schneider, Keith A

    2014-08-01

    Our objective was to measure how the misrouting of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) fibers affects the organization of the optic chiasm and lateral geniculate nuclei (LGN) in human albinism. We compared the chiasmal structures and the LGN in both pigmented controls and patients with albinism by using high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We studied 12 patients with oculocutaneous albinism and 12 age-matched pigmented controls. Using a 3T MRI scanner, we acquired a T1 -weighted three-dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo (MPRAGE) image of the whole brain, oriented so that the optic nerves, chiasm, and tracts were in the same plane. We acquired multiple proton density-weighted images centered on the thalamus and midbrain, and averaged them to increase the signal, enabling precise manual tracing of the anatomical boundaries of the LGN. Albinism patients exhibited significantly smaller diameters of the optic nerves, chiasm and tracts, and optic chiasm and LGN volume compared with controls (P albinism compared with the control group can be attributed to the abnormal crossing of optic fibers and the reduction of RGCs in the central retina. The volume of the LGN devoted to the center of the visual field may be reduced in albinism due to fewer RGCs representing the area where the fovea would normally lie. Our data may be clinically useful in addressing how genetic deficits compromise proper structural and functional development in the brain. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. New insights about the evaluation of human sperm quality: the aromatase example.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Saad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Male contribution to the couple's infertility is at first evaluated by the routine examination of semen parameters upon optical microscopy providing valuable information for a rational initial diagnosis and for a clinical management of infertility. But the different forms of infertility defined according to the WHO criteria especially teratozoospermia are not always related to the chromatin structure or to the fertilization capacity. New investigations at the molecular level (transcript and protein could be developed in order to understand the nature of sperm malformation responsible of human infertility and thus to evaluate the sperm quality. The profile analysis of spermatozoal transcripts could be considered as a fingerprint of the past spermatogenic events. The selection of representative transcripts of normal spermatozoa remains complex because a differential expression (increased, decreased or not modified levels of specific transcripts has been revealed between immotile and motile sperm fractions issued from normozoospermic donors. Microarrays tests or real-time quantitative PCR could be helpful for the identification of factors involved in the male infertility. Differences in the expression of specific transcripts have been reported between normal and abnormal semen samples. With the aromatase example, we have noted a negative strong correlation between the amount of transcript and the percentage of abnormal forms especially in presence of head defects. Immunocytochemical procedures using fluorescent probes associated with either confocal microscopy or flow cytometry can be also helpful to proceed with further investigations about the localization of proteins in the compartmentalized spermatozoa or the acrosome reaction. The dual location of aromatase both in the equatorial segment, the mid-piece and the tail could explain the double role of this enzyme in acrosome reaction and motility.

  8. Munc18-1 Controls SNARE Protein Complex Assembly during Human Sperm Acrosomal Exocytosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Facundo; Zanetti, M. Natalia; Mayorga, Luis S.; Tomes, Claudia N.

    2012-01-01

    The spermatozoon is a very specialized cell capable of carrying out a limited set of functions with high efficiency. Sperm are then excellent model cells to dissect fundamental processes such as regulated exocytosis. The secretion of the single dense-core granule of mammalian spermatozoa relies on the same highly conserved molecules and goes through the same stages as exocytosis in other types of cells. In this study, we describe the presence of Munc18-1 in human sperm and show that this protein has an essential role in acrosomal exocytosis. We observed that inactivation of endogenous Munc18-1 with a specific antibody precluded the stabilization of trans-SNARE complexes and inhibited acrosomal exocytosis. Addition of recombinant Munc18-1 blocked secretion by sequestering monomeric syntaxin, an effect that was rescued by α-soluble NSF attachment protein. By electron microscopy, we observed that both the anti-Munc18-1 antibody and recombinant Munc18-1 inhibited the docking of the acrosome to the plasma membrane. In conclusion, our results indicate that Munc18-1 plays a key role in the dynamics of trans-SNARE complex assembly and/or stabilization, a process that is necessary for the docking of the outer acrosomal membrane to the plasma membrane and subsequent fusion pore opening. PMID:23091057

  9. Alkaloids from areca (betel) nuts and their effects on human sperm motility in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jingsong; Yang, Dajian; Liang, Yonghong; Gao, Wenping; Ren, Zhipeng; Zeng, Wei; Wang, Baorong; Han, Jian; Guo, Dean

    2012-04-01

    An improved high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was established to rapidly and simultaneously determine 3 main alkaloids (arecoline, arecaidine, and guvacine) in areca (betel) nuts (AN), and 12 AN samples from the main betel palm growing areas on the Chinese Mainland were collected and determined. Semen samples from acceptable volunteers were treated in vitro with different concentrations of the 3 alkaloids to evaluate the effects on sperm motility (SM). Highly motile spermatozoa were selected from the samples and divided into 5 equal fractions. Various concentrations of each alkaloid were added to 4 of the 5 fractions, and 1 fraction was used as a control. All fractions were incubated for 4 h. A computer-aided sperm analysis system was used to measure 5 SM parameters, motility, average path velocity, straight-line velocity, curvilinear velocity, linearity, and amplitude of lateral head displacement. The results showed that the contents of the amount of alkaloids in AN differed markedly in different places in China and were higher in the kernel than in the husk, and higher in dried AN than in fresh AN. Arecoline had the strongest reduction effect on human SM and the effect was strongly dose dependent. Arecaidine had a much weaker reduction effect than arecoline, and guvacine had the least reduction effect. These findings also demonstrate that betel quid could have adverse effects on the gonadal functions of betel quid consumers. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Quantitative measurements of human sperm nuclei using automated microscopy and image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Firpo, M. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Sudar, D. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (United States))

    1993-01-01

    A package of computer codes, called Morphometry Automation Program (MAP), was developed to (a) detect human sperm smeared onto glass slides, (b) measure more than 30 aspects of the size, shape, texture, and staining of their nuclei, and (c) retain operator evaluation of the process. MAP performs the locating and measurement functions automatically, without operator assistance. In addition to standard measurements, MAP utilizes axial projections of nuclear area and stain intensity to detect asymmetries. MAP also stores for each cell the gray-scale images for later display and evaluation, and it retains coordinates for optional relocation and inspection under the microscope. MAP operates on the Quantitative Image Processing System (QUIPS) at LLNL. MAP has potential applications in the evaluation of infertility and in reproductive toxicology, such as (a) classifying sperm into clinical shape categories for assessing fertility status, (b) identifying subtle effects of host factors (diet, stress, etc.), (c) assessing the risk of potential spermatogenic toxicants (tobacco, drugs, etc.), and (d) investigating associations with abnormal pregnancy outcomes (time to pregnancy, early fetal loss, etc.).

  11. Cortical projection to the human red nucleus: complementary results with probabilistic tractography at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Christophe; Cabanis, Emmanuel A. [UPMC Paris 6, Service de NeuroImagerie, Hopital des Quinze-Vingts, Paris (France)

    2007-09-15

    In a previous study using streamlined diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) axonal tracking at 1.5 T, we found that the main afferents to the human red nucleus arise from the sensorimotor and prefrontal cortices. However, the spatial resolution of our data was low and our streamlining DTI algorithm was less powerful than the probabilistic tractography algorithm usually used to define connections between low anisotropic cortical or nuclear areas. Therefore, we reassessed and completed our previous results with trajectories computed with a probabilistic algorithm and with a high-field MRI system. Afferents to the red nuclei of five volunteers were studied at 3 T using probabilistic DTI axonal tracking. Trajectories were constantly tracked between the red nucleus and the ipsilateral prefrontal, pericentral, temporal and occipital cortices, and the ipsilateral lentiform and contralateral dentate nuclei. We showed that the dentate nucleus was connected to the mammillary tubercle and, through the contralateral ventral thalamus, to the frontal and prefrontal cortices. The red nucleus receives extensive projections from the cerebral cortex and has dense subcortical connections to the striopallidal system. (orig.)

  12. Yes, there is a Medial Nucleus of the Trapezoid Body in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy J Kulesza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB is a collection of brainstem neurons that function within the ascending auditory pathway. MNTB neurons are associated with a number of anatomical and physiological specializations which make these cells especially well-equipped to provide extremely fast and precise glycinergic inhibition to its target neurons in the superior olivary complex and ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus. The inhibitory influence of MNTB neurons plays essentials roles in the localization of sound sources and encoding temporal features of complex sounds. The morphology, afferent and efferent connections and physiological response properties of MNTB neurons have been well characterized in a number of laboratory rodents and some carnivores. Furthermore, the MNTB has been positively identified in all mammals examined, ranging from opossum and mice to chimpanzees. From the early 1970’s through 2009, a number of studies denied the existence of the MNTB in humans and consequentially, the existence of this nucleus in the human brain has been debated for nearly 50 years. The absence of the MNTB from the human brain would negate current principles of sound localization and would require a number of novel adaptations, entirely unique to humans. However, a number of recent studies of human post-mortem tissue have provided evidence supporting the existence of the MNTB in humans. It therefore seems timely to review the structure and function of the MNTB, critically review the literature which led to the denial of the human MNTB and then review recent investigations supporting the existence of the MNTB in the human brain.

  13. Gold-standard and improved framework for sperm head segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Violeta; Saavedra, Jose M; Castañeda, Victor; Sarabia, Luis; Hitschfeld, Nancy; Härtel, Steffen

    2014-11-01

    Semen analysis is the first step in the evaluation of an infertile couple. Within this process, an accurate and objective morphological analysis becomes more critical as it is based on the correct detection and segmentation of human sperm components. In this paper, we present an improved two-stage framework for detection and segmentation of human sperm head characteristics (including acrosome and nucleus) that uses three different color spaces. The first stage detects regions of interest that define sperm heads, using k-means, then candidate heads are refined using mathematical morphology. In the second stage, we work on each region of interest to segment accurately the sperm head as well as nucleus and acrosome, using clustering and histogram statistical analysis techniques. Our proposal is also characterized by being fully automatic, where a user intervention is not required. Our experimental evaluation shows that our proposed method outperforms the state-of-the-art. This is supported by the results of different evaluation metrics. In addition, we propose a gold-standard built with the cooperation of a referent expert in the field, aiming to compare methods for detecting and segmenting sperm cells. Our results achieve notable improvement getting above 98% in the sperm head detection process at the expense of having significantly fewer false positives obtained by the state-of-the-art method. Our results also show an accurate head, acrosome and nucleus segmentation achieving over 80% overlapping against hand-segmented gold-standard. Our method achieves higher Dice coefficient, lower Hausdorff distance and less dispersion with respect to the results achieved by the state-of-the-art method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Export of Precursor tRNAIle from the Nucleus to the Cytoplasm in Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wei

    Full Text Available In the current concept, tRNA maturation in vertebrate cells, including splicing of introns, trimming of 5' leader and 3' trailer, and adding of CCA, is thought to occur exclusively in the nucleus. Here we provide evidence to challenge this concept. Unspliced intron-containing precursor tRNAIle was identified in Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 virions, which are synthesized in the cytoplasm. Northern blot, confocal microscopy and quantitative RT-PCR further verified enrichment of this unspliced tRNAIle within the cytoplasm in human cells. In addition to containing an intron, the cytoplasmic precursor tRNAIle also contains a short incompletely processed 5´ leader and a 3´ trailer, which abundance is around 1000 fold higher than the nuclear precursor tRNAIle with long 5' leader and long 3' trailer. In vitro data also suggest that the cytoplasmic unspliced end-immature precursor tRNAIle could be processed by short isoform of RNase Z, but not long isoform of RNase Z. These data suggest that precursor tRNAs could export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in human cells, instead of be processed only in the nucleus.

  15. Sperm antigens in fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saling, P M

    1990-02-01

    A review of sperm antigens involved in fertilization includes a description of sperm differentiation, seminal fluid components that coat sperm, sperm antigens involved in binding to the zona pellucida (ZP), antigens involved in the acrosome reaction, in zona pellucida penetration, and those active in fusion with the ova membrane. Sperm antigens are located in certain domains of the cell, and they are altered during capacitation and passage through the female tract. Caltrin and acrosome-stabilizing factor are applied by seminal fluid. At least 2 antigens have been studied that occur in sterile women, although one cross reacts with milk proteins. Some antigens active in ZP binding are trypsin, proacrosin, acrosin, PH-20 from guinea pigs, and rabbit sperm autoantigen I. Antigens involved in the acrosome reaction, such as M42, are likely to cross react with other body proteins that also entail exocytosis. A mouse antigen involved in ZP penetration, MS 207 is well characterized. PH-30 from guinea pigs and M29 from mouse participate in sperm-egg membrane fusion, as does fertilization antigen I from human and mouse sperm which is know to cause infertility. Oddly, patients' sera react with polymers but not monomers of this antigen. Studies with antisperm antibodies suggest that it will not be necessary to agglutinate all sperm to block fertility, only to inhibit a single sperm epitope and function. It will probably be feasible to inhibit multiple successive events, and possibly to induce temporary immunity.

  16. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, Ryu [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Mizuno, Rie [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Watanabe, Kazunori, E-mail: watanabe@ric.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Ijiri, Kenichi [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  17. Post-translational cleavage of Hv1 in human sperm tunes pH- and voltage-dependent gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas K; Fußhöller, David M; Goodwin, Normann; Bönigk, Wolfgang; Müller, Astrid; Dokani Khesroshahi, Nasim; Brenker, Christoph; Wachten, Dagmar; Krause, Eberhard; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Strünker, Timo

    2017-03-01

    In human sperm, proton flux across the membrane is controlled by the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1. We show that sperm harbour both Hv1 and an N-terminally cleaved isoform termed Hv1Sper. The pH-control of Hv1Sper and Hv1 is distinctively different. Hv1Sper and Hv1 can form heterodimers that combine features of both constituents. Cleavage and heterodimerization of Hv1 might represent an adaptation to the specific requirements of pH control in sperm. In human sperm, the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 controls the flux of protons across the flagellar membrane. Here, we show that sperm harbour Hv1 and a shorter isoform, termed Hv1Sper. Hv1Sper is generated from Hv1 by removal of 68 amino acids from the N-terminus by post-translational proteolytic cleavage. The pH-dependent gating of the channel isoforms is distinctly different. In both Hv1 and Hv1Sper, the conductance-voltage relationship is determined by the pH difference across the membrane (∆pH). However, simultaneous changes in intracellular and extracellular pH that leave ΔpH constant strongly shift the activation curve of Hv1Sper but not that of Hv1, demonstrating that cleavage of the N-terminus tunes pH sensing in Hv1. Moreover, we show that Hv1 and Hv1Sper assemble as heterodimers that combine features of both constituents. We suggest that cleavage and heterodimerization of Hv1 represents an adaptation to the specific requirements of pH control in sperm. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  18. Clusterin facilitates exchange of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-linked SPAM1 between reproductive luminal fluids and mouse and human sperm membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Genevieve S; Galileo, Deni S; Aravindan, Rolands G; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2009-09-01

    Glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked proteins, which are involved in post-testicular maturation of sperm and have a role in fertilization, are acquired on the sperm surface from both vesicular and membrane-free soluble fractions of epididymal luminal fluid (LF) and uterine LF. Herein, we investigate the mechanism of uptake of these proteins from the soluble fraction of LFs using sperm adhesion molecule 1 (SPAM1) as a model. Ultracentrifugation and native Western blot analysis of the soluble fraction revealed that SPAM1 is present in low-molecular-weight (monomeric) and high-molecular-weight (oligomeric) complexes. The latter are incapable of transferring SPAM1 and may serve to produce monomers. Monomers are stabilized by hydrophobic interactions with clusterin (CLU), a lipid carrier that is abundantly expressed in LFs. We show that CLU is involved in the transfer of SPAM1 monomers, whose delivery was decreased by anti-CLU antibody under normal and apolipoprotein-enhanced conditions. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed an intimate association of CLU with SPAM1. Both plasma and recombinant CLU had a dose-related effect on transfer efficiency: high concentrations reduced and low concentrations enhanced delivery of SPAM1 to human and mouse sperm membranes, reflecting physiological states in the epididymal tract. We propose a lipid exchange model (akin to the lipid-poor model for cholesterol efflux) for the delivery of GPI-linked proteins to sperm membranes via CLU. Our investigation defines specific conditions for membrane-free GPI-linked protein transfer in vitro and could lead to technology for improving fertility or treating sperm pathology by the addition of relevant GPI-linked proteins critical for successful fertilization in humans and domestic animals.

  19. Delineation of motoneuron subgroups supplying individual eye muscles in the human oculomotor nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eChe-Ngwa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The oculomotor nucleus (nIII contains the motoneurons of medial, inferior and superior recti (MR, IR, SR, inferior oblique (IO and levator palpebrae (LP muscles. The delineation of motoneuron subgroups for each muscle is well-known in monkey, but not in human. We studied the transmitter inputs to human nIII and the trochlear nucleus (nIV, which innervates the superior oblique muscle (SO, to outline individual motoneuron subgroups. Parallel series of sections from human brainstems were immunostained for different markers: acetylcholine transferase (ChAT combined with glutamate decarboxylase (GAD, calretinin (CR or glycine receptor (GlyR. The cytoarchitecture was visualized with Cresyl violet, Gallyas staining and expression of non-phosphorylated neurofilaments (NP-NF. Apart from nIV, seven subgroups were delineated in nIII: the central caudal nucleus (CCN, a dorsolateral (DL, dorsomedial (DM, central (CEN, and ventral group (VEN, the nucleus of Perlia (NP and the non-preganglionic centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWcp. DL, VEN, NP and EWcp were characterized by a strong supply of GAD-positive terminals, in contrast to DM, CEN and nIV. CR-positive terminals and fibres were confined to CCN, CEN and NP. Based on location and histochemistry of the motoneuron subgroups in monkey, CEN is considered as the SR and IO motoneurons, DL and VEN as the B- and A-group of MR motoneurons, respectively, and DM as IR motoneurons. A good correlation between monkey and man is seen for the CR input, which labels only motoneurons of eye muscles participating in upgaze (SR, IO and LP. The CCN contained LP motoneurons, and nIV those of SO. This study provides a map of the individual subgroups of motoneurons in human nIII for the first time, and suggests that NP may contain upgaze motoneurons. Surprisingly, a strong GABAergic input to human MR motoneurons was discovered, which is not seen in monkey and may indicate a functional oculomotor specialization.

  20. Sperm design and sperm function

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aurelio F Malo; Montserrat Gomendio; Julian Garde; Barbara Lang-Lenton; Ana J Soler; Eduardo R.S Roldan

    2006-01-01

    .... Sperm swimming velocity is a key determinant of male fertilization success, but previous efforts to identity which sperm phenotypic traits are associated with swimming velocity have been unsuccessful...

  1. Clinical and prognostic significance of human papillomavirus DNA in the sperm or exfoliated cells of infertile patients and subjects with risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresta, Carlo; Pizzol, Damiano; Moretti, Afra; Barzon, Luisa; Palù, Giorgio; Garolla, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate human papillomavirus (HPV) sperm infection and its correlation with sperm parameters in infertile patients and subjects with risk factors. Cross-sectional clinical study. Andrology and microbiology sections at a university hospital. A cohort of 290 subjects: 26 with genital warts, 66 with HPV positive partners, 108 infertile patients, and 90 fertile controls. Semen analysis, sperm culture, polymerase chain reaction, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for HPV detection. Statistical analysis was performed with a two-tailed Student's t-test. The prevalence of HPV semen infection found in all groups was as follows: patients with genital warts, 53.8%; infected partners, 40.9%; infertile patients, 10.2%, fertile controls, 2.2%. Infertile patients had a higher HPV DNA prevalence in sperm cells than the other groups. The results of HPV investigation were compared with sperm parameters and the results of FISH analysis. Sperm motility was more frequently reduced in infected samples and in particular when the infection was present in the sperm. This study demonstrated a very high prevalence of infection in the semen of patients with risk factors for HPV. In each group of subjects, HPV seems to be preferentially located in sperm or exfoliated cells, with different effects on sperm motility. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sexual dimorphism of medium-sized neurons with spines in human nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazdanović Маја

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus accumbens is a limbic nucleus, representing part of the striatum body, and together with the caudate nucleus and putamen, it lies on the septum. The aim of this study was to examine morphological sexual dimorphism in spine density and also to undertake an immunohistochemical study of expression for estrogen and progesterone receptors in the medium-sized neurons in the nucleus accumbens. The research was conducted on twenty human brains of persons of both sexes, between the age of 20-75 years. The Golgi method was applied to determine the types and subtypes of neurons, morphologies of soma, dendrites and axons, as well as the relations between the cells and glial elements. The following were quantitatively examined: the maximum diameter of the neurons, the minimal diameter of the neurons, and the total length of the dendrites. The expression of receptors for estrogen and progesterone, their distribution and intensity were defined immunohistochemically. The parameters of the bodies of neurons in the shell and core of the nucleus accumbens were studied in both men and women. No statistically significant differences were found. Examination of the spine density showed statistical significance in terms of a higher density of spines in women. Immunohistochemically, in the female brain estrogen expression is diffusely spread in a large number of neurons; it is extra nuclear, of granular appearance and high intensity. In the male brain, expression of estrogen is visible and distributed over about one half of different types of neurons; it is extra nuclear, of granular appearance, mostly of middle and low staining intensity. Expression of progesterone in the female brain was very discreet and on a very small number of neurons; it was extra nuclear and with a weak staining intensity. Expression of progesterone in the male brain was distributed on a small number of neurons. It had a granular appearance, it was extra nuclear, with a very low

  3. [Morphometric studies of biological changes in synapses of the human caudate nucleus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, R; Knebel, G; Haug, H

    1991-01-01

    In the adult the caudate nucleus decreases with increasing age. Light microscopic measurements result in smaller sized neurons and a reduced neuropil in the aged. Comparable to a sintering, nerve cells move nearer, and in consequence, their density increases. The total number of nerve cells, however, does not change remarkably. Using electronmicroscopic methods the aging of synapses was morphometrically examined: Blocks of the caudate nucleus were cut out of formalin-fixed brains from 43 males who had died between the 22nd and 102nd year of age without any neurological symptoms. The blocks were contrasted with EPTA (ethanolic phosphotungstic acid) and embedded in araldite. Though the whole tissue was autolytic, presynaptic and postsynaptic densities were well-preserved and clearly visible. Their numbers and sizes were measured with semiautomatic procedures. The regression analysis shows a significant decrease of the density of synapses with increasing age. The aging of the human caudate nucleus is characterized by a decrease of its volume, by a reduction of the size of neuronal perikarya, and a diminution of the number of synapses per neuron. But the total number of nerve cells remains nearly constant.

  4. Three-dimensional positioning and structure of chromosomes in a human prophase nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Yusuf, Mohammed; Hashimoto, Teruo; Estandarte, Ana Katrina; Thompson, George; Robinson, Ian

    2017-01-01

    The human genetic material is packaged into 46 chromosomes. The structure of chromosomes is known at the lowest level, where the DNA chain is wrapped around a core of eight histone proteins to form nucleosomes. Around a million of these nucleosomes, each about 11 nm in diameter and 6 nm in thickness, are wrapped up into the complex organelle of the chromosome, whose structure is mostly known at the level of visible light microscopy to form a characteristic cross shape in metaphase. However, the higher-order structure of human chromosomes, between a few tens and hundreds of nanometers, has not been well understood. We show a three-dimensional (3D) image of a human prophase nucleus obtained by serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, with 36 of the complete set of 46 chromosomes captured within it. The acquired image allows us to extract quantitative 3D structural information about the nucleus and the preserved, intact individual chromosomes within it, including their positioning and full spatial morphology at a resolution of around 50 nm in three dimensions. The chromosome positions were found, at least partially, to follow the pattern of chromosome territories previously observed only in interphase. The 3D conformation shows parallel, planar alignment of the chromatids, whose occupied volumes are almost fully accounted for by the DNA and known chromosomal proteins. We also propose a potential new method of identifying human chromosomes in three dimensions, on the basis of the measurements of their 3D morphology. PMID:28776025

  5. Different Levels of DNA Methylation Detected in Human Sperms after Morphological Selection Using High Magnification Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nino Guy Cassuto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze DNA methylation levels between two groups of spermatozoa taken from the same sample, following morphological selection by high magnification (HM at 6100x microscopy. A prospective study was conducted and studied 876 spermatozoa from 10 randomly selected men. Sperm morphology was characterized at HM according to criteria previously established. High-scoring Score 6 and low-scoring Score 0 sperm were selected. Sperm DNA methylation level was assessed using an immunoassay method targeting 5-methylcytosine residues by fluorescence microscopy with imaging analysis system to detect DNA methylation in single spermatozoon. Results. In total, 448 S6 spermatozoa and 428 S0 spermatozoa were analyzed. A strong relationship was found between sperm DNA methylation levels and sperm morphology observed at HM. Sperm DNA methylation level in the S6 group was significantly lower compared with that in the S0 group (p<10-6, OR = 2.4; and p<0.001, as determined using the Wilcoxon test. Conclusion. Differences in DNA methylation levels are associated with sperm morphology variations as observed at HM, which allows spermatozoa with abnormal levels to be discarded and ultimately decrease birth defects, malformations, and epigenetic diseases that may be transmitted from sperm to offspring in ICSI.

  6. Evidence that a functional fertilin-like ADAM plays a role in human sperm-oolemmal interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronson, R A; Fusi, F M; Calzi, F; Doldi, N; Ferrari, A

    1999-05-01

    Fertilin is a protein initially identified in guinea pig spermatozoa; it is the prototype of a larger family of conserved, proteins designated as a disintegrin and a metalloproteinase (ADAM). These heterodimers which consist of alpha and beta subunits, containing metalloproteinase-like and disintegrin-like domains, appear to play a role in mammalian fertilization. Peptides derived from the disintegrin domains of two ADAMs, fertilin and cyritestin, interfere with gamete adhesion and sperm-egg membrane fusion in non-human species. It has been suggested that fertilin-beta binds to an oolemmal integrin, and it is proposed that the tripeptide FEE (Phe-Glu-Glu) is the integrin recognition sequence in human fertilin-beta. We evaluated whether fertilin beta plays a role in human fertilization by studying the effects of a linear octapeptide containing the FEE sequence, SFEECDLP, and a scrambled octapeptide with the same amino acids, SFPCEDEL, on the incorporation of human spermatozoa by human zona-free eggs. The effects of G4120, a potent RGD-containing (Arg-Gly-Asp) thioether-bridged cyclic peptide which blocks both fibronectin and vitronectin receptors, and the relationship between FEE- and RGD-receptor interactions on sperm-egg interactions were also studied. The FEE-containing peptide, but not the scrampled peptide, inhibited sperm adhesion to oocytes and their penetration, over the range 1-5 microM. The inhibition induced by SFEECDLP was reversible and occurred only in the presence of peptide itself. The G4120 peptide exhibited 10-fold less inhibitory effects on sperm adhesion and penetration than did SFEECDLP. When combined, SFEECDLP and G4120 exhibited strong inhibition of both adhesion and penetration at concentrations that individually had been ineffective, suggesting co-operation between the two receptor-ligand interactions during fertilization. We propose that a fertilin-like molecule is functionally active on human spermatozoa and that its interaction with an

  7. Local vs. volume conductance activity of field potentials in the human subthalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, Odeya; Valsky, Dan; Joshua, Mati; Bick, Atira S; Arkadir, David; Tamir, Idit; Bergman, Hagai; Israel, Zvi; Eitan, Renana

    2017-06-01

    Subthalamic nucleus field potentials have attracted growing research and clinical interest over the last few decades. However, it is unclear whether subthalamic field potentials represent locally generated neuronal subthreshold activity or volume conductance of the organized neuronal activity generated in the cortex. This study aimed at understanding of the physiological origin of subthalamic field potentials and determining the most accurate method for recording them. We compared different methods of recordings in the human subthalamic nucleus: spikes (300-9,000 Hz) and field potentials (3-100 Hz) recorded by monopolar micro- and macroelectrodes, as well as by differential-bipolar macroelectrodes. The recordings were done outside and inside the subthalamic nucleus during electrophysiological navigation for deep brain stimulation procedures (150 electrode trajectories) in 41 Parkinson's disease patients. We modeled the signal and estimated the contribution of nearby/independent vs. remote/common activity in each recording configuration and area. Monopolar micro- and macroelectrode recordings detect field potentials that are considerably affected by common (probably cortical) activity. However, bipolar macroelectrode recordings inside the subthalamic nucleus can detect locally generated potentials. These results are confirmed by high correspondence between the model predictions and actual correlation of neuronal activity recorded by electrode pairs. Differential bipolar macroelectrode subthalamic field potentials can overcome volume conductance effects and reflect locally generated neuronal activity. Bipolar macroelectrode local field potential recordings might be used as a biological marker of normal and pathological brain functions for future electrophysiological studies and navigation systems as well as for closed-loop deep brain stimulation paradigms.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our results integrate a new method for human subthalamic recordings with a development of an

  8. The effect of two cryopreservation methods on human sperm DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taixiu; Gao, Jianfang; Zhou, Niya; Mo, Min; Wang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Xi; Yang, Huan; Chen, Qing; Ao, Lin; Liu, Jinyi; Cui, Zhihong; Cao, Jia

    2016-06-01

    Several methods are currently available for selection when conducting sperm cryopreservation, however, these methods might cause different degrees of damage on sperm DNA. The aim of the this study is to compare the effects of storage at -80 °C (in ultra-low temperature refrigerator) and at -196 °C (in liquid nitrogen) on sperm DNA damage, thus to provide a reference for choosing the right method according to different aims. We randomly collected 28 semen samples from college students of Chongqing city. The samples stored at -80 °C were neat semen samples and the samples stored at -196 °C were mixed with additional cryoprotectants. Each sample was subjected to two freezing-thawing cycles, and the sperm DNA damage levels of fresh and thawed samples were measured by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). Both SCGE and SCSA assays showed cryopreservation induced significant damage to sperm DNA. However, storage at -196 °C lead to more severe damage to sperm DNA than storage at -80 °C measured by SCSA. Sperm DNA damage increased simultaneously with the higher frequency of freezing-thawing cycles. We concluded that storage of neat semen samples at -80 °C had milder damage to sperm DNA than storage at -196 °C mixed with cryoprotectants. To avoid additional sperm DNA damage, repeated freezing and thawing should be prevented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A comparative neuroanatomical study of the red nucleus of the cat, macaque and human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Onodera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human red nucleus (Nr is comparatively less well-studied than that of cats or monkeys. Given the functional importance of reticular and midbrain structures in control of movement and locomotion as well as from an evolutionary perspective, we investigated the nature and extent of any differences in Nr projections to the olivary complex in quadrupedal and bipedal species. Using neuroanatomical tract-tracing techniques we developed a "neural sheet" hypothesis allowing us to propose how rubro-olivary relations differ among the three species. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase staining supports findings that the cat's nucleus accessories medialis of Bechtrew (NB projects mainly to the lateral bend of the principal olive. We clarified boundaries among nucleus of Darkschewitsch (ND, NB and parvicellular red nucleus (pNr of the cat's neural sheet. The macaque's ND-medial accessory olivary projection is rostro-caudally organized and the dorsomedial and ventrolateral parts of the macaque's pNr may project to the principal olive's rostral and caudal dorsal lamella; in cat it projects as well to pNr. Myelin- and Nissl-stained sections show that a well-developed dorsomedial part of the human Nr consists of densely packed cells, deriving small myelinated fibers that continue into the medial central tegmental tract. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these findings we suggest there are distinct bipedal-quadrupedal differences for Nr projections to the olivary complex. We propose the Nr of cats and monkeys comprise the ND, NB and pNr in a zonal sheet-like structure, retaining clear nuclear boundaries and an isolated, well-developed mNr. The human NB may be distinguished from its more specialised ND (ND lies alongside a well-developed pNr in the human central gray. Phylogenetically, the NB may have been translocated into a roll-shaped Nr in the reticular formation, the dorsomedial portion of which might correspond to the cat

  10. Mathematical model of neuronal morphology: prenatal development of the human dentate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajković, Katarina; Bačić, Goran; Ristanović, Dušan; Milošević, Nebojša T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to quantify the morphological changes of the human dentate nucleus during prenatal development using mathematical models that take into account main morphometric parameters. The camera lucida drawings of Golgi impregnated neurons taken from human fetuses of gestational ages ranging from 14 to 41 weeks were analyzed. Four morphometric parameters, the size of the neuron, the dendritic complexity, maximum dendritic density, and the position of maximum density, were obtained using the modified Scholl method and fractal analysis. Their increase during the entire prenatal development can be adequately fitted with a simple exponential. The three parameters describing the evolution of branching complexity of the dendritic arbor positively correlated with the increase of the size of neurons, but with different rate constants, showing that the complex development of the dendritic arbor is complete during the prenatal period. The findings of the present study are in accordance with previous crude qualitative data on prenatal development of the human dentate nucleus, but provide much greater amount of fine details. The mathematical model developed here provides a sound foundation enabling further studies on natal development or analyzing neurological disorders during prenatal development.

  11. Distinct populations of neurons respond to emotional valence and arousal in the human subthalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieger, Tomáš; Serranová, Tereza; Růžička, Filip; Vostatek, Pavel; Wild, Jiří; Štastná, Daniela; Bonnet, Cecilia; Novák, Daniel; Růžička, Evžen; Urgošík, Dušan; Jech, Robert

    2015-03-10

    Both animal studies and studies using deep brain stimulation in humans have demonstrated the involvement of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in motivational and emotional processes; however, participation of this nucleus in processing human emotion has not been investigated directly at the single-neuron level. We analyzed the relationship between the neuronal firing from intraoperative microrecordings from the STN during affective picture presentation in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and the affective ratings of emotional valence and arousal performed subsequently. We observed that 17% of neurons responded to emotional valence and arousal of visual stimuli according to individual ratings. The activity of some neurons was related to emotional valence, whereas different neurons responded to arousal. In addition, 14% of neurons responded to visual stimuli. Our results suggest the existence of neurons involved in processing or transmission of visual and emotional information in the human STN, and provide evidence of separate processing of the affective dimensions of valence and arousal at the level of single neurons as well.

  12. Mathematical Model of Neuronal Morphology: Prenatal Development of the Human Dentate Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Rajković

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to quantify the morphological changes of the human dentate nucleus during prenatal development using mathematical models that take into account main morphometric parameters. The camera lucida drawings of Golgi impregnated neurons taken from human fetuses of gestational ages ranging from 14 to 41 weeks were analyzed. Four morphometric parameters, the size of the neuron, the dendritic complexity, maximum dendritic density, and the position of maximum density, were obtained using the modified Scholl method and fractal analysis. Their increase during the entire prenatal development can be adequately fitted with a simple exponential. The three parameters describing the evolution of branching complexity of the dendritic arbor positively correlated with the increase of the size of neurons, but with different rate constants, showing that the complex development of the dendritic arbor is complete during the prenatal period. The findings of the present study are in accordance with previous crude qualitative data on prenatal development of the human dentate nucleus, but provide much greater amount of fine details. The mathematical model developed here provides a sound foundation enabling further studies on natal development or analyzing neurological disorders during prenatal development.

  13. Is there a medial nucleus of the trapezoid body in humans?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Norris, B E; Fullerton, B C

    1983-01-01

    The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) appears to be a prominent auditory structure in many mammals. However, the presence of an MNTB in the human brain has not been clearly established. One of the most characteristic features of the cat MNTB is the presence of large somatic endings...... with multiple synaptic sites, the calyces of Held. We examined adult human brains at both light and electron microscopic levels and found neurons with unusually large endings in a location that is similar to that for the MNTB in other animals. Moreover, the sizes and shapes of some cells in this area...... are similar to the principal cells of the cat MNTB. These observations support the idea that humans have cells that resemble MNTB neurons in other species. It has been suggested that the cat MNTB may be involved in the generation of wave 3 of its brainstem auditory evoked potentials, so the presence...

  14. Effect of drinking water disinfection by-products in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aftab; Kurzawa-Zegota, Malgorzata; Najafzadeh, Mojgan; Gopalan, Rajendran C; Plewa, Michael J; Anderson, Diana

    2014-12-01

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are generated by the chemical disinfection of water and may pose hazards to public health. Two major classes of DBPs are found in finished drinking water: haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs). HAAs are formed following disinfection with chlorine, which reacts with iodide and bromide in the water. Previously the HAAs were shown to be cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic. To determine the effect of HAAs in human somatic and germ cells and whether oxidative stress is involved in genotoxic action. In the present study both somatic and germ cells have been examined as peripheral blood lymphocytes and sperm. The effects of three HAA compounds: iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoacetic acid (BAA) and chloroacetic acid (CAA) were investigated. After determining appropriate concentration responses, oxygen radical involvement with the antioxidants, butylated hydroxanisole (BHA) and the enzyme catalase, were investigated in the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay under alkaline conditions, >pH 13 and the micronucleus assay. In the Comet assay, BHA and catalase were able to reduce DNA damage in each cell type compared to HAA alone. In the micronucleus assay, micronuclei (MNi) were found in peripheral lymphocytes exposed to all three HAAs and catalase and BHA were in general, able to reduce MNi induction, suggesting oxygen radicals play a role in both assays. These observations are of concern to public health since both human somatic and germ cells show similar genotoxic responses. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Types, Causes, Detection and Repair of DNA Fragmentation in Animal and Human Sperm Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Roy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Concentration, motility and morphology are parameters commonly used to determine the fertilization potential of an ejaculate. These parameters give a general view on the quality of sperm but do not provide information about one of the most important components of the reproductive outcome: DNA. Either single or double DNA strand breaks can set the difference between fertile and infertile males. Sperm DNA fragmentation can be caused by intrinsic factors like abortive apoptosis, deficiencies in recombination, protamine imbalances or oxidative stress. Damage can also occur due to extrinsic factors such as storage temperatures, extenders, handling conditions, time after ejaculation, infections and reaction to medicines or post-testicular oxidative stress, among others. Two singular characteristics differentiate sperm from somatic cells: Protamination and absence of DNA repair. DNA repair in sperm is terminated as transcription and translation stops post-spermiogenesis, so these cells have no mechanism to repair the damage occurred during their transit through the epididymis and post-ejaculation. Oocytes and early embryos have been shown to repair sperm DNA damage, so the effect of sperm DNA fragmentation depends on the combined effects of sperm chromatin damage and the capacity of the oocyte to repair it. In this contribution we review some of these issues.

  16. Comparative cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble hexavalent chromium in human and sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Chen, Tânia; LaCerte, Carolyne; Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie; Martino, Julieta; Wise, John Pierce; Thompson, W Douglas; Wise, John Pierce

    2012-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a global marine pollutant, present in marine mammal tissues. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known human carcinogen. In this study, we compare the cytotoxic and clastogenic effects of Cr(VI) in human (Homo sapiens) and sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) skin fibroblasts. Our data show that increasing concentrations of both particulate and soluble Cr(VI) induce increasing amounts of cytotoxicity and clastogenicity in human and sperm whale skin cells. Furthermore, the data show that sperm whale cells are resistant to these effects exhibiting less cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than the human cells. Differences in Cr uptake accounted for some but not all of the differences in particulate and soluble Cr(VI) genotoxicity, although it did explain the differences in particulate Cr(VI) cytotoxicity. Altogether, the data indicate that Cr(VI) is a genotoxic threat to whales, but also suggest that whales have evolved cellular mechanisms to protect them against the genotoxicity of environmental agents such as Cr(VI). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Small human sperm vacuoles observed under high magnification are pocket-like nuclear concavities linked to chromatin condensation failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitrelle, F; Albert, M; Petit, J-M; Ferfouri, F; Wainer, R; Bergere, M; Bailly, M; Vialard, F; Selva, J

    2013-08-01

    Since an embryo's ability to grow to the blastocyst stage and implant can be improved by selection of a normal spermatozoon with a vacuole-free head, this study set out to determine the nature of small sperm vacuoles observed under high magnification (>×6300). For 15 infertile men with various sperm profiles, high-magnification microscopy was used to select motile, morphometrically normal spermatozoa with no vacuoles (n=450) or more than two small vacuoles (each of which occupied less than 4% of the head's area; n=450). Spermatozoa acrosome reaction status and degree of chromatin condensation were analysed. Three-dimensional deconvolution microscopy was used to accurately image the nucleus and acrosome at all depths in all spermatozoa. In all 450 spermatozoa with small vacuoles, the latter were seen to be abnormal, DNA-free nuclear concavities. Spermatozoa with small vacuoles were significantly more likely than vacuole-free spermatozoa to have noncondensed chromatin (39.8% versus 9.3%, respectively; Pvacuoles observed under high magnification are pocket-like nuclear concavities related to failure of chromatin condensation. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Kisspeptin Expression in the Human Infundibular Nucleus in Relation to Sex, Gender Identity, and Sexual Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taziaux, Melanie; Staphorsius, Annemieke S; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R; Swaab, Dick F; Bakker, Julie

    2016-06-01

    Since the discovery of its central role in reproduction, our functional neuroanatomical knowledge of the hypothalamic kisspeptin system is predominantly based on animal studies. Although sex differences in kisspeptin expression have been shown in humans in adulthood, the developmental origin of this sex difference is unknown. Our objectives were to determine the following: 1) when during development the sex difference in kisspeptin expression in the infundibular nucleus would emerge and 2) whether this sex difference is related to sexual orientation or transsexuality. Postmortem hypothalamic tissues were collected by The Netherlands Brain Bank, and sections were stained for kisspeptin by immunohistochemistry. Hypothalami of 43 control subjects were categorized into three periods: infant/prepubertal (six girls, seven boys), adult (11 women, seven men), and elderly (six aged women, six aged men). Eight male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals, three HIV(+) heterosexual men, and five HIV(+) homosexual men were also analyzed. We estimated the total number of kisspeptin-immunoreactive neurons within the infundibular nucleus. Quantitative analysis confirmed that the human infundibular kisspeptin system exhibits a female-dominant sex difference. The number of kisspeptin neurons is significantly greater in the infant/prepubertal and elderly periods compared with the adult period. Finally, in MTF transsexuals, but not homosexual men, a female-typical kisspeptin expression was observed. These findings suggest that infundibular kisspeptin neurons are sensitive to circulating sex steroid hormones throughout life and that the sex reversal observed in MTF transsexuals might reflect, at least partially, an atypical brain sexual differentiation.

  19. The relationship between environmental exposures to phthalates and DNA damage in human sperm using the neutral comet assay.

    OpenAIRE

    Duty, Susan M; Singh, Narendra P; Silva, Manori J; Barr, Dana B; Brock, John W; Ryan, Louise; Herrick, Robert F; Christiani, David C; Hauser, Russ

    2003-01-01

    Phthalates are industrial chemicals widely used in many commercial applications. The general population is exposed to phthalates through consumer products as well as through diet and medical treatments. To determine whether environmental levels of phthalates are associated with altered DNA integrity in human sperm, we selected a population without identified sources of exposure to phthalates. One hundred sixty-eight subjects recruited from the Massachusetts General Hospital Andrology Laborato...

  20. The effect of cigarette smoking on human seminal parameters, sperm chromatin structure and condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, R M; Nasrallah, Y S; Hassan, M M; Farrag, A F; Majzoub, A; Agarwal, A

    2017-11-09

    Considerable debate still exists regarding the effects of cigarette smoking on male fertility. This work aimed to explore effects of cigarette smoking on semen parameters and DNA fragmentation on 95 infertile patients who were divided into infertile male nonsmokers (45) and infertile male smokers (50). Smokers were subdivided according to a number of cigarettes smoked per day into mild (≤10), moderate (11-20) and heavy smokers (≥21). Semen analysis, sperm chromatin condensation integrity with aniline blue staining and sperm viability were compared between the study groups. A significant decrease has been shown in sperm count (p = .006), progressive motility (p = condensation was significantly higher in smokers compared to nonsmokers (p = condensation and sperm viability. These abnormalities were also proportional to the number of cigarettes smoked per day and to the duration of smoking. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Human semen quality and sperm DNA damage assessed by comet assay in clinical groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, Muhammad Haris; Ramzan, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Mumtaz; Ramzan, Faiqah; Wahab, Fazal; Khan, Muhammad Aslam; Jillani, Musharraf; Shah, Mohsin

    2015-01-01

    About 10%-15% of couples around the world suffer from infertility. Male infertility is responsible directly or indirectly in approximately 60% of cases. A deficiency in semen is the most common cause of male infertility. The study included 180 male subjects aged 18-50 years with 26 fertile and 154 infertile. The infertile subjects were further subdivided according to the WHO guidelines of semen analysis (2010) into different clinical groups. Sperm DNA damage was estimated using a neutral comet assay. Plasma gonadotropin and testosterone levels were measured using a chemiluminescence assay. The results of the study revealed no significant differences, in semen volume, pH, and liquefaction time between the fertile and all infertile groups. However, sperm concentration, sperm vitality, and sperm motility were significantly lower in all infertile groups as compared to the fertile males. The morphological forms of the sperm and its DNA fragmentation varied significantly between the fertile and infertile males. Reproductive hormone levels were observed to be significantly lower in the infertile than in the fertile males. Sperm DNA fragmentation was higher in all of the infertile subjects as compared to the fertile ones. Reproductive hormone levels varied significantly between the infertile patients and the fertile ones.

  2. Overexpression of human sperm protein 17 increases migration and decreases the chemosensitivity of human epithelial ovarian cancer cells

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    Huang Wen-bin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most deaths from ovarian cancer are due to metastases that are resistant to conventional therapies. But the factors that regulate the metastatic process and chemoresistance of ovarian cancer are poorly understood. In the current study, we investigated the aberrant expression of human sperm protein 17 (HSp17 in human epithelial ovarian cancer cells and tried to analyze its influences on the cell behaviors like migration and chemoresistance. Methods Immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry were used to identify HSp17 in paraffin embedded ovarian malignant tumor specimens and peritoneal metastatic malignant cells. Then we examined the effect of HSp17 overexpression on the proliferation, migration, and chemoresistance of ovarian cancer cells to carboplatin and cisplatin in a human ovarian carcinoma cell line, HO8910. Results We found that HSp17 was aberrantly expressed in 43% (30/70 of the patients with primary epithelial ovarian carcinomas, and in all of the metastatic cancer cells of ascites from 8 patients. The Sp17 expression was also detected in the metastatic lesions the same as in ovarian lesions. None of the 7 non-epithelial tumors primarily developed in the ovaries was immunopositive for HSp17. Overexpression of HSp17 increased the migration but decreased the chemosensitivity of ovarian carcinoma cells to carboplatin and cisplatin. Conclusion HSp17 is aberrantly expressed in a significant proportion of epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Our results strongly suggest that HSp17 plays a role in metastatic disease and resistance of epithelial ovarian carcinoma to chemotherapy.

  3. Chromatin organization in sperm may be the major functional consequence of base composition variation in the human genome.

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    Tanya Vavouri

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin in sperm is different from that in other cells, with most of the genome packaged by protamines not nucleosomes. Nucleosomes are, however, retained at some genomic sites, where they have the potential to transmit paternal epigenetic information. It is not understood how this retention is specified. Here we show that base composition is the major determinant of nucleosome retention in human sperm, predicting retention very well in both genic and non-genic regions of the genome. The retention of nucleosomes at GC-rich sequences with high intrinsic nucleosome affinity accounts for the previously reported retention at transcription start sites and at genes that regulate development. It also means that nucleosomes are retained at the start sites of most housekeeping genes. We also report a striking link between the retention of nucleosomes in sperm and the establishment of DNA methylation-free regions in the early embryo. Taken together, this suggests that paternal nucleosome transmission may facilitate robust gene regulation in the early embryo. We propose that chromatin organization in the male germline, rather than in somatic cells, is the major functional consequence of fine-scale base composition variation in the human genome. The selective pressure driving base composition evolution in mammals could, therefore, be the need to transmit paternal epigenetic information to the zygote.

  4. Efficacy of two sperm preparation techniques in reducing non-specific bacterial species from human semen

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    Prabath K Abeysundara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Artificial reproductive techniques using seminal preparations with bacteria may cause pelvic inflammatory disease and its sequalae. Aims: To assess efficacy of two sperm preparation techniques to clear bacteria and the effect of bacteriospermia on sperm recovery rates. Settings and Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among males of subfertile couples. Subjects and Methods: Semen samples were randomly allocated into swim-up method (group S, n = 68 and density gradient method (group D, n = 50 for sperm preparation. Seminal fluid analysis and bacterial cultures were performed in each sample before and after sperm preparation. Statistical Analysis: McNemar′s chi-squared test and independent samples t-test in SPSS version 16.0 were used. Results: Organisms were found in 86 (72.88% out of 118 samples, before sperm preparation; Streptococcus species (n = 40, 46.51% of which 14 were Group D Streptococcus species, Coagulase negative Staphylococcus species (n = 17, 19.76%, Staphylococcus aureus (n = 13, 15.11%, Coliform species (n = 11, 12.79% of which 09 were Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium species (n = 5, 5.81%. There was a statistically significant reduction of culture positive samples in raw vs. processed samples; in group S, 49 (72.05% vs. 16 (23.52% and in group D, 37 (74% vs. 18 (36%. In group S and D, mean (SD recovery rates of culture positive vs. culture negative samples were 39.44% (SD-14.02 vs. 44.22% (SD-22.38, P = 0.39 and 52.50% (SD-37.16 vs. 49.58% (SD-40.32, P = 0.82 respectively. Conclusions: Both sperm preparation methods significantly reduced bacteria in semen, but total clearance was not achieved. Sperm recovery rate was not affected by bacteriospermia.

  5. Preferential retention of the E6 and E7 regions of the human papilloma virus type 18 genome by human sperm cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, C C; Yang, F P; Lai, Y M

    1996-10-01

    To determine if sperm cells differentially take up or retain different regions of human papilloma virus (HPV) type 18 genome. A descriptive clinical study. A major medical center affiliated with a medical college. Twenty-three randomly selected patients who attended Fertility Clinics at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Semen specimens were obtained from volunteered patients who attended fertility clinics at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. The presence of various regions of HPV type 18 genome in sperm cells was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Among 23 sperm specimens that were positive for HPV type 18 DNA by polymerase chain reaction, the upstream regulatory region, E6, E7, E1, and L1 regions or open region frames were detected in 4 (17%), 7 (30%), 19 (83%), 5 (22%), and 1 (4%) specimens, respectively. The differential display of the presence of various regions of the HPV type 18 genome was not the result of different amplification and detection efficiencies of these DNA fragments. These results suggest that the oncogenic portion of HPV DNA is present in spermatozoa. Furthermore, the E6 and E7 regions of the viral genome preferentially were taken up and/or retained by the human sperm cells.

  6. Modern human sperm freezing: Effect on DNA, chromatin and acrosome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahiminia, Tahereh; Hosseini, Akram; Anvari, Morteza; Ghasemi-Esmailabad, Saeed; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2017-08-01

    Presence of vitrification method in sperm freezing and the introduction of solid surface vitrification beside rapid freezing in vapour, opens an easy and safe way to help infertility centres. While the effects of cryopreservation on motility, morphology and viability of sperm are documented, the question of the probable alteration of sperm DNA, chromatin and acrosome integrity after freezing and thawing procedures in different methods is still controversial. Normal sample were collected according to WHO strict criteria. Sperm suspensions were mixed 1:1 with 0.5 M sucrose and divided into four equal aliquots for freezing: fresh, nitrogen direct immersion vitrification (Vit), solid surface vitrification (SSV) and in vapour (Vapour). Sperm suspensions were transferred into a 0.25 ml sterile plastic. Then straw was inserted inside the 0.5 ml straw. For thawing, the straws were immersed in a 42 °C water bath. Beside the sperm parameters, we assessed the acrosome reaction by double staining, chromatin integrity by toluidine blue (Tb) and chromomycin A3 (CMA3) and DNA integrity by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) respectively. In progressive motility, the highest rate occurred in Vit (39.9 ± 13.3). Moreover, the lowest rate of immotile sperm was in Vit (32.7 ± 16.3). In normal morphology, the group Vit was similar to the fresh, while SSV and Vapour were significantly different from the fresh. The percentage of acrosome-reacted sperms was more in Vit (81.3 ± 10.2) than the fresh group. TUNEL+ results showed that DNA fragmentation was significantly increased in Vit (p-value = 0.025). While in SSV and Vapour results were comparable to fresh. There was a significant correlation between TUNEL+ and normal morphology, TB, CMA3 and presence of intact acrosome. Sperm in Vapour was healthier in terms of DNA, chromatin and acrosome integrity. In contrast of higher motility and normal morphology; DNA, chromatin and acrosome

  7. Decoding gripping force based on local field potentials recorded from subthalamic nucleus in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Brown, Peter

    2016-11-18

    The basal ganglia are known to be involved in the planning, execution and control of gripping force and movement vigour. Here we aim to define the nature of the basal ganglia control signal for force and to decode gripping force based on local field potential (LFP) activities recorded from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. We found that STN LFP activities in the gamma (55-90 Hz) and beta (13-30m Hz) bands were most informative about gripping force, and that a first order dynamic linear model with these STN LFP features as inputs can be used to decode the temporal profile of gripping force. Our results enhance the understanding of how the basal ganglia control gripping force, and also suggest that deep brain LFPs could potentially be used to decode movement parameters related to force and movement vigour for the development of advanced human-machine interfaces.

  8. Proteomics analysis of good and poor quality human sperm demonstrates several proteins are routinely aberrantly regulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netherton, J K; Hetherington, L; Ogle, R A; Velkov, T; Baker, M A

    2017-12-07

    Male infertility is a complex condition, and for the most part, all men produce defective spermatozoa, but infertile men have a tendency to produce more. Despite attempts to classify infertility, there is no definitive test. One approach would be to use protein biomarkers, however as yet, we still do not understand proteins that are differentially expressed within defective spermatozoa. As such, we took nine men (fertility status unknown) and used Percoll density gradients to isolate a population of good and poor quality sperm. For four of these men, we also obtained multiple ejaculations. The most noticeable difference between the Percoll-isolated fractions were motility and CMA3 staining. Whilst the good sperm fraction produced cells with at least 80% forward progressive motility and low levels of CMA3 staining, the poor quality sperm demonstrated less than 10% forward progressive motility and higher levels CMA3 staining. Using the technique of Sequential Window Activation of All Theoretical Mass spectra (SWATH-MS), we quantified 2774 proteins and found 171 proteins to be significantly more abundant in the good sperm fraction, whilst 104 proteins were significantly more abundant in the lower sperm fraction (adjusted Benjamini-Hochberg significance of p < 0.018, minimum 2-fold difference). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study of Reproduction. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Proteolytic release and partial characterization of human sperm-surface glycopeptides

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    Tortorella H.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm-surface glycopeptides were obtained from intact sperm membranes after proteolytic release by different enzymatic treatments such as autoproteolysis, trypsin, papain and pronase. Glycopeptides were isolated, their properties and composition were examined, and their monosaccharide and amino acid constituents were characterized. The monosaccharides identified were fucose, mannose, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine, and N-acetylgalactosamine, which form part of more than one type of oligosaccharide units. Autoproteolytic treatment mainly provided O-glycosidic type oligosaccharides, while a mixture of O- and N-glycosidic oligosaccharides was obtained in variable proportions when treated with trypsin, papain or pronase. The highest degree of peptide cleavage was obtained with pronase. Despite the higher yields reached with trypsin, these glycopeptides contain the lowest percentage of oligosaccharide chains. Proteolytic treatment provides a simple, rapid procedure for the isolation of glycopeptides from the sperm surface

  10. Oestrogenic compounds and oxidative stress (in human sperm and lymphocytes in the Comet assay).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Diana; Schmid, Thomas E; Baumgartner, Adolf; Cemeli-Carratala, Eduardo; Brinkworth, Martin H; Wood, John M

    2003-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by a wide variety of chemicals and physiological processes in which enzymes catalyse the transfer of electrons from a substrate to molecular oxygen. The immediate products of such reactions, superoxide anion radicals and hydrogen peroxide can be metabolised by enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), respectively, and depending on its concentration by Vitamin C (Vit C). Under certain circumstances the ROS form highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. We examined human sperm and lymphocytes after treatment with six oestrogenic compounds in the Comet assay, which measures DNA damage, and observed that all caused damage in both cell types. The damage was diminished in nearly all cases by catalase, and in some instances by SOD and Vit C. This response pattern was also seen with hydrogen peroxide. This similarity suggests that the oestrogen-mediated effects could be acting via the production of hydrogen peroxide since catalase always markedly reduced the response. The variable responses with SOD indicate a lesser involvement of superoxide anion radicals due to SOD-mediated conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide generally causing a lower level of DNA damage than other ROS. The variable Vit C responses are explained by a reduction of hydrogen peroxide at low Vit C concentrations and a pro-oxidant activity at higher concentrations. Together these data provide evidence that inappropriate exposure to oestrogenic compounds could lead to free-radical mediated damage. It is believed that the observed activities were not generated by cell free cell culture conditions because increased responses were observed over and above control values when the compounds were added, and also increasing dose-response relationships have been found after treatment with such oestrogenic compounds in previously reported studies.

  11. Preparation, Characterization, and Determination of Immunological Activities of Transfer Factor Specific to Human Sperm Antigen

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    Jianwei Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of this study was to prepare, characterize, and determine immunological activities of specific transfer factor (STF specific to human sperm antigen (HSA for the preparation of antisperm contraceptive vaccine that can be used as an immunocontraceptive. Methods. HSA-STF was prepared using the spleens of rabbits vaccinated with HSA. The specific immunological activities were examined by lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT, leukocyte adhesion inhibition test (LAIT, and by determining the concentrations of IL-4, γ-IFN, and IL-21. HSA-STF was a helveolous substance, having a pH value of 7.0±0.4 and UV absorption maxima at 258 ± 6 nm. It contained seventeen amino acids; glycine and glutamic acids were the highest in terms of concentrations (38.8 μg/mL and 36.3 μg/mL, resp.. Results. The concentration of polypeptide was 2.34±0.31 mg/mL, and ribose was 0.717±0.043 mg/mL. The stimulation index for lymphocyte proliferation test was 1.84, and the leukocyte adhesion inhibition rate was 37.7%. There was a statistically significant difference between the cultural lymphocytes with HSA-STF and non-HSA-STF for γ-IFN and IL-21 (P0.05. Conclusion. HSA-STF was prepared and characterized successfully. It had immunological activity which could transfer the immune response specific to HSA and prove to be a potential candidate for the development of male immunocontraceptive agents.

  12. Preparation, characterization, and determination of immunological activities of transfer factor specific to human sperm antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianwei; Kong, Cui; Yuan, Zhaohong; Luo, Junmin; Ma, Rui; Yu, Jiang; Cao, Jinghe

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The objective of this study was to prepare, characterize, and determine immunological activities of specific transfer factor (STF) specific to human sperm antigen (HSA) for the preparation of antisperm contraceptive vaccine that can be used as an immunocontraceptive. METHODS. HSA-STF was prepared using the spleens of rabbits vaccinated with HSA. The specific immunological activities were examined by lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT), leukocyte adhesion inhibition test (LAIT), and by determining the concentrations of IL-4, γ -IFN, and IL-21. HSA-STF was a helveolous substance, having a pH value of 7.0 ± 0.4 and UV absorption maxima at 258 ± 6 nm. It contained seventeen amino acids; glycine and glutamic acids were the highest in terms of concentrations (38.8 μ g/mL and 36.3 μ g/mL, resp.). RESULTS. The concentration of polypeptide was 2.34 ± 0.31 mg/mL, and ribose was 0.717 ± 0.043 mg/mL. The stimulation index for lymphocyte proliferation test was 1.84, and the leukocyte adhesion inhibition rate was 37.7%. There was a statistically significant difference between the cultural lymphocytes with HSA-STF and non-HSA-STF for γ -IFN and IL-21 (P 0.05). CONCLUSION. HSA-STF was prepared and characterized successfully. It had immunological activity which could transfer the immune response specific to HSA and prove to be a potential candidate for the development of male immunocontraceptive agents.

  13. Environmental and Occupational Pesticide Exposure and Human Sperm Parameters: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martenies, Sheena E.; Perry, Melissa J.

    2013-01-01

    Of continuing concern are the associations between environmental or occupational exposures to pesticides and semen quality parameters. Prior research has indicated that there may be associations between exposure to pesticides of a variety of classes and decreased sperm health. The intent of this review was to summarize the most recent evidence related to pesticide exposures and commonly used semen quality parameters, including concentration, motility and morphology. The recent literature was searched for studies published between January, 2007 and August, 2012 that focused on environmental or occupational pesticide exposures. Included in the review are 17 studies, 15 of which reported significant associations between exposure to pesticides and semen quality indicators. Two studies also investigated the roles genetic polymorphisms may play in the strength or directions of these associations. Specific pesticides targeted for study included dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), and abamectin. Pyrethroids and organophosphates were analyzed as classes of pesticides rather than as individual compounds, primarily due to the limitations of exposure assessment techniques. Overall, a majority of the studies reported significant associations between pesticide exposure and sperm parameters. A decrease in sperm concentration was the most commonly reported finding among all of the pesticide classes investigated. Decreased motility was also associated with exposures to each of the pesticide classes, although these findings were less frequent across studies. An association between pesticide exposure and sperm morphology was less clear, with only two studies reporting an association. The evidence presented in this review continues to support the hypothesis that exposures to pesticides at environmentally or occupationally relevant levels may be associated with decreased sperm health. Future work in this area should focus on associations between specific

  14. Protamine extraction and analysis of human sperm protamine 1/protamine 2 ratio using Acid gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lihua; Aston, Kenneth I; Carrell, Douglas T

    2013-01-01

    Protamines, sperm-specific nuclear proteins, are essential for sperm chromatin condensation and DNA stabilization. They are small, highly basic, and rich in disulfide bonds. Under reducing conditions, protamines, along with other basic proteins, are soluble in acid solutions. Because of their small and similar molecular weights, SDS-PAGE cannot resolve protamine 1 and protamine 2 well. Urea-acid gel electrophoresis separates proteins based on the level of the positive charge and is thus a suitable method for resolving protamines 1 and 2. Here, we describe the commonly used protamine extraction method and the Urea-acid gel electrophoresis for assessment of protamine 1/protamine 2 ratio.

  15. Are there intracellular Ca2+ oscillations correlated with flagellar beating in human sperm? A three vs. two-dimensional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkidi, G; Montoya, F; Hernández-Herrera, P; Ríos-Herrera, W A; Müller, M F; Treviño, C L; Darszon, A

    2017-09-01

    Are there intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) oscillations correlated with flagellar beating in human sperm? The results reveal statistically significant [Ca2+]i oscillations that are correlated with the human sperm flagellar beating frequency, when measured in three-dimensions (3D). Fast [Ca2+]i oscillations that are correlated to the beating flagellar frequency of cells swimming in a restricted volume have been detected in hamster sperm. To date, such findings have not been confirmed in any other mammalian sperm species. An important question that has remained regarding these observations is whether the fast [Ca2+]i oscillations are real or might they be due to remaining defocusing effects of the Z component arising from the 3D beating of the flagella. Healthy donors whose semen samples fulfill the WHO criteria between the age of 18-28 were selected. Cells from at least six different donors were utilized for analysis. Approximately the same number of experimental and control cells were analyzed. Motile cells were obtained by the swim-up technique and were loaded with Fluo-4 (Ca2+ sensitive dye) or with Calcein (Ca2+ insensitive dye). Ni2+ was used as a non-specific plasma membrane Ca2+ channel blocker. Fluorescence data and flagella position were acquired in 3D. Each cell was recorded for up to 5.6 s within a depth of 16 microns with a high speed camera (coupled to an image intensifier) acquiring at a rate of 3000 frames per second, while an oscillating objective vibrated at 90 Hz via a piezoelectric device. From these samples, eight experimental and nine control sperm cells were analyzed in both 2D and 3D. We have implemented a new system that allows [Ca2+]i measurements of the human sperm flagellum beating in 3D. These measurements reveal statistically significant [Ca2+]i oscillations that correlate with the flagellar beating frequency. These oscillations may arise from intracellular sources and/or Ca2+ transporters, as they were insensitive to external Ni2+, a non

  16. Chondroprotective supplementation promotes the mechanical properties of injectable scaffold for human nucleus pulposus tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Berit L; Maxwell, Thomas W; Deng, Ying

    2014-01-01

    A result of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, the nucleus pulposus (NP) is no longer able to withstand applied load leading to pain and disability. The objective of this study is to fabricate a tissue-engineered injectable scaffold with chondroprotective supplementation in vitro to improve the mechanical properties of a degenerative NP. Tissue-engineered scaffolds were fabricated using different concentrations of alginate and calcium chloride and mechanically evaluated. Fabrication conditions were based on structural and mechanical resemblance to the native NP. Chondroprotective supplementation, glucosamine (GCSN) and chondroitin sulfate (CS), were added to scaffolds at concentrations of 0:0µg/mL (0:0-S), 125:100µg/mL (125:100-S), 250:200µg/mL (250:200-S), and 500:400µg/mL (500:400-S), GCSN and CS, respectively. Scaffolds were used to fabricate tissue-engineered constructs through encapsulation of human nucleus pulposus cells (HNPCs). The tissue-engineered constructs were collected at days 1, 14, and 28 for biochemical and biomechanical evaluations. Confocal microscopy showed HNPC viability and rounded morphology over the 28 day period. MTT analysis resulted in significant increases in cell proliferation for each group. Collagen type II ELISA quantification and compressive aggregate moduli (HA) showed increasing trends for both 250:200-S and the 500:400-S groups on Day 28 with significantly greater HA compared to 0:0-S group. Glycosaminoglycan and water content decreased for all groups. Results indicate the increased mechanical properties of the 250:200-S and the 500:400-S was due to production of a functional matrix. This study demonstrated potential for a chondroprotective supplemented injectable scaffold to restore biomechanical function of a degenerative disc through the production of a mechanically functional matrix. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. In vitro effects of metal ions (Fe2+, Mn2+, Pb2+) on sperm motility and lipid peroxidation in human semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y L; Tseng, W C; Lin, T H

    2001-02-23

    The effects of divalent manganese ion (Mn2+), ferrous iron (Fe2+), and lead ion (Pb2+) on human sperm motility and lipid peroxidation were examined. Human semen from healthy male volunteers was incubated with 0, 5, 50, or 500 ppm divalent metal ions, and the sperm motility was determined at 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8 h by microscopy. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in seminal plasma was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography after 8 h of exposure. The results showed that 500 ppm Mn2+ or Pb2+ significantly inhibited sperm motility without an accompanying change in seminal MDA levels. Incubation with Fe2+ significantly inhibited sperm motility at 5 ppm, associated with a marked rise in MDA levels. Our results suggested that Fe2+ may induce lipid peroxidation to inhibit sperm motility. In the case of Mn2+ and Pb2+ there is an absence of seminal lipid peroxidation and the observed inhibition of sperm motility at high concentrations is not biologically or environmentally relevant.

  18. Morphometric analysis of vasopressin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide neurons in the human suprachiasmatic nucleus: influence of microwave treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, J. N.; Hofman, M. A.; Swaab, D. F.

    1996-01-01

    The vasopressin (VP) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-expressing neurons in the human suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) were morphometrically determined with or without microwave (MW) treatment. Both an enlarged volume and an increased number of neurons were found in the VP and VIP subnucleus

  19. Glucocorticoids decrease thyrotropin-releasing hormone messenger ribonucleic acid expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the human hypothalamus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, A.; Unmehopa, U.A.; Wiersinga, W.M.; Swaab, D.F.; Fliers, E.

    2005-01-01

    The way glucocorticoids affect TRH mRNA expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus is still unclear. In view of its relevance for Cushing's syndrome and depression, we measured TRH mRNA expression in human hypothalami obtained at autopsy by means of quantitative TRH mRNA in situ

  20. Modern human sperm freezing: Effect on DNA, chromatin and acrosome integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Rahiminia

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: Sperm in Vapour was healthier in terms of DNA, chromatin and acrosome integrity. In contrast of higher motility and normal morphology; DNA, chromatin and acrosome integrity were decreased in Vit. However, these findings were more acceptable in SSV or Vapour.

  1. Widespread epigenetic abnormalities suggest a broad DNA methylation erasure defect in abnormal human sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Houshdaran

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Male-factor infertility is a common condition, and etiology is unknown for a high proportion of cases. Abnormal epigenetic programming of the germline is proposed as a possible mechanism compromising spermatogenesis of some men currently diagnosed with idiopathic infertility. During germ cell maturation and gametogenesis, cells of the germ line undergo extensive epigenetic reprogramming. This process involves widespread erasure of somatic-like patterns of DNA methylation followed by establishment of sex-specific patterns by de novo DNA methylation. Incomplete reprogramming of the male germ line could, in theory, result in both altered sperm DNA methylation and compromised spermatogenesis.We determined concentration, motility and morphology of sperm in semen samples collected by male members of couples attending an infertility clinic. Using MethyLight and Illumina assays we measured methylation of DNA isolated from purified sperm from the same samples. Methylation at numerous sequences was elevated in DNA from poor quality sperm.This is the first report of a broad epigenetic defect associated with abnormal semen parameters. Our results suggest that the underlying mechanism for these epigenetic changes may be improper erasure of DNA methylation during epigenetic reprogramming of the male germ line.

  2. HYPOOSMOTIC SPERM SWELLING TEST DOES NOT ASSESS FERTILIZING-CAPACITY OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JAGER, S; KREMER, J; WIJCHMAN, J

    1991-01-01

    The hypo-osmotic sperm swelling (HOSS) test was performed on semen samples of five normospermic men from couples with prolonged infertility. Previously, the men had negative results of the zona-free hamster oocyte (ZFHO) test on two different ejaculates and the wives subsequently had become pregnant

  3. Intrinsic connectivity between the hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, and ventral tegmental area in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, I; Shohamy, D

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that memory formation in the hippocampus is modulated by the motivational significance of events, allowing past experience to adaptively guide behavior. The effects of motivation on memory are thought to depend on interactions between the hippocampus, the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Indeed, animal studies reveal anatomical pathways for circuit-level interaction between these regions. However, a homologue circuit connectivity in humans remains to be shown. We characterized this circuitry in humans by exploiting spontaneous low-frequency modulations in the fMRI signal (termed resting-state functional connectivity), which are thought to reflect functionally related regions and their organization into functional networks in the brain. We examined connectivity in this network across two datasets (hi-resolution, n = 100; standard resolution, n = 894). Results reveal convergent connectivity between the hippocampus, and both the NAcc and the VTA centered on ventral regions in the body of the hippocampus. Additionally, we found individual differences in the strength of connectivity within this network. Together, these results provide a novel task-independent characterization of circuitry underlying interactions between the hippocampus, NAcc, and VTA and provide a framework with which to understand how connectivity might reflect and constrain the effects of motivation on memory. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Assessment of the DNA Damage in Human Sperm and Lymphocytes Exposed to the Carcinogen Food Contaminant Furan with Comet Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Pandir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe aim of this work was to assess the damage of DNA in human blood cell and spermin vitro under the influence of furan. These cells were administered 0-600 μM of furan at 37 and 32oC for 30 and 60 min, respectively. A significant increase in tail DNA%, tail length and moment indicating DNA damage was observed at increasing doses when compared to the controls. The treatment with 300 and 600 μM of furan showed a maximum increase of 86.74 ± 2.43 and 93.29 ± 8.68 compared to the control tail DNA% in lymphocytes. However, only 600 μM of furan showed a maximum increase of 94.71 ± 6.24 compared to the control tail DNA% in sperm. The results suggested that furan caused DNA damage in lymphocytes at increasing doses, but appeared to have not the same effect on human sperm at the low doses. Genotoxic activity had an impact on the risk assessment of furan formed on the food for human cells. Therefore, it would be important to further investigate these properties of furan as the food mutagen.

  5. The relationship between environmental exposures to phthalates and DNA damage in human sperm using the neutral comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duty, Susan M; Singh, Narendra P; Silva, Manori J; Barr, Dana B; Brock, John W; Ryan, Louise; Herrick, Robert F; Christiani, David C; Hauser, Russ

    2003-07-01

    Phthalates are industrial chemicals widely used in many commercial applications. The general population is exposed to phthalates through consumer products as well as through diet and medical treatments. To determine whether environmental levels of phthalates are associated with altered DNA integrity in human sperm, we selected a population without identified sources of exposure to phthalates. One hundred sixty-eight subjects recruited from the Massachusetts General Hospital Andrology Laboratory provided a semen and a urine sample. Eight phthalate metabolites were measured in urine by using high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; data were corrected for urine dilution by adjusting for specific gravity. The neutral single-cell microgel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) was used to measure DNA integrity in sperm. VisComet image analysis software was used to measure comet extent, a measure of total comet length (micrometers); percent DNA in tail (tail%), a measure of the proportion of total DNA present in the comet tail; and tail distributed moment (TDM), an integrated measure of length and intensity (micrometers). For an interquartile range increase in specific gravity-adjusted monoethyl phthalate (MEP) level, the comet extent increased significantly by 3.6 micro m [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.74-6.47]; the TDM also increased 1.2 micro m (95% CI, -0.05 to 2.38) but was of borderline significance. Monobutyl, monobenzyl, monomethyl, and mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalates were not significantly associated with comet assay parameters. In conclusion, this study represents the first human data to demonstrate that urinary MEP, at environmental levels, is associated with increased DNA damage in sperm.

  6. GTP-bound Rab3A exhibits consecutive positive and negative roles during human sperm dense-core granule exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Matías A; Roggero, Carlos M; De la Iglesia, Paola X; Mayorga, Luis S; Tomes, Claudia N

    2014-08-01

    Exocytosis of mammalian sperm dense-core secretory granule relies on the same fusion molecules as all other secretory cells; one such molecule is the small GTPase Rab3A. Here, we report an in-depth biochemical characterization of the role of Rab3A in secretion by scrutinizing the exocytotic response of streptolysin O-permeabilized human sperm to the acute application of a number of Rab3A-containing constructs and correlating the findings with those gathered with the endogenous protein. Full length, geranylgeranylated, and active Rab3A elicited human sperm exocytosis per se. With Rab3A/Rab22A chimeric proteins, we demonstrated that the carboxy-terminal domain of the Rab3A molecule was necessary and sufficient to promote exocytosis, whereas its amino-terminus prevented calcium-triggered secretion. Interestingly, full length Rab3A halted secretion when added after the docking of the acrosome to the plasma membrane. This effect depended on the inability of Rab3A to hydrolyze GTP. We combined modified immunofluorescence and acrosomal staining protocols to detect membrane fusion and the activation status of endogenous Rab3 simultaneously in individual cells, and found that GTP hydrolysis on endogenous Rab3 was mandatory for fusion pores to open. Our findings contribute to establishing that Rab3 modulates regulated exocytosis differently depending on the nucleotide bound and the exocytosis stage under study. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Mitochondria functionality and sperm quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Alexandra; Lourenço, Bárbara; Marques, Mónica; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2013-01-01

    Although mitochondria are best known for being the eukaryotic cell powerhouses, these organelles participate in various cellular functions besides ATP production, such as calcium homoeostasis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and steroid hormone biosynthesis. The aim of this review was to discuss the putative roles of mitochondria in mammalian sperm function and how they may relate to sperm quality and fertilisation ability, particularly in humans. Although paternal mitochondria are degraded inside the zygote, sperm mitochondrial functionality seems to be critical for fertilisation. Indeed, changes in mitochondrial integrity/functionality, namely defects in mitochondrial ultrastructure or in the mitochondrial genome, transcriptome or proteome, as well as low mitochondrial membrane potential or altered oxygen consumption, have been correlated with loss of sperm function (particularly with decreased motility). Results from genetically engineered mouse models also confirmed this trend. On the other hand, increasing evidence suggests that mitochondria derived ATP is not crucial for sperm motility and that glycolysis may be the main ATP supplier for this particular aspect of sperm function. However, there are contradictory data in the literature regarding sperm bioenergetics. The relevance of sperm mitochondria may thus be associated with their role in other physiological features, particularly with the production of ROS, which in controlled levels are needed for proper sperm function. Sperm mitochondria may also serve as intracellular Ca²⁺ stores, although their role in signalling is still unclear.

  8. Causal Evidence from Humans for the Role of Mediodorsal Nucleus of the Thalamus in Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peräkylä, Jari; Sun, Lihua; Lehtimäki, Kai; Peltola, Jukka; Öhman, Juha; Möttönen, Timo; Ogawa, Keith H; Hartikainen, Kaisa M

    2017-12-01

    The mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus (MD), with its extensive connections to the lateral pFC, has been implicated in human working memory and executive functions. However, this understanding is based solely on indirect evidence from human lesion and imaging studies and animal studies. Direct, causal evidence from humans is missing. To obtain direct evidence for MD's role in humans, we studied patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) for refractory epilepsy. This treatment is thought to prevent the generalization of a seizure by disrupting the functioning of the patient's anterior nuclei of the thalamus (ANT) with high-frequency electric stimulation. This structure is located superior and anterior to MD, and when the DBS lead is implanted in ANT, tip contacts of the lead typically penetrate through ANT into the adjoining MD. To study the role of MD in human executive functions and working memory, we periodically disrupted and recovered MD's function with high-frequency electric stimulation using DBS contacts reaching MD while participants performed a cognitive task engaging several aspects of executive functions. We hypothesized that the efficacy of executive functions, specifically working memory, is impaired when the functioning of MD is perturbed by high-frequency stimulation. Eight participants treated with ANT-DBS for refractory epilepsy performed a computer-based test of executive functions while DBS was repeatedly switched ON and OFF at MD and at the control location (ANT). In comparison to stimulation of the control location, when MD was stimulated, participants committed 2.26 times more errors in general (total errors; OR = 2.26, 95% CI [1.69, 3.01]) and 2.86 times more working memory-related errors specifically (incorrect button presses; OR = 2.88, CI [1.95, 4.24]). Similarly, participants committed 1.81 more errors in general ( OR = 1.81, CI [1.45, 2.24]) and 2.08 times more working memory-related errors ( OR = 2.08, CI [1.57, 2.75]) in

  9. Development of the interpeduncular nucleus in the midbrain of Rhesus monkey and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenn, N J; Halfon, N; Rakic, P

    1978-02-20

    The development of the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN) in primates was studied in rhesus monkey with 3H-thymidine autoradiographic, Nissl and Golgi methods and in humans in histological preparations from embryos and fetuses of different ages. Autoradiographic analysis demonstrated that the neurons of the monkey IPN underwent their final cell division between postconception day 36 (E36) and E42, which corresponds to Stages 17 through 21 of Hendrickx and Sawyer. Autoradiograms of monkeys sacrificed at various short intervals following exposure to a pulse of 3H-thymidine showed that IPN neurons were generated in the proximity of the ventricular surface near the confluence of the 3rd ventricle and cerebral aqueduct, migrated ventrally along the midline and then spread laterally after reaching the ventral midbrain, where IPN was first recognized at E45 (Stage 23). The distribution of successively generated neurons in autoradiograms revealed caudal to rostal and lateral to medial spatiotemporal gradients. Differentiation of IPN neuronal size and development of Nissl substance began in rhesus monkey only after postmitotic cells had reached their destination and seemed to be pronounced mainly through E104. However, growth of the dendrites and elaboration of their side branches as seen in Golgi impregnations progressed gradually from E81 to birth (E165) and perhaps even later. Analysis of histological preparations of a series of human embryos and fetuses was used to derive similar information indirectly, since the autoradiographic method cannot be applied to man. It was found that IPN neurons in human probably underwent their final division between Carnegie Stage 17 and 21. Similarly, as in monkey, postmitotic cells in human IPN displayed an inverted fountain pattern of cellular migration. IPN could first be delineated at Stage 23. There was evidence for both caudal to rostral and lateral to medial spatiotemporal gradients in the human, as in the monkey. Thus, in monkey and

  10. Onuf's nucleus X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1981-01-01

    The first, second and third sacral segments of 59 human spinal cords were examined in order to localize and describe Onuf's nucleus X. The nucleus was found to be situated in the ventral horn of the segments S2 and S3; only in very few spinal cords did it extend into S1. A significant variation...... in the length of the nucleus was observed. Based on the cytoarchitecture the nucleus could be divided in three parts, a cranial, a dorsomedial and a ventrolateral. All parts of the nucleus consisted of chromatin-rich medium-sized neurons, and apparent direct appositions between different cells bodies as well...... as between cell bodies and large dendrites were observed. Characteristic findings in the neuropil surrounding the nucleus were the sparsity of myelinated fibers and the presence of dendritic bundles. The present observations are compared to the descriptions of a morphologically similar nucleus...

  11. Effects of the anti-malarial compound cryptolepine and its analogues in human lymphocytes and sperm in the Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Rajendran C; Emerce, Esra; Wright, Colin W; Karahalil, Bensu; Karakaya, Ali E; Anderson, Diana

    2011-12-15

    Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease caused by the genus Plasmodium. It causes one million deaths per year in African children under the age of 5 years. There is an increasing development of resistance of malarial parasites to chloroquine and other currently used anti-malarial drugs. Some plant products such as the indoloquinoline alkaloid cryptolepine have been shown to have potent activity against P. falciparum in vitro. On account of its toxicity, cryptolepine is not suitable for use as an antimalarial drug but a number of analogues of cryptolepine have been synthesised in an attempt to find compounds that have reduced cytotoxicity and these have been investigated in the present study in human sperm and lymphocytes using the Comet assay. The results suggest that cryptolepine and the analogues cause DNA damage in lymphocytes, but appear to have no effect on human sperm at the assessed doses. In the context of antimalarial drug development, the data suggest that all cryptolepine compounds and in particular 2,7-dibromocryptolepine cause DNA damage and therefore may not be suitable for pre clinical development as antimalarial agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Can the controversy about the putative role of the human female orgasm in sperm transport be settled with our current physiological knowledge of coitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Roy J

    2011-06-01

    Spermatozoal uptake, facilitated by uterine contractions induced by oxytocin at orgasm during coitus, has been a long term concept. Studies attempting its support, however, have been poorly examined especially in the context of the changes in the female genital tract activated by sexual arousal. To examine experimental support for the concept. Using a variety of search engines, mainly peer reviewed articles and un-reviewed books were examined relating to sperm transport and function in the human female genital tract in the absence and presence of arousal to orgasm. Identifying evidence-based data to support authority-based opinion. All the experimental observations of sperm or model substitute's transport have been undertaken in women who were not sexually aroused. They fail to take into account that arousal creates vaginal tenting lifting the cervico-uterine complex into the false pelvis away from the ejaculated semen. This delays sperm uptake and transport making conclusions from these observations invalid in relation to transport during coitus. Studies injecting oxytocin have not used women in their sexually aroused state and used supraphysiological doses unlikely to be comparable with coitus and orgasm. The proposal that the transport of extra sperm by oxytocin-induced uterine contractions at orgasm is needed to facilitate fertility ignores possible harm from increased sperm numbers creating polyspermy and sperm enzyme release causing ovum degeneration, leading to decreased fertility. The role of sperm motility in their uptake from the vagina into the cervix as opposed to en bloc transfer through uterine archimyometrial-mediated transport in the absence of orgasm is at present unresolvable because of conflicting studies. The bulk of the reported evidence favors the conclusion that the female orgasm, with its concomitant central release of oxytocin, has little or no effective role in the transport of spermatozoa in natural human coitus. © 2010 International

  13. The Testicular and Epididymal Expression Profile of PLCζ in Mouse and Human Does Not Support Its Role as a Sperm-Borne Oocyte Activating Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarabi, Mahmoud; Yu, Yang; Xu, Wei; Tse, Man Y.; Pang, Stephen C.; Yi, Young-Joo; Sutovsky, Peter; Oko, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) is a candidate sperm-borne oocyte activating factor (SOAF) which has recently received attention as a potential biomarker of human male infertility. However, important SOAF attributes of PLCζ, including its developmental expression in mammalian spermiogenesis, its compartmentalization in sperm head perinuclear theca (PT) and its release into the ooplasm during fertilization have not been established and are addressed in this investigation. Different detergent extractions of sperm and head/tail fractions were compared for the presence of PLCζ by immunoblotting. In both human and mouse, the active isoform of PLCζ was detected in sperm fractions other than PT, where SOAF is expected to reside. Developmentally, PLCζ was incorporated as part of the acrosome during the Golgi phase of human and mouse spermiogenesis while diminishing gradually in the acrosome of elongated spermatids. Immunofluorescence localized PLCζ over the surface of the postacrosomal region of mouse and bull and head region of human spermatozoa leading us to examine its secretion in the epididymis. While previously thought to have strictly a testicular expression, PLCζ was found to be expressed and secreted by the epididymal epithelial cells explaining its presence on the sperm head surface. In vitro fertilization (IVF) revealed that PLCζ is no longer detectable after the acrosome reaction occurs on the surface of the zona pellucida and thus is not incorporated into the oocyte cytoplasm for activation. In summary, we show for the first time that PLCζ is compartmentalized as part of the acrosome early in human and mouse spermiogenesis and is secreted during sperm maturation in the epididymis. Most importantly, no evidence was found that PLCζ is incorporated into the detergent-resistant perinuclear theca fraction where SOAF resides. PMID:22428063

  14. The testicular and epididymal expression profile of PLCζ in mouse and human does not support its role as a sperm-borne oocyte activating factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Aarabi

    Full Text Available Phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ is a candidate sperm-borne oocyte activating factor (SOAF which has recently received attention as a potential biomarker of human male infertility. However, important SOAF attributes of PLCζ, including its developmental expression in mammalian spermiogenesis, its compartmentalization in sperm head perinuclear theca (PT and its release into the ooplasm during fertilization have not been established and are addressed in this investigation. Different detergent extractions of sperm and head/tail fractions were compared for the presence of PLCζ by immunoblotting. In both human and mouse, the active isoform of PLCζ was detected in sperm fractions other than PT, where SOAF is expected to reside. Developmentally, PLCζ was incorporated as part of the acrosome during the Golgi phase of human and mouse spermiogenesis while diminishing gradually in the acrosome of elongated spermatids. Immunofluorescence localized PLCζ over the surface of the postacrosomal region of mouse and bull and head region of human spermatozoa leading us to examine its secretion in the epididymis. While previously thought to have strictly a testicular expression, PLCζ was found to be expressed and secreted by the epididymal epithelial cells explaining its presence on the sperm head surface. In vitro fertilization (IVF revealed that PLCζ is no longer detectable after the acrosome reaction occurs on the surface of the zona pellucida and thus is not incorporated into the oocyte cytoplasm for activation. In summary, we show for the first time that PLCζ is compartmentalized as part of the acrosome early in human and mouse spermiogenesis and is secreted during sperm maturation in the epididymis. Most importantly, no evidence was found that PLCζ is incorporated into the detergent-resistant perinuclear theca fraction where SOAF resides.

  15. Decreased number of oxytocin neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the human hypothalamus in AIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purba, J. S.; Hofman, M. A.; Portegies, P.; Troost, D.; Swaab, D. F.

    1993-01-01

    The number of immunocytochemically identified vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OXT) neurons was determined morphometrically in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus of 20 acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients and 10 controls. The AIDS group consisted of 14 homosexual males (age

  16. Characterization of a human glycoprotein with a potential role in sperm-egg fusion: cDNA cloning, immunohistochemical localization, and chromosomal assignment of the gene (AEGL1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Masaru; Fujimoto, Seiichiro; Takano, Hiroko [Hokkaido Univ. School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    Acidic epididymal glycoprotein (AEG), thus far identified only in rodents, is one of the sperm surface proteins involved in the fusion of the sperm and egg plasma membranes. In the present study, we describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding a human glycoprotein related to AEG. Although this protein, designated ARP (AEG-related protein), is not the ortholog of rodent AEG, it resembles AEG in that it is an epididymal secretory glycoprotein that binds to the postacrosomal region of the sperm head. The fact that no AEG mRNA can be detected in the human epididymis suggests that ARP might be the functional counterpart of rodent AEG. The gene encoding ARP (AEGL1) was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to 6p21.1-p21.2. This result indicates that AEGL1 and the mouse gene for AEG are located in the chromosomal segments with conserved syntenies. 43 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Identification of motoneurons innervating individual extraocular muscles within the oculomotor nucleus in human

    OpenAIRE

    Che Ngwa, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Der Nucleus oculomotorius nIII und Nucleus trochlearis (nIV) im Mittelhirn enthalten die Motoneurone der extraoculären Augenmuskeln. Ziel der vorliegenden Arbeit war die Identifizierung der verschiedenen Motoneuronengruppen im humanen nIII und nIV, welche individuelle Augenmuskeln innervieren. Dies erfolgte anhand verschiedener histochemischer Färbungen, die im Vergleich zu Daten an Affen erhoben wurden. Der nIV innerviert nur den Musculus obliquus superior (SO), während nIII die Motoneurone ...

  18. Decreased number of oxytocin neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the human hypothalamus in AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purba, J S; Hofman, M A; Portegies, P; Troost, D; Swaab, D F

    1993-08-01

    The number of immunocytochemically identified vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OXT) neurons was determined morphometrically in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus of 20 acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients and 10 controls. The AIDS group consisted of 14 homosexual males (age range 25-62 years), four of whom had a probable HIV-1 associated dementia complex, and six non-demented heterosexuals (four males and two females, age range 21-73 years). Ten males without a primary neurological or psychiatric disease served as a control group. The number of OXT-expressing neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of both groups of AIDS patients was approximately 40% lower than that of the controls. In contrast, the three groups showed no significant differences in the number of AVP-expressing neurons in the paraventricular nucleus. Since there were no significant differences in the number of AVP and OXT cells between the homosexual and heterosexual subjects with AIDS, the morphological difference in the paraventricular nucleus seems to be related to AIDS and not to sexual orientation. No inflammatory changes were found in the paraventricular nucleus area. The selective changes in the OXT neurons of the paraventricular nucleus may be the basis for part of the neuroendocrine, autonomic dysfunction or vegetative symptoms in AIDS.

  19. The Effect of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Treatment Before Testicular Sperm Extraction in Non-Obstructive Azoospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Gul

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate our experience on empirical hCG treatment of patients with idiopathic non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA. Material and Method: hCG group consisted of 34 patients who were empirically treated with hCG despite normal serum FSH and LH levels and normal testicular volumes. hCG was administered as 2500 IU twice weekly subcutaneous injections for 10 to 14 weeks prior to testicular sperm extraction (TESE. Control group consisted of 49 age and spouse age matched patients who underwent TESE in the same time period. Sperm retrieval rate (SRR, and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, lutenizing hormone (LH and testosterone levels, volume of testicles, fertilization rate (FR, implantation rate (IR, pregnancy rate (PR, live birth rate (LBR and cancel rate (CR and surgical technique were compared between the two groups. Results: Conventional technique was used in 14 of the 17 patients (82.3% with successful sperm retrieval in the hCG group, and 18 of the 28 patients (64.3% in the control group (p=0.170. There were no differences between groups in terms of SRR (p=0.338. There were no significant differences in patient age, mean infertility period, mean values of FSH, LH, testosterone, estradiol levels, and testis volume between the two groups (p>0.05. There were no statistically significant differences for FR, IR, PR, LBR between the two groups (p>0.05. Discussion: Empirical hCG treatment in patients with idiopathic NOA did not result in improved SRR. hCG treatment did not have any effect on the success of ICSI.

  20. Enrichment of committed human nucleus pulposus cells expressing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans under alginate encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y; Lv, M; Zhou, L; Tam, V; Lv, F; Chan, D; Wang, H; Zheng, Z; Cheung, K M C; Leung, V Y L

    2015-07-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is associated with a malfunction of the nucleus pulposus (NP). Alginate culturing provides a favorable microenvironment for the phenotypic maintenance of chondrocyte-like NP cells. However, NP cells are recently evidenced to present heterogeneous populations, including progenitors, fibroblastic cells and primitive NP cells. The aim of this study is to profile the phenotypic changes of distinct human NP cells populations and describe the dynamic expression of chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans (CS-GAGs) in extended alginate encapsulation. Non-degenerated (ND-NPC) and degenerated (D-NPC) NP cells were expanded in monolayers, and subject to 28-day culture in alginate after serial passaging. CS-GAG compositional expression in monolayer-/alginate-cultured NP cells was evaluated by carbohydrate electrophoresis. Cellular phenotypic changes were assessed by immunologic detection and gene expression analysis. Relative to D-NPC, ND-NPC displayed remarkably higher expression levels of chondroitin-4-sulfate GAGs over the 28-day culture. Compared with monolayer culture, ND-NPC showed increased NP marker expression of KRT18, KRT19, and CDH2, as well as chondrocyte markers SOX9 and MIA in alginate culture. In contrast, expression of fibroblastic marker COL1A1, COL3A1, and FN1 were reduced. Interestingly, ND-NPC showed a loss of Tie2+ but gain in KRT19+/CD24+ population during alginate culture. In contrast, D-NPC showed more consistent expression levels of NP surface markers during culture. We demonstrate for the first time that extended alginate culture selectively enriches the committed NP cells and favors chondroitin-4-sulfate proteoglycan production. These findings suggest its validity as a model to investigate IVD cell function. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Subthalamic Nucleus Long-Range Synchronization – an Independent Hallmark of Human Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shay eMoshel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Beta-band synchronous oscillations in the dorsolateral region of the subthalamic nucleus (STN of human patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD have been frequently reported. However, the correlation between STN oscillations and synchronization has not been thoroughly explored. The simultaneous recordings of 2390 multi-unit pairs recorded by two parallel microelectrodes (separated by fixed distance of 2 mm, n=72 trajectories with two electrode tracks > 4 mm STN span in 57 PD patients undergoing STN deep brain stimulation surgery were analyzed. Automatic procedures were utilized to divide the STN into dorsolateral oscillatory and ventromedial non-oscillatory regions, and to quantify the intensity of STN oscillations and synchronicity. Finally, the synchronicity of simultaneously vs. non-simultaneously recorded pairs were compared using a shuffling procedure.Synchronization was observed predominately in the beta range and only between multi-unit pairs in the dorsolateral oscillatory region (n=615. In paired recordings between sites in the dorsolateral and ventromedial (n=548 and ventromedial-ventromedial region pairs (n=1227, no synchronization was observed. Oscillation and synchronicity intensity decline along the STN dorsolateral-ventromedial axis suggesting a fuzzy border between the STN regions. Synchronization strength was significantly correlated to the oscillation power, but synchronization was no longer observed following shuffling. We conclude that STN long-range beta oscillatory synchronization is due to increased neuronal coupling in the Parkinsonian brain and does not merely reflect the outcome of oscillations at similar frequency. The neural synchronization in the dorsolateral (probably the motor domain STN probably augments the pathological changes in firing rate and patterns of subthalamic neurons in PD patients.  

  2. Asymmetric right/left encoding of emotions in the human subthalamic nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renana eEitan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Emotional processing is lateralized to the non-dominant brain hemisphere. However, there is no clear spatial model for lateralization of emotional domains in the basal ganglia. The subthalamic nucleus (STN, an input structure in the basal ganglia network, plays a major role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease (PD. This role is probably not limited only to the motor deficits of PD, but may also span the emotional and cognitive deficits commonly observed in PD patients. Beta oscillations (12-30Hz, the electrophysiological signature of PD, are restricted to the dorsolateral part of the STN that corresponds to the anatomically defined sensorimotor STN. The more medial, more anterior and more ventral parts of the STN are thought to correspond to the anatomically defined limbic and associative territories of the STN. Surprisingly, little is known about the electrophysiological properties of the non-motor domains of the STN, nor about electrophysiological differences between right and left STNs.In this study, microelectrodes were utilized to record the STN spontaneous spiking activity and responses to vocal non-verbal emotional stimuli during deep brain stimulation (DBS surgeries in human PD patients. The oscillation properties of the STN neurons were used to map the dorsal oscillatory and the ventral non-oscillatory regions of the STN. Emotive auditory stimulation evoked activity in the ventral non-oscillatory region of the right STN. These responses were not observed in the left ventral STN or in the dorsal regions of either the right or left STN. Therefore, our results suggest that the ventral non-oscillatory regions are asymmetrically associated with non-motor functions, with the right ventral STN associated with emotional processing. These results suggest that DBS of the right ventral STN may be associated with beneficial or adverse emotional effects observed in PD patients and may relieve mental symptoms in other neurological and

  3. Parallel evaluation of doxorubicin-induced genetic damage in human lymphocytes and sperm using the comet assay and spectral karyotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, A; Schmid, T E; Cemeli, E; Anderson, D

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, two techniques for detecting genetic damage in the whole genome have gained importance: the alkaline comet assay, to detect DNA damage such as strand breaks and alkali-labile sites, and a multicolour FISH method, spectral karyotyping (SKY), to identify chromosomal aberrations simultaneously in all metaphase chromosomes. In the present study, the induction of DNA damage in human sperm and lymphocytes in vitro has been studied employing an anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DX). An increase in DNA damage was observed with the comet assay as the median per cent head DNA of sperm significantly decreased from 82.07 and 85.14% in the untreated control groups to 63.48 and 72.52% at doses of 0.8 micro M DX. At 1.6 micro M the percentage declined to 60.96% (the corresponding tail moment increased from 4.42 to 12.19). In stimulated lymphocytes, a significant increase was observed in tail moment, from 0.72 and 0.53 in controls to 15.17 and 12.10 at 0.2 micro M DX, continuing at the same level to a final concentration of 1.6 micro M. Structural aberrations found in the parallel SKY study in stimulated lymphocytes at 0.2 micro M DX consisted of 14% chromatid-type and 2% chromosome-type aberrations; none were found in controls. The SKY results correlate very well with the findings of the comet assay in lymphocytes where DNA damage was observed at similar doses. This study is the first reporting use of the comet assay and SKY analysis in parallel after chemical treatment. The potential of the two techniques together is evident, as they represent a set of assays feasible for evaluating damage in human somatic and germ cells after chemical treatment (i) by direct observation of two different end-points, detecting general DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations and (ii) by extrapolation from lymphocytes to sperm, which provides a 'parallelogram' approach in human cells.

  4. Zona pellucida from fertilised human oocytes induces a voltage-dependent calcium influx and the acrosome reaction in spermatozoa, but cannot be penetrated by sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouannet Pierre

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functions of three zona glycoproteins, ZP1, ZP2 and ZP3 during the sperm-zona pellucida (ZP interaction are now well established in mice. The expression of an additional zona glycoprotein, ZPB/4, in humans, led us to reconsider the classical mouse model of gamete interaction. We investigated the various functions of human ZP (hZP during the interaction of spermatozoa with fertilised and unfertilised oocytes. Results The hZP of fertilised oocytes retained their ability to bind sperm (albeit less strongly than that from unfertilised oocytes, to induce an intraspermatic calcium influx through voltage-dependent channels similar to that observed with hZP from unfertilised oocytes and to promote the acrosome reaction at a rate similar to that induced by the ZP of unfertilised oocytes (61.6 ± 6.2% vs60.7 ± 9.1% respectively. Conversely, the rate of hZP penetrated by sperm was much lower for fertilised than for unfertilised oocytes (19% vs 57% respectively, p Conclusion The change in ZP function induced by fertilisation could be different in human and mouse species. Our results suggest a zona blocking to polyspermy based at the sperm penetration level in humans.

  5. Human Herpesvirus-6A/B Binds to Spermatozoa Acrosome and Is the Most Prevalent Herpesvirus in Semen from Sperm Donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Maja Døvling; Larsen, Peter; Kofod-Olsen, Emil

    2012-01-01

    ejaculate that was positive for one or more human herpesvirus. Of these 27.3% (n = 15) had a double herpesvirus infection. If corrected for the presence of multiple ejaculates from some donors, the adjusted frequency of herpesviruses in semen was 27.2% with HSV-1 in 0.4%; HSV-2 in 0.1%; EBV in 6.3%; HCMV...... was shown to associate with sperm within minutes in a concentration dependent manner. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that HHV-6B associated with the sperm head, but only to sperm with an intact acrosome. Taken together, our data suggest that HHV-6A/B could be transported to the uterus via binding...

  6. How Human Amygdala and Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis May Drive Distinct Defensive Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpers, Floris; Kroes, Marijn C W; Baas, Johanna M P; Fernández, Guillén

    2017-10-04

    The ability to adaptively regulate responses to the proximity of potential danger is critical to survival and imbalance in this system may contribute to psychopathology. The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is implicated in defensive responding during uncertain threat anticipation whereas the amygdala may drive responding upon more acute danger. This functional dissociation between the BNST and amygdala is however controversial, and human evidence scarce. Here we used data from two independent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies [ n = 108 males and n = 70 (45 females)] to probe how coordination between the BNST and amygdala may regulate responses during shock anticipation and actual shock confrontation. In a subset of participants from Sample 2 ( n = 48) we demonstrate that anticipation and confrontation evoke bradycardic and tachycardic responses, respectively. Further, we show that in each sample when going from shock anticipation to the moment of shock confrontation neural activity shifted from a region anatomically consistent with the BNST toward the amygdala. Comparisons of functional connectivity during threat processing showed overlapping yet also consistently divergent functional connectivity profiles for the BNST and amygdala. Finally, childhood maltreatment levels predicted amygdala, but not BNST, hyperactivity during shock anticipation. Our results support an evolutionary conserved, defensive distance-dependent dynamic balance between BNST and amygdala activity. Shifts in this balance may enable shifts in defensive reactions via the demonstrated differential functional connectivity. Our results indicate that early life stress may tip the neural balance toward acute threat responding and via that route predispose for affective disorder. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Previously proposed differential contributions of the BNST and amygdala to fear and anxiety have been recently debated. Despite the significance of understanding their

  7. Sperm function test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Talwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With absolute normal semen analysis parameters it may not be necessary to shift to specialized tests early but in cases with borderline parameters or with history of fertilization failure in past it becomes necessary to do a battery of tests to evaluate different parameters of spermatozoa. Various sperm function tests are proposed and endorsed by different researchers in addition to the routine evaluation of fertility. These tests detect function of a certain part of spermatozoon and give insight on the events in fertilization of the oocyte. The sperms need to get nutrition from the seminal plasma in the form of fructose and citrate (this can be assessed by fructose qualitative and quantitative estimation, citrate estimation. They should be protected from the bad effects of pus cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS (leukocyte detection test, ROS estimation. Their number should be in sufficient in terms of (count, structure normal to be able to fertilize eggs (semen morphology. Sperms should have intact and functioning membrane to survive harsh environment of vagina and uterine fluids (vitality and hypo-osmotic swelling test, should have good mitochondrial function to be able to provide energy (mitochondrial activity index test. They should also have satisfactory acrosome function to be able to burrow a hole in zona pellucida (acrosome intactness test, zona penetration test. Finally, they should have properly packed DNA in the nucleus to be able to transfer the male genes (nuclear chromatic decondensation test to the oocyte during fertilization.

  8. Construction and analysis of a human testis/sperm-enriched interaction network: Unraveling the PPP1CC2 interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Joana Vieira; Yoon, Sooyeon; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Goltsev, Alexander V; Gevaert, Kris; Mendes, José Fernando F; Fardilha, Margarida

    2017-02-01

    Phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit gamma 2 (PPP1CC2), a PPP1CC tissue-specific alternative splice restricted to testicular germ cells and spermatozoa, is essential for spermatogenesis and spermatozoa motility. The key to understand PPP1CC2 regulation lies on the characterization of its interacting partners. We construct a testis/sperm-enriched protein interaction network and analyzed the topological properties and biological context of the network. Further the interaction of a potential target for pharmacological intervention was validated in human spermatozoa. A total of 1778 proteins and 32,187 interactions between them were identified in the testis/sperm-enriched network. The network analysis revealed the members of functional modules that interact more tightly with each other. In the network, PPP1CC was located in the fourth maximum core part (k=41) and had 106 direct interactors. Sixteen PPP1CC interactors were involved in spermatogenesis-related categories. Also, PPP1CC had 50 direct interactors, highly interconnected and many of them part of the network maximum core (k=44), associated with motility-related annotations, including several previously uncharacterized interactors, such as, LMNA, JAK2 and RIPK3. In this study we integrated tissue-specific protein expression and protein-protein interaction data in order to identify key PPP1CC2 complexes for male reproductive functions. One of the most intriguing interactors was A-kinase anchor protein 4 (AKAP4), a testis-specific protein related to infertility phenotypes and involved in all major motility-related annotations. We demonstrated for the first time the interaction between PPP1CC2 and AKAP4 in human spermatozoa and the potential of the complex as contraceptive target. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Interaction between the human hippocampus and the caudate nucleus during route recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, Nicol C; Petersson, Karl Magnus; Daudey, Leonie; Weber, Bernd; Van Spaendonck, Karel P; Kremer, H P H; Fernández, Guillén

    2004-01-01

    Navigation through familiar environments can rely upon distinct neural representations that are related to different memory systems with either the hippocampus or the caudate nucleus at their core. However, it is a fundamental question whether and how these systems interact during route recognition.

  10. The suprachiasmatic nucleus of the human brain in relation to sex, age and senile dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaab, D. F.; Fliers, E.; Partiman, T. S.

    1985-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is considered to be the endogenous clock of the brain, essential for the ovulation cycle and the temporal organization of sleep-wake patterns, among other things. Immunocytochemical staining with anti-vasopressin as a marker permitted a morphometric study of this

  11. Cardiovascular control by the suprachiasmatic nucleus: neural and neuroendocrine mechanisms in human and rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheer, Frank A.; Kalsbeek, Andries; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2003-01-01

    The risk for cardiovascular incidents is highest in the early morning, which seems partially due to endogenous factors. Endogenous circadian rhythms in mammalian physiology and behavior are regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Recently, anatomical evidence has been provided that SCN

  12. A multi-regional study on new approaches to investigate the quality of human sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alipour, Hiva; Nielsen, H. Ingolf; Van Der Horst, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    could result in new prediction criteria for the pregnancy outcome. Materials and Methods: As one of the goals, this study will focus on analyzing the seminal fluid from the semen sample using NMR and Mass Spectrometry in research for a correlation between the results of these methods and the DNA...... fragmentation, Kinetic parameters and finally implantation rates and pregnancy outcome. Results: As another goal in this study we plan to assess whether the second consecutive sample obtained within 12 hours of the first sample has a lower DNA fragmentation rate which will be very important in lowering...... the number of failed implantations and repeated abortions. Conclusion: Collecting and analyzing the samples from different locations (different countries and continents) using the SCA (Sperm Class Analyzer, Microptic, Spain) which has eliminated the inter technician variation and provides quantitative data...

  13. Adapted methods for scanning electron microscopy (SEM in assessment of human sperm morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Nussdorfer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a widespread problem, and in some cases, the routine basic semen analysis is not sufficient to detect the cause of male infertility. The use of the scanning electron microscope (SEM could provide a detailed insight into spermatozoa morphology, but it requires specific sample preparation techniques. The purpose of this study was to select, adjust, and optimize a method for the preparation of spermatozoa samples prior to SEM analysis, and to establish the protocol required for its use in clinical practice. We examined sperm samples of 50 men. The samples were fixed with modified iso-osmolar aldehyde solution followed by osmium post-fixation. In the first method, dehydration of the cells and subsequent critical point drying (CPD were performed on a coverslip. In the second method, the samples were dehydrated in centrifuge tubes; hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS was used as a drying agent instead of CPD, and the samples were air-dried. The third procedure was based on a membrane filter. The samples were dehydrated and dried with HMDS in a Gooch crucible, continuously, without centrifugation or redispersion of the sample. Our results showed that the fixation with modified iso-osmolar aldehyde solution followed by osmium post-fixation, and combined with dehydration and CPD on a coverslip, is the most convenient procedure for SEM sample preparation. In the case of small-size samples or low sperm concentration, dehydration and drying with HMDS on the membrane filter enabled the best reliability, repeatability, and comparability of the results. The presented procedures are suitable for routine use, and they can be applied to confirm as well as to correct a diagnosis.

  14. Effects of n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated acid-rich soybean phosphatidylcholine on membrane lipid profile and cryotolerance of human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vireque, Alessandra A; Tata, Alessandra; Silva, Oswaldo F L L O; LoTurco, Edson G; Azzolini, Augusto; Ferreira, Christina R; Dantas, Marilda H Y; Ferriani, Rui A; Reis, Rosana M

    2016-08-01

    To study the effects of n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated acid-rich soybean phosphatidylcholine (soy-PC) on sperm cryotolerance with regard to sperm membrane lipid profile, membrane surface integrity, and routine semen parameters. Experimental study. University-affiliated tertiary hospital. A total of 20 normospermic fertile men. Semen samples examined for differences in semen parameters, sperm membrane lipid profile, and plasma membrane surface both before and after cryopreservation using basic freezing medium with N-tris(hydroxymethyl)-methyl-2-aminoethane sulfonic acid (TES) and tris-(hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane (TRIS) supplemented with purified soy-PC (TEST-PC) or egg yolk (TEST-Y), both alone or in association (TEST-Y-PC). Conventional semen parameters and membrane lipid profile by matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Postthaw sperm cell motility, vitality, and morphology parameters were similar for soy-PC (TEST-PC) and egg yolk (TEST-Y) cryoprotectants. However, sperm exposed to TEST-Y-PC presented better kinetic parameters, which were similar to the original quality of the fresh semen. Human sperm MALDI-MS lipid profiles revealed that the relative abundance of glycerophospholipids of m/z 760.44 [PC (34:1)+H]+, 781.55 [SM (20:0) +Na]+, 784.55 [PC (36:3) +H]+, 806.64 [PC (38:6) +H]+, 807.64 [SM (22:1) +Na]+, and 809.64 [SM (22:0) +Na]+ increased in soy-PC samples (TEST-PC). Nonetheless, only one lipid (m/z 781.55, [SM (20:0) +Na]+) statistically significantly changed when sperm was cryopreserved in TEST-Y-PC. Sphingomyelin was defined as a prospective biomarker of soy-PC treatment, and it could be related to the positive cryoprotective effects of soy-PC in human sperm, opening new perspectives to design of a more efficient synthetic cryoprotectant medium containing purified egg yolk biomolecules combined with soy-PC. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA fragmentation dynamics allows the assessment of cryptic sperm damage in human: Evaluation of exposure to ionizing radiation, hyperthermia, acidic pH and nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiso, Rebeca; Tamayo, Maria [Laboratorio de Genetica Molecular y Radiobiologia, Centro Oncologico de Galicia, Doctor Camilo Veiras 1, 15009-A Coruna (Spain); Genetics Unit, INIBIC-Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruna (CHUAC), As Xubias, 84, 15006-A Coruna (Spain); Gosalvez, Jaime [Genetics Unit, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Johnston, Steve [School of Agriculture and Food Science, University of Queensland, Gatton 4343 (Australia); Marino, Alfonso [Servicio de Oncologia Radioterapica, Centro Oncologico de Galicia, Doctor Camilo Veiras 1, 15009-A Coruna (Spain); Fernandez, Carlos; Losada, Carlos [Servicio de Radiofisica, Centro Oncologico de Galicia, Doctor Camilo Veiras 1, 15009-A Coruna (Spain); Fernandez, Jose Luis, E-mail: Jose.Luis.Fernandez.Garcia@sergas.es [Laboratorio de Genetica Molecular y Radiobiologia, Centro Oncologico de Galicia, Doctor Camilo Veiras 1, 15009-A Coruna (Spain); Genetics Unit, INIBIC-Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruna (CHUAC), As Xubias, 84, 15006-A Coruna (Spain)

    2012-06-01

    Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) is not a static seminal parameter, since the longevity of sperm DNA decreases progressively with time following ejaculation or thawing. While the dynamics of SDF is a species-specific characteristic, in the case of humans, there is still significant variation within patients. To evaluate the suitability of the dynamic SDF assay to assess the adverse effects of agents that cause genetic damage, fresh semen samples from different donors were exposed in vitro to (1) increasing acute doses of ionizing radiation, (2) elevated temperature (41 Degree-Sign C and 45 Degree-Sign C), (3) acidic pH (pH 4) and (4) the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Sperm DNA fragmentation was analyzed after an incubation period of chronic (24 h), or acute (1 h) exposure to each treatment followed by incubation at 37 Degree-Sign C over a period of 24 h. SDF was assessed using the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) test. Dynamic SDF for each treatment was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. All agents, except for ionizing radiation, accelerated SDF kinetics following chronic exposure over a 24 h period. Transient exposure to NO and heat but not acidic pH increased the basal (T0) level of SDF. Despite the removal of the three toxicants, the remaining sperm following acute exposure showed a decrease in their expected DNA longevity. It is concluded that the assessment of sperm DNA fragmentation dynamics is an effective methodological approach for revealing latent damage associated with toxicants that is not initially expressed following a single initial observation of SDF.

  16. The sperm structure of Cryptocercus punctulatus Scudder (Blattodea) and sperm evolution in Dictyoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallai, Romano; Thipaksorn, Apisit; Gottardo, Marco; Mercati, David; Machida, Ryuichiro; Beutel, Rolf Georg

    2015-04-01

    Sperm of the dictyopteran key taxon Cryptocercus punctulatus was examined. It has largely maintained a blattodean groundplan condition, with a three-layered acrosome, an elongate nucleus, a single centriole, a conspicuous centriole adjunct material, two connecting bands (=accessory bodies), and a long functional flagellum with a 9+9+2 axoneme provided with accessory tubules with 16 protofilaments and intertubular material. These sperm characters are shared with several other polyneopterans. The sperm of C. punctulatus is very similar to what is found in Periplaneta americana and species of other groups of roaches, including the sperm of Loboptera decipiens described here for the first time. The general sperm organization here described can be assumed for the groundplan of Insecta and Pterygota. The following evolutionary path can be suggested: after the split between Cryptocercidae and the common ancestor of Isoptera, the typical pattern of sperm formation was altered very distinctly, resulting in a duplication or multiplication (Mastotermitidae) of the centrioles. Mastotermes has maintained a certain sperm motility, but with a very unusual apparatus of multiple flagella with a 9+0 axoneme pattern. After the split into Mastotermitidae and the remaining Isoptera, sperm motility was completely abandoned, and different modifications of sperm components occurred, and even the loss of the sperm flagellum. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Requirement of sperm-oocyte plasma membrane fusion for establishment of the plasma membrane block to polyspermy in human pronuclear oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengoku, K; Tamate, K; Takaoka, Y; Horikawa, M; Goishi, K; Okada, R; Tsuchiya, K; Ishikawa, M

    1999-02-01

    We investigated whether the incorporation of the sperm membrane into the oolemma contributes to the human plasma membrane block to polyspermy. We used zona pellucida-free oocytes fertilized by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) or activated by parthenogenetic activation. Only two of the 35 pronuclear oocytes fertilized by spermatozoa (control) demonstrated one single penetrating spermatozoa. In contrast, the majority of ICSI and parthenogenetically activated pronuclear oocytes were penetrated with an average of three spermatozoa per oocyte. The number of fused and binding spermatozoa of ICSI and parthenogenetically activated oocytes were significantly higher than in control oocytes (3.5+/-0.6 and 4.3+/-0.6 for ICSI; 3.0+/-0.3 and 3.8+/-0.4 for activated and 0.2+/-0.1 and 0.6+/-0.2 for controls, respectively, P < 0.01). Furthermore, the cortical granules were released from the cortex of ICSI and calcium ionophore-puromycin-activated pronuclear oocytes to the same extent as that of pronuclear oocytes fertilized by spermatozoa. These results suggest that the establishment of the plasma membrane block to sperm penetration in the human oocyte may require a fusion process between sperm and oocyte plasma membranes.

  18. In Vitro Inhibition of Human Sperm Creatine Kinase by Nicotine,Cotinine and Cadmium, as a Mechanism in Smoker Men Infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ali Ghaffari; Mohammad Abromand; Behrooz Motlagh

    2009-01-01

    Background: Nicotine, cotinine and cadmium are harmful components of cigarettes that have aneffect on human reproductive function. Although the effects of cigarette smoke on male reproductivefunction is characterized in several articles its mechanism of action is still unknown.In the present study, we investigate the effect of nicotine, cotinine and cadmium on human spermcreatine kinase activity in vitro.Materials and Methods: Total creatine kinase activity is measured in sperm homogenates af...

  19. The influence of ginger (Zingiber officinale on human sperm quality and DNA fragmentation: A double-blind randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Hosseini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the effectiveness of ginger as an antioxidant agent has been exploited, little human research has been conducted on its activity on male reproductive functions. Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale on sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF in infertile men. Materials and Methods: This randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with a 1:1 allocation was performed on 100 infertility treatment candidates who were admitted to Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, Tehran, Iran. Patients were randomly assigned to receive one of two treatments: ginger and placebo. Patients were given a 3-month oral treatment (members received capsules containing 250 mg of ginger powder twice a day in ginger and a placebo in other group. Before and after treatment, standardized semen samples were obtained to determine sperm concentration, motility, and SDF according to World Health Organization. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding SDF at baseline (53.48. 95%CI: 37.95-69.02 in cases and (56.75, 95%CI: 40.01-73.5 in controls. The average positive percentage of SDF in patients receiving ginger (17.77, 95%CI: 6.16-29.39 was lower compared with placebo (40.54, 95%CI: 23.94-57.13 after three month of treatment (p=0.02. In multivariate analysis, SDF was significantly lower in patients receiving ginger compared with placebo (mean difference: 3.21, 95%CI: 0.78-5.63, p=0.009. There were no significant differences between two groups regarding to semen parameters. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that ginger in a controlled study of efficacy was effective in decreasing SDF in infertile men.

  20. The influence of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on human sperm quality and DNA fragmentation: A double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Jalil; Mardi Mamaghani, Azar; Hosseinifar, Hani; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Dadkhah, Farid; Sepidarkish, Mahdi

    2016-08-01

    Although the effectiveness of ginger as an antioxidant agent has been exploited, little human research has been conducted on its activity on male reproductive functions. This study was designed to investigate the effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) in infertile men. This randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with a 1:1 allocation was performed on 100 infertility treatment candidates who were admitted to Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, Tehran, Iran. Patients were randomly assigned to receive one of two treatments: ginger and placebo. Patients were given a 3-month oral treatment (members received capsules containing 250 mg of ginger powder twice a day in ginger and a placebo in other group). Before and after treatment, standardized semen samples were obtained to determine sperm concentration, motility, and SDF according to World Health Organization. There was no significant difference between two groups regarding SDF at baseline (53.48. 95%CI: 37.95-69.02) in cases and (56.75, 95%CI: 40.01-73.5) in controls. The average positive percentage of SDF in patients receiving ginger (17.77, 95%CI: 6.16-29.39) was lower compared with placebo (40.54, 95%CI: 23.94-57.13) after three month of treatment (p=0.02). In multivariate analysis, SDF was significantly lower in patients receiving ginger compared with placebo (mean difference: 3.21, 95%CI: 0.78-5.63, p=0.009). There were no significant differences between two groups regarding to semen parameters. The present study has demonstrated that ginger in a controlled study of efficacy was effective in decreasing SDF in infertile men.

  1. Sperm Production Rate, Gonadal and Extragonadal Sperm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five healthy West African Dwarf (WAD) rams, 1.5 to 2.5 years of age and weighing between 15 kg to 20 kg were used to determine daily sperm production, gonadal and exragonadal sperm reserves. Gonadal and extragonadal sperm reserves were estimated by the haemocytometric method, while the daily sperm production ...

  2. Establishment of human sperm-specific voltage-dependent anion channel 3 recombinant vector for the production of a male contraceptive vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmarinah Asmarinah

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant vector of human sperm specific VDAC3 gene for production of VDAC3 antibody, which is potential as male contraception vaccine.Methods: Target fragment sequence of VDAC3 gene was obtained through amplification of human sperm VDAC3 cDNA with primers covering exon 5 to exon 8. Its PCR product in size of 435 bp was cloned to the pET101/D-TOPO expression vector (5753 bp. E. coli bacteria were transformed with this vector. Cloning of VDAC3 fragment gene to the vector was confirmed by the using of XbaI restriction enzyme and PCR colony method with primers covering exons 5-8 of the human VDAC3 gene.Results: Alignment analysis of amplified fragment covering exon 5 to exon 8 of VDAC3 gene showed 94% homology to human VDAC3 gene from databank. After cloning to the expression vector and transformation to E. coli competent cells, twelve colonies could grow in culture media. Gel electrophoresis of sliced VDAC3 recombinant vector showed a single band in the size of 6181 bp in 8 colonies. After application of PCR colony and amplicon sequencing, the result showed a single band in the size of 435 bp and fragment sequence with 94% identity to human VDAC3 gene.Conclusion: The construction of human sperm specific VDAC3 gene recombinant vector was established in this study. In the future, this recombinant vector will be used to produce VDAC3 antibody for the development of a male contraception vaccine. (Med J Indones. 2012;21:61-5Keywords: Contraception, recombinant vector, sperm, VDAC3

  3. Sperm cells as vectors in the production of transgenic animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prince, R.M.

    1993-04-28

    Transgenic animals are used in industry and in biomedical research in order to provide in vivo experimental model systems. Sperm cells have been reported used as vectors in the production of transgenic animals before, however no approach has of yet proven to be successful. Fertilizing eggs with genetically modified sperm would be advantageous in that sperm are readily accessible and stable, and eggs can be fertilized by modified sperm cells in vivo. Recent elucidations regarding the unique manner of DNA packaging in sperm chromatin by protamines has provided us with the insight for developing a method of introducing foreign DNA into sperm which is likely to succeed where others have failed. We have developed a method for mimicking the in vivo system of sperm chromatin toroid subunits in vitro, concentrating these toroids, and fluorescent visualization. Our present work concerns development of a method to successfully deliver DNA across the cell membranes and into the nucleus.

  4. Determination of DNA damage after exposure to inhalation anesthetics in human peripheral lymphocytes and sperm cells in vitro by comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymak, C; Kadioglu, E; Coskun, E; Basar, H; Basar, M

    2012-12-01

    In this study, genotoxic activities of four halogenated anesthetics (halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane) were investigated in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and sperm cells in vitro by alkaline comet assay. For this purpose, sperm or lymphocyte suspension was exposed to different concentrations (0.1 mM, 1 mM, 10 mM and 100 mM) of anesthetic agents and 1% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as controls. The DNA strand breaks as well as alkali-labile sites were measured as percentage tail intensity with comet assay. The results of this study demonstrate that all analyzed drugs were capable of inducing DNA damage on PBLs in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. However, the results in sperm cells were slightly different since we did not observe any genotoxic effect for desflurane in any of the exposure doses, and the genotoxic effect of halothane was not dose dependent. This experimental study points out to the presence of DNA damage after exposure to halogenated anesthetics in both PBLs and sperm cells, although this effect seems to be higher in PBLs.

  5. Variance in total levels of phospholipase C zeta (PLC-ζ) in human sperm may limit the applicability of quantitative immunofluorescent analysis as a diagnostic indicator of oocyte activation capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashir, Junaid; Jones, Celine; Mounce, Ginny; Ramadan, Walaa M; Lemmon, Bernadette; Heindryckx, Bjorn; de Sutter, Petra; Parrington, John; Turner, Karen; Child, Tim; McVeigh, Enda; Coward, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether similar levels of phospholipase C zeta (PLC-ζ) protein are present in sperm from men whose ejaculates resulted in normal oocyte activation, and to examine whether a predominant pattern of PLC-ζ localization is linked to normal oocyte activation ability. Laboratory study. University laboratory. Control subjects (men with proven oocyte activation capacity; n = 16) and men whose sperm resulted in recurrent intracytoplasmic sperm injection failure (oocyte activation deficient [OAD]; n = 5). Quantitative immunofluorescent analysis of PLC-ζ protein in human sperm. Total levels of PLC-ζ fluorescence, proportions of sperm exhibiting PLC-ζ immunoreactivity, and proportions of PLC-ζ localization patterns in sperm from control and OAD men. Sperm from control subjects presented a significantly higher proportion of sperm exhibiting PLC-ζ immunofluorescence compared with infertile men diagnosed with OAD (82.6% and 27.4%, respectively). Total levels of PLC-ζ in sperm from individual control and OAD patients exhibited significant variance, with sperm from 10 out of 16 (62.5%) exhibiting levels similar to OAD samples. Predominant PLC-ζ localization patterns varied between control and OAD samples with no predictable or consistent pattern. The results indicate that sperm from control men exhibited significant variance in total levels of PLC-ζ protein, as well as significant variance in the predominant localization pattern. Such variance may hinder the diagnostic application of quantitative PLC-ζ immunofluorescent analysis. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sperm dimorphism in terms of nuclear shape and microtubule accumulation in Cyrtanthus mackenii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Tomonari; Hoshino, Yoichiro

    2010-06-01

    Pollen tubes of Cyrtanthus mackenii, a species with bicellular pollen, were cultured in vitro to investigate nuclear phase changes during generative cell division and male germ unit (MGU) formation, using flow cytometric analysis. Results revealed that sperm cells were formed after 12 h of culture. During sperm maturation, the nuclei of sperm cells were not associated with the vegetative nucleus (unassociated sperm cells; Sua) and became longer than those of sperm cells associated with the vegetative nucleus (Svn). These findings indicate that the pair of sperm cells in the C. mackenii MGU is dimorphic in terms of nuclear shape. Dimorphism coincides with anti-alpha-tubulin antibody immunofluorescence, which was higher in the Sua than in Svn. Following treatment with oryzalin, triggering microtubule depolymerization, differences between nuclear shapes in the two sperm nuclei disappeared, suggesting that microtubule accumulation between sperm cells in the MGU correlates with differences in the nuclear shape.

  7. In Vitro Effect of Cell Phone Radiation on Motility, DNA Fragmentation and Clusterin Gene Expression in Human Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Zalata

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of cellular phones emitting radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF has been increased exponentially and become a part of everyday life. This study aimed to investigate the effects of in vitro RF-EMF exposure emitted from cellular phones on sperm motility index, sperm DNA fragmentation and seminal clusterin (CLU gene expression. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, a total of 124 semen samples were grouped into the following main categories: i. normozoospermia (N, n=26, ii. asthenozoospermia (A, n=32, iii. asthenoteratozoospermia (AT, n=31 and iv. oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT, n=35. The same semen samples were then divided into two portions non-exposed and exposed samples to cell phone radiation for 1 hour. Before and immediately after exposure, both aliquots were subjected to different assessments for sperm motility, acrosin activity, sperm DNA fragmentation and CLU gene expression. Statistical differences were analyzed using paired t student test for comparisons between two sub-groups where pAT>A>N groups, respectively (p<0.05. Conclusion: Cell phone emissions have a negative impact on exposed sperm motility index, sperm acrosin activity, sperm DNA fragmentation and seminal CLU gene expression, especially in OAT cases.

  8. In vitro effect of cell phone radiation on motility, DNA fragmentation and clusterin gene expression in human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalata, Adel; El-Samanoudy, Ayman Z; Shaalan, Dalia; El-Baiomy, Youssef; Mostafa, Taymour

    2015-01-01

    Use of cellular phones emitting radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) has been increased exponentially and become a part of everyday life. This study aimed to investigate the effects of in vitro RF-EMF exposure emitted from cellular phones on sperm motility index, sperm DNA fragmentation and seminal clusterin (CLU) gene expression. In this prospective study, a total of 124 semen samples were grouped into the following main categories: i. normozoospermia (N, n=26), ii. asthenozoospermia (A, n=32), iii. asthenoteratozoospermia (AT, n=31) and iv. oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT, n=35). The same semen samples were then divided into two portions non-exposed and exposed samples to cell phone radiation for 1 hour. Before and immediately after exposure, both aliquots were subjected to different assessments for sperm motility, acrosin activity, sperm DNA fragmentation and CLU gene expression. Statistical differences were analyzed using paired t student test for comparisons between two sub-groups where pAT>A>N groups, respectively (pnegative impact on exposed sperm motility index, sperm acrosin activity, sperm DNA fragmentation and seminal CLU gene expression, especially in OAT cases.

  9. Differential effects of human papillomavirus DNA types on p53 tumor-suppressor gene apoptosis in sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cathy A; Huang, Christopher T F; King, Alan; Chan, Philip J

    2002-06-01

    Sperm DNA undergoes apoptotic fragmentation when exposed to HPV DNA. Details of the specific gene regions targeted by HPV in sperm are lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the integrity of exons 5 and 8 of the p53 gene in sperm exposed to HPV DNA. Washed sperm were exposed to either HLA-DQA1 (control) or HPV type 6b/11, 16, 18, 31, or 33 DNA fragments for 24 h at 37 degrees C. The integrity of sperm p53 exons 5 and 8 was assessed using a novel DNA disc chip assay based on comparative genomic hybridization. Fragmentation of exon 5 occurred after exposure to HPV DNA type 18. In contrast, only exon 8 was affected by HPV type 16. HPV DNA from type 31 or 33 was without effect on the p53 exons. Sperm motility but not hyperactivation was reduced in all HPV groups. The data suggest that different HPV types preferentially degrade different exons of important genes. Decreased motility but not hyperactivation in HPV-exposed sperm suggests retention of some fertilizing capacity and the possibility of transmitting virus-destabilized genes through fertilization.

  10. Decline of semen quality among Chinese sperm bank donors within 7 years (2008-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Semen from 5210 sperm bank donors was analyzed and trends in semen quality were evaluated at Shandong Human Sperm Bank between 2008 and 2014. After 2-7 days of abstinence, semen samples were collected. Measurements of semen volume, sperm concentration, sperm forward motility, and total sperm count were performed. There were significant declining trends in semen volume, sperm concentration, sperm forward motility, and total sperm count. Our results indicate that the quality of semen in this cohort of sperm donors had decreased during the study period.

  11. Alpha-smooth muscle actin in pathological human disc nucleus pulposus cells in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastreiter, Dawn; Chao, Jeannie; Wang, Qi; Ozuna, Richard M; Spector, Myron

    2004-01-01

    That a contractile actin isoform has been found in cells of other cartilage tissues in healing and disease states prompted this investigation of the presence of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) in pathological human intervertebral disc tissue. The presence of this isoform has been reported in human intervertebral disc specimens obtained at autopsy from subjects for whom there were no reported symptoms. An objective of this study was to evaluate the cell density and percentage of alpha-SMA-containing cells in pathological nucleus pulposus tissue obtained from lumbar disc surgery from 17 patients. Additionally, explants of nucleus pulposus material were cultured to determine how alpha-SMA expression changed with time in vitro. Seventy-six 5-mm diameter explants (approximately 2 mm thick) pooled from six lumbar surgeries were cultured for 1, 2, 4, or 6 weeks. Microtomed sections of paraffin-embedded specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or a monoclonal antibody to alpha-SMA. Histologically, cells were categorized as to alpha-SMA phenotype (positive or negative), and the areal cell density was determined. The evaluation of the cultured nucleus pulposus explants also included documentation of the percentage of cells that were round or elongated and the percentage of the cells that were part of a group (group: >/= 2 cells). Every nucleus pulposus section exhibited the presence of alpha-SMA-containing cells, which accounted for approximately 24 percent of the cells in vivo. In vivo, the cell density was significantly higher in older individuals (p = 0.02). The average time for cell outgrowth from the explants was 8.6 days. Approximately 10-15 percent of the cells in the explants stained positive for alpha-SMA. The time in culture had no significant effect on any of the outcome measures except the percentage of alpha-SMA-containing cells that were round (p = 0.008), with values decreasing through 4 weeks and then slightly rising at 6 weeks. The role of

  12. Etiology and Evaluation of Sperm Chromatin Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Tavalaee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that human sperm chromatin anomalies adversely affect reproductive outcomesand infertile men possess substantially amount of sperm with chromatin anomalies than fertilemen.Routine semen analysis evaluates parameters such as sperm motility and morphology, but doesnot examine the nuclear DNA integrity of spermatozoa. It has been suggested that altered nuclearchromatin structure or damaged DNA in spermatozoa could modify the special cellular functionsof human spermatozoa, and thereby affect the fertility potential. Intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection(ICSI bypass the barriers to fertilization for such a sperm, then the effect of chromatin anomalies onthe development remains a concern. Therefore, it is essential to develop and use accurate diagnostictests, which may provide better prognostic capabilities than the standard sperm assessments. Thisreview discusses our current understanding of the structure and organization of sperm DNA,the different procedures for assessment of sperm chromatin anomalies including comet assay,Chromomycin A3 (CMA3, sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA, acridine orange test (AOT,terminal TdT-mediated dUTP-nick-end labelling (TUNEL assay, aniline blue and sperm chromatindispersion (SCD test and the impact of chromatin anomalies on reproductive outcome.

  13. Sperm preparation for fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadella, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Description This book contains 19 chapters that discuss theoretical and applied andrology for domestic, zoo and wild animals. Topics include semen and its constituents; sperm production and harvest; determinants of sperm morphology; sperm preparation for fertilization; practical aspects of semen

  14. The presence of centrioles and centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells suggests human parthenotes developed in vitro can differentiate into mature cells without a sperm centriole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bo Yon, E-mail: boyonlee@gmail.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Sang Woo; Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Seung Bo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sperm centriole is the progenitor of centrosomes in all somatic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Centrioles and centrosomes exist in parthenogenetic ovarian teratoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without a sperm centriole, parthenogenetic oocytes produce centrioles and centrosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parthenogenetic human oocytes can develop and differentiate into mature cells. -- Abstract: In most animals, somatic cell centrosomes are inherited from the centriole of the fertilizing spermatozoa. The oocyte centriole degenerates during oogenesis, and completely disappears in metaphase II. Therefore, the embryos generated by in vitro parthenogenesis are supposed to develop without any centrioles. Exceptional acentriolar and/or acentrosomal developments are possible in mice and in some experimental cells; however, in most animals, the full developmental potential of parthenogenetic cells in vitro and the fate of their centrioles/centrosomes are not clearly understood. To predict the future of in vitro human parthenogenesis, we explored the centrioles/centrosomes in ovarian mature cystic teratoma cells by immunofluorescent staining and transmission electron microscopy. We confirmed the presence of centrioles and centrosomes in these well-known parthenogenetic ovarian tumor cells. Our findings clearly demonstrate that, even without a sperm centriole, parthenotes that develop from activated oocytes can produce their own centrioles/centrosomes, and can even develop into the well-differentiated mature tissue.

  15. Sexual selection and the evolution of sperm quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, John L; Lüpold, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Sperm experience intense and varied selection that dramatically impacts the evolution of sperm quality. Selection acts to ensure that sperm are fertilization-competent and able to overcome the many challenges experienced on their way towards eggs. However, simply being able to fertilize an egg is not enough to ensure male fertility in most species. Owing to the prevalence of female multiple mating throughout the animal kingdom, successful fertilization requires sperm to outcompete rival sperm. In addition, females can actively influence sperm quality, storage or utilization to influence male fertility. This review provides an overview of how these selective forces influence the evolution of sperm quality. After exploring the link between sperm traits and male fertility, we examine how post-mating competition between rival ejaculates influences the evolution of sperm quality. We then describe how complex genetic, social and sexual interactions influence sperm quality, focusing on the importance of seminal fluid and interactions between sperm and the female's reproductive tract. In light of the complexities of selection on sperm traits, greater use of multivariate approaches that incorporate male-male, sperm-sperm and sperm-female interactions to study sperm quality will enhance our understanding of how selection acts on sperm traits and factors influencing male fertility. Because the metric of male reproductive success--fertilization--is the same across the animal kingdom, we argue that information about sperm evolution gained from non-human animals has enormous potential to further our understanding of the factors that impact human fertility. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. An evaluation of DNA damage in human lymphocytes and sperm exposed to methyl methanesulfonate involving the regulation pathways associated with apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habas, Khaled; Najafzadeh, Mojgan; Baumgartner, Adolf; Brinkworth, Martin H; Anderson, Diana

    2017-10-01

    Exposure to DNA-damaging agents produces a range of stress-related responses. These change the expression of genes leading to mutations that cause cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis and cancer. We have examined the contribution of haploid and diploid DNA damage and genes involved in the regulation of the apoptotic process associated with exposure, The Comet assay was used to detect DNA damage and quantitative RT-PCR analysis (qPCR) to detect gene expression changes in lymphocytes and sperm in response to methyl methanesulfonate. In the Comet assay, cells were administered 0-1.2 mM of MMS at 37 °C for 30 min for lymphocytes and 32 °C for 60 min for sperm to obtain optimal survival for both cell types. In the Comet assay a significant increase in Olive tail moment (OTM) and % tail DNA indicated DNA damage at increasing concentrations compared to the control group. In the qPCR study, cells were treated for 4 h, and RNA was isolated at the end of the treatment. qPCR analysis of genes associated with DNA stress responses showed that TP53 and CDKN1A are upregulated, while BCL2 is downregulated compared with the control. Thus, MMS caused DNA damage in lymphocytes at increasing concentrations, but appeared not to have the same effect in sperm at the low concentrations. These results indicate that exposure to MMS increased DNA damage and triggered the apoptotic response by activating TP53, CDKN1A and BCL2. These findings of the processing of DNA damage in human lymphocytes and sperm should be taken into account when genotoxic alterations in both cell types are produced when monitoring human exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of correct endogenous reactive oxygen species content for human sperm capacitation and involvement of the NADPH oxidase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donà, Gabriella; Fiore, Cristina; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Brunati, AnnaMaria; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Armanini, Decio; Bordin, Luciana; Clari, Giulio

    2011-12-01

    Generation of controlled amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues (Tyr) are two closely related changes involved in sperm capacitation. This study investigated the effect of altered endogenous ROS production on Tyr-phosphorylation (Tyr-P), acrosome reaction (AR) and cell viability during sperm capacitation. The possible origin of the altered ROS production was also evaluated by apocynin (APO) or oligomycin (Oligo) addition. A total of 63 samples of purified sperm were analysed for ROS production by enhanced chemiluminescence, Tyr-P pattern by immunocytochemistry, and AR and viability by fluorochrome fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labelled peanut (Arachis hypogaea) agglutinin and propidium iodide positivity, respectively. Samples were divided into four categories depending on the ability of sperm to produce ROS, expressed as Relative Luminescence Units (RLU), in capacitating conditions: low ROS production (LRP), range about 0.0-0.05 RLU; normal (NRP), 0.05-0.1 RLU; high (HRP), 0.1-0.4 RLU; very high (VHRP) 0.4-2.0 RLU. In NRP sperm heads, capacitation induced Tyr-P in 87.9 ± 4.3%, and the AR occurred in 62.5 ± 5.4% of cells; in LRP, HRP and VHRP Tyr-P labelling rarely spread over the head, acrosome-reacted cells only accounted for a small number of sperm, and the non-viable cells (NVC) were increased. The addition of APO, but not Oligo, drastically decreased ROS production in analysed samples. This study proposes the optimal threshold for endogenous ROS production for correct sperm viability and functioning, and indicates the direct involvement of APO-sensitive NADPH oxidase in ROS production.

  18. Nucleus accumbens is involved in human action monitoring: evidence from invasive electrophysiological recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Münte

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Nucleus accumbens (Nacc has been proposed to act as a limbic-motor interface. Here, using invasive intraoperative recordings in an awake patient suffering from obsessive-compulsive disease (OCD, we demonstrate that its activity is modulated by the quality of performance of the subject in a choice reaction time task designed to tap action monitoring processes. Action monitoring, that is, error detection and correction, is thought to be supported by a system involving the dopaminergic midbrain, the basal ganglia, and the medial prefrontal cortex. In surface electrophysiological recordings, action monitoring is indexed by an error-related negativity (ERN appearing time-locked to the erroneous responses and emanating from the medial frontal cortex. In preoperative scalp recordings the patient's ERN was found to be signifi cantly increased compared to a large (n= 83 normal sample, suggesting enhanced action monitoring processes. Intraoperatively, error-related modulations were obtained from the Nacc but not from a site 5 mm above. Importantly, crosscorrelation analysis showed that error-related activity in the Nacc preceded surface activity by 40 ms. We propose that the Nacc is involved in action monitoring, possibly by using error signals from the dopaminergic midbrain to adjust the relative impact of limbic and prefrontal inputs on frontal control systems in order to optimize goal-directed behavior.

  19. Most human proteins made in both nucleus and cytoplasm turn over within minutes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabyasachi Baboo

    Full Text Available In bacteria, protein synthesis can be coupled to transcription, but in eukaryotes it is believed to occur solely in the cytoplasm. Using pulses as short as 5 s, we find that three analogues--L-azidohomoalanine, puromycin (detected after attaching fluors using 'click' chemistry or immuno-labeling, and amino acids tagged with 'heavy' 15N and 13C (detected using secondary ion mass spectrometry--are incorporated into the nucleus and cytoplasm in a process sensitive to translational inhibitors. The nuclear incorporation represents a significant fraction of the total, and labels in both compartments have half-lives of less than a minute; results are consistent with most newly-made peptides being destroyed soon after they are made. As nascent RNA bearing a premature termination codon (detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization is also eliminated by a mechanism sensitive to a translational inhibitor, the nuclear turnover of peptides is probably a by-product of proof-reading the RNA for stop codons (a process known as nonsense-mediated decay. We speculate that the apparently-wasteful turnover of this previously-hidden ('dark-matter' world of peptide is involved in regulating protein production.

  20. Human ROBO1 is cleaved by metalloproteinases and gamma-secretase and migrates to the nucleus in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Motoaki; Watanabe, Akira; Enomoto, Satoshi; Kawamura, Takeshi; Ito, Hirotaka; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Hamakubo, Takao; Aburatani, Hiroyuki

    2010-07-02

    ROBO1 is a receptor mediating Slit-induced repulsive action on axon guidance and differentially expressed in human cancers. Although ROBO1 ectodomain has been detected, the cleavage site had not been determined. In this study we identified the precise cleavage site of ROBO1. We also report multi-step proteolysis of ROBO1 by metalloproteinases and gamma-secretase, producing two carboxy-terminal fragments, ROBO1-CTF1 at 129-kDa and ROBO1-CTF2 at 118-kDa. We have further demonstrated nuclear accumulation of ROBO1, which is abolished by either a metalloproteinase inhibitor TAPI-1 or a gamma-secretase inhibitor L-685,458. ROBO1 may function beyond the receptor through stepwise cleavages and translocation to the nucleus. Copyright 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Episodic air pollution is associated with increased DNA fragmentation in human sperm without other changes in semen quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubes, J.; Selevan, S.G.; Evenson, D.P.; Zudova, D.; Vozdova, M.; Zudova, Z.; Robbins, W.A.; Perreault, S.D. [US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2005-10-01

    This study examined potential associations between exposure to episodes of air pollution and alterations in semen quality. The air pollution, resulting from combustion of coal for industry and home heating in the Teplice district of the Czech Republic, was much higher during the winter than at other times of year with peaks exceeding US air quality standards. Young men from Teplice were sampled up to seven times over 2 years allowing evaluation of semen quality after periods of exposure to both low and high air pollution. Routine semen analysis (sperm concentration, motility and morphology) and tests for sperm aneuploidy and chromatin integrity were performed, comparing measurements within each subject. Exposure was classified as high or low based on data from ambient air pollution monitoring. Using repeated measures analysis, a significant association was found between exposure to periods of high air pollution (at or above the upper limit of US air quality standards) and the percentage of sperm with DNA fragmentation according to sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). Other semen measures were not associated with air pollution. It is concluded that exposure to intermittent air pollution may result in sperm DNA damage and thereby increase the rates of male-mediated infertility, miscarriage, and other adverse reproductive outcomes.

  2. Integridade das membranas plasmática, nuclear e mitocondrial de espermatozóides ovinos criopreservados com etileno glicol Integrity of sperm plasm membrane, nucleus and mitochondria after freezing ram semen with ethylene glycol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Bignardi de Soares Brisola

    1999-09-01

    to 5, sperm cell concentration (3x10(6 cells/mm³ and normal sperm morphology (80%. Each pool of semen from ejaculates of two rams was divided into two equal subsamples. One subsample was frozen with ethylene glycol and the other with glycerol. The parameters used to evaluate the semen were sperm motility, vigor, acrossome status and membrane integrity. Sperm motility was evaluated in fresh semen, cooled semen, frozen semen, after 5 hours at 38°C or after 30 minutes at 45°C. No difference was observed between ethylene glycol and glycerol for acrossome status and sperm motility. The sperm cells that were preserved with ethylene glycol showed more integrity of the plasmatic, nuclear and mitochondrial membranes. From the viewpoint of cell membrane integrity, it can be concluded that ethylene glycol gives higher protection to the sperm cell than glycerol.

  3. Sperm motility under exposure of hydrogen dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Evdokimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains research data on the effect of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide on human sperm motility and specific enzyme activity of sperms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. It is shown that incubation of sperms with hydrogen dioxide in a low concentration leads to a change and motility in sperm and activity of sperm enzyme. Intensity of observed effect depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide: active mobility increased by 17–19 % and the total mobility – 11 %. Motility changes in sperms were accompanied by increased activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by 24 %, in normozoospermia response was higher than in pathozoospermia and also depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide. The use of sperm analyzer enabled revealing changes in the diapason of different speeds of the active fraction of sperm, which have been observed in the first 15 min of incubation with hydrogen dioxide. A possible mechanism of action of the detected effect is discussed. Reactive oxygen species easily oxidize enzyme for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of sperms, which leads to a loss of sperm motility, for example, in varicocele. Initially low enzyme activity in varicocele (pathozoospermia may be associated with the suppression of sperm antioxidant defense. Addition of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide into sperm samples leads to an increase in the concentration of reduced glutathione in a cell. Increase of sperm motility in this case can serve as an indicator of normal operation of the cellular antioxidant defense system. Obtained experimental results provide a background for their introduction into clinical practice in the program of assisted reproductive technologies. 

  4. Sperm motility under exposure of hydrogen dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Evdokimov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains research data on the effect of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide on human sperm motility and specific enzyme activity of sperms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. It is shown that incubation of sperms with hydrogen dioxide in a low concentration leads to a change and motility in sperm and activity of sperm enzyme. Intensity of observed effect depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide: active mobility increased by 17–19 % and the total mobility – 11 %. Motility changes in sperms were accompanied by increased activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by 24 %, in normozoospermia response was higher than in pathozoospermia and also depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide. The use of sperm analyzer enabled revealing changes in the diapason of different speeds of the active fraction of sperm, which have been observed in the first 15 min of incubation with hydrogen dioxide. A possible mechanism of action of the detected effect is discussed. Reactive oxygen species easily oxidize enzyme for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of sperms, which leads to a loss of sperm motility, for example, in varicocele. Initially low enzyme activity in varicocele (pathozoospermia may be associated with the suppression of sperm antioxidant defense. Addition of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide into sperm samples leads to an increase in the concentration of reduced glutathione in a cell. Increase of sperm motility in this case can serve as an indicator of normal operation of the cellular antioxidant defense system. Obtained experimental results provide a background for their introduction into clinical practice in the program of assisted reproductive technologies. 

  5. Sperm viability - Determination of sperm viability using fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine the percentage of viable sperm in a semen sample using stains that differentiates viable (live) sperm from nonviable (dead) sperm. Viable sperm are detected by SYBR-14, which stains the sperm nuclei green. Nonviable sperm are detected by propidium iodide (PI), which stains the sperm red...

  6. The preparation and culture of washed human sperm: A comparison of a suite of protein-free media with media containing human serum albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli L. Peirce

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: These results support the use of PF media supplemented with methylcellulose as an alternative to HSA, although a modification to the manufacturer's protocol of 6-min pre-incubation before assessing sperm motility must be used. Further studies should investigate the function of such sperm prepared in PF medium.

  7. Human subthalamic nucleus: evaluation with high-resolution MR imaging at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, Mika; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Hirai, Toshinori; Okuda, Tomoko; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Korogi, Yukunori; Kakeda, Shingo; Moriya, Junji; Ohnari, Norihiro; Sato, Toru [University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the visibility of the normal subthalamic nucleus (STN) between fast spin-echo T2-weighted (FSE T2-W) images and fast short inversion time inversion-recovery (FSTIR) images, and to assess the age-related changes of the STN at 3.0 T. We evaluated high-resolution FSE T2-W and FSTIR images in 24 neurologically normal subjects. Using both sequences, we assessed the visibility of the margins of the STN, and calculated the difference in signal intensity between the STN and structures adjacent to the STN. Then, to assess the age-related changes of the STN, we calculated the contrast-to-noise ratio between the STN and the white matter, and measured the position, length, and height of the STN. All data were statistically evaluated. The visibility of the lower margin of the STN was significantly better on the FSTIR images than on the FSE T2-W images (P=0.0001), while the visibility of other margins was significantly better on the FSE T2-W images than on the FSTIR mages (P=0.002). The difference in signal intensity between the STN and substantia nigra was significantly greater on the FSTIR images than on the FSE T2-W images (P<0.0001). The distance from the midline to the lateral border of the STN increased with age (FSE T2-W images: left r=0.4916, P=0.015; right r=0.4442, P=0.030). The combined reading of both FSE T2-W and FSTIR images at 3 T will improve the identification of the STN. The age-related positional change of the STN should be considered in target determination for deep brain stimulation procedures. (orig.)

  8. Local Fields in Human Subthalamic Nucleus Track the Lead-up to Impulsive Choices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Pearson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability to adaptively minimize not only motor but cognitive symptoms of neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's Disease (PD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, is a primary goal of next-generation deep brain stimulation (DBS devices. On the basis of studies demonstrating a link between beta-band synchronization and severity of motor symptoms in PD, the minimization of beta band activity has been proposed as a potential training target for closed-loop DBS. At present, no comparable signal is known for the impulsive side effects of PD, though multiple studies have implicated theta band activity within the subthalamic nucleus (STN, the site of DBS treatment, in processes of conflict monitoring and countermanding. Here, we address this challenge by recording from multiple independent channels within the STN in a self-paced decision task to test whether these signals carry information sufficient to predict stopping behavior on a trial-by-trial basis. As in previous studies, we found that local field potentials (LFPs exhibited modulations preceding self-initiated movements, with power ramping across multiple frequencies during the deliberation period. In addition, signals showed phasic changes in power around the time of decision. However, a prospective model that attempted to use these signals to predict decision times showed effects of risk level did not improve with the addition of LFPs as regressors. These findings suggest information tracking the lead-up to impulsive choices is distributed across multiple frequency scales in STN, though current techniques may not possess sufficient signal-to-noise ratios to predict—and thus curb—impulsive behavior on a moment-to-moment basis.

  9. Lack of an association between environmental exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and p,p'-DDE and DNA damage in human sperm measured using the neutral comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, R; Singh, N P; Chen, Z; Pothier, L; Altshul, L

    2003-12-01

    Chlorinated organic chemicals, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT), and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethene (DDE, the most stable daughter compound of DDT) are persistent lipophilic compounds found in a large portion of the general population. To explore the hypothesis that environmental exposure to these compounds is associated with altered DNA integrity in human sperm, a study of 212 male partners of a sub-fertile couple who presented to the Massachusetts General Hospital Andrology Laboratory was conducted. The neutral single cell microgel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) was used to assess DNA integrity in sperm. VisComet image analysis software was used to measure total comet length, the proportion of DNA present in the comet tail, and tail distributed moment, an integrated measure of length and intensity. In the regression analyses, there were no statistically significant consistent associations between the comet assay parameters and any of the individual PCB congeners, sum of PCB, or p,p'-DDE. These results suggest that there are not strong relationships between adult levels of these chlorinated organic compounds and sperm DNA damage as measured by the comet assay.

  10. Effect of human papillomavirus and Chlamydia trachomatis co-infection on sperm quality in young heterosexual men with chronic prostatitis-related symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tommaso; Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Mondaini, Nicola; D'Elia, Carolina; Meacci, Francesca; Migno, Serena; Malossini, Gianni; Mazzoli, Sandra; Bartoletti, Riccardo

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effect of human papillomavirus (HPV) and Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) co-infection on sperm concentration, motility and morphology, in a large cohort of young heterosexual male patients with chronic prostatitis-related symptoms. Patients with chronic prostatitis-related symptoms, attending the same centre for sexually transmitted diseases from January 2005 and December 2010, were consecutively enrolled in this cross-sectional study. All patients underwent clinical and instrumental examination, microbiological cultures for common bacteria, DNA extraction, mucosal and serum antibodies evaluation for Ct, specific tests for HPV and semen analysis. The semen variables analysed were: volume; pH; sperm concentration; motility; and morphology. Subjects were subdivided in two groups: group A, patients with Ct infection alone and group B, patients with Ct and HPV co-infection. The main outcome measurement was the effect of Ct and HPV co-infection on the semen variables examined. Of 3050 screened patients, 1003 were enrolled (32.9%) in the study. A total of 716 (71.3%) patients were allocated to group A, and 287 (28.7%) to group B. Significant differences between the two groups were reported in terms of percentage of motile sperm (degrees of freedom [df] = 1001; t-test = 11.85; P HPV genotype, mucosal IgA type and semen variables was found. In a population of prostatitis-related symptoms attributable to Ct infection, co-infection with HPV has a significant role in decreasing male fertility, in particular with regard to sperm motility and morphology. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  11. Characterization of Nuclease Activity in Human Seminal Plasma and its Relationship to Semen Parameters, Sperm DNA Fragmentation and Male Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; García-Peiró, Agustí; Ribas-Maynou, Jordi; Abad, Carlos; Amengual, María José; Navarro, Joaquima; Benet, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Some studies have shown that complementary biomarkers are needed in semen analysis to provide a more accurate diagnosis for couples with infertility problems. To our knowledge no study has been done to determine the relationships among nuclease activity in seminal plasma, semen parameters, sperm DNA fragmentation and male infertility. A total of 94 semen samples were collected according to WHO 2010 semen analysis parameters. Samples were analyzed using the single radial enzyme diffusion method for nuclease activity in seminal plasma, and alkaline and neutral Comet assay for sperm DNA fragmentation. Samples were obtained from 11 fertile donors with proven fertility, 17 patients with normozoospermia in an infertile couple, and 16 patients with asthenozoospermia, 19 with teratozoospermia, 21 with asthenoteratozoospermia and 10 with azoospermia. Nuclease activity analyzed in seminal plasma was higher in patients than in controls. It correlated with sperm motility and morphology, and sperm DNA fragmentation measured by the alkaline Comet assay. No correlation with sperm DNA fragmentation was measured by the neutral Comet assay. ROC curves to determine male infertility revealed 0.658 sensitivity, 0.727 specificity and 0.705 cm(2) AUC for the single radial enzyme diffusion method, 0.918, 1 and 0.994 cm(2) for the alkaline Comet assay, and 0.917, 0.250 and 0.373 cm(2), respectively, for the neutral Comet assay. Nuclease activity in seminal plasma corrected by sperm count is a good variable to predict male infertility. Results indicate that it could be a useful complementary parameter for male infertility diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Kisspeptin Expression in the Human Infundibular Nucleus in Relation to Sex, Gender Identity, and Sexual Orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taziaux, Melanie; Staphorsius, Annemieke S; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R; Swaab, Dick F; Bakker, Julie

    CONTEXT: Since the discovery of its central role in reproduction, our functional neuroanatomical knowledge of the hypothalamic kisspeptin system is predominantly based on animal studies. Although sex differences in kisspeptin expression have been shown in humans in adulthood, the developmental

  13. Regenerative and immunogenic characteristics of cultured nucleus pulposus cells from human cervical intervertebral discs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Stich

    Full Text Available Cell-based regenerative approaches have been suggested as primary or adjuvant procedures for the treatment of degenerated intervertebral disc (IVD diseases. Our aim was to evaluate the regenerative and immunogenic properties of mildly and severely degenerated cervical nucleus pulposus (NP cells with regard to cell isolation, proliferation and differentiation, as well as to cell surface markers and co-cultures with autologous or allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC including changes in their immunogenic properties after 3-dimensional (3D-culture. Tissue from the NP compartment of 10 patients with mild or severe grades of IVD degeneration was collected. Cells were isolated, expanded with and without basic fibroblast growth factor and cultured in 3D fibrin/poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid transplants for 21 days. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR showed the expression of characteristic NP markers ACAN, COL1A1 and COL2A1 in 2D- and 3D-culture with degeneration- and culture-dependent differences. In a 5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate N-succinimidyl ester-based proliferation assay, NP cells in monolayer, regardless of their grade of degeneration, did not provoke a significant proliferation response in T cells, natural killer (NK cells or B cells, not only with donor PBMC, but also with allogeneic PBMC. In conjunction with low inflammatory cytokine expression, analyzed by Cytometric Bead Array and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS, a low immunogenicity can be assumed, facilitating possible therapeutic approaches. In 3D-culture, however, we found elevated immune cell proliferation levels, and there was a general trend to higher responses for NP cells from severely degenerated IVD tissue. This emphasizes the importance of considering the specific immunological alterations when including biomaterials in a therapeutic concept. The overall expression of Fas receptor, found on cultured NP cells, could have

  14. Approaches leading to the Three-Dimensional Organization of the Human Interphase Nucleus: Simulations, FISH, Chromatin Labelling in vivo, Fractal Analysis, Carbon Ion Irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractDespite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its three-dimensional structure is widely unknown, although it is important for gene regulation and replication. For a long time the interphase nucleus has been viewed as a 'spaghetti soup' of DNA without much internal

  15. In vitro evaluation of baseline and induced DNA damage in human sperm exposed to benzo[a]pyrene or its metabolite benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide, using the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipinen, V; Laubenthal, J; Baumgartner, A; Cemeli, E; Linschooten, J O; Godschalk, R W L; Van Schooten, F J; Anderson, D; Brunborg, G

    2010-07-01

    Exposure to genotoxins may compromise DNA integrity in male reproductive cells, putting future progeny at risk for developmental defects and diseases. To study the usefulness of sperm DNA damage as a biomarker for genotoxic exposure, we have investigated cellular and molecular changes induced by benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) in human sperm in vitro, and results have been compared for smokers and non-smokers. Sperm DNA obtained from five smokers was indeed more fragmented than sperm of six non-smokers (mean % Tail DNA 26.5 and 48.8, respectively), as assessed by the alkaline comet assay (P sperm cells to B[a]P (10 or 25 microM) caused moderate increases in DNA fragmentation which was independent of addition of human liver S9 mix for enzymatic activation of B[a]P, suggesting some unknown metabolism of B[a]P in ejaculates. In vitro exposure of samples to various doses of B[a]P (with or without S9) did not reveal any significant differences in sensitivity to DNA fragmentation between smokers and non-smokers. Incubations with the proximate metabolite benzo[a]pyrene-r-7,t-8-dihydrodiol-t9,10-epoxide (BPDE) produced DNA fragmentation in a dose-dependent manner (20 or 50 microM), but only when formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase treatment was included in the comet assay. These levels of DNA fragmentation were, however, low in relation to very high amounts of BPDE-DNA adducts as measured with (32)P postlabelling. We conclude that sperm DNA damage may be useful as a biomarker of direct exposure of sperm using the comet assay adapted to sperm, and as such the method may be applicable to cohort studies. Although the sensitivity is relatively low, DNA damage induced in earlier stages of spermatogenesis may be detected with higher efficiencies.

  16. Diffusion and transport in the human interphase cell nucleus - FCS experiments compared to simulations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Wachsmuth (Malte); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    2001-01-01

    markdownabstractDespite the succesful linear sequencing of the human genome the three-dimensional arrangement of chromatin, functional, and structural components is still largely unknown. Molecular transport and diffusion are important for processes like gene regulation, replication, or repair and

  17. Activation of vasopressin neurons in the human supraoptic and paraventricular nucleus in senescence and senile dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendijk, J. E.; Fliers, E.; Swaab, D. F.; Verwer, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    A recent study has shown that vasopressin (AVP) cells in the human supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei increase in size after 60 years of age, suggesting that AVP production is increased in senescence. In the present study, the same brain material was used for the determination of

  18. Phase-Amplitude Cross-Frequency Coupling in the Human Nucleus Accumbens Tracks Action Monitoring during Cognitive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eDürschmid

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Nucleus Accumbens (NAcc is an important structure for the transfer of informationbetween cortical and subcortical structures, especially the prefrontal cortex and thehippocampus. However, the mechanism that allows the NAcc to achieve this integration is notwell understood. Phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling (PAC of oscillations in differentfrequency bands has been proposed as an effective mechanism to form functional networks tooptimize transfer and integration of information. Here we assess PAC between theta and highgamma oscillations as a potential mechanism that facilitates motor adaptation. To address thisissue we recorded intracranial field potentials directly from the bilateral human NAcc in threepatients while they performed a motor learning task that varied in the level of cognitive controlneeded to perform the task. As in rodents, PAC was observable in the human NAcc, transientlyoccurring contralateral to a movement following the motor response. Importantly, PAC correlatedwith the level of cognitive control needed to monitor the action performed.This functional relationindicates that the NAcc is engaged in action monitoring and supports the evaluation of motorprograms during adaptive behavior by means of PAC.

  19. Neuronal subtypes and diversity revealed by single-nucleus RNA sequencing of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Blue B; Ai, Rizi; Kaeser, Gwendolyn E; Salathia, Neeraj S; Yung, Yun C; Liu, Rui; Wildberg, Andre; Gao, Derek; Fung, Ho-Lim; Chen, Song; Vijayaraghavan, Raakhee; Wong, Julian; Chen, Allison; Sheng, Xiaoyan; Kaper, Fiona; Shen, Richard; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang, Wei; Chun, Jerold; Zhang, Kun

    2016-06-24

    The human brain has enormously complex cellular diversity and connectivities fundamental to our neural functions, yet difficulties in interrogating individual neurons has impeded understanding of the underlying transcriptional landscape. We developed a scalable approach to sequence and quantify RNA molecules in isolated neuronal nuclei from a postmortem brain, generating 3227 sets of single-neuron data from six distinct regions of the cerebral cortex. Using an iterative clustering and classification approach, we identified 16 neuronal subtypes that were further annotated on the basis of known markers and cortical cytoarchitecture. These data demonstrate a robust and scalable method for identifying and categorizing single nuclear transcriptomes, revealing shared genes sufficient to distinguish previously unknown and orthologous neuronal subtypes as well as regional identity and transcriptomic heterogeneity within the human brain. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. 'How to count sperm properly': checklist for acceptability of studies based on human semen analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björndahl, Lars; Barratt, Christopher L R; Mortimer, David; Jouannet, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    also declare the level of uncertainty in their analyses and how it complies with, or might confound, the aims of the study. The fundamental importance of appropriate and robust methodology to facilitate advances in scientific understanding and patient management and treatment, is now accepted as being paramount. Use of the semen analysis checklist should be part of this process, and when completed and signed by the corresponding author at the time of submitting a manuscript should result in greater transparency, and ultimately uniformity. It is hoped that this initiative will pave the way for wider adoption of the methodology/reporting by other biomedical, epidemiological and scientific journals, and ultimately become the standard of practice for papers reporting semen analysis results obtained in laboratory and clinical andrology. Systems to assist referees, authors and editors to present high quality findings should have a significant impact on the field of reproductive medicine. No funding was obtained for this work. The authors have no competing interests in relation to the present publication and checklist. N/A. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Transformation of sperm nuclei to metaphase chromosomes in the cytoplasm of maturing oocytes of the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, H J; Masui, Y

    1986-03-01

    Zona-free oocytes of the mouse were inseminated at prometaphase I or metaphase I of meiotic maturation in vitro, and the behavior of the sperm nuclei within the oocyte cytoplasm was examined. If the oocytes were penetrated by up to three sperm, maturation continued during subsequent incubation and became arrested at metaphase II. Meanwhile, each sperm nucleus underwent the following changes. First, the chromatin became slightly dispersed. By 6 h after insemination, this dispersed chromatin had become coalesced into a small mass, from which short chromosomal arms later became projected. Between 12 and 18 h after insemination, each mass of chromatin became resolved into 20 discrete metaphase chromosomes. In contrast, if oocytes were penetrated by four to six sperm, oocyte meiosis was arrested at metaphase I, and each sperm nucleus was transformed into a small mass of chromatin rather than into metaphase chromosomes. If oocytes were penetrated by more than six sperm, the maternal chromosomes became either decondensed or pycnotic, and the sperm nuclei were transformed into larger masses of chromatin. As control experiments, immature and fully mature metaphase II oocytes were inseminated. In the immature oocytes, which were kept immature by exposure to dibutyryl cyclic AMP, no morphological changes in the sperm nucleus were observed. On the other hand, in the fully mature oocytes, which were activated by sperm penetration, the sperm nucleus was transformed into the male pronucleus. Therefore, the cytoplasm of the maturing oocyte develops an activity that can transform the highly condensed chromatin of the sperm into metaphase chromosomes. However, the capacity of an oocyte is limited, such that it can transform a maximum of three sperm nuclei into metaphase chromosomes. Furthermore, the presence of more than six sperm causes a loss of the ability of the oocyte to maintain the maternal chromosomes in a metaphase state.

  2. Notochordal-cell derived extracellular vesicles exert regenerative effects on canine and human nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Frances; Libregts, Sten; Creemers, Laura; Meij, Björn; Ito, Keita; Wauben, Marca; Tryfonidou, Marianna

    2017-10-24

    During intervertebral disc ageing, chondrocyte-like cells (CLCs) replace notochordal cells (NCs). NCs have been shown to induce regenerative effects in CLCs. Since vesicles released by NCs may be responsible for these effects, we characterized NC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) and determined their effect on CLCs. EVs were purified from porcine NC-conditioned medium (NCCM) through size exclusion chromatography, ultracentrifugation or density gradient centrifugation. Additionally, the EVs were quantitatively analyzed by high-resolution flow cytometry. The effect of NCCM-derived EVs was studied on canine and human CLC micro-aggregates in vitro and compared with NCCM-derived proteins and unfractionated NCCM. Porcine NCCM contained a considerable amount of EVs. NCCM-derived EVs induced GAG deposition in canine CLCs to a comparable level as NCCM-derived proteins and unfractionated NCCM, and increased the DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of human micro-aggregates, although to a lesser extent than unfractionated NCCM. The biological EV effects were not considerably influenced by ultracentrifugation compared with size exclusion-based purification. Upon ultracentrifugation, interfering GAGs, but not collagens, were lost. Nonetheless, collagen type I or II supplemented to CLCs in a concentration as present in NCCM induced no anabolic effects. Porcine NCCM-derived EVs exerted anabolic effects comparable to NCCM-derived proteins, while unfractionated NCCM was more potent in human CLCs. GAGs and collagens appeared not to mediate the regenerative EV effects. Thus, NC-derived EVs have regenerative potential, and their effects may be influenced by the proteins present in NCCM. The optimal combination of NC-secreted factors needs to be determined to fully exploit the regenerative potential of NC-based technology.

  3. Generation of new cytotoxic human ribonuclease variants directed to the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vert, Anna; Castro, Jessica; Ruiz-Martínez, Santiago; Tubert, Pere; Escribano, Diego; Ribó, Marc; Vilanova, Maria; Benito, Antoni

    2012-10-01

    Ribonucleases are promising agents for use in anticancer therapy. Engineering a nuclear localization signal into the sequence of the human pancreatic ribonuclease has been revealed as a new strategy to endow this enzyme with cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. We previously described a cytotoxic human pancreatic ribonuclease variant, named PE5, which is able to cleave nuclear RNA, inducing the apoptosis of cancer cells and reducing the amount of P-glycoprotein in different multidrug-resistant cell lines. These results open the opportunity to use this ribonuclease in combination with other chemotherapeutics. In this work, we have investigated how to improve the properties of PE5 as an antitumor drug candidate. When attempting to develop a recombinant protein as a drug, two of the main desirable attributes are minimum immunogenicity and maximum potency. The improvements of PE5 have been designed in both senses. First, in order to reduce the potential immunogenicity of the protein, we have studied which residues mutated on PE5 can be reverted to those of the wild-type human pancreatic ribonuclease sequence without affecting its cytotoxicity. Second, we have investigated the effect of introducing an additional nuclear localization signal at different sites of PE5 in an effort to obtain a more cytotoxic enzyme. We show that the nuclear localization signal location is critical for the cytotoxicity. One of these variants, named NLSPE5, presents about a 10-fold increase in cytotoxicity respective to PE5. This variant induces apoptosis and kills the cells using the same mechanism as PE5.

  4. Altered DNA methylation patterns of the H19 differentially methylated region and the DAZL gene promoter are associated with defective human sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Li

    Full Text Available DNA methylation disturbance is associated with defective human sperm. However, oligozoospermia (OZ and asthenozoospermia (AZ usually present together, and the relationship between the single-phenotype defects in human sperm and DNA methylation is poorly understood. In this study, 20 infertile OZ patients and 20 infertile AZ patients were compared with 20 fertile normozoospermic men. Bisulfate-specific PCR was used to analyze DNA methylation of the H19-DMR and the DAZL promoter in these subjects. A similar DNA methylation pattern of the H19-DMR was detected in AZ and NZ(control, with only complete methylation and mild hypomethylation(0.05. However, the methylation pattern of severe hypomethylation (>50% unmethylated CpGs and complete unmethylation was only detected in 5 OZ patients, and the occurrence of these two methylation patterns was 8.54±10.86% and 9±6.06%, respectively. Loss of DNA methylation of the H19-DMR in the OZ patients was found to mainly occur in CTCF-binding site 6, with occurrence of 18.15±14.71%, which was much higher than that in patients with NZ (0.84±2.05% and AZ (0.58±1.77% (P20% methylated clones in the DAZL promoter only in infertile patients, there was no significant difference between the AZ and OZ patients in the proportion of moderately-to-severely hypermethylated clones (p>0.05. In all cases, global sperm genome methylation analyses, using LINE1 transposon as the indicator, showed that dysregulation of DNA methylation is specifically associated with the H19-DMR and DAZL promoter. Therefore, abnormal DNA methylation status of H19-DMR, especially at the CTCF-binding site 6, is closely associated with OZ. Abnormal DNA methylation of the DAZL promoter might represent an epigenetic marker of male infertility.

  5. The Kölliker-Fuse nucleus: a review of animal studies and the implications for cranial nerve function in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browaldh, Nanna; Bautista, Tara G; Dutschmann, Mathias; Berkowitz, Robert G

    2016-11-01

    To review the scientific literature on the relationship between Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KF) and cranial nerve function in animal models, with view to evaluating the potential role of KF maturation in explaining age-related normal physiologic parameters and developmental and acquired impairment of cranial nerve function in humans. Medical databases (Medline and PubMed). Studies investigating evidence of KF activity responsible for a specific cranial nerve function that were based on manipulation of KF activity or the use of neural markers were included. Twenty studies were identified that involved the trigeminal (6 studies), vagus (9), and hypoglossal nerves (5). These pertained specifically to a role of the KF in mediating the dive reflex, laryngeal adductor control, swallowing function and upper airway tone. The KF acts as a mediator of a number of important functions that relate primarily to laryngeal closure, upper airway tone and swallowing. These areas are characterized by a variety of disorders that may present to the otolaryngologist, and hence the importance of understanding the role played by the KF in maintaining normal function.

  6. A novel branched TAT(47-57) peptide for selective Ni(2+) introduction into the human fibrosarcoma cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyrwiel, Łukasz; Shimura, Mari; Shirataki, Junko; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Akihiro; Setner, Bartosz; Szczukowski, Łukasz; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Malinka, Wiesław; Chavatte, Laurent; Łobinski, Ryszard

    2015-07-01

    A TAT47-57 peptide was modified on the N-terminus by elongation with a 2,3-diaminopropionic acid residue and then by coupling of two histidine residues on its N-atoms. This branched peptide could bind to Ni under physiological conditions as a 1 : 1 complex. We demonstrated that the complex was quantitatively taken up by human fibrosarcoma cells, in contrast to Ni(2+) ions. Ni localization (especially at the nuclei) was confirmed by imaging using both scanning X-ray fluorescence microscopy and Newport Green fluorescence. A competitive assay with Newport Green showed that the latter displaced the peptide ligand from the Ni-complex. Ni(2+) delivered as a complex with the designed peptide induced substantially more DNA damage than when introduced as a free ion. The availability of such a construct opens up the way to investigate the importance of the nucleus as a target for the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity or carcinogenicity of Ni(2+).

  7. No unified reward prediction error in local field potentials from the human nucleus accumbens: evidence from epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Max-Philipp; Rutledge, Robb B; Zaehle, Tino; Schmitt, Friedhelm C; Kopitzki, Klaus; Kowski, Alexander B; Voges, Jürgen; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J

    2015-08-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), cyclic voltammetry, and single-unit electrophysiology studies suggest that signals measured in the nucleus accumbens (Nacc) during value-based decision making represent reward prediction errors (RPEs), the difference between actual and predicted rewards. Here, we studied the precise temporal and spectral pattern of reward-related signals in the human Nacc. We recorded local field potentials (LFPs) from the Nacc of six epilepsy patients during an economic decision-making task. On each trial, patients decided whether to accept or reject a gamble with equal probabilities of a monetary gain or loss. The behavior of four patients was consistent with choices being guided by value expectations. Expected value signals before outcome onset were observed in three of those patients, at varying latencies and with nonoverlapping spectral patterns. Signals after outcome onset were correlated with RPE regressors in all subjects. However, further analysis revealed that these signals were better explained as outcome valence rather than RPE signals, with gamble gains and losses differing in the power of beta oscillations and in evoked response amplitudes. Taken together, our results do not support the idea that postsynaptic potentials in the Nacc represent a RPE that unifies outcome magnitude and prior value expectation. We discuss the generalizability of our findings to healthy individuals and the relation of our results to measurements of RPE signals obtained from the Nacc with other methods. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Manual vs. computer-assisted sperm analysis: can CASA replace manual assessment of human semen in clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarczyk-Desole, Joanna; Berger, Anna; Taszarek-Hauke, Grażyna; Hauke, Jan; Pawelczyk, Leszek; Jedrzejczak, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to check the quality of computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system in comparison to the reference manual method as well as standardization of the computer-assisted semen assessment. The study was conducted between January and June 2015 at the Andrology Laboratory of the Division of Infertility and Reproductive Endocrinology, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, Poland. The study group consisted of 230 men who gave sperm samples for the first time in our center as part of an infertility investigation. The samples underwent manual and computer-assisted assessment of concentration, motility and morphology. A total of 184 samples were examined twice: manually, according to the 2010 WHO recommendations, and with CASA, using the program set-tings provided by the manufacturer. Additionally, 46 samples underwent two manual analyses and two computer-assisted analyses. The p-value of p CASA and manually. In the group of patients where all analyses with each method were performed twice on the same sample we found no significant differences between both assessments of the same probe, neither in the samples analyzed manually nor with CASA, although standard deviation was higher in the CASA group. Our results suggest that computer-assisted sperm analysis requires further improvement for a wider application in clinical practice.

  9. In Vitro Inhibition of Human Sperm Creatine Kinase by Nicotine,Cotinine and Cadmium, as a Mechanism in Smoker Men Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Ghaffari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nicotine, cotinine and cadmium are harmful components of cigarettes that have aneffect on human reproductive function. Although the effects of cigarette smoke on male reproductivefunction is characterized in several articles its mechanism of action is still unknown.In the present study, we investigate the effect of nicotine, cotinine and cadmium on human spermcreatine kinase activity in vitro.Materials and Methods: Total creatine kinase activity is measured in sperm homogenates afterchromatography on a diethylaminoethyl cellulose (DEAE-32 column.Results: We show that creatine kinase activity is significantly inhibited by nicotine (44%, cotinine(39% and cadmium (65% at a concentration of 60 μg/ml. Kinetic studies reveal that the inhibitoryeffect of nicotine, cotinine and cadmium are competitive in relation to creatine phosphate.Conclusion: Considering the importance of creatine kinase activity for normal sperm energymetabolism, our results suggest that inhibition of this enzyme by nicotine, cotinine and cadmium maybe an important mechanism in infertility amongst male smokers. However, further investigationsare needed to elucidate the exact mechanism of cigarette effect on male reproductive function atthe molecular level.

  10. Impact of cigarette smoking on histone (H2B) to protamine ratio in human spermatozoa and its relation to sperm parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, M F; Shelko, N; Kartarius, S; Montenarh, M; Hammadeh, M E

    2014-09-01

    Smoking is strongly associated with abnormalities in histone-to-protamine transition and with alteration of protamine expression in human spermatozoa. A proper protamine to histone ratio is, however, essential for sperm chromatin maturity and DNA integrity. Alterations in these sperm nuclear proteins were observed in infertile men. The present prospective study is aimed at evaluating the possible relationship among smoking, semen quality and the histone-to-protamine transition ratio in mature spermatozoa. Histone H2B and protamine 1 (P1) and 2 (P2) were quantified using acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the spermatozoa of 35 smokers and 19 non-smokers. Levels of lipid peroxidation marker malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in seminal plasma by thiobarbituric acid assay. Cotinine concentrations were determined in seminal plasma using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Histone H2B levels in smokers (292.27 ± 58.24 ng/10(6)) were significantly higher (p = 0.001) than that of non-smokers (109.1 ± 43.70 ng/10(6)), besides, a significant difference (p > 0.0001) was found for the P1 and P2 ratio between smokers (1.71 ± 0.071) and non-smokers (1.05 ± 0.033). The H2B/(H2B+P1 + P2) ratio (0.29 ± 0.71) of smokers were significantly higher (p = sperm count, motility (p = 0.018), vitality (p = 0.009) and membrane integrity (p = 0.0001) than non-smokers. These results reveal that patients who smoke possess a higher proportion of spermatozoa with an alteration of the histone to protamine ratio than patients who do not smoke, and suggest that cigarette smoking may inversely affect male fertility. © 2014 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  11. Human immunodeficiency type-1 virus (HIV-1) infection in serodiscordant couples (SDCs) does not have an impact on embryo quality or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Marco Antonio Barreto; Meseguer, Marcos; Bellver, José; Remohí, José; Pellicer, Antonio; Garrido, Nicolás

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the embryo quality in our program for human immunodeficiency type-1 virus (HIV-1) serodiscordant couples (SDCs) with the male infected in comparison with a tubal-factor infertility control group. Retrospective case-control study. Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad, Valencia, Spain. Thirty SDC and 79 control couples without HIV-1 infection attending for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Only first cycles were considered. Controlled ovarian hyperstimulation and ICSI in both groups; sperm wash, nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in semen sample, and capacitation by swim-up after thawing the semen sample in the SDC group; and sperm capacitation by swim-up after thawing the semen sample in the control group. ICSI procedure and embryo characteristics (fertilization, cleavage, embryo morphology, and development) and cycle outcome (ongoing pregnancy and miscarriage rates). Fertilization and cleavage rates were similar between the groups. On days 2 and 3 of embryo development, very similar embryo features were found between the groups. There was no difference in mean number of optimal embryos on day 3. When embryos were cultured up to 5-6 days, a significant increase in embryo blockage was found in the SDC group compared with the control group. The mean number of optimal blastocysts on day 6 was comparable in both groups. No difference was found regarding the number of cryopreserved and transferred embryos or implantation, pregnancy, multiple pregnancy, or miscarriage rates between the groups. HIV-1 infection in SDCs with infected males does not appear to have a significantly negative impact on embryo development or ICSI outcome.

  12. Sperm DNA damage measured by comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Luke; Carrell, Douglas T

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of sperm DNA damage is a useful tool in the evaluation of male infertility, as the sperm nucleus lacks protection against oxidative stress and is vulnerable to oxidation-mediated DNA damage. The Comet assay or single-cell gel electrophoresis is a relatively simple and sensitive method for measuring strand breaks in DNA in individual sperm. During this procedure, sperm cells are embedded in a thin layer of agarose on a microscope slide and lysed with detergent under high salt conditions. This process removes protamines and histones allowing the nucleus to form a nucleoid-like structure containing supercoiled loops of DNA. Alkaline pH conditions result in unwinding of double-stranded DNA, and subsequent electrophoresis results in the migration of broken strands towards the anode, forming a comet tail, when observed under fluorescence microscope. The amount of DNA in the head and tail is reflected by its fluorescent intensity. The relative fluorescence in the tail compared with its head serves as a measure of the level of DNA damage. In this chapter, we describe the alkaline version of the Comet assay, which is highly sensitive for measuring single- and double-strand DNA breaks.

  13. The subthalamic nucleus, Part I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marani, Enrico; Heida, Tjitske; Lakke, Egbert A.J.F.; Usunoff, Kamen G.

    2008-01-01

    Part I. Development, cytology, topography and connections. This monograph on the subthalamic nucleus accentuates in Part I the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections. The light and electron microscopical cytology

  14. Cryopreservation of human sperm: efficacy and use of a new nitrogen-free controlled rate freezer versus liquid nitrogen vapour freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creemers, E; Nijs, M; Vanheusden, E; Ombelet, W

    2011-12-01

    Preservation of spermatozoa is an important aspect of assisted reproductive medicine. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and use of a recently developed liquid nitrogen and cryogen-free controlled rate freezer and this compared with the classical liquid nitrogen vapour freezing method for the cryopreservation of human spermatozoa. Ten patients entering the IVF programme donated semen samples for the study. Samples were analysed according to the World Health Organization guidelines. No significant difference in total sperm motility after freeze-thawing between the new technique and classical technique was demonstrated. The advantage of the new freezing technique is that it uses no liquid nitrogen during the freezing process, hence being safer to use and clean room compatible. Investment costs are higher for the apparatus but running costs are only 1% in comparison with classical liquid nitrogen freezing. In conclusion, post-thaw motility of samples frozen with the classical liquid nitrogen vapour technique was comparable with samples frozen with the new nitrogen-free freezing technique. This latter technique can thus be a very useful asset to the sperm cryopreservation laboratory. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Comparative evolutionary psychology of sperm competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Todd K; Goetz, Aaron T

    2006-05-01

    A comparative evolutionary psychological perspective predicts that species that recurrently faced similar adaptive problems may have evolved similar psychological mechanisms to solve these problems. Sperm competition provides an arena in which to assess the heuristic value of such a comparative evolutionary perspective. The sperm competition that results from female infidelity and polyandry presents a similar class of adaptive problems for individuals across many species. The authors first describe mechanisms of sperm competition in insects and in birds. They suggest that the adaptive problems and evolved solutions in these species provide insight into human anatomy, physiology, psychology, and behavior. The authors then review recent theoretical and empirical arguments for the existence of sperm competition in humans and discuss proposed adaptations in humans that have analogs in insects or birds. The authors conclude by highlighting the heuristic value of a comparative evolutionary psychological approach in this field. Copyright 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Sperm competition in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkhead, T R

    1998-05-01

    Sperm competition in birds occurs when a female is inseminated by more than one male during a single breeding cycle. Despite most birds being socially monogamous, sperm competition is widespread and results in frequent extra-pair paternity. Sperm competition is a fundamental part of sexual selection since it results in differential reproductive success among males. Male adaptations to sperm competition include relatively large testes, large sperm stores and long spermatozoa, mate guarding and frequent pair copulations. Females show no obvious morphological adaptations to sperm competition but, by controlling whether copulations are successful, they probably determine its frequency and extent. Despite this, the evolutionary benefits females acquire from extra-pair fertilizations are poorly understood. Experiments in which females are inseminated with equal numbers of spermatozoa from two males usually show last male sperm precedence. Understanding the mechanism of sperm competition requires understanding of why the last male to inseminate a female fertilizes a disproportionate number of eggs. The data from sperm competition studies on the domestic fowl, turkeys and zebra finches are consistent only with a passive sperm loss model of sperm competition. The mechanism is as follows: after insemination, spermatozoa enter the sperm storage tubules located in the oviduct, from which they are lost at a constant rate over days or weeks. All else being equal, the interval between two inseminations determines the probability of fertilization: the second of two inseminations fertilizes most eggs simply because, by the time fertilization occurs, fewer of these spermatozoa have been lost. Other factors also affect the outcome of sperm competition: the timing of insemination relative to oviposition, the differential fertilizing capacity of males and differences in the numbers of spermatozoa inseminated; as a consequence, last male sperm precedence is not automatic. On the basis

  17. Study of nuclear and acrosomal sperm morphometry in ram using a computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis fluorescence (CASMA-F) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yániz, J L; Capistrós, S; Vicente-Fiel, S; Soler, C; Nuñez de Murga, J; Santolaria, P

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new method that allows morphometric assessment of the sperm nucleus and acrosome in the ram using fluorescence microscopy and free software. The study was divided into three experiments. In the first experiment, semen smears from 20 ejaculates were fixed and labeled with a propidium iodide-pisum sativum agglutinin (PI/PSA) combination. Digital images of the sperm nucleus, acrosome, and whole sperm head were captured and analyzed using the ImageJ program. The computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis fluorescence (CASMA-F) method used allowed the differentiation, capture, and morphometric analysis of most sperm nuclei, acrosomes, and whole heads with high precision and the assessment of the acrosomal status. In the second experiment, sperm nuclear morphometry by CASMA-F was compared by staining with the PI/PSA combination and staining with Hoechst 33342 as in previous studies. Similar results were obtained using both methods. In the third experiment, CASMA-F with PI/PSA was compared with a more conventional CASMA method (semen smears stained with Hemacolor (HEM) and processed with the ISAS commercial software, HEM). Spermatozoa displayed a bigger size when processed with CASMA-F than with HEM method in all primary sperm head morphometric parameters, but results using both methods were correlated. It was concluded that the CASMA-F method allows the simultaneous assessment of sperm nucleus, acrosome, and head in the ram. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sperm preparation for ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schill Wolf-Bernhard

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The onset of clinical assisted reproduction, a quarter of a century ago, required the isolation of motile spermatozoa. As the indication of assisted reproduction shifted from mere gynaecological indications to andrological indications during the years, this urged andrological research to understand the physiology of male germ cell better and develop more sophisticated techniques to separate functional spermatozoa from those that are immotile, have poor morphology or are not capable to fertilize oocytes. Initially, starting from simple washing of spermatozoa, separation techniques, based on different principles like migration, filtration or density gradient centrifugation evolved. The most simple and cheapest is the conventional swim-up procedure. A more sophisticated and most gentle migration method is migration-sedimentation. However, its yield is relatively small and the technique is therefore normally only limited to ejaculates with a high number of motile spermatozoa. Recently, however, the method was also successfully used to isolate spermatozoa for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Sperm separation methods that yield a higher number of motile spermatozoa are glass wool filtration or density gradient centrifugation with different media. Since Percoll® as a density medium was removed from the market in 1996 for clinical use in the human because of its risk of contamination with endotoxins, other media like IxaPrep®, Nycodenz, SilSelect®, PureSperm® or Isolate® were developed in order to replace Percoll®. Today, an array of different methods is available and the selection depends on the quality of the ejaculates, which also includes production of reactive oxygen species (ROS by spermatozoa and leukocytes. Ejaculates with ROS production should not be separated by means of conventional swim-up, as this can severely damage the spermatozoa. In order to protect the male germ cells from the influence of ROS and to stimulate

  19. Effect of microRNA-21 on the proliferation of human degenerated nucleus pulposus by targeting programmed cell death 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explore the effect of microRNA-21 (miR-21 on the proliferation of human degenerated nucleus pulposus (NP by targeting programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4 tumor suppressor. NP tissues were collected from 20 intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD patients, and from 5 patients with traumatic spine fracture. MiR-21 expressions were tested. NP cells from IDD patients were collected and divided into blank control group, negative control group (transfected with miR-21 negative sequences, miR-21 inhibitor group (transfected with miR-21 inhibitors, miR-21 mimics group (transfected with miR-21 mimics and PDCD4 siRNA group (transfected with PDCD4 siRNAs. Cell growth was estimated by Cell Counting Kit-8; PDCD4, MMP-2,MMP-9 mRNA expressions were evaluated by qRT-PCR; PDCD4, c-Jun and p-c-Jun expressions were tested using western blot. In IDD patients, the expressions of miR-21 and PDCD4 mRNA were respectively elevated and decreased (both P<0.05. The miR-21 expressions were positively correlated with Pfirrmann grades, but negatively correlated with PDCD4 mRNA (both P<0.001. In miR-21 inhibitor group, cell growth, MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA expressions, and p-c-Jun protein expressions were significantly lower, while PDCD4 mRNA and protein expressions were higher than the other groups (all P<0.05. These expressions in the PDCD4 siRNA and miR-21 mimics groups was inverted compared to that in the miR-21 inhibitor group (all P<0.05. MiR-21 could promote the proliferation of human degenerated NP cells by targeting PDCD4, increasing phosphorylation of c-Jun protein, and activating AP-1-dependent transcription of MMPs, indicating that miR-21 may be a crucial biomarker in the pathogenesis of IDD.

  20. Sperm immobilization by dental focus microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linossier, A; Thumann, A; Bustos-Obregon, E

    1982-01-01

    Focal infections and their ability to produce alterations in different tissues have been in dispute for long time. The purpose of this work was to observe "in vitro" the effect of an Escherichia coli filtrate obtained from open pulpar necrosis on human sperm motility. It was observed that the E. coli filtrate produced a loss in sperm motility. The immobilizating factor was studied and characterized as a heat-stable, resistant to lyophilization and non-dializable substance, which could via blood stream reach the male reproductive system and affect sperm motility.

  1. A possible role of transglutaminase 2 in the nucleus of INS-1E and of cells of human pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sileno, Sara; D'Oria, Valentina; Stucchi, Riccardo; Alessio, Massimo; Petrini, Stefania; Bonetto, Valentina; Maechler, Pierre; Bertuzzi, Federico; Grasso, Valeria; Paolella, Katia; Barbetti, Fabrizio; Massa, Ornella

    2014-01-16

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a multifunctional protein with Ca(2+)-dependent transamidating and G protein activity. Previously we reported that the role of TG2 in insulin secretion may involve cytoplasmic actin remodeling and a regulative action on other proteins during granule movement. The aim of this study was to gain a better insight into the role of TG2 transamidating activity in mitochondria and in the nucleus of INS-1E rat insulinoma cell line (INS-1E) during insulin secretion. To this end we labeled INS-1E with an artificial donor (biotinylated peptide), in basal condition and after stimulus with glucose for 2, 5, and 8min. Biotinylated proteins of the nuclear/mitochondrial-enriched fraction were analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Many mitochondrial proteins involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis (e.g. voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein, prohibitin and different ATP synthase subunits) and many nuclear proteins involved in gene regulation (e.g. histone H3, barrier to autointegration factor and various heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein) were identified among a number of transamidating substrates of TG2 in INS-1E. The combined results provide evidence that a temporal link exists between glucose-stimulation, first phase insulin secretion and the action of TG on histone H3 both in INS-1E and human pancreatic islets. Research into the role of transglutaminase 2 during insulin secretion in INS-1E rat insulinoma cellular model is depicting a complex role for this enzyme. Transglutaminase 2 acts in the different INS-1E compartments in the same way: catalyzing a post-translational modification event of its substrates. In this work we identify some mitochondrial and nuclear substrates of INS-1E during first phase insulin secretion. The finding that TG2 interacts with nuclear proteins that include BAF and histone H3 immediately after (2-5min) glucose stimulus of INS-1E suggests that TG2 may be involved not only in insulin

  2. Fluid viscoelasticity promotes collective swimming of sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Lin, Chungwei; Harvey, Benedict; Fiore, Alyssa G; Ardon, Florencia; Wu, Mingming; Suarez, Susan S

    2017-06-09

    From flocking birds to swarming insects, interactions of organisms large and small lead to the emergence of collective dynamics. Here, we report striking collective swimming of bovine sperm in dynamic clusters, enabled by the viscoelasticity of the fluid. Sperm oriented in the same direction within each cluster, and cluster size and cell-cell alignment strength increased with viscoelasticity of the fluid. In contrast, sperm swam randomly and individually in Newtonian (nonelastic) fluids of low and high viscosity. Analysis of the fluid motion surrounding individual swimming sperm indicated that sperm-fluid interaction was facilitated by the elastic component of the fluid. In humans, as well as cattle, sperm are naturally deposited at the entrance to the cervix and must swim through viscoelastic cervical mucus and other mucoid secretions to reach the site of fertilization. Collective swimming induced by elasticity may thus facilitate sperm migration and contribute to successful fertilization. We note that almost all biological fluids (e.g. mucus and blood) are viscoelastic in nature, and this finding highlights the importance of fluid elasticity in biological function.

  3. Sperm competition and the evolution of sperm design in mammals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Gomendio, Montserrat; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2011-01-01

    .... The hypothesis that, when ejaculates compete with rival males, an increase in sperm size would make sperm more competitive because it would increase sperm swimming speed, has generated contradictory...

  4. The spectrum of DNA damage in human sperm assessed by single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) and its relationship to fertilization and embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, I D; Ilott, S; Dixon, L; Brison, D R

    2002-04-01

    The integrity of sperm DNA is important for the success of natural or assisted fertilization, as well as normal development of the embryo, fetus and child. ICSI, by bypassing sperm selection mechanisms, increases the risk of transmitting damaged DNA and the significance of this requires investigation. DNA damage in sperm from an unselected group of 60 men undergoing IVF treatment was measured by single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) and correlated with semen and treatment cycle parameters. Wide spectra of sperm DNA damage were found both within and between men but no specific subgroups were identified. Semen and treatment cycle parameters were not different in men grouped according to high or low sperm DNA damage. However, regression analysis showed that DNA damage was positively associated with age (29-44 years), abnormal sperm and motility and negatively associated with sperm concentration. In ICSI cycles DNA damage was positively associated with impairment of post-fertilization embryo cleavage. This study contributes to the evidence of DNA damage within sperm. High loads of DNA damage measured by the Comet assay were predictive of failure of embryo development after ICSI. As it is likely that sperm with DNA damage contributed to successful fertilization and in-vitro development, potential adverse effects remain to be clarified.

  5. Probing the effect of human normal sperm morphology rate on cycle outcomes and assisted reproductive methods selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Li

    Full Text Available Sperm morphology is the best predictor of fertilization potential, and the critical predictive information for supporting assisted reproductive methods selection. Given its important predictive value and the declining reality of semen quality in recent years, the threshold of normal sperm morphology rate (NSMR is being constantly corrected and controversial, from the 4th edition (14% to the 5th version (4%. We retrospectively analyzed 4756 cases of infertility patients treated with conventional-IVF(c-IVF or ICSI, which were divided into three groups according to NSMR: ≥14%, 4%-14% and <4%. Here, we demonstrate that, with decrease in NSMR(≥14%, 4%-14%, <4%, in the c-IVF group, the rate of fertilization, normal fertilization, high-quality embryo, multi-pregnancy and birth weight of twins gradually decreased significantly (P<0.05, while the miscarriage rate was significantly increased (p<0.01 and implantation rate, clinical pregnancy rate, ectopic pregnancy rate, preterm birth rate, live birth rate, sex ratio, and birth weight(Singleton showed no significant change. In the ICSI group, with decrease in NSMR (≥14%, 4%-14%, <4%, high-quality embryo rate, multi-pregnancy rate and birth weight of twins were gradually decreased significantly (p<0.05, while other parameters had no significant difference. Considering the clinical assisted methods selection, in the NFMR ≥14% group, normal fertilization rate of c-IVF was significantly higher than the ICSI group (P<0.05, in the 4%-14% group, birth weight (twins of c-IVF were significantly higher than the ICSI group, in the <4% group, miscarriage of IVF was significantly higher than the ICSI group. Therefore, we conclude that NSMR is positively related to embryo reproductive potential, and when NSMR<4% (5th edition, ICSI should be considered first, while the NSMR≥4%, c-IVF assisted reproduction might be preferred.

  6. Do "sperm trading" simultaneous hermaphrodites always trade sperm?

    OpenAIRE

    Nils Anthes; Michiels, Nico K.

    2005-01-01

    Sperm trading can be a mechanism to solve the conflict over sex roles in hermaphrodites with copulation, sperm competition, and sperm digestion. If present, sperm donation depends on sperm receipt, resulting in conditional reciprocal inseminations. Conditional reciprocity can involve three traded commodities: penis intromissions on a yes-or-no basis, intromission durations (indicating ejaculate size), or sperm transfer. If present, animals that refuse to donate (cheaters) should be deserted b...

  7. The relationship between sperm viability and DNA fragmentation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samplaski, Mary K; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Lo, Kirk C; Grober, Ethan D; Mullen, Brendan; Garbens, Alaina; Jarvi, Keith A

    2015-05-14

    In humans, sperm DNA fragmentation rates have been correlated with sperm viability rates. Reduced sperm viability is associated with high sperm DNA fragmentation, while conversely high sperm viability is associated with low rates of sperm DNA fragmentation. Both elevated DNA fragmentation rates and poor viability are correlated with impaired male fertility, with a DNA fragmentation rate of >30% indicating subfertility. We postulated that in some men, the sperm viability assay could predict the sperm DNA fragmentation rates. This in turn could reduce the need for sperm DNA fragmentation assay testing, simplifying the infertility investigation and saving money for infertile couples. All men having semen analyses with both viability and DNA fragmentation testing were identified via a prospectively collected database. Viability was measured by eosin-nigrosin assay. DNA fragmentation was measured using the sperm chromosome structure assay. The relationship between DNA fragmentation and viability was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. From 2008-2013, 3049 semen analyses had both viability and DNA fragmentation testing. A strong inverse relationship was seen between sperm viability and DNA fragmentation rates, with r=-0.83. If viability was ≤50% (n=301) then DNA fragmentation was ≥ 30% for 95% of the samples. If viability was ≥75% (n=1736), then the DNA fragmentation was ≤30% for 95% of the patients. Sperm viability correlates strongly with DNA fragmentation rates. In men with high levels of sperm viability≥75%, or low levels of sperm viability≤ 30%, DFI testing may be not be routinely necessary. Given that DNA fragmentation testing is substantially more expensive than vitality testing, this may represent a valuable cost-saving measure for couples undergoing a fertility evaluation.

  8. Sperm preparation for fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    Gadella, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Description This book contains 19 chapters that discuss theoretical and applied andrology for domestic, zoo and wild animals. Topics include semen and its constituents; sperm production and harvest; determinants of sperm morphology; sperm preparation for fertilization; practical aspects of semen cryopreservation; evaluation of semen in the andrology laboratory; genetic aspects of male reproduction; emerging techniques and future development of semen evaluation and handling and applied androlo...

  9. Discovery of human posterior head 20 (hPH20) and homo sapiens sperm acrosome associated 1 (hSPACA1) immunocontraceptive epitopes and their effects on fertility in male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuemei; Liu, Xiaodong; Ren, Xiuhua; Li, Xuewu; Wang, Li; Zang, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    The key goals of immunocontraception research are to obtain full contraceptive effects using vaccines administered to both males and females. Current research concerning human anti-sperm contraceptive vaccines is focused on delineating infertility-related epitopes to avoid autoimmune disease. We constructed phage-display peptide libraries to select epitope peptides derived from human posterior head 20 (hPH20) and homo sapiens sperm acrosome associated 1 (hSPACA1) using sera collected from infertile women harbouring anti-sperm antibodies. Following five rounds of selection, positive colonies were reconfirmed for reactivity with the immunoinfertile sera. We biopanned and analysed the chemical properties of four epitope peptides, named P82, Sa6, Sa37 and Sa76. Synthetic peptides were made and coupled to either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or ovalbumin. We used the BSA-conjugated peptides to immunise BALB/c mice and examined the effects on fertility in female and male mice. The synthetic peptides generated a sperm-specific antibody response in female and male mice that caused a contraceptive state. The immunocontraceptive effect was reversible and, with the disappearance of peptide-specific antibodies, there was complete restoration of fertility. Vaccinations using P82, Sa6 and Sa76 peptides resulted in no apparent side effects. Thus, it is efficient and practical to identify epitope peptide candidates by phage display. These peptides may find clinical application in the specific diagnosis and treatment of male and female infertility and contraceptive vaccine development.

  10. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Gaffney, E.A.

    2011-01-21

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrity of human sperm DNA assessed by the neutral comet assay and its relationship to semen parameters and clinical outcomes for the IVF-ET program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Hee-Jun; Chung, Da-Yeon; Choi, Soon-Young; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Gi-Young; Lee, Jae-Seok; Lee, Hee-Sun; Kim, Myung-Hee; Roh, Sung-Il

    2011-03-01

    To explore potential relationships between sperm DNA integrity and both semen parameters and clinical outcomes. Semen analysis of 498 samples was performed according to the 2010 criteria of the World Health Organization. The sperm DNA fragmentation Index (DFI) of the semen samples was assessed using a neutral comet assay. Sperm DFI showed a significant correlation with semen parameters, including the patient's age, sperm viability, motility, morphology, and number of leukocytes (psperm DFI values for asthenozoospermic (15.2%), oligoteratozoospermic (18.3%), asthenoteratozoospermic (17.5%), and oligoasthenoteratozoospermic semen samples (21.3%) were significantly higher than that observed in normozoospermic semen samples (10.5%, psperm DFI value of 14% was used as a threshold of sperm DFI in assessing whether DNA was highly damaged. In 114 IVF-ET cycles, the fertilization rate of the sperm DFI sperm DFI assessed using the comet assay was shown to improve the quality of the semen evaluation. To evaluate the precise effect of ICSI on pregnancy rates in the patients who demonstrate high sperm DFI values, further study is necessary.

  12. The human subthalamic nucleus encodes the subjective value of reward and the cost of effort during decision-making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zénon, Alexandre; Duclos, Yann; Carron, Romain; Witjas, Tatiana; Baunez, Christelle; Régis, Jean; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Peter; Eusebio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive behaviour entails the capacity to select actions as a function of their energy cost and expected value and the disruption of this faculty is now viewed as a possible cause of the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Indirect evidence points to the involvement of the subthalamic nucleus—the most common target for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease—in cost-benefit computation. However, this putative function appears at odds with the current view that the subthalamic nucleus is important for adjusting behaviour to conflict. Here we tested these contrasting hypotheses by recording the neuronal activity of the subthalamic nucleus of patients with Parkinson’s disease during an effort-based decision task. Local field potentials were recorded from the subthalamic nucleus of 12 patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (mean age 63.8 years ± 6.8; mean disease duration 9.4 years ± 2.5) both OFF and ON levodopa while they had to decide whether to engage in an effort task based on the level of effort required and the value of the reward promised in return. The data were analysed using generalized linear mixed models and cluster-based permutation methods. Behaviourally, the probability of trial acceptance increased with the reward value and decreased with the required effort level. Dopamine replacement therapy increased the rate of acceptance for efforts associated with low rewards. When recording the subthalamic nucleus activity, we found a clear neural response to both reward and effort cues in the 1–10 Hz range. In addition these responses were informative of the subjective value of reward and level of effort rather than their actual quantities, such that they were predictive of the participant’s decisions. OFF levodopa, this link with acceptance was weakened. Finally, we found that these responses did not index conflict, as they did not vary as a function of the distance from indifference in the acceptance decision. These findings show

  13. Fluid flow and sperm guidance: a simulation study of hydrodynamic sperm rheotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Kenta; Gaffney, Eamonn A

    2015-05-06

    How does a sperm find its way? The study of guidance cues has fascinated sperm biologists and in particular the prospect of rheotaxis, that is a fluid flow orienting the direction of sperm swimming, has been the subject of extensive recent study, as readily motivated by the prospect that such guidance may be active in the mammalian female reproductive tract. For instance, it has been hypothesized that helical sperm flagellar beating is necessary for such guidance, whereas there is an extensive diversity of flagellar beating patterns, with planar sperm beating readily observed in human cells for example. In particular, such cells will not be guided by fluid flow according to hypothesized mechanisms for rheotaxis presented thus far. Here, using simulation methods, we investigate rheotaxis for a wide range of flagellar beat patterns. Providing the virtual sperm firstly does not possess a tightly circling trajectory in the absence of a background flow and secondly, remains within a region of low shear to prevent being washed away by the background flow, rheotaxis is generally observed with the sperm swimming into the flow together with a possible transverse velocity. Tight circling sperm motility, as observed in select hyperactivated sperm and CatSper mutants, is predicted to disrupt the rheotactic response, whereas confinement to low shear regions generally requires boundary accumulation, thus introducing subtleties in the relationship between rheotactic behaviours and the flagellar waveform and sperm characteristics. Nonetheless, such predictions suggest such rheotactic guidance may be more common and robust than previously thought, and we document simple criteria for the presence of rheotaxis that are consistent with our simulations and understanding, as well as reported observations to date. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Gold-standard for computer-assisted morphological sperm analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Violeta; Garcia, Alejandra; Hitschfeld, Nancy; Härtel, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    Published algorithms for classification of human sperm heads are based on relatively small image databases that are not open to the public, and thus no direct comparison is available for competing methods. We describe a gold-standard for morphological sperm analysis (SCIAN-MorphoSpermGS), a dataset of sperm head images with expert-classification labels in one of the following classes: normal, tapered, pyriform, small or amorphous. This gold-standard is for evaluating and comparing known techniques and future improvements to present approaches for classification of human sperm heads for semen analysis. Although this paper does not provide a computational tool for morphological sperm analysis, we present a set of experiments for comparing sperm head description and classification common techniques. This classification base-line is aimed to be used as a reference for future improvements to present approaches for human sperm head classification. The gold-standard provides a label for each sperm head, which is achieved by majority voting among experts. The classification base-line compares four supervised learning methods (1- Nearest Neighbor, naive Bayes, decision trees and Support Vector Machine (SVM)) and three shape-based descriptors (Hu moments, Zernike moments and Fourier descriptors), reporting the accuracy and the true positive rate for each experiment. We used Fleiss' Kappa Coefficient to evaluate the inter-expert agreement and Fisher's exact test for inter-expert variability and statistical significant differences between descriptors and learning techniques. Our results confirm the high degree of inter-expert variability in the morphological sperm analysis. Regarding the classification base line, we show that none of the standard descriptors or classification approaches is best suitable for tackling the problem of sperm head classification. We discovered that the correct classification rate was highly variable when trying to discriminate among non-normal sperm

  15. Microscale integrated sperm sorter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yaokuang; Zhu, Xiaoyue; Gu, Wei; Smith, Gary D; Takayama, Shuichi

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes the design and fabrication of a passively driven microfluidic sperm sorter using soft lithographic microfabrication techniques. This self-contained device can separate motile sperm from nonmotile sperm and other cellular debris. The sorting system is small (coin sized) and structurally simple. It comprises two inlets; two outlets; a sorting channel; and arrays of horizontally oriented reservoirs that function as passively driven, constant-flow-rate pumps. Sperm with higher motility are sorted out from the rest of the semen samples based on their ability to swim through interfaces between adjacent laminar streams into separate streamlines, whereas the nonmotile sperm and debris remain in their initial streamlines. The device, which we call a microscale integrated sperm sorter, does not rely on any external power sources or controllers and incorporates all sample loading and sorting functions necessary to prepare high-quality sperm for in vitro fertilization. This self-contained, inexpensive, and portable device may also be useful for developing convenient sperm motility assays that can be used at the point of care or at home.

  16. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji; Chen, Li; Li, Jie; Li, Hongjun; Hong, Zhiwei; Xie, Min; Chen, Shengrong; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) analysis, the intracellular Ca2(+ )concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility.

  17. Sperm storage potential and daily sperm production of brown male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Testes and epididymis were homogenised separately in 0.154M NaCl. Sperm reserves in the homogenates were determined. Sperm production efficiency and daily sperm production were also determined from testicular homogenates and epididymal sperm reserves from epididymal homogenate. The results showed that ...

  18. Relationship between Initial Telomere Length, Initial Telomerase Activity, Age, and Replicative Capacity of Nucleus Pulposus Chondrocytes in Human Intervertebral Discs: What Is a Predictor of Replicative Potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Seok; Jeong, Seo-Won; Cho, Sung-Wook; Juhn, Joon-Pyo; Kim, Ki-Won

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that telomere length (TL), telomerase activity (TA), and age are related to the replicative potential of human nucleus pulposus chondrocytes (NPCs). However, it has not yet been established if any of these factors can serve as predictors of the replicative potential of NPCs. To establish predictors of the replicative potential of NPCs, we evaluated potential relationships between replicative capacity of NPCs, initial TL (telomere length at the first passage), initial TA (telomerase activity at the first passage), and age. Nucleus pulposus specimens were obtained from 14 patients of various ages undergoing discectomy. NPCs were serially cultivated until the end of their replicative lifespans. Relationships among cumulative population doubling level (PDL), initial TL, initial TA, and age were analyzed. Initial TA was negatively correlated with age (r = -0.674, P = 0.008). However, no correlation between initial TL and age was observed. Cumulative PDL was also negatively correlated with age (r = -0.585, P = 0.028). Although the cumulative PDL appeared to increase with initial TL or initial TA, this trend was not statistically significant. In conclusion, age is the sole predictor of the replicative potential of human NPCs, and replicative potential decreases with age. Initial TL and initial TA are not predictors of replicative potential, and can serve only as reference values.

  19. The sperm epigenome: implications for the embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, John R; Emery, Benjamin R; Jenkins, Timothy G; Carrell, Douglas T

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances, including the human genome project and numerous studies of cancer and other diseases, have shown that the genetic code is not simply limited to the sequence of the four bases of DNA but also includes epigenetic programming, heritable changes that affect gene expression [Riggs A, Martinssen R, Russo V (2007) Introduction. In: Riggs A, Martinssen R, Russo V (eds) Epigenetics mechanisms of gene regulation. Cold Spring Harbor Press, New York]. The science of epigenetics is important in understanding many diseases and biological processes, including in identifying the causes of disease and better understanding the mechanisms by which the environment can affect gene expression [Carrell Fertil Steril 97 (2):267-274, 2012]. This chapter will focus on the epigenome of sperm and particularly highlight the potential role of the sperm epigenome in embryogenesis.The sperm epigenome is unique and highly specialized because of the unique nature and function of sperm and because of the diverse requirements for successful fertilization. Due to the need for motility, sperm chromatin must be compacted and highly organized. During spermiogenesis the chromatin is packaged tightly into the sperm head by the replacement of most histones with protamines. This allows for protection of the DNA from the hostile environment in the female reproductive tract. Remaining histones can have chemical modifications to the tails of the protein that either facilitate or repress gene transcription. Sperm, like embryonic stem cells, have a unique pattern of histone modifications that includes both activating and silencing marks in the promoters of genes associated with development. These bivalent marks, along with DNA hypomethylation, comprise a unique state in which the key genes are "poised" for possible activation in embryogenesis. Sperm epigenetic abnormalities have been linked with multiple diseases including male factor infertility and poor embryogenesis.

  20. Characterization and possible function of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-spermatogenic protein GAPDHS in mammalian sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaryan, Hasmik; Dorosh, Andriy; Capkova, Jana; Manaskova-Postlerova, Pavla; Philimonenko, Anatoly; Hozak, Pavel; Peknicova, Jana

    2015-03-08

    Sperm proteins are important for the sperm cell function in fertilization. Some of them are involved in the binding of sperm to the egg. We characterized the acrosomal sperm protein detected by a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (Hs-8) that was prepared in our laboratory by immunization of BALB/c mice with human ejaculated sperms and we tested the possible role of this protein in the binding assay. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold labelling, gel electrophoresis, Western blotting and protein sequencing were used for Hs-8 antigen characterization. Functional analysis of GAPDHS from the sperm acrosome was performed in the boar model using sperm/zona pellucida binding assay. Monoclonal antibody Hs-8 is an anti-human sperm antibody that cross-reacts with the Hs-8-related protein in spermatozoa of other mammalian species (boar, mouse). In the immunofluorescence test, Hs-8 antibody recognized the protein localized in the acrosomal part of the sperm head and in the principal piece of the sperm flagellum. In immunoblotting test, MoAb Hs-8 labelled a protein of 45 kDa in the extract of human sperm. Sequence analysis identified protein Hs-8 as GAPDHS (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrohenase-spermatogenic). For this reason, commercial mouse anti-GAPDHS MoAb was applied in control tests. Both antibodies showed similar staining patterns in immunofluorescence tests, in electron microscopy and in immunoblot analysis. Moreover, both Hs-8 and anti-GAPDHS antibodies blocked sperm/zona pellucida binding. GAPDHS is a sperm-specific glycolytic enzyme involved in energy production during spermatogenesis and sperm motility; its role in the sperm head is unknown. In this study, we identified the antigen with Hs8 antibody and confirmed its localization in the apical part of the sperm head in addition to the principal piece of the flagellum. In an indirect binding assay, we confirmed the potential role of GAPDHS as a binding protein that is involved in the secondary sperm

  1. Is there a relationship between sperm chromosome abnormalities and sperm morphology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko Evelyn

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review explores the relationship between sperm chromosomal constitution and morphology. With the advent of techniques for obtaining information on the chromosome complements of spermatozoa, this relationship has been studied in fertile men and in men with a high frequency of chromosomal abnormalities. Using human sperm karyotype analysis, no relationship between sperm chromosome abnormalities and morphology was found in fertile men, translocation carriers or post-radiotherapy cancer patients. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis has not generally revealed a specific association between morphologically abnormal sperm and sperm chromosome abnormalities, but has indicated that teratozoospermia, like other forms of abnormal semen profiles (aesthenozoospermia, oligozoospermia is associated with a modest increase in the frequency of sperm chromosome abnormalities. However, FISH studies on some infertile men and mouse strains have suggested that certain types of morphologically abnormal spermatozoa, such as macrocephalic multitailed spermatozoa, are associated with a very significantly increased frequency of aneuploidy. Thus, there may be an association between sperm morphology and aneuploidy in infertile men with specific abnormalities.

  2. Galanin neurons in the intermediate nucleus (InM) of the human hypothalamus in relation to sex, age, and gender identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Falgueras, Alicia; Ligtenberg, Lisette; Kruijver, Frank P M; Swaab, Dick F

    2011-10-15

    The intermediate nucleus (InM) in the preoptic area of the human brain, also known as the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) and the interstitial nucleus of the anterior hypothalamus-1 (INAH-1) is explored here. We investigated its population of galanin-immunoreactive (Gal-Ir) neurons in relation to sex, age, and gender identity in the postmortem brain of 77 subjects. First we compared the InM volume and number of Gal-Ir neurons of 22 males and 22 females in the course of aging. In a second experiment, we compared for the first time the InM volume and the total and Gal-Ir neuron number in 43 subjects with different gender identities: 14 control males (M), 11 control females (F), 10 male-to-female (MtF) transsexual people, and 5 men who were castrated because of prostate cancer (CAS). In the first experiment we found a sex difference in the younger age group ( 45 years. In the second experiment the MtF transsexual group presented an intermediate value for the total InM neuron number and volume that did not seem different in males and females. Because the CAS group did not have total neuron numbers that were different from the intact males, the change in adult circulating testosterone levels does not seem to explain the intermediate values in the MtF group. Organizational and activational hormone effects on the InM are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Induction of ultra-morphological features of apoptosis in mature and immature sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Grunewald

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a fundamental body of evidence suggesting that activated apoptosis signaling in ejaculated human sperm negatively influences their fertilization potential. However, it is still controversial whether this apoptotic signaling is a relic of an abortive apoptosis related to spermatogenesis or if it should be regarded as a functional preformed pathway in mature sperm leading to stereotypical morphological changes reflecting nuclear disassembly. To address this question, apoptosis was induced using betulinic acid in mature and immature ejaculated human sperm enriched by density gradient centrifugation. Execution of apoptosis was monitored by observing ultra-morphological changes via transmission electron microscopy. Typical morphological signs of apoptosis in somatic cells include plasma membrane blebbing with the formation of apoptotic bodies, impaired mitochondrial integrity, defects of the nuclear envelope, and nuclear fragmentation; these morphologies have also been observed in human sperm. In addition, these apoptotic characteristics were more frequent in immature sperm compared to mature sperm. Following betulinic acid treatment, apoptosis-related morphological changes were induced in mature sperm from healthy donors. This effect was much less pronounced in immature sperm. Moreover, in both fractions, the betulinic acid treatment increased the percentage of acrosome-reacted sperm. The results of our ultra-morphological study prove the functional competence of apoptosis in mature ejaculated human sperm. The theory of a sole abortive process may be valid only for immature sperm. The induction of the acrosome reaction by stimulating apoptosis might shed light on the biological relevance of sperm apoptosis.

  4. Divergence of sperm and leukocyte age-dependent telomere dynamics: implications for male-driven evolution of telomere length in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Aston, Kenneth I; Hunt, Steven C.; Susser, Ezra; Kimura, Masayuki; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Carrell, Douglas; Aviv, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) dynamics in vivo are defined by TL and its age-dependent change, brought about by cell replication. Leukocyte TL (LTL), which reflects TL in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), becomes shorter with age. In contrast, sperm TL, which reflects TL in the male germ cells, becomes longer with age. Moreover, offspring of older fathers display longer LTL. Thus far, no study has examined LTL and sperm TL relations with age in the same individuals, nor considered their implications fo...

  5. Vitrification of neat semen alters sperm parameters and DNA integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Adib, Maryam; Halvaei, Iman; Nabi, Ali

    2014-05-06

    Our aim was to evaluate the effect of neat semen vitrification on human sperm vital parameters and DNA integrity in men with normal and abnormal sperm parameters. Semen samples were 17 normozoospermic samples and 17 specimens with abnormal sperm parameters. Semen analysis was performed according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Then, the smear was provided from each sample and fixed for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Vitrification of neat semen was done by plunging cryoloops directly into liquid nitrogen and preserved for 7 days. The samples were warmed and re-evaluated for sperm parameters as well as DNA integrity. Besides, the correlation between sperm parameters and DNA fragmentation was assessed pre- and post vitrification. Cryopreserved spermatozoa showed significant decrease in sperm motility, viability and normal morphology after thawing in both normal and abnormal semen. Also, the rate of sperm DNA fragmentation was significantly higher after vitrification compared to fresh samples in normal (24.76 ± 5.03 and 16.41 ± 4.53, P = .002) and abnormal (34.29 ± 10.02 and 23.5 ± 8.31, P neat ejaculates has negative impact on sperm parameters as well as DNA integrity, particularly among abnormal semen subjects. It is, therefore, recommend to process semen samples and vitrify the sperm pellets.

  6. The aging human cochlear nucleus: Changes in the glial fibrillary acidic protein, intracellular calcium regulatory proteins, GABA neurotransmitter and cholinergic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Saroj; Nag, Tapas C; Thakar, Alok; Bhardwaj, Daya N; Roy, Tara Sankar

    2014-03-01

    The human auditory system is highly susceptible to environmental and metabolic insults which further affect the biochemical and physiological milieu of the cells that may contribute to progressive, hearing loss with aging. The cochlear nucleus (CN) is populated by morphologically diverse types of neurons with discrete physiological and neurochemical properties. Between the dorsal and the ventral cochlear nucleus (DCN and VCN), the VCN is further sub-divided into the rostral (rVCN) and caudal (cVCN) sub-divisions. Although, information is available on the age related neurochemical changes in the mammalian CN similar reports on human CN is still sparse. The morphometry and semiquantitative analysis of intensity of expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), calcium binding proteins (calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin), gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) and nicotinic acetyl choline receptor (nAchR) beta 2 immunostaining were carried out in all three sub-divisions of the human CN from birth to 90 years. There was increased GFAP immunoreactivity in decades 2 and 3 in comparison to decade 1 in the CN. But no change was observed in rVCN from decade 4 onwards, whereas intense staining was also observed in decades 5 and 6 in cVCN and DCN. All three calcium binding proteins were highly expressed in early to middle ages, whereas a significant reduction was found in later decades in the VCN. GABA and nAchR beta 2 expressions were unchanged throughout in all the decades. The middle age may represent a critical period of onset and progression of aging changes in the CN and these alterations may add to the deterioration of hearing responses in the old age. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Multifractal analysis of nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, K.; Cherry, M.L.; Jones, W.V.; Wefel, J.P. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)); Dabrowska, A.; Holynski, R.; Jurak, A.; Olszewski, A.; Szarska, M.; Trzupek, A.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K. (Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kawiory 26 A, 30-055, Krakow (Poland)); Freier, P.S.; Waddington, C.J. (School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)); (KLM Collaboration)

    1993-10-01

    We have performed a multifractal ([ital G]-moment) analysis of 14.6--200 GeV/nucleon nucleus-nucleus and 200--800 GeV proton-nucleus interactions from KLM and Fermilab E-90 and E-508 emulsion data, including explicit corrections for the finite statistical sample. The corrected slopes of the [ital G] moments for protons, [sup 16]O, [sup 28]Si, and [sup 32]S nuclei show only slight evidence for departures from random behavior, while the normalized entropies appear to show a more consistent departure from randomness, particularly for protons. Given the size of the uncertainties, the results of the fractal analysis are not consistent either with results of intermittency analyses for nucleus-nucleus collisions or with the nonrandom behavior previously reported for leptonic and hadronic collisions. However, because of the effects of statistical noise, the fractal analysis is not as sensitive as the intermittency analysis for detecting nonrandom fluctuations.

  8. Low Sperm Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lump or swelling in the testicle area A history of testicle, prostate or sexual problems Groin, testicle, penis or scrotum surgery Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic Causes The production of sperm is a complex ...

  9. Sperm preparation: DNA damage by comet assay in normo- and teratozoospermics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Laiq; Jalali, Samina; Shami, Sajjad Aslam; Akram, Zertashia

    2007-01-01

    The present study was carried out on semen samples of human fertile and infertile subjects, teratozoospermics (TZs) and idiopathics (IDs), with neat semen and sperm prepared by swim up or Percoll density gradient centrifugation procedures. Sperm morphology analysis revealed that only head and midpiece defects in TZs and IDs were significantly (P sperm DNA damage compared to fertile subjects. Fertile subjects with sperm prepared from neat and Percoll density gradient centrifugation exhibited a comet tail DNA percentage of 20% and 15%, respectively. The TZs and IDs infertile subjects had higher levels of comet tail DNA of 33% and 25% and 25% and 19%, respectively. A significant (F = 24.01; P = 0.0059) decrease in mean comet head DNA percentage or sperm DNA integrity was observed in neat samples from fertile and infertile subjects by Repeated Measures ANOVA. In Percoll prepared samples from fertile, TZs, and IDs, there was a significant increase in sperm DNA integrity. Similarily, there was a decrease in abnormal sperm morphology in swim up and Percoll prepared sperm compared to neat samples. The Percoll density gradient centrifugation procedure yields sperm with an increase in sperm DNA integrity relative to swim up. Sperm DNA damage of TZs with both sperm preparation methods was significantly (P sperm with improved DNA integrity. In conjunction with semen analysis, the assessment of nuclear integrity improves the characterization of the semen sample and may be used as a tool for allocating the patients to specific assisted reproductive treatments.

  10. The Influence of Sperm Morphology, Total Motile Sperm Count of Semen and the Number of Motile Sperm Inseminated in Sperm Samples on the Success of Intrauterine Insemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Saharkhiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study aimed to analyze the prognostic value of sperm morphology , totalmotile sperm count (TMSC and the number of motile sperm inseminated (NMSI on the outcomeof intrauterine insemination (IUI.Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out 445 women undergoing 820IUI cycles. All of the patients underwent controlled ovarian hyper stimulation with clomiphencitrate and human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG followed by intrauterine inseminationwith the husband’s sperm. Pregnancy rate (PR per cycle in correlation to sperm morphology,TMSC and NMSI was obtained. Statistical analysis of the data was done by the SPSS version13 (Chicago,USA.Results: A total of 81 clinical pregnancies were obtained for a pregnancy rate per cycle of 9.9%.When the TMSC was 5×106 to <10×106, the PR per cycle was significantly higher than thesubgroups <1×106, 1×106 to <5×106 and ≥10×106 (15%, 5.6%, 5.1%, 10.8%, respectively. Spermmorphology was in itself a significant factor that affected the likelihood of IUI success. Nonetheless,the most significant difference of the PR per cycle with sperm morphology was in the subgroup <5% (2.1% vs. 97.9%.When the NMSI was ≥10×106, the PR per cycle was significantly higher thanthe subgroups<5×106 and 5×106 to< 10× 106 (11.2%, 4.1%, 5.2%, respectively.Conclusion: The study showed that TMSC 5×106 to < 10×106 and normal sperm morphology ≥ 5%and NMSI ≥ 10×106 are useful prognostic factors of IUI cycles.

  11. Akt/mTOR mediated induction of bystander effect signaling in a nucleus independent manner in irradiated human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Wang, Lu; Prise, Kevin M; Yu, K N; Chen, Guodong; Chen, Lianyun; Mei, Yide; Han, Wei

    2017-03-14

    Cytoplasm is an important target for the radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE). In the present work, the critical role of protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the generation of RIBE signaling after X-ray irradiation and the rapid phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR was observed in the cytoplasm of irradiated human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial (A549) cells. Targeting A549 cytoplasts with individual protons from a microbeam showed that RIBE signal(s) mediated by the Akt/mTOR pathway were generated even in the absence of a cell nucleus. These results provide a new insight into the mechanisms driving the cytoplasmic response to irradiation and their impact on the production of RIBE signal(s).

  12. Sperm proteasomes degrade sperm receptor on the egg zona pellucida during mammalian fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn W Zimmerman

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research, the mechanism by which the fertilizing spermatozoon penetrates the mammalian vitelline membrane, the zona pellucida (ZP remains one of the unexplained fundamental events of human/mammalian development. Evidence has been accumulating in support of the 26S proteasome as a candidate for echinoderm, ascidian and mammalian egg coat lysin. Monitoring ZP protein degradation by sperm during fertilization is nearly impossible because those few spermatozoa that penetrate the ZP leave behind a virtually untraceable residue of degraded proteins. We have overcome this hurdle by designing an experimentally consistent in vitro system in which live boar spermatozoa are co-incubated with ZP-proteins (ZPP solubilized from porcine oocytes. Using this assay, mimicking sperm-egg interactions, we demonstrate that the sperm-borne proteasomes can degrade the sperm receptor protein ZPC. Upon coincubation with motile spermatozoa, the solubilized ZPP, which appear to be ubiquitinated, adhered to sperm acrosomal caps and induced acrosomal exocytosis/formation of the acrosomal shroud. The degradation of the sperm receptor protein ZPC was assessed by Western blotting band-densitometry and proteomics. A nearly identical pattern of sperm receptor degradation, evident already within the first 5 min of coincubation, was observed when the spermatozoa were replaced with the isolated, enzymatically active, sperm-derived proteasomes. ZPC degradation was blocked by proteasomal inhibitors and accelerated by ubiquitin-aldehyde(UBAL, a modified ubiquitin protein that stimulates proteasomal proteolysis. Such a degradation pattern of ZPC is consistent with in vitro fertilization studies, in which proteasomal inhibitors completely blocked fertilization, and UBAL increased fertilization and polyspermy rates. Preincubation of intact zona-enclosed ova with isolated active sperm proteasomes caused digestion, abrasions and loosening of the exposed zonae, and

  13. A highly efficient method for generation of therapeutic quality human pluripotent stem cells by using naive induced pluripotent stem cells nucleus for nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2014-01-01

    Even after several years since the discovery of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), we are still unable to make any significant therapeutic benefits out of them such as cell therapy or generation of organs for transplantation. Recent success in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) made it possible to generate diploid embryonic stem cells, which opens up the way to make high-quality pluripotent stem cells. However, the process is highly inefficient and hence expensive compared to the generation of iPSC. Even with the latest SCNT technology, we are not sure whether one can make therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cell from any patient's somatic cells or by using oocytes from any donor. Combining iPSC technology with SCNT, that is, by using the nucleus of the candidate somatic cell which got reprogrammed to pluripotent state instead that of the unmodified nucleus of the candidate somatic cell, would boost the efficiency of the technique, and we would be able to generate therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cells. Induced pluripotent stem cell nuclear transfer (iPSCNT) combines the efficiency of iPSC generation with the speed and natural reprogramming environment of SCNT. The new technique may be called iPSCNT. This technique could prove to have very revolutionary benefits for humankind. This could be useful in generating organs for transplantation for patients and for reproductive cloning, especially for childless men and women who cannot have children by any other techniques. When combined with advanced gene editing techniques (such as CRISPR-Cas system) this technique might also prove useful to those who want to have healthy children but suffer from inherited diseases. The current code of ethics may be against reproductive cloning. However, this will change with time as it happened with most of the revolutionary scientific breakthroughs. After all, it is the right of every human to have healthy offspring and it is the question of

  14. Transient and state modulation of beta power in human subthalamic nucleus during speech production and finger movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebb, A O; Darvas, F; Miller, K J

    2012-01-27

    Signs of Parkinson's disease (PD) are augmented by speech and repetitive motor tasks. The neurophysiological basis for this phenomenon is unknown, but may involve augmentation of β (13-30 Hz) oscillations within the subthalamic nucleus (STN). We hypothesized that speech and motor tasks increase β power in STN and propose a mechanism for clinical observations of worsening motor state during such behaviors. Subjects undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery performed tasks while STN local field potential (LFP) data were collected. Power in the β frequency range was analyzed across the entire recording to observe slow shifts related to block design and during time epochs synchronized to behavior to evaluate immediate fluctuations related to task execution. Bilaterally symmetric β event related desynchronization was observed in analysis time-locked to subject motor and speech tasks. We also observed slow shifts of β power associated with blocks of tasks. Repetitive combined speech and motor, and isolated motor blocks were associated with the highest bilateral β power state. Overt speech alone and imagined speech were associated with a low bilateral β power state. Thus, changing behavioral tasks is associated with bilateral switching of β power states. This offers a potential neurophysiologic correlate of worsened PD motor signs experienced during clinical examination with provocative tasks: switching into a high β power state may be responsible for worsening motor states in PD patients when performing unilateral repetitive motor tasks and combined speech and motor tasks. Beta state changes could be chronically measured and potentially used to control closed loop neuromodulatory devices in the future. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sperm length, sperm storage and mating system characteristics in bumblebees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Boris; Schmid-Hempel, Paul; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2003-01-01

    Multiple insemination induces sperm competition and may select for longer, faster moving sperm in species where sperm is short-lived and egg fertilization takes place almost immediately after ejaculation. Here we report the first detailed analysis of sperm length in social insects with long......-term storage of sperm, using three bumblebee species with different mating systems as models. We show that individual males produce only one size-class of sperm, but that sperm length is highly variable among brothers, among unrelated conspecific males, and among males of different species. Males of Bombus...... hypnorum, a species with multiple-mating queens, have longer sperm than males of B. terrestris and B. lucorum whose queens are single mated. Although the sample size on the species level was too small to perform a phylogenetic analysis, this finding supports the hypothesis that, all other things being...

  16. Sperm nuclear architecture is locally modified in presence of a Robertsonian translocation t(13;17.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Acloque

    Full Text Available In mammals, the non-random organization of the sperm nucleus supports an early function during embryonic development. Altering this organization may interfere with the zygote development and reduce fertility or prolificity. Thus, rare studies on sperm cells from infertile patients described an altered nuclear organization that may be a cause or a consequence of their respective pathologies. Thereby, chromosomal rearrangements and aneuploidy can be studied not only for their adverse effects on production of normal/balanced gametes at meiosis but also for their possible impact on sperm nuclear architecture and the epigenetic consequences of altered chromosome positioning. We decided to compare the global architecture of sperm nuclei from boars, either with a normal chromosome composition or with a Robertsonian translocation involving chromosomes 13 and 17. We hypothesized that the fusion between these chromosomes may change their spatial organization and we examined to what extend it could also modify the global sperm nuclear architecture. Analysis of telomeres, centromeres and gonosomes repartition does not support a global nuclear disorganization. But specific analysis of chromosomes 13 and 17 territories highlights an influence of chromosome 17 for the positioning of the fused chromosomes within the nucleus. We also observed a specific clustering of centromeres depending of the chromosome subtypes. Altogether our results showed that chromosome fusion does not significantly alter sperm nucleus architecture but suggest that centromere remodelling after chromosome fusion locally impacts chromosome positioning.

  17. Advancing age increases sperm chromatin damage and impairs fertility in peroxiredoxin 6 null mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Ozkosem

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to socioeconomic factors, more couples are choosing to delay conception than ever. Increasing average maternal and paternal age in developed countries over the past 40 years has raised the question of how aging affects reproductive success of males and females. Since oxidative stress in the male reproductive tract increases with age, we investigated the impact of advanced paternal age on the integrity of sperm nucleus and reproductive success of males by using a Prdx6−/− mouse model. We compared sperm motility, cytoplasmic droplet retention sperm chromatin quality and reproductive outcomes of young (2-month-old, adult (8-month-old, and old (20-month-old Prdx6−/− males with their age-matched wild type (WT controls. Absence of PRDX6 caused age-dependent impairment of sperm motility and sperm maturation and increased sperm DNA fragmentation and oxidation as well as decreased sperm DNA compaction and protamination. Litter size, total number of litters and total number of pups per male were significantly lower in Prdx6−/− males compared to WT controls. These abnormal reproductive outcomes were severely affected by age in Prdx6−/− males. In conclusion, the advanced paternal age affects sperm chromatin integrity and fertility more severely in the absence of PRDX6, suggesting a protective role of PRDX6 in age-associated decline in the sperm quality and fertility in mice.

  18. Low-Dose Urinary Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Is Effective for Oocyte Maturation in In Vitro Fertilization/ Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Cycles Independent of Body Mass Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R Hoyos, Luis; Khan, Sana; Dai, Jing; Singh, Manvinder; P Diamond, Michael; E Puscheck, Elizabeth; O Awonuga, Awoniyi

    2017-01-01

    Currently, there is no agreement on the optimal urinary derived human chorionic gonadotropin (u-hCG) dose requirement for initiating final oocyte maturation prior to oocyte collection in in vitro fertilization (IVF), but doses that range from 2500- 15000 IU have been used. We intended to determine whether low dose u-hCG was effective for oocyte maturation in IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles independent of body mass index (BMI). We retrospectively evaluated a cohort of 295 women who underwent their first IVF/ICSI cycles between January 2003 and December 2010 at the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA. Treatment cycles were divided into 3 groups based on BMI (kg/ m(2)): <25 (n=136), 25- <30 (n=84), and ≥30 (n=75) women. Patients received 5000, 10000 or 15000 IU u-hCG for final maturation prior to oocyte collection. The primary outcome was clinical pregnancy rates (CPRs) and secondary outcome was live birth rates (LBRs). Only maternal age negatively impacted (P<0.001) CPR [odds ratio (OR=0.85, confidence interval (CI: 0.79-0.91)] and LBR (OR=0.84, CI: 0.78-0.90). Administration of lower dose u-hCG was effective for oocyte maturation in IVF and did not affect the CPRs and LBRs irrespective of BMI. Women's BMI need not be taken into consideration in choosing the appropriate dose of u-hCG for final oocyte maturation prior to oocyte collection in IVF. Only maternal age at the time of IVF negatively influenced CPRs and LBRs in this study.

  19. Expression profiles of mitochondrial genes in the frontal cortex and the caudate nucleus of developing humans and mice selectively bred for high and low fear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang H Choi

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that mitochondrial function may be important in brain development and psychiatric disorders. However, detailed expression profiles of those genes in human brain development and fear-related behavior remain unclear. Using microarray data available from the public domain and the Gene Ontology analysis, we identified the genes and the functional categories associated with chronological age in the prefrontal cortex (PFC and the caudate nucleus (CN of psychiatrically normal humans ranging in age from birth to 50 years. Among those, we found that a substantial number of genes in the PFC (115 and the CN (117 are associated with the GO term: mitochondrion (FDR qv <0.05. A greater number of the genes in the PFC (91% than the genes in the CN (62% showed a linear increase in expression during postnatal development. Using quantitative PCR, we validated the developmental expression pattern of four genes including monoamine oxidase B (MAOB, NADH dehydrogenase flavoprotein (NDUFV1, mitochondrial uncoupling protein 5 (SLC25A14 and tubulin beta-3 chain (TUBB3. In mice, overall developmental expression pattern of MAOB, SLC25A14 and TUBB3 in the PFC were comparable to the pattern observed in humans (p<0.05. However, mice selectively bred for high fear did not exhibit normal developmental changes of MAOB and TUBB3. These findings suggest that the genes associated with mitochondrial function in the PFC play a significant role in brain development and fear-related behavior.

  20. Native nucleus pulposus tissue matrix promotes notochordal differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells with potential for treating intervertebral disc degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongxing; Fu, Susan; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Mao, Jeremy J; Bal, B Sonny

    2015-03-01

    Native porcine nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue harbors a number of notochordal cells (NCs). Whether the native NP matrix supports the homeostasis of notochordal cells is poorly understood. We hypothesized the NP matrix alone may contain sufficient regulatory factors and can serve as stimuli to generate notochordal cells (NCs) from human pluripotent stem cells. NCs are a promising cell sources for cell-based therapy to treat some types of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. One major limitation of this emerging technique is the lack of available NCs as a potential therapeutic cell source. Human pluripotent stem cells derived from reprogramming or somatic cell nuclear transfer technique may yield stable and unlimited source for therapeutic use. We devised a new method to use porcine NP matrix to direct notochordal differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). The results showed that hiPSCs successfully differentiated into NC-like cells under the influence of devitalized porcine NP matrix. The NC-like cells expressed typical notochordal marker genes including brachyury (T), cytokeratin-8 (CK-8) and cytokeratin-18 (CK-18), and they displayed the ability to generate NP-like tissue in vitro, which was rich in aggrecan and collagen type II. These findings demonstrated the proof of concept for using native NP matrix to direct notochordal differentiation of hiPSCs. It provides a foundation for further understanding the biology of NCs, and eventually towards regenerative therapies for disc degeneration. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Sperm aggregation by water extracts from two Bursera species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, H; Garcia-Suarez, M D

    2001-01-01

    Some plants have more than the common utility value, as is the case of some members of the Bursera species such as the Mexican copal, a plant used for worship. Water extracts of several plants have vaginal contraceptive properties. The authors evaluated the sperm agglutinating activity of two Bursera species on human and boar sperm. Extracts from stems and leaves were obtained. Capacitated sperm samples were used in all cases. There were different agglutinating capacities, which were not observed in the vehicle-only samples. The most frequent sperm agglutination response was that involving the heads. Agglutinating activity was higher from stem- than leaf-derived extracts. The results indicate that proteins present in the extracts are responsible for the aggregation of sperm heads.

  2. Shape and shear guide sperm cells spiraling upstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jorn; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2014-11-01

    A major puzzle in biology is how mammalian sperm determine and maintain the correct swimming direction during the various phases of the sexual reproduction process. Currently debated mechanisms for sperm long range travel vary from peristaltic pumping to temperature sensing (thermotaxis) and direct response to fluid flow (rheotaxis), but little is known quantitatively about their relative importance. Here, we report the first quantitative experimental study of mammalian sperm rheotaxis. Using microfluidic devices, we investigate systematically the swimming behavior of human and bull sperm over a wide range of physiologically relevant shear rates and viscosities. Our measurements show that the interplay of fluid shear, steric surface-interactions and chirality of the flagellar beat leads to a stable upstream spiraling motion of sperm cells, thus providing a generic and robust rectification mechanism to support mammalian fertilization. To rationalize these findings, we identify a minimal mathematical model that is capable of describing quantitatively the experimental observations.

  3. Psychosocial counselling of identifiable sperm donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, M; Mochtar, M H; de Melker, A A; van der Veen, F; Repping, S; Gerrits, T

    2016-05-01

    generalizability, since only a small number of identifiable donors at a single centre were studied. Variation in how donors are counselled upon intake may affect how donors value psychosocial counselling. This study reports on the issues that identifiable donors value being addressed during their intake procedure, as well as during counselling in the event that donor-offspring actually seek contact. These findings can be used to achieve a higher quality of care for identifiable sperm donors and may be the starting point for developing guidelines on psychosocial counselling for sperm donors. No funding was obtained for this study. The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. An investigation of the potential effect of sperm nuclear vacuoles in human spermatozoa on DNA fragmentation using a neutral and alkaline Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszek, E; Kiewisz, J; Skowronska, P; Liss, J; Lukaszuk, M; Bruszczynska, A; Jakiel, G; Lukaszuk, K

    2017-03-01

    Presence of vacuoles and degree of sperm DNA damage are considered to be the basic factors used for the assessment of sperm fertilization capacity. We aimed to investigate the link between these two parameters. According to our knowledge, this is the first study where the Comet assay was used to assess the degree of DNA fragmentation of sperm categorized by Motile Sperm Organelle Morphology Examination (MSOME) Grades. Semen samples from 10 patients were assessed. Spermatozoa were graded into four MSOME groups according to the Vanderzwalmen's criteria. A total of 3930 motile spermatozoa were selected one-by-one using an inverted microscope and transferred onto two different slides. The degree of DNA fragmentation was analyzed by alkaline and neutral Comet assay. Results of the neutral Comet assay showed that Grade I spermatozoa (absence of vacuoles) presented significantly lower dsDNA fragmentation level (mean: 3.13 ± 1.17%) than Grade II (maximum of two small vacuoles; mean: 10.34 ± 2.65%), Grade III (more than two small vacuoles or at least one large vacuole; mean: 23.88 ± 8.37%), and Grade IV (large vacuoles associated with abnormal head shapes or other abnormalities; mean: 36.94 ± 7.78%; p Comet assay showed that Grade I spermatozoa had significantly lower DNA (ssDNA + dsDNA) fragmentation level (mean: 8.33 ± 3.62%) than Grade III (mean: 25.64 ± 9.15%) and Grade IV (mean: 40.10 ± 9.10%, p  0.05). Probably, the vacuoles may be responsible for double strand DNA breaks rather than single strand DNA breaks (only 2.39% spermatozoa in MSOME Grade II, 1.76% in III, and 3.16% in IV has single strand breaks). The results demonstrate that lower MSOME grading correlates with lower sperm DNA fragmentation. Therefore, the observation of sperm nuclear vacuoles using real-time optical microscopy without precise DNA fragmentation examination is not sufficient for optimal sperm selection for intracytoplasmic sperm injection. © 2017 American Society of

  5. Healthy Sperm: Improving Your Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and what you can do to improve your fertility. By Mayo Clinic Staff Do your sperm pass ... understanding the various factors that can affect male fertility — then consider steps to help your sperm become ...

  6. Role of hypoxia and growth and differentiation factor-5 on differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells towards intervertebral nucleus pulposus-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, J V; Gantenbein-Ritter, B; Bertolo, A; Aebli, N; Baur, M; Alini, M; Grad, S

    2011-06-20

    There is evidence that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate towards an intervertebral disc (IVD)-like phenotype. We compared the standard chondrogenic protocol using transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFß) to the effects of hypoxia, growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF5), and coculture with bovine nucleus pulposus cells (bNPC). The efficacy of molecules recently discovered as possible nucleus pulposus (NP) markers to differentiate between chondrogenic and IVD-like differentiation was evaluated. MSCs were isolated from human bone marrow and encapsulated in alginate beads. Beads were cultured in DMEM (control) supplemented with TGFß or GDF5 or under indirect coculture with bNPC. All groups were incubated at low (2 %) or normal (20 %) oxygen tension for 28 days. Hypoxia increased aggrecan and collagen II gene expression in all groups. The hypoxic GDF5 and TGFß groups demonstrated most increased aggrecan and collagen II mRNA levels and glycosaminoglycan accumulation. Collagen I and X were most up-regulated in the TGFß groups. From the NP markers, cytokeratin-19 was expressed to highest extent in the hypoxic GDF5 groups; lowest expression was observed in the TGFß group. Levels of forkhead box F1 were down-regulated by TGFß and up-regulated by coculture with bNPC. Carbonic anhydrase 12 was also down-regulated in the TGFß group and showed highest expression in the GDF5 group cocultured with bNPC under hypoxia. Trends in gene expression regulation were confirmed on the protein level using immunohistochemistry. We conclude that hypoxia and GDF5 may be suitable for directing MSCs towards the IVD-like phenotype.

  7. The secretory products of Trichomonas vaginalis decrease fertilizing capacity of mice sperm in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaesook Roh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis infection is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections in humans and is now recognized as an important cause of infertility in men. There is little information about the effect of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS from T. vaginalis on sperm, but previous reports do not provide a conclusive description of the functional integrity of the sperm. To investigate the impact of EPS on the fertilizing capacity of sperm, we assessed sperm motility, acrosomal status, hypo-osmotic swelling, and in vitrofertilization rate after incubating the sperm with EPS in vitrousing mice. The incubation of sperm with EPS significantly decreased sperm motility, viability, and functional integrity in a concentration and time-dependent manner. These effects on sperm quality also resulted in a decreased fertilization rate in vitro. This is the first report that demonstrates the direct negative impact of the EPS of T. vaginalis on the fertilization rate of sperm in vitro. However, further study should be performed using human sperm to determine if EPS has similar negative impact on human sperm fertilizing capacity in vitro.

  8. The secretory products of Trichomonas vaginalis decrease fertilizing capacity of mice sperm in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jaesook; Lim, Young-Su; Seo, Min-Young; Choi, Yuri; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis infection is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections in humans and is now recognized as an important cause of infertility in men. There is little information about the effect of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from T. vaginalis on sperm, but previous reports do not provide a conclusive description of the functional integrity of the sperm. To investigate the impact of EPS on the fertilizing capacity of sperm, we assessed sperm motility, acrosomal status, hypo-osmotic swelling, and in vitro fertilization rate after incubating the sperm with EPS in vitro using mice. The incubation of sperm with EPS significantly decreased sperm motility, viability, and functional integrity in a concentration and time-dependent manner. These effects on sperm quality also resulted in a decreased fertilization rate in vitro. This is the first report that demonstrates the direct negative impact of the EPS of T. vaginalis on the fertilization rate of sperm in vitro. However, further study should be performed using human sperm to determine if EPS has similar negative impact on human sperm fertilizing capacity in vitro. PMID:25578937

  9. Effect of centrifugal fractionation protocols on quality and recovery rate of equine sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, A J; Brinsko, S P; Love, C C; Blanchard, T L; Teague, S R; Varner, D D

    2012-03-15

    Centrifugal fractionation of semen is commonly done to improve quality of human semen in assisted-reproduction laboratories, allowing sperm separation based on their isopycnic points. Sperm with morphologic abnormalities are often more buoyant, promoting their retention above defined density media, with structurally normal sperm passing through the media following centrifugation. Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of density-medium type, centrifuge-tube size, sperm number, and density-medium volume (column height) on stallion sperm quality and recovery rate in sperm pellets following centrifugation. In all three experiments, equine semen was initially centrifuged to increase sperm concentration. In Experiment 1, semen was layered over continuous or discontinuous gradients. For Experiment 2, semen was layered over three column heights of continuous gradients in 15- or 50-ml conical-bottom tubes. For Experiment 3, increasing sperm numbers were layered over continuous gradient in 15- or 50-ml conical-bottom tubes. Following centrifugation, sperm pellets were evaluated for sperm morphologic quality, motility, DNA integrity, and recovery rate. Centrifugal fractionation improved (P continuous gradient increased (P 0.05) by column height of gradient. Increasing sperm number subjected to gradient centrifugation decreased (P < 0.05) sperm recovery rate when 15-ml tubes were used. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Damage to Sperm DNA Mediated by Reactive Oxygen Species: Its Impact on Human Reproduction and the Health Trajectory of Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriliouk, Dan; Aitken, Robert John

    2015-01-01

    Disruptions to the genetic integrity of the mammalian spermatozoon play a major role in determining the subsequent developmental trajectory of the embryo. This chapter examines the causative links that connect DNA damage in human spermatozoa and the appearance of mutations in the progeny responsible for a variety of clinical conditions from autism to cancer. Integral to this discussion is an abundance of evidence indicating that human spermatozoa are vulnerable to free radical attack and the generation of oxidative DNA damage. The resolution of this damage appears to be initiated by the spermatozoa but is driven to completion by the oocyte in a round of DNA repair that follows fertilization. The persistence of unresolved oxidative DNA damage following zygote formation has the potential to create mutations/epimutations in the offspring that may have a profound impact on the health of the progeny. It is proposed that the creation of oxidative stress in the male germ line is a consequence of a wide variety of environmental/lifestyle factors that influence the health and well-being of the offspring as a consequence of mutational change induced by the aberrant repair of oxidative DNA damage in the zygote. Factors such as paternal age, subfertility, smoking, obesity, and exposure to a range of environmental influences, including radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation and xenobiotics, have all been implicated in this process. Identifying the contributors to oxidative stress in the germ line and resolving the mechanisms by which such stressors influence the mutational load carried by the progeny will be an important task for the future. This task is particularly pressing, given the extensive use of assisted reproductive technologies to achieve pregnancies in vitro that would have been prevented in vivo by the complex array of mechanisms that nature has put in place to ensure that only the fittest gametes participate in the generative process.

  11. Biological rhythms in the human life cycle and their relationship to functional changes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaab, D. F.; van Someren, E. J.; Zhou, J. N.; Hofman, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Biological rhythms play a prominent role in the human life cycle. The endogenous rhythms are entrained by the environment and have an astronomical counterpart which is obvious for daily, monthly, and yearly rhythms, and may possibly also be present in weekly rhythms. Circadian rhythms are present

  12. On mammalian sperm dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, J M; Woodall, P F

    1985-09-01

    Data on linear sperm dimensions in mammals are presented. There is information on a total of 284 species, representing 6.2% of all species; 17.2% of all genera and 49.2% of all families have some representation, with quantitative information missing only from the orders Dermoptera, Pholidota, Sirenia and Tubulidentata. In general, sperm size is inverse to body mass (except for the Chiroptera), so that the smallest known spermatozoa are amongst those of artiodactyls and the largest are amongst those of marsupials. Most variations are due to differences in the lengths of midpiece and principal piece, with head lengths relatively uniform throughout the mammals.

  13. Disruption of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) immunoreactivity in the human Kölliker-Fuse nucleus in victims of unexplained fetal and infant death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavezzi, Anna M; Corna, Melissa F; Matturri, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the neurotrophin brain-derived neutrophic factor (BDNF) is required for the appropriate development of the central respiratory network, a neuronal complex in the brainstem of vital importance to sustaining life. The pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KFN) is a fundamental component of this circuitry with strong implications in the pre- and postnatal breathing control. This study provides detailed account for the cytoarchitecture, the physiology and the BDNF behavior of the human KFN in perinatal age. We applied immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded brainstem samples (from 45 fetuses and newborns died of both known and unknown causes), to analyze BDNF, gliosis and apoptosis patterns of manifestation. The KFN showed clear signs of developmental immaturity, prevalently associated to BDNF altered expression, in high percentages of sudden intrauterine unexplained death syndrome (SIUDS) and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) victims. Our results indicate that BDNF pathway dysfunctions can derange the normal KFN development so preventing the breathing control in the sudden perinatal death. The data presented here are also relevant to a better understanding of how the BDNF expression in the KFN can be involved in several human respiratory pathologies such as the Rett's and the congenital central hypoventilation syndromes.

  14. Interactions of sperm perinuclear theca with the oocyte: implications for oocyte activation, anti-polyspermy defense, and assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutovsky, Peter; Manandhar, Gaurishankar; Wu, Alex; Oko, Richard

    2003-07-01

    Perinuclear theca (PT) is the cytoskeletal coat of mammalian sperm nucleus that is removed from the sperm head at fertilization. PT harbors the sperm borne, oocyte-activating factor (SOAF), a yet-to-be-characterized substance responsible for triggering the signaling cascade of oocyte activation, thought to be dependent on intra-oocyte calcium release. The present article reviews the current knowledge on the biogenesis and molecular composition of sperm PT. Possible functions of sperm PT during natural and assisted fertilization, and in the initiation of embryonic development are discussed. Furthermore, evidence is provided that SOAF is transferred from the sperm PT to oocyte cytoplasm through the internalization and rapid solubilization of the post-acrosomal PT. It is shown that during natural fertilization the sperm PT dissolves in the oocyte cytoplasm concomitantly with sperm nuclear decondensation and the initiation of pronuclear development. SOAF activity is preserved in the differentially extracted sperm heads only if the integrity of PT is maintained. After intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), activation occurs only in those oocytes in which the injected spermatozoon displays complete or partial dissolution of PT. In the latter case, the residual PT of the sub-acrosomal and/or post-acrosomal sperm region may persist on the apical surface of the sperm nucleus/male pronucleus and may cause a delay or arrest of zygotic development. We propose that the sperm PT harbors SOAF in the post-acrosomal sheath, as this is the first part of the sperm cytosol to enter the oocyte cytoplasm and its disassembly appears sufficient to initiate the early events of oocyte activation. Dissolution of the sub-acrosomal part of the PT, on the other hand, appears necessary to insure complete DNA decondensation in the internalized sperm nucleus and initiate DNA synthesis of both pronuclei. The release of the SOAF from the sperm head into oocyte cytoplasm at fertilization ultimately

  15. Characterization of the human nucleus pulposus cell phenotype and evaluation of novel marker gene expression to define adult stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, Ben M; Richardson, Stephen M; Zeef, Leo A H; Freemont, Anthony J; Hoyland, Judith A

    2010-12-01

    Development of stem cell therapies for regenerating the nucleus pulposus (NP) are hindered by the lack of specific markers by which to distinguish NP cells from articular chondrocytes (ACs). The purpose of this study was to define the phenotype profile of human NP cells using gene expression profiling and to assess whether the identified markers could distinguish mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation to a correct NP cell phenotype. Affymetrix MicroArray analyses were conducted on human NP cells and ACs, and differential expression levels for several positive (NP) and negative (AC) marker genes were validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. Novel marker gene and protein expression was also assessed in human bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) and adipose tissue-derived MSCs (AD-MSCs) following differentiation in type I collagen gels. Analysis identified 12 NP-positive and 36-negative (AC) marker genes that were differentially expressed ≥20-fold, and for a subset of them (NP-positive genes PAX1, FOXF1, HBB, CA12, and OVOS2; AC-positive genes GDF10, CYTL1, IBSP, and FBLN1), differential expression was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. Differentiated BM-MSCs and AD-MSCs demonstrated significant increases in the novel NP markers PAX1 and FOXF1. AD-MSCs lacked expression of the AC markers IBSP and FBLN1, whereas BM-MSCs lacked expression of the AC marker IBSP but expressed FBLN1. This study is the first to use gene expression profiling to identify the human NP cell phenotype. Importantly, these markers can be used to determine the in vitro differentiation of MSCs to an NP-like, rather than an AC-like, phenotype. Interestingly, these results suggest that AD-MSCs may be a more appropriate cell type than BM-MSCs for use in engineering intervertebral disc tissue. Copyright © 2010 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Decreased Fecundity and Sperm DNA Methylation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Timothy G.; Aston, Kenneth I.; Meyer, Tyson D.; Hotaling, James M.; Shamsi, Monis B.; Johnstone, Erica B.; Cox, Kyley J.; Stanford, Joseph B.; Porucznik, Christina A.; Carrell, Douglas T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship between epigenetic patterns in sperm and fecundity. Design Prospective study of couples trying to conceive, utilizing semen samples collected through the HOPE study, at the University of Utah. Setting Academic Andrology and IVF Laboratory Patients DNA methylation alterations associated with fecundity were analyzed in 124 semen samples. 27 semen samples from couples who conceived within 2 months of attempting a pregnancy and a total of 29 semen samples from couples who were unable to achieve a pregnancy within 12 months were analyzed to identify regions of interest. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measures Genome-wide assessment of differential sperm DNA methylation and standard semen analysis. Results No differences in sperm count, sperm morphology, or semen volume were observed between the patients achieving a pregnancy within 2 months of study time and those not obtaining a pregnancy within 12 months. However, using data from the Human Methylation 450k array analysis we did identify 2 genomic regions with significantly decreased (FDR <0.01) methylation and 3 genomic regions with significantly increased methylation in the “failure-to-conceive” group. Interestingly, the only two sites where decreased methylation was associated with reduced fecundity are at closely related genes known to be expressed in sperm, HSPA1L and HSPA1B. Conclusions Our data suggest that there are genomic loci where DNA methylation alterations are associated with decreased fecundity. We have thus identified candidate loci for future study to verify these results and investigate the causative or contributory relationship between altered sperm methylation and decreased fecundity. PMID:26453269

  17. Sperm morphology and phylogeny of lagriids (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Glenda; Oliveira, Claudia M; Lino-Neto, José

    2013-09-01

    The systematics of tenebrionids remain unclear, principally at the subfamily level, as is the case of the Lagriinae. Considering that sperm morphology has contributed to the various insect group phylogenies, in this work we describe the structure and ultrastructure of these cells in Lagria villosa. Sperm in this species exhibit a strong morphological similarity to those of Tenebrio molitor and Tribolium castaneum, the only two species of Tenebrionidae with previously described sperm. In tenebrionids, the flagellar components offer good diagnostic characters, e.g. the symmetry of mitochondrial derivatives in L. villosa differentiates sperm of this species from those of Te. molitor and Tr. castaneum. However, the lateral association of the nucleus with flagellar components, the form of accessory bodies, and the presence of material connecting the axoneme to the accessory bodies and mitochondrial derivatives indicate that the three species form a sister group. Therefore, the sperm morphology of L. villosa support lagriid beetles as a subfamily (Lagriinae) of Tenebrionidae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Oxidative DNA damage in mouse sperm chromosomes: Size matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocer, Ayhan; Henry-Berger, Joelle; Noblanc, Anais; Champroux, Alexandre; Pogorelcnik, Romain; Guiton, Rachel; Janny, Laurent; Pons-Rejraji, Hanae; Saez, Fabrice; Johnson, Graham D; Krawetz, Stephen A; Alvarez, Juan G; Aitken, R John; Drevet, Joël R

    2015-12-01

    Normal embryo and foetal development as well as the health of the progeny are mostly dependent on gamete nuclear integrity. In the present study, in order to characterize more precisely oxidative DNA damage in mouse sperm we used two mouse models that display high levels of sperm oxidative DNA damage, a common alteration encountered both in in vivo and in vitro reproduction. Immunoprecipitation of oxidized sperm DNA coupled to deep sequencing showed that mouse chromosomes may be largely affected by oxidative alterations. We show that the vulnerability of chromosomes to oxidative attack inversely correlated with their size and was not linked to their GC richness. It was neither correlated with the chromosome content in persisting nucleosomes nor associated with methylated sequences. A strong correlation was found between oxidized sequences and sequences rich in short interspersed repeat elements (SINEs). Chromosome position in the sperm nucleus as revealed by fluorescent in situ hybridization appears to be a confounder. These data map for the first time fragile mouse sperm chromosomal regions when facing oxidative damage that may challenge the repair mechanisms of the oocyte post-fertilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of the telomere repeat sequence in hamster sperm nuclear structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lara, J; Wydner, K L; Hyland, K M; Ward, W S

    1993-11-01

    The flat, hooked-shaped architecture of the hamster sperm nucleus makes this an excellent model for in situ hybridization studies of the three dimensional structure of the genome. We have examined the structure of the telomere repeat sequence (TTAGGG)n with respect to the various nuclear structures present in hamster spermatozoa, using fluorescent in situ hybridization. In fully condensed, mature sperm nuclei, the telomere sequences appeared as discrete spots of various sizes interspersed throughout the volume of the nuclei. While the pattern of these signals was non-random, it varied significantly in different nuclei. These discrete telomere foci were seen to gradually lengthen into linear, beaded signals as sperm nuclei were decondensed, in vitro, and were not associated with the nuclear annulus. We also examined the relationship of telomeres to the sperm nuclear matrix, a residual nuclear structure that retains the original size and shape of the nucleus. In these structures the DNA extends beyond the perimeter of the nucleus to form a halo around it, representing the arrangement of the chromosomal DNA into loop domains attached at their bases to the nuclear matrix. Telomere signals in these structures were also linear and equal in length to those of the decondensed nuclei, and each signal represented part of a single DNA loop domain. The telomeres were attached at one end to the nuclear matrix and extended into the halo. Sperm nuclear matrices treated with Eco RI retained the telomere signals. These data support sperm DNA packaging models in which DNA is coiled into discrete foci, rather than spread out linearly along the length of the sperm nucleus.

  20. DNA oxidative damage in mammalian spermatozoa: where and why is the male nucleus affected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblanc, Anais; Damon-Soubeyrand, Christelle; Karrich, Bouchta; Henry-Berger, Joelle; Cadet, Rémi; Saez, Fabrice; Guiton, Rachel; Janny, Laurent; Pons-Rejraji, Hanae; Alvarez, Juan G; Drevet, Joël R; Kocer, Ayhan

    2013-12-01

    Gamete DNA integrity is one key parameter conditioning reproductive success as well as the quality of life for the offspring. In particular, damage to the male nucleus can have profound negative effects on the outcome of fertilization. Because of the absence of repair activity of the quiescent mature spermatozoa it is easily subjected to nuclear damage, of which oxidative damage is by far the most prominent. In relation to the organization of the mammalian sperm nucleus we show here that one can correlate the nuclear regions of lower compaction with areas preferentially showing oxidative damage. More precisely, we show that oxidative DNA damage targets primarily histone-rich and nuclear matrix-attached domains located in the peripheral and basal regions of the mouse sperm nucleus. These particular sperm DNA domains were recently shown to be enriched in genes of paramount importance in postfertilization DNA replication events and in the onset of the embryonic developmental program. We propose that monitoring of sperm DNA oxidation using the type of assay presented here should be considered in clinical practice when one wants to estimate the integrity of the paternal nucleus along with more classical assays that essentially analyze DNA fragmentation and nucleus compaction. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A highly efficient method for generation of therapeutic quality human pluripotent stem cells by using naive induced pluripotent stem cells nucleus for nuclear transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudana Girija Sanal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Even after several years since the discovery of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC, we are still unable to make any significant therapeutic benefits out of them such as cell therapy or generation of organs for transplantation. Recent success in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT made it possible to generate diploid embryonic stem cells, which opens up the way to make high-quality pluripotent stem cells. However, the process is highly inefficient and hence expensive compared to the generation of iPSC. Even with the latest SCNT technology, we are not sure whether one can make therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cell from any patient’s somatic cells or by using oocytes from any donor. Combining iPSC technology with SCNT, that is, by using the nucleus of the candidate somatic cell which got reprogrammed to pluripotent state instead that of the unmodified nucleus of the candidate somatic cell, would boost the efficiency of the technique, and we would be able to generate therapeutic quality pluripotent stem cells. Induced pluripotent stem cell nuclear transfer (iPSCNT combines the efficiency of iPSC generation with the speed and natural reprogramming environment of SCNT. The new technique may be called iPSCNT. This technique could prove to have very revolutionary benefits for humankind. This could be useful in generating organs for transplantation for patients and for reproductive cloning, especially for childless men and women who cannot have children by any other techniques. When combined with advanced gene editing techniques (such as CRISPR-Cas system this technique might also prove useful to those who want to have healthy children but suffer from inherited diseases. The current code of ethics may be against reproductive cloning. However, this will change with time as it happened with most of the revolutionary scientific breakthroughs. After all, it is the right of every human to have healthy offspring and it is

  2. In vitro maturation, fertilization, embryo development & clinical outcome of human metaphase-I oocytes retrieved from stimulated intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Álvarez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The major cause of fertilisation failure after ICSI is failure of the oocyte to initiate the biochemical processes necessary for activation. This inability could be ascribed to cytoplasmic immaturity of those gametes even if they had reached nuclear maturity. The activation of a mature oocyte is characterised by release from metaphase II (MII arrest and extrusion of the second polar body, followed by pro-nuclear formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fate of in vitro matured (IVM metaphase I (MI oocytes subjected to intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI at different time intervals after extrusion of the first polar body (1PB in in vitro fertilization (IVF cycles. Methods: A total of 8030 oocytes were collected from 1400 ICSI cycles, 5504 MII at the time of cumulus retrieval. Four hundred eight metaphase II (MII (27.1% matured to MII after in vitro culture for 2-26 h and 5389 sibling MII in the moment of oocyte denudation were injected. On the other hand, 49 ICSI cycles containing only MI oocytes at retrieval were injected at three different time intervals after reaching the MII. The intervals were as follows: 2-6 h (n=10, 8-11 h (n=4 and 23-26 h (n=10. Fertilization and development potential were evaluated in both studies. Results: Fertilization, embryo cleavage and quality were significantly lower in IVM MI compared to MII at time of denudation. Pregnancy rate was higher in group MII. Pregnancy was achieved in three embryo transfers when ICSI was performed within 2-6 h (group I and 8-11 h (group II after PB extrusion. One pregnancy was obtained in group I and a healthy neonate was born. Interpretation & conclusions: Immature oocytes from women whose ovaries have been stimulated could be matured, fertilized by ICSI, cleaved in vitro and to give rise to a live birth. However, the developmental competence of embryos derived from immature oocytes is reduced, compared with sibling in vivo matured oocytes

  3. Equine sperm-neutrophil binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Abdorrahman S; Madill, Scott; Foster, Douglas N; Troedsson, Mats H T

    2015-04-01

    When mares are inseminated repeatedly, protein molecules from the seminal plasma (SP) prevent sperm-neutrophil binding and reduced fertility. The molecule(s) responsible for sperm-neutrophil binding is not known and the identification of beneficial SP proteins is complicated by their large numbers and abundant variation. We examined several important aspects of sperm-neutrophil binding to ultimately facilitate the identification and isolation of the molecule(s) responsible. First, we raised anti-equine P-selectin antibodies to determine the involvement of this adhesion molecule in sperm-neutrophil binding. While these antibodies identified equine P-selectin, they did not inhibit sperm-neutrophil binding. However, acrosome-reacted equine sperm expressed a molecule similar to the ligand recognition unit of P-selectin. Second, we attempted to characterize SP protein binding to equine sperm and gauge their affinity. Biotinylated SP proteins were incubated with fresh sperm, washed over a viscous medium, electrophoresed, and probed with avidin. Several SP proteins bound to sperm with a strong affinity to withstand these treatments. This finding may prove valuable for future attempts to identify and characterize specific SP molecules. Lastly, we compared the secretions from male sex organs/glands on sperm motility, sperm-neutrophil binding, and their protein profile. We expected fewer proteins from individual organs/glands, which would facilitate isolation and identification of target molecules. While each secretion had a varying effect on motility and sperm-neutrophil binding, the protein profile was as complex as that seen in whole SP, indicating that collection of proteins from individual sources will not facilitate this work. Together, these experiments answer several important questions related to sperm-neutrophil binding, sperm-SP proteins interaction, and the complexity of the SP proteome. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  4. Computer-Aided Sperm Analysis (CASA) of sperm motility and hyperactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, David; Mortimer, Sharon T

    2013-01-01

    Progressive motility is a vital functional characteristic of ejaculated human spermatozoa that governs their ability to penetrate into, and migrate through, both cervical mucus and the oocyte vestments, and ultimately fertilize the oocyte. A detailed protocol, based on the most common computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA) system with phase contrast microscope optics, is provided for performing reliable assessments of sperm movement pattern characteristics ("kinematics") in semen. The protocol can also be used with washed sperm suspensions where, in addition, the percentages of motile and progressively motile spermatozoa can also be derived. Using CASA technology it is also possible to identify biologically, and hence clinically, important subpopulations of spermatozoa (e.g., those in semen with good mucus-penetrating characteristics, or those showing hyperactivation when incubated under capacitating conditions) by applying multi-parametric definitions on a cell-by-cell basis.

  5. TGF-β1 and GDF5 Act Synergistically to Drive the Differentiation of Human Adipose Stromal Cells toward Nucleus Pulposus-like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombier, Pauline; Clouet, Johann; Boyer, Cécile; Ruel, Maëva; Bonin, Gaëlle; Lesoeur, Julie; Moreau, Anne; Fellah, Borhane-Hakim; Weiss, Pierre; Lescaudron, Laurent; Camus, Anne; Guicheux, Jérôme

    2016-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) primarily affects the central part of the intervertebral disc namely the nucleus pulposus (NP). DDD explains about 40% of low back pain and is characterized by massive cellular alterations that ultimately result in the disappearance of resident NP cells. Thus, repopulating the NP with regenerative cells is a promising therapeutic approach and remains a great challenge. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the potential of growth factor-driven protocols to commit human adipose stromal cells (hASCs) toward NP-like cell phenotype and the involvement of Smad proteins in this differentiation process. Here, we demonstrate that the transforming growth factor-β1 and the growth differentiation factor 5 synergistically drive the nucleopulpogenic differentiation process. The commitment of the hASCs was robust and highly specific as attested by the expression of NP-related genes characteristic of young healthy human NP cells. In addition, the engineered NP-like cells secreted an abundant aggrecan and type II collagen rich extracellular matrix comparable with that of native NP. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these in vitro engineered cells survived, maintained their specialized phenotype and secretory activity after in vivo transplantation in nude mice subcutis. Finally, we provide evidence suggesting that the Smad 2/3 pathway mainly governed the acquisition of the NP cell molecular identity while the Smad1/5/8 pathway controlled the NP cell morphology. This study offers valuable insights for the development of biologically-inspired treatments for DDD by generating adapted and exhaustively characterized autologous regenerative cells. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  6. Sperm vacuoles are not modified by freezing--thawing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatimel, Nicolas; Leandri, Roger; Parinaud, Jean

    2013-03-01

    Since the development of the motile sperm organellar morphology examination (MSOME) in 2001 for observing the cephalic vacuoles at high magnification, no study as yet assessed the effect of cryopreservation on these vacuoles, although sperm freezing-thawing procedures are known to affect sperm quality. Examination of the vacuoles before and after freezing-thawing would indicate whether the same normality criteria can be applied for frozen as for fresh spermatozoa when performing intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection. In 27 sperm samples from fertile men, analysis of conventional sperm parameters (motility, vitality, percentage of normal forms) and a morphological analysis at high magnification (×6000) using image analysis software was performed before freezing and after thawing. Whereas there were expected decreases in motility (Pvacuole area, total vacuole area, vacuole area in the anterior, median and basal parts of the head, percentage of spermatozoa with a vacuole area ≤6.5% and percentage of spermatozoa with a vacuole area >13%). Freezing-thawing procedures have no effect on human sperm vacuoles. Copyright © 2012 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cryoprotectant-free freezing of the goat epididymal sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katanbafzadeh, H; Barati, F; Tabandeh, M

    2014-01-01

    Cryoprotectant free approach successfully removed the impact of physical and chemical damages in preserving human sperm in a vitrification protocol. There is no any report on this technology in farm animal sperm freezing. The aim of the present study was to find the efficacy of cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrin (CLC; 1 mg per 60 million) and sucrose (0.1 and 0.2 M) on freezing of the goat epididymal sperm. Caudal epididymides (n=5 pairs) were dissected, incised and incubated in the Tris-BSA solution for 15 min, followed by swim-up at room temperature. Sperm was loaded in 0.25 mL French straws and cooled on nitrogen vapor for 3 min then immersed in liquid nitrogen and remained for 48 h. Then the straws thawed by immersing in 37 degree C waterbath for 30 sec and analyzed. The results showed the impact of freezing on the goat epididymal sperm motility, viability and DNA fragmentation that were improved by incorporation of CLC and sucrose (0.2 M). In conclusion, the goat epididymal sperm was frozen in a cryoprotectant-free freezing model. CLC and 0.4 M sucrose protected the goat epididymal sperm against freezing-induced damages.

  8. Comparative evidence for the evolution of sperm swimming speed by sperm competition and female sperm storage duration in passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleven, Oddmund; Fossøy, Frode; Laskemoen, Terje; Robertson, Raleigh J; Rudolfsen, Geir; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2009-09-01

    Sperm swimming speed is an important determinant of male fertility and sperm competitiveness. Despite its fundamental biological importance, the underlying evolutionary processes affecting this male reproductive trait are poorly understood. Using a comparative approach in a phylogenetic framework, we tested the predictions that sperm swim faster with (1) increased risk of sperm competition, (2) shorter duration of female sperm storage, and (3) increased sperm length. We recorded sperm swimming speed in 42 North American and European free-living passerine bird species, representing 35 genera and 16 families. We found that sperm swimming speed was positively related to the frequency of extrapair paternity (a proxy for the risk of sperm competition) and negatively associated with clutch size (a proxy for the duration of female sperm storage). Sperm swimming speed was unrelated to sperm length, although sperm length also increased with the frequency of extrapair paternity. These results suggest that sperm swimming speed and sperm length are not closely associated traits and evolve independently in response to sperm competition in passerine birds. Our findings emphasize the significance of both sperm competition and female sperm storage duration as evolutionary forces driving sperm swimming speed.

  9. Analysis of sperm antigens by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel/protein blot radioimmunobinding method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.Y.G. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada); Huang, Y.S.; Hu, P.C.; Gomel, V.; Menge, A.C.

    1982-06-01

    A radioimmunobinding method based on the blotting of renatured proteins from sodium dodecyl sulfate gels on to nitrocellulose filter papers was developed to analyze the sperm antigens that elicit serum anti-sperm antibodies. In rabbits, serum anti-sperm antibodies were raised by immunization with homologous epididymal spermatozoa mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant. The raised antisera from either male or female rabbits were shown to react with three major sperm protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels with the corresponding molecular weights of about 70,000 +/- 5000, 14,000, and 13,000, respectively. In humans, the monoclonal antibodies against human sperm were raised by a hybridoma technique. Out of six independent hybrid cell lines that were generated, three of them were shown to secrete immunoglobulins that react with the same two protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, which have the approximate molecular weight of 10,000. The same procedure was also used to analyze human serum samples that were shown to contain anti-sperm antibodies by the known techniques. Unique sperm antigens that elicit anti-sperm antibodies in humans were identified and correlated. The results of this study suggest that sodium dodecyl sulfate gel/protein blot radioimmunobinding method may be a sensitive and useful tool for the study of sperm antigens that elicit autoimmune responses and their association with human infertility.

  10. Sperm vacuoles cannot help to differentiate fertile men from infertile men with normal sperm parameter values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatimel, N; Léandri, R D; Marino, L; Esquerre-Lamare, C; Parinaud, J

    2014-11-01

    Can the assessment of sperm vacuoles at high magnification contribute to the explanation of idiopathic infertility? The characteristics of sperm head vacuoles (number, area, position) are no different between fertile controls and patients with unexplained infertility. Until now, the assessment of sperm head vacuoles has been focused on a therapeutic goal in the intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI) procedure, but it could be pertinent as a new diagnostic tool for the evaluation of male fertility. This diagnostic test study with blind assessment included a population of 50 fertile men and 51 men with idiopathic infertility. They were selected from September 2011 to May 2013. Fertile men were within couples who had a spontaneous pregnancy in the last 2 years. Infertile men were within couples who had unexplained infertility and were consulting in our centre. After analysis of conventional sperm parameters, we investigated the number, position and area of sperm head vacuoles at high magnification (×6000) with interference contrast using an image analysis software. We also carried out a nuclear status analysis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling assay (TUNEL), sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) and aniline blue staining. Concerning the vacuoles data, we did not find any significant difference between the two populations. We found no significant correlation between the vacuolar parameters (mean number of vacuoles, relative vacuole area and percentage of spermatozoa with large vacuoles) and either conventional semen parameters, male age or the data from the aniline blue staining, SCSA assay and TUNEL assay. Despite the fact all of the vacuole parameters values were identical in fertile and infertile men, we cannot totally exclude that a very small cause of unexplained infertilities could be related to an excess of sperm vacuoles. In line with its widely debated use as a therapeutic tool, sperm vacuole

  11. Morphology, Structure of Dimorphic Sperm, and Reproduction in the Hermaphroditic Commensal Bivalve Pseudopythina tsurumaru (Galeommatoidea: Kellidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jørgen; Jespersen, Åse; Takahashi, Tohru

    2004-01-01

    Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma......Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma...

  12. Sperm whale clicks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhl, Bertel; Wahlberg, Magnus; Madsen, Peter T.

    2000-01-01

    . A sound generator weighing upward of 10 tons and with a cross-section of 1 m is expected to generate high-intensity, directional sounds. This prediction from the Norris and Harvey theory is not supported by published data for sperm whale clicks ~source levels of 180 dB re 1 mPa and little, if any...... of the continental shelf off Andenes, Norway, in the summers of 1997 and 1998. With this system, source levels up to 223 dB re 1 mPa peRMS were recorded. Also, source level differences of 35 dB for the same click at different directions were seen, which are interpreted as evidence for high directionality....... This implicates sonar as a possible function of the clicks. Thus, previously published properties of sperm whale clicks underestimate the capabilities of the sound generator and therefore cannot falsify the Norris and Harvey theory....

  13. Cryopreservation of Fish Sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokura, Hisashi

    Present status of research activities in cryopreservation of fish gamete in aquaculture field was introduced. More than 59 fish species have been reported in the research histories and nearly half of them were studied during recent 10 years. This means that the research activities are increasing, though commercial profit have not obtained yet. Fish species of which sperm can successfully cryopreserved is still limited comparing to numerous species in telost. One of the major obstacle for improvement of the technique is existence of wide specie specific variance in the freezing tolerance of fish sperm. The varianc can possibly be explaind thorugh the informations obtained by the studies in comparative spermatology, which is recently activated field in fish biology.

  14. Ion channels in sperm physiology and male fertility and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Kamla Kant; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Rajender, Singh

    2012-01-01

    Ion channels regulate the membrane potential and intracellular ionic concentration and thus serve a central role in various cellular processes. Several ion channels have been identified in the germ cells, including sperm, emphasizing their importance in male fertility and reproduction. The molecular mechanism of ion transport and the nature of the ion channels involved have begun to emerge only recently despite the fact that several ligand-gated and voltage-gated channels have been identified and localized on sperm. The presence of the sperm-associated cation channel (CatSper1-4) gene family, proton voltage-gated ion channel (Hv1), potassium voltage-gated ion channel (SLO3/KCNU1), sodium voltage-gated channel (NaV1.1-1.9), and the members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family suggest an indispensable role for ion channels in sperm physiology and fertility potential. Ion channels are the key players in very important processes such as capacitation and the acrosome reaction, which are critical steps in sperm physiology preparing for fertilization. For example, CatSper, Hv1, SLO3, and TRP channel family members have been proposed to participate in the acrosome reaction, thereby making them most important for sperm fertility. Similarly, NaV channels could play a crucial role in noncapacitated sperm and in the initial capacitation steps. The role of ion channels seems indispensable for sperm fertility as evidenced by studies on animal models; however, the functional defects in infertile human males await further exploration. This article represents an update on the role of ion channels in sperm physiology, male fertility, and infertility.

  15. Modelling a tethered mammalian sperm cell undergoing hyperactivation

    KAUST Repository

    Curtis, M.P.

    2012-09-01

    The beat patterns of mammalian sperm flagella can be categorised into two different types. The first involves symmetric waves propagating down the flagellum with a net linear propulsion of the sperm cell. The second, hyperactive, waveform is classified by vigorous asymmetric waves of higher amplitude, lower wavenumber and frequency propagating down the flagellum resulting in highly curved trajectories. The latter beat pattern is part of the capacitation process whereby sperm prepare for the prospective penetration of the zona pellucida and fusion with the egg. Hyperactivation is often observed to initiate as sperm escape from epithelial and ciliary bindings formed within the isthmic regions of the female oviducts, leading to a conjecture in the literature that this waveform is mechanically important for sperm escape. Hence, we explore the mechanical effects of hyperactivation on a tethered sperm, focussing on a Newtonian fluid. Using a resistive force theory model we demonstrate that hyperactivation can indeed generate forces that pull the sperm away from a tethering point and consequently a hyperactivated sperm cell bound to an epithelial surface need not always be pushed by its flagellum. More generally, directions of the forces generated by tethered flagella are insensitive to reductions in beat frequency and the detailed flagellar responses depend on the nature of the binding at the tethering point. Furthermore, waveform asymmetry and amplitude increases enhance the tendency for a tethered flagellum to start tugging on its binding. The same is generally predicted to be true for reductions in the wavenumber of the flagellum beat, but not universally so, emphasising the dynamical complexity of flagellar force generation. Finally, qualitative observations drawn from experimental data of human sperm bound to excised female reproductive tract are also presented and are found to be consistent with the theoretical predictions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Cytometry of mammalian sperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-10-11

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. The accessibility of male cells makes them well suited for analytical cytology. We might automate the process of determining sperm morphology but should not do so solely for increased speed. Rather, richer tangible benefits will derive from cytometric evaluation through increased sensitivity, reduced subjectivity, standardization between investigators and laboratories, enhanced archival systems, and the benefits of easily exchanged standardized data. Inroads on the standardization of assays for motility and functional integrity are being made. Flow cytometric analysis of total DNA content of individual sperm is an insensitive means to detect exposure to reproductive toxins because of the small size and low frequency of the DNA content errors. Flow cytometry can be applied to determine the proportions of X- and Y-sperm in semen samples.

  17. Cryopreservation of microencapsulated canine sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shambhu; Otsuki, Tsubasa; Fujimura, Chika; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamashita, Yasuhisa; Higaki, Shogo; Hishinuma, Mitsugu

    2011-03-01

    The objective was to develop a method for cryopreserving microencapsulated canine sperm. Pooled ejaculates from three beagle dogs were extended in egg yolk tris extender and encapsulated using alginate and poly-L-lysine at room temperature. The microcapsules were cooled at 4 °C, immersed in pre-cooled extender (equivalent in volume to the microcapsules) to reach final concentration of 7% (v/v) glycerol and 0.75% (v/v) Equex STM paste, and equilibrated for 5, 30 and 60 min at 4 °C. Thereafter, microcapsules were loaded into 0.5 mL plastic straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen. In Experiment 1, characteristics of microencapsulated canine sperm were evaluated after glycerol addition at 4 °C. Glycerol exposure for 5, 30 and 60 min did not significantly affect progressive motility, viability, or acrosomal integrity of microencapsulated sperm compared with pre-cooled unencapsulated sperm (control). In Experiment 2, characteristics of frozen-thawed canine microencapsulated sperm were evaluated at 0, 3, 6, and 9 h of culture at 38.5 °C. Pre-freeze glycerol exposure for 5, 30, and 60 min at 4 °C did not influence post-thaw quality in unencapsulated sperm. Post-thaw motility and acrosomal integrity of microencapsulated sperm decreased more than those of unencapsulated sperm (P < 0.05) following glycerol exposure for 5 min. However, motility, viability and acrosomal integrity of microencapsulated sperm after 30 and 60 min glycerol exposure were higher than unencapsulated sperm cultured for 6 or 9 h (P < 0.05). In conclusion, since microencapsulated canine sperm were successfully cryopreserved, this could be a viable alternative to convention sperm cryopreservation in this species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cryopreservation of epididymal stallion sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaciregui, M; Gil, L; Montón, A; Luño, V; Jerez, R A; Martí, J I

    2014-02-01

    Any event that makes semen collection or mating impossible, such as death, castration, or injury, may terminate a stallion's breeding career. Fortunately, stallion sperm which are capable of fertilization can be harvested from the epididymis, and frozen for future use. However, the fertility of frozen-thawed epididymal sperm has been found to be lower than that of ejaculated sperm. Therefore, this study aimed to optimize the fertility of frozen epididymal stallion sperm by investigating the effects of different cryoprotectants and freezing protocols on sperm quality. Dimethylformamide was tested alone or combination with pasteurized egg yolk as substitute of fresh egg yolk. In addition, the effect of the pre-freeze stabilization on sperm quality was analyzed. Heterospermic samples obtained from stallion epididymis were collected and cryopreserved in lactose-egg-yolk extender or in the same extender with varying content of cryoprotectant and content of egg yolk, stabilized and no-stabilized. Sperm motility, viability, hypoosmotic swelling test (HOST) and acrosome integrity were evaluated post-thawing. No improvement was observed on the replacement of fresh yolk by pasteurized egg yolk, whereas the results suggest that dimethylformamide is a cryoprotectant suitable for cryopreservation of equine epididymal semen, even better than glycerol. In addition, we found that the stabilization before freezing on epididymal stallion sperm, can improve sperm quality parameters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Applying data mining techniques for increasing implantation rate by selecting best sperms for intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirroshandel, Seyed Abolghasem; Ghasemian, Fatemeh; Monji-Azad, Sara

    2016-12-01

    Aspiration of a good-quality sperm during intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is one of the main concerns. Understanding the influence of individual sperm morphology on fertilization, embryo quality, and pregnancy probability is one of the most important subjects in male factor infertility. Embryologists need to decide the best sperm for injection in real time during ICSI cycle. Our objective is to predict the quality of zygote, embryo, and implantation outcome before injection of each sperm in an ICSI cycle for male factor infertility with the aim of providing a decision support system on the sperm selection. The information was collected from 219 patients with male factor infertility at the infertility therapy center of Alzahra hospital in Rasht from 2012 through 2014. The prepared dataset included the quality of zygote, embryo, and implantation outcome of 1544 injected sperms into the related oocytes. In our study, embryo transfer was performed at day 3. Each sperm was represented with thirteen clinical features. Data preprocessing was the first step in the proposed data mining algorithm. After applying more than 30 classifiers, 9 successful classifiers were selected and evaluated by 10-fold cross validation technique using precision, recall, F1, and AUC measures. Another important experiment was measuring the effect of each feature in prediction process. In zygote and embryo quality prediction, IBK and RandomCommittee models provided 79.2% and 83.8% F1, respectively. In implantation outcome prediction, KStar model achieved 95.9% F1, which is even better than prediction of human experts. All these predictions can be done in real time. A machine learning-based decision support system would be helpful in sperm selection phase of ICSI cycle to improve the success rate of ICSI treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro characterization and in vivo behavior of human nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus cells in clinical-grade fibrin and collagen-enriched fibrin gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombini, Alessandra; Lopa, Silvia; Ceriani, Cristina; Lovati, Arianna B; Croiset, Samantha J; Di Giancamillo, Alessia; Lombardi, Giovanni; Banfi, Giuseppe; Moretti, Matteo

    2015-02-01

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) presents a limited self-repair ability and cell-based therapies have been suggested to prevent or treat IVD lesions. Fibrin-based scaffolds as cell carriers are promising candidates in IVD tissue engineering, thanks to their ability to be easily delivered into the defect and to adapt to the lesion shape, to support/retain the injected cells into the implantation site and to favor the production of a suitable extracellular matrix (ECM). We evaluated the in vitro and in vivo behavior of human nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) cells in a clinical-grade collagen-enriched fibrin that has never been tested before for orthopedic applications, comparing it with clinical-grade fibrin. The survival of IVD cells seeded within fibrin or collagen-enriched fibrin and the ECM synthesis were evaluated by biochemical, immunohistochemical, and transcriptional analyses, prior and after subcutaneous implantation of the gels in nude mice. After 28 days of implantation, NP and AF cells were still detectable within explants, produced tissue-specific ECM, and showed a higher content of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and type I and II collagen compared to gels before implantation. Both the fibrin gels, enriched or not with collagen, seemed to be suitable for the culture of AF cells, being able to support the homogeneous synthesis of type I collagen, characteristic of the native fibrocartilaginous AF tissue. Differently, fibrin alone was a more suitable matrix for NP culture, supporting the homogeneous deposition of GAGs and type II collagen. In conclusion, our results suggest to combine AF cells with fibrin, enriched or not with collagen, and NP cells with fibrin alone to maintain the typical features of these cell populations, indicating these clinical-grade materials as viable options in cell-based treatments for IVD lesions.

  1. Proportion of collagen type II in the extracellular matrix promotes the differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells into nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yiqing; Zhou, Xiaopeng; Liu, Dongyu; Li, Hao; Liang, Chengzhen; Li, Fangcai; Chen, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    During degeneration process, the catabolism of collagen type II and anabolism of collagen type I in nucleus pulposus (NP) may influence the bioactivity of transplanted cells. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) were cultured as a micromass or in a series of gradual proportion hydrogels of a mix of collagen types I and II. Cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were detected using CCK-8 and LDH assays respectively. The expression of differentiation-related genes and proteins, including SOX9, aggrecan, collagen type I, and collagen type II, was examined using RT-qPCR and Western blotting. Novel phenotypic genes were also detected by RT-qPCR and western blotting. Alcian blue and dimethylmethylene blue assays were used to investigate sulfate proteoglycan expression, and PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK, and Smad signaling pathways were examined by Western blotting. The results showed collagen hydrogels have good biocompatibility, and cell proliferation increased after collagen type II treatment. Expressions of SOX9, aggrecan, and collagen type II were increased in a collagen type II dependent manner. Sulfate proteoglycan synthesis increased in proportion to collagen type II concentration. Only hADMSCs highly expressed NP cell marker KRT19 in collagen type II culture. Additionally, phosphorylated Smad3, which is associated with phosphorylated ERK, was increased after collagen type II-stimulation. The concentration and type of collagen affect hADMSC differentiation into NP cells. Collagen type II significantly ameliorates hADMSC differentiation into NP cells and promotes extracellular matrix synthesis. Therefore, anabolism of collagen type I and catabolism of type II may attenuate the differentiation and biosynthesis of transplanted stem cells. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  2. Interleukin-2 is upregulated in patients with a prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc and modulates cell proliferation, apoptosis and extracellular matrix metabolism of human nucleus pulposus cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, ZHIRONG; WANG, GENLIN; ZHU, XUESONG; GENG, DECHUN; YANG, HUILIN

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the expression levels of cytokines are increased in degenerated intervertebral disc tissues, and several cytokines are associated with the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration. However, the role of interleukin (IL)-2 in the cellular functions of intervertebral disc tissues remains unreported. The present study aimed to determine the expression levels of IL-2 in the nucleus pulposus (NP) tissues of patients with a prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc; and to observe the changes in cell proliferation, apoptosis, extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in human NP cells (HNPCs) following treatment with IL-2. The present study demonstrated that IL-2 expression levels were upregulated in the NP tissues of patients with a prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc; and a subsequent MTT assay demonstrated that IL-2 inhibits the proliferation of HNPCs in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, as demonstrated by the increased protein expression levels of Fas cell surface death receptor and the induction of caspase-8 and caspase-3 activity, the death receptor pathway was activated by IL-2 in the HNPCs in order to promote cell apoptosis. In addition, IL-2 promoted ECM degradation in the HNPCs, as demonstrated by an increase in the expression levels of type I collagen, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs and matrix metalloproteinases, and decreased aggrecan and type II collagen expression levels. Furthermore, phosphorylated-p38 was significantly increased in the HNPCs following IL-2 treatment. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that IL-2 inhibits cell proliferation, and induces cell apoptosis and ECM degradation, accompanied by the activation of p38 MAPK signaling in HNPCs. Therefore, IL-2 may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. PMID:26668654

  3. Analysis of sperm karyotypes in a patient treated with griseofulvin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Evelyn M; Lowry, R Brian; Martin, Renée H

    2007-01-01

    Griseofulvin is known to interfere with chromosome segregation by binding to microtubule-associated proteins. Studies in mouse germ cells have demonstrated that griseofulvin can induce aneuploidy (numerical chromosome abnormalities) at therapeutic concentrations. The aim of this study was to determine if chronic griseofulvin treatment led to an increased frequency of sperm chromosome abnormalities in one male subject. We analyzed 290 full sperm karyotypes using the human sperm-hamster oocyte fusion system. The frequency of X- and Y-bearing sperm was equal. There was no increase in the frequency of numerical (1.7%) or structural (9.3%) abnormalities in the subject compared to unexposed controls. Although reassuring, this is the first report on this subject and future studies are needed to assess the risk of griseofulvin.

  4. Dose-dependent relationship between oocyte cytoplasmic volume and transformation of sperm nuclei to metaphase chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, H J; Masui, Y

    1987-04-01

    We have studied the chromosome condensation activity of mouse oocytes that have been inseminated during meiotic maturation. These oocytes remain unactivated, and in those penetrated by up to three or four sperm, each sperm nucleus is transformed, without prior development of a pronucleus, into metaphase chromosomes. However, those penetrated by more than four sperm never transform any of the nuclei into metaphase chromosomes (Clarke, H. J., and Y. Masui, 1986, J. Cell Biol. 102:1039-1046). We report here that, when the cytoplasmic volume of oocytes was doubled or tripled by cell fusion, up to five or eight sperm nuclei, respectively, could be transformed into metaphase chromosomes. Conversely, when the cytoplasmic volume was reduced by bisection of oocytes after the germinal vesicle (GV) had broken down, no more than two sperm could be transformed into metaphase chromosomes. Thus, the capacity of the oocyte cytoplasm to transform sperm nuclei to metaphase chromosomes was proportional to its volume. The contribution of the nucleoplasm of the GV and the cytoplasm outside the GV to the chromosome condensation activity was investigated by bisecting oocytes that contained a GV and then inseminating the nucleate and anucleate fragments. The anucleate fragments never induced sperm chromosome formation, indicating that GV nucleoplasm is required for this activity. In the nucleate fragments, the capacity to induce sperm chromosome formation was reduced as compared with whole oocytes, in spite of the fact that the fragments contained the entire GV nucleoplasm. This implies that non-GV cytoplasmic material also was required for chromosome condensation activity. When inseminated oocytes were incubated in the presence of puromycin, the sperm nuclei were transformed into interphase-like nuclei, but no metaphase chromosomes developed. However, when protein synthesis resumed, the interphase nuclei were transformed to metaphase chromosomes. These results suggest that the

  5. Evaluation of potential protein biomarkers in patients with high sperm DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrouzi, Bahar; Kenigsberg, Shlomit; Alladin, Naazish; Swanson, Sonja; Zicherman, Jonathan; Hong, Seok-Ho; Moskovtsev, Sergey I; Librach, Clifford L

    2013-06-01

    The laboratory evaluation of male infertility remains an essential area of research as 40-60% of infertility cases are attributable to male-related factors. Current sperm analysis methods add only partial information on sperm quality and fertility outcomes. The specific underlying cause of infertility in most cases is unknown, while a proportion of male infertility could be caused by molecular factors such as the absence or abnormal expression of some essential sperm proteins. The objective of this study was to screen for associations between sperm protein profiles and sperm concentration, motility, and DNA fragmentation index in patients undergoing fertility evaluation in a clinical setting. Based on those parameters, semen samples were categorized as either normal or abnormal. We screened 34 semen samples with various abnormal parameters and compared them to 24 normal control samples by using one dimensional (1-D) gel electrophoresis and mass-spectrometry. In this study, we anticipated to establish a normal sperm parameter profile which would be compared to abnormal sperm samples and reveal candidate proteins. Our preliminary results indicate that no normal uniform profile could be established, which affirms the complexity of male fertility and confirms the limitations of standard semen analysis. Four main protein groups were identified in correlation with abnormal DNA fragmentation and/or motility. The first group included sperm nuclear proteins such as the SPANX (sperm protein associated with the nucleus on the X chromosome) isoforms and several types of histones. The second group contained mitochondria-related functions and oxidative stress proteins including Mitochondrial Ferritin, Mitochondrial Single-Stranded DNA Binding Protein, and several isoforms of Peroxiredoxins. Two other protein groups were related to sperm motility such as microtubule-based flagellum and spindle microtubule as well as proteins related to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Further

  6. Subversive practices of sperm donation - globalizing Danish sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willum Adrian, Stine

    into how the bending of boundaries by “inappropriate parents”, fertility travellers, private sperm banks and fertility clinics have been part in negotiating the changes of the legislation in practice, and thus been part of developing a Danish industry of sperm banking. The presentation is based on a multi...

  7. Subversive practices of sperm donation - globalizing Danish sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willum Adrian, Stine

    as the use of donated sperm continuously has been debated as an ethical issue, and increasingly been regulated. In this presentation I will discuss how Denmark became a destination for fertility travelling (sperm donation) as a result of various subversive strategies of family making. The article inquires...

  8. Factors influencing boar sperm cryosurvival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, J; Hernández, M; Carvajal, G; Vázquez, J M; Martínez, E A

    2006-10-01

    Optimal sperm cryopreservation is a prerequisite for the sustainable commercial application of frozen-thawed boar semen for AI. Three experiments were performed to identify factors influencing variability of postthaw sperm survival among 464 boar ejaculates. Sperm-rich ejaculate fractions were cryopre-served using a standard freezing-thawing procedure for 0.5-mL plastic straws and computer-controlled freezing equipment. Postthaw sperm motility (assessed with a computer-assisted semen analysis system) and viability (simultaneously probed by flow cytometry analysis after triple-fluorescent stain), evaluated 30 and 150 min postthaw, were used to estimate the success of cryopreservation. In the first experiment, 168 unselected ejaculates (1 ejaculate/boar), from boars of 6 breeds with a wide age range (8 to 48 mo), were cryopreserved over a 12-mo period to evaluate the predictive value of boar (breed and age), semen collection, transport variables (season of ejaculate collection, interval between collections, and ejaculate temperature exposure), initial semen traits, and sperm quality before freezing on sperm survival after freezing-thawing. In Exp. 2, 4 ejaculates from each of 29 boars, preselected according to their initial semen traits and sperm quality before freezing, were collected and frozen over a 6-mo period to evaluate the influence of interboar and intraboar ejaculate variability in the survival of sperm after cryopreservation. In Exp. 3, 12 ejaculates preselected as for Exp. 2, from each of 15 boars with known good sperm cryosurvival, were collected and frozen over a 12-mo period to estimate the sustainability of sperm cryosurvival between ejaculates over time. Boar and semen collection and transport variables were not predictive of sperm cryosurvival among ejaculates. Initial semen traits and sperm quality variables observed before freezing explained 23.2 and 10.9%, respectively, of the variation in postthaw sperm motility and viability. However, more that

  9. The effects of male age on sperm DNA damage in healthy non-smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, T; Eskenazi, B; Baumgartner, A; Marchetti, F; Young, S; Weldon, R; Anderson, D; Wyrobek, A

    2006-03-08

    The trend for men to have children at older ages raises concerns that advancing age may increase the production of genetically defective sperm, increasing the risks of transmitting germ-line mutations. We investigated the associations between male age and sperm DNA damage and the influence of several lifestyle factors in a healthy non-clinical group of 80 non-smokers (age: 22-80) with no known fertility problems using the sperm Comet analyses. The average percent of DNA that migrated out of the sperm nucleus under alkaline electrophoresis increased with age (0.18% per year, p=0.006); but there was no age association for damage measured under neutral conditions (p=0.7). Men who consumed >3 cups coffee per day had {approx}20% higher % tail DNA under neutral but not alkaline conditions compared to men who consumed no caffeine (p=0.005). Our findings indicate that (a) older men have increased sperm DNA damage associated with alkali-labile sites or single-strand DNA breaks, and (b) independent of age, men with substantial daily caffeine consumption have increased sperm DNA damage associated with double-strand DNA breaks. DNA damage in sperm can be converted to chromosomal aberrations and gene mutations after fertilization increasing the risks for developmental defects and genetic diseases among offspring.

  10. Differences in sperm ultrastructure between Mytilus chilensis and Mytilus galloprovincialis (Bivalvia, Mytilidae: could be used as a taxonomic trait?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo A Oyarzún

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The sperm ultrastructure has been used to solve several systematic and phylogenetic problems in marine invertebrates. The sperm ultrastructure of the Chilean mussel Mytilus chilensis and Mytilus galloprovincialis corresponds to the ect-aquasperm type. Sperm from both taxa measured 55-60 μm between head (acrosome + nucleus, midpiece (only 5 mitochondria and the flagellum which in its end piece has a smaller diameter tail. The differences between both taxa are clearly shown, in the structure of the acrosome and nucleus. Therefore, according to our results and those reported in the literature, we indicate that Chilean native mussel sperm is different from other species of the Mytilus complex (M. trossulus, M. galloprovincialis and M. edulis. These differences in sperm ultrastructure found in M. chilensis, are another trait that can be used to validate the taxonomic status of the species. Differences in sperm morphology are related with reproductive isolation, and probably will be useful to understand future data on speciation. Finally, we discussed the finding that Mytilus galloprovincialis sperm from Chile have an acrosome notoriously smaller than those reported for specimens from Europe and Africa, though they have a great similarity with specimens from Japan, as reported in the literature.

  11. Social imaginaries, sperm and whiteness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    This article analyses narratives about so-called Viking babies and Viking sperm. Over the last few years an increasing number of British single women and lesbian couples have been creating families by becoming pregnant with Danish donor sperm, termed ‘Viking sperm’. Through analyses of British...

  12. Changes in estrogen receptor-alpha and -beta in the infundibular nucleus of the human hypothalamus are related to the occurrence of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hestiantoro, Andon; Swaab, Dick F.

    2004-01-01

    The expression of estrogen receptor (ER)alpha and -beta in the infundibular nucleus of the hypothalamus was studied immunocytochemically in 28 control subjects and 14 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). A shift was found from more nuclear staining of ERalpha in young female controls to more

  13. Corticotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the human hypothalamus in subjects with normal and abnormal sex hormone status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, A.-M.; Swaab, D.F.

    2007-01-01

    In order to determine the role of peripheral sex hormone levels in the expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons, we investigated by means of immunocytochemistry the number of CRH neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in postmortem material of young and old

  14. Pentoxifylline increase sperm motility in devitrified spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patient without damage chromatin and DNA integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Ali; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Fesahat, Farzaneh; Talebi, Alireza; Ghasemi-Esmailabad, Saeed

    2017-06-01

    The freeze-thaw process results in reduced motility, viability and fertilization potential of human spermatozoa. So, a variety of substances were evaluated in order to enhance human sperm resistance to the stress of cryopreservation, such as Pentoxifylline (PTX) for improving the Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes. The aim was to investigate the effect of PTX on sperm parameters and chromatin/DNA integrity of asthenozoospermic semen post vitrification. A total of 30 semen specimens were obtained from infertile men with asthenozoospermia. The cryoprotectant-free vitrification was performed for the samples after assessment of sperm parameters. After warming, each sample was exposed for 30 min to 3.6 mmol/l PTX in experimental group and the control group without any treatment apposing at 37 °C for 30 min in regard, to repeat all in vitro analysis (sperm parameters and DNA integrity assay). Regardless of the vitrification devastating impacts on sperm parameters, incubation of post vitrified samples with PTX increased the rate of progressive motility (P integrity of asthenozoospermic sperm samples. The data showed that PTX was able to improve sperm movement without any adverse effects on sperm chromatin/DNA integrity in vitrification program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sperm membrane modulation by Sapindus mukorossi during sperm maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivsarkar, Manish; Shrivastava, Neeta; Patel, Manoj; Padh, Harish; Bapu, Cherian

    2002-09-01

    To observe the alterations in the biochemical and biophysical changes in the sperm membrane during sperm maturation in male rats treated with the water extract of the fruit pericarp of S. mukorossi. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged the aqueous extract of the fruit pericarp of S. mukorossi at a dose of 50 mg/kg/d for 45 days. On day 46, the sperm parameters were observed in different sections of the epididymis and the sperm superoxide dismutase and the lipid peroxidation was determined and compared with the controls. The testis and epididymis were routinely prepared for histological examination under the light microscope. No significant differences in the sperm number and morphology were observed between the control and treated groups. However, a significant inhibition (P<0.05-0.01) of sperm motility in the caput, corpus and cauda regions of the epididymis was seen in the treated group. No significant histopathological changes were found in the testis and epididymis. The important finding was that in the treated animals, the spermatozoa showed an abnormal distribution of the superoxide dismutase activity, being minimum in the caput and maximum in the corpus, which was just opposite to that of the controls. The study provides a unique observation where the plant extract alters the sperm membrane physiology without change the testicular and epididymal morphology.

  16. Relationship between sperm parameters and intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Chaichian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: With the adventure of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI technique, great progresses have developed in the treatment of infertility. Concentration on the properties of male’s gamete has been encouraged by the increasing concerns about the causes of ICSI failure. We hence conducted this study to investigate the probable association of sperm parameters with ISCI outcome. Methods: A total of 523 couples referred to Isfahan Fertility and Sterility Center from January 2007 to June 2008 for ICSI. Semen analysis was performed before ICSI procedure according to the WHO criteria. Patients were assigned into successful ICSI (case and failed ICSI (control groups. Sperm parameters were then compared between the 2 groups. Results: One hundred and six patients (20% had successful ICSI results (case group compared with 417 couples (80% with undesirable ICSI outcomes (control group. Among evaluated factors, sperm agglutination (p = 0.007, sperm concentration (p = 0.043, leukocytospermia (p = 0.026 and head abnormality of sperm (p = 0.019 showed statistically significant differences between two groups with differing ICSI results. None of the other semen parameters revealed significant differences between these two groups. Conclusion: Our study showed that some sperm parameters are associated with desirable ICSI outcome. However, it is unclear whether these associations are causal.

  17. Sperm production and sperm morphology of Swedish Warmblood stallions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsson, S; Dalin, A-M; Lundeheim, N

    2009-02-01

    The present study investigated daily sperm output and sperm morphology of fresh semen in eight Swedish Warmblood stallions aged 5-8 years. They were used for artificial insemination, and their fertility during the breeding season of semen collection exceeded 60% per cycle. One ejaculate of semen was collected daily for 10 consecutive days from each stallion. The gel-free volume was measured, and the sperm concentration was assessed with a Bürker chamber. The volume of gel-free fraction was multiplied by the sperm concentration to give the total number of spermatozoa (TSN). Sperm morphology was examined in ejaculates collected on days 2, 5 and 10. An aliquot from each ejaculate was fixed in 1 ml formol-saline immediately after collection and examined under a phase-contrast microscope (magnification 1000x) to assess morphological abnormalities. Furthermore smears were prepared and stained according to Williams (carbolfuchsin-eosin) for a more detailed examination of the sperm heads under a light microscope (magnification 1000x). Analysis of variance was applied to data. Total spermatozoa number decreased progressively during the first 8 days of collection, and daily sperm output (DSO) was calculated as mean TSN of collections on days 8-10, being 6.4 x 10(9) spermatozoa. The overall percentages of morphologically normal spermatozoa in ejaculates collected on days 2, 5 and 10 were above 70%, being significantly lower in ejaculate 2 (68.6%) compared with ejaculates 5 and 10 (72.9% respectively 75.3%).

  18. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells exhibit immature nucleus pulposus cell phenotype in a laminin-rich pseudo-three-dimensional culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Brian H; Lee, Esther J; Jing, Liufang; Setton, Lori A; Chen, Jun

    2013-10-02

    Cell supplementation to the herniated or degenerated intervertebral disc (IVD) is a potential strategy to promote tissue regeneration and slow disc pathology. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (HUCMSCs) - originating from the Wharton's jelly - remain an attractive candidate for such endeavors with their ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. Previously, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been studied as a potential source for disc tissue regeneration. However, no studies have demonstrated that MSCs can regenerate matrix with unique characteristics matching that of immature nucleus pulposus (NP) tissues of the IVD. In our prior work, immature NP cells were found to express specific laminin isoforms and laminin-binding receptors that may serve as phenotypic markers for evaluating MSC differentiation to NP-like cells. The goal of this study is to evaluate these markers and matrix synthesis for HUCMSCs cultured in a laminin-rich pseudo-three-dimensional culture system. HUCMSCs were seeded on top of Transwell inserts pre-coated with Matrigel™, which contained mainly laminin-111. Cells were cultured under hypoxia environment with three differentiation conditions: NP differentiation media (containing 2.5% Matrigel™ solution to provide for a pseudo-three-dimensional laminin culture system) with no serum, or the same media supplemented with either insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) or transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Cell clustering behavior, matrix production and the expression of NP-specific laminin and laminin-receptors were evaluated at days 1, 7, 13 and 21 of culture. Data show that a pseudo-three-dimensional culture condition (laminin-1 rich) promoted HUCMSC differentiation under no serum conditions. Starting at day 1, HUCMSCs demonstrated a cell clustering morphology similar to that of immature NP cells in situ and that observed for primary immature NP cells within the similar laminin-rich culture system (prior study

  19. MicroRNA-7 regulates IL-1β-induced extracellular matrix degeneration by targeting GDF5 in human nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yukun; Xia, Ping; Li, Shuai; Feng, Xintong; Gao, Yong; Wang, Kun; Song, Yu; Duan, Zhenfeng; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu; Yang, Cao

    2016-10-01

    The precise role of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)-induced extracellular matrix degeneration in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is currently unknown. Recent evidence has revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with IDD, but their function in the extracellular matrix degradation of nucleus pulposus (NP) tissues is also poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression and functional role of miR-7 in IL-1β-induced disc degeneration. The expression level of miR-7 was investigated in degenerative NP tissues and in IL-1β-induced NP cells using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplification analysis. A dual-luciferase reporter assay was then utilized to determine whether growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) is a target of miR-7. Finally, mRNA and protein levels of known matrix components and of matrix degradation enzymes were determined to elucidate the function of miR-7 in IL-1β-induced disc degeneration. In this study, we found that miR-7 is highly expressed in human degenerative NP tissues and in IL-1β stimulated NP cells compared to normal controls. We also determined that GDF5 was a target of miR-7. Functional analysis showed that the overexpression of miR-7 significantly enhanced the IL-1β-induced extracellular matrix degeneration, whereas inhibition of miR-7 function by antagomiR-7 prevented NP cell detrimental catabolic changes in response to IL-1β. Additionally, the prevention of IL-1β-induced NP extracellular matrix degeneration by miR-7 silencing was attenuated by GDF5 siRNA. These findings suggest that miR-7 contributes to an impaired ECM in intervertebral discs through targeting GDF5 and miR-7 might therefore represent a novel therapeutic target for the prevention of IDD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Membrane remodelling during sperm maturation in the epididymis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R

    1989-01-01

    Identification of molecules or factors on spermatozoa that are involved in the recognition and binding to the zona pellucida of the egg is one of the central problems in current research on mammalian fertilization. This information is important, not just from the standpoint of scientific interest, but also for treatment of male infertility and design of future contraceptive technology. One of the most informative approaches to solving this puzzle has been to study the maturation of spermatozoa in the epididymis. The gradual development of motility and zona-binding capacity by spermatozoa after they leave the testis affords an opportunity to investigate what distinguishes a fertile from an infertile spermatozoon and what mechanisms are involved in the transformation from one state to the other. This chapter has reviewed some of the current information on sperm maturation in the epididymis and attempted to correlate it with concepts emerging from in vitro fertilization experiments. Emphasis has been placed on mechanistic aspects of maturation changes to the sperm plasma membrane, not only because in many species it is the surface membrane that encounters the zona and it is therefore likely to be the site of potential recognition molecules, but also because the plasma membrane influences many intracellular events and has a bearing on the maturation of the nucleus and axoneme as well. An example of the latter is shown by the induction of motility in demembranated testicular sperm by the addition of ATP and Mg2+ (Mohri and Yanagimachi 1980; White and Voglmayr 1986). This suggests that the motor apparatus for motility is essentially present in immature spermatozoa and that one of the requirements for it to become fully operative are subtle alterations to the permeability properties of the plasma membrane. A similar mechanism may also be true of the maturing sperm nucleus to which only passing reference has been made here. Very little is known about this aspect of sperm

  1. Radiolabelling of sperm cells with /sup 99m/Tc-HMPAO. In vivo visualization of sperm cell migration in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockisch, A.; Al-Hasani, S.; Ven, H.V.D.; Diedrich, K.; Krebs, D.; Posch, C.; Hotze, A.; Biersack, H.J.

    1989-04-01

    The present paper is the first descriptive radiolabeling of sperm cells in order to visualize their in vivo migration and imaging by scintigraphic technique, /sup 99m/Tc-HMPAO was used which combines favourable characteristics of both imaging modalities and radiation exposure. The radiolabeling yield was optimised for human sperm cells, and was increasing with the number of sperm cells, the amount of HMPAO, the /sup 99m/Tc-HMPAO concentration and the duration of the incubation. Incubation periods greater than 20 min, however, resulted only in a minor increase of labeling yield. A delay of more than 5 min between the labeling of the HMPAO with /sup 99m/Tc and initiation of the incubation of the sperm cells with the /sup 99m/Tc-HMPAO also decreased the maximum labeling yield. The radiolabeled cells were found to be stable and after 18 h > 93% of the activity was still bound to the sperm cells. After insemination of labeled sperm cells in ovulating rabbits the accumulation of the cells in the Fallopian tubes and their subsequent migration could be clearly visualized by scintigraphic techniques in vivo. (orig.).

  2. Modifications in sperm quality of Wister Albino Rats by Ethanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidydymal sperm was collected and analyzed using standard procedures. Sperm analyses involved sperm count, sperm morphology test and sperm motility test. At the doses administered, P. amarus extract affected the sperm number, morphology and motility of treated animals. Epididymal sperm count and motility were ...

  3. Female sperm storage in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, David M

    2002-02-01

    The three orders of extant amphibians are Gymnophiona, Anura, and Urodela. Although all gymnophionans apparently have internal fertilization and many are viviparous, female sperm storage is unknown. Internal fertilization has convergently evolved in a few anurans, but females of just one species, Ascaphus truei, are known to possess oviductal sperm storage tubules (SSTs). The SSTs of A. truei are similar anatomically to such glands in squamate reptiles. This similarity is convergence due to similar functional adaptations and/or internal design constraints. In salamanders and newts (Urodela), absence of sperm storage in females is the ancestral condition (three families). In the derived condition, sperm storage occurs in cloacal glands called spermathecae, and their possession is a synapomorphy for females in the suborder Salamandroidea (seven families). Salamandroids are the only vertebrates with cloacal sperm storage glands. In this paper, a phenetic analysis of variation in spermathecal characters reveals patterns of convergence in certain spermathecal characters in unrelated taxa that breed in similar habitats. In the family Salamandridae, a role in sperm nutrition for the spermathecal epithelium is questioned, and the widespread occurrence of spermiophagy is related to other reproductive strategies. I propose how the packaging of sperm in structurally different types of spermathecae may influence male paternity. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Drosophila sperm swim backwards in the female reproductive tract and are activated via TRPP2 ion channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Köttgen

    Full Text Available Sperm have but one purpose, to fertilize an egg. In various species including Drosophila melanogaster female sperm storage is a necessary step in the reproductive process. Amo is a homolog of the human transient receptor potential channel TRPP2 (also known as PKD2, which is mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. In flies Amo is required for sperm storage. Drosophila males with Amo mutations produce motile sperm that are transferred to the uterus but they do not reach the female storage organs. Therefore Amo appears to be a mediator of directed sperm motility in the female reproductive tract but the underlying mechanism is unknown.Amo exhibits a unique expression pattern during spermatogenesis. In spermatocytes, Amo is restricted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER whereas in mature sperm, Amo clusters at the distal tip of the sperm tail. Here we show that flagellar localization of Amo is required for sperm storage. This raised the question of how Amo at the rear end of sperm regulates forward movement into the storage organs. In order to address this question, we used in vivo imaging of dual labelled sperm to demonstrate that Drosophila sperm navigate backwards in the female reproductive tract. In addition, we show that sperm exhibit hyperactivation upon transfer to the uterus. Amo mutant sperm remain capable of reverse motility but fail to display hyperactivation and directed movement, suggesting that these functions are required for sperm storage in flies.Amo is part of a signalling complex at the leading edge of the sperm tail that modulates flagellar beating and that guides a backwards path into the storage organs. Our data support an evolutionarily conserved role for TRPP2 channels in cilia.

  5. Sub-fertile sperm cells exemplify telomere dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biron-Shental, Tal; Wiser, Amir; Hershko-Klement, Anat; Markovitch, Ofer; Amiel, Aliza; Berkovitch, Arie

    2017-09-13

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate telomere homeostasis in sub-fertile compared to fertile human sperm. This observational, comparative study included 16 sub-fertile men who required intracytoplasmic sperm injection and 10 fertile men. At least 100 sperm cells from each participant were assessed. Main outcome measures were telomere length and telomere aggregates. Telomerase RNA component (TERC) copy number and telomere capture were assessed using fluorescence in situ hybridization technique and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) using immunohistochemistry. Clinical backgrounds were similar. The percentage of sperm cells with shorter telomeres was higher among the sub-fertile compared to the fertile participants (3.3 ± 3.1 vs. 0.6 ± 1.2%, respectively; P < 0.005). The percentage of cells with telomere aggregates was significantly higher in the sub-fertile group (15.12 ± 3.73 vs. 4.73 ± 3.73%; P < 0.005). TERC gene copy number was similar between groups. The percentage of cells that were positive for hTERT was lower in the sub-fertile group (3.81 ± 1.27 vs. 8.42 ± 1.80%; P < 0.005). Telomere capture rates were higher among the sub-fertile sperm cells (P < 0.005). Sub-fertile sperm cells have short telomeres that are elongated by the alternative pathway of telomere capture. Dysfunctional telomeres may affect sperm fertilizability.

  6. Sperm structure and sperm transfer in Pseudopythina subsinuata (Bivalvia, Galeommatoidea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Åse

    2009-01-01

    to the elongate cells. Most females contain one to three "sperm trees", structures consisting of a short stem and numerous branches. They are firmly implanted in the abfrontal part of the gill filament and protrude into the posterior part of the suprabranchial (brooding) chamber. Implantation of the trees causes...... the receptacle and thereupon fuse. A similar process is known in the allied P. tsurumaru, but the resulting structure ("sperm-carrying body") is not attached to the gills....

  7. Myoinositol: does it improve sperm mitochondrial function and sperm motility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condorelli, Rosita A; La Vignera, Sandro; Bellanca, Salvatore; Vicari, Enzo; Calogero, Aldo E

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate whether an improvement in mitochondrial membrane potential was associated with sperm motility amelioration and greater sperm recovery after the swim-up procedure. A second purpose was to evaluate the effects of myoinositol (MYO) on sperm apoptosis, quality of chromatin compaction, and DNA integrity. Spermatozoa from 20 normozoospermic men and 20 patients with oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia were incubated in vitro with 2 mg/mL of MYO or phosphate-buffered saline as a control for 2 hours. After this incubation period, sperm motility was evaluated. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the mitochondrial membrane potential, phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin compactness, and DNA fragmentation. We also evaluated the total number of motile spermatozoa recovered after swim-up after incubation with MYO or phosphate-buffered saline. MYO significantly increased the percentage of spermatozoa with progressive motility in both normozoospermic men and patients with oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia. Motility improvement in the latter group was associated with a significant increase in the percentage of spermatozoa with high mitochondrial membrane potential. MYO had no effects on mitochondrial function in spermatozoa from normozoospermic men. Sperm phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin compactness, and DNA fragmentation were unaffected by MYO in both groups. After incubation with MYO, the total number of spermatozoa recovered after swim-up had improved significantly in both groups. These data show that MYO increases sperm motility and the number of spermatozoa retrieved after swim-up in both normozoospermic men and patients with abnormal sperm parameters. In patients with oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia, the improvement in these parameters was associated with improved sperm mitochondrial function. These findings support the use of MYO in both in vivo- and in vitro-assisted reproductive techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sperm Proteome Maturation in the Mouse Epididymis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerget, Sheri; Rosenow, Matthew A; Petritis, Konstantinos; Karr, Timothy L

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, transit through the epididymis, which involves the acquisition, loss and modification of proteins, is required to confer motility and fertilization competency to sperm. The overall dynamics of maturation is poorly understood, and a systems level understanding of the complex maturation process will provide valuable new information about changes occurring during epididymal transport. We report the proteomes of sperm collected from the caput, corpus and cauda segments of the mouse epididymis, identifying 1536, 1720 and 1234 proteins respectively. This study identified 765 proteins that are present in sperm obtained from all three segments. We identified 1766 proteins that are potentially added (732) or removed (1034) from sperm during epididymal transit. Phenotypic analyses of the caput, corpus and cauda sperm proteomes identified 60 proteins that have known sperm phenotypes when mutated, or absent from sperm. Our analysis indicates that as much as one-third of proteins with known sperm phenotypes are added to sperm during epididymal transit. GO analyses revealed that cauda sperm are enriched for specific functions including sperm-egg recognition and motility, consistent with the observation that sperm acquire motility and fertilization competency during transit through the epididymis. In addition, GO analyses revealed that the immunity protein profile of sperm changes during sperm maturation. Finally, we identified components of the 26S proteasome, the immunoproteasome, and a proteasome activator in mature sperm.

  9. Recent advances in bird sperm morphometric analysis and its role in male gamete characterization and reproduction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Moreno, Julian; Esteso, Milagros Cristina; Villaverde-Morcillo, Silvia; Toledano-Díaz, Adolfo; Castaño, Cristina; Velázquez, Rosario; López-Sebastián, Antonio; Goya, Agustín López; Martínez, Javier Gimeno

    2016-01-01

    Postcopulatory sexual selection through sperm competition may be an important evolutionary force affecting many reproductive traits, including sperm morphometrics. Environmental factors such as pollutants, pesticides, and climate change may affect different sperm traits, and thus reproduction, in sensitive bird species. Many sperm-handling processes used in assisted reproductive techniques may also affect the size of sperm cells. The accurately measured dimensions of sperm cell structures (especially the head) can thus be used as indicators of environmental influences, in improving our understanding of reproductive and evolutionary strategies, and for optimizing assisted reproductive techniques (e.g., sperm cryopreservation) for use with birds. Computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASA-Morph) provides an accurate and reliable method for assessing sperm morphometry, reducing the problem of subjectivity associated with human visual assessment. Computerized systems have been standardized for use with semen from different mammalian species. Avian spermatozoa, however, are filiform, limiting their analysis with such systems, which were developed to examine the approximately spherical heads of mammalian sperm cells. To help overcome this, the standardization of staining techniques to be used in computer-assessed light microscopical methods is a priority. The present review discusses these points and describes the sperm morphometric characteristics of several wild and domestic bird species. PMID:27678467

  10. Recent advances in bird sperm morphometric analysis and its role in male gamete characterization and reproduction technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Santiago-Moreno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Postcopulatory sexual selection through sperm competition may be an important evolutionary force affecting many reproductive traits, including sperm morphometrics. Environmental factors such as pollutants, pesticides, and climate change may affect different sperm traits, and thus reproduction, in sensitive bird species. Many sperm-handling processes used in assisted reproductive techniques may also affect the size of sperm cells. The accurately measured dimensions of sperm cell structures (especially the head can thus be used as indicators of environmental influences, in improving our understanding of reproductive and evolutionary strategies, and for optimizing assisted reproductive techniques (e.g., sperm cryopreservation for use with birds. Computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASA-Morph provides an accurate and reliable method for assessing sperm morphometry, reducing the problem of subjectivity associated with human visual assessment. Computerized systems have been standardized for use with semen from different mammalian species. Avian spermatozoa, however, are filiform, limiting their analysis with such systems, which were developed to examine the approximately spherical heads of mammalian sperm cells. To help overcome this, the standardization of staining techniques to be used in computer-assessed light microscopical methods is a priority. The present review discusses these points and describes the sperm morphometric characteristics of several wild and domestic bird species.

  11. Deletion of murine choline dehydrogenase results in diminished sperm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Amy R; Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Guo, Zhong; Teng, Ya-Wen; Thresher, Randy J; Blusztajn, Jan K; Zeisel, Steven H

    2010-08-01

    Choline dehydrogenase (CHDH) catalyzes the conversion of choline to betaine, an important methyl donor and organic osmolyte. We have previously identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human CHDH gene that, when present, seem to alter the activity of the CHDH enzyme. These SNPs occur frequently in humans. We created a Chdh(-/-) mouse to determine the functional effects of mutations that result in decreased CHDH activity. Chdh deletion did not affect fetal viability or alter growth or survival of these mice. Only one of eleven Chdh(-/-) males was able to reproduce. Loss of CHDH activity resulted in decreased testicular betaine and increased choline and PCho concentrations. Chdh(+/+) and Chdh(-/-) mice produced comparable amounts of sperm; the impaired fertility was due to diminished sperm motility in the Chdh(-/-) males. Transmission electron microscopy revealed abnormal mitochondrial morphology in Chdh(-/-) sperm. ATP content, total mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity and inner mitochondrial membrane polarization were all significantly reduced in sperm from Chdh(-/-) animals. Mitochondrial changes were also detected in liver, kidney, heart, and testis tissues. We suggest that men who have SNPs in CHDH that decrease the activity of the CHDH enzyme could have decreased sperm motility and fertility.

  12. Healthy Sperm: Improving Your Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fertilize an egg, sperm must move — wriggling and swimming through a woman's cervix, uterus and fallopian tubes. ... Biology. 2009;47:615. Swerdloff RS, et al. Evaluation of male infertility. http://www.uptodate.com/home. ...

  13. Oral alprazolam acutely increases nucleus accumbens perfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Daniel H.; Pinkham, Amy E.; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Ruparel, Kosha; Elliott, Mark A.; Valdez, Jeffrey; Smith, Mark A.; Detre, John A.; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepines treat anxiety, but can also produce euphoric effects, contributing to abuse. Using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, we provide the first direct evidence in humans that alprazolam (Xanax) acutely increases perfusion in the nucleus accumbens, a key reward-processing region linked to addiction.

  14. Production of live foals via intracytoplasmic injection of lyophilized sperm and sperm extract in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y H; Varner, D D; Love, C C; Hartman, D L; Hinrichs, K

    2011-10-01

    Work with lyophilized sperm helps delineate the factors required for successful fertilization. We investigated the use of lyophilized sperm in equine embryo production. In Experiment 1, sperm DNA fragmentation index was not affected by three freeze/thaw or lyophilization cycles. In Experiment 2, oocytes injected with lyophilized sperm or with sperm from a treatment in which lyophilized sperm were suspended in sperm cytoplasmic extract (SE) yielded blastocyst development rates of 0 and 28% respectively (P fertilization with lyophilized sperm in a non-laboratory animal species.

  15. Computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA): capabilities and potential developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Rupert P; Waberski, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    properties; means or medians for the total population are insufficient; and (4) a field-use, portable CASA system for measuring one motion and two or three morphology attributes of individual sperm is needed for field theriogenologists or andrologists working with human sperm outside urban centers; appropriate hardware to capture images and process data apparently are available. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sperm ultra-structure and spermiogenesis in Syllis krohni (Polychaeta: Syllidae, with some observations on its reproductive biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Lepore

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available yllidae show a wide spectrum of both reproductive strategies and sperm types. Analysis of their reproductive patterns could drastically change the presently accepted taxonomic hierarchy of the group. To further contribute to the knowledge of Syllidae we have described the sperm ultra-structure and the spermiogenesis of Syllis krohni (Ehlers, 1864. Mature sperm has a cone-shaped acrosome whose distal end is notched by a trough that transversely encircles its anterior portion. During spermiogenesis, the acrosomal vesicle undergoes modifications leading to its final shape with a posterior opening. The nucleus appears flattened anteriorly and forms a cleft that surrounds the proximal centriole in its distal region. A 9+2 flagellar axoneme is observed. Up to five mitochondria surround the distal centriole. The spermatozoon of S. krohni can be ascribed to the ect-aquasperm type that is typical in species having external fertilisation and appears to be very similar in appearance to that of the congeneric species thus far investigated. The main difference is in the shape of the acrosome, which is more elongated and as long as the nucleus. Reproduction of syllids seems to be conservative within sub-families, and the sperm morphology can probably help in phylogenetic reconstruction. External fertilisation is a widespread strategy within the genus Syllis, probably leading to a substantial similarity in sperm morphology being maintained. It is hypothesised, however, that within the same sperm type linked to a particularly reproductive strategy, the acrosome ultra-structure can be indicative of phylogeny.

  17. Sperm competition selects for sperm quantity and quality in the Australian Maluridae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissah Rowe

    Full Text Available When ejaculates from rival males compete for fertilization, there is strong selection for sperm traits that enhance fertilization success. Sperm quantity is one such trait, and numerous studies have demonstrated a positive association between sperm competition and both testes size and the number of sperm available for copulations. Sperm competition is also thought to favor increases in sperm quality and changes in testicular morphology that lead to increased sperm production. However, in contrast to sperm quantity, these hypotheses have received considerably less empirical support and remain somewhat controversial. In a comparative study using the Australian Maluridae (fairy-wrens, emu-wrens, grasswrens, we tested whether increasing levels of sperm competition were associated with increases in both sperm quantity and quality, as well as an increase in the relative amount of seminiferous tubule tissue contained within the testes. After controlling for phylogeny, we found positive associations between sperm competition and sperm numbers, both in sperm reserves and in ejaculate samples. Additionally, as sperm competition level increased, the proportion of testicular spermatogenic tissue also increased, suggesting that sperm competition selects for greater sperm production per unit of testicular tissue. Finally, we also found that sperm competition level was positively associated with multiple sperm quality traits, including the proportion of motile sperm in ejaculates and the proportion of both viable and morphologically normal sperm in sperm reserves. These results suggest multiple ejaculate traits, as well as aspects of testicular morphology, have evolved in response to sperm competition in the Australian Maluridae. Furthermore, our findings emphasize the importance of post-copulatory sexual selection as an evolutionary force shaping macroevolutionary differences in sperm phenotype.

  18. Study of Relativistic Nucleus - Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to survey the reaction mechanisms involved in the collision of 60~GeV/nucleon and 200~GeV/nucleon light ions ($^{16}$0 and $^{32}$S provided by a new GSI-LBL injector) with different nuclei, to determine the stopping power of nuclear matter and to search for evidence of the formation of quark matter by comparison to hadron-nucleus reactions at the same incident energies. \\\\ The experimental set-up consists of a 2 m Streamer Chamber in the Vertex Magnet used to detect all the charged particles emerging from the interaction as well as the neutral strange particles that decay inside the chamber. The high energy of the forward-going particles are detected by four sets of calorimeters. A highly segmented Photon Position Detector (PPD) backed up by a 240 segment Ring Calorimeter will cover one unit of rapidity around mid-rapidity. An Intermediate Calorimeter will cover the rest of the forward phase space except for the region around beam rapidity, where a Veto Calorimeter will detect be...

  19. Recombinant hamster oviductin is biologically active and exerts positive effects on sperm functions and sperm-oocyte binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Yang

    Full Text Available Studies carried out in several mammalian species suggest that oviductin, also known as oviduct-specific glycoprotein or OVGP1, plays a key role in sperm capacitation, fertilization, and development of early embryos. In the present study, we used recombinant DNA technology to produce, for the first time, recombinant hamster OVGP1 (rHamOVGP1 in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293 cells. rHamOVGP1 secreted in the culture medium was purified by affinity chromatography. The resulting protein migrated as a poly-dispersed band of 160-350 kDa on SDS-PAGE corresponding to the molecular mass of the native HamOVGP1. Subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of the purified rHamOVGP1 confirmed its identity as HamOVGP1. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated binding of rHamOVGP1 to the mid-piece and head of hamster sperm and to the zona pellucida (ZP of ovarian oocytes. In vitro functional experiments showed that addition of rHamOVGP1 in the capacitation medium further enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of two sperm proteins of approximately 75 kDa and 83 kDa in a time-dependent manner. After 3 hours of incubation in the presence of rHamOVGP1, a significant increase in acrosome reaction was measured. Pretreatment of either sperm or oocyte with 20 μg/ml of rHamOVGP1 prior to sperm-egg binding assay significantly increased the number of sperm bound to the ZP. Addition of rHamOVGP1 in the medium during sperm-egg binding with either oocyte or sperm pretreated with rHamOVGP1 also saw an increase in the number of sperm bound to ZP. In all experimental conditions, the effect of rHamOVGP1 on sperm-oocyte binding was negated by the addition of monoclonal anti-HamOVGP1 antibody. The successful production and purification of a biologically active rHamOVGP1 will allow further exploration of the function of this glycoprotein in reproductive function.

  20. Mechanism of Human Papillomavirus Binding to Human Spermatozoa and Fertilizing Ability of Infected Spermatozoa

    OpenAIRE

    Carlo Foresta; Cristina Patassini; Alessandro Bertoldo; Massimo Menegazzo; Felice Francavilla; Luisa Barzon; Alberto Ferlin

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are agents of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in females and males. Precise data about the presence, mechanism of infection and clinical significance of HPV in the male reproductive tract and especially in sperm are not available. Here we show that HPV can infect human sperm, it localizes at the equatorial region of sperm head through interaction between the HPV capsid protein L1 and syndecan-1. Sperm transfected with HPV E6/E7 genes and sperm expos...

  1. A role for carbohydrate recognition in mammalian sperm-egg binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Gary F., E-mail: clarkgf@health.missouri.edu

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Mammalian sperm-egg binding as a carbohydrate dependent species recognition event. • The role of carbohydrate recognition in human, mouse and pig sperm-egg binding. • Historical perspective and future directions for research focused on gamete binding. - Abstract: Mammalian fertilization usually requires three sequential cell–cell interactions: (i) initial binding of sperm to the specialized extracellular matrix coating the egg known as the zona pellucida (ZP); (ii) binding of sperm to the ZP via the inner acrosomal membrane that is exposed following the induction of acrosomal exocytosis; and (iii) adhesion of acrosome-reacted sperm to the plasma membrane of the egg cell, enabling subsequent fusion of these gametes. The focus of this review is on the initial binding of intact sperm to the mammalian ZP. Evidence collected over the past fifty years has confirmed that this interaction relies primarily on the recognition of carbohydrate sequences presented on the ZP by lectin-like egg binding proteins located on the plasma membrane of sperm. There is also evidence that the same carbohydrate sequences that mediate binding also function as ligands for lectins on lymphocytes that can inactivate immune responses, likely protecting the egg and the developing embryo up to the stage of blastocyst hatching. The literature related to initial sperm-ZP binding in the three major mammalian models (human, mouse and pig) is discussed. Historical perspectives and future directions for research related to this aspect of gamete adhesion are also presented.

  2. A pomeron approach to hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus 'soft' interaction at high energy

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarenko, S; Levin, E; Maor, U

    2001-01-01

    We formulate a generalization of the Glauber formalism for hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions based on the pomeron approach to high-energy interaction. Our treatment is based on two physical assumptions (i.e. two small parameters): (i) that only sufficiently small distances contribute to the pomeron structure; and (ii) the triple-pomeron vertex G sub 3 sub P /g sub P sub N <<1 (where g sub P sub N is the pomeron-nucleon vertex) is small. A systematic method is developed for calculating the total, elastic and diffractive dissociation cross sections as well as the survival probability of large rapidity gap processes and inclusive observables, both for hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Our approach suggests saturation of the density of the produced hadrons in nucleus-nucleus collisions, the value of the saturation density turns out to be large.

  3. Cell Biology of the Caenorhabditis elegans Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Fix, Orna; Askjaer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the Caenorhabditis elegans nucleus have provided fascinating insight to the organization and activities of eukaryotic cells. Being the organelle that holds the genetic blueprint of the cell, the nucleus is critical for basically every aspect of cell biology. The stereotypical development of C. elegans from a one cell-stage embryo to a fertile hermaphrodite with 959 somatic nuclei has allowed the identification of mutants with specific alterations in gene expression programs, nuclear morphology, or nuclear positioning. Moreover, the early C. elegans embryo is an excellent model to dissect the mitotic processes of nuclear disassembly and reformation with high spatiotemporal resolution. We review here several features of the C. elegans nucleus, including its composition, structure, and dynamics. We also discuss the spatial organization of chromatin and regulation of gene expression and how this depends on tight control of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Finally, the extensive connections of the nucleus with the cytoskeleton and their implications during development are described. Most processes of the C. elegans nucleus are evolutionarily conserved, highlighting the relevance of this powerful and versatile model organism to human biology. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  4. Targeting of membranes to sea urchin sperm chromatin is mediated by a lamin B receptor-like integral membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collas, P; Courvalin, J C; Poccia, D

    1996-12-01

    We have identified an integral membrane protein of sea urchin gametes with an apparent molecular mass of 56 kD that cross-reacts with an antibody against the nucleoplasmic NH2-terminal domain of human lamin B receptor (LBR). In mature sperm, p56 is located at the tip and base of the nucleus from where it is removed by egg cytosol in vitro. In the egg, p56 is present in a subset of cytoplasmic membranes (MV2 beta) which contributes the bulk of the nuclear envelope during male pronuclear formation. p56-containing vesicles are required for nuclear envelope assembly and have a chromatin-binding capacity that is mediated by p56. Lamin B is not present in these vesicles and is imported into the nucleus from a soluble pool at a later stage of pronuclear formation. Lamin B incorporation and addition of new membranes are necessary for pronuclear swelling and nuclear envelope growth. We suggest that p56 is a sea urchin LBR homologue that targets membranes to chromatin and later anchors the membrane to the lamina.

  5. Online sperm donation: a survey of the demographic characteristics, motivations, preferences and experiences of sperm donors on a connection website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, T; Jadva, V; Tranfield, E; Golombok, S

    2016-09-01

    What are the demographic characteristics, motivations, preferences and experiences of heterosexual, gay and bisexual sperm donors on a connection website (i.e. a website that facilitates direct contact between donors and recipients of gametes)? This demographically diverse group of men was donating for altruistic reasons and perceived the website as providing greater choice over donation arrangements: approximately one third favoured anonymous donation, most of whom were heterosexual, whilst gay and bisexual donors were more likely to be in contact with children conceived with their sperm. Despite substantially more sperm donors being registered on connection websites than with clinics, there has been very little research on this population. Current understanding of the impact of sexual orientation on donors' attitudes is also limited. An online survey was conducted over 7 weeks with 383 men registered as sperm donors with Pride Angel, a large UK-based connection website for donors and recipients of sperm. The survey obtained data on participants' demographic characteristics and their motivations, preferences and experiences regarding online sperm donation, including attitudes towards contact with offspring. Differences according to participants' sexual orientation were examined. Most participants (80.4%, 308) were heterosexual, 10.5% (40) were gay and 9.1% (35) were bisexual; ages ranged from 18 to 69 years (median = 36, mean = 37.3, SD = 9.7). A greater proportion of gay and bisexual men desired open-identity donation (P online sperm donation into clinical practice. This study was supported by the Wellcome Trust (097857/Z/11/Z). E.T. is the co-founder of Pride Angel; the remaining authors have no conflicts of interest. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

  6. Factors Affecting the Efficient Production of Boar Sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, W L

    2015-07-01

    Efficient sperm production in boars has developmental and functional components. Factors affecting the developmental phase influence Sertoli cell mitosis, appear to be mostly stimulatory and have permanent effects on production of sperm. Birthweight appears to hold promise as a prospective screening tool as it appears to have a strong positive relationship with adult sperm production. Strategic cross-fostering shortly after birth and socialization to humans between 4 and 9 weeks of age are strategies during the developmental phase that have been shown to increase spermatogenesis in adults. Factors affecting the functional phase influence the release of sperm by Sertoli cells and their subsequent maturation in the epididymi, appear to be mainly inhibitory and have temporary effects on spermatogenesis which can be corrected. The most common of these include exposure to elevated ambient temperature, nutrition, photoperiod, collection frequency and housing. Multiple deficiencies in several of these areas are common in commercial studs and have additive, negative effects on sperm production. However, there also is evidence that enhancements in one of these areas may be capable of offsetting deficiencies in others. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. The influence of fluorides on mouse sperm capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoráková-Hortová, K; Sandera, M; Jursová, M; Vasinová, J; Peknicová, J

    2008-10-01

    Increasing infertility, due to pathological changes on sperm, has become a serious issue. Eco-toxicological effect of rising concentration of fluorides can be enhanced in the presence of aluminium ions by forming fluorometallic complexes, analogues of phosphate groups that interfere with the activity of G-proteins and P-type ATPases, which are part of several signalling pathways during sperm maturation. In order for sperm to gain fertilizing ability, they must undergo in the female reproductive tract, capacitation that includes tyrosine phosphorylation and consequent actin polymerization. The present paper reports the findings of 3-month oral toxicity in mice of fluorides at the concentrations 0, 1, 10, and 100ppm and their synergic action with aluminium at dose of 10ppm. There were no mortalities, clinical signs of discomfort or body weight loss during the experiment. The analysis revealed, for the concentrations of 10 and 100ppm, abnormalities of spermatogenesis and ability of epididymal spermatozoa to capacitate in vitro, as the result of decreased sperm head tyrosine phosphorylation and actin polymerization. The enhancing overload caused by fluorides represents a potential factor, having an impact on function of sperm, hence contributing to a growing infertility in the human population.

  8. Nuclear reconstitution of demembranated Orychophragmus violaceus sperm in Xenopus laevis egg extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Ren, Min; Zhai, Zhonghe

    2002-12-01

    The cell-free extracts from animal Xenopus laevis egg could induce chromatin decondensation and pronuclear formation from demembranated plant (Orychophragmus violaceu) sperm. The demembranated Orychophragmus violaceus sperm began to swell in 30 min incubation, and then were gradually decondensed. The reassembly of nuclear envelope in the reconstituted nuclei had been visualized by means of electron microscopy and fluorescent microscopy. Membrane vesicles fused to form the double envelope around the periphery of the decondensed chromatin. The morphology of the newly formed nucleus, with a double membrane, was similar to those nuclei after fertilization. Transmission electron microscope micrograph of the whole mount prepared nuclear matrix-lamina showed the reconstituted nucleus to be filled with a dense network.

  9. Sperm ultrastructure in two species of Panorpa and one Bittacus (Mecoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sha; Hua, Baozhen

    2010-08-01

    The sperm ultrastructure of the scorpionflies Panorpa liui and P. longihypovalva in Panorpidae and the hangingfly Bittacus planus in Bittacidae were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The common features of the spermatozoa shared by all the mecopterans examined include a bilayered acrosome with a central perforatorium, an elongated homogeneously condensed nucleus, and a long flagellum with a 9+2 axoneme pattern and two mitochondrial derivatives. The two species of Panorpa possess a fossa at the posterior end of the nucleus, and differ from B. planus by lacking both the globular units running laterally from the head to the flagellum and the Golgi complex-derived membrane present in the flagellum. P. liui has pear-shaped mitochondrial derivatives and two small accessory bodies, while P. longihypovalva has elliptical mitochondrial derivatives and only one accessory body. The marked differences of the sperm structure among the Panorpa examined further confirm the paraphyly of this genus. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sperm chemorepulsion, a supplementary mechanism to regulate fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidobaldi, H A; Cubilla, M; Moreno, A; Molino, M V; Bahamondes, L; Giojalas, L C

    2017-08-01

    Are human spermatozoa able of chemorepulsive behaviour? Capacitated human spermatozoa are able to be chemorepelled by synthetic Progesterone Receptor Ligands (sPRL, known as contraceptives) and zinc (a cation released by the oocyte upon fertilization). Moving cells can be oriented towards or against a molecular gradient, processes called chemoattraction and chemorepulsion, respectively, which have been described in unicellular organisms such as amoebas and bacteria, to organismic cells such macrophages and developmental cells. In the case of spermatozoa, chemoattraction may help the finding of an oocyte and has been widely studied in various invertebrate and mammalian species; however, chemorepulsion has not yet been verified in spermatozoa. This is an in vitro study involving human, rabbit and mouse spermatozoa which were used to perform 3-30 experiments per treatment. Human sperm samples were obtained by masturbation from healthy donors who gave written consent. Only those samples exhibiting normal semen parameters according to current WHO criteria were included in the study. Rabbit spermatozoa were obtained by artificial vagina whereas mice spermatozoa were obtained from epididymis. The sperm selection assay (SSA), originally designed to evaluate sperm chemoattraction towards progesterone (P), and a video-microscopy and computer motion analysis system were used to test sperm chemorepulsion. Additional kinetic parameters were also determined by video-microscopy and computer motion analysis. In some experiments, the level of induced acrosome-reacted spermatozoa was determined. Rabbit mating manipulation was achieved to perform the sperm-oocyte co-incubation assay. Sperm accumulation in the well containing 100 pg/ml of sPRL was lower than the culture medium negative control (P < 0.05). The percentage of sperm persistence against the well containing 100 pg/ml ulipristal acetate (UPA) (P = 0.001), and the percentage of sperm showing a repulsive pattern of movement (a

  11. Variability in sperm form and function in the context of sperm competition risk in two Tupinambis lizards

    OpenAIRE

    Blengini, Cecilia Soledad; Naretto, Sergio; Cardozo Milanesio, Gabriela Alejandra; Giojalas, Laura Cecilia; Chiaraviglio, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    In polyandrous species, sperm morphometry and sperm velocity are under strong sexual selection. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the role of sperm competition in sperm trait variation, this aspect is still poorly understood. It has been suggested that an increase in sperm competition pressure could reduce sperm size variation or produce a diversity of sperm to maximize male fertilization success. We aim at elucidating the variability of sperm morphometric traits and v...

  12. Nucleus-Nucleus Collision as Superposition of Nucleon-Nucleus Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlova, G.I.; Adamovich, M.I.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Alexandrov, Y.A.; Andreeva, N.P.; Badyal, S.K.; Basova, E.S.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhasin, A.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bradnova, V.; Bubnov, V.I.; Cai, X.; Chasnikov, I.Y.; Chen, G.M.; Chernova, L.P.; Chernyavsky, M.M.; Dhamija, S.; Chenawi, K.El; Felea, D.; Feng, S.Q.; Gaitinov, A.S.; Ganssauge, E.R.; Garpman, S.; Gerassimov, S.G.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Grote, J.; Gulamov, K.G.; Gupta, S.K.; Gupta, V.K.; Henjes, U.; Jakobsson, B.; Kanygina, E.K.; Karabova, M.; Kharlamov, S.P.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Krasnov, S.A.; Kumar, V.; Larionova, V.G.; Li, Y.X.; Liu, L.S.; Lokanathan, S.; Lord, J.J.; Lukicheva, N.S.; Lu, Y.; Luo, S.B.; Mangotra, L.K.; Manhas, I.; Mittra, I.S.; Musaeva, A.K.; Nasyrov, S.Z.; Navotny, V.S.; Nystrand, J.; Otterlund, I.; Peresadko, N.G.; Qian, W.Y.; Qin, Y.M.; Raniwala, R.; Rao, N.K.; Roeper, M.; Rusakova, V.V.; Saidkhanov, N.; Salmanova, N.A.; Seitimbetov, A.M.; Sethi, R.; Singh, B.; Skelding, D.; Soderstrem, K.; Stenlund, E.; Svechnikova, L.N.; Svensson, T.; Tawfik, A.M.; Tothova, M.; Tretyakova, M.I.; Trofimova, T.P.; Tuleeva, U.I.; Vashisht, Vani; Vokal, S.; Vrlakova, J.; Wang, H.Q.; Wang, X.R.; Weng, Z.Q.; Wilkes, R.J.; Yang, C.B.; Yin, Z.B.; Yu, L.Z.; Zhang, D.H.; Zheng, P.Y.; Zhokhova, S.I.; Zhou, D.C

    1999-03-01

    Angular distributions of charged particles produced in {sup 16}O and {sup 32}S collisions with nuclear track emulsion were studied at momenta 4.5 and 200 A GeV/c. Comparison with the angular distributions of charged particles produced in proton-nucleus collisions at the same momentum allows to draw the conclusion, that the angular distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions can be seen as superposition of the angular distributions in nucleon-nucleus collisions taken at the same impact parameter b{sub NA}, that is mean impact parameter between the participating projectile nucleons and the center of the target nucleus.

  13. Association between the MTHFR-C677T isoform and structure of sperm DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Dominique; Cohen, Marc; Clement, Arthur; Amar, Edouard; Fournols, Laetitia; Clement, Patrice; Neveux, Paul; Ménézo, Yves

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate whether the MTHFR contribution to male decreased fertility can be attributable to anomalies in sperm nucleus DNA structure in relation to defective methylation. The presence of MTHFR C677T, contributing at most for male infertility, was determined from a venous blood sample, using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) and sperm nucleus decondensation index (SDI) measurements were performed using acridine orange and flow cytometry. SDF and SDI of men MTHFR C677T heterozygous or homozygous were compared to a general population of hypo-fertile patients RESULTS: SDF is not increased either in homozygous or heterozygous carriers of MTHFR C677T. In contrast, SDI is increased with a higher incidence in homozygous (p = 0.0006) than in heterozygous (p = 0.029) patients when compared with the control population. Using a critical threshold of 20% for either SDI or SDF assayed with our technique, the percentage of patients with results higher than this value is not significant with respect to fragmentation (0.128), but is significantly increased for decondensation (0.0003). Defective methylation linked to MTHFR may contribute to sperm pathogenesis via increased SDI. After DNA structure analysis, especially SDI, treatment with 5-methyl tetrahydrofolate (MTHF), the metabolite downstream from the action of MTHFR, should be recommended as a therapeutic approach. Patients with a high SDI should be tested for MTHFR isoforms as part of a healthcare policy.

  14. Psychosocial counselling of identifiable sperm donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.; Mochtar, M.H.; de Melker, A.A.; van der Veen, F.; Repping, S.; Gerrits, T.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What do identifiable sperm donors feel about psychosocial counselling? SUMMARY ANSWER: Identifiable sperm donors found it important that psychosocial counselling focused on emotional consequences and on rules and regulations and they expected to have access to psychosocial

  15. Temperature variable and the efficiency of sperm mediated transfection of HPV16 DNA into cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadze, Ruslana; Chan, Philip J; Jacobson, John D; Corselli, Johannah U; King, Alan

    2002-09-01

    To pretreat sperm at various temperatures before exposure to human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA fragments and to assess the efficiency of HPV carrier sperm to transfect cumulus cells. Cumulus cells from follicular aspirates were obtained, pooled and divided into culture dishes containing Sybr Gold-stained HPV DNA carrying sperm that were either pretreated at 4 degree C, 37 degree C or 40 degree C (n = 5). The cells were incubated in 5% CO(2) in air mixture at 37 degree C for 24 hours. The efficiency of sperm to take up fluorescent HPV DNA was determined at hour 0. After incubation, cumulus cell viability was assessed using the eosin method and the percentages of fluorescent cumulus cells determined. Over half of all the cumulus cells became fluorescent with the highest percentage in the 37 degree C group. Sperm pretreated at 4 degree C had the greatest amount of HPV DNA fragments. Total sperm motility was similar for the 3 pretreatment groups. There were no differences in cumulus viability among the groups. Sperm pretreated at 37 degree C transferred the greatest amount of fluorescent HPV DNA fragments to the cumulus cells. The HPV DNA was observed in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. The data suggested the possibility of sperm as a vector for the transmission of HPV DNA to the cumulus cells surrounding ovulated oocytes, which might lead to early implantation failures.

  16. Measurement of boar sperm motility by the trans-membrane migration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S L; Sun, C; Lin, J H; Hong, C Y; Wei, Y H

    1989-04-01

    The conventional microscopic methods for evaluating sperm motility of domestic animals are mostly inadequate due to their subjectivity and lack of precision. Recently, a trans-membrane migration method, originally developed for t