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Sample records for human skin cell

  1. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  2. Laser printing of skin cells and human stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Lothar; Kuhn, Stefanie; Sorg, Heiko; Gruene, Martin; Schlie, Sabrina; Gaebel, Ralf; Polchow, Bianca; Reimers, Kerstin; Stoelting, Stephanie; Ma, Nan; Vogt, Peter M; Steinhoff, Gustav; Chichkov, Boris

    2010-10-01

    Laser printing based on laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a new biofabrication technique for the arrangement of biological materials or living cells in well-defined patterns. In the current study, skin cell lines (fibroblasts/keratinocytes) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) were chosen for laser printing experiments due to their high potential in regeneration of human skin and new application possibilities of stem cell therapy. To evaluate the influence of LIFT on the cells, their survival rate, their proliferation and apoptotic activity, and the DNA damages and modifications of their cell surface markers were assessed and statistically evaluated over several days. The cells survived the transfer procedure with a rate of 98%  +/- 1% standard error of the mean (skin cells) and 90%  +/- 10% (hMSC), respectively. All used cell types maintain their ability to proliferate after LIFT. Further, skin cells and hMSC did not show an increase of apoptosis or DNA fragmentation. In addition, the hMSC keep their phenotype as proven by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. This study demonstrates LIFT as a suitable technique for unharmed computer-controlled positioning of different cell types and a promising tool for future applications in the ex vivo generation of tissue replacements.

  3. Identification of skin immune cells in non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Lucille; Rosenbaum, Pierre; Cosma, Antonio; Le Grand, Roger; Martinon, Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    The skin is a valuable target for vaccine delivery because it contains many immune cell populations, notably antigen presenting cells. Skin immune cells have been extensively described in mice and humans but not in non-human primates, which are pertinent models for immunological research in vaccination. The aim of this work was to describe immune cell populations in the epidermis, dermis and skin draining lymph nodes in cynomolgus macaques by a single 12-parameter flow cytometry protocol. Given that skin cells share several markers, we defined a gating strategy to identify accurately immune cells and to limit contamination of one immune cell population by another. The epidermis contained CD1a(+)CD1c(-) Langerhans cells (LCs), CD3(+) T cells and putative NK cells. The dermis contained CD1a(+)CD1c(-) cells, which were similar to LCs, CD1a(+)CD1c(+) dermal dendritic cells (DDCs), CD163(high)CD11b(+) resident macrophages, CD3(+) T cells and putative NK cells. The skin also contained CD66(+) polymorphonuclear cells in some animals. Thus, immune cell populations in the macaque are similar to those in humans despite some differences in phenotype. In skin draining lymph nodes, we identified migratory LCs, CD1a(+)CD1c(+) DDCs and macrophages. The simultaneous identification of these different immune cells with one panel of markers avoids the use of large amounts of precious sample and may improve the understanding of immune mechanisms in the skin after treatment or vaccination.

  4. Memory regulatory T cells reside in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Rodriguez, Robert; Pauli, Mariela L; Neuhaus, Isaac M; Yu, Siegrid S; Arron, Sarah T; Harris, Hobart W; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Anthony, Bryan A; Sverdrup, Francis M; Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth; MacKenzie, Tippi C; Johnson, David S; Meyer, Everett H; Löhr, Andrea; Hsu, Andro; Koo, John; Liao, Wilson; Gupta, Rishu; Debbaneh, Maya G; Butler, Daniel; Huynh, Monica; Levin, Ethan C; Leon, Argentina; Hoffman, William Y; McGrath, Mary H; Alvarado, Michael D; Ludwig, Connor H; Truong, Hong-An; Maurano, Megan M; Gratz, Iris K; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2014-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are characterized by expression of the transcription factor Foxp3, are a dynamic and heterogeneous population of cells that control immune responses and prevent autoimmunity. We recently identified a subset of Tregs in murine skin with properties typical of memory cells and defined this population as memory Tregs (mTregs). Due to the importance of these cells in regulating tissue inflammation in mice, we analyzed this cell population in humans and found that almost all Tregs in normal skin had an activated memory phenotype. Compared with mTregs in peripheral blood, cutaneous mTregs had unique cell surface marker expression and cytokine production. In normal human skin, mTregs preferentially localized to hair follicles and were more abundant in skin with high hair density. Sequence comparison of TCRs from conventional memory T helper cells and mTregs isolated from skin revealed little homology between the two cell populations, suggesting that they recognize different antigens. Under steady-state conditions, mTregs were nonmigratory and relatively unresponsive; however, in inflamed skin from psoriasis patients, mTregs expanded, were highly proliferative, and produced low levels of IL-17. Taken together, these results identify a subset of Tregs that stably resides in human skin and suggest that these cells are qualitatively defective in inflammatory skin disease.

  5. Derivation of Human Skin Fibroblast Lines for Feeder Cells of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Christian; Felldin, Ulrika; Rodin, Sergey; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Dilber, Sirac; Hovatta, Outi

    2016-02-03

    After the first derivations of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines on fetal mouse feeder cell layers, the idea of using human cells instead of mouse cells as feeder cells soon arose. Mouse cells bear a risk of microbial contamination, and nonhuman immunogenic proteins are absorbed from the feeders to hESCs. Human skin fibroblasts can be effectively used as feeder cells for hESCs. The same primary cell line, which can be safely used for up to 15 passages after stock preparations, can be expanded and used for large numbers of hESC derivations and cultures. These cells are relatively easy to handle and maintain. No animal facilities or animal work is needed. Here, we describe the derivation, culture, and cryopreservation procedures for research-grade human skin fibroblast lines. We also describe how to make feeder layers for hESCs using these fibroblasts.

  6. Human skin Langerhans cells are targets of dengue virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, SJL; Grouard-Vogel, G; Mascola, [No Value; Brachtel, E; Putvatana, R; Louder, MK; Filgueira, L; Marovich, MA; Wong, HK; Blauvelt, A; Murphy, GS; Robb, ML; Innes, BL; Birx, DL; Hayes, CG; Frankel, SS

    2000-01-01

    Dengue virus (DV), an arthropod-borne flavivirus, causes a febrile illness for which there is no antiviral treatment and no vaccine(1,2). Macrophages are important in dengue pathogenesis; however, the initial target cell for DV infection remains unknown. As DV is introduced into human skin by mosqui

  7. In Vitro Desensitization of Human Skin Mast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Gomez, Gregorio; Macey, Matthew; Kepley, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    Desensitization is a clinical procedure whereby incremental doses of a drug are administered over several hours to a sensitive patient until a therapeutic dose and clinical tolerance are achieved. Clinical tolerance may occur in part by attenuating the mast cell response. In the present study, primary human skin mast cells were used to establish and characterize an in vitro model of desensitization. Mast cells in culture were armed with allergen-specific (4-hydroxy-3-nitro-phenylacety and Der p2) and non-specific IgE antibodies, and then desensitized by incremental exposures to 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacety-BSA. This desensitization procedure abrogated the subsequent degranulation response to the desensitizing allergen, to an unrelated allergen, and to IgG anti-FcεRI, but not to C5a, substance P, compound 48/80, and calcium ionophore. Desensitized cells regained their FcεRI-dependent degranulation capability by 24–48 h after free allergen had been removed. Therefore, sensitized human skin mast cells are reversibly desensitized in vitro by exposure to incremental doses of that allergen, which also cross-desensitizes them to an unrelated allergen. PMID:22009002

  8. Induction of Skin-Derived Precursor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama-Nakagiri, Yoriko; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Moriwaki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    The generation of full thickness human skin from dissociated cells is an attractive approach not only for treating skin diseases, but also for treating many systemic disorders. However, it is currently not possible to obtain an unlimited number of skin dermal cells. The goal of this study was to develop a procedure to produce skin dermal stem cells from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Skin-derived precursor cells (SKPs) were isolated as adult dermal precursors that could differentiate into both neural and mesodermal progenies and could reconstitute the dermis. Thus, we attempted to generate SKPs from iPSCs that could reconstitute the skin dermis. Human iPSCs were initially cultured with recombinant noggin and SB431542, an inhibitor of activin/nodal and TGFβ signaling, to induce neural crest progenitor cells. Those cells were then treated with SKP medium that included CHIR99021, a WNT signal activator. The induction efficacy from neural crest progenitor cells to SKPs was more than 97%. No other modifiers tested were able to induce those cells. Those human iPSC-derived SKPs (hiPSC-SKPs) showed a similar gene expression signature to SKPs isolated from human skin dermis. Human iPSC-SKPs differentiated into neural and mesodermal progenies, including adipocytes, skeletogenic cell types and Schwann cells. Moreover, they could be induced to follicular type keratinization when co-cultured with human epidermal keratinocytes. We here provide a new efficient protocol to create human skin dermal stem cells from hiPSCs that could contribute to the treatment of various skin disorders. PMID:27992514

  9. Asiaticoside enhances normal human skin cell migration, attachment and growth in vitro wound healing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Hye-Lee; Lee, Mi Hee; You, Kyung Eun; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Seo, Hyok Jin; Park, Jong-Chul

    2012-10-15

    Wound healing proceeds through a complex collaborative process involving many types of cells. Keratinocytes and fibroblasts of epidermal and dermal layers of the skin play prominent roles in this process. Asiaticoside, an active component of Centella asiatica, is known for beneficial effects on keloid and hypertrophic scar. However, the effects of this compound on normal human skin cells are not well known. Using in vitro systems, we observed the effects of asiaticoside on normal human skin cell behaviors related to healing. In a wound closure seeding model, asiaticoside increased migration rates of skin cells. By observing the numbers of cells attached and the area occupied by the cells, we concluded that asiaticoside also enhanced the initial skin cell adhesion. In cell proliferation assays, asiaticoside induced an increase in the number of normal human dermal fibroblasts. In conclusion, asiaticoside promotes skin cell behaviors involved in wound healing; and as a bioactive component of an artificial skin, may have therapeutic value.

  10. In situ depletion of CD4(+) T cells in human skin by Zanolimumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, L.S.; Skov, L.; Dam, T.N.

    2007-01-01

    -driving T cells in situ may therefore be a useful approach in the treatment of inflammatory and malignant skin diseases. Depletion of CD4(+) T cells in intact inflamed human skin tissue by Zanolimumab, a fully human therapeutic monoclonal antibody (IgG1, kappa) against CD4, was studied in a human psoriasis...

  11. Brugia malayi infective larvae fail to activate Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, R N; McDonald-Fleming, R; Boyd, A; Spates, K; Nutman, T B; Tolouei Semnani, R

    2015-02-01

    Filarial infection in humans is initiated when a mosquito deposits third-stage parasite larvae (L3) in the skin. Langerhans cells (LCs) and dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) are the first cells that the parasite encounters, and L3s must evade these highly effective antigen-presenting cells to establish infection. To assess LC and DDC responses to L3 in human skin, we employed three models of increasing physiologic relevance: in vitro-generated LCs, epidermal blister explants and full-thickness human skin sections. In vitro-generated LCs expressed TLR1-10 and robustly produced IL-6 and TNF-α in response to PolyI:C, but pre-exposure to L3s did not alter inflammatory cytokine production or TLR expression. L3s did not modulate expression of LC markers CDH1, CD207, or CD1a, or the regulatory products TSLP or IDO in epidermal explants or in vitro-generated LC. LC, CD14+ DDC, CD1c+ DC and CD141+ DC from human skin sections were analysed by flow cytometry. While PolyI:C potently induced CCL22 production in LC, CD1c+ DC, and CD141+ DC, and IL-10 production in LC, L3s did not modulate the numbers of or cytokine production by any skin DC subset. L3s broadly failed to activate or modulate LCs or DDCs, suggesting filarial larvae expertly evade APC detection in human skin.

  12. The Nrf2-inducers tanshinone I and dihydrotanshinone protect human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shasha; Justiniano, Rebecca; Zhang, Donna D.; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a causative factor in skin photocarcinogenesis and photoaging, and an urgent need exists for improved strategies for skin photoprotection. The redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2), a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defense against environmental electrophilic insult, has recently emerged as an important determinant of cutaneous damage from solar UV, and the concept of pharmacological activation of Nrf2 has attracted considerable attention as a novel approach to skin photoprotection. In this study, we examined feasibility of using tanshinones, a novel class of phenanthrenequinone-based cytoprotective Nrf2 inducers derived from the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, for protection of cultured human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay in human Hs27 dermal fibroblasts pronounced transcriptional activation of Nrf2 by four major tanshinones [tanshinone I (T-I), dihydrotanshinone (DHT), tanshinone IIA (T-II-A) and cryptotanshinone (CT)] was detected. In fibroblasts, the more potent tanshinones T-I and DHT caused a significant increase in Nrf2 protein half-life via blockage of ubiquitination, ultimately resulting in upregulated expression of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes (GCLC, NQO1) with the elevation of cellular glutathione levels. Similar tanshinone-induced changes were also observed in HaCaT keratinocytes. T-I and DHT pretreatment caused significant suppression of skin cell death induced by solar simulated UV and riboflavin-sensitized UVA. Moreover, feasibility of tanshinone-based cutaneous photoprotection was tested employing a human skin reconstruct exposed to solar simulated UV (80 mJ/cm2 UVB; 1.53 J/cm2 UVA). The occurrence of markers of epidermal solar insult (cleaved procaspase 3, pycnotic nuclei, eosinophilic cytoplasm, acellular cavities) was significantly attenuated in DHT

  13. The Nrf2-inducers tanshinone I and dihydrotanshinone protect human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shasha Tao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV radiation is a causative factor in skin photocarcinogenesis and photoaging, and an urgent need exists for improved strategies for skin photoprotection. The redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2, a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defense against environmental electrophilic insult, has recently emerged as an important determinant of cutaneous damage from solar UV, and the concept of pharmacological activation of Nrf2 has attracted considerable attention as a novel approach to skin photoprotection. In this study, we examined feasibility of using tanshinones, a novel class of phenanthrenequinone-based cytoprotective Nrf2 inducers derived from the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, for protection of cultured human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay in human Hs27 dermal fibroblasts pronounced transcriptional activation of Nrf2 by four major tanshinones [tanshinone I (T-I, dihydrotanshinone (DHT, tanshinone IIA (T-II-A and cryptotanshinone (CT] was detected. In fibroblasts, the more potent tanshinones T-I and DHT caused a significant increase in Nrf2 protein half-life via blockage of ubiquitination, ultimately resulting in upregulated expression of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes (GCLC, NQO1 with the elevation of cellular glutathione levels. Similar tanshinone-induced changes were also observed in HaCaT keratinocytes. T-I and DHT pretreatment caused significant suppression of skin cell death induced by solar simulated UV and riboflavin-sensitized UVA. Moreover, feasibility of tanshinone-based cutaneous photoprotection was tested employing a human skin reconstruct exposed to solar simulated UV (80 mJ/cm2 UVB; 1.53 J/cm2 UVA. The occurrence of markers of epidermal solar insult (cleaved procaspase 3, pycnotic nuclei, eosinophilic cytoplasm, acellular cavities was significantly attenuated in DHT

  14. The Nrf2-inducers tanshinone I and dihydrotanshinone protect human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shasha; Justiniano, Rebecca; Zhang, Donna D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a causative factor in skin photocarcinogenesis and photoaging, and an urgent need exists for improved strategies for skin photoprotection. The redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2), a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defense against environmental electrophilic insult, has recently emerged as an important determinant of cutaneous damage from solar UV, and the concept of pharmacological activation of Nrf2 has attracted considerable attention as a novel approach to skin photoprotection. In this study, we examined feasibility of using tanshinones, a novel class of phenanthrenequinone-based cytoprotective Nrf2 inducers derived from the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, for protection of cultured human skin cells and reconstructed human skin against solar simulated UV. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay in human Hs27 dermal fibroblasts pronounced transcriptional activation of Nrf2 by four major tanshinones [tanshinone I (T-I), dihydrotanshinone (DHT), tanshinone IIA (T-II-A) and cryptotanshinone (CT)] was detected. In fibroblasts, the more potent tanshinones T-I and DHT caused a significant increase in Nrf2 protein half-life via blockage of ubiquitination, ultimately resulting in upregulated expression of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes (GCLC, NQO1) with the elevation of cellular glutathione levels. Similar tanshinone-induced changes were also observed in HaCaT keratinocytes. T-I and DHT pretreatment caused significant suppression of skin cell death induced by solar simulated UV and riboflavin-sensitized UVA. Moreover, feasibility of tanshinone-based cutaneous photoprotection was tested employing a human skin reconstruct exposed to solar simulated UV (80 mJ/cm(2) UVB; 1.53 J/cm(2) UVA). The occurrence of markers of epidermal solar insult (cleaved procaspase 3, pycnotic nuclei, eosinophilic cytoplasm, acellular cavities) was significantly attenuated in DHT

  15. Human Skin-Derived Stem Cells as a Novel Cell Source for In Vitro Hepatotoxicity Screening of Pharmaceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Robim M.; De Kock, Joery; Branson, Steven; Vinken, Mathieu; Meganathan, Kesavan; Chaudhari, Umesh; Sachinidis, Agapios; Govaere, Olivier; Roskams, Tania; De Boe, Veerle; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Human skin-derived precursors (hSKP) are postnatal stem cells with neural crest properties that reside in the dermis of human skin. These cells can be easily isolated from small (fore) skin segments and have the capacity to differentiate into multiple cell types. In this study, we show that upon exposure to hepatogenic growth factors and cytokines, hSKP acquire sufficient hepatic features that could make these cells suitable in vitro tools for hepatotoxicity screening of new chemical entities...

  16. DNA damage by carbonyl stress in human skin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Michael J.; Wondrak, Georg T.; Laurean, Daniel Cervantes; Jacobson, Myron K.; Jacobson, Elaine L

    2003-01-28

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) are potent mediators of cellular carbonyl stress originating from endogenous chemical processes such as lipid peroxidation and glycation. Skin deterioration as observed in photoaging and diabetes has been linked to accumulative protein damage from glycation, but the effects of carbonyl stress on skin cell genomic integrity are ill defined. In this study, the genotoxic effects of acute carbonyl stress on HaCaT keratinocytes and CF3 fibroblasts were assessed. Administration of the {alpha}-dicarbonyl compounds glyoxal and methylglyoxal as physiologically relevant RCS inhibited skin cell proliferation, led to intra-cellular protein glycation as evidenced by the accumulation of N{sup {epsilon}}-(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML) in histones, and caused extensive DNA strand cleavage as assessed by the comet assay. These effects were prevented by treatment with the carbonyl scavenger D-penicillamine. Both glyoxal and methylglyoxal damaged DNA in intact cells. Glyoxal caused DNA strand breaks while methylglyoxal produced extensive DNA-protein cross-linking as evidenced by pronounced nuclear condensation and total suppression of comet formation. Glycation by glyoxal and methylglyoxal resulted in histone cross-linking in vitro and induced oxygen-dependent cleavage of plasmid DNA, which was partly suppressed by the hydroxyl scavenger mannitol. We suggest that a chemical mechanism of cellular DNA damage by carbonyl stress occurs in which histone glycoxidation is followed by reactive oxygen induced DNA stand breaks. The genotoxic potential of RCS in cultured skin cells and its suppression by a carbonyl scavenger as described in this study have implications for skin damage and carcinogenesis and its prevention by agents selective for carbonyl stress.

  17. A Role for Human Skin Mast Cells in Dengue Virus Infection and Systemic Spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troupin, Andrea; Shirley, Devon; Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Watson, Alan M; McHale, Cody; Hall, Alex; Hartstone-Rose, Adam; Klimstra, William B; Gomez, Gregorio; Colpitts, Tonya M

    2016-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes serious global human disease and mortality. Skin immune cells are an important component of initial DENV infection and systemic spread. Here, we show that mast cells are a target of DENV in human skin and that DENV infection of skin mast cells induces degranulation and alters cytokine and growth factor expression profiles. Importantly, to our knowledge, we also demonstrate for the first time that DENV localizes within secretory granules in infected skin mast cells. In addition, DENV within extracellular granules was infectious in vitro and in vivo, trafficking through lymph to draining lymph nodes in mice. We demonstrate an important role for human skin mast cells in DENV infection and identify a novel mechanism for systemic spread of DENV infection from the initial peripheral mosquito injection site. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Archaea on human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Probst

    Full Text Available The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin.

  19. In Vitro Differentiation Potential of Human Placenta Derived Cells into Skin Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhma Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin autografting is the most viable and aesthetic technique for treatment of extensive burns; however, this practice has potential limitations. Harvesting cells from neonatal sources (such as placental tissue is a simple, inexpensive, and noninvasive procedure. In the current study authors sought to evaluate in vitro potential of human placenta derived stem cells to develop into skin-like cells. After extensive washing, amniotic membrane and umbilical cord tissue were separated to harvest amniotic epithelial cells (AECs and umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs, respectively. Both types of cells were characterized for the expression of embryonic lineage markers and their growth characteristics were determined. AECs and UC-MSCs were induced to differentiate into keratinocytes-like and dermal fibroblasts-like cells, respectively. After induction, morphological changes were detected by microscopy. The differentiation potential was further assessed using immunostaining and RT-PCR analyses. AECs were positive for cytokeratins and E-Cadherin while UC-MSCs were positive for fibroblast specific makers. AECs differentiated into keratinocytes-like cells showed positive expression of keratinocyte specific cytokeratins, involucrin, and loricrin. UC-MSCs differentiated into dermal fibroblast-like cells indicated expression of collagen type 3, desmin, FGF-7, fibroblast activation protein alpha, procollagen-1, and vimentin. In conclusion, placenta is a potential source of cells to develop into skin-like cells.

  20. Melanin Transfer in Human 3D Skin Equivalents Generated Exclusively from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Gledhill

    Full Text Available The current utility of 3D skin equivalents is limited by the fact that existing models fail to recapitulate the cellular complexity of human skin. They often contain few cell types and no appendages, in part because many cells found in the skin are difficult to isolate from intact tissue and cannot be expanded in culture. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs present an avenue by which we can overcome this issue due to their ability to be differentiated into multiple cell types in the body and their unlimited growth potential. We previously reported generation of the first human 3D skin equivalents from iPSC-derived fibroblasts and iPSC-derived keratinocytes, demonstrating that iPSCs can provide a foundation for modeling a complex human organ such as skin. Here, we have increased the complexity of this model by including additional iPSC-derived melanocytes. Epidermal melanocytes, which are largely responsible for skin pigmentation, represent the second most numerous cell type found in normal human epidermis and as such represent a logical next addition. We report efficient melanin production from iPSC-derived melanocytes and transfer within an entirely iPSC-derived epidermal-melanin unit and generation of the first functional human 3D skin equivalents made from iPSC-derived fibroblasts, keratinocytes and melanocytes.

  1. Insight into the immunobiology of human skin and functional specialization of skin dendritic cell subsets to innovate intradermal vaccination design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen, M B M; Haniffa, M; Collin, M P

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the key initiators and regulators of any immune response which determine the outcome of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses. Multiple distinct DC subsets can be distinguished by location, phenotype, and function in the homeostatic and inflamed human skin. The function of steady-state cutaneous DCs or recruited inflammatory DCs is influenced by the surrounding cellular and extracellular skin microenvironment. The skin is an attractive site for vaccination given the extended local network of DCs and the easy access to the skin-draining lymph nodes to generate effector T cells and immunoglobulin-producing B cells for long-term protective immunity. In the context of intradermal vaccination we describe in this review the skin-associated immune system, the characteristics of the different skin DC subsets, the mechanism of antigen uptake and presentation, and how the properties of DCs can be manipulated. This knowledge is critical for the development of intradermal vaccine strategies and supports the concept of intradermal vaccination as a superior route to the conventional intramuscular or subcutaneous methods.

  2. Airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons trigger human skin cells aging through aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yuan; Li, Qiang; Du, Hong-Yang; Wang, Qiao-Wei; Huang, Ye; Liu, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) which adsorbed on the surface of ambient air particulate matters (PM), are the major toxic compound to cause cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, even cancer. However, its detrimental effects on human skin cell remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that SRM1649b, a reference urban dust material of PAH, triggers human skin cells aging through cell cycle arrest, cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Principally, SRM1649b facilitated Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) translocated into nucleus, subsequently activated ERK/MAPK signaling pathway, and upregulated aging-related genes expression. Most important, we found that AhR antagonist efficiently revert the aging of skin cells. Thus our novel findings firstly revealed the mechanism of skin aging under PAH contamination and provided potential strategy for clinical application. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that reflect light more, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas that are painted white. The higher ... - skin - squamous cell; Skin cancer - squamous cell; Nonmelanoma skin cancer - squamous ...

  4. Activation of human tonsil and skin mast cells by agonists of proteinase activated receptor-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-heng HE; Hua XIE; Yi-ling FU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of the agonists of proteinase activated receptor (PAR)-2,and histamine on degranulation of human mast cells. Methods: Human mast cells were enzymatically dispersed from tonsil and skin tissues. The dis persed cells were then cultured with various stimuli, and tryptase and histamine levels in cell supernatants collected from challenge tubes were measured. Results:PAR-2 agonist peptide SLIGKV provoked a dose-dependent release of histamine from skin mast cells. It also induced tryptase release from tonsil mast cells, tcLIGRLO appeared less potent than SLIGKV in induction of release of histamine and tryptase. Trypsin was able to induce a "bell" shape increase in tryptase release from tonsil mast cells. It was also able to induce a dose-dependent release of histamine from both tonsil and skin mast cells. The actions of trypsin on mast cells were inhibited by soy bean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) or α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT).Time course study revealed that both stimulated tryptase or histamine release initiated within 10 s and reached their peak release between 4 and 6 min. Pretreatment of cells with metabolic inhibitors or pertussis toxin reduced the ability of mast cells to release tryptase or histamine. Conclusion: It was demonstrated that the in vitro tryptase release properties of human tonsil and skin mast cells suggested a novel type of mast cell heterogeneity. The activation of mast cells by PAR-2 agonists indicated a self-amplification mechanism of mast cell degranulation.

  5. Biological Activity of Polynesian Calophyllum inophyllum Oil Extract on Human Skin Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansel, Jean-Luc; Lupo, Elise; Mijouin, Lily; Guillot, Samuel; Butaud, Jean-François; Ho, Raimana; Lecellier, Gaël; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Pichon, Chantal

    2016-07-01

    Oil from the nuts of Calophyllum inophyllum, locally called "Tamanu oil" in French Polynesia, was traditionally used for wound healing and to cure various skin problems and ailments. The skin-active effect of "Tamanu oil emulsion" was investigated on human skin cells (keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts) and showed cell proliferation, glycosaminoglycan and collagen production, and wound healing activity. Transcriptomic analysis of the treated cells revealed gene expression modulation including genes involved in the metabolic process implied in O-glycan biosynthesis, cell adhesion, and cell proliferation. The presence of neoflavonoids as bioactive constituents in Tamanu oil emulsion may contribute to these biological activities. Altogether, consistent data related to targeted histological and cellular functions brought new highlights on the mechanisms involved in these biological processes induced by Tamanu oil effects in skin cells.

  6. Human amniotic fluid derived cells can competently substitute dermal fibroblasts in a tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal skin analog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; Hosper, Nynke; Luginbuehl, Joachim; Biedermann, Thomas; Reichmann, Ernst; Meuli, Martin

    Human amniotic fluid comprises cells with high differentiation capacity, thus representing a potential cell source for skin tissue engineering. In this experimental study, we investigated the ability of human amniotic fluid derived cells to substitute dermal fibroblasts and support epidermis

  7. Dermal Substitutes Support the Growth of Human Skin-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Potential Tool for Skin Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremias, Talita da Silva; Machado, Rafaela Grecco; Visoni, Silvia Beatriz Coutinho; Pereima, Maurício José; Leonardi, Dilmar Francisco; Trentin, Andrea Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    New strategies for skin regeneration are needed in order to provide effective treatment for cutaneous wounds and disease. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because of their prolonged self-renewal capacity, multipotentiality, and ability to release active molecules important for tissue repair. In this paper, we show that human skin-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (SD-MSCs) display similar characteristics to the multipotent MSCs. We also evaluate their growth in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system with dermal substitutes (Integra and Pelnac). When cultured in monolayers, SD-MSCs expressed mesenchymal markers, such as CD105, Fibronectin, and α-SMA; and neural markers, such as Nestin and βIII-Tubulin; at transcriptional and/or protein level. Integra and Pelnac equally supported the adhesion, spread and growth of human SD-MSCs in 3D culture, maintaining the MSC characteristics and the expression of multilineage markers. Therefore, dermal substitutes support the growth of mesenchymal stromal cells from human skin, promising an effective tool for tissue engineering and regenerative technology. PMID:24586857

  8. Generation of electrical power under human skin by subdermal solar cell arrays for implantable bioelectronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kwangsun; Han, Jung Hyun; Yang, Hyung Chae; Nam, Kwang Il; Lee, Jongho

    2017-06-15

    Medical electronic implants can significantly improve people's health and quality of life. These implants are typically powered by batteries, which usually have a finite lifetime and therefore must be replaced periodically using surgical procedures. Recently, subdermal solar cells that can generate electricity by absorbing light transmitted through skin have been proposed as a sustainable electricity source to power medical electronic implants in bodies. However, the results to date have been obtained with animal models. To apply the technology to human beings, electrical performance should be characterized using human skin covering the subdermal solar cells. In this paper, we present electrical performance results (up to 9.05mW/cm(2)) of the implantable solar cell array under 59 human skin samples isolated from 10 cadavers. The results indicate that the power densities depend on the thickness and tone of the human skin, e.g., higher power was generated under thinner and brighter skin. The generated power density is high enough to operate currently available medical electronic implants such as pacemakers that require tens of microwatt.

  9. Isolation and characterization of sweat gland myoepithelial cells from human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Ryuichiro; Futaki, Sugiko; Nakano, Itsuko; Tanemura, Atsushi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells routinely maintain the main epidermal components, i.e. the interfollicular epidermis, hair follicles, and sweat glands. Human sweat glands present throughout the body are glandular exocrine organs that mainly play a role in thermoregulation by sweating. Emerging evidence points to the presence of stem cells in sweat glands, but it remains unclear whether such stem cells exist in human sweat glands. Here, we attempted to gather evidence for stem cells in human sweat glands, which would be characterized by self-renewal ability and multipotency. First, we explored human sweat gland cells for expression of stem cell markers. CD29 and Notch, epidermal stem cell markers, were found to reside among α-smooth muscle actin-positive myoepithelial cells in human sweat glands. Next, sweat gland myoepithelial cells were isolated from human skin as a CD29(hi)CD49f (hi) subpopulation. The myoepithelial cell-enriched CD29(hi)CD49f (hi) subpopulation possessed the ability to differentiate into sweat gland luminal cells in sphere-forming assays. Furthermore, CD29(hi)CD49f (hi) subpopulation-derived sphere-forming cells exhibited long-term proliferative potential upon multiple passaging, indicating that the CD29(hi)CD49f (hi) myoepithelial subpopulation includes stem cells with self-renewal ability. These findings provide evidence that human sweat gland myoepithelial cells contain stem cells that possess both self-renewal ability and multipotency to differentiate into sweat glands.

  10. Direct Genesis of Functional Rodent and Human Schwann Cells from Skin Mesenchymal Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Krause

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports of directed reprogramming have raised questions about the stability of cell lineages. Here, we have addressed this issue, focusing upon skin-derived precursors (SKPs, a dermally derived precursor cell. We show by lineage tracing that murine SKPs from dorsal skin originate from mesenchymal and not neural crest-derived cells. These mesenchymally derived SKPs can, without genetic manipulation, generate functional Schwann cells, a neural crest cell type, and are highly similar at the transcriptional level to Schwann cells isolated from the peripheral nerve. This is not a mouse-specific phenomenon, since human SKPs that are highly similar at the transcriptome level can be made from neural crest-derived facial and mesodermally derived foreskin dermis and the foreskin SKPs can make myelinating Schwann cells. Thus, nonneural crest-derived mesenchymal precursors can differentiate into bona fide peripheral glia in the absence of genetic manipulation, suggesting that developmentally defined lineage boundaries are more flexible than widely thought.

  11. Dimethylarsenic acid damages cellular DNA and inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication between human skin fibroblast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuoXB; DengFR

    2002-01-01

    Although arsenic is identified as a human carcinogen,there is currently no accepted mechanism for its action or an established animal model for evaluating the carcinogenic activity of arsenic.To elucidate the mechanism of arsenic arcinogenesis,we investigated the effect of dimethylarsenic acid(DMAA),the main metabolite of inorganic arsenic in humans,on the cellular DNA and gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between human skin fibroblast cells.Single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay was used to detect the DNA damage in human skin fibroblast cells exposed to DMAA,and the GJIC between cells was detected by the scrape loading/dye transfer assay.DMAA at concentrations of 0.01-1.0 mmol·L-1 induced DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner,and GJIC between human skin fibroblast cells was significantly inhibited by DMAA at 1.0 mmol·L-1.Our results suggest that both genotoxic and nongenotoxic mechanism are involved in the mechanism of DMAA-induced cellular toxicity.

  12. Bilayer Hydrogel with Autologous Stem Cells Derived from Debrided Human Burn Skin for Improved Skin Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    to assess tis- sue viability and burn depth, and an abdominoplasty procedure skin sample was used as a control. The granulated skin tissue from the...BD Bioscience, San Jose, CA), or platelet -derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ; 50 μg/ml; BD Bioscience, San Jose, CA). The slides were...bilayer hydrogels alone showed an increase in granulation tissue formation by day 8 (Figure 6E; serrated line across wound bed and Figure 6F) and by

  13. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis interacts with dermal dendritic cells and keratinocytes in human skin and oral mucosa lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Wellington Luiz Ferreira da; Pagliari, Carla; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas; Sotto, Mirian N

    2016-05-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic disease caused by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii. In PCM the skin and oral mucosa are often affected. Dendritic cells and keratinocytes of the integument play a role in innate and adaptive immune response against pathogens, due to their function as antigen presenting cells. Aiming to verify the interaction of P. brasiliensis with these cell populations, we studied 52 skin and 47 oral mucosa samples taken from patients with proven diagnosis of PCM. The biopsies were subjected to immunohistochemical and/or immunofluorescence staining with anti-factor XIIIa (marker of dermal dendrocytes), anti-CD207 (marker of mature Langerhans cells), anti-pan cytokeratins (AE1-AE3) and anti-P. brasiliensis antibodies. Analyses with confocal laser microscopy were also performed for better visualization of the interaction between keratinocytes and the fungi. In sum, 42% of oral mucosa samples displayed yeast forms in Factor XIIIa dermal dendrocytes cytoplasm. Langerhans cells in skin and oral mucosa samples did not show yeast cells in their cytoplasm. In sum, 54% of skin and 60% of mucosal samples displayed yeast cells in the cytoplasm of keratinocytes. The parasitism of keratinocytes may represent a possible mechanism of evasion of the fungus to local immune mechanisms. Factor XIIIa dendrocytes and keratinocytes may be acting as antigen-presenting cells to fulfill the probably impaired function of Langerhans cells in skin and oral mucosa of human PCM. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Three-dimensional hierarchical cultivation of human skin cells on bio-adaptive hybrid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planz, Viktoria; Seif, Salem; Atchison, Jennifer S; Vukosavljevic, Branko; Sparenberg, Lisa; Kroner, Elmar; Windbergs, Maike

    2016-07-11

    The human skin comprises a complex multi-scale layered structure with hierarchical organization of different cells within the extracellular matrix (ECM). This supportive fiber-reinforced structure provides a dynamically changing microenvironment with specific topographical, mechanical and biochemical cell recognition sites to facilitate cell attachment and proliferation. Current advances in developing artificial matrices for cultivation of human cells concentrate on surface functionalizing of biocompatible materials with different biomolecules like growth factors to enhance cell attachment. However, an often neglected aspect for efficient modulation of cell-matrix interactions is posed by the mechanical characteristics of such artificial matrices. To address this issue, we fabricated biocompatible hybrid fibers simulating the complex biomechanical characteristics of native ECM in human skin. Subsequently, we analyzed interactions of such fibers with human skin cells focusing on the identification of key fiber characteristics for optimized cell-matrix interactions. We successfully identified the mediating effect of bio-adaptive elasto-plastic stiffness paired with hydrophilic surface properties as key factors for cell attachment and proliferation, thus elucidating the synergistic role of these parameters to induce cellular responses. Co-cultivation of fibroblasts and keratinocytes on such fiber mats representing the specific cells in dermis and epidermis resulted in a hierarchical organization of dermal and epidermal tissue layers. In addition, terminal differentiation of keratinocytes at the air interface was observed. These findings provide valuable new insights into cell behaviour in three-dimensional structures and cell-material interactions which can be used for rational development of bio-inspired functional materials for advanced biomedical applications.

  15. Human amniotic fluid derived cells can competently substitute dermal fibroblasts in a tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal skin analog

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Human amniotic fluid comprises cells with high differentiation capacity, thus representing a potential cell source for skin tissue engineering. In this experimental study, we investigated the ability of human amniotic fluid derived cells to substitute dermal fibroblasts and support epidermis formation and stratification in a humanized animal model. METHODS: Dermo-epidermal skin grafts with either amniocytes or with fibroblasts in the dermis were compared in a rat model. Full-thicknes...

  16. Skin Stem Cells in Skin Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollapour Sisakht

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Preclinical and clinical research has shown that stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many diseases. This article describes skin stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications. Evidence Acquisition Compared with conventional methods, cell therapy reduces the surgical burden for patients because it is simple and less time-consuming. Skin cell therapy has been developed for variety of diseases. By isolation of the skin stem cell from the niche, in vitro expansion and transplantation of cells offers a surprising healing capacity profile. Results Stem cells located in skin cells have shown interesting properties such as plasticity, transdifferentiation, and specificity. Mesenchymal cells of the dermis, hypodermis, and other sources are currently being investigated to promote regeneration. Conclusions Because skin stem cells are highly accessible from autologous sources and their immunological profile is unique, they are ideal for therapeutic approaches. Optimization of administrative routes requires more investigation own to the lack of a standard protocol.

  17. Selective susceptibility of human skin antigen presenting cells to productive dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cerny

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is a growing global concern with 390 million people infected each year. Dengue virus (DENV is transmitted by mosquitoes, thus host cells in the skin are the first point of contact with the virus. Human skin contains several populations of antigen-presenting cells which could drive the immune response to DENV in vivo: epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs, three populations of dermal dendritic cells (DCs, and macrophages. Using samples of normal human skin we detected productive infection of CD14(+ and CD1c(+ DCs, LCs and dermal macrophages, which was independent of DC-SIGN expression. LCs produced the highest viral titers and were less sensitive to IFN-β. Nanostring gene expression data showed significant up-regulation of IFN-β, STAT-1 and CCL5 upon viral exposure in susceptible DC populations. In mice infected intra-dermally with DENV we detected parallel populations of infected DCs originating from the dermis and migrating to the skin-draining lymph nodes. Therefore dermal DCs may simultaneously facilitate systemic spread of DENV and initiate the adaptive anti-viral immune response.

  18. TRPV channel expression in human skin and possible role in thermally induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Christine; Sinis, Nektarios; Sauter, Michael; Jahn, Sabrina; Kraushaar, Udo; Guenther, Elke; Rodemann, H Peter; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Cell death via necrosis and apoptosis is a hallmark of deep dermal to full-thickness cutaneous burn injuries. Keratinocytes might act as thermosensory cells that transmit information regarding ambient temperature via heat-gated transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of TRPV1, 2, 3, and 4 in uninjured and thermally burned skin. The authors investigated warmth-evoked currents in keratinocytes and cell kinetics of thermally injured keratinocytes in culture with agonists and antagonists of TRPV channels. Specimens of uninjured normal skin and discarded tissue of thermally injured skin were stained for TRPV1, 2, 3, and 4. Cultured primary human keratinocytes were heated for 5 minutes at the following temperatures: 37°C (control), 42°C, and 60°C and thereafter cultured for 24 or 48 hours at 37°C. Thermally stressed cells were treated with TRPV antagonists capsazepine or ruthenium red, and cell viability capacity was determined. TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV3, and TRPV4 immunoreactivity was differentially identified on basal and suprabasal keratinocytes of healthy human skin. Patch clamp analysis showed a functional response of human keratinocytes at temperatures >40°C. Cell death of keratinocytes after heating at 42°C was reduced by 15 and 5% with ruthenium red and by 20 and 30% by capsazepine at 24 and 48 hours, respectively. Cell death after treatment at 60°C was significantly reduced at 24 hours with capsazepine (22%) or ruthenium red (18%) but only minimally affected after 48 hours postinjury. Interaction with TRPV channels on keratinocytes may offer a new strategy to counteract cell death after thermal injury.

  19. Activin A induces Langerhans cell differentiation in vitro and in human skin explants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Musso

    Full Text Available Langerhans cells (LC represent a well characterized subset of dendritic cells located in the epidermis of skin and mucosae. In vivo, they originate from resident and blood-borne precursors in the presence of keratinocyte-derived TGFbeta. In vitro, LC can be generated from monocytes in the presence of GM-CSF, IL-4 and TGFbeta. However, the signals that induce LC during an inflammatory reaction are not fully investigated. Here we report that Activin A, a TGFbeta family member induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines and involved in skin morphogenesis and wound healing, induces the differentiation of human monocytes into LC in the absence of TGFbeta. Activin A-induced LC are Langerin+, Birbeck granules+, E-cadherin+, CLA+ and CCR6+ and possess typical APC functions. In human skin explants, intradermal injection of Activin A increased the number of CD1a+ and Langerin+ cells in both the epidermis and dermis by promoting the differentiation of resident precursor cells. High levels of Activin A were present in the upper epidermal layers and in the dermis of Lichen Planus biopsies in association with a marked infiltration of CD1a+ and Langerin+ cells. This study reports that Activin A induces the differentiation of circulating CD14+ cells into LC. Since Activin A is abundantly produced during inflammatory conditions which are also characterized by increased numbers of LC, we propose that this cytokine represents a new pathway, alternative to TGFbeta, responsible for LC differentiation during inflammatory/autoimmune conditions.

  20. Radioprotective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide in the artificial skin reconstructed with cultured human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Young Ha; Choi, Karp Shik [College of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Song, In Hwan [Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    To evaluate cultured human artificial skin as an experimental model for studying radiation effects in vitro. The skin was constructed by culturing keratinocytes over collagen lattice which made by culturing fibroblasts. Two groups were irradiated to gamma rays at single dose of 25 Gy with or without 3.5% of DMSO. Ultrastructures were investigated by electron microscopy after irradiation. The number of epidermal layers and expression of cytokeratin (CK) 14 and 10 were also seem by light microscopy. At 2 days after irradiation in experimental group without DMSO, necrotic cells were rarely found in the spinosal layer and undercornified cells were visible in the horney layer. Similar findings were also found in experimental group with DMSO but in mild form. The number of epidermal layers in experimental group without DMSO were significantly fewer than other group. CK 14 expressed in all the layer excluding horney layer but CK 10 expressed over 3-4 basal layers. Such patterns of CK expression were similar to all groups. It is suggested that structures of the keratinocytes and epidermal formation could be disturbed by irradiation in artificial skin and that DMSO can protect these damages. Therefore this work could be used as an organotypic experimental model in vitro using human cells for studying radiation effect in skin. Furthermore structural findings provided in this study could be used as useful basic data in further study using this model.

  1. Somatic copy number mosaicism in human skin revealed by induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abyzov, Alexej; Mariani, Jessica; Palejev, Dean; Zhang, Ying; Haney, Michael Seamus; Tomasini, Livia; Ferrandino, Anthony F; Rosenberg Belmaker, Lior A; Szekely, Anna; Wilson, Michael; Kocabas, Arif; Calixto, Nathaniel E; Grigorenko, Elena L; Huttner, Anita; Chawarska, Katarzyna; Weissman, Sherman; Urban, Alexander Eckehart; Gerstein, Mark; Vaccarino, Flora M

    2012-12-20

    Reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has been suspected of causing de novo copy number variation. To explore this issue, here we perform a whole-genome and transcriptome analysis of 20 human iPSC lines derived from the primary skin fibroblasts of seven individuals using next-generation sequencing. We find that, on average, an iPSC line manifests two copy number variants (CNVs) not apparent in the fibroblasts from which the iPSC was derived. Using PCR and digital droplet PCR, we show that at least 50% of those CNVs are present as low-frequency somatic genomic variants in parental fibroblasts (that is, the fibroblasts from which each corresponding human iPSC line is derived), and are manifested in iPSC lines owing to their clonal origin. Hence, reprogramming does not necessarily lead to de novo CNVs in iPSCs, because most of the line-manifested CNVs reflect somatic mosaicism in the human skin. Moreover, our findings demonstrate that clonal expansion, and iPSC lines in particular, can be used as a discovery tool to reliably detect low-frequency CNVs in the tissue of origin. Overall, we estimate that approximately 30% of the fibroblast cells have somatic CNVs in their genomes, suggesting widespread somatic mosaicism in the human body. Our study paves the way to understanding the fundamental question of the extent to which cells of the human body normally acquire structural alterations in their DNA post-zygotically.

  2. Changes in mast cell number and stem cell factor expression in human skin after radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbury, Charlotte B; Freeman, Alex; Rashid, Mohammed; Pearson, Ann; Yarnold, John R; Short, Susan C

    2014-05-01

    Mast cells are involved in the pathogenesis of radiation fibrosis and may be a therapeutic target. The mechanism of increased mast cell number in relation to acute and late tissue responses in human skin was investigated. Punch biopsies of skin 1 and 15-18 months after breast radiotherapy and a contralateral control biopsy were collected. Mast cells were quantified by immunohistochemistry using the markers c-Kit and tryptase. Stem cell factor (SCF) and collagen-1 expression was analysed by qRT-PCR. Clinical photographic scores were performed at post-surgical baseline and 18 months and 5 years post-radiotherapy. Primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (HDMEC) cultures were exposed to 2Gy ionising radiation and p53 and SCF expression was analysed by Western blotting and ELISA. Dermal mast cell numbers were increased at 1 (p=0.047) and 18 months (p=0.040) using c-Kit, and at 18 months (p=0.024) using tryptase immunostaining. Collagen-1 mRNA in skin was increased at 1 month (p=0.047) and 18 months (p=0.032) and SCF mRNA increased at 1 month (p=0.003). None of 16 cases scored had a change in photographic appearance at 5 years, compared to baseline. SCF expression was not increased in HDMECs irradiated in vitro. Increased mast cell number was associated with up-regulated collagen-1 expression in human skin at early and late time points. This increase could be secondary to elevated SCF expression at 1 month after radiotherapy. Although mast cells accumulate around blood vessels, no endothelial cell secretion of SCF was seen after in vitro irradiation. Modification of mast cell number and collagen-1 expression may be observed in skin at 1 and 18 months after radiotherapy in breast cancer patients with no change in photographic breast appearance at 5 years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Human amniotic fluid derived cells can competently substitute dermal fibroblasts in a tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal skin analog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; Hosper, Nynke; Luginbuehl, Joachim; Biedermann, Thomas; Reichmann, Ernst; Meuli, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Human amniotic fluid comprises cells with high differentiation capacity, thus representing a potential cell source for skin tissue engineering. In this experimental study, we investigated the ability of human amniotic fluid derived cells to substitute dermal fibroblasts and support epidermis formati

  4. T cells fail to develop in the human skin-cell explants system; an inconvenient truth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderlocht Joris

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haplo-identical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation is very successful in eradicating haematological tumours, but the long post-transplant T-lymphopenic phase is responsible for high morbidity and mortality rates. Clark et al. have described a skin-explant system capable of producing host-tolerant donor-HSC derived T-cells. Because this T-cell production platform has the potential to replenish the T-cell levels following transplantation, we set out to validate the skin-explant system. Results Following the published procedures, while using the same commercial components, it was impossible to reproduce the skin-explant conditions required for HSC differentiation towards mature T-cells. The keratinocyte maturation procedure resulted in fragile cells with minimum expression of delta-like ligand (DLL. In most experiments the generated cells failed to adhere to carriers or were quickly outcompeted by fibroblasts. Consequently it was not possible to reproduce cell-culture conditions required for HSC differentiation into functional T-cells. Using cell-lines over-expressing DLL, we showed that the antibodies used by Clark et al. were unable to detect native DLL, but instead stained 7AAD+ cells. Therefore, it is unlikely that the observed T-lineage commitment from HSC is mediated by DLL expressed on keratinocytes. In addition, we did confirm expression of the Notch-ligand Jagged-1 by keratinocytes. Conclusions Currently, and unfortunately, it remains difficult to explain the development or growth of T-cells described by Clark et al., but for the fate of patients suffering from lymphopenia it is essential to both reproduce and understand how these co-cultures really "work". Fortunately, alternative procedures to speed-up T-cell reconstitution are being established and validated and may become available for patients in the near future.

  5. Negligible immunogenicity of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from human skin fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Lu

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs have potential applications in cell replacement therapy and regenerative medicine. However, limited information is available regarding the immunologic features of iPSCs. In this study, expression of MHC and T cell co-stimulatory molecules in hiPSCs, and the effects on activation, proliferation and cytokine production in allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were examined. We found that no-integrate hiPSCs had no MHC-II and T cell co-stimulatory molecules expressions but had moderate level of MHC-I and HLA-G expressions. In contrast to human skin fibroblasts (HSFs which significantly induced allogeneic T cell activation and proliferation, hiPSCs failed to induce allogeneic CD45+ lymphocyte and CD8+ T cell activation and proliferation but could induce a low level of allogeneic CD4+ T cell proliferation. Unlike HSFs which induced allogeneic lymphocytes to produce high levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-17, hiPSCs only induced allogeneic lymphocytes to produce IL-2 and IL-10, and promote IL-10-secreting regulatory T cell (Treg generation. Our study suggests that the integration-free hiPSCs had low or negligible immunogenicity, which may result from their induction of IL-10-secreting Treg.

  6. Negligible immunogenicity of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiao; Yu, Meixing; Shen, Chongyang; Chen, Xiaoping; Feng, Ting; Yao, Yongchao; Li, Jinrong; Li, Hong; Tu, Wenwei

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have potential applications in cell replacement therapy and regenerative medicine. However, limited information is available regarding the immunologic features of iPSCs. In this study, expression of MHC and T cell co-stimulatory molecules in hiPSCs, and the effects on activation, proliferation and cytokine production in allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were examined. We found that no-integrate hiPSCs had no MHC-II and T cell co-stimulatory molecules expressions but had moderate level of MHC-I and HLA-G expressions. In contrast to human skin fibroblasts (HSFs) which significantly induced allogeneic T cell activation and proliferation, hiPSCs failed to induce allogeneic CD45+ lymphocyte and CD8+ T cell activation and proliferation but could induce a low level of allogeneic CD4+ T cell proliferation. Unlike HSFs which induced allogeneic lymphocytes to produce high levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-17, hiPSCs only induced allogeneic lymphocytes to produce IL-2 and IL-10, and promote IL-10-secreting regulatory T cell (Treg) generation. Our study suggests that the integration-free hiPSCs had low or negligible immunogenicity, which may result from their induction of IL-10-secreting Treg.

  7. Human skin-derived stem cells as a novel cell source for in vitro hepatotoxicity screening of pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Robim M; De Kock, Joery; Branson, Steven; Vinken, Mathieu; Meganathan, Kesavan; Chaudhari, Umesh; Sachinidis, Agapios; Govaere, Olivier; Roskams, Tania; De Boe, Veerle; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Human skin-derived precursors (hSKP) are postnatal stem cells with neural crest properties that reside in the dermis of human skin. These cells can be easily isolated from small (fore) skin segments and have the capacity to differentiate into multiple cell types. In this study, we show that upon exposure to hepatogenic growth factors and cytokines, hSKP acquire sufficient hepatic features that could make these cells suitable in vitro tools for hepatotoxicity screening of new chemical entities and already existing pharmaceutical compounds. Indeed, hepatic differentiated hSKP [hSKP-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hSKP-HPC)] express hepatic progenitor cell markers (EPCAM, NCAM2, PROM1) and adult hepatocyte markers (ALB), as well as key biotransformation enzymes (CYP1B1, FMO1, GSTA4, GSTM3) and influx and efflux drug transporters (ABCC4, ABCA1, SLC2A5). Using a toxicogenomics approach, we could demonstrate that hSKP-HPC respond to acetaminophen exposure in a comparable way to primary human hepatocytes in culture. The toxicological responses "liver damage", "liver proliferation", "liver necrosis" and "liver steatosis" were found to be significantly enriched in both in vitro models. Also genes associated with either cytotoxic responses or induction of apoptosis (BCL2L11, FOS, HMOX1, TIMP3, and AHR) were commonly upregulated and might represent future molecular biomarkers for hepatotoxicity. In conclusion, our data gives a first indication that hSKP-HPC might represent a suitable preclinical model for in vitro screening of hepatotoxicity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in which human postnatal stem cells derived from skin are described as a potentially relevant cell source for in vitro hepatotoxicity testing of pharmaceutical compounds.

  8. In vitro differentiation of human skin-derived multipotent stromal cells into putative endothelial-like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnubalaji Radhakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multipotent stem cells have been successfully isolated from various tissues and are currently utilized for tissue-engineering and cell-based therapies. Among the many sources, skin has recently emerged as an attractive source for multipotent cells because of its abundance. Recent literature showed that skin stromal cells (SSCs possess mesoderm lineage differentiation potential; however, the endothelial differentiation and angiogenic potential of SSC remains elusive. In our study, SSCs were isolated from human neonatal foreskin (hNFSSCs and adult dermal skin (hADSSCs using explants cultures and were compared with bone marrow (hMSC-TERT and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs for their potential differentiation into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and endothelial cells. Results Concordant with previous studies, both MSCs and SSCs showed similar morphology, surface protein expression, and were able to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes. Using an endothelial induction culture system combined with an in vitro matrigel angiogenesis assay, hNFSSCs and hADSSCs exhibited the highest tube-forming capability, which was similar to those formed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, with hNFSSCs forming the most tightly packed, longest, and largest diameter tubules among the three cell types. CD146 was highly expressed on hNFSSCs and HUVEC followed by hADSSCs, and hMSC-TERT, while its expression was almost absent on hADMSCs. Similarly, higher vascular density (based on the expression of CD31, CD34, vWF, CD146 and SMA was observed in neonatal skin, followed by adult dermal skin and adipose tissue. Thus, our preliminary data indicated a plausible relationship between vascular densities, and the expression of CD146 on multipotent cells derived from those tissues. Conclusions Our data is the first to demonstrate that human dermal skin stromal cells can be differentiated into endothelial lineage. Hence, SSCs

  9. Human Stromal (Mesenchymal) Stem Cells from Bone Marrow, Adipose Tissue and Skin Exhibit Differences in Molecular Phenotype and Differentiation Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Nbaheen, May; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan; Ali, Dalia;

    2013-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent stem cells with ability to differentiate into mesoderm-type cells e.g. osteoblasts and adipocytes and thus they are being introduced into clinical trials for tissue regeneration. Traditionally, hMSCs have been isolated from bone marrow......, but the number of cells obtained is limited. Here, we compared the MSC-like cell populations, obtained from alternative sources for MSC: adipose tissue and skin, with the standard phenotype of human bone marrow MSC (BM-MSCs). MSC from human adipose tissue (human adipose stromal cells (hATSCs)) and human skin...... (human adult skin stromal cells, (hASSCs) and human new-born skin stromal cells (hNSSCs)) grew readily in culture and the growth rate was highest in hNSSCs and lowest in hATSCs. Compared with phenotype of hBM-MSC, all cell populations were CD34(-), CD45(-), CD14(-), CD31(-), HLA-DR(-), CD13(+), CD29...

  10. Recovery of Aging-Related Size Increase of Skin Epithelial Cells: In vivo Mouse and In vitro Human Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Igor; Guz, Natali V.; Iyer, Swaminathan; Hewitt, Amy; Sokolov, Nina A.; Erlichman, Joseph S.; Woodworth, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    The size increase of skin epithelial cells during aging is well-known. Here we demonstrate that treatment of aging cells with cytochalasin B substantially decreases cell size. This decrease was demonstrated on a mouse model and on human skin cells in vitro. Six nude mice were treated by topical application of cytochalasin B on skin of the dorsal left midsection for 140 days (the right side served as control for placebo treatment). An average decrease in cell size of 56±16% resulted. A reduction of cell size was also observed on primary human skin epithelial cells of different in vitro age (passages from 1 to 8). A cell strain obtained from a pool of 6 human subjects was treated with cytochalasin B in vitro for 12 hours. We observed a decrease in cell size that became statistically significant and reached 20–40% for cells of older passage (6–8 passages) whereas no substantial change was observed for younger cells. These results may be important for understanding the aging processes, and for cosmetic treatment of aging skin. PMID:25807526

  11. CD49a Expression Defines Tissue-Resident CD8+ T Cells Poised for Cytotoxic Function in Human Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheuk, Stanley; Schlums, Heinrich; Sérézal, Irène Gallais

    2017-01-01

    Tissue-resident memory T (Trm) cells form a heterogeneous population that provides localized protection against pathogens. Here, we identify CD49a as a marker that differentiates CD8+ Trm cells on a compartmental and functional basis. In human skin epithelia, CD8+CD49a+ Trm cells produced...

  12. Inhibitory effect of berberine on human skin squamous cell carcinoma A431 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D X; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zhao, P W; Yang, L M

    2015-09-08

    Berberine (BBR) is a natural alkaloid with significant anti-tumor activity against many types of cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms employed by BBR to repress the proliferation and growth of skin squamous cell carcinoma A431 cells. Berberine was reported to inhibit the proliferation of A431 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner and was observed to induce a series of biochemical events, including the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome-c to cytosol, induction of proteins of the Bcl-2 family and caspases, and the cleavage of poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase. This suggested its ability to induce apoptosis. The results of a wound healing test revealed that berberine inhibited the migration of A431 cells. Ezrin was transfected into A431 cells by RNA interference. The level of expression of Ezrin in the transfected A431 cells was observed to decrease with berberine treatment, which suggested that berberine might inhibit the invasion of A431 cells through Ezrin. The results of this study demonstrated that berberine could potentially inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis, and inhibit the invasion of A431 cells.

  13. ANTIPROLIFERATIVE EFFECT OF INOSITOL HEXAPHOSPHATE ON HUMAN SKIN MELANOMA CELLS IN VITRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawszczyk, Joanna; Kapral, Małgorzata; Lodowska, Jolanta; Jesse, Katarzyna; Hollek, Andrzej; Węglarz, Ludmiła

    2015-01-01

    Human malignant melanoma is a highly metastatic tumor with poor prognosis. The majority of metastatic melanomas are resistant to diverse chemotherapeutic agents. Consequently, the search for novel antimelanoma agents continues. In recent years, the interest in plants and their biologically active constituents as a source of novel potential drugs significantly increased. Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is a naturally occurring compound that has been shown to inhibit the growth of a wide variety of tumor cells in multiple experimental model systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative and cytotoxic influence of IP6 on melanotic melanoma cells in vitro. The A2058 cells used as a model of human skin melanoma malignum were exposed to different concentrations of IP6 (0.1-5 mM) for a various period of time and their growth was determined by sulforhodamine B assay after 24, 48 and 72 h. The cytotoxicity of IP6 was measured at 24 and 72 h by XTT assay. IP6 has been found to cause dose-dependent growth suppression of A2058 melanoma cells. At low concentrations (0.1 and 0.5 mM) it did not exert any influence on the cell proliferation as compared to control cultures. Higher concentrations of IP6 (from 1 to 5 mM) had a statistically significant, suppressive effect on cell proliferation after 24 h incubation. When the experimental time period was increased up to 72 h, statistically significant inhibition of cell proliferation was monitored at all IP6 concentrations used. Data obtained from XTT assay indicated that IP6 had dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effect on melanoma cells. The results demonstrate the antiproliferative and cytotoxic properties of IP6 in a wide range of concentrations on human A2058 melanoma cells. Hence, it can be suggested that IP6 could have a promising therapeutic significance in treating cancer.

  14. Comparison of Franz cells and microdialysis for assessing salicylic acid penetration through human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque, N; Makki, S; Hadgraft, J; Humbert, Ph

    2004-01-28

    The purpose of the present study was to compare Franz cells (FC) and microdialysis (MD) for monitoring the skin absorption of salicylic acid (SA). The influence of pH on SA flux was also assessed by these two techniques. Excised abdominal human skin was used in the experiments. SA was dissolved in phosphate buffer solutions of pH 2, 5 and 7 (2 mg/ml). SA concentrations in the receptor FC solutions and in MD samples were assessed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results demonstrate that the flux of SA decreased with increased pH. The profiles permeation determined by Franz cells and microdialysis were similar. However, whatever the pH, the SA flux was higher with microdialysis than with Franz cells. The results showed that SA percutaneous permeation conformed to the pH partition hypothesis. The flux of SA was different when it was determined by the two techniques. The collect of SA, by these two techniques is different. The results of the two techniques are compared and discussed.

  15. Efficacy of Microneedling Plus Human Stem Cell Conditioned Medium for Skin Rejuvenation: A Randomized, Controlled, Blinded Split-Face Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Eo Gin; Kang, Sangjin; Sung, Jong-Hyuk; Chung, Hyung-Min; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of growth factors in skin rejuvenation is emerging as a novel anti-aging treatment. While the role of growth factors in wound healing is well established, their use in skin rejuvenation has only recently been to be studied and no controlled trials have been performed. Objective We evaluated the anti-aging effects of secretory factors of endothelial precursor cells differentiated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-EPC) in Asian skin. Methods A total of 25 women were inclu...

  16. IL-10 conditioning of human skin affects the distribution of migratory dendritic cell subsets and functional T cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle J Lindenberg

    Full Text Available In cancer patients pervasive systemic suppression of Dendritic Cell (DC differentiation and maturation can hinder vaccination efficacy. In this study we have extensively characterized migratory DC subsets from human skin and studied how their migration and T cell-stimulatory abilities were affected by conditioning of the dermal microenvironment through cancer-related suppressive cytokines. To assess effects in the context of a complex tissue structure, we made use of a near-physiological skin explant model. By 4-color flow cytometry, we identified migrated Langerhans Cells (LC and five dermis-derived DC populations in differential states of maturation. From a panel of known tumor-associated suppressive cytokines, IL-10 showed a unique ability to induce predominant migration of an immature CD14(+CD141(+DC-SIGN(+ DC subset with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules, up-regulated expression of the co-inhibitory molecule PD-L1 and the M2-associated macrophage marker CD163. A similarly immature subset composition was observed for DC migrating from explants taken from skin overlying breast tumors. Whereas predominant migration of mature CD1a(+ subsets was associated with release of IL-12p70, efficient Th cell expansion with a Th1 profile, and expansion of functional MART-1-specific CD8(+ T cells, migration of immature CD14(+ DDC was accompanied by increased release of IL-10, poor expansion of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells, and skewing of Th responses to favor coordinated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression and regulatory T cell differentiation and outgrowth. Thus, high levels of IL-10 impact the composition of skin-emigrated DC subsets and appear to favor migration of M2-like immature DC with functional qualities conducive to T cell tolerance.

  17. IL-10 conditioning of human skin affects the distribution of migratory dendritic cell subsets and functional T cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenberg, Jelle J; Oosterhoff, Dinja; Sombroek, Claudia C; Lougheed, Sinéad M; Hooijberg, Erik; Stam, Anita G M; Santegoets, Saskia J A M; Tijssen, Henk J; Buter, Jan; Pinedo, Herbert M; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Scheper, Rik J; Koenen, Hans J P M; van de Ven, Rieneke; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2013-01-01

    In cancer patients pervasive systemic suppression of Dendritic Cell (DC) differentiation and maturation can hinder vaccination efficacy. In this study we have extensively characterized migratory DC subsets from human skin and studied how their migration and T cell-stimulatory abilities were affected by conditioning of the dermal microenvironment through cancer-related suppressive cytokines. To assess effects in the context of a complex tissue structure, we made use of a near-physiological skin explant model. By 4-color flow cytometry, we identified migrated Langerhans Cells (LC) and five dermis-derived DC populations in differential states of maturation. From a panel of known tumor-associated suppressive cytokines, IL-10 showed a unique ability to induce predominant migration of an immature CD14(+)CD141(+)DC-SIGN(+) DC subset with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules, up-regulated expression of the co-inhibitory molecule PD-L1 and the M2-associated macrophage marker CD163. A similarly immature subset composition was observed for DC migrating from explants taken from skin overlying breast tumors. Whereas predominant migration of mature CD1a(+) subsets was associated with release of IL-12p70, efficient Th cell expansion with a Th1 profile, and expansion of functional MART-1-specific CD8(+) T cells, migration of immature CD14(+) DDC was accompanied by increased release of IL-10, poor expansion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and skewing of Th responses to favor coordinated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression and regulatory T cell differentiation and outgrowth. Thus, high levels of IL-10 impact the composition of skin-emigrated DC subsets and appear to favor migration of M2-like immature DC with functional qualities conducive to T cell tolerance.

  18. Sexual hormones in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouboulis, C C; Chen, W-C; Thornton, M J; Qin, K; Rosenfield, R

    2007-02-01

    The skin locally synthesizes significant amounts of sexual hormones with intracrine or paracrine actions. The local level of each sexual steroid depends upon the expression of each of the androgen- and estrogen-synthesizing enzymes in each cell type, with sebaceous glands and sweat glands being the major contributors. Sebocytes express very little of the key enzyme, cytochrome P450c17, necessary for synthesis of the androgenic prohormones dehydroepiandrosterone and androstenedione, however, these prohormones can be converted by sebocytes and sweat glands, and probably also by dermal papilla cells, into more potent androgens like testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. Five major enzymes are involved in the activation and deactivation of androgens in skin. Androgens affect several functions of human skin, such as sebaceous gland growth and differentiation, hair growth, epidermal barrier homeostasis and wound healing. Their effects are mediated by binding to the nuclear androgen receptor. Changes of isoenzyme and/or androgen receptor levels may have important implications in the development of hyperandrogenism and the associated skin diseases such as acne, seborrhoea, hirsutism and androgenetic alopecia. On the other hand, estrogens have been implicated in skin aging, pigmentation, hair growth, sebum production and skin cancer. Estrogens exert their actions through intracellular receptors or via cell surface receptors, which activate specific second messenger signaling pathways. Recent studies suggest specific site-related distribution of ERalpha and ERbeta in human skin. In contrast, progestins play no role in the pathogenesis of skin disorders. However, they play a major role in the treatment of hirsutism and acne vulgaris, where they are prescribed as components of estrogen-progestin combination pills and as anti-androgens. These combinations enhance gonadotropin suppression of ovarian androgen production. Estrogen-progestin treatment can reduce the need for shaving

  19. Borrelia burgdorferi Induces TLR2-Mediated Migration of Activated Dendritic Cells in an Ex Vivo Human Skin Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemakers, Alex; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Oei, Anneke; van der Pot, Wouter J.; Ahmed, Kalam; van der Poll, Tom; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Hovius, Joppe W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is transmitted into the skin of the host where it encounters and interacts with two dendritic cell (DC) subsets; Langerhans cells (LCs) and dermal DCs (DDCs). These cells recognize pathogens via pattern recognition receptors, mature and migrate out of the skin into draining lymph nodes, where they orchestrate adaptive immune responses. In order to investigate the response of skin DCs during the early immunopathogenesis of Lyme borreliosis, we injected B. burgdorferi intradermally into full-thickness human skin and studied the migration of DCs out of the skin, the activation profile and phenotype of migrated cells. We found a significant increase in the migration of LCs and DDCs in response to B. burgdorferi. Notably, migration was prevented by blocking TLR2. DCs migrated from skin inoculated with higher numbers of spirochetes expressed significantly higher levels of CD83 and produced pro-inflammatory cytokines. No difference was observed in the expression of HLA-DR, CD86, CD38, or CCR7. To conclude, we have established an ex vivo human skin model to study DC-B. burgdorferi interactions. Using this model, we have demonstrated that B. burgdorferi-induced DC migration is mediated by TLR2. Our findings underscore the utility of this model as a valuable tool to study immunity to spirochetal infections. PMID:27695100

  20. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shi-Wei [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chun-Ying [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Yen-Ting [Department of Medical Research and Education, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kao, Jun-Kai [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chia-Che; Mu, Szu-Wei; Chen, Yu-Yu [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Husan-Wen [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chuan-Hsun [Department of Surgical Oncology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Nutrition Therapy, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liang, Shu-Mei [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Ju [Department of Dermatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Jau-Ling [Department of Bioscience Technology, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Shieh, Jeng-Jer, E-mail: shiehjj@vghtc.gov.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Education and Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-15

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status.

  1. Honokiol, a chemopreventive agent against skin cancer, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human epidermoid A431 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilampalli, Chandeshwari; Guillermo, Ruth; Kaushik, Radhey S; Young, Alan; Chandrasekher, Gudiseva; Fahmy, Hesham; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2011-11-01

    Honokiol is a plant lignan isolated from bark and seed cones of Magnolia officinalis. Recent studies from our laboratory indicated that honokiol pretreatment decreased ultraviolet B-induced skin cancer development in SKH-1 mice. The aim of the present investigation was to study the effects of honokiol on human epidermoid squamous carcinoma A431 cells and to elucidate possible mechanisms involved in preventing skin cancer. A431 cells were pretreated with different concentrations of honokiol for a specific time period and investigated for effects on apoptosis and cell cycle analysis. Treatment with honokiol significantly decreased cell viability and cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Honokiol pretreatment at 50 μmol/L concentration induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest significantly (P Cdk4 and Cdk6 proteins and up-regulated the expression of Cdk's inhibitor proteins p21 and p27. Pretreatment of A431 cells with honokiol leads to induction of apoptosis and DNA fragmentation. These findings indicate that honokiol provides its effects in squamous carcinoma cells by inducing cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis.

  2. Apoptotic effect and mechanisms of AHPN on human skin malignant melanoma cell A375

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Pan; Zhenhui Peng; Shengxiang Xiao; Jianwen Ren; Yan Liu; Xiaoli Li; Zhengxiao Li

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study apoptotic effects of synthetic retinoic acid 6-[3-(1-adamantyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]-2-naphthalene carboxylic acid(AHPN) on human skin malignant melanoma A375 cells in comparison with the natural iigand all-trans-retinoic acid(ATRA) in vitro and the mechanisms related to the actions of AHPN. Methods:MTT assay was used to determine the anti-proliferative effects of AHPN and ATRA on A375 cells. Flow cytometry was performed to investigate the influence of AHPN and ATRA on cell cycle and cell apoptosis. In addition, transfection and luciferase activity assays were employed to explore the mechanisms of how AHPN executes its proapoptotic function. Results:Firstly, AHPN promoted apoptosis and G1 arrest in A375 cells compared with ATRA. Secondly, the activity of NF-kB in A375 cells treated with AHPN increased 2-3 times compared with solvent DMSO treatment. Conelusion:AHPN,in comparison with ATRA, is a more effective alternative for therapy of malignant melanoma. The potentially proapoptotic function of AHPN requires activation of NF-kB.

  3. Cytotoxic and Oxidative Stress Caused by Cadmium and Lead on Human Skin Fibroblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Beman Zaree Mahmodabady

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heavy metals are important occupational andenvironmental pollutants that cause damage to various organs.Although there is no effective therapy for such a poisoning,metallothionein has been shown to play a key role in thedetoxification of cadmium (Cd. Evidence in the literature suggeststhat superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalaseconstitute important defense mechanisms against oxygen toxicity inthe cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect ofcadmium chloride and Pb-acetate on antioxidant enzymes in thehuman skin fibroblast cells (HF2FF.Material and Methods: The human skin fibroblast (HF2FF cellswere incubated in serum-free medium containing 20 μM CdCl2 for18 hr three times a week. The same exposure to an equimolar doseof Pb-acetate was performed. After each exposure and after threetimes exposure the cells were collected and cell viability, thecontents of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase, glutathioneperoxidase (GSH-Px, GSH and malondialdehyde (MDA weremeasured.Results: Cd caused cytotoxicity and inhibition of glutathioneperoxidase (GSH-Px and SOD activity, as well as depletion of thereduced form of glutathione (GSH in the cell. The level of lipidperoxidation (LP was increased, but catalase activity was notsignificantly altered. These defects were increased with repeatedexposures. The same exposure to an equimolar dose of Pb-acetateevoked only inhibition of GSH-Px and SOD. The values of GSH,catalase and LP activity remained unchanged.Conclusion: The inhibition of GSH-Px and SOD may be consideredas an important biomarker of the toxic effect of metals.

  4. Merkel cells and Meissner's corpuscles in human digital skin display Piezo2 immunoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mesa, Y; García-Piqueras, J; García, B; Feito, J; Cabo, R; Cobo, J; Vega, J A; García-Suárez, O

    2017-09-14

    The transformation of mechanical energy into electrical signals is the first step in mechanotransduction in the peripheral sensory nervous system and relies on the presence of mechanically gated ion channels within specialized sensory organs called mechanoreceptors. Piezo2 is a vertebrate stretch-gated ion channel necessary for mechanosensitive channels in mammalian cells. Functionally, it is related to light touch, which has been detected in murine cutaneous Merkel cell-neurite complexes, Meissner-like corpuscles and lanceolate nerve endings. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of Piezo2 in human cutaneous mechanoreceptors has never been investigated. Here, we used simple and double immunohistochemistry to investigate the occurrence of Piezo2 in human digital glabrous skin. Piezo2 immunoreactivity was detected in approximately 80% of morphologically and immunohistochemically characterized (cytokeratin 20(+) , chromogranin A(+) and synaptophisin(+) ) Merkel cells. Most of them were in close contact with Piezo2(-) nerve fibre profiles. Moreover, the axon, but not the lamellar cells, of Meissner's corpuscles was also Piezo2(+) , but other mechanoreceptors, i.e. Pacinian or Ruffini's corpuscles, were devoid of immunoreactivity. Piezo2 was also observed in non-nervous tissue, especially the basal keratinocytes, endothelial cells and sweat glands. The present results demonstrate the occurrence of Piezo2 in cutaneous sensory nerve formations that functionally work as slowly adapting (Merkel cells) and rapidly adapting (Meissner's corpuscles) low-threshold mechanoreceptors and are related to fine and discriminative touch but not to vibration or hard touch. These data offer additional insight into the molecular basis of mechanosensing in humans. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  5. Testing of viable human skin cell dilution cultures as an approach to validating microsampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainger, Stephen A; Yong, X L Hilary; Soyer, H Peter; Sturm, Richard A

    2017-05-01

    Skin biopsies are a valuable technique in the diagnosis of cutaneous inflammatory and neoplastic conditions. We were interested to test the minimal size or equivalent volume by dilution of proteolytically disassociated skin tissue required to allow the isolation and propagation of cutaneous cells, for freezing, storage and biochemical analysis. It was possible to propagate with 100% efficiency fibroblast and melanocytic cells from a 0.1 to 0.5 mm(3) equivalent neonatal foreskin sample using a combination of DispaseII and CollagenaseIV. The smallest tissue dilution that allowed melanocytic cell culture was 0.01 mm(3), which equated to approximately 16 cells based on the average skin density of melanocytes. However, passaging of cells to create frozen stocks was achieved routinely only from 1 mm(3) skin, equating to 1560 cells. Tissue-specific antigen expression of these cultures was tested by western blot of total protein extracts. There was no pigmentation antigen expression in fibroblast cultures; however, smooth muscle actin protein expression was high in fibroblast but absent from melanocytic cell strains. Melanocytic cells expressed pigmentation antigens and E-cadherin, but these were not detected in fibroblasts. Moreover, maturation of these melanocytic cells resulted in a decrease of Dopachrome Tautomerase antigen expression and induction of Tyrosinase protein consistent with the differentiation potential seen in cell cultures derived routinely from large sections of skin tissue.

  6. Relationship of p53 Mutations to Epidermal Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis in Human UV-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine G. Einspahr

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is continually subjected to UV-irradiation with the p53 gene playing a pivotal role in repair of UV-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Consequently, p53 alterations are early events in human UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. We studied 13 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC, 16 actinic keratoses (AK, 13 samples adjacent to an AK (chronically sun-damaged, and 14 normal-appearing skin samples for p53 mutation, p53 immunostaining (IHC, apoptosis (in situ TUNEL and morphology, and proliferation (PCNA. The frequency of p53 mutation increased from 14% in normal skin, to 38.5% in sun-damaged skin, 63% in AK, and 54% in SCC. p53 IHC increased similarly. Apoptosis (TUNEL increased from 0.06 ± 0.02%, to 0.1 ± 0.2, 0.3 ± 0.3, and 0.4 ± 0.3 in normal skin, sun-damaged skin, AK, and SCC, respectively. Apoptosis was strongly correlated with proliferation (i.e., TUNEL and PCNA, r = 0.7, P < 0.0001, and proliferation was significantly increased in the progression from normal skin to SCC. Bax was significantly increased in SCC compared to AK. These data imply that apoptosis in samples with a high frequency of p53 mutation may not necessarily be p53-dependent. We suggest that there is a mechanism for apoptosis in response to increased cellular proliferation that is p53-independent.

  7. Raman and infrared spectroscopy differentiate senescent from proliferating cells in a human dermal fibroblast 3D skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Katharina; Matthäus, Christian; Winter, Doreen; Wiegand, Cornelia; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Diekmann, Stephan; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-08-15

    Senescent cells contribute to tissue aging and dysfunction. Therefore, detecting senescent cells in skin is of interest for skin tumor diagnostics and therapy. Here, we studied the transition into senescence of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) in a three-dimensional (3D) human fibroblast-derived matrix (FDM). Senescent and proliferating cells were imaged by Raman spectroscopy (RS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The obtained averaged spectra were analyzed using PLS-LDA. For these 3D cultured cells, RS and FTIR could clearly distinguish senescent from proliferating cells. For both techniques, we detected senescence-associated alterations in almost all cellular macromolecules. Furthermore, we identified different biochemical properties of 3D compared to two-dimensional (2D) cultured cells, indicating that cells in their natural, skin-like 3D environment act differently than in (2D) cell cultivations in vitro. Compared to 2D cultured cells, cells grown in 3D models displayed a sharper contrast between the proliferating and senescent state, also affecting the abundance of biomolecules including nucleic acids. The training accuracies of both vibrational spectroscopic techniques were >96%, demonstrating the suitability of these label-free measurements for detecting these cellular states in 3D skin models.

  8. Serotonin in human skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo Huang; Qiying Gong; Guiming Li

    2005-01-01

    In this review the authors summarize data of a potential role for serotonin in human skin physiology and pathology. The uncovering of endogenous serotonin synthesis and its transformation to melatonin underlines a putative important role of this pathway in melanocyte physiology and pathology. Pathways of the biosynthesis and biodegradation of serotonin have been characterized in human beings and its major cellular populations. Moreover, receptors of serotonin are expressed on keratinocytes, melanocytes, and fibroblasts and these mediate phenotypic actions on cellular proliferation and differentiation. And the widespread expression of a cutaneous seorotoninergic system indicates considerable selectivity of action to facilitate intra-, auto-, or paracrine mechanisms that define and influence skin function in a highly compartmentalized manner. Melatonin, in turn, can also act as a hormone, neurotransmitter, cytokine, biological modifier and immunomodulator. Thus, Serotonin local synthesis and cellular localization could thus become of great importance in the diagnosis and management of cutaneous pathology.

  9. Barrier properties of human skin equivalents : rising to the surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thakoersing, Varsha Sakina

    2012-01-01

    Human skin equivalents (HSEs) are generated from isolated skin cells. As the primary function of the skin is to form a barrier, in this thesis the barrier properties of three HSEs were assessed and compared with native human skin. The results show that all HSEs have a decreased skin barrier function

  10. Neurogenic inflammation in human and rodent skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmelz, M; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup

    2001-01-01

    The combination of vasodilation and protein extravasation following activation of nociceptors has been termed "neurogenic inflammation." In contrast to rodents, no neurogenic protein extravasation can be elicited in healthy human skin. Dermal microdialysis has considerably increased our knowledge...... about neurogenic inflammation in human skin, including the involvement of mast cells....

  11. Migration of human antigen-presenting cells in a human skin graft onto nude mice model after contact sensitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefakker, S.; Balk, H.P.; Boersma, W.J.A.; Joost, T. van; Notten, W.R.F.; Claassen, E.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent contact chemical allergens provoke sensitization after application on both syngeneic and allogeneic skin grafts in mice. We attempted to determine whether the functional activity in a contact sensitization response of human skin graft was affected at the level of antigen uptake and

  12. A yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid, shows potential moisturizing activity toward cultured human skin cells: the recovery effect of MEL-A on the SDS-damaged human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Tomotake; Kitagawa, Masaru; Suzuki, Michiko; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Sogabe, Atsushi; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Imura, Tomohiro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai

    2009-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are produced in large amounts from renewable vegetable oils by Pseudozyma antarctica, and are the most promising biosurfactants known due to its versatile interfacial and biochemical actions. In order to broaden the application in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals, the skin care property of MEL-A, the major component of MELs, was investigated using a three-dimensional cultured human skin model. The skin cells were cultured and treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution of 1 wt%, and the effects of different lipids on the SDS-damaged cells were then evaluated on the basis of the cell viability. The viability of the damaged cells was markedly recovered by the addition of MEL-A in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to the control, MEL-A solutions of 5 wt% and 10 wt% gave the recovery rate of 73% and 91%, respectively, while ceramide solution of 1 wt% gave the rate of over 100%. This revealed that MEL-A shows a ceramide-like moisturizing activity toward the skin cells. Considering the drawbacks of natural ceramides, namely limited amount and high production cost, the yeast biosurfactants should have a great potential as a novel moisturizer for treating the damaged skin.

  13. Polarimetry based partial least square classification of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma human skin tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ikram, Masroor

    2016-06-01

    Optical polarimetry was employed for assessment of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) tissue samples from human skin. Polarimetric analyses revealed that depolarization and retardance for healthy tissue group were significantly higher (ppolarimetry together with PLS statistics hold promise for automated pathology classification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Tissue Engineered Human Skin Equivalents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human skin not only serves as an important barrier against the penetration of exogenous substances into the body, but also provides a potential avenue for the transport of functional active drugs/reagents/ingredients into the skin (topical delivery and/or the body (transdermal delivery. In the past three decades, research and development in human skin equivalents have advanced in parallel with those in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The human skin equivalents are used commercially as clinical skin substitutes and as models for permeation and toxicity screening. Several academic laboratories have developed their own human skin equivalent models and applied these models for studying skin permeation, corrosivity and irritation, compound toxicity, biochemistry, metabolism and cellular pharmacology. Various aspects of the state of the art of human skin equivalents are reviewed and discussed.

  15. Induction of cancer-specific cytotoxicity towards human prostate and skin cells using quercetin and ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Paliwal, S.; Sundaram, J; Mitragotri, S

    2005-01-01

    Bioflavonoids, such as quercetin, have recently emerged as a new class of chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of various cancer types, but are marred by their low potency and poor selectivity. We report that a short application of low-frequency ultrasound selectively sensitises prostate and skin cancer cells against quercetin. Pretreatment of cells with ultrasound (20 kHz, 2 W cm−2, 60 s) selectively induced cytotoxicity in skin and prostate cancer cells, while having minimal effect on c...

  16. Mitochondrial tolerance to single and repeat exposure to simulated sunlight in human epidermal and dermal skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J; Murphy, J E J

    2016-12-01

    Sunlight represents the primary threat to mitochondrial integrity in skin given the unique nature of the mitochondrial genome and its proximity to the electron transport chain. The accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is a key factor in many human pathologies and this is linked to key roles of mitochondrial function in terms of energy production and cell regulation. The main objective of this study was to evaluate solar radiation induced changes in mitochondrial integrity, function and dynamics in human skin cells using a Q-Sun solar simulator to deliver a close match to the intensity of summer sunlight. Spontaneously immortalised human skin epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT) and Human Dermal Fibroblasts (HDFn) were divided into two groups. Group A were irradiated once and Group B twice 7days apart and evaluated using cell survival, viability and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mass at 1, 4 and 7days post one exposure for Group A and 1, 4, 7 and 14days post second exposure for Group B. Viability and survival of HaCaT and HDFn cells decreased after repeat exposure to Simulated Sunlight Irradiation (SSI) with no recovery. HDFn cells showed no loss in MMP after one or two exposures to SSI compared to HaCaT cells which showed a periodic loss of MMP after one exposure with a repeat exposure causing a dramatic decrease from which cells did not recover. Mitochondrial Mass in exposed HDFn cells was consistent with control after one or two exposures to SSI; however mitochondrial mass was significantly decreased in HaCaT cells. Data presented here suggests that mitochondria in epidermal cells are more sensitive to sunlight damage compared to mitochondria in dermal cells, despite their origin, confirming a skin layer specific sensitivity to sunlight, but not as expected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Subcellular Raman Microspectroscopy Imaging of Nucleic Acids and Tryptophan for Distinction of Normal Human Skin Cells and Tumorigenic Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piredda, Paola; Berning, Manuel; Boukamp, Petra; Volkmer, Andreas

    2015-07-07

    At present, tumor diagnostic imaging is commonly based on hematoxylin and eosin or immunohistochemical staining of biopsies, which requires tissue excision, fixation, and staining with exogenous marker molecules. Here, we report on label-free tumor imaging using confocal spontaneous Raman scattering microspectroscopy, which exploits the intrinsic vibrational contrast of endogenous biomolecular species. We present a chemically specific and quantitative approach to monitoring normal human skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts) as well as the human HaCaT in vitro skin carcinogenesis model and the tumor-derived MET in vivo skin cancer progression model. Mapping the amplitudes of two spectrally well isolated Raman bands at 752 and 785 cm(-1) allowed for direct visualization of the distributions representative of tryptophan-rich proteins and nucleic acids, respectively, with subcellular spatial resolution. Using these Raman markers, it was feasible to discriminate between normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) and dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) and to confine all tumorigenic cells from both the NHEK and NHDF. First evidence for the successful application of the proposed intracellular nucleic acid and tryptophan Raman signatures for skin cancer diagnosis was further demonstrated in an organotypic cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas model, allowing for the identification of tumor cells and their surrounding stroma in the tissue context.

  18. The use of adipose mesenchymal stem cells and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells on a fibrin matrix for endothelialized skin substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Muñoz, Isabel; Granados, Rosario; Holguín Holgado, Purificación; García-Vela, José Antonio; Casares, Celia; Casares, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the reconstruction of human skin by tissue engineering represents a clinical challenge and has offered a therapeutic alternative. Avascular engineered skin equivalents have been available for several years and used to treat wounds due to burns, nonhealing ulcers, and surgical excisions. They are constituted by different types of cultured cells included in a three-dimensional structure that permits cellular proliferation to create tissue substitutes. The major drawback of these artificial skin substitutes is their lack of blood supply, since the endurance and cell proliferation of the substitute depend on an adequate oxygen and nutrient supply and on toxin removal. These functions are served by the vascular system. We have produced a new model of endothelialized skin substitute that promotes the formation of capillary-like structures by seeding human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with dermal fibroblasts and human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) in a fibrin matrix. Dermal fibroblasts and hADMSCs produce extracellular matrix that stimulates cellular growth and proliferation. hADMSCs secrete significant quantities of angiogenic and antiapoptotic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor), which induce in vitro differentiation of these cells into endothelial cells promoting angiogenesis and participating in tissue repair and skin regeneration processes. We obtained the artificial skin substitute with similar structure to native skin, including dermis and epidermis. We demonstrated that endothelial cells (CD31 and von Willebrand factor positive) proliferated and organized themselves into capillary-like structures within the fibrin matrix. The epidermis showed a complete epithelization by squamous cells (AE1/AE3 cytokeratin positive) with intracytoplasmic keratohyalin granules, hyperkeratosis, and parakeratosis. We have established a novel artificial skin substitute that facilitates the formation

  19. Low-level laser therapy: Effects on human face aged skin and cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezghani Sana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic and excessive exposure to UV radiation leads to photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. Adequate protection of the skin against the deleterious effects of UV irradiation is essential. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT is a light source in the red to near-infrared range that has been accepted in a variety of medical applications. In this study, we explored the effect of LLLT in human face aged skin and the cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiation. We found that LLLT significantly reduced visible wrinkles and the loss of firmness of facial skin in aging subjects. Additionally, treatment of cultured HeLa cells with LLLT prior to or post UVA or UVB exposure significantly protected cells from UV-mediated cell death. All results showed the beneficial effects of LLLT on relieving signs of skin aging and its prevention and protection of the cell viability against UV-induced damage.

  20. Distinct molecular signature of human skin Langerhans cells denotes critical differences in cutaneous dendritic cell immune regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Marta E; Thirdborough, Stephen M; Ung, Chuin Y; Elliott, Tim; Healy, Eugene; Freeman, Tom C; Ardern-Jones, Michael R

    2014-03-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) residing in the epidermis. Despite their high potential to activate T lymphocytes, current understanding of human LC biology is limited. Genome-wide comparison of the transcriptional profiles of human skin migratory CD1a+ LCs and CD11c+ dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) demonstrated significant differences between these "dendritic cell (DC)" types, including preferential expression of 625 genes (Pmolecular networks activated after stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) confirmed the unique molecular signature of LCs. Although LCs conformed to the phenotype of professional APC, inflammatory signaling activated primarily genes associated with cellular metabolism and mitochondrial activation (e.g., CYB561 and MRPS35), cell membrane re-organization, and antigen acquisition and degradation (CAV1 and PSMD14; P<0.05-P<0.0001). Conversely, TNF-α induced classical activation in DDCs with early downregulation of surface receptors (mannose receptor-1 (MRC1) and C-type lectins), and subsequent upregulation of cytokines, chemokines (IL1a, IL1b, and CCL18), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP1, MMP3, and MMP9; P<0.05-P<0.0001). Functional interference of caveolin abrogated LCs superior ability to cross-present antigens to CD8+ T lymphocytes, highlighting the importance of these networks to biological function. Taken together, these observations support the idea of distinct biological roles of cutaneous DC types.

  1. DNA damage in wounded, hypoxic and acidotic human skin fibroblast cell cultures after low laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins Evans, D.; Mbene, A.; Zungu, I.; Houreld, N.; Abrahamse, H.

    2009-02-01

    Phototherapy has become more popular and widely used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. To ensure sound results as evidence of its effectiveness, well designed experiments must be conducted when determining the effect of phototherapy. Cell culture models such as hypoxic, acidotic and wounded cell cultures simulating different disease conditions including ischemic heart disease, diabetes and wound healing were used to determine the effect of laser irradiation on the genetic integrity of the cell. Even though phototherapy has been found to be beneficial in a wide spectrum of conditions, it has been shown to induce DNA damage. However, this damage appears to be repairable. The risk lies in the fact that phototherapy may help the medical condition initially but damage DNA at the same time leaving undetected damage that may result in late onset, more severe, induced medical conditions including cancer. Human skin fibroblasts were cultured and used to induce a wound (by the central scratch model), hypoxic (by incubation in an anaerobic jar, 95% N2 and 5% O2) and acidotic (reducing the pH of the media to 6.7) conditions. Different models were irradiated using a Helium-Neon (632.8 nm) laser with a power density of 2.07 mW/cm2 and a fluence of 5 J/cm2 or 16 J/cm2. The effect of the irradiation was determined using the Comet assay 1 and 24 h after irradiation. In addition, the Comet assay was performed with the addition of formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) obviating strand brakes in oxidized bases at a high fluence of 16 J/cm2. A significant increase in DNA damage was seen in all three injured models at both 1 and 24 h post-irradiation when compared to the normal un-injured cells. However, when compared to non-irradiated controls the acidotic model showed a significant decrease in DNA damage 24 h after irradiation indicating the possible induction of cellular DNA repair mechanisms. When wounded cells were irradiated with higher fluences of 16 J/cm2

  2. Photobiomodulation on the proliferation and collagen synthesis of normal human skin fibroblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Chi, Jin-Quan; Li, Yan; Jin, Hua

    2006-01-01

    Background and Objective: Cultured normal human skin fibroblast cells (HSFs) were once used to study the mechanism of the effects of low intensity He-Ne laser irradiation (LHNL) on wound healing. The proliferation and collagen synthesis of HFSs were modulated by LHNL in different papers, respectively, and both of them are studied in this paper. Study Design/Materials and Methods: The dosage was studied for the same radiation time 300s. The proliferation and collagen synthesis were measured by 3-[4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and the spectrophotometric method for the determination of hydroxyproline, respectively. Results: The dose zones were called dose 1, dose 2 and dose 3 from low dose on so that HSF proliferation was inhibited in dose 1 (16, 24 mJ/cm2), and promoted in dose 2 (298, 503, 597mJ/cm2), and the collagen synthesis was inhibited in dose 2 (401, 526 mJ/cm2), and promoted in dose 3 (714, 926, 1539, 1727mJ/cm2), which supports our biological model of photobiomodulation. It was found there is the linear relationship of the effect with dose with dose in each dose zone. Conclusions: The photobiomodulation on the proliferation and collagen synthesis of HSFs might be linearly dose-dependent in limited dosage with radiation time kept constant, which provides a foundation to discuss photobiomodulation on wound healing.

  3. Sunlight exposure and cutaneous human papillomavirus seroreactivity in basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannacone, Michelle R; Wang, Wei; Stockwell, Heather G; O'Rourke, Kathleen; Giuliano, Anna R; Sondak, Vernon K; Messina, Jane L; Roetzheim, Richard G; Cherpelis, Basil S; Fenske, Neil A; Michael, Kristina M; Waterboer, Tim; Pawlita, Michael; Rollison, Dana E

    2012-08-01

    Ultraviolet radiation exposure may interact synergistically with cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. To investigate differences in the risk of sunlight-associated BCC and SCC by cutaneous genus-specific HPV serostatus, a case-control study was conducted among 204 BCC and 156 SCC cases who were recruited from a university dermatology clinic and 297 controls who had no history of cancer and screened negative for current skin cancer. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between measures of sunlight exposure and BCC/SCC, stratified by genus-specific HPV serostatus, with adjustment for age and sex. Sunburn due to cutaneous sensitivity to sunlight exposure (P = .006) and poor tanning ability (P = .003) were associated with a higher seroprevalence for genus beta HPV types. Poor or no tanning ability was more strongly associated with SCC among individuals who were seropositive for antibodies to cutaneous HPV types in genera alpha (OR, 15.60; 95% CI, 5.40-45.1; P = .01 for interaction) and beta (OR, 6.86; 95% CI, 3.68-12.80; P = .001 for interaction), compared with individuals who were seronegative for these HPV types. Seropositivity for HPV types in genera alpha or beta increased the risk of SCC associated with poor tanning ability.

  4. Stimulating effects of Bacillus subtilis natto-fermented Radix astragali on hyaluronic acid production in human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Mei-Fang; Chiang, Been-Huang

    2009-09-25

    Radix astragali, a well-known Chinese herb, which has been traditionally used for skincare, and microbial fermentation is one of the conventional methods for processing Chinese herbs. This research studied the effects of non-fermented (HQNB) and fermented preparations (HQB) of Radix astragali on hyaluronic acid (HA) production in primary human skin cells. HQB and HQNB were prepared and added to the cultures of primary human skin cells. Hyaluronic acid content was determined using ELISA. Real-time RT-PCR was used to evaluate hyaluronan synthase gene expression. The bioactive compounds were analyzed by HPLC. The growth-stimulating effect of HQNB on both of keratinocytes and fibroblasts were significantly higher than that of HQB. Conversely, HQB, but not HQNB significantly stimulated HA production in both cultured primary human epidermal keratinocytes and human dermal fibroblasts in dose-dependent manners. In addition, HQB markedly and dose-dependently increased the expression of hyaluronan synthase 3 and hyaluronan synthase 2 mRNA in HaCaT cells and human fibroblasts, respectively. Therefore, HQB might be a promising candidate for preventing the age-dependent loss of HA content in aged human skin, and its effect on the enhancement of HA synthesis in skin cells is highly related to its effect on the expression of hyaluronan synthase genes. The three major active isoflavonoids in Radix astragali were identified as ononin, calycosin, and formononetin. After fermentation, all of these three compounds in HQB were significantly reduced. However, HQB still had significantly higher enhancement effect on the production of HA than HQNB. It appeared that isoflavonoid aglycones or other metabolites, converted from their primary isoflavones during fermentation, might be responsible for the skincare functions found in this study. This study demonstrated the low toxicity and the stimulating effects of HQB on HA synthesis, and suggests that HQB may play a promising role in anti

  5. An investigation into the concurrent collection of human scent and epithelial skin cells using a non-contact sampling device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, Norma Iris; Mendel, Julian; Holness, Howard; La Salvia, Joel; Moroose, Tina; Eckenrode, Brian; Stockham, Rex; Furton, Kenneth; Mills, DeEtta

    2016-09-01

    In criminal investigations, the collection of human scent often employs a non-contact, dynamic airflow device, known as the Scent Transfer Unit 100 (STU-100), to transfer volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from an object/person onto a collection material that is subsequently presented to human scent discriminating canines. Human scent is theorized to be linked to epithelial skin cells that are shed at a relatively constant rate allowing both scent and cellular material to be deposited into the environment and/or onto objects. Simultaneous collection of cellular material, with adequate levels of nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid (nDNA), and human scent using a non-invasive methodology would facilitate criminal investigations. This study evaluated the STU-100 for the concurrent collection of human scent and epithelial skin cells from a porous (paper) and non-porous (stainless steel bar) object that was held for a specified period of time in the dominant hand of twenty subjects (10 females and 10 males). Human scent analysis was performed using headspace static solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-MS). A polycarbonate filter was used to trap epithelial skin cells which, upon extraction, were subsequently analyzed, inter-laboratory, using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The STU-100 proved to be inadequate for collecting the minimum number of epithelial skin cells required to obtain nuclear DNA concentrations above the limit of detection for the qPCR kit. With regard to its use for human scent collection, a reduction in the number and mass of compounds was observed when compared to samples that were directly collected. However, when the indirect collection of human scent from the two different objects was compared, a greater number and mass of compounds was observed from the non-porous object than from the porous object. This outcome suggests that the matrix composition of the scent source could affect the

  6. [Monoclonal autoantibodies to the epithelial basement membrane cells of human skin and thymus obtained through immunization with Rickettsia prowazekii antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobyshevskaia, E I; Spitsyn, S V; Nedialkov, Iu A; Shchekotikhina, Iu A; Tarasevich, I V

    1989-05-01

    As the result of immunization of BALB/c mice with the commercial preparation of typhus vaccine and R. prowazekii corpuscular antigen, in 29.2% and 40.3% of cases (respectively) the appearance of hybridomas synthesizing monoclonal antibodies (McAb) to different autologous structures (skin and thymic epithelium, cell nuclei, conjunctive tissue structures and vascular endothelium) has been revealed. The McAb under test have proved to be IgM-autoantibodies. McAb M-6, active against the basal membrane of human skin and thymic epithelium, produce quite a definite picture of disturbances in the differentiation of epithelium and can be used for the diagnosis of dyskeratosis.

  7. Human skin: an independent peripheral endocrine organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouboulis, C C

    2000-01-01

    The historical picture of the endocrine system as a set of discrete hormone-producing organs has been substituted by organs regarded as organized communities in which the cells emit, receive and coordinate molecular signals from established endocrine organs, other distant sources, their neighbors, and themselves. In this wide sense, the human skin and its tissues are targets as well as producers of hormones. Although the role of hormones in the development of human skin and its capacity to produce and release hormones are well established, little attention has been drawn to the ability of human skin to fulfil the requirements of a classic endocrine organ. Indeed, human skin cells produce insulin-like growth factors and -binding proteins, propiomelanocortin derivatives, catecholamines, steroid hormones and vitamin D from cholesterol, retinoids from diet carotenoids, and eicosanoids from fatty acids. Hormones exert their biological effects on the skin through interaction with high-affinity receptors, such as receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters, steroid hormones and thyroid hormones. In addition, the human skin is able to metabolize hormones and to activate and inactivate them. These steps are overtaken in most cases by different skin cell populations in a coordinated way indicating the endocrine autonomy of the skin. Characteristic examples are the metabolic pathways of the corticotropin-releasing hormone/propiomelanocortin axis, steroidogenesis, vitamin D, and retinoids. Hormones exhibit a wide range of biological activities on the skin, with major effects caused by growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, neuropeptides, sex steroids, glucocorticoids, retinoids, vitamin D, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands, and eicosanoids. At last, human skin produces hormones which are released in the circulation and are important for functions of the entire organism, such as sex hormones, especially in aged individuals, and insulin-like growth

  8. Mast cells and atopic dermatitis. Stereological quantification of mast cells in atopic dermatitis and normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, T E; Olesen, A B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1997-01-01

    Stereological quantification of mast cell numbers was applied to sections of punch biopsies from lesional and nonlesional skin of atopic dermatitis patients and skin of healthy volunteers. We also investigated whether the method of staining and/or the fixative influenced the results of the determ...... the clinical score and the number of mast cell profiles per millimetre squared. Using stereological techniques, this study indicated that mast cells might participate in the inflammatory process in skin leading to atopic dermatitis.......Stereological quantification of mast cell numbers was applied to sections of punch biopsies from lesional and nonlesional skin of atopic dermatitis patients and skin of healthy volunteers. We also investigated whether the method of staining and/or the fixative influenced the results...... of the determination of the mast cell profile numbers. The punch biopsies were taken from the same four locations in both atopic dermatitis patients and normal individuals. The locations were the scalp, neck and flexure of the elbow (lesional skin), and nates (nonlesional skin). Clinical scoring was carried out...

  9. Screening of urocanic acid isomers in human basal and squamous cell carcinoma tumors compared with tumor periphery and healthy skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decara, Juan Manuel; Aguilera, José; Abdala, Roberto; Sánchez, Purificación; Figueroa, Félix L; Herrera, Enrique

    2008-10-01

    Trans-urocanic acid is a major chromophore for ultraviolet (UV) radiation in human epidermis. The UV induces photoisomerization of trans-urocanic acid (tUCA) form to cis-urocanic acid (cUCA) and has been reported as an important mediator in the immunosuppression induced by UV. This immunomodulation has been recognized as an important factor related to skin cancer development. This is the first time that UCA isomers have been measured in epidermis of skin biopsies from patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and compared with the tumor periphery and biopsies of healthy photoexposed and non-photoexposed skin as controls. The UCA isomers were separated and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography. Analysis of UCA in healthy skin showed significant increase in total UCA content in non-photoexposed body sites compared with highly exposed skins. In contrast, the percentage of cUCA was higher in photoexposed body sites. Maximal levels of cUCA were found in cheek, forehead and forearm and lower levels in abdomen and thigh. No differences were found in total UCA concentration between the tumor samples and healthy photoexposed skin. However, differences were found in relation between isomers. Higher levels of cUCA were detected in SCC biopsies (44% of total UCA) compared with samples of BCC and that of healthy photoexposed skin (30%). These results suggest that the UV radiation exposure, a main factor in development of SCC can be mediated, apart from direct effect to cells (DNA damage), by immunosuppression pathways mediated by high production of cUCA.

  10. Mast cell reactivity at the margin of human skin wounds: an early cell marker of wound survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, M; Gronki, T; Meissner, C; Anlauf, M; Schwark, T

    2009-10-30

    Detecting the vitality of mechanical skin wounds (antemortem versus postmortem injury) in human cadavers remains a specifically forensic problem. To determine whether skin mast cells (MCs) are activated during the very early phase of human wound healing we performed a histomorphometric evaluation of the extent of MC enzyme loss as an indication of MC degranulation at the wound margins of skin wounds in 64 human cadavers. We compared the number of tryptase-reactive MCs, which are said not to loose all of their enzyme activity during degranulation process, with the number of naphthol AS-D chloroacetate esterase (NAS-DClAE)-positive MCs, which loose their complete enzyme activity in the form of enzyme-positive granula after activation. The enzyme activity was evaluated on sequential histological sections after autopsy as an indirect quantification of the number of degranulated MCs. Most of the victims had died within 10-60 min after injury (n=50), 12 survived between 60 min and 24h, and only 2 victims survived more than 24h (12 days each). The number of enzyme-positive MCs were counted in six successive visual fields (0.785 mm(2)) on the one hand located parallel to and--on the other hand--at increasing distances outward from the wound margins. In victims surviving the injury less than 60 min the average number of NAS-DClAE-reactive MCs next to the wound margin was significantly lower than the number of tryptase-reactive MCs. The extent of the reduction in NAS-DClAE-reactive MC counts correlated inversely with the distance from the wound edges. Our findings show that MCs undergo very early loss of NAS-DClAE activity at wound margins, and thus appear to be an early cell marker of wound survival. However, definitive evidence that the enzyme loss (degranulation) represents a vital process can only be obtained by comparing MC enzyme loss induced by injury during intact circulation with the MC reaction to injury inflicted very shortly after cardiac arrest, a question that

  11. Influence of Skin Epithelial cells and Human Umbilical VEIN CELLS Conditioned Media on Maturation of Type 1 Dendritic Cells(DC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ganjybakhsh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dendritic cells have a high potential in presentation of antigens and can be generated and manipulated in invitro culture conditions. Dendritic cells(DC are therefore used in cancer immunotherapy, in prevention of graft rejection, treatment of allergy, autoimmune diseases and certain infectious diseases. Methods: Dendritic cell was generated in two stages. IN the first stage, monocyte cells were converted to immature DC affected GM-CSF and IL-4 .In the second stage, dendritic cells were maturated in the presence of supernatant skin epithelial cells(A375 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells(HUVEC and maturation factors. The ability of phagocytosis, expression phenotype, stimulation of T lymphocytes and cytokines was studied. Results: Mature Dendritic cells decreased their power of phagocytosis and increased expression of their surface markers. The ability of T cells stimulation and cytokine production(IL-12 increased . Conclusion: Mixture condition medium of epithelial cells and human skin umbilical vein endothelium cells induces maturation of monocyte-derived DCs. This condition medium improves their phenotype and their functions. The mentioned condition medium generates DC1 and Th1 in vitro.

  12. MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells in human skin equivalents show differential migration and phenotypic plasticity after allergen or irritant exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosten, Ilona J; Spiekstra, Sander W; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Gibbs, Susan

    2015-08-15

    After allergen or irritant exposure, Langerhans cells (LC) undergo phenotypic changes and exit the epidermis. In this study we describe the unique ability of MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells (MUTZ-LC) to display similar phenotypic plasticity as their primary counterparts when incorporated into a physiologically relevant full-thickness skin equivalent model (SE-LC). We describe differences and similarities in the mechanisms regulating LC migration and plasticity upon allergen or irritant exposure. The skin equivalent consisted of a reconstructed epidermis containing primary differentiated keratinocytes and CD1a(+) MUTZ-LC on a primary fibroblast-populated dermis. Skin equivalents were exposed to a panel of allergens and irritants. Topical exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of allergens (nickel sulfate, resorcinol, cinnamaldehyde) and irritants (Triton X-100, SDS, Tween 80) resulted in LC migration out of the epidermis and into the dermis. Neutralizing antibody to CXCL12 blocked allergen-induced migration, whereas anti-CCL5 blocked irritant-induced migration. In contrast to allergen exposure, irritant exposure resulted in cells within the dermis becoming CD1a(-)/CD14(+)/CD68(+) which is characteristic of a phenotypic switch of MUTZ-LC to a macrophage-like cell in the dermis. This phenotypic switch was blocked with anti-IL-10. Mechanisms previously identified as being involved in LC activation and migration in native human skin could thus be reproduced in the in vitro constructed skin equivalent model containing functional LC. This model therefore provides a unique and relevant research tool to study human LC biology in situ under controlled in vitro conditions, and will provide a powerful tool for hazard identification, testing novel therapeutics and identifying new drug targets.

  13. Grape seed proanthocyanidins reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes in human skin cancer cells by targeting epigenetic regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Jones, Virginia [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Katiyar, Santosh K., E-mail: skatiyar@uab.edu [Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been shown to have anti-skin carcinogenic effects in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise epigenetic molecular mechanisms remain unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether GSPs reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes following epigenetic modifications in skin cancer cells. For this purpose, A431 and SCC13 human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were used as in vitro models. The effects of GSPs on DNA methylation, histone modifications and tumor suppressor gene expressions were studied in these cell lines using enzyme activity assays, western blotting, dot-blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that treatment of A431 and SCC13 cells with GSPs decreased the levels of: (i) global DNA methylation, (ii) 5-methylcytosine, (iii) DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and (iv) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b in these cells. Similar effects were noted when these cancer cells were treated identically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. GSPs decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased levels of acetylated lysines 9 and 14 on histone H3 (H3-Lys 9 and 14) and acetylated lysines 5, 12 and 16 on histone H4, and reduced the levels of methylated H3-Lys 9. Further, GSP treatment resulted in re-expression of the mRNA and proteins of silenced tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1A, p16{sup INK4a} and Cip1/p21. Together, this study provides a new insight into the epigenetic mechanisms of GSPs and may have significant implications for epigenetic therapy in the treatment/prevention of skin cancers in humans. -- Highlights: ►Epigenetic modulations have been shown to have a role in cancer risk. ►Proanthocyanidins decrease the levels of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. ►Proanthocyanidins inhibit histone deacetylase activity in skin cancer cells. ►Proanthocyanidins reactivate tumor suppressor genes in skin

  14. Human polyomaviruses and incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in the New Hampshire skin cancer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossai, Anala; Waterboer, Tim; Hoen, Anne G; Farzan, Shohreh F; Nelson, Heather H; Michel, Angelika; Willhauck-Fleckenstein, Martina; Christensen, Brock C; Perry, Ann E; Pawlita, Michael; Karagas, Margaret R

    2016-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin is a malignancy arising from epithelial keratinocytes. Experimental and epidemiologic evidence raise the possibility that human polyomaviruses (PyV) may be associated with the occurrence of SCC. To investigate whether the risk for SCC was associated with PyV infection, seropositivity to 10 PyV types was assessed following diagnosis in a population-based case-control study conducted in the United States. A total of 253 SCC cases and 460 age group and gender-matched controls were included. Antibody response against each PyV was measured using a multiplex serology-based glutathione S-transferase capture assay of recombinantly expressed VP1 capsid proteins. Odds ratios (OR) for SCC associated with seropositivity to each PyV type were estimated using logistic regression, with adjustment for potentially confounding factors. SCC cases were seropositive for a greater number of PyVs than controls (P = 0.049). Those who were JC seropositive had increased odds of SCC when compared to those who were JC seronegative (OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 0.98-1.90), with an increasing trend in SCC risk with increasing quartiles of seroreactivity (P for trend = 0.04). There were no clear associations between SCC risk and serostatus for other PyV types. This study provides limited evidence that infection with certain PyVs may be related to the occurrence of SCC in the general population of the United States.

  15. Humanized mouse model of skin inflammation is characterized by disturbed keratinocyte differentiation and influx of IL-17A producing T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian L de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Humanized mouse models offer a challenging possibility to study human cell function in vivo. In the huPBL-SCID-huSkin allograft model human skin is transplanted onto immunodeficient mice and allowed to heal. Thereafter allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells are infused intra peritoneally to induce T cell mediated inflammation and microvessel destruction of the human skin. This model has great potential for in vivo study of human immune cells in (skin inflammatory processes and for preclinical screening of systemically administered immunomodulating agents. Here we studied the inflammatory skin response of human keratinocytes and human T cells and the concomitant systemic human T cell response.As new findings in the inflamed human skin of the huPBL-SCID-huSkin model we here identified: 1. Parameters of dermal pathology that enable precise quantification of the local skin inflammatory response exemplified by acanthosis, increased expression of human β-defensin-2, Elafin, K16, Ki67 and reduced expression of K10 by microscopy and immunohistochemistry. 2. Induction of human cytokines and chemokines using quantitative real-time PCR. 3. Influx of inflammation associated IL-17A-producing human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as immunoregulatory CD4+Foxp3+ cells using immunohistochemistry and -fluorescence, suggesting that active immune regulation is taking place locally in the inflamed skin. 4. Systemic responses that revealed activated and proliferating human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells that acquired homing marker expression of CD62L and CLA. Finally, we demonstrated the value of the newly identified parameters by showing significant changes upon systemic treatment with the T cell inhibitory agents cyclosporine-A and rapamycin. In summary, here we equipped the huPBL-SCID-huSkin humanized mouse model with relevant tools not only to quantify the inflammatory dermal response, but also to monitor the peripheral immune status. This combined approach

  16. Human adipose mesenchymal cells inhibit melanocyte differentiation and the pigmentation of human skin via increased expression of TGF-β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klar, Agnes S; Biedermann, Thomas; Michalak, Katarzyna; Michalczyk, Teresa; Meuli-Simmen, Claudia; Scherberich, Arnaud; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2017-07-31

    There is accumulating evidence that interactions between epidermal melanocytes and stromal cells play an important role in the regulation of skin pigmentation. In this study we established a pigmented dermo-epidermal skin model (melDESS) of human origin to investigate the effects of distinct stromal cells on melanogenesis. melDESS is a complex, clinically relevant skin equivalent composed of an epidermis containing both melanocytes and keratinocytes. Its dermal compartment consisted either of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASC), dermal fibroblasts, or a mixture of both cell types. These skin substitutes were transplanted for five weeks on the backs of immuno-incompetent rats and analyzed. Gene expression and western blot analyses showed a significantly higher expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) by ASC in comparison to dermal fibroblasts. In addition we showed that melanocytes responded to the increased levels of TGF-β1 by down-regulating the expression of key melanogenic enzymes such as tyrosinase. This caused decreased melanin synthesis and consequently greatly reduced pigmentation of melDESS. The conclusions are of utmost clinical relevance, namely that that ASC derived from the hypodermis fail to appropriately interact with epidermal melanocytes thus preventing the sustainable restoration of the patient's native skin color in bio-engineered skin grafts. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Human eccrine sweat gland cells turn into melanin-uptaking keratinocytes in dermo-epidermal skin substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Biedermann, Thomas; Pontiggia, Luca; Braziulis, Erik; Schiestl, Clemens; Hendriks, Bart; Eichhoff, Ossia M; Widmer, Daniel S; Meuli-Simmen, Claudia; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2013-02-01

    Recently, Biedermann et al. (2010) have demonstrated that human eccrine sweat gland cells can develop a multilayered epidermis. The question still remains whether these cells can fulfill exclusive and very specific functional properties of epidermal keratinocytes, such as the incorporation of melanin, a feature absent in sweat gland cells. We added human melanocytes to eccrine sweat gland cells to let them develop into an epidermal analog in vivo. The interaction between melanocytes and sweat gland-derived keratinocytes was investigated. The following results were gained: (1) macroscopically, a pigmentation of the substitutes was seen 2-3 weeks after transplantation; (2) we confirmed the development of a multilayered, stratified epidermis with melanocytes distributed evenly throughout the basal layer; (3) melanocytic dendrites projected to suprabasal layers; and (4) melanin was observed to be integrated into former eccrine sweat gland cells. These skin substitutes were similar or equal to skin substitutes cultured from human epidermal keratinocytes. The only differences observed were a delay in pigmentation and less melanin uptake. These data suggest that eccrine sweat gland cells can form a functional epidermal melanin unit, thereby providing striking evidence that they can assume one of the most characteristic keratinocyte properties.

  18. Recombinant human collagen III gel for transplantation of autologous skin cells in porcine full-thickness wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuutila, Kristo; Peura, Matti; Suomela, Sari; Hukkanen, Mika; Siltanen, Antti; Harjula, Ari; Vuola, Jyrki; Kankuri, Esko

    2015-12-01

    Complex skin wounds, such as chronic ulcers and deep burns, require lengthy treatments and cause extensive burdens on healthcare and the economy. Use of biomaterials and cell transplantation may improve traditional treatments and promote the healing of difficult-to-treat wounds. In this study, we investigated the use of recombinant human collagen III (rhCol-III) gel as a delivery vehicle for cultured autologous skin cells (keratinocytes only or keratinocyte-fibroblast mixtures). We examined its effect on the healing of full-thickness wounds in a porcine wound-healing model. Two Landrace pigs were used for the study. Fourteen deep dermal wounds were created on the back of each pig with an 8 mm biopsy punch. Syringes containing acellular rhCol-III gel (n = 8) or rhCol-III gel with autologous keratinocytes (n = 8) or rhCol-III gel with autologous keratinocytes and fibroblasts (n = 8) were applied into wounds. Untreated wounds were used as controls for the treatment groups (n = 4). We used rhCol-III gel to manufacture a cell-delivery syringe containing autologous skin cells. In a full-thickness wound-healing model, we observed that rhCol-III gel enhances early granulation tissue formation. Interestingly, we found cell type-dependent differences in the stability of rhCol-III in vivo. Fibroblast-containing gel was effectively removed from the wound, whereas gels without cells or with keratinocytes only remained intact. Our results demonstrate that the properties of rhCol-III gel for skin cell transplantation can be significantly altered in a cell type-dependent manner.

  19. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadoon, Saima; Karim, Sabiha; Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan Bin; Akram, Muhammad Rouf; Kalsoom Khan, Abida; Malik, Arif; Chen, Chunye; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR) is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed. PMID:26448818

  20. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Jadoon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed.

  1. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadoon, Saima; Karim, Sabiha; Bin Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan; Akram, Muhammad Rouf; Khan, Abida Kalsoom; Malik, Arif; Chen, Chunye; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR) is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed.

  2. MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells in human skin equivalents show differential migration and phenotypic plasticity after allergen or irritant exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosten, Ilona J.; Spiekstra, Sander W. [Department of Dermatology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gruijl, Tanja D. de [Department of Dermatology Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gibbs, Susan, E-mail: s.gibbs@acta.nl [Department of Dermatology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Oral Cell Biology, Academic Center for Dentistry (ACTA), Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    After allergen or irritant exposure, Langerhans cells (LC) undergo phenotypic changes and exit the epidermis. In this study we describe the unique ability of MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells (MUTZ-LC) to display similar phenotypic plasticity as their primary counterparts when incorporated into a physiologically relevant full-thickness skin equivalent model (SE-LC). We describe differences and similarities in the mechanisms regulating LC migration and plasticity upon allergen or irritant exposure. The skin equivalent consisted of a reconstructed epidermis containing primary differentiated keratinocytes and CD1a{sup +} MUTZ-LC on a primary fibroblast-populated dermis. Skin equivalents were exposed to a panel of allergens and irritants. Topical exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of allergens (nickel sulfate, resorcinol, cinnamaldehyde) and irritants (Triton X-100, SDS, Tween 80) resulted in LC migration out of the epidermis and into the dermis. Neutralizing antibody to CXCL12 blocked allergen-induced migration, whereas anti-CCL5 blocked irritant-induced migration. In contrast to allergen exposure, irritant exposure resulted in cells within the dermis becoming CD1a{sup −}/CD14{sup +}/CD68{sup +} which is characteristic of a phenotypic switch of MUTZ-LC to a macrophage-like cell in the dermis. This phenotypic switch was blocked with anti-IL-10. Mechanisms previously identified as being involved in LC activation and migration in native human skin could thus be reproduced in the in vitro constructed skin equivalent model containing functional LC. This model therefore provides a unique and relevant research tool to study human LC biology in situ under controlled in vitro conditions, and will provide a powerful tool for hazard identification, testing novel therapeutics and identifying new drug targets. - Highlights: • MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells integrated into skin equivalents are fully functional. • Anti-CXCL12 blocks allergen-induced MUTZ-LC migration.

  3. Immunomodulatory Effectiveness of Fish Oil and omega-3 Fatty Acids in Human Non-melanoma Skin Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Khurram; Mohd Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal; Yuen, Ng Pei; Zulfakar, Mohd Hanif

    2016-01-01

    Fish oil is composed of various fatty acids among which omega-3 fatty acids are considered as most beneficial. The effects of fish oil on the activity of a topical anticancer drug, imiquimod, and the immunomodulatory activity of omega-3 fatty acids was investigated in human basal and squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Imiquimod-fish oil mixture exhibited higher carcinoma cell growth inhibition and immunomodulatory activity than imiquimod alone, especially against squamous cell carcinoma cells. Omega-3 fatty acids exhibited growth inhibition of both basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and modulated the immune response. Omega-3 fatty acids of fish oil serve as inducers of interleukin-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, and as suppressors of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which not only depress tumor growth but also adequately control the inflammatory side effects of imiquimod. Thus, imiquimod administration with fish oil could be beneficial for inhibition of non-melanoma skin carcinoma cells but further in vivo studies are needed to understand their role in skin cancer.

  4. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in UVA-irradiated human skin cells in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treina, G.; Scaletta, C.; Frenk, E.; Applegate, L.A. [University Hospital-CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland). Laboratory of Photobiology; Fourtanier, A.; Seite, S. [L`Oreal-Centre de Recherche Charles Zviak (France). Recherche Avancee Biologie

    1996-08-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation represents an important oxidative stress to human skin and certain forms of oxidative stress have been shown to modulate intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression. ICAM-1 has been shown to play an important part in many immune reactions and the perturbations of this molecule by ultraviolet radiation could have implications in many inflammatory responses. An enhancement immunohistochemical method with avidin/biotin was used for analysing the early effects of UVA radiation on human cell cultures and human skin (340-400 nm). Both in vitro and in vivo data show that ICAM-1 staining in epidermal keratinocytes, which was expressed constitutively, decreased in a UVA dose-dependent manner. The decrease was most noted at 3-6 h following UVA radiation with some ICAM-1 staining returning by 48 h post-UVA. ICAM-1 positive staining in the dermis was specific for vascular structures and was increased 24 h after UVA radiation. Cultured dermal fibroblasts exhibited ICAM-1 staining which increased slightly within 6-48 h post-UVA radiation. As epidermal ICAM-1 expression is depleted following UVA radiation and dermal expression increases due to an increase in the vascular structures, ICAM-1 provides a valuable marker following UVA radiation in human skin that can be readily measured in situ. (author).

  5. Human Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells plasticity augments scar-free skin wound healing with hair growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabapathy, Vikram; Sundaram, Balasubramanian; V M, Sreelakshmi; Mankuzhy, Pratheesh; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising candidate for cell-based transplantation and regenerative medicine therapies. Thus in the present study Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells (WJ-MSCs) have been derived from extra embryonic umbilical cord matrix following removal of both arteries and vein. Also, to overcome the clinical limitations posed by fetal bovine serum (FBS) supplementation because of xenogeneic origin of FBS, usual FBS cell culture supplement has been replaced with human platelet lysate (HPL). Apart from general characteristic features of bone marrow-derived MSCs, wharton jelly-derived MSCs have the ability to maintain phenotypic attributes, cell growth kinetics, cell cycle pattern, in vitro multilineage differentiation plasticity, apoptotic pattern, normal karyotype-like intrinsic mesenchymal stem cell properties in long-term in vitro cultures. Moreover, the WJ-MSCs exhibited the in vitro multilineage differentiation capacity by giving rise to differentiated cells of not only mesodermal lineage but also to the cells of ectodermal and endodermal lineage. Also, WJ-MSC did not present any aberrant cell state upon in vivo transplantation in SCID mice and in vitro soft agar assays. The immunomodulatory potential assessed by gene expression levels of immunomodulatory factors upon exposure to inflammatory cytokines in the fetal WJ-MSCs was relatively higher compared to adult bone marrow-derived MSCs. WJ-MSCs seeded on decellularized amniotic membrane scaffold transplantation on the skin injury of SCID mice model demonstrates that combination of WJ-MSCs and decellularized amniotic membrane scaffold exhibited significantly better wound-healing capabilities, having reduced scar formation with hair growth and improved biomechanical properties of regenerated skin compared to WJ-MSCs alone. Further, our experimental data indicate that indocyanin green (ICG) at optimal concentration can be resourcefully used for labeling of stem cells and in vivo

  6. Human Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells plasticity augments scar-free skin wound healing with hair growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Sabapathy

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a promising candidate for cell-based transplantation and regenerative medicine therapies. Thus in the present study Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells (WJ-MSCs have been derived from extra embryonic umbilical cord matrix following removal of both arteries and vein. Also, to overcome the clinical limitations posed by fetal bovine serum (FBS supplementation because of xenogeneic origin of FBS, usual FBS cell culture supplement has been replaced with human platelet lysate (HPL. Apart from general characteristic features of bone marrow-derived MSCs, wharton jelly-derived MSCs have the ability to maintain phenotypic attributes, cell growth kinetics, cell cycle pattern, in vitro multilineage differentiation plasticity, apoptotic pattern, normal karyotype-like intrinsic mesenchymal stem cell properties in long-term in vitro cultures. Moreover, the WJ-MSCs exhibited the in vitro multilineage differentiation capacity by giving rise to differentiated cells of not only mesodermal lineage but also to the cells of ectodermal and endodermal lineage. Also, WJ-MSC did not present any aberrant cell state upon in vivo transplantation in SCID mice and in vitro soft agar assays. The immunomodulatory potential assessed by gene expression levels of immunomodulatory factors upon exposure to inflammatory cytokines in the fetal WJ-MSCs was relatively higher compared to adult bone marrow-derived MSCs. WJ-MSCs seeded on decellularized amniotic membrane scaffold transplantation on the skin injury of SCID mice model demonstrates that combination of WJ-MSCs and decellularized amniotic membrane scaffold exhibited significantly better wound-healing capabilities, having reduced scar formation with hair growth and improved biomechanical properties of regenerated skin compared to WJ-MSCs alone. Further, our experimental data indicate that indocyanin green (ICG at optimal concentration can be resourcefully used for labeling of stem cells

  7. Effect of capping agents on the cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles in human normal and cancer skin cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netchareonsirisuk, Ponsawan; Puthong, Songchan; Dubas, Stephan; Palaga, Tanapat; Komolpis, Kittinan

    2016-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are among the most widely used nanomaterials in medical and consumer products. However, safety in the uses of AgNPs is still controversial. The toxicity of AgNPs toward various cell types has been reported to depend on the surface properties of the nanoparticles. In this study, the effect of AgNPs with the average size of 5-15 nm on the viability of the CCD-986SK human normal skin fibroblast cell line and A375 human malignant melanoma cell line was evaluated. Comparative toxicity studies, based on MTT assay, were performed by using either sodium alginate or poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) sodium salt (PSSMA) as capping agent in the nanoparticle preparation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that AgNO3 alone was highly toxic to both cell types while both alginate and PSSMA alone were not toxic. AgNPs capped with alginate were selectively toxic to the cancer cell line but not to the normal cell line while AgNPs capped with PSSMA were toxic to both cancer and normal cell lines. Judging from the 50 % inhibition concentration (IC50), it was found that the cancer cell line was more sensitive to AgNPs than the normal cell line. Study on the mode of cell death by annexin V and propidium iodide staining revealed that AgNPs induced more apoptotic cell death (84-90 %) than necrosis (8-12 %) in the skin cancer cell line. These results suggest that the toxicity of AgNPs depended on the type of capping agent and the type of cell line.

  8. Aromatic DNA adducts in human white blood cells and skin after dermal application of coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godschalk, R.W.L.; Ostertag, J.U.; Moonen, E.J.C.; Neumann, H.A.M.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.; Schooten, F.J. van [University of Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology

    1998-09-01

    A group of eczema patients topically treated with coal tar (CT) ointments was used as a model population to examine the applicability of DNA adducts in white blood cell (WBC) subpopulations as a measure of dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Aromatic DNA adducts were examined by {sup 32}P-postlabeling in exposed skin and WBC subsets, and urinary excretion of PAH metabolites was determined to assess the whole-body burden. The median urinary excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene and 3-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene was 0.39 and 0.01 {mu}mol/mol creatinine respectively, before the dermal application of CT ointments. After treatment for 1 week, these levels increased to 139.7 and 1.18 {mu}mol/mol creatinine respectively, indicating that considerable amounts of PAHs were absorbed. Median aromatic DNA adduct levels were significantly increased in skin from 2.9 adduct/10{sup 8} nucleotides before treatment to 63.3 adducts/10{sup 8} nt after treatment with CT, in monocytes from 0.28 to 0.86 adducts/10{sup 8} nt, in lymphocytes from 0.33 to 0.89 adducts/10{sup 8} nt and in granulocytes from 0.28 to 0.54 adducts/10{sup 8} nt. A week after stopping the CT treatment, the DNA adduct levels in monocytes and granulocytes were reduced to 0.38 and 0.38 adducts/10{sup 8} nt respectively, whereas the adduct levels in lymphocytes remained enhanced. Total DNA adduct levels in skin correlated with the adduct levels in monocytes and lymphocytes. Excretion of urinary metabolites during the first week of treatment was correlated with the percentage of the skin surface treated with CT ointment and decreased within a week after the cessation of treatment. 3-Hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene excretion, correlated with the levels of DNA adducts in skin that comigrated with benzo(a)pyrene-diol-epoxide-DNA. This study indicates that the DNA adduct levels in mononuclear WBCs can possibly be used as a surrogate for skin DNA after dermal exposure to PAHs. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Grape seed proanthocyanidins reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes in human skin cancer cells by targeting epigenetic regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Jones, Virginia; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2012-08-15

    Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been shown to have anti-skin carcinogenic effects in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise epigenetic molecular mechanisms remain unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether GSPs reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes following epigenetic modifications in skin cancer cells. For this purpose, A431 and SCC13 human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were used as in vitro models. The effects of GSPs on DNA methylation, histone modifications and tumor suppressor gene expressions were studied in these cell lines using enzyme activity assays, western blotting, dot-blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that treatment of A431 and SCC13 cells with GSPs decreased the levels of: (i) global DNA methylation, (ii) 5-methylcytosine, (iii) DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and (iv) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b in these cells. Similar effects were noted when these cancer cells were treated identically with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. GSPs decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased levels of acetylated lysines 9 and 14 on histone H3 (H3-Lys 9 and 14) and acetylated lysines 5, 12 and 16 on histone H4, and reduced the levels of methylated H3-Lys 9. Further, GSP treatment resulted in re-expression of the mRNA and proteins of silenced tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1A, p16(INK4a) and Cip1/p21. Together, this study provides a new insight into the epigenetic mechanisms of GSPs and may have significant implications for epigenetic therapy in the treatment/prevention of skin cancers in humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gastrodia elata Blume Extract Modulates Antioxidant Activity and Ultraviolet A-Irradiated Skin Aging in Human Dermal Fibroblast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Eunju; Chung, Haeyon; Shim, Eugene; Jeong, Jung-Ky; Han, Bok-Kyung; Choi, Hyuk-Joon; Hwang, Jinah

    2016-11-01

    Gastrodia elata Blume (GEB), a traditional herbal medicine, has been used to treat a wide range of neurological disorders (e.g., paralysis and stroke) and skin problems (e.g., atopic dermatitis and eczema) in oriental medicine. This study was designed to investigate the antioxidant ability of GEB and its antiaging effect on human dermal fibroblast cells (HDF). The total phenolic and flavonoid contents of GEB were 21.8 and 0.43 mg/g dry weight (DW), respectively. The ergothioneine content of GEB was 0.41 mg/mL DW. The DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities of GEB at 5 and 10 mg/mL approximately ranged between 31% and 44%. The superoxide dismutase activity of GEB at 10 and 25 mg/mL was 57% and 76%, respectively. GEB increased procollagen type 1 (PC1) production and inhibited matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) production and elastase-1 activity in UVA-irradiated HDF. PC1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels decreased upon UVA irradiation, but recovered in response to high doses of GEB in HDF. On the contrary, GEB significantly decreased MMP-1 and elastase-1 mRNA levels, which were markedly induced in UVA-irradiated HDF. Collectively, these results suggest that GEB has sufficient antioxidant ability to prevent the signs of skin aging in UVA-irradiated human skin cells, suggesting its potential as a natural antiaging product.

  11. Human skin volatiles: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormont, Laurent; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Cohuet, Anna

    2013-05-01

    Odors emitted by human skin are of great interest to biologists in many fields; applications range from forensic studies to diagnostic tools, the design of perfumes and deodorants, and the ecology of blood-sucking insect vectors of human disease. Numerous studies have investigated the chemical composition of skin odors, and various sampling methods have been used for this purpose. The literature shows that the chemical profile of skin volatiles varies greatly among studies, and the use of different sampling procedures is probably responsible for some of these variations. To our knowledge, this is the first review focused on human skin volatile compounds. We detail the different sampling techniques, each with its own set of advantages and disadvantages, which have been used for the collection of skin odors from different parts of the human body. We present the main skin volatile compounds found in these studies, with particular emphasis on the most frequently studied body regions, axillae, hands, and feet. We propose future directions for promising experimental studies on odors from human skin, particularly in relation to the chemical ecology of blood-sucking insects.

  12. Enhancing growth of cultured human skin cells using low-energy CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Nili; Reuveni, Haim; Halevy, Sima; Lubart, Rachel

    1997-12-01

    In view of the versatility and usage of the CO2 laser as a too. in surgery and dermatology, we have studied its effect on enhancing proliferation of cultured skin cells using an attenuated CO2 laser. Exposure of cultured keratinocytes or fibroblasts to continuous wave or pulse mode irradiation enhanced thymidine incorporation by 1.4 to 1.7 folds, and cell number by 1.25 to 1.4 folds, measured 24 and 48 hours later, depending on the fluency applied. As expected, these effects were not suppressed by added antioxidants, indicating that the mechanism involved in this newly observed effect, differ from photosensitization by low energy visible and near IR lasers.

  13. Comparative cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate hexavalent chromium in human and hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jamie L; Wise, Sandra S; Xie, Hong; Zhu, Cairong; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-12-01

    Chromium is both a global marine pollutant and a known human health hazard. In this study, we compare the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of both soluble and particulate chromate in human and hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) skin fibroblasts. Our data show that both soluble and particulate Cr(VI) induce concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular Cr ion concentrations in both human and hawksbill sea turtle fibroblasts. Based on administered concentration, particulate and soluble Cr(VI) were more cytotoxic and clastogenic to human cells than sea turtle cells. When the analysis was based on the intracellular concentration of Cr, the data showed that the response of both species was similar. The one exception was the cytotoxicity of intracellular Cr ions from soluble Cr(VI), which caused more cytotoxicity in sea turtle cells (LC50=271μM) than that of human cells (LC50=471μM), but its clastogenicity was similar between the two species. Thus, adjusting for differences in uptake indicated that the explanation for the difference in potency was mostly due to uptake rather than differently affected mechanisms. Overall these data indicate that sea turtles may be a useful sentinel for human health responses to marine pollution.

  14. Effects of recombinant human interleukin-10 on Treg cells, IL-10 and TGF-β in transplantation of rabbit skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, KAI SHAN; FAN, XIAO QIN; ZHANG, LEI; WEN, QIONG NA; FENG, JI HONG; CHEN, FU CHAO; LUO, JUN MIN; SUN, WAN BANG

    2014-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the rejection and survival time of grafted skin, and the changes of Treg cells, interleukin 10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in peripheral blood following skin transplantation with recombinant human interleukin-10 (rhIL-10) or cyclosporin A (CsA), as well as the role of IL-10 in immunological rejection mechanisms. A total of 36 rabbits were divided into two groups. The skin of a donor rabbit was transplanted onto the back of one receptor rabbit. Receptors were randomly divided into six groups, including rhIL-10 low-dose (5 μg/kg/d), rhIL-10 high-dose (10 μg/kg/d), CsA low-dose (5 mg/kg/d), CsA high-dose (10 mg/kg/d), rhIL-10 (5 μg/kg/d) and CsA (5 mg/kg/d) and negative control normal saline (NS; 1 ml/d). All groups received intramuscular drug injection for ten days, beginning one day prior to skin transplantation surgery. Following transplantation, each rabbit’s peripheral blood was collected at different times. The changes of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells, IL-10 and TGF-β were determined by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. When compared with the control group, the rejection and survival times of the experimental groups were longer following skin graft. Compared with the two CsA groups and the control group, the proportion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells of rhIL-10 groups was significantly upregulated on the 4th and 7th days following surgery. However, TGF-β levels were not significantly different. Data suggested that the concentration of IL-10 was positively correlated with the proportion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. In addition, IL-10 may delay the rejection time of rabbit skin transplantation and prolong the survival time. Thus, the role of IL-10 in inhibited allograft rejection may be associated with CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and IL-10, and may be independent of TGF-β. PMID:24270972

  15. Effects of recombinant human interleukin-10 on Treg cells, IL-10 and TGF-β in transplantation of rabbit skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai Shan; Fan, Xiao Qin; Zhang, Lei; Wen, Qiong Na; Feng, Ji Hong; Chen, Fu Chao; Luo, Jun Min; Sun, Wan Bang

    2014-02-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the rejection and survival time of grafted skin, and the changes of Treg cells, interleukin 10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in peripheral blood following skin transplantation with recombinant human interleukin-10 (rhIL-10) or cyclosporin A (CsA), as well as the role of IL-10 in immunological rejection mechanisms. A total of 36 rabbits were divided into two groups. The skin of a donor rabbit was transplanted onto the back of one receptor rabbit. Receptors were randomly divided into six groups, including rhIL-10 low-dose (5 µg/kg/d), rhIL-10 high-dose (10 µg/kg/d), CsA low-dose (5 mg/kg/d), CsA high-dose (10 mg/kg/d), rhIL-10 (5 µg/kg/d) and CsA (5 mg/kg/d) and negative control normal saline (NS; 1 ml/d). All groups received intramuscular drug injection for ten days, beginning one day prior to skin transplantation surgery. Following transplantation, each rabbit's peripheral blood was collected at different times. The changes of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells, IL-10 and TGF-β were determined by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. When compared with the control group, the rejection and survival times of the experimental groups were longer following skin graft. Compared with the two CsA groups and the control group, the proportion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells of rhIL-10 groups was significantly upregulated on the 4th and 7th days following surgery. However, TGF-β levels were not significantly different. Data suggested that the concentration of IL-10 was positively correlated with the proportion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. In addition, IL-10 may delay the rejection time of rabbit skin transplantation and prolong the survival time. Thus, the role of IL-10 in inhibited allograft rejection may be associated with CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and IL-10, and may be independent of TGF-β.

  16. Collagen-coated nano-electrospun PCL seeded with human endometrial stem cells for skin tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Shiva; Ai, Jafar; Azami, Mahmoud; Verdi, Javad; Atlasi, Mohammad Ali; Shirian, Sadegh; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali

    2017-08-09

    Human endometrial stem cells (hEnSCs) are known as an attractive source of stem cells for regenerative medicine. hEnSCs are easily isolated and are capable of repairing uterine through their strong ability of creating new capillaries. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) nanofibrous polycaprolactone (PCL)/collagen scaffold was fabricated and characterized in order to be applied as a new approach for skin reconstruction. Furthermore, the behavior of hEnSCs on this scaffold was investigated. First, a PCL 3D scaffold was constructed using electrospinning technique. Plasma treated and PCL was grafted by collagen. The constructs were characterized for mechanical and structural properties. Cell attachment, proliferation, viability, and differentiation of hEnSCs were assessed after being seeded on PCL and PCL/collagen scaffolds using scanning electron microscopy, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, and real-time polymerase chain reaction tests. The results showed higher wettability for the PCL/collagen scaffold with desirable mechanical and structural characteristics compared to PCL and collagen alone. The attachment and proliferation rates of hEnSCs on the PCL/collagen scaffold were higher compared to those on the bare PCL. Hence, hEnSCs are newly discovered stem cell source for skin tissue engineering in vitro, particularly when developed on PCL/collagen nanofiber scaffolds. Therefore, application of hEnSCs for skin regeneration is a novel therapeutic approach for temporary skin substitute. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The Role of Carotenoids in Human Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theognosia Vergou

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The human skin, as the boundary organ between the human body and the environment, is under the constant influence of free radicals (FR, both from the outside in and from the inside out. Carotenoids are known to be powerful antioxidant substances playing an essential role in the reactions of neutralization of FR (mainly reactive oxygen species ROS. Carotenoid molecules present in the tissue are capable of neutralizing several attacks of FR, especially ROS, and are then destroyed. Human skin contains carotenoids, such as α-, γ-, β-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and their isomers, which serve the living cells as a protection against oxidation. Recent studies have reported the possibility to investigate carotenoids in human skin quickly and non-invasively by spectroscopic means. Results obtained from in-vivo studies on human skin have shown that carotenoids are vital components of the antioxidative protective system of the human skin and could serve as marker substances for the overall antioxidative status. Reflecting the nutritional and stress situation of volunteers, carotenoids must be administered by means of antioxidant-rich products, e.g., in the form of fruit and vegetables. Carotenoids are degraded by stress factors of any type, inter alia, sun radiation, contact with environmental hazards, illness, etc. The kinetics of the accumulation and degradation of carotenoids in the skin have been investigated.

  18. Endothelin-1 induces a histamine-dependent flare in vivo, but does not activate human skin mast cells in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Brain, S D; Thomas, G.; Crossman, D.C.; Fuller, R.; Church, M. K.

    1992-01-01

    The role of the mast cell in endothelin-1 induced flare has been investigated by in vivo and in vitro experiments. The intradermal injection of endothelin-1 (10 pmol) into human skin induced a pallor with surrounding axon-reflex flare which is similar to the flare response to histamine (1 nmol). At these doses, chosen to give identical flare areas, blood flow was increased in the area of the endothelin-induced flare over a longer period. A systemic H1-receptor antagonist significantly inhibit...

  19. Muscadine grape skin extract reverts snail-mediated epithelial mesenchymal transition via superoxide species in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Liza J; Barnett, Petrina; Smith, Basil; Arnold, Rebecca S; Hudson, Tamaro; Kundu, Kousik; Murthy, Niren; Odero-Marah, Valerie A

    2014-03-12

    Snail transcription factor can induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), associated with decreased cell adhesion-associated molecules like E-cadherin, increased mesenchymal markers like vimentin, leading to increased motility, invasion and metastasis. Muscadine grape skin extract (MSKE) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth and induce apoptosis without affecting normal prostate epithelial cells. We investigated novel molecular mechanisms by which Snail promotes EMT in prostate cancer cells via Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and whether it can be antagonized by MSKE. ARCaP and LNCaP cells overexpressing Snail were utilized to examine levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), specifically, superoxide, in vitro using Dihydroethidium (DHE) or HydroCy3 dyes. Mitosox staining was performed to determine whether the source of ROS was mitochondrial in origin. We also investigated the effect of Muscadine grape skin extract (MSKE) on EMT marker expression by western blot analysis. Migration and cell viability using MTS proliferation assay was performed following MSKE treatments. Snail overexpression in ARCaP and LNCaP cells was associated with increased concentration of mitochondrial superoxide, in vitro. Interestingly, MSKE decreased superoxide levels in ARCaP and LNCaP cells. Additionally, MSKE and Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) reverted EMT as evidenced by decreased vimentin levels and re-induction of E-cadherin expression in ARCaP-Snail cells after 3 days, concomitant with reduced cell migration. MSKE also decreased Stat-3 activity in ARCaP-Snail cells. This study shows that superoxide species may play a role in Snail transcription factor-mediated EMT. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of Snail with various antioxidants such as MSKE may prove beneficial in abrogating EMT and ROS-mediated tumor progression in human prostate cancer.

  20. Muscadine grape skin extract reverts snail-mediated epithelial mesenchymal transition via superoxide species in human prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Snail transcription factor can induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), associated with decreased cell adhesion-associated molecules like E-cadherin, increased mesenchymal markers like vimentin, leading to increased motility, invasion and metastasis. Muscadine grape skin extract (MSKE) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth and induce apoptosis without affecting normal prostate epithelial cells. We investigated novel molecular mechanisms by which Snail promotes EMT in prostate cancer cells via Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and whether it can be antagonized by MSKE. Methods ARCaP and LNCaP cells overexpressing Snail were utilized to examine levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), specifically, superoxide, in vitro using Dihydroethidium (DHE) or HydroCy3 dyes. Mitosox staining was performed to determine whether the source of ROS was mitochondrial in origin. We also investigated the effect of Muscadine grape skin extract (MSKE) on EMT marker expression by western blot analysis. Migration and cell viability using MTS proliferation assay was performed following MSKE treatments. Results Snail overexpression in ARCaP and LNCaP cells was associated with increased concentration of mitochondrial superoxide, in vitro. Interestingly, MSKE decreased superoxide levels in ARCaP and LNCaP cells. Additionally, MSKE and Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) reverted EMT as evidenced by decreased vimentin levels and re-induction of E-cadherin expression in ARCaP-Snail cells after 3 days, concomitant with reduced cell migration. MSKE also decreased Stat-3 activity in ARCaP-Snail cells. Conclusions This study shows that superoxide species may play a role in Snail transcription factor-mediated EMT. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of Snail with various antioxidants such as MSKE may prove beneficial in abrogating EMT and ROS-mediated tumor progression in human prostate cancer. PMID:24617993

  1. Isolation of skin-derived precursors from human foreskin and their differentiation into neurons and glial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhtiari M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Skin-derived precursors (SKPs are a type of progenitor cells extracted from mammalian dermal tissue and can be differentiate to neural and mesodermal lineage in vitro. These cells can introduce an accessible autologos source of neural precursor cells for treatment of different neurodegenerative diseases. This research was done in order to set up isolation, culture, proliferation and differentiation of human skin derived precursors (hSKPs."n"nMethods: Human foreskin samples were cut into smaller pieces and cultured in proliferation medium after enzymatic digestion. To induce neural differentiation, cells were cultured in neural differentiation medium after fifth passage. We used immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR for characterization of the cells. Neuron and glial cell differentiation potential was assessed by immunofloresence using specific antibodies. The experiments were carried out in triplicate."n"nResults: After differentiation, βΙΙΙ- tubulin and neurofilament-M positive cells were observed that are specific markers for neurons. Moreover, glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP and S100 positive cells were identified that are markers specifically express in glial cells. Detected neurons and glials were

  2. Proliferation and Differentiation of Human Hair Follicle Stem Cells on Chitosan-Skin Engineered Template in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Bakar Mohd Hilmi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Hair follicles repeatedly regress and reconstitute themselves, suggesting the presence of intrinsic tissue stem cells. Among the unique characteristics of adult stem cells isolated from hair follicles is their ability to differentiate into keratinocytes. Study on chitosan skin-engineered templates (SETs as scaffolds for the proliferation of human fibroblasts have shown the promise of SETs in facilitating skin cell growth in three-dimensional culture. High proliferation in three-dimensional culture using human cells allows the researcher to extensively evaluate the cultivation of desirable cell types on chitosan SETs. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the in vitro attachment, proliferation and differentiation of hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs on a chitosan SETs. HFSCs were isolated from human scalp tissues using collagenase type I prior to propagation in supplemented CnT-07 media. The phenotype of the HFSCs was verified using the markers keratin-15 (K15 and CD200, as detected by immunocytochemical staining. The attachment and proliferation of the HFSCs on the chitosan SETs were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, an alamar blue assay and a live/dead assay. Subsequently, the HFSCs were differentiated using CnT-2D differentiation media. The cells’ differentiation was verified using the markers involucrin and keratin-6 (K6, as detected by immunofluorescence staining. The HFSCs were successfully isolated, proliferated and differentiated according to staining positivity and microscopy imaging. HFSCs are able to proliferate and directly differentiate into keratinocytes on a chitosan SETs, which may facilitate their use in regenerative medicine.

  3. Photosensitized methyl paraben induces apoptosis via caspase dependent pathway under ambient UVB exposure in human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Divya; Chopra, Deepti; Singh, Jyoti; Srivastav, Ajeet K; Kumari, Smita; Verma, Ankit; Ray, Ratan Singh

    2017-10-01

    Methyl paraben (MP), is a widely used preservative in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic products. Its molecular mechanism under ambient ultraviolet radiation is not well understood. We investigated photosensitizing mechanism of MP under ambient UVB (0.6 mW/cm(2)) intensity. MP showed dose dependent decrease in cell viability of human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) by MTT and NRU assays. Study showed 40% reduction in antimicrobial activity of UVB irradiated MP through E. coli culture. Photosensitized MP (25 μg/ml) significantly enhanced lipid peroxidation, intracellular ROS generation and disrupted mitochondrial membrane integrity. MP induced loss of lysosomal membrane integrity and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) mediated stress evident from Ca(+2) release. Phototoxicity of MP showed nuclear fragmentation, phosphatidylserine translocation, 30% tail DNA and micronuclei formation. Study showed mitochondria mediated apoptosis via upregulation of Bax, Apaf-1, Cytochrome C and Caspase-3. Upregulation of Caspase-12 (2 folds) specifically showed role of ER in apoptosis. Specific caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK showed involvement of caspase cascade pathway in apoptosis. Results indicate that photosensitive MP leads to oxidative stress mediated DNA damage and apoptosis through mitochondria and ER. MP causes deleterious effects and its long term exposure to human skin may promote skin diseases. Therefore, MP should be replaced by other photosafe preservatives for humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tamarind Seed Xyloglucans Promote Proliferation and Migration of Human Skin Cells through Internalization via Stimulation of Proproliferative Signal Transduction Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, W; Deters, A M

    2013-01-01

    Xyloglucans (XGs) of Tamarindus indica L. Fabaceae are used as drug vehicles or as ingredients of cosmetics. Two xyloglucans were extracted from T. indica seed with cold water (TSw) and copper complex precipitation (TSc). Both were analyzed in regard to composition and influence on cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle progression, migration, MAPK phosphorylation, and gene expression of human skin keratinocytes (NHEK and HaCaT) and fibroblasts (NHDF) in vitro. TSw and TSc differed in molecular weight, rhamnose content, and ratios of xylose, arabinose, galactose, and glucose. Both XGs improved keratinocytes and fibroblast proliferation, promoted the cell cycle, and stimulated migration and intracellular enzyme activity of NHDF after endosomal uptake. Only TSw significantly enhanced HaCaT migration and extracellular enzyme activity of NHDF and HaCaT. TSw and TSc predominantly enhanced the phosphorylation of molecules that referred to Erk signaling in NHEK. In NHDF parts of the integrin signaling and SAPK/JNK pathway were affected. Independent of cell type TSw marginally regulated the expression of genes, which referred to membrane proteins, cytoskeleton, cytokine signaling, and ECM as well as to processes of metabolism and transcription. Results show that T. indica xyloglucans promote skin regeneration by a direct influence on cell proliferation and migration.

  5. Anticarcinogenic properties of medium chain fatty acids on human colorectal, skin and breast cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Amoolya; Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2015-03-05

    Colorectal cancer, breast cancer and skin cancer are commonly-reported cancer types in the U.S. Although radiation and chemotherapy are routinely used to treat cancer, they produce side effects in patients. Additionally, resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs has been noticed in cancers. Thus, there is a need for effective and safe bioprophylactics and biotherapeutics in cancer therapy. The medicinal value of goat milk has been recognized for centuries and is primarily attributed to three fatty acids, namely capric, caprylic and caproic acids. This research investigates the anticancer property of these fatty acids on human colorectal, skin and mammary gland cancer cells. The cancer cells were treated with various concentrations of fatty acids for 48 h, and cell viability was monitored by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay. Additionally, real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was performed to elucidate the potential anti-cancer mechanisms of the three fatty acids under investigation. Capric, caprylic and caproic acids reduced cancer cell viability by 70% to 90% (p < 0.05) compared to controls. RT-qPCR data indicated that these natural molecules produced anticancer effects by down-regulating cell cycle regulatory genes and up-regulating genes involved in apoptosis. Future research will validate the anticancer effect of these fatty acids in an appropriate in vivo model.

  6. Anticarcinogenic Properties of Medium Chain Fatty Acids on Human Colorectal, Skin and Breast Cancer Cells in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoolya Narayanan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer, breast cancer and skin cancer are commonly-reported cancer types in the U.S. Although radiation and chemotherapy are routinely used to treat cancer, they produce side effects in patients. Additionally, resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs has been noticed in cancers. Thus, there is a need for effective and safe bioprophylactics and biotherapeutics in cancer therapy. The medicinal value of goat milk has been recognized for centuries and is primarily attributed to three fatty acids, namely capric, caprylic and caproic acids. This research investigates the anticancer property of these fatty acids on human colorectal, skin and mammary gland cancer cells. The cancer cells were treated with various concentrations of fatty acids for 48 h, and cell viability was monitored by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT reduction assay. Additionally, real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR was performed to elucidate the potential anti-cancer mechanisms of the three fatty acids under investigation. Capric, caprylic and caproic acids reduced cancer cell viability by 70% to 90% (p < 0.05 compared to controls. RT-qPCR data indicated that these natural molecules produced anticancer effects by down-regulating cell cycle regulatory genes and up-regulating genes involved in apoptosis. Future research will validate the anticancer effect of these fatty acids in an appropriate in vivo model.

  7. Tamarind Seed Xyloglucans Promote Proliferation and Migration of Human Skin Cells through Internalization via Stimulation of Proproliferative Signal Transduction Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Nie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xyloglucans (XGs of Tamarindus indica L. Fabaceae are used as drug vehicles or as ingredients of cosmetics. Two xyloglucans were extracted from T. indica seed with cold water (TSw and copper complex precipitation (TSc. Both were analyzed in regard to composition and influence on cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle progression, migration, MAPK phosphorylation, and gene expression of human skin keratinocytes (NHEK and HaCaT and fibroblasts (NHDF in vitro. TSw and TSc differed in molecular weight, rhamnose content, and ratios of xylose, arabinose, galactose, and glucose. Both XGs improved keratinocytes and fibroblast proliferation, promoted the cell cycle, and stimulated migration and intracellular enzyme activity of NHDF after endosomal uptake. Only TSw significantly enhanced HaCaT migration and extracellular enzyme activity of NHDF and HaCaT. TSw and TSc predominantly enhanced the phosphorylation of molecules that referred to Erk signaling in NHEK. In NHDF parts of the integrin signaling and SAPK/JNK pathway were affected. Independent of cell type TSw marginally regulated the expression of genes, which referred to membrane proteins, cytoskeleton, cytokine signaling, and ECM as well as to processes of metabolism and transcription. Results show that T. indica xyloglucans promote skin regeneration by a direct influence on cell proliferation and migration.

  8. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Cross-section of human skin Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Logical Images, Inc. I n the areas of skin health and skin diseases, the NIH's National Institute ...

  9. A spectroscopic study on the effect of ultra-violet solar radiation in Antarctica on the human skin fibroblast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuyuki Yamamoto

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A study on the effect of the solar ultra-violet radiation on the human skin fibroblast cells revealed that the production of matrix metalloproteinase-2 was inhibited by the radiation. A CO2 incubator connected by optical fibers to a reflector telescope for collecting the solar light was built at Syowa station by the 49th Japanese Antarctica Research Expedition. The direction of the telescope was continuously controlled by a sun-tracker to follow the movement of the Sun automatically. The intensity of the collected light was monitored by a portable spectrophotometer housed inside. The human skin fibroblast cells were incubated in the CO2 chamber to investigate the effect of the solar radiation at Syowa station and were compared with those reference experiments at a laboratory in Japan. The results showed cell damage by strong UV radiation. The production of matrix metalloproteinase-2 was prompted by the moderate UV-B, but was inhibited by the strong UV-B radiation, as studied under laboratory conditions in Japan. The effect of strong solar radiation at Syowa station involving the radiation of UV-B region was estimated to be of the same extent of the radiation caused by an artificial UV-B light with the intensity more than 50 mJ/cm2.

  10. The impact of nitrite and antioxidants on ultraviolet-A-induced cell death of human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opländer, Christian; Cortese, Miriam M; Korth, Hans-Gert; Kirsch, Michael; Mahotka, Csaba; Wetzel, Wiebke; Pallua, Norbert; Suschek, Christoph V

    2007-09-01

    Nitrite (NO(2)(-)) occurs ubiquitously in biological fluids such as blood and sweat. Ultraviolet A-induced nitric oxide formation via decomposition of cutaneous nitrite, accompanied by the production of reactive oxygen (ROS) or nitrogen species (RNS), represents an important source for NO in human skin physiology. Examining the impact of nitrite and the antioxidants glutathione (GSH), Trolox (TRL), and ascorbic acid (ASC) on UVA-induced toxicity of human skin fibroblasts (FB) we found that NO(2)(-) concentration-dependently enhances the susceptibility of FB to the toxic effects of UVA by a mechanism comprising enhanced induction of lipid peroxidation. While ASC completely protects FB cultures from UVA/NO(2)(-)-induced cell damage, GSH or TRL excessively enhances UVA/NO(2)(-)-induced cell death by a mechanism comprising nitrite concentration-dependent TRL radical formation or GSH-derived oxidative stress. Simultaneously, in the presence of GSH or TRL the mode of UVA/NO(2)(-)-induced cell death changes from apoptosis to necrosis. In summary, during photodecomposition of nitrite, ROS or RNS formation may act as strong toxic insults. Although inhibition of oxidative stress by NO and other antioxidants represents a successful strategy for protection from UVA/NO(2)(-)-induced injuries, GSH and TRL may nitrite-dependently aggravate the injurious impact by TRL or GSH radical formation, respectively.

  11. Human atopic dermatitis skin-derived T cells can induce a reaction in mouse keratinocytes in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Britta C; Blom, Lars; Dyring-Andersen, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    In atopic dermatitis (AD), the inflammatory response between skin infiltrating T cells and keratinocytes is fundamental to the development of chronic lesional eczema. The aim of this study was to investigate whether skin-derived T cells from AD patients could induce an inflammatory response in mice...

  12. Extracts from Calendula officinalis offer in vitro protection against H2 O2 induced oxidative stress cell killing of human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnuqaydan, Abdullah M; Lenehan, Claire E; Hughes, Rachel R; Sanderson, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro safety and antioxidant potential of Calendula officinalis flower head extracts was investigated. The effect of different concentrations (0.125, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 5.0% (v/v)) of Calendula extracts on human skin cells HaCaT in vitro was explored. Doses of 1.0% (v/v) (0.88 mg dry weight/mL) or less showed no toxicity. Cells were also exposed to the Calendula extracts for either 4, 24 or 48 h before being exposed to an oxidative insult (hydrogen peroxide H2 O2 ) for 1 h. Using the MTT cytotoxicity assay, it was observed that two independent extracts of C. officinalis gave time-dependent and concentration-dependent H2 O2 protection against induced oxidative stress in vitro using human skin cells. Pre-incubation with the Calendula extracts for 24 and 48 h increased survival relative to the population without extract by 20% and 40% respectively following oxidative challenge. The antioxidant potential of the Calendula extracts was confirmed using a complimentary chemical technique, the DPPH(●) assay. Calendula extracts exhibited free radical scavenging abilities. This study demonstrates that Calendula flower extracts contain bioactive and free radical scavenging compounds that significantly protect against oxidative stress in a human skin cell culture model.

  13. Wound Dressing Model of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells-Alginates Complex Promotes Skin Wound Healing by Paracrine Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To probe growth characteristics of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs cultured with alginate gel scaffolds, and to explore feasibility of wound dressing model of hUCMSCs-alginates compound. Methods. hUCMSCs were isolated, cultured, and identified in vitro. Then cells were cultivated in 100 mM calcium alginate gel, and the capacity of proliferation and migration and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF were investigated regularly. Wound dressing model of hUCMSCs-alginate gel mix was transplanted into Balb/c mice skin defects. Wound healing rate and immunohistochemistry were examined. Results. hUCMSCs grew well but with little migration ability in the alginate gel. Compared with control group, a significantly larger cell number and more VEGF expression were shown in the gel group after culturing for 3–6 days (P < 0.05. In addition, a faster skin wound healing rate with more neovascularization was observed in the hUCMSCs-alginate gel group than in control groups at 15th day after surgery (P < 0.05. Conclusion. hUCMSCs can proliferate well and express massive VEGF in calcium alginate gel porous scaffolds. Wound dressing model of hUCMSCs-alginate gel mix can promote wound healing through paracrine signaling.

  14. Defensive effects of fullerene-C60 dissolved in squalane against the 2,4-nonadienal-induced cell injury in human skin keratinocytes HaCaT and wrinkle formation in 3D-human skin tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinya; Aoshima, Hisae; Saitoh, Yasukazu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2010-02-01

    We dissolved fullerene-C60 in squalane (LipoFullerene; LF-SQ, C60-eq.: 500 ppm) and examined its defensive effects against 2,4-nonadienal (NDA)-induced cell injury in HaCaT keratinocytes and wrinkle formation in three dimensional (3D)-human skin tissue model. NDA is an analog of 4-hydroxynonenal, one of major causes for human body odor indicative of aging and a lipophilic cell injury factor. Cell viability (% of the control) decreased to 31.6% on treatment with NDA (40 microM), but it increased to 66.0-97.5% when LF-SQ of 1-4% (C60-eq.: 5-20 ppm) was administered for 5 hr before NDA addition. The defensive effect by LF-SQ was superior to that of "squalane" alone at the same doses. NDA-induced DNA-fragmentation in HaCaT cells was suppressed by LF-SQ administered for 5 hr before NDA treatment, and LF-SQ protected HaCaT cells against apoptosis-like cell death. LF-SQ did not appreciably defend against hydrogen peroxide, though LF-SQ effectively defended against tert-butylhydroperoxide, a type of the intermediate hydrophilicity-lipophilicity degree out of other reactive oxygen species. The scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that NDA caused wrinkles and abnormal scales on keratinocytes of 3D-human skin tissue model, and structural homogeneity of the interstratum was broken, any of which were, however, markedly suppressed with LF-SQ. Squalane alone exhibited defensive effect against the skin tissue injury to some extent, but which was inferior to LF-SQ. LF-SQ might effectively capture and scavenge lipid radicals generated inside the cell membrane, because squalane acts as a lipophilic carrier of C60. C60 dissolved in squalane can be expected to serve as a cosmeceutical ingredient for anti-wrinkle formation.

  15. Metallic copper nanoparticles induce apoptosis in a human skin melanoma A-375 cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Ruchira; Basu, Tarakdas

    2017-03-01

    In two earlier communications (Chatterjee et al 2012 Nanotechnology 23 085103, Chatterjee et al 2014 Nanotechnology 25 135101), we reported the development of a simple and unique method of synthesizing highly stable metallic copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs) with high antibacterial activity. Here we report on the cytotoxic potency of the NPs against cancer cells. The value of the IC50 dose of the Cu NPs against human skin cancer cell A-375 was found to be 1.71 μg ml‑1 only, which was much less than values reported so far, and this concentration had no cytotoxic effect on normal white blood cells. The NPs caused (i) lowering of cell membrane rigidity, (ii) DNA degradation, (iii) chromosomal condensation, (iv) cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, (v) depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and (vi) apoptosis of cells. Cellular apoptosis occurred in the caspase-9-mediated intrinsic pathway. This study revealed that our Cu NPs had high anticancer properties by killing tumor cells through the apoptotic pathway. Since this particle has high antibacterial activity, our Cu NPs might be developed in future as a dual action drug—anticancer as well as antibacterial.

  16. Cell motility in models of wounded human skin is improved by Gap27 despite raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Catherine S.; Berends, Rebecca F. [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom); Flint, David J. [Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 161 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G4 0RE (United Kingdom); Martin, Patricia E.M., E-mail: Patricia.Martin@gcu.ac.uk [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    Reducing Cx43 expression stimulates skin wound healing. This is mimicked in models when Cx43 function is blocked by the connexin mimetic peptide Gap27. IGF-I also stimulates wound healing with IGFBP-5 attenuating its actions. Further, the IGF-I to IGFBP-5 ratio is altered in diabetic skin, where wound closure is impaired. We investigated whether Gap27 remains effective in augmenting scrape-wound closure in human skin wound models simulating diabetes-induced changes, using culture conditions with raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5. Gap27 increased scrape-wound closure in normal glucose and insulin (NGI) and to a lesser extent in high glucose and insulin (HGI). IGF-I enhanced scrape-wound closure in keratinocytes whereas IGFBP-5 inhibited this response. Gap27 overcame the inhibitory effects of IGFBP-5 on IGF-I activity. Connexin-mediated communication (CMC) was reduced in HGI, despite raised Cx43, and Gap27 significantly decreased CMC in NGI and HGI. IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect CMC. IGF-I increased keratinocyte proliferation in NGI, and Gap27 increased proliferation in NGI to a greater extent than in HGI. We conclude that IGF-I and Gap27 stimulate scrape-wound closure by independent mechanisms with Gap27 inhibiting Cx43 function. Gap27 can enhance wound closure in diabetic conditions, irrespective of the IGF-I:IGFBP-5 balance. - Highlights: ► Human organotypic and keratinocyte ‘diabetic’ skin models were used to demonstrate the ability of Gap27 to improve scrape-wound closure. ► Gap27 enhanced scrape-wound closure by reducing Cx43-mediated communication, whereas IGFBP-5 retarded cell migration. ► IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect connexin-mediated pathways. ► Gap27 can override altered glucose, insulin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 in ‘diabetic’ skin models and thus has therapeutic potential.

  17. CCL5 and CCL20 mediate immigration of Langerhans cells into the epidermis of full thickness human skin equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwehand, Krista; Spiekstra, Sander W; Waaijman, Taco; Breetveld, Melanie; Scheper, Rik J; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Gibbs, Susan

    2012-10-01

    Epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) play a key role in initiation and regulation of immune responses. Whereas LC migration out of the epidermis upon environmental assault is extensively studied, the mechanisms involved in the (re)population of the epidermis with LC are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the immigration of LC derived from the human MUTZ-3 cell line (MUTZ-LC) into the epidermis of a full thickness skin equivalent, comprising a fully differentiated epidermis on a fibroblast-populated dermis. MUTZ-LC were used to determine which epidermis-derived chemokines play a role in mediating LC trans-dermal migration into the epidermis. We found evidence for a role of keratinocyte-derived CCL5 and CCL20 in the chemo-attraction of MUTZ-LC. Neutralizing antibodies against CCL5 and CCL20 blocked LC migration towards keratinocytes. Secretion of these two chemokines was associated with incorporation of MUTZ-LC into the epidermis of full thickness skin equivalents. In conclusion, our findings suggest that epidermis derived CCL5 and CCL20 are pivotal mediators in recruitment of LC into the epidermis.

  18. Comparison of the effects between animal-derived trypsin and recombinant trypsin on human skin cells proliferation, gene and protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manira, Maarof; Khairul Anuar, Khairoji; Seet, Wan Tai; Ahmad Irfan, Abd Wahab; Ng, Min Hwei; Chua, Kien Hui; Mohd Heikal, Mohd Yunus; Aminuddin, Bin Saim; Ruszymah, Bt Hj Idrus

    2014-03-01

    Animal-derivative free reagents are preferred in skin cell culture for clinical applications. The aim of this study was to compare the performance and effects between animal-derived trypsin and recombinant trypsin for skin cells culture and expansion. Full thickness human skin was digested in 0.6 % collagenase for 6 h to liberate the fibroblasts, followed by treatment with either animal-derived trypsin; Trypsin EDTA (TE) or recombinant trypsin; TrypLE Select (TS) to liberate the keratinocytes. Both keratinocytes and fibroblasts were then culture-expanded until passage 2. Trypsinization for both cell types during culture-expansion was performed using either TE or TS. Total cells yield was determined using a haemocytometer. Expression of collagen type I, collagen type III (Col-III), cytokeratin 10, and cytokeratin 14 genes were quantified via RT-PCR and further confirmed with immunocytochemical staining. The results of our study showed that the total cell yield for both keratinocytes and fibroblasts treated with TE or TS were comparable. RT-PCR showed that expression of skin-specific genes except Col-III was higher in the TS treated group compared to that in the TE group. Expression of proteins specific to the two cell types were confirmed by immunocytochemical staining in both TE and TS groups. In conclusion, the performance of the recombinant trypsin is comparable with the well-established animal-derived trypsin for human skin cell culture expansion in terms of cell yield and expression of specific cellular markers.

  19. Porcine skin flow-through diffusion cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, R E

    2001-11-01

    Porcine Skin Flow-Through Diffusion Cell System (Ronald E. Baynes, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina). Porcine skin can be used in a diffusion cell apparatus to study the rate and extent of absorption of topically applied chemicals through the skin. Although the skin of a number of animals can be used in this system, that of the pig most closely approximates human skin anatomically and physiologically.

  20. Skin and the non-human human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösing, Lilian Munk

    2013-01-01

    The article puts forward an aesthetic and psychoanalytic analysis of Titian's painting, The Flaying of Marsyas, arguing that the painting is a reflection on the human subject as a being constituted by skin and by a core of non-humanity. The analysis is partly an answer to Melanie Hart's (2007......) article 'Visualizing the mind: Looking at Titian's Flaying of Marsyas', addressing features of the painting not commented on by Hart, and supplementing Hart's (Kleinian) theoretical frame by involving Didier Anzieu's 'skin ego', Slavoj Zizek's concept of the 'non-human', Giorgio Agamben's term...

  1. Quantum dots trigger immunomodulation of the NFκB pathway in human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romoser, Amelia A; Chen, Patricia L; Berg, J Michael; Seabury, Christopher; Ivanov, Ivan; Criscitiello, Michael F; Sayes, Christie M

    2011-07-01

    The immunological effects of quantum dots are dependent on a variety of factors including, but not limited to, exposure time and dosing concentrations. In this study, we investigated the influence of 15 nm CdSe/ZnS-COOH quantum dot nanocrystals (QDs) on cell density, viability, and morphology in human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) and human dermal fibroblasts (HDF). Furthermore, inflammatory and non-inflammatory immune responses were measured using protein and real time PCR array analysis from HDF cells exposed to predetermined sub-lethal concentrations of QDs. CdSe/ZnS-COOH QDs caused concentration-dependent (1-120 nM exposure concentrations) and time-dependent (8 h or 48 h) cell death, as evidenced by metabolic activity and morphological changes. QD exposure induced upregulation of apoptotic, inflammatory and immunoregulatory proteins such as TNF-α, IL-1B and IL-10. HMOX1, an indicator of stress due to reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) and/or metals, was upregulated at the later time point as well. QDs also caused modulation of genes known to be associated with inflammatory (IL1-β, CCL2, IRAK-2), immune (IL-1, IL-6, PGLYRP1, SERPINA1, IL-10), stress due to ROIs and/or heavy metals (HMOX1), and apoptotic (CASP1, ADORA2A) responses. Cellular effects from QD exposure were found to primarily follow the NFκB pathway. In addition, QDs induced a differential cytotoxicity in keratinocytes and fibroblasts at different exposure concentrations and time points, even at physiologically relevant dosing concentrations, thus emphasizing the need to investigate potential mechanisms of action among different cell types within the same target organ.

  2. Hair Follicle Morphogenesis in the Treatment of Mouse Full-Thickness Skin Defects Using Composite Human Acellular Amniotic Membrane and Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Minjuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early repair of skin injury and maximal restoration of the function and appearance have become important targets of clinical treatment. In the present study, we observed the healing process of skin defects in nude mice and structural characteristics of the new skin after transplantation of isolated and cultured adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs onto the human acellular amniotic membrane (AAM. The result showed that ADMSCs were closely attached to the surface of AAM and grew well 24 h after seeding. Comparison of the wound healing rate at days 7, 14, and 28 after transplantation showed that ADMSCs seeded on AAM facilitated the healing of full-thickness skin wounds more effectively as compared with either hAM or AAM alone, indicating that ADMSCs participated in skin regeneration. More importantly, we noticed a phenomenon of hair follicle development during the process of skin repair. Composite ADMSCs and AAM not only promoted the healing of the mouse full-thickness defects but also facilitated generation of the appendages of the affected skin, thus promoting restoration of the skin function. Our results provide a new possible therapy idea for the treatment of skin wounds with respect to both anatomical regeneration and functional restoration.

  3. Hair Follicle Morphogenesis in the Treatment of Mouse Full-Thickness Skin Defects Using Composite Human Acellular Amniotic Membrane and Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minjuan, Wu; Jun, Xiong; Shiyun, Shao; Sha, Xu; Haitao, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Early repair of skin injury and maximal restoration of the function and appearance have become important targets of clinical treatment. In the present study, we observed the healing process of skin defects in nude mice and structural characteristics of the new skin after transplantation of isolated and cultured adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) onto the human acellular amniotic membrane (AAM). The result showed that ADMSCs were closely attached to the surface of AAM and grew well 24 h after seeding. Comparison of the wound healing rate at days 7, 14, and 28 after transplantation showed that ADMSCs seeded on AAM facilitated the healing of full-thickness skin wounds more effectively as compared with either hAM or AAM alone, indicating that ADMSCs participated in skin regeneration. More importantly, we noticed a phenomenon of hair follicle development during the process of skin repair. Composite ADMSCs and AAM not only promoted the healing of the mouse full-thickness defects but also facilitated generation of the appendages of the affected skin, thus promoting restoration of the skin function. Our results provide a new possible therapy idea for the treatment of skin wounds with respect to both anatomical regeneration and functional restoration. PMID:27597871

  4. Isolation and characterization of two kinds of stem cells from the same human skin back sample with therapeutic potential in spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaowen Zong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS AND OBJECTIVE: Spinal cord injury remains to be a challenge to clinicians and it is attractive to employ autologous adult stem cell transplantation in its treatment, however, how to harvest cells with therapeutic potential easily and how to get enough number of cells for transplantation are challenging issues. In the present study, we aimed to isolate skin-derived precursors (SKPs and dermal multipotent stem cells (dMSCs simultaneously from single human skin samples from patients with paraplegia. METHODS: Dissociated cells were initially generated from the dermal layer of skin samples from patients with paraplegia and cultured in SKPs proliferation medium. Four hours later, many cells adhered to the base of the flask. The suspended cells were then transferred to another flask for further culture as SKPs, while the adherent cells were cultured in dMSCs proliferation medium. Twenty-four hours later, the adherent cells were harvested and single-cell colonies were generated using serial dilution method. [(3H]thymidine incorporation assay, microchemotaxis Transwell chambers assay, RT-PCR and fluorescent immunocytochemistry were employed to examine the characterizations of the isolated cells. RESULTS: SKPs and dMSCs were isolated simultaneously from a single skin sample. SKPs and dMSCs differed in several respects, including in terms of intermediate protein expression, proliferation capacities, and differentiation tendencies towards mesodermal and neural progenies. However, both SKPs and dMSCs showed high rates of differentiation into neurons and Schwann cells under appropriate inducing conditions. dMSCs isolated by this method showed no overt differences from dMSCs isolated by routine methods. CONCLUSIONS: Two kinds of stem cells, namely SKPs and dMSCs, can be isolated simultaneously from individual human skin sample from paraplegia patients. Both of them show ability to differentiate into neural cells under proper inducing conditions

  5. The top skin-associated genes: a comparative analysis of human and mouse skin transcriptomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Peter Arne; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Schrumpf, Holger; Homey, Bernhard; Zlotnik, Albert; Hevezi, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The mouse represents a key model system for the study of the physiology and biochemistry of skin. Comparison of skin between mouse and human is critical for interpretation and application of data from mouse experiments to human disease. Here, we review the current knowledge on structure and immunology of mouse and human skin. Moreover, we present a systematic comparison of human and mouse skin transcriptomes. To this end, we have recently used a genome-wide database of human gene expression to identify genes highly expressed in skin, with no, or limited expression elsewhere - human skin-associated genes (hSAGs). Analysis of our set of hSAGs allowed us to generate a comprehensive molecular characterization of healthy human skin. Here, we used a similar database to generate a list of mouse skin-associated genes (mSAGs). A comparative analysis between the top human (n=666) and mouse (n=873) skin-associated genes (SAGs) revealed a total of only 30.2% identity between the two lists. The majority of shared genes encode proteins that participate in structural and barrier functions. Analysis of the top functional annotation terms revealed an overlap for morphogenesis, cell adhesion, structure, and signal transduction. The results of this analysis, discussed in the context of published data, illustrate the diversity between the molecular make up of skin of both species and grants a probable explanation, why results generated in murine in vivo models often fail to translate into the human.

  6. Low doses of UVB or UVA induce chromosomal aberrations in cultured human skin cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emri, G.; Wenczl, E.; Erp, P. van; Jans, J.; Roza, L.; Horkay, I.; Schothorst, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosomal defects are frequently present in malignant and premalignant skin disorders; however, it is not known whether ultraviolet radiation from sunlight plays a role in their induction. To obtain information on the ability of ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B to induce chromosomal aberrations,

  7. Low doses of UVB or UVA induce chromosomal aberrations in cultured human skin cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emri, G.; Wenczl, E.; Erp, P. van; Jans, J.; Roza, L.; Horkay, I.; Schothorst, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosomal defects are frequently present in malignant and premalignant skin disorders; however, it is not known whether ultraviolet radiation from sunlight plays a role in their induction. To obtain information on the ability of ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B to induce chromosomal aberrations, cu

  8. Influence of hyperthermia on the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 from human skin fibroblasts and meningioma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, W W; Zang, K D; Issinger, O G

    1983-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts and meningioma cells, derived from primary cultures of the same patients have been used to study the influence of hyperthermia on (i) cell morphology and (ii) phosphorylation pattern of ribosomal and ribosome-associated proteins. Incubation of tumour cells and fibroblasts up to 7 h...

  9. Homing of regulatory T cells to human skin is important for the prevention of alloimmune-mediated pathology in an in vivo cellular therapy model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Issa

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cell (Treg therapy for immune modulation is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment and prevention of autoimmune disease and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD after bone marrow transplantation. However, Treg are heterogeneous and express a variety of chemokine receptor molecules. The optimal subpopulation of Treg for therapeutic use may vary according to the pathological target. Indeed, clinical trials of Treg for the prevention of GvHD where the skin is a major target of the anti-host response have employed Treg derived from a variety of different sources. We postulated that for the effective treatment of GvHD-related skin pathology, Treg must be able to migrate to skin in order to regulate local alloimmune responses efficiently. To test the hypothesis that different populations of Treg display distinct efficacy in vivo based on their expression of tissue-specific homing molecules, we evaluated the activity of human Treg derived from two disparate sources in a model of human skin transplantation. Treg were derived from adult blood or cord blood and expanded in vitro. While Treg from both sources displayed similar in vitro suppressive efficacy, they exhibited marked differences in the expression of skin homing molecules. Importantly, only adult-derived Treg were able to prevent alloimmune-mediated human skin destruction in vivo, by virtue of their improved migration to skin. The presence of Treg within the skin was sufficient to prevent its alloimmune-mediated destruction. Additionally, Treg expressing the skin homing cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA were more efficient at preventing skin destruction than their CLA-deficient counterparts. Our findings highlight the importance of the careful selection of an effective subpopulation of Treg for clinical use according to the pathology of interest.

  10. Effect of low intensity laser interaction with human skin fibroblast cells using fiber-optic nano-probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Gopalendu; Dutta, Ashim; Mitra, Kunal; Grace, Michael S; Amat, Albert; Romanczyk, Tara B; Wu, Xingjia; Chakrabarti, Kristi; Anders, Juanita; Gorman, Erik; Waynant, Ronald W; Tata, Darrell B

    2007-03-01

    Over the past forty years, many efforts have been devoted to study low power laser light interactions with biological systems. Some of the investigations were performed in-vitro, on bulk cell populations. Our present work was undertaken to apply specially engineered fiber-optic based nano-probes for the precise delivery of laser light on to a single cell and to observe production of low power laser light induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). A normal human skin fibroblast (NHF) cell line was utilized in this investigation and the cells were irradiated under two different schemes of exposure: (1) an entire NHF cell population within a Petri dish using a fan beam methodology, and (2) through the precise delivery of laser energy on to a single NHF cell using fiber-optic nano-probe. Photobiostimulative studies were conducted through variation of laser intensity, exposure time, and the energy dose of exposure. Laser irradiation induced enhancement in the rate of cell proliferation was observed to be dependent on laser exposure parameters and the method of laser delivery. The total energy dose (fluence) had a greater influence on the enhancement in the rate of cellular proliferation than compared to laser intensity. The enhancement in the growth rate was observed to have a finite life-time of several days after the initial laser exposure. Fluorescent life-time imaging of ROS was performed during the nano-based single cell exposure method. The kinetics of ROS generation was found to depend strongly on the laser fluence and not on the laser intensity.

  11. IgG and IgA with Potential Microbial-Binding Activity Are Expressed by Normal Human Skin Epidermal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyang Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system of the skin is thought to depend largely on a multi-layered mechanical barrier supplemented by epidermis-derived antimicrobial peptides. To date, there are no reports of antimicrobial antibody secretion by the epidermis. In this study, we report the expression of functional immunoglobulin G (IgG and immunoglobulin A (IgA, previously thought to be only produced by B cells, in normal human epidermal cells and the human keratinocyte line HaCaT. While B cells express a fully diverse Ig, epidermal cell-expressed IgG or IgA showed one or two conservative VHDJH rearrangements in each individual. These unique VDJ rearrangements in epidermal cells were found neither in the B cell-derived Ig VDJ databases published by others nor in our positive controls. IgG and IgA from epidermal cells of the same individual had different VDJ rearrangement patterns. IgG was found primarily in prickle cells, and IgA was mainly detected in basal cells. Both epidermal cell-derived IgG and IgA showed potential antibody activity by binding pathogens like Staphylococcus aureus, the most common pathogenic skin bacteria, but the microbial-binding profile was different. Our data indicates that normal human epidermal cells spontaneously express IgG and IgA, and we speculate that these Igs participate in skin innate immunity.

  12. Preparation of Inactivated Human Skin Using High Hydrostatic Pressurization for Full-Thickness Skin Reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Hieu Liem

    Full Text Available We have reported that high-hydrostatic-pressure (HHP technology is safe and useful for producing various kinds of decellularized tissue. However, the preparation of decellularized or inactivated skin using HHP has not been reported. The objective of this study was thus to prepare inactivated skin from human skin using HHP, and to explore the appropriate conditions of pressurization to inactivate skin that can be used for skin reconstruction. Human skin samples of 8 mm in diameter were packed in bags filled with normal saline solution (NSS or distilled water (DW, and then pressurized at 0, 100, 150, 200 and 1000 MPa for 10 minutes. The viability of skin after HHP was evaluated using WST-8 assay. Outgrowth cells from pressurized skin and the viability of pressurized skin after cultivation for 14 days were also evaluated. The pressurized skin was subjected to histological evaluation using hematoxylin and eosin staining, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, immunohistochemical staining of type IV collagen for the basement membrane of epidermis and capillaries, and immunohistochemical staining of von Willebrand factor (vWF for capillaries. Then, human cultured epidermis (CE was applied on the pressurized skin and implanted into the subcutis of nude mice; specimens were subsequently obtained 14 days after implantation. Skin samples pressurized at more than 200 MPa were inactivated in both NSS and DW. The basement membrane and capillaries remained intact in all groups according to histological and immunohistological evaluations, and collagen fibers showed no apparent damage by SEM. CE took on skin pressurized at 150 and 200 MPa after implantation, whereas it did not take on skin pressurized at 1000 MPa. These results indicate that human skin could be inactivated after pressurization at more than 200 MPa, but skin pressurized at 1000 MPa had some damage to the dermis that prevented the taking of CE. Therefore, pressurization at 200 MPa is optimal for

  13. The Microbiota of the Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egert, Markus; Simmering, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to sum up important progress in the field of human skin microbiota research that was achieved over the last years.The human skin is one of the largest and most versatile organs of the human body. Owing to its function as a protective interface between the largely sterile interior of the human body and the highly microbially contaminated outer environment, it is densely colonized with a diverse and active microbiota. This skin microbiota is of high importance for human health and well-being. It is implicated in several severe skin diseases and plays a major role in wound infections. Many less severe, but negatively perceived cosmetic skin phenomena are linked with skin microbes, too. In addition, skin microorganisms, in particular on the human hands, are crucial for the field of hygiene research. Notably, apart from being only a potential source of disease and contamination, the skin microbiota also contributes to the protective functions of the human skin in many ways. Finally, the analysis of structure and function of the human skin microbiota is interesting from a basic, evolutionary perspective on human microbe interactions.Key questions in the field of skin microbiota research deal with (a) a deeper understanding of the structure (species inventory) and function (physiology) of the healthy human skin microbiota in space and time, (b) the distinction of resident and transient skin microbiota members,

  14. Basic Red 51, a permitted semi-permanent hair dye, is cytotoxic to human skin cells: Studies in monolayer and 3D skin model using human keratinocytes (HaCaT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, Thalita B; Tiago, Manoela; Faião-Flores, Fernanda; de Moraes Barros, Silvia B; Bast, Aalt; Hageman, Geja; de Oliveira, Danielle Palma; Maria-Engler, Silvya S

    2014-06-01

    The use of hair dyes is closely associated with the increase of cancer, inflammation and other skin disorders. The recognition that human skin is not an impermeable barrier indicates that there is the possibility of human systemic exposure. The carcinogenic potential of hair dye ingredients has attracted the attention of toxicologists for many decades, mainly due to the fact that some ingredients belong to the large chemical family of aromatic amines. Herein, we investigated the cytotoxicity of Basic Red 51 (BR51) in immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). BR51 is a temporary hair dye that belongs to the azo group (NN); the cleavage of this bond may result in the release of toxic aromatic amines. The half maximal effective concentration (EC50) in HaCaT cells is 13μg/mL. BR51 induced a significant decrease on expression of p21 in a dose dependent manner. p53 was not affected, whereas BR51 decreased procaspase 8 and cleaved procaspase 9. These results proved that caspase 3 is fully involved in BR51-induced apoptosis. The dye was also able to stop this cell cycle on G2 in sub-toxic doses. Moreover, we reconstructed a 3D artificial epidermis using HaCaT cells; using this model, we observed that BR51 induced cell injury and cells were undergoing apoptosis, considering the fragmented nuclei. Subsequently, BR51 induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to an increase on the levels of 8-oxo-dG. In conclusion, we provide strong evidence that consumer and/or professional exposure to BR51 poses risk to human health.

  15. Identification of potential biomarkers of hepatitis B-induced acute liver failure using hepatic cells derived from human skin precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Robim M; Sachinidis, Agapios; De Boe, Veerle; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; De Kock, Joery

    2015-09-01

    Besides their role in the elucidation of pathogenic processes of medical and pharmacological nature, biomarkers can also be used to document specific toxicological events. Hepatic cells generated from human skin-derived precursors (hSKP-HPC) were previously shown to be a promising in vitro tool for the evaluation of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. In this study, their capacity to identify potential liver-specific biomarkers at the gene expression level was investigated with particular emphasis on acute liver failure (ALF). To this end, a set of potential ALF-specific biomarkers was established using clinically relevant liver samples obtained from patients suffering from hepatitis B-associated ALF. Subsequently, this data was compared to data obtained from primary human hepatocyte cultures and hSKP-HPC, both exposed to the ALF-inducing reference compound acetaminophen. It was found that both in vitro systems revealed a set of molecules that was previously identified in the ALF liver samples. Yet, only a limited number of molecules was common between both in vitro systems and the ALF liver samples. Each of the in vitro systems could be used independently to identify potential toxicity biomarkers related to ALF. It seems therefore more appropriate to combine primary human hepatocyte cultures with complementary in vitro models to efficiently screen out potential hepatotoxic compounds.

  16. Cutaneous Human Papillomavirus Infection and Development of Subsequent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalaka S. Hampras

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV infection in the development of subsequent cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is unknown. Pathologically confirmed cases of SCC (n=150 enrolled in a previously conducted case-control study were included in a retrospective cohort study to examine the association of cutaneous HPV at the time of SCC diagnosis with the risk of subsequent SCC development. Data on HPV seropositivity, HPV DNA in eyebrow hairs (EB and SCC tumors were available from the parent study. Incidence of subsequent SCC was estimated using person-years of follow up. Cox Proportional Hazards ratios were estimated to evaluate the associations of both, HPV seropositivity and HPV DNA positivity with subsequent SCC. The five year cumulative incidence of subsequent SCC was 72%. Seropositivity to cutaneous HPV was not associated with the risk of subsequent SCC (HR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.41–1.67. Any beta HPV infection in EB was associated with reduced risk (HR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.11–0.78 of subsequent SCC among cases who were positive for beta HPV DNA in tumor tissue. Infection with beta HPV type 2 (HR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.12–0.86 in EB was associated with reduced risk of subsequent SCC among HPV DNA positive SCCs. In conclusion, beta HPV infection was inversely associated with the risk of subsequent SCC.

  17. Assessment of Chemical Skin-Sensitizing Potency by an In Vitro Assay Based on Human Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lambrechts, Nathalie; Vanheel, Hanne; Nelissen, Inge; Witters, Hilda; VAN DEN HEUVEL Rosette; Van Tendeloo, Viggo; Schoeters, Greet; HOOYBERGHS, Jef

    2010-01-01

    The skin-sensitizing potential of chemicals is an important concern for public health and thus a significant end point in the hazard identification process. To determine skin-sensitizing capacity, large research efforts focus on the development of assays, which do not require animals. As such, an in vitro test has previously been developed based on the differential expression of CREM and CCR2 transcripts in CD34(+) progenitor-derived dendritic cells (CD34-DC), which allows to classify chemica...

  18. Electrospun Zein/PCL Fibrous Matrices Release Tetracycline in a Controlled Manner, Killing Staphylococcus aureus Both in Biofilms and Ex Vivo on Pig Skin, and are Compatible with Human Skin Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhusein, Nour; Blagbrough, Ian S; Beeton, Michael L; Bolhuis, Albert; De Bank, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the destruction of clinically-relevant bacteria within biofilms via the sustained release of the antibiotic tetracycline from zein-based electrospun polymeric fibrous matrices and to demonstrate the compatibility of such wound dressing matrices with human skin cells. Zein/PCL triple layered fibrous dressings with entrapped tetracycline were electrospun. The successful entrapment of tetracycline in these dressings was validated. The successful release of bioactive tetracycline, the destruction of preformed biofilms, and the viability of fibroblast (FEK4) cells were investigated. The sustained release of tetracycline from these matrices led to the efficient destruction of preformed biofilms from Staphylococcus aureus MRSA252 in vitro, and of MRSA252 and ATCC 25923 bacteria in an ex vivo pig skin model using 1 × 1 cm square matrices containing tetracycline (30 μg). Human FEK4 cells grew normally in the presence of these matrices. The ability of the zein-based matrices to destroy bacteria within increasingly complex in vitro biofilm models was clearly established. An ex vivo pig skin assay showed that these matrices, with entrapped tetracycline, efficiently kill bacteria and this, combined with their compatibility with a human skin cell line suggest these matrices are well suited for applications in wound healing and infection control.

  19. The molecular fingerprint of human papillomavirus infection and its effect on the Langerhans cell population in squamous cell carcinomas of the genital skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M Rios-Yuil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Information is scarce about the presence of molecular alterations related to human papillomavirus (HPV infection in squamous cell carcinomas of the genital skin and about the effect of this infection in the number of Langerhans cells present in these tumors. Aims: To determine the presence of HPV in genital skin squamous cell carcinomas and to see the relationship between HPV infection and changes in the expression of Ki-67 antigen (Ki-67, p53 protein (p53, retinoblastoma protein (pRb and E-cadherin and to alterations in Langerhans cell density, if any. Methods: A descriptive, comparative, retrospective and cross-sectional study was performed with all the cases diagnosed as squamous cell carcinomas of the genital skin at the Dermatopathology Service from 2001 to 2011. The diagnosis was verified by histopathological examination. The presence of HPV was examined using chromogenic in situ hybridization, and protein expression was studied via immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The 34 cases studied were verified as squamous cell carcinomas and 44.1% were HPV positive. The degree of expression of pRb was 17.50% ±14.11% (mean ± SD in HPV-positive cases and 29.74% ±20.38% in HPV-negative cases (P = 0.0236. The degree of expression of Ki-67 was 47.67% ±30.64% in HPV-positive cases and 29.87% ±15.95% in HPV-negative cases (P = 0.0273. Conclusion: HPV infection was related to lower pRb expression and higher Ki-67 expression in comparison with HPV negative samples. We could not find a relationship between HPV infection and the degree of expression of p53 and E-cadherin or with Langerhans cell density.

  20. Technical advance: Langerhans cells derived from a human cell line in a full-thickness skin equivalent undergo allergen-induced maturation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwehand, Krista; Spiekstra, Sander W; Waaijman, Taco; Scheper, Rik J; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Gibbs, Susan

    2011-11-01

    In this report, the construction of a functional, immunocompetent, full-thickness skin equivalent (SE) is described, consisting of an epidermal compartment containing keratinocytes, melanocytes, and human LCs derived from the MUTZ-3 cell line (MUTZ-LC) and a fibroblast-populated dermal compartment. The CD1a(+)Langerin(+)HLA-DR(+) MUTZ-LCs populate the entire epidermis at a similar density to that found in native skin. Exposure of the SE to subtoxic concentrations of the allergens NiSO(4) and resorcinol resulted in LC migration out of the epidermis toward the fibroblast-populated dermal compartment. A significant dose-dependent up-regulation of the DC maturation-related CCR7 and IL-1β transcripts and of CD83 at the protein level upon epidermal exposure to both allergens was observed, indicative of maturation and migration of the epidermally incorporated LC. We have thus successfully developed a reproducible and functional full-thickness SE model containing epidermal MUTZ-LC. This model offers an alternative to animal testing for identifying potential chemical sensitizers and for skin-based vaccination strategies and provides a unique research tool to study human LC biology in situ under controlled in vitro conditions.

  1. Molecular cartography of the human skin surface in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouslimani, Amina; Porto, Carla; Rath, Christopher M; Wang, Mingxun; Guo, Yurong; Gonzalez, Antonio; Berg-Lyon, Donna; Ackermann, Gail; Moeller Christensen, Gitte Julie; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Zhang, Lingjuan; Borkowski, Andrew W; Meehan, Michael J; Dorrestein, Kathleen; Gallo, Richard L; Bandeira, Nuno; Knight, Rob; Alexandrov, Theodore; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2015-04-28

    The human skin is an organ with a surface area of 1.5-2 m(2) that provides our interface with the environment. The molecular composition of this organ is derived from host cells, microbiota, and external molecules. The chemical makeup of the skin surface is largely undefined. Here we advance the technologies needed to explore the topographical distribution of skin molecules, using 3D mapping of mass spectrometry data and microbial 16S rRNA amplicon sequences. Our 3D maps reveal that the molecular composition of skin has diverse distributions and that the composition is defined not only by skin cells and microbes but also by our daily routines, including the application of hygiene products. The technological development of these maps lays a foundation for studying the spatial relationships of human skin with hygiene, the microbiota, and environment, with potential for developing predictive models of skin phenotypes tailored to individual health.

  2. The human POLH gene is not mutated, and is expressed in a cohort of patients with basal or squamous cell carcinoma of the skin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flanagan, Annabelle M

    2007-04-01

    Skin cancer, the most common cancer in the general population, is strongly associated with exposure to the ultraviolet component of sunlight. To investigate the relationship between DNA damage processing and skin tumour development, we determined the POLH status of a cohort of skin cancer patients. The human POLH gene encodes DNA polymerase eta (poleta), which normally carries out accurate translesion synthesis past the major UV-induced photoproduct, the dithymine cyclobutane dimer. In the absence of active poleta in xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) patients, mutations accumulate at sites of UV-induced DNA damage, providing the initiating step in skin carcinogenesis. Forty patients diagnosed with skin cancer were genotyped for polymorphisms in the POLH protein-coding sequence, using glycosylase-mediated polymorphism detection (GMPD) and direct DNA sequencing of POLH PCR products derived from white blood cell genomic DNA. All individuals carried the wild-type POLH sequence. No POLH mutations were identified in genomic DNA from skin tumours derived from 15 of these patients. As determined by RT-PCR, POLH mRNA was expressed in all normal and skin tumour tissue examined. Poleta protein was also detectable by Western blotting, in two matched normal and skin tumour extracts. An alternatively spliced form of POLH mRNA, lacking exon 2, was more readily detected in skin tissue than in white blood cells from the same patient. Real-time PCR was used to quantify POLH expression in matched normal and skin tumour-derived mRNA from a series of patients diagnosed with either basal or squamous cell carcinoma. Compared to matched normal skin tissue from the same patient, 1 of 7 SCC, and 4 of 10 BCC tumours examined showed at least a 2-fold reduction in POLH expression, while 1 of 7 SCC, and 3 of 10 BCC tumours showed at least a 2-fold increase in POLH expression. Differences in gene expression, rather than sequence changes may be the main mechanism by which POLH status varies

  3. Continuous irradiation with a 633-nm light-emitting diode exerts an anti-aging effect on human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak Sun; Park, Won Sang; Baek, Jong-In; Lee, Bo-Sub; Yoo, Dae Sung; Park, Si Jun

    2015-02-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that the light source emitted from light‑emitting diode (LED) has a potential anti-aging effect on human skin. Studies using single and interval LED irradiation have documented such effects; however, to the best of our knowledge, the anti-aging effects of continuous LED irradiation have not yet been investigated. In the present study, we demonstrated that continuous irradiation with a 633±3-nm LED exerted anti-aging effects in both in vitro and ex vivo experiments. More specifically, irradiation with a 633-nm LED for 2 days increased the synthesis of type 1 procollagen and decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)1 and MMP2 in skin fibroblasts. In addition, irradiation with a 633-nm LED decreased the expression levels of inflammatory genes, such has cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and interleukin-1-α (IL-1α) in keratinocytes. Furthermore, a 14-day LED irradiation moderately increased keratinocyte proliferation. Using human skin explants, we confirmed the safety of this 633-nm LED irradiation, which resulted in unaltered morphology and allergy-free potential in human tissue. Overall, these data provide insight into the anti-aging effects of continuous LED irradiation on human skin.

  4. A systems model for immune cell interactions unravels the mechanism of inflammation in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najl V Valeyev

    Full Text Available Inflammation is characterized by altered cytokine levels produced by cell populations in a highly interdependent manner. To elucidate the mechanism of an inflammatory reaction, we have developed a mathematical model for immune cell interactions via the specific, dose-dependent cytokine production rates of cell populations. The model describes the criteria required for normal and pathological immune system responses and suggests that alterations in the cytokine production rates can lead to various stable levels which manifest themselves in different disease phenotypes. The model predicts that pairs of interacting immune cell populations can maintain homeostatic and elevated extracellular cytokine concentration levels, enabling them to operate as an immune system switch. The concept described here is developed in the context of psoriasis, an immune-mediated disease, but it can also offer mechanistic insights into other inflammatory pathologies as it explains how interactions between immune cell populations can lead to disease phenotypes.

  5. Human papillomaviruses and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smola, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect squamous epithelia and can induce hyperproliferative lesions. More than 120 different HPV types have been characterized and classified into five different genera. While mucosal high-risk HPVs have a well-established causal role in anogenital carcinogenesis, the biology of cutaneous HPVs is less well understood. The clinical relevance of genus beta-PV infection has clearly been demonstrated in patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a rare inherited disease associated with ahigh rate of skin cancer. In the normal population genus beta-PV are suspected to have an etiologic role in skin carcinogenesis as well but this is still controversially discussed. Their oncogenic potency has been investigated in mouse models and in vitro. In 2009, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified the genus beta HPV types 5 and 8 as "possible carcinogenic" biological agents (group 2B) in EV disease. This chapter will give an overview on the knowns and unknowns of infections with genus beta-PV and discuss their potential impact on skin carcinogenesis in the general population.

  6. The Effects of Topically Applied Glycolic Acid and Salicylic Acid on Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Erythema, DNA Damage and Sunburn Cell Formation in Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhauser, Andrija; Wei, Rong-Rong; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Coelho, Sergio G.; Kaidbey, Kays; Barton, Curtis; Takahashi, Kaoruko; Beer, Janusz Z.; Miller, Sharon A.; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2009-01-01

    Background α-Hydroxy acids (αHA) are reported to reduce signs of aging in the skin and are widely used cosmetic ingredients. Several studies suggest that αHA can increase the sensitivity of skin to ultraviolet radiation. More recently, β-hydroxy acids (βHA), or combinations of αHA and βHA have also been incorporated into antiaging skin care products. Concerns have also arisen about increased sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation following use of skin care products containing β-HA. Objective To determine whether topical treatment with glycolic acid, a representative αHA, or with salicylic acid, a βHA, modifies the short-term effects of solar simulated radiation (SSR) in human skin. Methods Fourteen subjects participated in this study. Three of the four test sites on the mid-back of each subject were treated daily Monday - Friday, for a total of 3.5 weeks, with glycolic acid (10%), salicylic acid (2%), or vehicle (control). The fourth site received no treatment. After the last treatment, each site was exposed to SSR, and shave biopsies from all 4 sites were obtained. The endpoints evaluated in this study were erythema (assessed visually and instrumentally), DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Results Treatment with glycolic acid resulted in increased sensitivity of human skin to SSR, measured as an increase in erythema, DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Salicylic acid did not produce significant changes in any of these biomarkers. Conclusions Short-term topical application of glycolic acid in a cosmetic formulation increased the sensitivity of human skin to SSR, while a comparable treatment with salicylic acid did not. PMID:19411163

  7. Classification of basal cell carcinoma in human skin using machine learning and quantitative features captured by polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvdashti, Tahereh; Duan, Lian; Aasi, Sumaira Z; Tang, Jean Y; Ellerbee Bowden, Audrey K

    2016-09-01

    We report the first fully automated detection of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most commonly occurring type of skin cancer, in human skin using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). Our proposed automated procedure entails building a machine-learning based classifier by extracting image features from the two complementary image contrasts offered by PS-OCT, intensity and phase retardation (PR), and selecting a subset of features that yields a classifier with the highest accuracy. Our classifier achieved 95.4% sensitivity and specificity, validated by leave-one-patient-out cross validation (LOPOCV), in detecting BCC in human skin samples collected from 42 patients. Moreover, we show the superiority of our classifier over the best possible classifier based on features extracted from intensity-only data, which demonstrates the significance of PR data in detecting BCC.

  8. [The clinical use of cryopreserved human skin allografts for transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Flores, Francisco; Chacón-Gómez, María; Madinaveitia-Villanueva, Juan Antonio; Barrera-Lopez, Araceli; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda; Querevalu-Murillo, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The biological recovery of human skin allografts is the gold standard for preservation in Skin Banks. However, there is no worldwide consensus about specific allocation criteria for preserved human skin allografts with living cells. A report is presented on the results of 5 years of experience of using human skin allografts in burned patient in the Skin and Tissue Bank at the "Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" The human skin allografts were obtained from multi-organ donors. processed and preserved at -80 °C for 12 months. Allocation criteria were performed according to blood type match, clinical history, and burned body surface. Up to now, the Skin and Tissue Bank at 'Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" has processed and recovered 125,000 cm(2) of human skin allografts. It has performed 34 surgical implants on 21 burned patients. The average of burn body surface was 59.2%. More than two-thirds (67.7%) of recipients of skin allografts were matched of the same to type blood of the donor, and 66.6% survived after 126 days hospital stay. It is proposed to consider recipient's blood group as allocation criteria to assign tissue; and use human skin allografts on patiens affected with burns over 30% of body surface (according the "rule of the 9"). Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. Two novel Co(II complexes with two different Schiff bases: inhibiting growth of human skin cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-J. Xiao

    Full Text Available Using two flexible Schiff bases, H2L1 and H2L2, two new cobalt II (Co(II-coordination compounds, namely, Py3CoL1 (1 and Py3CoL2 (2 (Py=pyridine, L1=3,5-ClC6H2(OC=NC6H3(O-4-NO2, L2=3,5-BrC6H2(OC=NC6H3(O-4-NO2 have been synthesized under solvothermal conditions. Single crystal X-ray structural analysis revealed that compounds 1 and 2 are both six-coordinate in a distorted octahedral geometry, and the 1D chain structure was formed by the π…π and C-H…O interactions or C-H…Cl interaction. The in vitro antitumor activities of 1, 2 and their corresponding organic ligands Py, L1, and L2 were studied and evaluated, in which three human skin cancer cell lines (A-431, HT-144 and SK-MEL-30 were used in the screening tests.

  10. Xenobiotic metabolism in human skin and 3D human skin reconstructs: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibbs, S.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Merk, H.F.; Lockley, D.J.; Pendlington, R.U.; Pease, C.K.

    2007-01-01

    In this review, we discuss and compare studies of xenobiotic metabolism in both human skin and 3D human skin reconstructs. In comparison to the liver, the skin is a less studied organ in terms of characterising metabolic capability. While the skin forms the major protective barrier to environmental

  11. Xenobiotic metabolism in human skin and 3D human skin reconstructs: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibbs, S.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Merk, H.F.; Lockley, D.J.; Pendlington, R.U.; Pease, C.K.

    2007-01-01

    In this review, we discuss and compare studies of xenobiotic metabolism in both human skin and 3D human skin reconstructs. In comparison to the liver, the skin is a less studied organ in terms of characterising metabolic capability. While the skin forms the major protective barrier to environmental

  12. Expansion of Natural Killer Cells in Peripheral Blood in a Japanese Elderly with Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Related Skin Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsaku Imashuku

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells were proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1- (HTLV-1- associated neurologic disease. Our patient was a 77-year-old Japanese man, who had been treated for infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1 for nearly 10 years. When referred to us, he had facial eczema/edema as well as extensive dermatitis at the neck/upper chest and nuchal area/upper back regions. Dermal lesions had CD3+CD4+ cells, but no NK cells. Flow cytometry of his peripheral blood showed a phenotype of CD2+ (97%, CD3+ (17%, CD4+ (12%, CD7+ (94%, CD8+ (6%, CD11c+ (70%, CD16+ (82%, CD19+ (0%, CD20+ (0%, CD56+ (67%, HLA-DR+ (68%, and NKp46+ (36%. Absolute numbers of CD56+NK cells in the peripheral blood were in a range of 986/μL–1,270/μL. The expanded NK cells in the peripheral blood are considered to be reactive, to maintain the confinement of the HTLV-1-positive CD4+ cells in the skin, and to prevent the progression of the disease.

  13. Mean cell size and collagen orientation from 2D Fourier analysis on confocal laser scanning microscopy and two-photon fluorescence microscopy on human skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucassen, Gerald W.; Bakker, Bernard L.; Neerken, Sieglinde; Hendriks, Rob F. M.

    2003-07-01

    We present results from 2D Fourier analysis on 3D stacks of images obtained by confocal laser scanning reflectance microscopy (CLSM) and two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PM) on human skin in vivo. CLSM images were obtained with a modified commercial system (Vivascope1000, Lucid Inc, excitation wavelength 830 nm) equipped with a piezo-focusing element (350 μm range) for depth positioning of the objective lens. 2PM was performed with a specially designed set-up with excitation wavelength 730 nm. Mean cell size in the epidermal layer and structural orientation in the dermal layer have been determined as a function of depth by 2D Fourier analysis. Fourier analysis on microscopic images enables automatic non-invasive quantitative structural analysis (mean cell size and orientation) of living human skin.

  14. Development of human skin equivalents to unravel the impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eweje, M.O.

    2016-01-01

    The studies in this thesis describes the barrier defects in Atopic Dermatitis (AD) skin and various techniques to develop AD Human Skin Equivalents (HSEs) which can be used to better understand the role of several factors in the pathogenesis of AD skin. The results described show that Inflammation p

  15. Assessment of chemical skin-sensitizing potency by an in vitro assay based on human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Nathalie; Vanheel, Hanne; Nelissen, Inge; Witters, Hilda; Van Den Heuvel, Rosette; Van Tendeloo, Viggo; Schoeters, Greet; Hooyberghs, Jef

    2010-07-01

    The skin-sensitizing potential of chemicals is an important concern for public health and thus a significant end point in the hazard identification process. To determine skin-sensitizing capacity, large research efforts focus on the development of assays, which do not require animals. As such, an in vitro test has previously been developed based on the differential expression of CREM and CCR2 transcripts in CD34(+) progenitor-derived dendritic cells (CD34-DC), which allows to classify chemicals as skin (non-)sensitizing. However, skin sensitization is not an all-or-none phenomenon, and up to now, the assessment of relative potency can only be derived using the in vivo local lymph node assay (LLNA). In our study, we analyzed the feasibility to predict the sensitizing potency, i.e., the LLNA EC3 values, of 15 skin sensitizers using in vitro data from the CD34-DC-based assay. Hereto, we extended the in vitro-generated gene expression data set by an additional source of information, the concentration of the compound that causes 20% cell damage (IC20) in CD34-DC. We statistically confirmed that this IC20 is linearly independent from the gene expression changes but that it does correlate with LLNA EC3 values. In a further analysis, we applied a robust linear regression with both IC20 and expression changes of CREM and CCR2 as explanatory variables. For 13 out of 15 compounds, a high linear correlation was established between the in vitro model and the LLNA EC3 values over a range of four orders of magnitude, i.e., from weak to extreme sensitizers.

  16. Human cerebrospinal fluid contains CD4+ memory T cells expressing gut- or skin-specific trafficking determinants: relevance for immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell James J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circulating memory T cells can be divided into tissue-specific subsets, which traffic through distinct tissue compartments during physiologic immune surveillance, based on their expression of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors. We reasoned that a bias (either enrichment or depletion of CSF T cell expression of known organ-specific trafficking determinants might suggest that homing of T cells to the subarachnoid space could be governed by a CNS-specific adhesion molecule or chemokine receptor. Results The expression of cutaneous leukocyte antigen (CLA and CC-chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4; associated with skin-homing as well as the expression of integrin α4β7 and CCR9 (associated with gut-homing was analyzed on CD4+ memory T cells in CSF from individuals with non-inflammatory neurological diseases using flow cytometry. CSF contained similar proportions of CD4+ memory T cells expressing CLA, CCR4, integrin α4β7 and CCR9 as paired blood samples. Conclusion The results extend our previous findings that antigen-experienced CD4+ memory T cells traffic through the CSF in proportion to their abundance in the peripheral circulation. Furthermore, the ready access of skin- and gut-homing CD4+ memory T cells to the CNS compartment via CSF has implications for the mechanisms of action of immunotherapeutic strategies, such as oral tolerance or therapeutic immunization, where immunogens are administered using an oral or subcutaneous route.

  17. Green tea polyphenol, (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, induces toxicity in human skin cancer cells by targeting β-catenin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Tripti [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Katiyar, Santosh K., E-mail: skatiyar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The green tea polyphenol, (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), has been shown to have anti-carcinogenic effects in several skin tumor models, and efforts are continued to investigate the molecular targets responsible for its cytotoxic effects to cancer cells. Our recent observation that β-catenin is upregulated in skin tumors suggested the possibility that the anti-skin carcinogenic effects of EGCG are mediated, at least in part, through its effects on β-catenin signaling. We have found that treatment of the A431 and SCC13 human skin cancer cell lines with EGCG resulted in reduced cell viability and increased cell death and that these cytotoxic effects were associated with inactivation of β-catenin signaling. Evidence of EGCG-induced inactivation of β-catenin included: (i) reduced accumulation of nuclear β-catenin; (ii) enhanced levels of casein kinase1α, reduced phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β, and increased phosphorylation of β-catenin on critical serine{sup 45,33/37} residues; and (iii) reduced levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, which are down-stream targets of β-catenin. Treatment of cells with prostaglandin E2 (PGE{sub 2}) enhanced the accumulation of β-catenin and enhanced β-catenin signaling. Treatment with either EGCG or an EP2 antagonist (AH6809) reduced the PGE{sub 2}-enhanced levels of cAMP, an upstream regulator of β-catenin. Inactivation of β-catenin by EGCG resulted in suppression of cell survival signaling proteins. siRNA knockdown of β-catenin in A431 and SCC13 cells reduced cell viability. Collectively, these data suggest that induction of cytotoxicity in skin cancer cells by EGCG is mediated by targeting of β-catenin signaling and that the β-catenin signaling is upregulated by inflammatory mediators. - Highlights: • EGCG inhibits cancer cell viability through inactivation of β-catenin signaling. • Inactivation of β-catenin involves the downregulation of inflammatory mediators. • EGCG

  18. Human skin penetration of silver nanoparticles through intact and damaged skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larese, Francesca Filon; D'Agostin, Flavia; Crosera, Matteo; Adami, Gianpiero; Renzi, Nadia; Bovenzi, Massimo; Maina, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing interest on nanoparticle safety for topical use. The benefits of nanoparticles have been shown in several scientific fields, but little is known about their potential to penetrate the skin. This study aims at evaluating in vitro skin penetration of silver nanoparticles. Experiments were performed using the Franz diffusion cell method with intact and damaged human skin. Physiological solution was used as receiving phase and 70 microg/cm2 of silver nanoparticles coated with polyvinylpirrolidone dispersed in synthetic sweat were applied as donor phase to the outer surface of the skin for 24h. The receptor fluid measurements were performed by electro thermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS). Human skin penetration was also determined by using transmission electron microscope (TEM) to verify the location of silver nanoparticles in exposed membranes. Median silver concentrations of 0.46 ng cm(-2) (range cells where the nanoparticles solution was applied on intact skin (eight cells) and on damaged skin (eight cells), respectively. Twenty-four hours silver flux permeation in damaged skin was 0.62+/-0.2 ng cm(-2) with a lag time <1h. Our experimental data showed that silver nanoparticles absorption through intact and damaged skin was very low but detectable, and that in case of damaged skin it was possible an increasing permeation of silver applied as nanoparticles. Moreover, silver nanoparticles could be detected in the stratum corneum and the outermost surface of the epidermis by electron microscopy. We demonstrated for the first time that silver applied as nanoparticles coated with polyvinylpirrolidone is able to permeate the damaged skin in an in vitro diffusion cell system.

  19. A Fusion Approach for Efficient Human Skin Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Wei Ren; Chan, Chee Seng; Yogarajah, Pratheepan; Condell, Joan

    2014-01-01

    A reliable human skin detection method that is adaptable to different human skin colours and illu- mination conditions is essential for better human skin segmentation. Even though different human skin colour detection solutions have been successfully applied, they are prone to false skin detection and are not able to cope with the variety of human skin colours across different ethnic. Moreover, existing methods require high computational cost. In this paper, we propose a novel human skin de- ...

  20. Differential responses of skin cancer-chemopreventive agents silibinin, quercetin, and epigallocatechin 3-gallate on mitogenic signaling and cell cycle regulators in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, N; Agarwal, C; Agarwal, R

    2001-01-01

    Silibinin, quercetin, and epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) have been shown to be skin cancer-preventive agents, albeit by several different mechanisms. Here, we assessed whether these agents show their cancer-preventive potential by a differential effect on mitogenic signaling molecules and cell cycle regulators. Treatment of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells with these agents inhibited the activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and the downstream adapter protein Shc, but only silibinin showed a marked inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 activation. In terms of cell cycle regulators, silibinin treatment showed an induction of Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27 together with a significant decrease in cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-4, CDK2, and cyclin D1. Quercetin treatment, however, resulted in a moderate increase in Cip1/p21 with no change in Kip1/p27 and a decrease in CDK4 and cyclin D1. EGCG treatment also led to an induction of Cip1/p21 but no change in Kip1/27, CDK2, and cyclin D1 and a decrease in CDK4 only at low doses. Treatment of cells with these agents resulted in a strong dose- and time-dependent cell growth inhibition. A high dose of silibinin and low and high doses of quercetin and EGCG also led to cell death by apoptosis, suggesting that a lack of their inhibitory effect on mitogen-activated protein kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 activation possibly "turns on" an apoptotic cell death response associated with their cancer-preventive and anticarcinogenic effects. Together, these results suggest that silibinin, quercetin, and EGCG exert their cancer-preventive effects by differential responses on mitogenic signaling and cell cycle regulators.

  1. Multiphoton STED and FRET in human skin: Resolving the skin barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonescu, Irina; Dreier, Jes; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    Understanding the penetration properties of substances across biological bar- riers and membranes is vital for many areas of research. In the case of human skin, the barrier is primarily found in the stratum corneum and consists of protein-enriched cells surrounded by a lipid membrane -enriched...... excited STED and Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) microscopy to probe the structure of human skin. Super resolution optical microscopy enables resolving structures in the skin below to 60 nm allowing visualization of the stratum corneum intercellular lipid matrix and individual proteins...

  2. Skin anti-photoaging properties of ginsenoside Rh2 epimers in UV-B-irradiated human keratinocyte cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sun-Joo Oh; Sihyeong Lee; Woo-Yong Choi; Chang-Jin Lim

    2014-09-01

    Ginseng, one of the most widely used herbal medicines, has a wide range of therapeutic and pharmacological applications. Ginsenosides are the major bioactive ingredients of ginseng, which are responsible for various pharmacological activities of ginseng. Ginsenoside Rh2, known as an antitumour ginsenoside, exists as two different stereoisomeric forms, 20()-ginsenoside Rh2 [20()-Rh2] and 20()-ginsenoside Rh2 [20()-Rh2]. This work aimed to assess and compare skin anti-photoaging activities of 20()-Rh2 and 20()-Rh2 in UV-B-irradiated HaCat cells. 20()-Rh2, but not 20()-Rh2, was able to suppress UV-B-induced ROS production in HaCat cells. Both stereoisomeric forms could not modulate cellular survival and NO level in UV-B-irradiated HaCat cells. Both 20()-Rh2 and 20()-Rh2 exhibited suppressive effects on UV-B-induced MMP-2 activity and expression in HaCat cells. In brief, the two stereoisomers of ginsenoside Rh2, 20()-Rh2 and 20()-Rh2, possess skin anti-photoaging effects but possibly in different fashions.

  3. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Styrczewska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD, phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification.

  4. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kostyn, Anna; Kulma, Anna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Prescha, Anna; Czuj, Tadeusz; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD), phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification.

  5. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D-epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: phase II enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Ruwiedel, Karsten; Hübenthal, Ulrike; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Abel, Josef; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    The 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals in cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity. Therefore, skin in vitro models have to replace chemical testing in vivo. However, the metabolic competence neither of human skin nor of alternative in vitro models has so far been fully characterized, although skin is the first-pass organ for accidentally or purposely (cosmetics and pharmaceuticals) applied chemicals. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic-metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities to models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured the activity of the phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and N-acetyltransferase in ex vivo human skin, the 3D epidermal model EpiDerm 200 (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines (HaCaT and NCTC 2544) and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. We show that all three phase II enzymes are present and highly active in skin as compared to phase I. Human skin, therefore, represents a more detoxifying than activating organ. This work systematically compares the activities of three important phase II enzymes in four different in vitro models directly to human skin. We conclude from our studies that 3D epidermal models, like the EPI-200 employed here, are superior over monolayer cultures in mimicking human skin xenobiotic metabolism and thus better suited for dermatotoxicity testing. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Development of human skin equivalents to unravel the impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis skin

    OpenAIRE

    Eweje, M.O.

    2016-01-01

    The studies in this thesis describes the barrier defects in Atopic Dermatitis (AD) skin and various techniques to develop AD Human Skin Equivalents (HSEs) which can be used to better understand the role of several factors in the pathogenesis of AD skin. The results described show that Inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of epidermal and SC features of AD skin and that AD epidermal features can be maintained in vitro when AD skin biopsies are used to generate explant-HSEs. The...

  7. Dermal absorption and skin damage following hydrofluoric acid exposure in an ex vivo human skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Kiesewetter, Franklin; Kilo, Sonja; Jäger, Thomas; Göen, Thomas; Korinth, Gintautas; Drexler, Hans

    2016-04-25

    The wide industrial use of hydrofluoric acid (HF) poses a high risk for accidental dermal exposure. Despite local and systemic hazards associated with HF, information on percutaneous penetration and tissue damage is rare. In the present ex vivo study, the dermal absorption of HF (detected in terms of fluoride ions) was quantified and the skin damaging potential as a function of concentration and exposure duration was assessed. Percutaneous penetration of HF (c=5, 30, and 50%) at 3 exposure durations (3, 5, and 10 min) was investigated in a static diffusion cell model using freshly excised human skin. Alterations of skin were histologically evaluated. HF rapidly penetrated through skin under formation of a considerable intradermal reservoir (∼ 13-67% of total absorbed fluoride). Histologically, epidermal alterations were detected already after exposure to 5% HF for 3 min. The degree of skin damage increased with rising concentration and exposure duration leading to coagulation necrosis. For HF concentrations of ≥ 30%, skin damage progressed into deeper skin layers. Topically applied HF concentration was the principal parameter determining HF induced skin effects. The intradermal HF retention capacity associated with progression and prolongation of HF induced skin effects must be considered in the review of skin decontamination procedures.

  8. Acute Activation of Oxidative Pentose Phosphate Pathway as First-Line Response to Oxidative Stress in Human Skin Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehne, Andreas; Emmert, Hila; Soehle, Joern; Winnefeld, Marc; Fischer, Frank; Wenck, Horst; Gallinat, Stefan; Terstegen, Lara; Lucius, Ralph; Hildebrand, Janosch; Zamboni, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Integrity of human skin is endangered by exposure to UV irradiation and chemical stressors, which can provoke a toxic production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative damage. Since oxidation of proteins and metabolites occurs virtually instantaneously, immediate cellular countermeasures are pivotal to mitigate the negative implications of acute oxidative stress. We investigated the short-term metabolic response in human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes to H2O2 and UV exposure. In time-resolved metabolomics experiments, we observed that within seconds after stress induction, glucose catabolism is routed to the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and nucleotide synthesis independent of previously postulated blocks in glycolysis (i.e., of GAPDH or PKM2). Through ultra-short (13)C labeling experiments, we provide evidence for multiple cycling of carbon backbones in the oxidative PPP, potentially maximizing NADPH reduction. The identified metabolic rerouting in oxidative and non-oxidative PPP has important physiological roles in stabilization of the redox balance and ROS clearance.

  9. Photoprotection of human skin beyond ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether-Beck, Susanne; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Krutmann, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Photoprotection of human skin by means of sunscreens or daily skin-care products is traditionally centered around the prevention of acute (e.g. sunburn) and chronic (e.g. skin cancer and photoaging) skin damage that may result from exposure to ultraviolet rays (UVB and UVA). Within the last decade, however, it has been appreciated that wavelengths beyond the ultraviolet spectrum, in particular visible light and infrared radiation, contribute to skin damage in general and photoaging of human skin in particular. As a consequence, attempts have been made to develop skin care/sunscreen products that not only protect against UVB or UVA radiation but provide photoprotection against visible light and infrared radiation as well. In this article, we will briefly review the current knowledge about the mechanisms responsible for visible light/infrared radiation-induced skin damage and then, based on this information, discuss strategies that have been successfully used or may be employed in the future to achieve photoprotection of human skin beyond ultraviolet radiation. In this regard we will particularly focus on the use of topical antioxidants and the challenges that result from the task of showing their efficacy.

  10. Oxidative stress mediated Ca(2+) release manifests endoplasmic reticulum stress leading to unfolded protein response in UV-B irradiated human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, Mufti R; Nissar, Ul A; Afnan, Quadri; Rafiq, Rather A; Sharma, Love; Amin, Shajrul; Kaiser, Peerzada; Sharma, Parduman R; Tasduq, Sheikh A

    2014-07-01

    Exposure of skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, an environmental stressor induces number of adverse biological effects (photodamage), including cancer. The damage induced by UV-irradiation in skin cells is initiated by the photochemical generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and consequent activation of unfolded protein response (UPR). To decipher cellular and molecular events responsible for UV-B mediated ER stress and UPR activation in skin cells. The study was performed on human skin fibroblast (Hs68) and keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells exposed to UV-B radiations in lab conditions. Different parameters of UVB induced cellular and molecular changes were analyzed using Western-blotting, microscopic studies and flow cytometry. Our results depicted that UV-B induces an immediate ROS generation that resulted in emptying of ER Ca(2+) stores inducing ER stress and activation of PERK-peIF2α-CHOP pathway. Quenching ROS generation by anti-oxidants prevented Ca(2+) release and subsequent induction of ER stress and UPR activation. UV-B irradiation induced PERK dependent G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in Hs68 and G1/S phase cell cycle arrest in HaCaT. Also our study reflects that UV-B exposure leads to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of apoptotic cascade as evident by AnnexinV/PI staining, decreased expression of Bcl-2 and increased cleavage of PARP-1 protein. UV-B induced Ca(2+) deficit within ER lumen was mediated by immediate ROS generation. Insufficient Ca(2+) concentration within ER lumen developed ER stress leading to UPR activation. These changes were reversed by use of anti-oxidants which quench ROS. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Water vapour loss measurements on human skin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, Petrus Gerardus Maria van der

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis, the results of a series of investigations into the barrier function of human skin are presented. In these investigations, the barrier function was assessed by water vapour loss measurements of the skin using a method based on gradient estimation.... Zie: Summary and conclusions

  12. Roughness threshold for cell attachment and proliferation on plasma micro-nanotextured polymeric surfaces: the case of primary human skin fibroblasts and mouse immortalized 3T3 fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourkoula, A.; Constantoudis, V.; Kontziampasis, D.; Petrou, P. S.; Kakabakos, S. E.; Tserepi, A.; Gogolides, E.

    2016-08-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) surfaces have been micro-nanotextured in oxygen plasmas with increasing ion energy, leading to micro-nanotopography characterized by increased root mean square roughness, correlation length and fractal dimension. Primary human skin fibroblasts and mouse immortalized 3T3 fibroblasts were cultured on these surfaces and the number of adhering cells, their proliferation rate and morphology (cytoplasm and nucleus area) were evaluated as a function of roughness height, correlation length, and fractal dimension. A roughness threshold behavior was observed for both types of cells leading to dramatic cell number decrease above this threshold, which is almost similar for the two types of cells, despite their differences in size and stiffness. The results are discussed based on two theoretical models, which are reconciled and unified when the elastic moduli and the size of the cells are taken into account.

  13. Human skin penetration of cobalt nanoparticles through intact and damaged skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larese Filon, Francesca; Crosera, Matteo; Timeus, Elisa; Adami, Gianpiero; Bovenzi, Massimo; Ponti, Jessica; Maina, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    Cobalt nanoparticles (CoNPs) are produced for several industrial and biomedical applications but there is a lack of data on human cutaneous absorption. Cobalt is also a skin sensitizer that can cause allergic contact dermatitis. Co applied as NPs, due to their small size and high surface, can penetrate into the skin in higher amount that bulk material. The aim of this study was to evaluate the absorption of Co applied as NPs in both intact and damaged skin. Experiments were performed using Franz cells and 1.0 mg cm(-2) of CoNPs was applied as donor phase for 24h. Mean Co content of 8.5 ± 1.2 ng cm(-2) and 1.87 ± 0.86 μg cm(-2) were found in the receiving solutions of Franz cells when the CoNPs suspension was applied on intact skin and on damaged skin, respectively. Twenty-four hours Co flux permeation was 76 ± 49 ng cm(-2)h(-1) in damaged skin with a lag time of 2.8 ± 2.1h. This study suggests that Co applied as NPs is able to penetrate the human skin in an in vitro diffusion cell system.

  14. Reproducible pattern of microRNA in normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Line; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Gniadecki, Robert

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis via specific targeting of messenger RNA (mRNA). Aberrant mRNA expression contributes to pathological processes such as carcinogenesis. To take advantage of miRNA profiling in skin disease it is essential to investigate miRNA...... expression pattern in normal human skin. Here we investigated miRNA expression profiles from skin biopsies of 8 healthy volunteers taken from sun protected and mildly photo damaged skin using the modified protocol for miRNA extraction. We were able to show a constant pattern of miRNA expression between...... different individuals. We did not find any significant differences in miRNA expression between sun protected and mildly photodamaged skin. These results may be valuable for future design of studies on miRNA expression in skin disease....

  15. Reproducible pattern of microRNA in normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Line; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Gniadecki, Robert

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis via specific targeting of messenger RNA (mRNA). Aberrant mRNA expression contributes to pathological processes such as carcinogenesis. To take advantage of miRNA profiling in skin disease it is essential to investigate miRNA...... expression pattern in normal human skin. Here we investigated miRNA expression profiles from skin biopsies of 8 healthy volunteers taken from sun protected and mildly photo damaged skin using the modified protocol for miRNA extraction. We were able to show a constant pattern of miRNA expression between...... different individuals. We did not find any significant differences in miRNA expression between sun protected and mildly photodamaged skin. These results may be valuable for future design of studies on miRNA expression in skin disease....

  16. Human skin penetration of gold nanoparticles through intact and damaged skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filon, Francesca Larese; Crosera, Matteo; Adami, Gianpiero; Bovenzi, Massimo; Rossi, Federica; Maina, Giovanni

    2011-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are produced for many applications but there is a lack of available data on their skin absorption. Experiments were performed using the Franz diffusion cell method with intact and damaged human skin. A physiological solution was used as receiving phase and 0.5 mL (1st exp) and 1.5 mL (2nd exp) of a solution containing 100 mg L⁻¹ of AuNPs (15 and 45 μg cm⁻², respectively) was applied as donor phase to the outer surface of the skin for 24 h. Skin absorption was dose dependent. Mean gold content of 214.0 ± 43.7 ng cm⁻² and 187.7 ± 50.2 ng cm⁻² were found in the receiving solutions of cells where the AuNPs solution was applied in higher concentration on intact skin (8 Franz cells) and on damaged skin (8 Franz cells), respectively. Twenty-four hours gold flux permeation was 7.8 ± 2.0 ng cm⁻² h⁻¹ and 7.1 ± 2.5 ng cm⁻² h⁻¹ in intact and damaged skin, respectively, with a lag time less than 1 hour. Transmission Electron Microscope analysis on skin samples and chemical analysis using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry demonstrated the presence of AuNPs into epidermis and dermis. This study showed that AuNPs are able to penetrate the human skin in an in vitro diffusion cell system.

  17. Black and white human skin differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Maibach, H I

    1979-01-01

    This review of black and white human skin differences emphasizes the alleged importance of factors other than the obvious, i.e., skin color. Physicochemical differences and differences in susceptibility to irritants and allergens suggest a more resistant black than white skin. Differences appear...... to exist in the frequency of which several skin diseases occur among blacks and whites. A striking feature in this literature is the disagreement between authors. Common for much of this information is difficulty of interpretation, because of socioeconomic influences and other environmental factors....

  18. Black and white human skin differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Maibach, H I

    1979-01-01

    This review of black and white human skin differences emphasizes the alleged importance of factors other than the obvious, i.e., skin color. Physicochemical differences and differences in susceptibility to irritants and allergens suggest a more resistant black than white skin. Differences appear...... to exist in the frequency of which several skin diseases occur among blacks and whites. A striking feature in this literature is the disagreement between authors. Common for much of this information is difficulty of interpretation, because of socioeconomic influences and other environmental factors....

  19. Millimeter wave dosimetry of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, S I; Radzievsky, A A; Logani, M K; Ziskin, M C

    2008-01-01

    To identify the mechanisms of biological effects of mm waves it is important to develop accurate methods for evaluating absorption and penetration depth of mm waves in the epidermis and dermis. The main characteristics of mm wave skin dosimetry were calculated using a homogeneous unilayer model and two multilayer models of skin. These characteristics included reflection, power density (PD), penetration depth (delta), and specific absorption rate (SAR). The parameters of the models were found from fitting the models to the experimental data obtained from measurements of mm wave reflection from human skin. The forearm and palm data were used to model the skin with thin and thick stratum corneum (SC), respectively. The thin SC produced little influence on the interaction of mm waves with skin. On the contrary, the thick SC in the palm played the role of a matching layer and significantly reduced reflection. In addition, the palmar skin manifested a broad peak in reflection within the 83-277 GHz range. The viable epidermis plus dermis, containing a large amount of free water, greatly attenuated mm wave energy. Therefore, the deeper fat layer had little effect on the PD and SAR profiles. We observed the appearance of a moderate SAR peak in the therapeutic frequency range (42-62 GHz) within the skin at a depth of 0.3-0.4 mm. Millimeter waves penetrate into the human skin deep enough (delta = 0.65 mm at 42 GHz) to affect most skin structures located in the epidermis and dermis.

  20. Human Skin Penetration of Cobalt Nanoparticles Through Intact and Damaged Skin

    OpenAIRE

    LARESE FILON Francesca; Crosera, Matteo; TIMEUS Elena; Adami, Gianpiero; Bovenzi, Massimo; Ponti, Jessica; Maina, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt nanoparticles (CoNPs) are produced for many applications but there is a lack of data on human absorption. The aim of our study was to evaluate the CoNPs skin absorption. Experiments were performed using Franz cells with human skin. Physiological solution was used as receiving phase and 1.0 mg cm-2 of CoNPs was applied as donor phase for 24 h. Mean Co content of 8.3 ± 1.5 ng cm-2 and 1.87 ± 0.86 ug cm-2 were found in the receiving solutions of cells where the CoNPs suspension was app...

  1. Preservation of histological structure of cells in human skin presenting mummification and corification processes by Sandison's rehydrating solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collini, Federica; Andreola, Salvatore Ambrogio; Gentile, Guendalina; Marchesi, Matteo; Muccino, Enrico; Zoja, Riccardo

    2014-11-01

    To overcome the difficulties of construction and interpretation of microscopic material from corpses presenting mummification and corification processes, a variety of techniques and tricks are used: in this research the results of applying the Sandison's rehydrating solution are presented, generally used in archeological field on Egyptian mummies of different ages, in human cadaveric material in an advanced state of decomposition. Nineteen skin specimens were taken from corpses presenting corification and mummification processes, discovered in a time ranging between one and four months and exhumed after 11 years. Each biological sample was divided into two parts: one, directly fixed in buffered formalin 10%; the other, preliminarily treated with the Sandison's rehydrating solution and, therefore, post-fixed in 10% buffered formalin. All samples were then carried out the routine histological preparation, and the sections were stained by hematoxylin-eosin and by other histochemical stains. Under the microscope, the samples placed directly into formalin, showed marked structural changes of the various components, while those previously rehydrated with the Sandison's rehydrating solution allowed the clear recognition of different structures. The use of the Sandison's rehydrating solution on skin samples presenting corification and mummification processes, preserving significantly its general setting, stands as an indispensable procedure in the study of such cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Glutathione metabolism in the HaCaT cell line as a model for the detoxification of the model sensitisers 2,4-dinitrohalobenzenes in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquoilleot, Sandrine; Sheffield, David; Olayanju, Adedamola; Sison-Young, Rowena; Kitteringham, Neil R; Naisbitt, Dean J; Aleksic, Maja

    2015-08-19

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most prominent antioxidant in cells and the co-factor of an important set of enzymes involved in the skin metabolic clearance system, glutathione S-transferases (GST). Here, we describe an LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy) method to measure GSH and its disulfide form (GSSG) in HaCaT cells and a 3D Reconstructed Human Epidermis (RHE) model. In our assay, the basal level of GSH in both systems was in the low nmol/mg soluble protein range, while the level of GSSG was systematically below our limit of quantification (0.1 μM). We found that 2,4-dinitrohalobenzenes deplete the GSH present in HaCaT cells within the first hour of exposure, in a dose dependent manner. The level of GSH in HaCaT cells treated with a single non-toxic dose of 10 μM of dinitrohalobenzene was also shown to increase after two hours. While cells treated with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB) and 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB) repleted GSH to levels similar to untreated control cells within 24h, 1-bromo-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNBB) seemed to prevent such a repletion and appeared to be the most toxic compound in all assays. A mathematical modelling of experimental results was performed to further rationalise the differences observed between test chemicals. For this purpose the biological phenomena observed were simplified into two sequential events: the initial depletion of the GSH stock after chemical treatment followed by the repletion of the GSH once the chemical was cleared. Activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway was observed with all compounds within two hours, and at concentrations less than 10 μM. These data show that GSH depletion and repletion occur rapidly in skin cells and emphasize the importance of conducting kinetic studies when performing in vitro experiments exploring skin sensitization.

  3. Nonlinear spectral imaging of human normal skin, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, S. Y.; Yang, J. G.; Zhuang, J.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we use nonlinear spectral imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for analyzing the morphology of collagen and elastin and their biochemical variations in basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and normal skin tissue. It was found in this work that there existed apparent differences among BCC, SCC and normal skin in terms of their thickness of the keratin and epithelial layers, their size of elastic fibers, as well as their distribution and spectral characteristics of collagen. These differences can potentially be used to distinguish BCC and SCC from normal skin, and to discriminate between BCC and SCC, as well as to evaluate treatment responses.

  4. P16INK4a Positive Cells in Human Skin Are Indicative of Local Elastic Fiber Morphology, Facial Wrinkling, and Perceived Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waaijer, Mariëtte E C; Gunn, David A; Adams, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    from 178 participants (aged 45-81 years) of the Leiden Longevity Study. Local elastic fiber morphology, facial wrinkles, and perceived facial age were compared to tertiles of p16INK4a counts, while adjusting for chronological age and other potential confounders. The numbers of epidermal and dermal p16...... wrinkles and a higher perceived age. Participants in the lowest tertile of epidermal p16INK4a counts looked 3 years younger than those in the highest tertile, independently of chronological age and elastic fiber morphology. In conclusion, p16INK4a positive cell numbers in sun-protected human arm skin...

  5. Autophagy in human skin fibroblasts: Comparison between young and aged cells and evaluation of its cellular rhythm and response to Ultraviolet A radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernodet, Nadine; Dong, Kelly; Pelle, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Autophagic mechanisms play critical roles in cell maintenance. Damaged organelles that are not removed by autophagosomes, which act by engulfing and degrading these cellular components, have been linked to various pathologies. Recently, the progression of aging has also been correlated to a compromised autophagic response. Here, we report for the first time a significant reduction in autophagic levels in synchronized aged normal human skin fibroblasts as compared to young fibroblasts. We measured a 77.9% reduction in autophagy as determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for LC3B expression, a microtubule-associated protein correlated to late stage autophagosome formation. In addition, we visualized these same changes by immunocytofluorescence with antibodies directed against LC3B. By harvesting synchronized, as well as unsynchronized cells over time, we were also able to measure for the first time a nighttime peak in autophagy that was present in young but absent in aged fibroblasts. Finally, since human skin is constantly subjected to environmentally induced oxidative stress from sunlight, we exposed fibroblasts to 10 J/cm2 ultraviolet A and found, in good agreement with current literature, not only that irradiation could partially reactivate autophagy in the aged cells, but also that this increase was phase shifted earlier from its endogenous temporal pattern because of its loss of synchronization with circadian rhythm.

  6. Multivariate Models for Prediction of Human Skin Sensitization ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the lnteragency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Method's (ICCVAM) top priorities is the development and evaluation of non-animal approaches to identify potential skin sensitizers. The complexity of biological events necessary to produce skin sensitization suggests that no single alternative method will replace the currently accepted animal tests. ICCVAM is evaluating an integrated approach to testing and assessment based on the adverse outcome pathway for skin sensitization that uses machine learning approaches to predict human skin sensitization hazard. We combined data from three in chemico or in vitro assays - the direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA), human cell line activation test (h-CLAT) and KeratinoSens TM assay - six physicochemical properties and an in silico read-across prediction of skin sensitization hazard into 12 variable groups. The variable groups were evaluated using two machine learning approaches , logistic regression and support vector machine, to predict human skin sensitization hazard. Models were trained on 72 substances and tested on an external set of 24 substances. The six models (three logistic regression and three support vector machine) with the highest accuracy (92%) used: (1) DPRA, h-CLAT and read-across; (2) DPRA, h-CLAT, read-across and KeratinoSens; or (3) DPRA, h-CLAT, read-across, KeratinoSens and log P. The models performed better at predicting human skin sensitization hazard than the murine

  7. Primary culture and identification of human skin Merkel cells%人体皮肤Merkel细胞原代培养与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘太华; 周舟; 王春梅; 王骏; 唐丽君; 陈业红

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the culturing method for human skin Merkel cells in vitro and study the adjustment effects of Merkel cells on neuroendocrine function in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Methods Normal human skin tissues were obtained,and the cells were isolated by enzymatic digestion method. The adhesion and proliferation of Merkel cells in three different culture media were observed by means of a special designed in-vitro cell culturing system. Specific Merkel cell marker antibody CK20 was used to label Merkel cells,and immunohistochemistrical method and flow cytometry were used for cell identification. Results The human skin Merkel cells could smoothly complete adhesion and proliferation in three culture media,and all had an endocrine function,but No. 1 culture medium(Ham ˊs-F12+ fetal bovine serum(10/100 ml)+bFGF(20 ng/ml)was more conducive to the growth of Merkel cells. According to the identification by the flow cytometer,the purity of Merkel cells could be up to 90. 11%. Conclusion In this culture system,human skin Merkel cells can be successfully cultured in vitro,and high-purity Merkel cells can be obtained.%目的探索人体皮肤Merkel细胞体外培养方法,为进一步研究银屑病发病中Merkel细胞的神经内分泌调节作用积累基础资料。方法获取正常人皮肤组织,采用酶消化法分离细胞。设计专门的细胞体外培养系统,观察Merkel细胞在3种不同培养液中贴壁和增殖情况。采用Merkel细胞特异性标记抗体CK20标记Merkel细胞,采用免疫组化和流式细胞仪进行鉴定。结果人体皮肤Merkel细胞在3种培养液中均能顺利贴壁和增殖,并具有内分泌功能,但1号培养液[ Hamˊs-F12+胎牛血清(10/100 ml)+bFGF(20 ng/ml)]更有利于Merkel细胞生长。经流式细胞仪鉴定,Merkel细胞纯度可达90.11%。结论在本培养系统中,人体皮肤Merkel细胞能成功进行体外培养,并可获得较高纯度的Merkel细胞。

  8. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C

    1992-01-01

    Chromium permeation studies were performed on full thickness human skin in diffusion cells. All samples were analysed for the total chromium content by graphite furnace Zeeman-corrected atomic absorption spectrometry. Some samples were analysed by an ion chromatographic method permitting the simu......Chromium permeation studies were performed on full thickness human skin in diffusion cells. All samples were analysed for the total chromium content by graphite furnace Zeeman-corrected atomic absorption spectrometry. Some samples were analysed by an ion chromatographic method permitting...

  9. Dipeptides Increase Functional Activity of Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinin, V V; Durnova, A O; Polyakova, V O; Kvetnoi, I M

    2015-05-01

    We analyzed the effect of dipeptide Glu-Trp and isovaleroyl-Glu-Trp in concentrations of 0.2, 2 and 20 μg/ml and Actovegin preparation on functional activity of human skin fibroblasts. Dipeptides, especially Glu-Trp, produce a stimulating effect on human skin fibroblasts and their effect is equivalent to that of Actovegin. Dipeptides stimulate cell renewal processes by activating synthesis of Ki-67 and reducing expression of caspase-9 and enhance antioxidant function of the cells by stimulating the expression of Hsp-90 and inducible NO-synthase. These findings suggest that dipeptides are promising candidates for preparations stimulating reparative processes.

  10. [Study on the regular pattern of the distribution of skin epidermal stem cells in the different parts of a healthy human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-dong; Li, Tian-zeng; Qi, Shao-hai; Xie, Ju-lin; Xu, Ying-bin; Pan, Shu; Yuan, Ji-Shan; Zhang, Tao; Liang, Hui-zhen

    2006-02-01

    To investigate the regular pattern of the distribution of skin epidermal stem cells (ESCs) in the different parts of a healthy human body, and to evaluate the feasibility of the identification of ESCs by P63 and CD29 with single and double labeling. Full-thickness skin samples from 21 parts (including scalp, dorsum of foot, sole of foot, pubic region, and scrotum) of 5 healthy persons were harvested for the study. Immunohistochemistry method with biotin-streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase (SP) was employed with P63 and CD29 as the first antibody to carry out single and double labeling. The staining results were subjected to image analysis. The distribution of the ESCs in the skin from the above parts was observed and expressed as positive unit (PU) value. It was found by P63 single labeling and P63 and CD29 double labeling that the PU value in the dorsum of foot was the lowest while that in the scalp was the highest among all the parts of a healthy body. It was also found by CD29 single labeling that the PU value in the dorsum of foot was the lowest [(11.9 +/- 1.5)%] while highest in the scalp [(29.1 +/- 5.0)%]. The PU value in the hairy region of a human body was evidently higher than that in the non-hairy region (P 0.05). There are more ESCs in the skin from the scalp, mons pubis and scrotum than other parts of the body. Single P63 or CD29 labeling exhibits higher sensitivity but lower specificity in the identification of ESCs. While the double labeling method exhibits higher specificity but lower sensitivity. Above all, it seems that the double labeling may be a simple and effective method for the identification of ESCs.

  11. Heterogeneous Stem Cells in Skin Homeostatis and Wound Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meilana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The skin protects mammals from insults, infection and dehydration and enables thermoregulation and sensory perception. Various skin-resident cells carry out these diverse functions. Constant turnover of cells and healing upon injury necessitate multiple reservoirs of stem cells. The skin is a complex organ harboring several distinct populations of stem cells and a rich array of cell types. Advances in genetic and imaging tools have brought new findings about the lineage relationships between skin stem cells and their progeny. Such knowledge may offer novel avenues for therapeutics and regenerative medicine. CONTENT: In the past years, our view of the mechanisms that govern skin homeostasis and regeneration have markedly changed. New populations of stem cells have been identified that behave spatio-temporally differently in healthy tissues and in situations of damage, indicating that a great level of stem cell heterogeneity is present in the skin. There are believed to be distinct populations of stem cells in different locations. The lineages that they feed are normally constrained by signals from their local environment, but they can give rise to all epidermal lineages in response to appropriate stimuli. Given the richness of structures such as blood vessels, subcutaneous fat, innervation and the accumulation of fibroblasts under the upper parts of the rete ridges (in the case of human skin, it is reasonable to speculate that the microenvironment might be essential for interfollicular epidermal homeostasis. The bloodstream is probably the main source of long-range signals reaching the skin, and cues provided by the vascular niche might be essential for skin homeostasis. SUMMARY: A key function of the interfollicular epidermis is to act as a protective interface between the body and the external environment, and it contains several architectural elements that enable it to fulfill this function. All elements of the epidermis play

  12. Phosphoproteomics Profiling of Human Skin Fibroblast Cells Reveals Pathways and Proteins Affected by Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Miller, John H.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Du, Xiuxia; Livesay, Eric A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Wang, Yingchun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Background High doses of ionizing radiation result in biological damage; however, the precise relationships between long-term health effects, including cancer, and low-dose exposures remain poorly understood and are currently extrapolated using high-dose exposure data. Identifying the signaling pathways and individual proteins affected at the post-translational level by radiation should shed valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate dose-dependent responses to radiation. Principal Findings We have identified 7117 unique phosphopeptides (2566 phosphoproteins) from control and irradiated (2 and 50 cGy) primary human skin fibroblasts 1 h post-exposure. Semi-quantitative label-free analyses were performed to identify phosphopeptides that are apparently altered by radiation exposure. This screen identified phosphorylation sites on proteins with known roles in radiation responses including TP53BP1 as well as previously unidentified radiation-responsive proteins such as the candidate tumor suppressor SASH1. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that low and high doses of radiation affect both overlapping and unique biological processes and suggest a role for MAP kinase and protein kinase A (PKA) signaling in the radiation response as well as differential regulation of p53 networks at low and high doses of radiation. Conclusions Our results represent the most comprehensive analysis of the phosphoproteomes of human primary fibroblasts exposed to multiple doses of ionizing radiation published to date and provide a basis for the systems-level identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual proteins regulated in a dose dependent manner by ionizing radiation. Further study of these modified proteins and affected networks should help to define the molecular mechanisms that regulate biological responses to radiation at different radiation doses and elucidate the impact of low-dose radiation exposure on human health. PMID:21152398

  13. Phosphoproteomics profiling of human skin fibroblast cells reveals pathways and proteins affected by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Miller, John H.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Du, Xiuxia; Livesay, Eric A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Wang, Yingchun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2010-11-30

    Background: High doses of ionizing radiation result in biological damage, however the precise relationships between long term health effects, including cancer, and low dose exposures remain poorly understood and are currently extrapolated using high dose exposure data. Identifying the signaling pathways and individual proteins affected at the post-translational level by radiation should shed valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate dose dependent responses to radiation. Principle Findings: We have identified 6845 unique phosphopeptides (2566 phosphoproteins) from control and irradiated (2 and 50 cGy) primary human skin fibroblasts one hour post-exposure. Dual statistical analyses based on spectral counts and peak intensities identified 287 phosphopeptides (from 231 proteins) and 244 phosphopeptides (from 182 proteins) that varied significantly following exposure to 2 and 50 cGy respectively. This screen identified phosphorylation sites on proteins with known roles in radiation responses including TP53BP1 as well as previously unidentified radiation responsive proteins such as the candidate tumor suppressor SASH1. Bioinformatics analyses suggest that low and high doses of radiation affect both overlapping and unique biological processes and suggest a role of MAP kinase and protein kinase A (PKA) signaling in the radiation response as well as differential regulation of p53 networks at low and high doses of radiation. Conlcusions: Our results represent the most comprehensive analysis of the phosphoproteomes of human primary fibroblasts exposed to multiple doses of ionizing radiation published to date and provides a basis for the systems level identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual proteins regulated in a dose dependent manner by ionizing radiation. Further study of these modified proteins and affected networks should help to define the molecular mechanisms that regulate biological responses to radiation at

  14. Phosphoproteomics profiling of human skin fibroblast cells reveals pathways and proteins affected by low doses of ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High doses of ionizing radiation result in biological damage; however, the precise relationships between long-term health effects, including cancer, and low-dose exposures remain poorly understood and are currently extrapolated using high-dose exposure data. Identifying the signaling pathways and individual proteins affected at the post-translational level by radiation should shed valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate dose-dependent responses to radiation. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified 7117 unique phosphopeptides (2566 phosphoproteins from control and irradiated (2 and 50 cGy primary human skin fibroblasts 1 h post-exposure. Semi-quantitative label-free analyses were performed to identify phosphopeptides that are apparently altered by radiation exposure. This screen identified phosphorylation sites on proteins with known roles in radiation responses including TP53BP1 as well as previously unidentified radiation-responsive proteins such as the candidate tumor suppressor SASH1. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that low and high doses of radiation affect both overlapping and unique biological processes and suggest a role for MAP kinase and protein kinase A (PKA signaling in the radiation response as well as differential regulation of p53 networks at low and high doses of radiation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results represent the most comprehensive analysis of the phosphoproteomes of human primary fibroblasts exposed to multiple doses of ionizing radiation published to date and provide a basis for the systems-level identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual proteins regulated in a dose dependent manner by ionizing radiation. Further study of these modified proteins and affected networks should help to define the molecular mechanisms that regulate biological responses to radiation at different radiation doses and elucidate the impact of low-dose radiation exposure on human health.

  15. Immunoarchitectural characterization of a human skin model reconstructed in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Ricardo Martinhão Souto

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Over the last few years, different models for human skin equivalent reconstructed in vitro (HSERIV have been reported for clinical usage and applications in research for the pharmaceutical industry. Before release for routine use as human skin replacements, HSERIV models need to be tested regarding their similarity with in vivo skin, using morphological (architectural and immunohistochemical (functional analyses. A model for HSERIV has been developed in our hospital, and our aim here was to further characterize its immunoarchitectural features by comparing them with human skin, before it can be tested for clinical use, e.g. for severe burns or wounds, whenever ancillary methods are not indicated. DESIGN AND SETTING: Experimental laboratory study, in the Skin Cell Culture Laboratory, School of Medical Sciences, Universidade Estadual de Campinas. METHODS: Histological sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Masson's trichrome for collagen fibers, periodic acid-Schiff reagent for basement membrane and glycogen, Weigert-Van Gieson for elastic fibers and Fontana-Masson for melanocytes. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize cytokeratins (broad spectrum of molecular weight, AE1/AE3, high molecular weight cytokeratins (34βE12, low molecular weight cytokeratins (35βH11, cytokeratins 7 and 20, vimentin, S-100 protein (for melanocytic and dendritic cells, CD68 (KP1, histiocytes and CD34 (QBend, endothelium. RESULTS: Histology revealed satisfactory similarity between HSERIV and in vivo skin. Immunohistochemical analysis on HSERIV demonstrated that the marker pattern was similar to what is generally present in human skin in vivo. CONCLUSION: HSERIV is morphologically and functionally compatible with human skin observed in vivo.

  16. Three-Dimensional In Vitro Skin and Skin Cancer Models Based on Human Fibroblast-Derived Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berning, Manuel; Prätzel-Wunder, Silke; Bickenbach, Jackie R; Boukamp, Petra

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro skin and skin cancer models help to dissect epidermal-dermal and tumor-stroma interactions. In the model presented here, normal human dermal fibroblasts isolated from adult skin self-assembled into dermal equivalents with their specific fibroblast-derived matrix (fdmDE) over 4 weeks. The fdmDE represented a complex human extracellular matrix that was stabilized by its own heterogeneous collagen fiber meshwork, largely resembling a human dermal in vivo architecture. Complemented with normal human epidermal keratinocytes, the skin equivalent (fdmSE) thereof favored the establishment of a well-stratified and differentiated epidermis and importantly allowed epidermal regeneration in vitro for at least 24 weeks. Moreover, the fdmDE could be used to study the features of cutaneous skin cancer. Complementing fdmDE with HaCaT cells in different stages of malignancy or tumor-derived cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, the resulting skin cancer equivalents (fdmSCEs) recapitulated the respective degree of tumorigenicity. In addition, the fdmSCE invasion phenotypes correlated with their individual degree of tissue organization, disturbance in basement membrane organization, and presence of matrix metalloproteinases. Together, fdmDE-based models are well suited for long-term regeneration of normal human epidermis and, as they recapitulate tumor-specific growth, differentiation, and invasion profiles of cutaneous skin cancer cells, also provide an excellent human in vitro skin cancer model.

  17. Multiphoton spectroscopy of human skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Hans G.; Weinigel, Martin; König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    In vivo multiphoton-intensity images and emission spectra of human skin are reported. Optical sections from different depths of the epidermis and dermis have been measured with near-infrared laser-pulse excitation. While the intensity images reveal information on the morphology, the spectra show emission characteristics of main endogenous skin fluorophores like keratin, NAD(P)H, melanin, elastin and collagen as well as of second harmonic generation induced by the excitation-light interaction with the dermal collagen network.

  18. Elucidation of xenobiotic metabolism pathways in human skin and human skin models by proteomic profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven van Eijl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human skin has the capacity to metabolise foreign chemicals (xenobiotics, but knowledge of the various enzymes involved is incomplete. A broad-based unbiased proteomics approach was used to describe the profile of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes present in human skin and hence indicate principal routes of metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. Several in vitro models of human skin have been developed for the purpose of safety assessment of chemicals. The suitability of these epidermal models for studies involving biotransformation was assessed by comparing their profiles of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes with those of human skin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Label-free proteomic analysis of whole human skin (10 donors was applied and analysed using custom-built PROTSIFT software. The results showed the presence of enzymes with a capacity for the metabolism of alcohols through dehydrogenation, aldehydes through dehydrogenation and oxidation, amines through oxidation, carbonyls through reduction, epoxides and carboxylesters through hydrolysis and, of many compounds, by conjugation to glutathione. Whereas protein levels of these enzymes in skin were mostly just 4-10 fold lower than those in liver and sufficient to support metabolism, the levels of cytochrome P450 enzymes were at least 300-fold lower indicating they play no significant role. Four epidermal models of human skin had profiles very similar to one another and these overlapped substantially with that of whole skin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The proteomics profiling approach was successful in producing a comprehensive analysis of the biotransformation characteristics of whole human skin and various in vitro skin models. The results show that skin contains a range of defined enzymes capable of metabolising different classes of chemicals. The degree of similarity of the profiles of the in vitro models indicates their suitability for epidermal toxicity testing. Overall, these

  19. Studying cell biology in the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Angel; Lechler, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Advances in cell biology have often been driven by studies in diverse organisms and cell types. Although there are technical reasons for why different cell types are used, there are also important physiological reasons. For example, ultrastructural studies of vesicle transport were aided by the use of professional secretory cell types. The use of tissues/primary cells has the advantage not only of using cells that are adapted to the use of certain cell biological machinery, but also of highlighting the physiological roles of this machinery. Here we discuss advantages of the skin as a model system. We discuss both advances in cell biology that used the skin as a driving force and future prospects for use of the skin to understand basic cell biology. A unique combination of characteristics and tools makes the skin a useful in vivo model system for many cell biologists. PMID:26564861

  20. In-vitro percutaneous absorption of losartan potassium in human skin and prediction of human skin permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petkar K.C.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the feasibility of transdermal controlled administration of Losartan potassium (LP across human cadaver skin. Study also defines the influence of capsaicin, sex and site of application on permeation characteristics and determined an appropriate animal model for human skin permeability. The permeation of LP of various formulations was studied using Keshary-Chein diffusion cell. Optimized controlled formulation (without capsaicin released 42.17% (±1.85 of LP in 12 hr whereas treatment formulation (with capsaicin 0.028 % w/v released 48.94% (±1.71 of LP with significant difference on null hypothesis. Influence of sex showed statistically significant difference for permeation of LP through male and female rats, as well as male and female mice across both the abdominal and dorsal sides of the skin (p<0.05. Similarly statistically significant differences were noted for permeation of LP across male and female mice abdomen-dorsal, but not for male rat abdomen-dorsal and female rat abdomen-dorsal. Furthermore, in-vitro permeation of LP across human skin was compared with the permeation across rat and mice skins. Male rat and male mice dorsal skin was found to have closer permeability characteristics to human than other skin membranes, but the Factor of Difference values were < 3 for all membranes which were used suggesting the membranes are good models for human skin permeability. In conclusion simple transdermal adhesive patches formulations incorporating high molecular weight of LP can deliver a dose in-vivo and proposed model skin membranes can be utilized for future pharmacokineic and toxicokinetic studies as well as metabolism studies of LP

  1. Melanocytes in the skin--comparative whole transcriptome analysis of main skin cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reemann, Paula; Reimann, Ene; Ilmjärv, Sten; Porosaar, Orm; Silm, Helgi; Jaks, Viljar; Vasar, Eero; Kingo, Külli; Kõks, Sulev

    2014-01-01

    Melanocytes possess several functions besides a role in pigment synthesis, but detailed characteristics of the cells are still unclear. We used whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to assess differential gene expression of cultivated normal human melanocytes with respect to keratinocytes, fibroblasts and whole skin. The present results reveal cultivated melanocytes as highly proliferative cells with possible stem cell-like properties. The enhanced readiness to regenerate makes melanocytes the most vulnerable cells in the skin and explains their high risk of developing into malignant melanoma.

  2. Transcriptome comparison of human neurons generated using induced pluripotent stem cells derived from dental pulp and skin fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chen

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology is providing an opportunity to study neuropsychiatric disorders through the capacity to grow patient-specific neurons in vitro. Skin fibroblasts obtained by biopsy have been the most reliable source of cells for reprogramming. However, using other somatic cells obtained by less invasive means would be ideal, especially in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and other neurodevelopmental conditions. In addition to fibroblasts, iPSCs have been developed from cord blood, lymphocytes, hair keratinocytes, and dental pulp from deciduous teeth. Of these, dental pulp would be a good source for neurodevelopmental disorders in children because obtaining material is non-invasive. We investigated its suitability for disease modeling by carrying out gene expression profiling, using RNA-seq, on differentiated neurons derived from iPSCs made from dental pulp extracted from deciduous teeth (T-iPSCs and fibroblasts (F-iPSCs. This is the first RNA-seq analysis comparing gene expression profiles in neurons derived from iPSCs made from different somatic cells. For the most part, gene expression profiles were quite similar with only 329 genes showing differential expression at a nominally significant p-value (p<0.05, of which 63 remained significant after correcting for genome-wide analysis (FDR <0.05. The most striking difference was the lower level of expression detected for numerous members of the all four HOX gene families in neurons derived from T-iPSCs. In addition, an increased level of expression was seen for several transcription factors expressed in the developing forebrain (FOXP2, OTX1, and LHX2, for example. Overall, pathway analysis revealed that differentially expressed genes that showed higher levels of expression in neurons derived from T-iPSCs were enriched for genes implicated in schizophrenia (SZ. The findings suggest that neurons derived from T-iPSCs are suitable for disease

  3. Anisotropy of light propagation in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Stephan; Hermann, Marcus; Essenpreis, Matthias; Farrell, Thomas J.; Krämer, Uwe; Patterson, Michael S.

    2000-10-01

    Using spatially resolved, steady state diffuse reflectometry, a directional dependence was found in the propagation of visible and near infrared light through human skin in vivo. The skin's reduced scattering coefficient µ's varies by up to a factor of two between different directions of propagation at the same position. This anisotropy is believed to be caused by the preferential orientation of collagen fibres in the dermis, as described by Langer's skin tension lines. Monte Carlo simulations that examine the effect of partial collagen fibre orientation support this hypothesis. The observation has consequences for non-invasive diagnostic methods relying on skin optical properties, and it could be used non-invasively to determine the direction of lines of cleavage in order to minimize scars due to surgical incisions.

  4. Deposition of contaminant aerosol on human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Kasper Grann; Roed, Jørn; Byrne, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Over recent years, it has been established that deposition of various types of pollutant aerosols (e.g., radioactive) on human skin can have serious deleterious effects on health. However. only few investigations in the past have been devoted to measurement of deposition velocities on skin...... of particles of the potentially problematic sizes. An experimental programme has shown the deposition velocities on skin of particles in the ca. 0.5-5 mu m AMAD range to be high and generally associated with great variations. A series of investigations have been made to identify some of the factors that lead...... to this variation. Part of the variation was found to be caused by differences between individuals, whereas another part was found to be related to environmental factors, The identification of major influences on skin contaminant deposition is important in estimating health effects as well as in identifying means...

  5. Temporal Stability of the Human Skin Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Julia; Byrd, Allyson L; Park, Morgan; Kong, Heidi H; Segre, Julia A

    2016-05-05

    Biogeography and individuality shape the structural and functional composition of the human skin microbiome. To explore these factors' contribution to skin microbial community stability, we generated metagenomic sequence data from longitudinal samples collected over months and years. Analyzing these samples using a multi-kingdom, reference-based approach, we found that despite the skin's exposure to the external environment, its bacterial, fungal, and viral communities were largely stable over time. Site, individuality, and phylogeny were all determinants of stability. Foot sites exhibited the most variability; individuals differed in stability; and transience was a particular characteristic of eukaryotic viruses, which showed little site-specificity in colonization. Strain and single-nucleotide variant-level analysis showed that individuals maintain, rather than reacquire, prevalent microbes from the environment. Longitudinal stability of skin microbial communities generates hypotheses about colonization resistance and empowers clinical studies exploring alterations observed in disease states.

  6. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Pimpinella anisum seeds: antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity on human neonatal skin stromal cells and colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlSalhi MS

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mohamad S AlSalhi,1,2 Sandhanasamy Devanesan,1,2 Akram A Alfuraydi,3 Radhakrishnan Vishnubalaji,4 Murugan A Munusamy,3 Kadarkarai Murugan,5 Marcello Nicoletti,6 Giovanni Benelli7 1Research Chair in Laser Diagnosis of Cancers, 2Department of Physics and Astronomy, 3Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, 4Stem Cell Unit, Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 5Division of Entomology, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, India; 6Department of Environmental Biology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, 7Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Background: The present study focused on a simple and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs with multipurpose anticancer and antimicrobial activities. Materials and methods: We studied a green synthesis route to produce AgNPs by using an aqueous extract of Pimpinella anisum seeds (3 mM. Their antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity on human neonatal skin stromal cells (hSSCs and colon cancer cells (HT115 were assessed. Results: A biophysical characterization of the synthesized AgNPs was realized: the morphology of AgNPs was determined by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and ultraviolet-vis absorption spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy showed spherical shapes of AgNPs of P. anisum seed extracts with a 3.2 nm minimum diameter and average diameter ranging from 3.2 to 16 nm. X-ray powder diffraction highlighted the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles, ultraviolet-vis absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor their synthesis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed the main reducing groups from the seed extract. Energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to confirm the presence of elemental silver. We evaluated the antimicrobial potential

  7. Skin Biopsy and Patient-Specific Stem Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Nguyen, Huy V.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells permits the development of next-generation patient-specific systems biology models reflecting personalized genomics profiles to better understand pathophysiology. In this chapter, we describe how to create a patient-specific iPS cell line. There are three major steps: (1) performing a skin biopsy procedure on the patient; (2) extracting human fibroblast cells from the skin biopsy tissue; and (3) reprogramming patient-specific fibroblast cells into the pluripotent stem cell stage. PMID:26141312

  8. Light microscopic, electron microscopic, and immunohistochemical comparison of Bama minipig (Sus scrofa domestica) and human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Jun-ying; Shang, Hai-tao; Liu, Chang-e; Wang, Yong; Niu, Rong; Wu, Jun; Wei, Hong

    2010-04-01

    Here we sought to evaluate the possibility of using Chinese Bama miniature pig skin as a suitable animal model for human skin. Morphologic features of the skin of Bama miniature pigs resemble those of human skin, including skin layer thickness, development of a superficial vascular system, structure of the dermal-epidermal interface, and extracellular matrix. The characteristics and densities of Langerhans cells, fibroblasts, vascular endothelial cells, and mast cells were similar between Bama pig and human skin. Immunohistochemistry showed that miniature pigs and humans have the same antigenic determinants of human laminin, fibronectin, filaggrin, collagen I, collagen III, collagen IV, and keratin but not CD34, ICAM1, or S100. In addition, collagen type I from Bama miniature pig skin exhibited physicochemical characteristics resembling those of human skin, in regard to HPLC chromatography, UV spectroscopy, amino-acid composition, and SDS-PAGE analysis. Given these results, we concluded that Bama miniature pigs have great potential as a human skin model and for developing dermal substitute materials in wound repair. However, we also observed some disparities between the skin of Bama miniature pigs and humans, including pigment cell distribution, sweat gland types, and others. Therefore, further studies are needed to completely evaluate the effects of these interspecies differences on the actual application of the model.

  9. Using skin to assess iron accumulation in human metabolic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinote, I. [Laboratorio de Feixes de Ioes, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Fleming, R. [Imunohaemotherapy Department, Hospital de St. Maria, Lisbon (Portugal); Silva, R. [Dermatology Department, Hospital de St. Maria, Lisbon (Portugal); Filipe, P. [Dermatology Department, Hospital de St. Maria, Lisbon (Portugal); Silva, J.N. [Dermatology Department, Hospital de St. Maria, Lisbon (Portugal); Verissimo, A. [Laboratorio de Feixes de Ioes, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Napoleao, P. [Laboratorio de Feixes de Ioes, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisbon (Portugal); Alves, L.C. [Laboratorio de Feixes de Ioes, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisbon (Portugal); Pinheiro, T. [Laboratorio de Feixes de Ioes, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal) and Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: murmur@itn.pt

    2006-08-15

    The distribution of Fe in skin was assessed to monitor body Fe status in human hereditary hemochromatosis. The paper reports on data from nine patients with hemochromatosis that were studied along the therapeutic programme. Systemic evaluation of Fe metabolism was carried out by measuring with PIXE technique the Fe concentration in plasma and blood cells, and by determining with biochemical methods the indicators of Fe transport in serum (ferritin and transferrin). The Fe distribution and concentration in skin was assessed by nuclear microscopy and Fe deposits in liver estimated through nuclear magnetic resonance. Elevated Fe concentrations in skin were related to increased plasma Fe (p < 0.004), serum ferritin content (p < 0.01) and Fe deposits in liver (p < 0.004). The relationship of Fe deposits in organs and metabolism markers may help to better understand Fe pools mobilisation and to establish the quality of skin as a marker for the disease progression and therapy efficacy.

  10. Using skin to assess iron accumulation in human metabolic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinote, I.; Fleming, R.; Silva, R.; Filipe, P.; Silva, J. N.; Veríssimo, A.; Napoleão, P.; Alves, L. C.; Pinheiro, T.

    2006-08-01

    The distribution of Fe in skin was assessed to monitor body Fe status in human hereditary hemochromatosis. The paper reports on data from nine patients with hemochromatosis that were studied along the therapeutic programme. Systemic evaluation of Fe metabolism was carried out by measuring with PIXE technique the Fe concentration in plasma and blood cells, and by determining with biochemical methods the indicators of Fe transport in serum (ferritin and transferrin). The Fe distribution and concentration in skin was assessed by nuclear microscopy and Fe deposits in liver estimated through nuclear magnetic resonance. Elevated Fe concentrations in skin were related to increased plasma Fe (p serum ferritin content (p < 0.01) and Fe deposits in liver (p < 0.004). The relationship of Fe deposits in organs and metabolism markers may help to better understand Fe pools mobilisation and to establish the quality of skin as a marker for the disease progression and therapy efficacy.

  11. Development of an in vitro skin sensitization test using human cell lines: the human Cell Line Activation Test (h-CLAT). I. Optimization of the h-CLAT protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashikaga, T; Yoshida, Y; Hirota, M; Yoneyama, K; Itagaki, H; Sakaguchi, H; Miyazawa, M; Ito, Y; Suzuki, H; Toyoda, H

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study is to optimize the experimental conditions for an in vitro skin sensitization test using the human cell lines THP-1 and U-937. As regards pre-culturing time, the expression of CD86 on DNCB-treated THP-1 cells tended to be higher after 48h and 72h pre-culture compared with other time points evaluated. Next, we investigated the effect of chemical treatment time, and found that induction of CD86 expression on THP-1 cells by DNCB reached a plateau after 24h. Augmentation of CD86 expression is often observed when cells are treated with a subtoxic dose of allergens. To determine the appropriate dose of test samples, the cytotoxicity of test samples to THP-1 and U-937 cells was assessed with MTT assay, and the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of each test sample was calculated. Based on the cytotoxicity assay data, four concentrations in the range between toxic and non-toxic were selected (0.1x, 0.5x, 1x and 2x IC50). Several kinds of antibodies were tested for staining THP-1 and U-937 cells treated with allergens/non-allergens (e.g., DNCB, Ni/SLS), and suitable antibodies for staining CD86 and CD54 were selected. We confirmed that the working dilutions of the selected CD86 and CD54 antibodies were appropriate for use in our method. The effect of an FcR blocking procedure was also evaluated. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI value) was decreased by the FcR blocking procedure, which indicated that non-specific staining was blocked. Therefore, this procedure should be included in the method. Based on our findings, the protocol for this assay was optimized and the experimental conditions to be used in a future validation study were identified. We propose to call this kind of in vitro skin sensitization test h-CLAT, which is short for human Cell Line Activation Test.

  12. Human skin permeation of emerging mycotoxins (beauvericin and enniatins).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taevernier, Lien; Veryser, Lieselotte; Roche, Nathalie; Peremans, Kathelijne; Burvenich, Christian; Delesalle, Catherine; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Currently, dermal exposure data of cyclic depsipeptide mycotoxins are completely absent. There is a lack of understanding about the local skin and systemic kinetics and effects, despite their widespread skin contact and intrinsic hazard. Therefore, we provide a quantitative characterisation of their dermal kinetics. The emerging mycotoxins enniatins (ENNs) and beauvericin (BEA) were used as model compounds and their transdermal kinetics were quantitatively evaluated, using intact and damaged human skin in an in vitro Franz diffusion cell set-up and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-MS analytics. We demonstrated that all investigated mycotoxins are able to penetrate through the skin. ENN B showed the highest permeation (kp,v=9.44 × 10(-6) cm/h), whereas BEA showed the lowest (kp,v=2.35 × 10(-6) cm/h) and the other ENNs ranging in between. Combining these values with experimentally determined solubility data, Jmax values ranging from 0.02 to 0.35 μg/(cm(2) h) for intact skin and from 0.07 to 1.11 μg/(cm(2) h) for damaged skin were obtained. These were used to determine the daily dermal exposure (DDE) in a worst-case scenario. On the other hand, DDE's for a typical occupational scenario were calculated based on real-life mycotoxin concentrations for the industrial exposure of food-related workers. In the latter case, for contact with intact human skin, DDE's up to 0.0870 ng/(kg BW × day) for ENN A were calculated, whereas for impaired skin barrier this can even rise up to 0.3209 ng/(kg BW × day) for ENN B1. This knowledge is needed for the risk assessment after skin exposure of contaminated food, feed, indoor surfaces and airborne particles with mycotoxins.

  13. Human Extensive Head Skin Myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Soleimani Ahmadi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nChrysomya bezziana Villeneuve is the most important fly, which produces myiasis, exists as an obligate ectoparasite in the ani­mals, and afflicts human. Poor hygiene and working in contaminated areas particularly during warm seasons provide a situa­tion to infest by this parasite. Infestation in human and livestock are often observed in wounds, normal body orifices such as eyes, ears, nose, and mouth. The manifestations include pruritus, pain, inflammation, redness, eosinophilia, and secon­dary bacterial infections and rarely death. A 5-year-old boy with severe headache and agitation symptoms was fol­lowed up. After physical examination and endoscopy, larvae of third instar fly were obtained from his scalp. Our precise identifica­tion indicated that the flies were the C. bezziana. This is the second report of the human scalp myiasis caused by C. bezziana in Iran. This study confirmed that the old world screwworm fly was distributed in the southern of Iran and proba­bly could be one of the most important agents of myiasis in this area.

  14. The isolated perfused human skin flap model: A missing link in skin penetration studies?

    OpenAIRE

    Ternullo, Selenia; de Weerd, Louis; Flaten, Gøril Eide; Holsæter, Ann Mari; Skalko-Basnet, Natasa

    2016-01-01

    Development of effective (trans)dermal drug delivery systems requires reliable skinmodels to evaluate skin drug penetration. The isolated perfused human skin flap remainsmetabolically active tissue for up to 6 h during in vitro perfusion. We introduce the isolated perfused human skin flap as a close-to-in vivo skin penetration model. To validate the model's ability to evaluate skin drug penetration the solutions of a hydrophilic (calcein) and a lipophilic (rhodamine) fluorescence ...

  15. Cell-Type-Specific Differentiation and Molecular Profiles in Skin Transplantation: Implication of Medical Approach for Genetic Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noritaka Oyama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin is highly accessible and valuable organ, which holds promise to accelerate the understanding of future medical innovation in association with skin transplantation, engineering, and wound healing. In skin transplantation biology, multistage and multifocal damages occur in both grafted donor and perilesional host skin and need to be repaired properly for the engraftment and maintenance of characteristic skin architecture. These local events are more unlikely to be regulated by the host immunity, because human skin transplantation has accomplished the donor skin engraftment onto the immunocompromised or immunosuppressive animals. Recent studies have emerged the importance of α-smooth muscle actin- (SMA- positive myofibroblasts, via stage- and cell-specific contribution of TGFβ, PDGF, ET-1, CCN-2 signalling pathways, and mastocyte-derived mediators (e.g., histamine and tryptase, for the functional reorganisation of the grafted skin. Moreover, particular cell lineages from bone marrow (BM cells have been shown to harbour the diferentiation capacity into multiple skin cell phenotypes, including epidermal keratinocytes and dermal endothelial cells and pericytes, undercontrolled by chemokines or cytokines. From a dermatological viewpoint, we review the recent update of cell-type- and molecular-specific action associated with reconstitution of the grafted skin and also focus on the novel application of BM transplantation medicine in genetic skin diseases.

  16. Particle-based transcutaneous administration of HIV-1 p24 protein to human skin explants and targeting of epidermal antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Amselgruber, Sarah; Hadam, Sabrina; Munier, Sevérine; Pavot, Vincent; Verrier, Bernard; Hackbarth, Steffen; Combadiere, Behazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2014-02-28

    Transcutaneous immunization is a promising vaccination strategy for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. In this study, we investigate the combination of cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS) and particle-based antigen delivery to target the HIV-1 p24 protein to skin antigen presenting cells (APC). The CSSS treatment pre-activates skin APC and opens hair follicles, where protein-loaded particles accumulate and allow for sustained delivery of the loaded antigen to perifollicular APC. We found that poly-lactic acid (PLA) and polystyrene (PS) particles targeted the adsorbed HIV-1 p24 protein to the hair follicles. Small amounts of PS and PLA particles were found to translocate to the epidermis and be internalized by skin cells, whereas most of the particles aggregated in the hair follicle canal, where they released the loaded antigen. The p24 protein diffused to the epidermis and dermis and was detected in skin cells, especially in Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. Furthermore, the combination of CSSS and particle-based delivery resulted in activation and maturation of Langerhans cells (HLA-DR, CD80 and CD83). We conclude that particle-based antigen delivery across partially disrupted skin barrier is a feasible and effective approach to needle-free transcutaneous vaccination.

  17. Comparison of skin decontamination efficacy of commercial decontamination products following exposure to VX on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thors, L; Koch, M; Wigenstam, E; Koch, B; Hägglund, L; Bucht, A

    2017-08-01

    The decontamination efficacy of four commercially available skin decontamination products following exposure to the nerve agent VX was evaluated in vitro utilizing a diffusion cell and dermatomed human skin. The products included were Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL), the Swedish decontamination powder 104 (PS104), the absorbent Fuller's Earth and the aqueous solution alldecontMED. In addition, various decontamination procedures were assessed to further investigate important mechanisms involved in the specific products, e.g. decontamination removal from skin, physical removal by sponge swabbing and activation of degradation mechanisms. The efficacy of each decontamination product was evaluated 5 or 30 min after dermal application of VX (neat or diluted to 20% in water). The RSDL-lotion was superior in reducing the penetration of VX through human skin, both when exposed as neat agent and when diluted to 20% in water. Swabbing with the RSDL-sponge during 2 min revealed decreased efficacy compared to applying the RSDL-lotion directly on the skin for 30 min. Decontamination with Fuller's Earth and alldecontMED significantly reduced the penetration of neat concentration of VX through human skin. PS104-powder was insufficient for decontamination of VX at both time-points, independently of the skin contact time of PS104. The PS104-slurry (a mixture of PS104-powder and water), slightly improved the decontamination efficacy. Comparing the time-points for initiated decontamination revealed less penetrated VX for RSDL and Fuller's Earth when decontamination was initiated after 5 min compared to 30 min post-exposure, while alldecontMED displayed similar efficacy at both time-points. Decontamination by washing with water only resulted in a significant reduction of penetrated VX when washing was performed 5 min after exposure, but not when decontamination was delayed to 30 min post-exposure of neat VX. In conclusion, early initiated decontamination with the

  18. Cortisol extraction through human skin by reverse iontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Stephanie A; Heikenfeld, Jason; Brooks, Tiffany; Esfandiari, Leyla; Boyce, Steven; Park, Yoonjee; Kasting, Gerald B

    2017-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of cortisol at the surface of the skin would advance the diagnosis and treatment of cortisol-related diseases, or of elevated cortisol levels related to stress in otherwise healthy populations. Reliable and accurate detection of cortisol at the skin surface remains a limiting factor in real-time monitoring of cortisol. To address this limitation, cortisol extraction through excised human skin by reverse iontophoresis was studied in vitro in side-by-side diffusion cells using a radiolabeled probe. The skin was subjected to four direct current regimens (0, 28, 56, 113μAcm(-2)) with the anode in the donor chamber and the cumulative cortisol concentrations recorded in the receiver chamber. The 56 and 113μAcm(-2) regimens significantly increased transport of (3)H-cortisol through the skin, and current density correlated directly with transcutaneous transport of (3)H-cortisol. The threshold of detection of electroosmotic versus passive diffusion of cortisol through the skin was between 28 and 56μAcm(-2). The results of this study are significant in examining how lipophilic analytes found in the bloodstream respond to reverse iontophoresis across the skin. In addition, a device integration technique is presented which illustrates how continuous cortisol extraction and sensing could potentially be achieved in a conventional wearable format.

  19. In vivo study of human skin using pulsed terahertz radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickwell, E [Semiconductor Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Cole, B E [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); Fitzgerald, A J [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); Pepper, M [Semiconductor Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Wallace, V P [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-07

    Studies in terahertz (THz) imaging have revealed a significant difference between skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma) and healthy tissue. Since water has strong absorptions at THz frequencies and tumours tend to have different water content from normal tissue, a likely contrast mechanism is variation in water content. Thus, we have previously devised a finite difference time-domain (FDTD) model which is able to closely simulate the interaction of THz radiation with water. In this work we investigate the interaction of THz radiation with normal human skin on the forearm and palm of the hand in vivo. We conduct the first ever systematic in vivo study of the response of THz radiation to normal skin. We take in vivo reflection measurements of normal skin on the forearm and palm of the hand of 20 volunteers. We compare individual examples of THz responses with the mean response for the areas of skin under investigation. Using the in vivo data, we demonstrate that the FDTD model can be applied to biological tissue. In particular, we successfully simulate the interaction of THz radiation with the volar forearm. Understanding the interaction of THz radiation with normal skin will form a step towards developing improved imaging algorithms for diagnostic detection of skin cancer and other tissue disorders using THz radiation.

  20. Enkephalin-like immunoreactivity in human skin is found selectively in a fraction of CD68-positive dermal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, J B; Lund, Marianne; Stengaard-Pedersen, K

    1997-01-01

    psoriasis, sections of skin from psoriatic patients were immunohistochemically stained with antisera against methionine and leucine enkephalin, CD68 (KP1, PG-M1), calprotectin (M747), M130 (Ber-MAC3), CD1a and CD3. Enkephalin-like activity was detected selectively in dermal CD68-positive macrophages...

  1. Characterization of inflammatory cell infiltration in feline allergic skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taglinger, K; Day, M J; Foster, A P

    2007-11-01

    Sixteen cats with allergic dermatitis and six control cats with no skin disease were examined. Lymphoid and histiocytic cells in skin sections were examined immunohistochemically and mast cells were identified by toluidine blue staining. The 16 allergic cats showed one or more of several features (alopecia, eosinophilic plaques or granulomas, papulocrusting lesions), and histopathological findings were diverse. In control cats there were no cells that expressed IgM or MAC387, a few that were immunolabelled for IgG, IgA or CD3, and moderate numbers of mast cells. In allergic cats, positively labelled inflammatory cells were generally more numerous in lesional than in non-lesional skin sections, and were particularly associated with the superficial dermis and perifollicular areas. There were low numbers of plasma cells expressing cytoplasmic immunoglobulin; moderate numbers of MHC II-, MAC387- and CD3-positive cells; and moderate to numerous mast cells. MHC class II expression was associated with inflammatory cells morphologically consistent with dermal dendritic cells and macrophages, and epidermal Langerhans cells. Dendritic cells expressing MHC class II were usually associated with an infiltrate of CD3 lymphocytes, suggesting that these cells participate in maintenance of the local immune response by presenting antigen to T lymphocytes. These findings confirm that feline allergic skin disease is characterized by infiltration of activated antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes in addition to increased numbers of dermal mast cells. This pattern mimics the dermal inflammation that occurs in the chronic phase of both canine and human atopic dermatitis.

  2. Fingerprint recovery from human skin surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapecar, Matej; Balazic, Joze

    2007-11-01

    A study was conducted to investigate whether certain dactyloscopic powders and reagents can recover latent fingerprints on human skin surfaces. Four fingerprint powders, Magnetic Jet Black, Magnetic Silver, Silver Special, Swedish Black, and two other methods, cyanoacrylate fuming (CA) and Ruthenium tetroxide (RTX), were used. Having examined skin surfaces with a forensic light source, we observed that the fingerprint impressions remained visible up to 15 min after intentionally placing them on the skin surface of living subjects and dead bodies. Finger marks were recovered and positive results were achieved with Magnetic Black and Swedish Black powder on living subjects. On dead bodies finger marks treated with cyanoacrylate were visible but those treated with RTX, Swedish Black and Magnetic Jet Black powder were useful for potential comparison. On dead bodies best results were obtained with RTX method.

  3. Feed gas humidity: a vital parameter affecting a cold atmospheric-pressure plasma jet and plasma-treated human skin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, J.; Wende, K.; Masur, K.; Iseni, S.; Dünnbier, M.; Hammer, M. U.; Tresp, H.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Reuter, S.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, the effect of feed gas humidity on the reactive component generation of an atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet and its effect on human skin cells are investigated. Feed gas humidity is identified as one key parameter that strongly influences stability and reproducibility of plasma medical studies. The plasma jet is investigated by absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and infrared spectral region for its ozone production depending on the humidity concentration in the feed gas. By optical emission spectroscopy the dependence of present excited plasma species such as hydroxyl radicals, molecular nitrogen, argon and atomic oxygen on the feed gas humidity is investigated. As an interface layer between the plasma jet effluent and the biological cell, a buffer solution is treated and the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production is studied with two independent colorimetric assays as a function of humidity admixture to the feed gas. Ultimately, the effect of varying feed gas humidity on the cell viability of indirect plasma treated adherent HaCAT cells is investigated. The highest viability is found for the driest feed gas condition. Furthermore, this work shows answers for the relevance of unwanted—or intended—feed gas humidity in plasma medical experiments and their comparatively large relevance with respect to ambient humidity. The findings will lead to more reproducible experiments in the field of plasma medicine.

  4. Autophagy in human skin squamous cell carcinoma: Inhibition by 3-MA enhances the effect of 5-FU-induced chemotherapy sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Li; Wang, Jianli

    2015-12-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular multi-step catabolic degradation process that involves the degradation and recycling of cellular proteins and cytoplasmic damaged organelles to maintain cellular homeostasis and reduction of metabolic stress. Numerous studies have indicated the importance of autophagy in cancer, but the role of autophagy in human skin squamous cell carcinoma (SSCC) development and response to therapy it is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of autophagy in SSCC and the relationship with chemotherapy sensitivity. The present study demonstrated that autophagy related gene the microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) expression was low in SSCC. The negative correlation with Bcl2 and survivin, and the chemotherapy drug 5-FU increased the level of autophagy and the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA inhibited this effect in SSCC cells, time- and dose-dependently. When SSCC cells were treated first with 3-MA and then with 5-FU, the inhibition of proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis of SSCC cells was enhanced. Our results suggested the possibility of autophagy as a potential target in SSCC therapy and 3-MA and 5-FU combination treatment may be an effective SSCC therapy via autophagy modulating.

  5. Differential response of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts, and keratinocytes to burn wound exudates: potential role of skin-specific chemokine CCL27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, Lenie J; Kroeze, Kim L; Waaijman, Taco; Breetveld, Melanie; Sampat-Sardjoepersad, Shakun C; Niessen, Frank B; Middelkoop, Esther; Scheper, Rik J; Gibbs, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Many cell-based regenerative medicine strategies toward tissue-engineered constructs are currently being explored. Cell-cell interactions and interactions with different biomaterials are extensively investigated, whereas very few studies address how cultured cells will interact with soluble wound-healing mediators that are present within the wound bed after transplantation. The aim of this study was to determine how adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC), dermal fibroblasts, and keratinocytes will react when they come in contact with the deep cutaneous burn wound bed. Burn wound exudates isolated from deep burn wounds were found to contain many cytokines, including chemokines and growth factors related to inflammation and wound healing. Seventeen mediators were identified by ELISA (concentration range 0.0006-9 ng/mg total protein), including the skin-specific chemokine CCL27. Burn wound exudates activated both ASC and dermal fibroblasts, but not keratinocytes, to increase secretion of CXCL1, CXCL8, CCL2, and CCL20. Notably, ASC but not fibroblasts or keratinocytes showed significant increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (5-fold) and interleukin-6 (253-fold), although when the cells were incorporated in bi-layered skin substitute (SS) these differences were less pronounced. A similar discrepancy between ASC and dermal fibroblast mono-cultures was observed when recombinant human-CCL27 was used instead of burn wound exudates. Although CCL27 did not stimulate the secretion of any of the wound-healing mediators by keratinocytes, these cells, in contrast to ASC or dermal fibroblasts, showed increased proliferation and migration. Taken together, these results indicate that on transplantation, keratinocytes are primarily activated to promote wound closure. In contrast, dermal fibroblasts and, in particular, ASC respond vigorously to factors present in the wound bed, leading to increased secretion of angiogenesis/granulation tissue formation

  6. Harnessing dendritic cells in inflammatory skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chung-Ching; Di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-02-01

    The skin immune system harbors a complex network of dendritic cells (DCs). Recent studies highlight a diverse functional specialization of skin DC subsets. In addition to generating cellular and humoral immunity against pathogens, skin DCs are involved in tolerogenic mechanisms to ensure the maintenance of immune homeostasis, as well as in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation in the skin when excessive immune responses are initiated and unrestrained. Harnessing DCs by directly targeting DC-derived molecules or selectively modulate DC subsets is a convincing strategy to tackle inflammatory skin diseases. In this review we discuss recent advances underlining the functional specialization of skin DCs and discuss the potential implication for future DC-based therapeutic strategies.

  7. Changes of Langerhans cells during skin ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Zegarska

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : During the process of skin ageing, changes occur in all skin layers and all cells, including the Langerhans cells. Aim: To assess whether any quantitative difference in the number of CD1a+ LC cells/mm 2 and HLA-DR+ LC cells/mm 2 as well as in their morphological features can be observed during the course of different types of skin ageing. Material and methods: The study was conducted in a group of 60 women, which was divided into three independent groups: group I with symptoms of menopausal skin ageing, group II with symptoms of photoageing, group III with symptoms of chronological ageing. Skin biopsy samples were taken from the pre-auricular region from all of the participants. The number of CD1a+ LC cells/mm 2 and HLA-DR+ LC cells/mm 2 as well as their morphological features were evaluated. Results : The frequency of CD1a+ LC and HLA-DR+ LC in all the studied groups was diverse. In groups I and III, the LC with large cell bodies and long, multi-branched processes were the majority. In group II, the LC had small cell bodies and their processes were mainly short and unbranched. Conclusions : The obtained results indicate the presence of quantitative and morphological changes of the CD1a+ LC and HLA-DR+ LC during the course of different types of skin ageing.

  8. Multitask Imidazolium Salt Additives for Innovative Poly(l-lactide) Biomaterials: Morphology Control, Candida spp. Biofilm Inhibition, Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biocompatibility, and Skin Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrekker, Clarissa M L; Sokolovicz, Yuri C A; Raucci, Maria G; Selukar, Balaji S; Klitzke, Joice S; Lopes, William; Leal, Claudio A M; de Souza, Igor O P; Galland, Griselda B; Dos Santos, João Henrique Z; Mauler, Raquel S; Kol, Moshe; Dagorne, Samuel; Ambrosio, Luigi; Teixeira, Mário L; Morais, Jonder; Landers, Richard; Fuentefria, Alexandre M; Schrekker, Henri S

    2016-08-24

    Candida species have great ability to colonize and form biofilms on medical devices, causing infections in human hosts. In this study, poly(l-lactide) films with different imidazolium salt (1-n-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C16MImCl) and 1-n-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium methanesulfonate (C16MImMeS)) contents were prepared, using the solvent casting process. Poly(l-lactide)-imidazolium salt films were obtained with different surface morphologies (spherical and directional), and the presence of the imidazolium salt in the surface was confirmed. These films with different concentrations of the imidazolium salts C16MImCl and C16MImMeS presented antibiofilm activity against isolates of Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida albicans. The minor antibiofilm concentration assay enabled one to determine that an increasing imidazolium salt content promoted, in general, an increase in the inhibition percentage of biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs confirmed the effective prevention of biofilm formation on the imidazolium salt containing biomaterials. Lower concentrations of the imidazolium salts showed no cytotoxicity, and the poly(l-lactide)-imidazolium salt films presented good cell adhesion and proliferation percentages with human mesenchymal stem cells. Furthermore, no acute microscopic lesions were identified in the histopathological evaluation after contact between the films and pig ear skin. In combination with the good morphological, physicochemical, and mechanical properties, these poly(l-lactide)-based materials with imidazolium salt additives can be considered as promising biomaterials for use in the manufacturing of medical devices.

  9. The impact of skin colour on human photobiological responses

    OpenAIRE

    Fajuyigbe, Damilola; Young, Antony R.

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exerts both beneficial and adverse effects on human skin. Epidemiological studies show a lower incidence of skin cancer in people with pigmented skins compared to fair skins. This is attributed to photoprotection by epidermal melanin, as is the poorer vitamin D status of those with darker skins. We summarize a wide range of photobiological responses across different skin colours including DNA damage and immunosuppression. Some studies show the gen...

  10. Measurements and Characterizations of Mechanical Properties of Human Skins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Han Wook; Park, Yon Kyu

    A skin is an indispensible organ for humans because it contributes to metabolism using its own biochemical functions and protects the human body from external stimuli. Recently, mechanical properties such as a thickness, a friction and an elastic coefficient have been used as a decision index in the skin physiology and in the skin care market due to the increased awareness of wellbeing issues. In addition, the use of mechanical properties is known to have good discrimination ability in the classification of human constitutions, which are used in the field of an alternative medicine. In this study, a system that measures mechanical properties such as a friction and an elastic coefficient is designed. The equipment consists of a load cell type (manufactured by the authors) for the measurements of a friction coefficient, a decompression tube for the measurement of an elastic coefficient. Using the proposed system, the mechanical properties of human skins from different constitutions were compared, and the relative repeatability error for measurements of mechanical properties was determined to be less than 2%. Combining the inspection results of medical doctors in the field of an alternative medicine, we could conclude that the proposed system might be applicable to a quantitative constitutional diagnosis between human constitutions within an acceptable level of uncertainty.

  11. Mammalian skin cell biology: at the interface between laboratory and clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Fiona M

    2014-11-21

    Mammalian skin research represents the convergence of three complementary disciplines: cell biology, mouse genetics, and dermatology. The skin provides a paradigm for current research in cell adhesion, inflammation, and tissue stem cells. Here, I discuss recent insights into the cell biology of skin. Single-cell analysis has revealed that human epidermal stem cells are heterogeneous and differentiate in response to multiple extrinsic signals. Live-cell imaging, optogenetics, and cell ablation experiments show skin cells to be remarkably dynamic. High-throughput, genome-wide approaches have yielded unprecedented insights into the circuitry that controls epidermal stem cell fate. Last, integrative biological analysis of human skin disorders has revealed unexpected functions for elements of the skin that were previously considered purely structural.

  12. Development of a full-thickness human skin equivalent in vitro model derived from TERT-immortalized keratinocytes and fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M.A. Reijnders; A. van Lier; S. Roffel; D. Kramer; R.J. Scheper; S. Gibbs

    2015-01-01

    Currently, human skin equivalents (HSEs) used for in vitro assays (e.g., for wound healing) make use of primary human skin cells. Limitations of primary keratinocytes and fibroblasts include availability of donor skin and donor variation. The use of physiologically relevant cell lines could solve th

  13. Development of a Full-Thickness Human Skin Equivalent In Vitro Model Derived from TERT-Immortalized Keratinocytes and Fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, Christianne M. A.; van Lier, Amanda; Roffel, Sanne; Kramer, Duco; Scheper, Rik J.; Gibbs, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Currently, human skin equivalents (HSEs) used for in vitro assays (e.g., for wound healing) make use of primary human skin cells. Limitations of primary keratinocytes and fibroblasts include availability of donor skin and donor variation. The use of physiologically relevant cell lines could solve th

  14. Shikonin Suppresses Skin Carcinogenesis via Inhibiting Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Ren, Amy; Li, Teena; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been shown to be up-regulated in human skin cancers. To test whether PKM2 may be a target for chemoprevention, shikonin, a natural product from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and a specific inhibitor of PKM2, was used in a chemically-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis study. The results revealed that shikonin treatment suppressed skin tumor formation. Morphological examinations and immunohistochemical staining of the skin epidermal tissues suggested that shikonin inhibited cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis. Although shikonin alone suppressed PKM2 activity, it did not suppress tumor promoter-induced PKM2 activation in the skin epidermal tissues at the end of the skin carcinogenesis study. To reveal the potential chemopreventive mechanism of shikonin, an antibody microarray analysis was performed, and the results showed that the transcription factor ATF2 and its downstream target Cdk4 were up-regulated by chemical carcinogen treatment; whereas these up-regulations were suppressed by shikonin. In a promotable skin cell model, the nuclear levels of ATF2 were increased during tumor promotion, whereas this increase was inhibited by shikonin. Furthermore, knockdown of ATF2 decreased the expression levels of Cdk4 and Fra-1 (a key subunit of the activator protein 1. In summary, these results suggest that shikonin, rather than inhibiting PKM2 in vivo, suppresses the ATF2 pathway in skin carcinogenesis.

  15. Cell Type-dependent Gene Transcription Profile in Three Dimensional Human Skin Tissue Model Exposed to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Implications for Medical Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Shankaran, Harish; Karin, Norman J.; Kauer, Paula M.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Robinson, Robert J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2012-04-17

    The concern over possible health risks from exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation has been driven largely by the increase in medical exposures, the routine implementation of X-ray backscatter devices for airport security screening, and, most recently, the nuclear incident in Japan. Due to a paucity of direct epidemiological data at very low doses, cancer risk must be estimated from high dose exposure scenarios. However, there is increasing evidence that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events and may have different mechanisms of cancer induction. We have examined the radiation induced temporal response of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model using microarray-based transcriptional profiling. Our data shows that exposure to 100 mGy of X-rays is sufficient to affect gene transcription. Cell type specific analysis showed significant changes in gene expression with the levels of > 1400 genes altered in the dermis and > 400 genes regulated in the epidermis. The two cell types rarely exhibited overlapping responses at the mRNA level. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) measurements validated the microarray data in both regulation direction and value. Key pathways identified relate to cell cycle regulation, immune responses, hypoxia, reactive oxygen signaling, and DNA damage repair. We discuss in particular the role of proliferation and emphasizing how the disregulation of cellular signaling in normal tissue may impact progression towards radiation induced secondary diseases.

  16. The Protective Role of Melanin Against UV Damage in Human Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, Michaela; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2008-01-01

    Human skin is repeatedly exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) that influences the function and survival of many cell types and is regarded as the main causative factor in the induction of skin cancer. It has been traditionally believed that skin pigmentation is the most important photoprotective factor, since melanin, besides functioning as a broadband UV absorbent, has antioxidant and radical scavenging properties. Besides, many epidemiological studies have shown a lower incidence for skin...

  17. A new alternative method for testing skin irritation using a human skin model: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, A; Berthet, A; Hopf, N B; Gilliet, M; Raffoul, W; Vernez, D; Spring, P

    2014-03-01

    Studies assessing skin irritation to chemicals have traditionally used laboratory animals; however, such methods are questionable regarding their relevance for humans. New in vitro methods have been validated, such as the reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) model (Episkin®, Epiderm®). The comparison (accuracy) with in vivo results such as the 4-h human patch test (HPT) is 76% at best (Epiderm®). There is a need to develop an in vitro method that better simulates the anatomo-pathological changes encountered in vivo. To develop an in vitro method to determine skin irritation using human viable skin through histopathology, and compare the results of 4 tested substances to the main in vitro methods and in vivo animal method (Draize test). Human skin removed during surgery was dermatomed and mounted on an in vitro flow-through diffusion cell system. Ten chemicals with known non-irritant (heptylbutyrate, hexylsalicylate, butylmethacrylate, isoproturon, bentazon, DEHP and methylisothiazolinone (MI)) and irritant properties (folpet, 1-bromohexane and methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI/MI)), a negative control (sodiumchloride) and a positive control (sodiumlaurylsulphate) were applied. The skin was exposed at least for 4h. Histopathology was performed to investigate irritation signs (spongiosis, necrosis, vacuolization). We obtained 100% accuracy with the HPT model; 75% with the RHE models and 50% with the Draize test for 4 tested substances. The coefficients of variation (CV) between our three test batches were test method presented effective results for the tested chemicals. It should be further validated using a greater number of substances; and tested in different laboratories in order to suitably evaluate reproducibility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neural crest-derived cells with stem cell features can be traced back to multiple lineages in the adult skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Wong (Christine); S. Paratore (Sabrina); M.T. Dours-Zimmermann (María); T. Rochat (Thierry); T. Pietri (Thomas); U. Suter (Ueli); D. Zimmermann (Dieter); S. Dufour (Sylvie); J.P. Thiery (Joachim); D.N. Meijer (Dies); C. Beermann (Christopher); Y. Barrandon (Yann); L. Sommer (Lukas)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractGiven their accessibility, multipotent skin-derived cells might be useful for future cell replacement therapies. We describe the isolation of multipotent stem cell-like cells from the adult trunk skin of mice and humans that express the neural crest stem cell markers p75 and Sox10 and

  19. Neural crest-derived cells with stem cell features can be traced back to multiple lineages in the adult skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Wong (Christine); S. Paratore (Sabrina); M.T. Dours-Zimmermann (María); T. Rochat (Thierry); T. Pietri (Thomas); U. Suter (Ueli); D. Zimmermann (Dieter); S. Dufour (Sylvie); J.P. Thiery (Joachim); D.N. Meijer (Dies); C. Beermann (Christopher); Y. Barrandon (Yann); L. Sommer (Lukas)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractGiven their accessibility, multipotent skin-derived cells might be useful for future cell replacement therapies. We describe the isolation of multipotent stem cell-like cells from the adult trunk skin of mice and humans that express the neural crest stem cell markers p75 and Sox10 and di

  20. Human skin equivalent as an alternative to animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsching, Heike; Weimer, Michaela; Kersen, Silke; Brunner, Herwig

    2008-03-11

    The 3-D skin equivalent can be viewed as physiologically comparable to the natural skin and therefore is a suitable alternative for animal testing. This highly differentiated in vitro human skin equivalent is used to assess the efficacy and mode of action of novel agents. This model is generated from primary human keratinocytes on a collagen substrate containing human dermal fibroblasts. It is grown at the air-liquid interface which allows full epidermal stratification and epidermal-dermal interactions to occur. Future emphasis is the establishment of different test systems to investigate wound healing, melanoma research and infection biology. Key features of this skin model are that it can be used as an alternative for in vivo studies, donor tissue can be tailored to the needs of the study and multiple analyses can be carried out at mRNA and protein level. Driven by both ethical and economical incentives, this has already resulted in a shift of the test strategies used by the Pharmaceutical Industry in the early drug development process as reflected by the increased demand for application of cell based assays. It is also a suitable model for testing a wide variety of endpoints including cell viability, the release of proinflammatory mediators, permeation rate, proliferation and biochemical changes.

  1. Skin friction: a novel approach to measuring in vivo human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    The human skin plays an important role in people’s lives. It is in constant interaction with the environment, clothing and consumer products. This thesis discusses one of the parameters in the interaction between the human skin in vivo and other materials: skin friction. The thesis is divided into

  2. Pumpless microfluidic platform for drug testing on human skin equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Gledhill, Karl; Guo, Zongyou; Christiano, Angela M; Shuler, Michael L

    2015-02-07

    Advances in bio-mimetic in vitro human skin models increase the efficiency of drug screening studies. In this study, we designed and developed a microfluidic platform that allows for long-term maintenance of full thickness human skin equivalents (HSE) which are comprised of both the epidermal and dermal compartments. The design is based on the physiologically relevant blood residence times in human skin tissue and allows for the establishment of an air-epidermal interface which is crucial for maturation and terminal differentiation of HSEs. The small scale of the design reduces the amount of culture medium and the number of cells required by 36 fold compared to conventional transwell cultures. Our HSE-on-a-chip platform has the capability to recirculate the medium at desired flow rates without the need for pump or external tube connections. We demonstrate that the platform can be used to maintain HSEs for three weeks with proliferating keratinocytes similar to conventional HSE cultures. Immunohistochemistry analyses show that the differentiation and localization of keratinocytes was successfully achieved, establishing all sub-layers of the epidermis after one week. Basal keratinocytes located at the epidermal-dermal interface remain in a proliferative state for three weeks. We use a transdermal transport model to show that the skin barrier function is maintained for three weeks. We also validate the capability of the HSE-on-a-chip platform to be used for drug testing purposes by examining the toxic effects of doxorubucin on skin cells and structure. Overall, the HSE-on-a-chip is a user-friendly and cost-effective in vitro platform for drug testing of candidate molecules for skin disorders.

  3. Studying cell biology in the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Angel; Lechler, Terry

    2015-11-15

    Advances in cell biology have often been driven by studies in diverse organisms and cell types. Although there are technical reasons for why different cell types are used, there are also important physiological reasons. For example, ultrastructural studies of vesicle transport were aided by the use of professional secretory cell types. The use of tissues/primary cells has the advantage not only of using cells that are adapted to the use of certain cell biological machinery, but also of highlighting the physiological roles of this machinery. Here we discuss advantages of the skin as a model system. We discuss both advances in cell biology that used the skin as a driving force and future prospects for use of the skin to understand basic cell biology. A unique combination of characteristics and tools makes the skin a useful in vivo model system for many cell biologists. © 2015 Morrow and Lechler. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Low-dose radiation activates Nrf1/2 through reactive species and the Ca(2+)/ERK1/2 signaling pathway in human skin fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Kyeong; Kim, Jin-Ah; Park, Seong Joon; Kim, Jeung Ki; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwang Mo; Son, Tae Gen

    2013-05-01

    In the current study, we explored the effect of LDR on the activation of Nrfs transcription factor involved in cellular redox events. Experiments were carried out utilizing 0.05 and 0.5 Gy X-ray irradiated normal human skin fibroblast HS27 cells. The results showed LDR induced Nrf1 and Nrf2 activation and expression of antioxidant genes HO-1, Mn-SOD, and NQO1. In particular, 0.05 Gy-irradiation increased only Nrf1 activation, but 0.5 Gy induced both Nrf1 and Nrf2 activation. LDR-mediated Nrf1/2 activation was accompanied by reactive species (RS) generation and Ca(2+) flux. This effect was abolished in the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine and BAPTA- AM. Furthermore, Nrf1/2 activation by LDR was suppressed by PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK1/2. In conclusion, LDR induces Nrf1 and Nrf2 activation and expression of Nrf-regulated antioxidant defense genes through RS and Ca(2+)/ERK1/2 pathways, suggesting new insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial role of LDR in HS27 cells.

  5. Evaluation of skin viability effect on ethosome and liposome-mediated psoralen delivery via cell uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Tai; Shen, Li-Na; Wu, Zhong-Hua; Zhao, Ji-Hui; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of skin viability on its permeability to psoralen delivered by ethosomes, as compared with liposomes. With decreasing skin viability, the amount of liposome-delivered psoralen that penetrated through the skin increased, whereas skin deposition of psoralen from both ethosomes and liposomes reduced. Psoralen delivery to human-immortalized epidermal cells was more effective using liposomes, whereas delivery to human embryonic skin fibroblast cells was more effective when ethosomes were used. These findings agreed with those of in vivo studies showing that skin psoralen deposition from ethosomes and liposomes first increased and then plateaued overtime, which may indicate gradual saturation of intracellular drug delivery. It also suggested that the reduced deposition of ethosome- or liposome-delivered psoralen in skin with reduced viability may relate to reduced cellular uptake. This work indicated that the effects of skin viability should be taken into account when evaluating nanocarrier-mediated drug skin permeation.

  6. Gold Nanoparticles Synthesized with a Polyphenols-Rich Extract from Cornelian Cherry (Cornus mas Fruits: Effects on Human Skin Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Perde-Schrepler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (GNPs were obtained by green synthesis with an extract from Cornus mas fruits (GNPs-CM, characterized by several methods, and their biologic effects were evaluated on two cell lines: HaCaT, normal keratinocytes, and A431, epidermoid carcinoma. GNPs were spherical with sizes between 2 and 24 nm. Their optical spectra had a dominant plasmonic band centered at 525 nm; zeta potential distribution was narrow, centered at −19.7 mV, and the mean hydrodynamic diameter was 58 nm. GNPs were visualized in both cell types entering the cells by endocytosis. The amount of gold uptaken by the cells was dose and time dependent. The intracellular concentration of Au ions was higher in HaCaT compared to A431 cells. The toxicity of GNPs-CM was dose dependent being significant only when the highest concentrations were employed. A431 cells were less affected compared to HaCaT cells, but the difference was not statistically significant. ROS production was not significant, except in HaCaT cells at the highest concentration. The comet assay revealed no significant supplementary DNA lesions, while the secretion of inflammatory cytokines was modulated by the presence of GNPs only when the cells were additionally irradiated with UVB. These results recommend GNPs-CM for further testing and possible dermatological applications.

  7. The isolated perfused human skin flap model: A missing link in skin penetration studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternullo, Selenia; de Weerd, Louis; Flaten, Gøril Eide; Holsæter, Ann Mari; Škalko-Basnet, Nataša

    2017-01-01

    Development of effective (trans)dermal drug delivery systems requires reliable skin models to evaluate skin drug penetration. The isolated perfused human skin flap remains metabolically active tissue for up to 6h during in vitro perfusion. We introduce the isolated perfused human skin flap as a close-to-in vivo skin penetration model. To validate the model's ability to evaluate skin drug penetration the solutions of a hydrophilic (calcein) and a lipophilic (rhodamine) fluorescence marker were applied. The skin flaps were perfused with modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer (pH7.4). Infrared technology was used to monitor perfusion and to select a well-perfused skin area for administration of the markers. Flap perfusion and physiological parameters were maintained constant during the 6h experiments and the amount of markers in the perfusate was determined. Calcein was detected in the perfusate, whereas rhodamine was not detectable. Confocal images of skin cross-sections shoved that calcein was uniformly distributed through the skin, whereas rhodamine accumulated in the stratum corneum. For comparison, the penetration of both markers was evaluated on ex vivo human skin, pig skin and cellophane membrane. The proposed perfused flap model enabled us to distinguish between the penetrations of the two markers and could be a promising close-to-in vivo tool in skin penetration studies and optimization of formulations destined for skin administration.

  8. Dysregulated immune profiles for skin and dendritic cells are associated with increased host susceptibility to Haemophilus ducreyi infection in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Tricia L; Li, Lang; Li, Xiaoman; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Zhao, Qianqian; Li, Wei; McClintick, Jeanette; Katz, Barry P; Wilkes, David S; Edenberg, Howard J; Spinola, Stanley M

    2007-12-01

    In experimentally infected human volunteers, the cutaneous immune response to Haemophilus ducreyi is orchestrated by serum, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, macrophages, T cells, and myeloid dendritic cells (DC). This response either leads to spontaneous resolution of infection or progresses to pustule formation, which is associated with the failure of phagocytes to ingest the organism and the presence of Th1 and regulatory T cells. In volunteers who are challenged twice, some subjects form at least one pustule twice (PP group), while others have all inoculated sites resolve twice (RR group). Here, we infected PP and RR subjects with H. ducreyi and used microarrays to profile gene expression in infected and wounded skin. The PP and RR groups shared a core response to H. ducreyi. Additional transcripts that signified effective immune function were differentially expressed in RR infected sites, while those that signified a hyperinflammatory, dysregulated response were differentially expressed in PP infected sites. To examine whether DC drove these responses, we profiled gene expression in H. ducreyi-infected and uninfected monocyte-derived DC. Both groups had a common response that was typical of a type 1 DC (DC1) response. RR DC exclusively expressed many additional transcripts indicative of DC1. PP DC exclusively expressed differentially regulated transcripts characteristic of DC1 and regulatory DC. The data suggest that DC from the PP and RR groups respond differentially to H. ducreyi. PP DC may promote a dysregulated T-cell response that contributes to phagocytic failure, while RR DC may promote a Th1 response that facilitates bacterial clearance.

  9. MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells in human skin equivalents show differential migration and phenotypic plasticity after allergen or irritant exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosten, I.J.; Spiekstra, S.W.; de Gruijl, T.D.; Gibbs, S.

    2015-01-01

    After allergen or irritant exposure, Langerhans cells (LC) undergo phenotypic changes and exit the epidermis. In this study we describe the unique ability of MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells (MUTZ-LC) to display similar phenotypic plasticity as their primary counterparts when incorporated into a phys

  10. Characterization of porcine skin as a model for human skin studies using infrared spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Rong; Bhargava, Rohit

    2011-06-07

    Porcine skin is often considered a substitute for human skin based on morphological and functional data, for example, for transdermal drug diffusion studies. A chemical, structural and temporal characterization of porcine skin in comparison to human skin is not available but will likely improve our understanding of this porcine skin model. Here, we employ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging to holistically measure chemical species as well as spatial structure as a function of time to characterize porcine skin as a model for human skin. Porcine skin was found to resemble human skin spectroscopically and differences are elucidated. Cryo-prepared fresh porcine skin samples for spectroscopic imaging were found to be stable over time and small variations are observed. Hence, we extended characterization to the use of this model for dynamic processes. In particular, the capacity and stability of this model in transdermal diffusion is examined. The results indicate that porcine skin is likely to be an attractive tool for studying diffusion dynamics of materials in human skin.

  11. Use of Human Cadaveric Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cell Therapy of a Chronic Radiation-Induced Skin Lesion: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portas, M; Mansilla, E; Drago, H; Dubner, D; Radl, A; Coppola, A; Di Giorgio, M

    2016-09-01

    Acute and late radiation-induced injury on skin and subcutaneous tissues are associated with substantial morbidity in radiation therapy, interventional procedures and also are of concern in the context of nuclear or radiological accidents. Pathogenesis is initiated by depletion of acutely responding epithelial tissues and damage to vascular endothelial microvessels. Efforts for medical management of severe radiation-induced lesions have been made. Nevertheless, the development of strategies to promote wound healing, including stem cell therapy, is required. From 1997 to 2014, over 248 patients were referred to the Radiopathology Committee of Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Burns Hospital) for the diagnosis and therapy of radiation-induced localized lesions. As part of the strategies for the management of severe cases, there is an ongoing research and development protocol on 'Translational Clinical Trial phases I/II to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adult mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow for the treatment of large burns and radiological lesions'. The object of this work was to describe the actions carried out by the Radiopathology Committee of the Burns Hospital in a chronic case with more than 30 years of evolution without positive response to conventional treatments. The approach involved the evaluation of the tissular compromise of the lesion, the prognosis and the personalized treatment, including regenerative therapy. © World Health Organisation 2016. All rights reserved. The World Health Organization has granted Oxford University Press permission for the reproduction of this article.

  12. Vital roles of stem cells and biomaterials in skin tissueengineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abu Bakar Mohd Hilmi; Ahmad Sukari Halim

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering essentially refers to technologyfor growing new human tissue and is distinct fromregenerative medicine. Currently, pieces of skin arealready being fabricated for clinical use and manyother tissue types may be fabricated in the future.Tissue engineering was first defined in 1987 by theUnited States National Science Foundation whichcritically discussed the future targets of bioengineeringresearch and its consequences. The principles oftissue engineering are to initiate cell cultures in vitro ,grow them on scaffolds in situ and transplant thecomposite into a recipient in vivo . From the beginning,scaffolds have been necessary in tissue engineeringapplications. Regardless, the latest technology hasredirected established approaches by omitting scaffolds.Currently, scientists from diverse research institutesare engineering skin without scaffolds. Due to theiradvantageous properties, stem cells have robustlytransformed the tissue engineering field as part of anengineered bilayered skin substitute that will later bediscussed in detail. Additionally, utilizing biomaterialsor skin replacement products in skin tissue engineeringas strategy to successfully direct cell proliferation anddifferentiation as well as to optimize the safety ofhandling during grafting is beneficial. This approachhas also led to the cells' application in developing thenovel skin substitute that will be briefly explained in thisreview.

  13. Mast cell distribution in normal adult skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, A S; Heide, R; den Hollander, J C; Mulder, P G M; Tank, B; Oranje, A P

    2005-03-01

    To investigate mast cell distribution in normal adult skin to provide a reference range for comparison with mastocytosis. Mast cells (MCs) were counted in uninvolved skin adjacent to basal cell carcinomas and other dermatological disorders in adults. There was an uneven distribution of MCs in different body sites using the anti-tryptase monoclonal antibody technique. Numbers of MCs on the trunk, upper arm, and upper leg were similar, but were significantly different from those found on the lower leg and forearm. Two distinct groups were formed--proximal and distal. There were 77.0 MCs/mm2 at proximal body sites and 108.2 MCs/mm2 at distal sites. Adjusted for the adjacent diagnosis and age, this difference was consistent. The numbers of MCs in uninvolved skin adjacent to basal cell carcinomas and other dermatological disorders were not different from those in the control group. Differences in the numbers of MCs between the distal and the proximal body sites must be considered when MCs are counted for a reliable diagnosis of mastocytosis. A pilot study in patients with mastocytosis underlined the variation in the numbers of MCs in mastocytosis and normal skin, but showed a considerable overlap. The observed numbers of MCs in adults cannot be extrapolated to children. MC numbers varied significantly between proximal and distal body sites and these differences must be considered when MCs are counted for a reliable diagnosis of mastocytosis. There was a considerable overlap between the numbers of MCs in mastocytosis and normal skin.

  14. Human Dark Skin and Equatorial Africa: Toward a Critique

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvain K. Cibangu

    2015-01-01

    While skin color represents one of the most common markers of humans, the theories that explain it remain largely unknown both in academia and industry. Meanwhile, fraught with theoretical shortcomings about skin color, as clear from its body of knowledge, racial studies has not addressed skin color with needed attention. Consequently, misconceptions about human skin color have proliferated. This paper discusses anew Gloger’s theory and its widespread impact in the social sciences and general...

  15. Relating friction on the human skin to the hydration and temperature of the skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, M.A.; Heide, E. van der

    2013-01-01

    The human skin is constantly in interaction with materials and products. Therefore, skin friction is relevant to all people. In the literature, the frictional properties of the skin have been linked to a large variety of variables, like age, gender and hydration. The present study compares the data

  16. Relating friction on the human skin to the hydration and temperature of the skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, Marc Arthur; van der Heide, Emile

    2013-01-01

    The human skin is constantly in interaction with materials and products. Therefore, skin friction is relevant to all people. In the literature, the frictional properties of the skin have been linked to a large variety of variables, like age, gender and hydration. The present study compares the data

  17. Flagellin delivery by Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhamnolipids induces the antimicrobial protein psoriasin in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Meyer-Hoffert

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can cause severe infections in patients suffering from disruption or disorder of the skin barrier as in burns, chronic wounds, and after surgery. On healthy skin P. aeruginosa causes rarely infections. To gain insight into the interaction of the ubiquitous bacterium P. aeruginosa and healthy human skin, the induction of the antimicrobial protein psoriasin by P. aeruginosa grown on an ex vivo skin model was analyzed. We show that presence of the P. aeruginosa derived biosurfactant rhamnolipid was indispensable for flagellin-induced psoriasin expression in human skin, contrary to in vitro conditions. The importance of the bacterial virulence factor flagellin as the major inducing factor of psoriasin expression in skin was demonstrated by use of a flagellin-deficient mutant. Rhamnolipid mediated shuttle across the outer skin barrier was not restricted to flagellin since rhamnolipids enable psoriasin expression by the cytokines IL-17 and IL-22 after topical application on human skin. Rhamnolipid production was detected for several clinical strains and the formation of vesicles was observed under skin physiological conditions. In conclusion we demonstrate herein that rhamnolipids enable the induction of the antimicrobial protein psoriasin by flagellin in human skin without direct contact of bacteria and responding cells. Hereby, human skin might control the microflora to prevent colonization of unwanted microbes in the earliest steps before potential pathogens can develop strategies to subvert the immune response.

  18. ATF3 activates Stat3 phosphorylation through inhibition of p53 expression in skin cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhen-Feng; Ao, Jun-Hong; Zhang, Jie; Su, You-Ming; Yang, Rong-Ya

    2013-01-01

    ATF3, a member of the ATF/CREB family of transcription factors, has been found to be selectively induced by calcineurin/NFAT inhibition and to enhance keratinocyte tumor formation, although the precise role of ATF3 in human skin cancer and possible mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, clinical analysis of 30 skin cancer patients and 30 normal donors revealed that ATF3 was accumulated in skin cancer tissues. Functional assays demonstrated that ATF3 significantly promoted skin cancer cell proliferation. Mechanically, ATF3 activated Stat3 phosphorylation in skin cancer cell through regulation of p53 expression. Moreover, the promotion effect of ATF3 on skin cancer cell proliferation was dependent on the p53-Stat3 signaling cascade. Together, the results indicate that ATF3 might promote skin cancer cell proliferation and enhance skin keratinocyte tumor development through inhibiting p53 expression and then activating Stat3 phosphorylation.

  19. Solar ultraviolet irradiation induces decorin degradation in human skin likely via neutrophil elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Xia, Wei; Liu, Ying; Remmer, Henriette A; Voorhees, John; Fisher, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity, which degrades type I collagen fibrils. Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in skin and constitutes the majority of skin connective tissue (dermis). Degradation of collagen fibrils impairs the structure and function of skin that characterize skin aging. Decorin is the predominant proteoglycan in human dermis. In model systems, decorin binds to and protects type I collagen fibrils from proteolytic degradation by enzymes such as MMP-1. Little is known regarding alterations of decorin in response to UV irradiation. We found that solar-simulated UV irradiation of human skin in vivo stimulated substantial decorin degradation, with kinetics similar to infiltration of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells. Proteases that were released from isolated PMN cells degraded decorin in vitro. A highly selective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase blocked decorin breakdown by proteases released from PMN cells. Furthermore, purified neutrophil elastase cleaved decorin in vitro and generated fragments with similar molecular weights as those resulting from protease activity released from PMN cells, and as observed in UV-irradiated human skin. Cleavage of decorin by neutrophil elastase significantly augmented fragmentation of type I collagen fibrils by MMP-1. Taken together, these data indicate that PMN cell proteases, especially neutrophil elastase, degrade decorin, and this degradation renders collagen fibrils more susceptible to MMP-1 cleavage. These data identify decorin degradation and neutrophil elastase as potential therapeutic targets for mitigating sun exposure-induced collagen fibril degradation in human skin.

  20. Solar ultraviolet irradiation induces decorin degradation in human skin likely via neutrophil elastase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    Full Text Available Exposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet (UV irradiation induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 activity, which degrades type I collagen fibrils. Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in skin and constitutes the majority of skin connective tissue (dermis. Degradation of collagen fibrils impairs the structure and function of skin that characterize skin aging. Decorin is the predominant proteoglycan in human dermis. In model systems, decorin binds to and protects type I collagen fibrils from proteolytic degradation by enzymes such as MMP-1. Little is known regarding alterations of decorin in response to UV irradiation. We found that solar-simulated UV irradiation of human skin in vivo stimulated substantial decorin degradation, with kinetics similar to infiltration of polymorphonuclear (PMN cells. Proteases that were released from isolated PMN cells degraded decorin in vitro. A highly selective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase blocked decorin breakdown by proteases released from PMN cells. Furthermore, purified neutrophil elastase cleaved decorin in vitro and generated fragments with similar molecular weights as those resulting from protease activity released from PMN cells, and as observed in UV-irradiated human skin. Cleavage of decorin by neutrophil elastase significantly augmented fragmentation of type I collagen fibrils by MMP-1. Taken together, these data indicate that PMN cell proteases, especially neutrophil elastase, degrade decorin, and this degradation renders collagen fibrils more susceptible to MMP-1 cleavage. These data identify decorin degradation and neutrophil elastase as potential therapeutic targets for mitigating sun exposure-induced collagen fibril degradation in human skin.

  1. Epidermal melanin absorption in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvang Nilsen, Lill T.; Fiskerstrand, Elisanne J.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Berns, Michael W.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    1996-01-01

    The principle of laser induced selective photothermolysis is to induced thermal damage to specific targets in such a manner that the temperature of the surrounding tissue is maintained below the threshold for thermal damage. The selectivity is obtained by selection of a proper wavelength and pulse duration. The technique is presently being used in the clinic for removal of port-wine stains. The presence of melanin in the epidermal layer can represent a limitation to the selectivity. Melanin absorption drops off significantly with increasing wavelength, but is significant in the entire wavelength region where the blood absorption is high. Treatment of port-wine stain in patients with high skin pigmentation may therefore give overheating of the epidermis, resulting in epidermal necrosis. Melanosomal heating is dependent on the energy and duration of the laser pulse. The heating mechanism for time scales less than typically 1 microsecond(s) corresponds to a transient local heating of the individual melanosomes. For larger time scales, heat diffusion out of the melanosomes become of increased importance, and the temperature distribution will reach a local steady state condition after typically 10 microsecond(s) . For even longer pulse duration, heat diffusing from neighboring melanosomes becomes important, and the temperature rise in a time scale from 100 - 500 microsecond(s) is dominated by this mechanism. The epidermal heating during the typical 450 microsecond(s) pulse used for therapy is thus dependent on the average epidermal melanin content rather than on the absorption coefficient of the individual melanosomes. This study will present in vivo measurements of the epidermal melanin absorption of human skin when exposed to short laser pulses (< 0.1 microsecond(s) ) from a Q-switched ruby laser and with long laser pulses (approximately 500 microsecond(s) ) from a free-running ruby laser or a long pulse length flashlamp pumped dye laser. The epidermal melanin

  2. Application of low level laser on skin cell lines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndhundhuma, IM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lasers have emerged as powerful tools for tissue engineering. To examine cellular growth, and cell to cell interactions, in vitro skin models have been developed combining two major cell types of skin, keratinocytes and fibroblasts. The main...

  3. Structure and function of the human skin microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schommer, Nina N; Gallo, Richard L

    2013-12-01

    An abundant and diverse collection of bacteria, fungi, and viruses inhabits the human skin. These microorganisms vary between individuals and between different sites on the skin. The factors responsible for the unique variability of the skin microbiome are only partly understood, but results suggest that host genetic and environmental influences play a major role. Today, the steady accumulation of data describing the skin microbiome, combined with experiments designed to test the biological functions of surface microbes, has provided new insights into links between human physiology and skin microbiota. This review describes some of the current information regarding the skin microbiome and its impact on human health. Specifically, we summarize the present understanding of the function of microbe-host interactions on the skin and highlight some unique features that distinguish skin commensal organisms from pathogenic microbes.

  4. Expression of human skin-specific genes defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Danielsson, Angelika; Edlund, Karolina; Uhlén, Mathias; Pontén, Fredrik

    2015-02-01

    To increase our understanding of skin, it is important to define the molecular constituents of the cell types and epidermal layers that signify normal skin. We have combined a genome-wide transcriptomics analysis, using deep sequencing of mRNA from skin biopsies, with immunohistochemistry-based protein profiling to characterize the landscape of gene and protein expression in normal human skin. The transcriptomics and protein expression data of skin were compared to 26 (RNA) and 44 (protein) other normal tissue types. All 20,050 putative protein-coding genes were classified into categories based on patterns of expression. We found that 417 genes showed elevated expression in skin, with 106 genes expressed at least five-fold higher than that in other tissues. The 106 genes categorized as skin enriched encoded for well-known proteins involved in epidermal differentiation and proteins with unknown functions and expression patterns in skin, including the C1orf68 protein, which showed the highest relative enrichment in skin. In conclusion, we have applied a genome-wide analysis to identify the human skin-specific proteome and map the precise localization of the corresponding proteins in different compartments of the skin, to facilitate further functional studies to explore the molecular repertoire of normal skin and to identify biomarkers related to various skin diseases.

  5. Investigation of the Efficacy of Transdermal Penetration Enhancers Through the Use of Human Skin and a Skin Mimic Artificial Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Boglárka; Vizserálek, Gábor; Berkó, Szilvia; Budai-Szűcs, Mária; Kelemen, András; Sinkó, Bálint; Takács-Novák, Krisztina; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Csányi, Erzsébet

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of promising penetration enhancers through the use of 2 different skin test systems. Hydrogel-based transdermal formulations were developed with ibuprofen as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Transcutol and sucrose esters were used as biocompatible penetration enhancers. The permeability measurements were performed with ex vivo Franz diffusion cell methods and a newly developed Skin Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assays (PAMPA) model. Franz diffusion measurement is commonly used as a research tool in studies of diffusion through synthetic membranes in vitro or penetration through ex vivo human skin, whereas Skin PAMPA involves recently published artificial membrane-based technology for the fast prediction of skin penetration. It is a 96-well plate-based model with optimized artificial membrane structure containing free fatty acid, cholesterol, and synthetic ceramide analog compounds to mimic the stratum corneum barrier function. Transdermal preparations containing 2.64% of different sucrose esters and/or Transcutol and a constant (5%) of ibuprofen were investigated to determine the effects of these penetration enhancers. The study demonstrated the good correlation of the permeability data obtained through use of human skin membrane and the in vitro Skin PAMPA system. The Skin PAMPA artificial membrane serves as quick and relatively deep tool in the early stages of transdermal delivery systems, through which the enhancing efficacy of excipients can be screened so as to facilitate the choice of effective penetration components.

  6. Nicotinic acid receptor abnormalities in human skin cancer: implications for a role in epidermal differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yira Bermudez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic UV skin exposure leads to epidermal differentiation defects in humans that can be largely restored by pharmacological doses of nicotinic acid. Nicotinic acid has been identified as a ligand for the human G-protein-coupled receptors GPR109A and GPR109B that signal through G(i-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. We have examined the expression, cellular distribution, and functionality of GPR109A/B in human skin and skin derived epidermal cells. RESULTS: Nicotinic acid increases epidermal differentiation in photodamaged human skin as judged by the terminal differentiation markers caspase 14 and filaggrin. Both GPR109A and GPR109B genes are transcribed in human skin and in epidermal keratinocytes, but expression in dermal fibroblasts is below limits of detection. Receptor transcripts are greatly over-expressed in squamous cell cancers. Receptor protein in normal skin is prominent from the basal through granular layers of the epidermis, with cellular localization more dispersive in the basal layer but predominantly localized at the plasma membrane in more differentiated epidermal layers. In normal human primary and immortalized keratinocytes, nicotinic acid receptors show plasma membrane localization and functional G(i-mediated signaling. In contrast, in a squamous cell carcinoma derived cell line, receptor protein shows a more diffuse cellular localization and the receptors are nearly non-functional. CONCLUSIONS: The results of these studies justify future genetic and pharmacological intervention studies to define possible specific role(s of nicotinic acid receptors in human skin homeostasis.

  7. Characterization of Dendritic Cells Subpopulations in Skin and Afferent Lymph in the Swine Model

    OpenAIRE

    Florian Marquet; Michel Bonneau; Florentina Pascale; Celine Urien; Chantal Kang; Isabelle Schwartz-Cornil; Nicolas Bertho

    2011-01-01

    Transcutaneous delivery of vaccines to specific skin dendritic cells (DC) subsets is foreseen as a promising strategy to induce strong and specific types of immune responses such as tolerance, cytotoxicity or humoral immunity. Because of striking histological similarities between human and pig skin, pig is recognized as the most suitable model to study the cutaneous delivery of medicine. Therefore improving the knowledge on swine skin DC subsets would be highly valuable to the skin vaccine fi...

  8. Pumpless microfluidic platform for drug testing on human skin equivalents

    OpenAIRE

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Gledhill, Karl; Guo, Zongyou; Christiano, Angela M.; Shuler, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in bio-mimetic in vitro human skin models increase the efficiency of drug screening studies. In this study, we designed and developed a microfluidic platform that allows for long-term maintenance of full thickness human skin equivalents (HSE) which are comprised of both the epidermal and dermal compartments. The design is based on the physiologically relevant blood residence times in human skin tissue and allows for the establishment of an air-epidermal interface which is crucial for...

  9. Chemical ecology of interactions between human skin microbiota and mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, N.O.; Takken, W.; Dicke, M.; Schraa, G.; Smallegange, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    Microbiota on the human skin plays a major role in body odour production. The human microbial and chemical signature displays a qualitative and quantitative correlation. Genes may influence the chemical signature by shaping the composition of the microbiota. Recent studies on human skin microbiota,

  10. First genomic survey of human skin fungal diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungal infections of the skin affect 29 million people in the United States. In the first study of human fungal skin diversity, National Institutes of Health researchers sequenced the DNA of fungi that thrive at different skin sites of healthy adults to d

  11. Effect of Atropa belladonna L. on skin wound healing: biomechanical and histological study in rats and in vitro study in keratinocytes, 3T3 fibroblasts, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gál, Peter; Toporcer, Tomás; Grendel, Tomás; Vidová, Zuzana; Smetana, Karel; Dvoránková, Barbora; Gál, Tomás; Mozes, Stefan; Lenhardt, L'udovít; Longauer, Frantisek; Sabol, Marián; Sabo, Ján; Backor, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The effect of Atropa belladonna L. (AB) aqueous extract on skin wound healing was studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to two parallel full-thickness skin incisions on the back. Specimens for histological evaluation were collected on days 2 and 5 whereas for biomechanical testing, they were collected on day 5. In the in vitro study, a different concentration of AB extract was used to test the differentiation of keratinocytes using a panel of selected antibodies, proliferation, and cell survival of 3T3 fibroblasts and human umbilical vein endothelial cells using the MTT-assay. Results of the in vivo experiments showed in AB-treated wounds a shortened process of inflammation and accelerated collagen formation, as well as significantly increased wound stiffness as compared with control tissues. The in vitro examination showed that control keratinocytes were cytokeratin 19 free, while samples exposed to the highest AB extract concentration expressed CK19. Moreover, all concentrations were stimulatory to human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation. In addition, only the AB extract at the lowest tested concentration increased fibroblast growth, but higher concentrations decreased cell survival. In conclusion, our results indicate that the AB water extract positively affects early phases of skin wound healing in rats. However, the in vitro results on the inverse relation between the concentration of the AB extract and its effects on cell proliferation may be important for future research.

  12. Regulatory T Cells in Skin Facilitate Epithelial Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Niwa; Zirak, Bahar; Rodriguez, Robert Sanchez; Pauli, Mariela L; Truong, Hong-An; Lai, Kevin; Ahn, Richard; Corbin, Kaitlin; Lowe, Margaret M; Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Taravati, Keyon; Tan, Madeleine R; Ricardo-Gonzalez, Roberto R; Nosbaum, Audrey; Bertolini, Marta; Liao, Wilson; Nestle, Frank O; Paus, Ralf; Cotsarelis, George; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2017-06-01

    The maintenance of tissue homeostasis is critically dependent on the function of tissue-resident immune cells and the differentiation capacity of tissue-resident stem cells (SCs). How immune cells influence the function of SCs is largely unknown. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) in skin preferentially localize to hair follicles (HFs), which house a major subset of skin SCs (HFSCs). Here, we mechanistically dissect the role of Tregs in HF and HFSC biology. Lineage-specific cell depletion revealed that Tregs promote HF regeneration by augmenting HFSC proliferation and differentiation. Transcriptional and phenotypic profiling of Tregs and HFSCs revealed that skin-resident Tregs preferentially express high levels of the Notch ligand family member, Jagged 1 (Jag1). Expression of Jag1 on Tregs facilitated HFSC function and efficient HF regeneration. Taken together, our work demonstrates that Tregs in skin play a major role in HF biology by promoting the function of HFSCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Structure and function of the human skin microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Schommer, Nina N.; Gallo, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    An abundant and diverse collection of bacteria, fungi and viruses inhabit the human skin. These microorganisms have been reported to vary between individuals and between different sites on the skin. The factors responsible for the unique variability of the skin microbiome are only partially understood, but results suggest host genetic and environmental influences play a major role. Today, the steady accumulation of data describing the skin microbiome, combined with experiments designed to tes...

  14. Diversity of the Human Skin Microbiome Early in Life

    OpenAIRE

    Capone, Kimberly A; Scot E Dowd; Georgios N. Stamatas; Nikolovski, Janeta

    2011-01-01

    Within days after birth, rapid surface colonization of infant skin coincides with significant functional changes. Gradual maturation of skin function, structure, and composition continues throughout the first years of life. Recent reports have revealed topographical and temporal variations in the adult skin microbiome. Here we address the question of how the human skin microbiome develops early in life. We show that the composition of cutaneous microbial communities evolves over the first yea...

  15. Proteomic allergen-peptide/protein interaction assay for the identification of human skin sensitizers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, L.; Kinzebach, S.; Ohnesorge, S.; Franke, B.; Goette, I.; Koenig-Gressel, D.; Thierse, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Modification of proteins by skin sensitizers is a pivotal step in T cell mediated allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). In this process small reactive chemicals interact covalently or non-covalently with cellular or extracellular skin self-proteins or self-peptides to become recognized by the human imm

  16. Studies on percutaneous penetration of chemicals - Impact of storage conditions for excised human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Schneider, Désirée; Göen, Thomas; Schaller, Karl Heinz; Drexler, Hans; Korinth, Gintautas

    2013-03-01

    According to international guidelines skin penetration experiments can be carried out using freshly excised or frozen stored skin. However, this recommendation refers to data obtained in experiments with human cadaver skin. In our study, the percutaneous penetration of the occupationally relevant chemicals anisole, cyclohexanone and 1,4-dioxane was investigated for freshly excised as well as for 4 and 30 days at -20°C stored human skin using the diffusion cell technique. As indicator for the impairment of skin barrier by freezing cholesterol dissolution was determined in the solvents in exposure chambers of diffusion cells. Considering the percutaneously penetrated amounts, the following ranking was determined: 1,4-dioxane>anisole>cyclohexanone (decline to a factor of 5.9). The differences of fluxes between freshly excised and frozen stored skin (4 and 30 days) were not significant (p>0.05). Cholesterol dissolved from the skin indicates no significant differences between freshly excised and frozen stored skin. This study shows that freezing of human skin for up to 30 days does not alter the skin barrier function and the permeability of chemicals.

  17. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veijgen, N K; Masen, M A; van der Heide, E

    2013-12-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables. This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on the human skin, subject characteristics and environmental conditions on skin friction. The data are obtained on 50 subjects (34 males and 16 females). Friction measurements represent the friction between in vivo human skin and an aluminium sample, assessed on three anatomical locations. The coefficient of friction increased significantly (pskin and the height of the subject. Other outcome variables in this study were the hydration of the skin and the skin temperature.

  18. Permeation Studies of Captopril Transdermal Films Through Human Cadaver Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Rajesh Sreedharan; Nair, Sujith

    2015-01-01

    Mortality rate due to heart diseases increases dramatically with age. Captopril is an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE) used effectively for the management of hypertension. Due to short elimination half-life of captopril the oral dose is very high. Captopril is prone to oxidation and it has been reported that the oxidation rate of captopril in skin tissues is considerably low when compared to intestinal tissues. All these factors make captopril an ideal drug candidate for transdermal delivery. In this research work an effort was made to formulate transdermal films of captopril by utilizing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as film formers and polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400) as a plasticizer. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and dimethylformamide (DMF) were used as permeation enhancers. Physicochemical parameters of the films such as appearance, thickness, weight variation and drug content were evaluated. The invitro permeation studies were carried out through excised human cadaver skin using Franz diffusion cells. The in-vitro permeation studies demonstrated that the film (P4) having the polymer ratio (PVP:PVA = 80:20) with DMSO (10%) resulted a promising drug release of 79.58% at 24 hours with a flux of 70.0 µg/cm(2)/hr. No signs of erythema or oedema were observed on the rabbit skin as a result of skin irritation study by Draize test. Based on the stability report it was confirmed that the films were physically and chemically stable, hence the prepared films are very well suited for transdermal application.

  19. In vitro absorption of metal powders through intact and damaged human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filon, Francesca Larese; D'Agostin, Flavia; Crosera, Matteo; Adami, Gianpiero; Bovenzi, Massimo; Maina, Giovanni

    2009-06-01

    The bioavailability of metals, which are known as important contact allergens, is decisive for the development and the maintenance of contact dermatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the percutaneous penetration of metal powders of cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni) and chromium (Cr) and the effect of skin lesions on skin absorption. In vitro permeation experiments were performed using the Franz diffusion cells with intact and damaged human skin. Physiological solution was used as receiving phase and metal powders (Co, Ni and Cr) dispersed in synthetic sweat at pH 4.5 were applied as donor phase to the outer surface of the skin for 24h. The amount of each metal permeating the skin was analysed by electro-thermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS). Donor solution analysis demonstrated that metals were present as ions. Measurements of metals skin content were also exploited. Median Co and Ni concentrations found in the receiving phase were significantly higher when Co and Ni powders were applied on the abraded skin than after application on the intact skin (3566 and 2631ngcm(-2) vs. 8.4 and 31ngcm(-2), respectively). No significant difference was found in Cr permeation through intact and damaged skin. The measurement of metals skin content showed that Co, Ni and Cr concentrations were significantly higher in the damaged skin than in the intact skin. Co and Ni ions concentrations increased significantly when the donor solutions were applied on the damaged skin, while Cr ions concentrations did not increase. This study demonstrated that Co and Ni powders can permeate through damaged skin more easily than Cr powder, which has probably a stronger skin proteins binding capacity. Therefore, our results suggest that is necessary to prevent skin contamination when using toxic substances because a small injury to the skin barrier can significantly increase skin absorption.

  20. Setup for investigating gold nanoparticle penetration through reconstructed skin and comparison to published human skin data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouta, Hagar I.; Thude, Sibylle; Schneider, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Owing to the limited source of human skin (HS) and the ethical restrictions of using animals in experiments, in vitro skin equivalents are a possible alternative for conducting particle penetration experiments. The conditions for conducting penetration experiments with model particles, 15-nm gold nanoparticles (AuNP), through nonsealed skin equivalents are described for the first time. These conditions include experimental setup, sterility conditions, effective applied dose determination, skin sectioning, and skin integrity check. Penetration at different exposure times (two and 24 h) and after tissue fixation (fixed versus unfixed skin) are examined to establish a benchmark in comparison to HS in an attempt to get similar results to HS experiments presented earlier. Multiphoton microscopy is used to detect gold luminescence in skin sections. λex=800 nm is used for excitation of AuNP and skin samples, allowing us to determine a relative index for particle penetration. Despite the observed overpredictability of penetration into skin equivalents, they could serve as a first fast screen for testing the behavior of nanoparticles and extrapolate their penetration behavior into HS. Further investigations are required to test a wide range of particles of different physicochemical properties to validate the skin equivalent-human skin particle penetration relationship.

  1. Permeability of the reconstructed human epidermis model Episkin in comparison to various human skin preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzlaff, Frank; Kaca, Monika; Bock, Udo; Haltner-Ukomadu, Eleonore; Meiers, Peter; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Schaefer, Ulrich F

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this work was to compare the barrier function of the small diameter reconstructed human epidermis model Episkin (d=12 mm) to human skin in vitro. For that purpose a modification for the Franz diffusion cell (d=15mm) had to be developed so as to allow direct comparison with the following human skin preparations: Full thickness skin (FTS), split thickness skin (STS), heat-separated epidermis (HSE), and trypsin isolated stratum corneum (TISC). Among the tested preparations, HSE appeared to be the most preferable due to its clear morphological structure and ease of preparation. The lipid profile of HSE and Episkin was analyzed and showed significant differences in terms of cholesterol, ceramides and triglycerides contents, whereas cholesterol esters and fatty acids were not different. Permeation data with HSE and Episkin were then gathered using caffeine and testosterone. Both test compounds permeated much faster through Episkin than through HSE. Moreover, opposed to Episkin, HSE differentiated between the two test compounds. In spite of the remarkable progress in developing RHEs in the past years at this time Episkin can obviously not yet fully replace human skin for in vitro permeability experiments.

  2. Long-term maintenance of skin immune system in a NOD-Scid IL2rγ(null) mouse model transplanted with human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Angèle; Boccara, David; Chonco, Louis; Yahia, Nora; Dufossée, Mélody; Cardinaud, Sylvain; Moris, Arnaud; Liard, Christelle; Joulin-Giet, Alix; Julithe, Marion; Mimoun, Maurice; Combadière, Béhazine; Perrin, Hélène

    2014-11-01

    We developed a NOD-Scid IL2rγ(null) mouse model transplanted with human skin that brings fundamental insight on in vivo cellular mechanisms of intradermal immunization and antigen presentation by dermal dendritic and epidermal Langerhans cells for skin T-cell immunity. Indeed, T-cell immunity is a crucial checkpoint for the induction of in vivo rapid control of skin infection. With the long-term preservation of a complete human skin immune system, this model offers the unique opportunity not only to better understand mechanisms of skin immune response but also to test new compounds and devices for cutaneous routes of vaccination, as well as new therapeutics approach for skin diseases, allergies or infections.

  3. Transdermal Delivery of Water Soluble Molecules into Human Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Steinsland, Synne

    2012-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the human body and it constitutes a great protective barrier against entry of harmful microbial species and foreign materials into the body. The barrier function is a result of the highly hydrophobic nature and compact structure of the outermost skin layer, which makes transdermal delivery of drugs difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate diffusion of hydrophilic fish gelatin peptides and alginate oligomers (G-blocks) into human skin, and to evaluat...

  4. Chromium content in human skin after in vitro application of ordinary cement and ferrous-sulphate-reduced cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fullerton, A; Gammelgaard, Bente; Avnstorp, C

    1993-01-01

    The amount of chromium found in human skin after in vitro application of cement suspensions on full-thickness human skin in diffusion cells was investigated. Cement suspensions made from ordinary Portland cement or Portland cement with the chromate reduced with added ferrous sulphate were used....... The cement suspensions were either applied on the skin surface under occlusion for 48 h or applied repeatedly every 24 h for 96 h. No statistically significant difference in chromium content of skin layers between skin exposed to ordinary Portland cement, skin exposed to cement with added ferrous sulphate...

  5. The moisturizing effects of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Sogabe, Atsushi; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitagawa, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactants, such as mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), are produced by different yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma and have been attracting much attention as new cosmetic ingredients owing to their unique liquid-crystal-forming and moisturizing properties. In this study, the effects of different MEL derivatives on the skin were evaluated in detail using a three-dimensional cultured human skin model and an in vivo human study. The skin cells were cultured and treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and the effects of different lipids on the SDS-damaged cells were evaluated on the basis of cell viability. Most MEL derivatives efficiently recovered the viability of the cells and showed high recovery rates (over 80%) comparable with that of natural ceramide. It is interesting that the recovery rate with MEL-A prepared from olive oil was significantly higher than that of MEL-A prepared from soybean oil. The water retention properties of MEL-B were further investigated on human forearm skin in a preliminary study. Compared with the control, the aqueous solution of MEL-B (5 wt%) was estimated to considerably increase the stratum corneum water content in the skin. Moreover, perspiration on the skin surface was clearly suppressed by treatment with the MEL-B solution. These results suggest that MELs are likely to exhibit a high moisturizing action, by assisting the barrier function of the skin. Accordingly, the yeast glycolipids have a strong potential as a new ingredient for skin care products.

  6. Preclinical safety studies on autologous cultured human skin fibroblast transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Zhang, Shuying; Liu, Dai; Chai, Mi; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhao, Yuming

    2014-01-01

    Recently, FDA approved the clinical use of autologous fibroblasts (LAVIV™) for the improvement of nasolabial fold wrinkles in adults. The use of autologous fibroblasts for the augmentation of dermal and subcutaneous defects represents a potentially exciting natural alternative to the use of other filler materials for its long-term corrective ability and absence of allergic adverse effects proved by clinical application. However, compared to the clinical evidence, preclinical studies are far from enough. In this study, human skin-derived fibroblasts were cultured and expanded for both in vitro and in vivo observations. In vitro, the subcultured fibroblasts were divided into two groups. One set of cells underwent cell cycle and karyotype analysis at passages 5 and 10. The second group of cells was cocultured in medium with different concentrations of human skin extract D for the measurement of collagen concentration and cell count. In vivo, the subcultured fibroblasts were injected into nude mice subcutaneously. Biopsies were taken for morphology observation and specific collagen staining at 1, 2, and 3 months after injection. The results in vitro showed no significant differences in cell cycle distribution between passages 5 and 10. Cell proliferation and secretion were inhibited as the concentration of extract D increased. In vivo, the fibroblasts were remarkably denser on the experimental side with no dysplastic cells. Mitotic cells were easily observed at the end of the first month but were rare at the end of the third month. Type III collagen was detected at the end of the first month, while collagen type I was positive at the end of the second month. The content of both collagens increased as time passed. The above results indicated that the use of the autologous fibroblasts was safe, providing a basic support for clinical use of fibroblasts.

  7. A HYBRID APPROACH TO HUMAN SKIN REGION DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vijayanandh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Face recognition is important in research areas like machine vision and complex security systems. Skin region detection is a vital factor for processing in such systems. Hence the proposed paper focuses on isolating the regions of an image corresponding to human skin region through the hybrid method. This paper intends to combine the skin region detected from RGB and YCbCr color spaces image by the explicit skin color conditions and the skin label cluster identified from CIEL*a*b color space image, which is clustered by Hillclimbing segmentation with K-Means clustering algorithm. Then the resultant image is dilated by arbitrary shape and filtered by the median filter, in order to enhance the skin region and to avoid the noise respectively. The proposed method has been tested on various real images, which contain one or more human beings and the performance of skin region detection is found to be quite satisfactory.

  8. Microbiome dynamics of human epidermis following skin barrier disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.; Boekhorst, te J.; Bogaard, van den E.H.; Koning, de H.D.; Kerkhof, van de P.M.; Saulnier, D.M.; Swam, van I.I.; Hijum, van S.A.F.T.; Kleerebezem, M.; Schalkwijk, J.; Timmerman, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background - Recent advances in sequencing technologies have enabled metagenomic analyses of many human body sites. Several studies have catalogued the composition of bacterial communities of the surface of human skin, mostly under static conditions in healthy volunteers. Skin injury will disturb th

  9. Microbiome dynamics of human epidermis following skin barrier disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.; Boekhorst, te J.; Bogaard, van den E.H.; Koning, de H.D.; Kerkhof, van de P.M.; Saulnier, D.M.; Swam, van I.I.; Hijum, van S.A.F.T.; Kleerebezem, M.; Schalkwijk, J.; Timmerman, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background - Recent advances in sequencing technologies have enabled metagenomic analyses of many human body sites. Several studies have catalogued the composition of bacterial communities of the surface of human skin, mostly under static conditions in healthy volunteers. Skin injury will disturb

  10. A comprehensive two-dimensional gel protein database of noncultured unfractionated normal human epidermal keratinocytes: towards an integrated approach to the study of cell proliferation, differentiation and skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H

    1991-01-01

    proteins in alphabetical order), "basal cell markers", "differentiation markers", "proteins highly up-regulated in psoriatic skin", "microsequenced proteins" and "human autoantigens". For reference, we have also included 2-D gel (isoelectric focusing) patterns of cultured normal and psoriatic keratinocytes......A two-dimensional (2-D) gel database of cellular proteins from noncultured, unfractionated normal human epidermal keratinocytes has been established. A total of 2651 [35S]methionine-labeled cellular proteins (1868 isoelectric focusing, 783 nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis) were resolved...

  11. Cationic membrane-active peptides - anticancer and antifungal activity as well as penetration into human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Nhung; Weindl, Günther; Grohmann, Lisa; Salwiczek, Mario; Koksch, Beate; Korting, Hans Christian; Schäfer-Korting, Monika

    2014-05-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are ancient natural broad-spectrum antibiotics, and several compounds also exhibit anticancer activity. However, most applications pertain to bacterial infections, and treatment for skin cancer is less frequently considered. The cytotoxicity of melittin, cecropin A, protegrin-1 and histatin 5 against squamous skin cancer cell lines and normal human keratinocytes was evaluated and compared to established drugs. The results show that melittin clearly outperforms 5-fluorouracil regarding antitumor activity. Importantly, combined melittin and 5-fluorouracil enhanced cytotoxic effects on cancer cells and reduced toxicity on normal keratinocytes. Additionally, minimum inhibitory concentrations indicate that melittin also shows superior activity against clinical and laboratory strains of Candida albicans compared to amphotericin B. To evaluate its potential for topical applications, human skin penetration of melittin was investigated ex vivo and compared to two non-toxic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), low molecular weight protamine (LMWP) and penetratin. The stratum corneum prevents penetration into viable epidermis over 6 h; however, the peptides gain access to the viable skin after 24 h. Inhibition of digestive enzymes during skin penetration significantly enhances the availability of intact peptide. In conclusion, melittin may represent an innovative agent for non-melanoma skin cancer and infectious skin diseases. In order to develop a drug candidate, skin absorption and proteolytic digestion by skin enzymes need to be addressed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The role of innate lymphoid cells in healthy and inflamed skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte M.; Geisler, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The skin constitutes the interface between the organism and the environment, and it protects the body from harmful substances in the environment via physical, chemical and immunological barriers. The immunological barrier of the skin comprises both cells from the innate and the adaptive immune...... system. During the last years, it has become clear that innate lymphoid cells play a role in homeostasis and inflammation of the skin in humans and mice. In this review, we will discuss the role of innate lymphoid cells in healthy and inflamed skin with special focus on their role in atopic dermatitis....

  13. Morphine metabolism in human skin microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, S; Küchler, S; Schäfer-Korting, M

    2012-01-01

    For patients with severe skin wounds, topically applied morphine is an option to induce efficient analgesia due to the presence of opioid receptors in the skin. However, for topical administration it is important to know whether the substance is biotransformed in the skin as this can eventually reduce the concentration of the active agent considerably. We use skin microsomes to elucidate the impact of skin metabolism on the activity of topically applied morphine. We are able to demonstrate that morphine is only glucuronidated in traces, indicating that the biotransformation in the skin can be neglected when morphine is applied topically. Hence, there is no need to take biotransformation into account when setting up the treatment regimen.

  14. Skin Conditions in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoan Bernárdez Cruz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: patients with human immunodeficiency virus frequently develop skin conditions that affect their quality of life and modify their prognosis. Objective: to describe the most common skin conditions in patients with human immunodeficiency virus. Methods: a case-series study of patients with human immunodeficiency virus was conducted in the province of Cienfuegos. It included all patients diagnosed until February 2008 attending the internal medicine consultation for their follow-up. Forty-seven deceased patients, 12 patients not living in the province and 2 inmates were excluded from the study. Variables analyzed were: age, sex, skin color, self-reported skin conditions and diagnosed skin diseases. Results: Thirty-eight percent of patients were aged 25 to 34 years. Fifty-seven were white-skinned and 75% were male. Approximately half of the patients had AIDS and were under antiretroviral therapy. The skin infection of viral origin most commonly found was herpes simplex (30.0%; of fungal origin, onychomycosis (44 %; and of bacterial origin, folliculitis (43 %. Among papulosquamous disorders, seborrheic dermatitis (74 % predominated and among other skin disorders, lipodystrophy (23.6 %. Xerosis and pruritus shared equal percentage (16.3 %. Conclusions: viral and fungal skin infections predominated. An important number of these skin conditions were diagnosed during the study, particularly in AIDS patients.

  15. Basal level of autophagy is increased in aging human skin fibroblasts in vitro, but not in old skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirovic, Dino; Nizard, Carine; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular autophagy (AP) is a stress response that is enhanced under conditions of limitation of amino acids, growth factors and other nutrients, and also when macromolecules become damaged, aggregated and fibrillated. Aging is generally accompanied by an increase in intracellular stress due to all the above factors. Therefore, we have compared the basal levels of AP in serially passaged human facial skin fibroblasts undergoing aging and replicative senescence in vitro, and ex vivo in the skin biopsies from the photo-protected and photo-exposed area of the arms of 20 healthy persons of young and old ages. Immunofluorescence microscopy, employing antibodies against a specific intracellular microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 (LC3) as a well established marker of AP, showed a 5-fold increase in the basal level of LC3 in near senescent human skin fibroblasts. However, no such age-related increase in LC3 fluorescence and AP could be detected in full thickness skin sections from the biopsies obtained from 10 healthy young (age 25 to 30 yr) and 10 old (age 60 to 65 yr) donors. Furthermore, there was no difference in the basal level of LC3 in the skin sections from photo-protected and photo-exposed areas of the arm. Thus, in normal conditions, the aging phenotype of the skin cells in culture and in the body appears to be different in the case of AP.

  16. Using infrared and Raman microspectroscopies to compare ex vivo involved psoriatic skin with normal human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Marie; Lefèvre, Thierry; Pouliot, Roxane; Auger, Michèle; Laroche, Gaétan

    2015-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic dermatosis that affects around 3% of the world's population. The etiology of this autoimmune pathology is not completely understood. The barrier function of psoriatic skin is known to be strongly altered, but the structural modifications at the origin of this dysfunction are not clear. To develop strategies to reduce symptoms of psoriasis or adequate substitutes for modeling, a deep understanding of the organization of psoriatic skin at a molecular level is required. Infrared and Raman microspectroscopies have been used to obtain direct molecular-level information on psoriatic and healthy human skin biopsies. From the intensities and positions of specific vibrational bands, the lipid and protein distribution and the lipid order have been mapped in the different layers of the skin. Results showed a similar distribution of lipids and collagen for normal and psoriatic human skin. However, psoriatic skin is characterized by heterogeneity in lipid/protein composition at the micrometer scale, a reduction in the definition of skin layer boundaries and a decrease in lipid chain order in the stratum corneum as compared to normal skin. A global decrease of the structural organization is exhibited in psoriatic skin that is compatible with an alteration of its barrier properties.

  17. Digital Dermatoscopy Method for Human Skin Roughness Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suprijanto

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study we propose a digital dermatoscopy method to measure the human skin roughness. By using this method we eliminate the use of silicon replica. Digital dermatoscopy consists of handheld digital microscope, image processing and information extraction of skin roughness level. To reduce the noise due to the variation of reflection factor on the skin we use median filter. Hence, by Fourier transform the skin texture is imaged in terms of 2D frequency-spatial distribution. Skin roughness is determined from its entropy, where the roughness level is proportional to the entropy. Three types of experiment have been performed by evaluating: (i the skin replicas; (ii young and elderly skin; and (iii seven volunteers treated by anti wrinkle cosmetic in three weeks period. We find that for the first and second experiment that our system did manage to quantify the roughness, while on the third experiment, six of seven volunteers, the roughness are succeeded to identify.

  18. Impact of AQP3 inducer treatment on cultured human keratinocytes, ex vivo human skin and volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, N; Gondran, C; Menon, G; Mur, L; Oberto, G; Guerif, Y; Dal Farra, C; Domloge, N

    2011-10-01

    One of the main functions of the skin is to protect the organism against environmental threats, such as thermal stress. Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) facilitates water and glycerol transport across cell membranes and therefore regulates osmotic balance in different situations of stress. This mechanism seems to be particularly important for the resistance of different organisms to cold stress. Consequently, we were interested in investigating the effect of cold and osmotic stress on AQP3 expression in normal human keratinocytes. We developed a new active ingredient to stimulate aquaporins in skin and demonstrated the partial restoration of AQP3 expression in keratinocytes transfected with AQP3 siRNA. Moreover, we examined the effect of cold stress on cell morphology and the impact of a pre-treatment with the active ingredient. Our results indicated that induction of AQP3 helped maintain a correct organization of the actin cytoskeleton, preserving cell morphology and preventing cells from rounding. Immunofluorescent staining revealed cytoplasmic localization of AQP3 and its translocation to the cell membrane following osmotic stress. Histological ex vivo studies of skin under different conditions, such as cold environment and tape-stripping, indicated that increase in AQP3 expression appears to be involved in skin protection and showed that the pattern of AQP3 expression was more enhanced in the active ingredient-treated samples. In vivo confocal microscopy by Vivascope showed a generally healthier appearance of the skin in the treated areas. These results attest to the potential value of the active ingredient in optimizing environmental stress resistance and protecting the skin from stratum corneum damage.

  19. Heterogeneous Stem Cells in Skin Homeostatis and Wound Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Meilana; Nurrani Mustika Dewi; Andi Wijaya

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The skin protects mammals from insults, infection and dehydration and enables thermoregulation and sensory perception. Various skin-resident cells carry out these diverse functions. Constant turnover of cells and healing upon injury necessitate multiple reservoirs of stem cells. The skin is a complex organ harboring several distinct populations of stem cells and a rich array of cell types. Advances in genetic and imaging tools have brought new findings about the lineage relationsh...

  20. Cell-based regenerative strategies for treatment of diabetic skin wounds, a comparative study between human umbilical cord blood-mononuclear cells and calves' blood haemodialysate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala O El-Mesallamy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetes-related foot problems are bound to increase. However, medical therapies for wound care are limited; therefore, the need for development of new treatment modalities to improve wound healing in diabetic patients is essential and constitutes an emerging field of investigation. METHODS: Animals were randomly divided into 8 groups (I-VIII (32 rats/group, all were streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetics except groups III and VIII were non-diabetic controls. The study comprised two experiments; the first included 3 groups. Group I injected with mononuclear cells (MNCs derived from human umbilical cord blood (HUCB, group II a diabetic control group (PBS i.v. The second experiment included 5 groups, groups IV, V, and VI received topical HUCB-haemodialysate (HD, calves' blood HD, and solcoseryl, respectively. Group VII was the diabetic control group (topical saline. Standard circular wounds were created on the back of rats. A sample of each type of HD was analyzed using the high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS system. Wound area measurement and photography were carried out every 4 days. Plasma glucose, catalase (CAT, malondialdehyde (MDA, nitric oxide (NO and platelets count were assessed. Wound samples were excised for hydroxyproline (HP and histopathological study. RESULTS: Treatment with HUCB MNCs or HUCB-HD resulted in wound contraction, increased CAT, NO, platelets count, body weights, and HP content, and decreased MDA and glucose. CONCLUSION: Systemic administration of HUCB MNCs and topical application of the newly prepared HUCB-HD or calves' blood HD significantly accelerated the rate of diabetic wound healing and would open the possibility of their future use in regenerative medicine.

  1. Tactile-direction-sensitive and stretchable electronic skins based on human-skin-inspired interlocked microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jonghwa; Lee, Youngoh; Hong, Jaehyung; Lee, Youngsu; Ha, Minjeong; Jung, Youngdo; Lim, Hyuneui; Kim, Sung Youb; Ko, Hyunhyub

    2014-12-23

    Stretchable electronic skins with multidirectional force-sensing capabilities are of great importance in robotics, prosthetics, and rehabilitation devices. Inspired by the interlocked microstructures found in epidermal-dermal ridges in human skin, piezoresistive interlocked microdome arrays are employed for stress-direction-sensitive, stretchable electronic skins. Here we show that these arrays possess highly sensitive detection capability of various mechanical stimuli including normal, shear, stretching, bending, and twisting forces. Furthermore, the unique geometry of interlocked microdome arrays enables the differentiation of various mechanical stimuli because the arrays exhibit different levels of deformation depending on the direction of applied forces, thus providing different sensory output patterns. In addition, we show that the electronic skins attached on human skin in the arm and wrist areas are able to distinguish various mechanical stimuli applied in different directions and can selectively monitor different intensities and directions of air flows and vibrations.

  2. Plasma Lipoproteins as Mediators of the Oxidative Stress Induced by UV Light in Human Skin: A Review of Biochemical and Biophysical Studies on Mechanisms of Apolipoprotein Alteration, Lipid Peroxidation, and Associated Skin Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Filipe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous studies concerning the effect of UVB light on skin cells but fewer on other skin components such as the interstitial fluid. This review highlights high-density lipoprotein (HDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL as important targets of UVB in interstitial fluid. Tryptophan residues are the sole apolipoprotein residues absorbing solar UVB. The UVB-induced one-electron oxidation of Trp produces •Trp and O2•- radicals which trigger lipid peroxidation. Immunoblots from buffered solutions or suction blister fluid reveal that propagation of photooxidative damage to other residues such as Tyr or disulfide bonds produces intra- and intermolecular bonds in apolipoproteins A-I, A-II, and B100. Partial repair of phenoxyl tyrosyl radicals (TyrO• by α-tocopherol is observed with LDL and HDL on millisecond or second time scales, whereas limited repair of α-tocopherol by carotenoids occurs in only HDL. More effective repair of Tyr and α-tocopherol is observed with the flavonoid, quercetin, bound to serum albumin, but quercetin is less potent than new synthetic polyphenols in inhibiting LDL lipid peroxidation or restoring α-tocopherol. The systemic consequences of HDL and LDL oxidation and the activation and/or inhibition of signalling pathways by oxidized LDL and their ability to enhance transcription factor DNA binding activity are also reviewed.

  3. Plasma lipoproteins as mediators of the oxidative stress induced by UV light in human skin: a review of biochemical and biophysical studies on mechanisms of apolipoprotein alteration, lipid peroxidation, and associated skin cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipe, Paulo; Morlière, Patrice; Silva, João N; Mazière, Jean-Claude; Patterson, Larry K; Freitas, João P; Santus, R

    2013-01-01

    There are numerous studies concerning the effect of UVB light on skin cells but fewer on other skin components such as the interstitial fluid. This review highlights high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as important targets of UVB in interstitial fluid. Tryptophan residues are the sole apolipoprotein residues absorbing solar UVB. The UVB-induced one-electron oxidation of Trp produces (•)Trp and (•)O2 (-) radicals which trigger lipid peroxidation. Immunoblots from buffered solutions or suction blister fluid reveal that propagation of photooxidative damage to other residues such as Tyr or disulfide bonds produces intra- and intermolecular bonds in apolipoproteins A-I, A-II, and B100. Partial repair of phenoxyl tyrosyl radicals (TyrO(•)) by α -tocopherol is observed with LDL and HDL on millisecond or second time scales, whereas limited repair of α -tocopherol by carotenoids occurs in only HDL. More effective repair of Tyr and α -tocopherol is observed with the flavonoid, quercetin, bound to serum albumin, but quercetin is less potent than new synthetic polyphenols in inhibiting LDL lipid peroxidation or restoring α -tocopherol. The systemic consequences of HDL and LDL oxidation and the activation and/or inhibition of signalling pathways by oxidized LDL and their ability to enhance transcription factor DNA binding activity are also reviewed.

  4. Human Dark Skin and Equatorial Africa: Toward a Critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain K. Cibangu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While skin color represents one of the most common markers of humans, the theories that explain it remain largely unknown both in academia and industry. Meanwhile, fraught with theoretical shortcomings about skin color, as clear from its body of knowledge, racial studies has not addressed skin color with needed attention. Consequently, misconceptions about human skin color have proliferated. This paper discusses anew Gloger’s theory and its widespread impact in the social sciences and general public. Gloger explained dark skin by heat. Not surprisingly, dark skin is believed to be the product of and response to ultra violet radiation in Equatorial Africa. One reason might be the fixation of the debate on the white-black binary. Another reason might be the commonplace belief about the African heat. The present paper calls into question the Equator-Africa presentation of black skin. To this end, the paper situates the debate in the broader spectrum of social science disciplines, and investigates the ways in which black skin is presented. The paper advocates for the consideration of skin complexity and of minorities in the field of skin color. The goal is to work toward a deeper understanding of others and their traits, with a view to raise awareness among policy makers, the general public, and social science experts. The paper takes an encyclopedic approach to best cater to these audiences.

  5. In vitro study of ethosome penetration in human skin and hypertrophic scar tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Wo, Yan; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Danru; He, Rong; Chen, Huijin; Cui, Daxiang

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize a novel transdermal delivery carrier, ethosomes containing 5-fluorouracil. The delivery of drugs from ethosomes in human hypertrophic scar (HS) and the mechanisms of action of ethosomes in human HS were investigated. Percutaneous ethosome permeation was evaluated in vitro in human HS and skin using a Franz's cell. The amount of 5-fluorouracil that permeated HS and skin after 24 hours was most abundant in ethosomes via HS (E-Scar), followed by hydroethanolic solution via HS (H-Scar), ethosomes via skin (E-Skin), and hydroethanolic solution via skin (H-Skin). The penetration of ethosomes in HS and skin was analyzed by ethosomes fluorescently labeled with rhodamine 6GO using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The fluorescence intensity after application for 24 hours was highest in E-Scar, followed by E-Skin, H-Scar, and H-Skin, which indicates the penetration of ethosomes in HS was greatest. In conclusion, we consider that ethosomes are a highly efficient carrier in HS.

  6. 人皮肤成纤维细胞来源诱导性多潜能干细胞的建立和鉴定%Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from human skin fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋知新; 张清华; 艾民; 沙杭; 高毅; 卢海

    2011-01-01

    目的 建立和鉴定人皮肤成纤维细胞(HSF)来源的诱导性多潜能干细胞(iPS)。方法利用逆转录病毒将Sox2、Klf4、Oct4、c-Myc基因导入原代HSF细胞,将其编程为iPS细胞。检测细胞内源、外源基因表达量,鉴定外源基因是否插入iPS细胞,分析细胞核型,细胞碱性磷酸酶染色和免疫荧光染色,体内分化畸胎瘤,体外分化拟胚体实验,对建立的iPS细胞进行鉴定。结果(1)iPS细胞形态类似于胚胎干细胞(ES)。(2)iPS细胞内源多能基因(Nanog、Oct4、Rex1、Sox2)表达量增高,外源编程基因(Sox2、Klf4、Oct4、c-Myc)表达量降低。(3)琼脂糖凝胶电泳实验证实外源基因插入iPS细胞核内。(4)iPS细胞核型正常,碱性磷酸酶活性增高,表达ES细胞特异性蛋白。(5)iPS细胞在体内能分化为畸胎瘤,在体外能分化为拟胚体。结论新建立的iPS细胞类似于ES细胞具有多向分化潜能。%Objective Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from human skin fibroblasts.Methods Sox2, Klf4, Oct4, c-Myc were transfected into HSF cells with retrovirus, and then HSF cells was reprogrammed to iPS cells.Detecting cells endogenous and exogenous gene, analyzing karyotype,cells alkaline phosphatase staining and immunofluorescence staining, differentiating into teratomas in vivo and embryoid bodies in vitro were performed.Results iPS cell morphology was similar to embryonic stem cells (ES).The expression of Nanog, Oct4, Rex1, Sox2 in iPS cells were higher than HSF cells, and Sox2, Klf4, Oct4, c-Myc were silenced for the iPS cells.Exogenous genes were inserted into the nucleus of iPS cells, which was confirmed by 1% agarose gel electrophoresis.iPS cell karyotype was normal, alkaline phosphatase activity increased, ES cell-specific protein expressed.iPS cells were differentiated into a teratoma in vivo and embryoid bodies in vitro.Conclusions iPS cells were similar to ES cells, which have pluripotency.

  7. Terahertz pulse imaging in reflection geometry of human skin cancer and skin tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, Ruth M [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cole, Bryan E [TeraView Limited, 302/304 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wallace, Vincent P [TeraView Limited, 302/304 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pye, Richard J [Department of Dermatology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Arnone, Donald D [TeraView Limited, 302/304 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Linfield, Edmund H [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pepper, Michael [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2002-11-07

    We demonstrate the application of terahertz pulse imaging (TPI) in reflection geometry for the study of skin tissue and related cancers both in vitro and in vivo. The sensitivity of terahertz radiation to polar molecules, such as water, makes TPI suitable for studying the hydration levels in the skin and the determination of the lateral spread of skin cancer pre-operatively. By studying the terahertz pulse shape in the time domain we have been able to differentiate between diseased and normal tissue for the study of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Basal cell carcinoma has shown a positive terahertz contrast, and inflammation and scar tissue a negative terahertz contrast compared to normal tissue. In vivo measurements on the stratum corneum have enabled visualization of the stratum corneum-epidermis interface and the study of skin hydration levels. These results demonstrate the potential of terahertz pulse imaging for the study of skin tissue and its related disorders, both in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Dengue fever virus and Japanese encephalitis virus synthetic peptides, with motifs to fit HLA class I haplotypes prevalent in human populations in endemic regions, can be used for application to skin Langerhans cells to prime antiviral CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTLs)--a novel approach to the protection of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Y

    1994-09-01

    Flaviviruses were reported to induce CD8+ cytotoxic T cells in infected individuals, indicating that nonapeptides, proteolytic cleavage products of the viral precursor protein, enter the endoplasmic reticulum in infected cells and interact with HLA class I molecules. The assembled HLA class I molecules are transported to the plasma membrane and prime CD8+ T cells. Current knowledge of the interaction of viral peptides with HLA molecules is reviewed. Based on this review, an idea is presented to use synthetic flavivirus peptides with an amino acid motif to fit with the HLA class I peptide binding group of HLA haplotypes prevalent in a given population in an endemic area. These synthetic viral peptides may be introduced into the human skin using a lotion containing the peptides ("Peplotion") together with substances capable of enhancing the penetration of these peptides into the skin to reach Langerhans cells. The peptide-treated Langerhans cells, professional antigen-presenting cells, may bind the synthetic viral peptides by their HLA class I peptide-binding grooves. Antigens carrying Langerhans cells are able to migrate and induce the cellular immune response in the lymph nodes. This approach to the priming of antiviral CD8+ cytotoxic T cells may provide cellular immune protection from flavivirus infection without inducing the humoral immune response, which can lead to the shock syndrome in Dengue fever patients. To be able to develop anti-Dengue virus synthetic peptides for populations with different HLA class I haplotypes, it is necessary to develop computational studies to design HLA class I Dengue virus synthetic peptides with motifs to fit the HLA haplotypes of the population living in an endemic region for Dengue fever. Experiments to study Dengue virus and Japanese encephalitis peptides vaccines and their effectiveness in protection against Dengue fever and Japanese encephalitis are needed. The development of human antiviral vaccines for application of viral

  9. Evidence for a physiological role of intracellularly occurring photolabile nitrogen oxides in human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opländer, Christian; Wetzel, Wiebke; Cortese, Miriam M; Pallua, Norbert; Suschek, Christoph V

    2008-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a pivotal role in human skin biology. Cutaneous NO can be produced enzymatically by NO synthases (NOS) as well as enzyme independently via photodecomposition of photolabile nitrogen oxides (PNOs) such as nitrite or nitroso compounds, both found in human skin tissue in comparably high concentrations. Although the physiological role of NOS-produced NO in human skin is well defined, nothing is known about the biological relevance or the chemical origin of intracellularly occurring PNOs. We here, for the first time, give evidence that in human skin fibroblasts (FB) PNOs represent the oxidation products of NOS-produced NO and that in human skin fibroblasts intracellularly occurring PNOs effectively protect against the injurious effects of UVA radiation by a NO-dependent mechanism. In contrast, in PNO-depleted FB cultures an increased susceptibility to UVA-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death is observed, whereas supplementation of PNO-depleted FB cultures with physiological nitrite concentrations (10 microM) or with exogenously applied NO completely restores UVA-increased injuries. Thus, intracellular PNOs are biologically relevant and represent an important initial shield functioning in human skin physiology against UVA radiation. Consequently, nonphysiological low PNO concentrations might promote known UVA-related skin injuries such as premature aging and carcinogenesis.

  10. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, M.A.; Heide, van der E.

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables. This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on t

  11. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, M.A.; Heide, E. van der

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables.This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on the

  12. An Automatic Identification System of Human Skin Irritation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Fadlil

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative characterization of human skin irritation is an important but difficult task. Recently, identification of human skin is still doing manually. Furthermore, manual identification of the human skin irritation sample can be very subjective. The skin irritation analysis could conducted using biochemical test, but not simple. In this research, a new approach an automatic human skin identification system base on image recognition have been developed. Skin image processed using pattern recognition methods to obtain decision of skin sample test is skin irritation or not. System design is implementation of Gray Level Histogram (GLH feature or texture Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrices (GLCM features using classifier distance metric: Manhattan distance and Euclidean distance, or Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ neural network. Combination between feature extrator and classifier methods proposed to evaluate of performance system. The experimental results show that the best accuracy namely 83.33% obtained when design system is implementation of GLH or GLCM features using LVQ neural network classifier.

  13. Wound Coverage by Cultured Skin Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    and spread. 6 We later coated collagen sponges with human or porcine plasma. Although this coating improved the plating of epidermal cells, it did not...healing by cultured epidermal grafts, we have found that: - We were able to grow epidermal cells on collapsed collagen sponges . As a result, we can create...plastic. Epidermal cells grown on collagen sponges formed four to five layers of nucleated cells, compared to only one layer on plastic surfaces. The use of

  14. Utilization of reconstructed cultured human skin models as an alternative skin for permeation studies of chemical compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Kano, Satoshi; 藤堂, 浩明; 杉江, 謙一; 藤本, 英哲; 中田, 圭一; 徳留, 嘉寛; 橋本, フミ惠; 杉林, 堅次

    2010-01-01

    Two reconstructed human skin models, EpiskinSM and EpiDermTM, have been approved as alternative membranes for skin corrosive/irritation experiments due to their close correlation with animal skin. Such reconstructed human skin models were evaluated as alternative membranes for skin permeation experiments. Seven drugs with different lipophilicities and almost the same molecular weight were used as test penetrants. Relationships were investigated between permeability coefficients (P values) of ...

  15. Phasor analysis of multiphoton spectral images distinguishes autofluorescence components of in vivo human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereidouni, Farzad; Bader, Arjen N; Colonna, Anne; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2014-08-01

    Skin contains many autofluorescent components that can be studied using spectral imaging. We employed a spectral phasor method to analyse two photon excited autofluorescence and second harmonic generation images of in vivo human skin. This method allows segmentation of images based on spectral features. Various structures in the skin could be distinguished, including Stratum Corneum, epidermal cells and dermis. The spectral phasor analysis allowed investigation of their fluorescence composition and identification of signals from NADH, keratin, FAD, melanin, collagen and elastin. Interestingly, two populations of epidermal cells could be distinguished with different melanin content.

  16. Lymphoid neogenesis in skin of human hand, nonhuman primate, and rat vascularized composite allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautz, Theresa; Zelger, Bettina G; Nasr, Isam W; Mundinger, Gerhard S; Barth, Rolf N; Rodriguez, Eduardo D; Brandacher, Gerald; Weissenbacher, Annemarie; Zelger, Bernhard; Cavadas, Pedro; Margreiter, Raimund; Lee, W P Andrew; Pratschke, Johann; Lakkis, Fadi G; Schneeberger, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms of skin rejection in vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) remain incompletely understood. The formation of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO) in hand transplantation has been recently described. We assess this phenomenon in experimental and clinical VCA rejection. Skin biopsies of human (n = 187), nonhuman primate (n = 11), and rat (n = 15) VCAs were analyzed for presence of TLO. A comprehensive immunohistochemical assessment (characterization of the cell infiltrate, expression of adhesion molecules) including staining for peripheral node addressin (PNAd) was performed and correlated with rejection and time post-transplantation. TLO were identified in human, nonhuman primate, and rat skin samples. Expression of PNAd was increased in the endothelium of vessels upon rejection in human skin (P = 0.003) and correlated with B- and T-lymphocyte numbers and LFA-1 expression. PNAd expression was observed at all time-points after transplantation and increased significantly after year 5. In nonhuman primate skin, PNAd expression was found during inflammatory conditions early and late after transplantation. In rat skin, PNAd expression was strongly associated with acute rejection and time post-transplantation. Lymphoid neogenesis and TLO formation can be uniformly found in experimental and human VCA. PNAd expression in vascular endothelium correlates with skin rejection and T- and B-cell infiltration.

  17. Steroid synthesis by primary human keratinocytes; implications for skin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannen, Rosalind F., E-mail: r.f.hannen@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Michael, Anthony E. [Centre for Developmental and Endocrine Signalling, Academic Section of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Clinical Developmental Sciences, 3rd Floor, Lanesborough Wing, St. George' s, University of London, Cranmer Terrace, Tooting, London SW17 0RE (United Kingdom); Jaulim, Adil [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Bhogal, Ranjit [Life Science, Unilever R and D Colworth House, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom); Burrin, Jacky M. [Centre for Endocrinology, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Philpott, Michael P. [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Primary keratinocytes express the steroid enzymes required for cortisol synthesis. {yields} Normal primary human keratinocytes can synthesise cortisol. {yields} Steroidogenic regulators, StAR and MLN64, are expressed in normal epidermis. {yields} StAR expression is down regulated in eczema and psoriatic epidermis. -- Abstract: Cortisol-based therapy is one of the most potent anti-inflammatory treatments available for skin conditions including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Previous studies have investigated the steroidogenic capabilities of keratinocytes, though none have demonstrated that these skin cells, which form up to 90% of the epidermis are able to synthesise cortisol. Here we demonstrate that primary human keratinocytes (PHK) express all the elements required for cortisol steroidogenesis and metabolise pregnenolone through each intermediate steroid to cortisol. We show that normal epidermis and cultured PHK express each of the enzymes (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, 3{beta}HSD1, CYP21 and CYP11B1) that are required for cortisol synthesis. These enzymes were shown to be metabolically active for cortisol synthesis since radiometric conversion assays traced the metabolism of [7-{sup 3}H]-pregnenolone through each steroid intermediate to [7-{sup 3}H]-cortisol in cultured PHK. Trilostane (a 3{beta}HSD1 inhibitor) and ketoconazole (a CYP17A1 inhibitor) blocked the metabolism of both pregnenolone and progesterone. Finally, we show that normal skin expresses two cholesterol transporters, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), regarded as the rate-determining protein for steroid synthesis, and metastatic lymph node 64 (MLN64) whose function has been linked to cholesterol transport in steroidogenesis. The expression of StAR and MLN64 was aberrant in two skin disorders, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, that are commonly treated with cortisol, suggesting dysregulation of epidermal steroid synthesis in these patients. Collectively these data

  18. Characterization of dendritic cells subpopulations in skin and afferent lymph in the swine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Marquet

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous delivery of vaccines to specific skin dendritic cells (DC subsets is foreseen as a promising strategy to induce strong and specific types of immune responses such as tolerance, cytotoxicity or humoral immunity. Because of striking histological similarities between human and pig skin, pig is recognized as the most suitable model to study the cutaneous delivery of medicine. Therefore improving the knowledge on swine skin DC subsets would be highly valuable to the skin vaccine field. In this study, we showed that pig skin DC comprise the classical epidermal langerhans cells (LC and dermal DC (DDC that could be divided in 3 subsets according to their phenotypes: (1 the CD163(neg/CD172a(neg, (2 the CD163(highCD172a(pos and (3 the CD163(lowCD172a(pos DDC. These subtypes have the capacity to migrate from skin to lymph node since we detected them in pseudo-afferent lymph. Extensive phenotyping with a set of markers suggested that the CD163(high DDC resemble the antibody response-inducing human skin DC/macrophages whereas the CD163(negCD172(low DDC share properties with the CD8(+ T cell response-inducing murine skin CD103(pos DC. This work, by showing similarities between human, mouse and swine skin DC, establishes pig as a model of choice for the development of transcutaneous immunisation strategies targeting DC.

  19. Study of mast cell count in skin tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher Hesham

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin tags or acrochordons are common tumors of middle-aged and elderly subjects. They consist of loose fibrous tissue and occur mainly on the neck and major flexures as small, soft, pedunculated protrusions. Objectives: The aim was to compare the mast cells count in skin tags to adjacent normal skin in diabetic and nondiabetic participants in an attempt to elucidate the possible role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of skin tags. Participants and Methods: Thirty participants with skin tags were divided into group I (15 nondiabetic participants and group II (15 diabetic participants. Three biopsies were obtained from each participant: a large skin tag, a small skin tag and adjacent normal skin. Mast cell count from all the obtained sections was carried out, and the mast cell density was expressed as the average mast cell count/high power field (HPF. Results: A statistically significant increase in mast cells count in skin tags in comparison to normal skin was detected in group I and group II. There was no statistically significant difference between mast cell counts in skin tags of both the groups. Conclusion: Both the mast cell mediators and hyperinsulinemia are capable of inducing fibroblast proliferation and epidermal hyperplasia that are the main pathologic abnormalities seen in all types of skin tags. However, the presence of mast cells in all examined skin tags regardless of diabetes and obesity may point to the possible crucial role of mast cells in the etiogenesis of skin tags through its interaction with fibroblasts and keratinocytes.

  20. Evaporation of volatile organic compounds from human skin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjar, Rachna M; Miller, Matthew A; Kasting, Gerald B

    2013-08-01

    The specific evaporation rates of 21 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from either human skin or a glass substrate mounted in modified Franz diffusion cells were determined gravimetrically. The diffusion cells were positioned either on a laboratory bench top or in a controlled position in a fume hood, simulating indoor and outdoor environments, respectively. A data set of 54 observations (34 skin and 20 glass) was assembled and subjected to a correlation analysis employing 5 evaporative mass transfer relationships drawn from the literature. Models developed by Nielsen et al. (Prediction of isothermal evaporation rates of pure volatile organic compounds in occupational environments: a theoretical approach based on laminar boundary layer theory. Ann Occup Hyg 1995;39:497-511.) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Peress, Estimate evaporative losses from spills. Chem Eng Prog 2003; April: 32-34.) were found to be the most effective at correlating observed and calculated evaporation rates under the various conditions. The U.S. EPA model was selected for further use based on its simplicity. This is a turbulent flow model based only on vapor pressure and molecular weight of the VOC and the effective air flow rate u. Optimum values of u for the two laboratory environments studied were 0.23 m s(-1) (bench top) and 0.92 m s(-1) (fume hood).

  1. Anti-wrinkle effects of Sargassum muticum ethyl acetate fraction on ultraviolet B-irradiated hairless mouse skin and mechanistic evaluation in the human HaCaT keratinocyte cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae Hyoung; Piao, Mei Jing; Han, Xia; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Yoon, Weon Jong; Ko, Mi Hee; Lee, Nam Ho; Lee, Mi Young; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the photoprotective properties of the ethyl acetate fraction of Sargassum muticum (SME) against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced skin damage and photoaging in a mouse model. HR-1 strain hairless male mice were divided into three groups: An untreated control group, a UVB-irradiated vehicle group and a UVB-irradiated SME group. The UVB-irradiated mice in the SME group were orally administered with SME (100 mg/kg body weight in 0.1 ml water per day) and then exposed to radiation at a dose of 60–120 mJ/cm2. Wrinkle formation and skin damage were evaluated by analysis of skin replicas, epidermal thickness and collagen fiber integrity in the dermal connective tissue. The mechanism underlying the action of SME was also investigated in the human HaCaT keratinocyte cell line following exposure of the cells to UVB at a dose of 30 mJ/cm2. The protein expression levels and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), and the binding of activator protein-1 (AP-1) to the MMP-1 promoter were assessed in the HaCaT cells using western blot analysis, an MMP-1 fluorescent assay and a chromatin immune-precipitation assay, respectively. The results showed that the mean length and depth of the wrinkles in the UVB-exposed hairless mice were significantly improved by oral administration of SME, which also prevented the increase in epidermal thickness triggered by UVB irradiation. Furthermore, a marked increase in collagen bundle formation was observed in the UVB-treated mice with SME administration. SME pretreatment also significantly inhibited the UVB-induced upregulation in the expression and activity of MMP-1 in the cultured HaCaT keratinocytes, and the UVB-enhanced association of AP-1 with the MMP-1 promoter. These results suggested that SME may be useful as an anti-photoaging resource for the skin. PMID:27573915

  2. Multifaceted pathways protect human skin from UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Vivek T; Ganju, Parul; Ramkumar, Amrita; Grover, Ritika; Gokhale, Rajesh S

    2014-07-01

    The recurrent interaction of skin with sunlight is an intrinsic constituent of human life, and exhibits both beneficial and detrimental effects. The apparent robust architectural framework of skin conceals remarkable mechanisms that operate at the interface between the surface and environment. In this Review, we discuss three distinct protective mechanisms and response pathways that safeguard skin from deleterious effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The unique stratified epithelial architecture of human skin along with the antioxidant-response pathways constitutes the important defense mechanisms against UV radiation. The intricate pigmentary system and its intersection with the immune-system cytokine axis delicately balance tissue homeostasis. We discuss the relationship among these networks in the context of an unusual depigmenting disorder, vitiligo. The elaborate tunable mechanisms, elegant multilayered architecture and evolutionary selection pressures involved in skin and sunlight interaction makes this a compelling model to understand biological complexity.

  3. Tribological behaviour of skin equivalents and ex-vivo human skin against the material components of artificial turf in sliding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales Hurtado, Marina; Peppelman, P.; Zeng, Xiangqiong; van Erp, P.E.J.; van der Heide, Emile

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to analyse the interaction of three artificial skin equivalents and human skin against the main material components of artificial turf. The tribological performance of Lorica, Silicone Skin L7350 and a recently developed Epidermal Skin Equivalent (ESE) were studied and compared to

  4. Transdermal iontophoresis of the dopamine agonist 5-OH-DPAT in human skin in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nugroho, AK; Li, L; Dijkstra, D; Wikstrom, H; Danhof, M; Bouwstra, JA

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of transdermal iontophoretic delivery of a potent dopamine agonist 5-OH-DPAT was studied in vitro in side by side diffusion cells across human stratum corneum (HSC) and dermatomed human skin (DHS) according to the following protocol: 6 h of passive diffusion, 9 h of iontophoresis and

  5. Characterization of Skin Aging-Associated Secreted Proteins (SAASP) Produced by Dermal Fibroblasts Isolated from Intrinsically Aged Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldera Lupa, Daniel M; Kalfalah, Faiza; Safferling, Kai; Boukamp, Petra; Poschmann, Gereon; Volpi, Elena; Götz-Rösch, Christine; Bernerd, Francoise; Haag, Laura; Huebenthal, Ulrike; Fritsche, Ellen; Boege, Fritz; Grabe, Niels; Tigges, Julia; Stühler, Kai; Krutmann, Jean

    2015-08-01

    Most molecular hallmarks of cellular senescence have been identified in studies of cells aged in vitro by driving them into replicative or stress-induced senescence. Comparatively, less is known about the characteristic features of cells that have aged in vivo. Here we provide a systematic molecular analysis of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) that were isolated from intrinsically aged human skin of young versus middle aged versus old donors. Intrinsically aged NHDFs in culture exhibited more frequently nuclear foci positive for p53 binding protein 1 and promyelocytic leukemia protein reminiscent of 'DNA segments with chromatin alterations reinforcing senescence (DNA-SCARS)'. Formation of such foci was neither accompanied by increased DNA double strand breaks, nor decreased cell viability, nor telomere shortening. However, it was associated with the development of a secretory phenotype, indicating incipient cell senescence. By quantitative analysis of the entire secretome present in conditioned cell culture supernatant, combined with a multiplex cytokine determination, we identified 998 proteins secreted by intrinsically aged NHDFs in culture. Seventy of these proteins exhibited an age-dependent secretion pattern and were accordingly denoted 'skin aging-associated secreted proteins (SAASP)'. Systematic comparison of SAASP with the classical senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) revealed that matrix degradation as well as proinflammatory processes are common aspects of both conditions. However, secretion of 27 proteins involved in the biological processes of 'metabolism' and 'adherens junction interactions' was unique for NHDFs isolated from intrinsically aged skin. In conclusion, fibroblasts isolated from intrinsically aged skin exhibit some, but not all, molecular hallmarks of cellular senescence. Most importantly, they secrete a unique pattern of proteins that is distinct from the canonical SASP and might reflect specific processes of skin aging.

  6. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Rakesh, E-mail: rs05h@fsu.ed [Departments of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2010-07-21

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  7. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  8. Natural and sun-induced aging of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittié, Laure; Fisher, Gary J

    2015-01-05

    With worldwide expansion of the aging population, research on age-related pathologies is receiving growing interest. In this review, we discuss current knowledge regarding the decline of skin structure and function induced by the passage of time (chronological aging) and chronic exposure to solar UV irradiation (photoaging). Nearly every aspect of skin biology is affected by aging. The self-renewing capability of the epidermis, which provides vital barrier function, is diminished with age. Vital thermoregulation function of eccrine sweat glands is also altered with age. The dermal collagenous extracellular matrix, which comprises the bulk of skin and confers strength and resiliency, undergoes gradual fragmentation, which deleteriously impacts skin mechanical properties and dermal cell functions. Aging also affects wound repair, pigmentation, innervation, immunity, vasculature, and subcutaneous fat homeostasis. Altogether, age-related alterations of skin lead to age-related skin fragility and diseases.

  9. Terahertz spectroscopy of human skin constituents in suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Cecil; Yaroslavsky, Anna; Al-Arashi, Munir; Gatesman, Andrew; Goyette, Thomas; Giles, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Continuous wave terahertz imaging has the potential to offer a non-invasive medical imaging modality for detecting different types of human cancers. The aim of this study was to identify frequencies of interest for continuous wave terahertz imaging of skin cancer. The absorption characteristics of water, collagen, and elastin were studied in the range between 20 and 100cm-1. In addition, we have recorded and analyzed the teraherz absorption spectra of several substances that are present in human skin (i.e. tryptophan, tyrosine, melanin, urocanic acid, keratin) and their water suspensions with the goal of using them as biomarkers for skin cancer detection.

  10. Interleukin 4-producing CD4+ T cells in the skin of cats with allergic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosje, P J; Dean, G A; Willemse, T; Rutten, V P M G; Thepen, T

    2002-03-01

    Lesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis has a cellular infiltrate and a CD4/CD8 ratio comparable to that in humans with atopic dermatitis. CD4+ helper T cells and in particular cells belonging to the Th2 subset play an important role in disease pathogenesis in humans. We investigated the cytokine pattern of CD4+ T cells in situ, with special emphasis on the putative presence of cells producing interleukin 4 (IL4), in cats with allergic dermatitis. Immunohistochemical procedures were used to determine that CD4+ T cells in lesional and nonlesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis can produce IL4, as occurs in humans. Lesional and nonlesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis had significantly more IL4+ T cells (P = 0.001) than did skin of healthy control cats. Double staining indicated that all IL4+ cells were positive for pan-T or CD4 markers. Double labeling for mast cell chymase and IL4 stained primarily different cells. Western blotting demonstrated cross-reactivity between the antibody against human IL4 and a feline recombinant IL4. These results indicate that IL4 is primarily produced by CD4+ T cells and is also present in clinically uninvolved skin, indicating a role in the pathogenesis of allergic dermatitis in cats.

  11. Parabens inhibit human skin estrogen sulfotransferase activity: possible link to paraben estrogenic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusakiewicz, Jeffery J; Harville, Heather M; Zhang, Yanhua; Ackermann, Chrisita; Voorman, Richard L

    2007-04-11

    Parabens (p-hydroxybenzoate esters) are a group of widely used preservatives in topically applied cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. Parabens display weak associations with the estrogen receptors in vitro or in cell based models, but do exhibit estrogenic effects in animal models. It is our hypothesis that parabens exert their estrogenic effects, in part, by elevating levels of estrogens through inhibition of estrogen sulfotransferases (SULTs) in skin. We report here the results of a structure-activity-relationship of parabens as inhibitors of estrogen sulfation in human skin cytosolic fractions and normal human epidermal keratinocytes. Similar to reports of paraben estrogenicity and estrogen receptor affinity, the potency of SULT inhibition increased as the paraben ester chain length increased. Butylparaben was found to be the most potent of the parabens in skin cytosol, yielding an IC(50) value of 37+/-5 microM. Butylparaben blocked the skin cytosol sulfation of estradiol and estrone, but not the androgen dehydroepiandrosterone. The parabens were also tested as inhibitors of SULT activity in a cellular system, with normal human epidermal keratinocytes. The potency of butylparaben increased three-fold in these cells relative to the IC(50) value from skin cytosol. Overall, these results suggest chronic topical application of parabens may lead to prolonged estrogenic effects in skin as a result of inhibition of estrogen sulfotransferase activity. Accordingly, the skin anti-aging benefits of many topical cosmetics and pharmaceuticals could be derived, in part, from the estrogenicity of parabens.

  12. From frog integument to human skin: dermatological perspectives from frog skin biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Iain S; Roubos, Eric W; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Vaudry, Hubert; Kloepper, Jennifer E; Pattwell, David M; Maderson, Paul F A; Paus, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    For over a century, frogs have been studied across various scientific fields, including physiology, embryology, neuroscience, (neuro)endocrinology, ecology, genetics, behavioural science, evolution, drug development, and conservation biology. In some cases, frog skin has proven very successful as a research model, for example aiding in the study of ion transport through tight epithelia, where it has served as a model for the vertebrate distal renal tubule and mammalian epithelia. However, it has rarely been considered in comparative studies involving human skin. Yet, despite certain notable adaptations that have enabled frogs to survive in both aquatic and terrestrial environments, frog skin has many features in common with human skin. Here we present a comprehensive overview of frog (and toad) skin ontogeny, anatomy, cytology, neuroendocrinology and immunology, with special attention to its unique adaptations as well as to its similarities with the mammalian integument, including human skin. We hope to provide a valuable reference point and a source of inspiration for both amphibian investigators and mammalian researchers studying the structural and functional properties of the largest organ of the vertebrate body.

  13. Retracted: Exosomes secreted by human urine-derived stem cells accelerate skin wound healing by promoting angiogenesis in rat by Yuan H, Guan J, Zhang J, Zhang R, Li M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The above article, published online on 21 April 2016 in Wiley Online Library (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cbin.10615/full), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor, Sergio Schenkman, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed because the authors discovered inconsistent results in repeated tests. The authors and publisher apologise for any inconvenience. Reference Yuan H, Guan J, Zhang J, Zhang R, LiM(2016) Exosomes secreted by human urine-derived stem cells accelerate skin wound healing by promoting angiogenesis in rat. Cell Biol Int, Accepted Author Manuscript. https://doi.org/10.1002/cbin.10615. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  14. Design and fabrication of human skin by three-dimensional bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vivian; Singh, Gurtej; Trasatti, John P; Bjornsson, Chris; Xu, Xiawei; Tran, Thanh Nga; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Dai, Guohao; Karande, Pankaj

    2014-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting, a flexible automated on-demand platform for the free-form fabrication of complex living architectures, is a novel approach for the design and engineering of human organs and tissues. Here, we demonstrate the potential of 3D bioprinting for tissue engineering using human skin as a prototypical example. Keratinocytes and fibroblasts were used as constituent cells to represent the epidermis and dermis, and collagen was used to represent the dermal matrix of the skin. Preliminary studies were conducted to optimize printing parameters for maximum cell viability as well as for the optimization of cell densities in the epidermis and dermis to mimic physiologically relevant attributes of human skin. Printed 3D constructs were cultured in submerged media conditions followed by exposure of the epidermal layer to the air-liquid interface to promote maturation and stratification. Histology and immunofluorescence characterization demonstrated that 3D printed skin tissue was morphologically and biologically representative of in vivo human skin tissue. In comparison with traditional methods for skin engineering, 3D bioprinting offers several advantages in terms of shape- and form retention, flexibility, reproducibility, and high culture throughput. It has a broad range of applications in transdermal and topical formulation discovery, dermal toxicity studies, and in designing autologous grafts for wound healing. The proof-of-concept studies presented here can be further extended for enhancing the complexity of the skin model via the incorporation of secondary and adnexal structures or the inclusion of diseased cells to serve as a model for studying the pathophysiology of skin diseases.

  15. A rising cancer prevention target of RSK2 in human skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arul eNarayanasamy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available RSK2 is a p90 ribosomal S6 kinase family (p90RSK member regulating cell proliferation and transformation induced by tumor promoters such as epithelial growth factor (EGF and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA. This family of p90RSK has classified as a serine/threonine kinase that respond to many growth factors, peptide hormones, neurotransmitters, and environmental stresses such as ultraviolet light (UV. Our recent study demonstrates that RSK2 plays a key role in human skin cancer development. Activation of RSK2 by EGF and UV through ERKs signaling pathway induces cell cycle progression, cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell transformation. Moreover, knockdown of RSK2 by si-RNA or sh-RNA abrogates cell proliferation and cell transformation of non-malignant human skin keratinocyte, and colony growth of malignant melanoma cells in soft agar. Importantly, activated and total RSK2 protein levels are highly detected in human skin cancer tissues including squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma. Kaempferol and eriodictyol are natural substances to inhibit kinase activity of the RSK2 N-terminal kinase domain, which is a critical kinase domain to transducer their activation signals to the substrates by phosphorylation. In this review, we discuss the role of RSK2 in skin cancer particularly, in activation of signaling pathways and potent natural substances to target RSK2 as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents.

  16. Cohabitation--relationships of corynebacteria and staphylococci on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaszewska, Anna; Sobiś-Glinkowska, Maria; Szewczyk, Eligia M

    2014-11-01

    Skin microbiome main cultivable aerobes in human are coagulase-negative staphylococci and lipophilic corynebacteria. Staphylococcus strains (155) belonging to 10 species and 105 strains of Corynebacterium belonging to nine species from the skin swabs of healthy male volunteers were investigated to determine their enzymatic activity to main metabolic substrates: carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and response to factors present on the skin such as osmotic pressure, pH, and organic acids. The results showed that lipophilic corynebacteria have different capacity for adaptation on the skin than staphylococci. Most of Corynebacterium spp. expressed lack of proteinase, phospholipase, and saccharolytic enzymes activity. Corynebacteria were also more sensitive than Staphylococcus spp. to antimicrobial agents existing on human skin, especially to low pH. These characters can explain domination of Staphylococcus genera on healthy human skin. It can be suggested that within these two bacterial genus, there exists conceivable cooperation and reciprocal protection which results in their quantitative ratio. Such behavior must be considered as crucial for the stability of the population on healthy skin.

  17. Development of human skin equivalents mimicking skin aging : contrast between papillary and reticular fibroblasts as a lead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janson, D.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of human skin equivalents that show characteristics of skin aging. The type of skin equivalent used was a fibroblast derived matrix equivalent, in which the dermal compartment is generated by fibroblasts and thus is fully of human origin. Two strategies are

  18. Plant-Derived Human Collagen Scaffolds for Skin Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, James J.; Drexler, Jason W.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Shilo, Shani; Shoseyov, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly formed using proteins extracted from animal tissues, such as bovine hide. Risks associated with the use of these materials include hypersensitivity and pathogenic contamination. Human-derived proteins lower the risk of hypersensitivity, but possess the risk of disease transmission. Methods engineering recombinant human proteins using plant material provide an alternate source of these materials without the risk of disease transmission or concerns regarding variability. To investigate the utility of plant-derived human collagen (PDHC) in the development of engineered skin (ES), PDHC and bovine hide collagen were formed into tissue engineering scaffolds using electrospinning or freeze-drying. Both raw materials were easily formed into two common scaffold types, electrospun nonwoven scaffolds and lyophilized sponges, with similar architectures. The processing time, however, was significantly lower with PDHC. PDHC scaffolds supported primary human cell attachment and proliferation at an equivalent or higher level than the bovine material. Interleukin-1 beta production was significantly lower when activated THP-1 macrophages where exposed to PDHC electrospun scaffolds compared to bovine collagen. Both materials promoted proper maturation and differentiation of ES. These data suggest that PDHC may provide a novel source of raw material for tissue engineering with low risk of allergic response or disease transmission. PMID:23298216

  19. Transcriptome Analysis Identifies the Dysregulation of Ultraviolet Target Genes in Human Skin Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yao; Kim, Arianna L; Du, Rong; Liu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a major risk factor for both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. In addition to its mutagenic effect, UVR can also induce substantial transcriptional instability in skin cells affecting thousands of genes, including many cancer genes, suggesting that transcriptional instability may be another important etiological factor in skin photocarcinogenesis. In this study, we performed detailed transcriptomic profiling studies to characterize the kinetic changes in global gene expression in human keratinocytes exposed to different UVR conditions. We identified a subset of UV-responsive genes as UV signature genes (UVSGs) based on 1) conserved UV-responsiveness of this subset of genes among different keratinocyte lines; and 2) UV-induced persistent changes in their mRNA levels long after exposure. Interestingly, 11 of the UVSGs were shown to be critical to skin cancer cell proliferation and survival. Through computational Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, we demonstrated that a significant portion of the UVSGs were dysregulated in human skin squamous cell carcinomas, but not in other human malignancies. This highlights the potential and specificity of the UVSGs in clinical diagnosis of UV damage and stratification of skin cancer risk.

  20. Cell kinetics in a model of artificial skin. An immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analysis

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    A Casasco

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioengineered organs raised in vitro are candidate substitutes for natural organs in biological, pharmacological and clinical applications. We have studied cell kinetics in a human skin equivalent (HSE using a combined immunohistochemical and flow cytometric approach. Morphological analysis has shown that, relative to unstimulated natural skin, cell proliferation mainly occurs in the basal layer of the epidermal equivalent. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric measurements of the growth fraction suggested a cell turnover comparable to that of natural skin. Immunohistochemical labelling indices matched well with flow cytometric data. These observations are consistent with morphological and histochemical data demonstrating normal cell differentiation and tissue architecture in HSE and suggest that such HSE may be a usefull substitute for human skin.

  1. Functional specialization of skin dendritic cell subsets in regulating T cell responses

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    Björn E. Clausen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are a heterogeneous family of professional antigen presenting cells (APC classically recognized as most potent inducers of adaptive immune responses. In this respect, Langerhans cells (LC have long been considered to be prototypic immunogenic DC in the skin. More recently this view has considerably changed. The generation of in vivo cell ablation and lineage tracing models revealed the complexity of the skin DC network and, in particular, established the existence of a number of phenotypically distinct Langerin+ and negative DC populations in the dermis. Moreover, by now we appreciate that DC also exert important regulatory functions and are required for the maintenance of tolerance towards harmless foreign and self-antigens. This review summarizes our current understanding of the skin-resident DC system in the mouse and discusses emerging concepts on the functional specialization of the different skin DC subsets in regulating T cell responses. Special consideration is given to antigen cross-presentation as well as immune reactions towards contact sensitizers, cutaneous pathogens and tumors. These studies form the basis for the manipulation of the human counterparts of the murine DC subsets to promote immunity or tolerance for the treatment of human disease.

  2. Monomethylarsonous acid inhibited endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in human skin fibroblasts

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    Guo, Lei [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States); Xiao, Yongsheng [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States); Wang, Yinsheng, E-mail: yinsheng.wang@ucr.edu [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Human exposure to arsenic in drinking water is a widespread public health concern, and such exposure is known to be associated with many human diseases. The detailed molecular mechanisms about how arsenic species contribute to the adverse human health effects, however, remain incompletely understood. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a highly toxic and stable metabolite of inorganic arsenic. To exploit the mechanisms through which MMA(III) exerts its cytotoxic effect, we adopted a quantitative proteomic approach, by coupling stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) with LC-MS/MS analysis, to examine the variation in the entire proteome of GM00637 human skin fibroblasts following acute MMA(III) exposure. Among the ∼ 6500 unique proteins quantified, ∼ 300 displayed significant changes in expression after exposure with 2 μM MMA(III) for 24 h. Subsequent analysis revealed the perturbation of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis, selenoprotein synthesis and Nrf2 pathways evoked by MMA(III) exposure. Particularly, MMA(III) treatment resulted in considerable down-regulation of several enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, real-time PCR analysis showed reduced mRNA levels of select genes in this pathway. Furthermore, MMA(III) exposure contributed to a distinct decline in cellular cholesterol content and significant growth inhibition of multiple cell lines, both of which could be restored by supplementation of cholesterol to the culture media. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) may arise, at least in part, from the down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis enzymes and the resultant decrease of cellular cholesterol content. - Highlights: • MMA(III)-induced perturbation of the entire proteome of GM00637 cells is studied. • Quantitative proteomic approach revealed alterations of multiple cellular pathways. • MMA(III) inhibits de novo cholesterol biosynthesis. • MMA

  3. Applications of human skin in vitro

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    Lönnqvist, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a substantial problem in today’s health care and place significant strains on the patient. Successful modelling of the wound healing process is pivotal for the advancement of wound treatment research. Wound healing is a dynamic and multifactorial process involving all constituents of the skin. The progression from haemostasis and inflammation to proliferation of epidermal  keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts, and final scar maturation can be halted and result in a chronic ...

  4. In vivo multiphoton microscopy associated to 3D image processing for human skin characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldeweck, T.; Tancrède, E.; Dokladal, P.; Koudoro, S.; Morard, V.; Meyer, F.; Decencière, E.; Pena, A.-M.

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged in the past decade as a promising non-invasive skin imaging technique. The aim of this study was to assess whether multiphoton microscopy coupled to specific 3D image processing tools could provide new insights into the organization of different skin components and their age-related changes. For that purpose, we performed a clinical trial on 15 young and 15 aged human female volunteers on the ventral and dorsal side of the forearm using the DermaInspectR medical imaging device. We visualized the skin by taking advantage of intrinsic multiphoton signals from cells, elastic and collagen fibers. We also developed 3D image processing algorithms adapted to in vivo multiphoton images of human skin in order to extract quantitative parameters in each layer of the skin (epidermis and superficial dermis). The results show that in vivo multiphoton microscopy is able to evidence several skin alterations due to skin aging: morphological changes in the epidermis and modifications in the quantity and organization of the collagen and elastic fibers network. In conclusion, the association of multiphoton microscopy with specific image processing allows the three-dimensional organization of skin components to be visualized and quantified thus providing a powerful tool for cosmetic and dermatological investigations.

  5. Skin-resident T cells sense ultraviolet radiation-induced injury and contribute to DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Amanda S; Rudolph, Ross; Corriden, Ross; Ye, Ivan; Garijo, Olivia; Havran, Wendy L

    2014-06-15

    Skin-resident T cells have been shown to play important roles in tissue homeostasis and wound repair, but their role in UV radiation (UVR)-mediated skin injury and subsequent tissue regeneration is less clear. In this study, we demonstrate that acute UVR rapidly activates skin-resident T cells in humans and dendritic epidermal γδ T cells (DETCs) in mice through mechanisms involving the release of ATP from keratinocytes. Following UVR, extracellular ATP leads to an increase in CD69 expression, proliferation, and IL-17 production, and to changes in DETC morphology. Furthermore, we find that the purinergic receptor P2X7 and caspase-1 are necessary for UVR-induced IL-1 production in keratinocytes, which increases IL-17 secretion by DETCs. IL-17, in turn, induces epidermal TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis and growth arrest and DNA damage-associated gene 45, two molecules linked to the DNA repair response. Finally, we demonstrate that DETCs and human skin-resident T cells limit DNA damage in keratinocytes. Taken together, our findings establish a novel role for skin-resident T cells in the UVR-associated DNA repair response and underscore the importance of skin-resident T cells to overall skin regeneration.

  6. Comparing the effects of mitochondrial targeted and localized antioxidants with cellular antioxidants in human skin cells exposed to UVA and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewole, Anne O; Wilmot, Marie-Claire; Fowler, Mark; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer and aging are linked to increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly following exposure to ultraviolet A (UVA) in sunlight. As mitochondria are the main source of cellular ROS, this study compared the protective effects of mitochondria-targeted and -localized antioxidants (MitoQ and tiron, respectively) with cellular antioxidants against oxidative stress-induced [UVA and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)] mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in human dermal fibroblasts. With the use of a long quantitative PCR assay, tiron (EC50 10 mM) was found to confer complete (100%) protection (Pantioxidants investigated. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway provides cellular protection against oxidative stress. An ELISA assay for the Nrf2 target gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and studies using Nrf2 small interfering RNA both indicated that tiron's mode of action was Nrf2 independent. The comet assay showed that tiron's protective effect against H2O2-induced nuclear DNA damage was greater than the cellular antioxidants and MitoQ (Pantioxidants.

  7. Biohydrogels for the In Vitro Re-construction and In Situ Regeneration of Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkina, Liudmila; Kostyuk, Vladimir; Guerra, Liliana

    Natural and synthetic biohydrogels are of great interest for the development of innovative medicinal and cosmetic products feasible for the treatment of numerous skin diseases and age-related changes in skin structure and function. Here, the characteristics of bio-resorbable hydrogels as scaffolds for the in vitro re-construction of temporary skin substitutes or full skin equivalents for further transplantation are reviewed. Another fast developing area of regenerative medicine is the in situ regeneration of human skin. The approach is mainly applicable to activate and facilitate the skin regeneration process and angiogenesis in chronic wounds with impaired healing. In this case, extracellular matrix resembling polymers are used to stimulate cell growth, adhesion, and movement. Better results could be achieved by activation of biocompatible hydrogels either with proteins (growth factors, adhesion molecules or/and cytokines) or with allogenic skin cells producing and releasing these molecules. Hydrogels are widely applied as carriers of low molecular weight substances with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-ageing, and wound healing action. Incorporation of these substances into hydrogels enhances their penetration through the skin barrier and prevents their destruction by oxidation. Potential roles of hydrogel-based products for modern dermatology and cosmetology are also discussed.

  8. Diversity of the human skin microbiome early in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Kimberly A; Dowd, Scot E; Stamatas, Georgios N; Nikolovski, Janeta

    2011-10-01

    Within days after birth, rapid surface colonization of infant skin coincides with significant functional changes. Gradual maturation of skin function, structure, and composition continues throughout the first years of life. Recent reports have revealed topographical and temporal variations in the adult skin microbiome. Here we address the question of how the human skin microbiome develops early in life. We show that the composition of cutaneous microbial communities evolves over the first year of life, showing increasing diversity with age. Although early colonization is dominated by Staphylococci, their significant decline contributes to increased population evenness by the end of the first year. Similar to what has been shown in adults, the composition of infant skin microflora appears to be site specific. In contrast to adults, we find that Firmicutes predominate on infant skin. Timely and proper establishment of healthy skin microbiome during this early period might have a pivotal role in denying access to potentially infectious microbes and could affect microbiome composition and stability extending into adulthood. Bacterial communities contribute to the establishment of cutaneous homeostasis and modulate inflammatory responses. Early microbial colonization is therefore expected to critically affect the development of the skin immune function.

  9. Calendula extract: effects on mechanical parameters of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Naveed; Zaman, Shahiq Uz; Khan, Barkat Ali; Amir, Muhammad Naeem; Ebrahimzadeh, Muhammad Ali

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of newly formulated topical cream of Calendula officinalis extract on the mechanical parameters of the skin by using the cutometer. The Cutometer 580 MPA is a device that is designed to measure the mechanical properties of the skin in response to the application of negative pressure. This non-invasive method can be useful for objective and quantitative investigation of age related changes in skin, skin elasticity, skin fatigue, skin hydration, and evaluation of the effects of cosmetic and antiaging topical products. Two creams (base and formulation) were prepared for the study. Both the creams were applied to the cheeks of 21 healthy human volunteers for a period of eight weeks. Every individual was asked to come on week 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 and measurements were taken by using Cutometer MPA 580 every week. Different mechanical parameters of the skin measured by the cutometer were; R0, R1, R2, R5, R6, R7, and R8. These were then evaluated statistically to measure the effects produced by these creams. Using ANOVA, and t-test it was found that R0, and R6 were significant (p 0.05). The instrumental measurements produced by formulation reflected significant improvements in hydration and firmness of skin.

  10. Friction of Human Skin against Different Fabrics for Medical Use

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    Luís Vilhena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the tribology of human skin is essential to improve and optimize surfaces and materials in contact with the skin. Besides that, friction between the human skin and textiles is a critical factor in the formation of skin injuries, which are caused if the loads and shear forces are high enough and/or over long periods of time. This factor is of particular importance in bedridden patients, since they are not moving about or are confined to wheelchairs. Decubitus ulcers are one of the most frequently-reported iatrogenic injuries in developed countries. The risk of developing decubitus ulcers can be predicted by using the “Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Ulcer Risk” that was developed in 1987 and contains six areas of risk (cognitive-perceptual, immobility, inactivity, moisture, nutrition, friction/shear, although there are limitations to the use of such tools. The coefficient of friction of textiles against skin is mainly influenced by: the nature of the textile, skin moisture content and ambient humidity. This study will investigate how skin friction (different anatomical regions varies, rubbing against different types of contacting materials (i.e., fabrics for medical use under different contact conditions and their relationship in the formation and prevention of decubitus ulcers.

  11. Electrical properties of human skin as aging biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simić-Krstić, Jovana B; Kalauzi, Aleksandar J; Ribar, Srdjan N; Matija, Lidija R; Misevic, Gradimir N

    2014-09-01

    A non-invasive bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) and Cole-Cole impedance model parameters (R0, R∞, τ and α) were used to analyze electrical properties of intact and stripped human skin for both gender subjects divided into younger and older age groups. R0, R∞ and τ significantly increased while α significantly decreased with age in stripped skin for both genders (pCole-Cole parameters were age dependent with specific differences observed for genders and intact and stripped skin layers. Therefore, Cole-Cole parameters, obtained by non-invasive BIS measurements, are a new type of age dependent biomarkers.

  12. Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation colour affect perceived human health.

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    Ian D Stephen

    Full Text Available Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation depends upon cardiovascular, hormonal and circulatory health in humans and provides socio-sexual signals of underlying physiology, dominance and reproductive status in some primates. We allowed participants to manipulate colour calibrated facial photographs along empirically-measured oxygenated and deoxygenated blood colour axes both separately and simultaneously, to optimise healthy appearance. Participants increased skin blood colour, particularly oxygenated, above basal levels to optimise healthy appearance. We show, therefore, that skin blood perfusion and oxygenation influence perceived health in a way that may be important to mate choice.

  13. Raman Spectroscopic Analysis of H2O2-Stimulated Three-Dimensional Human Skin Models Containing Asian, Black, and Caucasian Melanocytes

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    Shin-ichi Morita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species generated in dermal cells of human skin is related to skin disorders or diseases. In this study, Raman analysis effectively clarified the identities of three types of human skin models after the models were stimulated with hydrogen peroxide. With the Caucasian skin model, the major Raman bands underwent large intensity changes within 4-5 days of stimulation. With the Black skin model, the Raman bands remained almost unchanged. The changes in the Asian skin model were unique compared to those in the above two. Eumelanin and pheomelanin are probably the main compounds that differentiate dermal cells in terms of their sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide.

  14. TSLP elicits IL-33–independent innate lymphoid cell responses to promote skin inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Brian S.; Siracusa, Mark C.; Saenz, Steven A.; Noti, Mario; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Hepworth, Matthew R.; Van Voorhees, Abby S.; Comeau, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently identified family of heterogeneous immune cells that can be divided into three groups based on their differential developmental requirements and expression of effector cytokines. Among these, group 2 ILCs produce the type 2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 and promote type 2 inflammation in the lung and intestine. However, whether group 2 ILCs reside in the skin and contribute to skin inflammation has not been characterized. Here, we identify for the first time a population of skin-resident group 2 ILCs present in healthy human skin that are enriched in lesional human skin from atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. Group 2 ILCs were also found in normal murine skin and were critical for the development of inflammation in a murine model of AD-like disease. Remarkably, in contrast to group 2 ILC responses in the intestine and lung, which are critically regulated by IL-33 and IL-25, ILC responses in the skin and skin-draining lymph nodes were independent of these canonical cytokines but were critically dependent on thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Collectively, these results demonstrate an essential role for IL-33– and IL-25–independent group 2 ILCs in promoting skin inflammation. PMID:23363980

  15. A novel model of human skin pressure ulcers in mice.

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    Andrés A Maldonado

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pressure ulcers are a prevalent health problem in today's society. The shortage of suitable animal models limits our understanding and our ability to develop new therapies. This study aims to report on the development of a novel and reproducible human skin pressure ulcer model in mice. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Male non-obese, diabetic, severe combined immunodeficiency mice (n = 22 were engrafted with human skin. A full-thickness skin graft was placed onto 4×3 cm wounds created on the dorsal skin of the mice. Two groups with permanent grafts were studied after 60 days. The control group (n = 6 was focused on the process of engraftment. Evaluations were conducted with photographic assessment, histological analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH techniques. The pressure ulcer group (n = 12 was created using a compression device. A pressure of 150 mmHg for 8 h, with a total of three cycles of compression-release was exerted. Evaluations were conducted with photographic assessment and histological analysis. RESULTS: Skin grafts in the control group took successfully, as shown by visual assessment, FISH techniques and histological analysis. Pressure ulcers in the second group showed full-thickness skin loss with damage and necrosis of all the epidermal and dermal layers (ulcer stage III in all cases. Complete repair occurred after 40 days. CONCLUSIONS: An inexpensive, reproducible human skin pressure ulcer model has been developed. This novel model will facilitate the development of new clinically relevant therapeutic strategies that can be tested directly on human skin.

  16. Multiple skin tumors of indeterminate cells in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolde, G; Bröcker, E B

    1986-10-01

    An adult patient with multiple unusual histiocytic tumors of the skin is described. As shown by immunohistologic study, electron microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy, the tumors represent circumscribed proliferations of the Langerhans cell-related indeterminate dendritic cells of the skin. This distinct cutaneous histiocytosis may represent a paraneoplastic syndrome.

  17. Novel approach to assess the emissivity of the human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Marin, Francisco J; Calixto-Carrera, Sergio; Villaseñor-Mora, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    To study the radiation emitted by the human skin, the emissivity of its surface must be known. We present a new approach to measure the emissivity of the human skin in vivo. Our method is based on the calculation of the difference of two infrared images: one acquired before projecting a CO(2) laser beam on the surface of the skin and the other after such projection. The difference image contains the radiation reflected by the skin, which is used to calculate the emissivity, making use of Kirchhoff's law and the Helmholtz reciprocity relation. With our method, noncontact measurements are achieved, and the determination of the skin temperature is not needed, which has been an inconvenience for other methods. We show that it is possible to make determinations of the emissivity at specific wavelengths. Last, our results confirm that the human skin obeys Lambert's law of diffuse reflection and that it behaves almost like a blackbody at a wavelength of 10.6 microm.

  18. Human skin hypoxia modulates cerebrovascular and autonomic functions.

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    Olivia Pucci

    Full Text Available Because the skin is an oxygen sensor in amphibians and mice, we thought to confirm this function also in humans. The human upright posture, however, introduces additional functional demands for the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis in which cerebral blood flow and autonomic nervous system (ANS function may also be involved. We examined nine males and three females. While subjects were breathing ambient air, at sea level, we changed gases in a plastic body-bag during two conditions of the experiment such as to induce skin hypoxia (with pure nitrogen or skin normoxia (with air. The subjects performed a test of hypoxic ventilatory drive during each condition of the experiment. We found no differences in the hypoxic ventilatory drive tests. However, ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities were modulated by skin hypoxia and the effect was significantly greater on the left than right middle cerebral arteries. We conclude that skin hypoxia modulates ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities and this might impact life styles and tolerance to ambient hypoxia at altitude. Thus the skin in normal humans, in addition to its numerous other functions, is also an oxygen sensor.

  19. Shelf-life evaluation of bilayered human skin equivalent, MyDerm™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seet, Wan Tai; Manira, Maarof; Maarof, Manira; Khairul Anuar, Khairoji; Chua, Kien-Hui; Ahmad Irfan, Abdul Wahab; Ng, Min Hwei; Aminuddin, Bin Saim; Ruszymah, Bt Hj Idrus

    2012-01-01

    Skin plays an important role in defense against infection and other harmful biological agents. Due to its fragile structure, skin can be easily damaged by heat, chemicals, traumatic injuries and diseases. An autologous bilayered human skin equivalent, MyDerm™, was engineered to provide a living skin substitute to treat critical skin loss. However, one of the disadvantages of living skin substitute is its short shelf-life, hence limiting its distribution worldwide. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shelf-life of MyDerm™ through assessment of cell morphology, cell viability, population doubling time and functional gene expression levels before transplantation. Skin samples were digested with 0.6% Collagenase Type I followed by epithelial cells dissociation with TrypLE Select. Dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes were culture-expanded to obtain sufficient cells for MyDerm™ construction. MyDerm™ was constructed with plasma-fibrin as temporary biomaterial and evaluated at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours after storage at 4°C for its shelf-life determination. The morphology of skin cells derived from MyDerm™ remained unchanged across storage times. Cells harvested from MyDerm™ after storage appeared in good viability (90.5%±2.7% to 94.9%±1.6%) and had short population doubling time (58.4±8.7 to 76.9±19 hours). The modest drop in cell viability and increased in population doubling time at longer storage duration did not demonstrate a significant difference. Gene expression for CK10, CK14 and COL III were also comparable between different storage times. In conclusion, MyDerm™ can be stored in basal medium at 4°C for at least 72 hours before transplantation without compromising its functionality.

  20. Host Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Promotes Human Skin Carcinoma Progression in a Stage-Dependent Manner

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    Catherine Maillard

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis and tumor expansion are associated with extracellular matrix remodeling and involve various proteases such as the plasminogen (Pig/plasminogen activator (PA system. Recently, several experimental data have implicated the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 in tumor angiogenesis in murine systems. However, little is known about PAI-1 functions in human skin carcinoma progression. By generating immunodeficient mice (in Rag-1-/- or nude background deleted for PAI-1 gene (PAI-1-/- , we have evaluated the impact of host PAI-1 deficiency on the tumorigenicity of two malignant human skin keratinocyte cell lines HaCaT II-4 and HaCaT A5-RT3 forming low-grade and high-grade carcinomas, respectively. When using the surface transplantation model, angiogenesis and tumor invasion of these two cell lines are strongly reduced in PAI-1-deficient mice as compared to the wild-type control animals. After subcutaneous injection in PAI-1-/- mice, the tumor incidence is reduced for HaCaT II-4 cells, but not for those formed by HaCaT A5-RT3 cells. These data indicate that PAI-1 produced by host cells is an important contributor to earlier stages of human skin carcinoma progression. It exerts its tumor-promoting effect in a tumor stage-dependent manner, but PAI-1 deficiency is not sufficient to prevent neoplastic growth of aggressive tumors of the human skin.

  1. ELASTIC LIPOSOME: DRUG DELIVERY ACROSS HUMAN SKIN

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    Vardhan Harsh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery is hardly an old technology, since 1800’s and the technology is no longer just adhesive patches. Due to recent advances in technology and the ability to apply the drug to the site of action without rupturing the skin membrane, transdermal route is becoming a widely accepted route of drug administration. Recently, various strategies have been used to augment the transdermal delivery of bioactives. Mainly, they include iontophoresis, electrophoresis, sonophoresis, chemical permeation enhancers, micro needles, and vesicular system. Among these strategies elastic liposomes appear promising. Elastic liposomes possess an infrastructure consisting of hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties together and as a result can accommodate drug molecules with wide range of solubility. It is an ultra deformable vesicle, elastic in nature which can squeeze itself through a pore which is many times smaller than its size owing to its elasticity. They can deform and pass through narrow constriction (from 5 to 10 times less than their own diameter without measurable loss. This high deformability gives better penetration of intact vesicles. This system is much more efficient at delivering a low and high molecular weight drug to the skin in terms of quantity and depth. The article speaks specifically on various phenomenon associated with the properties of these vesicles and their transport mechanisms. It also throws light on the effectiveness of conventional and deformable vesicles as drug delivery systems as well as their possible mode of action as transdermal drug carriers.

  2. Protective influence of hyaluronic acid on focal adhesion kinase activity in human skin fibroblasts exposed to ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donejko, Magdalena; Rysiak, Edyta; Galicka, Elżbieta; Terlikowski, Robert; Głażewska, Edyta Katarzyna; Przylipiak, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol and hyaluronic acid (HA) on cell survival and apoptosis in cultured human skin fibroblasts. Regarding the mechanism of ethanol action on human skin fibroblasts, we investigated cell viability and apoptosis, expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and the influence of HA on those processes. Materials and methods Studies were conducted in confluent human skin fibroblast cultures that were treated with 25 mM, 50 mM, and 100 mM ethanol or with ethanol and 500 µg/mL HA. Cell viability was examined using methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and NC-300 Nucleo-Counter. Imaging of the cells using a fluorescence microscope Pathway 855 was performed to measure FAK expression. Results Depending on the dosage, ethanol decreased cell viability and activated the process of apoptosis in human skin fibroblasts. HA prevented the negative influence of ethanol on cell viability and prevented apoptosis. The analysis of fluorescence imaging using BD Pathway 855 High-Content Bioimager showed the inhibition of FAK migration to the cell nucleus, depending on the increasing concentration of ethanol. Conclusion This study proves that downregulation of signaling pathway of FAK is involved in ethanol-induced apoptosis in human skin fibroblasts. The work also indicates a protective influence of HA on FAK activity in human skin fibroblasts exposed to ethanol. PMID:28293103

  3. Composition of human skin microbiota affects attractiveness to malaria mosquitoes.

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    Niels O Verhulst

    Full Text Available The African malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto continues to play an important role in malaria transmission, which is aggravated by its high degree of anthropophily, making it among the foremost vectors of this disease. In the current study we set out to unravel the strong association between this mosquito species and human beings, as it is determined by odorant cues derived from the human skin. Microbial communities on the skin play key roles in the production of human body odour. We demonstrate that the composition of the skin microbiota affects the degree of attractiveness of human beings to this mosquito species. Bacterial plate counts and 16S rRNA sequencing revealed that individuals that are highly attractive to An. gambiae s.s. have a significantly higher abundance, but lower diversity of bacteria on their skin than individuals that are poorly attractive. Bacterial genera that are correlated with the relative degree of attractiveness to mosquitoes were identified. The discovery of the connection between skin microbial populations and attractiveness to mosquitoes may lead to the development of new mosquito attractants and personalized methods for protection against vectors of malaria and other infectious diseases.

  4. Emerging Skin T-Cell Functions in Response to Environmental Insults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanpradid, Jutamas; Holcomb, Zachary E.; MacLeod, Amanda S.

    2017-01-01

    Skin is the primary barrier between the body and the outside world, functioning not only as a physical barrier, but also as an immunologic first line of defense. A large number of T cells populate the skin. This review highlights the ability of these cutaneous T cells to regulate skin-specific environmental threats, including microbes, injuries, solar UV radiation, and allergens. Since much of this knowledge has been advanced from murine studies, we focus our review on how the mouse state has informed the human state, emphasizing the key parallels and differences. PMID:27784595

  5. Digital Dermatoscopy Method for Human Skin Roughness Analysis

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    Suprijanto Suprijanto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we  propose a digital dermatoscopy  method to measure the human skin roughness. By using this method we eliminate the use of silicon replica.  Digital  dermatoscopy  consists  of  handheld  digital  microscope,  image processing  and  information  extraction  of  skin  roughness  level.  To  reduce  the noise due to the variation of reflection factor on the skin we use  median filter. Hence, by Fourier transform the skin texture is imaged in terms of 2D frequencyspatial  distribution.  Skin  roughness  is  determined  from  its  entropy,  where  the roughness level is proportional to the entropy.  Three types of experiment have been performed by evaluating: (i the skin replicas; (ii  young and elderly skin; and (iii seven volunteers treated by anti wrinkle cosmetic in three weeks period. We find that for the first and second experiment that our system did manage to quantify the roughness, while on the third experiment, six of seven volunteers, the roughness are succeeded to identify.

  6. Replacement of animal-derived collagen matrix by human fibroblast-derived dermal matrix for human skin equivalent products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Commandeur, Suzan; Rietveld, Marion H; Mulder, Aat A; Willemze, Rein

    2009-01-01

    Reconstructed human skin equivalents (HSEs) are representative models of human skin and widely used for research purposes and clinical applications. Traditional methods to generate HSEs are based on the seeding of human keratinocytes onto three-dimensional human fibroblast-populated non-human collagen matrices. Current HSEs have a limited lifespan of approximately 8 weeks, rendering them unsuitable for long-term studies. Here we present a new generation of HSEs being fully composed of human components and which can be cultured up to 20 weeks. This model is generated on a primary human fibroblast-derived dermal matrix. Pro-collagen type I secretion by human fibroblasts stabilized during long-term culture, providing a continuous and functional human dermal matrix. In contrast to rat-tail collagen-based HSEs, the present fibroblast-derived matrix-based HSEs contain more continuity in the number of viable cell layers in long-term cultures. In addition, these new skin models exhibit normal differentiation and proliferation, based on expression of K10/K15, and K16/K17, respectively. Detection of collagen types IV and VII and laminin 332 was confined to the epidermal-dermal junction, as in native skin. The presence of hemidesmosomes and anchoring fibrils was demonstrated by electron microscopy. Finally, we show that the presented HSE contained a higher concentration of the normal moisturizing factor compared to rat-tail collagen-based skin models, providing a further representation of functional normal human skin in vitro. This study, therefore, demonstrates the role of the dermal microenvironment on epidermal regeneration and lifespan in vitro.

  7. Current concepts of active vasodilation in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Brett J.; Hollowed, Casey G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In humans, an increase in internal core temperature elicits large increases in skin blood flow and sweating. The increase in skin blood flow serves to transfer heat via convection from the body core to the skin surface while sweating results in evaporative cooling of the skin. Cutaneous vasodilation and sudomotor activity are controlled by a sympathetic cholinergic active vasodilator system that is hypothesized to operate through a co-transmission mechanism. To date, mechanisms of cutaneous active vasodilation remain equivocal despite many years of research by several productive laboratory groups. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advancements in the field of cutaneous active vasodilation framed in the context of some of the historical findings that laid the groundwork for our current understanding of cutaneous active vasodilation.

  8. Skin Sensitive Difference of Human Body Sections under Clothing-Smirnov Test of Skin Surface Temperatures' Dynamic Changing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; WU Hai-yan; WANG Yun-yi

    2004-01-01

    Skin sensitive difference of human body sections under clothing is the theoretic foundation of thermal insulation clothing design.By a new method of researching on clothing comfort perception,the skin temperature live changing procedure of human body sections affected by the same cold stimulation is inspected.Furthermore with the Smirnov test the skin temperatures dynamic changing patterns of main human body sections are obtained.

  9. Deep sequencing extends the diversity of human papillomaviruses in human skin.

    OpenAIRE

    Bzhalava, Davit; Mühr, Laila Sara Arroyo; Lagheden, Camilla; Ekström, Johanna; Forslund, Ola; Dillner, Joakim; Hultin, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Most viruses in human skin are known to be human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Previous sequencing of skin samples has identified 273 different cutaneous HPV types, including 47 previously unknown types. In the present study, we wished to extend prior studies using deeper sequencing. This deeper sequencing without prior PCR of a pool of 142 whole genome amplified skin lesions identified 23 known HPV types, 3 novel putative HPV types and 4 non-HPV viruses. The complete sequence was obtained for one...

  10. Ginseng-berry-mediated gold and silver nanoparticle synthesis and evaluation of their in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and cytotoxicity effects on human dermal fibroblast and murine melanoma skin cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Pérez, Zuly Elizabeth; Mathiyalagan, Ramya; Markus, Josua; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Kang, Hyun Mi; Abbai, Ragavendran; Seo, Kwang Hoon; Wang, Dandan; Soshnikova, Veronika; Yang, Deok Chun

    2017-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in the design of environmentally affable and biocompatible nanoparticles among scientists to find novel and safe biomaterials. Panax ginseng Meyer berries have unique phytochemical profile and exhibit beneficial pharmacological activities such as antihyperglycemic, antiobesity, antiaging, and antioxidant properties. A comprehensive study of the biologically active compounds in ginseng berry extract (GBE) and the ability of ginseng berry (GB) as novel material for the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (GBAuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (GBAgNPs) was conducted. In addition, the effects of GBAuNPs and GBAgNPs on skin cell lines for further potential biological applications are highlighted. GBAuNPs and GBAgNPs were synthesized using aqueous GBE as a reducing and capping agent. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized for their size, morphology, and crystallinity. The nanoparticles were evaluated for antioxidant, anti-tyrosinase, antibacterial, and cytotoxicity activities and for morphological changes in human dermal fibroblast and murine melanoma skin cell lines. The phytochemicals contained in GBE effectively reduced and capped gold and silver ions to form GBAuNPs and GBAgNPs. The optimal synthesis conditions (ie, temperature and v/v % of GBE) and kinetics were investigated. Polysaccharides and phenolic compounds present in GBE were suggested to be responsible for stabilization and functionalization of nanoparticles. GBAuNPs and GBAgNPs showed increased scavenging activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radicals compared to GBE. GBAuNPs and GBAgNPs effectively inhibited mushroom tyrosinase, while GBAgNPs showed antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, GBAuNPs were nontoxic to human dermal fibroblast and murine melanoma cell lines, and GBAgNPs showed cytotoxic effect on murine melanoma cell lines. The current results evidently suggest that GBAgNPs can act as potential

  11. Phase II metabolism in human skin: skin explants show full coverage for glucuronidation, sulfation, N-acetylation, catechol methylation, and glutathione conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manevski, Nenad; Swart, Piet; Balavenkatraman, Kamal Kumar; Bertschi, Barbara; Camenisch, Gian; Kretz, Olivier; Schiller, Hilmar; Walles, Markus; Ling, Barbara; Wettstein, Reto; Schaefer, Dirk J; Itin, Peter; Ashton-Chess, Joanna; Pognan, Francois; Wolf, Armin; Litherland, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Although skin is the largest organ of the human body, cutaneous drug metabolism is often overlooked, and existing experimental models are insufficiently validated. This proof-of-concept study investigated phase II biotransformation of 11 test substrates in fresh full-thickness human skin explants, a model containing all skin cell types. Results show that skin explants have significant capacity for glucuronidation, sulfation, N-acetylation, catechol methylation, and glutathione conjugation. Novel skin metabolites were identified, including acyl glucuronides of indomethacin and diclofenac, glucuronides of 17β-estradiol, N-acetylprocainamide, and methoxy derivatives of 4-nitrocatechol and 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene. Measured activities for 10 μM substrate incubations spanned a 1000-fold: from the highest 4.758 pmol·mg skin(-1)·h(-1) for p-toluidine N-acetylation to the lowest 0.006 pmol·mg skin(-1)·h(-1) for 17β-estradiol 17-glucuronidation. Interindividual variability was 1.4- to 13.0-fold, the highest being 4-methylumbelliferone and diclofenac glucuronidation. Reaction rates were generally linear up to 4 hours, although 24-hour incubations enabled detection of metabolites in trace amounts. All reactions were unaffected by the inclusion of cosubstrates, and freezing of the fresh skin led to loss of glucuronidation activity. The predicted whole-skin intrinsic metabolic clearances were significantly lower compared with corresponding whole-liver intrinsic clearances, suggesting a relatively limited contribution of the skin to the body's total systemic phase II enzyme-mediated metabolic clearance. Nevertheless, the fresh full-thickness skin explants represent a suitable model to study cutaneous phase II metabolism not only in drug elimination but also in toxicity, as formation of acyl glucuronides and sulfate conjugates could play a role in skin adverse reactions.

  12. Permeation of platinum and rhodium nanoparticles through intact and damaged human skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauro, Marcella [University of Trieste, Clinical Unit of Occupational Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences (Italy); Crosera, Matteo; Bianco, Carlotta; Adami, Gianpiero; Montini, Tiziano; Fornasiero, Paolo [University of Trieste, Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences (Italy); Jaganjac, Morana [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Laboratory for Oxidative Stress, Department of Molecular Medicine (Croatia); Bovenzi, Massimo; Filon, Francesca Larese, E-mail: larese@units.it [University of Trieste, Clinical Unit of Occupational Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate percutaneous penetration of platinum and rhodium nanoparticles (PtNPs: 5.8 ± 0.9 nm, RhNPs: 5.3 ± 1.9 nm) through human skin. Salts compounds of these metals are sensitizers and some also carcinogenic agents. In vitro permeation experiments were performed using Franz diffusion cells with intact and damaged skin. PtNPs and RhNPs, stabilized with polyvinylpyrrolidone, were synthesized by reduction of Na{sub 2}PtC{sub l6} and RhCl{sub 3}·3H{sub 2}O respectively. Suspensions with a concentration of 2.0 g/L of PtNPs and RhNPs were dispersed separately in synthetic sweat at pH 4.5 and applied as donor phases to the outer surface of the skin for 24 h. Measurements of the content of the metals in the receiving solution and in the skin were performed subsequently. Rhodium skin permeation was demonstrated through damaged skin, with a permeation flux of 0.04 ± 0.04 μg cm{sup −2} h{sup −1} and a lag time of 7.9 ± 1.1 h, while no traces of platinum were found in receiving solutions. Platinum and rhodium skin-analysis showed significantly higher concentrations of the metals in damaged skin. Rh and Pt applied as NPs can penetrate the skin barrier and Rh can be found in receiving solutions. These experiments pointed out the need for skin contamination prevention, since even a minor injury to the skin barrier can significantly increase penetration.

  13. Anti-wrinkle effects of Sargassum muticum ethyl acetate fraction on ultraviolet B-irradiated hairless mouse skin and mechanistic evaluation in the human HaCaT keratinocyte cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae Hyoung; Piao, Mei Jing; Han, Xia; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Yoon, Weon Jong; Ko, Mi Hee; Lee, Nam Ho; Lee, Mi Young; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigated the photoprotective properties of the ethyl acetate fraction of Sargassum muticum (SME) against ultraviolet B (UVB)‑induced skin damage and photoaging in a mouse model. HR‑1 strain hairless male mice were divided into three groups: An untreated control group, a UVB‑irradiated vehicle group and a UVB‑irradiated SME group. The UVB‑irradiated mice in the SME group were orally administered with SME (100 mg/kg body weight in 0.1 ml water per day) and then exposed to radiation at a dose of 60‑120 mJ/cm2. Wrinkle formation and skin damage were evaluated by analysis of skin replicas, epidermal thickness and collagen fiber integrity in the dermal connective tissue. The mechanism underlying the action of SME was also investigated in the human HaCaT keratinocyte cell line following exposure of the cells to UVB at a dose of 30 mJ/cm2. The protein expression levels and activity of matrix metalloproteinase‑1 (MMP‑1), and the binding of activator protein‑1 (AP‑1) to the MMP‑1 promoter were assessed in the HaCaT cells using western blot analysis, an MMP‑1 fluorescent assay and a chromatin immune‑precipitation assay, respectively. The results showed that the mean length and depth of the wrinkles in the UVB‑exposed hairless mice were significantly improved by oral administration of SME, which also prevented the increase in epidermal thickness triggered by UVB irradiation. Furthermore, a marked increase in collagen bundle formation was observed in the UVB‑treated mice with SME administration. SME pretreatment also significantly inhibited the UVB‑induced upregulation in the expression and activity of MMP‑1 in the cultured HaCaT keratinocytes, and the UVB‑enhanced association of AP‑1 with the MMP‑1 promoter. These results suggested that SME may be useful as an anti-photoaging resource for the skin.

  14. Chronological age affects the permeation of fentanyl through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgaard, R; Benfeldt, E; Sorensen, J A

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the influence of chronological age on fentanyl permeation through human skin in vitro using static diffusion cells. Elderly individuals are known to be more sensitive to opioids and obtain higher plasma concentrations following dermal application of fentanyl compared to younger...... individuals. The influence of age - as an isolated pharmacokinetic term - on the absorption of fentanyl has not been previously studied. METHOD: Human skin from 30 female donors was mounted in static diffusion cells, and samples were collected during 48 h. Donors were divided into three age groups: ... and old age groups: 5,922 and 4,050 ng, respectively). Furthermore, the lag time and absorption rate were different between the three groups, with a significantly higher rate in the young participants versus the oldest participants. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that fentanyl permeates the skin of young...

  15. Hypoxia perturbs aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 in human skin and liver-derived cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorrink, Sabine U; Severson, Paul L; Kulak, Mikhail V; Futscher, Bernard W; Domann, Frederick E

    2014-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an important mediator of toxic responses after exposure to xenobiotics including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Activation of AhR responsive genes requires AhR dimerization with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), a heterodimeric partner also shared by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein. TCDD-stimulated AhR transcriptional activity can be influenced by hypoxia; however, it less well known whether hypoxia interferes with AhR transcriptional transactivation in the context of PCB-mediated AhR activation in human cells. Elucidation of this interaction is important in liver hepatocytes which extensively metabolize ingested PCBs and experience varying degrees of oxygen tension during normal physiologic function. This study was designed to assess the effect of hypoxia on AhR transcriptional responses after exposure to 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126). Exposure to 1% O2 prior to PCB 126 treatment significantly inhibited CYP1A1 mRNA and protein expression in human HepG2 and HaCaT cells. CYP1A1 transcriptional activation was significantly decreased upon PCB 126 stimulation under conditions of hypoxia. Additionally, hypoxia pre-treatment reduced PCB 126 induced AhR binding to CYP1 target gene promoters. Importantly, ARNT overexpression rescued cells from the inhibitory effect of hypoxia on XRE-luciferase reporter activity. Therefore, the mechanism of interference of the signaling crosstalk between the AhR and hypoxia pathways appears to be at least in part dependent on ARNT availability. Our results show that AhR activation and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 were significantly inhibited by hypoxia and hypoxia might therefore play an important role in PCB metabolism and toxicity.

  16. Two-wavelength Raman detector for noninvasive measurements of carotenes and lycopene in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2005-04-01

    Carotenoids are an important part of the antioxidant system in human skin. Carotenoid molecules, provided by fruits and vegetables, are potent free radical quenchers that accumulate in the body. If not balanced by carotenoids and other antioxidants, free radicals may cause premature skin aging, oxidative cell damage, and even skin cancers. As carotenoids depletion may predispose a person to cancer or other disease, rapid and noninvasive measurement of carotenoid level in skin may be of preventive or diagnostic help. At the very least, such measurement can be used to obtain a biomarker for healthy levels of fruit and vegetable consumption. Recently we have developed noninvasive optical technique based on Raman spectroscopy. In this paper we describe compact optical detector for clinical applications that utilizes two-wavelength excitation. It selectively measures the two most prominent skin carotenoids found in the human skin, lycopene and carotenes. According to the medical literature, these two compounds may play different roles in the human body and be part of different tissue defense mechanisms. Dual-wavelength Raman measurements reveal significant differences in the carotenoid composition of different subjects.

  17. Stable Skin-specific Overexpression of Human CTLA4-Ig in Transgenic Mice through Seven Generations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong WANG; Yong NI; Hong WEI; Feng-Chao WANG; Liang-Peng GE; Xiang GAO

    2006-01-01

    Skin graft rejection is a typical cellular immune response, mainly mediated by T cells. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen 4-immunoglobin (CTLA4-Ig) extends graft survival by blocking the T cell co-stimulation pathway and inhibiting T cell activation. To investigate the efficacy of CTLA4-Ig in prolonging skin graft survival, human CTLA4-Ig (hCTLA4-Ig) was engineered to overexpress in mouse skin by transgenesis using the K14 promoter. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot assay indicated that the expression of CTLA4-Ig remained skin-specific and relatively constant compared to the internal control protein, AKT, through seven generations. The presence and concentration of the hCTLA4-Ig protein in transgenic mouse sera was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the results indicated that the serum CTLA4-Ig concentration also remained constant through generations. Survival of transgenic mouse skins grafted onto rat wounds was remarkably prolonged compared to that of wild-type skins from the same mouse strain, and remained comparable among all seven generations. This suggested that the bioactive hCTLA4-Ig protein was stably expressed in transgenical mice through at least seven generations, which was consistent with the stable skin-specific CTLA4-Ig expression.The results demonstrated that the transgenic expression of hCTLA4-Ig in skin driven by the K14 promoter remained constant through generations, and a transgenic line can be established to provide transgenic skin with extended survival reproducibly.

  18. Three-dimensional human skin models to understand Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization and infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren ePopov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is both a major bacterial pathogen as well as a common member of the human skin microbiota. Due to its widespread prevalence as an asymptomatic skin colonizer and its importance as a source of skin and soft tissue infections, an improved understanding of how S. aureus attaches to, grows within, and breaches the stratified layers of the epidermis is of critical importance. Three-dimensional organotypic human skin culture models are informative and tractable experimental systems for future investigations of the interactions between S. aureus and the multifaceted skin tissue. We propose that S. aureus virulence factors, primarily appreciated for their role in pathogenesis of invasive infections, play alternative roles in promoting asymptomatic bacterial growth within the skin. Experimental manipulations of these cultures will provide insight into the many poorly understood molecular interactions occurring at the interface between S. aureus and stratified human skin tissue.

  19. Human skin transcriptome during superficial cutaneous wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuutila, Kristo; Siltanen, Antti; Peura, Matti; Bizik, Jozef; Kaartinen, Ilkka; Kuokkanen, Hannu; Nieminen, Tapio; Harjula, Ari; Aarnio, Pertti; Vuola, Jyrki; Kankuri, Esko

    2012-01-01

    Healing of the epidermis is a crucial process for maintaining the skin's defense integrity and its resistance to environmental threats. Compromised wound healing renders the individual readily vulnerable to infections and loss of body homeostasis. To clarify the human response of reepithelialization, we biopsied split-thickness skin graft donor site wounds immediately before and after harvesting, as well as during the healing process 3 and 7 days thereafter. In all, 25 biopsies from eight patients qualified for the study. All samples were analyzed by genome-wide microarrays. Here, we identified the genes associated with normal skin reepithelialization over time and organized them by similarities according to their induction or suppression patterns during wound healing. Our results provide the first elaborate insight into the transcriptome during normal human epidermal wound healing. The data not only reveal novel genes associated with epidermal wound healing but also provide a fundamental basis for the translational interpretation of data acquired from experimental models.

  20. CD1a-autoreactive T cells recognize natural skin oils that function as headless antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, A.; Cheng, T.Y.; Huang, S.; Gras, S.; Birkinshaw, R.W.; Kasmar, A.; van Rhijn, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/238098680; Pena-Cruz, V.; Ruan, D.T.; Altman, J.D.; Rossjohn, J.; Moody, D.B.

    2014-01-01

    T cells autoreactive to the antigen-presenting molecule CD1a are common in human blood and skin, but the search for natural autoantigens has been confounded by background T cell responses to CD1 proteins and self lipids. After capturing CD1a-lipid complexes, we gently eluted ligands while preserving

  1. Development of a Vascularized Skin Construct Using Adipose-Derived Stem Cells from Debrided Burned Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney K. Chan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Large body surface area burns pose significant therapeutic challenges. Clinically, the extent and depth of burn injury may mandate the use of allograft for temporary wound coverage while autografts are serially harvested from the same donor areas. The paucity of donor sites in patients with burns involving large surface areas highlights the need for better skin substitutes that can achieve early and complete coverage and retain normal skin durability with minimal donor requirements. We have isolated autologous stem cells from the adipose layer of surgically debrided burned skin (dsASCs, using a point-of-care stem cell isolation device. These cells, in a collagen—polyethylene glycol fibrin-based bilayer hydrogel, differentiate into an epithelial layer, a vascularized dermal layer, and a hypodermal layer. All-trans-retinoic acid and fenofibrate were used to differentiate dsASCs into epithelial-like cells. Immunocytochemical analysis showed a matrix- and time-dependent change in the expression of stromal, vascular, and epithelial cell markers. These results indicate that stem cells isolated from debrided skin can be used as a single autologous cell source to develop a vascularized skin construct without culture expansion or addition of exogenous growth factors. This technique may provide an alternative approach for cutaneous coverage after extensive burn injuries.

  2. Comparing models for vesicant responses in skin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mershon, M.M.; Rhoads, L.S.; Petrali, J.P.; Mills, K.R.; Kim, S.K.

    1993-05-13

    Vesicant challenges have been delivered to NHEK (normal human epidermal keratinocyes) and to artificial human epidermal tissues. Confluent NHEK, grown on plastic surfaces or gel-coated microporous membranes of Millicell CMR inserts, were challenged with vesicants diluted in cell culture medium. Testskin was provided on agarose nutrient gel as a cornified wafer of sufficient diameter to receive vesicant vapor from cups normally used to challenge animal skin. Stratum corneum of preproduction EpiDerm (PreEpiD) specimens were challenged with vesicant vapor from cups suspended inside of Millicells. Inverted phase contrast microscopy of NHEK on plastic revealed dose-related vesicant effects that could facilitate screening of antivesicants. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed vesicant effects in two distinctly different populations of NHEK on gel-coated inserts. SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of Testskin and PreEpiD disclosed structural differences between these models that became amplified in vesicant-challenged specimens. PreEpiD shows more promise than Testskin for screening of antivesicant topical skin protectants. However, both epidermal models lack the basal lamina that is needed for advanced antivesicant testing.

  3. Technical note: comparing von Luschan skin color tiles and modern spectrophotometry for measuring human skin pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatoniowski, Anna K; Quillen, Ellen E; Shriver, Mark D; Jablonski, Nina G

    2013-06-01

    Prior to the introduction of reflectance spectrophotometry into anthropological field research during the 1950s, human skin color was most commonly classified by visual skin color matching using the von Luschan tiles, a set of 36 standardized, opaque glass tiles arranged in a chromatic scale. Our goal was to establish a conversion formula between the tile-based color matching method and modern reflectance spectrophotometry to make historical and contemporary data comparable. Skin pigmentation measurements were taken on the forehead, inner upper arms, and backs of the hands using both the tiles and a spectrophotometer on 246 participants showing a broad range of skin pigmentation. From these data, a second-order polynomial conversion formula was derived by jackknife analysis to estimate melanin index (M-index) based on tile values. This conversion formula provides a means for comparing modern data to von Luschan tile measurements recorded in historical reports. This is particularly important for populations now extinct, extirpated, or admixed for which tile-based measures of skin pigmentation are the only data available.

  4. Differentiating skin-limited and multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simko, Stephen J.; Garmezy, Benjamin; Abhyankar, Harshal; Lupo, Philip J.; Chakraborty, Rikhia; Lim, Karen Phaik Har; Shih, Albert; Hicks, M. John; Wright, Teresa S.; Levy, Moise L.; McClain, Kenneth L.; Allen, Carl E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify features associated with multisystem involvement and therapeutic failure in patients with skin Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). Study design We reviewed medical records of 71 consecutive LCH patients with skin involvement evaluated at Texas Children’s Hospital and analyzed clinical features, laboratory results, and presence of circulating cells with the BRAF-V600E mutation, with respect to initial staging and clinical outcomes. Results Skin disease in patients older than 18 months at diagnosis was associated with presence of multisystem disease (OR 9.65, 95% CI 1.17–79.4). Forty percent of patients referred for presumed skin-limited LCH had underlying multisystem involvement, half of these with risk-organ involvement. Patients with skin-limited LCH had 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) of 89% after initial therapy, and none developed multisystem disease. Patients with skin/multisystem involvement had 3 year PFS of 44% with vinblastine/prednisone therapy, and risk-organ involvement did not correlate with failure to achieve non-active disease. Circulating cells with BRAF-V600E were detected at higher frequency in multisystem patients (8/11 skin/multisystem, 1/13 skin-limited, P=0.002). Conclusions Skin-limited LCH requires infrequent therapeutic intervention and has lower risk of progression relative to skin plus multisystem LCH. The less aggressive clinical course and lack of circulating cells with BRAF-V600E mutation in skin-limited LCH suggest a different mechanism of disease origin compared with multisystem or risk-organ disease. PMID:25441388

  5. Aging and senescence of skin cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Studying age-related changes in the physiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology of isolated skin cell populations in culture has greatly expanded the understanding of the fundamental aspects of skin aging. The three main cell types that have been studied extensively with respect to cellular...... aging in vitro are dermal fibroblasts, epidermal keratinocytes, and melanocytes. Serial subcultivation of normal diploid skin cells can be performed only a limited number of times, and the emerging senescent phenotype can be categorized into structural, physiological, biochemical, and molecular...... phenotypes, which can be used as biomarkers of cellular aging in vitro. The rate and phenotype of aging are different in different cell types. There are both common features and specific features of aging of skin fibroblasts, keratinocytes, melanocytes, and other cell types. A progressive accumulation...

  6. Raman measurement of carotenoid composition in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2004-07-01

    The carotenoids lycopene and beta-carotene are powerful antioxidants in skin and are thought to act as scavengers for free radicals and singlet oxygen. The role of carotenoid species in skin health is of strong current interest. We demonstrate the possibility to use Resonance Raman spectroscopy for fast, non-invasive, highly specific, and quantitative detection of beta-carotene and lycopene in human skin. Analyzing Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue and green laser excitation, we were able to characterize quantitatively the relative concentrations of each carotenoid species in-vivo. In the selective detection, we take advantage of different Raman cross-section spectral profiles for beta-carotene and lycopene molecules, and obtain a quantitative assessment of individual long-chain carotenoid species in the skin rather than their cumulative levels. Preliminary dual-wavelength Raman measurements reveal significant differences in the carotenoid composition of different subjects. The technique holds promise for rapid screening of carotenoid compositions in human skin in large populations and may be suitable in clinical studies for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  7. Cyclooxygenases in human and mouse skin and cultured human keratinocytes: association of COX-2 expression with human keratinocyte differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.; Rakhlin, N.; Habib, A.; Maclouf, J.; Goldyne, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Epidermal expression of the two isoforms of the prostaglandin H-generating cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) was evaluated both by immunohistochemistry performed on human and mouse skin biopsy sections and by Western blotting of protein extracts from cultured human neonatal foreskin keratinocytes. In normal human skin, COX-1 immunostaining is observed throughout the epidermis whereas COX-2 immunostaining increases in the more differentiated, suprabasilar keratinocytes. Basal cell carcinomas express little if any COX-1 or COX-2 immunostaining whereas both isozymes are strongly expressed in squamous cell carcinomas deriving from a more differentiated layer of the epidermis. In human keratinocyte cultures, raising the extracellular calcium concentration, a recognized stimulus for keratinocyte differentiation, leads to an increased expression of both COX-2 protein and mRNA; expression of COX-1 protein, however, shows no significant alteration in response to calcium. Because of a recent report that failed to show COX-2 in normal mouse epidermis, we also looked for COX-1 and COX-2 immunostaining in sections of normal and acetone-treated mouse skin. In agreement with a previous report, some COX-1, but no COX-2, immunostaining is seen in normal murine epidermis. However, following acetone treatment, there is a marked increase in COX-1 expression as well as the appearance of significant COX-2 immunostaining in the basal layer. These data suggest that in human epidermis as well as in human keratinocyte cultures, the expression of COX-2 occurs as a part of normal keratinocyte differentiation whereas in murine epidermis, its constitutive expression is absent, but inducible as previously published.

  8. Increased numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in lesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosje, P J; van Kooten, P J; Thepen, T; Bihari, I C; Rutten, V P; Koeman, J P; Willemse, T

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize T cells in the skin of cats with an allergic dermatitis histologically compatible with atopic dermatitis, since T cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in humans. We observed a significantly greater number of T cells in lesional skin of domestic short-haired cats with allergic dermatitis (n = 10; median age 5.8 years) than in the skin of healthy control animals (n = 10; median age 5.0 years). In the skin of the healthy control animals, one or two CD4+ cells and no CD8+ cells were found. A predominant increase of CD4+ T cells and a CD4+/CD8+ ratio (mean +/- SD: 3.9 +/- 2.0) was found in the lesional skin of 10 cats with allergic dermatitis. The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio in the skin of healthy control animals could not be determined because of the absence of CD8+ cells. The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio in the peripheral blood of 10 cats with allergic dermatitis (mean +/- SD: 1.9 +/- 0.4) did not differ significantly from that in 10 healthy control animals (2.2 +/- 0.4). The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio and predominance of CD4+ T cells in the lesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis is comparable to that found in atopic dermatitis in humans. In addition, the observed increase of CD4+ T cells in the nonlesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis compared to the skin of healthy cats is similar to what is seen in humans. Cytokines produced by T cells and antigen-specific T cells are important mediators in the inflammatory cascade resulting in atopic dermatitis in humans. This study is a first step to investigate their role in feline allergic dermatitis.

  9. The Skin Deformation of a 3D Virtual Human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Jing Zhou; Zheng-Xu Zhao

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a skin deformation algorithm for creating 3D characters or virtual human models. The algorithm can be applied to rigid deformation, joint dependent localized deformation, skeleton driven deformation, cross contour deformation, and free-form deformation (FFD). These deformations are computed and demonstrated with examples and the algorithm is applied to overcome the difficulties in mechanically simulating the motion of the human body by club-shape models. The techniques described in this article enables the reconstruction of dynamic human models that can be used in defining and representing the geometrical and kinematical characteristics of human motion.

  10. Hypoxia perturbs aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 in human skin and liver-derived cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorrink, Sabine U. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Human Toxicology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Severson, Paul L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Kulak, Mikhail V. [Department of Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Futscher, Bernard W. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Domann, Frederick E., E-mail: frederick-domann@uiowa.edu [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Human Toxicology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an important mediator of toxic responses after exposure to xenobiotics including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Activation of AhR responsive genes requires AhR dimerization with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), a heterodimeric partner also shared by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein. TCDD-stimulated AhR transcriptional activity can be influenced by hypoxia; however, it less well known whether hypoxia interferes with AhR transcriptional transactivation in the context of PCB-mediated AhR activation in human cells. Elucidation of this interaction is important in liver hepatocytes which extensively metabolize ingested PCBs and experience varying degrees of oxygen tension during normal physiologic function. This study was designed to assess the effect of hypoxia on AhR transcriptional responses after exposure to 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126). Exposure to 1% O{sub 2} prior to PCB 126 treatment significantly inhibited CYP1A1 mRNA and protein expression in human HepG2 and HaCaT cells. CYP1A1 transcriptional activation was significantly decreased upon PCB 126 stimulation under conditions of hypoxia. Additionally, hypoxia pre-treatment reduced PCB 126 induced AhR binding to CYP1 target gene promoters. Importantly, ARNT overexpression rescued cells from the inhibitory effect of hypoxia on XRE-luciferase reporter activity. Therefore, the mechanism of interference of the signaling crosstalk between the AhR and hypoxia pathways appears to be at least in part dependent on ARNT availability. Our results show that AhR activation and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 were significantly inhibited by hypoxia and hypoxia might therefore play an important role in PCB metabolism and toxicity. - Highlights: • Significant crosstalk exists between AhR and HIF-1α signaling. • Hypoxia perturbs PCB 126 induced AhR function and

  11. Differential response of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts, and keratinocytes to burn wound exudates: potential role of skin-specific chemokine CCL27

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, L.J.; Kroeze, K.L.; Waaijman, T.; Breetveld, M.; Sampat-Sardjoepersad, S.C.; Niessen, F.B.; Middelkoop, E.; Scheper, R.J.; Gibbs, S.

    2014-01-01

    Many cell-based regenerative medicine strategies toward tissue-engineered constructs are currently being explored. Cell-cell interactions and interactions with different biomaterials are extensively investigated, whereas very few studies address how cultured cells will interact with soluble

  12. Optoelectronic set for measuring reflectance spectrum of living human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryko, Lukasz; Zajac, Andrzej; Gilewski, Marian; Kulesza, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    In the paper the authors present the developed optoelectronic set for measuring spectral reflectance of living human skin. The basic elements of the set are: the illuminator consists of the LED illuminator emitting a uniform distribution of spectral irradiance in the exposed field, the semispherical measuring chamber and the spectrometer which measures spectrum of reflected radiation. Measured radiation is from spectral range of tissue optical window (from 600 nm to 1000 nm). Knowledge about the reflectance spectrum of the patient skin allows adjusting spectral and energetic parameters of the radiation used in biostimulation treatment. The developed set also enables the repeatable exposures of patients in the Low Level Laser Therapy procedures.

  13. Raman spectroscopy of Chinese human skin in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongzeng Li; Rong Chen; Haishan Zeng; Zhiwei Huang; Shangyuan Feng; Shusen Xie

    2007-01-01

    A novel and compact near-infrared (NIR) Raman system is developed using 785-nm diode laser, volumephase technology (VPT) holographic system, and NIR intensified charge-coupled device (CCD). Signal-tonoise ratio (SNR) and resolution are improved compared with ordinary acquisition method by a specially designed optical fiber detector and the spectrograph image aberration correction with a parabolic-line fiber array. In 1-5 s, Raman spectra of different parts of Chinese human skin are acquired. Autofluorescence is subtracted from the raw spectrum by polynomial fitting and skin Raman spectrum is then smoothed for further analysis.

  14. In vivo multimodality video microscopy of human skin in the vertical plane (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenguo; Tian, Yunxian; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-02-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are non-invasive methods of acquiring morphological images of the skin in vivo. Most research in this area focuses on instruments that are configured for two-dimensional imaging in a horizontal plane parallel to the skin surface. In contrast, conventional histopathologic evaluation of the skin is based on vertical tissue sections that show microscopic features and their interrelationships according to their depth within the skin. The ability to similarly depict the skin in the vertical plane during in vivo microscopic imaging poses several significant challenges with respect to imaging speed, resolution and extractable information. Aiming to address above challenges, we developed a laser scanning multimodal microscopy system which combines RCM and MPM, and has the ability to do fast xz scanning to achieve high resolution vertical "optical sectioning" of in vivo human skin at video rates. RCM and MPM images are obtained simultaneously and co-registered thereby providing complementary morphological information. To validate the performance of this system vertical section RCM and MPM microscopic images of normal human skin in vivo were obtained at half video rates (15 frames/s). Using our system it is possible to discern the following structures: all layers of the epidermis including the stratum lucidum, the dermal-epidermal junction, and the papillary dermis. Blood flow is also visible as evidenced by blood cell movement within vessels. The effective imaging depth is about 200 micrometers. This system provides a means of interrogating human skin noninvasively at an orientation analogous to conventional histological sectioning.

  15. Palladium nanoparticles exposure: Evaluation of permeation through damaged and intact human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larese Filon, Francesca; Crosera, Matteo; Mauro, Marcella; Baracchini, Elena; Bovenzi, Massimo; Montini, Tiziano; Fornasiero, Paolo; Adami, Gianpiero

    2016-07-01

    The intensified use of palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) in many chemical reactions, jewellery, electronic devices, in car catalytic converters and in biomedical applications lead to a significant increase in palladium exposure. Pd can cause allergic contact dermatitis when in contact with the skin. However, there is still a lack of toxicological data related to nano-structured palladium and information on human cutaneous absorption. In fact, PdNPs, can be absorbed through the skin in higher amounts than bulk Pd because NPs can release more ions. In our study, we evaluated the absorption of PdNPs, with a size of 10.7 ± 2.8 nm, using intact and damaged human skin in Franz cells. 0.60 mg cm(-2) of PdNPs were applied on skin surface for 24 h. Pd concentrations in the receiving solutions at the end of experiments were 0.098 ± 0.067 μg cm(-2) and 1.06 ± 0.44 μg cm(-2) in intact skin and damaged skin, respectively. Pd flux permeation after 24 h was 0.005 ± 0.003 μg cm(-2) h(-1) and 0.057 ± 0.030 μg cm(-2) h(-1) and lag time 4.8 ± 1.7 and 4.2 ± 3.6 h, for intact and damaged skin respectively. This study indicates that Pd can penetrate human skin.

  16. Diffusion profile of macromolecules within and between human skin layers for (trans)dermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römgens, Anne M; Bader, Dan L; Bouwstra, Joke A; Baaijens, Frank P T; Oomens, Cees W J

    2015-10-01

    Delivering a drug into and through the skin is of interest as the skin can act as an alternative drug administration route for oral delivery. The development of new delivery methods, such as microneedles, makes it possible to not only deliver small molecules into the skin, which are able to pass the outer layer of the skin in therapeutic amounts, but also macromolecules. To provide insight into the administration of these molecules into the skin, the aim of this study was to assess the transport of macromolecules within and between its various layers. The diffusion coefficients in the epidermis and several locations in the papillary and reticular dermis were determined for fluorescein dextran of 40 and 500 kDa using a combination of fluorescent recovery after photobleaching experiments and finite element analysis. The diffusion coefficient was significantly higher for 40 kDa than 500 kDa dextran, with median values of 23 and 9 µm(2)/s in the dermis, respectively. The values only marginally varied within and between papillary and reticular dermis. For the 40 kDa dextran, the diffusion coefficient in the epidermis was twice as low as in the dermis layers. The adopted method may be used for other macromolecules, which are of interest for dermal and transdermal drug delivery. The knowledge about diffusion in the skin is useful to optimize (trans)dermal drug delivery systems to target specific layers or cells in the human skin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Engineered Skin Cells Control Type 2 Diabetes in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167588.html Engineered Skin Cells Control Type 2 Diabetes in Mice: Study 'Therapeutic ... technique, heralded as a major breakthrough in genetic engineering, allows scientists to make precision "edits" in DNA -- ...

  18. Skin Sensitive Difference of Human Body Sections under Clothing--Multiple Analysis of Skin Surface Temperature Changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊; 吴海燕; 张渭源

    2003-01-01

    A new researching method on clothing comfort perception is developed.By it the skin surface temperature changes and subjective psychological perception of human body sections stimulated by the same cold stimulation are studied.With the multiple comparison analysis method the changing laws of skin temperature of main human body sections is obtained.

  19. Transdermal kinetics of a mercurous chloride beauty cream: an in vitro human skin analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R B; Godwin, D A; McKinney, P E

    2000-01-01

    Crema de Belleza-Manning is a popular mercurous chloride-containing beauty cream used to smooth and lighten the complexion and treat acne. Hundreds of people in the Southwestern US border states have been identified with elevated (>20 microg/L) urine mercury levels believed to be secondary to using this cream. The kinetic characteristics of percutaneous mercury absorption are incompletely defined. The objective of this study was to determine the transdermal kinetics of two formulations of mercurous chloride from a beauty cream in an in vitro human skin model. A proprietary formulation and an aqueous formulation of the beauty cream were studied using modified Franz diffusion cells. Mercury content in the skin samples and the underlying diffusion buffer was determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. A rapid initial increase in mercury content both in the skin and the buffer was noted for both formulations. Mercury concentrations in the aqueous samples were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in both the skin and the diffusion buffer compared to parallel samples containing glycerol. Mercury was readily absorbed through the skin in this in vitro human skin model. The aqueous preparation had a markedly increased rate and extent of mercury absorption relative to the proprietary formulation.

  20. New developments in two-photon analysis of human skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, I.; Schwarz, M.; Stracke, F.; Ehlers, A.; Dimitrow, E.; Kaatz, M.; König, K.; Le Harzic, R.

    2009-02-01

    Two-photon imaging of human skin using ultra short laser pulses can be used to obtain information about the state of cells and tissues by means of their natural autofluorescence. Using this method, it is possible to determine whether the normal cell pattern is disturbed or the autofluorescence is influenced by internal or external stimuli. Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) can further enhance this providing information about physiological processes, fluorophores (like NAD(P)H, collagen, keratin, elastin, flavins, melanin,...) and external applied probes inside cells and tissue parts. For example the part of the cells metabolism and energy level can be determined by analyzing the NADH regarding its free / bound state and its oxidized / reduced state. The combination of two-photon imaging with FLIM may lead to a better understanding and diagnosis of skin reactions and disorders. We also present some results of in vivo simultaneous collagen and elastin measurements in skin dermis. Changes of dermal collagen and elastin content are characteristic for skin aging as well as for pathological skin conditions.

  1. Production of an acellular matrix from amniotic membrane for the synthesis of a human skin equivalent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanluis-Verdes, Anahí; Yebra-Pimentel Vilar, Maria Teresa; García-Barreiro, Juan Javier; García-Camba, Marta; Ibáñez, Jacinto Sánchez; Doménech, Nieves; Rendal-Vázquez, Maria Esther

    2015-09-01

    Human amniotic membrane (HAM) has useful properties as a dermal matrix substitute. The objective of our work was to obtain, using different enzymatic or chemical treatments to eliminate cells, a scaffold of acellular HAM for later use as a support for the development of a skin equivalent. The HAM was separated from the chorion, incubated and cryopreserved. The membrane underwent different enzymatic and chemical treatments to eliminate the cells. Fibroblasts and keratinocytes were separately obtained from skin biopsies of patients following a sequential double digestion with first collagenase and then trypsin-EDTA (T/E). A skin equivalent was then constructed by seeding keratinocytes on the epithelial side and fibroblasts on the chorionic side of the decellularizated HAM. Histological, immunohistochemical, inmunofluorescent and molecular biology studies were performed. Treatment with 1% T/E at 37 °C for 30 min totally removed epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The HAM thus treated proved to be a good matrix to support adherence of cells and allowed the achievement of an integral and intact scaffold for development of a skin equivalent, which could be useful as a skin substitute for clinical use.

  2. Primary Cilia Negatively Regulate Melanogenesis in Melanocytes and Pigmentation in a Human Skin Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Sung; Park, So Jung; Bae, Il-Hong; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Jeong, In Young; Kim, Hyoung-June; Lee, Youngjin; Park, Hea Chul; Jeon, Hong Bae; Kim, Ki Woo; Lee, Tae Ryong; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium is an organelle protruding from the cell body that senses external stimuli including chemical, mechanical, light, osmotic, fluid flow, and gravitational signals. Skin is always exposed to the external environment and responds to external stimuli. Therefore, it is possible that primary cilia have an important role in skin. Ciliogenesis was reported to be involved in developmental processes in skin, such as keratinocyte differentiation and hair formation. However, the relation between skin pigmentation and primary cilia is largely unknown. Here, we observed that increased melanogenesis in melanocytes treated with a melanogenic inducer was inhibited by a ciliogenesis inducer, cytochalasin D, and serum-free culture. However, these inhibitory effects disappeared in GLI2 knockdown cells. In addition, activation of sonic hedgehog (SHH)-smoothened (Smo) signaling pathway by a Smo agonist, SAG inhibited melanin synthesis in melanocytes and pigmentation in a human skin model. On the contrary, an inhibitor of primary cilium formation, ciliobrevin A1, activated melanogenesis in melanocytes. These results suggest that skin pigmentation may be regulated partly by the induction of ciliogenesis through Smo-GLI2 signaling. PMID:27941997

  3. Vitis vinifera seeds extract for the modulation of cytosolic factors BAX-α and NF-kB involved in UVB-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis of human skin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    DECEAN, HANA; FISCHER-FODOR, EVA; TATOMIR, CORINA; PERDE-SCHREPLER, MARIA; SOMFELEAN, LIDIA; BURZ, CLAUDIA; HODOR, TUDOR; ORASAN, REMUS; VIRAG, PIROSKA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The depletion of the ozone layer allows overexposure of the skin to UV radiation, which is prolonged due to the increasing life expectancy, together with inappropriate life habits contribute to the increasing incidence of cutaneous malignancies. Plant extracts with antioxidant capacities are frequently employed as a means to protect skin against ultraviolet (UV) radiations, thus preventing skin cancers. In the present study we assessed a red grape seed extract (GSE) potential capacities to reduce ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent apoptosis in a human keratinocytes cell line (HaCaT). We identified molecules and pathways modulated by the GSE through which this may exert its photoprotective effect. Methods The GSE was standardized according to its polyphenolic content and the most important biologically active compounds, such as epigallocatechin and epicatechin, catechin hydrate, procyanidin B and gallic acid were evidenced by high-performance liquid chromatography. According to the plant extract cytotoxicity on the HaCaT cell line, two concentrations were selected for testing from the non-toxic range: GSE1 (37.5 μgEqGA/ml) and GSE2 (75 μgEqGA/ml). The level of ROS was evaluated with CM-H2DCFDA assay, while apoptosis, Bax-α and NF-kβ p65 proteins with ELISA and confirmed by western-blot. Results Both concentrations of the extract decreased the level of ROS in UVB-irradiated keratinocytes (p<0.001), whereas apoptosis and Bax-α pro-apoptotic protein were only reduced by the higher concentration (GSE2). The NF-kB p65 protein level registered increasing values in time after UVB exposure of the cells, while the tested plant extract re-established its level when its smaller concentration was used (GSE1). Conclusion These results encourage further studies on this extract in order to identify other molecules and pathways through which this extract might exert its beneficial effects and also recommend

  4. Near infrared laser penetration and absorption in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasouri, Babak; Murphy, Thomas E.; Berberoglu, Halil

    2014-02-01

    For understanding the mechanisms of low level laser/light therapy (LLLT), accurate knowledge of light interaction with tissue is necessary. In this paper, we present a three dimensional, multi-layer Monte Carlo simulation tool for studying light penetration and absorption in human skin. The skin is modeled as a three-layer participating medium, namely epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous, where its geometrical and optical properties are obtained from the literature. Both refraction and reflection are taken into account at the boundaries according to Snell's law and Fresnel relations. A forward Monte Carlo method was implemented and validated for accurately simulating light penetration and absorption in absorbing and anisotropically scattering media. Local profiles of light penetration and volumetric absorption densities were simulated for uniform as well as Gaussian profile beams with different spreads at 155 mW average power over the spectral range from 1000 nm to 1900 nm. The results show the effects of beam profiles and wavelength on the local fluence within each skin layer. Particularly, the results identify different wavelength bands for targeted deposition of power in different skin layers. Finally, we show that light penetration scales well with the transport optical thickness of skin. We expect that this tool along with the results presented will aid researchers resolve issues related to dose and targeted delivery of energy in tissues for LLLT.

  5. Skin-resident antigen-presenting cells: Instruction manual for vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia M. Fehres

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The induction of antigen-specific effector T cells is driven by proper antigen presentation and co-stimulation by dendritic cells (DCs. For this reason strategies have been developed to instruct DCs for the induction of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Since DCs are localized, amongst other locations, in peripheral tissues such as the skin, new vaccines are aiming at targeting antigens to DCs in situ. Optimal skin-DC targeting in combination with adequate adjuvant delivery facilitates DC maturation and migration to draining lymph nodes and enhances antigen cross-presentation and T cell priming. In this review we describe what DC subsets populate the human skin, as well as current vaccination strategies based on targeting strategies and alternative administration for the induction of robust long-lived anti-cancer effector T cells.

  6. Epidermal stem cells and skin tissue engineering in hairfollicle regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The reconstitution of a fully organized and functionalhair follicle from dissociated cells propagated underdefined tissue culture conditions is a challenge stillpending in tissue engineering. The loss of hair folliclescaused by injuries or pathologies such as alopecia notonly affects the patients' psychological well-being, butalso endangers certain inherent functions of the skin. Itis then of great interest to find different strategies aimingto regenerate or neogenerate the hair follicle underconditions proper of an adult individual. Based uponcurrent knowledge on the epithelial and dermal cells andtheir interactions during the embryonic hair generationand adult hair cycling, many researchers have tried toobtain mature hair follicles using different strategies andapproaches depending on the causes of hair loss. Thisreview summarizes current advances in the differentexperimental strategies to regenerate or neogenerate hairfollicles, with emphasis on those involving neogenesisof hair follicles in adult individuals using isolated cellsand tissue engineering. Most of these experiments wereperformed using rodent cells, particularly from embryonicor newborn origin. However, no successful strategy togenerate human hair follicles from adult cells has yetbeen reported. This review identifies several issues thatshould be considered to achieve this objective. Perhapsthe most important challenge is to provide threedimensionalculture conditionsmimicking the structure ofliving tissue. Improving culture conditions that allow theexpansion of specific cells while protecting their inductiveproperties, as well as methods for selecting populationsof epithelial stem cells, should give us the necessary toolsto overcome the difficulties that constrain human hairfollicle neogenesis. An analysis of patent trends showsthat the number of patent applications aimed at hairfollicle regeneration and neogenesis has been increasingduring the last decade. This field is attractive not only

  7. Spectral analysis of delayed luminescence as a tool to discriminate between normal and cancer skin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, F.; Scordino, A.; Tudisco, S.; Privitera, S.; Applegate, L. A.; Niggli, H. J.

    2005-08-01

    Photobiological research in the last decades has shown the existence of Delayed Luminescence in biological tissue, which presents an excitation spectrum with a peak within the UVA region and can be detected with sophisticated photomultiplier systems. Based on these findings, a new and powerful tool able to measure the UV-A-laser-induced Delayed Luminescence emission of cultured cells was developed, with the intention to detect biophysical changes between carcinogenic and normal cells. Indeed noticeable differences have been found in the time resolved emission spectrum of delayed luminescence of cell cultures of human fibroblast and human melanoma. This new, powerful and non-invasive technique, in principle, could be applied in all fields of skin research, such as the investigation of skin abnormalities and to test the effect of products involved in regeneration, anti-aging and UV-light protection in order to prevent skin cancer.

  8. Topical or oral administration with an extract of Polypodium leucotomos prevents acute sunburn and psoralen-induced phototoxic reactions as well as depletion of Langerhans cells in human skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, S.; Pathak, M.A.; Fitzpatrick, T.B. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Dept. of Dermatology, Boston, MA (United States); Cuevas, J. [Hospital Universitario de Guadalajara, Dept. of Pathology, Guadalajara (Spain); Villarrubia, V.G. [I.F. Cantabria SA, Medical Dept., Immunology Sect., Madrid (Spain)

    1997-12-31

    Sunburn, immune suppression, photo-aging, and skin cancers result from uncontrolled overexposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Preventive measures, including photo-protection, are helpful and can be achieved by topical sun-screening agents. Polypodium leucotomos (PL) has been used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and has shown some in vitro and in vivo immunomodulating properties. Its beneficial photo-protective effects in the treatment of vitiligo and its antioxidant properties encouraged us to evaluate in vivo the potentially useful photo-protective property of natural extract of PL after topical application or oral ingestion. Twenty-one healthy volunteers [either untreated or treated with oral psoralens (8-MOP or 5-MOP)] were enrolled in this study and exposed to solar radiation for evaluation of the following clinical parameters: immediate pigment darkening (IPD), minimal erythema dose (MED), minimal melanogenic dose (MMD), and minimal phototoxic dose (MPD) before and after topical or oral administration of PL. Immunohistochemical assessment of CD1a-expressing epidermal cells were also performed. PL was found to be photo-protective after topical application as well as oral administration. PL increased UV dose required for IPD (P<0.01), MED (P<0.001) and MPD (P<0.001). After oral administration of PL, MED increased 2.,8{+-}0.59 times and MPD increased 2.75{+-}0.5 and 6.8{+-}1.3 times depending upon the type of psoralen used. Immunohistochemical study revealed photo-protection of Langherhans cells by oral as well as topical PL. The observed photo-protective activities of oral or topical PL reveal a new avenue in examining the potentially useful field of systemic photo-protection and suggests that PL can be used as adjunct treatment and can make photochemotherapy and phototherapy possibly safe and effective when the control of cutaneous phototoxicity to PUVA or UVB is a limiting factor in such photo-therapies. (au). 50 refs.

  9. Microarray Analysis of Host Cell Gene Transcription in Response to Varicella-Zoster Virus Infection of Human T Cells and Fibroblasts In Vitro and SCIDhu Skin Xenografts In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Jeremy O.; Arvin, Ann M.

    2003-01-01

    During primary infection, varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is spread via lymphocytes to skin, where it induces a rash and establishes latency in sensory ganglia. A live, attenuated varicella vaccine (vOka) was generated by using the VZV Oka strain (pOka), but the molecular basis for vOka attenuation remains unknown. Little is known concerning the effects of wild-type or attenuated VZV on cellular gene regulation in the host cells that are critical for pathogenesis. In this study, transcriptional ...

  10. Data Mining Based Skin Pixel Detection Applied On Human Images: A Study Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagandeep Kaur

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Skin segmentation is the process of the identifying the skin pixels in a image in a particular color model and dividing the images into skin and non-skin pixels. It is the process of find the particular skin of the image or video in a color model. Finding the regions of the images in human images to say these pixel regions are part of the image or videos is typically a preprocessing step in skin detection in computer vision, face detection or multi-view face detection. Skin pixel detection model converts the images into appropriate format in a color space and then classification process is being used for labeling of the skin and non-skin pixels. A skin classifier identifies the boundary of the skin image in a skin color model based on the training dataset. Here in this paper, we present the survey of the skin pixel segmentation using the learning algorithms.

  11. Visible skin condition and perception of human facial appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, N; Fink, B; Matts, P J

    2010-06-01

    Evolutionary psychology suggests that certain human beauty standards have evolved to provide reliable cues of fertility and health. Hence, preferences for some physical characteristics of the face and body are thought to reflect adaptations for the promotion of mate choice. Studies that have investigated facial attractiveness have concentrated mainly on features such as symmetry, averageness and sex-typical traits, which are developed under the influence of sex steroids. Few studies, however, have addressed the effect of human skin condition on perception of facial appearance in this context, and possible implications for sexual selection. There is now accumulating evidence that skin pigmentation and skin surface topography cues, particularly in women, have a significant influence on attractiveness judgements, as they seem primarily to signal aspects of age and health. This article (i) reviews briefly some of the main determinants of visible skin condition, (ii) presents recent evidence on its signalling value in face perception and (iii) suggests areas for future research with reference to an evolutionary psychology framework.

  12. Noncontacting diffuse VIS-NIR spectroscopy of human skin for evaluation of skin type and time-dependent microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Wolf-Dieter; Fassler, Dieter; Zimmermann, Gabi; Liebold, Kristin; Wollina, Uwe

    2000-11-01

    Spectroscopic investigations of the VIS-NIR range allow the objective determination of pigmentation, blood microcirculation and water content of human skin. Non- contacting in vivo measurements of the human skin of 50 volunteers reflect the clinical skin type well. Our correlation analysis yields that the red/infrared spectral range can be used for a determination of skin type. The observed strong spectral variations within the same group of skin type are likely based on the high biological variability of human skin and subjective clinically observed skin type. Therefore it can be useful to measure the full spectral range and to calculate a non-observed skin score with multivariate spectral methods. By multivariate analysis a correct classification of remittance spectra can be obtained. Time- depending spectral variations of dermal microcirculation can be measured at defined locations of the body, for instance the dynamics of oxygenation or blood volume in the skin of the fingertip. The cardial, pulmonal and vasomotoric waves of the micro- and macrocirculation are clearly visible at different wavelengths. The spectroscopic informations are important as an objective measure for the skin type evaluation, the penetration behavior of pharmaca, laser surgery, and therapy.

  13. Does human leukocyte elastase degrade intact skin elastin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Christian E H; Jung, Michael C; Wohlrab, Johannes; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Heinz, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the susceptibility of intact fibrillar human elastin to human leukocyte elastase and cathepsin G. Elastin is a vital protein of the extracellular matrix of vertebrates, and provides exceptional properties including elasticity and tensile strength to many tissues and organs, including the aorta, lung, cartilage, elastic ligaments and skin, and is thus critical for their long-term function. Mature elastin is an insoluble and extremely durable protein that undergoes very little turnover, but sustained exposure to proteases may lead to irreversible and severe damage, and thus to functional loss of the elastic fiber network. Hence, it is a key issue to understand which enzymes actually initiate elastolysis under certain pathological conditions or during intrinsic aging. In this paper, we provide a complete workflow for isolation of pure and intact elastin from very small tissue samples to test enzymes for their elastolytic potential. This workflow was applied to skin samples from variously aged individuals, and it was found that strong differences exist in the degradability of the elastins investigated. In summary, human leukocyte elastase was unable to degrade intact elastin fibers but hydrolyzed elastin derived from the skin of old people. However, cathepsin G cleaved all elastin samples, even those derived from younger individuals. These results indicate that human leukocyte elastase is not a driving force for elastolysis, but may nevertheless promote further breakdown of elastic fibers after the action of other enzymes such as cathepsin G. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  14. The topical use of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD): nitric oxide related effects on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Kiara; Hoffmanns, Martin A; Demir, Erhan; Baldus, Sabrina; Volkmar, Christine M; Röhle, Mirco; Fuchs, Paul C; Awakowicz, Peter; Suschek, Christoph V; Opländer, Christian

    2015-01-30

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) devices generate air plasma above the skin containing active and reactive species including nitric oxide (NO). Since NO plays an essential role in skin physiology, a topical application of NO by plasma may be useful in the treatment of skin infections, impaired microcirculation and wound healing. Thus, after safety assessments of plasma treatment using human skin specimen and substitutes, NO-penetration through the epidermis, the loading of skin tissue with NO-derivates in vitro and the effects on human skin in vivo were determined. After the plasma treatment (0-60 min) of skin specimen or reconstructed epidermis no damaging effects were found (TUNEL/MTT). By Franz diffusion cell experiments plasma-induced NO penetration through epidermis and dermal enrichment with NO related species (nitrite 6-fold, nitrate 7-fold, nitrosothiols 30-fold) were observed. Furthermore, skin surface was acidified (~pH 2.7) by plasma treatment (90 s). Plasma application on the forearms of volunteers increased microcirculation fourfold in 1-2 mm and twofold in 6-8 mm depth in the treated skin areas. Regarding the NO-loading effects, skin acidification and increase in dermal microcirculation, plasma devices represent promising tools against chronic/infected wounds. However, efficacy of plasma treatment needs to be quantified in further studies and clinical trials.

  15. Topical stabilized retinol treatment induces the expression of HAS genes and HA production in human skin in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Hwa; Wong, Heng-Kuan; Serrano, José; Randhawa, Manpreet; Kaur, Simarna; Southall, Michael D; Parsa, Ramine

    2017-05-01

    Skin Aging manifests primarily with wrinkles, dyspigmentations, texture changes, and loss of elasticity. During the skin aging process, there is a loss of moisture and elasticity in skin resulting in loss of firmness finally leading to skin sagging. The key molecule involved in skin moisture is hyaluronic acid (HA), which has a significant water-binding capacity. HA levels in skin decline with age resulting in decrease in skin moisture, which may contribute to loss of firmness. Clinical trials have shown that topically applied ROL effectively reduces wrinkles and helps retain youthful appearance. In the current study, ROL was shown to induce HA production and stimulates the gene expression of all three forms of hyaluronic acid synthases (HAS) in normal human epidermal keratinocytes monolayer cultures. Moreover, in human skin equivalent tissues and in human skin explants, topical treatment of tissues with a stabilized-ROL formulation significantly induced the gene expression of HAS mRNA concomitant with an increased HA production. Finally, in a vehicle-controlled human clinical study, histochemical analysis confirmed increased HA accumulation in the epidermis in ROL-treated human skin as compared to vehicle. These results show that ROL increases skin expression of HA, a significant contributing factor responsible for wrinkle formation and skin moisture, which decrease during aging. Taken together with the activity to increase collagen, elastin, and cell proliferation, these studies establish that retinol provides multi-functional activity for photodamaged skin.

  16. Formation of a carcinogenic aromatic amine from an azo dye by human skin bacteria in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzek, T; Lang, C; Grohmann, G; Gi, U S; Baltes, W

    1999-09-01

    Azo dyes represent the major class of dyestuffs. They are metabolised to the corresponding amines by liver enzymes and the intestinal microflora following incorporation by both experimental animals and humans. For safety evaluation of the dermal exposure of consumers to azo dyes from wearing coloured textiles, a possible cleavage of azo dyes by the skin microflora should be considered since, in contrast to many dyes, aromatic amines are easily absorbed by the skin. A method for measuring the ability of human skin flora to reduce azo dyes was established. In a standard experiment, 3x10(11) cells of a culture of Staphylococcus aureus were incubated in synthetic sweat (pH 6.8, final volume 20 mL) at 28 degrees C for 24 h with Direct Blue 14 (C.I. 23850, DB 14). The reaction products were extracted and analysed using HPLC. The reduction product o-tolidine (3,3'-dimethylbenzidine, OT) could indeed be detected showing that the strain used was able to metabolise DB 14 to the corresponding aromatic amine. In addition to OT, two further metabolites of DB 14 were detected. Using mass spectrometry they were identified as 3,3'-dimethyl-4-amino-4'-hydroxybiphenyl and 3, 3'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl. The ability to cleave azo dyes seems to be widely distributed among human skin bacteria, as, under these in vitro conditions, bacteria isolated from healthy human skin and human skin bacteria from strain collections also exhibited azo reductase activity. Further studies are in progress in order to include additional azo dyes and coloured textiles. At the moment, the meaning of the results with regard to consumer health cannot be finally assessed.

  17. 分离培养汗腺导管部细胞的新方法%A new way for isolation and cultivation of sweat gland ductual cells from human split-thickness skin in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷永红; 付小兵; 盛志勇; 蔡飒; 孙同柱

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨建立汗腺导管部细胞分离的新技术.方法 成人仞厚皮片和薄中厚皮片标本(n=10)剪碎后用Ⅱ型胶原酶消化12 h,吸取并转移汗腺导管到培养皿中贴壁培养.应用流式细胞仪、免疫组织化学染色和逆转录-聚合酶链式反应(RT-PCR)以及蛋白印迹(Western Blot)分析检测培养细胞的汗腺特异标志CEA、CK8、CK18、CK19抗原表达,并用膜片钳技术检测培养细胞膜上阿米洛利(amiloride)敏感Na~+离子通道,用t检验比较分析两组间实验数据.结果 汗腺导管贴壁48 h后,围绕汗腺导管出现单层扁平的上皮细胞,生长2~4周融合成片.流式细胞学检查示原代培养汗腺导管细胞与原代培养汗腺细胞在癌胚抗原(CEA)阳性率[(90.26±1.12)%vs.(89.70±1.43)%]和细胞角蛋白8(CK8)阳性率[(94.41±1.84)%vs.(93.65±1.63)%]上,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).形态学染色汗腺导管细胞抗CEA、CK8、CK18、CK19染色均为阳性.RT-PCR表明原代培养汗腺导管细胞表达CEA、CK8、CK18、CK19基因,Western Blot清晰显示CEA条带,CK8、CK18、CK19蛋白条带.膜片钳检测表明原代培养汗腺导管细胞膜上存在amiloride敏感Na~+离子通道.无血清表皮细胞EpiLife培养基在汗腺导管细胞生长过程中抑制成纤维细胞生长.结论 从仞厚皮片和中厚皮片分离培养汗腺导管部细胞的方法较传统的分离方法具有简便快速的优点,EpiLife培养基可抑制培养过程中成纤维细胞的生长,可以在体外建立最佳汗腺导管细胞模型.%Objective To explore a new method of isolation and culture of eccrine sweat gland ductual cells from human split-thickness skin graft in vitro. Methods Human split-thickness skin graft which was presented by volunteer (n=10) was digested with type Ⅱ collagenase, and then sweat gland duct were isolated from the split-thickness skin graft, primary cultures were incubated at 37 ℃ in humidified atmosphere of 5% CO_2,95% O_2

  18. Your Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Your Skin KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Skin Print A A ... are really dead skin cells. continue Bye-Bye Skin Cells These old cells are tough and strong, ...

  19. A summary about dendritic cells in skin diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo Huang; Robert Gniadecki

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cellls (DCs) comprise an essential component of the immune system, are crucial in the initiation of antigen specific immune responses. In this summary we focus on summarizing on the central role of DCs in skin diseases: Bullous dermatoses,Dermatitis, Psoriasis, Lichen Planus , Graft-versus-host disease, Connect Tissue Diseases, Virus Diseases, Fungi Diseases, HIV, Urticaria, Urticaria pigmentosa, Mastocytosis, Tumour, Solar dermatoses. Moreover, in this summary we review the distribution and phenotype of DCs in human skin. Markers and phenotyps ' s study have provided strong support for a concept in which DCs play an important role in the pothogenesis of some skin diseases.

  20. Protective influence of hyaluronic acid on focal adhesion kinase activity in human skin fibroblasts exposed to ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donejko M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Magdalena Donejko,1 Edyta Rysiak,2 Elżbieta Galicka,1 Robert Terlikowski,3 Edyta Katarzyna Głażewska,1 Andrzej Przylipiak1 1Department of Esthetic Medicine, 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, 3Department of Health Restoration, Medical University of Białystok, Białystok, Poland Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol and hyaluronic acid (HA on cell survival and apoptosis in cultured human skin fibroblasts. Regarding the mechanism of ethanol action on human skin fibroblasts, we investigated cell viability and apoptosis, expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK, and the influence of HA on those processes. Materials and methods: Studies were conducted in confluent human skin fibroblast cultures that were treated with 25 mM, 50 mM, and 100 mM ethanol or with ethanol and 500 µg/mL HA. Cell viability was examined using methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT assay and NC-300 Nucleo-Counter. Imaging of the cells using a fluorescence microscope Pathway 855 was performed to measure FAK expression. Results: Depending on the dosage, ethanol decreased cell viability and activated the process of apoptosis in human skin fibroblasts. HA prevented the negative influence of ethanol on cell viability and prevented apoptosis. The analysis of fluorescence imaging using BD Pathway 855 High-Content Bioimager showed the inhibition of FAK migration to the cell nucleus, depending on the increasing concentration of ethanol. Conclusion: This study proves that downregulation of signaling pathway of FAK is involved in ethanol-induced apoptosis in human skin fibroblasts. The work also indicates a protective influence of HA on FAK activity in human skin fibroblasts exposed to ethanol. Keywords: apoptosis, skin fibroblast, focal adhesion kinase, hyaluronic acid, ethanol

  1. Characterization of ERAS, a putative novel human oncogene, in skin and breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña Avalos, B.L. de la

    2014-07-01

    Most human tumors have mutations in genes of the RAS small GTPase protein family. RAS works as a molecular switch for signaling pathways that modulate many aspects of cell behavior, including proliferation, differentiation, motility and death. Oncogenic mutations in RAS prevent GTP hydrolysis, locking RAS in a permanently active state, being the most common mutations in HRAS, KRAS and NRAS. The human RAS family consists of at least 36 different genes, many of which have been scarcely studied. One of these relatively unknown genes is ERAS (ES cell-expressed RAS), which is a constitutively active RAS protein, localized in chromosome X and expressed only in embryonic cells, being undetectable in adult tissues. New high throughput technologies have made it possible to screen complete cancer genomes for identification of mutations associated to cancer. Using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system, ERAS was identified as a putative novel oncogene in non-melanoma skin and breast cancers. The major aim of this project is to determine the general characteristics of ERAS as a putative novel human oncogene in skin and breast cells. Forced expression of ERAS results in drastic changes in cell shape, proliferation and motility. When ERAS is overexpressed in skin and breast human cells it is mainly localized in the cytoplasmic membrane. ERAS activates the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K) pathway but not the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. ERAS-expressing cells suffer spontaneous morphologic and phenotypic EMT-like changes, including cytoskeleton reorganization, vimentin and N-cadherin up-regulation and down-regulation of E-cadherin, which can be associated with increased malignancy, and invasive and metastatic potential. Our results suggest that inappropriate expression of ERAS lead to transformation of human cells. (Author)

  2. Mechanisms of carcinogenesis in human skin against the background of papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, I V; Reva, G V; Yamamoto, T; Tolmachyov, V E

    2014-09-01

    The cells in the skin tumor developing under conditions of persisting papillomavirus infection are morphologically identical to blast cells in a blood smear from a leukemia patient. The cells filling the lesion focus are morphologically and immunohistochemically related to blood stem cells. A mechanism of epithelial layer modification under conditions of papillomavirus infection leading to carcinogenesis is proposed. The dynamics of structural changes in the skin is characterized by disturbed interactions between the epithelium and adjacent connective tissue, destruction of the basal membrane, disorders in the cambial keratinocyte differentiation, and absence of the spinous and granular layers. We conclude that detection of blast leukocytes in the human skin lesion can be explained by disorders in the cell-cell interactions in the epithelium-mesenchymal tissue system. High proliferative activity followed by death of cambial keratinocytes, migration of effector antigen-presenting CD68 cells to the adjacent connective tissue are the factors inducing migration of blast leukocytic forms to the focus. Not only keratinocyte restitution capacity, but also epithelium-dependent differentiation of young leukocytes disappeared. Undifferentiated cells are migrated from the blood to the epithelium alteration zone, but not in the reverse direction. The insufficiency or the absence of blood blast cell differentiation of the in the focus of epidermal injury and adjacent tissue triggers carcinogenesis. The authors suggest their model of carcinogenesis. The conclusions offer a new concept of cancer pathogenesis and suggest a new strategy in the search for methods for early diagnosis of carcinogenesis.

  3. Freeze-drying as a preserving preparation technique for in vitro testing of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Lutz; Vidlářová, Lucie; Kostka, Karl-Heinz; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Windbergs, Maike

    2013-01-01

    In vitro testing of drugs with excised human skin is a valuable prerequisite for clinical studies. However, the analysis of excised human skin presents several obstacles. Ongoing drug diffusion, microbial growth and changes in hydration state influence the results of drug penetration studies. In this work, we evaluate freeze-drying as a preserving preparation method for skin samples to overcome these obstacles. We analyse excised human skin before and after freeze-drying and compare these results with human skin in vivo. Based on comprehensive thermal and spectroscopic analysis, we demonstrate comparability to in vivo conditions and exclude significant changes within the skin samples due to freeze-drying. Furthermore, we show that freeze-drying after skin incubation with drugs prevents growth of drug crystals