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Sample records for human sera application

  1. Expression of Hepatitis C Virus E2 Ectodomain in E.coli and Its Application in the Detection of Anti-E2 Antibodies in Human Sera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingLIU; Xin-XinZHANG; Shen-YingZHANG; MinLU; Yu-YingKONG; YuanWANG; Guang-DiLI

    2004-01-01

    The second envelope glycoprotein (E2) of hepatitis C virus has been shown to bind human target cells and has become a major target for the development of anti-HCV vaccines. Anti-E2 antibodies have been suggested to be of clinical significance in diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of hepatitis C. However,large-scale expression and purification of E2 proteins in mammalian cells is difficult. As an alternative, E2 fragment (aa 385-730) with a four-amino-acid mutation (aa 568-571 PCNI to RVTS) was expressed as hexa-histidine-tagged full length protein [E2N730(m)] in E.coli and purified to over 85% purity. Purified E2N730(m) was specifically recognized by homologous hepatitis C patient serum in Western blot, suggesting that it displayed E2-specific antigenicity. Rabbit antiserum raised against E2N730(m) recognized E2 glycoproteins expressed in mammalian cells in Western blot. Purified E2N730(m) was ttsed to detect anti-E2 antibodies in human sera and showed better specificity and sensitivity than previously reported C-terminally truncated E2 fragment (aa 385-565). Association between anti-E2 antibodies in patient sera and HCV RNA status was also demonstrated using this E.coli-derived protein. E2N730(m) might serve as an inexpensive alternative to mammalian cell-expressed E2 proteins in clinical and research applications.

  2. Expression of Hepatitis C Virus E2 Ectodomain in E.coli and Its Application in the Detection of Anti-E2 Antibodies in Human Sera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LIU; Xin-Xin ZHANG; Shen-Ying ZHANG; Min LU; Yu-Ying KONG; Yuan WANG; Guang-Di LI

    2004-01-01

    The second envelope glycoprotein (E2) of hepatitis C virus has been shown to bind human target cells and has become a major target for the development of anti-HCV vaccines. Anti-E2 antibodies have been suggested to be of clinical significance in diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of hepatitis C. However,large-scale expression and purification of E2 proteins in mammalian cells is difficult. As an alternative, E2 fragment (aa 385-730) with a four-amino-acid mutation (aa 568-571 PCNI to RVTS) was expressed as hexa-histidine-tagged full length protein [E2N730(m)] in E. Coli and purified to over 85% purity. Purified E2N730(m) was specifically recognized by homologous hepatitis C patient serum in Western blot, suggesting that it displayed E2-specific antigenicity. Rabbit antiserum raised against E2N730(m) recognized E2 glycoproteins expressed in mammalian cells in Western blot. Purified E2N730(m) was used to detect anti-E2 antibodies in human sera and showed better specificity and sensitivity than previously reported C-terminally truncated E2 fragment (aa 385-565). Association between anti-E2 antibodies in patient sera and HCV RNA status was also demonstrated using this E. Coli-derived protein. E2N730(m) might serve as an inexpensive alternative to mammalian cell-expressed E2 proteins in clinical and research applications.

  3. Studies of neutralising antibodies to SV40 in human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, P; Pipkin, P; Jarzebek, Z; Knowles, W

    2003-07-01

    It has been suggested that the low levels of antibody to the simian polyoma virus SV40 found in human sera may be linked to the use of polio vaccines. Panels of sera from areas of the world with different vaccination histories were examined to see if consistent differences could be identified. In a total of 2,054 sera from the United Kingdom, 692 from Africa and 923 from Poland taken between 1985 and 1997, the seroprevalence was generally between 3 and 5%, although exceptionally one collection from Morocco had a prevalence of 100%, and one from Poland of 0.4%. The seroprevalence showed no obvious age-dependent increase and titres were low compared to post infection animal sera. The results are consistent with previous studies and reveal no general geographically based differences related to possible differences in vaccination history, but the origin of the SV40 antibody in human sera remains to be established.

  4. 21 CFR 864.2800 - Animal and human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2800 Animal and... of humans or other animals, that provide the necessary growth-promoting nutrients in a cell culture... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Animal and human sera. 864.2800 Section 864.2800...

  5. BACTERICIDAL ACTIVITY OF HUMAN SERA AGAINST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-12-12

    Dec 12, 2000 ... Immunoglobulin in the resistance or susceptibility of Salmonella typhi and Salmonella paratyphi A,B,C ... individual to Salmonella typhi and paratyphi infections. Individuals of ..... human immunodeficiency virus. J. Immuno.

  6. Uraemic sera stimulate lipolysis in human adipocytes: role of perilipin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Jonas; Aström, Gaby; Sjölin, Eva; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lorente-Cebrián, Silvia; Stenvinkel, Peter; Rydén, Mikael

    2011-08-01

    Although chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, the exact cause(s) are unknown. Since adipose tissue plays an important role in the development of these complications, we investigated the effect of uraemic sera on human adipocytes in vitro. Cultured human adipocytes were incubated for 48 h with media containing sera from eight CKD Stage 5 patients or four (matched for age, sex and body mass index) healthy controls. Glycerol release (an index of lipolysis) was determined in conditioned media. RNA was isolated from the cells and quantitative polymerase chain reaction of genes involved in lipolysis was performed. In vivo lipolysis was determined by the plasma glycerol/total fat mass (from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry) ratio in 28 CKD patients and 28 matched controls. Incubation with uraemic, but not control, sera resulted in a significant ∼30% increase in spontaneous (basal) lipolysis (P lipolysis in human adipocytes in vitro, probably by attenuating the expression of the lipolytic regulator PLIN. Since in vivo lipolysis is a well-established risk factor for insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease, these effects may promote increased morbidity and mortality in CKD.

  7. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-07-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5-FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad-FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy.

  8. Mining biomarkers in human sera using proteomic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rulin; Barker, Lisa; Pinchev, Deborah; Marshall, John; Rasamoelisolo, Michèle; Smith, Chris; Kupchak, Peter; Kireeva, Inga; Ingratta, Leslee; Jackowski, George

    2004-01-01

    One of the major difficulties in mining low abundance biomarkers from serum or plasma is due to the fact that a small number of proteins such as albumin, alpha2-macroglobulin, transferrin, and immunoglobulins, may represent as much as 80% of the total serum protein. The large quantity of these proteins makes it difficult to identify low abundance proteins in serum using traditional 2-dimensional electrophoresis. We recently used a combination of multidimensional liquid chromatography and gel electrophoresis coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-quadrupole-time of flight and Ion Trap liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify protein markers in sera of Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance/type-2 diabetes (IR/D2), and congestive heart failure (CHF) patients. We identified 8 proteins that exhibit higher levels in control sera and 36 proteins that exhibit higher levels in disease sera. For example, haptoglobin and hemoglobin are elevated in sera of AD, IR/D2, and CHF patients. The levels of several other proteins including fibrinogen and its fragments, alpha 2-macroglobulin, transthyretin, pro-platelet basic protein, protease inhibitors clade A and C, as well as proteins involved in the classical complement pathway such as complement C3, C4, and C1 inhibitor, were found to differ between IR/D2 and control sera. The sera levels of proteins, such as the 10 kDa subunit of vitronectin, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, apolipoprotein B100, fragment of factor H, and histidine-rich glycoprotein were observed to be different between AD and controls. The differences observed in these biomarker candidates were confirmed by Western blot and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The biological meaning of the proteomic changes in the disease states and the potential use of these changes as diagnostic tools or for therapeutic intervention will be discussed.

  9. A survey for arboviral antibodies in sera of humans and animals in Lombok, Republic of Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, J G; Ksiazek, T G; Gubler, D J; Lubis, S I; Simanjuntak, G; Lee, V H; Nalim, S; Juslis, K; See, R

    1983-04-01

    Sera were collected from humans, cattle, horses, goats, ducks, chickens, wild birds, bats and rats in Lombok, Indonesia, and were tested by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) for antibodies to JE, ZIKA, CHIK and RR. Selected sera were tested by microneutralization tests for antibodies to the following viruses: JE, ZIKA, MVE, TMU, LGT, KUN, SEP, DEN-2, CHIK, RR, GET, SIN, BUN, BAT and BAK. Human sera had JE HI antibody in 135 (30%) of 446 tested. Neutralization tests indicated that DEN-2, ZIKA, TMU, KUN and SEP may have caused flavivirus infections. Antibodies to other arboviruses tested for were not found. HI and neutralization tests on animal sera indicated possible flavivirus infections with JE, MVE, KUN and SEP, and also that infections with BAT and BUN had occurred among domestic animals. No neutralizing antibodies were found for alphaviruses or other viruses used in the tests.

  10. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease based on disease-specific autoantibody profiles in human sera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Nagele

    Full Text Available After decades of Alzheimer's disease (AD research, the development of a definitive diagnostic test for this disease has remained elusive. The discovery of blood-borne biomarkers yielding an accurate and relatively non-invasive test has been a primary goal. Using human protein microarrays to characterize the differential expression of serum autoantibodies in AD and non-demented control (NDC groups, we identified potential diagnostic biomarkers for AD. The differential significance of each biomarker was evaluated, resulting in the selection of only 10 autoantibody biomarkers that can effectively differentiate AD sera from NDC sera with a sensitivity of 96.0% and specificity of 92.5%. AD sera were also distinguishable from sera obtained from patients with Parkinson's disease and breast cancer with accuracies of 86% and 92%, respectively. Results demonstrate that serum autoantibodies can be used effectively as highly-specific and accurate biomarkers to diagnose AD throughout the course of the disease.

  11. Quantitation of Circulating Neuropilin-1 in Human, Monkey, Mouse, and Rat Sera by ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanmei; Meng, Y Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) is a single spanning transmembrane glycoprotein that acts as a co-receptor for class 3 semaphorins and vascular endothelial growth factors. Naturally occurring soluble NRP1 isoforms containing partial extracellular domain (ECD) have been reported. In addition to soluble NRP1, full-length NRP1 ECD has also been identified in human and animal sera. Here, we describe primate and rodent NRP1 ELISAs that measure total circulating NRP1 including soluble NPR1 and NRP1 ECD in human, monkey, mouse, and rat sera.

  12. 9th International Conference on Software Engineering Research, Management and Applications(SERA 2011)

    CERN Document Server

    Software Engineering Research, Management and Applications 2011

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the 9th International Conference on Software Engineering Research, Management and Applications(SERA 2011) held on August 10-12, 2011 in Baltimore, Maryland was to bring together scientists, engineers, computer users, and students to share their experiences and exchange new ideas and research results about all aspects (theory, applications and tools) of computer and information sciences, and to discuss the practical challenges encountered along the way and the solutions adopted to solve them.   The conference organizers selected 12 outstanding papers from SERA 2011, all of which you will find in this volume of Springer’s Studies in Computational Intelligence.

  13. Diagnosis of Parkinson's disease based on disease-specific autoantibody profiles in human sera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Han

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, hallmarked by a variety of motor disorders and neurological decline, is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide. Currently, no diagnostic test exists to identify sufferers, and physicians must rely on a combination of subjective physical and neurological assessments to make a diagnosis. The discovery of definitive blood-borne biomarkers would be a major step towards early and reliable diagnosis. Despite attention devoted to this search, such biomarkers have remained elusive. In the present study, we used human protein microarrays to reveal serum autoantibodies that are differentially expressed among PD and control subjects. The diagnostic significance of each of these autoantibodies was evaluated, resulting in the selection of 10 autoantibody biomarkers that can effectively differentiate PD sera from control sera with a sensitivity of 93.1% and specificity of 100%. PD sera were also distinguishable from sera obtained from Alzheimer's disease, breast cancer, and multiple sclerosis patients with accuracies of 86.0%, 96.6%, and 100%, respectively. Results demonstrate that serum autoantibodies can be used as highly specific and accurate biomarkers for PD diagnosis throughout the course of the disease.

  14. Recognition by human sera of a variable region of the surface glycoprotein of HTLV-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edouard, E; Londos-Gagliardi, D; Busetta, B; Geoffre, S; Dalbon, P; Moreau, J P; Guillemain, B

    1994-04-01

    The region comprised between the amino acids 175 and 199 of the HTLV-I envelope surface glycoprotein is one of the immunodominant domains of this molecule. In this region, which is well recognized by sera from HTLV-I infected patients, a substitution of the proline at position 192 by a serine has been described in some isolates. Because this mutation could modify the secondary structure of the glycoprotein molecule, we studied the inference of the presence of proline or serine on the recognition of the region 175-199 by human sera. For this, three peptides have been synthetized (a 25-mer 175-199 corresponding to the sequence of the ATK prototype, and two internal 10-mer 190-Pro-199 and 190-Ser-199 having a proline or a serine at position 192) and tested by immunosorbent assay. While most sera reacted with 190-Pro-199 and with 190-Ser-199 synthetic peptides, a differential recognition was observed according to the pathology associated to HTLV-I infection. Moreover sera corresponding to patients infected with a virus harboring a serine at position 192 were found to recognize only the 10-mer with a serine. These data indicates that HTLV-I is subject to antigenic variability.

  15. ALTERATION OF CHOLESTEROL SULFATE IN HUMAN SERA DURING THE COURSE OF PREGNANCY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林蓓; 张淑兰; 岩森正男

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the concentrations of cholesterol sulfate (CS) in human sera and placental villi during the course of pregnancy. And to analyze its inhibitory activity on thrombin and further characterize the functional significance of CS. Methods The concentrations of CS were determined by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) on 60 cases of normal pregnant women and 30 cases of normal placental villi. The effect of CS in human sera on the activity of thrombin was analyzed. Results The concentrations of CS in human sera gradually increased from the first to third trimester of gestation with a correlation coefficient of 0.69, and a correlation between the concentration of CS and weeks of gestation (P <0.01 ). CS was also contained in the placental villi, and its concentrations at the second and third trimester of gestations were 4. 7 and 6. 2-fold of that at the first trimester of gestation. CS inhibited the activity of thrombin. Conclusion Placental CS is one of the sources of CS in the serum, probably by shedding. From the observation that CS inhibited the activity of thrombin, the increased expression of CS may play an important role in the regulation of blood coagulation during the course of pregnancy.

  16. SERA: Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications - Users Manual Version 1CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venhuizen, James Robert; Wessol, Daniel Edward; Wemple, Charles Alan; Wheeler, Floyd J; Harkin, G. J.; Frandsen, M. W.; Albright, C. L.; Cohen, M.T.; Rossmeier, M.; Cogliati, J.J.

    2002-06-01

    This document is the user manual for the Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications (SERA) software program developed for boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) patient treatment planning by researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and students and faculty at Montana State University (MSU) Computer Science Department. This manual corresponds to the final release of the program, Version 1C0, developed to run under the RedHat Linux Operating System (version 7.2 or newer) or the Solaris™ Operating System (version 2.6 or newer). SERA is a suite of command line or interactively launched software modules, including graphical, geometric reconstruction, and execution interface modules for developing BNCT treatment plans. The program allows the user to develop geometric models of the patient as derived from Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) images, perform dose computation for these geometric models, and display the computed doses on overlays of the original images as three dimensional representations. This manual provides a guide to the practical use of SERA, but is not an exhaustive treatment of each feature of the code.

  17. Nanomagnetic competition assay for low-abundance protein biomarker quantification in unprocessed human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanpeng; Srinivasan, Balasubramanian; Jing, Ying; Yao, Xiaofeng; Hugger, Marie A; Wang, Jian-Ping; Xing, Chengguo

    2010-03-31

    A novel giant magnetoresistive sensor and uniform high-magnetic-moment FeCo nanoparticles (12.8 nm)-based detecting platform with minimized detecting distance was developed for rapid biomolecule quantification from body fluids. Such a system demonstrates specific, accurate, and quick detection and quantification of interleukin-6, a low-abundance protein and a potential cancer biomarker, directly in 4 muL of unprocessed human sera. This platform is expected to facilitate the identification and validation of disease biomarkers. It may eventually lead to a low-cost personal medical device for chronic disease early detection, diagnosis, and prognosis.

  18. Monitoring of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in Czechoslovak human sera by immunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukal, L. (Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czechoslovakia)); Reisnerova, H. (Univ. of Agriculture, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1990-03-01

    Since a level of food contamination with aflatoxins and ochratoxin A has been found low in Czechoslovakia, human exposure to these mycotoxins may not be negligible. However, analysis of food samples provides only indirect evidence of mycotoxin ingestion and no evidence about mycotoxin absorption. Direct evidence can only be obtained by analysis of human body fluids. Therefore, the authors decided to carry out a monitoring of aflatoxin and ochratoxin A level in human sera. In general, TLC and HPLC are most commonly used to analyze mycotoxins and its metabolites. The recent development of immunochemical techniques opens the possibility of determining individual exposure in a relatively large human population. These assays have the advantage of high specificity and sensitivity. Sample through-put is high, and the methods are technically simple and can be performed at low cost.

  19. Detection of antibodies to bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan in human sera. [/sup 125/I tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heymer, B.; Schleifer, K.H.; Read, S.; Zabriskie, J.B.; Krause, R.M.

    1976-07-01

    A radioimmunoassay has been developed for the measurement of antibodies to peptidoglycan in human sera including patients with rheumatic feaver and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The assay is based on the percentage of binding of the hapten /sup 125/I-L-Ala-..gamma..-D-Glu-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, the major peptide determinant of peptidoglycan. Because of differences in the avidity of the antibodies in different sera, the amount of antibody was expressed as pentapeptide hapten-binding capacity (pentapeptide-HBC in ng/ml of serum). Fourteen out of 105 normal blood donors had a pentapeptide-HBC value greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml serum. Values in healthy children 5 to 18 years of age were less than or equal to 50 ng/ml. Sixty-eight percent of the individuals with rheumatic fever had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml, an indication that streptococcal infections can stimulate an immune response to peptidoglycan. Thirty-five percent of the patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml. Such a finding points to a possible association between bacterial infections and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Direct assessment of cumulative aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist activity in sera from experimentally exposed mice and environmentally exposed humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlezinger, Jennifer J; Bernard, Pamela L; Haas, Amelia;

    2010-01-01

    readouts to provide a broader context for estimating human risk than that obtained with serum extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS)-based assays alone. METHODS: AhR agonist activity was quantified in sera from dioxin-treated mice, commercial human sources, and polychlorinated biphenyl...

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi: identification of specific epimastigote antigens by human immune sera

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Soluble antigens from epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi were analyzed by western blot in terms of their reactivity with sera from patients with Chagas' disease. In addition, sera from patients with visceral (AVL) and tegumentar leishmaniasis (ATL) were also tested in order to identify cross-reactivities with Trypanosoma cruzy antigens. Twenty eight polypeptides with molecular weights ranging from 14 kDa to 113 kDa were identified with sera from Chagas' disease patients. An extensive cross-re...

  2. Expression of Recombinant Streptokinase from Streptococcus Pyogenes and Its Reaction with Infected Human and Murine Sera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Molaee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Streptokinase (SKa is an antigenic protein which is secreted by Streptococcus pyogenes. Streptokinase induces inflammation by complement activation, which may play a role in post infectious diseases. In the present study, recombinant streptokinase from S. pyogenes was produced and showed that recombinant SKa protein was recognized by infected human sera using Western blot analysis.   Materials and Methods: In this study, the ska gene from S. pyogenes was amplified and cloned into pET32a which is a prokaryotic expression vector. pET32a-ska was transformed to Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 pLysS and gene expression was induced by IPTG. Protein production was improved by modification of composition of the bacterial culture media and altering the induction time by IPTG. The expressed protein was purified by affinity chromatography using the Ni-NTA resin. The integrity of the product was confirmed by Westernblot analysis using infected mice. Serum reactivity of five infected individuals was further analyzed against the recombinant SKa protein. Results: Data indicated that recombinant SKa protein from S. pyogenes can be recognized by patient and mice sera. The concentration of the purified recombinant protein was 3.2 mg/L of initial culture. The highest amount of the expressed protein after addition of IPTG was obtained in a bacterial culture without glucose with the culture optical density of 0.8 (OD600 = 0.8. Conclusion : Present data shows, recombinant SKa protein has same epitopes with natural form of this antigen. Recombinant SKa also seemed to be a promising antigen for the serologic diagnosis of S. pyogenes infections.

  3. Immunoreactive proteins of Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum CCM 7952 and Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum CCDM 372 identified by gnotobiotic mono-colonized mice sera, immune rabbit sera and nonimmune human sera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Górska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Bifidobacteria show great diversity in the cell surface architecture which may influence the physicochemical properties of the bacterial cell and strain specific properties. The immunomodulatory role of bifidobacteria has been extensively studied, however studies on the immunoreactivity of their protein molecules are very limited. Here, we compared six different methods of protein isolation and purification and we report identification of immunogenic and immunoreactive protein of two human Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum strains. We evaluated potential immunoreactive properties of proteins employing polyclonal sera obtained from germ free mouse, rabbit and human. The protein yield was isolation method-dependent and the reactivity of proteins detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting was heterogeneous and varied between different serum samples. The proteins with the highest immunoreactivity were isolated, purified and have them sequenced. Among the immunoreactive proteins we identified enolase, aspartokinase, pyruvate kinase, DnaK (B. longum ssp. longum CCM 7952 and sugar ABC transporter ATP-binding protein, phosphoglycerate kinase, peptidoglycan synthethase penicillin-binding protein 3, transaldolase, ribosomal proteins and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (B. longum ssp. longum CCDM 372.

  4. Mass-sensing BioCD Protein Array towards Clinical Application: Prostate Specific Antigen Detection in Patient Sera

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xuefeng; Nolte, David D; Ratliff, Timothy L

    2009-01-01

    Mass-sensing biosensor arrays for protein detection require no fluorophores or enzyme labels. However, few mass biosensor protein arrays have demonstrated successful application in high background samples, such as serum. In this paper, we test the BioCD as a mass biosensor based on optical interferometry of antibodies covalently attached through Schiff-base reduction. We use the BioCD to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA, a biomarker of prostate cancer) in patient sera in a 96-well anti-PSA microarray. We have attained a 4 ng/ml detection limit in full serum and have measured PSA concentrations in three patient sera.

  5. Salmonella typhi O:9,12 polysaccharide-protein conjugates: characterization and immunoreactivity with pooled and individual normal human sera, sera from patients with paratyphoid A and B and typhoid fever, and animal sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, L; Di Fabio, J; Cabello, F C

    1993-04-01

    Polysaccharide of O:9,12 specificity purified from Salmonella typhi was conjugated to tetanus toxoid or bovine serum albumin in order to obtain defined antigenic material that would contain O chain free of other S. typhi antigens and that would be suitable for characterizing host humoral response to only S. typhi O-chain antigens. These artificial conjugates were strongly reactive in immunodots with 18 pooled and 3 individual serum samples from patients with typhoid fever and with rabbit anti-Salmonella O antiserum (group D, factors 1, 9, and 12). They reacted weakly with one serum sample from one human with paratyphoid A. These results suggest that the periodate oxidation and the reductive amination used in the conjugation conserved the immunogenicity of the O chain and allowed its absorption to nitrocellulose. They also suggest that the bovine serum albumin conjugate could be used in the diagnosis of S. typhi infections as normal sera may react with the protein molecule of the tetanus toxoid conjugate.

  6. Biofilm and planktonic pneumococci demonstrate disparate immunoreactivity to human convalescent sera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivshankar Pooja

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus is the leading cause of otitis media, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, sepsis, and meningitis. It is now evident that S. pneumoniae forms biofilms during nasopharyngeal colonization; the former which facilitates persistence, the latter, a prerequisite for subsequent development of invasive disease. Proteomic evaluation of S. pneumoniae suggests the antigen profile available for host-recognition is altered as a consequence of biofilm growth. This has potentially meaningful implications in regards to adaptive immunity and protection from disseminated disease. We therefore examined the antigen profile of biofilm and planktonic pneumococcal cell lysates, tested their reactivity with human convalescent sera and that generated against biofilm pneumococci, and examined whether immunization with biofilm pneumococci protected mice against infectious challenge. Results Biofilm pneumococci have dramatically altered protein profiles versus their planktonic counterparts. During invasive disease the humoral immune response is skewed towards the planktonic protein profile. Immunization with biofilm bacteria does not elicit a strong-cross-reactive humoral response against planktonic bacteria nor confer resistance against challenge with a virulent isolate from another serotype. We identified numerous proteins, including Pneumococcal serine-rich repeat protein (PsrP, which may serve as a protective antigens against both colonization and invasive disease. Conclusion Differential protein production by planktonic and biofilm pneumococci provides a potential explanation for why individuals remain susceptible to invasive disease despite previous colonization events. These findings also strongly suggest that differential protein production during colonization and disease be considered during the selection of antigens for any future protein vaccine.

  7. Surface plasmon resonance-based competition assay to assess the sera reactivity of variants of humanized antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Noreen R; Schuck, Peter; Schlom, Jeffrey; Kashmiri, Syed V S

    2002-10-15

    While clinical trials are the only way to evaluate the immunogenicity, in patients, of murine or genetically engineered humanized variants of a potentially therapeutic or diagnostic monoclonal antibody (MAb), ethical and logistical considerations of clinical trials do not permit the evaluation of variants of a given MAb that are generated to minimize its immunogenicity. The most promising variant could be identified by comparing the reactivities of the parental antibody (Ab) and its variants to the sera of patients containing anti-variable region (anti-VR) Abs to the administered parental Ab. We have developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based assay to monitor the binding of the sera anti-VR Abs to the parental Ab and the inhibition of this binding by the variants. SPR biosensors allow the real-time detection and monitoring of the binding between an immobilized protein and its soluble ligand without the need for prior purification and labeling of the mobile analyte. This new assay requires no radiolabeling, is relatively less time-consuming, and uses only small amounts of serum (5-20 microl of diluted serum) through a new microfluidic sample handling technique. To validate the assay, we have tested the relative reactivities of the CDR-grafted anti-carcinoma Ab, HuCC49, and its two variants, designated V5 and V10, to the sera of patients who were earlier administered radiolabeled murine CC49 in a clinical trial. A comparison of IC(50)s (the concentrations of the competitor Abs required for 50% inhibition of the binding of sera to immobilized HuCC49) showed that V5 and V10 were less reactive than HuCC49 to the three patients' sera tested. We have also demonstrated, for the first time, the specific detection and comparison of relative amounts of anti-VR Abs present in the sera of different patients without prior removal of anti-murine Fc Abs and/or circulating antigen. This may facilitate the rapid screening, for the presence of anti-VR Abs, of the

  8. Strongyloides stercoralis excretory/secretory protein strongylastacin specifically recognized by IgE antibodies in infected human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varatharajalu, Ravi; Parandaman, Vijayalakshmi; Ndao, Momar; Andersen, John F; Neva, Franklin A

    2011-02-01

    The infective, microscopic Strongyloides stercoralis larvae in contaminated soil can penetrate human skin with the help of excretory/secretory proteases. These proteases play a critical role in infection and transmigration of the parasite to the intestines. Strongylastacin is similar to astacin (from the digestive gland of the crayfish Astacus astacus), a multi-domain protein with a signal peptide, a pro-enzyme, a catalytic domain containing the zinc binding consensus astacin family signature sequence HEXXHXXGFXHEXXRXDR, and a second conserved zinc binding motif SIMHY at N- terminal region. An EGF-1 like domain and a CUB domain are located at the COOH- terminal. In this study, the excretory/secretory Strongylastacin gene from S. stercoralis infective larval stage was cloned and expressed as a 45 kDa in Escherichia coli. Immunoblot analysis showed the presence of natural IgG antibodies against strongylastacin in six infected and six non-endemic normal sera. These findings were confirmed in an ELISA of 32 S. stercoralis infected and 32 presumed normal human sera; all contained natural anti-strongylastacin IgG antibodies. By contrast, IgE antibodies specific to strongylastacin were present in sera from individuals infected with S. stercoralis but not in uninfected control sera. Moreover, recombinant strongylastacin did not cross-react with IgE antibodies either from patients infected with filaria or patients with tropical pulmonary eosinophilic (TPE) who had increased IgE antibodies. The present authors conclude that strongylastacin, an excretory/secretory antigen, elicits specific IgE antibodies in S. stercoralis infected humans. Non-specific IgG antibodies to strongylastacin are present in both infected and normal humans. Further investigation is needed to understand the role of the host protective response against strongylastacin.

  9. Antibodies to immunoglobulin-G in dog sera, synovial fluids and aqueous humor : a comparative study of rheumatoid factor assays, suitable for routine application

    OpenAIRE

    Bernadina, W.E.; Kol, P.J. van; Willemse, A.

    1988-01-01

    The incidence of anti-IgG antibodies (rheumatoid factors, RF) in body fluids (sera, synovial fluids and aqueous humor) selected from 62 normal and 275 diseased dogs was studied. Fluids were assayed by canine versions of standard agglutinating and/or precipitating RF assays with routine application in human practice. The number of RF detected by dog IgG-coated particles was substantially higher by latex fixation test (LFT) than by modified Rose-Waaler (RW) test (61/144 vs. 14/144). This did no...

  10. Hyperglycemia Determines Increased Specific MicroRNAs Levels in Sera and HDL of Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients and Stimulates MicroRNAs Production in Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnuta, Mihaela G.; Sanda, Gabriela M.; Stancu, Camelia S.; Popescu, Andreea C.; Popescu, Mihaela R.; Vlad, Adelina; Dimulescu, Doina R.; Simionescu, Maya; Sima, Anca V.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) in sera and HDL of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared to stable angina (SA) patients with/without hyperglycemia, and evaluate comparatively the functional effect of these sera on the processing machinery proteins (Drosha, DGCR8, Dicer) and miRNAs production in human macrophages. MiRNAs levels in sera and HDL from 35 SA and 72 ACS patients and 30 healthy subjects were measured by using microRNA TaqMan assays. MiR-223, miR-92a, miR-486, miR-122, miR-125a and miR-146a levels were higher in the hyperglycemic ACS compared to normoglycemic sera. MiR-223 and miR-486 prevailed in HDL2, while miR-92a predominated in HDL3, all three miRNAs discriminating between ACS and SA patients; their levels were increased in HDL from hyperglycemic ACS patients versus normoglycemic ones. The incubation of human macrophages with sera from ACS and SA patients showed that all patients’ sera induced an increase of Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expressions and of selected miRNAs levels compared to control sera, the effect being higher in the case of hyperglycemic versus normoglycemic ACS sera. The addition of glucose to SA and ACS sera increased Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expression and miRNAs levels in the exposed macrophages. In conclusion, hyperglycemia is associated with increased miR-223, miR-92a, miR-486 levels in HDL, which discriminate between ACS and SA patients. Exposure of human macrophages to ACS compared to SA sera determines the upregulation of Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expression and the increase of selected miRNAs production, the effect being augmented by an increased glucose concentration. PMID:27519051

  11. Profiles ofEntamoeba histolytica-specific immunoglobulins in human sera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Windell L Rivera; Herbert J Santos; Vanissa A Ong; Lara Jessica G Murao

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To determine the profiles of anti-Entamoeba histolytica(E. histolytica) IgA, IgG, and IgM in sera of diarrheic and non-diarrheic individuals and partially characterize target antigens.Methods:Serum samples from thirty diarrheic and thirty non-diarrheic individuals were subjected to IgA, IgG, and IgM profiling through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), flow cytometry, and immunoblot.Results:ELISA titer results showed that both diarrheic and non-diarrheic individuals possess high levels ofE. histolytica-specific IgG compared to IgA and IgM. Flow cytometry data showed that diarrheic serum samples had higher mean reaction percentages againstE. histolyticacells compared to non-diarrheic samples. Immunoreactive E.histolytica proteins with molecular weights ranging between7 kDa and 292 kDa were recognized by diarrheic serum IgG, and170 kDa and250 kDa by non-diarrheic serum IgG. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that serum anti-E. histolyticaIgG, compared with serum anti-E. histolytica IgA and IgM responses, was generally high in both diarrheic and non-diarrheic sera, indicating a past exposure to the organism both in symptomatic patients as well as in asymptomatic carriers, respectively. In addition, serum IgG from diarrheic and non-diarrheic patients were able to detect immunogenicE. histolytica proteins.

  12. THE PERSISTENCE OF LEPTOSPIRAL AGGLUTININS TITERS IN HUMAN SERA DIAGNOSED BY THE MICROSCOPIC AGGLUTINATION TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliete C. ROMERO

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of agglutinins detected by MAT has created some problems to the interpretation of the results. The aim of this study was to examine the data of serology from 70 patients with serologically confirmed diagnosis of leptospirosis by during 3-13 months after being affected with leptospires in order to elucidate the interpretation of the persistence of agglutinins detected by MAT. Sixty-one patients sera (87.14% had titers equal or greater than 800. Of these, two individuals maintained titers of 800 thirteen months after the onset. This study showed that only one sample of sera with high titers is not reliable to determine the time at which infection occurred.Persistência de títulos de aglutininas anti-leptospiras em soros humanos diagnosticados pelo teste de aglutinação microscópica A persistência de aglutininas detectadas por MAT tem criado problemas na interpretação dos resultados. O objetivo deste trabalho foi examinar os resultados da sorologia de 70 pacientes com confirmação sorológica de leptospirose durante 3-13 meses após terem sido infectados para se poder elucidar a interpretação da persistência de aglutininas detectadas por MAT. Sessenta e um soros de pacientes (87,14% apresentaram títulos iguais, ou maiores, que 800. Destes, 2 indivíduos mantiveram títulos de 800 treze meses após terem sido infectados. Este estudo mostra que apenas uma amostra de soro, mesmo com alto título de aglutininas, não pode ser considerada para determinar a fase da doença.

  13. Analysis of epitopes on dengue virus envelope protein recognized by monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal human sera by a high throughput assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-En Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The envelope (E protein of dengue virus (DENV is the major target of neutralizing antibodies and vaccine development. While previous studies on domain III or domain I/II alone have reported several epitopes of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against DENV E protein, the possibility of interdomain epitopes and the relationship between epitopes and neutralizing potency remain largely unexplored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a dot blot assay by using 67 alanine mutants of predicted surface-exposed E residues as a systematic approach to identify epitopes recognized by mAbs and polyclonal sera, and confirmed our findings using a capture-ELISA assay. Of the 12 mouse mAbs tested, three recognized a novel epitope involving residues (Q211, D215, P217 at the central interface of domain II, and three recognized residues at both domain III and the lateral ridge of domain II, suggesting a more frequent presence of interdomain epitopes than previously appreciated. Compared with mAbs generated by traditional protocols, the potent neutralizing mAbs generated by a new protocol recognized multiple residues in A strand or residues in C strand/CC' loop of DENV2 and DENV1, and multiple residues in BC loop and residues in DE loop, EF loop/F strand or G strand of DENV1. The predominant epitopes of anti-E antibodies in polyclonal sera were found to include both fusion loop and non-fusion residues in the same or adjacent monomer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analyses have implications for epitope-specific diagnostics and epitope-based dengue vaccines. This high throughput method has tremendous application for mapping both intra and interdomain epitopes recognized by human mAbs and polyclonal sera, which would further our understanding of humoral immune responses to DENV at the epitope level.

  14. Yellow fever virus envelope protein expressed in insect cells is capable of syncytium formation in lepidopteran cells and could be used for immunodetection of YFV in human sera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Yellow fever is an haemorrhagic disease caused by a virus that belongs to the genus Flavivirus (Flaviviridae family) and is transmitted by mosquitoes. Among the viral proteins, the envelope protein (E) is the most studied one, due to its high antigenic potencial. Baculovirus are one of the most popular and efficient eukaryotic expression system. In this study a recombinant baculovirus (vSynYFE) containing the envelope gene (env) of the 17D vaccine strain of yellow fever virus was constructed and the recombinant protein antigenicity was tested. Results Insect cells infected with vSynYFE showed syncytium formation, which is a cytopathic effect characteristic of flavivirus infection and expressed a polypeptide of around 54 kDa, which corresponds to the expected size of the recombinant E protein. Furthermore, the recombinant E protein expression was also confirmed by fluorescence microscopy of vSynYFE-infected insect cells. Total vSynYFE-infected insect extracts used as antigens detected the presence of antibodies for yellow fever virus in human sera derived from yellow fever-infected patients in an immunoassay and did not cross react with sera from dengue virus-infected patients. Conclusions The E protein expressed by the recombinant baculovirus in insect cells is antigenically similar to the wild protein and it may be useful for different medical applications, from improved diagnosis of the disease to source of antigens for the development of a subunit vaccine. PMID:21619598

  15. Dengue viruses are enhanced by distinct populations of serotype cross-reactive antibodies in human immune sera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruklanthi de Alwis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENV are mosquito-borne flaviviruses of global importance. DENV exist as four serotypes, DENV1-DENV4. Following a primary infection, individuals produce DENV-specific antibodies that bind only to the serotype of infection and other antibodies that cross-react with two or more serotypes. People exposed to a secondary DENV infection with another serotype are at greater risk of developing more severe forms of dengue disease. The increased risk of severe dengue in people experiencing repeat DENV infections appear to be due, at least in part, to the ability of pre-existing serotype cross-reactive antibodies to form virus-antibody complexes that can productively infect Fcγ receptor-bearing target cells. While the theory of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE is supported by several human and small animal model studies, the specific viral antigens and epitopes recognized by enhancing human antibodies after natural infections have not been fully defined. We used antibody-depletion techniques to remove DENV-specific antibody sub-populations from primary DENV-immune human sera. The effects of removing specific antibody populations on ADE were tested both in vitro using K562 cells and in vivo using the AG129 mouse model. Removal of serotype cross-reactive antibodies ablated enhancement of heterotypic virus infection in vitro and antibody-enhanced mortality in vivo. Further depletion studies using recombinant viral antigens showed that although the removal of DENV E-specific antibodies using recombinant E (rE protein resulted in a partial reduction in DENV enhancement, there was a significant residual enhancement remaining. Competition ADE studies using prM-specific Fab fragments in human immune sera showed that both rE-specific and prM-specific antibodies in primary DENV-immune sera significantly contribute to enhancement of heterotypic DENV infection in vitro. Identification of the targets of DENV-enhancing antibodies should contribute to

  16. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay identifies vitamin D binding protein (Gc-globulin) in human, rat, and mouse sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, W X; Bazaraa, H M; Magiera, H; Cooke, N E; Haddad, J G

    1996-06-01

    Serum vitamin D binding protein (DBP, also known as Gc-globulin) is a multifunctional protein capable of binding both vitamin D metabolites and actin. DBP can be visualized when analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by staining. Confirmation of its identity had previously required immunoprecipitation with specific anti-DBP antisera or occupancy of the protein with radioactive vitamin D sterols. We present studies showing that preincubation of G-actin with mammalian sera produced a discernible DBP protein band shift on native gel electrophoresis. Addition of DNaseI, a 33-kDa intracellular protein with an avid actin-binding site, to the incubations resulted in a supershift of DBP-actin complexes to an even more cathodal region of the gels. Following incubations with human, rat, and murine sera the same actin shift occurred as did the actin plus DNaseI supershift. The migrations of each complex were correlated with purified DBP migrations under identical conditions. It was confirmed that the supershifted bands contained DBP by Western blotting and detection of DBP by binding of 25-OH[3H]D3. After intravenous G-actin injections into living mice, a serum DBP-actin complex could be detected on native gels as the uncomplexed DBP band decreased in intensity. This simple, direct-staining technique appears to be suitable for identifying DBP/Gc phenotypes in human populations as well as for semiquantitatively monitoring the plasma actin-scavenger system in vivo in animal models or in human diseases.

  17. 12th International Conference on Software Engineering, Arti fi cial Intelligence Research, Management and Applications (SERA 2014)

    CERN Document Server

    Software Engineering Research, Management and Applications

    2015-01-01

    This edited book presents scientific results of the 12th International Conference on Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence Research, Management and Applications (SERA 2014) held on August 31 – September 4, 2014 in Kitakyushu, Japan.  The aim of this conference was to bring together researchers and scientists, businessmen and entrepreneurs, teachers, engineers, computer users, and students to discuss the numerous fields of computer science and to share their experiences and exchange new ideas and information in a meaningful way. Research results about all aspects (theory, applications and tools) of computer and information science, and to discuss the practical challenges encountered along the way and the solutions adopted to solve them. This publication captures 17 of the conference’s most promising papers.

  18. Effect of IBD sera on expression of inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthase in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Károly Palatka; István Altorjay; Zoltán Serf(o)z(o); Zoltán Veréb; Róbert Bátori; Beáta Lontay; Zoltán Hargitay; Zoltán Nemes; Miklós Udvardy; Ferenc Erd(o)di

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases (eNOS and iNOS) and their role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).METHODS: We examined the effect of sera obtained from patients with active Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) on the function and viability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVECs were cultured for 0-48 h in the presence of a medium containing pooled serum of healthy controls, or serum from patients with active CD or UC. Expression of eNOS and iNOS was visualized by immunofluorescence,and quantified by the densitometry of Western blots.Proliferation activity was assessed by computerized image analyses of Ki-67 immunoreactive cells, and also tested in the presence of the NOS inhibitor, 10-4 mol/L L-NAME. Apoptosis and necrosis was examined by the annexin-Ⅴ-biotin method and by propidium iodide staining, respectively.RESULTS: In HUVEC immediately after exposure to UC,serum eNOS was markedly induced, reaching a peak at 12 h. In contrast, a decrease in eNOS was observed after incubation with CD sera and the eNOS level was minimal at 20 h compared to control (18% ± 16% vs 23% ± 15% P<0.01). UC or CD serum caused a significant increase in iNOS compared to control (UC: 300%±21%; CD:275%±27% vs 108%± 14%, P<0.01). Apoptosis/necrosis characteristics did not differ significantly in either experiment. Increased proliferation activity was detected in the presence of CD serum or after treatment with L-NAME. Cultures showed tube-like formations after 24 h treatment with CD serum.CONCLUSION: IBD sera evoked changes in the ratio of eNOS/iNOS, whereas did not influence the viability of HUVEC. These involved down-regulation of eNOS and up-regulation of iNOS simultaneously, leading to increased proliferation activity and possibly a reduced antiinflammatory protection of endothelial cells.

  19. Human sera IgE reacts with a Metarhizium anisopliae fungal catalase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Previous studies have demonstrated that Metarhzium anisopliae extract can induce immune responses in a mouse model that are characteristic of human allergic asthma. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify and characterize the extract proteins t...

  20. Testing UK blood donors for exposure to human parvovirus 4 using a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay to screen sera and Western blot to confirm reactive samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maple, Peter A C; Beard, Stuart; Parry, Ruth P; Brown, Kevin E

    2013-10-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (ParV4), a newly described member of the family Parvoviridae, like B19V, has been found in pooled plasma preparations. The extent, and significance, of ParV4 exposure in UK blood donors remain to be determined and reliable detection of ParV4 immunoglobulin (Ig)G, using validated methods, is needed. With ParV4 virus-like particles a ParV4 IgG time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (TRFIA) was developed. There is no gold standard or reference assay for measuring ParV4 IgG and the utility of the TRFIA was first examined using a panel of sera from people who inject drugs (PWIDS)--a high-prevalence population for ParV4 infection. Western blotting was used to confirm the specificity of TRFIA-reactive sera. Two cohorts of UK blood donor sera comprising 452 sera collected in 1999 and 156 sera collected in 2009 were tested for ParV4 IgG. Additional testing for B19V IgG, hepatitis C virus antibodies (anti-HCV), and ParV4 DNA was also undertaken. The rate of ParV4 IgG seroprevalence in PWIDS was 20.7% and ParV4 IgG was positively associated with the presence of anti-HCV with 68.4% ParV4 IgG-positive sera testing anti-HCV-positive versus 17.1% ParV4 IgG-negative sera. Overall seropositivity for ParV4 IgG, in 608 UK blood donors was 4.76%. The ParV4 IgG seropositivity for sera collected in 1999 was 5.08%, compared to 3.84% for sera collected in 2009. No ParV4 IgG-positive blood donor sera had detectable ParV4 DNA. ParV4 IgG has been found in UK blood donors and this finding needs further investigation. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  1. Reactivity to human papillomavirus type 16 Ll virus-like particles in sera from patients with genital cancer and patients with carcinomas at five different extragenital sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.J. van Doornum (Gerard); C.M. Korse (Catharina); J.C.G.M. Buning-Kager (J. C G M); J.M. Bonfrer (Hans); S. Horenblas (Simon); B. Taal (Babs); J. Dillner (Joakim)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractA retrospective seroepidemiologic study was performed to examine the association between human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 infection and carcinomas of the oropharynx, the oesophagus, penis and vagina. Sera were selected from the serum bank from the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (Netherla

  2. Detection of diphtheria toxin antibodies in human sera in New Zealand by ELISA.

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect IgG antibodies to diphtheria toxin in human serum. Serum samples obtained from 557 normal persons aged 1-65 years from different areas in New Zealand showed maximum antibody levels in the 1-9 years age group (95.1%) and the least in the 60-65 years age group (38.1%). The indirect ELISA is suitable for seroepidemiological survey study as it is simple to perform, economical and precise.

  3. Assay interference caused by antibodies reacting with rat kappa light-chain in human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degn, Søren E; Andersen, Stig Henrik; Jensen, Lisbeth; Thiel, Steffen; Jensenius, Jens C

    2011-09-30

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and its derivatives are powerful tools used in research, in the clinic, and in many other analytical and quality control settings. In general, ELISAs are robust, reproducible and reliable. However, a number of pitfalls of ELISAs have been described over the years. The issue of rheumatoid factor (RF), autoantibodies against the Fc portion of IgG, is well recognized (yet often forgotten), as are problems arising from heterophilic antibodies induced by external antigens that cross-react with self-antigens. A few years ago focus was on human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) concomitant with the increased use of mouse monoclonal antibody therapy, a problem that is now diminishing due to development of humanized antibodies. Issues pertaining to food antigens or environmentally encountered antigens are less recognized. We report a recently encountered example of the latter resulting in interference in a solid-phase sandwich assay. Due to the set-up employing a monoclonal rat IgG for capture and a monoclonal rat IgM for development the interference had to be human antibodies reacting with rat light-chain. Out of 102 Danish Caucasian blood donors we found a prevalence of anti-rat kappa light chain antibodies of close to 40% (39/102, defined as at least 2-fold elevated measurements), with around 6% (6/102) having very high levels (defined as at least 4-fold elevated measurements), yielding significantly higher measurements in the assay designed to measure the complement component MAp19 in serum samples. The interference could be blocked by the addition of rat immunoglobulin to the sample buffer. An individual, who had been followed over time, demonstrated a periodic increase of interfering antibodies, highlighting that it is an independently varying parameter and thereby a variable interference in assays. Our results highlight a major pitfall of potential relevance to many sandwich-type assays, as well as an approach to rectify such

  4. Development of a surface display ELISA to detect anti-IgG antibodies against bovine αS1-casein in human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Thorsten; Braukmann, Achim; Vordenbäumen, Stefan; Altendorfer, Irina; Bleck, Ellen; Hochwallner, Heidrun; Valenta, Rudolf; Schneider, Matthias; Jose, Joachim

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a surface display ELISA (SD-ELISA) for IgG-serum reaction against bovine casein αS1 (CSN1S1). In a SD-ELISA, the antigen is displayed on the surface of Escherichia coli using the autodisplay technology and whole cells of E. coli are used to coat the microplates for serum testing. After establishing the setup of the SD-ELISA with polyclonal rabbit antiserum against bovine CSN1S1, the SD-ELISA was validated with 20 human sera, of which 10 sera were proven to have an IgG-mediated reaction against bovine CSN1S1 and 10 sera were shown to be negative for this reaction. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis revealed sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% at a cut-off value of 0.133. Furthermore, human serum of 48 patients with known reactivity against human CSN1S1 (31 positive and 17 negative) was examined by the newly developed SD-ELISA to exclude cross-reactivity. Twenty human sera showed an IgG-mediated reaction against bovine CSN1S1. Eleven of these sera were positive for the reactivity against human CSN1S1, and nine were negative. In conclusion it was demonstrated that the performance of SD-ELISA is comparable to established ELISA without loss in sensitivity or specificity. Based on the advantages of this method - in particular no need for time-consuming and expensive antigen production and purification - the SD-ELISA is a potent alternative to convenient methods for identification and especially high-throughput screening of new antigens in the field of food allergies.

  5. Antigenic Relatedness of Norovirus GII.4 Variants Determined by Human Challenge Sera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chun Dai

    Full Text Available The GII.4 noroviruses (NoVs are a single genotype that is responsible for over 50% of NoV gastroenteritis epidemics worldwide. However, GII.4 NoVs have been found to undergo antigenic drifts, likely selected by host herd immunity, which raises an issue for vaccine strategies against NoVs. We previously characterized GII.4 NoV antigenic variations and found significant levels of antigenic relatedness among different GII.4 variants. Further characterization of the genetic and antigenic relatedness of recent GII.4 variants (2008b and 2010 cluster was performed in this study. The amino acid sequences of the receptor binding interfaces were highly conserved among all GII.4 variants from the past two decades. Using serum samples from patients enrolled in a GII.4 virus challenge study, significant cross-reactivity between major GII.4 variants from 1998 to 2012 was observed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and HBGA receptor blocking assays. The overall abilities of GII.4 NoVs to bind to the A/B/H HBGAs were maintained while their binding affinities to individual ABH antigens varied. These results highlight the importance of human HBGAs in NoV evolution and how conserved antigenic types impact vaccine development against GII.4 variants.

  6. 10th ACIS International Conference on Software Engineering Research, Management and Applications (SERA 2012)

    CERN Document Server

    Software Engineering Research, Management and Applications 2012

    2012-01-01

    The series Studies in Computational Intelligence (SCI) publishes new developments and advances in the various areas of computational intelligence-quickly and with a high quality.  The intent is to cover the theory, applications, and design methods of computational intelligence, as embedded in the fields of engineering, computer science, physics and life science, as well as the methodologies behind them.  The series contains monographs, lecture notes and edited volumes in computational intelligence spanning the areas of neural networks, connectionist systems, genetic algorithms, evolutionary computation, artificial intelligence, cellular automata, self-organizing systems, soft computing, fuzzy systems and hybrid intelligent systems. Critical to both contributors and readers are the short publication time and world-wide distribution-this permits a rapid and broad dissemination of research results.  The purpose of the 10th International Conference on Software Engineering Research, Management and Applications(...

  7. Serologic reactivity of a synthetic peptide from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 with sera from a Mexican population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkian, G; Soler, C; Viveros, M; Padilla, A; Govezensky, T; Larralde, C

    1996-01-01

    The reactivities of 1,172 serum samples obtained from asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-positive and HIV-1-negative individuals residing in Mexico to a synthetic disulfide-looped peptide from the HIV-1 gp41 (amino acids 602 to 616 [IWGCSGKLICTTAVP] were examined by an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA) procedure. Antibodies to the synthetic peptide were detected in 261 of 268 serum samples from HIV-positive individuals (sensitivity, 97.4%). The peptide also reacted with 12 of 904 serum samples from control HIV-negative individuals (specificity, 98.7%). Western blots (immunoblots) of four of the seven serum samples that produced false-negative results in the ELISA showed that three of them reacted weakly with gp41 and strongly with gp120, p55, and/or p24. Potential diagnostic difficulties raised by the reported C1q binding capacity of this peptide were also evaluated: few and weak false-positive results were found among sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (1 of 31) and neurocysticercosis (2 of 111). In fact, strong reactivity with the peptide spotted an undetected HIV infection underlying clinical neurocysticercosis. PMID:8914754

  8. Autoantibody profiling on human proteome microarray for biomarker discovery in cerebrospinal fluid and sera of neuropsychiatric lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaojun Hu

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE may be potential biomarkers for prediction, diagnosis, or prognosis of NPSLE. We used a human proteome microarray with~17,000 unique full-length human proteins to investigate autoantibodies associated with NPSLE. Twenty-nine CSF specimens from 12 NPSLE, 7 non-NPSLE, and 10 control (non-systemic lupus erythematosuspatients were screened for NPSLE-associated autoantibodies with proteome microarrays. A focused autoantigen microarray of candidate NPSLE autoantigens was applied to profile a larger cohort of CSF with patient-matched sera. We identified 137 autoantigens associated with NPSLE. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that these autoantigens were enriched for functions involved in neurological diseases (score = 43.Anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA was found in the CSF of NPSLE and non-NPSLE patients. The positive rates of 4 autoantibodies in CSF specimens were significantly different between the SLE (i.e., NPSLE and non-NPSLE and control groups: anti-ribosomal protein RPLP0, anti-RPLP1, anti-RPLP2, and anti-TROVE2 (also known as anti-Ro/SS-A. The positive rate for anti-SS-A associated with NPSLE was higher than that for non-NPSLE (31.11% cf. 10.71%; P = 0.045.Further analysis showed that anti-SS-A in CSF specimens was related to neuropsychiatric syndromes of the central nervous system in SLE (P = 0.009. Analysis with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient indicated that the titers of anti-RPLP2 and anti-SS-A in paired CSF and serum specimens significantly correlated. Human proteome microarrays offer a powerful platform to discover novel autoantibodies in CSF samples. Anti-SS-A autoantibodies may be potential CSF markers for NPSLE.

  9. Antibodies to immunoglobulin-G in dog sera, synovial fluids and aqueous humor : a comparative study of rheumatoid factor assays, suitable for routine application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernadina, W.E.; Kol, P.J. van; Willemse, A.

    1988-01-01

    The incidence of anti-IgG antibodies (rheumatoid factors, RF) in body fluids (sera, synovial fluids and aqueous humor) selected from 62 normal and 275 diseased dogs was studied. Fluids were assayed by canine versions of standard agglutinating and/or precipitating RF assays with routine application i

  10. Evaluation of the reactivity of sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus against the human MCP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Nóvoa, Ana; Teixeira, Natércia; Vasconcelos, Carlos Silva; Cerveira, Conceição; Castro e Melo, João; Carvalho, Manuel Cirne

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluates metaphase chromosome protein 1 (MCP1), a nuclear antigen, as a diagnostic marker for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Reactivity of sera from 114 Portuguese patients with autoimmune rheumatic disease or from healthy blood donors (HBD), against MCP1, produced in bacteria (bact-MCP1) or in its native form (native-MCP1), was determined by immunoblotting. Predictive and discriminative power of MCP1 reactivity for SLE diagnosis in disease-control groups was evaluated by logistic regression, its diagnostic value determined by receiver-operating characteristic analysis and compared with similar analysis of antinuclear antibody and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). We demonstrated that native-MCP1, in contrast to bact-MCP1, reacts with SLE sera with significant predictive and discriminative power versus other autoimmune diseases (odds ratio [OR] ≤3.537 and ≥3.265; area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve [AUC] ≤0.643 and ≥0.636) or versus HBD (OR = 5.006; AUC = 0.671), showing a good diagnostic power with high specificity (82.1% versus HBD) and low sensitivity for SLE, similar to those of dsDNA. The reactivity of SLE sera with native-MCP1 was shown to be dependent on the presence of phosphorylated residues. Native-MCP1 was shown to have diagnostic value as a specific marker for SLE diagnosis and, therefore, is a suitable substrate for a new antibody test. The widely reported importance of phosphorylated epitopes as targets for autoantibodies in SLE could also be confirmed for native-MCP1.

  11. Detection of Human Papillomavirus 16-Specific IgG and IgM Antibodies in Patient Sera: A Potential Indicator of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Risk Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Kerishnan, Jesinda P.; Subash C B Gopinath; Kai, Sia Bik; Tang, Thean-Hock; Ng, Helen Lee-Ching; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Hashim, Uda; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    The association between human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) and oral cancer has been widely reported. However, detecting anti-HPV antibodies in patient sera to determine risk for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has not been well studied. In the present investigation, a total of 206 OSCC serum samples from the Malaysian Oral Cancer Database & Tissue Bank System, with 134 control serum samples, were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) to detect HPV16-specific IgG and IgM ...

  12. Identification of host-immune response protein candidates in the sera of human oral squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeng Chen

    Full Text Available One of the most common cancers worldwide is oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, which is associated with a significant death rate and has been linked to several risk factors. Notably, failure to detect these neoplasms at an early stage represents a fundamental barrier to improving the survival and quality of life of OSCC patients. In the present study, serum samples from OSCC patients (n = 25 and healthy controls (n = 25 were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and silver staining in order to identify biomarkers that might allow early diagnosis. In this regard, 2-DE spots corresponding to various up- and down-regulated proteins were sequenced via high-resolution MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and analyzed using the MASCOT database. We identified the following differentially expressed host-specific proteins within sera from OSCC patients: leucine-rich α2-glycoprotein (LRG, alpha-1-B-glycoprotein (ABG, clusterin (CLU, PRO2044, haptoglobin (HAP, complement C3c (C3, proapolipoprotein A1 (proapo-A1, and retinol-binding protein 4 precursor (RBP4. Moreover, five non-host factors were detected, including bacterial antigens from Acinetobacter lwoffii, Burkholderia multivorans, Myxococcus xanthus, Laribacter hongkongensis, and Streptococcus salivarius. Subsequently, we analyzed the immunogenicity of these proteins using pooled sera from OSCC patients. In this regard, five of these candidate biomarkers were found to be immunoreactive: CLU, HAP, C3, proapo-A1 and RBP4. Taken together, our immunoproteomics approach has identified various serum biomarkers that could facilitate the development of early diagnostic tools for OSCC.

  13. Anti-GaL IgG antibodies in sera of newborn humans and baboons and its significance in pig xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minanov, O P; Itescu, S; Neethling, F A; Morgenthau, A S; Kwiatkowski, P; Cooper, D K; Michler, R E

    1997-01-27

    We have previously demonstrated that hyperacute rejection does not occur in a pig-to-newborn baboon heart transplant model, presumably because of low levels of cytotoxic antipig antibodies present in the serum of newborn baboons. Cytotoxic antipig antibodies are primarily directed to alpha-1,3-galactosyl (alpha Gal) residues on endothelial cell surface structures Twenty-one full-term humans and 5 full-term baboons were tested for complement mediated lysis (CML) of pig kidney (PK-15) cells and anti-alpha Gal activity with an ELISA using BSA-conjugated alpha Gal residues as target. To evaluate the significance of the anti-alpha Gal titers in vivo 5 newborn baboons underwent heterotopic pig cardiac xenotransplantation. Six of 21 human samples and 1 of 5 baboon samples demonstrated significant cytotoxicity to PK-15 cells. Twelve of 21 newborn humans had anti-alpha Gal IgG antibodies at titers of 1:80 or greater. None of the samples had anti-alpha Gal IgM. In newborn baboons, 1 of 5 sera had anti-alpha Gal IgG antibodies at titers greater than 1:80 and none of these samples had anti-alpha Gal IgM. Xenografts survived for an average of 3.6 days, even in the baboon with high anti-alpha Gal IgG titers. Analysis of the explanted grafts showed minimal evidence of complement-mediated hyperacute rejection (HAR), but prominent mononuclear cell infiltrates. In serum tested posttransplant there was an induced anti-alpha Gal response with cytotoxicity against PK-15 cells. These results show that anti-alpha Gal IgM is absent in newborn human and baboon sera, allowing pig grafts to avoid HAR. However, the presence of anti-alpha Gal IgG may be associated with mononuclear cell infiltration of the xenograft and its subsequent rejection.

  14. Comparison of colorimetry and electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy for the quantification of non-transferrin bound iron in human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jittangprasert, Piyada; Wilairat, Prapin; Pootrakul, Pensri

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes a comparison of two analytical techniques, one employing bathophenanthrolinedisulfonate (BPT), a most commonly-used reagent for Fe (II) determination, as chromogen and an electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS) for the quantification of non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI) in sera from thalassemic patients. Nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was employed as the ligand for binding iron from low molecular weight iron complexes present in the serum but without removing iron from the transferrin protein. After ultrafiltration the Fe (III)-NTA complex was then quantified by both methods. Kinetic study of the rate of the Fe (II)-BPT complex formation for various excess amounts of NTA ligand was also carried out. The kinetic data show that a minimum time duration (> 60 minutes) is necessary for complete complex formation when large excess of NTA is used. Calibration curves given by colorimetric and ETAAS methods were linear over the range of 0.15-20 microM iron (III). The colorimetric and ETAAS methods exhibited detection limit (3sigma) of 0.13 and 0.14 microM, respectively. The NTBI concentrations from 55 thalassemic serum samples measured employing BPT as chromogen were statistically compared with the results determined by ETAAS. No significant disagreement at 95% confidence level was observed. It is, therefore, possible to select any one of these two techniques for determination of NTBI in serum samples of thalassemic patients. However, the colorimetric procedure requires a longer analysis time because of a slow rate of exchange of NTA ligand with BPT, leading to the slow rate of formation of the colored complex.

  15. [Impact of sera from children with active Henoch-Schönlein purpura on human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) and protective effects of methylprednisolone against HUVECs injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Yuan, Li-Ping; Fei, Wen-Jun; Deng, Fang; Zhang, Qin; Hu, Bo; Lu, Ling

    2012-01-01

    To observe the changes of human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) induced by the sera from children with active Henoch-Sch-nlein purpura (HSP) and the protective effects of methylprednisolone against HUVECs injury. HUVECs were divided into four groups based on the culture conditions: blank control group, normal serum group, HSP serum group, and HSP serum plus methylprednisolone group. The levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-8 in the supernatants of each group were detected using ELISA and the nitric oxide (NO) level by nitrate reductase determination. Moreover, the expressions of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and Fractalkine in HUVECs were examined by semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. The levels of IL-8, TNF-α, and NO in the HSP serum group were significantly higher than those in the blank control and normal serum groups (Pinflamation.

  16. Cross-reactive antibodies in convalescent SARS patients' sera against the emerging novel human coronavirus EMC (2012) by both immunofluorescent and neutralizing antibody tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwok-Hung; Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Tse, Herman; Chen, Honglin; Lau, Candy Choi-Yi; Cai, Jian-Piao; Tsang, Alan Ka-Lun; Xiao, Xincai; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; Lau, Susanna Kar-Pui; Woo, Patrick Chiu-Yat; Zheng, Bo-Jiang; Wang, Ming; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2013-08-01

    A severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-like disease due to a novel betacoronavirus, human coronavirus EMC (HCoV-EMC), has emerged recently. HCoV-EMC is phylogenetically closely related to Tylonycteris-bat-coronavirus-HKU4 and Pipistrellus-bat-coronavirus-HKU5 in Hong Kong. We conducted a seroprevalence study on archived sera from 94 game-food animal handlers at a wild life market, 28 SARS patients, and 152 healthy blood donors in Southern China to assess the zoonotic potential and evidence for intrusion of HCoV-EMC and related viruses into humans. Anti-HCoV-EMC and anti-SARS-CoV antibodies were detected using screening indirect immunofluorescence (IF) and confirmatory neutralizing antibody tests. Two (2.1%) animal handlers had IF antibody titer of ≥ 1:20 against both HCoV-EMC and SARS-CoV with neutralizing antibody titer of SARS patients had significant IF antibody titers with 7/28 (25%) having anti-HCoV-EMC neutralizing antibodies at low titers which significantly correlated with that of HCoV-OC43. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated a significant B-cell epitope overlapping the heptad repeat-2 region of Spike protein. Virulence of SARS-CoV over other betacoronaviruses may boost cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies against other betacoronaviruses. Convalescent SARS sera may contain cross-reactive antibodies against other betacoronaviruses and confound seroprevalence study for HCoV-EMC. Copyright © 2013 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Natural IgG autoantibodies are abundant and ubiquitous in human sera, and their number is influenced by age, gender, and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric P Nagele

    Full Text Available The presence of self-reactive IgG autoantibodies in human sera is largely thought to represent a breakdown in central tolerance and is typically regarded as a harbinger of autoimmune pathology. In the present study, immune-response profiling of human serum from 166 individuals via human protein microarrays demonstrates that IgG autoantibodies are abundant in all human serum, usually numbering in the thousands. These IgG autoantibodies bind to human antigens from organs and tissues all over the body and their serum diversity is strongly influenced by age, gender, and the presence of specific diseases. We also found that serum IgG autoantibody profiles are unique to an individual and remarkably stable over time. Similar profiles exist in rat and swine, suggesting conservation of this immunological feature among mammals. The number, diversity, and apparent evolutionary conservation of autoantibody profiles suggest that IgG autoantibodies have some important, as yet unrecognized, physiological function. We propose that IgG autoantibodies have evolved as an adaptive mechanism for debris-clearance, a function consistent with their apparent utility as diagnostic indicators of disease as already established for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  18. Investigation of immunosuppressive properties of inactivated human immunodeficiency virus and possible neutralization of this effect by some patient sera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, B; Langhoff, E; Lindhardt, B O

    1989-01-01

    Retroviral infections are accompanied by immunosuppression in a variety of species. For feline leukemia virus, the immunosuppression has been ascribed to the transmembrane envelope protein, p15E, which suppresses the proliferative responses of cat, mouse, and human lymphocytes. A similar suppress......Retroviral infections are accompanied by immunosuppression in a variety of species. For feline leukemia virus, the immunosuppression has been ascribed to the transmembrane envelope protein, p15E, which suppresses the proliferative responses of cat, mouse, and human lymphocytes. A similar...... cells, and a commercially obtained UV and psoralene-inactivated lysate were examined and demonstrated to have a similar suppressive effect. The HIV lysate was not directly cytotoxic to lymphocytes and did not contain tumor necrosis factor or lymphotoxin. The HIV lysate specifically suppressed...... the proliferation of a range of hemopoietic cell lines from man and mouse including three EBV transformed CD4- and IL-2 receptor-negative B-cell lines. The lysate also suppressed the formation of human bone marrow colonies, whereas the lysate had only a slight or no effect on fibroblasts. The suppression...

  19. The in vitro protection of human decay accelerating factor and hDAF/heme oxygenase-1 transgenes in porcine aortic endothelial cells against sera of Formosan macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, C-F; Tai, H-C; Wu, C-P; Ho, L-L; Lin, Y-J; Hwang, C-S; Yang, T-S; Lee, J-M; Tseng, Y-L; Huang, C-C; Weng, C-N; Lee, P-H

    2010-01-01

    To mitigate hyperacute rejection, pigs have been generated with alpha-Gal transferase gene knockout and transgenic expression of human decay accelerating factor (hDAF), MCP, and CD59. Additionally, heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been suggested to defend endothelial cells. Sera (MS) (0%, 1%, 5%, 10%, and 15%) from Formosan macaques (Macaca cyclopis, MC), an Old World monkey wildly populated in Taiwan, was used to test the protective in vitro, effects of hDAF or hDAF/hHO-1 on porcine aortic endothelial cells (pAEC) derived from hDAF(+), hDAF(+)/hHO-1(+), and hDAF(+)/hHO-1(-) and 1 nontransgenic pAEC. Ten percent human serum (HS) served as a positive control. When MS addition increased to 10% or 15%, all transgenic pAEC exhibited a greater survival than nontransgenic pAEC. Noticeably, 15% MS reduced survived to 40% in nontransgenic and transgenic pAEC, respectively. These results revealed that hDAF exerted protective effects against MC complement activation. However, comparing with 10% MS and HS in pAEC of nontransgenic pigs, the survivability was higher in HS, suggesting that complement activation by MS was more toxic than that by HS. Furthermore, hDAF(+)/hHO-1(+) showed no further protection against effects of MS on transgenic pAEC. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of three human FcεRI-transfected RBL cell-lines for identifying IgE induced degranulation utilizing peanut-allergic patient sera and peanut protein extract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ladics, G.S.; Bilsen, J.H.M. van; Brouwer, H.M.H.; Vogel, L.; Vieths, S.; Knippels, L.M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Specific IgE sera screening studies are employed to investigate protein cross-reactivity. Such nonfunctional immunochemical methods cannot measure the biological activity of proteins. Therefore, an assay using RBL cells transfected with human FcεRI was developed. Our objective was to evaluate the de

  1. Detection of Human Papillomavirus 16-Specific IgG and IgM Antibodies in Patient Sera: A Potential Indicator of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Risk Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerishnan, Jesinda P; Gopinath, Subash C B; Kai, Sia Bik; Tang, Thean-Hock; Ng, Helen Lee-Ching; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Hashim, Uda; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    The association between human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) and oral cancer has been widely reported. However, detecting anti-HPV antibodies in patient sera to determine risk for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has not been well studied. In the present investigation, a total of 206 OSCC serum samples from the Malaysian Oral Cancer Database & Tissue Bank System, with 134 control serum samples, were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) to detect HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies. In addition, nested PCR analysis using comprehensive consensus primers (PGMY09/11 and GP5(+)/6(+)) was used to confirm the presence of HPV. Furthermore, we have evaluated the association of various additional causal factors (e.g., smoking, alcohol consumption, and betel quid chewing) in HPV-infected OSCC patients. Statistical analysis of the Malaysian population indicated that OSCC was more prevalent in female Indian patients that practices betel quid chewing. ELISA revealed that HPV16 IgG, which demonstrates past exposure, could be detected in 197 (95.6%) OSCC patients and HPV16-specific IgM was found in a total of 42 (20.4%) OSCC patients, indicating current exposure. Taken together, our study suggest that HPV infection may play a significant role in OSCC (OR: 13.6; 95% CI: 3.89-47.51) and HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies could represent a significant indicator of risk factors in OSCC patients.

  2. Detection of Human Papillomavirus 16-Specific IgG and IgM Antibodies in Patient Sera: A Potential Indicator of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Risk Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerishnan, Jesinda P.; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Kai, Sia Bik; Tang, Thean-Hock; Ng, Helen Lee-Ching; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Hashim, Uda; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    The association between human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) and oral cancer has been widely reported. However, detecting anti-HPV antibodies in patient sera to determine risk for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has not been well studied. In the present investigation, a total of 206 OSCC serum samples from the Malaysian Oral Cancer Database & Tissue Bank System, with 134 control serum samples, were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) to detect HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies. In addition, nested PCR analysis using comprehensive consensus primers (PGMY09/11 and GP5+/6+) was used to confirm the presence of HPV. Furthermore, we have evaluated the association of various additional causal factors (e.g., smoking, alcohol consumption, and betel quid chewing) in HPV-infected OSCC patients. Statistical analysis of the Malaysian population indicated that OSCC was more prevalent in female Indian patients that practices betel quid chewing. ELISA revealed that HPV16 IgG, which demonstrates past exposure, could be detected in 197 (95.6%) OSCC patients and HPV16-specific IgM was found in a total of 42 (20.4%) OSCC patients, indicating current exposure. Taken together, our study suggest that HPV infection may play a significant role in OSCC (OR: 13.6; 95% CI: 3.89-47.51) and HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies could represent a significant indicator of risk factors in OSCC patients. PMID:27279791

  3. Sera from remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients disrupt the blood-brain barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitaka Shimizu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pathological destruction of blood-brain barrier (BBB has been thought to be the initial key event in the process of developing multiple sclerosis (MS. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the possible molecular mechanisms responsible for the malfunction of BBB by sera from relapse-remitting MS (RRMS and secondary progressive MS (SPMS patients. METHODS: We evaluated the effects of sera from the patients in the relapse phase of RRMS (RRMS-R, stable phase of RRMS (RRMS-S and SPMS on the expression of tight junction proteins and vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1, and on the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs. RESULTS: Sera from the RRMS-R or SPMS patients decreased the claudin-5 protein expression and the TEER in BMECs. In RRMS-R, this effect was restored after adding an MMP inhibitor, and the MMP-2/9 secretion by BMECs was significantly increased after the application of patients' sera. In SPMS, the immunoglobulin G (IgG purified from patients' sera also decreased the claudin-5 protein expression and the TEER in BMECs. The sera and purified IgG from all MS patients increased the VCAM-1 protein expression in BMECs. CONCLUSIONS: The up-regulation of autocrine MMP-2/9 by BMECs after exposure to sera from RRMS-R patients or the autoantibodies against BMECs from SPMS patients can compromise the BBB. Both RRMS-S and SPMS sera increased the VCAM-1 expression in the BBB, thus indicating that targeting the VCAM-1 in the BBB could represent a possible therapeutic strategy for even the stable phase of MS and SPMS.

  4. Naturally occurring antibodies against nerve growth factor in human and rabbit sera: comparison between control and herpes simplex virus-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicou, E; Nerrière, V; Labropoulou, V

    1991-11-01

    Antibodies against nerve growth factor (NGF) in sera were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), by their isolation after passage of sera through NGF immunoadsorbent columns and by their specificity to bind and immunoprecipitate mouse NGF as well as to stain by immunohistochemical methods cellular sites of NGF synthesis. Increased levels of anti-NGF antibodies were found in sera of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected patients but not in HSV-inoculated rabbits. As HSV latency is known to be promoted by NGF in vitro, these results may suggest that anti-NGF antibodies modulate the cytokine function of NGF and thus might play a role in HSV infection. The biological function of circulating antibodies against NGF, in general, is now open to future investigation.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi: identification of specific epimastigote antigens by human immune sera Trypanosoma cruzi: identificação de antígenos específicos de epimastigotas reconhecidos por soros humanos imunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Morgado

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available Soluble antigens from epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi were analyzed by western blot in terms of their reactivity with sera from patients with Chagas' disease. In addition, sera from patients with visceral (AVL and tegumentar leishmaniasis (ATL were also tested in order to identify cross-reactivities with Trypanosoma cruzy antigens. Twenty eight polypeptides with molecular weights ranging from 14 kDa to 113 kDa were identified with sera from Chagas' disease patients. An extensive cross-reactivity was observed when sera from human visceral leishmaniasis were used, while only a slight cross-reaction was observed with sera from tegumentar leishmaniasis. On the other hand, 10 polypeptidesspecifically reacting with sera from Chagas' disease patients were identified. Among them, the antigens with molecular weights of 46 kDa and 25 kDa reacted with all sera teste and may be good candidates for specific immunodiagnosis of Chagas' disease.Antígenos solúveis de epimastigotas de Trypanosoma cruzi foram analisados por "imunoblot" a fim de verificar sua reatividade com soros de pacientes com doença de Chagas. Além disso, soro de pacientes com leishmaniose visceral (LVA e tegumentar americana (LTA foram também analisados com o objetivo de se identificar oa antígenos de reação cruzada com o Trypanosoma cruzi. Pelo menos 28 polipeptídeos, com pesos moleculares variando de 14 a 113 kDa foram identificados com soros de pacientes com doença de Chagas. Uma intensa reatividade cruzada foi observada quando foram utilizados soros de pacientes com leishmaniose visceral, enquanto que uma fraca reação cruzada foi observada com soros de pacientes portadores de leishmaniose tegumentar. Por outro lado, pelo menos 10 polipeptídeos puderam ser identificados apresentando reação específica com soros de pacientes chagásicos. Entre estes, os polipeptídeos de pesos moleculares de 46 kDa e 25 kDa que reagiram com todos esses soros e são potencialmente bons

  6. SERA - An Advanced Treatment Planning System for Neutron Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. A. Wemple; C. L. Albright; D. W. Nigg; D. W. Wessol; F. J. Wheeler; G. J. Harkin; M. B. Rossmeirer; M. T. Cohen; M. W. Frandsen

    1999-06-01

    The technology for computational dosimetry and treatment planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has advanced significantly over the past few years. Because of the more complex nature of the problem, the computational methods that work well for treatment planning in photon radiotherapy are not applicable to BNCT. The necessary methods have, however, been developed and have been successfully employed both for research applications as well as human trials. Computational geometry for BNCT applications can be constructed directly from tomographic medical imagery and computed radiation dose distributions can be readily displayed in formats that are familiar to the radiotherapy community. The SERA system represents a significant advance in several areas for treatment planning. However further improvements in speed and results presentation are still needed for routine clinical applications, particularly when optimizations of dose pattern is required.

  7. Simple and Efficient Method for Measuring Anti-Toxoplasma Immunoglobulin Antibodies in Human Sera Using Complement-Mediated Lysis of Transgenic Tachyzoites Expressing β-Galactosidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Caroline; Gabriel, Katie E.; Remington, Jack S.; Parmley, Stephen F.

    2001-01-01

    A simple and efficient method using transgenic Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites expressing β-galactosidase was developed for detection of specific antibodies against the parasite in sera of patients. The titers obtained with the new test were similar to those obtained with the Sabin-Feldman dye test run in parallel. Although significant changes in endpoint titers were not observed when sera drawn sequentially at 2- to 3-week intervals were tested with both procedures, apparent differences in antibody affinity were observed with the new test which were not perceptible with the Sabin-Feldman dye test. Like the Sabin-Feldman dye test, the new test is based on complement lysis of tachyzoites, but it is much easier to perform and the reaction is read colorimetrically instead of visually. PMID:11376045

  8. Phage neutralization by sera of patients receiving phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Zaczek, Maciej; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Kłak, Marlena; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Rogóż, Paweł; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Owczarek, Barbara; Górski, Andrzej

    2014-08-01

    The aim of our investigation was to verify whether phage therapy (PT) can induce antiphage antibodies. The antiphage activity was determined in sera from 122 patients from the Phage Therapy Unit in Wrocław with bacterial infections before and during PT, and in sera from 30 healthy volunteers using a neutralization test. Furthermore, levels of antiphage antibodies were investigated in sera of 19 patients receiving staphylococcal phages and sera of 20 healthy volunteers using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phages were administered orally, locally, orally/locally, intrarectally, or orally/intrarectally. The rate of phage inactivation (K) estimated the level of phages' neutralization by human sera. Low K rates were found in sera of healthy volunteers (K ≤ 1.73). Low K rates were detected before PT (K ≤ 1.64). High antiphage activity of sera K > 18 was observed in 12.3% of examined patients (n = 15) treated with phages locally (n = 13) or locally/orally (n = 2) from 15 to 60 days of PT. High K rates were found in patients treated with some Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus faecalis phages. Low K rates were observed during PT in sera of patients using phages orally (K ≤ 1.04). Increased inactivation of phages by sera of patients receiving PT decreased after therapy. These results suggest that the antiphage activity in patients' sera depends on the route of phage administration and phage type. The induction of antiphage activity of sera during or after PT does not exclude a favorable result of PT.

  9. Of monkeys and men: immunomic profiling of sera from humans and non-human primates resistant to schistosomiasis reveals novel potential vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Mark S; Becker, Luke; Driguez, Patrick; Young, Neil D; Gaze, Soraya; Mendes, Tiago; Li, Xiao-Hong; Doolan, Denise L; Midzi, Nicholas; Mduluza, Takafira; McManus, Donald P; Wilson, R Alan; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Nausch, Norman; Mutapi, Francisca; Felgner, Philip L; Loukas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Schistosoma haematobium affects more than 100 million people throughout Africa and is the causative agent of urogenital schistosomiasis. The parasite is strongly associated with urothelial cancer in infected individuals and as such is designated a group I carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Using a protein microarray containing schistosome proteins, we sought to identify antigens that were the targets of protective IgG1 immune responses in S. haematobium-exposed individuals that acquire drug-induced resistance (DIR) to schistosomiasis after praziquantel treatment. Numerous antigens with known vaccine potential were identified, including calpain (Smp80), tetraspanins, glutathione-S-transferases, and glucose transporters (SGTP1), as well as previously uncharacterized proteins. Reactive IgG1 responses were not elevated in exposed individuals who did not acquire DIR. To complement our human subjects study, we screened for antigen targets of rhesus macaques rendered resistant to S. japonicum by experimental infection followed by self-cure, and discovered a number of new and known vaccine targets, including major targets recognized by our human subjects. This study has further validated the immunomics-based approach to schistosomiasis vaccine antigen discovery and identified numerous novel potential vaccine antigens.

  10. Of monkeys and men: immunomic profiling of sera from humans and non-human primates resistant to schistosomiasis reveals novel potential vaccine candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark ePearson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma haematobium affects more than 100 million people throughout Africa and is the causative agent of urogenital schistosomiasis. The parasite is strongly associated with urothelial cancer in infected individuals and as such is designated a group I carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Using a protein microarray containing schistosome proteins, we sought to identify antigens that were the targets of protective IgG1 immune responses in S. haematobium-exposed individuals that acquire drug-induced resistance (DIR to schistosomiasis after praziquantel treatment. Numerous antigens with known vaccine potential were identified, including calpain (Smp80, tetraspanins, glutathione-S-transferases and glucose transporters (SGTP1, as well as previously uncharacterized proteins. Reactive IgG1 responses were not elevated in exposed individuals who did not acquire DIR. To complement our human subjects study, we screened for antigen targets of rhesus macaques rendered resistant to Schistosoma japonicum by experimental infection followed by self-cure, and discovered a number of new and known vaccine targets, including major targets recognised by our human subjects. This study has further validated the immunomics-based approach to schistosomiasis vaccine antigen discovery and identified numerous novel potential vaccine antigens.

  11. Effects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis sera on cultured cholinergic neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touzeau, G.; Kato, A.C.

    1983-03-01

    Dissociated monolayer cultures of chick ciliary ganglion neurons have been used to study the effects of control and ALS sera. The cultured neurons survive and extend neurites for a minimum of 2 weeks in a standard tissue culture medium that contains 10% heat-inactivated human serum. Three parameters of the neurons have been examined when cultured in control and ALS sera for 8 to 12 days: (1) neuronal survival, (2) activity of the enzyme choline acetyltransferase, and (3) synthesis of /sup 3/H-acetylcholine using /sup 3/H-choline as precursor. ALS sera cause a small decrease in these three parameters, but this difference is not significant.

  12. Effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate on immuno-electrosyneresis between normal human erythrocyte membrane and sera of systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arimori,Shigeru

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available An anti-membrane antibody was present in the sera of systemic lupus erythematosus patients in immunoelectrosyneresis with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS solubilized erythrocyte membrane as antigen. The SDS bound to protein was detected by chromatography at 10(-3M concentration under U.V. light, at 10(-5M concentration by the distilled water spray method and at 10(-6M concentration by using rosaniline hydrochloride colorimetry. SDS was removed from the membrane protein at a concentration of 10(-3M by the first gel filtration of Sephadex G-25 column and at a concentration of 10(-6M by rechromatography of the same column. More than 99% of SDS in the solubilized erythrocyte membrane was removed by gel filtration. The antigenicity was still positive in the refiltrated fractions of systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Therefore, all precipitates in the gels were antigen-antibody aggregates.

  13. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for group A Streptococcal anti-DNase B in human sera, using recombinant proteins - Comparison to the DNA methyl green micromethod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sarita; Dileepan, T; Johnson, D R; Kaplan, E L; Patrick Cleary, P

    2017-09-19

    Among the four known Streptococcal nucleases comprising of DNase A, B, C and D; DNase B is the most common, and determination of the levels of antibody to DNase B (ADB) is often used to confirm a clinical diagnosis of Streptococcus pyogenes/group A Streptococcal (GAS) infection. The commonly used assays for antibodies that neutralize DNase B or streptolysin O activity use partially purified antigens that often fail to detect antibody changes subsequent to culture documented infections. Therefore, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed employing his-tagged recombinant DNase B as plate antigen for comparison to the commonly used DNA methyl green micromethod (DMGM). DNAs from various Streptococcal species were screened for presence of dnaseB gene by PCR. Measurements of ADB in sera collected from subjects belonging to different ages, and ethnic groups were used to compare the two methods. dnaseB was not detected by PCR in DNA samples isolated from different strains of group B (GBS), C (GCS) and G (GGS) Streptococci. The ADB based ELISA proved to be highly sensitive and more responsive to changes in antibody concentration than DMGM. Use of recombinant DNase B eliminates the variability associated with the enzyme, partially purified from Streptococcal culture supernatants from various commercial sources and may provide a more reliable source of antigen to a wider group of laboratories concerned with GAS diagnosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Mutations in the H, F, or M Proteins Can Facilitate Resistance of Measles Virus to Neutralizing Human Anti-MV Sera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Kweder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there is currently no evidence of emerging strains of measles virus (MV that can resist neutralization by the anti-MV antibodies present in vaccinees, certain mutations in circulating wt MV strains appear to reduce the efficacy of these antibodies. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that resistance to neutralization by such antibodies could allow MV to persist. In this study, we use a novel in vitro system to determine the molecular basis of MV’s resistance to neutralization. We find that both wild-type and laboratory strain MV variants that escape neutralization by anti-MV polyclonal sera possess multiple mutations in their H, F, and M proteins. Cytometric analysis of cells expressing viral escape mutants possessing minimal mutations and their plasmid-expressed H, F, and M proteins indicates that immune resistance is due to particular mutations that can occur in any of these three proteins that affect at distance, rather than directly, the native conformation of the MV-H globular head and hence its epitopes. A high percentage of the escape mutants contain mutations found in cases of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis (SSPE and our results could potentially shed light on the pathogenesis of this rare fatal disease.

  15. HUMAN INTERACTION WITH MOBILE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Alin Zamfiroiu; Emanuel Herteliu; Bogdan Vintila

    2012-01-01

    Computing - human interaction is a very important paradigm because informatics applications are created to be used by people via human interaction. Nowadays mobile applications are more used so is necessarily to talk about mobile - human interaction. In this paper types of mobile devices are presented. Citizen oriented character of mobile application and his utility are described. Different means of interactions with mobile devices are analyzed and in the end of the paper direction of mobile ...

  16. Pesquisa de aglutininas anti Brucella canis em soros humanos na cidade de São Paulo, Brasil Research on agglutinins for Brucella canis in human sera in the city of S. Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Matiko Akao Larsson

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available De 330 soros humanos examinados pela prova de soroaglutinação lenta em tubos, 4(1,21% apresentaram aglutininas anti Brucella canis em diluição 1:100 (1 reagente com título 100, 2 reagentes com título 200 e 1 reagente com título 400.Of the 330 human sera tested by tube agglutination test, 4 (1.21% were positive for Brucella canis antibodies with tilers 1:100 or higher (1 reagent with titer of 1:100, 2 reagents with titer of 1:200, and 1 reagent with tiler of 1:400.

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi: identification of specific epimastigote antigens by human immune sera Trypanosoma cruzi: identificação de antígenos específicos de epimastigotas reconhecidos por soros humanos imunes

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Soluble antigens from epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi were analyzed by western blot in terms of their reactivity with sera from patients with Chagas' disease. In addition, sera from patients with visceral (AVL) and tegumentar leishmaniasis (ATL) were also tested in order to identify cross-reactivities with Trypanosoma cruzy antigens. Twenty eight polypeptides with molecular weights ranging from 14 kDa to 113 kDa were identified with sera from Chagas' disease patients. An extensive cross-re...

  18. The prevalence and genotypic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii in human sera and brain tissue from individuals in Scotland between 2006 - 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Up to date information about the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in humans is lacking for the UK population, with even less information available about the prevalence of the parasite in people in Scotland. To address this, two different study groups were used to determine the prevalence and genotyp...

  19. Comparison of human IgE-binding soya bean allergenic protein Gly m I with the antigenicity profiles of calf anti-soya protein sera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessing, M.; Bleeker, H.; Tsuji, H.; Ogawa, T.; Vlooswijk, R.A.A.

    1996-01-01

    In the food, particularly the feed, industry, large quantities of soya bean protein products are used for the formulation of end-products destined for human or animal consumption. These basic ingredients and the final end products often have to fulfill specific requirements regarding the presence of

  20. Comparison of human IgE-binding soya bean allergenic protein Gly m I with the antigenicity profiles of calf anti-soya protein sera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessing, M.; Bleeker, H.; Tsuji, H.; Ogawa, T.; Vlooswijk, R.A.A.

    1996-01-01

    In the food, particularly the feed, industry, large quantities of soya bean protein products are used for the formulation of end-products destined for human or animal consumption. These basic ingredients and the final end products often have to fulfill specific requirements regarding the presence of

  1. Recognition of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae antigens by sera from human infected with this parasite and its potential use in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa-Ruiz, M R; Salinas-Tobón, M R; Aguilar-Alvarez, D J; Martínez-Marañón, R

    1992-01-01

    Human antibody response to total soluble extract of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (TSE) was analyzed by Western blot. The most frequently recognized antigens had molecular weights of 96, 67, 63, 60, 55 and 47 kDa. An antigenic fraction containing two peptides with M.W. of 43, 47 kDa from the parasite (p43, 47 Ts L1) was isolated by elution from polyacrylamide gel slabs. It was used as antigen in an ELISA test and compared to that of TSE. Serum samples from 51 symptomatic trichinellosis patients--43 with high antibody levels to TSE, 5 of them with positive biopsy and 8 with low levels of these antibodies--as well as 38 from asymptomatic individuals from the area where the trichinellosis outbreaks had occurred and 43 from apparently healthy individuals from a non-endemic area, 37 from patients with intestinal parasitic infections caused by helminth and protozoan parasites--11 from recurrent and 26 from non-recurrent disease--were analyzed by ELISA using both antigens. The ELISA using p43, 47 Ts L1 detected all trichinellosis patients with high antibody levels as well as 6 out of 8 of those with low antibody levels. All control groups were negative. Therefore, this purified fraction allowed the ELISA to be more specific and sensitive for human trichinellosis diagnosis.

  2. Highly immunoreactive IgG antibodies directed against a set of twenty human proteins in the sera of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identified by protein array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline May

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, the most common adult-onset motor neuron disorder, is characterized by the progressive and selective loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Diagnosis of this disorder is based on clinical assessment, and the average survival time is less than 3 years. Injections of IgG from ALS patients into mice are known to specifically mark motor neurons. Moreover, IgG has been found in upper and lower motor neurons in ALS patients. These results led us to perform a case-control study using human protein microarrays to identify the antibody profiles of serum samples from 20 ALS patients and 20 healthy controls. We demonstrated high levels of 20 IgG antibodies that distinguished the patients from the controls. These findings suggest that a panel of antibodies may serve as a potential diagnostic biomarker for ALS.

  3. HCV derived from sera of HCV-infected patients induces pro-fibrotic effects in human primary fibroblasts by activating GLI2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, M.; Zompetta, C.; Vescarelli, E.; Rizzello, C.; Cardi, A.; Valia, S.; Antonelli, G.; Marchese, C.; Torrisi, M. R.; Faggioni, A.; Cirone, M.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of liver fibrosis, especially in developing countries. The process is characterized by the excess accumulation of ECM that may lead, over time, to hepatic cirrhosis, liver failure and also to hepatocarcinoma. The direct role of HCV in promoting fibroblasts trans-differentiation into myofibroblasts, the major fibrogenic cells, has not been fully clarified. In this study, we found that HCV derived from HCV-infected patients infected and directly induced the trans-differentiation of human primary fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, promoting fibrogenesis. This effect correlated with the activation of GLI2, one of the targets of Hedgehog signaling pathway previously reported to be involved in myofibroblast generation. Moreover, GLI2 activation by HCV correlated with a reduction of autophagy in fibroblasts, that may further promoted fibrosis. GLI2 inhibition by Gant 61 counteracted the pro-fibrotic effects and autophagy inhibition mediated by HCV, suggesting that targeting HH/GLI2 pathway might represent a promising strategy to reduce the HCV-induced fibrosis. PMID:27476557

  4. Antigens and antibodies in sera from human cases of epilepsy or taeniasis from an area of Mexico where Taenia solium cysticercosis is endemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, D; Sarti, E; Tapia-Romero, R; Rico, R; Alcántara-Anguiano, I; Salgado, A; Valdez, L; Flisser, A

    1999-01-01

    Human neurocysticercosis is an important parasitic disease in developing countries. Most epidemiological studies on the disease have used antibody-based assays that allow the detection of transmission 'hot spots' and the identification of the main risk factors for transmission. However, such assays have low predictive value in the detection of active cases of neurocysticercosis. The screening potential of the most commonly used antibody-detection technique, the electroimmunotransfer blot assay (EITB), has now been compared with an antigen-capture assay, in an endemic region of Mexico. The subjects were 68 patients with late-onset epilepsy, 35 cases of taeniasis and a randomly selected, control group of 133 individuals from the same region. Parasite-specific antibodies and antigens were more common among the epileptics and taeniasis cases than among the controls. The antigens appeared to be associated with late-onset epilepsy and the antibodies with the presence of subcutaneous nodules. The sensitivities of both tests, to detect epilepsy or taeniasis, were low, but the specificity and the positive predictive value of the antigen-capture assay was high when used with the epileptics. As late-onset epilepsy and neurocysticercosis seem to be associated in endemic regions, antigen-capture assays are probably the most reliable method of detecting active cases of neurocysticercosis in epidemiological studies.

  5. Functional convergence of Akt protein with VEGFR-1 in human endothelial progenitor cells exposed to sera from patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, Mehdi; Rezabakhsh, Aysa; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Nourazarian, Alireza; Nouri, Mohammad; Avci, Çığır Biray; Ghaderi, Shahrooz; Alidadyani, Neda; Bagca, Bakiye Goker; Bagheri, Hesam Saghaei

    2017-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 predisposes patients to various microvascular complications. In the current experiment, the potent role of diabetes mellitus was investigated on the content of VEGFR-1, -2, Tie-1 and -2, and Akt in human endothelial progenitor cells. The gene expression profile of mTOR and Hedgehog signaling pathways were measured by PCR array. The possible crosstalk between RTKs, mTOR and Hedgehog signaling was also studied by bioinformatic analysis. Endothelial progenitor cells were incubated with serum from normal and diabetic for 7days. Compared to non-treated cells, diabetic serum-induced cell apoptosis (~2-fold) and prohibited cell migration toward bFGF (p<0.001). ELISA analysis showed that diabetes exposed cells had increased abundance of Tie-1, -2 and VEGFR-2 and reduced amount of VEGFR-1 (p<0.0001) in diabetic cells. Western blotting showed a marked reduction in the protein level of Akt after cells exposure to serum from diabetic subjects (p<0.0001). PCR array revealed a significant stimulation of both mTOR and Hedgehog signaling pathways in diabetic cells (p<0.05). According to data from bioinformatic datasets, we showed VEGFR-1, -2 and Tie-2, but not Tie-1, are master regulators of angiogenesis. There is a crosstalk between RTKs and mTOR signaling by involving P62, GABARAPL1, and HTT genes. It seems that physical interaction and co-expression of Akt decreased the level of VEGFR-1 in diabetic cells. Regarding data from the present experiment, diabetic serum contributed to uncontrolled induction of both mTOR and Hedgehog signaling in endothelial progenitor cells. Diabetes mellitus induces mTOR pathway by involving receptor tyrosine kinases while Hedgehog stimulation is independent of these receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploring the Presence of microDNAs in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines, Tissue, and Sera of Prostate Cancer Patients and its Possible Application as Biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    human genome and its role in disease . Annu. Rev. Med. 61, 437–455. Takata, M., Sasaki, M.S., Sonoda, E., Morrison, C., Hashimoto , M., Utsumi, H...are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by...PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) Pankaj Kumar 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail: pk7z@virginia.edu 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7

  7. Lactoferrin in canine sera: a pyometra study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoskova, A; Adlerova, L; Kudlackova, H; Leva, L; Vitasek, R; Faldyna, M

    2009-07-01

    The concentration of lactoferrin was measured in canine sera from groups of healthy male dogs as well as pregnant and non-pregnant female dogs and was compared with that of bitches with pyometra. Lactoferrin concentrations were higher in bitches with pyometra. The role of elevated lactoferrin concentrations in the suppression of lymphocyte activity was examined in sera from bitches with pyometra in a series of investigations. Although the sera from bitches with pyometra were capable of suppressing lymphocyte activity, lactoferrin was not found to be involved in this action.

  8. Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy individuals with background of diabetic sibling. ... As the prevalence of lipoprotein abnormalities in adolescents is increasing dramatically, the identification of ... Article Metrics.

  9. Analysis of hyperimmune sera by NAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, T.S.; Zamboni, C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Marcelino, J.R. [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Nowadays, Butantan Institute (Sao Paulo city, Brazil) take care a demand of hyperimmune sera production that supplies 80% of the Brazilian market. The hyperimmune sera are immunological products that contain antibodies used for the treatment of victims of poisonous animals and patients with diseases caused by toxins of infectious agents. For hyperimmune sera production several steps are involved: first, horses are immunized with toxins or anatoxins from one or several species (mainly snakes and spiders); in the end of each cycle of immunization the horses are submitted to a bleeding for plasma extraction. The next step is the plasma treatment: it must be treated and purified in order to diminish the possibility of adverse reactions in patients who will receive the hyperimmune sera. Considering that only chlorine, sodium and sulfur can be present the final product, in this study Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) have been applied to check concentrations of these elements in the final of sera purification. These results must be inside of the limits established for the Word Health Organization (WHO) together with the Brazilian Pharmacopoeia (Pharmaceutical Code Official of the Country) for its certification and commercialization. These data are an important support for quality control of hyperimmune sera production. (author)

  10. Clues to evolution of the SERA multigene family in 18 Plasmodium species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuko Arisue

    Full Text Available SERA gene sequences were newly determined from 11 primate Plasmodium species including two human parasites, P. ovale and P. malariae, and the evolutionary history of SERA genes was analyzed together with 7 known species. All have one each of Group I to III cysteine-type SERA genes and varying number of Group IV serine-type SERA genes in tandem cluster. Notably, Group IV SERA genes were ascertained in all mammalian parasite lineages; and in two primate parasite lineages gene events such as duplication, truncation, fragmentation and gene loss occurred at high frequency in a manner that mimics the birth-and-death evolution model. Transcription profile of individual SERA genes varied greatly among rodent and monkey parasites. Results support the lineage-specific evolution of the Plasmodium SERA gene family. These findings provide further impetus for studies that could clarify/provide proof-of-concept that duplications of SERA genes were associated with the parasites' expansion of host range and the evolutionary conundrums of multigene families in Plasmodium.

  11. Sera Monastery's Home for the Elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伊侬格·林班巴拉

    2007-01-01

    @@ Xirao Jiangcan, a 78-year-old lama, is sunbathing in front of a scripture-chanting hall in Sera Monastery in Lhasa, Tibet. He feels comfortable in the warmth of the sun. A native of Deqin County in Diqing Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Yun-nan, Xirao came to Lhasa at the age of 26. He has lived in Sera Monastery for 52 years. Currently he resides in the monastery's Old People's Home. Many other old lamas also live in the old people's home.

  12. Detection of anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibodies in the sera of Chinese neuromyelitis optica patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Li; Weiheng Su; Jie Wang; Francesco Pisani; Antonio Frigeri; Tonghui Ma

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we recruited 10 neuromyelitis optica patients, two multiple sclerosis patients and two myelitis patients. Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79) cells transfected with a human aquaporin-4-mCherry fusion protein gene were used to detect anti-aquaporin-4 antibody in neuromyelitis optica patient sera by immunofluorescence. Anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibody was stably detected by immunofluorescence in neuromyelitis optica patient sera exclusively. The sensitivity of the assay for neuromyelitis optica was 90% and the specificity for neuromyelitis optica was 100%. The anti-aquaporin-4 antibody titers in sera were tested with serial dilutions until the signal disappeared. A positive correlation was detected between Expanded Disability Status Scale scores and serum anti-aquaporin-4 antibody titers. The anti-aquaporin-4 antibody assay is highly sensitive and specific in the sera of Chinese neuromyelitis optica patients. Detection of aquaporin-4 autoantibody is important for the diagnosis and treatment of neuromyelitis optica.

  13. Detection of anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibodies in the sera of Chinese neuromyelitis optica patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao; Su, Weiheng; Wang, Jie; Pisani, Francesco; Frigeri, Antonio; Ma, Tonghui

    2013-03-15

    In this study, we recruited 10 neuromyelitis optica patients, two multiple sclerosis patients and two myelitis patients. Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79) cells transfected with a human aquaporin-4-mCherry fusion protein gene were used to detect anti-aquaporin-4 antibody in neuromyelitis optica patient sera by immunofluorescence. Anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibody was stably detected by immunofluorescence in neuromyelitis optica patient sera exclusively. The sensitivity of the assay for neuromyelitis optica was 90% and the specificity for neuromyelitis optica was 100%. The anti-aquaporin-4 antibody titers in sera were tested with serial dilutions until the signal disappeared. A positive correlation was detected between Expanded Disability Status Scale scores and serum anti-aquaporin-4 antibody titers. The anti-aquaporin-4 antibody assay is highly sensitive and specific in the sera of Chinese neuromyelitis optica patients. Detection of aquaporin-4 autoantibody is important for the diagnosis and treatment of neuromyelitis optica.

  14. Detection of anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibodies in the sera of Chinese neuromyelitis optica patients★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao; Su, Weiheng; Wang, Jie; Pisani, Francesco; Frigeri, Antonio; Ma, Tonghui

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we recruited 10 neuromyelitis optica patients, two multiple sclerosis patients and two myelitis patients. Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79) cells transfected with a human aquaporin-4-mCherry fusion protein gene were used to detect anti-aquaporin-4 antibody in neuromyelitis optica patient sera by immunofluorescence. Anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibody was stably detected by immunofluorescence in neuromyelitis optica patient sera exclusively. The sensitivity of the assay for neuromyelitis optica was 90% and the specificity for neuromyelitis optica was 100%. The anti-aquaporin-4 antibody titers in sera were tested with serial dilutions until the signal disappeared. A positive correlation was detected between Expanded Disability Status Scale scores and serum anti-aquaporin-4 antibody titers. The anti-aquaporin-4 antibody assay is highly sensitive and specific in the sera of Chinese neuromyelitis optica patients. Detection of aquaporin-4 autoantibody is important for the diagnosis and treatment of neuromyelitis optica. PMID:25206717

  15. Stability of Freeze-Dried Sera Stored at Different Temperatures for the Detection of Anti-Leishmania infantum Antibodies Using Direct Agglutination Test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Kakooei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate freeze-dried sera as an alternative to non-freeze dried for detection of anti-Leishmania infantum antibodies over the course of 11 months using the direct agglutination test (DAT.Altogether, 60 serum samples (30 from humans and 30 from dogs were collected from various geographical locations in Iran. All the collected sera were pooled and each pooled serum sample contained 10 different sera. In the beginning, the human and dog pooled sera were categorized as positive (weak and strong and negative based on anti-L. infantum antibodies using the DAT. All the freeze-dried and non-freeze-dried sera were stored at -70°C, -20°C, 4°C, 22-28°C and 56°C for 11 months. The positive and negative human and dog pooled sera were separately tested using the DAT each month and the results were compared to non-freeze-dried sera kept under the same conditions.We found strong agreement (100% between the results obtained from freeze-dried human and dog in strong DAT positive sera kept at -70°C, -20°C, 4°C and 22-28°C during this study. The human and dog pooled sera stored at 56°C were corrupted after 2 weeks. The DAT results were highly reproducible using freeze-dried human pooled sera in the beginning and month 11 of this study (CV = 0.036.Freeze-dried human and dog strong DAT positive sera are highly stable under different temperature conditions, are easy to transport and are safe for use as positive and negative serum controls in laboratories.

  16. Effect of neutralizing sera on factor X-mediated adenovirus serotype 5 gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parker, A.L.; Waddington, S.N.; Buckley, S.M.K.; Custers, J.; Havenga, M.J.E.; Rooijen, N. van; Goudsmit, J.; McVey, J.H.; Nicklin, S.A.; Baker, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    The deployment of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors is hampered by preexisting immunity. When such vectors are delivered intravenously, hepatocyte transduction is mediated by the hexon-coagulation factor X (FX) interaction. Here, we demonstrate that human sera efficiently block FX-mediated

  17. Detection of autoantibodies against survivin in sera from cancer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tango, Yumiko; Kano, Rui; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Asano, Kazushi; Tanaka, Shigeo; Hasegawa, Astuhiko; Kamata, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Survivin overexpression has been reported in relation to tumor malignancy, suggesting that it is an unfavorable prognostic marker, and antibody responses to this protein have been confirmed in human cancer patients. In this study, we investigated antibody responses to survivin in canine cancer cases, and examined the prevalence of such responses by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using recombinant canine survivin protein as the antigen. The cut-off value for positivity in the anti-survivin ELISA was 0.35, as determined using the mean absorbance +2 S.D. of samples from healthy dogs. Sera from 16 of 59 (27.1%) cancer and 3 of 25 (12%) non-cancer disease dogs were positive on ELISA. The highest positivity rates (>50%) among the cancer cases were seen in dogs with mammary tumor, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

  18. α-synuclein reactive antibodies as diagnostic biomarkers in blood sera of Parkinson's disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Yanamandra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Auto-antibodies with specificity to self-antigens have been implicated in a wide variety of neurological diseases, including Parkinson's (PD and Alzheimer's diseases, being sensitive indicators of neurodegeneration and focus for disease prevention. Of particular interest are the studies focused on the auto-immune responses to amyloidogenic proteins associated with diseases and their applications in therapeutic treatments such as vaccination with amyloid antigens and antibodies in PD, Alzheimer's disease and potentially other neurodegeneration ailments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Generated auto-antibodies towards the major amyloidogenic protein involved in PD Lewy bodies--α-synuclein and its amyloid oligomers and fibrils were measured in the blood sera of early and late PD patients and controls by using ELISA, Western blot and Biacore surface plasmon resonance. We found significantly higher antibody levels towards monomeric α-synuclein in the blood sera of PD patients compared to controls, though the responses decreased with PD progression (P<0.0001. This indicates potential protective role of autoimmunity in maintaining the body homeostasis and clearing protein species whose disbalance may lead to amyloid assembly. There were no noticeable immune responses towards amyloid oligomers, but substantially increased levels of IgGs towards α-synuclein amyloid fibrils both in PD patients and controls, which subsided with the disease progression (P<0.0001. Pooled IgGs from PD patients and controls interacted also with the amyloid fibrils of Aβ (1-40 and hen lysozyme, however the latter were recognized with lower affinity. This suggests that IgGs bind to the generic amyloid conformational epitope, displaying higher specificity towards human amyloid species associated with neurodegeneration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings may suggest the protective role of autoimmunity in PD and therefore immune reactions towards PD major

  19. Ficolin-2 inhibitors are present in sera after prolonged storage at −80 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball Aaron Geno

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ficolins can activate the lectin pathway of the complement system that provides innate immune protection against pathogens, marks host cellular debris for clearance, and promotes inflammation. Baseline inflammation increases with aging in a phenomenon known as “inflammaging.” Although IL-6 and C-reactive protein are known to increase with age, contributions of many complement factors, including ficolins, to inflammaging have been little studied. Ficolin-2 is abundant in human serum and can recognize many target structures; therefore, ficolin-2 has potential to contribute to inflammaging. We hypothesized that inflammaging would alter ficolin-2 levels among older adults and examined 360 archived sera collected from older individuals. We found that these sera had apparently reduced ficolin-2 levels and that 84.2% of archived sera exhibited ficolin-2 inhibitors, which suppressed apparent amounts of ficolin-2 detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fresh serum samples were obtained from donors whose archived sera showed inhibitors, but the fresh sera did not have ficolin-2 inhibitors. Ficolin-2 inhibitors were present in other long-stored sera from younger persons. Furthermore, noninhibiting samples and fresh sera from older adults had apparently normal amounts of ficolin-2. Thus, ficolin-2 inhibitors may arise as an artifact of long-term storage of serum at −80 °C.

  20. Microbiology and Human Spaceflight Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. Mark

    2016-01-01

    As humans continue to travel further into space, microorganisms will accompany them. Thus, understanding how microorganisms can impact the crew, the spacecraft, and spacecraft systems is critical to enable future spaceflight exploration. To mitigate microbial risks during spaceflight, NASA relies heavily on preventative measures, including appropriate vehicle design, crew quarantine prior to flight, and extensive microbial monitoring. While these precautions minimize the proliferation of infectious agents, their presence cannot be completely eliminated. Microbiological contamination of vehicle systems can also be a key issue for long duration missions, as system deterioration and fouling have been previously observed in spacecraft. Current studies of the microbiomes of the crew and the International Space Station environment are providing a wealth of information and hold the potential to help refine microbiological requirements for NASA mission beyond low Earth orbit, as spaceflight environments and mission architectures rapidly evolve.

  1. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense adaptation to different mammalian sera is associated with VSG expression site plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cordon-Obras

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infection is widely considered an anthroponosis, although it has also been found in wild and domestic animals. Thus, fauna could act as reservoir, constraining the elimination of the parasite in hypo-endemic foci. To better understand the possible maintenance of T. b. gambiense in local fauna and investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation, we generated adapted cells lines (ACLs by in vitro culture of the parasites in different mammalian sera. Using specific antibodies against the Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs we found that serum ACLs exhibited different VSG variants when maintained in pig, goat or human sera. Although newly detected VSGs were independent of the sera used, the consistent appearance of different VSGs suggested remodelling of the co-transcribed genes at the telomeric Expression Site (VSG-ES. Thus, Expression Site Associated Genes (ESAGs sequences were analysed to investigate possible polymorphism selection. ESAGs 6 and 7 genotypes, encoding the transferrin receptor (TfR, expressed in different ACLs were characterised. In addition, we quantified the ESAG6/7 mRNA levels and analysed transferrin (Tf uptake. Interestingly, the best growth occurred in pig and human serum ACLs, which consistently exhibited a predominant ESAG7 genotype and higher Tf uptake than those obtained in calf and goat sera. We also detected an apparent selection of specific ESAG3 genotypes in the pig and human serum ACLs, suggesting that other ESAGs could be involved in the host adaptation processes. Altogether, these results suggest a model whereby VSG-ES remodelling allows the parasite to express a specific set of ESAGs to provide selective advantages in different hosts. Finally, pig serum ACLs display phenotypic adaptation parameters closely related to human serum ACLs but distinct to parasites grown in calf and goat sera. These results suggest a better suitability of swine to maintain T. b. gambiense infection

  2. Sera from patients with seropositive neuromyelitis optica spectral disorders caused the degeneration of rodent optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yoshiko; Kanamori, Akiyasu; Nakamura, Makoto; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Nakashima, Ichiro; Negi, Akira

    2014-02-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune inflammatory, neurodestructive disease primarily targeting the optic nerve and spinal cord. An autoantibody against water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which is expressed at endofeet of astrocytes has been implicated in the pathogenesis of NMO. We evaluated the impact of sera of seropositive patients with NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSDs) on the rodent optic nerve and retina. Serum was obtained either from patients with seropositive NMOSD (AQP4+), seronegative patient with idiopathic optic neuritis (AQP4-), and healthy volunteers (control). Anti-AQP4 antibody in a serum was measured by a previously established cell-based assay. The patients' sera were applied on the optic nerve after de-sheathed. Immunohistochemistry showed that at 7 days after the treatment, the area of the optic nerve exposed to the AQP4+ sera lost expression of both AQP4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Also, Human-IgG immunoreactivity and marked invasion of inflammation cells were observed in the optic nerve treated with AQP4+ serum. Immnoreactivity of neurofilament was reduced at 14 days after the treatment, not 7 days. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed the reduced gene expression of neurofilament in retina from the eye that was exposed to the AQP4+ sera at 14 days. Retrograde fluorogold-labeling on the retinal flatmount disclosed the significantly reduced number of retinal ganglion cells when the AQP4+ sera were applied. The present model has demonstrated that the sera from patients with seropositive NMOSDs led to the regional astrocytic degeneration and inflammatory cell invasion in the optic nerve, resulting in the ultimate loss of RGCs and their axons at areas beyond the injury site.

  3. Preliminary antigenic characterisation of an adult worm vomit preparation of Fasciola hepatica by infected human sera Caracterização antigênica preliminar de preparação de vômito de verme adulto de Fasciola hepatica por soros humanos infectados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Alejandra De Almeida

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Fascioliasis is an emerging/re-emerging vector-borne disease with the widest known distribution. Approximately 17 million people are infected around the world, being the Andean region the most affected area. There is an important necessity to develop sensitive and specific diagnostic tools to treat patients early and to avoid complications. In this paper we evaluated the immune response of infected humans against two antigenic preparations: the total soluble extract (FhTSE and the adult worm vomit (FhAWV in order to identify antigenic fractions specific for Fasciola hepatica. Both preparations were processed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot with human sera with fascioliasis (F, other parasitosis and healthy individuals. In the immunoblot of FhTSE, sera F recognised 16 bands with MW between eight and 110 kDa, from which those of 8, 9, 10, 38, 45 and 57 kDa were specific. In the preparation FhAWV, sera F recognised nine bands with MW from eight to 85 kDa, from which those of 8, 12, 15 and 24 kDa were specific. Some bands of cross-reaction were evident with sera from patients with other parasitoses, more frequent with the FhTSE. Bands within the MW mentioned, particularly that of eight kDa, have been shown to be specific by others, and deserve additional characterisation for their potential use in immunodiagnosis.Fasciolíase é uma doença emergente/re-emergente transmitida por vetores com a distribuição sabidamente mais ampla. Existem aproximadamente 17 milhões de pessoas infectadas em todo mundo, sendo a região andina a área mais afetada. Há uma necessidade importante para desenvolver ferramentas diagnósticas sensíveis e específicas para tratar cedo os pacientes e para evitar complicações. Neste trabalho avaliamos a resposta imune de seres humanos infectados comparando a duas preparações antigênicas: o extrato solúvel total (FhTSE e o vômito (FhAWV do verme adulto a fim de identificar as frações antigênicas específicas para

  4. Roe deer sera used for TBE surveillance in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duscher, Georg Gerhard; Wetscher, Monika; Baumgartner, Raphaela; Walder, Gernot

    2015-06-01

    A large majority of Austrian citizens are aware of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), consequently reflected by a high vaccination rate of 85%. In return, risk assessment and disease mapping on human cases might be hampered due to high and inhomogeneous vaccination rates and travel habitats of humans. The roe deer was used to obtain a starting point for the integral view on the actual risk of TBE in Austria. The roe deer exhibits several attributes which makes it suitable as an indicator species: the roe deer has a restricted home range and it is known to be a heavy tick carrier. Furthermore it sero-converts after infection with TBE, but no outbreak occurs. Sera from 945 roe deer were obtained from all over Austria and screened with IFAT for the antibodies against TBE. Twenty-two positive samples, 2.4%, and 17 samples at the borderline titre of 1:16 were identified. The majority of the positive samples, 70.6%, were located in known TBE areas based on human cases. Further research is needed to confirm or reject new endemic foci of TBE transmission.

  5. An acousto-optical method for registration of erythrocytes' agglutination reaction—sera color influence on the resolving power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubrovski, V. A.; Medvedeva, M. F.; Torbin, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    The absorption spectra of agglutinating sera were used to determine blood groups. It was shown experimentally that the sera color significantly affects the resolving power of the acousto-optical method of blood typing. In order to increase the resolving power of the method and produce an invariance of the method for sera color, we suggested introducing a probing light beam individually for different sera. The proposed technique not only improves the resolving power of the method, but also reduces the risk of false interpretation of the experimental results and, hence, error in determining the blood group of the sample. The latter is especially important for the typing of blood samples with weak agglutination of erythrocytes. This study can be used in the development of an instrument for instrumental human blood group typing based on the acousto-optical method.

  6. Sera from chronic chagasic patients depress cardiac electrogenesis and conduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa P.C.S.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We report results obtained with sera from 58 chronic chagasic patients that were evaluated for effects on heart rate and atrioventricular (AV conduction in isolated rabbit hearts and screened for the presence of muscarinic and beta-adrenergic activity. We show that sera from 26 patients decreased heart rate, while 10 increased it and 22 had no effect. Additionally, sera from 20 of the 58 patients blocked AV conduction. Muscarinic activation seems to be involved in both effects, but is not the only mechanism, since atropine did not antagonize the decrease in heart rate in 23% of sera or AV block in 40%. Sera from patients with complex arrhythmias were significantly more effective in depressing both heart rate and AV conduction. Sera that induce increases in heart rate seem to operate exclusively through beta-adrenergic activation. Two of these sera, evaluated with respect to intercellular communication in primary cultures of embryonic cardiomyocytes were able to block gap junction conductance evaluated by a dye injection technique after 24-h exposure. The mechanisms underlying this uncoupling effect are currently being investigated.

  7. Sera from patients with chronic Lyme disease protect mice from Lyme borreliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikrig, E; Bockenstedt, L K; Barthold, S W; Chen, M; Tao, H; Ali-Salaam, P; Telford, S R; Flavell, R A

    1994-03-01

    Sera from selected patients with Lyme disease in different stages were used to passively immunize mice against Borrelia burgdorferi challenge to determine if human antibodies could protect the animals from infection. Sera from 2 patients with late-stage Lyme disease that contained strong antibody reactivity to proteins in B. burgdorferi lysates, including antibodies to the outer surface proteins (Osps) A and B, partly protected mice from infection after challenge with a small inoculum (10(2)) of B. burgdorferi. Mice immunized with sera from either of these 2 patients developed significantly fewer infections from the borreliae (patient 1 serum, 5%; patient 2 serum, 25%) relative to control mice (patient 1 serum, 90%; patient 2 serum, 74%). In contrast, sera from 2 patients with early or late Lyme disease that lacked antibodies reactive to OspA and OspB did not confer protection. Immunity appeared to be related, at least in part, to the presence of a strong humoral response to the Osps. These results suggest that during prolonged infection, some patients develop an immune response that may be partly protective against reinfection with B. burgdorferi. Therefore, although most patients do not mount a strong humoral response to the Osps during natural infection, vaccination with an Osp may elicit protective immunity.

  8. Suppression of in vitro megakaryopoiesis by maternal sera containing anti-HPA-1a antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Jian; Bussel, James B; Lakkaraja, Madhavi; Ferrer-Marin, Francisca; Ghevaert, Cedric; Feldman, Henry A; McFarland, Janice G; Chavda, Chaitanya; Sola-Visner, Martha

    2015-09-01

    Incompatibility of the human platelet antigen-1 (HPA-1) system is the most common cause of fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (F/NAIT) and is thought to be mediated by accelerated clearance of antibody-opsonized fetal platelets. We evaluated the effect of maternal sera containing anti-HPA-1a antibodies (F/NAIT sera) on in vitro megakaryopoiesis. Compared with control maternal sera, 14 out of 17 F/NAIT sera significantly reduced megakaryocyte (MK) number. This finding was associated with increased apoptosis and cell death of early MKs/MK progenitors, but normal maturation and differentiation of surviving MKs. An analysis of platelet counts in infants born to mothers following antenatal intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) ± prednisone therapy demonstrated a significant and moderately strong correlation between the MK growth in cultures and the infants' platelet counts at birth. These findings suggest that maternal anti-HPA-1a antibodies can suppress fetal megakaryopoiesis by inducing early cell death and that this influences the neonatal platelet count. Thus, the ability of maternal antibodies to suppress MK growth is a potential predictive factor for the fetal response to maternal IVIG therapy.

  9. Angiogenic activity of sera from extrinsic allergic alveolitis patients in relation to clinical, radiological, and functional pulmonary changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielonka, Tadeusz M; Demkow, Urszula; Filewska, Małgorzata; Bialas, Beata; Zycinska, Katarzyna; Radzikowska, Elzbieta; Wardyn, Andrzej K; Skopinska-Rozewska, Ewa

    2010-10-01

    Extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA) caused by inhaled organic environmental allergens can progress to a fibrotic end-stage lung disease. Neovascularization plays an important role in pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of sera from EAA patients on the angiogenic capability of normal peripheral human mononuclear cells (MNC) in relation to the clinical, radiological, and functional changes. The study population consisted of 30 EAA patients and 16 healthy volunteers. Routine pulmonary function tests were undertaken using ERS standards. As an angiogenic test, leukocyte-induced angiogenesis assay according to Sidky and Auerbach was used. Compared with sera from healthy volunteers, sera from our EAA patients significantly stimulated angiogenesis (P < 0.001). However, sera from healthy donors also stimulated angiogenesis compared to PBS (P < 0.001). No correlation was found between serum angiogenic activity and clinical symptoms manifested by evaluated patients. A decrease in DLco and in lung compliance in EAA patients was observed but no significant correlation between pulmonary functional tests and serum angiogenic activity measured by the number of microvessels or an angiogenesis index was found. However, the proangiogenic effect of sera from EAA patients differed depending on the stage of the disease and was stronger in patients with fibrotic changes. The present study suggests that angiogenesis plays a role in the pathogenesis of EAA. It could be possible that the increase in the angiogenic activity of sera from EAA patients depends on the phase of the disease.

  10. Human Defensins: Potential Tools for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Wenghoefer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available As components of the innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides in the form of human defensins play an important role in host defense by serving as the epithelial layer’s biochemical barrier against local infections. Recent studies have shown these molecules to have far more additional cellular functions besides their antimicrobial activity. Defensins play a role in cell division, attraction and maturation of immune cells, differentiation and reorganization of epithelial tissues, wound healing and tumor suppression. This multitude of function makes human defensins appear to be excellent tools for therapeutic approaches. These antimicrobial peptides may be used directly as a remedy against bacterial and viral infections. Furthermore, the application of human defensins can be used to promote wound healing and epithelial reorganization. In particular, human β-defensins have a strong impact on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Human β-defensins have already been applied as a vaccination against HIV-1. Another potentially useful characteristic of defensins is their suitability as diagnostic markers in cancer therapy. In particular, α-defensins have already been used for this purpose. Human α-defensin-3, for example, has been described as a tumor marker for lymphocytes. High gene expression levels of α-defensin-3 and -4 have been detected in benign oral neoplasia, α-defensin-6 is considered to be a tumor marker for colon cancer.

  11. Detection of auto-anti-idiotypic antibodies to Lol p I (rye I) IgE antibodies in human sera by the use of murine idiotypes: levels in atopic and non-atopic subjects and effects of immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, J; Bernier, D; Mourad, W

    1990-06-01

    Anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Id Abs) are involved in the regulation of a number of immune responses including the IgE antibody production. In atopic patients, the increased synthesis of IgE antibodies could be related to a defective production of regulatory anti-Id Abs. In the present study, we first developed a sensitive assay for measuring the levels of anti-Id Abs directed against antibodies specific for Lol p I, the major allergenic determinant of Lolium perenne (rye grass). In this assay, we used previously described murine monoclonal anti-Lol p I antibodies that were shown to share epitopic specificities with human anti-Lol p I IgE and IgG antibodies, thus short-cutting the need for purification of F(ab')2 fragments of human IgG Abs and insuring optimal specificity and sensitivity. Levels of anti-Id Abs against two anti-Lol p I monoclonal antibodies (290A-167, 348A-6) were higher in normal volunteers than in untreated atopic patients. Specific immunotherapy increased the levels of anti-Id Abs to those of normal volunteers. These observations suggest a role for the Id-anti-Id network in the regulation of IgE antibody production.

  12. SYNTHESIS OF 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN D3 CONJUGATE WITH KEYHOLE LIMPET HEMOCYANIN AND OBTAINING OF IMMUNE SERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. O. Mazanova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at obtaining polyclonal antibodies that recognize 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3, for their further specifications and applications in immunochemical test systems of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3, determination in blood serum. We used the methods of chemical synthesis of immunoconjugates (modified carbodiimide method using N´-ethyl carbodiimide, thin layer chromatography, gel filtration and indirect immunoenzyme analysis ELISA. The work describes the stages of the synthesis of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3, immunoconjugate with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH, which was used for receiving immune sera. As a result of mouse and rabbit immunization antisera were obtained and antibody titers against 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3, were tested by immunoenzyme assay. It was demonstrated that the titer of specific antibodies was higher in rabbits compared with mice. The resulting polyclonal antibodies can be used for the development of immunochemical test systems for screening studies of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3, content in human blood serum as a marker of vitamin D3 availability.

  13. Detection of trichothecene mycotoxins in sera from individuals exposed to Stachybotrys chartarum in indoor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasel, Trevor L; Campbell, Andrew W; Demers, Roger E; Ferguson, Bruce S; Fink, Jordan; Vojdani, Aristo; Wilson, Stephen C; Straus, David C

    2004-06-01

    To date, no study has effectively demonstrated a direct human exposure to mycotoxins in mold-contaminated buildings. Therefore, the authors investigated the presence of trichothecene mycotoxins in sera from individuals exposed to indoor molds (specifically Stachybotrys chartarum). Sera from occupants of contaminated (test samples, n=44) and uncontaminated (control samples, n=26) buildings were analyzed using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) highly specific for macrocyclic trichothecenes. Twenty-three samples were significantly different (p human serum tested in the same manner, whereas only 1 of the control samples tested positive. Mass spectrometry analysis could not confirm the presence of intact S. chartarum macrocyclic trichothecenes. The authors hypothesize that this result was caused by uncharacterized ELISA-reactive metabolic breakdown products. Data from this study suggest that trichothecene mycotoxins can be demonstrated in the tissues of certain individuals exposed to S. chartarum in contaminated buildings.

  14. Beta-nerve growth factor levels in newborn cord sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, J; Vilge, V; Juif, J G; Maitre, M; Donato, L; Messer, J; Mark, J

    1994-06-01

    This study was designed to examine beta-nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in human cord blood by a two-site enzyme immunoassay using MAb 27/21 to mouse NGF and to determine whether beta-NGF levels show developmental changes. Blood was collected at delivery from 61 newborns, 55 neonates appropriate for gestational age (46 term infants and 9 premature infants), 5 neonates small for gestational age, and 1 neonate with congenital hydrocephalus. In addition, samples were collected from 2 microcephalic children (microcephaly vera) aged 15 and 18 mo, 2 control children, and 4 healthy adults. Mean levels of NGF in preterm infants (n = 9; 13.7 +/- 8 pg/mL) were significantly lower than levels in term infants (n = 47; 21.2 +/- 8.8 pg/mL; p = 0.034 by Mann-Whitney U test). There was no correlation between birth weight, length, head circumference, and beta-NGF levels. In microcephalic children, NGF levels were low (8 pg/mL) compared with control infants' values (22 pg/mL). In adults, beta-NGF levels were higher and ranged between 238 and 292 pg/mL. Our study demonstrates that beta-NGF levels can be assessed in human newborn sera using a two-site enzyme immunoassay with MAb 27/21 to mouse beta-NGF, that beta-NGF levels are extremely low in newborns compared with adults, that beta-NGF levels seems to show developmental changes, and that beta-NGF levels may be used to assess NGF utilization under normal and pathologic conditions such as cerebral malformations.

  15. IGE IN ASTHMATIC HUMAN SERA IS REACTIVE AGAINST MOLD EXTRACTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molds have been associated with various health effects including asthma, but their role in induction of asthma is unclear. However, the presence of mold-specific IgE indicates their capacity to induce allergic responses and possibly exacerbate asthma symptoms. This study was und...

  16. Analyses of p53 antibodies in sera of patients with lung carcinoma define immunodominant regions in the p53 protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Schlichtholz, B.; Trédaniel, J.; Lubin, R; Zalcman, G.; Hirsch, A.; Soussi, T

    1994-01-01

    Antibodies specific for human p53 were analysed in sera of lung cancer patients. We detected p53 antibodies in the sera of 24% (10/42) of patients with lung carcinoma. The distribution was as follows: 4/9 small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs), 2/18 squamous cell lung carcinomas (SCCs), 2/10 adenocarcinomas (ADCs) and 2/5 large-cell lung carcinomas (LCCs). p53 antibodies were always present at the time of diagnosis and did not appear during progression of the disease. Using an original peptide-ma...

  17. [原著]Comparison of Rotavirus Immunoglobulin G Titers in Sera Collected in Japan and Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Makino, Yoshihiro; Iwanaga, Tatsue; Maedar, Yukiko; Igarashi, Akira; Fukunaga, Toshihiko; Department of Virology, School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus; Department of Virology, Institute for Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University; Participant m the Oversea Training Project sponsored by Nagasaki Prefectural Government

    1984-01-01

    ELISA for detecting IgG antibody against human rotavirus was carried out on the sera collected in Kumamoto and Nyeri, Kenya. In both areas, most of the infants acquired antibody by 3 years of age and kept high level thereafter. The antibody prevalence among age groups in the two areas showed almost same patterns. Correlation was seen between ELISA titers and neutralization titers.

  18. Practical Applications of Cosmology to Human Society

    CERN Document Server

    Chaisson, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Complex systems throughout Nature display structures and functions that are built and maintained, at least in part, by optimal energies flowing through them--not specific, ideal values, rather ranges in energy rate density below which systems are starved and above which systems are destroyed. Cosmic evolution, as a physical cosmology that notably includes life, is rich in empirical findings about many varied systems that can potentially help assess global problems facing us here on Earth. Despite its grand and ambitious objective to unify theoretical understanding of all known complex systems from big bang to humankind, cosmic evolution does have useful, practical applications from which humanity could benefit. Cosmic evolution's emphasis on quantitative data analyses might well inform our attitudes toward several serious issues now challenging 21st-century society, including global warming, smart machines, world economics, and cancer research. This paper comprises one physicist's conjectures about each of th...

  19. DETECTION OF HPVB19 IN SERA OF KASHIN-BECK DISEASE PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between Kashin-Beck Disease(KBD) and Human Parvovirus B19(HPVB19).Methods HPVB19DNA was detected in 55 sera of KBD patients and 52 healthy in adjacent non-endemic area and 35 healthy sera in normal area using PCR and then linked the HPVB19DNA to pGEM-T vector.The nucleotide sequence was analyzed and compared with HPVB19 nucleotide sequence published by Genebank and another in Journal of virology.Results HPVB19DNA was found in 16 of 55 sera in KBD patients,and the HPVB19DNA position rate(29.09%) is significantly higher than that of the two healthy control groups(11.54%、11.42% respectively)(P<0.05).The nucleotide sequence homologies compared with the two published nucleotide sequence were 97.75%、97%,respectively.The putative amino acid homologies compared with the tow published were 93.5%.The amino acid variation was greater than the nucleotide sequence variation because of a base insertion.Conclusion There was a close relationship between HPVB19 infection and Kashin-Beck Disease.

  20. Human facial neural activities and gesture recognition for machine-interfacing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamedi M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available M Hamedi1, Sh-Hussain Salleh2, TS Tan2, K Ismail2, J Ali3, C Dee-Uam4, C Pavaganun4, PP Yupapin51Faculty of Biomedical and Health Science Engineering, Department of Biomedical Instrumentation and Signal Processing, University of Technology Malaysia, Skudai, 2Centre for Biomedical Engineering Transportation Research Alliance, 3Institute of Advanced Photonics Science, Nanotechnology Research Alliance, University of Technology Malaysia (UTM, Johor Bahru, Malaysia; 4College of Innovative Management, Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University, Pathum Thani, 5Nanoscale Science and Engineering Research Alliance (N'SERA, Advanced Research Center for Photonics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok, ThailandAbstract: The authors present a new method of recognizing different human facial gestures through their neural activities and muscle movements, which can be used in machine-interfacing applications. Human–machine interface (HMI technology utilizes human neural activities as input controllers for the machine. Recently, much work has been done on the specific application of facial electromyography (EMG-based HMI, which have used limited and fixed numbers of facial gestures. In this work, a multipurpose interface is suggested that can support 2–11 control commands that can be applied to various HMI systems. The significance of this work is finding the most accurate facial gestures for any application with a maximum of eleven control commands. Eleven facial gesture EMGs are recorded from ten volunteers. Detected EMGs are passed through a band-pass filter and root mean square features are extracted. Various combinations of gestures with a different number of gestures in each group are made from the existing facial gestures. Finally, all combinations are trained and classified by a Fuzzy c-means classifier. In conclusion, combinations with the highest recognition accuracy in each group are chosen. An average accuracy

  1. Downregulation of hepcidin and haemojuvelin expression in the hepatocyte cell-line HepG2 induced by thalassaemic sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizer-Stern, Orly; Adamsky, Konstantin; Amariglio, Ninette; Levin, Carina; Koren, Ariel; Breuer, William; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Cabantchik, Z Ioav; Rechavi, Gideon

    2006-10-01

    Beta-thalassaemia represents a group of diseases, in which ineffective erythropoiesis is accompanied by iron overload. In a mouse model of beta-thalassaemia, we observed that the liver expressed relatively low levels of hepcidin, which is a key factor in the regulation of iron absorption by the gut and of iron recycling by the reticuloendothelial system. It was hypothesised that, despite the overt iron overload, a putative plasma factor found in beta-thalassaemia might suppress liver hepcidin expression. Sera from beta-thalassaemia and haemochromatosis (C282Y mutation) patients were compared with those of healthy individuals regarding their capacity to induce changes the expression of key genes of iron metabolism in human HepG2 hepatoma cells. Sera from beta-thalassaemia major patients induced a major decrease in hepcidin (HAMP) and lipocalin2 (oncogene 24p3) (LCN2) expression, as well as a moderate decrease in haemojuvelin (HFE2) expression, compared with sera from healthy individuals. A significant correlation was found between the degree of downregulation of HAMP and HFE2 induced by beta-thalassaemia major sera (r = 0.852, P < 0.0009). Decreased HAMP expression was also found in HepG2 cells treated with sera from beta-thalassaemia intermedia patients. In contrast, the majority of sera from hereditary haemochromatosis patients induced an increase in HAMP expression, which correlated with transferrin (Tf) saturation (r = 0.765, P < 0.0099). Our results suggest that, in beta-thalassaemia, serum factors might override the potential effect of iron overload on HAMP expression, thereby providing an explanation for the failure to arrest excessive intestinal iron absorption in these patients.

  2. Introduction to the Security Engineering Risk Analysis (SERA) Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    framework to elicit better secu- rity requirements; and proposes future work to build a SERA method description and additional model types and archetypes ...that threat to be realized. During threat iden- tification, the Analysis Team might refer to a Library of Threat Archetypes for guidance. In this...context, we define a threat archetype to be a pattern or model that illustrates the key characteris- tics of a complex threat scenario. The team can then

  3. Epitope mapping of Campylobacter jejuni flagellar capping protein (FliD) by chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Telli, Arife Ezgi; Jagne, Jarra F; Benson, Christopher L; Hiett, Kelli L; Line, John E

    2016-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative rod, is a zoonotic pathogen associated with human acute bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. The flagellum, composed of more than 35 proteins, is responsible for colonization of C. jejuni in the host gastrointestinal tract as well as inducing protective antibodies against the homologous serotype. In our previous study, we demonstrated that the flagellar capping protein (FliD) is an immunodominant protein that reacted strongly to sera from field chickens. In this communication, we mapped linear immunoreactive epitopes on FliD using a set of 158 synthetic peptides of 15-mer overlapping with 11 amino acid residues on peptide microarrays with sera from field chickens. The results from peptide microarrays showed (1) no cross-reactivity of the immobilized peptides with the secondary anti-chicken antibody in the control incubation, and (2) heterogeneous patterns of sera reacting to the immobilized peptides. The peptides that reacted to more than three chicken sera and had higher averages of fluorescence units were selected for further validation by the peptide ELISA. The results showed peptides 24, 91 and 92 had relatively high reactivity and less variation among 64 individual serum samples, indicating these peptides represented the shared immunodominant epitopes on the C. jejuni FliD protein. These peptides were also recognized by sera from chickens immunized with the purified recombinant FliD protein. The findings of the specific shared linear immunodominant epitopes on FliD in this study provide a rationale for further evaluation to determine their utility as epitope vaccines covering multiple serotypes for chicken immunization, and subsequently, for providing safer poultry products for human consumption.

  4. Human hand modelling: kinematics, dynamics, applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gustus, A.; Stillfried, G.; Visser, J.; Jörntell, H.; Van der Smagt, P.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of mathematical modelling of the human hand is given. We consider hand models from a specific background: rather than studying hands for surgical or similar goals, we target at providing a set of tools with which human grasping and manipulation capabilities can be studied, and hand funct

  5. Space Human Factors: Research to Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Human Factors has been instrumental in preventing potential on-orbit hazards and increasing overall crew safety. Poor performance & operational learning curves on-orbit are mitigated. Human-centered design is applied to optimize design and minimize potentially hazardous conditions, especially with larger crew sizes and habitat constraints. Lunar and Mars requirements and design developments are enhanced, based on ISS Lessons Learned.

  6. Human pluripotent stem cells: applications and challenges in neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef eHIBAOUI

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability to generate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs holds great promise for the understanding and the treatment of human neurological diseases in modern medicine. The hPSCs are considered for their in vitro use as research tools to provide relevant cellular model for human diseases, drug discovery and toxicity assays and for their in vivo use in regenerative medicine applications. In this review, we highlight recent progress, promises and challenges of hPSC applications in human neurological disease modelling and therapies.

  7. Comprehensive Identification of Immunodominant Proteins of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis Using Antibodies in the Sera from Naturally Infected Hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Gamal Wareth; Murat Eravci; Christoph Weise; Uwe Roesler; Falk Melzer; Sprague, Lisa D.; Heinrich Neubauer; Jayaseelan Murugaiyan

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a debilitating zoonotic disease that affects humans and animals. The diagnosis of brucellosis is challenging, as accurate species level identification is not possible with any of the currently available serology-based diagnostic methods. The present study aimed at identifying Brucella (B.) species-specific proteins from the closely related species B. abortus and B. melitensis using sera collected from naturally infected host species. Unlike earlier reported investigations with ...

  8. Enzymatic modification of phospholipids forfunctional applications and human nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Zheng; Vikbjerg, Anders / Falk; Xu, Xuebing

    2005-01-01

    Rapid progress in biochemistry of phospholipids and evolution of modern bioengineering has brought forth a number of novel concepts and technical advancements in the modification of phospholipids for industrial applications and human nutrition. Highlights cover preparation of novel phospholipid...... analogs based on the latest understanding of pivotal role of phospholipids in manifold biological processes, exploration of remarkable application potentials of phospholipids in meliorating human health, as well as development of new chemical and biotechnological approaches applied to the modification...

  9. Proteolytic antibodies in the sera of pregnant women: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimzadeh jahromi M, Mirshahi M, Shamsipour F, Mohamadi M

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Background: The induction of catalytic antibodies (abzymes was first postulated by Pauling in 1948. Various catalytic antibodies have been detected recently in the sera of patients with several autoimmune pathologies such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, antibodies with DNase and RNase activity have been discovered in the milk and sera of healthy human mothers, which shows the physiologic role of these antibodies. In this study, we examined the proteolytic activity of antibodies in the sera of pregnant women. "n"nMethods: IgG antibody fractions were isolated from the sera of 30 healthy pregnant women in the first trimester of pregnancy and 10 control samples (men and nonpregnant women by subsequent steps of chromatographic purification on Protein G sepharose and sephacryl S-300. All patients were in their first pregnancy and aged 25-35 years. The conditions for proteolytic activity, such as type of buffer, pH and temperature, were optimized. The proteolytic activity of these antibodies was demonstrated by in-gel assay with gelatin as the substrate. "n"nResults: Antibody treatments at the optimum temperature showed that some samples from pregnant women contain proteolytic abzymes, as demonstrated by in-gel assays. Western blot results confirmed that the proteolytic activity is an intrinsic property of the antibodies. "n"nConclusions: During pregnancy and immediately after delivery women very often experience autoimmune processes similar to

  10. Autoantibodies Profile in the Sera of Patients with Sjogren]s Syndrome: The ANA Evaluation—A Homogeneous, Multiplexed System

    OpenAIRE

    Boris Gilburd; Mahmoud Abu-Shakra; Yehuda Shoenfeld; Andrea Giordano; Elena Bartoloni Bocci; Francesco delle Monache; Roberto Gerli

    2004-01-01

    Background: Flow-based, multiplex bead arrays (MBA) have been developed for a variety of applications including the detection of antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (ENA). It offers a rapid and sensitive method to assess multiple analyses in a single tube/well. Purpose: To evaluate the Athena Multi-Lyte ANA Test System utilizes Luminex Corporation's MBA technology for the detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and ENA antibodies in the sera of patients with Sjogren's syndrome (SS). ...

  11. Human Metabolic Network: Reconstruction, Simulation, and Applications in Systems Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming; Chan, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Metabolism is crucial to cell growth and proliferation. Deficiency or alterations in metabolic functions are known to be involved in many human diseases. Therefore, understanding the human metabolic system is important for the study and treatment of complex diseases. Current reconstructions of the global human metabolic network provide a computational platform to integrate genome-scale information on metabolism. The platform enables a systematic study of the regulation and is applicable to a wide variety of cases, wherein one could rely on in silico perturbations to predict novel targets, interpret systemic effects, and identify alterations in the metabolic states to better understand the genotype-phenotype relationships. In this review, we describe the reconstruction of the human metabolic network, introduce the constraint based modeling approach to analyze metabolic networks, and discuss systems biology applications to study human physiology and pathology. We highlight the challenges and opportunities in network reconstruction and systems modeling of the human metabolic system. PMID:24957377

  12. Annotated bibliography of human factors applications literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCafferty, D.B.

    1984-09-30

    This bibliography was prepared as part of the Human Factors Technology Project, FY 1984, sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Safety, US Department of Energy. The project was conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with Essex Corporation as a subcontractor. The material presented here is a revision and expansion of the bibliographic material developed in FY 1982 as part of a previous Human Factors Technology Project. The previous bibliography was published September 30, 1982, as Attachment 1 to the FY 1982 Project Status Report.

  13. Homogeneity study of the internal quality control sera for immunodiagnosis of HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Jorge Castejon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study reports the data from the first homogeneity assessment of samples composing the serum panels produced at the Immunology Center of Instituto Adolfo Lutz, São Paulo. These samples have been distributed to the public laboratories and those partaking in the Brazilian Unified Health System, and to the participants in the Internal Quality Control Program for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV antibody (Ab testing. Objective: To assess the homogeneity of serum samples in panels from different lots for HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS immunodiagnosis by using the statistical method to ensure quality of the reference material. Method: Sera homogeneity was evaluated by means of enzyme-linked immunoassay/enzyme immunoassay (ELISA/EIA for detection of HIV Ab, and the one-way analysis of variance was employed for analyzing the data. No statistically significant differences were found among the several serum vials. Conclusion: The sera dispensed in the vials were homogeneous in the respective lots.

  14. Occurrences of major polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in maternal and fetal cord blood sera in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gyuyeon; Kim, Sungjoo; Kim, Sunmi; Kim, Sungkyoon; Choi, Youngeun; Kim, Hai-Joong; Lee, Jeong Jae; Kim, Su Young; Lee, Sunggyu; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Choi, Sooran; Choi, Kyungho; Park, Jeongim

    2014-09-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are of growing public health concern because of their potential toxicities which range from endocrine disruption to neurodevelopment. However, information on their exposure among sensitive human populations is limited. The objectives of this study were to determine the levels of major PBDEs in blood sera of pregnant women and their matching newborn infants. For this purpose, a total of 198 maternal blood samples and 118 matching umbilical cord blood samples were collected from four regions of South Korea in 2011, and were determined for 19 PBDE congeners. Various demographic, dietary, and behavioral characteristics were asked in a questionnaire survey. Average concentration of total PBDEs in maternal blood serum was 3.34 ± 8.42 ng/g lipid weight (lw) at delivery and 3.14 ± 7.46 ng/g lw at 6 months of pregnancy, respectively. In cord blood serum, an average of 9.37 ± 12.60 ng/g lw was detected. Among the measured PBDE congeners, BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-153 were most dominant in both maternal and cord blood sera. Relatively higher levels of BDE-99 were detected in cord blood serum. Strong positive correlations were detected between maternal and cord blood serum samples, indicating the importance of maternal transfer. Health consequences of transplacental exposure to PBDEs among fetuses and newborn infants warrant further investigation.

  15. Asymmetry quantization and application to human mandibles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, Nanna; Nielsen, Mads; Sporring, Jon;

    2004-01-01

    All biological objects exhibit some degree of asymmetry, but for some parts of the human body, excessive asymmetry is a sign of pathology. Hence, the problem is to draw the line between categorization of objects being too asymmetric and objects exhibiting normal asymmetry. With a measure...

  16. Human-computer interface incorporating personal and application domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2011-03-29

    The present invention provides a human-computer interface. The interface includes provision of an application domain, for example corresponding to a three-dimensional application. The user is allowed to navigate and interact with the application domain. The interface also includes a personal domain, offering the user controls and interaction distinct from the application domain. The separation into two domains allows the most suitable interface methods in each: for example, three-dimensional navigation in the application domain, and two- or three-dimensional controls in the personal domain. Transitions between the application domain and the personal domain are under control of the user, and the transition method is substantially independent of the navigation in the application domain. For example, the user can fly through a three-dimensional application domain, and always move to the personal domain by moving a cursor near one extreme of the display.

  17. Prevalence of mycoplasma antibodies in lesser prairie-chicken sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Christian A; Crupper, Scott S; Applegate, Roger D; Robel, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    Serologic testing by the serum plate agglutination (SPA) procedure was performed to detect the presence of cross-reacting antibodies to Mycoplasma meleagridis, Mycoplasma synoviae, and Mycoplasma gallisepticum in lesser prairie-chickens (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) trapped over a 2-yr period in Finney and Kearny counties of southwestern Kansas. Sera examined from birds (n = 50) obtained in March-April 2000 tested positive for M meleagridis, M. synoviae, and M. gallisepticum at levels of 6%, 10%, and 10%, respectively, for the population examined. Mycoplasma meleagridis antibodies were detected in 3 samples (2.7%), M. synoviae antibodies in 2 samples (1.7%), and M. gallisepticum antibodies in 3 samples (2.7%) from birds (n = 112) collected in March-April 2001. Data obtained by SPA can result in false positives and should be verified by additional procedures such as the hemagglutination-inhibition test. Low amounts of sera prohibited this additional testing. Thus, the positive SPA results should be considered presumptive for the presence of Mycoplasma antibodies. Although Mycoplasma antibodies have been detected in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from Kingman and Butler counties in Kansas, this report is the first of possible mycoplasmosis in Finney and Kearny counties, Kansas. All birds testing positive by this procedure should be considered as potential carriers of Mycoplasma and should not be used in relocation efforts.

  18. Generation and application of human iPS cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Ghun; RAO LingJun; CHENG LinZhao; XIAO Lei

    2009-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of unlimited proliferation and maintenance of pluripo-tency in vitro; these properties may lead to potential applications in regenerative medicine.However,immune rejection hampers the allogenic application of human ES cells.Over-expression of several specific transcription factors has been used to reprogram human adult cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells,which are similar to hESCs in many aspects.The iPS technique makes it possible to produce patient-specific pluripotent stem cells for transplantation therapy without immune rejection.However,some challenges remain,including viral vector integration into the genome,the existence of exogenous oncogenic factors,and low induction efficiency.Here,we review recent advances in human iPS methodology,as well as remaining challenges and its potential applications.

  19. Camera systems in human motion analysis for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Lim Chee; Basah, Shafriza Nisha; Yaacob, Sazali; Juan, Yeap Ewe; Kadir, Aida Khairunnisaa Ab.

    2015-05-01

    Human Motion Analysis (HMA) system has been one of the major interests among researchers in the field of computer vision, artificial intelligence and biomedical engineering and sciences. This is due to its wide and promising biomedical applications, namely, bio-instrumentation for human computer interfacing and surveillance system for monitoring human behaviour as well as analysis of biomedical signal and image processing for diagnosis and rehabilitation applications. This paper provides an extensive review of the camera system of HMA, its taxonomy, including camera types, camera calibration and camera configuration. The review focused on evaluating the camera system consideration of the HMA system specifically for biomedical applications. This review is important as it provides guidelines and recommendation for researchers and practitioners in selecting a camera system of the HMA system for biomedical applications.

  20. Applications of deuterium oxide in human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bila, Wendell Costa; Mariano, Reysla Maria da Silveira; Silva, Valmin Ramos; Santos, Maria Emília Soares Martins Dos; Lamounier, Joel Alves; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Galdino, Alexsandro Sobreira

    2017-02-06

    The main aim goal of this review was to gather information about recent publications related to deuterium oxide (D2O), and its use as a scientific tool related to human health. Searches were made in electronic databases Pubmed, Scielo, Lilacs, Medline and Cochrane. Moreover, the following patent databases were consulted: EPO (Espacenet patent search), USPTO (United States Patent and Trademark Office) and Google Patents, which cover researches worldwide related to innovations using D2O.

  1. Limited hydrolysis combined with controlled Maillard-induced glycation does not reduce immunoreactivity of soy protein for all sera tested.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Jordan; Greenberg, Yana; Sriramarao, P; Ismail, Baraem P

    2016-12-15

    Combining proteolysis and Maillard-induced glycation was investigated to reduce the immunoreactivity of soy protein. Soy protein was hydrolyzed by Alcalase following response surface methodology utilizing three variables, temperature, time, and enzyme:substrate ratio, with the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and percent reduction in immunoreactivity as response variables. Western blots and ELISA were used to evaluate immunoreactivity using human sera. Data were fitted to appropriate models and prediction equations were generated to determine optimal hydrolysis conditions. The hydrolysate produced under optimized conditions was subjected to glycation with dextran. Hydrolysate produced under optimal conditions had 7.8% DH and a percent reduction in immunoreactivity ranging from 20% to 52%, depending on the sera used. Upon glycation, immunoreactivity was further reduced only when using serum that had the highest soy-specific IgE. This work revealed limitations and provided premises for future studies intended to prove the potency of the combined modification approach to produce a hypoallergenic protein ingredient.

  2. Asymmetry quantization and application to human mandibles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, Nanna; Nielsen, Mads; Sporring, Jon

    2004-01-01

    All biological objects exhibit some degree of asymmetry, but for some parts of the human body, excessive asymmetry is a sign of pathology. Hence, the problem is to draw the line between categorization of objects being too asymmetric and objects exhibiting normal asymmetry. With a measure...... for quantizing asymmetry. The methodology is based on non-rigid registration in the sense that the "size" of a diffeomorphism describes the amount of asymmetry. We will define this size in terms of the minimum biological work needed. That is, we evaluate how much work the biological system must carry out...

  3. Development of an elisa for the diagnosis of reactive IgE antibodies anti-therapeutic horse sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Simone, Salvatore Giovanni; Souza, Andre Luis Almeida; Aguiar, Aniesse Silva; Melgarejo, Anibal Raphel; Provance-Jr, David William

    2017-08-12

    Hypersensitive diseases that involve IgE reactivity are important concern of public, especially those encompassing the potential pathogenesis from the administration of horse serum-based therapeutics such as antivenoms. A method for the definitive diagnosis of reactive IgE is important for identifying allergic patients to control severe collateral effects during planned and emergency application of immunotherapies when the allergy source cannot be avoided for treatment. To date, no tests have been developed to accompany the wide range of antivenoms produced from horse sera. The aim of this was to develop a cost-effective ELISA of high sensitivity and specificity to detect circulating patient IgE that binds horse IgG3, the most prevalent antibody class in passive antibody therapies. Horse IgG3 was purified in a single step on jacalin-Sepharose and absorbed to standard ELISA plates as the capture molecule for reactive human IgE. The direct performance evaluation with allergenic and non-allergenic patient, together with competitive peptides assays, showed high sensitivity and specificity to detect human IgE that recognized horse IgG3. The analytical sensitivity and ED50 were calculated to be 0.01 μg mL(-1) and 0.052 μg mL(-1), respectively. The intra- and inter-assay coefficient of variation ranged from 3.3 to 11.1% and 4.0-8.0%, respectively. The horse IgG3-based ELISA assay can detect reactive allergenic IgE at picomolar concentrations. The coefficient of variation suggests that it can be easily standardized between laboratories, provide rapid and can be applied to population surveillance. Patient management during treatment for envenomation would be greatly improved by a robust and reliable diagnostic test for preexisting allergies to mitigate life-threating consequences of hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anti-collagen antibodies in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, H K; Ryvar, R; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C L

    1980-11-01

    Anti-cartilage antibodies, demonstrable by immunofluorescence, were found in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In most of these patients antibodies to type II collagen were detected. In specificity studies on these anti-collagen antibodies, they appeared to be type specific, showing no reaction with collagen types I and III. Denatured type II collagen reacted much less well than native type II, but isolated peptides from different regions of the collagen molecule were differentiated by individual sera. Removal of the glycoside side chains from native type II collagen had no effect on its antigenicity. The findings suggest that these patients produce highly specific antibodies which react with the triple helix of type II collagen.

  5. Bioassay and radioimmunoassay of lactogens in sera from children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gout, P W; Tze, W J; Rennie, P S; Bruchovsky, N

    1984-05-16

    Lactogen levels in sera from children have been determined using the Nb 2 lymphoma cell bioassay (BA) and conventional radioimmunoassay (RIA). Assays were done on samples obtained under basal conditions and after pituitary stimulation induced by insulin or arginine administration. There was a close correspondence between BA and RIA results (r = 0.94; n = 43). The average ratio of the BA and RIA estimates of the lactogen levels (BA/RIA) was 0.86 +/- 0.13 (mean +/- SD) and 0.82 +/- 0.17 for basal and stimulated conditions, respectively. The increased secretion of lactogens after pituitary stimulation was not found to be associated with a change in the BA/RIA ratio.

  6. Identification of new centrosome proteins by autoimmune patient sera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Compared to other subcellular organelles, centrosome proteome can hardly be studied, due to the dif- ficulties in separation and purification of centrosome. Auto-antisera from 6 autoimmune patients, which recognized centrosome specifically in immunofluorescence, were used to identify the corresponding centrosomal proteins. The sera were first tested by Western blot on whole cell lysate, and all bound antibodies were then eluted from each single band in Western blot membrane to assure which antibody was responsible for the centrosome specific immunofluorescence staining. The corresponding pro- teins were obtained by immunoprecipitation and identified by mass spectrometry. Six centrosomal proteins, including 2 known centrosomal proteins and 4 proteins with unknown localization or report- edly non-centrosomal localization, were identified. These proteins apparently involve in cell cycle regulation, signal transduction pathways, molecular chaperons, and metabolism enzymes, which may reflect the expected functional diversity of centrosome.

  7. Identification of new centrosome proteins by autoimmune patient sera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Liang; LI Yan; YANG Dong; WANG LiMin; HE Fang; ZHOU ChunYuan; LI YongZhe; ZENG ChangQing; He DaCheng

    2007-01-01

    Compared to other subcellular organelles, centrosome proteome can hardly be studied, due to the difficulties in separation and purification of centrosome. Auto-antisera from 6 autoimmune patients, which recognized centrosome specifically in immunofluorescence, were used to identify the corresponding centrosomal proteins. The sera were first tested by Western blot on whole cell lysate, and all bound antibodies were then eluted from each single band in Western blot membrane to assure which antibody was responsible for the centrosome specific immunofluorescence staining. The corresponding proteins were obtained by immunoprecipitation and identified by mass spectrometry. Six centrosomal proteins, including 2 known centrosomal proteins and 4 proteins with unknown localization or reportedly non-centrosomal localization, were identified. These proteins apparently involve in cell cycle regulation, signal transduction pathways, molecular chaperons, and metabolism enzymes, which may reflect the expected functional diversity of centrosome.

  8. [Screening and studies of the specificity of antinuclear antibodies in lupus erythematosus and scleroderma sera in the tumor cell monolayer substrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüthke, K; Conrad, K; Frank, K H

    1989-01-01

    The comparative study of the human tumour cell line HeLa and rat liver sections for the detection of antinuclear antibodies by the indirect immunofluorescence technique demonstrates the superiority of HeLa monolayer in sensitivity and specificity. Use of monolayers is essential for the diagnosis of antinucleolar and anticentromere ANA specificities and permits differentiation between anti-Sm/RNP, anti-SS-B and anti-Scl-70. ANA profiles are evaluated in 142 sera of 72 patients with different forms of lupus erythematosus and scleroderma and in 216 sera of healthy subjects.

  9. Potential applications and human biosafety of nanomaterials used in nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hong; Wang, Yafei; Gu, Yuanliang; Bowman, Linda; Zhao, Jinshun; Ding, Min

    2017-06-06

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, potential applications of nanomaterials in medicine have been widely researched in recent years. Nanomaterials themselves can be used as image agents or therapeutic drugs, and for drug and gene delivery, biological devices, nanoelectronic biosensors or molecular nanotechnology. As the composition, morphology, chemical properties, implant sites as well as potential applications become more and more complex, human biosafety of nanomaterials for clinical use has become a major concern. If nanoparticles accumulate in the human body or interact with the body molecules or chemical components, health risks may also occur. Accordingly, the unique chemical and physical properties, potential applications in medical fields, as well as human biosafety in clinical trials are reviewed in this study. Finally, this article tries to give some suggestions for future work in nanomedicine research. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. In Vitro Endothelial Cell Proliferation Assay Reveals Distinct Levels of Proangiogenic Cytokines Characterizing Sera of Healthy Subjects and of Patients with Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Voltan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although myocardial angiogenesis is thought to play an important role in heart failure (HF, the involvement of circulating proinflammatory and proangiogenic cytokines in the pathogenesis and/or prognosis of HF has not been deeply investigated. By using a highly standardized proliferation assay with human endothelial cells, we first demonstrated that sera from older (mean age 52±7.6 years; n=46 healthy donors promoted endothelial cell proliferation to a significantly higher extent compared to sera obtained from younger healthy donors (mean age 29±8.6 years; n=20. The promotion of endothelial cell proliferation was accompanied by high serum levels of several proangiogenic cytokines. When we assessed endothelial cell proliferation in response to HF patients’ sera, we observed that a subset of sera (n=11 promoted cell proliferation to a significantly lesser extent compared to the majority of sera (n=18. Also, in this case, the difference between the patient groups in the ability to induce endothelial cell proliferation correlated to significant (P<0.05 differences in serum proangiogenic cytokine levels. Unexpectedly, HF patients associated to the highest endothelial proliferation index showed the worst prognosis as evaluated in terms of subsequent cardiovascular events in the follow-up, suggesting that high levels of circulating proangiogenic cytokines might be related to a worse prognosis.

  11. Challenges for coexistence of machine to machine and human to human applications in mobile network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanyal, R.; Cianca, E.; Prasad, Ramjee

    2012-01-01

    be evolved to address various nuances of the mobile devices used by man and machines. The bigger question is as follows. Is the state-of-the-art mobile network designed optimally to cater both the Human-to-Human and Machine-to-Machine applications? This paper presents the primary challenges...

  12. Circulating Natural IgM Antibodies Against Angiogenin in the Peripheral Blood Sera of Patients with Osteosarcoma as Candidate Biomarkers and Reporters of Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitskaya, Yulia A.; Rico, Genaro; Linares, Luis; González, Roberto; Téllez, René; Estrada, Eréndira; Marín, Norma; Martínez, Elisa; Alfaro, Alfonso; Ibarra, Clemente

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tumor immunology research has led to the identification of a number of tumor-associated self antigens, suggesting that most tumors trigger an immunogenic response, as is the case in osteosarcoma, where the detection of natural serum IgM antibodies might achieve the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. Natural IgM antibodies to tumor-associated proteins may expand the number of available tumor biomarkers for osteosarcoma and may be used together in a serum profile to enhance test sensitivity and specificity. Natural IgM antibodies can be consistently detected in the peripheral blood sera months to years before the tumor is diagnosed clinically. The study of the level of a potential biomarker many months (or years) prior to diagnosis is fundamentally important. Integrated circulating and imaging markers in clinical practice treating osteosarcoma have potential applications for controlling tumor angiogenesis. Objectives: To study the expression of natural IgM antibodies to the tumor antigens of angiogenesis in the peripheral blood sera of osteosarcoma patients and healthy individuals, and to develop serum-based predictive biomarkers. Methods: Peripheral venous blood samples were collected from 117 osteosarcoma patients and 117 patients with other tumors. All diagnosis was histologically confirmed. Staging of patients was performed according to the Enneking Surgical Staging System. The control group consisted of 117 age- and sex- matched healthy individuals. In this study, novel immunoconjugates were designed, synthesized and then used to develop a rapid, specific and sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method to detect angiogenin (ANG)–IgM directly in the peripheral blood sera of humans. Results: Serum ANG–IgM levels are significantly higher in osteosarcoma patients than in healthy individuals (P osteosarcoma patients and ANG–IgM levels were significantly higher in osteosarcoma patients compared to any other tumors (P osteosarcoma patients than

  13. Prebiotics from marine macroalgae for human and animal health applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Laurie; Murphy, Brian; McLoughlin, Peter; Duggan, Patrick; Lawlor, Peadar G; Hughes, Helen; Gardiner, Gillian E

    2010-07-01

    The marine environment is an untapped source of bioactive compounds. Specifically, marine macroalgae (seaweeds) are rich in polysaccharides that could potentially be exploited as prebiotic functional ingredients for both human and animal health applications. Prebiotics are non-digestible, selectively fermented compounds that stimulate the growth and/or activity of beneficial gut microbiota which, in turn, confer health benefits on the host. This review will introduce the concept and potential applications of prebiotics, followed by an outline of the chemistry of seaweed polysaccharides. Their potential for use as prebiotics for both humans and animals will be highlighted by reviewing data from both in vitro and in vivo studies conducted to date.

  14. Prebiotics from marine macroalgae for human and animal health applications.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Laurie

    2010-01-01

    The marine environment is an untapped source of bioactive compounds. Specifically, marine macroalgae (seaweeds) are rich in polysaccharides that could potentially be exploited as prebiotic functional ingredients for both human and animal health applications. Prebiotics are non-digestible, selectively fermented compounds that stimulate the growth and\\/or activity of beneficial gut microbiota which, in turn, confer health benefits on the host. This review will introduce the concept and potential applications of prebiotics, followed by an outline of the chemistry of seaweed polysaccharides. Their potential for use as prebiotics for both humans and animals will be highlighted by reviewing data from both in vitro and in vivo studies conducted to date.

  15. Effects of sera taken from women with recurrent spontaneous abortion on sperm motility and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recurrent spontaneous abortion impacts almost 1% of couples. The sera from women with unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion (URSA) have toxic effects on embryos that grow in the uterus. Therefore, the abnormal condition of the uterus may also affect sperm qualities. Objective: The objectives of this study were to search if these sera could induce DNA denaturation in sperm nuclei and also it could reduce sperm motility. Materials and Methods: Sera of 20 women with URSA history...

  16. Characterization of Sera with Discordant Results from Reverse Sequence Screening for Syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyunghoon Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse sequence screening for syphilis (RSSS (screening with treponemal tests, followed by confirmation with nontreponemal tests has been increasingly adopted. CDC recommends confirmation of discordant results (reactive EIA/CIA and nonreactive nontreponemal test with Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA. We characterized sera with discordant results from RSSS with Architect Syphilis TP CIA. Among 15,713 screening tests using Architect Syphilis TP at Seoul National University Gangnam Center between October 2010 and May 2011, 260 (1.7% showed reactive results. Rapid plasma reagin (RPR and TP-PA were performed on 153 available sera among them. On sera with discordant results between Architect Syphilis TP and TP-PA, INNO-LIA Syphilis Score and FTA-ABS were performed. Among 153 sera, RPR was nonreactive in 126 (82.4%. Among them, TP-PA was positive in 103 (81.7%, indeterminate (± in 7 (5.6%, and negative in 16 (12.7%. Out of 16 CIA(+/RPR(−/TP-PA(− sera, INNO-LIA Syphilis Score and/or FTA-ABS were negative on 14 sera. Out of 7 CIA(+/RPR(−/TP-PA(± sera, INNO-LIA Syphilis Score and FTA-ABS were positive/reactive in 6 sera. RSSS with confirmation by TP-PA on sera with discordant results between Architect Syphilis TP and RPR effectively delineated those discordant results and could be successfully adopted for routine checkup for syphilis.

  17. Characterization of sera with discordant results from reverse sequence screening for syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyunghoon; Park, Hyewon; Roh, Eun Youn; Shin, Sue; Park, Kyoung Un; Park, Myoung Hee; Song, Eun Young

    2013-01-01

    Reverse sequence screening for syphilis (RSSS) (screening with treponemal tests, followed by confirmation with nontreponemal tests) has been increasingly adopted. CDC recommends confirmation of discordant results (reactive EIA/CIA and nonreactive nontreponemal test) with Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA). We characterized sera with discordant results from RSSS with Architect Syphilis TP CIA. Among 15,713 screening tests using Architect Syphilis TP at Seoul National University Gangnam Center between October 2010 and May 2011, 260 (1.7%) showed reactive results. Rapid plasma reagin (RPR) and TP-PA were performed on 153 available sera among them. On sera with discordant results between Architect Syphilis TP and TP-PA, INNO-LIA Syphilis Score and FTA-ABS were performed. Among 153 sera, RPR was nonreactive in 126 (82.4%). Among them, TP-PA was positive in 103 (81.7%), indeterminate (±) in 7 (5.6%), and negative in 16 (12.7%). Out of 16 CIA(+)/RPR(-)/TP-PA(-) sera, INNO-LIA Syphilis Score and/or FTA-ABS were negative on 14 sera. Out of 7 CIA(+)/RPR(-)/TP-PA(±) sera, INNO-LIA Syphilis Score and FTA-ABS were positive/reactive in 6 sera. RSSS with confirmation by TP-PA on sera with discordant results between Architect Syphilis TP and RPR effectively delineated those discordant results and could be successfully adopted for routine checkup for syphilis.

  18. The rapid plasma reagin (circle) card test in biological false positive and leprosy sera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, M. F.; Backhouse, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The rapid plasma reagin (RPR) circle card and the Venereal Disease Reference Laboratory (VDRL) slide test results were compared on a group of sera known to show biological false positive (BFP) reactions to reagin detection tests for syphilis. The RPR test was more specific than the VDRL test on the sera selected, ie, it gave fewer false positive results than the VDRL test. However, in a group of presumed normal sera, the RPR test gave BFP reactions while the VDRL test gave none. The RPR test gave fewer BFP reactions than the VDRL test in 269 sera from patients with lepromatous leprosy. PMID:5086221

  19. Training human mesenchymal stromal cells for bone tissue engineering applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, J.

    2012-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are an interesting source for cell therapies and tissue engineering applications, because these cells are able to differentiate into various target tissues, such as bone, cartilage, fat and endothelial cells. In addition, they secrete a wide array of growth fa

  20. Application of Data Collection Techniques by Human Performance Technology Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Minjing

    2011-01-01

    By content-analyzing 22 published cases from a variety of professional and academic books and journals, this study examines the status quo of human performance technology (HPT) practitioners' application of five major data collection techniques in their everyday work: questionnaire, interview, focus group, observation, and document collection. The…

  1. Human applications of the INEL patient treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, F.; Wessol, D.; Atkinson, C.; Nigg, D. [Idaho National Accelerator Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-11-01

    During the past few years, murine and large animal research, as well as human studies have provided data to the point where human clinical trials have been initiated at the BMRR using BPA-F for gliomas and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR) using BPA for melanomas of the extremeties. It is expected that glioma trials using BSH will proceed soon at the Petten High Flux Reactor (HFR) in the Netherlands. The first human glioma epithermal boron neutron capture therapy application was performed at the BMRR in the fall of 1994. This was a collaborative effort by BNL, Beth Israel Manhattan hospital, and INEL. The INEL planning system was chosen to perform dose predictions for this application.

  2. Human walking in virtual environments perception, technology, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Visell, Yon; Campos, Jennifer; Lécuyer, Anatole

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a survey of past and recent developments on human walking in virtual environments with an emphasis on human self-motion perception, the multisensory nature of experiences of walking, conceptual design approaches, current technologies, and applications. The use of virtual reality and movement simulation systems is becoming increasingly popular and more accessible to a wide variety of research fields and applications. While, in the past, simulation technologies have focused on developing realistic, interactive visual environments, it is becoming increasingly obvious that our everyday interactions are highly multisensory. Therefore, investigators are beginning to understand the critical importance of developing and validating locomotor interfaces that can allow for realistic, natural behaviours. The book aims to present an overview of what is currently understood about human perception and performance when moving in virtual environments and to situate it relative to the broader scientific and ...

  3. A macroecological analysis of SERA derived forest heights and implications for forest volume remote sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Brolly

    Full Text Available Individual trees have been shown to exhibit strong relationships between DBH, height and volume. Often such studies are cited as justification for forest volume or standing biomass estimation through remote sensing. With resolution of common satellite remote sensing systems generally too low to resolve individuals, and a need for larger coverage, these systems rely on descriptive heights, which account for tree collections in forests. For remote sensing and allometric applications, this height is not entirely understood in terms of its location. Here, a forest growth model (SERA analyzes forest canopy height relationships with forest wood volume. Maximum height, mean, H₁₀₀, and Lorey's height are examined for variability under plant number density, resource and species. Our findings, shown to be allometrically consistent with empirical measurements for forested communities world-wide, are analyzed for implications to forest remote sensing techniques such as LiDAR and RADAR. Traditional forestry measures of maximum height, and to a lesser extent H₁₀₀ and Lorey's, exhibit little consistent correlation with forest volume across modeled conditions. The implication is that using forest height to infer volume or biomass from remote sensing requires species and community behavioral information to infer accurate estimates using height alone. SERA predicts mean height to provide the most consistent relationship with volume of the height classifications studied and overall across forest variations. This prediction agrees with empirical data collected from conifer and angiosperm forests with plant densities ranging between 10²-10⁶ plants/hectare and heights 6-49 m. Height classifications investigated are potentially linked to radar scattering centers with implications for allometry. These findings may be used to advance forest biomass estimation accuracy through remote sensing. Furthermore, Lorey's height with its specific relationship to

  4. A macroecological analysis of SERA derived forest heights and implications for forest volume remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolly, Matthew; Woodhouse, Iain H; Niklas, Karl J; Hammond, Sean T

    2012-01-01

    Individual trees have been shown to exhibit strong relationships between DBH, height and volume. Often such studies are cited as justification for forest volume or standing biomass estimation through remote sensing. With resolution of common satellite remote sensing systems generally too low to resolve individuals, and a need for larger coverage, these systems rely on descriptive heights, which account for tree collections in forests. For remote sensing and allometric applications, this height is not entirely understood in terms of its location. Here, a forest growth model (SERA) analyzes forest canopy height relationships with forest wood volume. Maximum height, mean, H₁₀₀, and Lorey's height are examined for variability under plant number density, resource and species. Our findings, shown to be allometrically consistent with empirical measurements for forested communities world-wide, are analyzed for implications to forest remote sensing techniques such as LiDAR and RADAR. Traditional forestry measures of maximum height, and to a lesser extent H₁₀₀ and Lorey's, exhibit little consistent correlation with forest volume across modeled conditions. The implication is that using forest height to infer volume or biomass from remote sensing requires species and community behavioral information to infer accurate estimates using height alone. SERA predicts mean height to provide the most consistent relationship with volume of the height classifications studied and overall across forest variations. This prediction agrees with empirical data collected from conifer and angiosperm forests with plant densities ranging between 10²-10⁶ plants/hectare and heights 6-49 m. Height classifications investigated are potentially linked to radar scattering centers with implications for allometry. These findings may be used to advance forest biomass estimation accuracy through remote sensing. Furthermore, Lorey's height with its specific relationship to remote sensing

  5. Trace elements in sera from patients with renal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Yoshinori; Nakai, Keiko; Sera, Kouichiro; Sato, Michirou

    1999-04-01

    In hemodialysis (HD) patients, an accumulation of trace elements such as aluminum, copper, silicon and vanadium has been reported. Aluminum-caused encephalopathy and aluminum-related bone diseases are important trace element-related complications. Using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) we determined concentrations of aluminum, silicon, copper, zinc, selenium and bromine in sera of 29 patients with HD, 14 nondialysis patients with renal disease (RD) and 27 normal controls. The concentration of serum silicon of the patients with HD was 107.4 ± 61.3 μmol/l, which is markedly higher than that of normal controls (48.3 ± 25.8 μmol/l, p < 0.0001). The serum concentrations of zinc and bromine in patients with HD were 11.9 ± 1.7 and 21.3 ± 3.0 μmol/l, respectively. Both were markedly lower than those of normal controls (15.6 ± 2.6, 69.2 ± 8.3 μmol/l, p < 0.0001). The concentrations of aluminium and bromine in the serum of patients with RD were 171.9 ± 64.3 and 81.9 ± 11.6 μmol/l, which were markedly higher than those of normal controls ( p < 0.0001, p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in the concentration of copper and selenium among three groups.

  6. Application of human error analysis to aviation and space operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, W.R.

    1998-03-01

    For the past several years at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) the authors have been working to apply methods of human error analysis to the design of complex systems. They have focused on adapting human reliability analysis (HRA) methods that were developed for Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for application to system design. They are developing methods so that human errors can be systematically identified during system design, the potential consequences of each error can be assessed, and potential corrective actions (e.g. changes to system design or procedures) can be identified. The primary vehicle the authors have used to develop and apply these methods has been a series of projects sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to apply human error analysis to aviation operations. They are currently adapting their methods and tools of human error analysis to the domain of air traffic management (ATM) systems. Under the NASA-sponsored Advanced Air Traffic Technologies (AATT) program they are working to address issues of human reliability in the design of ATM systems to support the development of a free flight environment for commercial air traffic in the US. They are also currently testing the application of their human error analysis approach for space flight operations. They have developed a simplified model of the critical habitability functions for the space station Mir, and have used this model to assess the affects of system failures and human errors that have occurred in the wake of the collision incident last year. They are developing an approach so that lessons learned from Mir operations can be systematically applied to design and operation of long-term space missions such as the International Space Station (ISS) and the manned Mars mission.

  7. An endogenous antitoxin to the lethal venom of the funnel web spider, Atrax robustus, in rabbit sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheumack, D D; Comis, A; Claassens, R; Mylecharane, E J; Spence, I; Howden, M E

    1991-01-01

    1. An endogenous antitoxin fraction was isolated from non-immune rabbit sera by affinity chromatography with robustoxin bound to the solid support. 2. Robustoxin is the sole lethal toxin in the venom of the male funnel web spider, Atrax robustus. 3. The fraction was found to contain IgG and IgM immunoglobulins. 4. This fraction prevented or reversed the lethal actions of the crude venom in newborn mice, in mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations, and in anaesthetized monkeys. 5. The antitoxin fraction is of potential value in the therapy of human envenomation by A. robustus.

  8. Treatment Strategies for Human Arboviral Infections Applicable to Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-16

    0 Lf Reprintod from Tropical Veterinary Medicine : Current Issues and Perspectives 1• • Volume 653 of the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences...June 16, 1992 _ Treatment Strategies for Human = __ Arboviral Infections Applicable to I= ’ Veterinary Medicine = ! Chlh. MEIR KENDE (A) U •Department...A 3 0. C . U. 2 * >. U u U>1 it 020 ce*. 0. , -,r- 8 C- ed U a - .; U~u0.M KENDE: HUMAN ARBOVIRAL INFECTIONS AND VETERINARY MEDICINE 299 TABLE 2

  9. Th17-relevant cytokines vary with sera of different ANA staining patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinhui; Meng, Wei; Zhang, Denghai; Qiu, Chaolin; Hua, Ling; Xie, Qiuhua; He, Xiaoxue; Ye, Hongxing

    2013-04-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) react with components located in the cell nucleus and cytoplasm. Differing ANA staining patterns may reflect the specificity of autoantibodies in sera and indicate some autoimmune diseases specifically, to some extent. Th17-relevant cytokines have been shown to be involved in a variety of autoimmune diseases, but not consistently. In this study, we investigated whether differences in Th17-relevant cytokines exist between different ANA pattern sera. Sera of 64 ANA-positive patients (12 homogeneous, 13 speckled particle, 11 nucleolar, 15 centromere, 6 peripheral nuclear) and 16 healthy donors were analyzed for IL-17, IL-6, IL-21, IL-22, IL-23 (p19), and TGF-β, and subsequently correlations between IL-17 and IL-6, IL-21, IL-22, IL-23, and TGF-β were analyzed. Results showed that these Th17-relevant cytokines varied with different ANA-positive sera compared with healthy donors, except TGF-β. Among them, IL-21 and IL-22 were higher with all ANA-positive sera and IL-17, IL-6, and IL-23 were higher with three or more ANA staining sera. No significant difference in these cytokines was seen between the different ANA staining sera except IL-17 levels in sera of peripheral nuclear staining positive subjects were higher than nucleolar. Additionally, in ANA-positive sera, IL-17 correlated with IL-6, IL-21, IL-22, and IL-23, but not with TGF-β. Thus, we demonstrated that Th17-relevant cytokines varied with different ANA staining pattern sera, suggesting that Th17-relevant cytokines play differing roles in autoimmune diseases.

  10. Human Amnion Membrane: Potential Applications in Oral and Periodontal Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Ranjana; Bajaj, Aashima; Gundappa, Mohan

    2017-01-01

    Human amniotic membrane (HAM) is derived from the fetal membranes which consist of the inner amniotic membrane made of single layer of amnion cells fixed to collagen-rich mesenchyme attached to chorion. HAM has low immunogenicity, anti-inflammatory properties and their cells can be isolated without the sacrifice of human embryos. Amniotic membrane has biological properties which are important for the experimental and clinical applications in managing patients of various medical specialties. Abundant, natural and wonderful biomembrane not only protects the foetus but also has various clinical applications in the field of dermatology, ophthalmology, ENT surgery, orthopedics and dental surgery. As it is discarded post-partum it may be useful for regenerative medicine and cell therapy to treat damaged or diseased tissues.

  11. Prebiotics from Marine Macroalgae for Human and Animal Health Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie O’Sullivan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The marine environment is an untapped source of bioactive compounds. Specifically, marine macroalgae (seaweeds are rich in polysaccharides that could potentially be exploited as prebiotic functional ingredients for both human and animal health applications. Prebiotics are non-digestible, selectively fermented compounds that stimulate the growth and/or activity of beneficial gut microbiota which, in turn, confer health benefits on the host. This review will introduce the concept and potential applications of prebiotics, followed by an outline of the chemistry of seaweed polysaccharides. Their potential for use as prebiotics for both humans and animals will be highlighted by reviewing data from both in vitro and in vivo studies conducted to date.

  12. Prebiotics from Marine Macroalgae for Human and Animal Health Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Sullivan, Laurie; Murphy, Brian; McLoughlin, Peter; Duggan, Patrick; Lawlor, Peadar G.; Hughes, Helen; Gardiner, Gillian E.

    2010-01-01

    The marine environment is an untapped source of bioactive compounds. Specifically, marine macroalgae (seaweeds) are rich in polysaccharides that could potentially be exploited as prebiotic functional ingredients for both human and animal health applications. Prebiotics are non-digestible, selectively fermented compounds that stimulate the growth and/or activity of beneficial gut microbiota which, in turn, confer health benefits on the host. This review will introduce the concept and potential applications of prebiotics, followed by an outline of the chemistry of seaweed polysaccharides. Their potential for use as prebiotics for both humans and animals will be highlighted by reviewing data from both in vitro and in vivo studies conducted to date. PMID:20714423

  13. Human Amnion Membrane: Potential Applications in Oral and Periodontal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Ranjana; Bajaj, Aashima; Gundappa, Mohan

    2017-01-01

    Human amniotic membrane (HAM) is derived from the fetal membranes which consist of the inner amniotic membrane made of single layer of amnion cells fixed to collagen-rich mesenchyme attached to chorion. HAM has low immunogenicity, anti-inflammatory properties and their cells can be isolated without the sacrifice of human embryos. Amniotic membrane has biological properties which are important for the experimental and clinical applications in managing patients of various medical specialties. Abundant, natural and wonderful biomembrane not only protects the foetus but also has various clinical applications in the field of dermatology, ophthalmology, ENT surgery, orthopedics and dental surgery. As it is discarded post-partum it may be useful for regenerative medicine and cell therapy to treat damaged or diseased tissues. PMID:28316944

  14. A General Method to Discover Epitopes from Sera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Whittemore

    Full Text Available Antigen-antibody complexes are central players in an effective immune response. However, finding those interactions relevant to a particular disease state can be arduous. Nonetheless many paths to discovery have been explored since deciphering these interactions can greatly facilitate the development of new diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. In silico B cell epitope mapping approaches have been widely pursued, though success has not been consistent. Antibody mixtures in immune sera have been used as handles for biologically relevant antigens, but these and other experimental approaches have proven resource intensive and time consuming. In addition, these methods are often tailored to individual diseases or a specific proteome, rather than providing a universal platform. Most of these methods are not able to identify the specific antibody's epitopes from unknown antigens, such as un-annotated neo antigens in cancer. Alternatively, a peptide library comprised of sequences unrestricted by naturally-found protein space provides for a universal search for mimotopes of an antibody's epitope. Here we present the utility of such a non-natural random sequence library of 10,000 peptides physically addressed on a microarray for mimotope discovery without sequence information of the specific antigen. The peptide arrays were probed with serum from an antigen-immunized rabbit, or alternatively probed with serum pre-absorbed with the same immunizing antigen. With this positive and negative screening scheme, we identified the library-peptides as the mimotopes of the antigen. The unique library peptides were successfully used to isolate antigen-specific antibodies from complete immune serum. Sequence analysis of these peptides revealed the epitopes in the immunized antigen. We present this method as an inexpensive, efficient method for identifying mimotopes of any antibody's targets. These mimotopes should be useful in defining both components of the

  15. Characterization of KLK4 expression and detection of KLK4-specific antibody in prostate cancer patient sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Craig H; Fanger, Gary R; Retter, Marc W; Hylander, Bonnie L; Penetrante, Remedios B; Houghton, Raymond L; Zhang, Xinqun; McNeill, Patricia D; Filho, Aristides Maltez; Nolasco, Marcos; Badaro, Roberto; Cheever, Martin A; Reed, Steven G; Dillon, Davin C; Watanabe, Yoshihiro

    2002-10-10

    The ability to identify prostate tumor or prostate tissue specific genes that are expressed at high levels and use their protein products as targets could greatly aid in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based subtraction technique, we have recovered the recently described KLK4 (prostase) gene from human prostate cDNA. In this study, KLK4 gene expression in human prostate tumors was further characterized using cDNA quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry, demonstrating that the gene is specifically expressed at both the mRNA and protein levels in normal human prostate tissue, and in both primary and metastatic prostate tumor samples. Quantitative mRNA analysis also demonstrated low level expression including adrenal gland, salivary gland and thyroid. Finally, it was demonstrated that prostate cancer patient sera contain antibodies that bind specifically to recombinant KLK4 protein. This antibody has been used to detect KLK4-specific peptides in epitope mapping experiments. The relatively specific expression profile and elevated level of KLK4 mRNA and protein in both tumor and normal prostate tissues, in addition to detectable KLK4-specific antibody in cancer patient sera, supports additional efforts to determine if KLK4 can play a role in the diagnosis of prostate cancer, the monitoring of residual disease, or act as a target for immunotherapy.

  16. Big Data and Intelligence: Applications, Human Capital, and Education

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Landon-Murray

    2016-01-01

    The potential for big data to contribute to the US intelligence mission goes beyond bulk collection, social media and counterterrorism. Applications will speak to a range of issues of major concern to intelligence agencies, from military operations to climate change to cyber security. There are challenges too: procurement lags, data stovepiping, separating signal from noise, sources and methods, a range of normative issues, and central to managing these challenges, human capital. These potent...

  17. Marine Enzymes: Production and Applications for Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, T Eswara; Imchen, M; Kumavath, R

    Marine microbial enzymes have wide applications in bioindustries. Selection of microorganisms for enzyme production at the industrial level requires good yield and high production rate. A number of enzymes such as amylase, caseinase, lipase, gelatinase, and DNases have been discovered from microbes isolated from extreme marine environments. Such enzymes are thermostable, tolerant to a varied range of pH and other harsh conditions required in industrial applications. Novelty in their structure and characteristics has shown promising scope to the researchers in academia and industry. In this chapter, we present a bird's eye view on recent research works in the field of enzyme production from marine origin as well as their potential biological applications relevant to human health. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Immunoproteome of Aspergillus fumigatus Using Sera of Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emylli D. Virginio

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis is a life-threatening lung or systemic infection caused by the opportunistic mold Aspergillus fumigatus. The disease affects mainly immunocompromised hosts, and patients with hematological malignances or who have been submitted to stem cell transplantation are at high risk. Despite the current use of Platelia™ Aspergillus as a diagnostic test, the early diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis remains a major challenge in improving the prognosis of the disease. In this study, we used an immunoproteomic approach to identify proteins that could be putative candidates for the early diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis. Antigenic proteins expressed in the first steps of A. fumigatus germination occurring in a human host were revealed using 2-D Western immunoblots with the serum of patients who had previously been classified as probable and proven for invasive aspergillosis. Forty antigenic proteins were identified using mass spectrometry (MS/MS. A BLAST analysis revealed that two of these proteins showed low homology with proteins of either the human host or etiological agents of other invasive fungal infections. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing specific antigenic proteins of A. fumigatus germlings that are recognized by sera of patients with confirmed invasive aspergillosis who were from two separate hospital units.

  19. Transfection, overexpression and clinical application of human 60 kDa Ro/SSA autoantigens in HEp-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕良敬; 陈顺乐; 顾越英; 沈南; 鲍春德; 王元; 薛峰; 叶萍; 俞翀曌

    2003-01-01

    Objective To develop an improved substrate for indirect immunofluorescence test (IIF) for detecting anti-Ro60/Sjogren's syndrome A (Ro/SSA) autoantibodies.Methods 60-kDa Ro/SSA autoantigens (Ro60) cDNAs were obtained from human placental cDNA library using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and were cloned into the mammalian expression vector-pEGFP-C1. Then, the recombinant plasmids were transfected into HEp-2 cells. We confirmed the overexpression, localization and antigenicity of fusion proteins in transfected cells by means of immunoblotting, confocal fluorescence microscopy and IIF. HEp-2 and HEp-Ro60 were analyzed by IIF using a panel of 10 precipitin-positive anti-Ro human sera simultaneously.Results Stable expression of Ro60-green fluorescent protein (Ro60-GFP) fusion proteins were maintained ten more generations. Ro60-GFP kept the antigenicity of Ro while demonstrating its own characteristic immunofluorescent pattern in HEp-Ro60 cells. The transfectants dramatically increased the sensitivity of IIF testing (a mean increase of 6.7-fold in endpoint titer). Eight overten (8/10) positive anti-Ro sera showed characteristic immunofluorescent patterns for HEp-Ro60, including two sera that were anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) negative for untransfected HEp-2. IIF-ANA in all healthy sera was negative for HEp-Ro60. Conclusions As a new substrate for IIF, the Ro60 transfectants can be used to detect anti-Ro antibodies. In addition, transfected HEp-2 cells keep the immunofluorescent properties of HEp-2 cells in IIF-ANA tests and can be employed as a substrate for routine IIF-ANA detection.

  20. Generation and epitope analysis of human monoclonal antibody isotypes with specificity for the timothy grass major allergen Phl p 5a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, J.; Diethers, A.; Seismann, H.;

    2011-01-01

    of the antibodies with the allergen was assessed. Applicability in allergy diagnostics was confirmed by establishment of artificial human sera. Functionality of both antibodies was further demonstrated in receptor binding studies and mediator release assays using humanised rat basophil leukaemia cells (RBL-SX38...

  1. [Prokaryotic expression for fusion protein of human metapneumovirus and its preliminary application as an antigen for antibody detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ru-nan; Qian, Yuan; Zhao, Lin-qing; Sun, Yu; Deng, Jie; Wang, Fang

    2011-03-01

    To understand the effectiveness of prokaryotic expression of fusion protein (F) of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and its application as antigen, F proteins from different genotypes of hMPV were expressed in prokaryotic expression system and purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography column. According to the hydrophobicity, antigen index and surface probability of F protein, the subunit 1 (F1) region of F protein was generated and expressed in E. Coil. BL21(DE3). The 6-His-F1 proteins with molecular weight of approximately 37 kD generated from hMPV of two genotypes were expressed efficiently mainly in inclusion body. The antigenicity and specificity of the expressed proteins were tested and confirmed by Western Blot using polyclonal antibody against hMPV and one serum specimen from a patient with confirmed hMPV acute infection,and polyclonal antibodies against human respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus 2 and 3. The results of preliminary use of the expressed proteins for detecting antibodies against hMPV in 457 serum specimens collected from different age groups in Beijing indicated that 66%-67% of sera in all age groups were positive. The positive rate of antibodies declined in children in age groups from birth to 2-year-old and then rose along with the increase in age, in which the lowest was in age group from 1 to 2-year-old and the highest in newborn and people older than 60 years. The data indicated the existence of maternal transferred antibodies against hMPV in infants and the risk of hMPV infections in children younger than 2 years old.

  2. Detection of soluble tumor-associated antigens in sera and effusions using novel monoclonal antibodies, KL-3 and KL-6, against lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, N; Akiyama, M; Kyoizumi, S; Hakoda, M; Kobuke, K; Yamakido, M

    1988-09-01

    Two novel monoclonal antibodies, KL-3 (IgM) and KL-6 (IgG1), which can detect soluble antigens in sera and effusions (molecular weights greater than 1,000 K) were produced against human pulmonary adenocarcinoma VMRC-LCR cells. KL-3 and KL-6 antibodies reacted with asialo- and sialo-carbohydrate antigenic determinants, respectively. Both carbohydrate epitopes appear, from competitive inhibition studies, to be different from Lex, Ley, sialyl Lea and sialyl Lexi which were recognized with FH2, AH6, NS19-9 and FH6 antibodies, respectively. Using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, elevated KL-6 antigen levels were frequently observed in the sera of patients with lung adenocarcinoma [52% (17/33)], pancreatic cancer [44% (4/9)] and breast cancer [40% (8/20)], but infrequently in the sera of patients with lung squamous cell carcinoma [18% (4/22)], lung small cell carcinoma [8% (1/13)], gastric cancer [0% (0/19)], colorectal cancer [0% (0/8)] and hepatocellular cancer [13% (1/8)]. The levels and positive rates of serum KL-6 antigen increased with the progression of clinical stage of lung adenocarcinoma. In pleural effusions, the prevalences of lung adenocarcinoma cases with elevated levels of KL-3 and KL-6 antigens were 76% (13/17) and 82% (14/17), respectively. These monoclonal antibodies can define novel soluble antigens in sera and effusions which could be useful in tumor diagnoses and for monitoring tumor progression.

  3. Applications of human error analysis to aviation and space operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, W.R.

    1998-07-01

    For the past several years at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) we have been working to apply methods of human error analysis to the design of complex systems. We have focused on adapting human reliability analysis (HRA) methods that were developed for Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for application to system design. We are developing methods so that human errors can be systematically identified during system design, the potential consequences of each error can be assessed, and potential corrective actions (e.g. changes to system design or procedures) can be identified. These applications lead to different requirements when compared with HR.As performed as part of a PSA. For example, because the analysis will begin early during the design stage, the methods must be usable when only partial design information is available. In addition, the ability to perform numerous ''what if'' analyses to identify and compare multiple design alternatives is essential. Finally, since the goals of such human error analyses focus on proactive design changes rather than the estimate of failure probabilities for PRA, there is more emphasis on qualitative evaluations of error relationships and causal factors than on quantitative estimates of error frequency. The primary vehicle we have used to develop and apply these methods has been a series of projects sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to apply human error analysis to aviation operations. The first NASA-sponsored project had the goal to evaluate human errors caused by advanced cockpit automation. Our next aviation project focused on the development of methods and tools to apply human error analysis to the design of commercial aircraft. This project was performed by a consortium comprised of INEEL, NASA, and Boeing Commercial Airplane Group. The focus of the project was aircraft design and procedures that could lead to human errors during

  4. Human dental pulp stem cells: Applications in future regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potdar, Pravin D; Jethmalani, Yogita D

    2015-06-26

    Stem cells are pluripotent cells, having a property of differentiating into various types of cells of human body. Several studies have developed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from various human tissues, peripheral blood and body fluids. These cells are then characterized by cellular and molecular markers to understand their specific phenotypes. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are having a MSCs phenotype and they are differentiated into neuron, cardiomyocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, liver cells and β cells of islet of pancreas. Thus, DPSCs have shown great potentiality to use in regenerative medicine for treatment of various human diseases including dental related problems. These cells can also be developed into induced pluripotent stem cells by incorporation of pluripotency markers and use for regenerative therapies of various diseases. The DPSCs are derived from various dental tissues such as human exfoliated deciduous teeth, apical papilla, periodontal ligament and dental follicle tissue. This review will overview the information about isolation, cellular and molecular characterization and differentiation of DPSCs into various types of human cells and thus these cells have important applications in regenerative therapies for various diseases. This review will be most useful for postgraduate dental students as well as scientists working in the field of oral pathology and oral medicine.

  5. Application of metagenomics in the human gut microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Lin; Xu, Shao-Yan; Ren, Zhi-Gang; Tao, Liang; Jiang, Jian-Wen; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2015-01-21

    There are more than 1000 microbial species living in the complex human intestine. The gut microbial community plays an important role in protecting the host against pathogenic microbes, modulating immunity, regulating metabolic processes, and is even regarded as an endocrine organ. However, traditional culture methods are very limited for identifying microbes. With the application of molecular biologic technology in the field of the intestinal microbiome, especially metagenomic sequencing of the next-generation sequencing technology, progress has been made in the study of the human intestinal microbiome. Metagenomics can be used to study intestinal microbiome diversity and dysbiosis, as well as its relationship to health and disease. Moreover, functional metagenomics can identify novel functional genes, microbial pathways, antibiotic resistance genes, functional dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiome, and determine interactions and co-evolution between microbiota and host, though there are still some limitations. Metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics represent enormous complements to the understanding of the human gut microbiome. This review aims to demonstrate that metagenomics can be a powerful tool in studying the human gut microbiome with encouraging prospects. The limitations of metagenomics to be overcome are also discussed. Metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics in relation to the study of the human gut microbiome are also briefly discussed.

  6. PRESENCE OF ANTILAMIN ANTIBODIES IN SERA OF PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧珍; 崔京涛; 王晓红; 王永潮

    1995-01-01

    In this study,we characterized specifically-stained sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) which had been shown to display the homogeneous or peripheral region of nuclei by indirect immunoflucrescence (IIF),By western blotting,we demonstrated that in some cases these was a correlation between the peripheral or homogenous,IIF staining of nuclei by sera from patients with SLE and the presence of autoantibodies to lamins.Here we first report the presence of 2.2% anti-lamin autoantibodies in the sera among the 174 patients with SLE in China.

  7. A STUDY OF PNEUMOCOCCI REACTING WITH ANTIPNEUMOCOCCUS SERA OF TYPES I, II, AND III, WITH AN OBSERVATION OF A MUTATION OF ONE OF THE STRAINS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, M C

    1919-08-01

    In this paper are reported the results of a study of nine strains of pneumococci agglutinating with antipneumococcus sera of all three types (Nos. I, II, and III). Seven of the strains were the cause of serious or fatal infections in human beings. Morphologically they were typical pneumococci with characteristic growth on ordinary media. Most of the strains were soluble in bile, fermented inulin, and caused no precipitation on glucose ascitic fluid agar. Two of the strains, however, resembled streptococci in these three cultural characteristics, but have been regarded as pneumococci on account of their serological reactions. Variations in the cultural reactions occurred with several strains while they were under observation. The virulence of the strains varied greatly, some strains being almost non-pathogenic, and others killing mice in doses of 0.000001 cc. of a 24 hour broth culture. Antipneumococcus Sera I, II, and III agglutinated all the strains in fairly high dilution (1:8 to 1:64 or higher), while normal horse serum caused no agglutination. Antipneumococcus Sera I, II, and III stimulated active phagocytosis of all the strains, while no phagocytosis occurred in control preparations with normal horse serum. These strains elaborated a soluble substance in the body of inoculated mice which caused the formation of a precipitate when the peritoneal washings, cleared by centrifugalization, were added to the antipneumococcus sera of all three types. Antipneumococcus Sera I, II, and III protected mice equally well against 1,000 to 10,000 times the minimal lethal dose of the two strains with which protection tests could be carried out. Absorption of serum of Types I and II with the homologous pneumococcus removed the agglutinins and the bacteriotropins for all these strains. Absorption of these sera with Strains T and N removed the agglutinins and the bacteriotropins for the homologous strain only, and not for typical members of Type I or II, or for the other

  8. Reduced complement-mediated immune complex solubilizing capacity and the presence of incompletely solubilized immune complexes in SLE sera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Petersen, I; Jensenius, J C

    1983-01-01

    Reduced complement-mediated solubilization (CMS) of pre-formed immune complexes (IC) was demonstrated in sera from 11 out of 12 SLE patients. The presence of incompletely solubilized endogeneous IC in SLE sera was indicated by the following findings: (1) When IC positive SLE sera with reduced CMS...

  9. Comprehensive Identification of Immunodominant Proteins of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis Using Antibodies in the Sera from Naturally Infected Hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal Wareth

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a debilitating zoonotic disease that affects humans and animals. The diagnosis of brucellosis is challenging, as accurate species level identification is not possible with any of the currently available serology-based diagnostic methods. The present study aimed at identifying Brucella (B. species-specific proteins from the closely related species B. abortus and B. melitensis using sera collected from naturally infected host species. Unlike earlier reported investigations with either laboratory-grown species or vaccine strains, in the present study, field strains were utilized for analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of the naturally isolated strains of these two closely related species revealed 402 differentially expressed proteins, among which 63 and 103 proteins were found exclusively in the whole cell extracts of B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains, respectively. The sera from four different naturally infected host species, i.e., cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat were applied to identify the immune-binding protein spots present in the whole protein extracts from the isolated B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains and resolved on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Comprehensive analysis revealed that 25 proteins of B. abortus and 20 proteins of B. melitensis were distinctly immunoreactive. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate/malate dehydrogenase from B. abortus, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein from B. melitensis and fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase from both species were reactive with the sera of all the tested naturally infected host species. The identified proteins could be used for the design of serological assays capable of detecting pan-Brucella, B. abortus- and B. melitensis-specific antibodies.

  10. Comprehensive Identification of Immunodominant Proteins of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis Using Antibodies in the Sera from Naturally Infected Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareth, Gamal; Eravci, Murat; Weise, Christoph; Roesler, Uwe; Melzer, Falk; Sprague, Lisa D; Neubauer, Heinrich; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan

    2016-04-30

    Brucellosis is a debilitating zoonotic disease that affects humans and animals. The diagnosis of brucellosis is challenging, as accurate species level identification is not possible with any of the currently available serology-based diagnostic methods. The present study aimed at identifying Brucella (B.) species-specific proteins from the closely related species B. abortus and B. melitensis using sera collected from naturally infected host species. Unlike earlier reported investigations with either laboratory-grown species or vaccine strains, in the present study, field strains were utilized for analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of the naturally isolated strains of these two closely related species revealed 402 differentially expressed proteins, among which 63 and 103 proteins were found exclusively in the whole cell extracts of B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains, respectively. The sera from four different naturally infected host species, i.e., cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat were applied to identify the immune-binding protein spots present in the whole protein extracts from the isolated B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains and resolved on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Comprehensive analysis revealed that 25 proteins of B. abortus and 20 proteins of B. melitensis were distinctly immunoreactive. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate/malate dehydrogenase from B. abortus, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein from B. melitensis and fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase from both species were reactive with the sera of all the tested naturally infected host species. The identified proteins could be used for the design of serological assays capable of detecting pan-Brucella, B. abortus- and B. melitensis-specific antibodies.

  11. Reactions of Chicken Sera to Recombinant Campylobacter jejuni Flagellar Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter jejuni is a Gram-negative rod bacterium and is the leading but under-reported bacterial food-borne pathogen that causes human campylobacteriosis worldwide. Raw or undercooked poultry products are regarded as a major source for human infection. C. jejuni flagella have been implicated ...

  12. Applicability of non-invasively collected matrices for human biomonitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickmilder Marc

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With its inclusion under Action 3 in the Environment and Health Action Plan 2004–2010 of the European Commission, human biomonitoring is currently receiving an increasing amount of attention from the scientific community as a tool to better quantify human exposure to, and health effects of, environmental stressors. Despite the policy support, however, there are still several issues that restrict the routine application of human biomonitoring data in environmental health impact assessment. One of the main issues is the obvious need to routinely collect human samples for large-scale surveys. Particularly the collection of invasive samples from susceptible populations may suffer from ethical and practical limitations. Children, pregnant women, elderly, or chronically-ill people are among those that would benefit the most from non-invasive, repeated or routine sampling. Therefore, the use of non-invasively collected matrices for human biomonitoring should be promoted as an ethically appropriate, cost-efficient and toxicologically relevant alternative for many biomarkers that are currently determined in invasively collected matrices. This review illustrates that several non-invasively collected matrices are widely used that can be an valuable addition to, or alternative for, invasively collected matrices such as peripheral blood sampling. Moreover, a well-informed choice of matrix can provide an added value for human biomonitoring, as different non-invasively collected matrices can offer opportunities to study additional aspects of exposure to and effects from environmental contaminants, such as repeated sampling, historical overview of exposure, mother-child transfer of substances, or monitoring of substances with short biological half-lives.

  13. Potential applications of human saliva as diagnostic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagnola, M; Picciotti, P M; Messana, I; Fanali, C; Fiorita, A; Cabras, T; Calò, L; Pisano, E; Passali, G C; Iavarone, F; Paludetti, G; Scarano, E

    2011-12-01

    The use of human saliva as a diagnostic and prognostic fluid has until recently been somewhat disregarded. Although sample collection is non-invasive, physiological and genetic variations were largely responsible for its infrequent application in the past. Recently, several proteomic studies contributed to partial elucidation of the salivary proteome (more than 2400 protein components have been characterized), both in terms of composition, contributions to whole saliva and genetic/physiological variability. On this basis, is not too optimistic to believe that in the near future human saliva could become a relevant diagnostic fluid. In this review, the characterization by proteomic approaches of new salivary markers in oncology, head and neck carcinoma (oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, and salivary glands), breast and gastric cancers, salivary gland function and disease, Sjögren syndrome, systemic sclerosis, dental and gingival pathology, systemic, psychiatric and neurological diseases, is described.

  14. Human embryo twinning with applications in reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illmensee, Karl; Levanduski, Mike; Vidali, Andrea; Husami, Nabil; Goudas, Vasilios T

    2010-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of human embryo twinning by blastomere biopsy at different early embryonic stages (splitting efficiency) and to determine the in vitro developmental capacity of twinned human embryos (developmental efficiency). Randomized comparative study. Private IVF centers. Couples undergoing IVF donating triploid embryos. Embryos at the 2- to 5- and 6- to 8-cell stage were split into twin embryos. Half the number of blastomeres from donor embryos were removed and inserted into recipient empty zonae pellucidae. After embryo splitting, donor and recipient embryos were cultured in vitro. Development of twinned embryos to the blastocyst stage. The number of developing embryos obtained after splitting could be increased in comparison with the number of embryos available before splitting at the 6- to 8-cell stage but not at the 2- to 5-cell stage (splitting efficiency). Splitting of 6- to 8-cell embryos yielded superior rates of twin embryos developing to blastocysts (developmental efficiency). Twinning success was related to the superior morphological quality of embryos used for splitting. This is the first report on twinned human embryos developing to blastocysts. This study exhibits the potential for novel applications in human assisted reproduction. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. TRANSLATOR OF FINITE STATE MACHINE MODEL PARAMETERS FROM MATLAB ENVIRONMENT INTO HUMAN-MACHINE INTERFACE APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Technology and means for automatic translation of FSM model parameters from Matlab application to human-machine interface application is proposed. The example of technology application to the electric apparatus model is described.

  16. Electromagnetic and Thermal Dosimetric Techniques in Humans and its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu

    There has been increasing public concern about the adverse health effects of human exposure to radio frequency fields. Radio frequency fields are also used for medical application. This paper reviews electromagnetic and thermal computational dosimetric techniques, which has been developed by the authors. The feature of the thermal dosimetric method is that body core temperature can be computed reasonably unlike conventional method. This scheme is particularly useful for intense localized or whole-body electromagnetic wave exposure. Computational examples are shown to verify the effectiveness of the proposal.

  17. Experiences in the application of human factors engineering to human-system interface modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba Alonso, Pedro; Fernandez Illobre, Luis; Ortega Pascual, Fernando [Tecnatom S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes (Spain). Simulation and Control Rooms Div.

    2015-07-15

    Almost all the existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) include plans to modernize their existing Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems and associated Human System Interfaces (HSIs), due to obsolescence problems. Tecnatom, S.A. has been participating in modernization programs in NPPs to help them to plan, specify, design and implement the modernization of control rooms and associated I and C and HSIs. The application of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) in modernization programs is nowadays unavoidable. This is because is becoming a regulatory requirement, and also because it is needed to ensure that any plant modification, involving the modernization of I and C and HSI, is well designed to improve overall plant operations, reliability, and safety. This paper shows some experiences obtained during the application of HFE to the modernization of these HSIs. The experience applying HFE in modernizations and design modifications show a positive effect, improving the associated HSIs, with the acceptability of the final user.

  18. Effects of sera taken from women with recurrent spontaneous abortion on sperm motility and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Talaei-khozani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent spontaneous abortion impacts almost 1% of couples. The sera from women with unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion (URSA have toxic effects on embryos that grow in the uterus. Therefore, the abnormal condition of the uterus may also affect sperm qualities.Objective: The objectives of this study were to search if these sera could induce DNA denaturation in sperm nuclei and also it could reduce sperm motility.Materials and Methods: Sera of 20 women with URSA history and sera from 20 women with at least two healthy children were added to the sperms samples from 20 healthy men for 2 hours. The sperm motility was assessed after incubation with sera. The samples were stained with Tdt mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay for DNA fragmentation. The samples were analyzed with flow cytometry and the percentage of the TUNEL positive sperms were calculated. The data were analyzed by t-test.Results: The incubation of the sperm samples in sera with URSA lead to a decrease in the percentage of the motile sperm from 55% in control to 41% in the treated group, significantly (p=0.038. The percentage of the sperm with abnormal fragmented DNA increased after incubation with URSA (26.6% compare to the control (21.2%; however, it was not significant.Conclusion: It seems that sera from URSA patients could not induce a significant increase in the percentage of the sperms with nuclei contain DNA fragmentation. However, the sera of women with URSA could affect the fertility rate by reduction of the sperm motility.

  19. Interlaboratory testing of porcine sera for antibodies to porcine circovirus type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNair, I.; Marshall, M.; McNeilly, F.

    2004-01-01

    A panel of 20 porcine sera was distributed to 5 laboratories across Europe and Canada. Each center was requested to test the sera for the presence of porcine circovirus type 2 antibodies using the routine assays, indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and indirect immunoperoxidase monolayer assa...... than did IFA, and paraformaldehyde gave higher titers than did acetone or ethyl alcohol. This report highlights the need for standardized procedures and biologicals for this virus....

  20. [Sensitivity of different morphological variants of Leptospira to the leptospirocidal activity of normal animal sera].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan'ina, Iu V; Chernukha, Iu G

    1984-10-01

    The leptospirocidal activity of normal animal sera with respect to 23 Leptospira strains was experimentally studied in vitro. 91.3% of the strains under study proved to be sensitive to the lytic action of cattle serum and 86.9%, to sheep serum. The uncinate variants of the pathogenic strains showed resistance to the action of the above sera, and their nonuncinate analogs were subject to agglutination with subsequent lysis, similarly to saprophytes.

  1. Rapid Microfluidic Assay for the Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin in Animal Sera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lmar Babrak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Potent Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs represent a threat to public health and safety. Botulism is a disease caused by BoNT intoxication that results in muscle paralysis that can be fatal. Sensitive assays capable of detecting BoNTs from different substrates and settings are essential to limit foodborne contamination and morbidity. In this report, we describe a rapid 96-well microfluidic double sandwich immunoassay for the sensitive detection of BoNT-A from animal sera. This BoNT microfluidic assay requires only 5 μL of serum, provides results in 75 min using a standard fluorescence microplate reader and generates minimal hazardous waste. The assay has a <30 pg·mL−1 limit of detection (LOD of BoNT-A from spiked human serum. This sensitive microfluidic BoNT-A assay offers a fast and simplified workflow suitable for the detection of BoNT-A from serum samples of limited volume in most laboratory settings.

  2. Ultrastructural damage of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes exposed to decomplemented immune sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Presas, A M; Zavala, J T; Fauser, I B; Merchant, M T; Guerrero, L R; Willms, K

    2001-08-01

    The susceptibility of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes to lysis by normal or immune sera in a complement-dependent reaction has been reported, but the effects induced directly by immune serum depleted of complement remain unstudied. The aim of this work was to study the ultrastructural alterations induced in T. cruzi epimastigotes by immune mouse or rabbit sera with or without complement. A local isolate of T. cruzi (Queretaro) was used in all experiments. Immune sera were raised in both mouse and rabbit by immunization with T. cruzi epimastigote antigens. Light microscopy showed intense agglutination of epimastigotes when incubated with decomplemented mouse or rabbit immune sera. A distinctive ultrastructural feature of this agglutination pattern was the fusion of plasma membranes and a pattern of intercrossing between subpellicular microtubules. Agglutination was associated with fragmentation of nuclear membranes and swelling of cytoplasm, Golgi cisternae, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and kinetoplast membranes. Agglutinated parasites also incorporated trypan blue stain. Results of [3H]-thymidine incorporation confirmed that epimastigotes exposed to specific antibodies in the absence of complement were incapable of proliferating. Ultrastructural changes observed in epimastigote micrographs incubated with decomplemented immune mouse sera were statistically significant (P<0.001) when compared with results obtained from images after incubation with decomplemented normal mouse sera.

  3. Antibody recognition to secreted proteins of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in sera from infected ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradenas, M; Jara, M C; Hernández, N; Zambrano, A; Collins, M T; Kruze, J

    2009-09-18

    Two liquid culture media to obtain secreted proteins of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis at different incubation periods were evaluated. Middlebrook 7H9-OADC (7H9) and Watson-Reid (WR) broths were inoculated with a field strain of M. paratuberculosis and growth curves determined using nonlinear regression analysis. Most culture filtrate (CF) proteins were of low molecular weight and reacted strongly against sera from cultured-positive cases of paratuberculosis. CF proteins obtained in WR yielded a higher number of bands and were detected earlier than those obtained from 7H9. A high degree of variability in CF protein immunoreactivity was seen among infected animals. Sera from cattle with clinical paratuberculosis or heavy fecal shedders of M. paratuberculosis reacted more intensively and to more CF proteins than did sera from other infected cattle. Immunoblots showed differences in antibody binding to CF proteins when sera were absorbed with M. avium but not with others environmental mycobacteria. Immunoblots with sera from infected goats and a sheep showed reactivity with proteins of 32, 33 and 46kDa both before and after the sera were absorbed with M. phlei. Antibodies found in serum of infected deer reacted with CF proteins in a similar way as did for cattle. These results suggest that a pool of CF proteins of M. paratuberculosis could be good candidates as antigens for serodiagnosis of paratuberculosis.

  4. Selection of polymers for application in scaffolds applicable for human pancreatic islet transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smink, Alexandra M; de Haan, Bart J; Paredes-Juarez, Genaro A; Wolters, Anouk H G; Kuipers, Jeroen; Giepmans, Ben N G; Schwab, Leendert; Engelse, Marten A; van Apeldoorn, Aart A; de Koning, Eelco; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2016-05-13

    The liver is currently the site for transplantation of islets in humans. This is not optimal for islets, but alternative sites in humans are not available. Polymeric scaffolds in surgically accessible areas are a solution. As human donors are rare, the polymers should not interfere with functional survival of human-islets. We applied a novel platform to test the adequacy of polymers for application in scaffolds for human-islet transplantation. Viability, functionality, and immune parameters were included to test poly(D,L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PDLLCL), poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/polybutylene terephthalate (PEOT/PBT) block copolymer, and polysulfone. The type of polymer influenced the functional survival of human islets. In islets cultured on PDLLCL the glucagon-producing α-cells and insulin-producing β-cells contained more hormone granules than in islets in contact with PEOT/PBT or polysulfone. This was studied with ultrastructural analysis by electron microscopy (nanotomy) during 7 d of culture. PDLLCL was also associated with statistically significant lower release of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA, a so called danger-associate molecular pattern (DAMP)) from islets on PDLLCL when compared to the other polymers. DAMPs support undesired immune responses. Hydrophilicity of the polymers did not influence dsDNA release. Islets on PDLLCL also showed less cellular outgrowth. These outgrowing cells were mainly fibroblast and some β-cells undergoing epithelial to mesenchymal cell transition. None of the polymers influenced the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. As PDLLCL was associated with less release of DAMPs, it is a promising candidate for creating a scaffold for human islets. Our study demonstrates that for sensitive, rare cadaveric donor tissue such as pancreatic islets it might be necessary to first select materials that do not influence functionality before proposing the biomaterial for in vivo application. Our presented platform may facilitate

  5. Radiocarbon analysis of human remains: a review of forensic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubelaker, Douglas H

    2014-11-01

    Radiocarbon analysis of organic materials, with the comparison of values with those of the post-1950 modern bomb curve, has proven useful in forensic science to help evaluate the antiquity of evidence. Applications are particularly helpful in the study of human remains, especially with those displaying advanced decomposition of soft tissues. Radiocarbon analysis can reveal if the remains relate to the modern, post-1950 era and if so, also provide information needed to evaluate the death and birth date. Sample selection and interpretation of results must be guided by knowledge of the formation and remodeling of different human tissues, as well as contextual information and the approximate age at death of the individual represented. Dental enamel does not remodel and thus captures dietary radiocarbon values at the time of juvenile formation. Most other human tissues do remodel but at differing rates and therefore collectively offer key information relative to the estimation of the death date. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. EU H2020 SERA: Seismology and Earthquake Engineering Research Infrastructure Alliance for Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardini, Domenico; Saleh, Kauzar; SERA Consortium, the

    2017-04-01

    SERA - Seismology and Earthquake Engineering Research Infrastructure Alliance for Europe - is a new infrastructure project awarded in the last Horizon 2020 call for Integrating Activities for Advanced Communities (INFRAIA-01-2016-2017). Building up on precursor projects like NERA, SHARE, NERIES, SERIES, etc., SERA is expected to contribute significantly to the access of data, services and research infrastructures, and to develop innovative solutions in seismology and earthquake engineering, with the overall objective of reducing the exposure to risks associated to natural and anthropogenic earthquakes. For instance, SERA will revise the European Seismic Hazard reference model for input in the current revision of the Eurocode 8 on Seismic Design of Buildings; we also foresee to develop the first comprehensive framework for seismic risk modeling at European scale, and to develop new standards for future experimental observations and instruments for earthquake engineering and seismology. To that aim, SERA is engaging 31 institutions across Europe with leading expertise in the operation of research facilities, monitoring infrastructures, data repositories and experimental facilities in the fields of seismology, anthropogenic hazards and earthquake engineering. SERA comprises 26 activities, including 5 Networking Activities (NA) to improve the availability and access of data through enhanced community coordination and pooling of resources, 6 Joint Research Activities (JRA) aimed at creating new European standards for the optimal use of the data collected by the European infrastructures, Virtual Access (VA) to the 5 main European services for seismology and engineering seismology, and Trans-national Access (TA) to 10 high-class experimental facilities for earthquake engineering and seismology in Europe. In fact, around 50% of the SERA resources will be dedicated to virtual and transnational access. SERA and EPOS (European Platform Observing System, a European Research

  7. Immune reactivity of sera obtained from brucellosis patients and vaccinated-rabbits to a fusion protein from Brucella melitensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Amani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular pathogens which can stay alive and multiply in professional and nonprofessional phagocytes. Immunity against Brucella melitensis involves antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells activation and humoral immune responses. Due to negative aspects of live attenuated vaccines, much attention has been focused on finding Brucella-protective antigens to introduce them as potential subunit vaccine candidates. Materials and Methods: A chimeric gene encoding trigger factor (TF, Omp3148-74 and BP2687-111 fragments (TOB from B. melitensis was successfully cloned, expressed in Escherichia coliBL21-DE3 and purified by Ni-NTA agarose column. Antibodies to recombinant TOB (rTOB have been investigated in Brucella-infected human sera and a pool serum prepared from B. melitensis-vaccinated rabbits. Results: Our results showed that the immunized rabbit pool serum strongly reacted with rTOB. In addition, antibodies against rTOB were detectable in 76.5% of sera obtained from infected patients. Conclusion: These findings suggest that rTOB may provide a potential immunogenic candidate which could be considered in future vaccine studies.

  8. Cross-reactive anti-PfCLAG9 antibodies in the sera of asymptomatic parasite carriers of Plasmodium vivax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Joana D'Arc Neves; Zanchi, Fernando Berton; Rodrigues, Francisco Lurdevanhe da Silva; Honda, Eduardo Rezende; Katsuragawa, Tony Hiroschi; Pereira, Dhélio Batista; Taborda, Roger Lafontaine Mesquita; Tada, Mauro Shugiro; Ferreira, Ricardo de Godoi Mattos; Pereira-da-Silva, Luiz Hildebrando

    2013-01-01

    The PfCLAG9 has been extensively studied because their immunogenicity. Thereby, the gene product is important for therapeutics interventions and a potential vaccine candidate. Antibodies against synthetic peptides corresponding to selected sequences of the Plasmodium falciparum antigen PfCLAG9 were found in sera of falciparum malaria patients from Rondônia, in the Brazilian Amazon. Much higher antibody titres were found in semi-immune and immune asymptomatic parasite carriers than in subjects suffering clinical infections, corroborating original findings in Papua Guinea. However, sera of Plasmodium vivax patients from the same Amazon area, in particular from asymptomatic vivax parasite carriers, reacted strongly with the same peptides. Bioinformatic analyses revealed regions of similarity between P. falciparum Pfclag9 and the P. vivax ortholog Pvclag7. Indirect fluorescent microscopy analysis showed that antibodies against PfCLAG9 peptides elicited in BALB/c mice react with human red blood cells (RBCs) infected with both P. falciparum and P. vivax parasites. The patterns of reactivity on the surface of the parasitised RBCs are very similar. The present observations support previous findings that PfCLAG9 may be a target of protective immune responses and raises the possibility that the cross reactive antibodies to PvCLAG7 in mixed infections play a role in regulate the fate of Plasmodium mixed infections. PMID:23440122

  9. Cross-reactive anti-PfCLAG9 antibodies in the sera of asymptomatic parasite carriers of Plasmodium vivax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana D'Arc Neves Costa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The PfCLAG9 has been extensively studied because their immunogenicity. Thereby, the gene product is important for therapeutics interventions and a potential vaccine candidate. Antibodies against synthetic peptides corresponding to selected sequences of the Plasmodium falciparum antigen PfCLAG9 were found in sera of falciparum malaria patients from Rondônia, in the Brazilian Amazon. Much higher antibody titres were found in semi-immune and immune asymptomatic parasite carriers than in subjects suffering clinical infections, corroborating original findings in Papua Guinea. However, sera of Plasmodium vivax patients from the same Amazon area, in particular from asymptomatic vivax parasite carriers, reacted strongly with the same peptides. Bioinformatic analyses revealed regions of similarity between P. falciparum Pfclag9 and the P. vivax ortholog Pvclag7. Indirect fluorescent microscopy analysis showed that antibodies against PfCLAG9 peptides elicited in BALB/c mice react with human red blood cells (RBCs infected with both P. falciparum and P. vivax parasites. The patterns of reactivity on the surface of the parasitised RBCs are very similar. The present observations support previous findings that PfCLAG9 may be a target of protective immune responses and raises the possibility that the cross reactive antibodies to PvCLAG7 in mixed infections play a role in regulate the fate of Plasmodium mixed infections.

  10. The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in the sera of patients with brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelski, Wojciech; Laniewska-Dunaj, Magdalena; Orywal, Karolina; Kochanowicz, Jan; Rutkowski, Robert; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2014-12-01

    Human brain tissue contains various alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and possess also aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. In our last experiments we have shown that ADH and ALDH are present also in the brain tumour cells. Moreover the activities of total ADH and class I isoenzymes were significantly higher in cancer tissue than healthy cells. It can suggests that these changes may be reflected by enzyme activity in the serum of patients with brain cancer. Serum samples were taken for routine biochemical investigation from 62 patients suffering from brain cancer (36 glioblastoma, 26 meningioma). For the measurement of the activity of class I and II ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity, the fluorometric methods were used. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by the photometric method. A statistically significant increase of class I alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes was found in the sera of patients with brain cancer. The median activity of this class isoenzyme in the patients group increased about 24 % in the comparison to the control level. The total alcohol dehydrogenase activity was also significantly higher (26 %) among patients with brain tumour than healthy ones. The activities of other tested ADH isoenzymes and total ALDH were unchanged. The increase of the activity of total ADH and class I alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme in the sera of patients with brain cancer seems to be caused by the release of this isoenzyme from tumour's cells.

  11. Raman spectroscopy-based screening of IgM positive and negative sera for dengue virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, M.; Saleem, M.; Bilal, Maria; Ijaz, T.; Khan, Saranjam; Ullah, Rahat; Raza, A.; Khurram, M.; Akram, W.; Ahmed, M.

    2016-11-01

    A statistical method based on Raman spectroscopy for the screening of immunoglobulin M (IgM) in dengue virus (DENV) infected human sera is presented. In total, 108 sera samples were collected and their antibody indexes (AI) for IgM were determined through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Raman spectra of these samples were acquired using a 785 nm wavelength excitation laser. Seventy-eight Raman spectra were selected randomly and unbiasedly for the development of a statistical model using partial least square (PLS) regression, while the remaining 30 were used for testing the developed model. An R-square (r 2) value of 0.929 was determined using the leave-one-sample-out (LOO) cross validation method, showing the validity of this model. It considers all molecular changes related to IgM concentration, and describes their role in infection. A graphical user interface (GUI) platform has been developed to run a developed multivariate model for the prediction of AI of IgM for blindly tested samples, and an excellent agreement has been found between model predicted and clinically determined values. Parameters like sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and area under receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve for these tested samples are also reported to visualize model performance.

  12. Big Data and Intelligence: Applications, Human Capital, and Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Landon-Murray

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential for big data to contribute to the US intelligence mission goes beyond bulk collection, social media and counterterrorism. Applications will speak to a range of issues of major concern to intelligence agencies, from military operations to climate change to cyber security. There are challenges too: procurement lags, data stovepiping, separating signal from noise, sources and methods, a range of normative issues, and central to managing these challenges, human capital. These potential applications and challenges are discussed and a closer look at what data scientists do in the Intelligence Community (IC is offered. Effectively filling the ranks of the IC’s data science workforce will depend on the provision of well-trained data scientists from the higher education system. Program offerings at America’s top fifty universities will thus be surveyed (just a few years ago there were reportedly no degrees in data science. One Master’s program that has melded data science with intelligence is examined as well as a university big data research center focused on security and intelligence. This discussion goes a long way to clarify the prospective uses of data science in intelligence while probing perhaps the key challenge to optimal application of big data in the IC.

  13. 22 CFR 225.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 225.118 Section 225.118 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 225.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  14. 15 CFR 27.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 27.118 Section 27.118 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 27.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  15. 28 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 46.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  16. 10 CFR 745.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 745.118 Section 745.118 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human...

  17. 14 CFR 1230.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 1230.118 Section 1230.118 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1230.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for...

  18. Solubilization of immune complexes in complement factor deficient sera and the influence of temperature, ionic strength and divalent cations on the solubilization reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Petersen, Ivan; Svehag, Svend-Erik;

    1984-01-01

    The complement-mediated solubilization (CMS) of immune complexes (IC) and the initial kinetics (IKS) of this reaction in human sera depleted of or deficient in C2, C3, C8, factors B, P and I were investigated. Sera depleted of B or P and those lacking native C3 or factor I showed virtually no CMS...... by a radioassay and kinetic data for the binding of C3b to preformed immune complexes. The CMS capacity reached maximum at 39-41 degrees C and at an ionic strength of approximately 0.20 mu. Selective chelation of Mg2+ completely abolished the CMS of IC. Maximal CMS was observed at Mg2+ concentration of about 2m...

  19. Semantic Web Mining and its application in Human Resource Mgt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Malik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Semantic Web is a project and vision of the World WideWeb Consortium to extend the current Web, so that informationis given a well-defined meaning and structure, enhancingcomputers and people to work in cooperation. Semantic webmining is the combination of web mining and semantic web. Theknowledge of semantic web makes web mining easier to achieveand can also improve the effectiveness of web mining. Semanticweb mining technologies are being added to enterprise solutionsto accommodate new techniques for discovering relationshipsacross different database, business applications and Webservices. Since this is an interdisciplinary concept in bothengineering and management; we first review web mining,semantic web, semantic web mining and finally propose anapplication of semantic web mining in human resourcemanagement.

  20. Cognitive representation of human action: theory, applications, and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eSeegelke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this perspective article, we propose a cognitive architecture model of human action that stresses the importance of cognitive representations stored in long-term memory (LTM as reference structures underlying and guiding voluntary motor performance. We introduce an experimental approach to ascertain cognitive representation structures, and provide evidence from a variety of different studies, ranging from basic research in manual action to application-oriented research such as athlete performance and rehabilitation. As results from these studies strongly support the presence of functional links between cognitive and motor processes, we regard this approach as a suitable and valuable tool for a variety of different disciplines related to cognition and movement. We conclude this article by highlighting current advances in ongoing research projects aimed at improving interaction capabilities in technical systems, particularly for rehabilitation and everyday support of the elderly, and outline future research directions.

  1. Inhibition of adenovirus DNA synthesis in vitro by sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, M.S.; Friefeld, B.R.; Keiser, H.D.

    1982-12-01

    Sera containing antinuclear antibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and related disorders were tested for their effect on the synthesis of adenovirus (Ad) DNA in an in vitro replication system. After being heated at 60/sup 0/C for 1 h, some sera from patients with SLE inhibited Ad DNA synthesis by 60 to 100%. Antibodies to double-stranded DNA were present in 15 of the 16 inhibitory sera, and inhibitory activity copurified with anti-double-stranded DNA in the immunoglobulin G fraction. These SLE sera did not inhibit the DNA polymerases ..cap alpha.., BETA, ..gamma.. and had no antibody to the 72,000-dalton DNA-binding protein necessary for Ad DNA synthesis. The presence of antibodies to single-stranded DNA and a variety of saline-extractable antigens (Sm, Ha, nRNP, and rRNP) did not correlate with SLE serum inhibitory activity. Methods previously developed for studying the individual steps in Ad DNA replication were used to determine the site of inhibition by the SLE sera that contained antibody to double-stranded DNA. Concentrations of the SLE inhibitor that decreased the elongation of Ad DNA by greater than 85% had no effect on either the initiation of Ad DNA synthesis or the polymerization of the first 26 deoxyribonucleotides.

  2. A Novel Method for Detecting p53 Autoantibodies in Sera of Patients with NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai TANG

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Serum autoantibody detection is useful means for the early diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. So our objective was to synthesize peptide array to analyse p53 autoantibodies in the sera of patients with non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods Cellulose-bound overlapping peptides (12 mers derived from p53 wild type protein were synthesized using SOPTs synthesis technique by an AutoSpot robot –ASP SL (Intavis, Germany. The membrane was incubated with 1/400 dilutions of p53 monoclonal antibody (Sc-53394 to establish a new approach to detect p53 antibody, and the epitopes of the p53 monoclonal antibody is already known. We analysed the p53 autoantibodies from the sera of NSCLC and controls by peptide array and ELISA. Results We synthesized on cellulose membranes twelve-amino-acid overlapping peptides which included all of the sequences of the polypeptide chain of p53. The p53 autoantibody was positive in seven cases of thirty patients’ sera with NSCLC and was negative in sera of the controls, with the same result of ELISA. Conclusion The peptide array could be applied not only to detect the autoantibodies in the sera of patients with lung cancer, but also to map the epitopes of the autoantibodies which might be useful for the early diagnosis and prognosis of cancer.

  3. Detection of Borreliae in Archived Sera from Patients with Clinically Suspect Lyme Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sin Hang Lee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The diagnoses of Lyme disease based on clinical manifestations, serological findings and detection of infectious agents often contradict each other. We tested 52 blind-coded serum samples, including 20 pre-treatment and 12 post-treatment sera from clinically suspect Lyme disease patients, for the presence of residual Lyme disease infectious agents, using nested PCR amplification of a signature segment of the borrelial 16S ribosomal RNA gene for detection and direct DNA sequencing of the PCR amplicon for molecular validation. These archived sera were split from the samples drawn for the 2-tier serology tests performed by a CDC-approved laboratory, and are used as reference materials for evaluating new diagnostic reagents. Of the 12 post-treatment serum samples, we found DNA evidence of a novel borrelia of uncertain significance in one, which was also positive for the 2-tier serology test. The rest of the post-treatment sera and all 20 control sera were PCR-negative. Of the 20 pre-treatment sera from clinically suspect early Lyme disease patients, we found Borrelia miyamotoi in one which was 2-tier serology-negative, and a Borrelia burgdorferi in two—one negative and one positive for 2-tier serology. We conclude that a sensitive and reliable DNA-based test is needed to support the diagnosis of Lyme disease and Lyme disease-like borreliosis.

  4. Human dental pulp stem cells: Applications in futureregenerative medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are pluripotent cells, having a property ofdifferentiating into various types of cells of humanbody. Several studies have developed mesenchymalstem cells (MSCs) from various human tissues,peripheral blood and body fluids. These cells are thencharacterized by cellular and molecular markers tounderstand their specific phenotypes. Dental pulpstem cells (DPSCs) are having a MSCs phenotype andthey are differentiated into neuron, cardiomyocytes,chondrocytes, osteoblasts, liver cells and β cells of isletof pancreas. Thus, DPSCs have shown great potentialityto use in regenerative medicine for treatment of varioushuman diseases including dental related problems.These cells can also be developed into induced pluripotentstem cells by incorporation of pluripotencymarkers and use for regenerative therapies of variousdiseases. The DPSCs are derived from various dentaltissues such as human exfoliated deciduous teeth,apical papilla, periodontal ligament and dental follicletissue. This review will overview the information aboutisolation, cellular and molecular characterization anddifferentiation of DPSCs into various types of humancells and thus these cells have important applications inregenerative therapies for various diseases. This reviewwill be most useful for postgraduate dental students aswell as scientists working in the field of oral pathologyand oral medicine.

  5. The Human Thioredoxin System: Modifications and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Isaac Hashemy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The thioredoxin system, comprising thioredoxin (Trx, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR and NADPH, is one of the major cellular antioxidant systems, implicated in a large and growing number of biological functions. Trx acts as an oxidoreductase via a highly conserved dithiol/disulfide motif located in the active site (-Trp-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-Lys-. Different factors are involved in the regulation of Trx activity, including its expression level, localization, protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications and some chemical inhibitors. Mammalian TrxRs are selenoproteins which have a –Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- N-terminal active site, as well as a C-terminal selenium-containing active site. Besides two Cys-residues in the redox-regulatory domain of cytosolic Trx (Trx1, human Trx1 has three additional Cys-residues. Post-translational modifications of human Trx1 which are involved in the regulation of its activity can happen via modification of Cys-residues including thiol oxidation, glutathionylation and S-nitrosylation or via modification of other amino acid residues such as nitration of Tyr-49. Because of the numerous functions of the thioredoxin system, its inhibition (mainly happens via the targeting TrxR can result in major cellular consequences, which are potentially pro-oxidant in nature, leading to cell death via necrosis or apoptosis if overexpression of Trx and other antioxidative enzymes can not recuperate cell response. Considering this feature, several anticancer drugs have been used which can inhibit TrxR. Elevated levels of Trx and/or TrxR have been reported in many different human malignancies, positively correlated with aggressive tumor growth and poor prognosis. Moreover, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects of Trx are reasons to study its clinical application as a drug.

  6. Plants as Factories for Human Pharmaceuticals: Applications and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Yao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant molecular farming (PMF, defined as the practice of using plants to produce human therapeutic proteins, has received worldwide interest. PMF has grown and advanced considerably over the past two decades. A number of therapeutic proteins have been produced in plants, some of which have been through pre-clinical or clinical trials and are close to commercialization. Plants have the potential to mass-produce pharmaceutical products with less cost than traditional methods. Tobacco-derived antibodies have been tested and used to combat the Ebola outbreak in Africa. Genetically engineered immunoadhesin (DPP4-Fc produced in green plants has been shown to be able to bind to MERS-CoV (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, preventing the virus from infecting lung cells. Biosafety concerns (such as pollen contamination and immunogenicity of plant-specific glycans and costly downstream extraction and purification requirements, however, have hampered PMF production from moving from the laboratory to industrial application. In this review, the challenges and opportunities of PMF are discussed. Topics addressed include; transformation and expression systems, plant bioreactors, safety concerns, and various opportunities to produce topical applications and health supplements.

  7. Smart sensor systems for human health breath monitoring applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G W; Xu, J C; Biaggi-Labiosa, A M; Laskowski, D; Dutta, P K; Mondal, S P; Ward, B J; Makel, D B; Liu, C C; Chang, C W; Dweik, R A

    2011-09-01

    Breath analysis techniques offer a potential revolution in health care diagnostics, especially if these techniques can be brought into standard use in the clinic and at home. The advent of microsensors combined with smart sensor system technology enables a new generation of sensor systems with significantly enhanced capabilities and minimal size, weight and power consumption. This paper discusses the microsensor/smart sensor system approach and provides a summary of efforts to migrate this technology into human health breath monitoring applications. First, the basic capability of this approach to measure exhaled breath associated with exercise physiology is demonstrated. Building from this foundation, the development of a system for a portable asthma home health care system is described. A solid-state nitric oxide (NO) sensor for asthma monitoring has been identified, and efforts are underway to miniaturize this NO sensor technology and integrate it into a smart sensor system. It is concluded that base platform microsensor technology combined with smart sensor systems can address the needs of a range of breath monitoring applications and enable new capabilities for healthcare.

  8. Serological follow-up after non-typhoid salmonella infection in humans using a mixed lipopolysaccharide ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenhorst, Gerhard; Ceper, Tina H; Strid, Mette A; Mølbak, Kåre; Krogfelt, Karen A

    2013-12-01

    In industrialized countries, non-typhoid salmonella are a frequent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. Diagnosis is usually made by stool culture, which is labour-intensive and time-consuming. Sensitivity depends on handling of stool samples and delay from illness onset to sampling. We developed an indirect mixed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of human serum antibodies against lipopolysaccharide antigens of the two predominant serovars, Salmonella serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) and S. Typhimurium. We measured IgA, IgM and IgG in 964 sera from 302 patients with stool culture-confirmed acute salmonella gastroenteritis, in 300 sera from healthy blood donors, and in 147 sera from patients with antibodies against other bacteria. Patient sera were collected within 1 month and approximately 3, 6, and 12 months after illness onset. For sera collected ≤ 30 days of onset, sensitivity of the ELISA was 92% for S. Enteritidis and 86% for S. Typhimurium, with a specificity of 95% for both serovars. The mixed ELISA is a useful additional tool for the diagnosis of acute salmonella gastroenteritis. It allows rapid analysis of multiple samples, thus can be used for sero-epidemiological studies of large population-based serum collections in order to estimate the population incidence of salmonella infections. Another application is aetiological diagnostics in patients with suspected post-infectious complications such as reactive arthritis, even when faecal shedding of salmonella has ceased.

  9. Trace elements in sera from patients with visceral leishmaniasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Bhattacharya, A. [Department of Zoology, Calcutta University, Calcutta (India); Chakraborty, A.; Sudarshan, M.; Jal, P.K.; Chintalapudi, S.N. [Inter University Consortium for DAE Facilities, Calcutta Centre 3/LB-8, Bidhan Nagar, Calcutta (India); Dutta, R.K. [Schonland Research Centre for Nuclear Sciences, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2000-07-01

    Trace elements are known to have pivotal role in human health and disease. Present investigation employed PIXE analysis to probe into the elemental profile of patients suffering from visceral Leishmaniasis. Remarkable alternations were observed in concentration of elements like Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn. The pattern of enhancement of elemental concentration corresponds to the progression of the disease. Additionally, our present data reflect probable correlation between alteration in trace elemental status and other pathological syndromes associated with Leishmaniasis. The possibility of considering trace elements as a diagnostic marker for a better understanding of the disease is discussed. (author)

  10. Human CRISP-3 binds serum alpha(1)B-glycoprotein across species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udby, Lene; Johnsen, Anders H; Borregaard, Niels

    2010-01-01

    CRISP-3 was previously shown to be bound to alpha(1)B-glycoprotein (A1BG) in human serum/plasma. All mammalian sera are supposed to contain A1BG, although its presence in rodent sera is not well-documented. Since animal sera are often used to supplement buffers in experiments, in particular such ...... such that involve cell cultures, binding proteins present in sera might interfere in the experiments....

  11. A serological survey of sera from domestic animals on Easter Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, P; Gray, D P; Gibbs, H C; Murphy, D A

    1968-04-01

    Animals' sera collected on Easter Island from December 1964 to February 1965 were tested by appropriate methods for the presence of antibodies to various infections. These included, ornithosis, Q-fever, brucellosis, Johne's disease, leptospirosis, toxoplasmosis and vesicular stomatitis viruses. It appeared that the cattle and sheep were exposed to the ornithosis group of agents. The sheep were also exposed to toxoplasmosis. The low-grade reactions observed on the cattle sera with the leptospira and brucella antigens were not sufficient to indicate past infection. All sera tested with Q-fever and Johne's disease antigens gave negative reactions. The results suggested that neither strain of vesicular stomatitis virus had yet been introduced into this restricted animal population.

  12. Detection of liver HBc antigen and its antibody in sera from viral hepatitis by the immunofluorescent complement technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuji,Takao

    1976-02-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B core antigen (HBc Ag and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBs Ag were detected in the liver tissue of a patient with chronic aggressive hepatitis by the immunofluorescent complement technique. The presence of anti-HBc was examined by the same method in 67 human sera previously tested for HBs Ag, anti-HBs and s-GPT levels. HBc Ag was localized mainly in the nucleus and sometimes in the cytoplasm of the hepatic cells. HBs Ag was found only in the cytoplasm. The focal area of HBc Ag positive hepatic cells seemed to correspond to the HBs Ag positive cells. Double staining demonstrated the simultaneous presence of HBs Ag and HBc Ag in individual cells. Anti-HBc positive serum was found in 46 (68.7% cases. Forty-eight (71.6% indicated a combination of HBs Ag and anti-HBc.

  13. Herd immunity to GII.4 noroviruses is supported by outbreak patient sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jennifer L; Lindesmith, Lisa C; Donaldson, Eric F; Saxe, Lauryn; Baric, Ralph S; Vinjé, Jan

    2009-06-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) of genogroup II, cluster 4 (GII.4), are the most common cause of outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. During the past 13 years, GII.4 NoVs caused four seasons of widespread activity globally, each associated with the emergence of a new strain. In this report, we characterized the most recent epidemic strain, GII.4-2006 Minerva, by comparing virus-like particle (VLP) antigenic relationships and histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) binding profiles with strains isolated earlier. We also investigated the seroprevalence and specificity of GII.4 antibody in the years prior to, during, and following the GII.4 pandemic of 1995 and 1996 using a large collection of acute- and convalescent-phase serum pairs (n = 298) collected from 34 outbreaks. In a surrogate neutralization assay, we measured the blockade of HBGA binding using a panel of GII.4 VLPs representing strains isolated in 1987, 1997, 2002, and 2006 and a GII.3 VLP representing a strain isolated in the mid-1990s. Serum titers required for 50% HBGA blockade were compared between populations. In general, blockade of GII.4 VLP-HBGA binding was greater with convalescent-phase outbreak sera collected near the time of origin of the VLP strain. Heterotypic genotypes did not contribute to herd immunity against GII.4 NoVs based on their inability to block GII.4 VLP binding to HBGA. However, previous exposure to GII.4 NoV followed by infection by GII.3 NoV appeared to evoke an immune response to GII.4 NoV. These results support the hypothesis that herd immunity is a driving force for GII.4 evolution in the U.S. population. The data also suggest that complex patterns of cross-protection may exist across NoV genotypes in humans.

  14. Soluble CD40 Ligand in Sera of Subjects Exposed to Leishmania infantum Infection Reduces the Parasite Load in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrícia Alvisi de Oliveira

    Full Text Available While CD40L is typically a membrane glycoprotein expressed on activated T cells and platelets that binds and activates CD40 on the surface on antigen presenting cells, a soluble derivative (sCD40L that appears to retain its biological activity after cleavage from cell membrane also exists. We recently reported that sCD40L is associated with clinical resolution of visceral leishmaniasis and protection against the disease. In the present study we investigated if this sCD40L is functional and exerts anti-parasitic effect in L. infantum-infected macrophages.Macrophages from normal human donors were infected with L. infantum promastigotes and incubated with either sera from subjects exposed to L. infantum infection, monoclonal antibodies against human CD40L, or an isotype control antibody. We then evaluated infection by counting the number of infected cells and the number of parasites in each cell. We also measured a variety of immune modulatory cytokines in these macrophage culture supernatants by Luminex assay. The addition of sCD40L, either recombinant or from infected individuals' serum, decreased both the number of infected macrophages and number of intracellular parasites. Moreover, this treatment increased the production of IL-12, IL-23, IL-27, IL-15, and IL1β such that negative correlations between the levels of these cytokines with both the infection ratio and number of intracellular parasites were observed.sCD40L from sera of subjects exposed to L. infantum is functional and improves both the control of parasite and production of inflamatory cytokines of infected macrophages. Although the mechanisms involved in parasite killing are still unclear and require further exploration, these findings indicate a protective role of sCD40L in visceral leishmaniasis.

  15. Increased Levels of Soluble CD14 in Sera of Periodontitis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Joichiro; Masaka, Tamami; Ishikawa, Isao

    1999-01-01

    Soluble CD14 (sCD14) mediates the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in cells lacking membrane-bound CD14. We determined sCD14 concentrations in the sera of 38 periodontitis patients and 25 healthy controls by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The sCD14 levels in the sera of patients with periodontitis were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects and decreased after treatment. Enhanced levels of sCD14 in serum may contribute to the host response to LPS in periodontitis. Further...

  16. Potential applications of gut microbiota to control human physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umu, Ozgün Candan Onarman; Oostindjer, Marije; Pope, Phillip B; Svihus, Birger; Egelandsdal, Bjørg; Nes, Ingolf F; Diep, Dzung B

    2013-11-01

    The microorganisms living in our gut have been a black box to us for a long time. However, with the recent advances in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies, it is now possible to assess virtually all microorganisms in our gut including non-culturable ones. With the use of powerful bioinformatics tools to deal with multivariate analyses of huge amounts of data from metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, metabolomics, we now start to gain some important insights into these tiny gut inhabitants. Our knowledge is increasing about who they are, to some extent, what they do and how they affect our health. Gut microbiota have a broad spectrum of possible effects on health, from preventing serious diseases, improving immune system and gut health to stimulating the brain centers responsible for appetite and food intake control. Further, we may be on the verge of being capable of manipulating the gut microbiota by diet control to possibly improve our health. Diets consisting of different components that are fermentable by microbiota are substrates for different kinds of microbes in the gut. Thus, diet control can be used to favor the growth of some selected gut inhabitants. Nowadays, the gut microbiota is taken into account as a separate organ in human body and their activities and metabolites in gut have many physiological and neurological effects. In this mini-review, we discuss the diversity of gut microbiota, the technologies used to assess them, factors that affect microbial composition and metabolites that affect human physiology, and their potential applications in satiety control via the gut-brain axis.

  17. The human heart: application of the golden ratio and angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henein, Michael Y; Zhao, Ying; Nicoll, Rachel; Sun, Lin; Khir, Ashraf W; Franklin, Karl; Lindqvist, Per

    2011-08-04

    The golden ratio, or golden mean, of 1.618 is a proportion known since antiquity to be the most aesthetically pleasing and has been used repeatedly in art and architecture. Both the golden ratio and the allied golden angle of 137.5° have been found within the proportions and angles of the human body and plants. In the human heart we found many applications of the golden ratio and angle, in addition to those previously described. In healthy hearts, vertical and transverse dimensions accord with the golden ratio, irrespective of different absolute dimensions due to ethnicity. In mild heart failure, the ratio of 1.618 was maintained but in end-stage heart failure the ratio significantly reduced. Similarly, in healthy ventricles mitral annulus dimensions accorded with the golden ratio, while in dilated cardiomyopathy and mitral regurgitation patients the ratio had significantly reduced. In healthy patients, both the angles between the mid-luminal axes of the pulmonary trunk and the ascending aorta continuation and between the outflow tract axis and continuation of the inflow tract axis of the right ventricle approximate to the golden angle, although in severe pulmonary hypertension, the angle is significantly increased. Hence the overall cardiac and ventricular dimensions in a normal heart are consistent with the golden ratio and angle, representing optimum pump structure and function efficiency, whereas there is significant deviation in the disease state. These findings could have anatomical, functional and prognostic value as markers of early deviation from normality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sera from patients with anti-GBM nephritis including goodpasture syndrome show heterogenous reactivity to recombinant NC1 domain of type IV collagen alpha chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehan, P; Weber, M; Zhang, X; Reeders, S T; Foidart, J M; Tryggvason, K

    1996-11-01

    Goodpasture (GP) syndrome is defined by the clinical association of pulmonary haemorrhage with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. The disease is caused by pathogenic autoantibodies directed against type IV collagen, which is a major structural component of glomerular basement membranes (GBM). The non-collagenous domains (NC1) of all six human type IV collagen alpha chains was produced in E. coli as recombinant fusion proteins with glutathione-S transferase. Sera from 10 patients with different types of anti-GBM nephritis, including GP syndrome, were tested for reactivity with the six proteins using immunoblotting of denatured and reduced proteins and ELISA without reduction. All 10 sera reacted with the alpha 3 (IV) collagen chain by immunoblotting and ELISA. One serum also recognized the alpha 2(IV), alpha 4(IV), alpha 5(IV) and alpha 6(IV) chains by immunoblotting. ELISA measurements revealed reactivity of several other sera with alpha 2(IV), alpha 4(IV) or alpha 6(IV) but not with alpha 5(IV) collagen chains. No reactivity was observed with the alpha 1(IV) chain. Autoantibodies in anti-GBM nephritis may not be directed only against the alpha 3(IV) collagen chain and they frequently recognize conformational epitopes.

  19. Proteolytic Activation of the Essential Parasitophorous Vacuole Cysteine Protease SERA6 Accompanies Malaria Parasite Egress from Its Host Erythrocyte*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruecker, Andrea; Shea, Michael; Hackett, Fiona; Suarez, Catherine; Hirst, Elizabeth M. A.; Milutinovic, Katarina; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Blackman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The malaria parasite replicates within an intraerythrocytic parasitophorous vacuole (PV). The PV and host cell membranes eventually rupture, releasing merozoites in a process called egress. Certain inhibitors of serine and cysteine proteases block egress, indicating a crucial role for proteases. The Plasmodium falciparum genome encodes nine serine-repeat antigens (SERAs), each of which contains a central domain homologous to the papain-like (clan CA, family C1) protease family. SERA5 and SERA6 are indispensable in blood-stage parasites, but the function of neither is known. Here we show that SERA6 localizes to the PV where it is precisely cleaved just prior to egress by an essential serine protease called PfSUB1. Mutations that replace the predicted catalytic Cys of SERA6, or that block SERA6 processing by PfSUB1, could not be stably introduced into the parasite genomic sera6 locus, indicating that SERA6 is an essential enzyme and that processing is important for its function. We demonstrate that cleavage of SERA6 by PfSUB1 converts it to an active cysteine protease. Our observations reveal a proteolytic activation step in the malarial PV that may be required for release of the parasite from its host erythrocyte. PMID:22984267

  20. Application of social domain of human mind in water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piirimäe, Kristjan

    2010-05-01

    , and NGOs. These people were randomly divided to two working groups and asked to criticize the proposed plan. One group was encouraged to detect cheating behind the plan. Later, a group of independent experts evaluated the criticism of both groups and each individual person. The resulting assignements rated the group of cheater detectors as significantly more adequate decision-supporters. The results confirmed that simulation of the 'cheater detection module' of human mind might improve the performance of an EDSS. The study calls for the development of special methodologies for the stimulation and application of social domain in water management. References Buchner, A., Bell, R., Mehl, B., & Musch, J., (2009). No enhanced recognition memory, but better source memory for faces of cheaters. Evolution and Human Behaviour, 30(3), 212 - 224. Byrne, R., Bates, L. (2009). Sociality, evolution and cognition. Current Biology, 17(16), R714 - R723. Cosmides, L. (1989). The logic of social exchange: Has natural selection shaped how humans reason? Studies with the Wason selection task. Cognition, 31(3), 187-276. Fiddick, L. (2004). Domains of deontic reasoning: Resolving the discrepancy between the cognitive and moral reasoning literatures. The Quartlerly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 57A(3), 447 - 474.

  1. An improvement of the applicability of human factors guidelines for coping with human factors issues in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. H.; Lee, J. Y. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Human factors have been well known as one of the key factors to the system effectiveness as well as the efficiency and safety of nuclear power plants(NPPs). Human factors engineering(HFE) are included in periodic safety review(PSR) on the existing NPPs and the formal safety assessment for the new ones. However, HFE for NPPs is still neither popular in practice nor concrete in methodology. Especially, the human factors guidelines, which are the most frequent form of human factors engineering in practice, reveal the limitations in their applications. We discuss the limitations and their casual factors found in human factors guidelines in order to lesson the workload of HFE practitioners and to improve the applicability of human factors guidelines. According to the purposes and the phases of HFE for NPPs, more selective items and specified criteria should be prepared carefully in the human factors guidelines for the each HFE applications in practice. These finding on the human factors guidelines can be transferred to the other HFE application field, such as military, aviation, telecommunication, HCI, and product safety.

  2. Application of fractal theory in analysis of human electroencephalographic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramanathan, P; Uthayakumar, R

    2008-03-01

    In medical discipline, complexity measure is focused on the analysis of nonlinear patterns in processing waveform signals. The complexity measure of such waveform signals is well performed by fractal dimension technique, which is an index for measuring the complexity of an object. Its applications are found in diverse fields like medical, image and signal processing. Several algorithms have been suggested to compute the fractal dimension of waveforms. We have evaluated the performance of the two famous algorithms namely Higuchi and Katz. They contain some problems of determining the initial and final length of scaling factors and their performance with electroencephalogram (EEG) signals did not give better results. In this paper, fractal dimension is proposed as an effective tool for analyzing and measuring the complexity of nonlinear human EEG signals. We have developed an algorithm based on size measure relationship (SMR) method. The SMR algorithm can be used to detect the brain disorders and it locates the affected brain portions by analyzing the behavior of signals. The efficiency of the algorithm to locate the critical brain sites (recurrent seizure portion) is compared to other fractal dimension algorithms. The K-means clustering algorithm is used for grouping of electrode positions.

  3. Hibernation Control Mechanism and Possible Applications to Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, N.

    Mammalian hibernation, characterized by the ability to survive temporarily at low body temperatures close to 0oC, has been reported to increase resistance to various lethal events such as low body temperature, severe ischemia, bacterial infection and irradiation, and to prolong the life span. The application of this physiological phenomenon to space life has been dreamed of. However, realization of this dream has been prevented by a poor understanding of the control mechanisms of hibernation. Recent findings of a novel and unique protein complex (HP) in the blood of chipmunks, a rodent hibernator, which is controlled by the endogenous circannual rhythm of hibernation, allowed new developments in understanding the molecular mechanism of hibernation and its physiological significance. From these studies, two hormones regulated by the brain were identified as promising candidate molecules controlling HP production in the liver, assuming that hibernation is controlled via the neuroendocrine system and regulated by the endogenous circannual rhythm in the brain. A circannual HP rhythm was observed in chipmunks maintaining euthermia under conditions of constant warmth, suggesting that the physiological control of hibernation progresses without a lowering of body temperature. Furthermore, the study of HP rhythm on longevity revealed that a circannual rhythm plays an essential role in the much longer life span of hibernators. The present progress in hibernation research may open a new pathway for manipulating a circannual rhythm controlling hibernation in humans. In the future, this will make it feasible to take advantage of hibernation in space life.

  4. Application of 'writing for healing' in premedical humanities education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Jae Yu; Yeh, Byung Il

    2012-09-01

    There has been a recent tendency to attach special importance to writing education. Books on 'writing to heal' are being written in or translated into Korean. According to these texts, writing is a valuable tool for internal healing, depending on the mode of application. Writing can have positive effects and give hope to an individual or group, but it can also be a source of frustration and despair. Based on the distinct effects of writing, we cannot overemphasize the significance of writing education. Writing is generally taught during a premedical course that targets students who will eventually practice medicine. Many reports have examined immorality in medical students and health care providers, which is a reason that writing education is important for medical systems. 'Writing for Healing' is open to freshmen at Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine. The aim of this subject is to help students identify and acknowledge internal diseases to lead a healthier life and eventually become positive and responsible health care providers. However, in addition to the vague definition of what 'healing' is, the concept of 'writing for healing' has not been defined. This paper attempts to define the concept of 'writing for healing' and considers what influences it can have on a humanities curriculum in medical colleges.

  5. Human tolerogenic DC-10: perspectives for clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amodio Giada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs are critically involved in inducing either immunity or tolerance. During the last decades efforts have been devoted to the development of ad hoc methods to manipulate DCs in vitro to enhance or stabilize their tolerogenic properties. Addition of IL-10 during monocyte-derived DC differentiation allows the induction of DC-10, a subset of human tolerogenic DCs characterized by high IL-10/IL-12 ratio and co-expression of high levels of the tolerogenic molecules HLA-G and immunoglobulin-like transcript 4. DC-10 are potent inducers of adaptive type 1 regulatory T cells, well known to promote and maintain peripheral tolerance. In this review we provide an in-depth comparison of the phenotype and mechanisms of suppression mediated by DC-10 and other known regulatory antigen-presenting cells currently under clinical development. We discuss the clinical therapeutic application of DC-10 as inducers of type 1 regulatory T cells for tailoring regulatory T-cell-based cell therapy, and the use of DC-10 as adoptive cell therapy for promoting and restoring tolerance in T-cell-mediated diseases.

  6. Characterization of sequence diversity in Plasmodium falciparum SERA5 from Indian isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul C.N

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize the sequence diversity of blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum serine repeat antigen-5 (PfSERA5 which is lacking in a malaria-endemic country like India. Methods: In this study, parasitic DNA was obtained from field isolates collected from various geographic regions. Subsequently, PfSERA5 gene sequence was PCR amplified and DNA sequenced. Results: We reported the existence of unique repeat polymorphisms and novel haplotypes for both the octamer repeat (OR and serine repeat (SR regions of the N-terminal fragment of PfSERA5 from Indian isolates. Several isolates from India were identical to low-frequency African haplotypes. Unique finding of our study was an Indian isolate showing deletion in a perfectly conserved 14 mer sequence within octamer repeat. Indian haplotypes reported in this study were found to be distributed into the three earlier classified allelic clusters of FCR3, K1 and Honduras showcasing broad diversity as compared to worldwide haplotypes. Conclusions: This study is the first report on genetic diversity of PfSERA5 antigen from India. Further evaluation of these haplotypes by serotyping would provide useful information for investigating variant-specific immunity and aid in malaria vaccine research.

  7. Effect of leukaemic sera & cell-extracts on splenic colony counts (CFU-S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Rusia, U; Agarwal, S; Sood, S K

    1991-08-01

    Sera and leukaemic cell extracts from patients of acute leukaemia were evaluated for their effect on the repopulating ability of the pluripotent stem cells and erythroid differentiation by an in vivo splenic colony count (CFU-S) technique. Normal donor marrow cells of mice were treated with sera and cell extracts from patients of acute leukaemic and healthy controls and injected in the recipient mice. The CFU-S performed on the seventh day to assess repopulating ability of the stem cell showed consistently lower CFU-S counts in the test groups, with leukaemic sera (P less than 0.01) as well as leukaemic cell-extracts (P less than 0.001). The erythroid differentiation assessed by 59Fe uptake by the spleens also showed significantly reduced counts in the two test groups (P less than 0.01 and less than 0.001 respectively). The results indicate that both leukaemic sera and cell-extracts exert a significant suppressive effect on the repopulating ability of the stem cells and on their erythroid differentiation.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Porcine Parvovirus 2 Recovered from Swine Sera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, M.; Franco, A. C.; Giongo, A.; Valdez, F. P.; Saddi, T. M.; Brito, W. M. E. D.; Roehe, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    A complete genomic sequence of porcine parvovirus 2 (PPV-2) was detected by viral metagenome analysis on swine sera. A phylogenetic analysis of this genome reveals that it is highly similar to previously reported North American PPV-2 genomes. The complete PPV-2 sequence is 5,426 nucleotides long. PMID:26823583

  9. PROMOTER HYPERMETHYLATION OF p16 GENE AND DAPK GENE IN SERA FROM HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA (HCC) PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qing; CHEN Long-bang; TANG Yong-ming; WANG Jing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the aberrant methylation of p16 gene and DAPK gene in sera from primary liver cancer patients ad to evaluate the clinical significance. Methods: A methylation-specific PCR was performed for the detection of promoter hypermethylation of p16 gene and DAPK gene in blood DNA from 64 cases of HCC patients, and to analyze the relation of the aberrant methylation of p16 gene and KAPK gene and the clinical pathological data. Results: 76.6%(49/64) of the sera from 64 cases of HCC patients showed hypermethylation for p16 promoter and 40.6% (26/64) for KAPK promoter, whereas no methylated p16 gene promoter and DAPK gene promoter were found in sera from benign liver diseases patients and normal control. Methylated p16 gene and KAPK gene promoters in sera did not strongly correlated with HBsAg, stage,metastasis and differentiation in HCC; but strongly correlated with AFP. Conclusion: Detection of the aberrant methylation of p16 gene and KAPK gene in blood DNA from HCC patients might offer an effective means for the earlier auxiliary diagnosis of the malignancy.

  10. Total pepsin activity and gastrin in sera as markers of eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshkholgh, M.; Saberi-Firoozi, M.; Fattahi, M.; Siavoshi, F.; Khatibian, M.; Vahedi, H.; Mikaeli, J.; Ansari, R.; Alizadeh, B.; Malekzadeh, R.; Massarrat, S.

    1994-01-01

    The measurement of total pepsin activity by colorimetry, and gastrin by radioimmunoassay method was performed on the sera of 100 patients (80 with duodenal ulcer and 20 with non-ulcer dyspepsia) before and 4 weeks after the end of antibacterial treatment for eradication of Helicobacter pylori. While

  11. Specific Antibodies in Sera and Gastric Aspirates of Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Helicobacter pylori-Infected Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, A.; Tinnert, A.; Hamlet, A.; Lönroth, H.; Bölin, I.; Svennerholm, A.-M.

    1998-01-01

    In this study we have determined systemic and local antibody responses against different Helicobacter pylori antigens in H. pylori-infected and noninfected subjects. In addition, we studied whether differences in antibody responses between patients with duodenal ulcers and asymptomatic H. pylori carriers might explain the different outcomes of infection. Sera and in most instances gastric aspirates were collected from 19 duodenal ulcer patients, 15 asymptomatic H. pylori carriers, and 20 noninfected subjects and assayed for specific antibodies against different H. pylori antigens, i.e., whole membrane proteins (MP), lipopolysaccharides, flagellin, urease, the neuraminyllactose binding hemagglutinin HpaA, and a 26-kDa protein, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The H. pylori-infected subjects had significantly higher antibody titers against MP, flagellin, and urease in both sera and gastric aspirates compared with the noninfected subjects. Furthermore, the antibody titers against HpaA were significantly elevated in sera but not in gastric aspirates from the infected subjects. However, no differences in antibody titers against any of the tested antigens could be detected between the duodenal ulcer patients and the asymptomatic H. pylori carriers, either in sera or in gastric aspirates. PMID:9605978

  12. Extensions to the Systematic Error and Risk Analysis (SERA) Software Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-05

    texte enregistré sur un enregistreur de voix Sony IC et transcrit par le logiciel Dragon Naturally Speaking. Le logiciel SERA gère l’insertion du texte...enrichi d’une fonction qui accepte un texte enregistré sur un enregistreur de voix Sony IC et transcrit par le logiciel Dragon Naturally Speaking. Des

  13. Tennessee Report (Annual Report to SERA-IEG8 Tall Fescue Toxicosis/Endophyte Workshop)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of updates on research projects conducted within Tennessee concerning tall fescue (Lolium arundinacium) and its symbiotic endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum) were presented at the annual SERA-IEG 8 workshop including one with Forage-Animal Production Research Unit scientist collaborations...

  14. Kentucky Report (Annual Report to SERA-IEG8 Tall Fescue Toxicosis/Endophyte Workshop)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of updates on research projects conducted within Kentucky concerning tall fescue (Lolium arundinacium) and its symbiotic endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum) were presented at the annual SERA-IEG 8 workshop including a number with Forage-Animal Production Research Unit scientist collaborat...

  15. First Complete Genome Sequences of Zika Virus Isolated from Febrile Patient Sera in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, S.; Carrera, J.; Pullan, S. T.; Lewandowski, K.; Paz, V.; Loman, N.; Quick, J.; Bonsall, D.; Powell, R.; Thézé, J.; Pybus, O. G.; Klenerman, P.; Eisenberg, J.; Coloma, J.; Carroll, M. W.; Trueba, G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we present the complete genome sequences of two Zika virus (ZIKV) strains, EcEs062_16 and EcEs089_16, isolated from the sera of febrile patients in Esmeraldas City, in the northern coastal province of Esmeraldas, Ecuador, in April 2016. These are the first complete ZIKV genomes to be reported from Ecuador. PMID:28232448

  16. 7 CFR 1c.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 1c.118 Section 1c.118 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement...

  17. 45 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Research Subjects § 46.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  18. 49 CFR 11.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 11.118 Section 11.118 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 11.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans...

  19. 34 CFR 97.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for Protection of Human Research Subjects) § 97.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 97.118 Section 97.118 Education Office of the Secretary, Department...

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa serA Gene Is Required for Bacterial Translocation through Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Masashi; Nagata, Syouya; Yamane, Satoshi; Kunikata, Chinami; Kida, Yutaka; Kuwano, Koichi; Suezawa, Chigusa; Okuda, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To specify critical factors responsible for Pseudomonas aeruginosa penetration through the Caco-2 cell epithelial barrier, we analyzed transposon insertion mutants that demonstrated a dramatic reduction in penetration activity relative to P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. From these strains, mutations could be grouped into five classes, specifically flagellin-associated genes, pili-associated genes, heat-shock protein genes, genes related to the glycolytic pathway, and biosynthesis-related genes. Of these mutants, we here focused on the serA mutant, as the association between this gene and penetration activity is yet unknown. Inactivation of the serA gene caused significant repression of bacterial penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers with decreased swimming and swarming motilities, bacterial adherence, and fly mortality rate, as well as repression of ExoS secretion; however, twitching motility was not affected. Furthermore, L-serine, which is known to inhibit the D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase activity of the SerA protein, caused significant reductions in penetration through Caco-2 cell monolayers, swarming and swimming motilities, bacterial adherence to Caco-2 cells, and virulence in flies in the wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. Together, these results suggest that serA is associated with bacterial motility and adherence, which are mediated by flagella that play a key role in the penetration of P. aeruginosa through Caco-2 cell monolayers. Oral administration of L-serine to compromised hosts might have the potential to interfere with bacterial translocation and prevent septicemia caused by P. aeruginosa through inhibition of serA function. PMID:28046014

  1. Global human rights frameworks applicable to LGBTI migrants

    OpenAIRE

    Shana Tabak; Rachel Levitan

    2013-01-01

    Although no international legal instrument exists to specifically protect the human rights of LGBTI individuals, over recent years international legal bodies have interpreted basic human rights provisions to apply to LGBTI populations.

  2. Global human rights frameworks applicable to LGBTI migrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shana Tabak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Although no international legal instrument exists to specifically protect the human rights of LGBTI individuals, over recent years international legal bodies have interpreted basic human rights provisions to apply to LGBTI populations.

  3. Nanotechnology & human stem cells: Applications in cardiogenesis and neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Martin L.

    Human stem cell research holds an unprecedented promise to revolutionize the way we approach medicine and healthcare in general, moving us from a position of mostly addressing the symptoms to a state where treatments can focus on removing the underlying causes of a condition. Stem cell research can shed light into normal developmental pathways, as we are beginning to replicate them in a petri dish and can also be used to model diseases and abnormal conditions. Direct applications can range from finding cures for single or multigene diseases to demonstrating that we can replace these genes with a normal copy. We can even begin to model lifelong conditions such as aging by iPSC technology by relying on fetal, young, adult, and centenarian populations to provide insights into the process. We have also begun to understand the microenvironment in which specific cell populations reside. Being able to replicate the chemical, physical mechanical, and spatial needs of those cells, research groups are successfully generating full organs using cadaver scaffolds of heart and kidney, and there is promising research to reach the same success with other organs, such as the liver, and pancreas. Advances in those areas open an enormous potential to study organs, organoids, organ valves, tubes or other functional elements such as beating cardiomyocytes in vitro. There is also the need to evaluate the whole genome of induced and differentiated cells, with its myriad of interacting pathways. Bioinformatics can help our understanding of embryogenesis, organ differentiation and function. It can also help optimize our stem cell and bio-scaffold tools to advance closer to functional organs and tissues. Such a combination approach will also include pluripotency evaluation and multi-lineage differentiation, as well as platforms that may assist in cell therapies: 3D structures, micro-ribbons, directed patterning to name a few. There is now a clearer path forward with stem cell research than

  4. Techniques and applications for binaural sound manipulation in human-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begault, Durand R.; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1992-01-01

    The implementation of binaural sound to speech and auditory sound cues (auditory icons) is addressed from both an applications and technical standpoint. Techniques overviewed include processing by means of filtering with head-related transfer functions. Application to advanced cockpit human interface systems is discussed, although the techniques are extendable to any human-machine interface. Research issues pertaining to three-dimensional sound displays under investigation at the Aerospace Human Factors Division at NASA Ames Research Center are described.

  5. 40 CFR 26.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 26.118 Section 26.118 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic EPA Policy for Protection of Subjects... plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  6. 16 CFR 1028.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 1028.118 Section 1028.118 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... subjects remain to be selected; and projects in which human subjects' involvement will depend...

  7. Controlled Human Malaria Infection: Applications, Advances and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisic, Danielle I; McCarthy, James S; Good, Michael F

    2017-09-18

    Controlled Human Malaria Infection (CHMI) entails deliberate infection with malaria parasites either by mosquito bite or direct injection of sporozoites or parasitised erythrocytes. When required, the resulting blood-stage infection is curtailed by the administration of anti-malarial drugs. Inducing a malaria infection via inoculation with infected blood was first used as a treatment (malariotherapy) for neurosyphilis in Europe and the United States in the early 1900s. More recently, CHMI has been applied to the fields of malaria vaccine and drug development where it is used to evaluate products in well-controlled early phase proof-of-concept clinical studies thus facilitating progression of only the most promising candidates for further evaluation in malaria-endemic areas. Controlled infections have also been used to immunise against malaria infection. Historically, CHMI studies have been restricted by the need for access to insectaries housing infected mosquitoes or suitable malaria-infected individuals. Evaluation of vaccine and drug candidates has been constrained in these studies by the availability of a limited number of P. falciparum isolates. Recent advances have included cryopreservation of sporozoites, the manufacture of well characterised and genetically distinct cultured malaria cell banks for blood-stage infection, and P. vivax-specific reagents. These advances will help to accelerate malaria vaccine and drug development by making the reagents for CHMI more widely accessible and also enabling a more rigorous evaluation with multiple parasite strains and species. Here we discuss the different applications of CHMI, recent advances in the use of CHMI and ongoing challenges for consideration. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. SERA Scenarios of Early Market Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Introductions: Modeling Framework, Regional Markets, and Station Clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Melaina, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Penev, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Daniel, W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the development and analysis of detailed temporal and spatial scenarios for early market hydrogen fueling infrastructure clustering and fuel cell electric vehicle rollout using the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model. The report provides an overview of the SERA scenario development framework and discusses the approach used to develop the nationwidescenario.

  9. Plasmodium falciparum SERA5 plays a non-enzymatic role in the malarial asexual blood-stage lifecycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallmach, Robert; Kavishwar, Manoli; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Hackett, Fiona; Collins, Christine R; Howell, Steven A; Yeoh, Sharon; Knuepfer, Ellen; Atid, Avshalom J; Holder, Anthony A; Blackman, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum replicates in an intraerythrocytic parasitophorous vacuole (PV). The most abundant P. falciparum PV protein, called SERA5, is essential in blood stages and possesses a papain-like domain, prompting speculation that it functions as a proteolytic enzyme. Unusually however, SERA5 possesses a Ser residue (Ser596) at the position of the canonical catalytic Cys of papain-like proteases, and the function of SERA5 or whether it performs an enzymatic role is unknown. In this study, we failed to detect proteolytic activity associated with the Ser596-containing parasite-derived or recombinant protein. However, substitution of Ser596 with a Cys residue produced an active recombinant enzyme with characteristics of a cysteine protease, demonstrating that SERA5 can bind peptides. Using targeted homologous recombination in P. falciparum, we substituted Ser596 with Ala with no phenotypic consequences, proving that SERA5 does not perform an essential enzymatic role in the parasite. We could also replace an internal segment of SERA5 with an affinity-purification tag. In contrast, using almost identical targeting constructs, we could not truncate or C-terminally tag the SERA5 gene, or replace Ser596 with a bulky Arg residue. Our findings show that SERA5 plays an indispensable but non-enzymatic role in the P. falciparum blood-stage life cycle.

  10. Mycobacterial Hsp65 potentially cross-reacts with autoantibodies of diabetes sera and also induces (in vitro) cytokine responses relevant to diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Pittu Sandhya; Babajan, Banaganapalli; Tulsian, Nikhil K; Begum, Mahabubunnisa; Kumar, Ashutosh; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2013-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multifactorial disease and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Among the two types of diabetes, type-2 accounts for about 90% of all diabetic cases, whereas type-1 or juvenile diabetes is less prevalent and presents with humoral immune responses against some of the autoantigens. We attempted to test whether the sera of type-1 diabetes patients cross-react with mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 (Hsp65) due to postulated epitope homologies between mycobacterial Hsp65 and an important autoantigen of type-1 diabetes, glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD65). In our study, we used either recombinant mycobacterial Hsp65 protein or synthetic peptides corresponding to some of the potential epitopes of mycobacterial Hsp65 that are shared with GAD65 or human Hsp60, and a control peptide sourced from mycobacterial Hsp65 which is not shared with GAD65, Hsp60 and other autoantigens of type-1 diabetes. The indirect ELISA results indicated that both type-1 diabetes and type-2 diabetes sera cross-react with conserved mycobacterial Hsp65 peptides and recombinant mycobacterial Hsp65 protein but do not do so with the control peptide. Our results suggest that cross-reactivity of mycobacterial Hsp65 with autoantibodies of diabetes sera could be due to the presence of significantly conserved peptides between mycobacterial Hsp65 and human Hsp60 rather than between mycobacterial Hsp65 and GAD65. The treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with recombinant mycobacterial Hsp65 protein or the synthetic peptides resulted in a significant increase in the secretion of cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10. Taken together, these findings point towards a dual role for mycobacterial Hsp65: in inducing autoimmunity and in inflammation, the two cardinal features of diabetes mellitus.

  11. Peptide mimotopes of malondialdehyde epitopes for clinical applications in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amir, Shahzada; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Gonen, Ayelet;

    2012-01-01

    . Furthermore, MDA mimotopes were found to mimic MDA epitopes on the surface of apoptotic cells. Immunization of mice with P2 resulted in the induction of MDA-LDL-specific Abs, which strongly immunostained human atherosclerotic lesions. We detected IgG and IgM autoAbs to both MDA mimotopes in sera of healthy....... These mimotopes can serve as standardized and reproducible antigens that will be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in cardiovascular disease....

  12. Cross-reactivity of tree shrew sera with various secondary antibodies:extensive application to tree shrew models of diseases%树鼩血清与多种二抗的交叉反应:可在树鼩疾病动物模型中广泛应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮光萍; 姚翔; 刘菊芬; 王金祥; 何洁; 杨建勇; 潘兴华

    2015-01-01

      结果与结论:Western 结果表明树鼩的血清与抗兔、抗羊、抗人、抗小鼠、抗大鼠的二抗均不发生反应,与抗猴的二抗有交叉反应。ELISA 的结果也表明树鼩的血清与抗猴的二抗有交叉反应,而与其他二抗没有交叉反应。结果说明通常卖的二抗不能用于树鼩IgG的免疫检测,只有抗猴的二抗与树鼩的血清发生交叉反应,必需制备抗树鼩IgG的单克隆和多克隆抗体,在没有现成抗体可用时,可采用抗猴的二抗替代检测,能在树鼩疾病动物模型的研究中得到广泛应用。%BACKGROUND:Tree shrew is a representative between insectivore and primates, has a high degree of evolution, is more inexpensive primates, has high use of medical biology, and has been attached by scholars. OBJECTIVE:To detect whether the commonly used secondary antibodies have immune response with tree shrew serum. METHODS:Western blot assay and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay were utilized to detect whether the tree shrew serum had cross-reacts with anti-rabbit, anti-goat, anti-human, anti-mouse, anti-rat, and anti-monkey secondary antibodies. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Western blot assay results indicated that tree shrew serums did not react with anti-rabbit, anti-goat, anti-human, anti-mouse, and anti-rat secondary antibodies and had cross reaction with anti-monkey secondary antibody. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay results also indicated that tree shrew serums were cross-reactive with anti-monkey secondary antibody, but did not have cross-reactivity with the other secondary antibodies. Above data confirmed that the usual y soled secondary antibody cannot be used to immunoassay with tree shrews IgG. Only anti-monkey secondary antibody has cross-react with tree shrew serum. It is necessary to prepare anti-tree shrew IgG monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. When no antibody is readily available at present, anti-monkey secondary antibody can be used to substitute

  13. The Application of Humanized Mouse Models for the Study of Human Exclusive Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Fatemeh; Giles, Elizabeth C; Ashkar, Ali A

    2017-01-01

    The symbiosis between humans and viruses has allowed human tropic pathogens to evolve intricate means of modulating the human immune response to ensure its survival among the human population. In doing so, these viruses have developed profound mechanisms that mesh closely with our human biology. The establishment of this intimate relationship has created a species-specific barrier to infection, restricting the virus-associated pathologies to humans. This specificity diminishes the utility of traditional animal models. Humanized mice offer a model unique to all other means of study, providing an in vivo platform for the careful examination of human tropic viruses and their interaction with human cells and tissues. These types of animal models have provided a reliable medium for the study of human-virus interactions, a relationship that could otherwise not be investigated without questionable relevance to humans.

  14. Effects of Different Sera Conditions on Olfactory Ensheathing Cells in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Lu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC is a promising therapy in spinal cord injury (SCI treatment. However, the therapeutic efficacy of this method is unstable due to unknown reasons. Considering the alterations in the culture environment that occur during OEC preparation for transplantation, we hypothesize that these changes may cause variations in the curative effects of this method. In this study, we compared OEC cultured in medium containing different types and concentrations of serum. After purification and passage, the OEC were cultured for 7 days in different media containing 5%, 10%, 15% or 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS or rat serum (RS, or the cells were cultured in FBS-containing medium first, followed by medium containing RS. In another group, the OEC were first cultured in 10% FBS for 3 days and then cultured with rat spinal cord explants with 10% RS for another 4 days. An MTT assay and P75 neurotrophin receptor immunofluorescence staining were used to examine cell viability and OEC numbers, respectively. The concentration of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, which is secreted by OEC into the culture supernatant, was detected using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. RT-PCR was applied to investigate the NT-3 gene expression in OEC according to different groups. Compared with FBS, RS reduced OEC proliferation in relation to OEC counts (χ2 = 166.279, df = 1, p < 0.01, the optical density (OD value in the MTT assay (χ2 = 34.730, df = 1, p < 0.01, and NT-3 concentration in the supernatant (χ2 = 242.997, df = 1, p < 0.01. OEC cultured with spinal cord explants secreted less NT-3 than OEC cultured alone (F = 9.611, df = 5.139, p < 0.01. Meanwhile, the order of application of different sera was not influential. There was statistically significant difference in NT-3 gene expression among different groups when the serum concentration was 15% (χ2 = 64.347, df = 1, p < 0.01. In conclusion, different serum conditions may be

  15. The application of humanization theory to health-promoting practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Elizabeth

    2015-05-01

    It has been identified that if public health interventions do not account for what it means to be human, they are likely to fail. The aim of this article is to introduce humanization theory and to show how it can be applied to health-promoting practice. Health promotion can feature humanizing and dehumanizing elements, and these appear to impact on how people may (or may not) engage with interventions. The primary prevention of skin cancer in young people is an illustration of this. The practice implications of applying humanization theory to health promotion are potentially vast and complex; however, it is proposed that considering the dimensions of humanization may be a useful activity to inform the early stages of health-promotion intervention designs. Furthermore, developing the qualitative research evidence base about peoples' experiences of humanizing dimensions of health promotion would also be a valuable step towards ensuring that interventions account for the 'human dimension'. Applying humanization theory to the specific example of skin cancer prevention in young people has been a new venture but based on work so far, suggestions for humanizing principles for skin cancer prevention would need to be inclusive of the needs of young people, to support them and to involve them in research and intervention development.

  16. Applications of artificial intelligence in safe human-robot interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmaei, Nima; Kermani, Mehrdad R

    2011-04-01

    The integration of industrial robots into the human workspace presents a set of unique challenges. This paper introduces a new sensory system for modeling, tracking, and predicting human motions within a robot workspace. A reactive control scheme to modify a robot's operations for accommodating the presence of the human within the robot workspace is also presented. To this end, a special class of artificial neural networks, namely, self-organizing maps (SOMs), is employed for obtaining a superquadric-based model of the human. The SOM network receives information of the human's footprints from the sensory system and infers necessary data for rendering the human model. The model is then used in order to assess the danger of the robot operations based on the measured as well as predicted human motions. This is followed by the introduction of a new reactive control scheme that results in the least interferences between the human and robot operations. The approach enables the robot to foresee an upcoming danger and take preventive actions before the danger becomes imminent. Simulation and experimental results are presented in order to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in sera samples of mice experimentally infected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Langoni

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Detection of Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii DNA in blood can help to diagnose the disease in its acute phase; however, it must be considered that hemoglobin, present in blood, can inhibit polymerase activity, making impracticable the detection of DNA in samples. Mice were experimentally infected via oral route with ME49 and BTU2 strains cysts and RH strain tachyzoites; polymerase chain reaction was used to detect T. gondii DNA in mice sera 18, 24, 48, 96, and 192 hours post infection (PI. Toxoplama gondii DNA was detected in only one animal infected with BTU2 strain, genotype III (isolated from a dog with neurological signs 18 hours PI. The agent's DNA was not detected in any sample of the other experimental groups. New studies must be carried out to verify the technique sensitivity in researches on this agent's genetic material using sera samples of acute-phase toxoplasmosis patients, especially in cases of immunosuppression.

  18. Adsorbing/dissolving Lyoprotectant Matrix Technology for Non-cryogenic Storage of Archival Human Sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solivio, Morwena J; Less, Rebekah; Rynes, Mathew L; Kramer, Marcus; Aksan, Alptekin

    2016-04-12

    Despite abundant research conducted on cancer biomarker discovery and validation, to date, less than two-dozen biomarkers have been approved by the FDA for clinical use. One main reason is attributed to inadvertent use of low quality biospecimens in biomarker research. Most proteinaceous biomarkers are extremely susceptible to pre-analytical factors such as collection, processing, and storage. For example, cryogenic storage imposes very harsh chemical, physical, and mechanical stresses on biospecimens, significantly compromising sample quality. In this communication, we report the development of an electrospun lyoprotectant matrix and isothermal vitrification methodology for non-cryogenic stabilization and storage of liquid biospecimens. The lyoprotectant matrix was mainly composed of trehalose and dextran (and various low concentration excipients targeting different mechanisms of damage), and it was engineered to minimize heterogeneity during vitrification. The technology was validated using five biomarkers; LDH, CRP, PSA, MMP-7, and C3a. Complete recovery of LDH, CRP, and PSA levels was achieved post-rehydration while more than 90% recovery was accomplished for MMP-7 and C3a, showing promise for isothermal vitrification as a safe, efficient, and low-cost alternative to cryogenic storage.

  19. Maternal phenylketonuria: Embryotoxicity in vitro of PKU-related metabolites and of human PKU-sera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma AH; Verhoef A; Hamers AM; van den Ham WA; Jansen EHJM

    1993-01-01

    Mothers with untreated phenylketonuria (PKU) have an increased risk of bearing children with congenital malformations. PKU causes accumulation of phenylalanine (PHE) and its metabolites in urine and blood, and this condition may contribute to the developmental problems. In the present study we inv

  20. Fingolimod prevents blood-brain barrier disruption induced by the sera from patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Nishihara

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Effect of fingolimod in multiple sclerosis (MS is thought to involve the prevention of lymphocyte egress from lymphoid tissues, thereby reducing autoaggressive lymphocyte infiltration into the central nervous system across blood-brain barrier (BBB. However, brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs represent a possible additional target for fingolimod in MS patients by directly repairing the function of BBB, as S1P receptors are also expressed by BMECs. In this study, we evaluated the effects of fingolimod on BMECs and clarified whether fingolimod-phosphate restores the BBB function after exposure to MS sera. METHODS: Changes in tight junction proteins, adhesion molecules and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER in BMECs were evaluated following incubation in conditioned medium with or without fingolimod/fingolimod-phosphate. In addition, the effects of sera derived from MS patients, including those in the relapse phase of relapse-remitting (RR MS, stable phase of RRMS and secondary progressive MS (SPMS, on the function of BBB in the presence of fingolimod-phosphate were assessed. RESULTS: Incubation with fingolimod-phosphate increased the claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in BMECs, although it did not change the amount of occludin, ICAM-1 or MelCAM proteins. Pretreatment with fingolimod-phosphate restored the changes in the claudin-5 and VCAM-1 protein/mRNA levels and TEER values in BMECs after exposure to MS sera. CONCLUSIONS: Pretreatment with fingolimod-phosphate prevents BBB disruption caused by both RRMS and SPMS sera via the upregulation of claudin-5 and downregulation of VCAM-1 in BMECs, suggesting that fingolimod-phosphate is capable of directly modifying the BBB. BMECs represent a possible therapeutic target for fingolimod in MS patients.

  1. Circulating antibodies directed against "polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-like" structures in the sera of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouns, Olivier; Mangas, Arturo; Coveñas, Rafael; Geffard, Michel

    2009-07-01

    An increase in immunoglobulin (Ig) A isotype directed against benzo(a)pyrene (BP) structure has previously been described in sera of cancer patients. In this study, new polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) conjugates were synthesized in order to more closely mimic the endogenous ligands of the cytosolic aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). PAH [benzo(a)pyrene; 1,2-benzanthracene; dibenz[a,c]anthracene; 7,12-dimethylbenza[a]anthracene; benzo(ghi)perylene] were bound to protein carriers such as bovine serum albumin (BSA) via N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). The levels of circulating antibodies (Abs) directed against PAH-NAC conjugates in the sera of cancer patients were evaluated using an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) with these new conjugates. The avidity (IC(50)) and specificity of these circulating Abs were assessed via competition experiments. An increase in Ig directed against these PAH-NAC conjugates was found in the sera of cancer patients, irrespective of the state and stage of the tumors. These Ig were principally of the A isotype. Sera from cancer patients had significantly higher optical density (OD) ranges than the controls, p<0.0001. The ELISA test for breast cancer (n=155) and ovarian cancer (n=62) identified 82% and 92% of positive patients, respectively. The percentage positive in the control group (n=60) was around 5%. Moreover, competition experiments with the different PAH-NAC conjugates and NAC-BSA revealed an estimated avidity of 10(-6)M for the circulating IgA antibodies. The Abs discriminated between the different PAH-NAC conjugates and NAC-BSA. Therefore, these Abs recognize a carcinogenic PAH-NAC structure and not only a BP structure. These markers may be useful in the future for monitoring cancer evolution and recurrence.

  2. B cell epitopes on infliximab identified by oligopeptide microarray with unprocessed patient sera

    OpenAIRE

    Homann, Arne; Röckendorf, Niels; Kromminga, Arno; Frey, Andreas; Jappe, Uta

    2015-01-01

    Background Autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease are treated with TNF-alpha-blocking antibodies such as infliximab and adalimumab. A common side effect of therapeutic antibodies is the induction of anti-drug antibodies, which may reduce therapeutic efficacy. Methods In order to reveal immunogenic epitopes on infliximab which are responsible for the adverse effects, sera from patients treated with infliximab were screened by ELISA for anti-infliximab anti...

  3. Microarray screening of Guillain-Barré syndrome sera for antibodies to glycolipid complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Halstead, Susan K.; Kalna, Gabriela; Islam, Mohammad B.; Jahan, Israt; Mohammad, Quazi D.; Bart C Jacobs; Endtz, Hubert P.; Islam, Zhahirul; Willison, Hugh J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the patterns of autoantibodies to glycolipid complexes in a large cohort of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and control samples collected in Bangladesh using a newly developed microarray technique.\\ud \\ud Methods: Twelve commonly studied glycolipids and lipids, plus their 66 possible heteromeric complexes, totaling 78 antigens, were applied to polyvinylidene fluoride–coated slides using a microarray printer. Arrays were probed with 266 GBS and 579 control sera (2 μL p...

  4. Microarray screening of Guillain-Barré syndrome sera for antibodies to glycolipid complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Halstead, Susan K.; Kalna, Gabriela; Islam, Mohammad B.; Jahan, Israt; Mohammad, Quazi D.; Bart C Jacobs; Endtz, Hubert P.; Islam, Zhahirul; Willison, Hugh J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the patterns of autoantibodies to glycolipid complexes in a large cohort of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and control samples collected in Bangladesh using a newly developed microarray technique. Methods: Twelve commonly studied glycolipids and lipids, plus their 66 possible heteromeric complexes, totaling 78 antigens, were applied to polyvinylidene fluoride–coated slides using a microarray printer. Arrays were probed with 266 GBS and 579 control sera (2 μL per seru...

  5. Vasoprotective effects of human CD34+ cells: towards clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerman Amir

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of cell-based therapeutics for humans requires preclinical testing in animal models. The use of autologous animal products fails to address the efficacy of similar products derived from humans. We used a novel immunodeficient rat carotid injury model in order to determine whether human cells could improve vascular remodelling following acute injury. Methods Human CD34+ cells were separated from peripheral buffy coats using automatic magnetic cell separation. Carotid arterial injury was performed in male Sprague-Dawley nude rats using a 2F Fogarty balloon catheter. Freshly harvested CD34+ cells or saline alone was administered locally for 20 minutes by endoluminal instillation. Structural and functional analysis of the arteries was performed 28 days later. Results Morphometric analysis demonstrated that human CD34+ cell delivery was associated with a significant reduction in intimal formation 4 weeks following balloon injury as compared with saline (I/M ratio 0.79 ± 0.18, and 1.71 ± 0.18 for CD34, and saline-treated vessels, respectively P Conclusion Delivery of human CD34+ cells limits neointima formation and improves arterial reactivity after vascular injury. These studies advance the concept of cell delivery to effect vascular remodeling toward a potential human cellular product.

  6. Determination of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in the sera of patients with liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, T; Migita, K; Miyashita, T; Maeda, Y; Nakamura, M; Abiru, S; Myoji, M; Komori, A; Yano, K; Yatsuhashi, H; Eguchi, K; Ishibashi, H

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies in patients with HCV infection, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and type-I autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) to assess the specificity of anti-CCP antibodies. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-CCP antibodies were measured in the sera from patients with HCV infection (n=45), PBC (n=73), AIH (n=55) and rheumatoid arthritis (n=48), and also from the sera of healthy subjects (n=23). Anti-CCP antibodies were measured using a second generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). No sera with elevated anti-CCP were found in the patients with HCV infection. Two PBC patients (2.7%) and six AIH patients (10.5%) had anti-CCP antibodies. The seropositivity for anti-CCP in these autoimmune disease patients was associated with a high frequency of RA association [PBC; 100% (2/2), AIH; 86.4% (5/6)]. Although anti-CCP antibodies may be present in patients with autoimmune liver diseases, almost seropositive patients had concomitant RA. As a result, the measurement of anti-CCP antibodies may therefore be helpful for accurately diagnosing RA in patients with these liver diseases.

  7. Detection of Babesia divergens in southern Norway by using an immunofluorescence antibody test in cow sera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Røed Knut H

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of bovine babesiosis, caused by Babesia divergens (Apicomplexa: Piroplasmida has decreased markedly since the 1930 s, but may re-emerge as a consequence of climate change and changes in legislation and pasturing practices. This is a potentially serious disease, with both economical and animal welfare consequences. Therefore, there is a need to survey the distribution of B. divergens. Methods We tested sera from 306 healthy pastured cows from 24 farms along the southern Norwegian coast by using an indirect immunofluorescence IgG antibody test (IFAT. Fractions of seropositive cows were compared by calculating 95% CI. Results The results of this test showed that 27% of the sera were positive for B. divergens antibodies. The fraction of antibody-positive sera that we detected showed a two-humped distribution, with a high fraction of positives being found in municipalities in the western and eastern parts of the study area, while the municipalities between these areas had few or no positive serum samples. Conclusions Neither the farmers' observations nor the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording System give an adequate picture of the distribution of bovine babesiosis. Serological testing of cows by using IFAT is a convenient way of screening for the presence of B. divergens in an area.

  8. Autoantibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein in the sera of cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Sachiko; Miyasho, Taku; Maeda, Naoyuki; Doh-ura, Katsumi; Yokota, Hiroshi

    2009-08-01

    It is desirable to make the diagnosis in live cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), and thus surrogate markers for the disease have been eagerly sought. Serum proteins from BSE cattle were analyzed by 2-D Western blotting and TOF-MS. Autoantibodies against proteins in cytoskeletal fractions prepared from normal bovine brains were found in the sera of BSE cattle. The protein recognized was identified to be glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), which is expressed mainly in astrocytes in the brain. The antigen protein, GFAP, was also found in the sera of BSE cattle. The percentages of both positive sera in the autoantibody and GFAP were 44.0% for the BSE cattle, 0% for the healthy cattle, and 5.0% for the clinically suspected BSE-negative cattle. A significant relationship between the presence of GFAP and the expression of its autoantibody in the serum was recognized in the BSE cattle. These findings suggest a leakage of GFAP into the peripheral blood during neurodegeneration associated with BSE, accompanied by the autoantibody production, and might be useful in understanding the pathogenesis and in developing a serological diagnosis of BSE in live cattle.

  9. Synthetic Biology and Human Health: Potential Applications for Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouia, Fathi; Carr, Christopher; Cai, Yizhi; Chen, Y.; Grenon, Marlene; Larios-Sanz, Maia; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Santos, Orlando

    2011-01-01

    Human space travelers experience a unique environment that affects homeostasis and physiologic adaptation. Spaceflight-related changes have been reported in the musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular, neurovestibular, endocrine, and immune systems. The spacecraft environment further subjects the traveler to noise and gravitational forces, as well as airborne chemical, microbiological contaminants, and radiation exposure. As humans prepare for longer duration missions effective countermeasures must be developed, verified, and implemented to ensure mission success. Over the past ten years, synthetic biology has opened new avenues for research and development in areas such as biological control, biomaterials, sustainable energy production, bioremediation, and biomedical therapies. The latter in particular is of great interest to the implementation of long-duration human spaceflight capabilities. This article discusses the effects of spaceflight on humans, and reviews current capabilities and potential needs associated with the health of the astronauts where synthetic biology could play an important role in the pursuit of space exploration.

  10. Antigenic Variation of East/Central/South African and Asian Chikungunya Virus Genotypes in Neutralization by Immune Sera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Chong-Long; Sam, I-Ching; Merits, Andres; Chan, Yoke-Fun

    2016-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging mosquito-borne virus which causes epidemics of fever, severe joint pain and rash. Between 2005 and 2010, the East/Central/South African (ECSA) genotype was responsible for global explosive outbreaks across India, the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia. From late 2013, Asian genotype CHIKV has caused outbreaks in the Americas. The characteristics of cross-antibody efficacy and epitopes are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We characterized human immune sera collected during two independent outbreaks in Malaysia of the Asian genotype in 2006 and the ECSA genotype in 2008–2010. Neutralizing capacity was analyzed against representative clinical isolates as well as viruses rescued from infectious clones of ECSA and Asian CHIKV. Using whole virus antigen and recombinant E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins, we further investigated antibody binding sites, epitopes, and antibody titers. Both ECSA and Asian sera demonstrated stronger neutralizing capacity against the ECSA genotype, which corresponded to strong epitope-antibody interaction. ECSA serum targeted conformational epitope sites in the E1-E2 glycoprotein, and E1-E211K, E2-I2T, E2-H5N, E2-G118S and E2-S194G are key amino acids that enhance cross-neutralizing efficacy. As for Asian serum, the antibodies targeting E2 glycoprotein correlated with neutralizing efficacy, and I2T, H5N, G118S and S194G altered and improved the neutralization profile. Rabbit polyclonal antibody against the N-terminal linear neutralizing epitope from the ECSA sequence has reduced binding capacity and neutralization efficacy against Asian CHIKV. These findings imply that the choice of vaccine strain may impact cross-protection against different genotypes. Conclusion/Significance Immune serum from humans infected with CHIKV of either ECSA or Asian genotypes showed differences in binding and neutralization characteristics. These findings have implications for the continued

  11. 75 FR 63189 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Investigational New Drug Applications-Determining Whether Human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Investigational New Drug... Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled... draft guidance for industry entitled ``Investigational New Drug Applications (INDs)--Determining...

  12. Multiple antibody targets on herpes B glycoproteins B and D identified by screening sera of infected rhesus macaques with peptide microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven-Kevin Hotop

    Full Text Available Herpes B virus (or Herpesvirus simiae or Macacine herpesvirus 1 is endemic in many populations of macaques, both in the wild and in captivity. The virus elicits only mild clinical symptoms (if any in monkeys, but can be transmitted by various routes, most commonly via bites, to humans where it causes viral encephalitis with a high mortality rate. Hence, herpes B constitutes a considerable occupational hazard for animal caretakers, veterinarians and laboratory personnel. Efforts are therefore being made to reduce the risk of zoonotic infection and to improve prognosis after accidental exposure. Among the measures envisaged are serological surveillance of monkey colonies and specific diagnosis of herpes B zoonosis against a background of antibodies recognizing the closely related human herpes simplex virus (HSV. 422 pentadecapeptides covering, in an overlapping fashion, the entire amino acid sequences of herpes B proteins gB and gD were synthesized and immobilized on glass slides. Antibodies present in monkey sera that bind to subsets of the peptide collection were detected by microserological techniques. With 42 different rhesus macaque sera, 114 individual responses to 18 different antibody target regions (ATRs were recorded, 17 of which had not been described earlier. This finding may pave the way for a peptide-based, herpes B specific serological diagnostic test.

  13. Application of chimeric mice with humanized liver for study of human-specific drug metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Thomas J; Reddy, Vijay G B; Kakuni, Masakazu; Morikawa, Yoshio; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2014-06-01

    Human-specific or disproportionately abundant human metabolites of drug candidates that are not adequately formed and qualified in preclinical safety assessment species pose an important drug development challenge. Furthermore, the overall metabolic profile of drug candidates in humans is an important determinant of their drug-drug interaction susceptibility. These risks can be effectively assessed and/or mitigated if human metabolic profile of the drug candidate could reliably be determined in early development. However, currently available in vitro human models (e.g., liver microsomes, hepatocytes) are often inadequate in this regard. Furthermore, the conduct of definitive radiolabeled human ADME studies is an expensive and time-consuming endeavor that is more suited for later in development when the risk of failure has been reduced. We evaluated a recently developed chimeric mouse model with humanized liver on uPA/SCID background for its ability to predict human disposition of four model drugs (lamotrigine, diclofenac, MRK-A, and propafenone) that are known to exhibit human-specific metabolism. The results from these studies demonstrate that chimeric mice were able to reproduce the human-specific metabolite profile for lamotrigine, diclofenac, and MRK-A. In the case of propafenone, however, the human-specific metabolism was not detected as a predominant pathway, and the metabolite profiles in native and humanized mice were similar; this was attributed to the presence of residual highly active propafenone-metabolizing mouse enzymes in chimeric mice. Overall, the data indicate that the chimeric mice with humanized liver have the potential to be a useful tool for the prediction of human-specific metabolism of xenobiotics and warrant further investigation.

  14. 38 CFR 16.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 16.118 Section 16.118 Pensions, Bonuses... and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications... knowledge that subjects may be involved within the period of support, but definite plans would not...

  15. 32 CFR 219.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 219.118 Section 219.118 National Defense Department of Defense....118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types... agencies with the knowledge that subjects may be involved within the period of support, but definite...

  16. Human embryonic stem cells : advancing biology and cardiogenesis towards functional applications l

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, Stefan Robbert

    2010-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) hold great potential as a model for human development, disease pathology, drug discovery and safety pharmacology. All these applications will depend on comprehensive knowledge of their biology and control of their signaling mechanisms and fate choices. To begin to a

  17. Construction and expression of a humanized M2 autoantigen trimer and its application in the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hua Jiang; Ren-Qian Zhong; Sheng-Qian Yu; Yin Hu; Weng-Weng Li; Xian-Tao Kong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct and express a humanized M2 autoantigen trimer designated as BPO and to apply it in the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). METHODS: cDNA fragments encoding M2-reactive epitopes of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex Ez (PDCE2), branched chain 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase complex E2 (BCOADC-E2) and 2-oxo-glutarate dehydrogenase complex E2 (OGDC-E2) were amplified with PCR using total RNA extracted from human peripheral mononuclear blood cells. The fragments were cloned into the plasmid vector pQE-30 and then transferred into E. coliM15 (pREP4) for expression, which was induced by isopropylthio-β-Dgalactoside. The expressed recombinant BPO protein was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE, Western-blotting and Immunoabsorption test, its antigenic reactivity and specificity were identified with seven M2-positive sera confirmed at Euroimmun Research Center (Germany).Using the purified BPO, M2 antibodies in sera from patients with PBC and other liver related diseases were detected with ELISA. RESULTS: The expressed BPO was observed with both antigenic reactivity and specificity of M2 autoantigens. The determination of M2 antibodies by BPO with ELISA was more sensitive than using the Euroimmun's kit with the coefficients of variation less than 10 % in both interassay and intraassay.With the newly established method, M2 antibodies were found in 100 % (20/20) of patients with PBC. Six cases of liver disease with unknown etiology and 1 patient with drug induced liver injury had detectable levels of serum M2antibodies. There were also 2 patients with autoimmune cholangitis and 1 with autoimmune hepatitis showing M2-antibody positive. CONCLUSION: Compared with the routine immunofluorescenoe assay and commercially available assay kit using porcine heart mitochondrial protein as the antigen, the detection system established in the present study shows higher sensitivity and specificity and may be used as a powerful tool for the diagnosis of PBC.

  18. 45 CFR 690.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of... knowledge that subjects may be involved within the period of support, but definite plans would not normally... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite...

  19. Anti-leptospirose agglutinins in equine sera, from São Paulo, Goias, and Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, 1996-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Langoni

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Equine leptospirosis can present a non-symptomatic form, an acute clinical form, or even develop chronically, causing reproductive alterations, such as abortion and recurrent uveitis. Since the prevalence of leptospirosis in several countries and regions is widely reported, the objective of this study was to verify the prevailing equine leptospirosis in different regions of Brazil. Sera from 1402 blood samples from horses of different age, sex, breed, and purpose were examined. These samples came from southeastern and central west states of Brazil. The method utilized was the Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT, with 12 different Leptospira serovars. From the sera tested, 754 (54% were positive for one (385 or more (372 serovars. These results were higher when compared to national and international levels. The most commonly found serovars were icterohaemorrhagiae (37.01%, suggesting exposure to rodents, castellonis (16.97%, and djasiman (15.19%. There were significant differences of reagents between sexes, and a tendency toward higher positivity with age. Distribution of sera-reagents related to aptitude showed a markedly higher value for work animals than for sporting ones. Higher rates were found for animals with undefined breed. There were no significant differences related to regional origin. As an indication of multiple exposure, significant associations were observed between the following serovars: castellonis and djasiman; castellonis and grippotyphosa; castellonis and copenhageni; castellonis and icterohaemorrhagiae; castellonis and pomona; canicola and pomona; canicola and djasiman; djasiman and copenhageni; icterohaemorrhagiae and djasiman; icterohaemorrhagiae and pyrogenes; copenhageni and pomona. These results showed the necessity of further studies on the epidemiology of this disease in equines and its relationship to human illness.

  20. Obesity: from animal models to human genetics to practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Craig H; Fisler, Janis S

    2010-01-01

    Although many animal models are used in genetic studies, the mouse is most common. Analysis of single-gene mutations, linkage analysis in crossbred strains, and gene targeting are the primary techniques used to associate obesity phenotypes with specific genes or alleles. The orthologous human gene can then be tested, either in linkage studies in families or in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), for effect on the phenotype. Frequent lack of concordance between mouse and human obesity genes may be due to the difference in phenotypes measured in humans (body mass index) versus mouse (fat mass or % body fat), lack of intermediate phenotypes, and the fact that identified genes account for only a small percentage of the heritability of common obesity, suggesting that many genes remain unknown. New technology allows analysis of individual genomes at a reasonable cost, making large-scale obesity genome projects in humans feasible. Such projects could identify common allelic variants that contribute to obesity and to variable individual response to obesity therapy. Currently, family history may be more predictive than genetics for risk of obesity, but individual testing could ultimately guide therapy and, in the aggregate, guide public health policy. The primary limitation to development of genotype-based diets is that successful randomized diet trials of widely ranging macronutrient content, adequately powered for finding rare Mendelian mutations, have not been performed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Human mesenchymal stromal cells : biological characterization and clinical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardo, Maria Ester

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the characterization of the biological and functional properties of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), isolated from different tissue sources. The differentiation capacity of MSCs from fetal and adult tissues has been tested and compared. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has be

  2. Human factors engineering checklists for application in the SAR process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overlin, T.K.; Romero, H.A.; Ryan, T.G.

    1995-03-01

    This technical report was produced to assist the preparers and reviewers of the human factors portions of the SAR in completing their assigned tasks regarding analysis and/or review of completed analyses. The checklists, which are the main body of the report, and the subsequent tables, were developed to assist analysts in generating the needed analysis data to complete the human engineering analysis for the SAR. The technical report provides a series of 19 human factors engineering (HFE) checklists which support the safety analyses of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) reactor and nonreactor facilities and activities. The results generated using these checklists and in the preparation of the concluding analyses provide the technical basis for preparing the human factors chapter, and subsequent inputs to other chapters, required by DOE as a part of the safety analysis reports (SARs). This document is divided into four main sections. The first part explains the origin of the checklists, the sources utilized, and other information pertaining to the purpose and scope of the report. The second part, subdivided into 19 sections, is the checklists themselves. The third section is the glossary which defines terms that could either be unfamiliar or have specific meanings within the context of these checklists. The final section is the subject index in which the glossary terms are referenced back to the specific checklist and page the term is encountered.

  3. Designing for Humans in Autonomous Systems: Military Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    directs its activity towards achieving goals” (Russell and Norvig , 2009, p. 34). The advantage of an executive paradigm is that the human (executive...Frontiers Series. Taylor and Francis: London, 2013; pp 185–208. Russell, S. J.; Norvig , P. Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach, 3rd ed.; Upper

  4. Flexible Human Behavior Analysis Framework for Video Surveillance Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilun Lao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a flexible framework for semantic analysis of human motion from surveillance video. Successful trajectory estimation and human-body modeling facilitate the semantic analysis of human activities in video sequences. Although human motion is widely investigated, we have extended such research in three aspects. By adding a second camera, not only more reliable behavior analysis is possible, but it also enables to map the ongoing scene events onto a 3D setting to facilitate further semantic analysis. The second contribution is the introduction of a 3D reconstruction scheme for scene understanding. Thirdly, we perform a fast scheme to detect different body parts and generate a fitting skeleton model, without using the explicit assumption of upright body posture. The extension of multiple-view fusion improves the event-based semantic analysis by 15%–30%. Our proposed framework proves its effectiveness as it achieves a near real-time performance (13–15 frames/second and 6–8 frames/second for monocular and two-view video sequences.

  5. Development of Multiple ELISAs for the Detection of Antibodies against Classical Swine Fever Virus in Pig Sera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-hua Yang; Ling Li; Zi-shu Pan

    2012-01-01

    The major immunogenic proteins (Ems,E2 and NS3) of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) (Shimen strain) were expressed in E.coli and purified by affinity chromatography.The recombinant antigens were applied to develop multiple enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of specific antibodies in pig sera.Optimum cut-off values were determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis after testing 201 sera of vaccinated pigs and 64 negative sera of unvaccinated piglets.The multiple ELISAs were validated with 265 pig sera yielding high sensitivity and specificity in comparison with the virus neutralization results.The results demonstrated that multiple ELISAs can be a valuable tool for the detection of CSFV infection and serological surveys in CSFV-free countries or for the evaluation of the antibody responses in pigs induced by a live attenuated C-strain vaccination.

  6. STATE-OF-THE-ART HUMAN GENE THERAPY: PART II. GENE THERAPY STRATEGIES AND APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In Part I of this Review, we introduced recent advances in gene delivery technologies and explained how they have powered some of the current human gene therapy applications. In Part II, we expand the discussion on gene therapy applications, focusing on some of the most exciting clinical uses. To help readers to grasp the essence and to better organize the diverse applications, we categorize them under four gene therapy strategies: (1) gene replacement therapy for monogenic diseases, (2) gene...

  7. Applications of earth resources technology to human needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, C.

    1975-01-01

    The application of remote sensing technology in the fields of health and education is examined. The technology and accomplishments of ATS 6 and the development of a nationwide telecommunications system to meet the varied needs of the health and education communities are among the topics discussed. The economic and social aspects of utilizing and benefiting from remote sensing technology are stressed.

  8. Plant metabolomics and its potential application for human nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, R.D.; Brouwer, I.D.; Fitzgerald, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    With the growing interest in the use of metabolomic technologies for a wide range of biological targets, food applications related to nutrition and quality are rapidly emerging. Metabolomics offers us the opportunity to gain deeper insights into, and have better control of, the fundamental biochemic

  9. Plant metabolomics and its potential application for human nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, R.D.; Brouwer, I.D.; Fitzgerald, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    With the growing interest in the use of metabolomic technologies for a wide range of biological targets, food applications related to nutrition and quality are rapidly emerging. Metabolomics offers us the opportunity to gain deeper insights into, and have better control of, the fundamental

  10. Applications of earth resources technology to human needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, C.

    1975-01-01

    The application of remote sensing technology in the fields of health and education is examined. The technology and accomplishments of ATS 6 and the development of a nationwide telecommunications system to meet the varied needs of the health and education communities are among the topics discussed. The economic and social aspects of utilizing and benefiting from remote sensing technology are stressed.

  11. Complexes of hepatitis B surface antigen and immunoglobulin M in the sera of patients with hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, M; Rizzi, R; Toti, M; Almi, P; Rizzetto, M; Bonino, F; Purcell, R

    1983-01-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) bound to immunoglobulin M (IgM) was detected in sera of HBsAg carriers by a radioimmunoassay based on selective absorption of the immunoglobulin on a solid phase coated with antiserum to human IgM. Isopycnic banding and rate-zonal sedimentation have shown that the reaction is related to particulate forms of the HBsAg complexed with IgM. The binding of IgM possibly occurred because of a selective affinity of these molecules to the surface of HBsAg particles. HBsAg/IgM was found transiently in 24 of 25 (96%) patients with acute self-limited hepatitis B and persistently in 6 of 25 patients whose acute hepatitis B progressed to chronicity. It was also found in 20 of 39 (51%) chronic HBsAg carriers with inactive and asymptomatic infection. The HBsAg/IgM phenomenon is not dependent on replication of hepatitis B virions; its persistence in patients with acute hepatitis B may provide complementary evidence of transition of the infection to chronicity. PMID:6309673

  12. Specific IgG Antibodies React to Mimotopes of BK Polyomavirus, a Small DNA Tumor Virus, in Healthy Adult Sera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrobon, Silvia; Bononi, Ilaria; Mazzoni, Elisa; Lotito, Francesca; Manfrini, Marco; Puozzo, Andrea; Destro, Federica; Guerra, Giovanni; Nocini, Pier Francesco; Martini, Fernanda; Tognon, Mauro G.

    2017-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) was isolated in 1971 from the urine of a kidney transplant patient. Soon after its identification, BKPyV was characterized as a kidney-tropic virus, which is responsible of a significant fraction of the rejection of transplant kidney in the host. Moreover, in experimental conditions, BKPyV is able to transform different types of animal and human cells and to induce tumors of different histotypes in experimental animals. BKPyV DNA sequences have been detected in healthy individuals and cancer patients using polymerase chain reaction/Shouthern blot hybridization methods. Serum antibodies against this polyomavirus were revealed using immunological techniques, which, however, cross-react with other polyomaviruses such as JC (JCPyV) and Simian Virus 40. These non-specific data indicate the need of novel immunological methods and new investigations to check in a specific manner, BKPyV spread in humans. To this aim, mimotopes from BKPyV structural capsid protein 1 (VP1) were employed for specific immunological reactions to IgG antibodies of human serum samples. An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with synthetic peptides mimicking immunogenic epitopes of BKPyV VP1 was set up and employed to test sera of healthy adult subjects. Data from this innovative immunological assay indicate that serum antibodies against BKPyV VP1 mimotopes are detectable in healthy subjects ranging from 18 to 90 years old. The overall prevalence of serum samples that reacted to BKPyV VP1 mimotopes was 72%. The strong points from this investigation are the novelty of the immunological method, its simplicity of the approach, and the specificity of BKPyV antibody reaction to VP1 mimotopes. PMID:28321224

  13. Application of the Human Intestinal Tract Chip to the non-human primate gut microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bello Gonzalez, T.D.G.; Passel, van M.W.J.; Tims, S.; Fuentes, S.; Vos, de W.M.; Smidt, H.; Belzer, C.

    2015-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is responsible for various health-related functions, and its diversity can be readily mapped with the 16S ribosomal RNA targeting Human Intestinal Tract (HIT) Chip. Here we characterise distal gut samples from chimpanzees, gorillas and marmosets, and compare them with

  14. Application of the Human Intestinal Tract Chip to the non-human primate gut microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bello Gonzalez, T.D.G.; Passel, van M.W.J.; Tims, S.; Fuentes, S.; Vos, de W.M.; Smidt, H.; Belzer, C.

    2015-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is responsible for various health-related functions, and its diversity can be readily mapped with the 16S ribosomal RNA targeting Human Intestinal Tract (HIT) Chip. Here we characterise distal gut samples from chimpanzees, gorillas and marmosets, and compare them with

  15. Human-computer systems interaction backgrounds and applications 3

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikowski, Juliusz; Mroczek, Teresa; Wtorek, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    This book contains an interesting and state-of the art collection of papers on the recent progress in Human-Computer System Interaction (H-CSI). It contributes the profound description of the actual status of the H-CSI field and also provides a solid base for further development and research in the discussed area. The contents of the book are divided into the following parts: I. General human-system interaction problems; II. Health monitoring and disabled people helping systems; and III. Various information processing systems. This book is intended for a wide audience of readers who are not necessarily experts in computer science, machine learning or knowledge engineering, but are interested in Human-Computer Systems Interaction. The level of particular papers and specific spreading-out into particular parts is a reason why this volume makes fascinating reading. This gives the reader a much deeper insight than he/she might glean from research papers or talks at conferences. It touches on all deep issues that ...

  16. Evaluation of a C-reactive protein latex agglutination detection test with sera from patients with sexually transmitted diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalla, W O; Arko, R J; Thompson, S E

    1984-01-01

    A total of 149 sera, including 79 pre- and posttreatment sera from 33 patients with disseminated gonococcal infections, 18 from patients with uncomplicated gonococcal infections, 6 from patients with pelvic inflammatory disease, 4 from patients with genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections, and 42 from normal volunteers, were examined for C-reactive protein with a latex agglutination C-reactive protein detection kit (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, Mich.). Results were quantitated with LC-Partigen C-reactive protein radial immuno-diffusion plates (Calbiochem-Behring, La Jolla, Calif.). Positive latex agglutination results were observed in all of the pretreatment sera and some of the posttreatment sera of patients with disseminated gonococcal infections and in two sera from patients with pelvic inflammatory disease, which corresponded to quantitative C-reactive protein levels in the radial immunodiffusion plates. C-reactive protein levels were not detectable in the serum samples from normal volunteers or patients with uncomplicated gonococcal infections or genital chlamydial infections. Positive latex agglutination occurred as early as 20 s in sera with high C-reactive protein levels, and all positive results were observed within 90 s of the 3-min test limit. Positive latex test results were obtained with C-reactive protein levels as low as 1 mg/dl (10 micrograms/ml). PMID:6440907

  17. Identification and profiling of circulating antigens by screening with the sera from schistosomiasis japonica patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosomiasis is a chronic disease caused by trematode flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. The disease remains a serious public health problem in endemic countries and affects at least 207 million people worldwide. A definite diagnosis of the disease plays a key role in the control of schistosomiasis. The detection of schistosome circulating antigens (CAs is an effective approach to discriminate between previous exposure and current infection. Different methods have been investigated for detecting the CAs. However, the components of the schistosome CAs remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed the CAs in sera of patients infected with Schistosoma japonicum. Methods The parasites were collected from the infected rabbits for preparing the adult worm antigen (AWA. The hyline hens were immunized subcutaneously with AWA to produce anti-AWA IgY. The IgY was purified by water-dilution and ammonium sulfate precipitation method and identified by ELISA and Western blotting. After purification and characterization, IgY was immobilized onto the resin as a capture antibody. The circulating antigens were immune-precipitated from patients′ serum samples by direct immunoprecipitation. The precipitated proteins were separated by one-dimensional electrophoresis and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Results Firstly, the IgY against AWA was produced from the eggs of immunized hens by AWA, which gave a titer of 1:12800. The purified IgY was used as the capture antibody to enrich the CAs in sera of S. japonicum infected patients through immunoprecipitation. The CAs were determined by LC-MS/MS. There were four proteins, including protein BUD31 homolog, ribonuclease, SJCHGC06971 protein and SJCHGC04754 protein, which were identified among the CAs. Conclusions We developed a novel method based on IgY for identification and profiling CAs in sera of S. japonicum infected patients. Four new CAs were identified and have potential value for further development

  18. Detection of tumor-specific autoantibodies in sera of patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashio, Ryo; Sato, Yuichi; Jiang, Shi-Xu; Ryuge, Shinichiro; Kodera, Yoshio; Maeda, Tadakazu; Nakajima, Takashi

    2008-12-01

    The presence of autoantibodies (AAs) in sera from two pulmonary carcinoma patients, adenocarcinoma (AD) and small cell carcinoma (SCLC) was screened by immunoblotting using cell lysate of four cell lines (LCN1, large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC); N231, SCLC; A549, AD; RERF-LC-AI, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)). To identify the antigens recognized by AAs, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was immunoblotted and target spots were cut out from the membrane and gel. After trypsin digestion, the proteins were analyzed by mass-spectrometry using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer. By this method, cytokeratin18 (CK18) and villin1 were identified with AAs in sera from patients with AD and SCLC, respectively. Thus, the expressions of CK18 and villin1 were further immunohistochemically studied on 124 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded pulmonary carcinomas of various histologic types (44 AD, 27 SCC, 29 SCLC, and 34 LCNEC) using commercially available CK18 and villin1 antibodies. Positive CK18 immunostaining was observed in almost all cases with staining intensities significantly higher in AD and LCNEC than in SCC and SCLC. Villin1 was detected in 17/44 (38.6%) of AD and 21/34 (61.8%) of LCNEC, respectively, while in only one each of SCLC and SCC. Thus, villin1 and CK18 may be useful markers to distinguish LCNEC/AD from SCLC/SCC, and the present method might be useful to identify specific tumor-associated molecules in sera from pulmonary carcinoma patients with different histologic types.

  19. Evaluation of a blocking ELISA for the detection of antibodies against Lawsonia intracellularis in pig sera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merza Malik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lawsonia intracellularis is a common cause of chronic diarrhoea and poor performance in young growing pigs. Diagnosis of this obligate intracellular bacterium is based on the demonstration of the microbe or microbial DNA in tissue specimens or faecal samples, or the demonstration of L. intracellularis-specific antibodies in sera. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a blocking ELISA in the detection of serum antibodies to L. intracellularis, by comparison to the previously widely used immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT. Methods Sera were collected from 176 pigs aged 8-12 weeks originating from 24 herds with or without problems with diarrhoea and poor performance in young growing pigs. Sera were analyzed by the blocking ELISA and by IFAT. Bayesian modelling techniques were used to account for the absence of a gold standard test and the results of the blocking ELISA was modelled against the IFAT test with a "2 dependent tests, 2 populations, no gold standard" model. Results At the finally selected cut-off value of percent inhibition (PI 35, the diagnostic sensitivity of the blocking ELISA was 72% and the diagnostic specificity was 93%. The positive predictive value was 0.82 and the negative predictive value was 0.89, at the observed prevalence of 33.5%. Conclusion The sensitivity and specificity as evaluated by Bayesian statistic techniques differed from that previously reported. Properties of diagnostic tests may well vary between countries, laboratories and among populations of animals. In the absence of a true gold standard, the importance of validating new methods by appropriate statistical methods and with respect to the target population must be emphasized.

  20. Spirulina in clinical practice: evidence-based human applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkos, P D; Leong, S C; Karkos, C D; Sivaji, N; Assimakopoulos, D A

    2011-01-01

    Spirulina or Arthrospira is a blue-green alga that became famous after it was successfully used by NASA as a dietary supplement for astronauts on space missions. It has the ability to modulate immune functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting the release of histamine by mast cells. Multiple studies investigating the efficacy and the potential clinical applications of Spirulina in treating several diseases have been performed and a few randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews suggest that this alga may improve several symptoms and may even have an anticancer, antiviral and antiallergic effects. Current and potential clinical applications, issues of safety, indications, side-effects and levels of evidence are addressed in this review. Areas of ongoing and future research are also discussed.

  1. Spirulina in Clinical Practice: Evidence-Based Human Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Karkos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spirulina or Arthrospira is a blue-green alga that became famous after it was successfully used by NASA as a dietary supplement for astronauts on space missions. It has the ability to modulate immune functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting the release of histamine by mast cells. Multiple studies investigating the efficacy and the potential clinical applications of Spirulina in treating several diseases have been performed and a few randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews suggest that this alga may improve several symptoms and may even have an anticancer, antiviral and antiallergic effects. Current and potential clinical applications, issues of safety, indications, side-effects and levels of evidence are addressed in this review. Areas of ongoing and future research are also discussed.

  2. Spirulina in Clinical Practice: Evidence-Based Human Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Karkos, P. D.; Leong, S. C.; C. D. Karkos; Sivaji, N.; Assimakopoulos, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Spirulina or Arthrospira is a blue-green alga that became famous after it was successfully used by NASA as a dietary supplement for astronauts on space missions. It has the ability to modulate immune functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting the release of histamine by mast cells. Multiple studies investigating the efficacy and the potential clinical applications of Spirulina in treating several diseases have been performed and a few randomized controlled trials and sy...

  3. Mass spectrometry analysis of melanoma related O-glycans in sera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Glycomics comparison was carried out by screening melanoma serum biomarkers between C57 mice with and without B16 implanted. O-glycans were released from 10 μL sera by β-elimination, purified by Graphitized Carbon Cartridge Solid Phase Extraction (GCC-SPE) and analyzed by MALDI-QIT-TOF-MS. MS raw data were acquired and exported by Launchpad software. MATLAB was then applied for further data analysis. 10 Glycans were considered to have stable changes after B16 implantation and 5 of them were under structural analysis via MS/MS.

  4. Validation of ELISA for the determination of anti-ricin immunoglobulin G concentration in mouse sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Changhong Y; Pace-Templeton, Judith G; Millard, Charles B; Wannemacher, Robert W; Hewetson, John F

    2006-03-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the determination of anti-ricin immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration in mouse sera was systematically validated. The results obtained throughout the validation process strongly demonstrated that the ELISA was reliable, reproducible, and suitable for its intended use. The assay had a high level of precision within and between runs, was specific for the anti-ricin IgG, and showed no interference with a number of different serum matrices. The assay exhibited excellent accuracy, linearity, and stability. The mean recovery of four test samples with different known concentrations was 100.9+/-11.3%, 102.7+/-10.8%, 99.0+/-7.2%, and 95.9+/-11.3%, respectively (n=10). The mean recovery of the observed anti-ricin IgG concentration of three quality control samples run on 73 plates to their nominal concentrations was 100.1+/-7.3%, 100.2+/-5.8%, and 103.7+/-8.1%; and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.3%, 5.8%, and 7.8%, respectively. The back-calculated anti-ricin IgG concentration, %CV, and relative error of seven standards from the calibration curves run in the entire validation study were analyzed (n=7 x 73). The results indicated that the four-parameter logistic (4PL) equation, y=(a-d)/(1+(x/c)b)+d, provided an accurate representation of a sigmoidal relationship between the measured response and the logarithm of observed concentration of anti-ricin IgG in mouse sera for this ELISA. The lower limit of quantification and upper limit of quantification of the calibration curve were 3.3 ng/ml and 82.8 ng/ml, respectively. The measurable range of the assay would cover all possible anti-ricin IgG concentrations in mouse sera stimulated with a ricin vaccine candidate, when the test sera are measured at a 1:800 starting dilution followed by four additional fourfold serial dilutions.

  5. Declaration of the 2nd Meeting of the Committee on Clinical Application of Human Organ Transplantation of China and National Summit of Clinical Application and Management of Human Organ Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ We, medical practitioners of human organ transplantation, met in the 2nd Meeting of the People's Republic of China Ministry of Health Committee on Clinical Application of Human Organ Transplantation and National Summit of Clinical Application and Management of Human Organ Transplantation in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, People's Republic of China, on 13 and 14 November 2006.

  6. Electromagnetic and Thermal Simulations of Human Neurons for SAR Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Felipe; Millholland, Gilbert; Peddinti, Seshasai Vamsi Krishna; Thella, Ashok Kumar; Rizkalla, James; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, Maher; Morisaki, Jorge; Rizkalla, Maher E.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of the electromagnetic waves (EM) on human neurons (HN) has been under investigation for decades, in efforts to understand the impact of cell phones (radiation) on human health, or radiation absorption by HN for medical diagnosis and treatment. Research issues including the wave frequency, power intensity, reflections and scattering, and penetration depths are of important considerations to be incorporated into the research study. In this study, computer simulation for the EM exposure to HN was studied for the purpose of determining the upper limits of the electric and magnetic field intensities, power consumption, reflections and transmissions, and the change in temperature resulting from the power absorption by human neurons. Both high frequency structural simulators (HFSS) from ANSYS software, and COMSOL multi-physics were used for the simulation of the EM transmissions and reflections, and the temperature profile within the cells, respectively. For the temperature profile estimation, the study considers an electrical source of 0.5 watt input power, 64 MHz. The EM simulation was looking into the uniformity of the fields within the sample cells. The size of the waveguide was set to be appropriate for a small animal model to be conducted in the future. The incident power was fully transmitted throughout the waveguide, and less than 1% reflections were observed from the simulation. The minimum reflected power near the sample under investigation was found to be with negligible reflected field strengths. The temperature profile resulting from the COMSOL simulation was found to be near 0.25 m°K, indicating no change in temperature on the neuro cells under the EM exposure. The paper details the simulation results for the EM response determined by HFSS, and temperature profile simulated by COMSOL. PMID:27617054

  7. The Biological Effects of Quadripolar Radiofrequency Sequential Application: A Human Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaglia, Antonia Icaro; Faga, Angela; Scevola, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: An experimental study was conducted to assess the effectiveness and safety of an innovative quadripolar variable electrode configuration radiofrequency device with objective measurements in an ex vivo and in vivo human experimental model. Background data: Nonablative radiofrequency applications are well-established anti-ageing procedures for cosmetic skin tightening. Methods: The study was performed in two steps: ex vivo and in vivo assessments. In the ex vivo assessments the radiofrequency applications were performed on human full-thickness skin and subcutaneous tissue specimens harvested during surgery for body contouring. In the in vivo assessments the applications were performed on two volunteer patients scheduled for body contouring surgery at the end of the study. The assessment methods were: clinical examination and medical photography, temperature measurement with thermal imaging scan, and light microscopy histological examination. Results: The ex vivo assessments allowed for identification of the effective safety range for human application. The in vivo assessments allowed for demonstration of the biological effects of sequential radiofrequency applications. After a course of radiofrequency applications, the collagen fibers underwent an immediate heat-induced rearrangement and were partially denaturated and progressively metabolized by the macrophages. An overall thickening and spatial rearrangement was appreciated both in the collagen and elastic fibers, the latter displaying a juvenile reticular pattern. A late onset in the macrophage activation after sequential radiofrequency applications was appreciated. Conclusions: Our data confirm the effectiveness of sequential radiofrequency applications in obtaining attenuation of the skin wrinkles by an overall skin tightening. PMID:25244081

  8. Application of RNA interference in treating human diseases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Abdolhamid Angaji; Sara Sadate Hedayati; Reihane Hosein Poor; Safoura Madani; Sanaz Samad Poor; Samin Panahi

    2010-12-01

    Gene silencing can occur either through repression of transcription, termed transcriptional gene silencing (TGS), or through translation repression and mRNA degradation, termed posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS). PTGS results from sequence-specific mRNA degradation in the cytoplasm without dramatic changes in transcription of corresponding gene in nucleus. Both TGS and PTGS are used to regulate endogenous genes. Interestingly, mechanisms for gene silencing also protect the genome from transposons and viruses. In this paper, we first review RNAi mechanism and then focus on some of its applications in biomedical research such as treatment for HIV, viral hepatitis, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, metabolic disease, neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

  9. Applications of agent-based simulation for human socio-cultural behavior modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Karwowski, Waldemar; Ahram, Tareq Z

    2012-01-01

    Agent-based modeling and simulation (ABMS) has gained wide attention over the past few years. ABMS is a powerful simulation modeling technique that has a number of applications, including applications to real-world business problems [1]. This modeling technique has been used by scientists to analyze complex system-level behavior by simulating the system from the bottom up. The major application of ABMS includes social, political, biology, and economic sciences. This paper provides an overview of ABMS applications with the emphasis on modeling human socio-cultural behavior (HSCB).

  10. Proteomic Applications in the Study of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Mateos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are undifferentiated cells with an unlimited capacity for self-renewal and able to differentiate towards specific lineages under appropriate conditions. MSCs are, a priori, a good target for cell therapy and clinical trials as an alternative to embryonic stem cells, avoiding ethical problems and the chance for malignant transformation in the host. However, regarding MSCs, several biological implications must be solved before their application in cell therapy, such as safe ex vivo expansion and manipulation to obtain an extensive cell quantity amplification number for use in the host without risk accumulation of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. Cell surface markers for direct characterization of MSCs remain unknown, and the precise molecular mechanisms whereby growth factors stimulate their differentiation are still missing. In the last decade, quantitative proteomics has emerged as a promising set of techniques to address these questions, the answers to which will determine whether MSCs retain their potential for use in cell therapy. Proteomics provides tools to globally analyze cellular activity at the protein level. This proteomic profiling allows the elucidation of connections between broad cellular pathways and molecules that were previously impossible to determine using only traditional biochemical analysis. However; thus far, the results obtained must be orthogonally validated with other approaches. This review will focus on how these techniques have been applied in the evaluation of MSCs for their future applications in safe therapies.

  11. Proteomic Applications in the Study of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Jesús; Fernández Pernas, Pablo; Fafián Labora, Juan; Blanco, Francisco; Arufe, María del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are undifferentiated cells with an unlimited capacity for self-renewal and able to differentiate towards specific lineages under appropriate conditions. MSCs are, a priori, a good target for cell therapy and clinical trials as an alternative to embryonic stem cells, avoiding ethical problems and the chance for malignant transformation in the host. However, regarding MSCs, several biological implications must be solved before their application in cell therapy, such as safe ex vivo expansion and manipulation to obtain an extensive cell quantity amplification number for use in the host without risk accumulation of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. Cell surface markers for direct characterization of MSCs remain unknown, and the precise molecular mechanisms whereby growth factors stimulate their differentiation are still missing. In the last decade, quantitative proteomics has emerged as a promising set of techniques to address these questions, the answers to which will determine whether MSCs retain their potential for use in cell therapy. Proteomics provides tools to globally analyze cellular activity at the protein level. This proteomic profiling allows the elucidation of connections between broad cellular pathways and molecules that were previously impossible to determine using only traditional biochemical analysis. However; thus far, the results obtained must be orthogonally validated with other approaches. This review will focus on how these techniques have been applied in the evaluation of MSCs for their future applications in safe therapies.

  12. Comparison of RFFIT tests with different standard sera and testing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peng-cheng; Noguchi, Akira; Inoue, Satoshi; Tang, Qing; Rayner, Simon; Liang, Guo-dong

    2012-06-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) standard assay for determining antibody level is the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) and is used to determine the degree of immunity after vaccination against rabies. To compare the difference in RFFIT results between the laboratories of The National Institute of Infectious Disease in Japan (NIID) and the Chinese Centre for Disease Control (CCDC) as well the influence of the choice of standard serum (STD) for the detection, the two laboratories detection methods were simultaneously manipulated by RFFIT. The reference serums used in NIID and the WHO standard serum used in CCDC were compared in the same RFFIT detection to determine the titer of four sera samples C1, S1, S2 and S4 in parallel, and the titers of the detected sera samples were calculated using the standard formula for neutralizing antibody titer. No significant difference was found in RFFIT methods from the two laboratories and the RFFIT testing procedures of the two laboratories have good consistency. However, different titers were obtained with the tentative internal standard serum (TI-STD) produced by adjusting to 2.0 IU of WHO standard serum in NIID and the WHO STD. The titer determined with the TI-STD was higher than that determined with WHO STD, This difference appears to be significant and requires further investigation.

  13. Rock squirrel (Spermophilus variegatus) blood sera affects proteolytic and hemolytic activities of rattlesnake venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biardi, James E; Coss, Richard G

    2011-02-01

    Rock squirrels (Spermophilus variegatus) from two sites in south central New Mexico, where prairie (Crotalus viridis viridis) and western diamondback (Crotalus atrox) rattlesnakes are common predators, were assayed for inhibition of rattlesnake venom digestive and hemostatic activities. At statistically significant levels rock squirrel blood sera reduced the metalloprotease and hemolytic activity of venoms from C. v. viridis and C. atrox more than venom from an allopatric snake species, the northern Pacific rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus). In contrast, general proteolytic activity of venom from C. oreganus was inhibited more by S. variegatus serum defenses than activity of venom from sympatric snakes. For all three venoms, incubation with squirrel sera increased the level of fibrinolysis over venom-only treatments. These results suggest that rock squirrels (S. variegatus) can defend against metalloproteases and other proteases after envenomation from at least two of five rattlesnake predators they might encounter. However, there were statistically significant differences between general proteolytic activity and fibrinolytic activity of C. v. viridis and C. atrox venom, suggesting that rock squirrels might be differentially vulnerable to these two predators. The hypothesis that prey resistance influences snake venom evolution in a predator-prey arms race is given further support by the previously cryptic variation in venoms detected when assayed against prey defenses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Circulating Haptoglobin Is an Independent Prognostic Factor in the Sera of Patients with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Changqing; Annamalai, Loganath; Guo, Changfa; Kothandaraman, Narasimhan; Koh, Stephen Chee Liang; Zhang, Huoming; Biswas, Arijit; Choolani, Mahesh

    2007-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE This study was conducted to evaluate the prognostic significance of haptoglobin levels in the overall survival of patients presenting with various stages of epithelial ovarian cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS We employed an in-house sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method to determine the concentrations of preoperative haptoglobin and C-reactive protein (CRP) in sera samples obtained from 66 malignant tumors, 60 benign tumors, and 10 normal healthy women. RESULTS Levels of serum haptoglobin significantly correlated with tumor type (P < .001) and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage (P < .05). A significant correlation was observed between clinical stage and patient survival (r = 5.99, P = .026). Our data also indicated that elevated serum haptoglobin levels were associated with poor outcome for overall survival using both univariate and multivariate analyses (P = .048 and P = .036 respectively). Using Pearson's correlation, we have noted that serum CRP concentrations significantly correlated with haptoglobin levels (r2 = 0.22, P < .001). Immunohistochemical findings and Western blot analyses were compatible with sera levels of haptoglobin in which a higher intensity of staining occurred in late-stage epithelial ovarian cancers. CONCLUSION This study provides evidence that preoperative serum levels of haptoglobin could serve as an independent prognostic factor in patients presenting with epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:17325738

  15. Circulating Haptoglobin Is an Independent Prognostic Factor in the Sera of Patients with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changqing Zhao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to evaluate the prognostic significance of haptoglobin levels in the overall survival of patients presenting with various stages of epithelial ovarian cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We employed an in-house sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method to determine the concentrations of preoperative haptoglobin and C-reactive protein (CRP in sera samples obtained from 66 malignant tumors, 60 benign tumors, and 10 normal healthy women. RESULTS: Levels of serum haptoglobin significantly correlated with tumor type (P < .001 and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage (P < .05. A significant correlation was observed between clinical stage and patient survival (r = 5.99, P = .026. Our data also indicated that elevated serum haptoglobin levels were associated with poor outcome for overall survival using both univariate and multivariate analyses (P = .048 and P = .036 respectively. Using Pearson's correlation, we have noted that serum CRP concentrations significantly correlated with haptoglobin levels (r2 = 0.22, P < .001. Immunohistochemical findings and Western blot analyses were compatible with sera levels of haptoglobin in which a higher intensity of staining occurred in late-stage epithelial ovarian cancers. CONCLUSION: This study provides evidence that preoperative serum levels of haptoglobin could serve as an independent prognostic factor in patients presenting with epithelial ovarian cancer.

  16. Comparison of RFFIT Tests with Different Standard Sera and Testing Procedures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-cheng Yu; Akira Noguchi; Satoshi Inoue; Qing Tang; Simon Rayner; Guo-dong Liang

    2012-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) standard assay for determining antibody level is the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) and is used to determine the degree of immunity after vaccination against rabies.To compare the difference in RFFIT results between the laboratories of The National Institute of Infectious Disease in Japan (NIID) and the Chinese Centre for Disease Control (CCDC) as well the influence of the choice of standard serum (STD) for the detection,the two laboratories detection methods were simultaneously manipulated by RFFIT.The reference serums used in NIID and the WHO standard serum used in CCDC were compared in the same RFFIT detection to determine the titer of four sera samples C1,S1,S2 and S4 in parallel,and the titers of the detected sera samples were calculated using the standard formula for neutralizing antibody titer.No significant difference was found in RFFIT methods from the two laboratories and the RFFIT testing procedures of the two laboratories have good consistency.However,different titers were obtained with the tentative internal standard serum (TI-STD) produced by adjusting to 2.0 IU of WHO standard serum in NIID and the WHO STD.The titer determined with the TI-STD was higher than that determined with WHO STD,This difference appears to be significant and requires further investigation.

  17. Antibodies reacting to carbonic anhydrase isozymes (I and II) and albumin in sera from dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishita, Toshiho; Miyazaki, Rui; Miyazaki, Takae; Ochiai, Hideharu; Orito, Kensuke

    2016-06-01

    IgGs to carbonic anhydrase isozymes (CA-I and CA-II) and albumin were identified in dog serum. IgG titers were determined in the sera of asymptomatic dogs, and in dogs with atopic dermatitis, diarrhea and/or vomiting, diabetes and/or pancreatitis, kidney disease, hepatic disease, and thyroid gland disease, using ELISA. Low titres of IgG-reactive CA-I, CA-II, BSA, and CSA were found in the sera of healthy beagles. Compared with healthy beagles, there was a significant difference in the titers of antibodies against CA-I in asymptomatic dogs, dogs with diabetes and/or pancreatitis, or thyroid gland disease, or hepatic disease. Compared with healthy beagles, there was a significant difference in the antibody titer of anti-CA-II IgG in asymptomatic dogs and in those with hepatic disease. There was a significant difference in the antibody titer of anti-BSA IgG between healthy beagles and dogs with hepatic disease.

  18. Immunosorbent assay using gold colloid cluster technology for determination of IgEs in patients’ sera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifa Al-Dubai

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Haifa Al-Dubai1, Irene Lichtscheidl2, Martina Strobl1, Gisela Pittner1, Fritz Pittner11Department of Biochemistry, Max F Perutz Laboratories, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; 2Institute of Cell Imaging and Ultrastructure Research, Vienna, AustriaAbstract: This study focuses on the development of a sensitive and simple cluster-linked immunosorbent assay (CLISA using gold colloidal cluster labeling for determination of proteins such as antigens (Ags or antibodies (Abs. Abs for detection can be labeled with gold colloid clusters (GCCs. The Fc domain of the Abs binds to the clusters, and the Fab domain to the Ag on a nitrocellulose membrane or a microtiter plate as a support for dot-blotting. The signal of positive interaction between GCC-labeled Abs and its dotted Ag is detectable by the naked eye and can be quantified by comparison to a color scale prepared from a dilution series of known sample concentrations. The colored reaction product is stable for prolonged periods and does not fade, making this method a simple, fast, and convenient means for detection of Ag or Ab biorecognitions and an alternative to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Several interactions between different Ags or Abs (eg, ß-lactoglobulin and solutions avoiding gold colloidal cluster flocculation (eg, using protein G were studied. CLISA was tested for other analytical purposes such as detection of IgEs in patients’ sera.Keywords: ELISA, allergen, patient sera, CLISA, immunoassay, ß-lactoglobulin

  19. Detection of mammaglobin in the sera of patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, G R; Houghton, R L; Retter, M W; Hendrickson, R C; Babcook, J; Dillon, D C; Durham, M D; Reynolds, L D; Johnson, J C; Carter, D; Fleming, T P; Roche, P C; Persing, D H; Reed, S G

    2002-01-01

    Current procedures for the diagnosis of breast cancer are cumbersome and invasive, making detection of this disease difficult. A rapid screening test for early detection of breast cancer would allow for better management of this deadly disease. In this report, we show that, with the exception of the skin, mammaglobin mRNA is specifically expressed in mammary tissue and commonly overexpressed in breast cancer. Mammaglobin is not expressed in other types of cancer including colon, lung, ovarian, and prostate cancer. Breast-specific expression of mammaglobin protein was shown using immunohistochemical methods. Mammaglobin is secreted from both established breast cancer cell lines and primary breast carcinoma cells cultured in vitro. Using a monoclonal antibody-based assay for monitoring the presence of mammaglobin in serum, elevated levels of mammaglobin were detected in sera of patients with breast cancer, but not in healthy women. Thus, mammaglobin, which is overexpressed and secreted from breast carcinoma cells, is detectable in sera of patients with breast cancer and may provide a rapid screening test for the diagnosis and management of breast cancer.

  20. Applicability of simplified human reliability analysis methods for severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, R.; St Germain, S. [Idaho National Lab., Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States); Banaseanu, G.; Chatri, H.; Akl, Y. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-03-15

    Most contemporary human reliability analysis (HRA) methods were created to analyse design-basis accidents at nuclear power plants. As part of a comprehensive expansion of risk assessments at many plants internationally, HRAs will begin considering severe accident scenarios. Severe accidents, while extremely rare, constitute high consequence events that significantly challenge successful operations and recovery. Challenges during severe accidents include degraded and hazardous operating conditions at the plant, the shift in control from the main control room to the technical support center, the unavailability of plant instrumentation, and the need to use different types of operating procedures. Such shifts in operations may also test key assumptions in existing HRA methods. This paper discusses key differences between design basis and severe accidents, reviews efforts to date to create customized HRA methods suitable for severe accidents, and recommends practices for adapting existing HRA methods that are already being used for HRAs at the plants. (author)

  1. Application technology on human general function as a group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numano, Masayoshi; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Fukuto, Junji; Mitomo, Nobuo; Miyazaki; Keiko; Matsukura, Hiroshi; Niwa, Yasuyuki; Ando, Hirotomo [Ship Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    An operation assistant system for two operators as an object of plant model simulated on PWR was made experimentally, effectiveness on applying 3D-VR spatial indication and repulsive feedback input apparatus to plant operation assistance was investigated. By adopting a transmission type HMD, combination use with the conventional type operation monitoring system was made possible, and then it could be thought to become possible that human error was found by oneself by adding intuitive indication and feedback to judgement and operation used by a system assisting with logic understanding. And, by sharing these informations in a group, it was also found that correction of not only selfish but also other operator's error was made possible. (G.K.)

  2. Identification of Immunoreactive Leishmania infantum Protein Antigens to Asymptomatic Dog Sera through Combined Immunoproteomics and Bioinformatics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiotaki, Martina; Panayotou, George; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is the etiologic agent of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in countries in the Mediterranean basin, where dogs are the domestic reservoirs and represent important elements in the transmission of the disease. Since the major focal areas of human VL exhibit a high prevalence of seropositive dogs, the control of canine VL could reduce the infection rate in humans. Efforts toward this have focused on the improvement of diagnostic tools, as well as on vaccine development. The identification of parasite antigens including suitable major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I- and/or II-restricted epitopes is very important since disease protection is characterized by strong and long-lasting CD8+ T and CD4+ Th1 cell-dominated immunity. In the present study, total protein extract from late-log phase L. infantum promastigotes was analyzed by two-dimensional western blots and probed with sera from asymptomatic and symptomatic dogs. A total of 42 protein spots were found to differentially react with IgG from asymptomatic dogs, while 17 of these identified by Coommasie stain were extracted and analyzed. Of these, 21 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry; they were mainly involved in metabolism and stress responses. An in silico analysis predicted that the chaperonin HSP60, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, enolase, cyclophilin 2, cyclophilin 40, and one hypothetical protein contain promiscuous MHCI and/or MHCII epitopes. Our results suggest that the combination of immunoproteomics and bioinformatics analyses is a promising method for the identification of novel candidate antigens for vaccine development or with potential use in the development of sensitive diagnostic tests. PMID:26906226

  3. Safety Characteristics in System Application Software for Human Rated Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and its industry and international partners are embarking on a bold and inspiring development effort to design and build an exploration class space system. The space system is made up of the Orion system, the Space Launch System (SLS) and the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) system. All are highly coupled together and dependent on each other for the combined safety of the space system. A key area of system safety focus needs to be in the ground and flight application software system (GFAS). In the development, certification and operations of GFAS, there are a series of safety characteristics that define the approach to ensure mission success. This paper will explore and examine the safety characteristics of the GFAS development.

  4. CRALBP is a Highly Prevalent Autoantigen for Human Autoimmune Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia A. Deeg

    2007-01-01

    uveitis patient's sera was first evaluated in two-dimensional (2D Western blot analysis. Subsequent identification of the immunoreactive proteins by mass spectrometry resulted in the identification of CRALBP as a putative autoantigen. Additionally, sera from human uveitis and control patients were by Western blot using purified human recombinant CRALBP. Anti-CRALBP autoantibodies occur more frequently (P<.01 in human uveitis patients than in normal controls. Thirty out of 56 tested uveitis patient's sera contained autoantibodies reactive against CRALBP, compared to only four out of 23 normal control subjects. The presence of CRALBP autoantibodies in 54% of tested uveitis patients supports CRALBP as a possible autoantigen in human autoimmune uveitis.

  5. Hardware Development Process for Human Research Facility Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Liz

    2000-01-01

    The simple goal of the Human Research Facility (HRF) is to conduct human research experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) astronauts during long-duration missions. This is accomplished by providing integration and operation of the necessary hardware and software capabilities. A typical hardware development flow consists of five stages: functional inputs and requirements definition, market research, design life cycle through hardware delivery, crew training, and mission support. The purpose of this presentation is to guide the audience through the early hardware development process: requirement definition through selecting a development path. Specific HRF equipment is used to illustrate the hardware development paths. The source of hardware requirements is the science community and HRF program. The HRF Science Working Group, consisting of SCientists from various medical disciplines, defined a basic set of equipment with functional requirements. This established the performance requirements of the hardware. HRF program requirements focus on making the hardware safe and operational in a space environment. This includes structural, thermal, human factors, and material requirements. Science and HRF program requirements are defined in a hardware requirements document which includes verification methods. Once the hardware is fabricated, requirements are verified by inspection, test, analysis, or demonstration. All data is compiled and reviewed to certify the hardware for flight. Obviously, the basis for all hardware development activities is requirement definition. Full and complete requirement definition is ideal prior to initiating the hardware development. However, this is generally not the case, but the hardware team typically has functional inputs as a guide. The first step is for engineers to conduct market research based on the functional inputs provided by scientists. CommerCially available products are evaluated against the science requirements as

  6. Victims of ‘private’ crimes and application of human rights in interpersonal relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiter Axelle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available International human rights law has been challenged because of its alleged inability to safeguard the rights of the most vulnerable victims of violence. Whereas in real life they are often marginalized and effectively left without adequate protection, this is not to be attributed to the absence of an appropriate normative framework but rather to the contempt, lack of enforcement and systemic neglect of their claims. This paper proposes to find a ‘cure’ inside international human rights law, by strengthening the mechanisms that permit a horizontal application of human rights standards in private relations. The paper is divided in four sections. The first section describes the problematic at hand, focusing in particular on violence against women and children. The three subsequent sections then analyze the avenues open to victims in order to claim a ‘third-party’ application of human rights treaties against non-state actors who have violated their fundamental rights.

  7. Adjustable Autonomy and Human-Agent Teamwork in Practice: An Interim Report on Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Jeffrey M.; Feltovich, Paul; Hoffman, Robert; Jeffers, Renia; Suri, Niranhan; Uszok, Andrzej; VanHoof, Ron; Acquisti, Alessandro; Prescott, Debbie

    2003-01-01

    We give a preliminary perspective on the basic principles and pitfalls of adjustable autonomy and human-centered teamwork. We then summarize the interim results of our study on the problem of work practice modeling and human-agent collaboration in space applications, the development of a broad model of human-agent teamwork grounded in practice, and the integration of the Brahms, KAoS, and NOMADS agent frameworks. We hope our work will benefit those who plan and participate in work activities in a wide variety of space applications, as well as those who are interested in design and execution tools for teams of robots that can function as effective assistants to humans.

  8. Applications of human factors engineering to LNG release prevention and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikiar, R.; Rankin, W.L.; Rideout, T.B.

    1982-06-01

    The results of an investigation of human factors engineering and human reliability applications to LNG release prevention and control are reported. The report includes a discussion of possible human error contributions to previous LNG accidents and incidents, and a discussion of generic HF considerations for peakshaving plants. More specific recommendations for improving HF practices at peakshaving plants are offered based on visits to six facilities. The HF aspects of the recently promulgated DOT regulations are reviewed, and recommendations are made concerning how these regulations can be implemented utilizing standard HF practices. Finally, the integration of HF considerations into overall system safety is illustrated by a presentation of human error probabilities applicable to LNG operations and by an expanded fault tree analysis which explicitly recognizes man-machine interfaces.

  9. Control architecture for human-robot integration: application to a robotic wheelchair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Cipriano; Gonzalez, Javier; Fernández-Madrigal, Juan-Antonio

    2006-10-01

    Completely autonomous performance of a mobile robot within noncontrolled and dynamic environments is not possible yet due to different reasons including environment uncertainty, sensor/software robustness, limited robotic abilities, etc. But in assistant applications in which a human is always present, she/he can make up for the lack of robot autonomy by helping it when needed. In this paper, the authors propose human-robot integration as a mechanism to augment/improve the robot autonomy in daily scenarios. Through the human-robot-integration concept, the authors take a further step in the typical human-robot relation, since they consider her/him as a constituent part of the human-robot system, which takes full advantage of the sum of their abilities. In order to materialize this human integration into the system, they present a control architecture, called architecture for human-robot integration, which enables her/him from a high decisional level, i.e., deliberating a plan, to a physical low level, i.e., opening a door. The presented control architecture has been implemented to test the human-robot integration on a real robotic application. In particular, several real experiences have been conducted on a robotic wheelchair aimed to provide mobility to elderly people.

  10. Application of Human Augmentics: A Persuasive Asthma Inhaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Brent; Conner, Steve; Mosnaim, Giselle; Albers, Joshua; Leigh, Jason; Jones, Steve; Kenyon, Robert

    2017-03-01

    This article describes a tailored health intervention delivered on a mobile phone platform, integrating low-literacy design strategies and basic principles of behavior change, to promote increased adherence and asthma control among underserved minority adolescents. We based the intervention and design principles on theories of Human Augmentics and the Elaboration Likelihood Model. We tested the efficacy of using electronic monitoring devices that incorporate informative and persuasive elements to improve adherence to a prescribed daily medication regimen intended to reduce use of asthma rescue medications. We describe the theoretical framework, hardware and software systems, and results of user testing for design purposes and a clinical pilot study incorporating use of the device and software by the targeted population. The results of the clinical pilot study showed an 83% completion rate for the treatment as well as improved adherence. Of note, 8% and 58% of participants achieved clinically significant adherence targets at baseline and last week of the study, respectively. Rescue asthma medication use decreased from a median of 3 puffs per week at baseline to 0 puffs per week during the last week of the study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Human Performance Modeling and Simulation for Launch Team Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peaden, Cary J.; Payne, Stephen J.; Hoblitzell, Richard M., Jr.; Chandler, Faith T.; LaVine, Nils D.; Bagnall, Timothy M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing research into modeling and simulation of humans for launch team analysis, training, and evaluation. The initial research is sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA)'s Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA) and NASA's Exploration Program and is focused on current and future launch team operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The paper begins with a description of existing KSC launch team environments and procedures. It then describes the goals of new Simulation and Analysis of Launch Teams (SALT) research. The majority of this paper describes products from the SALT team's initial proof-of-concept effort. These products include a nominal case task analysis and a discrete event model and simulation of launch team performance during the final phase of a shuttle countdown; and a first proof-of-concept training demonstration of launch team communications in which the computer plays most roles, and the trainee plays a role of the trainee's choice. This paper then describes possible next steps for the research team and provides conclusions. This research is expected to have significant value to NASA's Exploration Program.

  12. Advancements in remote physiological measurement and applications in human-computer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDuff, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Physiological signals are important for tracking health and emotional states. Imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) is a set of techniques for remotely recovering cardio-pulmonary signals from video of the human body. Advances in iPPG methods over the past decade combined with the ubiquity of digital cameras presents the possibility for many new, lowcost applications of physiological monitoring. This talk will highlight methods for recovering physiological signals, work characterizing the impact of video parameters and hardware on these measurements, and applications of this technology in human-computer interfaces.

  13. MRI Segmentation of the Human Brain: Challenges, Methods, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Despotović

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation is one of the most important tasks in medical image analysis and is often the first and the most critical step in many clinical applications. In brain MRI analysis, image segmentation is commonly used for measuring and visualizing the brain’s anatomical structures, for analyzing brain changes, for delineating pathological regions, and for surgical planning and image-guided interventions. In the last few decades, various segmentation techniques of different accuracy and degree of complexity have been developed and reported in the literature. In this paper we review the most popular methods commonly used for brain MRI segmentation. We highlight differences between them and discuss their capabilities, advantages, and limitations. To address the complexity and challenges of the brain MRI segmentation problem, we first introduce the basic concepts of image segmentation. Then, we explain different MRI preprocessing steps including image registration, bias field correction, and removal of nonbrain tissue. Finally, after reviewing different brain MRI segmentation methods, we discuss the validation problem in brain MRI segmentation.

  14. MRI segmentation of the human brain: challenges, methods, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despotović, Ivana; Goossens, Bart; Philips, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Image segmentation is one of the most important tasks in medical image analysis and is often the first and the most critical step in many clinical applications. In brain MRI analysis, image segmentation is commonly used for measuring and visualizing the brain's anatomical structures, for analyzing brain changes, for delineating pathological regions, and for surgical planning and image-guided interventions. In the last few decades, various segmentation techniques of different accuracy and degree of complexity have been developed and reported in the literature. In this paper we review the most popular methods commonly used for brain MRI segmentation. We highlight differences between them and discuss their capabilities, advantages, and limitations. To address the complexity and challenges of the brain MRI segmentation problem, we first introduce the basic concepts of image segmentation. Then, we explain different MRI preprocessing steps including image registration, bias field correction, and removal of nonbrain tissue. Finally, after reviewing different brain MRI segmentation methods, we discuss the validation problem in brain MRI segmentation.

  15. QUALITATIVE MEASUREMENTS OF IGE AND IGG IN HUMAN ASTHMATIC SERUM FOR MOLD REACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rational: Molds have the ability to induce allergic asthma-like responses in mouse models; however, their role in human disease is unclear. This study was to develop a screening tool for reactivity of human sera to mold extracts by using a minimal amount of sera for a qual...

  16. Effect of whole body cold application to the thermal regulation of resting upright human

    OpenAIRE

    Lura, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    Whole body cryotherapy (WBCT) has been used to increase athletic performance and the inclusion of the cold athletic in training and competition are known. As clinical applications, there are new diagnostic as well as therapeutic approaches. The present work deals with the influence of cryotherapy application to the thermal regulation of healthy humans. Out of the question - how is the temperature behavior of healthy people under extreme cold temperature exposure, how they react to the col...

  17. Vitrification Increased Vacuolization of Human Spematozoa: Application of MSOME Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherzadeh, Sara; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Agha-Rahimi, Azam; Anbari, Fateme; Ghazali, Shahin; Macchiarelli, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Sperm vitrification is a technique of ice and cryoprotectant free cryopreservation by direct plunging of sperm suspension into liquid nitrogen (LN2). The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of cryoprotectant free-vitrification on human sperm fine structure by MSOME technology and the fertility potential by zona binding assay (ZBA). 20 normo-ejaculates were prepared by swim up technique, and supernatants were divided into two parts of fresh and vitrified groups. For vitrification, sperm was dropped into LN2. Sperm motility, morphology, viability and MSOME were evaluated for each sample. In MSOM morphologically normal sperm (class 1), ≤2 small vacuoles (class 2), and one large vacuole or >2 small vacuoles (class 3) were evaluated. Also, fertility potential was evaluated by zona binding assay. Data was analyzed using paired t-test or Willcoxon's test and p-value <0.05 was considered significant. Vitrification significantly reduced both progressive motility, viability and morphology. Also, normal morphology of spermatozoa decreased significantly after vitrification. In MSOME evaluation, normal motile spermatozoa (Class 1) decreased from 23.00±12.44 to 16.00.56±10.79 after vitrification (p=0.008). Although spermatozoa classes 2 and 3 were increased, the difference was not significant. Moreover, fertility potential of motile spermatozoa was reduced after vitrification (9.0±13.87 vs. 13.40±22.73; p=0.07). Vitrification increased the rate of vacuolization in motile sperm head. Therefore, MSOME technology is recommended for assessment of sperm fine morphology in ICSI program used cryopreserved spermatozoa.

  18. HBV cccDNA in patients′ sera as an indicator for HBV reactivation and an early signal of liver damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Chen; Johnny Sze; Ming-Liang He

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the covalently closed circle DNA (cccDNA)level of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in patients′ liver and sera.METHODS: HBV DNA was isolated from patients′liver biopsies and sera. A sensitive real-time PCR method, which is capable of differentiation of HBV viral genomic DNA and cccDNA, was used to quantify the total HBV cccDNA. The total HBV viral DNA was quantitated by real-time PCR using a HBV diagnostic kit (PG Biotech, LTD, Shenzhen, China)described previously.RESULTS: For the first time, we measured the level of HBV DNA and cccDNA isolated from ten HBV patients′liver biopsies and sera. In the liver biopsies, cccDNA was detected from all the biopsy samples. The copy number of cccDNA ranged from from 0.03 to 173.1 per cell, the copy number of total HBV DNA ranged from 0.08 to 3 717 per cell. The ratio of total HBV DNA to cccDNA ranged from 1 to 3 406. In the sera,cccDNA was only detected from six samples whereas HBV viral DNA was detected from all ten samples. The ratio of cccDNA to total HBV DNA ranged from 0 to 1.77%. To further investigate the reason why cccDNA could only be detected in some patients′sera, we performed longitudinal studies. The cccDNA was detected from the patients′sera with HBV reactivation but not from the patients′sera without HBV reactivation. The level of cccDNA in the sera was correlated with ALT and viral load in the HBV reactivation patients.CONCLUSION: HBV cccDNA is actively transcribed and replicated in some patients′hepatocytes, which is reflected by a high ratio of HBV total DNA vs cccDNA. Detection of cccDNA in the liver biopsy will provide an end-point for the anti-HBV therapy. The occurrence of cccDNA in the sera is an early signal of liver damage, which may be another important clinical parameter.

  19. Functional MRI in human motor control studies and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toma, Keiichiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Nakai, Toshiharu [Inst. of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been a useful tool for the noninvasive mapping of brain function associated with various motor and cognitive tasks. Because fMRI is based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, it does not directly record neural activity. With the fMRI technique, distinguishing BOLD signals creased by cortical projection neurons from those created by intracortical neurons appears to be difficult. Two major experimental designs are used in fMRI studies: block designs and event-related designs. Block-designed fMRI presupposes the steady state of regional cerebral blood flow and has been applied to examinations of brain activation caused by tasks requiring sustained or repetitive movements. By contrast, the more recently developed event-related fMRI with time resolution of a few seconds allows the mapping of brain activation associated with a single movement according to the transient aspects of the hemodynamic response. Increasing evidence suggests that multiple motor areas are engaged in a networked manner to execute various motor acts. In order to understand functional brain maps, it is important that one understands sequential and parallel organizations of anatomical connections between multiple motor areas. In fMRI studies of complex motor tasks, elementary parameters such as movement length, force, velocity, acceleration and frequency should be controlled, because inconsistency in those parameters may alter the extent and intensity of motor cortical activation, confounding interpretation of the findings obtained. In addition to initiation of movements, termination of movements plays an important role in the successful achievement of complex movements. Brain areas exclusively related to the termination of movements have been, for the first time, uncovered with an event-related fMRI technique. We propose the application of fMRI to the elucidation of the pathophysiology of movement disorders, particularly dystonia

  20. Cytokine Expression Profile in Aqueous Humor and Sera of Patients with Acute Anterior Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Zhao, B; Jiang, R; Zhang, R; Wang, Y; Wu, H; Gordon, L; Chen, L

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate cytokine expression profile in aqueous humor and sera in patients with HLAB27 associated acute anterior uveitis (AAU) and idiopathic AAU. Twenty patients with AAU and 17 controls were recruited from August 2012 to March 2013. Study subjects with uveitis were divided into two groups: 9 patients with idiopathic AAU and 11 patients with HLA-B27 associated AAU. Complete ophthalmological examinations were performed and clinical features of each group were clearly documented. Aqueous humor and sera were collected and the concentration of 15 immune mediators (IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, IL-22, IL-23, IL-25, IL-31, IL-33, TNF-α, IFN-γ, sCD40L) were measured in both aqueous humor and sera simultaneously by multiplex immunoassay. There were significantly higher levels of multiple cytokines in aqueous humor in patients with uveitis compared to controls, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17a, IL-17f, IL-21, IL-25, IL-31, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and sCD40L. The levels of IL-17a in aqueous humor correlated significantly with disease activity in patients with idiopathic AAU, while the level of IFN-γ in aqueous humor correlated significantly with disease activity in patients with HLA-B27 associated AAU. There was no significant difference in serum cytokine expression between uveitis patients and controls except IL-6, elevated in patients with both idiopathic and HLA-B27 associated AAU. Cytokine expression pattern in the aqueous humor, in contrast to that in serum, may reflect intraocular immune reactions during active inflammation in patients with AAU. Both Th1 and Th17 are involved in immunopathogenesis of HLA-B27 associated and idiopathic AAU, but a different cytokine pattern was identified in these two clinical entities. A predominant Th17-driven immune response may play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of idiopathic AAU, while Th1 dominant immune response may be responsible for the inflammation in HLA-B27 associated AAU.

  1. Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in hospitalized children diagnosed at acute stage by paired sera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chun-ling; WEI Ming; LIU Zhen-ye; WANG Gui-qiang; ZHANG Bo; XU Hua; HU Liang-ping; HE Xiao-feng; WANG Jun-hua; ZHANG Jun-hong; LIU Xiao-yu

    2010-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) is a frequent cause of respiratory tract infections. However,there is deficient knowledge about the clinical manifestations of M. pneumoniae infection. We described the clinical and laboratory findings of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in hospitalized children who were all diagnosed by a ≥ fourfold increase in antibody titer.Methods M. pneumoniae antibodies were routinely detected in children admitted with acute respiratory infection during a one-year period. The medical history was re-collected from children whose M. pneumoniae antibody titer increased≥fourfold at the bedside by a single person, and their frozen paired serum samples were measured again for the M.pneumoniae antibody titer.Results Of the 635 children whose sera were detected for the M. pneumoniae antibody, paired sera were obtained from 82 and 29.3% (24/82) showed a ≥ fourfold increase in antibody titer. There were 24 cases, nine boys and 15 girls, aged from two to 14 years, whose second serum samples were taken on day 9 at the earliest after symptom onset; the shortest interval was three days. All children presented with a high fever (≥38.5℃) and coughing. Twenty-one had no nasal obstruction or a runny nose, and five had mild headaches which all were associated with the high fever. The disease was comparatively severe if the peak temperature was >39.5℃. All were diagnosed as having pneumonia through chest X-rays. Four had bilateral or multilobar involvement and their peak temperatures were all ≤ 39.5℃. None of the children had difficulty in breathing and all showed no signs of wheezing.Conclusions The second serum sample could be taken on day 9 at the earliest after symptom onset meant that paired sera could be used for the clinical diagnosis of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in children at the acute stage. M. pneumoniae is a lower respiratory tract pathogen. Extrapulmonary complications were rare and minor in our study. High peak temperature (

  2. The Relevancies and Applicability of Human Resources Accounting Implementations Under Hegelian Dialectic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha Baniita Firdlo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The discourse on Human Resource Accounting has started as far as 1960s when Rensis Likert outlined the recognition of human resource on fi nancial reporting. However, controversies also emerge, mainly concerning about the concept measurement, absence of accounting standard, and assets defi nition. This research is aimed to analyze the debate between two opposing theories under Hegelian Dialectic. Analysis of the controversies through both literature review and empirical evidences are then utilized to formulate synthesis to facilitate relevant and applicable Human Resource Accounting implementations.

  3. Metabolomics in plants and humans: applications in the prevention and diagnosis of diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Casati, Diego F; Zanor, Maria I; Busi, María V

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, there has been an increase in the number of metabolomic approaches used, in parallel with proteomic and functional genomic studies. The wide variety of chemical types of metabolites available has also accelerated the use of different techniques in the investigation of the metabolome. At present, metabolomics is applied to investigate several human diseases, to improve their diagnosis and prevention, and to design better therapeutic strategies. In addition, metabolomic studies are also being carried out in areas such as toxicology and pharmacology, crop breeding, and plant biotechnology. In this review, we emphasize the use and application of metabolomics in human diseases and plant research to improve human health.

  4. Immunoreactive insulin in diabetes mellitus patient sera detected by ultrasensitive ELISA with thio-NAD cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Etsuro; Kaneda, Mugiho; Kodama, Hiromi; Morikawa, Mika; Tai, Momoko; Aoki, Kana; Watabe, Satoshi; Nakaishi, Kazunari; Hashida, Seiichi; Tada, Satoshi; Kuroda, Noriyuki; Imachi, Hitomi; Murao, Koji; Yamashita, Masakane; Yoshimura, Teruki; Miura, Toshiaki

    2015-12-01

    To minimize patient suffering, the smallest possible volume of blood should be collected for diagnosis and disease monitoring. When estimating insulin secretion capacity and resistance to insulin in diabetes mellitus (DM), increasing insulin assay immunosensitivity would reduce the blood sample volume required for testing. Here we present an ultrasensitive ELISA coupled with thio-NAD cycling to measure immunoreactive insulin in blood serum. Only 5 μL of serum was required for testing, with a limit of detection (LOD) for the assay of 10(-16) moles/assay. Additional recovery tests confirmed this method can detect insulin in sera. Comparisons between a commercially available immunoreactive insulin kit and our ultrasensitive ELISA using the same commercially available reference demonstrated good data correlation, providing further evidence of assay accuracy. Together, these results demonstrate our ultrasensitive ELISA could be a powerful tool in the diagnosis and treatment of not only DM but also many other diseases in the future.

  5. Detection of specific Mycoplasma conjunctivae antibodies in the sera of sheep with infectious keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloy, L; Giacometti, M; Abdo, E M; Nicolet, J; Krawinkler, M; Janovsky, M; Bruderer, U; Frey, J

    2001-01-01

    The serological cross reactions between Mycoplasma conjunctivae, the etiological agent of infectious keratoconjunctivitis (IKC), and the antigenetically and phylogenetically closely related Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, which is often found in sheep, were analysed. Cross reacting antigens were identified using sera from sheep with IKC and from sheep of herds known to be free of IKC, as well as rabbit hyperimmune serum specific to the two Mycoplasma species. Cross reactions were predominantly due to the strongly antigenic proteins of 42 kDa and 83 kDa. Serospecific antigens of M. conjunctivae could be separated from cross-reacting antigens by the extraction of Tween 20-soluble membrane proteins. The Tween 20-extracted proteins of the M. conjunctivae strain HRC/581T were used for the development of an indirect ELISA test. This ELISA test was shown to be a useful serological method for the diagnosis of M. conjunctivae infections and to identify infected sheep herds.

  6. Natural occurrence of Nuc in the sera of autoimmune-prone MRL/lpr mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Y; Miura, K; Uehara, T; Amagai, M; Takeda, O; Tanuma, S; Kurosawa, Y

    1993-10-29

    We previously established a clone of cells termed KML1-7 which produces a soluble factor that boosts anti-DNA antibody production both in vitro and in vivo across the H-2 barrier. By using the purified protein, termed nucleobindin (Nuc), we cloned cDNA and produced recombinant(r) Nuc in E.coli. Although the purified rNuc showed biological activities such as anti-DNA antibody boosting and DNA binding, there was no evidence that Nuc is really associated with autoimmune status in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice. Here we report that identification of Nuc was successful from the sera of MRL/lpr mice, but not from those of the substrain MRL/n mice, which show no apparent autoimmune syndrome at the same age of MRL/lpr mice, by means of immunochemical as well as N-terminal amino-acid sequencing methods.

  7. A New Sandwich ELISA for Quantification of Thymidine Kinase 1 Protein Levels in Sera from Dogs with Different Malignancies Can Aid in Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagarlamudi, Kiran Kumar; Moreau, Laura; Westberg, Sara; Rönnberg, Henrik; Eriksson, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a DNA precursor enzyme whose expression is closely correlated with cell proliferation and cell turnover. Sensitive serum TK1 activity assays have been used for monitoring and prognosis of hematological malignancies in both humans and dogs. Here we describe the development of a specific sandwich TK1-ELISA for the quantification of TK1 protein levels in sera from dogs with different malignancies. A combination of rabbit polyclonal anti-dog TK1 antibody and a mouse monoclonal anti-human TK1 antibody was used. Different concentrations of recombinant canine TK1 was used as standard. Clinical evaluation of the ELISA was done by using sera from 42 healthy dogs, 43 dogs with hematological tumors and 55 with solid tumors. An established [3H]-dThd phosphorylation assay was used to determine the TK1 activity levels in the same sera. The mean TK1 activities in dogs with hematological tumors were significantly higher than those found in healthy dogs. In agreement with earlier studies, no significant difference was observed in serum TK1 activities between healthy dogs and dogs with solid tumors. However, the mean TK1 protein levels determined by new TK1-ELISA were significantly higher not only in hematological tumors but also in solid tumors compared to healthy dogs (mean ± SD = 1.30 ± 1.16, 0.67 ± 0.55 and 0.27± 0.10 ng/mL, respectively). Moreover, TK1-ELISA had significantly higher ability to distinguish lymphoma cases from healthy based on receiver operating characteristic analyses (area under the curve, AUC, of 0.96) to that of the activity assay (AUC, 0.84). Furthermore, fluctuations in TK1 protein levels during the course of chemotherapy in dogs with lymphoma closely associated with clinical outcome. Overall, the TK1-ELISA showed significant linear correlation with the TK1 activity assay (rs = 0.6, p<0.0001). Thus, the new TK1-ELISA has sufficient sensitivity and specificity for routine clinical use in veterinary oncology.

  8. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies and rheumatoid factor sera titers in leprosy patients from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Cerna, María G; Fafutis-Morris, Mary; Guillen-Vargas, Cecilia; Salazar-Páramo, Mario; García-Cruz, Diana E; Riebeling, Carlos; Nava, Arnulfo

    2012-11-01

    Leprosy offers a broad spectrum of altered immunological sceneries, ranging from strong cell-mediated immune responses seen in tuberculoid leprosy (TT), through borderline leprosy (BB), to the virtual absence of T cell responses characteristic in lepromatous leprosy (LL). The exact mechanism of autoantibodies production remains unknown in leprosy and other chronic inflammatory diseases and also the contribution of these antibodies to the pathogenesis of the disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency and profiles of serum anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (a-CCP), rheumatoid factor (RF) and its relationship with leprosy spectrum. Serum samples from 67 leprosy patients (54 LL, 5 TT and 8 BB) and 46 clinically healthy subjects (CHS) from the same endemic region were investigated. The clinical chart and questionnaire were used to obtain clinical information. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (a-CCP) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas the rheumatoid factor (RF) levels were measured by nephelometric method. The mean age of patients was 51.5 ± 13 years. Sera levels of a-CCP where higher in leprosy patients than in CHS (5.9 ± 11.6 vs. 0.3 ± 0.29) (P < 0.0001); the same pattern was found for RF sera titers without reaching statistical significance (16.8 ± 22.5 vs. 9.9 ± 3) (P = NS). We did not find a correlation between a-CCP and RF Rho =0.02786 (IC 95%) P = 0.8229. However, LL patients had higher a-CCP and RF levels than TT patients. Although an absence in correlation was observed, the serum levels of a-CCP antibodies and RF appeared to be useful in distinguishing LL from TT patients with a limited significance in detecting reactional leprosy patients.

  9. Evaluation of three Campylobacter pylori antigen preparations for screening sera from patients undergoing endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, F J; Hutchinson, D N

    1989-01-01

    A surface antigen (SA), acid glycine extract (AGE), and urease preparation (UP) were evaluated using sera from patients undergoing endoscopy and from subjects with gastric or duodenal ulcers. Sera were tested for the presence of IgG and IgA antibodies by a conventional indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In patients with confirmed Campylobacter pylori associated gastritis, raised IgG antibody titres were indicated by absorbance values of greater than or equal to 500, greater than or equal to 500, and greater than or equal to 1500 for the SA, AGE, and UP, respectively. Corresponding values for the IgA assay were greater than or equal to 500, greater than or equal to 500, and greater than or equal to 1000. The specificity of the IgG assays were 94%, 92%, and 90% for the AGE, SA, and UP, respectively. In contrast, the UP was the most sensitive (97%); the other two antigen preparations gave values of 82%. In the IgA assay the UP showed the greatest specificity (90%) and sensitivity (90%). The predictive value for a true positive for the IgG assay was the same for all antigens (93%), whereas the UP gave a predictive value for a true negative of 96% compared with 79% for the other two antigen preparations. Of the patients with gastric or duodenal ulcers, raised antibody titres to SA were found in 72% (IgG) and 73% (IgA), to AGE in 75% (IgG) and 63% (IgA), and to UP in 77% (IgG) and 75% (IgA). The use of a urease antigen preparation to determine IgG antibody is recommended for screening patients undergoing endoscopy. PMID:2760233

  10. 78 FR 32668 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Changes to an Approved Application: Biological Products: Human Blood...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Changes to an Approved Application: Biological Products: Human Blood and Blood Components Intended for Transfusion or for Further Manufacture'' dated June 2013. The draft guidance document provides manufacturers of licensed Whole Blood and blood components intended for......

  11. 15. APPLICATION OF THE ALKALINE COMET ASSAY IN HUMAN BIOMONITORING: INTERNAL STANDARD AND GLOBAL REPAIR PHENOTYPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@An internal standard, composed of untreated an ethy1 methane sulfonate treated K562 cells was validated for its application in comet analysis of human biomonitoring samples. Firstly, the different levels of variability which may influence the damage levels of the internal standards were assessed. Three experimenters performed the comet assay with cells coming from the same set of untreated

  12. Pulpal reactions to orthodontic force application in humans: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohl, M. von; Ren, Y.; Fudalej, P.S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Force application to a tooth during orthodontic treatment evokes a biological response of the dental pulp. The aim of this systematic literature review was to investigate the relationship between orthodontic force level and pulp reaction in humans. METHODS: Electronic search was made o

  13. Pulpal reactions to orthodontic force application in humans : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Bohl, Martina; Ren, Yijin; Fudalej, Piotr S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Force application to a tooth during orthodontic treatment evokes a biological response of the dental pulp. The aim of this systematic literature review was to investigate the relationship between orthodontic force level and pulp reaction in humans. METHODS: Electronic search was made o

  14. Cracking the Code of Human Diseases Using Next-Generation Sequencing: Applications, Challenges, and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenza Precone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have greatly impacted on every field of molecular research mainly because they reduce costs and increase throughput of DNA sequencing. These features, together with the technology’s flexibility, have opened the way to a variety of applications including the study of the molecular basis of human diseases. Several analytical approaches have been developed to selectively enrich regions of interest from the whole genome in order to identify germinal and/or somatic sequence variants and to study DNA methylation. These approaches are now widely used in research, and they are already being used in routine molecular diagnostics. However, some issues are still controversial, namely, standardization of methods, data analysis and storage, and ethical aspects. Besides providing an overview of the NGS-based approaches most frequently used to study the molecular basis of human diseases at DNA level, we discuss the principal challenges and applications of NGS in the field of human genomics.

  15. Sera and conditioned media contain different isoforms of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) which bind to different classes of PDGF receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen-Pope, D F; Hart, C E; Seifert, R A

    1989-02-15

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is encoded by separate genes for two possible subunit chains (A-chain and B-chain) which can form three possible dimers (AA, AB, and BB). We have recently presented evidence that multiple forms of PDGF receptor exist which distinguish between these isoforms (Hart, C. H., Forstrom, J. W., Kelley, J. D., Smith, R. A., Ross, R., Murray, M. J., and Bowen-Pope, D. F. (1988) Science 240, 1529-1531). We used this specificity to determine the amount of PDGF from different sources which is able to bind to each class of receptor and found that each source had a characteristic isoform composition. Levels of total PDGF activity in sera from different species ranged more than 15-fold, from less than 1 ng/ml in dog, chicken, pig, and calf, to greater than 13 ng/ml in mouse and human. Despite these differences in PDGF content, the total mitogenic activities of the sera were comparable indicating that the relative importance of PDGF as a serum mitogen may vary considerably between species. Analysis of the total PDGF into the amounts of each isoform revealed great differences in composition. PDGF-BB constitutes only about 15% of the total binding activity in human PDGF purified by the method of Raines and Ross (Raines, E. W., and Ross, R. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 5154-5160) but is the predominant isoform in whole blood serum from all other species. In contrast to serum, medium conditioned by cultured PDGF-secreting cell types contained no detectable PDGF-BB except in two cases: medium conditioned by vascular endothelial cells and by cells transformed by simian sarcoma virus. The existence of isoform-specific PDGF receptors and the large variation in PDGF isoform composition dependent upon source may provide an important mechanism through which the effects of PDGF can be targeted to different cell types and/or toward eliciting different cell responses.

  16. Performance levels of four Latin American laboratories for the serodiagnosis of Chagas disease in Mexican sera samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquetti, Alejandro O; Espinoza, Bertha; Martínez, Ignacio; Hernández-Becerril, Nidia; Ponce, Carlos; Ponce, Elisa; Reyes, Pedro A; Hernández, Oscar; López, Ruth; Monteón, Victor

    2009-08-01

    In nearly all of the previous multicentre studies evaluating serological tests for Trypanosoma cruzi infection, sera samples from Central or South American countries have been used preferentially. In this work we compared the reliability of the serological tests using Mexican sera samples that were evaluated in four independent laboratories. This included a reference laboratory in Brazil and three participant laboratories, including one in Central America and two in Mexico. The kappa index between Brazilian and Honduran laboratories reached 1.0 and the index for the Mexican laboratories reached 0.94. Another finding of this study was that the source of antigen did not affect the performance of the serological tests.

  17. Overcoming a "probable" diagnosis in antimitochondrial antibody negative primary biliary cirrhosis: study of 100 sera and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzaro, Nicola; Covini, Giovanni; Rosina, Floriano; Muratori, Paolo; Tonutti, Elio; Villalta, Danilo; Pesente, Fiorenza; Alessio, Maria Grazia; Tampoia, Marilina; Antico, Antonio; Platzgummer, Stefan; Porcelli, Brunetta; Terzuoli, Lucia; Liguori, Marco; Bassetti, Danila; Brusca, Ignazio; Almasio, Piero L; Tarantino, Giuseppe; Bonaguri, Chiara; Agostinis, Paolo; Bredi, Elena; Tozzoli, Renato; Invernizzi, Pietro; Selmi, Carlo

    2012-06-01

    Serum anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are the serological hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), yet up to 15% of PBC sera are AMA negative at routine indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) while being referred to as "probable" cases. The diagnostic role of PBC-specific antinuclear antibodies (ANA) remains to be determined. We will report herein data on the accuracy of new laboratory tools for AMA and PBC-specific ANA in a large series of PBC sera that were AMA-negative at IIF. We will also provide a discussion of the history and current status of AMA detection methods. We included IIF AMA-negative PBC sera (n=100) and sera from patients with other chronic liver diseases (n=104) that had been independently tested for IIF AMA and ANA; sera were blindly tested with an ELISA PBC screening test including two ANA (gp210, sp100) and a triple (pMIT3) AMA recombinant antigens. Among IIF AMA-negative sera, 43/100 (43%) manifested reactivity using the PBC screening test. The same test was positive for 6/104 (5.8%) control sera. IIF AMA-negative/PBC screen-positive sera reacted against pMIT3 (11/43), gp210 (8/43), Sp100 (17/43), both pMIT3 and gp210 (1/43), or both pMIT3 and Sp100 (6/43). Concordance rates between the ANA pattern on HEp-2 cells and specific Sp100 and gp210 ELISA results in AMA-negative subjects were 92% for nuclear dots and Sp100 and 99% for nuclear rim and gp210. Our data confirm the hypothesis that a substantial part of IIF AMA-negative (formerly coined "probable") PBC cases manifest disease-specific autoantibodies when tested using newly available tools and thus overcome the previously suggested diagnostic classification. As suggested by the recent literature, we are convinced that the proportion of AMA-negative PBC cases will be significantly minimized by the use of new laboratory methods and recombinant antigens.

  18. On the applicability of brain reading for predictive human-machine interfaces in robotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Andrea Kirchner

    Full Text Available The ability of today's robots to autonomously support humans in their daily activities is still limited. To improve this, predictive human-machine interfaces (HMIs can be applied to better support future interaction between human and machine. To infer upcoming context-based behavior relevant brain states of the human have to be detected. This is achieved by brain reading (BR, a passive approach for single trial EEG analysis that makes use of supervised machine learning (ML methods. In this work we propose that BR is able to detect concrete states of the interacting human. To support this, we show that BR detects patterns in the electroencephalogram (EEG that can be related to event-related activity in the EEG like the P300, which are indicators of concrete states or brain processes like target recognition processes. Further, we improve the robustness and applicability of BR in application-oriented scenarios by identifying and combining most relevant training data for single trial classification and by applying classifier transfer. We show that training and testing, i.e., application of the classifier, can be carried out on different classes, if the samples of both classes miss a relevant pattern. Classifier transfer is important for the usage of BR in application scenarios, where only small amounts of training examples are available. Finally, we demonstrate a dual BR application in an experimental setup that requires similar behavior as performed during the teleoperation of a robotic arm. Here, target recognition processes and movement preparation processes are detected simultaneously. In summary, our findings contribute to the development of robust and stable predictive HMIs that enable the simultaneous support of different interaction behaviors.

  19. The German VR Simulation Realism Scale--psychometric construction for virtual reality applications with virtual humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeschl, Sandra; Doering, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Virtual training applications with high levels of immersion or fidelity (for example for social phobia treatment) produce high levels of presence and therefore belong to the most successful Virtual Reality developments. Whereas display and interaction fidelity (as sub-dimensions of immersion) and their influence on presence are well researched, realism of the displayed simulation depends on the specific application and is therefore difficult to measure. We propose to measure simulation realism by using a self-report questionnaire. The German VR Simulation Realism Scale for VR training applications was developed based on a translation of scene realism items from the Witmer-Singer-Presence Questionnaire. Items for realism of virtual humans (for example for social phobia training applications) were supplemented. A sample of N = 151 students rated simulation realism of a Fear of Public Speaking application. Four factors were derived by item- and principle component analysis (Varimax rotation), representing Scene Realism, Audience Behavior, Audience Appearance and Sound Realism. The scale developed can be used as a starting point for future research and measurement of simulation realism for applications including virtual humans.

  20. Using recruitment source timing and diagnosticity to enhance applicants' occupation-specific human capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, Michael C; Ployhart, Robert E; Campion, Michael A

    2017-05-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 102(5) of Journal of Applied Psychology (see record 2017-14296-001). In the article, the following headings were inadvertently set at the wrong level: Method, Participants and Procedure, Measures, Occupation specific human capital, Symbolic jobs, Relevant majors, Occupation-specific capital hotspots, Source timing, Source diagnosticity, Results, and Discussion. All versions of this article have been corrected.] This study proposes that reaching applicants through more diagnostic recruitment sources earlier in their educational development (e.g., in high school) can lead them to invest more in their occupation-specific human capital (OSHC), thereby making them higher quality candidates. Using a sample of 78,157 applicants applying for jobs within a desirable professional occupation in the public sector, results indicate that applicants who report hearing about the occupation earlier, and applicants who report hearing about the occupation through more diagnostic sources, have higher levels of OSHC upon application. Additionally, source timing and diagnosticity affect the likelihood of candidates applying for jobs symbolic of the occupation, selecting relevant majors, and attending educational institutions with top programs related to the occupation. These findings suggest a firm's recruiting efforts may influence applicants' OSHC investment strategies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Human Modelling for Military Application (Applications militaires de la modelisation humaine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Supporting documents are attached to the report as separate files (MS Word, MS PowerPoint, PDF, HTM). HFM-202 addressed progress for advancing the...on the human science base for social -cultural modeling. This dialogue includes specific new guidance on model design and development as well as the...cours de cette première décennie du XXIème siècle, la Commission des Facteurs Humains et de la Médecine (HFM) de l’Organisation pour la Recherche et

  2. Overcoming the limited availability of human milk oligosaccharides: challenges and opportunities for research and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Lars; Contractor, Nikhat; Barile, Daniela; Pohl, Nicola; Prudden, Anthony R; Boons, Geert-Jan; Jin, Yong-Su; Jennewein, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are complex sugars highly abundant in human milk but currently not present in infant formula. Rapidly accumulating evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies, combined with epidemiological associations and correlations, suggests that HMOs benefit infants through multiple mechanisms and in a variety of clinical contexts. Until recently, however, research on HMOs has been limited by an insufficient availability of HMOs. Most HMOs are found uniquely in human milk, and thus far it has been prohibitively tedious and expensive to isolate and synthesize them. This article reviews new strategies to overcome this lack of availability by generating HMOs through chemoenzymatic synthesis, microbial metabolic engineering, and isolation from human donor milk or dairy streams. Each approach has its advantages and comes with its own challenges, but combining the different methods and acknowledging their limitations creates new opportunities for research and application with the goal of improving maternal and infant health.

  3. The application of ecological theory toward an understanding of the human microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Elizabeth K; Stagaman, Keaton; Dethlefsen, Les; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Relman, David A

    2012-06-08

    The human-microbial ecosystem plays a variety of important roles in human health and disease. Each person can be viewed as an island-like "patch" of habitat occupied by microbial assemblages formed by the fundamental processes of community ecology: dispersal, local diversification, environmental selection, and ecological drift. Community assembly theory, and metacommunity theory in particular, provides a framework for understanding the ecological dynamics of the human microbiome, such as compositional variability within and between hosts. We explore three core scenarios of human microbiome assembly: development in infants, representing assembly in previously unoccupied habitats; recovery from antibiotics, representing assembly after disturbance; and invasion by pathogens, representing assembly in the context of invasive species. Judicious application of ecological theory may lead to improved strategies for restoring and maintaining the microbiota and the crucial health-associated ecosystem services that it provides.

  4. Application of Sequence-based Methods in Human MicrobialEcology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, Li; Rubin, Edward M.; Bristow, James

    2005-08-29

    Ecologists studying microbial life in the environment have recognized the enormous complexity of microbial diversity for many years, and the development of a variety of culture-independent methods, many of them coupled with high-throughput DNA sequencing, has allowed this diversity to be explored in ever greater detail. Despite the widespread application of these new techniques to the characterization of uncultivated microbes and microbial communities in the environment, their application to human health and disease has lagged behind. Because DNA based-techniques for defining uncultured microbes allow not only cataloging of microbial diversity, but also insight into microbial functions, investigators are beginning to apply these tools to the microbial communities that abound on and within us, in what has aptly been called the second Human Genome Project. In this review we discuss the sequence-based methods for microbial analysis that are currently available and their application to identify novel human pathogens, improve diagnosis of known infectious diseases, and to advance understanding of our relationship with microbial communities that normally reside in and on the human body.

  5. Exploring the current application of professional competencies in human resource management in the South African context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Schutte

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Human research (HR practitioners have an important role to play in the sustainability and competitiveness of organisations. Yet their strategic contribution and the value they add remain unrecognised.Research purpose: The main objective of this research was to explore the extent to which HR practitioners are currently allowed to display HR competencies in the workplace, and whether any significant differences exist between perceived HR competencies, based on the respondents’ demographic characteristics.Motivation for the study: Limited empirical research exists on the extent to which HR practitioners are allowed to display key competencies in the South African workplace.Research approach, design, and method: A quantitative research approach was followed. A Human Resource Management Professional Competence Questionnaire was administered to HR practitioners and managers (N = 481.Main findings: The results showed that HR competencies are poorly applied in selected South African workplaces. The competencies that were indicated as having the poorest application were talent management, HR metrics, HR business knowledge, and innovation. The white ethic group experienced a poorer application of all human research management (HRM competencies compared to the black African ethnic group.Practical/managerial implications: The findings of the research highlighted the need for management to evaluate the current application of HR practices in the workplace and also the extent to which HR professionals are involved as strategic business partners.Contribution/value-add: This research highlights the need for the current application of HR competencies in South African workplaces to be improved.

  6. Model of Competencies for Decomposition of Human Behavior: Application to Control System of Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Vicente Berna-Martinez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Humans and machines have shared the same physical space for many years. To share the same space, we want the robots to behave like human beings. This will facilitate their social integration, their interaction with humans and create an intelligent behavior. To achieve this goal, we need to understand how human behavior is generated, analyze tasks running our nerves and how they relate to them. Then and only then can we implement these mechanisms in robotic beings. In this study, we propose a model of competencies based on human neuroregulator system for analysis and decomposition of behavior into functional modules. Using this model allow separate and locate the tasks to be implemented in a robot that displays human-like behavior. As an example, we show the application of model to the autonomous movement behavior on unfamiliar environments and its implementation in various simulated and real robots with different physical configurations and physical devices of different nature. The main result of this study has been to build a model of competencies that is being used to build robotic systems capable of displaying behaviors similar to humans and consider the specific characteristics of robots.

  7. Sera from children with autism induce autistic features which can be rescued with a CNTF small peptide mimetic in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazim, Syed Faraz; Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria Del Carmen; Arif, Mohammad; Blanchard, Julie; Fayyaz, Fatima; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized clinically by impairments in social interaction and verbal and non-verbal communication skills as well as restricted interests and repetitive behavior. It has been hypothesized that altered brain environment including an imbalance in neurotrophic support during early development contributes to the pathophysiology of autism. Here we report that sera from children with autism which exhibited abnormal levels of various neurotrophic factors induced cell death and oxidative stress in mouse primary cultured cortical neurons. The effects of sera from autistic children were rescued by pre-treatment with a ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) small peptide mimetic, Peptide 6 (P6), which was previously shown to exert its neuroprotective effect by modulating CNTF/JAK/STAT pathway and LIF signaling and by enhancing brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Similar neurotoxic effects and neuroinflammation were observed in young Wistar rats injected intracerebroventricularly with autism sera within hours after birth. The autism sera injected rats demonstrated developmental delay and deficits in social communication, interaction, and novelty. Both the neurobiological changes and the behavioral autistic phenotype were ameliorated by P6 treatment. These findings implicate the involvement of neurotrophic imbalance during early brain development in the pathophysiology of autism and a proof of principle of P6 as a potential therapeutic strategy for autism.

  8. Sera from children with autism induce autistic features which can be rescued with a CNTF small peptide mimetic in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Faraz Kazim

    Full Text Available Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized clinically by impairments in social interaction and verbal and non-verbal communication skills as well as restricted interests and repetitive behavior. It has been hypothesized that altered brain environment including an imbalance in neurotrophic support during early development contributes to the pathophysiology of autism. Here we report that sera from children with autism which exhibited abnormal levels of various neurotrophic factors induced cell death and oxidative stress in mouse primary cultured cortical neurons. The effects of sera from autistic children were rescued by pre-treatment with a ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF small peptide mimetic, Peptide 6 (P6, which was previously shown to exert its neuroprotective effect by modulating CNTF/JAK/STAT pathway and LIF signaling and by enhancing brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression. Similar neurotoxic effects and neuroinflammation were observed in young Wistar rats injected intracerebroventricularly with autism sera within hours after birth. The autism sera injected rats demonstrated developmental delay and deficits in social communication, interaction, and novelty. Both the neurobiological changes and the behavioral autistic phenotype were ameliorated by P6 treatment. These findings implicate the involvement of neurotrophic imbalance during early brain development in the pathophysiology of autism and a proof of principle of P6 as a potential therapeutic strategy for autism.

  9. Autoantibodies to IL-1 alpha in sera from umbilical cords, children, and adults, and from patients with juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, K; Hansen, M B; Zak, M;

    1996-01-01

    umbilical cords (n = 11), children (n = 45), and adults (n = 20), as well as in 51 patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) of pauciarticular (n = 34), polyarticular (n = 8), or systemic onset type (n = 9). RESULTS. The frequency of positive sera was significantly lower in children than in cord blood...

  10. High Production of IL-18 by Dendritic Cells Induced by Sera from Patients with Primary Antibody Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Nourizadeh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Predominantly antibody deficiencies are a category of primary immunodeficiency diseases, whichconsist of several rare disorders such as common variable immunodeficiency (CVID and X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA. We evaluated the effects of CVID and XLA patients’ sera as a source of microenviromental factors on maturation and function of monocyte-derived DCs.Blood was collected from 10 CVID and 5 XLA patients before immunoglobulin replacementtherapy and also from 8 healthy volunteers in order to obtain necessary sera for this study. Monocyte derived DCs were generated from blood cells obtained from healthy volunteers in the presence of GM-CSF, IL-4 and 10% serum concentrations from cases and controls. Immature DCs were incubated with monocyte conditioned medium (MCM and TNF-α in order to generate mature DCs. Interleukin 18 (IL-18 production by CD40L-activated mature DCs was measured after 24 hours of culture in vitro.IL-18 production by DCs generated in the presence of CVID and XLA patients’ sera were6.75±2.59 and 7.08±1.75 ng/ml, respectively, which were significantly higher than normal serumconditioned DCs (3.55±0.68 ng/ml.These results suggest that the sera of patients with predominantly antibody deficiencies maycontain soluble factor(s that can induce a significant increase in IL-18 production by DCs.

  11. Distribution of perfluorochemicals between sera and milk from the same mothers and implications for prenatal and postnatal exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung-Kyu [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (BK-21), Seoul National University, Kwanakgu Shilimdong san 56-1, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyu Tae [Institute of Environmental Protection and Safety, NeoEnBiz Co., Rm 1306, Bucheon Daewoo Technopark Bldg. A, Dodang dong 187-7, Bucheon, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chang Seong [Department of OB and GYN KEPCO Medical Foundation, Hanil General Hospital, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Tao, Lin; Kannan, Kurunthachalam [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, Empire State 18 Plaza, P.O. Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, Empire State 18 Plaza, P.O. Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Kim, Kyung-Ryul [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (BK-21), Seoul National University, Kwanakgu Shilimdong san 56-1, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan-Kook; Lee, Jung Suk; Park, Pan Soo [Institute of Environmental Protection and Safety, NeoEnBiz Co., Rm 1306, Bucheon Daewoo Technopark Bldg. A, Dodang dong 187-7, Bucheon, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Yung Wook; Ha, Jeong Yi [Department of OB and GYN KEPCO Medical Foundation, Hanil General Hospital, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yong-Seung [Environmental Policy Division, Korea Environment Institute, Eunpyung-ku, Bulkwang-dong 613-2, Seoul 122-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-Hyeon, E-mail: jhleecheju@gmail.co [Institute of Environmental Protection and Safety, NeoEnBiz Co., Rm 1306, Bucheon Daewoo Technopark Bldg. A, Dodang dong 187-7, Bucheon, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    The levels of six perfluorocarboxylates (PFCAs), four perfloroalkylsulfonates (PFASs), and one sulfonamide were measured in paired samples of maternal serum, umbilical cord serum, and breast milk. The maternal and cord sera were strongly correlated with each other for all measured compounds (r > 0.5 and p < 0.01). Nevertheless, there was a significant difference in compound composition profile between the two sera matrices, with a more depletion of the longer chain compounds in cord serum. The transfer efficiency values from maternal to cord serum (TF{sub CS/MS}) decreased by 70% with each increasing unit of -CF{sub 2} chain within a PFCA group, and for perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), by a half compared to perfluorooctanoate (PFOA). In contrast to the strong correlation in concentrations between the two sera matrices, the pattern of compounds in breast milk differed considerably with those in sera. Accordingly, compound- and matrix-specific transfer must be considered when assessing prenatal and postnatal exposure. - Functional group and -CF2 chain-length dependent transfer of PFCs from maternal serum to cord serum and to breast milk was clearly observed.

  12. Structural Insights into the Protease-like Antigen Plasmodium falciparum SERA5 and Its Noncanonical Active-Site Serine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodder, Anthony N.; Malby, Robyn L.; Clarke, Oliver B.; Fairlie, W. Douglas; Colman, Peter M.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Smith, Brian J.; (WEHIMR); (Melbourne)

    2009-08-28

    The sera genes of the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium encode a family of unique proteins that are maximally expressed at the time of egress of parasites from infected red blood cells. These multi-domain proteins are unique, containing a central papain-like cysteine-protease fragment enclosed between the disulfide-linked N- and C-terminal domains. However, the central fragment of several members of this family, including serine repeat antigen 5 (SERA5), contains a serine (S596) in place of the active-site cysteine. Here we report the crystal structure of the central protease-like domain of Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, revealing a number of anomalies in addition to the putative nucleophilic serine: (1) the structure of the putative active site is not conducive to binding substrate in the canonical cysteine-protease manner; (2) the side chain of D594 restricts access of substrate to the putative active site; and (3) the S{sub 2} specificity pocket is occupied by the side chain of Y735, reducing this site to a small depression on the protein surface. Attempts to determine the structure in complex with known inhibitors were not successful. Thus, despite having revealed its structure, the function of the catalytic domain of SERA5 remains an enigma.

  13. Prevalence of anti-Taenia solium antibodies in sera from outpatients in an Andean region of Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Escalante

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Sera from 9,254 individuals that presented at one of three outpatient clinics in Quito, Ecuador were assayed by indirect hemagglutination for the presence of antibodies reactive with antigens from Taenia solium cysts. Immunoblot anlysis of 81 selected sera with IHA titers ranging from 0 to 1,028 showed that a titer of maior ou igual a 32 was suggestive of exposure to the parasite. Nine percent (9 % of the 9,254 patients had titers of 32 or greater. Of 3,503 sera from one clinic, which included sera from food handlers undergoing yearly physicals, 390 (11 % were positive. In addition, a correlation with age was seen in some, but not all, populations. In situations where age-related effects were noted, the highest incidence was seen in the youngest (0-20 years and in the oldest (51-60 years group. Thus, a resurgence of infection after a period of lower prevalence may be developing. Overall, this study shows that cysticercosis is relatively common and potentially a serious health problem in this region.

  14. [Measurement of human body fat by means of gravimetry. Application of Archimedes' principle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettwiler, W; Ribordy, M; Donath, A; Scherrer, J R

    1978-12-02

    The weighing of the human body under water is an application of Archimedes' law. Fat being lighter than water or than the structures of lean body mass, body fat can be measured by determining the specific gravity of the human body; that is, by underwater weighing. Body fat has been determined in an "ideal" sample of 14 men and 23 women, all aged 20 years. Testing against a reference measure of body fat makes it possible to test the validity of some anthropometric measurements and of some indices of obesity. These indices offer no advantages over anthropometric measurements.

  15. Human-computer interaction handbook fundamentals, evolving technologies and emerging applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sears, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    This second edition of The Human-Computer Interaction Handbook provides an updated, comprehensive overview of the most important research in the field, including insights that are directly applicable throughout the process of developing effective interactive information technologies. It features cutting-edge advances to the scientific knowledge base, as well as visionary perspectives and developments that fundamentally transform the way in which researchers and practitioners view the discipline. As the seminal volume of HCI research and practice, The Human-Computer Interaction Handbook feature

  16. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture...

  17. Applications for human rights relief and the recommendations of the Japan Federations of Bar Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi, Takeshi

    2005-01-01

    Between the enactment of Japan's "Organ Transplantation Law" (OTL) in 1997 and the end of October 2003, there were 27 (30 now) legal declarations of brain death, and organs were donated from 26 (29) of those. During this period, four applications for human rights relief were made against organ donation facilities by Takayoshi Okamoto and others. One of these remains under investigation, but the Japanese Federation of Bar Associations (JFBA) has offered recommendations relating to the other three. The purpose of this report lies in examining these applications and recommendations.

  18. Human behavior understanding in networked sensing theory and applications of networks of sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Spagnolo, Paolo; Distante, Cosimo

    2014-01-01

    This unique text/reference provides a broad overview of both the technical challenges in sensor network development, and the real-world applications of distributed sensing. Important aspects of distributed computing in large-scale networked sensor systems are analyzed in the context of human behavior understanding, including such topics as systems design tools and techniques, in-network signals, and information processing. Additionally, the book examines a varied range of application scenarios, covering surveillance, indexing and retrieval, patient care, industrial safety, social and ambient

  19. Comparison of protocatechuic aldchyde in Radix Salvia miltiorrhiza and corresponding pharmacological sera from normal and fibrotic rats by high performance liquid chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Lv; Xi-Xian Yao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effect of protocatechuic aldchyde on the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs).METHODS: Liver fibrosis was induced in rats by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Then normal and fibrotic drug sera were extracted from rats. The effects of protocatechuic aldchyde, raw Radix Salvia miltiorrhiza and drug sera of Salvia miltiorrhiza on HSC growth were determined by CCK-8. The protocatechuic aldchyde was separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in a Alltima C18 column (250 mm x4.6 mm, 5 μm) with a mobile phase of acetonitrile-4% glacial acetic acid solution (gradient elution) at the wavelength of 281 nm.RESULTS: Protocatechuic aldchyde, raw Radix Salvia miltiorrhiza and drug sera of Salvia miltiorrhiza were found to have inhibitory effects on proliferation of rat HSCs. Raw Radix Salvia miltiorrhiza had a stronger inhibitory effect than the drug sera. The fibrotic drug sera showed a higher suppressive effect than the normal drug sera (P < 0.05). Protocatechuic aldchyde was found in crude materials of both Radix Salvia miltiorrhiza and its corresponding drug sera. The average recovery (n = 6)was 110.5% for raw Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge, 102% for normal drug sera and 105.2% for fibrotic drug sera.The relative standard devitation (RSD) was 0.37%,1.96% and 1.51%, respectively (n=6). The contents of protocatechuic aldchyde were 0.22%, 0.15% and 0.19%,respectively (n=6) (P<0.05). The RSD was 0.33%,0.75% and 1.24% (n =6) for raw material of Radix Salvia miltiorrhiza, normal drug sera and fibrotic drug sera,respectively. The samples were stable for 6 d.CONCLUSION: Protocatechuic aldchyde can inhibit the growth of HSCs. HPLC is suitable for the determination of virtual bioactive components of Chinese herbal medicines in vitro.

  20. Evaluation of different confirmatory algorithms using seven treponemal tests on Architect Syphilis TP-positive/RPR-negative sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, S; Berth, M; Van Esbroeck, M; Blomme, S; Lagrou, K; Padalko, E

    2015-10-01

    The Architect Syphilis TP is considered to be a suitable screening test due to its high sensitivity and full automation. According to the International Union against Sexually Transmitted Infections (IUSTI) 2014 guidelines, however, positive screening tests need confirmation with Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TP.PA). Among Architect-positive results, samples with a negative non-treponemal test present the major diagnostic challenge. In this multicenter study, we investigated if other, preferable less labor-intensive treponemal tests could replace TP.PA. A total of 178 rapid plasma reagin (RPR)-negative sera with an Architect value between 1 and 15 S/CO were prospectively selected in three centers. These sera were analyzed with TP.PA and six alternative treponemal tests: three immunoblots and three tests on random-access analyzers. The diagnostic performance of the treponemal tests differed substantially, with the overall agreement between the six alternative tests ranging from 44.6 to 82.0%. Based on TP.PA as the gold standard, the INNO-LIA IgG blot, the BioPlex 2200 IgG, and the Syphilis TPA showed a high sensitivity, while the EUROLINE-WB IgG blot, recomLine Treponema IgG blot, and the Chorus Syphilis screen showed a high specificity. However, an Architect cut-off of 5.6 S/CO can serve as an alternative for these confirmatory treponemal tests in case of an RPR-negative result. Treponemal tests show poor agreement in this challenging group of Architect-positive/RPR-negative sera. The most optimal algorithm is obtained by assigning sera with an Architect value >5.6 S/CO as true-positives and sera with a value between 1 and 5.6 S/CO as undetermined, requiring further testing with TP.PA.

  1. Clinical application and analysis of hepatitis C virus NS3 antigen detection by ELISA in human serum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Li; WU Xiao-dong; HUANG De-zhuang; CHEN Hai-lun; HE Li-xiang; WANG Jian; HAN Da-kang

    2007-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen assays have been produced to exclude infectious donations collected during the preseroconversion window phase (PWP). For the same purpose, we evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of a novel hepatitis C virus NS3 antigen detection immunoassay and the application of this assay in clinical diagnosis.Methods Samples from 77 healthy subjects, 173 anti-HCV positive patients and 3708 hepatitis patients other than HCV positive were tested with the HCV NS3 antigen assay. Some HCV NS3 antigen positive samples were further validated with HCV-RNA, neutralization and immunodot assays. Twenty-five sequential samples from 11 HCV NS3 antigen positive patients were subjected to kinetic study.Results Only 48 (1.3%) of 3708 anti-HCV negative samples were positive for HCV NS3 antigen. Among them, 44 of 3030 samples from patients only infected with HBV were HCV NS3 antigen positive, 4 of the 445 samples from patients infected with other type hepatitis were HCV NS3 antigen positive. In addition, 42 (24.3%) of 173 anti-HCV positive samples were HCV NS3 antigen positive and all 77 samples from healthy subjects were negative to HCV NS3 antigen assay. Of the 15 HCV NS3 antigen positive samples, 9 (60%) were HCV-RNA positive. The neutralization and positive percentage of immunodot assay for 23 HCV NS3 antigen positive sera were 87.0% (20/23) and 69.6% (16/23)respectively. Of the 25 sequential samples from 11 HCV NS3 antigen positive patients, there was a negative correlation between the OD values and the duration of test (r=-0.989, P<0.05), and there were correlations among their HCV NS3 antigen, HCV-RNA and anti-HCV titres. The anti-HCV antibodies of two sera were detected while their OD values of HCV NS3 antigen decreased gradually.Conclusions The HCV NS3 antigen detection assay showed perfect specificity and high sensitivity. Thus, it would be useful and economical as a routine test in laboratories for early diagnosis of HCV infection

  2. Development and evaluation of a competitive ELISA using a monoclonal antibody for antibody detection after goose parvovirus virus-like particles (VLPs) and vaccine immunization in goose sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Ju, Huanyu; Li, Yanwei; Jing, Zhiqiang; Guo, Lu; Zhao, Yu; Ma, Bo; Gao, Mingchun; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Junwei

    2014-12-01

    An assay protocol based on a monoclonal antibody-based competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAb-based C-ELISA) for detecting antibodies against goose parvovirus (GPV) and its virus-like particles (VLPs) is described. The assay was developed using baculovirus-expressed recombinant VP2 virus-like particles (rVP2-VLPs) as antigens and a monoclonal antibody against GPV as the competitive antibody. Of the four anti-GPV MAbs that were screened, MAb 1G3 was selected as it was blocked by the GPV positive serum. Based on the distribution of percent inhibition (PI) of the known negative sera (n=225), a cut-off value was set at 36% inhibition. Using this cut-off value, the sensitivity of the assay was 93.3% and the specificity was 95.8%, as compared with the gold standard (virus neutralization assay). The rVP2-VLPs did not react with anti-sera to other goose pathogens, indicating that it is specific for the recognization of goose parvovirus antibodies. The assay was then validated with serum samples from goslings vaccinated with several VLPs (rVP1-VLPs, rVP2-VLPs, rVP3-VLPs, and rCGV-VLPs) and other vaccines (inactivated and attenuated). The C-ELISA described in this study is a sensitive and specific diagnostic test and should have wide applications for the sero-diagnosis and immunologic surveillance of GPV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Suppression of angiogenic activity of sera from diabetic patients with non-proliferative retinopathy by compounds of herbal origin and sulindac sulfone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skopinski, Piotr; Szaflik, Jerzy; Duda-Król, Barbara; Nartowska, Jadwiga; Sommer, Ewa; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna; Demkow, Urszula; Skopinska-Rózewska, Ewa

    2004-10-01

    Angiogenesis, the process of new blood vessel formation, is the key event in the mechanism of several pathological processes including diabetic retinopathy. The physiological control of angiogenesis depends on the balance between stimulatory and inhibitory factors. Therefore, a number of anti-angiogenic approaches has been developed, many of them based on the inhibition of the functional activity of pro-angiogenic factors. The aim of the present study was to compare the anti-angiogenic effectiveness of sulindac sulfone and some herbal compounds in the serum-induced angiogenesis test performed in Balb/c mice. Pooled sera from 35 patients with diabetes type 2 and retinopathy were used as pro-angiogenic stimuli. The strongest inhibitory effect was observed for the sulindac sulfone and ursolic acid in the highest concentration of 200 micro g/ml, as well as for the low-dosage concomitant treatment with 2 micro g/ml of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, green tea flavanol), ursolic acid (plant-derived triterpenoid), sulindac sulfone and convalamaroside (steroidal saponin). Combination treatment was significantly more effective than monotherapy with medium (20 micro g/ml) or lowest doses of tested compounds. The present study is the first to demonstrate the potent anti-angiogenic effect of the combination therapy comprising of plant-derived extracts and sulindac sulfone, as tested in the in vivo angiogenesis experimental model with sera of non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy patients used as the pro-angiogenic stimuli. We think that it might be the first step toward application of some of these compounds, in the future, in preventive anti-angiogenic therapy of these patients, as well, as in the treatment of later, proliferative stage of this disease.

  4. Measuring human emotions with modular neural networks and computer vision based applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veaceslav Albu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a neural network architecture for emotion recognition for human-computer interfaces and applied systems. In the current research, we propose a combination of the most recent biometric techniques with the neural networks (NN approach for real-time emotion and behavioral analysis. The system will be tested in real-time applications of customers' behavior for distributed on-land systems, such as kiosks and ATMs.

  5. Influence of various coagulation factors on chemical composition of sera gained by centrifugation from casein gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Snežana T.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Technological operations applied during curd processing influence syneresis and total solids content of cheese. Syneresis is not a simple physical process representing whey segregation due to curd contractions. Numerous factors can influence the process of syneresis. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of various parameters (pH, quantity of CaCl2 added, temperature of coagulation and heat treatment on induced syneresis. Reconstituted instant skim milk (control samples and reconstituted instant skim milk heated at 87ºC for 10 min (experimental samples were coagulated at 30ºC and 35ºC, and pH of 5.8 and 6.2 with 100, 200 and 400 mg/l of CaCl2 added. According to our results, these parameters had significant influence on nitrogen content of serum as well as on the distribution of nitrogen matter from gel into sera. Due to the formation of coaggregates the best rheological properties of gel were obtained for experimental samples coagulated with 400 mg/l of CaCl2 added at pH 5.8 and temperature of 35ºC.

  6. The sL1CAM in sera of patients with endometrial and ovarian cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Michał; Głowacka, Ewa; Wilczyński, Miłosz; Pękala-Wojciechowska, Anna; Malinowski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    L1CAM is a cell adhesion molecule suspected to play an important role in carcinogenesis. The objective of the study was to evaluate the level of soluble L1CAM in the sera of patients with endometrial and ovarian carcinomas and verify the feasibility of the sL1CAM as a marker of these carcinomas. 35 endometrial and 18 ovarian cancer patients were enrolled in the study. 43 patients with benign gynecological conditions constituted a control group. The sL1CAM serum level was measured with ELISA test in each patient and it was referred to the data from the surgical staging of the cancers. The sL1CAM serum level was significantly lower in patients with endometrial cancer than in healthy women and slightly lower in the ovarian cancer group than in the control group. In the endometrial cancer group there was no correlation between sL1CAM concentration and cancer histopathology, stage or grade. sL1CAM concentration positively correlated with ovarian cancer stage and (not significantly) with grade. Despite the increasing data about the possible role of L1CAM as a strong prognostic factor of poor outcome in many cancers, we did not find evidence supporting the use of sL1CAM as a marker of endometrial or ovarian cancers.

  7. Detection of IgG against Toxocara in Sera of Employees of Meat Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Guido-Arreola, Carlos Alberto; Saenz-Soto, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Contact with raw meat could represent a risk for Toxocara infection. We assessed the association of Toxocara infection with an occupation of meat worker though a case-control seroprevalence study of 124 meat workers and 248 subjects without this occupation. Sera of participants was analyzed for the presence of anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies. One (0.8%) of the 124 meat workers, and 5 (2.0%) of the 248 controls were positive for anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies (OR=0.39; 95% CI: 0.04-3.41; P=0.66). The seropositive meat worker was a male aged 28 years old, without vision impairment. None of the work characteristics i.e. frequency of contact with raw meat, use of safety practices, history of splashes at face with blood or raw meat, and injuries with sharp material at work was associated with Toxocara exposure. Seroprevalence of Toxocara infection was significantly higher (P=0.04) in meat workers with consumption of boar meat (1/6: 16.7%) than in those without this consumption (0/117: 0%). We conclude that meat workers do not have a higher risk for Toxocara infection than subjects without this occupation do. The 2% seroprevalence of Toxocara infection found in control subjects might suggest a low seroprevalence of this infection among people with other occupations in Durango City. However, additional case-control studies with larger sample sizes to confirm our results are needed. PMID:26508909

  8. Measurement of low concentration and nano-quantity hydrogen sulfide in sera using unfunctionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X. C.; Zhang, W. J.; Sammynaiken, R.; Meng, Q. H.; Wu, D. Q.; Yang, Q.; Yang, W.; Zhang, Edwin M.; Wang, R.

    2009-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced in small amounts by certain cells in the mammalian body and has a number of biological functions. H2S gas naturally produced by the body is not simply a toxic gas; it could be a vascular dilator and play a physiological role in regulating cardiovascular functions. In order to know the effects of H2S, it is necessary to accurately know its concentrations in the body. Conventional measurement methods have their limitations concerning the small amount and low concentration of H2S in the body. A new paradigm of using carbon nanotubes in H2S measurement expresses its potential. However, the influence of proteins in the mammalian body must be studied in the measurement of H2S by carbon nanotubes. In this paper, we demonstrate a successful measurement of low concentration (20 µM) and nano-quantity (0.5 µg) H2S in the serum by using carbon nanotubes and further with the fluorescence of confocal laser scanning microscopy and the luminescence of Raman microscopy. Statistical analysis of the experimental data shows that the relationship between concentrations and intensities is linear, which thus makes the carbon nanotube sensor highly promising for the measurement of H2S in sera.

  9. Identification of immunologically relevant proteins of Chlamydophila abortus using sera from experimentally infected pregnant ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, P X; Souda, Puneet; O'Donovan, J; Gutierrez, J; Gutierrez, E J; Worrall, S; McElroy, M; Proctor, A; Brady, C; Sammin, D; Basset, H F; Whitelegge, Julian P; Markey, B E; Nally, J E

    2010-08-01

    Chlamydophila abortus is an intracellular pathogen and the etiological agent of enzootic abortion of ewes (EAE). C. abortus has a biphasic development cycle; extracellular infectious elementary bodies (EB) attach and penetrate host cells, where they give rise to intracellular, metabolically active reticulate bodies (RB). RB divide by binary fission and subsequently mature to EB, which, on rupture of infected cells, are released to infect new host cells. Pregnant ewes were challenged with 2 x 10(6) inclusion forming units (IFU) of C. abortus cultured in yolk sac (comprising both EB and RB). Serum samples were collected at 0, 7, 14, 21, 27, 30, 35, 40, and 43 days postinfection (dpi) and used to identify antigens of C. abortus expressed during disease. Additionally, sera from fetal lambs were collected at 30, 35, 40, and 43 dpi. All serum samples collected from experimentally infected pregnant ewes reacted specifically with several antigens of EB as determined by one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D gel electrophoresis; reactive antigens identified by mass spectrometry included the major outer membrane protein (MOMP), polymorphic outer membrane protein (POMP), and macrophage infectivity potentiator (MIP) lipoprotein.

  10. Profile of upregulated inflammatory proteins in sera of Myasthenia Gravis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, Carl Johan; Westerberg, Elisabet; Punga, Anna Rostedt

    2017-01-01

    This study describes specific patterns of elevated inflammatory proteins in clinical subtypes of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients. MG is a chronic, autoimmune neuromuscular disease with antibodies most commonly targeting the acetylcholine receptors (AChRab), which causes fluctuating skeletal muscle fatigue. MG pathophysiology includes a strong component of inflammation, and a large proportion of patients with early onset MG additionally present thymus hyperplasia. Due to the fluctuating nature and heterogeneity of the disease, there is a great need for objective biomarkers as well as novel potential inflammatory targets. We examined the sera of 45 MG patients (40 AChRab seropositive and 5 AChRab seronegative), investigating 92 proteins associated with inflammation. Eleven of the analysed proteins were significantly elevated compared to healthy controls, out of which the three most significant were: matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP-10; p = 0.0004), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α; p = 0.0017) and extracellular newly identified receptor for advanced glycation end-products binding protein (EN-RAGE) (also known as protein S100-A12; p = 0.0054). Further, levels of MMP-10, C-X-C motif ligand 1 (CXCL1) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) differed between early and late onset MG. These novel targets provide valuable additional insight into the systemic inflammatory response in MG. PMID:28045063

  11. Human iPSC for Therapeutic Approaches to the Nervous System: Present and Future Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giuseppina Cefalo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many central nervous system (CNS diseases including stroke, spinal cord injury (SCI, and brain tumors are a significant cause of worldwide morbidity/mortality and yet do not have satisfying treatments. Cell-based therapy to restore lost function or to carry new therapeutic genes is a promising new therapeutic approach, particularly after human iPSCs became available. However, efficient generation of footprint-free and xeno-free human iPSC is a prerequisite for their clinical use. In this paper, we will first summarize the current methodology to obtain footprint- and xeno-free human iPSC. We will then review the current iPSC applications in therapeutic approaches for CNS regeneration and their use as vectors to carry proapoptotic genes for brain tumors and review their applications for modelling of neurological diseases and formulating new therapeutic approaches. Available results will be summarized and compared. Finally, we will discuss current limitations precluding iPSC from being used on large scale for clinical applications and provide an overview of future areas of improvement. In conclusion, significant progress has occurred in deriving iPSC suitable for clinical use in the field of neurological diseases. Current efforts to overcome technical challenges, including reducing labour and cost, will hopefully expedite the integration of this technology in the clinical setting.

  12. Human facial neural activities and gesture recognition for machine-interfacing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, M; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Tan, T S; Ismail, K; Ali, J; Dee-Uam, C; Pavaganun, C; Yupapin, P P

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a new method of recognizing different human facial gestures through their neural activities and muscle movements, which can be used in machine-interfacing applications. Human-machine interface (HMI) technology utilizes human neural activities as input controllers for the machine. Recently, much work has been done on the specific application of facial electromyography (EMG)-based HMI, which have used limited and fixed numbers of facial gestures. In this work, a multipurpose interface is suggested that can support 2-11 control commands that can be applied to various HMI systems. The significance of this work is finding the most accurate facial gestures for any application with a maximum of eleven control commands. Eleven facial gesture EMGs are recorded from ten volunteers. Detected EMGs are passed through a band-pass filter and root mean square features are extracted. Various combinations of gestures with a different number of gestures in each group are made from the existing facial gestures. Finally, all combinations are trained and classified by a Fuzzy c-means classifier. In conclusion, combinations with the highest recognition accuracy in each group are chosen. An average accuracy >90% of chosen combinations proved their ability to be used as command controllers.

  13. Potential Applications for Radioisotope Power Systems in Support of Human Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Robert L.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Radioisotope power systems (RPS) for space applications have powered over 27 U.S. space systems, starting with Transit 4A and 4B in 1961, and more recently with the successful landing of the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity in August 2012. RPS enable missions with destinations far from the Sun with faint solar flux, on planetary surfaces with dense or dusty atmospheres, and at places with long eclipse periods where solar array sizes and energy storage mass become impractical. RPS could also provide an enabling capability in support of human exploration activities. It is envisioned that with the higher power needs of most human mission concepts, a high efficiency thermal-to-electric technology would be required such as the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope generator (ASRG). The ASRG should be capable of a four-fold improvement in efficiency over traditional thermoelectric RPS. While it may be impractical to use RPS as a main power source, many other applications could be considered, such as crewed pressurized rovers, in-situ resource production of propellants, back-up habitat power, drilling, any mobile or remote activity from the main base habitat, etc. This paper will identify potential applications and provide concepts that could be a practical extension of the current ASRG design in providing for robust and flexible use of RPS on human exploration missions.

  14. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Basic Research to Potential Clinical Applications in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa de Souza Fernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs are derived from a direct reprogramming of human somatic cells to a pluripotent stage through ectopic expression of specific transcription factors. These cells have two important properties, which are the self-renewal capacity and the ability to differentiate into any cell type of the human body. So, the discovery of hiPSCs opens new opportunities in biomedical sciences, since these cells may be useful for understanding the mechanisms of diseases in the production of new diseases models, in drug development/drug toxicity tests, gene therapies, and cell replacement therapies. However, the hiPSCs technology has limitations including the potential for the development of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities leading to tumorigenicity. Nowadays, basic research in the hiPSCs field has made progress in the application of new strategies with the aim to enable an efficient production of high-quality of hiPSCs for safety and efficacy, necessary to the future application for clinical practice. In this review, we show the recent advances in hiPSCs’ basic research and some potential clinical applications focusing on cancer. We also present the importance of the use of statistical methods to evaluate the possible validation for the hiPSCs for future therapeutic use toward personalized cell therapies.

  15. Application Design of Human Resource Information System on Binus Student Learning Community of Bina Nusantara University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Heriyanni

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Information exchange between human resources within an organization is a valuable asset that must be managed properly. Information technology now supports information management between human resources through Human Resource Information System (HRIS. Binus Student Learning Community (BSLC implementsdifferent technologies for each work they performed so that affect the quality of information exchange and performance of their members. This study aims to streamline the used technology in BSLC by combining it all into the same system through the implementation of HRIS constructed by Extreme Programming (XP method. Results of this research is the web-based HRIS BSLC application and expected to improve the quality of information exchange and optimize the performance of BSLC’s members.

  16. Complex for monitoring visual acuity and its application for evaluation of human psycho-physiological state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokoumov, P. S.; Khabibullin, T. R.; Tolstaya, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The existing psychological theories associate the movement of a human eye with its reactions to external change: what we see, hear and feel. By analyzing the glance, we can compare the external human response (which shows the behavior of a person), and the natural reaction (that they actually feels). This article describes the complex for detection of visual activity and its application for evaluation of the psycho-physiological state of a person. The glasses with a camera capture all the movements of the human eye in real time. The data recorded by the camera are transmitted to the computer for processing implemented with the help of the software developed by the authors. The result is given in an informative and an understandable report, which can be used for further analysis. The complex shows a high efficiency and stable operation and can be used both, for the pedagogic personnel recruitment and for testing students during the educational process.

  17. Metabolomics in Plants and Humans: Applications in the Prevention and Diagnosis of Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego F. Gomez-Casati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, there has been an increase in the number of metabolomic approaches used, in parallel with proteomic and functional genomic studies. The wide variety of chemical types of metabolites available has also accelerated the use of different techniques in the investigation of the metabolome. At present, metabolomics is applied to investigate several human diseases, to improve their diagnosis and prevention, and to design better therapeutic strategies. In addition, metabolomic studies are also being carried out in areas such as toxicology and pharmacology, crop breeding, and plant biotechnology. In this review, we emphasize the use and application of metabolomics in human diseases and plant research to improve human health.

  18. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in the U.S. swine herd using sera collected during the National Animal Health Monitoring Survey (Swine 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sera and data on swine management practices was collected during the voluntary survey of 185 grower/finisher swine production sites located in 16 states accounting for >90% of U.S. swine production . A total of 6,238 sera were tested for T. gondii antibodies using a commercial ELISA assay; all posit...

  19. Precision wildlife medicine: applications of the human-centred precision medicine revolution to species conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whilde, Jenny; Martindale, Mark Q; Duffy, David J

    2017-05-01

    The current species extinction crisis is being exacerbated by an increased rate of emergence of epizootic disease. Human-induced factors including habitat degradation, loss of biodiversity and wildlife population reductions resulting in reduced genetic variation are accelerating disease emergence. Novel, efficient and effective approaches are required to combat these epizootic events. Here, we present the case for the application of human precision medicine approaches to wildlife medicine in order to enhance species conservation efforts. We consider how the precision medicine revolution, coupled with the advances made in genomics, may provide a powerful and feasible approach to identifying and treating wildlife diseases in a targeted, effective and streamlined manner. A number of case studies of threatened species are presented which demonstrate the applicability of precision medicine to wildlife conservation, including sea turtles, amphibians and Tasmanian devils. These examples show how species conservation could be improved by using precision medicine techniques to determine novel treatments and management strategies for the specific medical conditions hampering efforts to restore population levels. Additionally, a precision medicine approach to wildlife health has in turn the potential to provide deeper insights into human health and the possibility of stemming and alleviating the impacts of zoonotic diseases. The integration of the currently emerging Precision Medicine Initiative with the concepts of EcoHealth (aiming for sustainable health of people, animals and ecosystems through transdisciplinary action research) and One Health (recognizing the intimate connection of humans, animal and ecosystem health and addressing a wide range of risks at the animal-human-ecosystem interface through a coordinated, collaborative, interdisciplinary approach) has great potential to deliver a deeper and broader interdisciplinary-based understanding of both wildlife and human

  20. Carbon nanotubes: a novel material for multifaceted applications in human healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Rani, Ruma; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Tankeshwar, K; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2017-01-03

    Remarkable advances have been achieved in modern material technology, especially in device fabrication, and these have facilitated the use of diverse materials in various applications. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being successfully implemented in drug delivery, sensing, water purification, composite materials, and bone scaffolds. Thus, CNTs must meet a wide range of criteria such as surface modification, high aspect ratio, desired conductivity, high porosity and loading, non-toxicity, specificity, and selectivity, and compatibility for device fabrication. The main focus of this review is to explore the maximum applications of CNTs for human health, and we particularly focus on nanocarrier and biomedical applications. The scope of this review initially covers the basic aspects of CNTs and is also extended further to describe their synthesis strategies as well as various challenges encountered in their functionalization, dispersion, and toxicity. Our discussion also emphasizes future directions for these emerging fields of research.

  1. Kawasaki disease-specific molecules in the sera are linked to microbe-associated molecular patterns in the biofilms.

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    Takeshi Kusuda

    Full Text Available Kawasaki disease (KD is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. The innate immune system is involved in its pathophysiology at the acute phase. We have recently established a novel murine model of KD coronary arteritis by oral administration of a synthetic microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP. On the hypothesis that specific MAMPs exist in KD sera, we have searched them to identify KD-specific molecules and to assess the pathogenesis.We performed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS analysis of fractionated serum samples from 117 patients with KD and 106 controls. Microbiological and LC-MS evaluation of biofilm samples were also performed.KD samples elicited proinflammatory cytokine responses from human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs. By LC-MS analysis of KD serum samples collected at 3 different periods, we detected a variety of KD-specific molecules in the lipophilic fractions that showed distinct m/z and MS/MS fragmentation patterns in each cluster. Serum KD-specific molecules showed m/z and MS/MS fragmentation patterns almost identical to those of MAMPs obtained from the biofilms formed in vitro (common MAMPs from Bacillus cereus, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus at the 1st study period, and from the biofilms formed in vivo (common MAMPs from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis/Bacillus cereus/Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus at the 2nd and 3rd periods. The biofilm extracts from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus also induced proinflammatory cytokines by HCAECs. By the experiments with IgG affinity chromatography, some of these serum KD-specific molecules bound to IgG.We herein conclude that serum KD-specific molecules were mostly derived from biofilms and possessed molecular structures common to MAMPs from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus. Discovery of these KD

  2. Prospect of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells in Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs represent a transient and multipotent cell population that contributes to numerous anatomical structures such as peripheral nervous system, teeth, and cornea. NCSC maldevelopment is related to various human diseases including pigmentation abnormalities, disorders affecting autonomic nervous system, and malformations of teeth, eyes, and hearts. As human pluripotent stem cells including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs can serve as an unlimited cell source to generate NCSCs, hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs can be a valuable tool to study the underlying mechanisms of NCSC-associated diseases, which paves the way for future therapies for these abnormalities. In addition, hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs with the capability of differentiating to various cell types are highly promising for clinical organ repair and regeneration. In this review, we first discuss NCSC generation methods from human pluripotent stem cells and differentiation mechanism of NCSCs. Then we focus on the clinical application potential of hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs on peripheral nerve injuries, corneal blindness, tooth regeneration, pathological melanogenesis, Hirschsprung disease, and cardiac repair and regeneration.

  3. Prospect of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells in Clinical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qian; Lu, Qiqi; Gao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) represent a transient and multipotent cell population that contributes to numerous anatomical structures such as peripheral nervous system, teeth, and cornea. NCSC maldevelopment is related to various human diseases including pigmentation abnormalities, disorders affecting autonomic nervous system, and malformations of teeth, eyes, and hearts. As human pluripotent stem cells including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can serve as an unlimited cell source to generate NCSCs, hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs can be a valuable tool to study the underlying mechanisms of NCSC-associated diseases, which paves the way for future therapies for these abnormalities. In addition, hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs with the capability of differentiating to various cell types are highly promising for clinical organ repair and regeneration. In this review, we first discuss NCSC generation methods from human pluripotent stem cells and differentiation mechanism of NCSCs. Then we focus on the clinical application potential of hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs on peripheral nerve injuries, corneal blindness, tooth regeneration, pathological melanogenesis, Hirschsprung disease, and cardiac repair and regeneration. PMID:28090209

  4. In-Space Assembly Capability Assessment for Potential Human Exploration and Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Sharon A.; Jones, Christopher A.; Arney, Dale C.; Stillwagen, Frederic H.; Chai, Patrick R.; Hutchinson, Craig D.; Stafford, Matthew A.; Moses, Robert W.; Dempsey, James A.; Rodgers, Erica M.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Human missions to Mars present several major challenges that must be overcome, including delivering multiple large mass and volume elements, keeping the crew safe and productive, meeting cost constraints, and ensuring a sustainable campaign. Traditional methods for executing human Mars missions minimize or eliminate in-space assembly, which provides a narrow range of options for addressing these challenges and limits the types of missions that can be performed. This paper discusses recent work to evaluate how the inclusion of in-space assembly in space mission architectural concepts could provide novel solutions to address these challenges by increasing operational flexibility, robustness, risk reduction, crew health and safety, and sustainability. A hierarchical framework is presented to characterize assembly strategies, assembly tasks, and the required capabilities to assemble mission systems in space. The framework is used to identify general mission system design considerations and assembly system characteristics by assembly strategy. These general approaches are then applied to identify potential in-space assembly applications to address each challenge. Through this process, several focus areas were identified where applications of in-space assembly could affect multiple challenges. Each focus area was developed to identify functions, potential assembly solutions and operations, key architectural trades, and potential considerations and implications of implementation. This paper helps to identify key areas to investigate were potentially significant gains in addressing the challenges with human missions to Mars may be realized, and creates a foundation on which to further develop and analyze in-space assembly concepts and assembly-based architectures.

  5. Fast magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging techniques in human brain- applications in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Iedani, Oun; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Ribbons, Karen; Ramadan, Saadallah

    2017-02-28

    Multi voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is an important imaging tool that combines imaging and spectroscopic techniques. MRSI of the human brain has been beneficially applied to different clinical applications in neurology, particularly in neurooncology but also in multiple sclerosis, stroke and epilepsy. However, a major challenge in conventional MRSI is the longer acquisition time required for adequate signal to be collected. Fast MRSI of the brain in vivo is an alternative approach to reduce scanning time and make MRSI more clinically suitable.Fast MRSI can be categorised into spiral, echo-planar, parallel and turbo imaging techniques, each with its own strengths. After a brief introduction on the basics of non-invasive examination ((1)H-MRS) and localization techniques principles, different fast MRSI techniques will be discussed from their initial development to the recent innovations with particular emphasis on their capacity to record neurochemical changes in the brain in a variety of pathologies.The clinical applications of whole brain fast spectroscopic techniques, can assist in the assessment of neurochemical changes in the human brain and help in understanding the roles they play in disease. To give a good example of the utilities of these techniques in clinical context, MRSI application in multiple sclerosis was chosen. The available up to date and relevant literature is discussed and an outline of future research is presented.

  6. State-of-the-art human gene therapy: part II. Gene therapy strategies and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-09-01

    In Part I of this Review (Wang and Gao, 2014), we introduced recent advances in gene delivery technologies and explained how they have powered some of the current human gene therapy applications. In Part II, we expand the discussion on gene therapy applications, focusing on some of the most exciting clinical uses. To help readers to grasp the essence and to better organize the diverse applications, we categorize them under four gene therapy strategies: (1) gene replacement therapy for monogenic diseases, (2) gene addition for complex disorders and infectious diseases, (3) gene expression alteration targeting RNA, and (4) gene editing to introduce targeted changes in host genome. Human gene therapy started with the simple idea that replacing a faulty gene with a functional copy can cure a disease. It has been a long and bumpy road to finally translate this seemingly straightforward concept into reality. As many disease mechanisms unraveled, gene therapists have employed a gene addition strategy backed by a deep knowledge of what goes wrong in diseases and how to harness host cellular machinery to battle against diseases. Breakthroughs in other biotechnologies, such as RNA interference and genome editing by chimeric nucleases, have the potential to be integrated into gene therapy. Although clinical trials utilizing these new technologies are currently sparse, these innovations are expected to greatly broaden the scope of gene therapy in the near future.

  7. Application of bacteriophages in post-harvest control of human pathogenic and food spoiling bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Grande Burgos, Maria José; Gálvez, Antonio; Lucas López, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    Bacteriophages have attracted great attention for application in food biopreservation. Lytic bacteriophages specific for human pathogenic bacteria can be isolated from natural sources such as animal feces or industrial wastes where the target bacteria inhabit. Lytic bacteriophages have been tested in different food systems for inactivation of main food-borne pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni and Cronobacter sakazkii, and also for control of spoilage bacteria. Application of lytic bacteriophages could selectively control host populations of concern without interfering with the remaining food microbiota. Bacteriophages could also be applied for inactivation of bacteria attached to food contact surfaces or grown as biofilms. Bacteriophages may receive a generally recognized as safe status based on their lack of toxicity and other detrimental effects to human health. Phage preparations specific for L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica serotypes have been commercialized and approved for application in foods or as part of surface decontamination protocols. Phage endolysins have a broader host specificity compared to lytic bacteriophages. Cloned endolysins could be used as natural preservatives, singly or in combination with other antimicrobials such as bacteriocins.

  8. Immunoreactivity of protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) in sera from sheep infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Ratna B; Begg, Douglas J; Purdie, Auriol C; Bach, Horacio; Whittington, Richard J

    2014-07-15

    Evasion of host defense mechanisms and survival inside infected host macrophages are features of pathogenic mycobacteria including Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants. Protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) has been identified as a secreted protein critical for survival of mycobacteria within infected macrophages. The host may mount an immune response to such secreted proteins. In this study, the humoral immune response to purified recombinant M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis PtpA was investigated using sera from a cohort of sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and compared with uninfected healthy controls. A significantly higher level of reactivity to PtpA was observed in sera collected from M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis infected sheep when compared to those from uninfected healthy controls. PtpA could be a potential candidate antigen for detection of humoral immune responses in sheep infected with M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

  9. Performance levels of four Latin American laboratories for the serodiagnosis of Chagas disease in Mexican sera samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro O Luquetti

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In nearly all of the previous multicentre studies evaluating serological tests for Trypanosoma cruzi infection, sera samples from Central or South American countries have been used preferentially. In this work we compared the reliability of the serological tests using Mexican sera samples that were evaluated in four independent laboratories. This included a reference laboratory in Brazil and three participant laboratories, including one in Central America and two in Mexico. The kappa index between Brazilian and Honduran laboratories reached 1.0 and the index for the Mexican laboratories reached 0.94. Another finding of this study was that the source of antigen did not affect the performance of the serological tests.

  10. ISRU Reactant, Fuel Cell Based Power Plant for Robotic and Human Mobile Exploration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Russell S.; Sanders, Gerald; Simon, Thomas; McCurdy, Kerri

    2003-01-01

    Three basic power generation system concepts are generally considered for lander, rover, and Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) assistant applications for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration missions. The most common power system considered is the solar array and battery system. While relatively simple and successful, solar array/battery systems have some serious limitations for mobile applications. For typical rover applications, these limitations include relatively low total energy storage capabilities, daylight only operating times (6 to 8 hours on Mars), relatively short operating lives depending on the operating environment, and rover/lander size and surface use constraints. Radioisotope power systems are being reconsidered for long-range science missions. Unfortunately, the high cost, political controversy, and launch difficulties that are associated with nuclear-based power systems suggests that the use of radioisotope powered landers, rovers, and EVA assistants will be limited. The third power system concept now being considered are fuel cell based systems. Fuel cell power systems overcome many of the performance and surface exploration limitations of solar array/battery power systems and the prohibitive cost and other difficulties associated with nuclear power systems for mobile applications. In an effort to better understand the capabilities and limitations of fuel cell power systems for Moon and Mars exploration applications. NASA is investigating the use of In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) produced reactant, fuel cell based power plants to power robotic outpost rovers, science equipment, and future human spacecraft, surface-excursion rovers, and EVA assistant rovers. This paper will briefly compare the capabilities and limitations of fuel cell power systems relative to solar array/battery and nuclear systems, discuss the unique and enhanced missions that fuel cell power systems enable, and discuss the common technology and system attributes

  11. Detection of Potentially Diagnostic Leishmania Antigens with Western Blot Analysis of Sera from Patients with Cutaneous and Visceral Leishmaniases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyyedtabaei, Seyyed Javad; Rostami, Ali; Haghighi, Ali; Mohebali, Mehdi; Kazemi, Bahram; Fallahi, Shirzad; Spotin, Adel

    2017-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) are important public health problems in Iran. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic potential of Western blot (WB) compared with indirect immunofluorescence test (IFAT) to serodiagnosis of leishmaniasis. This study was performed from 2010-2014 and participants were different parts of Iran. Serum samples were obtained from 43 patients with proven CL, 33 patients with proven VL, 39 patients with other parasitic diseases and 23 healthy individuals. WB sensitivity for CL and VL was 100% and 91%, compared to IFA 4.6% and 87.8%, respectively. Sera from patients with CL and VL recognized numerous antigens with molecular weights ranging from 14 to 68 kDa and 12 to 94 kDa, respectively. The most sensitive antigens were 14 and 16 kDa for CL recognized by 100% of the sera from patients with proven CL and 12, 14 and 16 kDa for VL, recognized by 63.6%, 100% and 63.6% of the sera from patients with proven VL respectively. WB analysis is more sensitive than IFAT for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis particularly in cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis. The 12, 14 and 16 kDa can be valuable diagnostic molecules for serodiagnosis of leishmaniasis because at least two immunogenic molecules were simultaneously detected by all patient sera, as well as produced antibodies against these antigens have no cross-reactivity with other control groups. WB could be useful for screening and serodiagnosis of CL and VL in epidemiologic studies in endemic areas.

  12. Absence of antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide in sera of patients with hepatitis C virus infection and cryoglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wener, Mark H; Hutchinson, Kathleen; Morishima, Chihiro; Gretch, David R

    2004-07-01

    To determine if antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) are found in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-CCP were measured in sera from 50 patients with HCV infection but without cryoglobulinemia, sera from 29 patients with mixed cryoglobulinemia (including 13 with rheumatic symptoms and 5 with arthritis), and sera from 20 normal blood donors. Anti-CCP was measured by second-generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). No sera with elevated anti-CCP were found in patients with HCV infection without cryoglobulinemia, and in that population, the maximum anti-CCP was 10 units, well below the positive cutoff of 20 units. Positive findings on RF testing >13 IU/ml were present in 22 (44%) of the HCV patients, with RF >50 IU/ml in 8 (16%) and a maximum RF of 526 IU/ml. Of the cryoglobulinemia patients, 22 (76%) had positive results on tests for RF, including 18 (62%) with RF >50 IU/ml and a maximum RF of 5,540 IU/ml. Two (6.9%) of the cryoglobulinemia patients had borderline-positive findings on tests for anti-CCP (25 units and 37 units), which were false-positive results caused by nonspecific binding in the ELISA. No association between the RF and the anti-CCP concentrations was found. Whereas RF was frequent in patients with HCV infection with and without cryoglobulinemia, anti-CCP was not observed in patients with uncomplicated HCV infection. Borderline-positive anti-CCP results were observed infrequently in patients with mixed cryoglobulinemia and were caused by nonspecific binding to plastic. Measurement of anti-CCP may help in diagnosing RA in patients with chronic HCV infection.

  13. [Measurement of human thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies by enzyme immunoassay using recombinant human TPO].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T; Ishiguro, R; Takenouchi, H; Umeki, K; Matsumoto, K; Yagihashi, S; Kato, H; Kotani, T; Ohtaki, S

    1994-03-01

    An EIA for measuring anti-TPO autoantibodies (rhTPO-EIA) was developed using recombinant human TPO expressed in CHO cells and was compared with MC-HA generally used in laboratory routine work. rhTPO-EIA showed a satisfactory reproducibility in the intra-assay test and did not have an accidental error of lots. Almost equal number of healthy females and males were measured for their IgG binding to TPO to define a normal range of anti-TPO autoantibodies. After setting 20 IU/ml as an upper limit of normal range, sera from patient with thyroid disorders were measured for their anti-TPO autoantibodies. Chronic thyroiditis and Graves' disease were highly positive, while adenoma, thyroid cancer, SLE, and RA were low in their positivity. The positive rate of anti-TPO autoantibodies was compatible to those of previous reports in each disorder. Seventy-two sera from patients with chronic thyroiditis or Graves' disease were measured for their autoantibodies by both rhTPO-EIA and MC-HA and the results were compared between both methods. A correlation coefficient was 0.486. Following absorption with thyroglobulin, sera were measured again and as the results, the correlation coefficient increased to 0.723. Therefore, MC-HA was thought to be influenced in the presence of anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies. Since rhTPO-EIA is excellent in quality and not affected by anti-thyroglobulin antibodies, it is useful and applicable to clinical diagnosis and observation of thyroid disorders.

  14. Microbial transglutaminase treatment in pasta-production does not affect the immunoreactivity of gliadin with celiac disease patients' sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruh, Tobias; Ohsam, Jürgen; Pasternack, Ralf; Yokoyama, Keiichi; Kumazawa, Yoshiyuki; Hils, Martin

    2014-07-30

    The effect of microbial transglutaminase (MTG)-treatment of pasta-dough on the immunoreactivity with celiac disease patient's sera has been investigated. Modification by MTG has been proven by determination of the MTG reaction product ε-(γ-glutamyl)lysine (3.63 μmol/g protein), which was not detectable in non-MTG-treated pasta. Antigenicity has been analyzed by immunoblotting and ELISA using gliadin-extracts from pasta and MTG-treated pasta. Immunoblotting showed that the antibody-population (antigliadin antibodies and antideamidated gliadin antibodies) of the sera is specific for every individual patient. Immunoblotting and ELISA showed that there is no difference in immunoreactivity of gliadin extracted from pasta and MTG-pasta. Recognition pattern and intensity in Western blot as well as antibody titer has also been identical even for sera with a high antideamidated gliadin antibody titer. These results indicate no difference between pasta-gliadin and MTG-pasta-gliadin and especially no increased deamidation in pasta-gliadin by MTG-treatment.

  15. The influence of antisperm Ig G and Ig A antibodies from cows sera and cervical mucus on bull sperm motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Miodrag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of antisperm Ig G and Ig A antibodies (ASA from the sera and cervical mucus of cows on bulls sperm motility. A total of 64 cows was included in the study and samples of sera and cervical mucus were collected on the day of artificial insemination. Cows were of Busha breed or mix breed with Simmental. The presence of antisperm Ig G and Ig A antibodies was determined by indirect immunofluorescence method and according to these results, cows were divided in groups as follows: cows with high or low ASA titer in their sera and cows with high or low ASA titer in the cervical mucus. Influence of antisperm antibodies on sperm motility was further estimated by Computer Assisted Semen Analysis (CASA. Results demonstrated a significant difference in the influence of antisperm antibodies depending on their origin and titer. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46002: Molecular genetic and ecophysiological researches on the protection of autochthonous animal resources, sustaining domestic animals’ welfare, health and reproduction, and safe food production

  16. Human thermal modeling to augment MWIR image analysis in surveillance applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodyard, R. L.; Skipper, J. A.

    2014-05-01

    The interpretation of thermal imagery can be augmented with information derived from human thermal modeling to better infer human activity during, or prior to, data capture. This additional insight into human activity could prove useful in security and surveillance applications. We have implemented Tanabe's 65 NM thermocomfort model to predict skin surface temperature under a wide variety of environmental, activity and body parameters. Here, humans are modeled as sixteen segments (head, chest, upper leg, etc.), wherein spherical geometry is assumed for the head and cylindrical geometry is assumed for all other segments. Each segment is comprised of four layers: core, muscle, fat, and skin. Clothing is modeled as an additional layer (or layers) of resistance. Users supply input parameters via our custom MATLAB graphical user interface that includes a robust clothing database based on McCullough's A Database for Determining the Evaporative Resistance of Clothing, and then Tanabe's bioheat equations are solved to predict skin temperatures of each body segment. As an initial step of model validation, we compared our computed thermal resistances with literature values. Our evaporative and dry resistance on a per segment basis agreed with literature values. The dry resistance of each segment varied no more than .03 [m2°C/W]. Model validation will be extended to compare the results of our human subject trials (known body parameters, clothing, environmental factors and activity levels) to model outputs. Agreement would further substantiate the propagation of model- predicted skin temperatures through the thermal imager's transfer function to predict human heat signatures in thermal imagery.

  17. A new muscle fatigue and recovery model and its ergonomics application in human simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Liang; Bennis, Fouad; Zhang, Wei; Guillaume, François; 10.1080/17452759.2010.504056

    2010-01-01

    Although automatic techniques have been employed in manufacturing industries to increase productivity and efficiency, there are still lots of manual handling jobs, especially for assembly and maintenance jobs. In these jobs, musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the major health problems due to overload and cumulative physical fatigue. With combination of conventional posture analysis techniques, digital human modelling and simulation (DHM) techniques have been developed and commercialized to evaluate the potential physical exposures. However, those ergonomics analysis tools are mainly based on posture analysis techniques, and until now there is still no fatigue index available in the commercial software to evaluate the physical fatigue easily and quickly. In this paper, a new muscle fatigue and recovery model is proposed and extended to evaluate joint fatigue level in manual handling jobs. A special application case is described and analyzed by digital human simulation technique.

  18. Promoting positive human development and social justice: Integrating theory, research and application in contemporary developmental science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Richard M

    2015-06-01

    The bold claim that developmental science can contribute to both enhancing positive development among diverse individuals across the life span and promoting social justice in their communities, nations and regions is supported by decades of theoretical, methodological and research contributions. To explain the basis of this claim, I describe the relational developmental systems (RDS) metamodel that frames contemporary developmental science, and I present an example of a programme of research within the adolescent portion of the life span that is associated with this metamodel and is pertinent to promoting positive human development. I then discuss methodological issues associated with using RDS-based models as frames for research and application. Finally, I explain how the theoretical and methodological ideas associated with RDS thinking may provide the scholarly tools needed by developmental scientists seeking to contribute to human thriving and to advance social justice in the Global South. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  19. Current Applications of Chromatographic Methods in the Study of Human Body Fluids for Diagnosing Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwik, Jagoda; Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Currently, analysis of various human body fluids is one of the most essential and promising approaches to enable the discovery of biomarkers or pathophysiological mechanisms for disorders and diseases. Analysis of these fluids is challenging due to their complex composition and unique characteristics. Development of new analytical methods in this field has made it possible to analyze body fluids with higher selectivity, sensitivity, and precision. The composition and concentration of analytes in body fluids are most often determined by chromatography-based techniques. There is no doubt that proper use of knowledge that comes from a better understanding of the role of body fluids requires the cooperation of scientists of diverse specializations, including analytical chemists, biologists, and physicians. This article summarizes current knowledge about the application of different chromatographic methods in analyses of a wide range of compounds in human body fluids in order to diagnose certain diseases and disorders.

  20. Physicologically Based Toxicokinetic Models of Tebuconazole and Application in Human Risk Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Reffstrup, Trine Klein; Petersen, Annette

    2016-01-01

    A series of physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) models for tebuconazole were developed in four species, rat, rabbit, rhesus monkey, and human. The developed models were analyzed with respect to the application of the models in higher tier human risk assessment, and the prospect of using...... (ADME) of tebuconazole. The developed models were validated on in vivo half-life data for rabbit with good results, and on plasma and tissue concentration-time course data of tebuconazole after i.v. administration in rabbit. In most cases, the predicted concentration levels were seen to be within...... a factor of 2 compared to the experimental data, which is the threshold set for the use of PBTK simulation results in risk assessment. An exception to this was seen for one of the target organs, namely, the liver, for which tebuconazole concentration was significantly underestimated, a trend also seen...

  1. Effect of sera of normal cycling, pregnant and repeat breeding buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) on in vitro maturation of buffalo, sheep and goat oocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anthony Sabasthin; Sumanta Nandi; Venkataswamy Girish Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the oocytes maturation capacity of buffalo, sheep and goat using media containing sera of three different groups of buffaloes (regularly cycling, pregnant and repeat breeding). Methods: The buffalo, sheep and goat oocytes were matured under suitable conditions in medium containing sera of regularly cycling, pregnant and repeat breeding buffaloes. Results:The oocytes maturation rate containing buffalo oocytes cultured in media containing sera of the control group and regularly cycling group were not significantly different. However when oocytes cultured in the media containing sera of pregnant buffaloes the maturation rate were significantly declined. Further significant declined in maturation rate were observed when oocytes cultured in media containing sera of repeat breeding buffaloes. When sheep and goat oocytes cultured in the media containing control, pregnant and regularly cycling animals sera the oocytes maturation rate were not significantly different. A significant decline in maturation rate of sheep and goat oocytes were observed, when oocytes cultured in media containing sera of repeat breeding buffaloes. Conclusion: We may conclude that serum collected from normal cycling buffaloes can be used for oocytes maturation in both homogeneous and heterogeneous species.

  2. Passive transfer of resistance to mice with sera from rabbits, rats or mice vaccinated with ultraviolet-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, N A; Hinchcliffe, P; Webbe, G

    1987-06-01

    All serum transfers from donor rats or rabbits given single or multiple vaccinations of ultraviolet (u.v.)-attenuated Schistosoma japonicum cercariae conferred significant resistance against challenge to mice. Donors given 5 vaccinations, however, produced the most effective sera; rat sera giving up to 88% protection and rabbit sera up to 80%. This protective effect was species-specific and titratable. Sera from vaccinated rabbits and rats were were most effective when transferred to mice 2 h before challenge, but became progressively less effective when transferred with increasing time after challenge. These sera had no efficacy when given 6 days after challenge. Thus, sera from vaccinated rabbits and rats were effective against the early stage of migration, but did not necessarily have to act in the skin as all serum transfers were as effective against intraperitoneal as percutaneous challenge. By contrast, serum from multiply vaccinated mice had little or no protective effect when transferred to mice before challenge, but conferred 62% resistance when transferred 5 days after challenge. Further, there was an additive protective effect when vaccinated rat and mouse sera were given in combination at their optimum transfer times (days 0 and +5, respectively). Thus, there appears to be a stage-specific immune response induced by vaccination depending upon whether the vaccinated hosts are truly permissive or not. Vaccinated rats and rabbits respond to the early phase of migration and vaccinated mice make protective responses against the lung phase of migration.

  3. Characterizing Properties of Biochar Produced from Simulated Human Feces and Its Potential Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilango, Ajaykannan; Lefebvre, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    This study presents a comprehensive characterization of biochar obtained from simulated human feces (SHF) with a view to improve human waste sanitization and stabilization before usage as a resource. The possible applications of SHF are as a fuel, as a soil amendment, or for emerging applications (e.g., activated carbon precursor and odor control), depending on the charring conditions. Simulated human feces were charred under different conditions of peak temperature (200-800°C), heating rate (2-50°C min), and holding time (0.5-6.0 h); these parameters have been shown to have the largest influence on the thermal and physicochemical characteristics of the final product. The peak temperature was shown to have a higher impact than the heating rate or the holding time. At 200°C, the very mild structural changes of the product were characteristic of dry torrefaction, a process useful to remove moisture and sterilize the product. At 400°C the carbon content (76.2 ± 0.4) and the calorific heat value (30.6 ± 0.4 MJ kg) of the product increased by 60%. From 600°C onward, the improved degree of aromatization verified by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (alkene [C=C] stretching around 1680-1450 cm) and C nuclear magnetic resonance (C=C stretching at 140-110 ppm) made the biochar increasingly suitable for carbon sequestration or commercial fabrication of briquettes of charcoal. In conclusion, SHF proved to be a suitable feedstock to produce a biochar whose characteristics depended mostly on the peak charring temperature. Ultimately, the selection of a suitable application may depend on local and sociological considerations.

  4. Taurine supplementation in spontaneously hypertensive rats: Advantages and limitations for human applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanich, Atchariya; Wyss, J Michael; Roysommuti, Sanya

    2013-11-26

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is a β-amino acid found in many tissues particularly brain, myocardium, and kidney. It plays several physiological roles including cardiac contraction, antioxidation, and blunting of hypertension. Though several lines of evidence indicate that dietary taurine can reduce hypertension in humans and in animal models, evidence that taurine supplementation reduces hypertension in humans has not been conclusive. One reason for the inconclusive nature of past studies may be that taurine having both positive and negative effects on cardiovascular system depending on when it is assessed, some effects may occur early, while others only appear later. Further, other consideration may play a role, e.g., taurine supplementation improves hypertension in spontaneously hypertensive rats on a low salt diet but fails to attenuate hypertension on a high salt diet. In humans, some epidemiologic studies indicate that people with high taurine and low salt diets display lower arterial pressure than those with low taurine and high salt diets. Differences in techniques for measuring arterial pressure, duration of treatment, and animal models likely affect the response in different studies. This review considers both the positive and negative effects of taurine on blood pressure in animal models and their applications for human interventions.

  5. Inverse Modeling of Human Knee Joint Based on Geometry and Vision Systems for Exoskeleton Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Piña-Martínez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current trends in Robotics aim to close the gap that separates technology and humans, bringing novel robotic devices in order to improve human performance. Although robotic exoskeletons represent a breakthrough in mobility enhancement, there are design challenges related to the forces exerted to the users’ joints that result in severe injuries. This occurs due to the fact that most of the current developments consider the joints as noninvariant rotational axes. This paper proposes the use of commercial vision systems in order to perform biomimetic joint design for robotic exoskeletons. This work proposes a kinematic model based on irregular shaped cams as the joint mechanism that emulates the bone-to-bone joints in the human body. The paper follows a geometric approach for determining the location of the instantaneous center of rotation in order to design the cam contours. Furthermore, the use of a commercial vision system is proposed as the main measurement tool due to its noninvasive feature and for allowing subjects under measurement to move freely. The application of this method resulted in relevant information about the displacements of the instantaneous center of rotation at the human knee joint.

  6. Hierarchical multifractal representation of symbolic sequences and application to human chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provata, A.; Katsaloulis, P.

    2010-02-01

    The two-dimensional density correlation matrix is constructed for symbolic sequences using contiguous segments of arbitrary size. The multifractal spectrum obtained from this matrix motif is shown to characterize the correlations in the symbolic sequences. This method is applied to entire human chromosomes, shuffled human chromosomes, reconstructed human genomic sequences and to artificial random sequences. It is shown that all human chromosomes have common characteristics in their multifractal spectrum and deviate substantially from random and uncorrelated sequences of the same size. Small deviations are observed between the longer and the shorter chromosomes, especially for the higher (in absolute values) statistical moments. The correlations are crucial for the form of the multifractal spectrum; surrogate shuffled chromosomes present randomlike spectrum, distinctly different from the actual chromosomes. Analytical approaches based on hierarchical superposition of tensor products show that retaining pair correlations in the sequences leads to a closer representation of the genomic multifractal spectra, especially in the region of negative exponents, due to the underrepresentation of various functional units (such as the cytosine-guanine CG combination and its complementary GC complex). Retaining higher-order correlations in the construction of the tensor products is a way to approach closer the structure of the multifractal spectra of the actual genomic sequences. This hierarchical approach is generic and is applicable to other correlated symbolic sequences.

  7. The Human Behavioral Ecology of Contemporary World Issues : Applications to Public Policy and International Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Bram; Rende Taylor, Lisa

    2007-09-01

    Human behavioral ecology (HBE) began as an attempt to explain human economic, reproductive, and social behavior using neodarwinian theory in concert with theory from ecology and economics, and ethnographic methods. HBE has addressed subsistence decision-making, cooperation, life history trade-offs, parental investment, mate choice, and marriage strategies among hunter-gatherers, herders, peasants, and wage earners in rural and urban settings throughout the world. Despite our rich insights into human behavior, HBE has very rarely been used as a tool to help the people with whom we work. This article introduces a special issue of Human Nature which explores the application of HBE to significant world issues through the design and critique of public policy and international development projects. The articles by Tucker, Shenk, Leonetti et al., and Neil were presented at the 104th annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) in Washington, D.C., in December 2005, in the first organized session of the nascent Evolutionary Anthropology Section (EAS). We conclude this introduction by summarizing some theoretical challenges to applying HBE, and ways in which evolutionary anthropologists can contribute to solving tough world issues.

  8. Genetic recombination pathways and their application for genome modification of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Mikko; Tuuri, Timo; Savilahti, Harri

    2010-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells derived from early human embryo and retain a potential to differentiate into all adult cell types. They provide vast opportunities in cell replacement therapies and are expected to become significant tools in drug discovery as well as in the studies of cellular and developmental functions of human genes. The progress in applying different types of DNA recombination reactions for genome modification in a variety of eukaryotic cell types has provided means to utilize recombination-based strategies also in human embryonic stem cells. Homologous recombination-based methods, particularly those utilizing extended homologous regions and those employing zinc finger nucleases to boost genomic integration, have shown their usefulness in efficient genome modification. Site-specific recombination systems are potent genome modifiers, and they can be used to integrate DNA into loci that contain an appropriate recombination signal sequence, either naturally occurring or suitably pre-engineered. Non-homologous recombination can be used to generate random integrations in genomes relatively effortlessly, albeit with a moderate efficiency and precision. DNA transposition-based strategies offer substantially more efficient random strategies and provide means to generate single-copy insertions, thus potentiating the generation of genome-wide insertion libraries applicable in genetic screens.

  9. Expandable and Rapidly Differentiating Human Induced Neural Stem Cell Lines for Multiple Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana M. Cairns

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Limited availability of human neurons poses a significant barrier to progress in biological and preclinical studies of the human nervous system. Current stem cell-based approaches of neuron generation are still hindered by prolonged culture requirements, protocol complexity, and variability in neuronal differentiation. Here we establish stable human induced neural stem cell (hiNSC lines through the direct reprogramming of neonatal fibroblasts and adult adipose-derived stem cells. These hiNSCs can be passaged indefinitely and cryopreserved as colonies. Independently of media composition, hiNSCs robustly differentiate into TUJ1-positive neurons within 4 days, making them ideal for innervated co-cultures. In vivo, hiNSCs migrate, engraft, and contribute to both central and peripheral nervous systems. Lastly, we demonstrate utility of hiNSCs in a 3D human brain model. This method provides a valuable interdisciplinary tool that could be used to develop drug screening applications as well as patient-specific disease models related to disorders of innervation and the brain.

  10. Targeted Application of Human Genetic Variation Can Improve Red Blood Cell Production from Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giani, Felix C; Fiorini, Claudia; Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ludwig, Leif S; Salem, Rany M; Jobaliya, Chintan D; Regan, Stephanie N; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Liang, Ge; Steinberg-Shemer, Orna; Guo, Michael H; Esko, Tõnu; Tong, Wei; Brugnara, Carlo; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Weiss, Mitchell J; Zon, Leonard I; Chou, Stella T; French, Deborah L; Musunuru, Kiran; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-01-07

    Multipotent and pluripotent stem cells are potential sources for cell and tissue replacement therapies. For example, stem cell-derived red blood cells (RBCs) are a potential alternative to donated blood, but yield and quality remain a challenge. Here, we show that application of insight from human population genetic studies can enhance RBC production from stem cells. The SH2B3 gene encodes a negative regulator of cytokine signaling and naturally occurring loss-of-function variants in this gene increase RBC counts in vivo. Targeted suppression of SH2B3 in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells enhanced the maturation and overall yield of in-vitro-derived RBCs. Moreover, inactivation of SH2B3 by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells allowed enhanced erythroid cell expansion with preserved differentiation. Our findings therefore highlight the potential for combining human genome variation studies with genome editing approaches to improve cell and tissue production for regenerative medicine.

  11. Human – Computer Systems Interaction Backgrounds and Applications 2 Part 1

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikowski, Juliusz; Mroczek, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The main contemporary human-system interaction (H-SI) problems consist in design and/or improvement of the tools for effective exchange of information between individual humans or human groups and technical systems created for humans aiding in reaching their vital goals. This book is a second issue in a series devoted to the novel in H-SI results and contributions reached for the last years by many research groups in European and extra-European countries. The preliminary (usually shortened) versions of the chapters  were presented as conference papers at the 3rd International Conference on H-SI held in Rzeszow, Poland, in 2010. A  large number of valuable papers  selected for publication caused a necessity to publish the book in two volumes. The given, 1st Volume  consists of sections devoted to: I. Decision Supporting Systems, II. Distributed Knowledge Bases and WEB Systems and III. Impaired Persons  Aiding Systems. The decision supporting systems concern various application areas, like enterprises mana...

  12. Adapting Human Reliability Analysis from Nuclear Power to Oil and Gas Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-09-01

    ABSTRACT: Human reliability analysis (HRA), as currently used in risk assessments, largely derives its methods and guidance from application in the nuclear energy domain. While there are many similarities be-tween nuclear energy and other safety critical domains such as oil and gas, there remain clear differences. This paper provides an overview of HRA state of the practice in nuclear energy and then describes areas where refinements to the methods may be necessary to capture the operational context of oil and gas. Many key distinctions important to nuclear energy HRA such as Level 1 vs. Level 2 analysis may prove insignifi-cant for oil and gas applications. On the other hand, existing HRA methods may not be sensitive enough to factors like the extensive use of digital controls in oil and gas. This paper provides an overview of these con-siderations to assist in the adaptation of existing nuclear-centered HRA methods to the petroleum sector.

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Lactoferrin-Related Peptides and Applications in Human and Veterinary Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascia Bruni

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs represent a vast array of molecules produced by virtually all living organisms as natural barriers against infection. Among AMP sources, an interesting class regards the food-derived bioactive agents. The whey protein lactoferrin (Lf is an iron-binding glycoprotein that plays a significant role in the innate immune system, and is considered as an important host defense molecule. In search for novel antimicrobial agents, Lf offers a new source with potential pharmaceutical applications. The Lf-derived peptides Lf(1–11, lactoferricin (Lfcin and lactoferrampin exhibit interesting and more potent antimicrobial actions than intact protein. Particularly, Lfcin has demonstrated strong antibacterial, anti-fungal and antiparasitic activity with promising applications both in human and veterinary diseases (from ocular infections to osteo-articular, gastrointestinal and dermatological diseases.

  14. Computational Modeling of Human Metabolism and Its Application to Systems Biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurich, Maike K; Thiele, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Modern high-throughput techniques offer immense opportunities to investigate whole-systems behavior, such as those underlying human diseases. However, the complexity of the data presents challenges in interpretation, and new avenues are needed to address the complexity of both diseases and data. Constraint-based modeling is one formalism applied in systems biology. It relies on a genome-scale reconstruction that captures extensive biochemical knowledge regarding an organism. The human genome-scale metabolic reconstruction is increasingly used to understand normal cellular and disease states because metabolism is an important factor in many human diseases. The application of human genome-scale reconstruction ranges from mere querying of the model as a knowledge base to studies that take advantage of the model's topology and, most notably, to functional predictions based on cell- and condition-specific metabolic models built based on omics data.An increasing number and diversity of biomedical questions are being addressed using constraint-based modeling and metabolic models. One of the most successful biomedical applications to date is cancer metabolism, but constraint-based modeling also holds great potential for inborn errors of metabolism or obesity. In addition, it offers great prospects for individualized approaches to diagnostics and the design of disease prevention and intervention strategies. Metabolic models support this endeavor by providing easy access to complex high-throughput datasets. Personalized metabolic models have been introduced. Finally, constraint-based modeling can be used to model whole-body metabolism, which will enable the elucidation of metabolic interactions between organs and disturbances of these interactions as either causes or consequence of metabolic diseases. This chapter introduces constraint-based modeling and describes some of its contributions to systems biomedicine.

  15. Application of the Stephan et al. Chest Radiograph Comparison Method to Decomposed Human Remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Mariyam I; Hefner, Joseph T; Markey, Michael A

    2017-09-01

    This manuscript describes the use of comparative radiography of the chest to facilitate positive identification of human remains in advanced stages of decomposition. The method reported by Stephan et al. for positive identification of dry, disarticulated skeletal elements was used on semifleshed, decomposing remains. Positive identification was established through multiple points of concordance observed in radiographs of the left and right clavicles and the C5-T1 vertebrae. This case study demonstrates the applicability of the Stephan et al.'s method in cases involving decomposing remains. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. Assessing the Safety of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells and Their Derivatives for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W. Andrews

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells may acquire genetic and epigenetic variants during culture following their derivation. At a conference organized by the International Stem Cell Initiative, and held at The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, Maine, October 2016, participants discussed how the appearance of such variants can be monitored and minimized and, crucially, how their significance for the safety of therapeutic applications of these cells can be assessed. A strong recommendation from the meeting was that an international advisory group should be set up to review the genetic and epigenetic changes observed in human pluripotent stem cell lines and establish a framework for evaluating the risks that they may pose for clinical use.

  17. Application of next generation sequencing to human gene fusion detection: computational tools, features and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingguo; Xia, Junfeng; Jia, Peilin; Pao, William; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-07-01

    Gene fusions are important genomic events in human cancer because their fusion gene products can drive the development of cancer and thus are potential prognostic tools or therapeutic targets in anti-cancer treatment. Major advancements have been made in computational approaches for fusion gene discovery over the past 3 years due to improvements and widespread applications of high-throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. To identify fusions from NGS data, existing methods typically leverage the strengths of both sequencing technologies and computational strategies. In this article, we review the NGS and computational features of existing methods for fusion gene detection and suggest directions for future development.

  18. The application of Shari’ah and international human rights law in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rodiman, Abdulaziz

    2013-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University The present dissertation provides an analytical and comparative study of the application of Islamic law (Shari’ah) and international human rights law in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. It provides an analysis of the sources of Islamic law as well as the sources of international law to set the background for analysis and defines the nature of both laws. It also tackles the subject of the domes...

  19. Human-Computer Interaction Handbook Fundamentals, Evolving Technologies, and Emerging Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jacko, Julie A

    2012-01-01

    The third edition of a groundbreaking reference, The Human--Computer Interaction Handbook: Fundamentals, Evolving Technologies, and Emerging Applications raises the bar for handbooks in this field. It is the largest, most complete compilation of HCI theories, principles, advances, case studies, and more that exist within a single volume. The book captures the current and emerging sub-disciplines within HCI related to research, development, and practice that continue to advance at an astonishing rate. It features cutting-edge advances to the scientific knowledge base as well as visionary perspe

  20. On the dynamics of chain systems. [applications in manipulator and human body models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, R. L.; Passerello, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    A computer-oriented method for obtaining dynamical equations of motion for chain systems is presented. A chain system is defined as an arbitrarily assembled set of rigid bodies such that adjoining bodies have at least one common point and such that closed loops are not formed. The equations of motion are developed through the use of Lagrange's form of d'Alembert's principle. The method and procedure is illustrated with an elementary study of a tripod space manipulator. The method is designed for application with systems such as human body models, chains and cables, and dynamic finite-segment models.

  1. A Class of Selenocentric Retrograde Orbits With Innovative Applications to Human Lunar Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Daniel R.; Lester, Daniel F.; Thronson, Harley A.; Barbee, Brent

    2014-01-01

    Selenocentric distant retrograde orbits with radii from approx. 12,500 km to approx. 25,000 km are assessed for stability and for suitability as crewed command and control infrastructure locations in support of telerobotic lunar surface operations and interplanetary human transport. Such orbits enable consistent transits to and from Earth at virtually any time if they are coplanar with the Moon's geocentric orbit. They possess multiple attributes and applications distinct from NASA's proposed destination orbit for a redirected asteroid about 70,000 km from the Moon.

  2. An interactive web application for the dissemination of human systems immunology data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speake, Cate; Presnell, Scott; Domico, Kelly; Zeitner, Brad; Bjork, Anna; Anderson, David; Mason, Michael J; Whalen, Elizabeth; Vargas, Olivia; Popov, Dimitry; Rinchai, Darawan; Jourde-Chiche, Noemie; Chiche, Laurent; Quinn, Charlie; Chaussabel, Damien

    2015-06-19

    Systems immunology approaches have proven invaluable in translational research settings. The current rate at which large-scale datasets are generated presents unique challenges and opportunities. Mining aggregates of these datasets could accelerate the pace of discovery, but new solutions are needed to integrate the heterogeneous data types with the contextual information that is necessary for interpretation. In addition, enabling tools and technologies facilitating investigators' interaction with large-scale datasets must be developed in order to promote insight and foster knowledge discovery. State of the art application programming was employed to develop an interactive web application for browsing and visualizing large and complex datasets. A collection of human immune transcriptome datasets were loaded alongside contextual information about the samples. We provide a resource enabling interactive query and navigation of transcriptome datasets relevant to human immunology research. Detailed information about studies and samples are displayed dynamically; if desired the associated data can be downloaded. Custom interactive visualizations of the data can be shared via email or social media. This application can be used to browse context-rich systems-scale data within and across systems immunology studies. This resource is publicly available online at [Gene Expression Browser Landing Page ( https://gxb.benaroyaresearch.org/dm3/landing.gsp )]. The source code is also available openly [Gene Expression Browser Source Code ( https://github.com/BenaroyaResearch/gxbrowser )]. We have developed a data browsing and visualization application capable of navigating increasingly large and complex datasets generated in the context of immunological studies. This intuitive tool ensures that, whether taken individually or as a whole, such datasets generated at great effort and expense remain interpretable and a ready source of insight for years to come.

  3. [The changes of complement activities in sera of mice after subcutaneous administration of beryllium chloride].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, T; Sakaguchi, S; Nakamura, I; Kudo, Y

    1996-02-01

    We studied changes of the complement pathway activities and the content of C3 in sera of mice, administered BeCl2 (containing 5 micrograms of Be per mouse) or CuCl2 (containing 5 micrograms of Cu per mouse) by a single subcutaneous injection. The value of the classical complement pathway activity (CH50) of the Be group 3 days after administration was significantly higher than that of the control group (P < 0.001). It was significantly lower than in the control group after 7 days (P < 0.001). On the other hand, the CH50 value of the Cu group 3 hr after administration tended to increase, however, it was significantly lower than in the control group after 7 days (P < 0.01). The change of the alternative complement pathway activity (ACH50) value of the Be group was similar to the change of the CH50 value of the group. The ACH50 value of the Cu group 3 days after administration tended to increase but it was the same as the ACH50 value of the control group after 7 days. The C3 contents of both the Be and Cu groups 3 days after administration were significantly higher than in the control group (P < 0.001). The aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity of the Be group 7 days after administration was significantly higher than that of the control group (P < 0.01). By contrast, AST activity of the Cu group 3 hr after administration was significantly higher than in the control group (P < 0.05). The value of the alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity of the Be group was low (P < 0.01), but that of the Cu group was high (P < 0.05), 3 hr after administration. These values of both groups after 7 days, however, were significantly higher than in the control group (P < 0.05). The AST/ALT ratio in mice was very high at 3 hr, and it remained high by 7 days after Be injection. On the other hand, the ratio of the Cu group was almost constant for 7 days after Cu injection. Thus, these values changed with relative expedition after Be injection. Therefore, we confirmed that measurements of

  4. Targeted MS Assay Predicting Tamoxifen Resistance in Estrogen-Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer Tissues and Sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Tommaso; Kuhn, Erik; Dekker, Lennard J; Stingl, Christoph; Braakman, Rene B H; Opdam, Mark; Linn, Sabine C; Sweep, Fred C G J; Span, Paul N; Luider, Theo M; Foekens, John A; Martens, John W M; Carr, Steven A; Umar, Arzu

    2016-04-01

    We recently reported on the development of a 4-protein-based classifier (PDCD4, CGN, G3BP2, and OCIAD1) capable of predicting outcome to tamoxifen treatment in recurrent, estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer based on high-resolution MS data. A precise and high-throughput assay to measure these proteins in a multiplexed, targeted fashion would be favorable to measure large numbers of patient samples to move these findings toward a clinical setting. By coupling immunoprecipitation to multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS and stable isotope dilution, we developed a high-precision assay to measure the 4-protein signature in 38 primary breast cancer whole tissue lysates (WTLs). Furthermore, we evaluated the presence and patient stratification capabilities of our signature in an independent set of 24 matched (pre- and post-therapy) sera. We compared the performance of immuno-MRM (iMRM) with direct MRM in the absence of fractionation and shotgun proteomics in combination with label-free quantification (LFQ) on both WTL and laser capture microdissected (LCM) tissues. Measurement of the 4-proteins by iMRM showed not only higher accuracy in measuring proteotypic peptides (Spearman r: 0.74 to 0.93) when compared with MRM (Spearman r: 0.0 to 0.76) but also significantly discriminated patient groups based on treatment outcome (hazard ratio [HR]: 10.96; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.33 to 27.76; Log-rank P < 0.001) when compared with LCM (HR: 2.85; 95% CI: 1.24 to 6.54; Log-rank P = 0.013) and WTL (HR: 1.16; 95% CI: 0.57 to 2.33; Log-rank P = 0.680) LFQ-based predictors. Serum sample analysis by iMRM confirmed the detection of the four proteins in these samples. We hereby report that iMRM outperformed regular MRM, confirmed our previous high-resolution MS results in tumor tissues, and has shown that the 4-protein signature is measurable in serum samples.

  5. miRNA Signatures in Sera of Patients with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Ilaria C.; Norbis, Luca; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Bosu, Roberta; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Codecasa, Luigi R.; Goletti, Delia; Matteelli, Alberto; Ntinginya, Elias N.; Aloi, Francesco; Heinrich, Norbert; Reither, Klaus; Cirillo, Daniela M.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies showed that assessing levels of specific circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) is a non-invasive, rapid, and accurate method for diagnosing diseases or detecting alterations in physiological conditions. We aimed to identify a serum miRNA signature to be used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). To account for variations due to the genetic makeup, we enrolled adults from two study settings in Europe and Africa. The following categories of subjects were considered: healthy (H), active pulmonary TB (PTB), active pulmonary TB, HIV co-infected (PTB/HIV), latent TB infection (LTBI), other pulmonary infections (OPI), and active extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB). Sera from 10 subjects of the same category were pooled and, after total RNA extraction, screened for miRNA levels by TaqMan low-density arrays. After identification of “relevant miRNAs”, we refined the serum miRNA signature discriminating between H and PTB on individual subjects. Signatures were analyzed for their diagnostic performances using a multivariate logistic model and a Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) model. A leave-one-out-cross-validation (LOOCV) approach was adopted for assessing how both models could perform in practice. The analysis on pooled specimens identified selected miRNAs as discriminatory for the categories analyzed. On individual serum samples, we showed that 15 miRNAs serve as signature for H and PTB categories with a diagnostic accuracy of 82% (CI 70.2–90.0), and 77% (CI 64.2–85.9) in a RVM and a logistic classification model, respectively. Considering the different ethnicity, by selecting the specific signature for the European group (10 miRNAs) the diagnostic accuracy increased up to 83% (CI 68.1–92.1), and 81% (65.0–90.3), respectively. The African-specific signature (12 miRNAs) increased the diagnostic accuracy up to 95% (CI 76.4–99.1), and 100% (83.9–100.0), respectively. Serum miRNA signatures represent an interesting source of biomarkers for TB disease with the

  6. miRNA signatures in sera of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Miotto

    Full Text Available Several studies showed that assessing levels of specific circulating microRNAs (miRNAs is a non-invasive, rapid, and accurate method for diagnosing diseases or detecting alterations in physiological conditions. We aimed to identify a serum miRNA signature to be used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB. To account for variations due to the genetic makeup, we enrolled adults from two study settings in Europe and Africa. The following categories of subjects were considered: healthy (H, active pulmonary TB (PTB, active pulmonary TB, HIV co-infected (PTB/HIV, latent TB infection (LTBI, other pulmonary infections (OPI, and active extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB. Sera from 10 subjects of the same category were pooled and, after total RNA extraction, screened for miRNA levels by TaqMan low-density arrays. After identification of "relevant miRNAs", we refined the serum miRNA signature discriminating between H and PTB on individual subjects. Signatures were analyzed for their diagnostic performances using a multivariate logistic model and a Relevance Vector Machine (RVM model. A leave-one-out-cross-validation (LOOCV approach was adopted for assessing how both models could perform in practice. The analysis on pooled specimens identified selected miRNAs as discriminatory for the categories analyzed. On individual serum samples, we showed that 15 miRNAs serve as signature for H and PTB categories with a diagnostic accuracy of 82% (CI 70.2-90.0, and 77% (CI 64.2-85.9 in a RVM and a logistic classification model, respectively. Considering the different ethnicity, by selecting the specific signature for the European group (10 miRNAs the diagnostic accuracy increased up to 83% (CI 68.1-92.1, and 81% (65.0-90.3, respectively. The African-specific signature (12 miRNAs increased the diagnostic accuracy up to 95% (CI 76.4-99.1, and 100% (83.9-100.0, respectively. Serum miRNA signatures represent an interesting source of biomarkers for TB disease with the potential to

  7. Isolation, cryopreservation and culture of human amnion epithelial cells for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean V; Kidyoor, Amritha; Reid, Tanya; Atala, Anthony; Wallace, Euan M; Lim, Rebecca

    2014-12-21

    Human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) derived from term or pre-term amnion membranes have attracted attention from researchers and clinicians as a potential source of cells for regenerative medicine. The reason for this interest is evidence that these cells have highly multipotent differentiation ability, low immunogenicity, and anti-inflammatory functions. These properties have prompted researchers to investigate the potential of hAECs to be used to treat a variety of diseases and disorders in pre-clinical animal studies with much success. hAECs have found widespread application for the treatment of a range of diseases and disorders. Potential clinical applications of hAECs include the treatment of stroke, multiple sclerosis, liver disease, diabetes and chronic and acute lung diseases. Progressing from pre-clinical animal studies into clinical trials requires a higher standard of quality control and safety for cell therapy products. For safety and quality control considerations, it is preferred that cell isolation protocols use animal product-free reagents. We have developed protocols to allow researchers to isolate, cryopreserve and culture hAECs using animal product-free reagents. The advantage of this method is that these cells can be isolated, characterized, cryopreserved and cultured without the risk of delivering potentially harmful animal pathogens to humans, while maintaining suitable cell yields, viabilities and growth potential. For researchers moving from pre-clinical animal studies to clinical trials, these methodologies will greatly accelerate regulatory approval, decrease risks and improve the quality of their therapeutic cell population.

  8. High-definition fiber tractography of the human brain: neuroanatomical validation and neurosurgical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Pathak, Sudhir; Engh, Johnathan; Jarbo, Kevin; Verstynen, Timothy; Yeh, Fang-Cheng; Wang, Yibao; Mintz, Arlan; Boada, Fernando; Schneider, Walter; Friedlander, Robert

    2012-08-01

    High-definition fiber tracking (HDFT) is a novel combination of processing, reconstruction, and tractography methods that can track white matter fibers from cortex, through complex fiber crossings, to cortical and subcortical targets with subvoxel resolution. To perform neuroanatomical validation of HDFT and to investigate its neurosurgical applications. Six neurologically healthy adults and 36 patients with brain lesions were studied. Diffusion spectrum imaging data were reconstructed with a Generalized Q-Ball Imaging approach. Fiber dissection studies were performed in 20 human brains, and selected dissection results were compared with tractography. HDFT provides accurate replication of known neuroanatomical features such as the gyral and sulcal folding patterns, the characteristic shape of the claustrum, the segmentation of the thalamic nuclei, the decussation of the superior cerebellar peduncle, the multiple fiber crossing at the centrum semiovale, the complex angulation of the optic radiations, the terminal arborization of the arcuate tract, and the cortical segmentation of the dorsal Broca area. From a clinical perspective, we show that HDFT provides accurate structural connectivity studies in patients with intracerebral lesions, allowing qualitative and quantitative white matter damage assessment, aiding in understanding lesional patterns of white matter structural injury, and facilitating innovative neurosurgical applications. High-grade gliomas produce significant disruption of fibers, and low-grade gliomas cause fiber displacement. Cavernomas cause both displacement and disruption of fibers. Our HDFT approach provides an accurate reconstruction of white matter fiber tracts with unprecedented detail in both the normal and pathological human brain. Further studies to validate the clinical findings are needed.

  9. User Interface Design, Standards & Guidelines for Web Applications Based on Human Personality Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasthuri Subaramaniam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the standards and guidelines of user interface features in web-based applications for the different personality types of people. An overview of human computer interaction and human  personality types is described. LEONARD, Let’s Explore our personality type based on Openness (O, Neutral (N, Analytical (A, Relational (R and Decisive (D is the model used to determine the different personality types for this study. The purpose is to define user personality profiles and to establish guidelines for the graphical user interface. The personality inventory and a user interface questionnaire were administered to university students. Interview sessions were also conducted and parts of the interviews with the university students were used to validate the results obtained from the questionnaires. The analysis of the students' personality types identified five main groups. The results suggest that users do have definable expectations concerning the features of web applications. This profile served as basis for the guidelines of web features for the graphical user interface design for the particular user groups.

  10. Application of Fourier Domain OCT Imaging Technology to the Anterior Segment of the Human Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtkowski, Maciej; Marcos, Susana; Ortiz, Sergio; Grulkowski, Ireneusz

    The anterior segment is the front part of the human eye, which forms the optical system and hence directly impacts vision. Traumatic or pathological changes in the anterior segment may lead to vision loss and, in some cases, even blindness. Since the eighteenth century, optical instrumentation for measuring and imaging the anterior segment of the human eye has been developing along with modern ophthalmology. The application of OCT to the anterior segment imaging is particularly of interest, since this could potentially provide substantial complementary information regarding the large-scale architecture of the cornea and the crystalline lens, or on small portions of tissue imaged with high spatial resolutions comparable to regular microscopy. Especially an introduction of Fourier domain detection in OCT has opened new frontiers in OCT ophthalmic applications. The resultant substantial speed improvement enables rapid image acquisition, helping to reduce artifacts due to patient motion. Thus, it is currently possible to perform high-speed, in vivo, three-dimensional volumetric imaging over large scales within a reasonable time limit and without reducing system sensitivity. This chapter describes the state-of the art OCT technology dedicated to anterior segment imaging and indicates all important parameters which are required for optimization of the performance of OCT instrument.

  11. The Use of the Matrix Method for the Study of Human Motion:Theory and Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-Ming Li; Jesse A. Fisk; Savio L-Y. Woo

    2003-01-01

    Kinematics has been successfully used to describe body motion without reference to the kinetics (or forces causing the motion). In this article, both the theory and applications of the matrix method are provided to describe complex human motion. After the definition of a Cartesian coordinate frame is introduced, the description of transformations between multiple coordinate frames is given; the decomposition of a transformation matrix into anatomical joint motion parameters (e.g. Euler angles) is then explained. The advantages of the matrix method are illustrated by three examples related to biomechanical studies. The first describes a reaching and grasping task in which matrix transformations are applied to position the hand with respect to an object during grasping. The second example demonstrates the utility of the matrix method in revealing the coupling motion of the wrist between flexion-extension and radial-ulnar deviation. The last example highlights the indispensable use of the matrix method for the study of knee biomechanics, including the description of knee joint kinematics during functional activities and determination of in-situ ligament forces using robotic technology, which has advanced our understanding of the functions of the cruciate ligaments to knee joint kinematics. It is hoped that the theoretical development and biomechanical application examples will help the readers apply the matrix method to research problems related to human motion.

  12. Human health risk assessment of nitrosamines and nitramines for potential application in CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravnum, S; Rundén-Pran, E; Fjellsbø, L M; Dusinska, M

    2014-07-01

    Emission and accumulation of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere exert an environmental and climate change challenge. An attempt to deal with this challenge is made at Mongstad by application of amines for CO2 capture and storage (CO2 capture Mongstad (CCM) project). As part of the CO2 capture process, nitrosamines and nitramines may be emitted. Toxicological testing of nitrosamines and nitramines indicate a genotoxic potential of these substances. Here we present a risk characterization and assessment for five nitrosamines (N-Nitrosodi-methylamine (NDMA) N-Nitrosodi-ethylamine (NDEA), N-Nitroso-morpholine (NNM), N-Nitroso-piperidine (NPIP), and Dinitroso-piperazine (DNP)) and two nitramines (N-Methyl-nitramine (NTMA), Dimethyl-nitramine (NDTMA)), which are potentially emitted from the CO2 capture plant (CCP). Human health risk assessment of genotoxic non-threshold substances is a heavily debated topic, and no consensus methodology exists internationally. Extrapolation modeling from high-dose animal exposures to low-dose human exposures can be crucial for the final risk calculation. In the work presented here, different extrapolation models are discussed, and suggestions on applications are given. Then, preferred methods for calculating derived minimal effect level (DMEL) are presented with the selected nitrosamines and nitramines.

  13. Technical guide for applications of gene expression profiling in human health risk assessment of environmental chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon-Lacombe, Julie A; Moffat, Ivy D; Deveau, Michelle; Husain, Mainul; Auerbach, Scott; Krewski, Daniel; Thomas, Russell S; Bushel, Pierre R; Williams, Andrew; Yauk, Carole L

    2015-07-01

    Toxicogenomics promises to be an important part of future human health risk assessment of environmental chemicals. The application of gene expression profiles (e.g., for hazard identification, chemical prioritization, chemical grouping, mode of action discovery, and quantitative analysis of response) is growing in the literature, but their use in formal risk assessment by regulatory agencies is relatively infrequent. Although additional validations for specific applications are required, gene expression data can be of immediate use for increasing confidence in chemical evaluations. We believe that a primary reason for the current lack of integration is the limited practical guidance available for risk assessment specialists with limited experience in genomics. The present manuscript provides basic information on gene expression profiling, along with guidance on evaluating the quality of genomic experiments and data, and interpretation of results presented in the form of heat maps, pathway analyses and other common approaches. Moreover, potential ways to integrate information from gene expression experiments into current risk assessment are presented using published studies as examples. The primary objective of this work is to facilitate integration of gene expression data into human health risk assessments of environmental chemicals. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficient blastomere biopsy for mouse embryo splitting for future applications in human assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illmensee, K; Kaskar, K; Zavos, P M

    2005-12-01

    The objective of the current study was to establish a safe, efficient biopsy procedure for embryo splitting using the mouse model for future applications in human assisted reproduction. From mouse embryos at the 2-, 4-, 6- and 8-cell stage, half the number of blastomeres were microsurgically biopsied and transferred into empty mouse zonae pellucidae. Twin embryonic development was monitored during in-vitro culture. Blastocyst developmental rate using 2-, 4-, 6-, and 8-cell splitting was 74.4, 75.0, 66.7 and 38.4 respectively, with corresponding hatching rates of 94.9, 97.5, 92.7 and 83.8%. Blastocysts from 2-, 4-, and 6-cell splitting resulted in elevated hatching rates compared with non-operated blastocysts (87.5%), due to the Tyrode-assisted hatching effect. Blastocyst morphology was superior from 2- and 4-cell splitting when compared with 6- and 8-cell splitting. Furthermore, outgrowth of twin blastocysts from 2- and 4-cell splitting showed well-developed colonies with trophoblast cells and clusters of ICM cells, whereas those obtained from 6- and 8-cell splitting frequently formed small-sized colonies. Due to the high twinning success rate obtained under the experimental conditions employed in this study, it appears that with further modifications and proper safeguards, such embryo splitting efforts could have potential applications in humans.

  15. Designing Mobile Applications for Emergency Response: Citizens Acting as Human Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Marco; Onorati, Teresa; Aedo, Ignacio; Diaz, Paloma

    2016-03-19

    When an emergency occurs, citizens can be a helpful support for the operation centers involved in the response activities. As witnesses to a crisis, they initially can share updated and detailed information about what is going on. Moreover, thanks to the current technological evolution people are able to quickly and easily gather rich information and transmit it through different communication channels. Indeed, modern mobile devices embed several sensors such as GPS receivers, Wi-Fi, accelerometers or cameras that can transform users into well-equipped human sensors. For these reasons, emergency organizations and small and medium enterprises have demonstrated a growing interest in developing smart applications for reporting any exceptional circumstances. In this paper, we present a practical study about this kind of applications for identifying both limitations and common features. Based on a study of relevant existent contributions in this area and our personal direct experience in developing and evaluating emergency management solutions, our aim is to propose several findings about how to design effective and efficient mobile emergency notification applications. For this purpose we have exploited the basic sensors of modern mobile devices and the users' aptitude for using them. The evaluation consists of a practical and a theoretical part. In the practical part, we have simulated a traffic accident as closely as possible to a real scenario, with a victim lying on the ground near a car in the middle of a street. For the theoretical part, we have interviewed some emergency experts for collecting their opinions about the utility of the proposed solution. Results from this evaluation phase confirm the positive impact that EN application have for both operators' and citizens' perspective. Moreover, we collected several findings useful for future design challenges in the same area, as shown in the final redesign of the proposed application.

  16. Designing Mobile Applications for Emergency Response: Citizens Acting as Human Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Romano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available When an emergency occurs, citizens can be a helpful support for the operation centers involved in the response activities. As witnesses to a crisis, they initially can share updated and detailed information about what is going on. Moreover, thanks to the current technological evolution people are able to quickly and easily gather rich information and transmit it through different communication channels. Indeed, modern mobile devices embed several sensors such as GPS receivers, Wi-Fi, accelerometers or cameras that can transform users into well-equipped human sensors. For these reasons, emergency organizations and small and medium enterprises have demonstrated a growing interest in developing smart applications for reporting any exceptional circumstances. In this paper, we present a practical study about this kind of applications for identifying both limitations and common features. Based on a study of relevant existent contributions in this area and our personal direct experience in developing and evaluating emergency management solutions, our aim is to propose several findings about how to design effective and efficient mobile emergency notification applications. For this purpose we have exploited the basic sensors of modern mobile devices and the users’ aptitude for using them. The evaluation consists of a practical and a theoretical part. In the practical part, we have simulated a traffic accident as closely as possible to a real scenario, with a victim lying on the ground near a car in the middle of a street. For the theoretical part, we have interviewed some emergency experts for collecting their opinions about the utility of the proposed solution. Results from this evaluation phase confirm the positive impact that EN application have for both operators’ and citizens’ perspective. Moreover, we collected several findings useful for future design challenges in the same area, as shown in the final redesign of the proposed application.

  17. Application of human amniotic mesenchymal cells as an allogeneic transplantation cell source in bone regenerative therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuno, Hiroaki [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Yoshida, Toshiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nogami, Makiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Koike, Chika; Okabe, Motonori [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Noto, Zenko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Arai, Naoya; Noguchi, Makoto [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nikaido, Toshio, E-mail: tnikaido@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Autogenous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have therapeutic applications in bone regenerative therapy due to their pluripotency. However, the ability of MSCs to proliferate and differentiate varies between donors. Furthermore, alternative sources of MSCs are required for patients with contraindications to autogenous cell therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of mesenchymal cells from the human amniotic membrane (HAM) as a source of cells for allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. Cells that retained a proliferative capacity of more than 50 population doubling level were distinguished from other HAM cells as HAM{alpha} cells and induced to osteogenic status-their in vivo osteogenesis was subsequently investigated in rats. It was found that HAM{alpha} cells were spindle shaped and were positive for MSC markers and negative for hematopoietic stem cell markers. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition increased with osteogenic status of HAM{alpha} cells. The expression of osteocalcin mRNA was increased in HAM{alpha} cells cultured on calcium phosphate scaffolds. Moreover, xenografted HAM{alpha} cells remained viable and produced extracellular matrix for several weeks. Thus, this study suggests that human amniotic mesenchymal cells possess osteogenic differentiation potential and could be applied to allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human amniotic mesenchymal cells include cells (HAM{alpha} cells) that have the properties of MSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells have excellent osteogenic differentiation potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osteogenic differentiation ability of HAM{alpha} was amplified by calcium phosphate scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells can be applicable to allogeneic cell transplantation in bone regenerative therapy.

  18. Fluorescence properties of human teeth and dental calculus for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescent emission of human teeth and dental calculus is important for the esthetic rehabilitation of teeth, diagnosis of dental caries, and detection of dental calculus. The purposes of this review were to summarize the fluorescence and phosphorescence of human teeth by ambient ultraviolet (UV) light, to investigate the clinically relevant fluorescence measurement methods in dentistry, and to review the fluorescence of teeth and dental calculus by specific wavelength light. Dentine was three times more phosphorescent than enamel. When exposed to light sources containing UV components, the fluorescence of human teeth gives them the quality of vitality, and fluorescent emission with a peak of 440 nm is observed. Esthetic restorative materials should have fluorescence properties similar to those of natural teeth. Based on the fluorescence of teeth and restorative materials as determined with a spectrophotometer, a fluorescence parameter was defined. As to the fluorescence spectra by a specific wavelength, varied wavelengths were investigated for clinical applications, and several methods for the diagnosis of dental caries and the detection of dental calculus were developed. Since fluorescent properties of dental hard tissues have been used and would be expanded in diverse fields of clinical practice, these properties should be investigated further, embracing newly developed optical techniques.

  19. Fluorescence properties of human teeth and dental calculus for clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescent emission of human teeth and dental calculus is important for the esthetic rehabilitation of teeth, diagnosis of dental caries, and detection of dental calculus. The purposes of this review were to summarize the fluorescence and phosphorescence of human teeth by ambient ultraviolet (UV) light, to investigate the clinically relevant fluorescence measurement methods in dentistry, and to review the fluorescence of teeth and dental calculus by specific wavelength light. Dentine was three times more phosphorescent than enamel. When exposed to light sources containing UV components, the fluorescence of human teeth gives them the quality of vitality, and fluorescent emission with a peak of 440 nm is observed. Esthetic restorative materials should have fluorescence properties similar to those of natural teeth. Based on the fluorescence of teeth and restorative materials as determined with a spectrophotometer, a fluorescence parameter was defined. As to the fluorescence spectra by a specific wavelength, varied wavelengths were investigated for clinical applications, and several methods for the diagnosis of dental caries and the detection of dental calculus were developed. Since fluorescent properties of dental hard tissues have been used and would be expanded in diverse fields of clinical practice, these properties should be investigated further, embracing newly developed optical techniques.

  20. Hypothesis of human penile anatomy, erection hemodynamics and their clinical applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geng-Long Hsu

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To summarize recent advances in human penile anatomy, hemodynamics and their clinical applications. Methods:Using dissecting, light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy the fibroskeleton structure, penile venous vasculature,the relationship of the architecture between the skeletal and smooth muscles, and erection hemodynamics were studied on human cadaveric penises and clinical patients over a period of 10 years. Results: The tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosa is a bi-layered structure with inner circular and outer longitudinal collagen bundles. Although there is no bone in the human glans, a strong equivalent distal ligament acts as a trunk of the glans penis. A guaranteed method of local anesthesia for penile surgeries and a tunical surgery was developed accordingly. On the venous vasculature it is elucidated that a deep dorsal vein, a couple of cavernosal veins and two pairs of para-arterial veins are located between the Buck's fascia and the tunica albuginea. Furthermore, a hemodynamic study suggests that a fully rigid erection may depend upon the drainage veins as well, rather than just the intracavernosal smooth muscle. It is believed that penile venous surgery deserves another look, and that it may be meaningful if thoroughly and carefully performed. Accordingly, a penile venous surgery was developed. Conclusion: Using this new insight into penile anatomy and physiology, exact penile curvature correction, refined penile implants and promising penile venous surgery, as well as a venous patch, for treating Peyronie's deformity might be performed under pure local anesthesia on an outpatient basis.

  1. The validation and application of a finite element human head model for frontal skull fracture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharpour, Z; Baumgartner, D; Willinger, R; Graw, M; Peldschus, S

    2014-05-01

    Traumatic head injuries can result from vehicular accidents, sports, falls or assaults. The current advances in computational methods and the detailed finite element models of the human head provide a significant opportunity for biomechanical study of human head injuries. The biomechanical characteristics of the human head through head impact scenarios can be studied in detail by using the finite element models. Skull fracture is one of the most frequent occurring types of head injuries. The purpose of this study is to analyse the experimental head impacts on cadavers by means of the Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model (SUFEHM). The results of the numerical model and experimental data are compared for validation purpose. The finite element model has also been applied to predict the skull bone fracture in frontal impacts. The head model includes the scalp, the facial bone, the skull, the cerebral spinal fluid, the meninges, the cerebrum and the cerebellum. The model is used to simulate the experimental frontal head impact tests using a cylindrical padded impactor. Results of the computational simulation shows that the model correlated well with a number of experimental data and a global fracture pattern has been predicted well by the model. Therefore the presented numerical model could be used for reconstruction of head impacts in different impact conditions also the forensic application of the head model would provide a tool for investigation of the causes and mechanism of head injuries.

  2. Radio sterilized human ligaments and their clinical application;Ligamentos humanos radioesterilizados y su aplicacion clinica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna Z, D.; Reyes F, M. L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Diaz M, I.; Hernandez R, G., E-mail: daniel.luna@inin.gob.m [Centro Estatal de Trasplantes del Estado de Mexico, Pablo Sidar No. 602, Col. Universidad, 50130 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    The ligaments are human tissues that are used in the transplantation area. A ligament is an anatomical structure in band form, composed by resistant fibers that connect the tissues that unite the bones with the articulations. In an articulation, the ligaments allow and facilitate the movement inside the natural anatomical directions, while it restricts those movements that are anatomically abnormal, impeding lesions that could arise of this type of movements. The kneecap ligament is a very important tissue in the knee mobility and of walking in the human beings. This ligament can injure it because of automobile accidents, for sport lesions or illnesses, and in many cases the only form of recovering the knee movement is carried out a transplant with the purpose of replacing the damage ligament by allo gen kneecap ligament processed in specialized Tissue Banks where the tissue is sterilized with gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co at very low temperatures, obtaining high quality ligaments for clinical application in injured patients. The kneecap ligaments are processed in the Tissue Banks with a segment of kneecap bone, a segment of tibial bone, the contained ligament between both bones and in some cases a fraction of the quadriceps tendon. In this work is given a description of the selection method of the tissue that includes the donor's serologic control, the kneecap ligament processing in the Radio Sterilized Tissues Bank, its sterilization with gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co, also it is indicated like the clinical application of the allo gen ligament was realized in a hasty patient and whose previous crossed ligament was injured. Finally the results are presented from the tissue obtaining until the clinical application of it is, and in this case is observed a favorable initial evolution of the transplantation patient. (Author)

  3. Characterization and Reactivity of Broiler Chicken Sera to Selected Recombinant Campylobacter jejuni Chemotactic Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative rod bacterium, is the leading causative agent of human acute bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Consumption and handling of raw or undercooked poultry are regarded as a major source for human infection. Because bacterial chemotaxis guides microorganisms to c...

  4. Anti-hepatitis B virus X protein in sera is one of the markers of development of liver cirrhosis and liver cancer mediated by HBV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Wu, Lian-Ying; Zhang, Shuai; Qiu, Li-Yan; Li, Nan; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Xue-Zhi; Shan, Chang-Liang; Ye, Li-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays a crucial role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the significance of circulating antibody to hepatitis B virus X antigen (anti-HBx) in sera remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the titers of anti-HBx (IgG) in the sera from 173 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), 106 liver cirrhosis (LC), and 61 HCC by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Our data showed that the positive rates of anti-HBx were higher in sera of LC (40.6%) and HCC (34.4%) than those of CHB (10.4%), P HBV replication rather than a protective antibody. Thus, our findings reveal that circulating anti-HBx in sera is one of the markers of development of LC and HCC mediated by HBV.

  5. Development of a Compact Wireless Laplacian Electrode Module for Electromyograms and Its Human Interface Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Ichikawa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed a compact wireless Laplacian electrode module for electromyograms (EMGs. One of the advantages of the Laplacian electrode configuration is that EMGs obtained with it are expected to be sensitive to the firing of the muscle directly beneath the measurement site. The performance of the developed electrode module was investigated in two human interface applications: character-input interface and detection of finger movement during finger Braille typing. In the former application, the electrode module was combined with an EMG-mouse click converter circuit. In the latter, four electrode modules were used for detection of finger movements during finger Braille typing. Investigation on the character-input interface indicated that characters could be input stably by contraction of (a the masseter, (b trapezius, (c anterior tibialis and (d flexor carpi ulnaris muscles. This wide applicability is desirable when the interface is applied to persons with physical disabilities because the disability differs one to another. The investigation also demonstrated that the electrode module can work properly without any skin preparation. Finger movement detection experiments showed that each finger movement was more clearly detectable when comparing to EMGs recorded with conventional electrodes, suggesting that the Laplacian electrode module is more suitable for detecting the timing of finger movement during typing. This could be because the Laplacian configuration enables us to record EMGs just beneath the electrode. These results demonstrate the advantages of the Laplacian electrode module.

  6. Apoptosis induction in Jurkat cells and sCD95 levels in women's sera are related with the risk of developing cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravo-Cuellar Alejandro

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, there is clear evidence that apoptosis plays an important role in the development and progression of tumors. One of the best characterized apoptosis triggering systems is the CD95/Fas/APO-1 pathway; previous reports have demonstrated high levels of soluble CD95 (sCD95 in serum of patients with some types of cancer. Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. As a first step in an attempt to design a minimally invasive test to predict the risk of developing cervical cancer in patients with precancerous lesions, we used a simple assay based on the capacity of human serum to induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We evaluated the relationship between sCD95 levels and the ability to induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells in cervical cancer patients and controls. Methods Jurkat cells were exposed to serum from 63 women (20 healthy volunteers, 21 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade I [CIN 1] and 22 with cervical-uterine carcinoma. The apoptotic rate was measured by flow cytometry using Annexin-V-Fluos and Propidium Iodide as markers. Serum levels of sCD95 and soluble CD95 ligand (sCD95L were measured by ELISA kits. Results We found that serum from almost all healthy women induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells, while only fifty percent of the sera from women with CIN 1 induced cell death in Jurkat cells. Interestingly, only one serum sample from a patient with cervical-uterine cancer was able to induce apoptosis, the rest of the sera protected Jurkat cells from this killing. We were able to demonstrate that elimination of Jurkat cells was mediated by the CD95/Fas/Apo-1 apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, the serum levels of sCD95 measured by ELISA were significantly higher in women with cervical cancer. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that there is a strong correlation between low levels of sCD95 in serum of normal women and higher apoptosis induction in Jurkat cells. We suggest that an analysis of

  7. Molecular analysis of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O111:H- proteins which react with sera from patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, E; Paton, A W; Manning, P A; Paton, J C

    1998-04-01

    Western blot analysis was used to assess the reactivity of convalescent-phase sera from patients who were associated with an outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) caused by fermented sausage contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). The predominant STEC isolated from HUS patients belonged to serotype O111:H-, and reactivity to O111:H- whole-cell lysates, treated or untreated with proteinase K, was examined. As expected, all five serum samples demonstrated a marked anti-lipopolysaccharide response, but several protein bands were also immunoreactive, particularly one with an apparent size of 94 kDa. One convalescent-phase serum sample was subsequently used to screen an O111:H- cosmid bank and 2 of 900 cosmid clones were found to be positive, both of which contained a similar DNA insert. Western blot analysis of one of these clones identified three major immunoreactive protein bands of approximately 94, 70, and 50 kDa. An immune response to the three proteins was detectable with all five convalescent-phase serum samples but not with healthy human serum. Immunoreactive 94- and 50-kDa species were produced by a deletion derivative of the cosmid containing a 7-kb STEC DNA insert. Sequence analysis of this region indicated that it is part of the locus for enterocyte effacement, including the eaeA gene which encodes intimin. The deduced amino acid sequence of the O111:H- intimin was 88.6% identical to intimin from O157:H7 STEC, and the most divergent region was the 200 residues at the carboxyl terminus, which were only 75% identical. Such variation may be antigenically significant as serum from a HUS patient infected only with the O111:H- STEC reacted with intimin from an enteropathogenic E. coli O111 strain, as well as several other eaeA-positive STEC isolates, but not with an eaeA-positive STEC belonging to serotype O157:H-. Sera from two of the other HUS patients also failed to react with intimin from this latter strain. However, intimin

  8. Molecular Analysis of Shiga Toxigenic Escherichia coli O111:H− Proteins Which React with Sera from Patients with Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Elena; Paton, Adrienne W.; Manning, Paul A.; Paton, James C.

    1998-01-01

    Western blot analysis was used to assess the reactivity of convalescent-phase sera from patients who were associated with an outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) caused by fermented sausage contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). The predominant STEC isolated from HUS patients belonged to serotype O111:H−, and reactivity to O111:H− whole-cell lysates, treated or untreated with proteinase K, was examined. As expected, all five serum samples demonstrated a marked anti-lipopolysaccharide response, but several protein bands were also immunoreactive, particularly one with an apparent size of 94 kDa. One convalescent-phase serum sample was subsequently used to screen an O111:H− cosmid bank and 2 of 900 cosmid clones were found to be positive, both of which contained a similar DNA insert. Western blot analysis of one of these clones identified three major immunoreactive protein bands of approximately 94, 70, and 50 kDa. An immune response to the three proteins was detectable with all five convalescent-phase serum samples but not with healthy human serum. Immunoreactive 94- and 50-kDa species were produced by a deletion derivative of the cosmid containing a 7-kb STEC DNA insert. Sequence analysis of this region indicated that it is part of the locus for enterocyte effacement, including the eaeA gene which encodes intimin. The deduced amino acid sequence of the O111:H− intimin was 88.6% identical to intimin from O157:H7 STEC, and the most divergent region was the 200 residues at the carboxyl terminus, which were only 75% identical. Such variation may be antigenically significant as serum from a HUS patient infected only with the O111:H− STEC reacted with intimin from an enteropathogenic E. coli O111 strain, as well as several other eaeA-positive STEC isolates, but not with an eaeA-positive STEC belonging to serotype O157:H−. Sera from two of the other HUS patients also failed to react with intimin from this latter strain. However

  9. Integrated analysis of the climate change effects on water availability for catchment management. The case of the Ésera River (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solera, Abel; Segura, Carlos; Bussi, Gianbattista; Momblanch, Andrea; Francés, Félix

    2014-05-01

    The analysis of the impact of climate change on water resources is of primary importance in Mediterranean Areas. Mean precipitation is expected to decrease, although an increase in its torrentiality is foreseen, and temperature is expected to increase. In addition, growing urban water demand and new environmental requirements also contribute to increase water stress. To achieve an improved use of water resources, new and detailed studies of the impact of the climate change are needed. Due to the high complexity of rainfall-runoff processes and the need to incorporate climate change effect in them, physically based distributed models are proposed as a tool for assessing and analysing the climate change impact on water discharge. In this case, the distributed conceptual TETIS model was employed. This model was previously calibrated and validated in order to reproduce the hydrological cycle of a Mediterranean-influenced catchment, the Ésera River (Spain), under current climate conditions. Then, the TETIS model was driven by the results of a climatic model (precipitation and temperature series) under three climatic scenarios: current climate (or control scenario), A2 and B2 of the Special Report on Emission Scenarios. Water discharge series were generated at different points of the catchment. The model results pointed out that a global decrease in water yield is devised, being around 33% and 37% for scenario A2 and B2 respectively. Water discharge series were subsequently used in the analysis of climate change impact on water resources and water use in the studied river basin. To do so, a water allocation model was built, calibrated and validated under current streamflow conditions for the Ésera River. It considered all the water management infrastructures, water uses and environmental requirements. The results from TETIS for the three different scenarios were introduced as inputs to the water management model, what allowed performing three simulations. The outcomes

  10. Results of a nuclear power plant application of A New Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, D.W.; Forester, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bley, D.C. [Buttonwood Consulting, Inc. (United States)] [and others

    1998-03-01

    A new method to analyze human errors has been demonstrated at a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant. This was the first application of the new method referred to as A Technique for Human Error Analysis (ATHEANA). The main goals of the demonstration were to test the ATHEANA process as described in the frame-of-reference manual and the implementation guideline, test a training package developed for the method, test the hypothesis that plant operators and trainers have significant insight into the error-forcing-contexts (EFCs) that can make unsafe actions (UAs) more likely, and to identify ways to improve the method and its documentation. A set of criteria to evaluate the success of the ATHEANA method as used in the demonstration was identified. A human reliability analysis (HRA) team was formed that consisted of an expert in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) with some background in HRA (not ATHEANA) and four personnel from the nuclear power plant. Personnel from the plant included two individuals from their PRA staff and two individuals from their training staff. Both individuals from training are currently licensed operators and one of them was a senior reactor operator on shift until a few months before the demonstration. The demonstration was conducted over a 5-month period and was observed by members of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ATHEANA development team, who also served as consultants to the HRA team when necessary. Example results of the demonstration to date, including identified human failure events (HFEs), UAs, and EFCs are discussed. Also addressed is how simulator exercises are used in the ATHEANA demonstration project.

  11. Application of Gold Nanorods for Photothermal Therapy in Ex Vivo Human Oesophagogastric Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mohan; Harris-Birtill, David C C; Zhou, Yu; Gallina, Maria E; Cass, Anthony E G; Hanna, George B; Elson, Daniel S

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles are chemically fabricated and tuned to strongly absorb near infrared (NIR) light, enabling deep optical penetration and therapy within human tissues, where sufficient heating induces tumour necrosis. In our studies we aim to establish the optimal gold nanorod (GNR) concentration and laser power for inducing hyperthermic effects in tissues and test this photothermal effect on ex vivo human oesophagogastric adenocarcinoma. The ideal GNR concentration and NIR laser power that would elicit sufficient hyperthermia for tumour necrosis was pre-determined on porcine oesophageal tissues. Human ex vivo oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma tissues were incubated with GNR solutions and a GNR-free control solution with corresponding healthy tissues for comparison, then irradiated with NIR light for 10 minutes. Temperature rise was found to vary linearly with both the concentration of GNRs and the laser power. Human ex vivo oesophageal and gastric tissues consistently demonstrated a significant temperature rise when incubated in an optimally concentrated GNR solution (3 x 10(10) GNRs/ml) prior to NIR irradiation delivered at an optimal power (2 W/cm2). A mean temperature rise of 27 degrees C was observed in tissues incubated with GNRs, whereas only a modest 2 degrees C rise in tissues not exposed to any GNRs. This study evaluates the photothermal effects of GNRs on oesophagogastric tissue examines their application in the minimally invasive therapeutics of oesophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas. This could potentially be an effective method of clinically inducing irreversible oesophagogastric tumour photodestruction, with minimal collateral damage expected in (healthy) tissues free from GNRs.

  12. Immunological diagnosis of human hydatid cyst using Western immunoblotting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadipour, Mahboubeh; Nazari, Mohammad; Sanei, Behnam; Ghayour, Zahra; Sharafi, Seyedeh Maryam; Yazdani, Hajar; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Echinococcosis is a parasitic disease with worldwide distribution which is caused by the tapeworms Echinococcus granulosus. Diagnosis of the disease relies on imaging techniques, but the techniques are not able to differentiate the cyst from benign or malignant tumors; hence, appropriate serologic methods are required for the differential diagnosis of the infection. Materials and Methods: In this investigation, different sheep hydatid cyst antigens probed with thirty sera of patients with hydatid cyst and also thirty human normal sera using Western immunoblotting technique. Considering results of surgery as gold standard, sensitivity and specificity of Western blotting was estimated. Results: Sera of 29, 26, and 16 patients with hydatid cyst reacted with specific bands of hydatid cyst fluid (HCF), protoscolex crude antigen, and cyst wall crude antigen, respectively. However, none of the normal human sera reacted with those specific bands. Conclusion: A 20 kDa band of sheep HCF is an appropriate antigen for serodiagnosis of hydatid cyst infection. PMID:28331516

  13. Immunological diagnosis of human hydatid cyst using Western immunoblotting technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboubeh Hadipour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Echinococcosis is a parasitic disease with worldwide distribution which is caused by the tapeworms Echinococcus granulosus. Diagnosis of the disease relies on imaging techniques, but the techniques are not able to differentiate the cyst from benign or malignant tumors; hence, appropriate serologic methods are required for the differential diagnosis of the infection. Materials and Methods: In this investigation, different sheep hydatid cyst antigens probed with thirty sera of patients with hydatid cyst and also thirty human normal sera using Western immunoblotting technique. Considering results of surgery as gold standard, sensitivity and specificity of Western blotting was estimated. Results: Sera of 29, 26, and 16 patients with hydatid cyst reacted with specific bands of hydatid cyst fluid (HCF, protoscolex crude antigen, and cyst wall crude antigen, respectively. However, none of the normal human sera reacted with those specific bands. Conclusion: A 20 kDa band of sheep HCF is an appropriate antigen for serodiagnosis of hydatid cyst infection.

  14. Immune escape mutants of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 selected using polyclonal sera: identification of key amino acids in the HA protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Sitaras

    Full Text Available Evolution of Avian Influenza (AI viruses--especially of the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI H5N1 subtype--is a major issue for the poultry industry. HPAI H5N1 epidemics are associated with huge economic losses and are sometimes connected to human morbidity and mortality. Vaccination (either as a preventive measure or as a means to control outbreaks is an approach that splits the scientific community, due to the risk of it being a potential driving force in HPAI evolution through the selection of mutants able to escape vaccination-induced immunity. It is therefore essential to study how mutations are selected due to immune pressure. To this effect, we performed an in vitro selection of mutants from HPAI A/turkey/Turkey/1/05 (H5N1, using immune pressure from homologous polyclonal sera. After 42 rounds of selection, we identified 5 amino acid substitutions in the Haemagglutinin (HA protein, most of which were located in areas of antigenic importance and suspected to be prone to selection pressure. We report that most of the mutations took place early in the selection process. Finally, our antigenic cartography studies showed that the antigenic distance between the selected isolates and their parent strain increased with passage number.

  15. Prevalence of antibody to hantaviruses in humans and rodents in the Caribbean region of Colombia determined using Araraquara and Maciel virus antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Camilo Guzmán; Salim Mattar; Silvana Levis; Noemí Pini; Tadeu Figueiredo; James Mills; Jorge Salazar-Bravo

    2013-01-01

    We tested sera from 286 agricultural workers and 322 rodents in the department of Córdoba, northeastern Colombia, for antibodies against two hantaviruses. The sera were analysed by indirect ELISA using the lysate of Vero E6 cells infected with Maciel virus (MACV) or the N protein of Araraquara virus (ARAV) as antigens for the detection of antibodies against hantaviruses. Twenty-four human sera were IgG positive using one or both antigens. We detected anti-MACV IgG antibodies in 10 sera (...

  16. Development and application of spaceflight performance shaping factors for human reliability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindock, Jennifer

    requirements and human performance data is discussed. Applications of this modeling approach in terms of requirement completeness assessment and identification of future research needs are also described. Finally, an illustrative quantified Bayesian Network for the spaceflight domain is given, built on the factor identification and structure development work throughout the thesis. Its use in a Human Reliability Analysis is demonstrated.

  17. [Investigation of mold fungi in air samples of elementary schools and evaluation of allergen-specific IgE levels in students' sera].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovet, Habibe; Ergin, Cağrı; Kaleli, Ilknur

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric fungal spores play important role in allergic reactions in atopic individuals. Monitorization of those spores found in the environment of atopic cases is crucial for the choice of the antigens that will be included in allergen screening procedures and precautions to be taken against mold-originated health problems. Since most of the people spend plenty of time indoors in recent years, the effects of exposure to indoor air fungi on human health have gained importance. This study was aimed to investigate the indoor air mold distribution of elementary schools in Denizli province (located in west Anatolia, Turkey) and to compare the allergen-specific IgE levels of children against the most frequently detected mold genus. A questionnaire (MM080) was distributed to the 4967 students (6-8 year-old) attending first and second degrees of 16 different elementary schools with scattered locations in city center. This questionnaire form included the questions related to the general information about the child, school environment, allergic complaints since last year, home environment and nutrition. Response rate to the questionnaire was 51.6% (2565/4967). Air samples were collected from 18 classrooms in March 2009, during which high rates of allergic symptoms were observed according to the questionnaire results. Mold fungi belonging to 10 different genera (Penicillium spp. 46%; Aspergillus spp. 18%; Cladosporium spp. 17%; Alternaria spp. 15%; Drechslera spp. 1%; Chrysosporium, Fusarium, Conidiobolus and Cladothecium species 0.5%; unidentified 1%) were isolated from indoor air of classrooms. Since the most frequently detected mold was Penicillium spp. (46%), the 48 children with atopic symptoms were called to the hospital for the determination of total IgE and Penicillium specific IgE in their sera. Twenty two students accepted the invitation and serum total IgE (Immulite 2000; Diagnostic Product Corporation, USA) and allergen-specific IgE (Penicillium brevicompactum

  18. A novel system for transcutaneous application of carbon dioxide causing an "artificial Bohr effect" in the human body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitada Sakai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbon dioxide (CO(2 therapy refers to the transcutaneous administration of CO(2 for therapeutic purposes. This effect has been explained by an increase in the pressure of O(2 in tissues known as the Bohr effect. However, there have been no reports investigating the oxygen dissociation of haemoglobin (Hb during transcutaneous application of CO(2in vivo. In this study, we investigate whether the Bohr effect is caused by transcutaneous application of CO2 in human living body. METHODS: We used a novel system for transcutaneous application of CO(2 using pure CO(2 gas, hydrogel, and a plastic adaptor. The validity of the CO(2 hydrogel was confirmed in vitro using a measuring device for transcutaneous CO(2 absorption using rat skin. Next, we measured the pH change in the human triceps surae muscle during transcutaneous application of CO(2 using phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31P-MRS in vivo. In addition, oxy- and deoxy-Hb concentrations were measured with near-infrared spectroscopy in the human arm with occulted blood flow to investigate O2 dissociation from Hb caused by transcutaneous application of CO(2. RESULTS: The rat skin experiment showed that CO(2 hydrogel enhanced CO(2 gas permeation through the rat skin. The intracellular pH of the triceps surae muscle decreased significantly 10 min. after transcutaneous application of CO(2. The NIRS data show the oxy-Hb concentration decreased significantly 4 min. after CO(2 application, and deoxy-Hb concentration increased significantly 2 min. after CO(2 application in the CO(2-applied group compared to the control group. Oxy-Hb concentration significantly decreased while deoxy-Hb concentration significantly increased after transcutaneous CO(2 application. CONCLUSIONS: Our novel transcutaneous CO(2 application facilitated an O(2 dissociation from Hb in the human body, thus providing evidence of the Bohr effect in vivo.

  19. Immunoblot profiles of sera from laboratory rats naturally infected with Mycoplasma pulmonis and technicians exposed to infected animal facilities Imunoeletroforese do soro de ratos naturalmente infectados com Mycoplasma pulmonis e bioteristas expostos a biotérios infectados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Oliveira Delgado

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pulmonis have been isolated in about 10(5 CFU/mL from tracheal aspirates of rats from conventional animal facilities in São Paulo. The mycoplasma transmission by aerosol may happen from an infected rat to a healthy one at distances up to 120 cm. This condition also favors the technicians contamination. As this infection is unknown in humans, in this study the immunoblot profiles to M. pulmonis of sera from rats were compared to those presented by animal facility technicians. About 32 proteins from 11 to 230 kDa (kilodaltons were recognized by the sera from rats naturally infected with M. pulmonis. Sera from technicians responsible for the cleaning and sanitation of cages of infected animals for more than seven years recognized about 10 proteins of this bacteria. Sera from individuals with shorter working time or that had never been exposed to such environment recognized few proteins. Proteins about 117 and 95 kDa were recognized by human and rat sera and by the negative controls. Although a positive human serum against M. pulmonis is unknown, this study established a temporary profile of protein recognition of human serum against such mycoplasma.Mycoplasma pulmonis foi isolado em aproximadamente 10(5 UFC/mL do lavado traqueal de ratos mantidos em biotérios convencionais da cidade de São Paulo. A transmissão do micoplasma por aerossol pode ocorrer entre os animais em até 120 cm. Esta condição favorece a sua transmissão para os bioteristas que também são expostos a este microrganismo. Como esta colonização é desconhecida em humanos, as imunoeletroforeses dos soros destes indivíduos foram comparados à com os dos ratos. Aproximadamente 32 proteínas de 11 a 230 kDa foram reconhecidas pelo soros dos ratos naturalmente infectados com M. pulmonis. Os soros dos bioteristas que estão envolvidos por mais de 7 anos na higenização das caixas com animais infectados reconheceram cerca de 10 proteínas deste microrganismo. O soro

  20. Evaluation of the usefulness of Treponema pallidum hemagglutination test in the diagnosis of syphilis in weak reactive Venereal Disease Research Laboratory sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Manju; Toor, Aman; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Kakran, Monika; Muralidhar, Sumathi; Ramesh, V

    2012-07-01

    Biological false positive (BFP) reactivity by the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test used for diagnosis of syphilis is a cause for concern. The use of the VDRL as a screening procedure is challenged by some studies. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of BFP reactions in different subject groups and to assess the usefulness of Treponema pallidum hemagglutination (TPHA) test in low titre VDRL reactive sera. A total of 5785 sera from sexually transmitted diseases (STD) clinic attendees, antenatal clinic attendees, husbands of antenatal cases, peripheral health centres attendees (representing community population) and from patients referred from different OPDs/wards were screened for BFP reactions by the VDRL test. Sera reactive in the VDRL test were confirmed by the TPHA test. Out of 80 qualitative VDRL reactive sera, 68 had VDRL and TPHA positivity was highest (76%) in the age group of 20-29 years. The seroprevalence of syphilis varied from 0.4% to 3.5% in different patient groups. The results of this study highlight that the TPHA positivity was high (86.8%) in sera with VDRL titre less than 1:8. Therefore, for the diagnosis of syphilis, it is recommended that a confirmatory test such as TPHA should be performed on all sera with a reactive VDRL regardless of its titre.