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Sample records for human retinal disease

  1. Retinal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Linked Retinoschisis (XLRS) X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP) Usher Syndrome Other Retinal Diseases Glossary News & Research News & Research ... central portion of the retina called the macula. Usher Syndrome Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  2. Allelic Expression Imbalance in the Human Retinal Transcriptome and Potential Impact on Inherited Retinal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llavona, Pablo; Mutarelli, Margherita; Singh Marwah, Veer; Schimpf-Linzenbold, Simone; Thaler, Sebastian; Yoeruek, Efdal; Vetter, Jan; Wissinger, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Inherited retinal diseases (IRDs) are often associated with variable clinical expressivity (VE) and incomplete penetrance (IP). Underlying mechanisms may include environmental, epigenetic, and genetic factors. Cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTLs) can be implicated in the regulation of genes by favoring or hampering the expression of one allele over the other. Thus, the presence of such loci elicits allelic expression imbalance (AEI) that can be traced by massive parallel sequencing techniques. In this study, we performed an AEI analysis on RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) data, from 52 healthy retina donors, that identified 194 imbalanced single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) in 67 IRD genes. Focusing on SNPs displaying AEI at a frequency higher than 10%, we found evidence of AEI in several IRD genes regularly associated with IP and VE (BEST1, RP1, PROM1, and PRPH2). Based on these SNPs commonly undergoing AEI, we performed pyrosequencing in an independent sample set of 17 healthy retina donors in order to confirm our findings. Indeed, we were able to validate CDHR1, BEST1, and PROM1 to be subjected to cis-acting regulation. With this work, we aim to shed light on differentially expressed alleles in the human retina transcriptome that, in the context of autosomal dominant IRD cases, could help to explain IP or VE. PMID:29053642

  3. Allelic Expression Imbalance in the Human Retinal Transcriptome and Potential Impact on Inherited Retinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Llavona

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Inherited retinal diseases (IRDs are often associated with variable clinical expressivity (VE and incomplete penetrance (IP. Underlying mechanisms may include environmental, epigenetic, and genetic factors. Cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTLs can be implicated in the regulation of genes by favoring or hampering the expression of one allele over the other. Thus, the presence of such loci elicits allelic expression imbalance (AEI that can be traced by massive parallel sequencing techniques. In this study, we performed an AEI analysis on RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq data, from 52 healthy retina donors, that identified 194 imbalanced single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs in 67 IRD genes. Focusing on SNPs displaying AEI at a frequency higher than 10%, we found evidence of AEI in several IRD genes regularly associated with IP and VE (BEST1, RP1, PROM1, and PRPH2. Based on these SNPs commonly undergoing AEI, we performed pyrosequencing in an independent sample set of 17 healthy retina donors in order to confirm our findings. Indeed, we were able to validate CDHR1, BEST1, and PROM1 to be subjected to cis-acting regulation. With this work, we aim to shed light on differentially expressed alleles in the human retina transcriptome that, in the context of autosomal dominant IRD cases, could help to explain IP or VE.

  4. Retinal oximetry in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rilvén, Sandra; Torp, Thomas Lee; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. We used PubMed and Embase to search for retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. Three separate searches identified a total of 79 publications. After two levels of manual screening, 10 studies were included: six about diabetic......The retinal oximeter is a new tool for non-invasive measurement of retinal oxygen saturation in humans. Several studies have investigated the associations between retinal oxygen saturation and retinal diseases. In the present systematic review, we examine whether there are associations between...... retinopathy (DR) and four about retinal vein occlusion. No studies about retinal artery occlusion were included. In diabetes, all studies found that increases in retinal venous oxygen saturation (rvSatO2 ) were associated with present as well as increasing levels of DR. Four of six studies also found...

  5. Retinal remodeling in human retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B W; Pfeiffer, R L; Ferrell, W D; Watt, C B; Marmor, M; Marc, R E

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Defining the Human Macula Transcriptome and Candidate Retinal Disease Genes UsingEyeSAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Catherine Bowes; Ebright, Jessica N.; Zavodni, Zachary J.; Yu, Ling; Wang, Tianyuan; Daiger, Stephen P.; Wistow, Graeme; Boon, Kathy; Hauser, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To develop large-scale, high-throughput annotation of the human macula transcriptome and to identify and prioritize candidate genes for inherited retinal dystrophies, based on ocular-expression profiles using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE). Methods Two human retina and two retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/choroid SAGE libraries made from matched macula or midperipheral retina and adjacent RPE/choroid of morphologically normal 28- to 66-year-old donors and a human central retina longSAGE library made from 41- to 66-year-old donors were generated. Their transcription profiles were entered into a relational database, EyeSAGE, including microarray expression profiles of retina and publicly available normal human tissue SAGE libraries. EyeSAGE was used to identify retina- and RPE-specific and -associated genes, and candidate genes for retina and RPE disease loci. Differential and/or cell-type specific expression was validated by quantitative and single-cell RT-PCR. Results Cone photoreceptor-associated gene expression was elevated in the macula transcription profiles. Analysis of the longSAGE retina tags enhanced tag-to-gene mapping and revealed alternatively spliced genes. Analysis of candidate gene expression tables for the identified Bardet-Biedl syndrome disease gene (BBS5) in the BBS5 disease region table yielded BBS5 as the top candidate. Compelling candidates for inherited retina diseases were identified. Conclusions The EyeSAGE database, combining three different gene-profiling platforms including the authors’ multidonor-derived retina/RPE SAGE libraries and existing single-donor retina/RPE libraries, is a powerful resource for definition of the retina and RPE transcriptomes. It can be used to identify retina-specific genes, including alternatively spliced transcripts and to prioritize candidate genes within mapped retinal disease regions. PMID:16723438

  7. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-13

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  8. Functional annotation of the human retinal pigment epithelium transcriptome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Booij (Judith); S. van Soest (Simone); S.M.A. Swagemakers (Sigrid); A.H.W. Essing (Anke); J.H.M. Verkerk (Annemieke); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); T.G.M.F. Gorgels (Theo); A.A.B. Bergen (Arthur)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To determine level, variability and functional annotation of gene expression of the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the key tissue involved in retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Macular RPE cells from six selected healthy

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer...

  10. Near infrared autofluorescence imaging of retinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skondra, Dimitra; Papakostas, Thanos D; Hunter, Rebecca; Vavvas, Demetrios G

    2012-01-01

    Near infrared autofluorescence (excitation 787 nm, emission >800 nm) is a non-invasive imaging technology that provides information on the distribution of melanin within the retinal pigment epithelial cell/choroid complex. This review contains an introduction to near infrared autofluorescence imaging methods. Characteristics of near infrared imaging in a variety of retinal diseases, including age-related macular degeneration, choroidal nevus, retinal degenerations, retinal dystrophies, central serous chorioretinopathy, pseudoxanthoma elasticum and chloroquine retinopathy, are summarized.

  11. A Computational Approach From Gene to Structure Analysis of the Human ABCA4 Transporter Involved in Genetic Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trezza, Alfonso; Bernini, Andrea; Langella, Andrea; Ascher, David B; Pires, Douglas E V; Sodi, Andrea; Passerini, Ilaria; Pelo, Elisabetta; Rizzo, Stanislao; Niccolai, Neri; Spiga, Ottavia

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this article is to report the investigation of the structural features of ABCA4, a protein associated with a genetic retinal disease. A new database collecting knowledge of ABCA4 structure may facilitate predictions about the possible functional consequences of gene mutations observed in clinical practice. In order to correlate structural and functional effects of the observed mutations, the structure of mouse P-glycoprotein was used as a template for homology modeling. The obtained structural information and genetic data are the basis of our relational database (ABCA4Database). Sequence variability among all ABCA4-deposited entries was calculated and reported as Shannon entropy score at the residue level. The three-dimensional model of ABCA4 structure was used to locate the spatial distribution of the observed variable regions. Our predictions from structural in silico tools were able to accurately link the functional effects of mutations to phenotype. The development of the ABCA4Database gathers all the available genetic and structural information, yielding a global view of the molecular basis of some retinal diseases. ABCA4 modeled structure provides a molecular basis on which to analyze protein sequence mutations related to genetic retinal disease in order to predict the risk of retinal disease across all possible ABCA4 mutations. Additionally, our ABCA4 predicted structure is a good starting point for the creation of a new data analysis model, appropriate for precision medicine, in order to develop a deeper knowledge network of the disease and to improve the management of patients.

  12. Long-term safety of human retinal progenitor cell transplantation in retinitis pigmentosa patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Chen, Shao Jun; Li, Shi Ying; Qu, Ling Hui; Meng, Xiao Hong; Wang, Yi; Xu, Hai Wei; Liang, Zhi Qing; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2017-09-29

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a common genetic disease that causes retinal degeneration and blindness for which there is currently no curable treatment available. Vision preservation was observed in retinitis pigmentosa animal models after retinal stem cell transplantation. However, long-term safety studies and visual assessment have not been thoroughly tested in retinitis pigmentosa patients. In our pre-clinical study, purified human fetal-derived retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) were transplanted into the diseased retina of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a model of retinal degeneration. Based on these results, we conducted a phase I clinical trial to establish the safety and tolerability of transplantation of RPCs in eight patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa. Patients were studied for 24 months. After RPC transplantation in RCS rats, we observed moderate recovery of vision and maintenance of the outer nuclear layer thickness. Most importantly, we did not find tumor formation or immune rejection. In the retinis pigmentosa patients given RPC injections, we also did not observe immunological rejection or tumorigenesis when immunosuppressive agents were not administered. We observed a significant improvement in visual acuity (P retinal sensitivity of pupillary responses in three of the eight patients between 2 and 6 months after the transplant, but this improvement did not appear by 12 months. Our study for the first time confirmed the long-term safety and feasibility of vision repair by stem cell therapy in patients blinded by retinitis pigmentosa. WHO Trial Registration, ChiCTR-TNRC-08000193 . Retrospectively registered on 5 December 2008.

  13. Vitamin A Derivatives as Treatment Options for Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadao Maeda

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The visual cycle is a sequential enzymatic reaction for vitamin A, all-trans-retinol, occurring in the outer layer of the human retina and is essential for the maintenance of vision. The central source of retinol is derived from dietary intake of both retinol and pro-vitamin A carotenoids. A series of enzymatic reactions, located in both the photoreceptor outer segment and the retinal pigment epithelium, transform retinol into the visual chromophore 11-cis-retinal, regenerating visual pigments. Retina specific proteins carry out the majority of the visual cycle, and any significant interruption in this sequence of reactions is capable of causing varying degrees of blindness. Among these important proteins are Lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT and retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65-kDa protein (RPE65 known to be responsible for esterification of retinol to all-trans-retinyl esters and isomerization of these esters to 11-cis-retinal, respectively. Deleterious mutations in these genes are identified in human retinal diseases that cause blindness, such as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA and retinitis pigmentosa (RP. Herein, we discuss the pathology of 11-cis-retinal deficiency caused by these mutations in both animal disease models and human patients. We also review novel therapeutic strategies employing artificial visual chromophore 9-cis-retinoids which have been employed in clinical trials involving LCA patients.

  14. Retinal Macroglial Responses in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa de Hoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their permanent and close proximity to neurons, glial cells perform essential tasks for the normal physiology of the retina. Astrocytes and Müller cells (retinal macroglia provide physical support to neurons and supplement them with several metabolites and growth factors. Macroglia are involved in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular ions and neurotransmitters, are essential for information processing in neural circuits, participate in retinal glucose metabolism and in removing metabolic waste products, regulate local blood flow, induce the blood-retinal barrier (BRB, play fundamental roles in local immune response, and protect neurons from oxidative damage. In response to polyetiological insults, glia cells react with a process called reactive gliosis, seeking to maintain retinal homeostasis. When malfunctioning, macroglial cells can become primary pathogenic elements. A reactive gliosis has been described in different retinal pathologies, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD, diabetes, glaucoma, retinal detachment, or retinitis pigmentosa. A better understanding of the dual, neuroprotective, or cytotoxic effect of macroglial involvement in retinal pathologies would help in treating the physiopathology of these diseases. The extensive participation of the macroglia in retinal diseases points to these cells as innovative targets for new drug therapies.

  15. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs) as a chronic experimental model for investigation of retinal ganglion cell degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Osborne, Andrew; Hopes, Marina; Wright, Phillip; David C Broadway; Sanderson, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing need for models of human diseases that utilise native, donated human tissue in order to model disease processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies. In this paper we assessed the suitability of adult human retinal explants as a potential model of chronic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration. Our results confirmed that RGC markers commonly used in rodent studies (NeuN, bIII Tubulin and Thy-1) were appropriate for labelling human RGCs and followed the expected differ...

  16. Photostress Testing Device for Diagnosing Retinal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Swan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Retinal diseases such as Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD affect nearly one in three elderly patients. ARMD damages the central vision photoreceptors in the fovea. The Photostress Test is a simple technique for testing for the early effects of ARMD. Here, the illumination sources in a novel self-administered Photostress Testing device were modeled for safety and distribution in illumination software. After satisfying the design constraints in the model, a prototype of the illumination system was fabricated and tested to confirm the modeling results. The resultant prototype can be used to aid in the diagnosis of retinal disease and is well within retinal safety levels.

  17. Mitochondrial transcription factor A protects human retinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , and the probable mechanism. Methods: After ... Keywords: Mitochondrial transcription factor A, NF-κB, Hypoxia, Human retinal endothelial cell,. Diabetic retinopathy ..... choice for diabetic retinopathy therapy, as TFAM activity clearly affects the ...

  18. Application of stem cell-derived retinal pigmented epithelium in retinal degenerative diseases: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingyue; Chen, Youxin

    2018-01-01

    As a constituent of blood-retinal barrier and retinal outer segment (ROS) scavenger, retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is fundamental to normal function of retina. Malfunctioning of RPE contributes to the onset and advance of retinal degenerative diseases. Up to date, RPE replacement therapy is the only possible method to completely reverse retinal degeneration. Transplantation of human RPE stem cell-derived RPE (hRPESC-RPE) has shown some good results in animal models. With promising results in terms of safety and visual improvement, human embryonic stem cell-derived RPE (hESC-RPE) can be expected in clinical settings in the near future. Despite twists and turns, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived RPE (iPSC-RPE) is now being intensely investigated to overcome genetic and epigenetic instability. By far, only one patient has received iPSC-RPE transplant, which is a hallmark of iPSC technology development. During follow-up, no major complications such as immunogenicity or tumorigenesis have been observed. Future trials should keep focusing on the safety of stem cell-derived RPE (SC-RPE) especially in long period, and better understanding of the nature of stem cell and the molecular events in the process to generate SC-RPE is necessary to the prosperity of SC-RPE clinical application.

  19. Human cord blood cells can differentiate into retinal nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike-Kiriyama, Naoko; Adachi, Yasushi; Minamino, Keizo; Iwasaki, Masayoshi; Nakano, Keiji; Koike, Yasushi; Yamada, Haruhiko; Mukaide, Hiromi; Shigematsu, Akio; Mizokami, Tomomi; Matsumura, Miyo; Ikehara, Susumu

    2007-01-01

    Retinal degeneration and dystrophy are the major causes of blindness in the developed world. It has been reported that human cord blood cells (HCBCs) can differentiate into neuron-like cells in vitro. We have recently demonstrated that bone marrow cells (BMCs) of both mice and rats can differentiate into retinal nerve cells (RNCs). In the present study, we show the differentiation capacity of HCBCs into RNCs in vivo. We transplanted lineage-negative HCBCs into the subretinal space of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Two weeks after the transplantation, some of the transplanted cells expressed human nestin, human MAP2, human neuron specific enolase (NSE), beta-III tubulin and also rhodopsin. These results indicate that HCBCs can differentiate into RNCs and suggest that our new strategy could be used for the regeneration of retinal nerve cells in degenerative or dystrophic diseases.

  20. The all-trans-retinal dimer series of lipofuscin pigments in retinal pigment epithelial cells in a recessive Stargardt disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So R; Jang, Young P; Jockusch, Steffen; Fishkin, Nathan E; Turro, Nicholas J; Sparrow, Janet R

    2007-12-04

    The bis-retinoid pigments that accumulate in retinal pigment epithelial cells as lipofuscin are associated with inherited and age-related retinal disease. In addition to A2E and related cis isomers, we previously showed that condensation of two molecules of all-trans-retinal leads to the formation of a protonated Schiff base conjugate, all-trans-retinal dimer-phosphatidylethanolamine. Here we report the characterization of the related pigments, all-trans-retinal dimer-ethanolamine and unconjugated all-trans-retinal dimer, in human and mouse retinal pigment epithelium. In eyecups of Abcr(-/-) mice, a model of recessive Stargardt macular degeneration, all-trans-retinal dimer-phosphatidylethanolamine was increased relative to wild type and was more abundant than A2E. Total pigment of the all-trans-retinal dimer series (sum of all-trans-retinal dimer-phosphatidylethanolamine, all-trans-retinal dimer-ethanolamine, and all-trans-retinal dimer) increased with age in Abcr(-/-) mice and was modulated by amino acid variants in Rpe65. In in vitro assays, enzyme-mediated hydrolysis of all-trans-retinal dimer-phosphatidylethanolamine generated all-trans-retinal dimer-ethanolamine, and protonation/deprotonation of the Schiff base nitrogen of all-trans-retinal dimer-ethanolamine was pH-dependent. Unconjugated all-trans-retinal dimer was a more efficient generator of singlet oxygen than A2E, and the all-trans-retinal dimer series was more reactive with singlet oxygen than was A2E. By analyzing chromatographic properties and UV-visible spectra together with mass spectrometry, mono- and bis-oxygenated all-trans-retinal dimer photoproducts were detected in Abcr(-/-) mice. The latter findings are significant to an understanding of the adverse effects of retinal pigment epithelial cell lipofuscin.

  1. Mitochondrial transcription factor A protects human retinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), as a modulator of NF-κB, on proliferation of hypoxia-induced human retinal endothelial cell (HREC), and the probable mechanism. Methods: After exposure to hypoxia (1 % O2) for 5 days, cell proliferation and cell cycle of HREC were ...

  2. Melanopsin retinal ganglion cell loss in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Koronyo, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Melanopsin retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) are photoreceptors driving circadian photoentrainment, and circadian dysfunction characterizes Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated mRGCs in AD, hypothesizing their contribution to circadian dysfunction. METHODS: We assessed retinal nerve...

  3. Retinal vasculature development in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvam, Senthil; Kumar, Tejas; Fruttiger, Marcus

    2017-11-10

    Development of the retinal vasculature is based on highly coordinated signalling between different cell types of the retina, integrating internal metabolic requirements with external influences such as the supply of oxygen and nutrients. The developing mouse retinal vasculature is a useful model system to study these interactions because it is experimentally accessible for intra ocular injections and genetic manipulations, can be easily imaged and develops in a similar fashion to that of humans. Research using this model has provided insights about general principles of angiogenesis as well as pathologies that affect the developing retinal vasculature. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that govern the interactions between neurons, glial and vascular cells in the developing retina. This includes a review of mechanisms that shape the retinal vasculature, such as sprouting angiogenesis, vascular network remodelling and vessel maturation. We also explore how the disruption of these processes in mice can lead to pathology - such as oxygen induced retinopathy - and how this translates to human retinopathy of prematurity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Aging Changes in Retinal Microglia and their Relevance to Age-related Retinal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenxin; Wong, Wai T

    2016-01-01

    Age-related retinal diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma, contain features of chronic retinal inflammation that may promote disease progression. However, the relationship between aging and neuroinflammation is unclear. Microglia are long-lived, resident immune cells of the retina, and mediate local neuroinflammatory reactions. We hypothesize that aging changes in microglia may be causally linked to neuroinflammatory changes underlying age-dependent retinal diseases. Here, we review the evidence for (1) how the retinal microglial phenotype changes with aging, (2) the factors that drive microglial aging in the retina, and (3) aging-related changes in microglial gene expression. We examine how these aspects of microglial aging changes may relate to pathogenic mechanisms of immune dysregulation driving the progression of age-related retinal disease. These relationships can highlight microglial aging as a novel target for the prevention and treatment of retinal disease.

  5. EYS Mutations Causing Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa: Changes of Retinal Structure and Function with Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. McGuigan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the EYS (eyes shut homolog gene are a common cause of autosomal recessive (ar retinitis pigmentosa (RP. Without a mammalian model of human EYS disease, there is limited understanding of details of disease expression and rates of progression of the retinal degeneration. We studied clinically and with chromatic static perimetry, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT, and en face autofluoresence imaging, a cohort of 15 patients (ages 12–51 at first visit, some of whom had longitudinal data of function and structure. Rod sensitivity was able to be measured by chromatic perimetry in most patients at their earliest visits and some patients retained patchy rod function into the fifth decade of life. As expected from RP, cone sensitivity persisted after rod function was no longer measurable. The photoreceptor nuclear layer of the central retina was abnormal except at the fovea in most patients at first visit. Perifoveal disease measured over a period of years indicated that photoreceptor structural loss was followed by dysmorphology of the inner retina and loss of retinal pigment epithelial integrity. Although there could be variability in severity, preliminary analyses of the rates of vision loss suggested that EYS is a more rapidly progressive disease than other ciliopathies causing arRP, such as USH2A and MAK.

  6. The Development of Human Organotypic Retinal Cultures (HORCs) to study Retinal Neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Niyadurupola, Nuwan; Sidaway, Peter; Osborne, Andrew; David C Broadway; Sanderson, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aims To develop human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs) to study retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death in response to ischaemic and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) excitotoxic insults, both known to cause loss of RGCs and proposed as mechanisms involved in glaucomatous retinal neurodegeneration. Methods Human donor eyes were obtained within 24hr post mortem. The retina was isolated and explants cultured using two techniques. THY-1 mRNA (as assessed by real time quantitativ...

  7. Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 regulates retinal pigment epithelium proliferation and may be important in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, M; Kiilgaard, J F; Wang, J

    2009-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2, group VIA (iPLA2-VIA) is involved in cell proliferation. This study aimed to evaluate the role of iPLA2-VIA in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell proliferation and in retinal diseases involving RPE proliferation. A human RPE cell line (ARPE-19) was used...

  8. Central Retinal Vein Occlusion Revealing Coelic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana ZOUBEIDI

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Thrombosis has been widely reported in coeliac disease (CD but central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO is rarely described. Case presentation: A 27-year-old woman presented with acute visual loss and was diagnosed with CRVO. Her protein S and protein C levels were low and CD was diagnosed on the basis of endoscopic, immunological and histological results. A gluten-free diet resulted in favourable evolution. Conclusion: CD should be considered in young patients with thrombosis, especially if in an unusual location. Treatment is based on a gluten-free diet.

  9. The influence of retinal eye diseases on painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanišević, Petar; Ivanišević, Milan

    2015-03-01

    In this work the possible influences of some retinal eye problems on paintings of several famous artists are considered. The change of painting styles and artistic expression in different periods and ages in a group of world-wide well-known painters are described and correlated with known or suspected retinal diseases. Some of them largely became recognizable because of that. Contemplations are offered about the effects of retinal diseases in the works of Degas, Munch, Cézanne, O'Keeffe, Constable and Goya. Retinal eye diseases have a significant impact on the work of selected famous painters.

  10. Biology and therapy of inherited retinal degenerative disease: insights from mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobi Veleri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Retinal neurodegeneration associated with the dysfunction or death of photoreceptors is a major cause of incurable vision loss. Tremendous progress has been made over the last two decades in discovering genes and genetic defects that lead to retinal diseases. The primary focus has now shifted to uncovering disease mechanisms and designing treatment strategies, especially inspired by the successful application of gene therapy in some forms of congenital blindness in humans. Both spontaneous and laboratory-generated mouse mutants have been valuable for providing fundamental insights into normal retinal development and for deciphering disease pathology. Here, we provide a review of mouse models of human retinal degeneration, with a primary focus on diseases affecting photoreceptor function. We also describe models associated with retinal pigment epithelium dysfunction or synaptic abnormalities. Furthermore, we highlight the crucial role of mouse models in elucidating retinal and photoreceptor biology in health and disease, and in the assessment of novel therapeutic modalities, including gene- and stem-cell-based therapies, for retinal degenerative diseases.

  11. Human retinal gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis shows advancing retinal degeneration despite enduring visual improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cideciyan, Artur V; Jacobson, Samuel G; Beltran, William A; Sumaroka, Alexander; Swider, Malgorzata; Iwabe, Simone; Roman, Alejandro J; Olivares, Melani B; Schwartz, Sharon B; Komáromy, András M; Hauswirth, William W; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2013-02-05

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) associated with retinal pigment epithelium-specific protein 65 kDa (RPE65) mutations is a severe hereditary blindness resulting from both dysfunction and degeneration of photoreceptors. Clinical trials with gene augmentation therapy have shown partial reversal of the dysfunction, but the effects on the degeneration are not known. We evaluated the consequences of gene therapy on retinal degeneration in patients with RPE65-LCA and its canine model. In untreated RPE65-LCA patients, there was dysfunction and degeneration of photoreceptors, even at the earliest ages. Examined serially over years, the outer photoreceptor nuclear layer showed progressive thinning. Treated RPE65-LCA showed substantial visual improvement in the short term and no detectable decline from this new level over the long term. However, retinal degeneration continued to progress unabated. In RPE65-mutant dogs, the first one-quarter of their lifespan showed only dysfunction, and there was normal outer photoreceptor nuclear layer thickness retina-wide. Dogs treated during the earlier dysfunction-only stage showed improved visual function and dramatic protection of treated photoreceptors from degeneration when measured 5-11 y later. Dogs treated later during the combined dysfunction and degeneration stage also showed visual function improvement, but photoreceptor loss continued unabated, the same as in human RPE65-LCA. The results suggest that, in RPE65 disease treatment, protection from visual function deterioration cannot be assumed to imply protection from degeneration. The effects of gene augmentation therapy are complex and suggest a need for a combinatorial strategy in RPE65-LCA to not only improve function in the short term but also slow retinal degeneration in the long term.

  12. Measurement of retinal oxygen saturation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

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    Palkovits, Stefan; Lasta, Michael; Boltz, Agnes; Schmidl, Doreen; Kaya, Semira; Hammer, Martin; Marzluf, Beatrice; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina; Frantal, Sophie; Schmetterer, Leopold; Garhöfer, Gerhard

    2013-02-05

    There is growing evidence that disturbances in retinal oxygenation may trigger ocular diseases. New instruments allow for the noninvasive measurement of retinal oxygen saturation in humans. The present study was designed to investigate the retinal oxygen saturation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This was also done in an effort to test the validity of retinal oxygenation measurements with a retinal vessel analyzer. In all, 16 patients with severe COPD grade 4 who were on long-term oxygen treatment were included in the study. For each patient two identical study days were scheduled. Measurements of retinal arterial and venous oxygen saturation were done using a commercially available instrument for retinal oxygen analysis. Peripheral arterial oxygen saturation values were analyzed with pulse oximetry and via a capillary blood sample drawn from the earlobe. Measurements were performed during oxygen treatment and during a period without oxygen supplementation. Analysis of all images for retinal oxygen saturation quantification was done by a masked investigator. Analysis was done using Pearson's correlation and a multivariate regression model. Arterial and venous retinal oxygen saturation decreased significantly after the cessation of the oxygen therapy. The arteriovenous oxygen difference was unchanged while breathing ambient air or pure oxygen-enriched air. With both Pearson's correlation and the multivariate model, we found significant positive correlation coefficients between retinal arterial and peripheral arterial oxygen saturation as assessed with pulse oximetry as well as between retinal arterial and peripheral arterial oxygen saturation measured in blood samples. The change of oxygen saturation after discontinuation of oxygen supplementation showed a good correlation between retinal arterial oxygen saturation and peripheral arterial oxygen saturation (r = 0.53, P arterial and peripheral arterial oxygen saturation indicating good

  13. Functional annotation of the human retinal pigment epithelium transcriptome

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    Gorgels Theo GMF

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine level, variability and functional annotation of gene expression of the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, the key tissue involved in retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Macular RPE cells from six selected healthy human donor eyes (aged 63–78 years were laser dissected and used for 22k microarray studies (Agilent technologies. Data were analyzed with Rosetta Resolver, the web tool DAVID and Ingenuity software. Results In total, we identified 19,746 array entries with significant expression in the RPE. Gene expression was analyzed according to expression levels, interindividual variability and functionality. A group of highly (n = 2,194 expressed RPE genes showed an overrepresentation of genes of the oxidative phosphorylation, ATP synthesis and ribosome pathways. In the group of moderately expressed genes (n = 8,776 genes of the phosphatidylinositol signaling system and aminosugars metabolism were overrepresented. As expected, the top 10 percent (n = 2,194 of genes with the highest interindividual differences in expression showed functional overrepresentation of the complement cascade, essential in inflammation in age-related macular degeneration, and other signaling pathways. Surprisingly, this same category also includes the genes involved in Bruch's membrane (BM composition. Among the top 10 percent of genes with low interindividual differences, there was an overrepresentation of genes involved in local glycosaminoglycan turnover. Conclusion Our study expands current knowledge of the RPE transcriptome by assigning new genes, and adding data about expression level and interindividual variation. Functional annotation suggests that the RPE has high levels of protein synthesis, strong energy demands, and is exposed to high levels of oxidative stress and a variable degree of inflammation. Our data sheds new light on the molecular composition of BM, adjacent to the

  14. [Significance of ophthalmological imaging in common hereditary retinal diseases].

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    Kortüm, K; Kernt, M; Reznicek, L

    2013-03-01

    Over the past years, a significant progress in genetic, functional and imaging diagnostics in hereditary retinal diseases has been made. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) as well as fundus autofluorescence (FAF) allow for high-resolution, non-invasive imaging - from various perspectives - of retinal and choroidal layers of the posterior fundus. Both techniques have gained more and more significance in the diagnosis of hereditary retinal diseases. Of all patients presented in this review, extensive family history was taken and a clinical ophthalmological examination performed. OCT scans as well as FAF images were acquired and compared to results of other functional and molecular genetic tests in the context of each disease. The presented cases in this review addressing hereditary retinal diseases (Best's disease, Stargardt's disease, cone-rod dystrophy, retinitis pigmentosa, achromatopsia, and X-linked retinoschisis) show the significance of ophthalmic imaging (OCT + FAF) for a targeted diagnosis of hereditary retinal diseases. The described imaging techniques (OCT + FAF) are becoming more and more important in the diagnosis of hereditary retinal diseases. Due to increasing availability of the devices, earlier detection of typical morphological changes not seen in clinical fundoscopy is feasible. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Derivation of Neural Progenitors and Retinal Pigment Epithelium from Common Marmoset and Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Laughing Bear Torrez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs derived from mammalian species are valuable tools for modeling human disease, including retinal degenerative eye diseases that result in visual loss. Restoration of vision has focused on transplantation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs and retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE to the retina. Here we used transgenic common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus and human pluripotent stem cells carrying the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP reporter as a model system for retinal differentiation. Using suspension and subsequent adherent differentiation cultures, we observed spontaneous in vitro differentiation that included NPCs and cells with pigment granules characteristic of differentiated RPE. Retinal cells derived from human and common marmoset pluripotent stem cells provide potentially unlimited cell sources for testing safety and immune compatibility following autologous or allogeneic transplantation using nonhuman primates in early translational applications.

  16. Cytotoxic effects of curcumin in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

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    Margrit Hollborn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Curcumin from turmeric is an ingredient in curry powders. Due to its antiinflammatory, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic effects, curcumin is a promising drug for the treatment of cancer and retinal diseases. We investigated whether curcumin alters the viability and physiological properties of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cellular proliferation was investigated with a bromodeoxy-uridine immunoassay, and chemotaxis was investigated with a Boyden chamber assay. Cell viability was determined by trypan blue exclusion. Apoptosis and necrosis rates were determined with a DNA fragmentation ELISA. Gene expression was determined by real-time PCR, and secretion of VEGF and bFGF was examined with ELISA. The phosphorylation level of proteins was revealed by Western blotting. The proliferation of RPE cells was slightly increased by curcumin at 10 µM and strongly reduced by curcumin above 50 µM. Curcumin at 50 µM increased slightly the chemotaxis of the cells. Curcumin reduced the expression and secretion of VEGF under control conditions and abolished the VEGF secretion induced by PDGF and chemical hypoxia. Whereas low concentrations of curcumin stimulated the expression of bFGF and HGF, high concentrations caused downregulation of both factors. Curcumin decreased dose-dependently the viability of RPE cells via induction of early necrosis (above 10 µM and delayed apoptosis (above 1 µM. The cytotoxic effect of curcumin involved activation of caspase-3 and calpain, intracellular calcium signaling, mitochondrial permeability, oxidative stress, increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and decreased phosphorylation of Akt protein. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that curcumin at concentrations described to be effective in the treatment of tumor cells and in inhibiting death of retinal neurons (∼10 µM has adverse effects on RPE cells. It is suggested that, during the intake of curcumin as

  17. Modulation of Abnormal Metabolic Brain Networks by Experimental Therapies in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Parkinson Disease: An Application to Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Implantation.

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    Peng, Shichun; Ma, Yilong; Flores, Joseph; Cornfeldt, Michael; Mitrovic, Branka; Eidelberg, David; Doudet, Doris J

    2016-10-01

    Abnormal covariance pattern of regional metabolism associated with Parkinson disease (PD) is modulated by dopaminergic pharmacotherapy. Using high-resolution (18)F-FDG PET and network analysis, we previously derived and validated a parkinsonism-related metabolic pattern (PRP) in nonhuman primate models of PD. It is currently not known whether this network is modulated by experimental therapeutics. In this study, we examined changes in network activity by striatal implantation of human levodopa-producing retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells in parkinsonian macaques and evaluated the reproducibility of network activity in a small test-retest study. (18)F-FDG PET scans were acquired in 8 healthy macaques and 8 macaques with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced bilateral nigrostriatal dopaminergic lesions after unilateral putaminal implantation of hRPE cells or sham surgery. PRP activity was measured prospectively in all animals and in a subset of test-retest animals using a network quantification approach. Network activity and regional metabolic values were compared on a hemispheric basis between animal groups and treatment conditions. All individual macaques showed clinical improvement after hRPE cell implantation compared with the sham surgery. PRP activity was elevated in the untreated MPTP hemispheres relative to those of the normal controls (P therapy and other symptomatic interventions. With further validation in large samples, (18)F-FDG PET imaging with network analysis may provide a viable biomarker for assessing treatment response in animal models of PD after experimental therapies. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  18. Bilateral cytomegalovirus retinitis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnaz, Sabiha; Choksi, Mamta T; Tan, Irene J

    2003-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases are not commonly associated with cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis. We report a case of bilateral CMV retinitis in a human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who was undergoing hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease. The CMV retinitis in this patient was associated with combined azathioprine and low-dose corticosteroid therapy for lupus flare. This association may have important clinical implications because this drug combination is used routinely to treat active SLE. Our patient responded to discontinuation of azathioprine, reduction of the corticosteroid dose, and systemic administration of ganciclovir. We recommend that clinicians maintain heightened awareness of the possibility of CMV retinitis in patients with SLE and end-stage renal disease who are receiving azathioprine and low-dose corticosteroids.

  19. Endogenous and Synthetic Cannabinoids as Therapeutics in Retinal Disease

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    Despina Kokona

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The functional significance of cannabinoids in ocular physiology and disease has been reported some decades ago. In the early 1970s, subjects who smoked Cannabis sativa developed lower intraocular pressure (IOP. This led to the isolation of phytocannabinoids from this plant and the study of their therapeutic effects in glaucoma. The main treatment of this disease to date involves the administration of drugs mediating either the decrease of aqueous humour synthesis or the increase of its outflow and thus reduces IOP. However, the reduction of IOP is not sufficient to prevent visual field loss. Retinal diseases, such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, have been defined as neurodegenerative diseases and characterized by ischemia-induced excitotoxicity and loss of retinal neurons. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies must be applied in order to target retinal cell death, reduction of visual acuity, and blindness. The aim of the present review is to address the neuroprotective and therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in retinal disease.

  20. Endogenous and Synthetic Cannabinoids as Therapeutics in Retinal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokona, Despina; Georgiou, Panagiota-Christina; Kounenidakis, Mihalis; Kiagiadaki, Foteini; Thermos, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    The functional significance of cannabinoids in ocular physiology and disease has been reported some decades ago. In the early 1970s, subjects who smoked Cannabis sativa developed lower intraocular pressure (IOP). This led to the isolation of phytocannabinoids from this plant and the study of their therapeutic effects in glaucoma. The main treatment of this disease to date involves the administration of drugs mediating either the decrease of aqueous humour synthesis or the increase of its outflow and thus reduces IOP. However, the reduction of IOP is not sufficient to prevent visual field loss. Retinal diseases, such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, have been defined as neurodegenerative diseases and characterized by ischemia-induced excitotoxicity and loss of retinal neurons. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies must be applied in order to target retinal cell death, reduction of visual acuity, and blindness. The aim of the present review is to address the neuroprotective and therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in retinal disease. PMID:26881135

  1. Enhanced generation of retinal progenitor cells from human retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by amniotic fluid

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    Sanie-Jahromi Fatemeh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal progenitor cells are a convenient source of cell replacement therapy in retinal degenerative disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression patterns of the homeobox genes PAX6 and CHX10 (retinal progenitor markers during treatment of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells with amniotic fluid (AF, RPE cells harvested from neonatal cadaver globes were cultured in a mixture of DMEM and Ham's F12 supplemented with 10% FBS. At different passages, cells were trypsinized and co-cultured with 30% AF obtained from normal fetuses of 1416 weeks gestational age. Results Compared to FBS-treated controls, AF-treated cultures exhibited special morphological changes in culture, including appearance of spheroid colonies, improved initial cell adhesion and ordered cell alignment. Cell proliferation assays indicated a remarkable increase in the proliferation rate of RPE cells cultivated in 30% AF-supplemented medium, compared with those grown in the absence of AF. Immunocytochemical analyses exhibited nuclear localization of retinal progenitor markers at a ratio of 33% and 27% for CHX10 and PAX6, respectively. This indicated a 3-fold increase in retinal progenitor markers in AF-treated cultures compared to FBS-treated controls. Real-time PCR data of retinal progenitor genes (PAX6, CHX10 and VSX-1 confirmed these results and demonstrated AF's capacity for promoting retinal progenitor cell generation. Conclusion Taken together, the results suggest that AF significantly promotes the rate of retinal progenitor cell generation, indicating that AF can be used as an enriched supplement for serum-free media used for the in vitro propagation of human progenitor cells.

  2. Generation of Storable Retinal Organoids and Retinal Pigmented Epithelium from Adherent Human iPS Cells in Xeno-Free and Feeder-Free Conditions.

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    Reichman, Sacha; Slembrouck, Amélie; Gagliardi, Giuliana; Chaffiol, Antoine; Terray, Angélique; Nanteau, Céline; Potey, Anais; Belle, Morgane; Rabesandratana, Oriane; Duebel, Jens; Orieux, Gael; Nandrot, Emeline F; Sahel, José-Alain; Goureau, Olivier

    2017-05-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are potentially useful in regenerative therapies for retinal disease. For medical applications, therapeutic retinal cells, such as retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells or photoreceptor precursors, must be generated under completely defined conditions. To this purpose, we have developed a two-step xeno-free/feeder-free (XF/FF) culture system to efficiently differentiate hiPSCs into retinal cells. This simple method, relies only on adherent hiPSCs cultured in chemically defined media, bypassing embryoid body formation. In less than 1 month, adherent hiPSCs are able to generate self-forming neuroretinal-like structures containing retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). Floating cultures of isolated structures enabled the differentiation of RPCs into all types of retinal cells in a sequential overlapping order, with the generation of transplantation-compatible CD73 + photoreceptor precursors in less than 100 days. Our XF/FF culture conditions allow the maintenance of both mature cones and rods in retinal organoids until 280 days with specific photoreceptor ultrastructures. Moreover, both hiPSC-derived retinal organoids and dissociated retinal cells can be easily cryopreserved while retaining their phenotypic characteristics and the preservation of CD73 + photoreceptor precursors. Concomitantly to neural retina, this process allows the generation of RPE cells that can be effortlessly amplified, passaged, and frozen while retaining a proper RPE phenotype. These results demonstrate that simple and efficient retinal differentiation of adherent hiPSCs can be accomplished in XF/FF conditions. This new method is amenable to the development of an in vitro GMP-compliant retinal cell manufacturing protocol allowing large-scale production and banking of hiPSC-derived retinal cells and tissues. Stem Cells 2017;35:1176-1188. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  3. Robust Differentiation of mRNA-Reprogrammed Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Toward a Retinal Lineage.

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    Sridhar, Akshayalakshmi; Ohlemacher, Sarah K; Langer, Kirstin B; Meyer, Jason S

    2016-04-01

    The derivation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from patient-specific sources has allowed for the development of novel approaches to studies of human development and disease. However, traditional methods of generating hiPSCs involve the risks of genomic integration and potential constitutive expression of pluripotency factors and often exhibit low reprogramming efficiencies. The recent description of cellular reprogramming using synthetic mRNA molecules might eliminate these shortcomings; however, the ability of mRNA-reprogrammed hiPSCs to effectively give rise to retinal cell lineages has yet to be demonstrated. Thus, efforts were undertaken to test the ability and efficiency of mRNA-reprogrammed hiPSCs to yield retinal cell types in a directed, stepwise manner. hiPSCs were generated from human fibroblasts via mRNA reprogramming, with parallel cultures of isogenic human fibroblasts reprogrammed via retroviral delivery of reprogramming factors. New lines of mRNA-reprogrammed hiPSCs were established and were subsequently differentiated into a retinal fate using established protocols in a directed, stepwise fashion. The efficiency of retinal differentiation from these lines was compared with retroviral-derived cell lines at various stages of development. On differentiation, mRNA-reprogrammed hiPSCs were capable of robust differentiation to a retinal fate, including the derivation of photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells, at efficiencies often equal to or greater than their retroviral-derived hiPSC counterparts. Thus, given that hiPSCs derived through mRNA-based reprogramming strategies offer numerous advantages owing to the lack of genomic integration or constitutive expression of pluripotency genes, such methods likely represent a promising new approach for retinal stem cell research, in particular, those for translational applications. In the current report, the ability to derive mRNA-reprogrammed human induced pluripotent stem cells (hi

  4. No Evidence for Retinal Damage Evolving from Reduced Retinal Blood Flow in Carotid Artery Disease

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    Henning Heßler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Carotid artery disease (CAD comprising high-grade internal carotid artery stenosis (CAS or carotid artery occlusion (CAO may lead to ipsilateral impaired cerebral blood flow and reduced retinal blood supply. Objective. To examine the influence of chronic CAD on retinal blood flow, retinal morphology, and visual function. Methods. Patients with unilateral CAS ≥ 50% (ECST criteria or CAO were grouped according to the grade of the stenosis and to the flow direction of the ophthalmic artery (OA. Retinal perfusion was measured by transorbital duplex ultrasound, assessing central retinal artery (CRA blood flow velocities. In addition, optic nerve and optic nerve sheath diameter were measured. Optical coherence tomography (OCT was performed to study retinal morphology. Visual function was assessed using high- and low-contrast visual paradigms. Results. Twenty-seven patients were enrolled. Eyes with CAS ≥ 80%/CAO and retrograde OA blood flow showed a significant reduction in CRA peak systolic velocity (no-CAD side: 0.130±0.035 m/s, CAS/CAO side: 0.098±0.028; p=0.005; n=12. OCT, optic nerve thicknesses, and visual functional parameters did not show a significant difference. Conclusion. Despite assessable hemodynamic effects, chronic high-grade CAD does not lead to gaugeable morphological or functional changes of the retina.

  5. Genetic characterization and disease mechanism of retinitis pigmentosa; current scenario.

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    Ali, Muhammad Umar; Rahman, Muhammad Saif Ur; Cao, Jiang; Yuan, Ping Xi

    2017-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetically transmitted disorders affecting 1 in 3000-8000 individual people worldwide ultimately affecting the quality of life. Retinitis pigmentosa is characterized as a heterogeneous genetic disorder which leads by progressive devolution of the retina leading to a progressive visual loss. It can occur in syndromic (with Usher syndrome and Bardet-Biedl syndrome) as well as non-syndromic nature. The mode of inheritance can be X-linked, autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive manner. To date 58 genes have been reported to associate with retinitis pigmentosa most of them are either expressed in photoreceptors or the retinal pigment epithelium. This review focuses on the disease mechanisms and genetics of retinitis pigmentosa. As retinitis pigmentosa is tremendously heterogeneous disorder expressing a multiplicity of mutations; different variations in the same gene might induce different disorders. In recent years, latest technologies including whole-exome sequencing contributing effectively to uncover the hidden genesis of retinitis pigmentosa by reporting new genetic mutations. In future, these advancements will help in better understanding the genotype-phenotype correlations of disease and likely to develop new therapies.

  6. Poly(trimethylene carbonate) as an elastic biodegradable film for human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorkio, A.; Haimi, Suvi; Verdoold, Vincent; Juuti-Uusitalo, K.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Skottman, H.

    2017-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cell therapies show tremendous potential for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. A tissue engineering approach, where cells are delivered to the subretinal space on a biodegradable carrier as a sheet, shows great

  7. Applications of CRISPR/Cas9 in retinal degenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying-Qian; Tang, Luo-Sheng; Yoshida, Shigeo; Zhou, Ye-Di

    2017-01-01

    Gene therapy is a potentially effective treatment for retinal degenerative diseases. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system has been developed as a new genome-editing tool in ophthalmic studies. Recent advances in researches showed that CRISPR/Cas9 has been applied in generating animal models as well as gene therapy in vivo of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). It has also been shown as a potential attempt for clinic by combining with other technologies such as adeno-associated virus (AAV) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this review, we highlight the main points of further prospect of using CRISPR/Cas9 in targeting retinal degeneration. We also emphasize the potential applications of this technique in treating retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:28503441

  8. Clinical and immunological features of retinal vasculitis in systemic diseases

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    Paović Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Vasculitis is a clinical, pathologic process characterized by inflammation and necrosis of blood vessel occurring anywhere in the body. The aim of the study was to present some clinical and immunologic features of retinal vasculitis in systemic diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis, Behcet's diseases, and others. Methods. A total of 1 254 patients with uveitis were included in the study. The immunochemical diagnostic methods were used to determine the pathogenesis of ocular manifestations. Ocular manifestations were examined using biomicroscope, direct or indirect ophtalmoscopy. Results. Primary retinal vasculitis was diagnosed in 85/1254 (6.8% of total uveitis. In more than half of the cases of vasculitis (58.8%, both arteries and veins were involved in inflammatory process. Periphlebitis was diagnosed far more commonly (36.5% than periarteritis (4.7%. Retinal vasculitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus was characterized by microinfarctions and the consequent foci of inflammatory cells or diseases of large arteries manifesting in vasospasm and occlusions. Cotton wool spots occurred in 38.3% and retinal hemorrhages in 34% of the cases. In this study periphlebitis of the retina was one of the less frequent ocular manifestations of multiple sclerosis. Comparing with the other changes of the retinal blood vessels, venous sheating occurred in 25.1% and occlusion and vein trombosis in 43.75% of the cases. Retinal vasculitis associated with chronic sarcoidosis occured in 37.5% of patients with sarcoidosis. The most frequent manifestation of ocular sarcoidosis was intermediary uveitis (43.75%. Anterior granulomatous uveitis occured in 37.5% of patients with sarcoidoses. Immune complexes occurred in 13/20 (65% of the patients. Antiretinal anti-S antibody in the serum occurred in 73% of the patients with retinal detachment as a complication of primary disease and in 25% those with vasculitis

  9. EFFECTUAL HUMAN AUTHENTICATION FOR CRITICAL SECURITY APPLICATIONS USING RETINAL IMAGES

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    L. Latha

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A robust method of human authentication based on the retinal blood vessel pattern is presented in this paper. This method entails a segmentation process to identify retinal blood vessel pattern, template generation consisting of the bifurcation points in the retina and matching of the intersection points in the template patterns. The number of matched blood vessel intersection points between the two patterns compared is used as a measure of similarity. As Liveness detection is a highly desirable anti-spoofing measure in biometric authentication, it is ensured while acquiring retinal images in realtime. The validity of our approach is verified with experimental results obtained from 603 comparisons made using 303 retinal images from three different publicly available databases, namely DRIVE, VARIA and STARE. We found that the proposed retinal recognition method gives 100%, 96.3% and 91.1% recognition rates respectively for the above databases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that uses a large number of retinal images from different retinal databases for the authentication purpose.

  10. Cytomegalovirus retinitis after central retinal vein occlusion in a patient on systemic immunosuppression: does venooclusive disease predispose to cytomegalovirus retinitis in patients already at risk?

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    Welling JD

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available John D Welling, Ahmad B Tarabishy, John ChristoforidisDepartment of Ophthalmology, Havener Eye Institute, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Cytomegalovirus (CMV retinitis remains the most common opportunistic ocular infection in immunocompromised patients. Patients with immunocompromising diseases, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, inherited immunodeficiency states, malignancies, and those on systemic immunosuppressive therapy, are known to be at risk. Recently, it has been suggested that patients undergoing intravitreal injection of immunosuppressive agents may also be predisposed. One previous case report speculated that there may be an additional risk for CMV retinitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with venoocclusive disease. This case study presents a case of CMV retinitis following central retinal vein occlusion in a patient on systemic immunosuppressants.Keywords: cytomegalovirus retinitis, central retinal vein occlusion, immunosuppression, solid organ transplant, venous stasis, risk factor

  11. Transcriptome of the human retina, retinal pigmented epithelium and choroid

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    Tian, Lifeng; Kazmierkiewicz, Krista L; Bowman, Anita S; Li, Mingyao; Curcio, Christine A; Stambolian, Dwight E

    2015-01-01

    The retina and its adjacent supporting tissues -- retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and choroid -- are critical structures in human eyes required for normal visual perception. Abnormal changes in these layers have been implicated in diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. With the advent of high-throughput methods, such as serial analysis of gene expression, cDNA microarray, and RNA sequencing, there is unprecedented opportunity to facilitate our understanding of the normal retina, RPE, and choroid. This information can be used to identify dysfunction in age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. In this review, we describe the current status in our understanding of these transcriptomes through the use of high throughput techniques. PMID:25645700

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of human retinal detachment reveals both inflammatory response and photoreceptor death.

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    Marie-Noëlle Delyfer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinal detachment often leads to a severe and permanent loss of vision and its therapeutic management remains to this day exclusively surgical. We have used surgical specimens to perform a differential analysis of the transcriptome of human retinal tissues following detachment in order to identify new potential pharmacological targets that could be used in combination with surgery to further improve final outcome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Statistical analysis reveals major involvement of the immune response in the disease. Interestingly, using a novel approach relying on coordinated expression, the interindividual variation was monitored to unravel a second crucial aspect of the pathological process: the death of photoreceptor cells. Within the genes identified, the expression of the major histocompatibility complex I gene HLA-C enables diagnosis of the disease, while PKD2L1 and SLCO4A1 -which are both down-regulated- act synergistically to provide an estimate of the duration of the retinal detachment process. Our analysis thus reveals the two complementary cellular and molecular aspects linked to retinal detachment: an immune response and the degeneration of photoreceptor cells. We also reveal that the human specimens have a higher clinical value as compared to artificial models that point to IL6 and oxidative stress, not implicated in the surgical specimens studied here. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This systematic analysis confirmed the occurrence of both neurodegeneration and inflammation during retinal detachment, and further identifies precisely the modification of expression of the different genes implicated in these two phenomena. Our data henceforth give a new insight into the disease process and provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies aimed at limiting inflammation and photoreceptor damage associated with retinal detachment and, in turn, improving visual prognosis after retinal surgery.

  13. AAV Serotype Testing on Cultured Human Donor Retinal Explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, Thilo M; Pellissier, Lucie P; Vos, Rogier M; van Dijk, Elon H C; Boon, Camiel J F; Wijnholds, J.

    2018-01-01

    This protocol details on a screening method for infectivity and tropism of different serotypes of adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) on human retinal explants with cell-type specific or ubiquitous green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression vectors. Eyes from deceased adult human donors are enucleated

  14. [Effect of extract of Lycium barbarum L. on adult human retinal nerve cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhi-jun; Wang, Jin-jin; Li, Gen-lin

    2012-09-01

    To study possible protective effects of extract of Lycium barbarum L. on the cultured human retinal nerve cells. Retinal nerve cells were co-cultured with the extract of Lycium barbarum L. and 24 hours and 72 hours later, retinal nerve cells were respectively used to evaluate cell proliferation with MTT assays; to observe ultracellular structural alternation with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and to evaluate mitochondrial membrane potentials (MMP) of cells with confocal microscopy. The peaks of MMP between experiment group and control group were compared using one-way analysis of variance. Co-cultured retinal nerve cells with the extract were shown survival well under the TEM including photoreceptor segments remaining well, abundant mitochondria in inner segments and well-distributed chromatin in photoreceptor nucleus (F = 124.110, P < 0.05). The addition of the extract promoted survival of adult retinal neurons significantly in concentration-dependent manner with the strongest effect in 20 g/L. Cell survival rate (24 h and 72 h); (223.23 ± 12.13)% and (252.35 ± 13.24)%. The peak of MMP increased 848% after the first adding of the extract (P = 0.000) and 1152% after the second adding of the extract (P = 0.000). It showed that the extract could enhance the MMP significantly with undulatory property. The extract of Lycium barbarum L. showed protective effects on cultured cells and could be used in treatment of some retinal diseases in future.

  15. Retinoid metabolism in cultured human retinal pigment epithelium.

    OpenAIRE

    S. R. Das; Gouras, P.

    1988-01-01

    Uptake, esterification and release of all-trans-retinol in primary cultures of human retinal epithelium were studied. Cultured cells were supplemented with 3H-labelled 11,12-all-trans-retinol, using fatty-acid-free albumin as the carrier. This led to incorporation of retinal and the formation of all-trans- and 11-cis-retinyl palmitate. The metabolism of the all-trans ester was monitored in a medium containing various concentrations of foetal-bovine serum (FBS). In 20% (v/v) FBS, the ester was...

  16. Progressive outer retinal necrosis: manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Phey Feng; Lim, Rongxuan; Antonakis, Serafeim N; Almeida, Goncalo C

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 54-year-old man who developed progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) as an initial manifestation of HIV infection without any significant risk factors for infection with HIV. PORN is usually found as a manifestation of known AIDS late in the disease. Our patient presented with transient visual loss followed by decrease in visual acuity and facial rash. Subsequent investigation revealed anterior chamber tap positive for varicella zoster virus (VZV), as well as HIV positivity, with an initial CD4 count of 48 cells/µL. Systemic and intravitreal antivirals against VZV, and highly active antiretroviral therapy against HIV were started, which halted further progression of retinal necrosis. This case highlights the importance of suspecting PORN where there is a rapidly progressive retinitis, and also testing the patient for HIV, so appropriate treatment can be started. PMID:25948844

  17. Progressive outer retinal necrosis: manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Phey Feng; Lim, Rongxuan; Antonakis, Serafeim N; Almeida, Goncalo C

    2015-05-06

    We present the case of a 54-year-old man who developed progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) as an initial manifestation of HIV infection without any significant risk factors for infection with HIV. PORN is usually found as a manifestation of known AIDS late in the disease. Our patient presented with transient visual loss followed by decrease in visual acuity and facial rash. Subsequent investigation revealed anterior chamber tap positive for varicella zoster virus (VZV), as well as HIV positivity, with an initial CD4 count of 48 cells/µL. Systemic and intravitreal antivirals against VZV, and highly active antiretroviral therapy against HIV were started, which halted further progression of retinal necrosis. This case highlights the importance of suspecting PORN where there is a rapidly progressive retinitis, and also testing the patient for HIV, so appropriate treatment can be started. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Retinal thickness correlates with parietal cortical atrophy in early-onset Alzheimer's disease and controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Haan, Jurre; Janssen, Sarah F.; van de Kreeke, Jacoba A.; Scheltens, Philip; Verbraak, Frank D.; Bouwman, Femke H.

    2018-01-01

    The retina may reflect Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathological changes and is easily visualized with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Retinal thickness decrease has been correlated to AD, however, without information on amyloid status. We correlated retinal (layer) thickness to AD biomarkers

  19. Genome editing: the breakthrough technology for inherited retinal disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew J; Carter, Stephen P; Kennedy, Breandán N

    2017-10-01

    Genetic alterations resulting in a dysfunctional retinal pigment epithelium and/or degenerating photoreceptors cause impaired vision. These juxtaposed cells in the retina of the posterior eye are crucial for the visual cycle or phototransduction. Deficits in these biochemical processes perturb neural processing of images capturing the external environment. Notably, there is a distinct lack of clinically approved pharmacological, cell- or gene-based therapies for inherited retinal disease. Gene editing technologies are rapidly advancing as a realistic therapeutic option. Areas covered: Recent discovery of endonuclease-mediated gene editing technologies has culminated in a surge of investigations into their therapeutic potential. In this review, the authors discuss gene editing technologies and their applicability in treating inherited retinal diseases, the limitations of the technology and the research obstacles to overcome before editing a patient's genome becomes a viable treatment option. Expert opinion: The ability to strategically edit a patient's genome constitutes a treatment revolution. However, concerns remain over the safety and efficacy of either transplanting iPSC-derived retinal cells following ex vivo gene editing, or with direct gene editing in vivo. Ultimately, further refinements to improve efficacy and safety profiles are paramount for gene editing to emerge as a widely available treatment option.

  20. Zika virus infection of cellular components of the blood-retinal barriers: implications for viral associated congenital ocular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Tracoyia; Alcendor, Donald J

    2017-03-03

    Ocular abnormalities present in microcephalic infants with presumed Zika virus (ZIKV) congenital disease includes focal pigment mottling of the retina, chorioretinal atrophy, optic nerve abnormalities, and lens dislocation. Target cells in the ocular compartment for ZIKV infectivity are unknown. The cellular response of ocular cells to ZIKV infection has not been described. Mechanisms for viral dissemination in the ocular compartment of ZIKV-infected infants and adults have not been reported. Here, we identify target cells for ZIKV infectivity in both the inner and outer blood-retinal barriers (IBRB and OBRB), describe the cytokine expression profile in the IBRB after ZIKV exposure, and propose a mechanism for viral dissemination in the retina. We expose primary cellular components of the IBRB including human retinal microvascular endothelial cells, retinal pericytes, and Müller cells as well as retinal pigmented epithelial cells of the OBRB to the PRVABC56 strain of ZIKV. Viral infectivity was analyzed by microscopy, immunofluorescence, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and qRT-PCR). Angiogenic and proinflammatory cytokines were measured by Luminex assays. We find by immunofluorescent staining using the Flavivirus 4G2 monoclonal antibody that retinal endothelial cells and pericytes of the IBRB and retinal pigmented epithelial cells of the OBRB are fully permissive for ZIKV infection but not Müller cells when compared to mock-infected controls. We confirmed ZIKV infectivity in retinal endothelial cells, retinal pericytes, and retinal pigmented epithelial cells by RT-PCR and qRT-PCR using ZIKV-specific oligonucleotide primers. Expression profiles by Luminex assays in retinal endothelial cells infected with ZIKV revealed a marginal increase in levels of beta-2 microglobulin (β2-m), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP

  1. Photobiomodulation for the treatment of retinal diseases: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivayla I. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Photobiomodulation (PBM, also known as low level laser therapy, has recently risen to the attention of the ophthalmology community as a promising new approach to treat a variety of retinal conditions including age-related macular degeneration, retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy, Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy, amblyopia, methanol-induced retinal damage, and possibly others. This review evaluates the existing research pertaining to PBM applications in the retina, with a focus on the mechanisms of action and clinical outcomes. All available literature until April 2015 was reviewed using PubMed and the following keywords: “photobiomodulation AND retina”, “low level light therapy AND retina”, “low level laser therapy AND retina”, and “FR/NIR therapy AND retina”. In addition, the relevant references listed within the papers identified through PubMed were incorporated. The literature supports the conclusion that the low-cost and non-invasive nature of PBM, coupled with the first promising clinical reports and the numerous preclinical-studies in animal models, make PBM well-poised to become an important player in the treatment of a wide range of retinal disorders. Nevertheless, large-scale clinical trials will be necessary to establish the PBM therapeutic ranges for the various retinal diseases, as well as to gain a deeper understanding of its mechanisms of action.

  2. Portable, low-priced retinal imager for eye disease screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliz, Peter; Nemeth, Sheila; VanNess, Richard; Barriga, E. S.; Zamora, Gilberto

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a portable, low-priced, easy to use non-mydriatic retinal camera for eye disease screening in underserved urban and rural locations. Existing portable retinal imagers do not meet the requirements of a low-cost camera with sufficient technical capabilities (field of view, image quality, portability, battery power, and ease-of-use) to be distributed widely to low volume clinics, such as the offices of single primary care physicians serving rural communities or other economically stressed healthcare facilities. Our approach for Smart i-Rx is based primarily on a significant departure from current generations of desktop and hand-held commercial retinal cameras as well as those under development. Our techniques include: 1) Exclusive use of off-the-shelf components; 2) Integration of retinal imaging device into low-cost, high utility camera mount and chin rest; 3) Unique optical and illumination designed for small form factor; and 4) Exploitation of autofocus technology built into present digital SLR recreational cameras; and 5) Integration of a polarization technique to avoid the corneal reflex. In a prospective study, 41 out of 44 diabetics were imaged successfully. No imaging was attempted on three of the subjects due to noticeably small pupils (less than 2mm). The images were of sufficient quality to detect abnormalities related to diabetic retinopathy, such as microaneurysms and exudates. These images were compared with ones taken non-mydriatically with a Canon CR-1 Mark II camera. No cases identified as having DR by expert retinal graders were missed in the Smart i-Rx images.

  3. Surgically Induced Focal Retinal Detachment Does Not Cause Detectable SD-OCT Retinal Changes in Normal Human Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogachi, Kaitlin; Wolfe, Jeremy D; Kashani, Amir H

    2017-10-01

    Induction of focal retinal detachment (RD) for subretinal delivery of stem cells and gene therapy is increasingly common. In order to determine if this procedure has an adverse impact on the retina, we use spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to evaluate the pre- and postoperative retinal anatomy of the incidentally detached normal retina surrounding large submacular hemorrhages (SMH) during surgical displacement procedures. Retrospective, observational study of human subjects with monocular SMH evaluated before and after surgical displacement using clinical exam, fundus photography, and SD-OCT. Manual measurements of the inner retinal thickness (IRT), outer retinal thickness (ORT), and full retinal thickness (FRT) were made in regions involving the SMH and surrounding normal retina. Comparison of retinal thickness measurements was made using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Seven eyes were included in this study. All eyes successfully underwent surgical displacement of SMH. Visual acuity improved in 6/7 subjects and was unchanged in the remaining subject. Incidental RD of the normal retinal regions surrounding the SMH did not cause any significant change in IRT, ORT, or FRT that was detectable by SD-OCT. In contrast, mean FRT overlying regions with SMH was significantly greater before surgery compared to after displacement of SMH or normal adjacent retina. Surgically induced focal RD does not cause detectable retinal changes in the incidentally detached normal retina surrounding large SMH. Therefore, surgical induction of focal RD should not be considered to have the same adverse impact on the retina as pathologic RD.

  4. Effects of Retinal Eccentricity on Human Manual Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovici, Alexandru; Zaal, Peter M. T.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of viewing a primary flight display at different retinal eccentricities on human manual control behavior and performance. Ten participants performed a pitch tracking task while looking at a simplified primary flight display at different horizontal and vertical retinal eccentricities, and with two different controlled dynamics. Tracking performance declined at higher eccentricity angles and participants behaved more nonlinearly. The visual error rate gain increased with eccentricity for single-integrator-like controlled dynamics, but decreased for double-integrator-like dynamics. Participants' visual time delay was up to 100 ms higher at the highest horizontal eccentricity compared to foveal viewing. Overall, vertical eccentricity had a larger impact than horizontal eccentricity on most of the human manual control parameters and performance. Results might be useful in the design of displays and procedures for critical flight conditions such as in an aerodynamic stall.

  5. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Clinical Trial Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    diseases and dry AMD; • Established patient databases at the University of Utah and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey CTECs, classified...clinical trial, 2) as many as 50% affected are missed if you don’t include those under the age of 18, and 3) while Stargardt’s lends itself to a pediatric ...population study, the risk should be assessed in an adult population prior to treating the pediatric population. Final Discussions: Suggestions

  6. Retinal microvascular structure and function in patients with risk factors of atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fiadh, Ali H; Farouque, Omar; Kawasaki, Ryo; Nguyen, T T; Uddin, Nazim; Freeman, Melanie; Patel, Sheila K; Burrell, Louise M; Wong, Tien Y

    2014-04-01

    Retinal microvascular signs are markers of cardiovascular disease risk. There are limited data, on relationships between retinal microvascular signs and retinal microvascular endothelial function. We sought to determine the relationship of retinal vascular signs with retinal microvascular endothelial function in patients with or at high risk of coronary artery disease. Participants with atherosclerosis risk factors and coronary disease (n=258; mean age 57±11 years) were recruited to have static and dynamic retinal vascular assessment. Retinal arteriolar dilatation in response to flicker light (FI-RAD) was measured using the Digital Vessel Analyser and expressed as percentage increase over baseline diameter. Static retinal photographs were acquired utilising a digital fundus camera for measurement of central retinal artery and vein equivalent (CRAE and CRVE), arteriovenous nicking (AVN) and focal arteriolar narrowing (FAN). Intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.82 for flicker-light induced retinal arteriolar dilatation. There were modest associations in retinal vascular measurements between eyes. For each 10 μm decrease in retinal arteriolar diameter, the absolute increase in FI-RAD was 0.28% (95% CI 0.11, 0.45; p=0.002) independent of age, gender and atherosclerosis risk factors. AVN and FAN were associated with attenuated FI-RAD (β=-0.67%; 95% CI -1.20, -0.15; p=0.012) and (β=-0.83%; 95% CI -1.44, -0.23; p=0.007) respectively after adjustment for age and gender. Assessment of retinal microvascular endothelial function is reproducible and correlated with retinal microvascular structure and signs, independent of atherosclerosis risk factors. Assessment of retinal vascular structure and function may provide insights into atherosclerotic disease. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Frequency encoded optical assessment of human retinal physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Michaely, Roland; Bachmann, Adrian; Lassner, Theo; Blatter, Cedric

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate in-vivo functional imaging of the human retina with Fourier domain optical coherence tomography employing frequency encoding of an excitation pattern. The principle is based on projecting a modulated rectangular pattern across the foveal region and acquiring a time series of B-Scans at the same vertical position across the pattern. The idea is to modulate the excitation with a frequency that is distinct from the heartbeat and irregular motion artifacts. Fourier analysis of the time series at each transverse position in the B-scan series allows assessing the retinal response as change in the FDOCT reflectivity signal exactly at the pattern modulation frequency. We observe a change in retinal reflectivity within the region of the outer segment photoreceptor layer exactly at the pattern modulation frequency.

  8. DIETARY HYPERGLYCEMIA, GLYCEMIC INDEX AND METABOLIC RETINAL DISEASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chung-Jung; Taylor, Allen

    2014-01-01

    The glycemic index (GI) indicates how fast blood glucose is raised after consuming a carbohydrate-containing food. Human metabolic studies indicate that GI is related to patho-physiological responses after meals. Compared with a low-GI meal, a high-GI meal is characterized with hyperglycemia during the early postprandial stage (0~2 h) and a compensatory hyperlipidemia associated with counter-regulatory hormone responses during late postprandial stage (4~6 h). Over the past three decades, several human health disorders have been related to GI. The strongest relationship suggests that consuming low-GI foods prevents diabetic complications. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a complication of diabetes. In this aspect, GI appears to be useful as a practical guideline to help diabetic people choose foods. Abundant epidemiological evidence also indicates positive associations between GI and risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and more recently, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in people without diabetes. Although data from randomized controlled intervention trials are scanty, these observations are strongly supported by evolving molecular mechanisms which explain the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia. This wide range of evidence implies that dietary hyperglycemia is etiologically related to human aging and diseases, including DR and AMD. In this context, these diseases can be considered metabolic retinal diseases. Molecular theories that explain hyperglycemic pathogenesis involve a mitochondria-associated pathway and four glycolysis-associated pathways, including advanced glycation end products formation, protein kinase C activation, polyol pathway, and hexosamine pathway. While the four glycolysis-associated pathways appear to be universal for both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, the mitochondria-associated mechanism appears to be most relevant to the hyperglycemic, normoxic pathogenesis. For diseases that affect tissues with highly active metabolism and that

  9. Melanopsin expressing human retinal ganglion cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Christensen, Anders Tolstrup; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    microscopy and 3D reconstruction of melanopsin immunoreactive (-ir) RGCs, we applied the criteria used in mouse on human melanopsin-ir RGCs. We identified M1, displaced M1, M2 and M4 cells. We found two other subtypes of melanopsin-ir RGCs, which were named "gigantic M1 (GM1)" and "gigantic displaced M1 (GDM...

  10. Protective Effects of Memantine on Hydroquinone-Treated Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells and Human Retinal Müller Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Mohamed Tarek; Ramirez, Claudio; Schneider, Kevin; Atilano, Shari R; Limb, Gloria Astrid; Kuppermann, Baruch D; Kenney, Maria Cristina

    2017-10-01

    Memantine (MEM) acts on the glutamatergic system by blocking N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors. The role that MEM plays in protecting retinal cells is unknown. Hydroquinone (HQ) is one of the cytotoxic components in cigarette smoke. In the present study, we tested whether pretreatment with MEM could protect against the cytotoxic effects of HQ on human retinal pigment epithelium cells (ARPE-19) and human retinal Müller cells (MIO-M1) in vitro. Cells were plated, pretreated for 6 h with 30 μM of MEM, and then exposed for 24 h to 200, 100, 50, and 25 μM of HQ while MEM was still present. Cell viability (CV), reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays were performed. HQ-treated cells showed a dose-dependent decrease in CV and ΔΨm, but an increase in ROS production and LDH levels in both cell lines. MEM pretreatment reversed the CV in 50, 100, and 200 μM doses in ARPE-19 cells and at all HQ concentrations in MIO-M1 cells compared to HQ-treated cultures. ROS production was reversed in all HQ concentrations in both cell lines. ΔΨm was significantly increased after MEM pretreatment only in 50 μM HQ concentration for both cell lines. LDH levels were decreased at 50 and 25 μM HQ in ARPE-19 and MIO-M1 cells, respectively. HQ-induced toxicity is concentration dependent in ARPE-19 and MIO-M1 cultures. MEM exerts protective effects against HQ-induced toxicity on human retinal pigment epithelial and Müller cells in vitro.

  11. 3D culture of human pluripotent stem cells in RGD-alginate hydrogel improves retinal tissue development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Nicola C; Hallam, Dean; Karimi, Ayesha; Mellough, Carla B; Chen, Jinju; Steel, David H W; Lako, Majlinda

    2017-02-01

    No treatments exist to effectively treat many retinal diseases. Retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and neural retina can be generated from human embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (hESCs/hiPSCs). The efficacy of current protocols is, however, limited. It was hypothesised that generation of laminated neural retina and/or RPE from hiPSCs/hESCs could be enhanced by three dimensional (3D) culture in hydrogels. hiPSC- and hESC-derived embryoid bodies (EBs) were encapsulated in 0.5% RGD-alginate; 1% RGD-alginate; hyaluronic acid (HA) or HA/gelatin hydrogels and maintained until day 45. Compared with controls (no gel), 0.5% RGD-alginate increased: the percentage of EBs with pigmented RPE foci; the percentage EBs with optic vesicles (OVs) and pigmented RPE simultaneously; the area covered by RPE; frequency of RPE cells (CRALBP+); expression of RPE markers (TYR and RPE65) and the retinal ganglion cell marker, MATH5. Furthermore, 0.5% RGD-alginate hydrogel encapsulation did not adversely affect the expression of other neural retina markers (PROX1, CRX, RCVRN, AP2α or VSX2) as determined by qRT-PCR, or the percentage of VSX2 positive cells as determined by flow cytometry. 1% RGD-alginate increased the percentage of EBs with OVs and/or RPE, but did not significantly influence any other measures of retinal differentiation. HA-based hydrogels had no significant effect on retinal tissue development. The results indicated that derivation of retinal tissue from hESCs/hiPSCs can be enhanced by culture in 0.5% RGD-alginate hydrogel. This RGD-alginate scaffold may be useful for derivation, transport and transplantation of neural retina and RPE, and may also enhance formation of other pigmented, neural or epithelial tissue. The burden of retinal disease is ever growing with the increasing age of the world-wide population. Transplantation of retinal tissue derived from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is considered a promising treatment. However, derivation of

  12. Does the Adult Human Ciliary Body Epithelium Contain “True” Retinal Stem Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Frøen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports of retinal stem cells being present in several locations of the adult eye have sparked great hopes that they may be used to treat the millions of people worldwide who suffer from blindness as a result of retinal disease or injury. A population of proliferative cells derived from the ciliary body epithelium (CE has been considered one of the prime stem cell candidates, and as such they have received much attention in recent years. However, the true nature of these cells in the adult human eye has still not been fully elucidated, and the stem cell claim has become increasingly controversial in light of new and conflicting reports. In this paper, we will try to answer the question of whether the available evidence is strong enough for the research community to conclude that the adult human CE indeed harbors stem cells.

  13. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) in hereditary retinal degenerations: Layer-by-layer analyses in normal and diseased retinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yijun

    OCT is a new technique for non-invasive, non-contact, cross-sectional imaging of biological tissues with micrometer longitudinal resolution. As it applies to the field of ophthalmology, OCT can delineate retinal sublayers based on their backscattering characteristics, and permit quantitative measurement of the structure of retina in vivo. This dissertation intended to clarify the basis of the OCT signals and whether this procedure has potential for diagnosis and monitoring of human retinal degenerative diseases. Key to this goal are quantitation of OCT signal features and accurate, layer-by-layer correlation of these features with underlying retinal microanatomy. In normal and degenerate avian and swine retinas, OCT signal features were quantified using custom computer programs, and were correlated with cryosections of unfixed retinas obtained at the same retinal location. The results suggested a definable and quantifiable relationship between OCT signal components and retinal microanatomy. The correlation in the outer retina indicated that the OCT posterior highly reflective band, or the outer- retina-choroid complex (ORCC), is attributable to the photoreceptor layer, RPE, and anterior choroid. Further evidence of OCT signal origin was provided by the rd chicken and the rhodopsin P347L mutant transgenic swine. In these animals where photoreceptors had degenerated, OCT abnormalities were observed at the level of and vitreal to the ORCC, consistent with the hypothesis that photoreceptors contribute to the ORCC. Studies of quantitative OCT analysis in man were also performed. In selected hereditary retinal degenerative diseases in which there was regional difference in retinal function, frequently observed OCT abnormalities that were associated with visual dysfunction were reduced OCT thickness, reduced ORCC thickness, increased reflectivity posterior to ORCC, and abnormal OCT signal lamination. These preliminary results suggested that OCT abnormalities at the level

  14. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Linked Retinoschisis (XLRS) X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP) Usher Syndrome Other Retinal Diseases Glossary News & Research News & Research ... degenerate. Forms of RP and related diseases include Usher syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, and Bardet-Biedl syndrome, among ...

  15. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs for Retinal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. Schoenberger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are used extensively in ophthalmology for pain and photophobia after photorefractive surgery and to reduce miosis, inflammation, and cystoid macular edema following cataract surgery. In recent years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved new topical NSAIDs and previously approved NSAIDs have been reformulated. These changes may allow for greater drug penetration into the retina and thereby offer additional therapeutic advantages. For example, therapeutic effects on diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration may now be achievable. We provide an updated review on the scientific rationale and clinical use of NSAIDs for retinal disease.

  16. Analysis of the scattering performance of human retinal tissue layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dan; Gao, Zhisan; Ye, Haishui; Yuan, Qun

    2017-02-01

    Human retina is different from other ocular tissues, such as cornea, crystalline lens and vitreous because of high scattering performance. As an anisotropic tissue, we cannot neglect its impact on the polarization state of the scattered light. In this paper, Mie scattering and radiative transfer theory are applied to analyze the polarization state of backscattered light from four types of retinal tissues, including neural retina, retinal pigment epithelial (RPE), choroid and sclera. The results show that the most backscattered zones in different depths have almost the same electrical fields of Jones vector, which represents the polarization state of light, whether neural retina layer is under normal incidence or oblique incidence. Very little change occurs in the polarization of backscattered light compared to that of the incident light. Polarization distribution of backward scattered light from neural retina layer doesn't make apparent effects on polarization phase shifting in spectral domain OCT because its thickness is far less than photon mean free path, while other retinal tissues do not meet this rule.

  17. Retina tissue engineering by conjunctiva mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in fibrin gel: Hypotheses on novel approach to retinal diseases treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimannejad, Mostafa; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Nadri, Samad; Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad; Soleimani, Masoud; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Ai, Jafar

    2017-04-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age related macular degeneration (AMD) are two retinal diseases that progress by photoreceptor cells death. In retinal transplantation studies, stem and progenitor cells inject into the sub retinal space or vitreous and then these cells can be migrate to the site of retinal degeneration and locate in the host retina and restitute vision. Our hypothesis suggests that using human conjunctiva stem cells (as the source for increasing the number of human stem cells progenitor cells in retina dysfunction diseases) with fibrin gel and also assessing its relating in vitro (cellular and molecular processes) and in vivo (vision tests and pathology) could be a promising strategy for treatment of AMD and RP disorders. In this idea, we describe a novel approach for retina tissue engineering with differentiation of conjunctiva mesenchymal stem cells (CJMSCs) into photoreceptor-like cells in fibrin gel with induction medium contain taurine. For assessment of differentiation, immunocytochemistry and real time PCR are used for the expression of Rhodopsin, RPE65, Nestin as differentiated photoreceptor cell markers in 2D and 3D culture. The results show that fibrin gel will offer a proper 3D scaffold for CJMSCs derived photoreceptor cell-like cells. Application of immune-privileged, readily available sources of adult stem cells like human conjunctiva stem cells with fibrin gel would be a promising strategy to increase the number of photoreceptor progenitor cells and promote involuntary angiogenesis needed in retina layer repair and regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A method for the isolation and culture of adult rat retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells to study retinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janosch Peter Heller

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD affect the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and lead to the death of the epithelial cells and ultimately blindness. RPE transplantation is currently a major focus of eye research and clinical trials using human stem cell-derived RPE cells are ongoing. However, it remains to be established to which extent the source of RPE cells for transplantation affects their therapeutic efficacy and this needs to be explored in animal models. Autotransplantation of RPE cells has attractions as a therapy, but existing protocols to isolate adult RPE cells from rodents are technically difficult, time-consuming, have a low yield and are not optimized for long-term cell culturing. Here, we report a newly devised protocol which facilitates reliable and simple isolation and culture of RPE cells from adult rats. Incubation of a whole rat eyeball in 20 U/ml papain solution for 50 minutes yielded 4 x 104 viable RPE cells. These cells were hexagonal and pigmented upon culture. Using immunostaining, we demonstrated that the cells expressed RPE cell-specific marker proteins including cytokeratin 18 and RPE65, similar to RPE cells in vivo. Additionally, the cells were able to produce and secrete Bruch’s membrane matrix components similar to in vivo situation. Similarly, the cultured RPE cells adhered to isolated Bruch’s membrane as has previously been reported. Therefore, the protocol described in this article provides an efficient method for the rapid and easy isolation of high quantities of adult rat RPE cells. This provides a reliable platform for studying the therapeutic targets, testing the effects of drugs in a preclinical setup and to perform in vitro and in vivo transplantation experiments to study retinal diseases.

  19. A Method for the Isolation and Culture of Adult Rat Retinal Pigment Epithelial (RPE) Cells to Study Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Janosch P; Kwok, Jessica C F; Vecino, Elena; Martin, Keith R; Fawcett, James W

    2015-01-01

    Diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affect the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and lead to the death of the epithelial cells and ultimately blindness. RPE transplantation is currently a major focus of eye research and clinical trials using human stem cell-derived RPE cells are ongoing. However, it remains to be established to which extent the source of RPE cells for transplantation affects their therapeutic efficacy and this needs to be explored in animal models. Autotransplantation of RPE cells has attractions as a therapy, but existing protocols to isolate adult RPE cells from rodents are technically difficult, time-consuming, have a low yield and are not optimized for long-term cell culturing. Here, we report a newly devised protocol which facilitates reliable and simple isolation and culture of RPE cells from adult rats. Incubation of a whole rat eyeball in 20 U/ml papain solution for 50 min yielded 4 × 10(4) viable RPE cells. These cells were hexagonal and pigmented upon culture. Using immunostaining, we demonstrated that the cells expressed RPE cell-specific marker proteins including cytokeratin 18 and RPE65, similar to RPE cells in vivo. Additionally, the cells were able to produce and secrete Bruch's membrane matrix components similar to in vivo situation. Similarly, the cultured RPE cells adhered to isolated Bruch's membrane as has previously been reported. Therefore, the protocol described in this article provides an efficient method for the rapid and easy isolation of high quantities of adult rat RPE cells. This provides a reliable platform for studying the therapeutic targets, testing the effects of drugs in a preclinical setup and to perform in vitro and in vivo transplantation experiments to study retinal diseases.

  20. Cultured primary human fetal retinal pigment epithelium (hfRPE) as a model for evaluating RPE metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adijanto, Jeffrey; Philp, Nancy J

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been shown to contribute to age-related and proliferative retinal diseases. Over the past decade, the primary human fetal RPE (hfRPE) culture model has emerged as an effective tool for studying RPE function and mechanisms of retinal diseases. This model system has been rigorously characterized and shown to closely resemble native RPE cells at the genomic and protein level, and that they are capable of accomplishing the characteristic functions of a healthy native RPE (e.g., rod phagocytosis, ion and fluid transport, and retinoid cycle). In this review, we demonstrated that the metabolic activity of the RPE is an indicator of its health and state of differentiation, and present the hfRPE culture model as a valuable in vitro system for evaluating RPE metabolism in the context of RPE differentiation and retinal disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence and pattern of vitreo-retinal diseases in Nepal: the Bhaktapur glaucoma study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thapa, S.S.; Thapa, R.; Paudyal, I.; Khanal, S.; Aujla, J.; Paudyal, G.; van Rens, G.H.M.B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vitreo-retinal diseases are among the leading causes of visual impairment and blindness worldwide. This study reports the prevalence and pattern of vitreo-retinal diseases in the Bhaktapur Glaucoma Study (BGS), a population based study conducted in Nepal. Methods. BGS was a population

  2. Meta-analysis: retinal vessel caliber and risk for coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGeechan, Kevin; Liew, Gerald; Macaskill, Petra; Irwig, Les; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Wang, Jie Jin; Mitchell, Paul; Vingerling, Johannes R.; deJong, Paulus T. V. M.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Breteler, Monique M. B.; Shaw, Jonathan; Zimmet, Paul; Wong, Tien Y.

    2009-01-01

    Retinal vessel caliber may be a novel marker of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. However, the sex-specific effect, magnitude of association, and effect independent of traditional CHD disease risk factors remain unclear. To determine the association between retinal vessel caliber and risk for CHD.

  3. Canine and human visual cortex intact and responsive despite early retinal blindness from RPE65 mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey K Aguirre

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available RPE65 is an essential molecule in the retinoid-visual cycle, and RPE65 gene mutations cause the congenital human blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA. Somatic gene therapy delivered to the retina of blind dogs with an RPE65 mutation dramatically restores retinal physiology and has sparked international interest in human treatment trials for this incurable disease. An unanswered question is how the visual cortex responds after prolonged sensory deprivation from retinal dysfunction. We therefore studied the cortex of RPE65-mutant dogs before and after retinal gene therapy. Then, we inquired whether there is visual pathway integrity and responsivity in adult humans with LCA due to RPE65 mutations (RPE65-LCA.RPE65-mutant dogs were studied with fMRI. Prior to therapy, retinal and subcortical responses to light were markedly diminished, and there were minimal cortical responses within the primary visual areas of the lateral gyrus (activation amplitude mean +/- standard deviation [SD] = 0.07% +/- 0.06% and volume = 1.3 +/- 0.6 cm(3. Following therapy, retinal and subcortical response restoration was accompanied by increased amplitude (0.18% +/- 0.06% and volume (8.2 +/- 0.8 cm(3 of activation within the lateral gyrus (p < 0.005 for both. Cortical recovery occurred rapidly (within a month of treatment and was persistent (as long as 2.5 y after treatment. Recovery was present even when treatment was provided as late as 1-4 y of age. Human RPE65-LCA patients (ages 18-23 y were studied with structural magnetic resonance imaging. Optic nerve diameter (3.2 +/- 0.5 mm was within the normal range (3.2 +/- 0.3 mm, and occipital cortical white matter density as judged by voxel-based morphometry was slightly but significantly altered (1.3 SD below control average, p = 0.005. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in human RPE65-LCA patients revealed cortical responses with a markedly diminished activation volume (8.8 +/- 1.2 cm(3 compared to controls

  4. Harnessing the Potential of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells and Gene Editing for the Treatment of Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovando-Roche, Patrick; Georgiadis, Anastasios; Smith, Alexander J; Pearson, Rachael A; Ali, Robin R

    2017-01-01

    A major cause of visual disorders is dysfunction and/or loss of the light-sensitive cells of the retina, the photoreceptors. To develop better treatments for patients, we need to understand how inherited retinal disease mutations result in the dysfunction of photoreceptors. New advances in the field of stem cell and gene editing research offer novel ways to model retinal dystrophies in vitro and present opportunities to translate basic biological insights into therapies. This brief review will discuss some of the issues that should be taken into account when carrying out disease modelling and gene editing of retinal cells. We will discuss (i) the use of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) for disease modelling and cell therapy; (ii) the importance of using isogenic iPSC lines as controls; (iii) CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing of iPSCs; and (iv) in vivo gene editing using AAV vectors. Ground-breaking advances in differentiation of iPSCs into retinal organoids and methods to derive mature light sensitive photoreceptors from iPSCs. Furthermore, single AAV systems for in vivo gene editing have been developed which makes retinal in vivo gene editing therapy a real prospect. Genome editing is becoming a valuable tool for disease modelling and in vivo gene editing in the retina.

  5. Establishment of human retinal mitoscriptome gene expression signature for diabetic retinopathy using cadaver eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Gowthaman; Mathews, Saumi; Srinivasan, Karthik; Ramasamy, Kim; Periasamy, Sundaresan

    2017-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of blindness due to retinal microvasculature. We used microarray analysis for the first time to establish the retinal mitoscriptome gene expression signature for DR using human cadaver eyes. Among the 1042 genes, 60 (52-down, 8-up) and 39 (36-down, 3-up) genes were differentially expressed in the DR as compared to normal control and diabetic retinas respectively. These genes were mainly responsible for regulating angiogenesis, anti-oxidant defense mechanism, ATP production and apoptosis contributing to the disease pathology of DR. These findings might be useful for the discovery of biomarker and developing therapeutic regimen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of Anatomic Structures in Human Retinal Imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL; Chaum, Edward [ORNL; Muthusamy Govindasamy, Vijaya Priya [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    The widespread availability of electronic imaging devices throughout the medical community is leading to a growing body of research on image processing and analysis to diagnose retinal disease such as diabetic retinopathy (DR). Productive computer-based screening of large, at-risk populations at low cost requires robust, automated image analysis. In this paper we present results for the automatic detection of the optic nerve and localization of the macula using digital red-free fundus photography. Our method relies on the accurate segmentation of the vasculature of the retina followed by the determination of spatial features describing the density,average thickness, and average orientation of the vasculature in relation to the position of the optic nerve. Localization of the macula follows using knowledge of the optic nerve location to detect the horizontal raphe of the retina using a geometric model of the vasculature. We report 90.4% detection performance for the optic nerve and 92.5% localization performance for the macula for red-free fundus images representing a population of 345 images corresponding to 269 patients with 18 different pathologies associated with DR and other common retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration.

  7. Analysis of normal human retinal vascular network architecture using multifractal geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Călugăru, Dan Mihai; Lupaşcu, Carmen Alina; Nicoară, Simona Delia

    2017-01-01

    To apply the multifractal analysis method as a quantitative approach to a comprehensive description of the microvascular network architecture of the normal human retina. Fifty volunteers were enrolled in this study in the Ophthalmological Clinic of Cluj-Napoca, Romania, between January 2012 and January 2014. A set of 100 segmented and skeletonised human retinal images, corresponding to normal states of the retina were studied. An automatic unsupervised method for retinal vessel segmentation was applied before multifractal analysis. The multifractal analysis of digital retinal images was made with computer algorithms, applying the standard box-counting method. Statistical analyses were performed using the GraphPad InStat software. The architecture of normal human retinal microvascular network was able to be described using the multifractal geometry. The average of generalized dimensions (Dq ) for q=0, 1, 2, the width of the multifractal spectrum (Δα=αmax - αmin ) and the spectrum arms' heights difference (|Δf|) of the normal images were expressed as mean±standard deviation (SD): for segmented versions, D0 =1.7014±0.0057; D1 =1.6507±0.0058; D2 =1.5772±0.0059; Δα=0.92441±0.0085; |Δf|= 0.1453±0.0051; for skeletonised versions, D0 =1.6303±0.0051; D1 =1.6012±0.0059; D2 =1.5531±0.0058; Δα=0.65032±0.0162; |Δf|= 0.0238±0.0161. The average of generalized dimensions (Dq ) for q=0, 1, 2, the width of the multifractal spectrum (Δα) and the spectrum arms' heights difference (|Δf|) of the segmented versions was slightly greater than the skeletonised versions. The multifractal analysis of fundus photographs may be used as a quantitative parameter for the evaluation of the complex three-dimensional structure of the retinal microvasculature as a potential marker for early detection of topological changes associated with retinal diseases.

  8. Analysis of normal human retinal vascular network architecture using multifractal geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan Ţălu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To apply the multifractal analysis method as a quantitative approach to a comprehensive description of the microvascular network architecture of the normal human retina. METHODS: Fifty volunteers were enrolled in this study in the Ophthalmological Clinic of Cluj-Napoca, Romania, between January 2012 and January 2014. A set of 100 segmented and skeletonised human retinal images, corresponding to normal states of the retina were studied. An automatic unsupervised method for retinal vessel segmentation was applied before multifractal analysis. The multifractal analysis of digital retinal images was made with computer algorithms, applying the standard box-counting method. Statistical analyses were performed using the GraphPad InStat software. RESULTS: The architecture of normal human retinal microvascular network was able to be described using the multifractal geometry. The average of generalized dimensions (Dq for q=0, 1, 2, the width of the multifractal spectrum (Δα=αmax - αmin and the spectrum arms’ heights difference (│Δf│ of the normal images were expressed as mean±standard deviation (SD: for segmented versions, D0=1.7014±0.0057; D1=1.6507±0.0058; D2=1.5772±0.0059; Δα=0.92441±0.0085; │Δf│= 0.1453±0.0051; for skeletonised versions, D0=1.6303±0.0051; D1=1.6012±0.0059; D2=1.5531±0.0058; Δα=0.65032±0.0162; │Δf│= 0.0238±0.0161. The average of generalized dimensions (Dq for q=0, 1, 2, the width of the multifractal spectrum (Δα and the spectrum arms’ heights difference (│Δf│ of the segmented versions was slightly greater than the skeletonised versions. CONCLUSION: The multifractal analysis of fundus photographs may be used as a quantitative parameter for the evaluation of the complex three-dimensional structure of the retinal microvasculature as a potential marker for early detection of topological changes associated with retinal diseases.

  9. Alginate as a cell culture substrate for growth and differentiation of human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Razeih; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Samiei, Shahram; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Davari, Maliheh; Nazemroaya, Fatemeh; Bagheri, Abouzar; Deezagi, Abdolkhalegh

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells' behavior in alginate beads that establish 3D environment for cellular growth and mimic extracellular matrix versus the conventional 2D monolayer culture. RPE cells were encapsulated in alginate beads by dripping alginate cell suspension into CaCl2 solution. Beads were suspended in three different media including Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)/F12 alone, DMEM/F12 supplemented with 10 % fetal bovine serum (FBS), and DMEM/F12 supplemented with 30 % human amniotic fluid (HAF). RPE cells were cultivated on polystyrene under the same conditions as controls. Cell phenotype, cell proliferation, cell death, and MTT assay, immunocytochemistry, and real-time RT-PCR were performed to evaluate the effect of alginate on RPE cells characteristics and integrity. RPE cells can survive and proliferate in alginate matrixes. Immunocytochemistry analysis exhibited Nestin, RPE65, and cytokeratin expressions in a reasonable number of cultured cells in alginate beads. Real-time PCR data demonstrated high levels of Nestin, CHX10, RPE65, and tyrosinase gene expressions in RPE cells immobilized in alginate when compared to 2D monolayer culture systems. The results suggest that alginate can be used as a reliable scaffold for maintenance of RPE cells' integrity and in vitro propagation of human retinal progenitor cells for cell replacement therapies in retinal diseases.

  10. Generation of retinal pigment epithelial cells from human embryonic stem cell-derived spherical neural masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung Soo; Kim, Sang Jin; Ku, Seung-Yup; Park, Jung Hyun; Lee, Haksup; Yoo, Dae Hoon; Park, Un Chul; Song, Seul Ae; Choi, Young Min; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2012-09-01

    Dysfunction and loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are major pathologic changes observed in various retinal degenerative diseases such as aged-related macular degeneration. RPE generated from human pluripotent stem cells can be a good candidate for RPE replacement therapy. Here, we show the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) toward RPE with the generation of spherical neural masses (SNMs), which are pure masses of hESCs-derived neural precursors. During the early passaging of SNMs, cystic structures arising from opened neural tube-like structures showed pigmented epithelial morphology. These pigmented cells were differentiated into functional RPE by neuroectodermal induction and mechanical purification. Most of the differentiated cells showed typical RPE morphologies, such as a polygonal-shaped epithelial monolayer, and transmission electron microscopy revealed apical microvilli, pigment granules, and tight junctions. These cells also expressed molecular markers of RPE, including Mitf, ZO-1, RPE65, CRALBP, and bestrophin. The generated RPE also showed phagocytosis of isolated bovine photoreceptor outer segment and secreting pigment epithelium-derived factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Functional RPE could be generated from SNM in our method. Because SNMs have several advantages, including the capability of expansion for long periods without loss of differentiation capability, easy storage and thawing, and no need for feeder cells, our method for RPE differentiation may be used as an efficient strategy for generating functional RPE cells for retinal regeneration therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of hereditary retinal degeneration in the English springer spaniel dog and disease relationship to an RPGRIP1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narfström, Kristina; Jeong, Manbok; Hyman, Jennifer; Madsen, Richard W; Bergström, Tomas F

    2012-01-01

    Intensive breeding and selection on desired traits have produced high rates of inherited diseases in dogs. Hereditary retinal degeneration, often called progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), is prevalent in dogs with disease entities comparable to human retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA). Recent molecular studies in the English Springer Spaniel (ESS) dog have shown that PRA cases are often homozygous for a mutation in the RPGRIP1 gene, the defect also causing human RP, LCA, and cone rod dystrophies. The present study characterizes the disease in a group of affected ESS in USA, using clinical, functional, and morphological studies. An objective evaluation of retinal function using electroretinography (ERG) is further performed in a masked fashion in a group of American ESS dogs, with the examiner masked to the genetic status of the dogs. Only 4 of 6 homozygous animals showed clinical signs of disease, emphasizing the need and importance for more precise studies on the clinical expression of molecular defects before utilizing animal models for translational research, such as when using stem cells for therapeutic intervention.

  12. Assessment of Hereditary Retinal Degeneration in the English Springer Spaniel Dog and Disease Relationship to an RPGRIP1 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Narfström

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensive breeding and selection on desired traits have produced high rates of inherited diseases in dogs. Hereditary retinal degeneration, often called progressive retinal atrophy (PRA, is prevalent in dogs with disease entities comparable to human retinitis pigmentosa (RP and Leber’s congenital amaurosis (LCA. Recent molecular studies in the English Springer Spaniel (ESS dog have shown that PRA cases are often homozygous for a mutation in the RPGRIP1 gene, the defect also causing human RP, LCA, and cone rod dystrophies. The present study characterizes the disease in a group of affected ESS in USA, using clinical, functional, and morphological studies. An objective evaluation of retinal function using electroretinography (ERG is further performed in a masked fashion in a group of American ESS dogs, with the examiner masked to the genetic status of the dogs. Only 4 of 6 homozygous animals showed clinical signs of disease, emphasizing the need and importance for more precise studies on the clinical expression of molecular defects before utilizing animal models for translational research, such as when using stem cells for therapeutic intervention.

  13. High-speed adaptive optics line scan confocal retinal imaging for human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Gu, Boyu; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2017-01-01

    Continuous and rapid eye movement causes significant intraframe distortion in adaptive optics high resolution retinal imaging. To minimize this artifact, we developed a high speed adaptive optics line scan confocal retinal imaging system. A high speed line camera was employed to acquire retinal image and custom adaptive optics was developed to compensate the wave aberration of the human eye's optics. The spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio were assessed in model eye and in living human eye. The improvement of imaging fidelity was estimated by reduction of intra-frame distortion of retinal images acquired in the living human eyes with frame rates at 30 frames/second (FPS), 100 FPS, and 200 FPS. The device produced retinal image with cellular level resolution at 200 FPS with a digitization of 512×512 pixels/frame in the living human eye. Cone photoreceptors in the central fovea and rod photoreceptors near the fovea were resolved in three human subjects in normal chorioretinal health. Compared with retinal images acquired at 30 FPS, the intra-frame distortion in images taken at 200 FPS was reduced by 50.9% to 79.7%. We demonstrated the feasibility of acquiring high resolution retinal images in the living human eye at a speed that minimizes retinal motion artifact. This device may facilitate research involving subjects with nystagmus or unsteady fixation due to central vision loss.

  14. Structural and functional human retinal imaging with a fiber-based visible light OCT ophthalmoscope (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Shau Poh; Bernucci, Marcel T.; Borycki, Dawid; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2017-02-01

    Visible light is absorbed by intrinsic chromophores such as photopigment, melanin, and hemoglobin, and scattered by subcellular structures, all of which are potential retinal disease biomarkers. Recently, high-resolution quantitative measurement and mapping of hemoglobin concentrations was demonstrated using visible light Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Yet, most high-resolution visible light OCT systems adopt free-space, or bulk, optical setups, which could limit clinical applications. Here, the construction of a multi-functional fiber-optic OCT system for human retinal imaging with high-resolution visible light OCT has potential for depth-resolved functional imaging of the eye.

  15. PDZD7 is a modifier of retinal disease and a contributor to digenic Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebermann, Inga; Phillips, Jennifer B; Liebau, Max C; Koenekoop, Robert K; Schermer, Bernhard; Lopez, Irma; Schäfer, Ellen; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Dafinger, Claudia; Bernd, Antje; Zrenner, Eberhart; Claustres, Mireille; Blanco, Bernardo; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Ruland, Rebecca; Westerfield, Monte; Benzing, Thomas; Bolz, Hanno J

    2010-06-01

    Usher syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous recessive disease characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). It frequently presents with unexplained, often intrafamilial, variability of the visual phenotype. Although 9 genes have been linked with Usher syndrome, many patients do not have mutations in any of these genes, suggesting that there are still unidentified genes involved in the syndrome. Here, we have determined that mutations in PDZ domain-containing 7 (PDZD7), which encodes a homolog of proteins mutated in Usher syndrome subtype 1C (USH1C) and USH2D, contribute to Usher syndrome. Mutations in PDZD7 were identified only in patients with mutations in other known Usher genes. In a set of sisters, each with a homozygous mutation in USH2A, a frame-shift mutation in PDZD7 was present in the sister with more severe RP and earlier disease onset. Further, heterozygous PDZD7 mutations were present in patients with truncating mutations in USH2A, G protein-coupled receptor 98 (GPR98; also known as USH2C), and an unidentified locus. We validated the human genotypes using zebrafish, and our findings were consistent with digenic inheritance of PDZD7 and GPR98, and with PDZD7 as a retinal disease modifier in patients with USH2A. Pdzd7 knockdown produced an Usher-like phenotype in zebrafish, exacerbated retinal cell death in combination with ush2a or gpr98, and reduced Gpr98 localization in the region of the photoreceptor connecting cilium. Our data challenge the view of Usher syndrome as a traditional Mendelian disorder and support the reclassification of Usher syndrome as an oligogenic disease.

  16. Cellular Senescence Is Associated With Human Retinal Microaneurysm Formation During Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Luppo, Mariana; Catita, Joana; Ramos, David; Navarro, Marc; Carretero, Ana; Mendes-Jorge, Luísa; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura; Rodriguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Nacher, Victor; Ruberte, Jesus

    2017-06-01

    Microaneurysms are present in healthy old-age human retinas. However, to date, no age-related pathogenic mechanism has been implicated in their formation. Here, cellular senescence, a hallmark of aging and several age-related diseases, has been analyzed in the old-age human retina and in the retina of a progeric mouse. Retinas were obtained from 17 nondiabetic donors and from mice deficient in Bmi1. Cellular senescence was analyzed by immunohistochemistry, senescent-associated β-galactosidase activity assay, Sudan black B staining, conventional transmission electron microscopy, and immunoelectronmicroscopy. Neurons, but not neuroglia, and blood vessels undergo cellular senescence in the old-age human retina. The canonical senescence markers p16, p53, and p21 were up-regulated and coexisted with apoptosis in old-age human microaneurysms. Senescent endothelial cells were discontinuously covered by fibronectin, and p16 colocalized with the β1 subunit of fibronectin receptor α5β1 integrin under the endothelial cellular membrane, suggesting anoikis as a mechanism involved in endothelial cell apoptosis. In a progeric mouse model deficient in Bmi1, where p21 was overexpressed, the retinal blood vessels displayed an aging phenotype characterized by enlarged caveolae and lipofuscin accumulation. Although mouse retina is not prone to develop microaneurysms, Bmi1-deficient mice presented abundant retinal microaneurysms. Together, these results uncover cellular senescence as a player during the formation of microaneurysms in old-age human retinas.

  17. Comparative gene expression study and pathway analysis of the human iris- and the retinal pigment epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennis, Anna; Ten Brink, Jacoline B; Moerland, Perry D; Heine, Vivi M; Bergen, Arthur A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a neural monolayer lining the back of the eye. Degeneration of the RPE leads to severe vision loss in, so far incurable, diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and some forms of retinitis pigmentosa. A promising future replacement

  18. Successful arrest of photoreceptor and vision loss expands the therapeutic window of retinal gene therapy to later stages of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, William A; Cideciyan, Artur V; Iwabe, Simone; Swider, Malgorzata; Kosyk, Mychajlo S; McDaid, Kendra; Martynyuk, Inna; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Shaffer, James; Deng, Wen-Tao; Boye, Sanford L; Lewin, Alfred S; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2015-10-27

    Inherited retinal degenerations cause progressive loss of photoreceptor neurons with eventual blindness. Corrective or neuroprotective gene therapies under development could be delivered at a predegeneration stage to prevent the onset of disease, as well as at intermediate-degeneration stages to slow the rate of progression. Most preclinical gene therapy successes to date have been as predegeneration interventions. In many animal models, as well as in human studies, to date, retinal gene therapy administered well after the onset of degeneration was not able to modify the rate of progression even when successfully reversing dysfunction. We evaluated consequences of gene therapy delivered at intermediate stages of disease in a canine model of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) caused by a mutation in the Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator (RPGR) gene. Spatiotemporal natural history of disease was defined and therapeutic dose selected based on predegeneration results. Then interventions were timed at earlier and later phases of intermediate-stage disease, and photoreceptor degeneration monitored with noninvasive imaging, electrophysiological function, and visual behavior for more than 2 y. All parameters showed substantial and significant arrest of the progressive time course of disease with treatment, which resulted in long-term improved retinal function and visual behavior compared with control eyes. Histology confirmed that the human RPGR transgene was stably expressed in photoreceptors and associated with improved structural preservation of rods, cones, and ON bipolar cells together with correction of opsin mislocalization. These findings in a clinically relevant large animal model demonstrate the long-term efficacy of RPGR gene augmentation and substantially broaden the therapeutic window for intervention in patients with RPGR-XLRP.

  19. RETINAL MANIFESTATIONS IN ADULT T-CELL LEUKEMIA/LYMPHOMA RELATED TO INFECTION BY THE HUMAN T-CELL LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS TYPE-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Harold; Hage, Rabih; Meniane, Jean-Côme; Deligny, Christophe; Plumelle, Yves; Donnio, Angélique; Jean-Charles, Albert

    2016-07-01

    To describe the retinal manifestations in adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) related to an infection by the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1). Retrospective case series of patients with ATL with retinal findings. A total of 175 patients were diagnosed with ATL in Martinique between 1983 and 2013. Three of them showed intraocular findings related to ATL. They were bilateral deep retinal infiltrates associated with intermediate uveitis. In two cases, the ATL diagnosis was known. In the third, fluorescein angiography was remarkable for deep retinal infiltrates although fundus examination was unremarkable. The ATL cells were found in the blood of this patient. Despite chemotherapy, infiltrates progressed from the retinal periphery to the posterior pole in two patients, thus reducing visual acuity to light perception. They were associated with vasculitis. Retinal involvement in ATL is very rare. It can occur at any point during the natural course of the disease. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 carriers should benefit from a regular ophthalmic examination, and a fluorescein angiography must be performed in all patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 with vitreous cells. The presence of deep retinal infiltrates must raise suspicion for ATL in a patient with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1.

  20. Targeting the complement system for the management of retinal inflammatory and degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Heping; Chen, Mei

    2016-09-15

    The retina, an immune privileged tissue, has specialized immune defense mechanisms against noxious insults that may exist in diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy (DR), uveoretinitis and glaucoma. The defense system consists of retinal innate immune cells (including microglia, perivascular macrophages, and a small population of dendritic cells) and the complement system. Under normal aging conditions, retinal innate immune cells and the complement system undergo a low-grade activation (parainflammation) which is important for retinal homeostasis. In disease states such as AMD and DR, the parainflammatory response is dysregulated and develops into detrimental chronic inflammation. Complement activation in the retina is an important part of chronic inflammation and may contribute to retinal pathology in these disease states. Here, we review the evidence that supports the role of uncontrolled or dysregulated complement activation in various retinal degenerative and angiogenic conditions. We also discuss current strategies that are used to develop complement-based therapies for retinal diseases such as AMD. The potential benefits of complement inhibition in DR, uveoretinitis and glaucoma are also discussed, as well as the need for further research to better understand the mechanisms of complement-mediated retinal damage in these disease states. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ciliary neurotrophic factor: a survival and differentiation inducer in human retinal progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Kamla; Cao, Yang; Ezeonu, Ifeoma

    2010-07-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration, and Parkinson's disease remain major problems in the field of medicine. Some of the strategies being explored for treatment include replacement of damaged tissue by transplantation of healthy tissues or progenitor cells and delivery of neurotrophins to rescue degenerating tissue. One of the neurotrophins with promise is the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). In this study, we report the role played by CNTF in retinal cell differentiation and survival in retinal progenitors. We found that CNTF is a survival factor for multipotential human retinal cells and increased cell survival by 50%, over a 7-d period, under serum-free conditions, as determined by apoptotic assays (immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry). This effect is dose dependent with a maximum survival at a CNTF concentration of 20 ng/ml. We also report that CNTF might be a cell commitment factor, directing the differentiation mainly toward large multipolar cells with ganglionic and amacrine phenotype. These cells express tyrosine hydroxylase (amacrine cells) as well as, thy 1.1 and neuron-specific enolase (ganglionic cells). Additionally, there was also an increase in protein kinase C alpha, a protein expressed in rod and cone bipolars as well as cone photoreceptors and calbindin, a protein expressed in cone photoreceptors and horizontal cells. In our studies, CNTF doubled the number of cells with ganglionic phenotypes, and basic fibroblast growth factor doubled the number of cells with photoreceptor phenotype. Additionally, CNTF induced a subset of progenitors to undergo multiple rounds of cell division before acquiring the large multipolar ganglionic phenotype. Our conclusion is that CNTF could be an agent that has therapeutic potential and possibly induces differentiation of large multipolar ganglionic phenotype in a subset of progenitors.

  2. Surgical management of retinal diseases: proliferative diabetic retinopathy and traction retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Iñigo, Yousef J; Acabá, Luis A; Berrocal, Maria H

    2014-01-01

    Current indications for pars plana vitrectomy in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) include vitreous hemorrhage, tractional retinal detachment (TRD), combined tractional and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (CTRRD), diabetic macular edema associated with posterior hyaloidal traction, and anterior segment neovascularization with media opacities. This chapter will review the indications, surgical objectives, adjunctive pharmacotherapy, microincision surgical techniques, and outcomes of diabetic vitrectomy for PDR, TRD, and CTRRD. With the availability of new microincision vitrectomy technology, wide-angle microscope viewing systems, and pharmacologic agents, vitrectomy can improve visual acuity and achieve long-term anatomic stability in eyes with severe complications from PDR. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. The potential of using biodegradable microspheres in retinal diseases and other intraocular pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Vanrell, Rocío; Bravo-Osuna, Irene; Andrés-Guerrero, Vanessa; Vicario-de-la-Torre, Marta; Molina-Martínez, Irene Teresa

    2014-09-01

    Pathologies affecting the posterior segment of the eye are one of the major causes of blindness in developed countries and are becoming more prevalent due to the increase in society longevity. Successful therapy of diseases affecting the back of the eye requires effective concentrations of the active substance maintained during a long period of time in the intraocular target site. Treatment of vitreoretinal diseases often include repeated intravitreous injections that are associated with adverse effects. Local administration of biodegradable microspheres offers an excellent alternative to multiple administrations, as they are able to deliver the therapeutic molecule in a controlled fashion. Furthermore, injection of microparticles is performed without the need for surgical procedures. As most of the retinal diseases are multifactorial, microspheres result especially promising because they can be loaded with more than one active substance and complemented with the inclusion of additives with pharmacological properties. Personalized therapy can be easily achieved by changing the amount of administered microspheres. Contrary to non-biodegradable devices, biodegradable PLA and PLGA microspheres disappear from the site of administration after delivering the drug. Furthermore, microspheres prepared from these mentioned biomaterials are well tolerated after periocular and intravitreal injections in animals and humans. After injection, PLA and PLGA microspheres suffer aggregation behaving like an implant. Biodegradable microspheres are potential tools in regenerative medicine for retinal repair. According to the reported results, presumably a variety of microparticulate formulations for different ophthalmic therapeutic uses will be available in the clinical practice in the near future. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Optimized Culture System to Induce Neurite Outgrowth From Retinal Ganglion Cells in Three-Dimensional Retinal Aggregates Differentiated From Mouse and Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Yuki; Onishi, Akishi; Matsushita, Keizo; Koide, Naoshi; Mandai, Michiko; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Kitaoka, Takashi; Kuwahara, Atsushi; Ozone, Chikafumi; Nakano, Tokushige; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Takahashi, Masayo

    2016-04-01

    To establish a practical research tool for studying the pathogenesis of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) diseases, we optimized culture procedures to induce neurite outgrowth from three-dimensional self-organizing optic vesicles (3D-retinas) differentiated in vitro from mouse and human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). The developing 3D-retinas isolated at various time points were placed on Matrigel-coated plates and cultured in media on the basis of the 3D-retinal culture or the retinal organotypic culture protocol. The number, length, and morphology of the neurites in each culture condition were compared. First, we confirmed that Venus-positive cells were double-labeled with a RGC marker, Brn3a, in the 3D-retina differentiated from Fstl4::Venus mouse ESCs, indicating specific RGC-subtype differentiation. Second, Venus-positive neurites grown from these RGC subsets were positive for beta-III tubulin and SMI312 by immunohistochemistry. Enhanced neurite outgrowth was observed in the B27-supplemented Neurobasal-A medium on Matrigel-coated plates from the optic vesicles isolated after 14 days of differentiation from mouse ESCs. For the differentiated RGCs from human ESCs, we obtained neurite extension of >4 mm by modifying Matrigel coating and the culture medium from the mouse RGC culture. We successfully optimized the culture conditions to enhance lengthy and high-frequency neurite outgrowth in mouse and human models. The procedure would be useful for not only developmental studies of RGCs, including maintenance and projection, but also clinical, pathological, and pharmacological studies of human RGC diseases.

  5. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...... block alloactivation, had no inhibitory effect on RPE-mediated T-cell apoptotic responses in MHC class II-specific CD4+ T-cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells express FasL and induce TCR-independent apoptosis in activated human T cells through Fas-FasL interaction. Retinal pigment...

  6. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    block alloactivation, had no inhibitory effect on RPE-mediated T-cell apoptotic responses in MHC class II-specific CD4+ T-cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells express FasL and induce TCR-independent apoptosis in activated human T cells through Fas-FasL interaction. Retinal pigment...... human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...

  7. Simultaneous Mutation Detection in 90 Retinal Disease Genes in Multiple Patients Using a Custom-designed 300-kb Retinal Resequencing Chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, Judith C.; Bakker, Arne 1; Kulumbetova, Jamilia; Moutaoukil, Youssef; Smeets, Bert; Verheij, Joke; Kroes, Hester Y.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; van Schooneveld, Mary; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Florijn, Ralph J.

    Purpose: To develop a high-throughput, cost-effective diagnostic strategy for the identification of known and new mutations in 90 retinal disease genes. Design: Evidence-based study. Participants: Sixty patients with a variety of retinal disorders, including Leber's congenital amaurosis, ocular

  8. Prevalence and pattern of vitreo-retinal diseases in Nepal: the Bhaktapur glaucoma study

    OpenAIRE

    Thapa, Suman S; Thapa, Raba; Paudyal, Indira; Khanal, Shankar; Aujla, Jaskirat; Paudyal, Govinda; Rens, Ger van

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitreo-retinal diseases are among the leading causes of visual impairment and blindness worldwide. This study reports the prevalence and pattern of vitreo-retinal diseases in the Bhaktapur Glaucoma Study (BGS), a population based study conducted in Nepal. Methods BGS was a population based cross-sectional study involving 4800 subjects aged 40 years and over from Bhaktapur district. Subjects were selected using a cluster sampling methodology and a door-to-door enumeration. All subje...

  9. Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells can Differentiate to a Retinal Pigment Epithelial Phenotype when Co-Cultured with Pig Retinal Pigment Epithelium using a Transwell System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Duan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an increasing interest in generating retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells from stem cells for therapy against degenerative eye diseases. Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs can be induced to express retinal neuron-specific markers when co-cultured with retinal neurons, however, whether hBMSCs can differentiate into RPE-like cells in a co-culture system has not been clarified. Methods: The induction of hBMSCs into RPE-like cells was performed by combining hBMSCs and pig RPE cells in a transwell system. The biomarkers of hBMSCs-derived RPE cells were determined by quantitative RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. The function of induced cells was assayed by ELISA for secretion of neurotrophic factors. Results: Intracellular pigment granules and many RPE markers existed in hBMSCs-derived RPE cells after co-culturing with pig RPE cells for 14 days. Typical RPE functions, such as phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments and secretion of the trophic factors, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and glia-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, were observed in these induced cells. Conclusion: hBMSCs can be induced toward functional RPE cells simply by transwell-based co-culture with RPE cells.

  10. The Domestic Cat as a Large Animal Model for Characterization of Disease and Therapeutic Intervention in Hereditary Retinal Blindness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Narfström

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Large mammals, including canids and felids, are affected by spontaneously occurring hereditary retinal diseases with similarities to those of humans. The large mammal models may be used for thorough clinical characterization of disease processes, understanding the effects of specific mutations, elucidation of disease mechanisms, and for development of therapeutic intervention. Two well-characterized feline models are addressed in this paper. The first model is the autosomal recessive, slowly progressive, late-onset, rod-cone degenerative disease caused by a mutation in the CEP290 gene. The second model addressed in this paper is the autosomal dominant early onset rod cone dysplasia, putatively caused by the mutation found in the CRX gene. Therapeutic trials have been performed mainly in the former type including stem cell therapy, retinal transplantation, and development of ocular prosthetics. Domestic cats, having large human-like eyes with comparable spontaneous retinal diseases, are also considered useful for gene replacement therapy, thus functioning as effective model systems for further research.

  11. Intravitreal ganciclovir in the management of non-AIDS-related human cytomegalovirus retinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langner-Wegscheider, Beate J.; ten Dam-van Loon, Ninette; Mura, Marco; Faridpooya, Koorosh; de Smet, Marc D.

    2010-01-01

    To report and evaluate intravitreal ganciclovir injections in non-AIDS patients with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) retinitis. Retrospective chart review. Two SLE patients and one patient post chemotherapy for a non Hodgkin's lymphoma presented with myelosuppression and persistent cytomegalovirus

  12. Temporal expression of CD184(CXCR4) and CD171(L1CAM) identifies distinct early developmental stages of human retinal ganglion cells in embryonic stem cell derived retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, J G; Hopp, H; Choi, A; Mandayam Comar, J; Liao, V C; Harutyunyan, N; Lee, T C

    2017-01-01

    Human retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have anticipated value for human disease study, drug screening, and therapeutic applications; however, their full potential remains underdeveloped. To characterize RGCs in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived retinal organoids we examined RGC markers and surface antigen expression and made comparisons to human fetal retina. RGCs in both tissues exhibited CD184 and CD171 expression and distinct expression patterns of the RGC markers BRN3 and RBPMS. The retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) of retinal organoids expressed CD184, consistent with its expression in the neuroblastic layer in fetal retina. In retinal organoids CD184 expression was enhanced in RGC competent RPCs and high CD184 expression was retained on post-mitotic RGC precursors; CD171 was detected on maturing RGCs. The differential expression timing of CD184 and CD171 permits identification and enrichment of RGCs from retinal organoids at differing maturation states from committed progenitors to differentiating neurons. These observations will facilitate molecular characterization of PSC-derived RGCs during differentiation, critical knowledge for establishing the veracity of these in vitro produced cells. Furthermore, observations made in the retinal organoid model closely parallel those in human fetal retina further validating use of retinal organoid to model early retinal development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Retinal and post-retinal contributions to the Quantum efficiency of the human eye revealed by electrical neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibran eManasseh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The retina is one of the best known quantum detectors with rods able to reliably respond to single photons. However, estimates on the number of photons eliciting conscious perception, based on signal detection theory, are systematically above these values after discounting by retinal losses. One possibility is that there is a trade-off between the limited motor resources available to living systems and the excellent reliability of the visual photoreceptors. On this view, the limits to sensory thresholds are not set by the individual reliability of the receptors within each sensory modality (as often assumed but rather by the limited central processing and motor resources available to process the constant inflow of sensory information. To investigate this issue, we reproduced the classical experiment from Hetch aimed to determine the sensory threshold in human vision. We combined a careful physical control of the stimulus parameters with high temporal/spatial resolution recordings of EEG signals and behavioral variables over a relatively large sample of subjects (12. Contrarily to the idea that the limits to visual sensitivity are fully set by the statistical fluctuations in photon absorption on retinal photoreceptors we observed that the state of ongoing neural oscillations before any photon impinges the retina helps to determine if the responses of photoreceptors have access to central conscious processing. Our results suggest that motivational and attentional off-retinal mechanisms play a major role in reducing the QE efficiency of the human visual system when compared to the efficiency of isolated retinal photoreceptors. Yet, this mechanism might subserve adaptive behavior by enhancing the overall multisensory efficiency of the whole system composed by diverse reliable sensory modalities.

  14. Retinal Diseases Caused by Mutations in Genes Not Specifically Associated with the Clinical Diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Wang

    Full Text Available When seeking a confirmed molecular diagnosis in the research setting, patients with one descriptive diagnosis of retinal disease could carry pathogenic variants in genes not specifically associated with that description. However, this event has not been evaluated systematically in clinical diagnostic laboratories that validate fully all target genes to minimize false negatives/positives.We performed targeted next-generation sequencing analysis on 207 ocular disease-related genes for 42 patients whose DNA had been tested negative for disease-specific panels of genes known to be associated with retinitis pigmentosa, Leber congenital amaurosis, or exudative vitreoretinopathy.Pathogenic variants, including single nucleotide variations and copy number variations, were identified in 9 patients, including 6 with variants in syndromic retinal disease genes and 3 whose molecular diagnosis could not be distinguished easily from their submitted clinical diagnosis, accounting for 21% (9/42 of the unsolved cases.Our study underscores the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of retinal disorders and provides valuable reference to estimate the fraction of clinical samples whose retinal disorders could be explained by genes not specifically associated with the corresponding clinical diagnosis. Our data suggest that sequencing a larger set of retinal disorder related genes can increase the molecular diagnostic yield, especially for clinically hard-to-distinguish cases.

  15. Two-photon polymerization for production of human iPSC-derived retinal cell grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Kristan S; Wiley, Luke A; Kaalberg, Emily E; Collins, Malia M; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2017-06-01

    Recent advances in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology have paved the way for the production of patient-specific neurons that are ideal for autologous cell replacement for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In the case of retinal degeneration and associated photoreceptor cell therapy, polymer scaffolds are critical for cellular survival and integration; however, prior attempts to materialize this concept have been unsuccessful in part due to the materials' inability to guide cell alignment. In this work, we used two-photon polymerization to create 180μm wide non-degradable prototype photoreceptor scaffolds with varying pore sizes, slicing distances, hatching distances and hatching types. Hatching distance and hatching type were significant factors for the error of vertical pore diameter, while slicing distance and hatching type most affected the integrity and geometry of horizontal pores. We optimized printing parameters in terms of structural integrity and printing time in order to create 1mm wide scaffolds for cell loading studies. We fabricated these larger structures directly on a porous membrane with 3µm diameter pores and seeded them with human iPSC-derived retinal progenitor cells. After two days in culture, cells nested in and extended neuronal processes parallel to the vertical pores of the scaffolds, with maximum cell loading occurring in 25μm diameter pores. These results highlight the feasibility of using this technique as part of an autologous stem cell strategy for restoring vision to patients affected with retinal degenerative diseases. Cell replacement therapy is an important goal for investigators aiming to restore neural function to those suffering from neurodegenerative disease. Cell delivery scaffolds are frequently necessary for the success of such treatments, but traditional biomaterials often fail to facilitate the neuronal orientation and close packing needed to recapitulate the in vivo environment. Here, we use two

  16. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 mediates migration of Th1 and Th17 cells across human retinal vascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S; Schewitz-Bowers, Lauren P; Wei, Lai; Lee, Richard W J; Smith, Justine R

    2013-10-23

    Autoimmune inflammation of the retina causes vision loss in the majority of affected individuals. Th1 or Th17 cells initiate the disease on trafficking from the circulation into the eye across the retinal vascular endothelium. We investigated the ability of human Th1- and Th17-polarized cells to cross a simulated human retinal endothelium, and examined the role of IgG superfamily members in this process. Th1- and Th17-polarized cell populations were generated from human peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells, using two Th1- and Th17-polarizing protocols. Transendothelial migration assays were performed over 18 hours in Boyden chambers, after seeding the transwell membrane with human retinal endothelial cells. In some assays intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), or activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) blocking antibody, or isotype- and concentration-matched control antibody, was added to the upper chambers. Th1- and Th17-polarized cells migrated equally efficiently across the human retinal endothelial monolayer. The percentage of IL-17(+) IFN-γ(-) Th17-polarized cells was reduced following migration. Blocking ICAM-1, but not VCAM-1 or ALCAM, significantly reduced migration of Th1- and Th17-polarized cells for a majority of human donors. Taken in the context of other literature on transendothelial migration, our results illustrate the importance of investigating the specific tissue and vascular endothelium when considering helper T cell migration in autoimmune inflammation. Our findings further indicate that while generalizations about involvement of specific adhesion molecules in uveitis and other autoimmune disease may be possible, these may not apply to individual patients universally. The observations are relevant to the use of adhesion blockade for therapeutic purposes.

  17. Associations between retinal microvascular structure and the severity and extent of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Bamini; Chiha, Joseph; Plant, Adam J H; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Burlutsky, George; Kovoor, Pramesh; Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Microvascular mechanisms are increasingly recognized as being involved in a significant proportion of coronary artery disease (CAD) cases, but their exact contribution or role is unclear. We aimed to define the association between retinal microvascular signs and both CAD extent and severity. 1120 participants of the Australian Heart Eye Study were included. Retinal vessel caliber was measured from digital retinal images. Extent and severity of CAD was assessed using several approaches. First, a simple scoring classifying participants as having one-vessel, two-vessel, and three-vessel disease was used. Gensini and Extent scores were calculated using angiography findings. After multivariable adjustment, significantly narrower retinal arteriolar caliber in women (comparing lowest versus highest quartile or reference) and wider venular caliber in men (comparing highest versus lowest quartile or reference) were associated with 2-fold and 54% higher odds of having at least one stenosis ≥50% in the epicardial coronary arteries, respectively. Women in the third versus first tertile of retinal venular caliber had 92% and ∼2-fold higher likelihood of having higher Gensini and Extent scores, respectively. Women in the lowest versus highest tertile of retinal arteriolar caliber had greater odds of having higher Extent scores, OR 2.99 (95% CI 1.45-6.16). In men, non-significant associations were observed between retinal vascular caliber and Gensini and Extent scores. An unhealthy retinal microvascular profile, namely, narrower retinal arterioles and wider venules was associated with more diffuse and severe CAD among women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The retinal clock in mammals: role in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felder-Schmittbuhl MP

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Marie-Paule Felder-Schmittbuhl,1,* Hugo Calligaro,2 Ouria Dkhissi-Benyahya2,* 1Institute of Cellular and Integratives Neurosciences, UPR3212, CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, 2University of Lyon, Stem Cell and Brain Research Institute, INSERM U1208, Bron, France *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The mammalian retina contains an extraordinary diversity of cell types that are highly organized into precise circuits to perceive and process visual information in a dynamic manner and transmit it to the brain. Above this builds up another level of complex dynamic, orchestrated by a circadian clock located within the retina, which allows retinal physiology, and hence visual function, to adapt to daily changes in light intensity. The mammalian retina is a remarkable model of circadian clock because it harbors photoreception, self-sustained oscillator function, and physiological outputs within the same tissue. However, the location of the retinal clock in mammals has been a matter of long debate. Current data have shown that clock properties are widely distributed among retinal cells and that the retina is composed of a network of circadian clocks located within distinct cellular layers. Nevertheless, the identity of the major pacemaker, if any, still warrants identification. In addition, the retina coordinates rhythmic behavior by providing visual input to the master hypothalamic circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN. This light entrainment of the SCN to the light/dark cycle involves a network of retinal photoreceptor cells: rods, cones, and intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs. Although it was considered that these photoreceptors synchronized both retinal and SCN clocks, new data challenge this view, suggesting that none of these photoreceptors is involved in photic entrainment of the retinal clock. Because circadian organization is a ubiquitous feature of the retina and controls

  19. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) for human retinal degeneration: phase I trial of CNTF delivered by encapsulated cell intraocular implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieving, Paul A; Caruso, Rafael C; Tao, Weng; Coleman, Hanna R; Thompson, Darby J S; Fullmer, Keri R; Bush, Ronald A

    2006-03-07

    Neurotrophic factors are agents with a promising ability to retard progression of neurodegenerative diseases and are effective in slowing photoreceptor degeneration in animal models of retinitis pigmentosa. Here we report a human clinical trial of a neurotrophic factor for retinal neurodegeneration. In this Phase I safety trial, human ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was delivered by cells transfected with the human CNTF gene and sequestered within capsules that were surgically implanted into the vitreous of the eye. The outer membrane of the encapsulated cell implant is semipermeable to allow CNTF to reach the retina. Ten participants received CNTF implants in one eye. When the implants were removed after 6 months, they contained viable cells with minimal cell loss and gave CNTF output at levels previously shown to be therapeutic for retinal degeneration in rcd1 dogs. Although the trial was not powered to form a judgment as to clinical efficacy, of seven eyes for which visual acuity could be tracked by conventional reading charts, three eyes reached and maintained improved acuities of 10-15 letters, equivalent to two- to three-line improvement on standard Snellen acuity charts. A surgically related choroidal detachment in one eye resulted in a transient acuity decrease that resolved with conservative management. This Phase I trial indicated that CNTF is safe for the human retina even with severely compromised photoreceptors. The approach to delivering therapeutic proteins to degenerating retinas using encapsulated cell implants may have application beyond disease caused by genetic mutations.

  20. Ceroid lipofuscinosis in the border collie dog: retinal lesions in an animal model of juvenile Batten disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R M; Farrow, B R

    1992-02-15

    Ceroid lipofuscinosis, an inherited disorder of lipopigment accumulation, was identified in a group of Border Collie dogs. The dogs developed mental, motor, and visual signs between age 15 and 22 months and progressed rapidly to severe neurological disease. The principal signs were blindness and gait and behavioural abnormalities with progressive dementia. Lipopigment accumulation was severe in neurones and glial cells of the central nervous system and was present in some visceral cells. Inclusions with variable ultrastructure were common in all cells of the retina, but the pigment accumulation did not damage the retinal architecture. The cytoplasmic inclusions were granular, sudanophilic, eosinophilic, and autofluorescent. Ultrastructural morphology varied, but fingerprint and curvilinear patterns predominated. The retinal lesions in the Border Collies were similar to those in English Setters with ceroid lipofuscinosis, but were much less severe than in juvenile human ceroid lipofuscinosis. This disorder bears a close resemblance to ceroid lipofuscinosis in English Setters and is another useful model for Batten's disease.

  1. The clinical implications of molecular monitoring and analyses of inherited retinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Camacho, Oscar F; García-Montaño, Leopoldo A; Zenteno, Juan C

    2017-11-01

    Retinal dystrophies (RDs) are the most common cause of inherited blindness and one of the most genetically heterogeneous human diseases. RDs arise from mutations in genes involved in development and function of photoreceptors or other retinal cells. Identification of the genetic defect causing RD allows accurate diagnosis, prognosis, and counseling in affected patients. Molecular diagnosis is a tremendous challenge in RDs due to their locus and phenotypic heterogeneity. As conventional DNA sequencing approaches are impractical in such situation, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS)-based protocols are needed to identify RD-causing mutations. This is being accomplished by sequencing RD gene panels or by whole exome or whole genome sequencing approaches. Areas covered: This review discusses the current strategies for molecular diagnosis in RDs including their advantages and limitations, as well as their utility in diagnosis of non-syndromic versus syndromic RDs. Results of ongoing gene therapy protocols in RDs are also presented. Expert commentary: Molecular diagnosis in RD improves the medical management of patients. Importantly, demand for molecular screening for RDs is greatly expanding not only as a result of increasing development and availability of NGS technologies, but also of the growing number of gene-based clinical trials offering a potential treatment to patients.

  2. Characterization of lincRNA expression in the human retinal pigment epithelium and differentiated induced pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Au, Elizabeth D.; Fernandez-Godino, Rosario; Kaczynksi, Tadeusz J.; Sousa, Maria E; Farkas, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    Long intervening non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are increasingly being implicated as important factors in many aspects of cellular development, function, and disease, but remain poorly understood. In this study, we examine the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) lincRNA transcriptome using RNA-Seq data generated from human fetal RPE (fRPE), RPE derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-RPE), and undifferentiated iPS (iPS). In addition, we determine the suitability of iPS-RPE, from...

  3. An improved arteriovenous classification method for the early diagnostics of various diseases in retinal image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiayu; Ding, Wenxiang; Abràmoff, Michael D; Cao, Ruofan

    2017-04-01

    Retinal artery and vein classification is an important task for the automatic computer-aided diagnosis of various eye diseases and systemic diseases. This paper presents an improved supervised artery and vein classification method in retinal image. Intra-image regularization and inter-subject normalization is applied to reduce the differences in feature space. Novel features, including first-order and second-order texture features, are utilized to capture the discriminating characteristics of arteries and veins. The proposed method was tested on the DRIVE dataset and achieved an overall accuracy of 0.923. This retinal artery and vein classification algorithm serves as a potentially important tool for the early diagnosis of various diseases, including diabetic retinopathy and cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The vitreous, the retinal interface in ocular health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Smet, Marc D.; Gad Elkareem, Ashraf M.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.

    2013-01-01

    The vitreous is a complex structure whose composition and appearance change with age. Anomalous adhesions between the posterior vitreous face and the retinal surface are the cause of numerous vitreoretinal complications, while the presence of an intact posterior hyaloid provides a scaffold for

  5. CNTF mediates neurotrophic factor secretion and fluid absorption in human retinal pigment epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Li

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF protects photoreceptors and regulates their phototransduction machinery, but little is known about CNTF's effects on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE physiology. Therefore, we determined the expression and localization of CNTF receptors and the physiological consequence of their activation in primary cultures of human fetal RPE (hfRPE. Cultured hfRPE express CNTF, CT1, and OsM and their receptors, including CNTFRα, LIFRβ, gp130, and OsMRβ, all localized mainly at the apical membrane. Exogenous CNTF, CT1, or OsM induces STAT3 phosphorylation, and OsM also induces the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (p44/42 MAP kinase. CNTF increases RPE survivability, but not rates of phagocytosis. CNTF increases secretion of NT3 to the apical bath and decreases that of VEGF, IL8, and TGFβ2. It also significantly increases fluid absorption (J(V across intact monolayers of hfRPE by activating CFTR chloride channels at the basolateral membrane. CNTF induces profound changes in RPE cell biology, biochemistry, and physiology, including the increase in cell survival, polarized secretion of cytokines/neurotrophic factors, and the increase in steady-state fluid absorption mediated by JAK/STAT3 signaling. In vivo, these changes, taken together, could serve to regulate the microenvironment around the distal retinal/RPE/Bruch's membrane complex and provide protection against neurodegenerative disease.

  6. CNTF mediates neurotrophic factor secretion and fluid absorption in human retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Wen, Rong; Banzon, Tina; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Miller, Sheldon S

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) protects photoreceptors and regulates their phototransduction machinery, but little is known about CNTF's effects on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) physiology. Therefore, we determined the expression and localization of CNTF receptors and the physiological consequence of their activation in primary cultures of human fetal RPE (hfRPE). Cultured hfRPE express CNTF, CT1, and OsM and their receptors, including CNTFRα, LIFRβ, gp130, and OsMRβ, all localized mainly at the apical membrane. Exogenous CNTF, CT1, or OsM induces STAT3 phosphorylation, and OsM also induces the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (p44/42 MAP kinase). CNTF increases RPE survivability, but not rates of phagocytosis. CNTF increases secretion of NT3 to the apical bath and decreases that of VEGF, IL8, and TGFβ2. It also significantly increases fluid absorption (J(V)) across intact monolayers of hfRPE by activating CFTR chloride channels at the basolateral membrane. CNTF induces profound changes in RPE cell biology, biochemistry, and physiology, including the increase in cell survival, polarized secretion of cytokines/neurotrophic factors, and the increase in steady-state fluid absorption mediated by JAK/STAT3 signaling. In vivo, these changes, taken together, could serve to regulate the microenvironment around the distal retinal/RPE/Bruch's membrane complex and provide protection against neurodegenerative disease.

  7. Induction of oxidative and nitrosative stresses in human retinal pigment epithelial cells by all-trans-retinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xue [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi 214063, Jiangsu Province (China); Wang, Ke, E-mail: wangke@jsinm.org [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi 214063, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Kai [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi 214063, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhou, Fanfan [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Zhu, Ling [Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2000 (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    Delayed clearance of free form all-trans-retinal (atRAL) is estimated be the key cause of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells injury during the pathogenesis of retinopathies such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are far from clear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity effect and underlying molecular mechanism of atRAL on human retinal pigment epithelium ARPE-19 cells. The results indicated that atRAL could cause cell dysfunction by inducing oxidative and nitrosative stresses in ARPE-19 cells. The oxidative stress induced by atRAL was mediated through up-regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, activating mitochondrial-dependent and MAPKs signaling pathways, and finally resulting in apoptosis of ARPE-19 cells. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin could partly attenuated ROS generation, indicating that NADPH oxidase activity was involved in atRAL-induced oxidative stress in ARPE-19 cells. The nitrosative stress induced by atRAL was mainly reflected in increasing nitric oxide (NO) production, enhancing iNOS, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions, and promoting monocyte adhesion. Furthermore, above effects could be dramatically blocked by using a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitor SN50, indicated that atRAL-induced oxidative and nitrosative stresses were mediated by NF-κB. The results provide better understanding of atRAL-induced toxicity in human RPE cells. - Highlights: • atRAL induces oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells. • atRAL induces oxidative stress-mediated inflammation in ARPE-19 cells. • NF-κB is involved in atRAL-induced oxidative and nitrosative stresses.

  8. Human ocular-derived virus-specific CD4+ T cells control Varicella zoster virus replication in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Milikan (Johannes); G.S. Baarsma (Seerp); R.W.A.M. Kuijpers (Robert); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE. Varicella zoster virus (VZV)-induced retinitis is characterized by the presence of virus-infected cells in the retinal layer and the ocular infiltration of VZV-specific T cells. Herein, the susceptibility of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to VZV infection and the

  9. Intravitreal drug delivery in retinal disease: are we out of our depth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Sachin S; Barnett, Nigel L; Donaldson, Mark J; Parekh, Harendra S

    2014-10-01

    With the ever-increasing global burden of retinal disease, there is an urgent need to vastly improve formulation strategies that enhance posterior eye delivery of therapeutics. Despite intravitreal administration having demonstrated notable superiority over other routes in enhancing retinal drug availability, there still exist various significant physical/biochemical barriers preventing optimal drug delivery into the retina. A further complication lies with an inability to reliably translate laboratory-based retinal models into a clinical setting. Several formulation approaches have recently been evaluated to improve intravitreal therapeutic outcomes, and our aim in this review is to highlight strategies that hold the most promise. We discuss the complex barriers faced by the intravitreal route and examine how formulation strategies including implants, nanoparticulate carriers, viral vectors and sonotherapy have been utilized to attain both sustained delivery and enhanced penetration through to the retina. We conclude by highlighting the advances and limitations of current in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo retinal models in use by researchers globally. Various nanoparticle compositions have demonstrated the ability to overcome the retinal barriers successfully; however, their utility is limited to the laboratory setting. Optimization of these formulations and the development of more robust experimental retinal models are necessary to translate success in the laboratory into clinically efficacious outcomes.

  10. Prevalence and pattern of vitreo-retinal diseases in Nepal: the Bhaktapur glaucoma study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Suman S; Thapa, Raba; Paudyal, Indira; Khanal, Shankar; Aujla, Jaskirat; Paudyal, Govinda; Rens, Ger van

    2013-03-28

    Vitreo-retinal diseases are among the leading causes of visual impairment and blindness worldwide. This study reports the prevalence and pattern of vitreo-retinal diseases in the Bhaktapur Glaucoma Study (BGS), a population based study conducted in Nepal. BGS was a population based cross-sectional study involving 4800 subjects aged 40 years and over from Bhaktapur district. Subjects were selected using a cluster sampling methodology and a door-to-door enumeration. All subjects underwent a detailed ocular examination at the base hospital which included log MAR visual acuity, refraction, applanation tonometry and a dilated fundus examination. Fundus photography, optical coherence tomography and fundus fluorescein angiography were performed where indicated. Complete data was available for 3966 (82.62%) out of the total of 4800 enumerated subjects. The mean age was 55.08 years (SD 11.51). The overall prevalence of vitreo-retinal disorders was 5.35% (95% CI, 4.67 - 6.09). Increasing age was associated with a higher prevalence of vitreo-retinal disorders (P < 0.001). The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 7.69% (95% CI, 6.88 - 8.56). Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) was the most common vitreo-retinal disorder with a prevalence of 1.50% (95% CI, 1.15 - 1.94), increasing significantly with age. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy among the study population was 0.78% (95% CI, 0.53 - 1.11) and among the diabetic population 10.16% (95% CI, 7.01 - 14.12). The population prevalence of other retinal disorders were hypertensive retinopathy 0.88%, macular scar 0.37%, retinal vein occlusion 0.50%, macular hole 0.20%, retinitis pigmentosa 0.12%. and retinal detachment 0.10%.The prevalence of low vision and blindness due to vitreo-retinal disorders was 1.53% (95% CI, 1.18 - 1.97) and 0.65% (95% CI, 0.43 - 0.96), respectively. The prevalence of low vision and blindness was 28.77% (95% CI, 22.78-35.37) and 12.26% (95% CI, 8.17-17.45), respectively among cases with vitreo-retinal

  11. Efflux protein expression in human stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kati Juuti-Uusitalo

    Full Text Available Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells in the back of the eye nourish photoreceptor cells and form a selective barrier that influences drug transport from the blood to the photoreceptor cells. At the molecular level, ATP-dependent efflux transporters have a major role in drug delivery in human RPE. In this study, we assessed the relative expression of several ATP-dependent efflux transporter genes (MRP1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, p-gp, and BCRP, the protein expression and localization of MRP1, MRP4, and MRP5, and the functionality of MRP1 efflux pumps at different maturation stages of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESC and RPE derived from the hESC (hESC-RPE. Our findings revealed that the gene expression of ATP-dependent efflux transporters MRP1, -3, -4, -5, and p-gp fluctuated during hESC-RPE maturation from undifferentiated hESC to fusiform, epithelioid, and finally to cobblestone hESC-RPE. Epithelioid hESC-RPE had the highest expression of MRP1, -3, -4, and P-gp, whereas the most mature cobblestone hESC-RPE had the highest expression of MRP5 and MRP6. These findings indicate that a similar efflux protein profile is shared between hESC-RPE and the human RPE cell line, ARPE-19, and suggest that hESC-RPE cells are suitable in vitro RPE models for drug transport studies. Embryonic stem cell model might provide a novel tool to study retinal cell differentiation, mechanisms of RPE-derived diseases, drug testing and targeted drug therapy.

  12. Contrast sensitivity, ocular blood flow and their potential role in assessing ischaemic retinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshani, Yochai Z; Harris, Alon; Rusia, Deepam; Spaeth, George L; Siesky, Brent; Pollack, Ayala; Wirostko, Barbara

    2011-08-01

    To examine the definition, evaluation methodology, association to ocular blood flow and potential clinical value of contrast sensitivity (CS) testing in clinical and research settings, focusing in patients with ischemic retinal disease. A review of the medical literature focusing on CS and ocular blood flow in ischemic retinal disease. CS may be more sensitive than other methods at detecting subtle defects or improvements in primarily central retinal ganglion cell function early on in a disease process. CS testing attempts to provide spatial detection differences which are not directly assessed with standard visual acuity chart testing. Analyzing all studies that have assessed both CS change and ocular blood flow, it is apparent that both choroidal circulation and retinal circulation may have an important role in influencing CS. The concept that CS is directly influenced by ocular blood flow is supported by reviewing the studies involving both. Although the studies in the literature have not established a direct cause and effect relationship per se, the literature review makes it logical to assume that changes in retinal and choroidal blood flow influence CS. This raises the possibility that a subjective visual characteristic, specifically CS, may be able to be evaluated more objectively by studying blood flow. It appears appropriate to study the relationship between blood flow and CS more extensively to develop improved ways of measuring various aspects of blood flow to the eye and to best quantify early changes in visual function. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2011 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  13. Elevated vitreous body glial fibrillary acidic protein in retinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jünemann, Anselm Gerhard Maria; Rejdak, Robert; Huchzermeyer, Cord; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Grieb, Pawel; Kruse, Friedrich E; Zrenner, Eberhart; Rejdak, Konrad; Petzold, Axel

    2015-12-01

    Increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a characteristic of gliotic activation (Müller cells and astrocytes) in the retina. This study assessed vitreous body GFAP levels in various forms of retinal pathology. This prospective study included 82 patients who underwent vitrectomy (46 retinal detachments (RDs), 13 macular hole (MHs), 15 epiretinal glioses (EGs), 8 organ donors). An established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, SMI26) was used for quantification of GFAP. The highest concentration of vitreous body GFAP in organ donors was 20 pg/mL and it was used as the cutoff. A significant proportion of patients suffering from RD (65 %) to EG (53 %) had vitreous body GFAP levels above this cutoff when compared to organ donors (0 %, p vitreous body GFAP levels were correlated with axial length (R = 0.69, R = 0.52, p vitreous body GFAP is a protein biomarker for glial activation in response to retinal pathologies. Vitreous body GFAP levels may be of interest as a surrogate outcome for experimental treatment strategies in translational studies.

  14. [Progress in research on pathogenic genes and gene therapy for inherited retinal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Cao, Cong; Sun, Jiji; Gao, Tao; Liang, Xiaoyang; Nie, Zhipeng; Ji, Yanchun; Jiang, Pingping; Guan, Minxin

    2017-02-10

    Inherited retinal diseases (IRDs), including retinitis pigmentosa, Usher syndrome, Cone-Rod degenerations, inherited macular dystrophy, Leber's congenital amaurosis, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy are the most common and severe types of hereditary ocular diseases. So far more than 200 pathogenic genes have been identified. With the growing knowledge of the genetics and mechanisms of IRDs, a number of gene therapeutic strategies have been developed in the laboratory or even entered clinical trials. Here the progress of IRD research on the pathogenic genes and therapeutic strategies, particularly gene therapy, are reviewed.

  15. Recapitulation of Human Retinal Development from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generates Transplantable Populations of Cone Photoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anai Gonzalez-Cordero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of rod photoreceptors, derived either from neonatal retinae or pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, can restore rod-mediated visual function in murine models of inherited blindness. However, humans depend more upon cone photoreceptors that are required for daylight, color, and high-acuity vision. Indeed, macular retinopathies involving loss of cones are leading causes of blindness. An essential step for developing stem cell-based therapies for maculopathies is the ability to generate transplantable human cones from renewable sources. Here, we report a modified 2D/3D protocol for generating hPSC-derived neural retinal vesicles with well-formed ONL-like structures containing cones and rods bearing inner segments and connecting cilia, nascent outer segments, and presynaptic structures. This differentiation system recapitulates human photoreceptor development, allowing the isolation and transplantation of a pure population of stage-matched cones. Purified human long/medium cones survive and become incorporated within the adult mouse retina, supporting the potential of photoreceptor transplantation for treating retinal degeneration.

  16. In vitro phagocytosis of collagens by immortalised human retinal Muller cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsioen, Theodorus Leonardus; van Luyn, Marja Johanna Adriana; van der Worp, Roelofje Jacoba; Nolte, Ilja Maria; Hooymans, Johanna Martina Maria; Los, Leonoor Inge

    Purpose: This study is a first step to investigate phagocytosis of collagens by human retinal Muller cells, since Muller cells could be involved in remodelling of the vitreous and vitreoretinal interface in the human eye. Methods: Muller cells in culture were exposed to 2.0 mu m fluorescent latex

  17. The Role Of Gene Therapy In The Treatment Of Retinal Diseases: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Claudio; Gallenga, Carla Enrica; Bolletta, Elena; Perri, Paolo

    2017-11-16

    Gene therapy represents the therapeutic delivery of nucleic acid polymers into a patient's cells with the aim of treating an underlying disease. Over the past 2 decades this new therapy has made substantial progress owing to better understanding of the pathobiologic basis of various diseases coupled with growth of gene transfer biotechnologies. The eye, in particular, represents a suitable target for such therapy due to the immune privilege provided by the blood-ocular barrier, the ability to directly visualize, access and locally treat the cells and the minimal amount of vector needed given the size of this organ. It is not surprising therefore that several clinical trials are now ongoing in this field. The purpose of this review was to provide an update on gene therapy for retinal diseases, discussing differences in treatment strategies, vector designs and surgical techniques. Research was performed on PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Home Genetic Reference. We additionally utilized the internet database for genetics of retinal diseases, the portal for rare diseases and orphan drugs and the NCBI database Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. No restriction was applied on the language of publications. We present the available results of current active clinical trials for inherited retinal disease such Leber’s congenital amaurosis type 2, choroideremia, Stargardt disease, achromatopsia and juvenile X-linked retinoschisis. We also illustrate a new approach of this therapy for the treatment of much more common ocular diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Gene therapy represents an emerging and promising therapeutic approach for the treatment not only of rare inherited retinal diseases but also much more common retinal pathologies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Spectrum of Retinal Vascular Diseases Associated With Paracentral Acute Middle Maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuejing; Rahimy, Ehsan; Sergott, Robert C; Nunes, Renata P; Souza, Eduardo C; Choudhry, Netan; Cutler, Nathan E; Houston, Samuel K S; Munk, Marion R; Fawzi, Amani A; Mehta, Sonia; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre; Ho, Allen C; Sarraf, David

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the spectrum of retinal diseases that can demonstrate paracentral acute middle maculopathy and isolated ischemia of the intermediate and deep capillary plexus. Retrospective, multicenter, observational case series. This is a retrospective case series review of 9 patients (10 eyes) from 5 centers with paracentral acute middle maculopathy lesions and previously unreported retinal vascular etiologies. Case presentations and multimodal imaging, including color photographs, near-infrared reflectance, fluorescein angiography, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT), and orbital color Doppler imaging, are described. Baseline and follow-up findings are correlated with clinical presentation, demographics, and systemic associations. Five men and 4 women, aged 27-66 years, were included. Isolated band-like hyperreflective lesions in the middle retinal layers, otherwise known as paracentral acute middle maculopathy, were observed in all patients at baseline presentation. Follow-up SD OCT analysis of these paracentral acute middle maculopathy lesions demonstrated subsequent thinning of the inner nuclear layer. Novel retinal vascular associations leading to retinal vasculopathy and paracentral acute middle maculopathy include eye compression injury causing global ocular ischemia, sickle cell crisis, Purtscher's retinopathy, inflammatory occlusive retinal vasculitis, post-H1N1 vaccine, hypertensive retinopathy, migraine disorder, and post-upper respiratory infection. Paracentral acute middle maculopathy lesions may develop in a wide spectrum of retinal vascular diseases. They are best identified with SD OCT analysis and may represent ischemia of the intermediate and deep capillary plexus. These lesions typically result in permanent thinning of the inner nuclear layer and are critical to identify in order to determine the cause of unexplained vision loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Personalized Ophthalmology - Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for In Vitro Modelling of Retinal Degenerative Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Caroline; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2018-02-16

    Today, the search for therapeutic options to treat retinal degeneration often relies on an in-depth understanding of the underlying pathological events. Alternatively, it is conceivable to search, in an undirected screening approach, for chemical compounds affecting disease outcome. For both approaches, there is an urgent need for in vitro and, ideally, in vivo disease models that adequately reflect the site of pathology. Currently available animal models possess limitations as they often develop only defined aspects of disease. Primary cell cultures, derived from the posterior pole of the eye, can only be obtained after invasive surgery or are available post mortem, but due to rapid cell senescence are not suited for long-term analysis. Immortalized retinal cell lines, on the other hand, differ in many aspects from native cells. In this situation, a promising alternative could arise from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This cell species can be generated via non-invasive techniques, they are patient-specific, can be propagated indefinitely, and theoretically can be differentiated in all types of retinal cells due to their pluripotent capacities. Importantly, the iPSC-derived retinal cells greatly resemble native cells in many characteristic traits. In this review we present a selection of established in vivo und in vitro models for retinal degenerative disease. We also discuss the potential of iPSCs for personalized in vitro modelling and provide an overview of existent iPSC-derived cell types of the posterior pole, particularly for cells of the retinal pigment epithelium. We finally give an outlook for the potential of such cells for basic research in ophthalmology. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Comparative gene expression study and pathway analysis of the human iris- and the retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, Anna; Ten Brink, Jacoline B; Moerland, Perry D; Heine, Vivi M; Bergen, Arthur A

    2017-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a neural monolayer lining the back of the eye. Degeneration of the RPE leads to severe vision loss in, so far incurable, diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and some forms of retinitis pigmentosa. A promising future replacement therapy may be autologous iris epithelial cell transdifferentiation into RPE in vitro and, subsequently, transplantation. In this study we compared the gene expression profiles of the iris epithelium (IE) and the RPE. We collected both primary RPE- and IE cells from 5 freshly frozen human donor eyes, using respectively laser dissection microscopy and excision. We performed whole-genome expression profiling using 44k Agilent human microarrays. We investigated the gene expression profiles on both gene and functional network level, using R and the knowledge database Ingenuity. The major molecular pathways related to the RPE and IE were quite similar and yielded basic neuro-epithelial cell functions. Nonetheless, we also found major specific differences: For example, genes and molecular pathways, related to the visual cycle and retinol biosynthesis are significantly higher expressed in the RPE than in the IE. Interestingly, Wnt and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR-) signaling pathways are much higher expressed in the IE than in the RPE, suggesting, respectively, a possible pluripotent and high detoxification state of the IE. This study provides a valuation of the similarities and differences between the expression profiles of the RPE and IE. Our data combined with that of the literature, represent a most comprehensive perspective on transcriptional variation, which may support future research in the development of therapeutic transplantation of IE.

  1. Comparative gene expression study and pathway analysis of the human iris- and the retinal pigment epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bennis

    Full Text Available The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is a neural monolayer lining the back of the eye. Degeneration of the RPE leads to severe vision loss in, so far incurable, diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and some forms of retinitis pigmentosa. A promising future replacement therapy may be autologous iris epithelial cell transdifferentiation into RPE in vitro and, subsequently, transplantation. In this study we compared the gene expression profiles of the iris epithelium (IE and the RPE.We collected both primary RPE- and IE cells from 5 freshly frozen human donor eyes, using respectively laser dissection microscopy and excision. We performed whole-genome expression profiling using 44k Agilent human microarrays. We investigated the gene expression profiles on both gene and functional network level, using R and the knowledge database Ingenuity.The major molecular pathways related to the RPE and IE were quite similar and yielded basic neuro-epithelial cell functions. Nonetheless, we also found major specific differences: For example, genes and molecular pathways, related to the visual cycle and retinol biosynthesis are significantly higher expressed in the RPE than in the IE. Interestingly, Wnt and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR- signaling pathways are much higher expressed in the IE than in the RPE, suggesting, respectively, a possible pluripotent and high detoxification state of the IE.This study provides a valuation of the similarities and differences between the expression profiles of the RPE and IE. Our data combined with that of the literature, represent a most comprehensive perspective on transcriptional variation, which may support future research in the development of therapeutic transplantation of IE.

  2. First-in-Human Trial of a Novel Suprachoroidal Retinal Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayton, Lauren N.; Blamey, Peter J.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Luu, Chi D.; Nayagam, David A. X.; Sinclair, Nicholas C.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Yeoh, Jonathan; McCombe, Mark F.; Briggs, Robert J.; Opie, Nicholas L.; Villalobos, Joel; Dimitrov, Peter N.; Varsamidis, Mary; Petoe, Matthew A.; McCarthy, Chris D.; Walker, Janine G.; Barnes, Nick; Burkitt, Anthony N.; Williams, Chris E.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Allen, Penelope J.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal visual prostheses (“bionic eyes”) have the potential to restore vision to blind or profoundly vision-impaired patients. The medical bionic technology used to design, manufacture and implant such prostheses is still in its relative infancy, with various technologies and surgical approaches being evaluated. We hypothesised that a suprachoroidal implant location (between the sclera and choroid of the eye) would provide significant surgical and safety benefits for patients, allowing them to maintain preoperative residual vision as well as gaining prosthetic vision input from the device. This report details the first-in-human Phase 1 trial to investigate the use of retinal implants in the suprachoroidal space in three human subjects with end-stage retinitis pigmentosa. The success of the suprachoroidal surgical approach and its associated safety benefits, coupled with twelve-month post-operative efficacy data, holds promise for the field of vision restoration. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01603576 PMID:25521292

  3. First-in-human trial of a novel suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayton, Lauren N; Blamey, Peter J; Guymer, Robyn H; Luu, Chi D; Nayagam, David A X; Sinclair, Nicholas C; Shivdasani, Mohit N; Yeoh, Jonathan; McCombe, Mark F; Briggs, Robert J; Opie, Nicholas L; Villalobos, Joel; Dimitrov, Peter N; Varsamidis, Mary; Petoe, Matthew A; McCarthy, Chris D; Walker, Janine G; Barnes, Nick; Burkitt, Anthony N; Williams, Chris E; Shepherd, Robert K; Allen, Penelope J

    2014-01-01

    Retinal visual prostheses ("bionic eyes") have the potential to restore vision to blind or profoundly vision-impaired patients. The medical bionic technology used to design, manufacture and implant such prostheses is still in its relative infancy, with various technologies and surgical approaches being evaluated. We hypothesised that a suprachoroidal implant location (between the sclera and choroid of the eye) would provide significant surgical and safety benefits for patients, allowing them to maintain preoperative residual vision as well as gaining prosthetic vision input from the device. This report details the first-in-human Phase 1 trial to investigate the use of retinal implants in the suprachoroidal space in three human subjects with end-stage retinitis pigmentosa. The success of the suprachoroidal surgical approach and its associated safety benefits, coupled with twelve-month post-operative efficacy data, holds promise for the field of vision restoration. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01603576.

  4. First-in-human trial of a novel suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren N Ayton

    Full Text Available Retinal visual prostheses ("bionic eyes" have the potential to restore vision to blind or profoundly vision-impaired patients. The medical bionic technology used to design, manufacture and implant such prostheses is still in its relative infancy, with various technologies and surgical approaches being evaluated. We hypothesised that a suprachoroidal implant location (between the sclera and choroid of the eye would provide significant surgical and safety benefits for patients, allowing them to maintain preoperative residual vision as well as gaining prosthetic vision input from the device. This report details the first-in-human Phase 1 trial to investigate the use of retinal implants in the suprachoroidal space in three human subjects with end-stage retinitis pigmentosa. The success of the suprachoroidal surgical approach and its associated safety benefits, coupled with twelve-month post-operative efficacy data, holds promise for the field of vision restoration.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01603576.

  5. Research progress of the association between PAX6 gene and retinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Wen Liu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available PAX6 gene plays an important role in embryological development, and the mutation of this gene may result incongenital aniridia, retinoblastoma, macula hypoplasia, Peters' anomaly and so on. A brief introduction of the background PAX6 gene, and the association between PAX6 and retinal diseases were summarized in this review.

  6. Optical Coherence Tomography in the Diagnosis and Monitoring of Retinal Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Simona-Delia Ţălu

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows the visualization of the retinal microarchitecture as cross-sectional or tomographic volumetric data. The usefulness of OCT in the management of various retinal diseases is validated by the possibility to allow early diagnosis and to help in the decision-making process. OCT is applied by two main methods: time domain (TD-OCT) and spectral domain (SD-OCT). The advantages of SD-OCT over TD-OCT are significant improvement of the image axial resolution, d...

  7. Microscope-Integrated Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in the Operating Room in Young Children With Retinal Vascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Viehland, Christian; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; Keller, Brenton; Vajzovic, Lejla; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A

    2017-05-01

    Intraoperative optical coherence tomography (OCT) has gained traction as an important adjunct for clinical decision making during vitreoretinal surgery, and OCT angiography (OCTA) has provided novel insights in clinical evaluation of retinal diseases. To date, these two technologies have not been applied in combination to evaluate retinal vascular disease in the operating suite. To conduct microscope-integrated, swept-source OCTA (MIOCTA) in children with retinal vascular disease. In this case report analysis, OCT imaging in pediatric patients, MIOCTA images were obtained during examination under anesthesia from a young boy with a history of idiopathic vitreous hemorrhage and a female infant with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy. Side-by-side comparison of research MIOCT angiograms and clinically indicated fluorescein angiograms. In 2 young children with retinal vascular disease, the MIOCTA images showed more detailed vascular patterns than were visible on the fluorescein angiograms although within a more posterior field of view. The MIOCTA system allowed visualization of small pathological retinal vessels in the retinal periphery that were obscured in the fluorescein angiograms by fluorescein staining from underlying, preexisting laser scars. This is the first report to date of the use of MIOCTA in the operating room for young children with retinal vascular disease. Further optimization of this system may allow noninvasive detailed evaluation of retinal vasculature during surgical procedures and in patients who could not cooperate with in-office examinations.

  8. Risk of serous retinal detachment in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuh-Shin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Hong-I; Ko, Shun-Yao; Tu, I-Te; Chien, Chih-Chiang; Wang, Jian-Jhong; Wang, Ching-Min; Jan, Ren-Long

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective, nationwide, matched cohort study was to investigate the association of serous retinal detachment with having end-stage renal disease (ESRD) while on dialysis. The cohort study included 94,024 patients with ESRD on dialysis registered between January 2000 to December 2009 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. An age- and sex-matched control group comprised 94,024 patients selected from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Information for each patient was collected from the index date until December 2011. Twenty-seven ESRD patients and 11 controls developed serous retinal detachment (P dialysis compared with controls (incidence rate ratio = 3.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.68-6.83). After adjustment for potential confounders, patients were 3.86 times more likely to develop serous retinal detachment than the full cohort (adjusted HR = 3.86, 95% CI = 1.15-12.96). In conclusion, patients with ESRD on dialysis demonstrate an increased risk of serous retinal detachment. Interdisciplinary collaboration between nephrologists and ophthalmologists is important to deal with serous retinal detachment in patients with ESRD on dialysis and prevent impairments of visual acuity.

  9. A Probabilistic Framework for Content-Based Diagnosis of Retinal Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL; Abdelrahman, Mohamed A [ORNL; Chaum, Edward [ORNL; Muthusamy Govindasamy, Vijaya Priya [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in the working age population around the world. Computer assisted analysis has the potential to assist in the early detection of diabetes by regular screening of large populations. The widespread availability of digital fundus cameras today is resulting in the accumulation of large image archives of diagnosed patient data that captures historical knowledge of retinal pathology. Through this research we are developing a content-based image retrieval method to verify our hypothesis that retinal pathology can be identified and quantified from visually similar retinal images in an image archive. We will present diagnostic results for specificity and sensitivity on a population of 395 fundus images representing the normal fundus and 14 stratified disease states.

  10. Contacting co-culture of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells alters barrier function of human embryonic stem cell derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skottman, H; Muranen, J; Lähdekorpi, H; Pajula, E; Mäkelä, K; Koivusalo, L; Koistinen, A; Uusitalo, H; Kaarniranta, K; Juuti-Uusitalo, K

    2017-10-01

    Here we evaluated the effects of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (hREC) on mature human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. The hESC-RPE cells (Regea08/017, Regea08/023 or Regea11/013) and hREC (ACBRI 181) were co-cultured on opposite sides of transparent membranes for up to six weeks. Thereafter barrier function, small molecule permeability, localization of RPE and endothelial cell marker proteins, cellular fine structure, and growth factor secretion of were evaluated. After co-culture, the RPE specific CRALBP and endothelial cell specific von Willebrand factor were appropriately localized. In addition, the general morphology, pigmentation, and fine structure of hESC-RPE cells were unaffected. Co-culture increased the barrier function of hESC-RPE cells, detected both with TEER measurements and cumulative permeability of FD4 - although the differences varied among the cell lines. Co-culturing significantly altered VEGF and PEDF secretion, but again the differences were cell line specific. The results of this study showed that co-culture with hREC affects hESC-RPE functionality. In addition, co-culture revealed drastic cell line specific differences, most notably in growth factor secretion. This model has the potential to be used as an in vitro outer blood-retinal barrier model for drug permeability testing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Multimodal imaging of central retinal disease progression in a 2 year mean follow up of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujirakul, Tharikarn; Lin, Michael K.; Duong, Jimmy; Wei, Ying; Lopez-Pintado, Sara; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the rate of progression and optimal follow up time in patients with advanced stage retinitis pigmentosa (RP) comparing the use of fundus autofluorescence imaging and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Design Retrospective analysis of progression rate. Methods Longitudinal imaging follow up in 71 patients with retinitis pigmentosa was studied using the main outcome measurements of hyperautofluoresent ring horizontal diameter and vertical diameter along with ellipsoid zone line width from spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Test-retest reliability and the rate of progression were calculated. The interaction between the progression rates was tested for sex, age, mode of inheritance, and baseline measurement size. Symmetry of left and right eye progression rate was also tested. Results Significant progression was observed in >75% of patients during the 2 year mean follow up. The mean annual progression rates of ellipsoid zone line, and hyperautofluorescent ring horizontal diameter and vertical diameter were 0.45° (4.9%), 0.51° (4.1%), and 0.42° (4.0%), respectively. The e llipsoid zone line width, and hyperautofluorescent ring horizontal diameter and vertical diameter had low test-retest variabilities of 8.9%, 9.5% and 9.6%, respectively. This study is the first to demonstrate asymmetrical structural progression rate between right and left eye, which was found in 19% of patients. The rate of progression was significantly slower as the disease approached the fovea, supporting the theory that RP progresses in an exponential fashion. No significant interaction between progression rate and patient age, sex, or mode of inheritance was observed. Conclusions Fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography detect progression in patients with RP reliably and with strong correlation. These parameters may be useful alongside functional assessments as the outcome measurements for future therapeutic trials. Follow-up at 1 year

  12. Pattern of retinal diseases in hilly terrain of Himachal Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhav Chauhan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the pattern/distribution of retinal vascular diseases in the hilly terrain of Himachal Pradesh(altitude ranging from 500-4500m above sea level.METHODS: It is a retro/prospective study of patients with retinal diseases attending the general ophthalmology clinic of a tertiary care facility at Shimla from August 2008 to April 2013. Out of 5600 subjects, 4323 were taken as a sample. The data were taken from the hospital records and thereafter analyzed to determine their age, sex distribution and diagnosis. All patients underwent visual acuity, refraction, slit lamp examination and fundus evaluation. The diagnosis was confirmed from fundus clinic records and evaluation of fundus photographic records retro/prospectively. The photographs were taken on the fundus camera(Kowa Fundus Camera VX-10and fundus fluorescein angiography done where ever indicated.RESULTS:Out of the 4323 patients, there were more males 2563(59.29%than females 1760(40.71%with retinal diseases. Out of the 525(12.14%diabetic retinopathy(DRsubjects, mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy was present in 133(3.08%, moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy in 156(3.60%, severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy in 120(2.78%and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in 116(2.68%subjects. Amongst the 393(9.10%subjects of hypertensive retinopathy, hypertensive retinopathy-grade 1(was present in 130(3.01%, hypertensive retinopathy-grade 2 in 111(2.57%, hypertensive retinopathy-grade 3 in 131(3.03%and hypertensive retinopathy-grade 4 in 21(0.49%subjects. Of all the 660(15.27%subjects of other retinal vascular disorders, branch retinal vein occlusion(BRVOwas present in 229(5.30%, central retinal vein occlusion(CRVOin 55(1.27%, hemi central vein occlusion in 8(0.19%, central retinal artery occlusion(CRAOin 20(0.46%, branch retinal artery occlusion in 4(0.09%, ocular ischaemic syndrome in 1(0.02%, retinopathy of prematurity in 9(0.21%, retinal artery macroaneurysm in 5

  13. Outcome of cytomegalovirus retinitis in immunocompromised patients without Human Immunodeficiency Virus treated with intravitreal ganciclovir injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aniruddha; Kumari, Neha; Trehan, Amita; Khadwal, Alka; Dogra, Mangat R; Gupta, Vishali; Sharma, Aman; Gupta, Amod; Singh, Ramandeep

    2014-09-01

    To study the outcomes of treatment with intravitreal ganciclovir injection for cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in patients without Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. In this retrospective cohort study, demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with CMV retinitis without HIV were noted. Patients received intravitreal ganciclovir injection (2 mg/0.1 ml) alone until quiescence. The outcome measures were time taken for the lesions to heal, number of injections, change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), recurrence of retinitis, occurrence of immune recovery uveitis (IRU) or injection-related complications and retinal detachment (RD). 18 eyes of ten patients (six males) with mean age of 33.7 years from June 2004 to March 2013 were included. Thirteen eyes with active lesions (mean BCVA of 0.51 ± 0.41) received 5.54 ± 3.36 intravitreal ganciclovir injections with complete healing within 1.81 ± 1.25 months. The final BCVA was 0.43 ± 0.52. IRU was observed in six eyes (33.33%) and RD developed in one eye. One eye had recurrence 1 month after stopping ganciclovir injections. The rest of the patients had recurrence-free follow-up at 9.46 ± 12.42 months. Non-HIV patients with CMV retinitis can be successfully treated with intravitreal ganciclovir injection alone, avoiding the systemic side effects of systemic anti-CMV therapy.

  14. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...... induced apoptosis in several activated T-cell populations and T-cell lines, including T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-CD3-negative T-cell lines. In contrast, RPE cells induced little or no apoptosis in resting peripheral T cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies, which...

  15. Retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatments for retinitis pigmentosa, including the use of DHA, which is an omega-3 fatty acid. Other ... counseling and testing may help determine whether your children are at risk for this disease.

  16. Unusual presentation: pulmonary hemosiderosis with celiac disease and retinitis pigmentosa in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Ozlem; Keskin, Mehmet; Guler, Elif; Tutar, Ediz; Saygili, Oguzhan; Kucukosmanoglu, Ercan; Kor, Yilmaz; Celik, Haydar; Coskun, Enes

    2011-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare disease characterized by anemia, hemoptysis and recurrent alveolar hemorrhage. The combination of IPH and celiac disease (CD) is extremely rare. We report a 9-year-old boy with Lane-Hamilton syndrome, co-occurrence of pulmonary hemosiderosis with CD. This presentation is unique presentation because he has also retinal pigmentation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Noninvasive near infrared autofluorescence imaging of retinal pigment epithelial cells in the human retina using adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Jung, HaeWon; Liu, Jianfei; Droettboom, Michael; Tam, Johnny

    2017-10-01

    The retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells contain intrinsic fluorophores that can be visualized using infrared autofluorescence (IRAF). Although IRAF is routinely utilized in the clinic for visualizing retinal health and disease, currently, it is not possible to discern cellular details using IRAF due to limits in resolution. We demonstrate that the combination of adaptive optics (AO) with IRAF (AO-IRAF) enables higher-resolution imaging of the IRAF signal, revealing the RPE mosaic in the living human eye. Quantitative analysis of visualized RPE cells in 10 healthy subjects across various eccentricities demonstrates the possibility for in vivo density measurements of RPE cells, which range from 6505 to 5388 cells/mm 2 for the areas measured (peaking at the fovea). We also identified cone photoreceptors in relation to underlying RPE cells, and found that RPE cells support on average up to 18.74 cone photoreceptors in the fovea down to an average of 1.03 cone photoreceptors per RPE cell at an eccentricity of 6 mm. Clinical application of AO-IRAF to a patient with retinitis pigmentosa illustrates the potential for AO-IRAF imaging to become a valuable complementary approach to the current landscape of high resolution imaging modalities.

  18. Relationship between Retinal Vascular Caliber and Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marmor Alon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the relationship between retinal vascular caliber and cardiovascular disease in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD patients without diabetes and hypertension. Methods: Intention to treat study of individuals who underwent cardiac computed tomography (CT during a two year period. Coronary artery disease (CAD was defined as stenosis of >50% in at least one major coronary artery. Liver and spleen density were measured by abdominal (CT; intima-media thickness (IMT by Doppler ultrasound; retinal artery and vein diameter by colored-retinal angiography; and metabolic syndrome by ATP III guidelines. Serum biomarkers of insulin resistance, inflammation, and oxidant-antioxidant status were assessed. Results: Compared with 22 gender and age matched controls, the 29 NAFLD patients showed higher prevalence of coronary plaques (70% vs. 30%, p < 0.001, higher prevalence of coronary stenosis (30% vs. 15%, p < 0.001, lower retinal arteriole-to-venule ratio (AVR (0.66 ± 0.06 vs. 0.71 ± 0.02, p < 0.01, higher IMT (0.98 ± 0.3 vs. 0.83 ± 0.1, p < 0.04, higher carotid plaques (60% vs. 40%, p < 0.001, higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA (4.0 ± 3.4 vs. 2.0 ± 1.0, p < 0.005, and higher triglyceride levels (200 ± 80 vs. 150 ± 60, p < 0.005 than controls. Multivariate analysis showed fatty liver (OR 2.5; p < 0.01, IMT (OR 2.3 p < 0.001, and retinal AVR ratio (OR 1.5, p < 0.01 to be strongly associated with CAD independent of metabolic syndrome (OR 1.2, p < 0.05. Conclusions: Patients with smaller retinal AVR (<0.7 are likely to be at increased risk for CAD and carotid atherosclerosis in patients with NAFLD even without hypertension or diabetes.

  19. Lipid composition of the human eye: are red blood cells a good mirror of retinal and optic nerve fatty acids?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyazi Acar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The assessment of blood lipids is very frequent in clinical research as it is assumed to reflect the lipid composition of peripheral tissues. Even well accepted such relationships have never been clearly established. This is particularly true in ophthalmology where the use of blood lipids has become very common following recent data linking lipid intake to ocular health and disease. In the present study, we wanted to determine in humans whether a lipidomic approach based on red blood cells could reveal associations between circulating and tissue lipid profiles. To check if the analytical sensitivity may be of importance in such analyses, we have used a double approach for lipidomics. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Red blood cells, retinas and optic nerves were collected from 9 human donors. The lipidomic analyses on tissues consisted in gas chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ionization source-mass spectrometer (LC-ESI-MS. Gas chromatography did not reveal any relevant association between circulating and ocular fatty acids except for arachidonic acid whose circulating amounts were positively associated with its levels in the retina and in the optic nerve. In contrast, several significant associations emerged from LC-ESI-MS analyses. Particularly, lipid entities in red blood cells were positively or negatively associated with representative pools of retinal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, retinal very-long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFA or optic nerve plasmalogens. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: LC-ESI-MS is more appropriate than gas chromatography for lipidomics on red blood cells, and further extrapolation to ocular lipids. The several individual lipid species we have identified are good candidates to represent circulating biomarkers of ocular lipids. However, further investigation is needed before considering them as indexes of disease risk and before using them in clinical studies on

  20. Lipid composition of the human eye: are red blood cells a good mirror of retinal and optic nerve fatty acids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Niyazi; Berdeaux, Olivier; Grégoire, Stéphane; Cabaret, Stéphanie; Martine, Lucy; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine P; Bron, Alain M; Bretillon, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of blood lipids is very frequent in clinical research as it is assumed to reflect the lipid composition of peripheral tissues. Even well accepted such relationships have never been clearly established. This is particularly true in ophthalmology where the use of blood lipids has become very common following recent data linking lipid intake to ocular health and disease. In the present study, we wanted to determine in humans whether a lipidomic approach based on red blood cells could reveal associations between circulating and tissue lipid profiles. To check if the analytical sensitivity may be of importance in such analyses, we have used a double approach for lipidomics. Red blood cells, retinas and optic nerves were collected from 9 human donors. The lipidomic analyses on tissues consisted in gas chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ionization source-mass spectrometer (LC-ESI-MS). Gas chromatography did not reveal any relevant association between circulating and ocular fatty acids except for arachidonic acid whose circulating amounts were positively associated with its levels in the retina and in the optic nerve. In contrast, several significant associations emerged from LC-ESI-MS analyses. Particularly, lipid entities in red blood cells were positively or negatively associated with representative pools of retinal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), retinal very-long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFA) or optic nerve plasmalogens. LC-ESI-MS is more appropriate than gas chromatography for lipidomics on red blood cells, and further extrapolation to ocular lipids. The several individual lipid species we have identified are good candidates to represent circulating biomarkers of ocular lipids. However, further investigation is needed before considering them as indexes of disease risk and before using them in clinical studies on optic nerve neuropathies or retinal diseases displaying photoreceptors degeneration.

  1. Proteomic profiling of human retinal and choroidal endothelial cells reveals molecular heterogeneity related to tissue of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, David O; Riviere, Michael; Choi, Dongseok; Pan, Yuzhen; Planck, Stephen R; Rosenbaum, James T; David, Larry L; Smith, Justine R

    2007-10-30

    The ocular vascular endothelium plays a key role in the development of several leading retinal causes of blindness in Western nations. Choroidal endothelial cells are integral to the subretinal neovascular lesions that characterize the exudative form of late age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and retinal endothelial cells participate in the initiation of diabetic retinopathy and posterior uveitis. Vascular endothelial cells at different sites exhibit considerable molecular diversity. This diversity has implications for understanding the pathogenesis of tissue-specific diseases and for the development of targeted therapies to treat these conditions. Previous work from our group has identified significant differences in the gene transcript profiles of human retinal and choroidal endothelial cells. Because the proteome ultimately determines the behavior of any given cell, however, it is critical to determine whether molecular differences exist at the level of protein expression. Retinal and choroidal endothelial cells were separately isolated from five sets of human eyes by enzymatic digestion with type II collagenase followed by anti-CD31 antibody-conjugated magnetic bead separation. Cells were washed to remove serum peptides in the culture medium, and lysed by sonication in buffer containing 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. Protein was then precipitated with acetone. Retinal and choroidal endothelial samples from each donor were labeled with Cy3 and Cy5, respectively, mixed with a Cy2-labeled pooled protein sample to facilitate spot matching across gels, and separated by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Following a global normalization, differentially abundant protein spots that were visible in at least four of five donor gels were detected by the significance analysis of microarrays method, with false discovery rate set at 5%. Corresponding spots were excised from additional DIGE-labeled or Coomassie-stained 2D electrophoretic gels. Protein

  2. PEDF and VEGF-A output from human retinal pigment epithelial cells grown on novel microcarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Torsten; Congrove, Nicole R; Zhang, Shiling; McCourt, Alexander D; Sherman, Scott J; McKay, Brian S

    2012-01-01

    Human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells have been tested as a cell-based therapy for Parkinson's disease but will require additional study before further clinical trials can be planned. We now show that the long-term survival and neurotrophic potential of hRPE cells can be enhanced by the use of FDA-approved plastic-based microcarriers compared to a gelatin-based microcarrier as used in failed clinical trials. The hRPE cells grown on these plastic-based microcarriers display several important characteristics of hRPE found in vivo: (1) characteristic morphological features, (2) accumulation of melanin pigment, and (3) high levels of production of the neurotrophic factors pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A). Growth of hRPE cells on plastic-based microcarriers led to sustained levels (>1 ng/ml) of PEDF and VEGF-A in conditioned media for two months. We also show that the expression of VEGF-A and PEDF is reciprocally regulated by activation of the GPR143 pathway. GPR143 is activated by L-DOPA (1 μM) which decreased VEGF-A secretion as opposed to the previously reported increase in PEDF secretion. The hRPE microcarriers are therefore novel candidate delivery systems for achieving long-term delivery of the neuroprotective factors PEDF and VEGF-A, which could have a value in neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease.

  3. The Relationship between Retinal Microvascular Abnormalities and Coronary Heart Disease: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintic, Benjamin R.; McClintic, Jedediah I.; Bisognano, John D.; Block, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the United States despite decades of advancement in its diagnosis and treatment. Due to the limitations of traditional risk stratification for heart disease, evaluation of the retinal vasculature has been proposed as an easily and safely measured adjunct to commonly used screening methods. In this article we provide a comprehensive review of the literature concerning the relationships between retinal microvascular abnormalities and coronary heart disease. We outline details of the most recent large epidemiological studies and discuss their potential implications for clinical practice. Finally, we propose a change to the current guidelines regarding the screening of “low risk” women, a group that is often failed by traditional evaluation algorithms. PMID:20362758

  4. Development of the hyaloid, choroidal and retinal vasculatures in the fetal human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutty, Gerard A; McLeod, D Scott

    2017-11-01

    The development of the ocular vasculatures is perfectly synchronized to provide the nutritional and oxygen requirements of the forming human eye. The fetal vasculature of vitreous, which includes the hyaloid vasculature, vasa hyaloidea propria, and tunica vasculosa lentis, initially develops around 4-6 weeks gestation (WG) by hemo-vasculogenesis (development of blood and blood vessels from a common progenitor, the hemangioblast). This transient fetal vasculature expands around 12 WG by angiogenesis (budding from primordial vessels) and remains until a retinal vasculature begins to form. The fetal vasculature then regresses by apoptosis with the assistance of macrophages/hyalocytes. The human choroidal vasculature also forms by a similar process and will supply nutrients and oxygen to outer retina. This lobular vasculature develops in a dense collagenous tissue juxtaposed with a cell constitutively producing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), the retinal pigment epithelium. This epithelial/endothelial relationship is critical in maintaining the function of this vasculature throughout life and maintaining it's fenestrated state. The lobular capillary system (choriocapillaris) develops first by hemo-vasculogenesis and then the intermediate choroidal blood vessels form by angiogenesis, budding from the choriocapillaris. The human retinal vasculature is the last to develop. It develops by vasculogenesis, assembly of CXCR4(+)/CD39(+) angioblasts or vascular progenitors perhaps using Muller cell Notch1 or axonal neuropilinin-1 for guidance of semaphorin 3A-expressing angioblasts. The fovea never develops a retinal vasculature, which is probably due to the foveal avascular zone area of retina expressing high levels of antiangiogenic factors. From these studies, it is apparent that development of the mouse ocular vasculatures is not representative of the development of the human fetal, choroidal and retinal vasculatures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  5. Retinal macroglia changes in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Malia M; Rodríguez, José J; Gutierrez-Lanza, Raquel; Yates, Joseph; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Lutty, Gerard A

    2014-10-01

    The retinas of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and transgenic AD animal models display amyloid beta deposits and degeneration of ganglion cells. Little is known, however, about the glial changes in the AD retina. The present study used a triple transgenic mouse model (3xTG-AD), which carries mutated human amyloid precursor protein, tau, and presenilin 1 genes and closely mimics the human brain pathology, to investigate retinal glial changes in AD. AD cognitive symptoms are known to begin in the 3xTG-AD mice at four months of age but plaques and tangles are not seen until six to twelve months. Müller cells in 3xTG-AD animals were GFAP-positive, indicating activation, at the earliest time point investigated, nine months. Astrocyte activation was also suggested in the 3xTG-AD mice by an apparent increase in size and process number. Another glial marker, S100, was expressed by astrocytes in both the non-transgenic (NTG) controls and 3xTG-AD retinas. Labeling was predominantly nuclear in nine month non-transgenic (NTG) control mice but was also seen in the cytoplasm and processes at 18 months of age. Interestingly, the nuclear localization was not as prominent in the 3xTG-AD retina even at nine months with labeling observed in astrocyte processes. The diffusion of S100 suggests the possible secretion of this protein, as is seen in the brain, with age and, more profoundly, associated with AD. Several dense, abnormally shaped, opaque structures were noted in all 3xTG-AD mice investigated. These structures, which were enveloped by GFAP and S100-positive astrocytes and Müller cells, were positive for amyloid beta, suggesting that they are amyloid plaques. Staining control retinas with amyloid showed similar structures in 30% of NTG animals but these were fewer in number and not associated with glial activation. The results herein indicate retinal glia activation in the 3xTG-AD mouse retina. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of retinal disease-associated RPE65 mutations on retinoid isomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, Grzegorz; Kiser, Philip D; Golczak, Marcin; Sun, Wenyu; Heon, Elise; Saperstein, David A; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2008-09-16

    Pathogenic mutations in the RPE65 gene are associated with a spectrum of congenital blinding diseases in humans. We evaluated changes in the promoter region, coding regions, and exon/intron junctions of the RPE65 gene by direct sequencing of DNA from 36 patients affected with Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA), 62 with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP), and 21 with autosomal dominant/recessive cone-rod dystrophies (CORD). Fifteen different variants were found, of which 6 were novel. Interesting was Gly244Val, a novel mutation close to the catalytic center. To assess the role of this mutation in RPE65 inactivation, we performed detailed biochemical studies of the mutant along with a structural analysis of the 244 amino acid position with respect to amino acids known to be important for RPE65-dependent retinoid isomerization. Bicistronic plasmid expression of the RPE65 Gly244Val mutant and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) allowed us to document both its instability in cultured cells by cell sorting and immunoblotting methodology and its loss of RPE65-dependent isomerase activity by enzymatic assays. Further insights into the structural requirements for retinoid isomerization by RPE65 were obtained by using the carotenoid oxygenase (ACO) from Synechocystis (PDB accession code 2BIW ) as a structural template to construct a RPE65 homology model and locating all known inactivating mutations including Gly244Val within this model.

  7. Impact of Retinal Disease-Associated RPE65 Mutations on Retinoid Isomerization†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, Grzegorz; Kiser, Philip D.; Golczak, Marcin; Sun, Wenyu; Heon, Elise; Saperstein, David A.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in the RPE65 gene are associated with a spectrum of congenital blinding diseases in humans. We evaluated changes in the promoter region, coding regions, and exon/intron junctions of the RPE65 gene by direct sequencing of DNA from 36 patients affected with Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA), 62 with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP), and 21 with autosomal dominant/recessive cone-rod dystrophies (CORD). Fifteen different variants were found, of which 6 were novel. Interesting was Gly244Val, a novel mutation close to the catalytic center. To assess the role of this mutation in RPE65 inactivation, we performed detailed biochemical studies of the mutant along with a structural analysis of the 244 amino acid position with respect to amino acids known to be important for RPE65-dependent retinoid isomerization. Bicistronic plasmid expression of the RPE65 Gly244Val mutant and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) allowed us to document both its instability in cultured cells by cell sorting and immunoblotting methodology and its loss of RPE65-dependent isomerase activity by enzymatic assays. Further insights into the structural requirements for retinoid isomerization by RPE65 were obtained by using the carotenoid oxygenase (ACO) from Synechocystis (PDB accession code 2BIW) as a structural template to construct a RPE65 homology model and locating all known inactivating mutations including Gly244Val within this model. PMID:18722466

  8. Age-Dependent Disease Expression Determines Remodeling of the Retinal Mosaic in Carriers of RPGR Exon ORF15 Mutations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beltran, William A; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2009-01-01

    .... Cell-specific markers were used to examine retinal remodeling events. RESULTS . A mosaic pattern composed of patches of diseased and normal retina was first detected in XLPRA2 carriers at 4.9 weeks of age...

  9. Human Environmental Disease Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, many epidemiological, toxicological and biological studies have been performed to assess the role of environmental chemicals as potential toxicants for diverse human disorders. However, the relationships between diseases based on chemical exposure have been rarely studied...... by computational biology. We developed a human environmental disease network (EDN) to explore and suggest novel disease-disease and chemical-disease relationships. The presented scored EDN model is built upon the integration on systems biology and chemical toxicology using chemical contaminants information...

  10. Induced pluripotent stem cells for retinal degenerative diseases: a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-12-31

    Dec 31, 2009 ... Frane J. L., Tian S. et al. 2007 Induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from human somatic cells. Science 318, 1917–1920. Yu J., Hu K., Smuga-Otto K., Tian S., Stewart R., Slukvin II et al. 2009 Human induced pluripotent stem cells free of vector and transgene sequences. Science 324, 797–801.

  11. Characterization of human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Tălu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To characterize the human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal geometry and lacunarity parameters.METHODS:Multifractal analysis using a box counting algorithm was carried out for a set of 12 segmented and skeletonized human retinal images, corresponding to both normal (6 images and amblyopia states of the retina (6 images.RESULTS:It was found that the microvascular geometry of the human retina network represents geometrical multifractals, characterized through subsets of regions having different scaling properties that are not evident in the fractal analysis. Multifractal analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions show a higher average of the generalized dimensions (Dq for q=0, 1, 2 indicating a higher degree of the tree-dimensional complexity associated with the human retinal microvasculature network whereas images of healthy subjects show a lower value of generalized dimensions indicating normal complexity of biostructure. On the other hand, the lacunarity analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions show a lower average of the lacunarity parameter Λ than the corresponding values for normal images (segmented and skeletonized versions.CONCLUSION:The multifractal and lacunarity analysis may be used as a non-invasive predictive complementary tool to distinguish amblyopic subjects from healthy subjects and hence this technique could be used for an early diagnosis of patients with amblyopia.

  12. Progress toward the maintenance and repair of degenerating retinal circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vugler, Anthony A

    2010-01-01

    Retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa remain major causes of severe vision loss in humans. Clinical trials for treatment of retinal degenerations are underway and advancements in our understanding of retinal biology in health/disease have implications for novel therapies. A review of retinal biology is used to inform a discussion of current strategies to maintain/repair neural circuitry in age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and Type 2 Leber congenital amaurosis. In age-related macular degeneration/retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive loss of rods/cones results in corruption of bipolar cell circuitry, although retinal output neurons/photoreceptive melanopsin cells survive. Visual function can be stabilized/enhanced after treatment in age-related macular degeneration, but in advanced degenerations, reorganization of retinal circuitry may preclude attempts to restore cone function. In Type 2 Leber congenital amaurosis, useful vision can be restored by gene therapy where central cones survive. Remarkable progress has been made in restoring vision to rodents using light-responsive ion channels inserted into bipolar cells/retinal ganglion cells. Advances in genetic, cellular, and prosthetic therapies show varying degrees of promise for treating retinal degenerations. While functional benefits can be obtained after early therapeutic interventions, efforts should be made to minimize circuitry changes as soon as possible after rod/cone loss. Advances in retinal anatomy/physiology and genetic technologies should allow refinement of future reparative strategies.

  13. Primary Adult Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Cultures on Human Amniotic Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhal Shweta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells grow well on surfaces that provide an extracellular matrix. Our aim was to establish primary adult human RPE cell cultures that retain their epithelial morphology in vitro using human amniotic membrane (hAM as substrate. Materials and Methods: Human cadaver eyeballs (16 were obtained from the eye bank after corneal trephination. RPE cells were harvested by a mechanical dissection of the inner choroid surface (10, group 1 or by b enzymatic digestion using 0.25% Trypsin/0.02% EDTA (6, group 2. The cells were explanted onto de-epithelialized hAM, nourished using DMEM/HAMS F-12 media and monitored for growth under the phase contrast microscope. Cell cultures were characterised by whole mount studies and paraffin sections. Growth data in the two groups were compared using the students′ ′t′ test. Results: Eleven samples (68.75% showed positive cultures with small, hexagonal cells arising from around the explant which formed a confluent and progressively pigmented monolayer. Whole mounts showed closely placed polygonal cells with heavily pigmented cytoplasm and indistinct nuclei. The histologic sections showed monolayers of cuboidal epithelium with variable pigmentation within the cytoplasm. Growth was seen by day 6-23 (average 11.5 days in the mechanical group, significantly earlier ( P Conclusions: Primary adult human RPE cell cultures retain epithelial morphology in vitro when cultured on human amniotic membranes . Mechanical dissection of the inner choroid surface appears to be an effective method of isolating RPE cells and yields earlier growth in cultures as compared to isolation by enzymatic digestion

  14. Telemedicine screening of retinal diseases with a handheld portable non-mydriatic fundus camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kai; Lu, Haitong; Su, Zhaoan; Cheng, Chuming; Ye, Juan; Qian, Dahong

    2017-06-13

    We modified and reconstructed a high image quality portable non-mydriatic fundus camera and compared it with the tabletop fundus camera to evaluate the efficacy of the new camera in detecting retinal diseases. We designed and built a novel portable handheld fundus camera with telemedicine system. The image quality of fundus cameras was compared to that of existing commercial tabletop cameras by taking photographs of 364 eyes from the 254 patients. In all 800 fundus images taken by two camera types, 400 images per camera, were graded with the four image clarity classifications. Using the portable fundus camera, 63% (252/400) images were graded as excellent overall quality, 20.5% (82/400) were good, 11.75% (47/400) were fair, and 4.75% (19/400) were inadequate. Using the tabletop fundus camera, 70.75% (283/400) images were graded as excellent overall quality, 20.4% (51/400) were good, 13.25% (53/400) were fair, and 3.25% (13/400) were inadequate. Common retinal diseases were easily identified from fundus images obtained from the portable fundus camera. The new type of non-mydriatic portable fundus camera was qualified to have professional quality of fundus images. The revolutionary screening camera provides a foundational platform which can potentially improve the accessibility of retinal screening programmes.

  15. Safety and Efficacy of Human Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Therapy for Retinal Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S N Leow

    Full Text Available To investigate the safety and efficacy of subretinal injection of human Wharton's Jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hWJ-MSCs on retinal structure and function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS rats.RCS rats were divided into 2 groups: hWJ-MSCs treated group (n = 8 and placebo control group (n = 8. In the treatment group, hWJ-MSCs from healthy donors were injected into the subretinal space in one eye of each rat at day 21. Control group received saline injection of the same volume. Additional 3 animals were injected with nanogold-labelled stem cells for in vivo tracking of cells localisation using a micro-computed tomography (microCT. Retinal function was assessed by electroretinography (ERG 3 days before the injection and repeated at days 15, 30 and 70 after the injection. Eyes were collected at day 70 for histology, cellular and molecular studies.No retinal tumor formation was detected by histology during the study period. MicroCT scans showed that hWJ-MSCs stayed localised in the eye with no systemic migration. Transmission electron microscopy showed that nanogold-labelled cells were located within the subretinal space. Histology showed preservation of the outer nuclear layer (ONL in the treated group but not in the control group. However, there were no significant differences in the ERG responses between the groups. Confocal microscopy showed evidence of hWJ-MSCs expressing markers for photoreceptor, Müller cells and bipolar cells.Subretinal injection of hWJ-MSCs delay the loss of the ONL in RCS rats. hWJ-MSCs appears to be safe and has potential to differentiate into retinal-like cells. The potential of this cell-based therapy for the treatment of retinal dystrophies warrants further studies.

  16. Retinal pathology as biomarker for cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.K. Ikram (Kamran); C.Y.-L. Cheung (Carol Yim-Lui); T.Y. Wong (Tien Yin); C. Chen (Christopher)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAlzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. Furthermore, over the last few decades, there has been a shift towards identifying earlier stages of AD, which include mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Improved methods of screening and early detection are essential to

  17. Ischemia-induced nitrotyrosine formation and nuclear translocation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in human retinal pigment epithelium in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaji, Takahiro; Elner, Victor M; Yang, Dong-Li; Clark, Andrea; Petty, Howard R

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxidative compounds including superoxide anions and nitric oxide are believed to play a central role in many blinding eye diseases. In the present study, we examine the effect of ischemia on human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in an unusual clinical case. We show that ischemia leads to extensive nitrotyrosine deposition in the RPE and choroid, thus indicating NO-dependent oxidative stress. We also show for the first time the in vivo translocation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH) to the nuclei of RPE cells. This enzyme's nuclear translocation has previously been demonstrated in vitro where it is a marker of apoptosis. Furthermore, nitrotyrosine deposition and GAPDH translocation have been duplicated in vitro using human RPE cells. Thus, nitrotyrosine formation and GAPDH trafficking to the nucleus may be observed during ischemic conditions.

  18. Intracerebroventricular gene therapy that delays neurological disease progression is associated with selective preservation of retinal ganglion cells in a canine model of CLN2 disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Rebecca E H; Jensen, Cheryl A; Pearce, Jacqueline W; Gillespie, Lauren E; Bristow, Daniel E; Katz, Martin L

    2016-05-01

    CLN2 disease is one of a group of lysosomal storage disorders called the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). The disease results from mutations in the TPP1 gene that cause an insufficiency or complete lack of the soluble lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1). TPP1 is involved in lysosomal protein degradation, and lack of this enzyme results in the accumulation of protein-rich autofluorescent lysosomal storage bodies in numerous cell types including neurons throughout the central nervous system and the retina. CLN2 disease is characterized primarily by progressive loss of neurological functions and vision as well as generalized neurodegeneration and retinal degeneration. In children the progressive loss of neurological functions typically results in death by the early teenage years. A Dachshund model of CLN2 disease with a null mutation in TPP1 closely recapitulates the human disorder with a progression from disease onset at approximately 4 months of age to end-stage at 10-11 months. Delivery of functional TPP1 to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), either by periodic infusion of the recombinant protein or by a single administration of a TPP1 gene therapy vector to the CSF, significantly delays the onset and progression of neurological signs and prolongs life span but does not prevent the loss of vision or modest retinal degeneration that occurs by 11 months of age. In this study we found that in dogs that received the CSF gene therapy treatment, the degeneration of the retina and loss of retinal function continued to progress during the prolonged life spans of the treated dogs. Eventually the normal cell layers of the retina almost completely disappeared. An exception was the ganglion cell layer. In affected dogs that received TPP1 gene therapy to the CSF and survived an average of 80 weeks, ganglion cell axons were present in numbers comparable to those of normal Dachshunds of similar age. The selective preservation of the retinal ganglion cells suggests

  19. Role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in the effects of oxidative stress on human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ji-Ae; Sotani, Yasuyuki; Ibrahim, Diah Gemala; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is the major cause of treatment failure in individuals who undergo surgery for retinal detachment. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR. Oxidative stress is thought to play a role in the progression of retinal diseases including PVR. We have now examined the effects of oxidative stress on the EMT and related processes in the human RPE cell line. We found that H 2 O 2 induced the contraction of RPE cells in a three-dimensional collagen gel. Analysis of a cytokine array revealed that H 2 O 2 specifically increased the release of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) from RPE cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses showed that H 2 O 2 increased the expression of MIF in RPE cells. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that H 2 O 2 upregulated the expression of α-SMA and vimentin and downregulated that of ZO-1 and N-cadherin. Consistent with these observations, the transepithelial electrical resistance of cell was reduced by exposure to H 2 O 2 . The effects of oxidative stress on EMT-related and junctional protein expression as well as on transepithelial electrical resistance were inhibited by antibodies to MIF, but they were not mimicked by treatment with recombinant MIF. Finally, analysis with a profiling array for mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling revealed that H 2 O 2 specifically induced the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Our results thus suggest that MIF may play a role in induction of the EMT and related processes by oxidative stress in RPE cells and that it might thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of PVR. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy is a major complication of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, and both oxidative stress and induction of the EMT in RPE cells are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of this condition. We have now

  20. Human retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibit proliferation and IL2R expression of activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, Charlotte G; Jørgensen, Annette; Nielsen, Mette

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells on activated T cells. Activated T cells were cocultured with adult and foetal human RPE cells whereafter apoptosis and proliferation were determined by flow cytometry and (3)H......-Thymidine incorporation assay, respectively. T cells and RPE cells were cultured directly together or in a transwell system for determination of the effect of cell contact. The importance of cell surface molecules was examined by application of a panel of blocking antibodies (CD2, CD18, CD40, CD40L, CD54, CD58...

  1. Analysis of autofluorescent retinal images and measurement of atrophic lesion growth in Stargardt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B; Tosha, C; Gorin, M B; Nusinowitz, S

    2010-08-01

    Current retinal imaging techniques using scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) provide a powerful mechanism for characterizing the topographical distribution of lipofuscin fluorophores and atrophic lesions (ALs) in retinal disease. In this paper we describe a novel Edge-Flow-Driven Variational Image Segmentation analysis to measure and evaluate progressive change in the area of ALs as well as regions of hyperfluorescence (HF). The algorithm is embedded in a series of almost completely automated image processing steps that allow rapid comparison of serial images. The sensitivity of the methodology to detect change was evaluated by measuring progression of AF lesion size in a cohort of Stargardt Macular Dystrophy (STGD) patients. Fifty-two STGD subjects (mean age = 41.0 +/- 16.6 years, range 9-78 yrs) at varying stages of disease participated in this prospective study. Twenty-four of the 52 subjects presented with atrophic lesions in one or both eyes on first evaluation. For this subgroup of subjects, the mean (+/-1 sd) follow-up time was 2.92 (+0.26) years (range 0.57-3.26 years) and the mean (+/-1 sd) rate of change was found to be approximately 0.94 (+/-0.87) mm(2)/year (range 0.2-2.13 mm(2)/yr). With this methodology, progressive enlargement of AL area was detectable in as little as one year, while regions of HF generally decreased, although there was considerable variability in the appearnce of HF, presumably reflecting the combined effects of the creation or expansion of lipofuscin deposits and resorption and loss associated with retinal cell death. Our findings suggest that this methodology is sufficiently sensitive to detect change and provides a clinically relevant tool to monitor progression not only with regards to natural history, but also to evaluate the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions in STGD. Finally, we evaluated the association between AL area and measures of rod- and cone-mediated retinal function, as assessed with electroretinography

  2. [Retinal imaging of the macula and optic disc in neurodegenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turski, G N; Schmitz-Valckenberg, S; Holz, F G; Finger, R P

    2017-02-01

    Due to current demographic trends, the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment and dementia is expected to increase considerably. For potential new therapies it is important to identify patients at risk as early as possible. Currently, there is no population-based screening. Therefore, identification of biomarkers that will help screen the population at risk is urgently needed. Thus, a literature review on retinal pathology in neurodegenerative diseases was performed. PubMed was searched for studies published up to August 2016 using the following keywords: "mild cognitive impairment", "dementia", "eye", "ocular biomarkers", "OCT" and "OCT angiography". Relevant publications were selected and summarized qualitatively. Multiple studies using noninvasive in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging showed nonspecific retinal pathological changes in patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Pathological changes in macular volume, optic nerve fiber layer thickness and the ganglion cell complex were observed. However, based on available evidence, no ocular biomarkers for neurodegeneration which could be integrated in routine clinical diagnostics have been identified. The potential use of OCT in the early diagnostic workup and monitoring of progression of neurodegenerative diseases needs to be further explored in longitudinal studies with large cohorts.

  3. 2-ethylpyridine, a cigarette smoke component, causes mitochondrial damage in human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mansoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Our goal was to identify the cellular and molecular effects of 2-ethylpyridine (2-EP, a component of cigarette smoke on human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 in vitro. Materials and Methods: ARPE-19 cells were exposed to varying concentrations of 2-EP. Cell viability (CV was measured by a trypan blue dye exclusion assay. Caspase-3/7 and caspase-9 activities were measured by fluorochrome assays. The production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS was detected with a 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate dye assay. The JC-1 assay was used to measure mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm. Mitochondrial redox potential was measured using a RedoxSensor Red kit and mitochondria were evaluated with Mitotracker dye. Results: After 2-EP exposure, ARPE-19 cells showed significantly decreased CV, increased caspase-3/7 and caspase-9 activities, elevated ROS/RNS levels, decreased ΔΨm value and decreased redox fluorescence when compared with control samples. Conclusions: These results show that 2-EP treatment induced cell death by caspase-dependent apoptosis associated with an oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. These data represent a possible mechanism by which smoking contributes to age-related macular degeneration and other retinal diseases and identify mitochondria as a target for future therapeutic interventions.

  4. Human prion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Rajeev; Vincent, Yasmeen Marbaniang; Chaturvedi, Sujata

    2002-01-01

    Prion diseases is another name for a group of 'transmissible spongiform encephalopathies'. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, the first prion disease described in humans, occurs in sporadic, familial or iatrogenic form. Other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in humans such as familial Creutzfeldt-]akob disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease and fatal familial Insomnia have been shown to be associated with specific prion protein gene mutations. In 1996, a new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease was reported in the United Kingdom among young patients with unusual clinical features and unique neuropathological findings. This new form could be due to transmission to humans of the agent causing bovine spongiform encephalopathy. While examination of brain tissue is the key to making a diagnosis, it is not always possible antemortem. Immunological tests such as ELISA or western blot assays along with tests for 1 4-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid remain the main tools of diagnosis. Conventional disinfection and sterilization practices are Ineffective for these agents. The unusual properties of prions pose a challenge for treatment, surveillance and control of these diseases.

  5. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Harold; Hage, Rabih; Jeannin, Séverine; Cabre, Philippe; Olindo, Stéphane

    2017-10-06

    To determine whether there is an optic neuropathy (ON) in patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. We included HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers (a.c.HTLV-1) and tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM) patients between January 1st, 2014 and March 31st, 2015. All patients had complete eye examination. The visual acuity (VA) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness were measured and compared to age- and sex-matched control groups including patients seen in our refraction clinic with no previous medical or surgical history. Thirty-one a.c.HTLV-1 (group 1) and 29 TSP/HAM patients (group 2) were included. The average RNFL thickness was 99.9 ± 14.3 µm in group 1 and 87.8 ± 19.2 µm in group 2. The average RFNL thicknesses were lower in both groups, when compared to controls. The difference was significant in patients with TSP/HAM (87.8 ± 19.2 µm vs. 97 ± 7.8 µm; p = 0.003) who also had significantly decreased VA. We report here the first study about the RNFL thickness in patients with TSP/HAM. In these patients, there is decrease of the RNFL thickness with subtle but definite decrease of VA. This suggests that subclinical ON occurs in the natural history of the disease. The diagnosis of TSP/HAM must be evoked as a differential of primary progressive multiple sclerosis in a population at risk. Moreover, RNFL thinning with no evidence of glaucoma should raise suspicion for HTLV-1 infection and TSP/HAM in a population at risk.

  6. HIV-1 Tat-mediated apoptosis in human blood-retinal barrier-associated cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Che

    Full Text Available HIV-1-associated ocular complications, such as microvasculopathies, can lead to the loss of vision in HIV-1-infected patients. Even in patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy, ocular lesions are unavoidable. Ocular complications have been demonstrated to be closely related to the breakdown of the blood-retinal-barrier (BRB; however, the underlying mechanism is not clear. The data from this study indicated that the HIV-1 Tat protein induced the apoptosis of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs and retinal pigmen epithelium (RPE cells, which compose the inner BRB and the outer BRB, respectively. In addition, this study found that the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs was involved in the apoptosis of RPE cells, but it caused no changes in HRMECs. Furthermore, both cell types exhibited enhanced expression of Bak, Bax and Cytochrome c. The inhibition of Tat activity protected against the apoptosis induced by NMDAR activation and prevented the dysregulation of Bak, Bax and Cytochrome c, revealing an important role for the mitochondrial pathway in HIV-1 Tat-induced apoptosis. Together, these findings suggest a possible mechanism and may identify a potential therapeutic strategy for HIV-1-associated ocular complications.

  7. Evaluation of the Retinal Vasculature in Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease in an Elderly Population of Irish Nuns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy McGowan

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD and hypertension are global public health problems associated with considerable morbidity, premature mortality and attendant healthcare costs. Previous studies have highlighted that non-invasive examination of the retinal microcirculation can detect microvascular pathology that is associated with systemic disorders of the circulatory system such as hypertension. We examined the associations between retinal vessel caliber (RVC and fractal dimension (DF, with both hypertension and CKD in elderly Irish nuns.Data from 1233 participants in the cross-sectional observational Irish Nun Eye Study (INES were assessed from digital photographs with a standardized protocol using computer-assisted software. Multivariate regression analyses were used to assess associations with hypertension and CKD, with adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI, refraction, fellow eye RVC, smoking, alcohol consumption, ischemic heart disease (IHD, cerebrovascular accident (CVA, diabetes and medication use.In total, 1122 (91% participants (mean age: 76.3 [range: 56-100] years had gradable retinal images of sufficient quality for blood vessel assessment. Hypertension was significantly associated with a narrower central retinal arteriolar equivalent (CRAE in a fully adjusted analysis (P = 0.002; effect size = -2.16 μm; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: -3.51, -0.81 μm. No significant associations between other retinal vascular parameters and hypertension or between any retinal vascular parameters and CKD were found.Individuals with hypertension have significantly narrower retinal arterioles which may afford an earlier opportunity for tailored prevention and treatment options to optimize the structure and function of the microvasculature, providing additional clinical utility. No significant associations between retinal vascular parameters and CKD were detected.

  8. Prevalence and Associations of Retinal Emboli With Ethnicity, Stroke, and Renal Disease in a Multiethnic Asian Population: The Singapore Epidemiology of Eye Disease Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ning; Teo, Kelvin; Zhao, Wanting; Wang, Jie Jin; Neelam, Kumari; Tan, Nicholas Y Q; Mitchell, Paul; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wong, Tien Yin

    2017-10-01

    To our knowledge, population-based data on retinal emboli are limited in Asia. Besides its associations with traditional cardiovascular risk factors and stroke, associations between retinal emboli and renal disease and function remain unclear. To examine the prevalence of and risk factors for retinal emboli in a large, contemporary, multiethnic Asian population. This population-based cross-sectional study was conducted from 2004 to 2011 and included a total of 10 033 Chinese, Malay, and Indian persons aged 40 to 80 years residing in the general communities of Singapore. Analyses were performed from November 2016 to February 2017. Retinal emboli were ascertained from retinal photographs obtained from both eyes of all participants according to a standardized protocol. Age-standardized prevalence of retinal emboli was calculated using the 2010 Singapore adult population. Risk factors were assessed from comprehensive systemic and ophthalmic examinations, interviews, and laboratory investigations. Retinal emboli. Of the 10 033 participants, 9978 (99.5%) had gradable retinal photographs. Of these, 5057 (50.7%) were female, and 3375 (33.8%) were Indian. We identified 88 individuals (0.9%) with retinal emboli; the overall person-specific, age-standardized prevalence of retinal emboli was 0.75% (95% CI, 0.60-0.95), with the highest prevalence seen in the Indian cohort (0.98%), followed by the Chinese (0.73%) and Malay (0.44%) cohorts (P = .03). In multivariable-adjusted analysis, factors associated with prevalent retinal emboli included older age (per 5-year increase; odds ratio [OR], 1.22; 95% CI, 1.05-1.41), Indian ethnicity (compared with Malay ethnicity; OR, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.95-6.60), hypertension (OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.03-3.70), chronic kidney disease (OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.15-3.64), creatinine level (per SD increase; OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.05-1.21), glomerular filtration rate (per SD increase; OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.51-0.86), and history of stroke (OR, 3.45; 95% CI, 1

  9. Effectiveness of relevant examination on visual function assessment and retinal disease detection before cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of applying visual electrophysiological examination, including flash visual evoked potentials(FVEP, flash electroretinogram(FERG, pattrn electroretinogram(PERG, fundus photography, eye B-type ultrasound, optical coherence tomography(OCT, on visual function assessment and retinal disease detection before cataract surgery.METHODS: Visual elctrophysiological examination,fundus photography, eye B-type ultrasound and OCT were applied in 148 cases(196 eyes. The positive rate was analyzed according to the results of FVEP, FERG(or PERG, fundus photography, eye B-type ultrasound and OCT.RESULTS: In 148 cases(196 eyes, vitreous opacities was showed in 165 eyes(84.2%by eye B-type ultrasound examination, 31 eyes(15.8%without access to B-type ultrasound image; success for fundus camera images in 161 eyes(80.6%, and unable to get image in 35 eyes(19.4%; the VEP and ERG in 58 eyes(29.6%were get valuable, and the VEP and ERG were saw no obvious abnormal in 138 eyes(70.4%; success for OCT image in 167 eyes(85.2%, without access to OCT image in 29 eyes(14.8%. CONCLUSION: Visual elctrophysiological detection,fundus photography, eye B-type ultrasound and OCT can predict the preoperative visual acuity of cataractous patients. A variety of inspection methods complement each other, can further improve detection rate of retinal diseases and other eye disease before cataract surgery.

  10. Differential behavioral outcomes following neonatal versus fetal human retinal pigment epithelial cell striatal implants in parkinsonian rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russ, Kaspar; Flores, Joseph; Brudek, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    Following the failure of a Phase II clinical study evaluating human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cell implants as a potential treatment option for Parkinson's disease, speculation has centered on implant function and survival as possible contributors to the therapeutic outcomes. We recently...... reported that neonatal hRPE cells, similar to hRPE cells used in the Phase II clinical study, produced short-lived in vitro and limited in vivo trophic factors, which supports that assumption. We hypothesize that the switch from fetal to neonatal hRPE cells, between the Phase I and the Phase II clinical...... trial may be partly responsible for the later negative outcomes. To investigate this hypothesis, we used two neonatal hRPE cell lots, prepared in a similar manner to neonatal hRPE cells used in the Phase II clinical study, and compared them to previously evaluated fetal hRPE cells for behavioral changes...

  11. Distilling a Visual Network of Retinitis Pigmentosa Gene-Protein Interactions to Uncover New Disease Candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Boloc

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is a highly heterogeneous genetic visual disorder with more than 70 known causative genes, some of them shared with other non-syndromic retinal dystrophies (e.g. Leber congenital amaurosis, LCA. The identification of RP genes has increased steadily during the last decade, and the 30% of the cases that still remain unassigned will soon decrease after the advent of exome/genome sequencing. A considerable amount of genetic and functional data on single RD genes and mutations has been gathered, but a comprehensive view of the RP genes and their interacting partners is still very fragmentary. This is the main gap that needs to be filled in order to understand how mutations relate to progressive blinding disorders and devise effective therapies.We have built an RP-specific network (RPGeNet by merging data from different sources: high-throughput data from BioGRID and STRING databases, manually curated data for interactions retrieved from iHOP, as well as interactions filtered out by syntactical parsing from up-to-date abstracts and full-text papers related to the RP research field. The paths emerging when known RP genes were used as baits over the whole interactome have been analysed, and the minimal number of connections among the RP genes and their close neighbors were distilled in order to simplify the search space.In contrast to the analysis of single isolated genes, finding the networks linking disease genes renders powerful etiopathological insights. We here provide an interactive interface, RPGeNet, for the molecular biologist to explore the network centered on the non-syndromic and syndromic RP and LCA causative genes. By integrating tissue-specific expression levels and phenotypic data on top of that network, a more comprehensive biological view will highlight key molecular players of retinal degeneration and unveil new RP disease candidates.

  12. Sulfatases and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Roux, Graciana; Ballabio, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Sulfatases are a highly conserved family of proteins that cleave sulfate esters from a wide range of substrates. The importance of sulfatases in human metabolism is underscored by the presence of at least eight human monogenic diseases caused by the deficiency of individual sulfatases. Sulfatase activity requires a unique posttranslational modification, which is impaired in patients with multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) due to a mutation of the sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1). Here we review current knowledge and future perspectives on the evolution of the sulfatase gene family, on the role of these enzymes in human metabolism, and on new developments in the therapy of sulfatase deficiencies.

  13. Midlife diagnosis of Refsum Disease in siblings with Retinitis Pigmentosa – the footprint is the clue: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaram Hari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Refsum disease is a potentially lethal and disabling condition associated with retinitis pigmentosa in which early treatment can prevent some of the systemic manifestations. Case presentation We present the cases of two brothers with a diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa from childhood in whom Refsum disease was subsequently diagnosed midlife, after routine enquiry into hand and feet abnormalities. Subsequent treatment through dietary modification stabilised visual impairment and has prevented development of neurological complications to date. Conclusion It is therefore important to consider the diagnosis of Refsum disease in any patient with autosomal recessive or simplex retinitis pigmentosa, and to enquire about the presence of "unusual" feet or hands in such patients.

  14. The Role of Microglia in Retinal Neurodegeneration: Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson, and Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Ana I.; de Hoz, Rosa; Salobrar-Garcia, Elena; Salazar, Juan J.; Rojas, Blanca; Ajoy, Daniel; López-Cuenca, Inés; Rojas, Pilar; Triviño, Alberto; Ramírez, José M.

    2017-01-01

    Microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the central nervous system (CNS), act as neuropathology sensors and are neuroprotective under physiological conditions. Microglia react to injury and degeneration with immune-phenotypic and morphological changes, proliferation, migration, and inflammatory cytokine production. An uncontrolled microglial response secondary to sustained CNS damage can put neuronal survival at risk due to excessive inflammation. A neuroinflammatory response is considered among the etiological factors of the major aged-related neurodegenerative diseases of the CNS, and microglial cells are key players in these neurodegenerative lesions. The retina is an extension of the brain and therefore the inflammatory response in the brain can occur in the retina. The brain and retina are affected in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and glaucoma. AD is an age-related neurodegeneration of the CNS characterized by neuronal and synaptic loss in the cerebral cortex, resulting in cognitive deficit and dementia. The extracellular deposits of beta-amyloid (Aβ) and intraneuronal accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau protein (pTau) are the hallmarks of this disease. These deposits are also found in the retina and optic nerve. PD is a neurodegenerative locomotor disorder with the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. This is accompanied by Lewy body inclusion composed of α-synuclein (α-syn) aggregates. PD also involves retinal dopaminergic cell degeneration. Glaucoma is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease of the optic nerve, characterized by retinal ganglion cell loss. In this pathology, deposition of Aβ, synuclein, and pTau has also been detected in retina. These neurodegenerative diseases share a common pathogenic mechanism, the neuroinflammation, in which microglia play an important role. Microglial activation has been reported in AD, PD, and glaucoma in

  15. The Role of Microglia in Retinal Neurodegeneration: Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson, and Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. Ramirez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the central nervous system (CNS, act as neuropathology sensors and are neuroprotective under physiological conditions. Microglia react to injury and degeneration with immune-phenotypic and morphological changes, proliferation, migration, and inflammatory cytokine production. An uncontrolled microglial response secondary to sustained CNS damage can put neuronal survival at risk due to excessive inflammation. A neuroinflammatory response is considered among the etiological factors of the major aged-related neurodegenerative diseases of the CNS, and microglial cells are key players in these neurodegenerative lesions. The retina is an extension of the brain and therefore the inflammatory response in the brain can occur in the retina. The brain and retina are affected in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, and glaucoma. AD is an age-related neurodegeneration of the CNS characterized by neuronal and synaptic loss in the cerebral cortex, resulting in cognitive deficit and dementia. The extracellular deposits of beta-amyloid (Aβ and intraneuronal accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau protein (pTau are the hallmarks of this disease. These deposits are also found in the retina and optic nerve. PD is a neurodegenerative locomotor disorder with the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. This is accompanied by Lewy body inclusion composed of α-synuclein (α-syn aggregates. PD also involves retinal dopaminergic cell degeneration. Glaucoma is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease of the optic nerve, characterized by retinal ganglion cell loss. In this pathology, deposition of Aβ, synuclein, and pTau has also been detected in retina. These neurodegenerative diseases share a common pathogenic mechanism, the neuroinflammation, in which microglia play an important role. Microglial activation has been reported in AD, PD, and

  16. Perimetric and retinal nerve fiber layer findings in patients with Parkinson’s disease

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    Tsironi Evangelia E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visual dysfunction is common in Parkinson’s disease (PD. It remains, however, unknown whether it is related to structural alterations of the retina. The aim of this study is to compare visual field (VF findings and circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness in a series of PD patients and normal controls, in order to assess possible retinal anatomical changes and/or functional damage associated with PD. Methods PD patients and controls were recruited and underwent VF testing with static automated perimetry and RNFL examination with optical coherence tomography (OCT. Cognitive performance using Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, PD staging using modified Hoehn and Yahr (H-Y scale and duration of the disease was recorded in PD patients. Results One randomly selected eye from each of 24 patients and 24 age-matched controls was included. OCT RNFL thickness analysis revealed no difference in the inferior, superior, nasal or temporal sectors between the groups. The average peripapillary RNFL was also similar in the two groups. However, perimetric indices of generalized sensitivity loss (mean deviation and localized scotomas (pattern standard deviation were worse in patients with PD compared to controls (p  Conclusion PD patients may demonstrate glaucomatous-like perimetric defects even in the absence of decreased RNFL thickness.

  17. Genes associated with retinitis pigmentosa and allied diseases are frequently mutated in the general population.

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    Koji M Nishiguchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinitis pigmentosa and other hereditary retinal degenerations (HRD are rare genetic diseases leading to progressive blindness. Recessive HRD are caused by mutations in more than 100 different genes. Laws of population genetics predict that, on a purely theoretical ground, such a high number of genes should translate into an extremely elevated frequency of unaffected carriers of mutations. In this study we estimate the proportion of these individuals within the general population, via the analyses of data from whole-genome sequencing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We screened complete and high-quality genome sequences from 46 control individuals from various world populations for HRD mutations, using bioinformatic tools developed in-house. All mutations detected in silico were validated by Sanger sequencing. We identified clear-cut, null recessive HRD mutations in 10 out of the 46 unaffected individuals analyzed (∼22%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on our data, approximately one in 4-5 individuals from the general population may be a carrier of null mutations that are responsible for HRD. This would be the highest mutation carrier frequency so far measured for a class of Mendelian disorders, especially considering that missenses and other forms of pathogenic changes were not included in our assessment. Among other things, our results indicate that the risk for a consanguineous couple of generating a child with a blinding disease is particularly high, compared to other genetic conditions.

  18. Analysis of Retinal Peripapillary Segmentation in Early Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

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    Elena Salobrar-Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Decreased thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL may reflect retinal neuronal-ganglion cell death. A decrease in the RNFL has been demonstrated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD in addition to aging by optical coherence tomography (OCT. Twenty-three mild-AD patients and 28 age-matched control subjects with mean Mini-Mental State Examination 23.3 and 28.2, respectively, with no ocular disease or systemic disorders affecting vision, were considered for study. OCT peripapillary and macular segmentation thickness were examined in the right eye of each patient. Compared to controls, eyes of patients with mild-AD patients showed no statistical difference in peripapillary RNFL thickness (P>0.05; however, sectors 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, and 11 of the papilla showed thinning, while in sectors 1, 5, 6, 7, and 10 there was thickening. Total macular volume and RNFL thickness of the fovea in all four inner quadrants and in the outer temporal quadrants proved to be significantly decreased (P<0.01. Despite the fact that peripapillary RNFL thickness did not statistically differ in comparison to control eyes, the increase in peripapillary thickness in our mild-AD patients could correspond to an early neurodegeneration stage and may entail the existence of an inflammatory process that could lead to progressive peripapillary fiber damage.

  19. Red-Tinted Contact Lenses May Improve Quality of Life in Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severinsky, Boris; Yahalom, Claudia; Florescu Sebok, Tatiana; Tzur, Veronika; Dotan, Shlomo; Moulton, Eric Alan

    2016-04-01

    Supplemental digital content is available in the text. To determine the benefits provided by centrally red-tinted contact lenses on visual acuity, contrast sensitivity (CS), photophobia, and quality of life in patients with degenerative retinal diseases.We evaluated the impact of centrally red-tinted hydrogel contact lenses on nine patients (aged 15 to 22 years) with severe photophobia and poor visual acuity. Each patient underwent a full eye examination with and without contact lenses, including visual acuity at distance and near, CS, eye movement recording for nystagmus, refraction, and a fundus examination. All patients completed a low vision-adapted VFQ 25-Version 2000 quality-of-life questionnaire.Seven of nine patients demonstrated improvement in binocular visual acuity as well as improvement in CS with the tinted contact lenses. Subjectively, all patients described a major improvement in their photophobia both outdoors and indoors, as well as a marked improvement in quality of life.Red-tinted contact lenses may dramatically improve visual functions, outdoor performance, and quality of life of patients suffering from retinal diseases. These lenses should be a part of the regular assessment in specialty clinics treating patients with low vision, glare, and photophobia.

  20. G protein-coupled receptor 91 signaling in diabetic retinopathy and hypoxic retinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianyan; Li, Tingting; Du, Xinhua; Wu, Qiang; Le, Yun-Zheng

    2017-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 91 (GPR91) is a succinate-specific receptor and activation of GPR91 could initiate a complex signal transduction cascade and upregulate inflammatory and pro-angiogenic cytokines. In the retina, GPR91 is predominately expressed in ganglion cells, a major cellular entity involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and other hypoxic retinal diseases. During the development of DR and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), chronic hypoxia causes an increase in the levels of local succinate. Succinate-mediated GPR91 activation upregulates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) through ERK1/2-C/EBP β (c-Fos) and/or ERK1/2-COX-2/PGE2 signaling pathways, which in turn, leads to the breakdown of blood-retina barriers in these disorders. In this review, we will have a brief introduction of GPR91 and its biological functions and a more detailed discussion about the role and mechanisms of GPR91 in DR and ROP. A better understanding of GPR91 regulation may be of great significance in identifying new biomarkers and drug targets for the prediction and treatment of DR, ROP, and hypoxic retinal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning in dementia associated with Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Benito-León, Julián; Villarejo, Alberto; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography is a simple, high-resolution technique to quantify the thickness of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). Previous studies have shown that degenerative changes occur in optic nerve fibers and are manifested as thinning of RNLF in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are no studies on the thickness of the RNLF in other types of dementia, such as dementia with Lewy bodies and dementia associated with Parkinson's disease. In this study, patients fulfilling diagnostic for AD (n = 10), dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 10), dementia associated with Parkinson's disease (n = 10), and cognitively normal age-matched controls (n = 10) underwent optical coherence tomography examinations to measure RNLF thickness. There was a significant decrease in RNLF thickness in each type of dementia compared to the control group (Mann-Whitney test, all p dementia with Lewy bodies may have a greater thinning than both patients with AD and dementia associated with Parkinson's disease, the differences were statistically nonsignificant (Kruskal-Wallis test, p = 0.525). The thickness of the RNLF correlated significantly (p Dementia Rating Scale scores in all types of dementia; that is to say, the greater the cognitive deterioration, the greater the reduction of thickness of the RNLF. The findings from this study show that retinal involvement measured by optical coherence tomography may also be present in non-AD dementias.

  2. Differential effect of long versus short wavelength light exposure on pupillary re-dilation in patients with outer retinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léon, Lorette; Crippa, Sylvain V; Borruat, François-Xavier; Kawasaki, Aki

    2012-01-01

    In patients with outer retinal degeneration, a differential pupil response to long wavelength (red) versus short wavelength (blue) light stimulation has been previously observed. The goal of this study was to quantify differences in the pupillary re-dilation following exposure to red versus blue light in patients with outer retinal disease and compare them with patients with optic neuropathy and with healthy subjects. Prospective comparative cohort study. Twenty-three patients with outer retinal disease, 13 patients with optic neuropathy and 14 normal subjects. Subjects were tested using continuous red and blue light stimulation at three intensities (1, 10 and 100 cd/m2) for 13 s per intensity. Pupillary re-dilation dynamics following the brightest intensity was analysed and compared between the three groups. The parameters of pupil re-dilation used in this study were: time to recover 90% of baseline size; mean pupil size at early and late phases of re-dilation; and differential re-dilation time for blue versus red light. Patients with outer retinal disease showed a pupil that tended to stay smaller after light termination and thus had a longer time to recovery. The differential re-dilation time was significantly greater in patients with outer retinal disease (median = 28.0 s, P blue light stimulation is present in patients with outer retinal disease but is not found in normal eyes or among patients with visual loss from optic neuropathy. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2011 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  3. In-depth characterisation of Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC).

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    Brandl, Caroline; Zimmermann, Stephanie J; Milenkovic, Vladimir M; Rosendahl, Sibylle M G; Grassmann, Felix; Milenkovic, Andrea; Hehr, Ute; Federlin, Marianne; Wetzel, Christian H; Helbig, Horst; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2014-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) has widely been appreciated as a promising tool to model human ocular disease emanating from primary RPE pathology. Here, we describe the successful reprogramming of adult human dermal fibroblasts to iPSCs and their differentiation to pure expandable RPE cells with structural and functional features characteristic for native RPE. Fibroblast cultures were established from skin biopsy material and subsequently reprogrammed following polycistronic lentiviral transduction with OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and L-Myc. Fibroblast-derived iPSCs showed typical morphology, chromosomal integrity and a distinctive stem cell marker profile. Subsequent differentiation resulted in expandable pigmented hexagonal RPE cells. The cells revealed stable RNA expression of mature RPE markers RPE65, RLBP and BEST1. Immunolabelling verified localisation of BEST1 at the basolateral plasma membrane, and scanning electron microscopy showed typical microvilli at the apical side of iPSC-derived RPE cells. Transepithelial resistance was maintained at high levels during cell culture indicating functional formation of tight junctions. Secretion capacity was demonstrated for VEGF-A. Feeding of porcine photoreceptor outer segments revealed the proper ability of these cells for phagocytosis. IPSC-derived RPE cells largely maintained these properties after cryopreservation. Together, our study underlines that adult dermal fibroblasts can serve as a valuable resource for iPSC-derived RPE with characteristics highly reminiscent of true RPE cells. This will allow its broad application to establish cellular models for RPE-related human diseases.

  4. Epiretinal transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells rescues retinal and vision function in a rat model of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzameret, Adi; Sher, Ifat; Belkin, Michael; Treves, Avraham J; Meir, Amilia; Nagler, Arnon; Levkovitch-Verbin, Hani; Rotenstreich, Ygal; Solomon, Arieh S

    2015-09-01

    Vision incapacitation and blindness associated with incurable retinal degeneration affect millions of people worldwide. In this study, 0.25×10(6) human bone marrow stem cells (hBM-MSCs) were transplanted epiretinally in the right eye of Royal College Surgeons (RCS) rats at the age of 28 days. Epiretinally transplanted cells were identified as a thin layer of cells along vitreous cavity, in close proximity to the retina or attached to the lens capsule, up to 6 weeks following transplantation. Epiretinal transplantation delayed photoreceptor degeneration and rescued retinal function up to 20 weeks following cell transplantation. Visual functions remained close to normal levels in epiretinal transplantation rats. No inflammation or any other adverse effects were observed in transplanted eyes. Our findings suggest that transplantation of hBM-MSCs as a thin epiretinal layer is effective for treatment of retinal degeneration in RCS rats, and that transplanting the cells in close proximity to the retina enhances hBM-MSC therapeutic effect compared with intravitreal injection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Profile of the genes expressed in the human peripheral retina, macula, and retinal pigment epithelium determined through serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Dror; Blackshaw, Seth; Cepko, Constance L.; Dryja, Thaddeus P.

    2002-01-01

    We used the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) technique to catalogue and measure the relative levels of expression of the genes expressed in the human peripheral retina, macula, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) from one or both of two humans, aged 88 and 44 years. The cone photoreceptor contribution to all transcription in the retina was found to be similar in the macula versus the retinal periphery, whereas the rod contribution was greater in the periphery versus the macula. Genes encoding structural proteins for axons were found to be expressed at higher levels in the macula versus the retinal periphery, probably reflecting the large proportion of ganglion cells in the central retina. In comparison with the younger eye, the peripheral retina of the older eye had a substantially higher proportion of mRNAs from genes encoding proteins involved in iron metabolism or protection against oxidative damage and a substantially lower proportion of mRNAs from genes encoding proteins involved in rod phototransduction. These differences may reflect the difference in age between the two donors or merely interindividual variation. The RPE library had numerous previously unencountered tags, suggesting that this cell type has a large, idiosyncratic repertoire of expressed genes. Comparison of these libraries with 100 reported nonocular SAGE libraries revealed 89 retina-specific or enriched genes expressed at substantial levels, of which 14 are known to cause a retinal disease and 53 are RPE-specific genes. We expect that these libraries will serve as a resource for understanding the relative expression levels of genes in the retina and the RPE and for identifying additional disease genes. PMID:11756676

  6. Adaptive optics for in-vivo exploration of human retinal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paques, Michel; Meimon, Serge; Grieve, Kate; Rossant, Florence

    2017-06-01

    Adaptive optics (AO)-enhanced imaging of the retina is now reaching a level of technical maturity which fosters its expanding use in research and clinical centers in the world. By achieving wavelength-limited resolution it did not only allow a better observation of retinal substructures already visible by other means, it also broke anatomical frontiers such as individual photoreceptors or vessel walls. The clinical applications of AO-enhanced imaging has been slower than that of optical coherence tomography because of the combination of technical complexity, costs and the paucity of interpretative scheme of complex data. In several diseases, AO-enhanced imaging has already proven to provide added clinical value and quantitative biomarkers. Here, we will review some of the clinical applications of AO-enhanced en face imaging, and trace perspectives to improve its clinical pertinence in these applications. An interesting perspective is to document cell motion through time-lapse imaging such as during agerelated macular degeneration. In arterial hypertension, the possibility to measure parietal thickness and perform fine morphometric analysis is of interest for monitoring patients. In the near future, implementation of novel approaches and multimodal imaging, including in particular optical coherence tomography, will undoubtedly expand our imaging capabilities. Tackling the technical, scientific and medical challenges offered by high resolution imaging are likely to contribute to our rethinking of many retinal diseases, and, most importantly, may find applications in other areas of medicine.

  7. Comprehensive Rare Variant Analysis via Whole-Genome Sequencing to Determine the Molecular Pathology of Inherited Retinal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carss, Keren J; Arno, Gavin; Erwood, Marie; Stephens, Jonathan; Sanchis-Juan, Alba; Hull, Sarah; Megy, Karyn; Grozeva, Detelina; Dewhurst, Eleanor; Malka, Samantha; Plagnol, Vincent; Penkett, Christopher; Stirrups, Kathleen; Rizzo, Roberta; Wright, Genevieve; Josifova, Dragana; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Scott, Richard H; Clement, Emma; Allen, Louise; Armstrong, Ruth; Brady, Angela F; Carmichael, Jenny; Chitre, Manali; Henderson, Robert H H; Hurst, Jane; MacLaren, Robert E; Murphy, Elaine; Paterson, Joan; Rosser, Elisabeth; Thompson, Dorothy A; Wakeling, Emma; Ouwehand, Willem H; Michaelides, Michel; Moore, Anthony T; Webster, Andrew R; Raymond, F Lucy

    2017-01-05

    Inherited retinal disease is a common cause of visual impairment and represents a highly heterogeneous group of conditions. Here, we present findings from a cohort of 722 individuals with inherited retinal disease, who have had whole-genome sequencing (n = 605), whole-exome sequencing (n = 72), or both (n = 45) performed, as part of the NIHR-BioResource Rare Diseases research study. We identified pathogenic variants (single-nucleotide variants, indels, or structural variants) for 404/722 (56%) individuals. Whole-genome sequencing gives unprecedented power to detect three categories of pathogenic variants in particular: structural variants, variants in GC-rich regions, which have significantly improved coverage compared to whole-exome sequencing, and variants in non-coding regulatory regions. In addition to previously reported pathogenic regulatory variants, we have identified a previously unreported pathogenic intronic variant in CHM in two males with choroideremia. We have also identified 19 genes not previously known to be associated with inherited retinal disease, which harbor biallelic predicted protein-truncating variants in unsolved cases. Whole-genome sequencing is an increasingly important comprehensive method with which to investigate the genetic causes of inherited retinal disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Association of Dark-Adapted Visual Function with Retinal Structural Changes in Patients with Stargardt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Serena; Fishman, Gerald A.; McAnany, J. Jason; Genead, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate dark-adapted retinal sensitivity in patients with Stargardt disease (STGD1) using a modified MP-1 microperimeter (MP-1S) and to compare the sensitivity loss with structural changes observed by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) infrared imaging. Methods Twelve STGD1 patients and 10 normally sighted controls participated. Dark-adapted mean sensitivity (MS) was obtained using a MP-1S. Additionally, MS percent difference between the patients and the controls was obtained. Sensitivity results were superimposed on cSLO infrared images and compared with corresponding SD-OCT scans. Results Dark-adapted MS±SD was 8.34±1.54 dB for the controls and 3.68±1.74 dB for STGD1(pmeasurements can be made in STGD1 and normal controls with the MP-1S. Sensitivity loss is associated with structural changes. This finding can be useful for the determination of optimal areas for potential improvement of retinal function in Stargardt patients. PMID:24280667

  9. In vivo transcriptional targeting into the retinal vasculature using recombinant baculovirus carrying the human flt-1 promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaca Luis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial cells are a target for gene therapy because they are implicated in a number of vascular diseases. Recombinant baculovirus have emerged as novel gene delivery vectors. However, there is no information available concerning the use of endothelial-specific promoters in the context of the baculovirus genome. In the present study, we have generated a recombinant baculovirus containing the human flt-1 promoter (BacFLT-GFP driving the expression of the green fluorescent protein. Transcriptional gene targeting was analyzed in vitro in different mammalian cell lines and in vivo in adult rat retinal vasculature. Results BacFLT-GFP evoked the highest levels of expression in the endothelial cell line BUVEC-E6E7-1, similar to those reached by recombinant baculovirus carrying the CMV promoter (112% relative to BacCMV-GFP, n = 4. Interestingly, BacFLT-GFP directed high levels of expression in rat glioma C6 and in human glioblastoma CH235 cells (34.78% and 47.86% relative to BacCMV-GFP, respectively. Histone deacetylase inhibitors such as butyrate or trichostatin A enhanced the transcriptional activity of both BacCMV-GFP and BacFLT-GFP. Thus, in this study histone deacetylation appears to be a central mechanism for the silencing of baculovirus, independently of the promoter utilized. In vivo transcriptional targeting was demonstrated in adult rat retinal vasculature by intravitreal delivery of BacFLT-GFP and immunohistochemical staining with von Willebrand factor (vWF. Analysis by fluorescence microscopy and deconvolved three-dimensional confocal microscopy of retinal whole mounts obtained after 3 days of baculovirus injection showed that most GFP-expressing cells localized to the inner limiting membrane (ILM and ganglion cell layer (GCL and colocalize with vWF (70%, n = 10 in blood vessels, confirming the endothelial phenotype of the transduced cells. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that the restricted expression

  10. Accumulation of phosphorylated alpha-synuclein (p129S) and retinal pathology in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by accumulation of misfolded alpha-synuclein within the CNS. Although non-motor clinical phenotypes of PD such as visual dysfunction have become increasingly apparent, retinal pathology associated with PD is not well under...

  11. Bioethics of intervention and the case of drugs Bevacizumab and Ranibizumab for retinal diseases

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    Flávio R. L. Paranhos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available From the year 2000, on a class of biological drugs, the anti-VEGF proved to be quite effective in the treatment of retinal diseases, which have in its pathophysiological mechanism an important vascular proliferation component that can lead to blindness. Two of these drugs, bevacizumab and ranibizumab, are quite similar and have the same efficacy and safety. They were developed by the same laboratory and are commercialized by two major pharmaceutical companies through an agreement made between them. However, there is a big difference in the price of the drugs. The aim of this article is to present the Bioethics of intervention as grounds for choosing the cheaper drug, even if forced to do so by regulatory entities.

  12. Distinct signature of altered homeostasis in aging rod photoreceptors: implications for retinal diseases.

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    Sunil K Parapuram

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Advanced age contributes to clinical manifestations of many retinopathies and represents a major risk factor for age-related macular degeneration, a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness in the elderly. Rod photoreceptors are especially vulnerable to genetic defects and changes in microenvironment, and are among the first neurons to die in normal aging and in many retinal degenerative diseases. The molecular mechanisms underlying rod photoreceptor vulnerability and potential biomarkers of the aging process in this highly specialized cell type are unknown.To discover aging-associated adaptations that may influence rod function, we have generated gene expression profiles of purified rod photoreceptors from mouse retina at young adult to early stages of aging (1.5, 5, and 12 month old mice. We identified 375 genes that showed differential expression in rods from 5 and 12 month old mouse retina compared to that of 1.5 month old retina. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments validated expression change for a majority of the 25 genes that were examined. Macroanalysis of differentially expressed genes using gene class testing and protein interaction networks revealed overrepresentation of cellular pathways that are potentially photoreceptor-specific (angiogenesis and lipid/retinoid metabolism, in addition to age-related pathways previously described in several tissue types (oxidative phosphorylation, stress and immune response.Our study suggests a progressive shift in cellular homeostasis that may underlie aging-associated functional decline in rod photoreceptors and contribute to a more permissive state for pathological processes involved in retinal diseases.

  13. Effects of the vegetable polyphenols epigallocatechin-3-gallate, luteolin, apigenin, myricetin, quercetin, and cyanidin in primary cultures of human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Grosche, Antje; Reichenbach, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Bringmann, Andreas; Kohen, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Vegetable polyphenols (bioflavonoids) have been suggested to represent promising drugs for treating cancer and retinal diseases. We compared the effects of various bioflavonoids (epigallocatechin-3-gallate [EGCG], luteolin, apigenin, myricetin, quercetin, and cyanidin) on the physiological properties and viability of cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Methods Human RPE cells were obtained from several donors within 48 h of death. Secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Messenger ribonucleic acid levels were determined with real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Cellular proliferation was investigated with a bromodeoxyuridine immunoassay, and chemotaxis was examined with a Boyden chamber assay. The number of viable cells was determined by Trypan Blue exclusion. Apoptosis and necrosis rates were determined with a DNA fragmentation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phosphorylation level of signaling proteins was revealed by western blotting. Results With the exception of EGCG, all flavonoids tested decreased dose-dependently the RPE cell proliferation, migration, and secretion of VEGF. EGCG inhibited the secretion of VEGF evoked by CoCl2-induced hypoxia. The gene expression of VEGF was reduced by myricetin at low concentrations and elevated at higher concentrations. Luteolin, apigenin, myricetin, and quercetin induced significant decreases in the cell viability at higher concentration, by triggering cellular necrosis. Cyanidin reduced the rate of RPE cell necrosis. Myricetin caused caspase-3 independent RPE cell necrosis mediated by free radical generation and activation of calpain and phospholipase A2. The myricetin- and quercetin-induced RPE cell necrosis was partially inhibited by necrostatin-1, a blocker of programmed necrosis. Most flavonoids tested diminished the phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and Akt

  14. Effects of the vegetable polyphenols epigallocatechin-3-gallate, luteolin, apigenin, myricetin, quercetin, and cyanidin in primary cultures of human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Hollborn, Margrit; Grosche, Antje; Reichenbach, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Bringmann, Andreas; Kohen, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Vegetable polyphenols (bioflavonoids) have been suggested to represent promising drugs for treating cancer and retinal diseases. We compared the effects of various bioflavonoids (epigallocatechin-3-gallate [EGCG], luteolin, apigenin, myricetin, quercetin, and cyanidin) on the physiological properties and viability of cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Human RPE cells were obtained from several donors within 48 h of death. Secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Messenger ribonucleic acid levels were determined with real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Cellular proliferation was investigated with a bromodeoxyuridine immunoassay, and chemotaxis was examined with a Boyden chamber assay. The number of viable cells was determined by Trypan Blue exclusion. Apoptosis and necrosis rates were determined with a DNA fragmentation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phosphorylation level of signaling proteins was revealed by western blotting. With the exception of EGCG, all flavonoids tested decreased dose-dependently the RPE cell proliferation, migration, and secretion of VEGF. EGCG inhibited the secretion of VEGF evoked by CoCl2-induced hypoxia. The gene expression of VEGF was reduced by myricetin at low concentrations and elevated at higher concentrations. Luteolin, apigenin, myricetin, and quercetin induced significant decreases in the cell viability at higher concentration, by triggering cellular necrosis. Cyanidin reduced the rate of RPE cell necrosis. Myricetin caused caspase-3 independent RPE cell necrosis mediated by free radical generation and activation of calpain and phospholipase A2. The myricetin- and quercetin-induced RPE cell necrosis was partially inhibited by necrostatin-1, a blocker of programmed necrosis. Most flavonoids tested diminished the phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and Akt proteins. The intake of

  15. MicroRNA expression profiles of human iPS cells, retinal pigment epithelium derived from iPS, and fetal retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Whitney A; Muñiz, Alberto; Plamper, Mark L; Kaini, Ramesh R; Wang, Heuy-Ching

    2014-06-24

    The objective of this report is to describe the protocols for comparing the microRNA (miRNA) profiles of human induced-pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) derived from human iPS cells (iPS-RPE), and fetal RPE. The protocols include collection of RNA for analysis by microarray, and the analysis of microarray data to identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed among three cell types. The methods for culture of iPS cells and fetal RPE are explained. The protocol used for differentiation of RPE from human iPS is also described. The RNA extraction technique we describe was selected to allow maximal recovery of very small RNA for use in a miRNA microarray. Finally, cellular pathway and network analysis of microarray data is explained. These techniques will facilitate the comparison of the miRNA profiles of three different cell types.

  16. The immune privilege of the eye: human retinal pigment epithelial cells selectively modulate T-cell activation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, Charlotte G; Lovato, Paola; Ødum, Niels

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the effect of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells on phytohemagglutinin (PHA) activation of T cells. METHODS: Resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were stimulated with PHA with or without the presence of gamma-irradiated RPE cells. Proliferation and the cell...

  17. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles : Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennis, Anna; Gorgels, Theo G M F; Ten Brink, Jacoline B; van der Spek, Peter J; Bossers, Koen; Heine, Vivi M; Bergen, Arthur A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to

  18. Angiogênese e doenças da retina Angiogenesis and retinal diseases

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    Francisco Max Damico

    2007-06-01

    anos.Angiogenesis is the process involving the growth of new blood vessels from preexisting vessels which occurs in both physiologic and pathological settings. It is a complex process controlled by a large number of modulating factors, the pro-and antiangiogenic factors. The underlying cause of vision loss in proliferative retinal diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration and proliferative diabetic retinopathy, are increased vascular permeability and choroidal neovascularization, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF plays a central role in this process. VEGF is produced in the eye by retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells and is upregulated by hypoxia. There are four major biologically active human isoforms, of which VEGF165 is the predominant in the human eye and appears to be the responsible for pathological ocular neovascularization. Besides being a potent and specific mitogen for endothelial cells, VEGF increases vascular permeability, inhibits endothelial cells apoptosis, and is a chemoattractant for endothelial cell precursors. VEGF is not the only growth factor involved in ocular neovascularization. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, angiopoietins, pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF, and adhesion molecules also play a role in the pro- and antiangiogenic balance. Advances in the understanding of the bases of pathological ocular angiogenesis and identification of angiogenesis regulators have enabled the development of novel therapeutic agents. Anti-VEGF antibodies have been developed for intravitreal use, and other approaches are currently under investigation. These new drugs may be powerful tools for the treatment of the leading causes of irreversible blindness in people over age 65.

  19. Retinal ganglion cell/inner plexiform layer thickness in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Živković

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the paper was to analyze the changes in the macular ganglion cell layer and inner plexiform layer (GCL-IPL thickness in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Material and methods : The study enrolled 46 patients with established diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease and 46 healthy subjects. Both groups were age- and gender-matched. An OCT protocol, namely standardized Ganglion Cell Analysis algorithm was used to measure the thickness of the macular GCL-IPL layer. The average, minimum, and six sectoral (superotemporal, superior, superonasal, inferonasal, inferior, inferotemporal GCL-IPL thicknesses were measured from the elliptical annulus centered on the fovea. Results : The mean value of the clinical severity of Parkinson’s disease was between 2 and 3, according to the Hoehn and Yahr scale. Statistically significant thinning of the GCL-IPL layer was registered in average and minimum GCL-IPL thickness, as well as in the sectoral layer thicknesses in patients with Parkinson’s disease in comparison to the controls. There was no correlation between structural changes in the retina and disease duration or severity. A statistically significant difference in thickness between the different stages of the disease was registered only in the inferior sector. Conclusions : Parkinson’s disease is accompanied by thinning of the GCL-IPL complex of macula even in the earliest stages. This may indicate a possible retinal dopaminergic neurodegeneration. There is no correlation between duration or severity of Parkinson’s disease with thinning of the GCL-IPL complex.

  20. c-Kit⁺ cells isolated from human fetal retinas represent a new population of retinal progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng-Yi; Peng, Guang-Hua; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2015-06-01

    Definitive surface markers for retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) are still lacking. Therefore, we sorted c-Kit(+) and stage-specific embryonic antigen-4(-) (SSEA4(-)) retinal cells for further biological characterization. RPCs were isolated from human fetal retinas (gestational age of 12-14 weeks). c-Kit(+)/SSEA4(-) RPCs were sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and their proliferation and differentiation capabilities were evaluated by using immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. The effectiveness and safety were assessed following injection of c-Kit(+)/SSEA4(-) cells into the subretina of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. c-Kit(+) cells were found in the inner part of the fetal retina. Sorted c-Kit(+)/SSEA4(-) cells expressed retinal stem cell markers. Our results clearly demonstrate the proliferative potential of these cells. Moreover, c-Kit(+)/SSEA4(-) cells differentiated into retinal cells that expressed markers of photoreceptor cells, ganglion cells and glial cells. These cells survived for at least 3 months after transplantation into the host subretinal space. Teratomas were not observed in the c-Kit(+)/SSEA4(-)-cell group. Thus, c-Kit can be used as a surface marker for RPCs, and c-Kit(+)/SSEA4(-) RPCs exhibit the ability to self-renew and differentiate into retinal cells. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Stem Cell Therapy: a Novel Approach for Vision Restoration in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siy Uy, Harvey; Chan, Pik Sha; Cruz, Franz Marie

    2013-01-01

    Unfortunately, at present, degenerative retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa remains untreatable. Patients with these conditions suffer progressive visual decline resulting from continuing loss of photoreceptor cells and outer nuclear layers. However, stem cell therapy is a promising approach to restore visual function in eyes with degenerative retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. Animal studies have established that pluripotent stem cells when placed in the mouse retinitis pigmentosa models have the potential not only to survive, but also to differentiate, organize into and function as photoreceptor cells. Furthermore, there is early evidence that these transplanted cells provide improved visual function. These groundbreaking studies provide proof of concept that stem cell therapy is a viable method of visual rehabilitation among eyes with retinitis pigmentosa. Further studies are required to optimize these techniques in human application. This review focuses on stem cell therapy as a new approach for vision restitution in retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:24600643

  2. Stem cell therapy: a novel approach for vision restoration in retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uy, Harvey Siy; Chan, Pik Sha; Cruz, Franz Marie

    2013-01-01

    Unfortunately, at present, degenerative retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa remains untreatable. Patients with these conditions suffer progressive visual decline resulting from continuing loss of photoreceptor cells and outer nuclear layers. However, stem cell therapy is a promising approach to restore visual function in eyes with degenerative retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. Animal studies have established that pluripotent stem cells when placed in the mouse retinitis pigmentosa models have the potential not only to survive, but also to differentiate, organize into and function as photoreceptor cells. Furthermore, there is early evidence that these transplanted cells provide improved visual function. These groundbreaking studies provide proof of concept that stem cell therapy is a viable method of visual rehabilitation among eyes with retinitis pigmentosa. Further studies are required to optimize these techniques in human application. This review focuses on stem cell therapy as a new approach for vision restitution in retinitis pigmentosa.

  3. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  4. Genetic determinants of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyde David R

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The retinal vasculature is a capillary network of blood vessels that nourishes the inner retina of most mammals. Developmental abnormalities or microvascular complications in the retinal vasculature result in severe human eye diseases that lead to blindness. To exploit the advantages of zebrafish for genetic, developmental and pharmacological studies of retinal vasculature, we characterised the intraocular vasculature in zebrafish. Results We show a detailed morphological and developmental analysis of the retinal blood supply in zebrafish. Similar to the transient hyaloid vasculature in mammalian embryos, vessels are first found attached to the zebrafish lens at 2.5 days post fertilisation. These vessels progressively lose contact with the lens and by 30 days post fertilisation adhere to the inner limiting membrane of the juvenile retina. Ultrastructure analysis shows these vessels to exhibit distinctive hallmarks of mammalian retinal vasculature. For example, smooth muscle actin-expressing pericytes are ensheathed by the basal lamina of the blood vessel, and vesicle vacuolar organelles (VVO, subcellular mediators of vessel-retinal nourishment, are present. Finally, we identify 9 genes with cell membrane, extracellular matrix and unknown identity that are necessary for zebrafish hyaloid and retinal vasculature development. Conclusion Zebrafish have a retinal blood supply with a characteristic developmental and adult morphology. Abnormalities of these intraocular vessels are easily observed, enabling application of genetic and chemical approaches in zebrafish to identify molecular regulators of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in development and disease.

  5. Retinal tissue transplantation and retinal progenitor cells: A therapeutic promise for patients with retinal disease Trasplante de tejido retiniano y de células progenitoras retinianas: una promesa terapéutica para pacientes con enfermedad de la retina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diana Estefania Jiménez

    2010-01-01

    .... Despite the lack of enough trials demonstrating positive functional results on eyesight recovery, the use of stem cells, retinal progenitor cells, and fetal retinal tissue transplantation seem very promising...

  6. Cytomegalovirus retinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is a viral infection of the ... need treatment to prevent its return. Alternative Names Cytomegalovirus retinitis Images Eye CMV retinitis CMV (cytomegalovirus) References ...

  7. [Fundus autofluorescence in patients with inherited retinal diseases : Patterns of fluorescence at two different wavelengths.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, T.; Boon, C.J.F.; Klevering, B.J.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) may be excited and measured at different wavelengths. In the present study we compared short wavelength and near-infrared FAF patterns of retinal dystrophies. METHODS: We analysed both eyes of 108 patients with diverse retinal dystrophies. Besides colour

  8. Monomethylfumarate induces γ-globin expression and fetal hemoglobin production in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and erythroid cells, and in intact retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promsote, Wanwisa; Makala, Levi; Li, Biaoru; Smith, Sylvia B; Singh, Nagendra; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Pace, Betty S; Martin, Pamela M

    2014-05-13

    Sickle retinopathy (SR) is a major cause of vision loss in sickle cell disease (SCD). There are no strategies to prevent SR and treatments are extremely limited. The present study evaluated (1) the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell as a hemoglobin producer and novel cellular target for fetal hemoglobin (HbF) induction, and (2) monomethylfumarate (MMF) as an HbF-inducing therapy and abrogator of oxidative stress and inflammation in SCD retina. Human globin gene expression was evaluated by RT-quantitative (q)PCR in the human RPE cell line ARPE-19 and in primary RPE cells isolated from Townes humanized SCD mice. γ-Globin promoter activity was monitored in KU812 stable dual luciferase reporter expressing cells treated with 0 to 1000 μM dimethylfumarate, MMF, or hydroxyurea (HU; positive control) by dual luciferase assay. Reverse transcriptase-qPCR, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), immunofluorescence, and Western blot techniques were used to evaluate γ-globin expression and HbF production in primary human erythroid progenitors, ARPE-19, and normal hemoglobin producing (HbAA) and homozygous β(s) mutation (HbSS) RPE that were treated similarly, and in MMF-injected (1000 μM) HbAA and HbSS retinas. Dihydroethidium labeling and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), IL-1β, and VEGF expression were also analyzed. Retinal pigment epithelial cells express globin genes and synthesize adult and fetal hemoglobin MMF stimulated γ-globin expression and HbF production in cultured RPE and erythroid cells, and in HbSS mouse retina where it also reduced oxidative stress and inflammation. The production of hemoglobin by RPE suggests the potential involvement of this cell type in the etiology of SR. Monomethylfumarate influences multiple parameters consistent with improved retinal health in SCD and may therefore be of therapeutic potential in SR treatment. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  9. Modelling the optical response of human retinal photoreceptors to plane wave illumination with the finite integration technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlagh Moayed, Alireza; Dang, Shannon; Ramahi, Omar M.; Bizheva, Kostadinka K.

    2009-02-01

    The early stages of ocular diseases such as Diabetic Retinopathy are manifested by morphological changes in retinal tissue occurring on cellular level. Therefore, a number of ophthalmic diseases can be diagnosed at an early stage by detecting spatial and temporal variations in the scattering profile of retinal tissue. It was recently demonstrated that, OCT can be used to probe the functional response of retinal photoreceptors to external light stimulation [1]-[3]. fUHROCT measures localized differential changes in the retina reflectivity over time resulting from external light stimulation of the retina. Currently the origins of the observed reflectivity changes are not well understood. However, due to the complex nature of retinal physiology using purely experimental approaches in this case is problematic. For example fUHROCT is sensitive to small changes in the refractive index of biological tissue which as demonstrated previously, can result from a number of processes such as membrane hyperpolarization, osmotic swelling, metabolic changes, etc. In this paper, we present a computational model of interaction between photoreceptor cells and optical plane wave based on the Finite Integration Technique (FIT).

  10. Melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells: implications for human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Hannibal, Jens

    2011-01-01

    .e. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dominant optic atrophy. The mechanism leading to mRGCs sparing in these blinding disorders, characterized by extensive and selective loss of RGCs, is currently unknown and under investigation. Other studies reported on mRGCs in glaucoma, on genetic variation...

  11. The effects of platelet gel on cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Balagholi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The positive role of platelet gel (PG in tissue regeneration is well known, however, other characteristics of PG still remain to be determined. We investigated cellular and molecular changes in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE cells when treated with different concentrations of PG named PG1, PG2, and PG3. hRPE cells were isolated from donor eyes of two newborn children, within 24 hours after their death. The cells were treated with three concentrations of PG for 7 days: 3 × 104/ml (PG1, 6 × 104/ml (PG2, and 9 × 104/ml (PG3. Fetal bovine serum was used as a control. Immunocytochemistry was performed with anti-RPE65 (H-85, anti-Cytokeratin 8/18 (NCL-5D3, and anti-PAX6 antibody. We used MTT assay to determine cell viability. Gene expressions of PAX6, MMP2, RPE65, ACTA2, MKI67, MMP9, and KDR were analyzed using real-time PCR. A significant increase in viability was observed for PG3-treated cells compared to control (p = 0.044 and compared to PG1 group (p = 0.027, on day 7. Cellular elongation together with dendritiform extensions were observed in PG-treated cells on days 1 and 3, while epithelioid morphology was observed on day 7. All cells were immunoreactive for RPE65, cytokeratin 8/18, and PAX6. No significant change was observed in the expression of MKI67 and PAX6, but the expressions of MMP2, MMP9, ACTA2, and KDR were significantly higher in PG2-treated cells compared to controls (p < 0.05. Our results indicate that increased concentration of PG and extended exposure time have positive effects on viability of hRPE cells. PG may be useful for hRPE cell encapsulation in retinal cell replacement therapy.

  12. Lutein Activates the Transcription Factor Nrf2 in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frede, Katja; Ebert, Franziska; Kipp, Anna P; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Baldermann, Susanne

    2017-07-26

    The degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium caused by oxidative damage is a stage of development in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The carotenoid lutein is a major macular pigment that may reduce the incidence and progression of AMD, but the underlying mechanism is currently not fully understood. Carotenoids are known to be direct antioxidants. However, carotenoids can also activate cellular pathways resulting in indirect antioxidant effects. Here, we investigate the influence of lutein on the activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) target genes in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 cells) using lutein-loaded Tween40 micelles. The micelles were identified as a suitable delivery system since they were nontoxic in APRE-19 cells up to 0.04% Tween40 and led to a cellular lutein accumulation of 62 μM ± 14 μM after 24 h. Lutein significantly enhanced Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus 1.5 ± 0.4-fold compared to that of unloaded micelles after 4 h. Furthermore, lutein treatment for 24 h significantly increased the transcripts of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) by 1.7 ± 0.1-fold, glutamate-cysteine ligase regulatory subunit (GCLm) by 1.4 ± 0.1-fold, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) by 1.8 ± 0.3-fold. Moreover, we observed a significant enhancement of NQO1 activity by 1.2 ± 0.1-fold. Collectively, this study indicates that lutein not only serves as a direct antioxidant but also activates Nrf2 in ARPE-19 cells.

  13. Evaluation of the arrestin gene in patients with retinitis pigmentosa or an allied disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeStefano, D.J.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Arrestin, also called 48K protein or S-antigen, plays a role in deactivating rhodopsin, the photosensitive, seven-helix, G-protein receptor found in rod photoreceptors. In Drosophila, null mutations in arrestin genes cause a light-dependent photoreceptor degeneration. It is possible that a comparable photoreceptor degeneration in humans is caused by defects in the rod arrestin gene. In order to evaluate this possibility, we are characterizing the human arrestin locus on chromosome 2q. We screened a genomic library (5 million plaques) using an arrestin cDNA clone. Sixty-eight hybridizing clones were identified; portions of 7 clones were sequenced to determine the intron sequence flanking the exons. We are using SSCP analysis and direct genomic sequencing to screen the entire coding region, splice donor and acceptor sites, and the promoter region of the arrestin gene in 188 patients with autosomal dominant and 104 patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. We have already obtained flanking intron sequences necessary for SSCP analysis for 13 of 16 exons. So far, we have identified 4 silent base changes at codons 67 (TGC-to-TGT), 107 (CTG-to-CTC), 163 (GCC-to-GCT), and 288 (CTG-to-TGT), all with allele frequencies at 1% or less. Several other variant bands detected by SSCP analysis are currently being sequenced.

  14. Dissociation of retinal and headcentric disparity signals in dorsal human cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldussen, David M.; Goossens, Jeroen; van Den Berg, Albert V.

    2015-01-01

    Recent fMRI studies have shown fusion of visual motion and disparity signals for shape perception (Ban et al., 2012), and unmasking camouflaged surfaces (Rokers et al., 2009), but no such interaction is known for typical dorsal motion pathway tasks, like grasping and navigation. Here, we investigate human speed perception of forward motion and its representation in the human motion network. We observe strong interaction in medial (V3ab, V6) and lateral motion areas (MT+), which differ significantly. Whereas the retinal disparity dominates the binocular contribution to the BOLD activity in the anterior part of area MT+, headcentric disparity modulation of the BOLD response dominates in area V3ab and V6. This suggests that medial motion areas not only represent rotational speed of the head (Arnoldussen et al., 2011), but also translational speed of the head relative to the scene. Interestingly, a strong response to vergence eye movements was found in area V1, which showed a dependency on visual direction, just like vertical-size disparity. This is the first report of a vertical-size disparity correlate in human striate cortex. PMID:25759642

  15. Dissociation of retinal and headcentric disparity signals in dorsal human cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mattijs Arnoldussen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent fMRI studies have shown fusion of visual motion and disparity signals for shape perception (Ban et al., 2012, and unmasking camouflaged surfaces (Rokers et al., 2009, but no such interaction is known for typical dorsal motion pathway tasks, like grasping and navigation. Here, we investigate human speed perception of forward motion and its representation in the human motion network. We observe strong interaction in medial (V3ab, V6 and lateral motion areas (MT+, which differ significantly. Whereas the retinal disparity dominates the binocular contribution to the BOLD activity in the anterior part of area MT+, headcentric disparity modulation of the BOLD response dominates in area V3ab and V6. This suggests that medial motion areas not only represent rotational speed of the head (Arnoldussen et al., 2011, but also translational speed of the head relative to the scene.Interestingly, a strong response to vergence eye movements was found in area V1, which showed a dependency on visual direction, just like vertical-size disparity. This is the first report of a vertical-size disparity correlate in human striate cortex.

  16. Biological effects of cigarette smoke in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice L Yu

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to determine whether treatment with cigarette smoke extract (CSE induces cell loss, cellular senescence, and extracellular matrix (ECM synthesis in primary human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells. Primary cultured human RPE cells were exposed to 2, 4, 8, and 12% of CSE concentration for 24 hours. Cell loss was detected by cell viability assay. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by loss of cis-parinaric acid (PNA fluorescence. Senescence-associated ß-galactosidase (SA-ß-Gal activity was detected by histochemical staining. Expression of apolipoprotein J (Apo J, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, fibronectin, and laminin were examined by real-time PCR, western blot, or ELISA experiments. The results showed that exposure of cells to 12% of CSE concentration induced cell death, while treatment of cells with 2, 4, and 8% CSE increased lipid peroxidation. Exposure to 8% of CSE markedly increased the number of SA-ß-Gal positive cells to up to 82%, and the mRNA expression of Apo J, CTGF, and fibronectin by approximately 3-4 fold. Treatment with 8% of CSE also increased the protein expression of Apo J and CTGF and the secretion of fibronectin and laminin. Thus, treatment with CSE can induce cell loss, senescent changes, and ECM synthesis in primary human RPE cells. It may be speculated that cigarette smoke could be involved in cellular events in RPE cells as seen in age-related macular degeneration.

  17. Transport of protons and lactate in cultured human fetal retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Steffen; Cour, Morten la; Ming Lui, Ge

    2000-01-01

    Electron microscopy, intracellular pH, monocarboxylate transport, pigment epithelium of eye, proton-lactate cotransport, retinal metabolism, sodium/proton exchange......Electron microscopy, intracellular pH, monocarboxylate transport, pigment epithelium of eye, proton-lactate cotransport, retinal metabolism, sodium/proton exchange...

  18. Retinitis pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is an inherited retinal dystrophy caused by the loss of photoreceptors and characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination. Prevalence of non syndromic RP is approximately 1/4,000. The most common form of RP is a rod-cone dystrophy, in which the first symptom is night blindness, followed by the progressive loss in the peripheral visual field in daylight, and eventually leading to blindness after several decades. Some extreme cases may have a rapid evolution over two decades or a slow progression that never leads to blindness. In some cases, the clinical presentation is a cone-rod dystrophy, in which the decrease in visual acuity predominates over the visual field loss. RP is usually non syndromic but there are also many syndromic forms, the most frequent being Usher syndrome. To date, 45 causative genes/loci have been identified in non syndromic RP (for the autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and digenic forms. Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of night blindness and peripheral visual field defects, lesions in the fundus, hypovolted electroretinogram traces, and progressive worsening of these signs. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, but is not usually performed due to the tremendous genetic heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic counseling is always advised. Currently, there is no therapy that stops the evolution of the disease or restores the vision, so the visual prognosis is poor. The therapeutic approach is restricted to slowing down the degenerative process by sunlight protection and vitaminotherapy, treating the complications (cataract and macular edema, and helping patients to cope with the social and psychological impact of blindness. However, new therapeutic strategies are emerging from intensive research (gene therapy, neuroprotection, retinal prosthesis.

  19. Hydrostatic pressure does not cause detectable changes in survival of human retinal ganglion cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Osborne

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP is a major risk factor for glaucoma. One consequence of raised IOP is that ocular tissues are subjected to increased hydrostatic pressure (HP. The effect of raised HP on stress pathway signaling and retinal ganglion cell (RGC survival in the human retina was investigated. METHODS: A chamber was designed to expose cells to increased HP (constant and fluctuating. Accurate pressure control (10-100 mmHg was achieved using mass flow controllers. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs from donor eyes (<24 h post mortem were cultured in serum-free DMEM/HamF12. Increased HP was compared to simulated ischemia (oxygen glucose deprivation, OGD. Cell death and apoptosis were measured by LDH and TUNEL assays, RGC marker expression by qRT-PCR (THY-1 and RGC number by immunohistochemistry (NeuN. Activated p38 and JNK were detected by Western blot. RESULTS: Exposure of HORCs to constant (60 mmHg or fluctuating (10-100 mmHg; 1 cycle/min pressure for 24 or 48 h caused no loss of structural integrity, LDH release, decrease in RGC marker expression (THY-1 or loss of RGCs compared with controls. In addition, there was no increase in TUNEL-positive NeuN-labelled cells at either time-point indicating no increase in apoptosis of RGCs. OGD increased apoptosis, reduced RGC marker expression and RGC number and caused elevated LDH release at 24 h. p38 and JNK phosphorylation remained unchanged in HORCs exposed to fluctuating pressure (10-100 mmHg; 1 cycle/min for 15, 30, 60 and 90 min durations, whereas OGD (3 h increased activation of p38 and JNK, remaining elevated for 90 min post-OGD. CONCLUSIONS: Directly applied HP had no detectable impact on RGC survival and stress-signalling in HORCs. Simulated ischemia, however, activated stress pathways and caused RGC death. These results show that direct HP does not cause degeneration of RGCs in the ex vivo human retina.

  20. Hydrostatic Pressure Does Not Cause Detectable Changes in Survival of Human Retinal Ganglion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Andrew; Aldarwesh, Amal; Rhodes, Jeremy D.; Broadway, David C.; Everitt, Claire; Sanderson, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a major risk factor for glaucoma. One consequence of raised IOP is that ocular tissues are subjected to increased hydrostatic pressure (HP). The effect of raised HP on stress pathway signaling and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival in the human retina was investigated. Methods A chamber was designed to expose cells to increased HP (constant and fluctuating). Accurate pressure control (10-100mmHg) was achieved using mass flow controllers. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs) from donor eyes (<24h post mortem) were cultured in serum-free DMEM/HamF12. Increased HP was compared to simulated ischemia (oxygen glucose deprivation, OGD). Cell death and apoptosis were measured by LDH and TUNEL assays, RGC marker expression by qRT-PCR (THY-1) and RGC number by immunohistochemistry (NeuN). Activated p38 and JNK were detected by Western blot. Results Exposure of HORCs to constant (60mmHg) or fluctuating (10-100mmHg; 1 cycle/min) pressure for 24 or 48h caused no loss of structural integrity, LDH release, decrease in RGC marker expression (THY-1) or loss of RGCs compared with controls. In addition, there was no increase in TUNEL-positive NeuN-labelled cells at either time-point indicating no increase in apoptosis of RGCs. OGD increased apoptosis, reduced RGC marker expression and RGC number and caused elevated LDH release at 24h. p38 and JNK phosphorylation remained unchanged in HORCs exposed to fluctuating pressure (10-100mmHg; 1 cycle/min) for 15, 30, 60 and 90min durations, whereas OGD (3h) increased activation of p38 and JNK, remaining elevated for 90min post-OGD. Conclusions Directly applied HP had no detectable impact on RGC survival and stress-signalling in HORCs. Simulated ischemia, however, activated stress pathways and caused RGC death. These results show that direct HP does not cause degeneration of RGCs in the ex vivo human retina. PMID:25635827

  1. Modeling human retinal development with patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells reveals multiple roles for visual system homeobox 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M Joseph; Perez, Enio T; Martin, Jessica M; Reshel, Samantha T; Wallace, Kyle A; Capowski, Elizabeth E; Singh, Ruchira; Wright, Lynda S; Clark, Eric M; Barney, Patrick M; Stewart, Ron; Dickerson, Sarah J; Miller, Michael J; Percin, E Ferda; Thomson, James A; Gamm, David M

    2014-06-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have been shown to differentiate along the retinal lineage in a manner that mimics normal mammalian development. Under certain culture conditions, hiPSCs form optic vesicle-like structures (OVs), which contain proliferating progenitors capable of yielding all neural retina (NR) cell types over time. Such observations imply conserved roles for regulators of retinogenesis in hiPSC-derived cultures and the developing embryo. However, whether and to what extent this assumption holds true has remained largely uninvestigated. We examined the role of a key NR transcription factor, visual system homeobox 2 (VSX2), using hiPSCs derived from a patient with microphthalmia caused by an R200Q mutation in the VSX2 homeodomain region. No differences were noted between (R200Q)VSX2 and sibling control hiPSCs prior to OV generation. Thereafter, (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs displayed a significant growth deficit compared to control hiPSC-OVs, as well as increased production of retinal pigmented epithelium at the expense of NR cell derivatives. Furthermore, (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs failed to produce bipolar cells, a distinctive feature previously observed in Vsx2 mutant mice. (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs also demonstrated delayed photoreceptor maturation, which could be overcome via exogenous expression of wild-type VSX2 at early stages of retinal differentiation. Finally, RNAseq analysis on isolated hiPSC-OVs implicated key transcription factors and extracellular signaling pathways as potential downstream effectors of VSX2-mediated gene regulation. Our results establish hiPSC-OVs as versatile model systems to study retinal development at stages not previously accessible in humans and support the bona fide nature of hiPSC-OV-derived retinal progeny. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  2. Human Vision-Motivated Algorithm Allows Consistent Retinal Vessel Classification Based on Local Color Contrast for Advancing General Diagnostic Exams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Iliya V; Leitritz, Martin A; Norrenberg, Lars A; Völker, Michael; Dynowski, Marek; Ueffing, Marius; Dietter, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    Abnormalities of blood vessel anatomy, morphology, and ratio can serve as important diagnostic markers for retinal diseases such as AMD or diabetic retinopathy. Large cohort studies demand automated and quantitative image analysis of vascular abnormalities. Therefore, we developed an analytical software tool to enable automated standardized classification of blood vessels supporting clinical reading. A dataset of 61 images was collected from a total of 33 women and 8 men with a median age of 38 years. The pupils were not dilated, and images were taken after dark adaption. In contrast to current methods in which classification is based on vessel profile intensity averages, and similar to human vision, local color contrast was chosen as a discriminator to allow artery vein discrimination and arterial-venous ratio (AVR) calculation without vessel tracking. With 83% ± 1 standard error of the mean for our dataset, we achieved best classification for weighted lightness information from a combination of the red, green, and blue channels. Tested on an independent dataset, our method reached 89% correct classification, which, when benchmarked against conventional ophthalmologic classification, shows significantly improved classification scores. Our study demonstrates that vessel classification based on local color contrast can cope with inter- or intraimage lightness variability and allows consistent AVR calculation. We offer an open-source implementation of this method upon request, which can be integrated into existing tool sets and applied to general diagnostic exams.

  3. Melanopsin expressing human retinal ganglion cells: Subtypes, distribution, and intraretinal connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Jens; Christiansen, Anders Tolstrup; Heegaard, Steffen; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke

    2017-06-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin belong to a heterogenic population of RGCs which regulate the circadian clock, masking behavior, melatonin suppression, the pupillary light reflex, and sleep/wake cycles. The different functions seem to be associated to different subtypes of melanopsin cells. In rodents, subtype classification has associated subtypes to function. In primate and human retina such classification has so far, not been applied. In the present study using antibodies against N- and C-terminal parts of human melanopsin, confocal microscopy and 3D reconstruction of melanopsin immunoreactive (-ir) RGCs, we applied the criteria used in mouse on human melanopsin-ir RGCs. We identified M1, displaced M1, M2, and M4 cells. We found two other subtypes of melanopsin-ir RGCs, which were named "gigantic M1 (GM1)" and "gigantic displaced M1 (GDM1)." Few M3 cells and no M5 subtypes were labeled. Total cell counts from one male and one female retina revealed that the human retina contains 7283 ± 237 melanopsin-ir (0.63-0.75% of the total number of RGCs). The melanopsin subtypes were unevenly distributed. Most significant was the highest density of M4 cells in the nasal retina. We identified input to the melanopsin-ir RGCs from AII amacrine cells and directly from rod bipolar cells via ribbon synapses in the innermost ON layer of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and from dopaminergic amacrine cells and GABAergic processes in the outermost OFF layer of the IPL. The study characterizes a heterogenic population of human melanopsin-ir RGCs, which most likely are involved in different functions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Disease consequences of human adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin C. Fay

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive evolution has provided us with a unique set of characteristics that define us as humans, including morphological, physiological and cellular changes. Yet, natural selection provides no assurances that adaptation is without human health consequences; advantageous mutations will increase in frequency so long as there is a net gain in fitness. As such, the current incidence of human disease can depend on previous adaptations. Here, I review genome-wide and gene-specific studies in which adaptive evolution has played a role in shaping human genetic disease. In addition to the disease consequences of adaptive phenotypes, such as bipedal locomotion and resistance to certain pathogens, I review evidence that adaptive mutations have influenced the frequency of linked disease alleles through genetic hitchhiking. Taken together, the links between human adaptation and disease highlight the importance of their combined influence on functional variation within the human genome and offer opportunities to discover and characterize such variation.

  5. Melissa Officinalis L. Extracts Protect Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeung, In Cheul; Jee, Donghyun; Rho, Chang-Rae; Kang, Seungbum

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the protective effect of ALS-L1023, an extract of Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae; lemon balm) against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 cells). ARPE-19 cells were incubated with ALS-L1023 for 24 h and then treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by flow cytometry. Caspase-3/7 activation and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) were measured to investigate the protective role of ALS-L1023 against apoptosis. The protective effect of ALS-L1023 against oxidative stress through activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) was evaluated by Western blot analysis. ALS-L1023 clearly reduced H2O2-induced cell apoptosis and intracellular production of ROS. H2O2-induced oxidative stress increased caspase-3/7 activity and apoptotic PARP cleavage, which were significantly inhibited by ALS-L1023. Activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway was associated with the protective effect of ALS-L1023 on ARPE-19 cells. ALS-L1023 protected human RPE cells against oxidative damage. This suggests that ALS-L1023 has therapeutic potential for the prevention of dry age-related macular degeneration.

  6. Severity of coronary artery disease and retinal microvascular signs in patients with diagnosed versus undiagnosed diabetes: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Mitchell, Paul; Liew, Gerald; Plant, Adam J; Wang, Sarah B; Xu, Joshua; Chiha, Joseph; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Burlutsky, George; Gopinath, Bamini

    2016-07-01

    There is increasing evidence that a considerable proportion of patients with diabetes remain undiagnosed and untreated, however, it is unclear whether this is associated with more severe coronary artery disease (CAD) and microvasculature changes compared with diagnosed patients. We assessed CAD extent and severity, along with changes to the retinal microvascular structure in participants with undiagnosed versus diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Participants of the Australian Heart Eye Study were stratified into participants with previously diagnosed diabetes (n=489), undiagnosed diabetes (n=76) and no diabetes (n=1,112). Retinal vessel caliber was measured from digital retinal images. Extent and severity of CAD was assessed using Extent and Gensini scores from angiography findings, respectively. Participants with undiagnosed and diagnosed diabetes versus those with no diabetes (reference group) had increased odds of being in the highest quartile of Gensini scores, multivariate adjusted odds ratios (OR) =7.02 [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.04-24.1] and OR =2.76 (95% CI, 1.67-4.55), respectively. Participants with undiagnosed and diagnosed diabetes versus those with no diabetes also had increased odds of being in the highest quartile of Extent scores, multivariate adjusted OR =7.63 (95% CI, 2.15-27.10) and OR =3.72 (95% CI, 2.22-6.27), respectively. No significant differences were observed in retinal vessel caliber between participants with undiagnosed versus diagnosed diabetes. The present study demonstrated that participants with undiagnosed diabetes compared to those with previously diagnosed diabetes, had a stronger likelihood of having more severe and extensive CAD. However, retinal microvascular signs did not differ by diabetes status.

  7. Retrospective Analysis of Structural Disease Progression in Retinitis Pigmentosa Utilizing Multimodal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Thiago; Sengillo, Jesse D; Duong, Jimmy K; Justus, Sally; Boudreault, Katherine; Schuerch, Kaspar; Belfort, Rubens; Mahajan, Vinit B; Sparrow, Janet R; Tsang, Stephen H

    2017-09-04

    In this report, we assess the natural progression rate of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) over an average of three years using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and short wavelength fundus autofluorescence (SW-AF). Measurement of the ellipsoid zone (EZ) line width and hyperautofluorescent ring diameters was performed in 81 patients with RP in a retrospective, longitudinal fashion. Rate of structural disease progression, symmetry between eyes, and test-retest variability were quantified. We observed on average, EZ-line widths decreased by 140 µm (5.2%, p < 0.001) per year, and average horizontal and vertical hyperautofluorescent ring diameters decreased by 149 µm (3.6%, p < 0.001) and 120 µm (3.9%, p < 0.001) per year, respectively. The 95th percentile of this cohort had differences in progression slopes between eyes that were less than 154 µm, 118 µm, and 132 µm for EZ-line width and horizontal and vertical ring diameters, respectively. For all measures except horizontal ring diameter, progression rates were significantly slower at end-stage disease. From our data, we observed a statistically significant progression rate in EZ line width and SW-AF ring diameters over time, verifying the utility of these measurements for disease monitoring purposes. Additionally, calculated differences in progression slopes between eyes may prove useful for investigators evaluating the efficacy of unilateral treatments for RP in clinical trials.

  8. Distinct characteristics of inferonasal fundus autofluorescence patterns in stargardt disease and retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, Tobias; Lee, Winston; Tsang, Stephen H; Greenberg, Jonathan P; Zernant, Jana; Allikmets, Rando; Sparrow, Janet R

    2013-10-17

    To report distinct characteristics of fundus autofluorescence (AF) patterns inferior to the optic disc in recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Short-wavelength (SW) and near-infrared (NIR) AF images were acquired from patients with STGD1 and RP. In SW- and NIR-AF images of STGD1 patients, gray levels (GL) on both sides of the demarcation line were measured. In STGD1, a demarcation line, which has been assigned to the closed optic fissure, was visible on SW-AF and NIR-AF inferior to the optic disc. In healthy subjects, this demarcation line is only visible by SW-AF. At 20° inferior to the disc center, AF levels on the nasal side were 25% (±11%) lower than on the temporal side in SW-AF images and 18% (±11%) lower in NIR-AF images. For both STGD1 and RP, the inferonasal quadrant exhibited distinct SW- and NIR-AF patterns compared with other fundus areas. Disease-related AF changes, such as flecks, appeared to respect the demarcation line as a boundary. Disease-related AF patterns originating in RPE in STGD1 and RP appear to respect the demarcation line in the inferonasal quadrant of the fundus as a border. The visibility of the inferonasal demarcation line by NIR-AF in STGD1 but not in healthy eyes may indicate that increased levels of RPE lipofuscin modulate the melanin-related NIR-AF signal. This feature of NIR-AF images may aid in the diagnosis of STGD1 patients.

  9. Therapeutic Effect of Novel Single-Stranded RNAi Agent Targeting Periostin in Eyes with Retinal Neovascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahito Nakama

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Retinal neovascularization (NV due to retinal ischemia remains one of the principal causes of vision impairment in patients with ischemic retinal diseases. We recently reported that periostin (POSTN may play a role in the development of preretinal fibrovascular membranes, but its role in retinal NV has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of POSTN in the ischemic retinas of a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinal NV. We also studied the function of POSTN on retinal NV using Postn KO mice and human retinal endothelial cells (HRECs in culture. In addition, we used a novel RNAi agent, NK0144, which targets POSTN to determine its effect on the development of retinal NV. Our results showed that the expression of POSTN was increased in the vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and M2 macrophages in ischemic retinas. POSTN promoted the ischemia-induced retinal NV by Akt phosphorylation through integrin αvβ3. NK0144 had a greater inhibitory effect than canonical double-stranded siRNA on preretinal pathological NV in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest a causal relationship between POSTN and retinal NV, and indicate a potential therapeutic role of intravitreal injection of NK0144 for retinal neovascular diseases.

  10. Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS for retinal and optic nerve diseases: a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey N Weiss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we present the results of a single patient with optic neuropathy treated within the Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS. SCOTS is an Institutional Review Board approved clinical trial and is the largest ophthalmology stem cell study registered at the National Institutes of Health to date- www.clinicaltrials.gov Identifier NCT 01920867. SCOTS utilizes autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells in the treatment of optic nerve and retinal diseases. Pre- and post-treatment comprehensive eye exams were independently performed at the Wilmer Eye Institute at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, USA. A 27 year old female patient had lost vision approximately 5 years prior to enrollment in SCOTS. Pre-treatment best-corrected visual acuity at the Wilmer Eye Institute was 20/800 Right Eye (OD and 20/4,000 Left Eye (OS. Four months following treatment in SCOTS, the central visual acuity had improved to 20/100 OD and 20/40 OS.

  11. The Human Disease Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kwang-Il Goh; Michael E. Cusick; David Valle; Barton Childs; Marc Vidal; Albert-László Barabási

    2007-01-01

    A network of disorders and disease genes linked by known disordergene associations offers a platform to explore in a single graphtheoretic framework all known phenotype and disease gene associations...

  12. Human dental pulp stem cells respond to cues from the rat retina and differentiate to express the retinal neuronal marker rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, A F; Cevallos, R R; Gazarian, K; Lamas, M

    2014-11-07

    Human adult dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are self-renewing stem cells that originate from the neural crest during development and remain within the dental pulp niche through adulthood. Due to their multi-lineage differentiation potential and their relative ease of access they represent an exciting alternative for autologous stem cell-based therapies in neurodegenerative diseases. In animal models, DPSCs transplanted into the brain differentiate into functional neurons or astrocytes in response to local environmental cues that appear to influence the fate of the surviving cells. Here we tested the hypothesis that DPSCs might be able to respond to factors present in the retina enabling the regenerative potential of these cells. We evaluated the response of DPSCs to conditioned media from organotypic explants from control and chemically damaged rat retinas. To evaluate cell differentiation, we analyzed the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), early neuronal and retinal markers (polysialic acid-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM); Pax6; Ascl1; NeuroD1) and the late photoreceptor marker rhodopsin, by immunofluorescence and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Exposure of DPSC cultures to conditioned media from control retinas induced a 39% reduction on the number of DPSCs that expressed GFAP; the expression of Pax6, Ascl1, PSA-NCAM or NeuroD1 was undetectable or did not change significantly. Expression of rhodopsin was not detectable in control or after exposure of the cultures with retinal conditioned media. By contrast, 44% of DPSCs exposed to conditioned media from damaged retinas were immunopositive to this protein. This response could not be reproduced when conditioned media from Müller-enriched primary cultures was used. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR was performed to compare the relative expression of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and brain

  13. Comparing Three Methods of Co-culture of Retinal Pigment Epithelium with Progenitor Cells Derived Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirpour, Noushin; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Razavi, Shahnaz; Karamali, Fereshteh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Close interaction between retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptors plays an essential role in visual function. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of RPE cells in the differentiation of progenitor derived human embryonic stem cells (hESC) into retinal cells; we developed in vitro co-culture models and compare these models to investigate in which model the expression of photoreceptor markers is superior. It seems the effects of RPE cells on differentiation of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) through the cell-to-cell contact or with the use of insert and compare of these methods has not been reported yet. Methods: Initially, retinal progenitors (RPs) were differentiated from hESC. After isolation of RPE sheet from rabbit eyes, demonstrated these cells maintains the integrity and feature after 2 weeks. Next, we examined the induction of photoreceptors by the co-culture of RPE through insert in 1 week and 2 weeks (indirect) or without insert by the cell-to-cell contact (direct). The differentiation of retinal cells was verified by protein and gene expression in these three methods. The adherent cells were morphologically examined using phase contrast microscopy and characterized by immunofluorescent staining and reverse transcription.polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) Results: Evaluation of immunostaining showed that hESC, highly (>80%) can be directed to the RPs fate. Upon co-culture of RPCs with RPE sheet using insert for 2 weeks or by the cell-to-cell contact, these cells differentiated to neural retina and expressed photoreceptor-specific markers. However, in direct co-culture, some mature photoreceptor markers like arrestin expressed in compare with indirect co-culture. Conclusions: The expression of late photoreceptor marker could be improved when RPE cells seeded on RPCs in compare with the use of insert. PMID:24404357

  14. Changes in retinal function and morphology are early clinical signs of disease in cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Heather West Greenlee

    Full Text Available Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE belongs to a group of fatal, transmissible protein misfolding diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs. All TSEs are caused by accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrPSc throughout the central nervous system (CNS, which results in neuronal loss and ultimately death. Like other protein misfolding diseases including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, TSEs are generally not diagnosed until the onset of disease after the appearance of unequivocal clinical signs. As such, identification of the earliest clinical signs of disease may facilitate diagnosis. The retina is the most accessible part of the central nervous system, and retinal pathology in TSE affected animals has been previously reported. Here we describe antemortem changes in retinal function and morphology that are detectable in BSE inoculated animals several months (up to 11 months prior to the appearance of any other signs of clinical disease. We also demonstrate that differences in the severity of these clinical signs reflect the amount of PrPSc accumulation in the retina and the resulting inflammatory response of the tissue. These results are the earliest reported clinical signs associated with TSE infection and provide a basis for understanding the pathology and evaluating therapeutic interventions.

  15. Human cadaver retina model for retinal heating during corneal surgery with a femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Fan, Zhongwei; Yun, Jin; Zhao, Tianzhuo; Yan, Ying; Kurtz, Ron M.; Juhasz, Tibor

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers are widely used in everyday clinical procedures to perform minimally invasive corneal refractive surgery. The intralase femtosecond laser (AMO Corp. Santa Ana, CA) is a common example of such a laser. In the present study a numerical simulation was developed to quantify the temperature rise in the retina during femtosecond intracorneal surgery. Also, ex-vivo retinal heating due to laser irradiation was measured with an infrared thermal camera (Fluke Corp. Everett, WA) as a validation of the simulation. A computer simulation was developed using Comsol Multiphysics to calculate the temperature rise in the cadaver retina during femtosecond laser corneal surgery. The simulation showed a temperature rise of less than 0.3 degrees for realistic pulse energies for the various repetition rates. Human cadaver retinas were irradiated with a 150 kHz Intralase femtosecond laser and the temperature rise was measured withan infrared thermal camera. Thermal camera measurements are in agreement with the simulation. During routine femtosecond laser corneal surgery with normal clinical parameters, the temperature rise is well beneath the threshold for retina damage. The simulation predictions are in agreement with thermal measurements providing a level of experimental validation.

  16. The marine n-3 PUFA DHA evokes cytoprotection against oxidative stress and protein misfolding by inducing autophagy and NFE2L2 in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ida; Monsen, Vivi Talstad; Pettersen, Kristine; Mildenberger, Jennifer; Misund, Kristine; Kaarniranta, Kai; Schønberg, Svanhild; Bjørkøy, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins is a hallmark of several diseases collectively known as proteinopathies. Autophagy has a cytoprotective role in diseases associated with protein aggregates. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common neurodegenerative eye disease that evokes blindness in elderly. AMD is characterized by degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and leads to loss of photoreceptor cells and central vision. The initial phase associates with accumulation of intracellular lipofuscin and extracellular deposits called drusen. Epidemiological studies have suggested an inverse correlation between dietary intake of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases, including AMD. However, the disease-preventive mechanism(s) mobilized by n-3 PUFAs is not completely understood. In human retinal pigment epithelial cells we find that physiologically relevant doses of the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) induce a transient increase in cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels that activates the oxidative stress response regulator NFE2L2/NRF2 (nuclear factor, erythroid derived 2, like 2). Simultaneously, there is a transient increase in intracellular protein aggregates containing SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1) and an increase in autophagy. Pretreatment with DHA rescues the cells from cell cycle arrest induced by misfolded proteins or oxidative stress. Cells with a downregulated oxidative stress response, or autophagy, respond with reduced cell growth and survival after DHA supplementation. These results suggest that DHA both induces endogenous antioxidants and mobilizes selective autophagy of misfolded proteins. Both mechanisms could be relevant to reduce the risk of developing aggregate-associate diseases such as AMD. PMID:26237736

  17. Gene Therapy for Retinitis Pigmentosa Caused by MFRP Mutations: Human Phenotype and Preliminary Proof of Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinculescu, Astra; Estreicher, Jackie; Zenteno, Juan C.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Huang, Wei Chieh; Roman, Alejandro J.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Li, Qiuhong; Deng, Wen-Tao; Min, Seok-Hong; Chiodo, Vince A.; Neeley, Andy; Liu, Xuan; Shu, Xinhua; Matias-Florentino, Margarita; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Boye, Sanford L.; Cideciyan, Artur V.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of degenerations of the retina, can be due to mutations in the MFRP (membrane-type frizzled-related protein) gene. A patient with RP with MFRP mutations, one of which is novel and the first splice site mutation reported, was characterized by noninvasive retinal and visual studies. The phenotype, albeit complex, suggested that this retinal degeneration may be a candidate for gene-based therapy. Proof-of-concept studies were performed in the rd6 Mfrp mutant mouse model. The fast-acting tyrosine-capsid mutant AAV8 (Y733F) vector containing the small chicken β-actin promoter driving the wild-type mouse Mfrp gene was used. Subretinal vector delivery on postnatal day 14 prevented retinal degeneration. Treatment rescued rod and cone photoreceptors, as assessed by electroretinography and retinal histology at 2 months of age. This AAV-mediated gene delivery also resulted in robust MFRP expression predominantly in its normal location within the retinal pigment epithelium apical membrane and its microvilli. The clinical features of MFRP-RP and our preliminary data indicating a response to gene therapy in the rd6 mouse suggest that this form of RP is a potential target for gene-based therapy. PMID:22142163

  18. Using the rd1 mouse to understand functional and anatomical retinal remodelling and treatment implications in retinitis pigmentosa: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalloniatis, M; Nivison-Smith, L; Chua, J; Acosta, M L; Fletcher, E L

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) reflects a range of inherited retinal disorders which involve photoreceptor degeneration and retinal pigmented epithelium dysfunction. Despite the multitude of genetic mutations being associated with the RP phenotype, the clinical and functional manifestations of the disease remain the same: nyctalopia, visual field constriction (tunnel vision), photopsias and pigment proliferation. In this review, we describe the typical clinical phenotype of human RP and review the anatomical and functional remodelling which occurs in RP determined from studies in the rd/rd (rd1) mouse. We also review studies that report a slowing down or show an acceleration of retinal degeneration and finally we provide insights on the impact retinal remodelling may have in vision restoration strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Retinal remodeling in the Tg P347L rabbit, a large-eye model of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B W; Kondo, M; Terasaki, H; Watt, C B; Rapp, K; Anderson, J; Lin, Y; Shaw, M V; Yang, J-H; Marc, R E

    2011-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited blinding disease characterized by progressive loss of retinal photoreceptors. There are numerous rodent models of retinal degeneration, but most are poor platforms for interventions that will translate into clinical practice. The rabbit possesses a number of desirable qualities for a model of retinal disease including a large eye and an existing and substantial knowledge base in retinal circuitry, anatomy, and ophthalmology. We have analyzed degeneration, remodeling, and reprogramming in a rabbit model of retinal degeneration, expressing a rhodopsin proline 347 to leucine transgene in a TgP347L rabbit as a powerful model to study the pathophysiology and treatment of retinal degeneration. We show that disease progression in the TgP347L rabbit closely tracks human cone-sparing RP, including the cone-associated preservation of bipolar cell signaling and triggering of reprogramming. The relatively fast disease progression makes the TgP347L rabbit an excellent model for gene therapy, cell biological intervention, progenitor cell transplantation, surgical interventions, and bionic prosthetic studies. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Computer-aided diagnosis of plus disease via measurement of vessel thickness in retinal fundus images of preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloumi, Faraz; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Casti, Paola; Ells, Anna L

    2015-11-01

    Changes in the characteristics of retinal vessels such as width and tortuosity can be signs of the presence of several diseases such retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and diabetic retinopathy. Plus disease is an indicator of ROP which requires treatment and is signified by an increase in posterior venular width. In this work, we present image processing techniques for the detection, segmentation, tracking, and measurement of the width of the major temporal arcade (MTA), which is the thickest venular branch in the retina. Several image processing techniques have been employed, including the use of Gabor filters to detect the MTA, morphological image processing to obtain its skeleton, Canny's method to detect and select MTA vessel-edge candidates, least-squares fitting to interpolate the MTA edges, and geometrical procedures to measure the width of the MTA. The results, obtained using 110 retinal fundus images of preterm infants, indicate a statistically highly significant difference in MTA width of normal cases as compared to cases with plus disease (pcomputer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of plus disease with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.76. The proposed methods may be used in CAD of plus disease and timely treatment of ROP in a clinical or teleophthalmological setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stem Cell Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium: The Role of Pigmentation as Maturation Marker and Gene Expression Profile Comparison with Human Endogenous Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, A; Jacobs, J G; Catsburg, L A E; Ten Brink, J B; Koster, C; Schlingemann, R O; van Meurs, J; Gorgels, T G M F; Moerland, P D; Heine, V M; Bergen, A A

    2017-10-01

    In age-related macular degeneration (AMD) the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) deteriorates, leading to photoreceptor decay and severe vision loss. New therapeutic strategies aim at RPE replacement by transplantation of pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived RPE. Several protocols to generate RPE have been developed where appearance of pigmentation is commonly used as indicator of RPE differentiation and maturation. It is, however, unclear how different pigmentation stages reflect developmental stages and functionality of PSC-derived RPE cells. We generated human embryonic stem cell-derived RPE (hESC-RPE) cells and investigated their gene expression profiles at early pigmentation (EP) and late pigmentation (LP) stages. In addition, we compared the hESC-RPE samples with human endogenous RPE. We used a common reference design microarray (44 K). Our analysis showed that maturing hESC-RPE, upon acquiring pigmentation, expresses markers specific for human RPE. Interestingly, our analysis revealed that EP and LP hESC-RPE do not differ much in gene expression. Our data further showed that pigmented hESC-RPE has a significant lower expression than human endogenous RPE in the visual cycle and oxidative stress pathways. In contrast, we observed a significantly higher expression of pathways related to the process adhesion-to-polarity model that is typical of developing epithelial cells. We conclude that, in vitro, the first appearance of pigmentation hallmarks differentiated RPE. However, further increase in pigmentation does not result in much significant gene expression changes and does not add important RPE functionalities. Consequently, our results suggest that the time span for obtaining differentiated hESC-RPE cells, that are suitable for transplantation, may be greatly reduced.

  2. Enhancing retinal images by nonlinear registration

    CERN Document Server

    Molodij, Guillaume; Glanc, Marie; Chenegros, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Being able to image the human retina in high resolution opens a new era in many important fields, such as pharmacological research for retinal diseases, researches in human cognition, nervous system, metabolism and blood stream, to name a few. In this paper, we propose to share the knowledge acquired in the fields of optics and imaging in solar astrophysics in order to improve the retinal imaging at very high spatial resolution in the perspective to perform a medical diagnosis. The main purpose would be to assist health care practitioners by enhancing retinal images and detect abnormal features. We apply a nonlinear registration method using local correlation tracking to increase the field of view and follow structure evolutions using correlation techniques borrowed from solar astronomy technique expertise. Another purpose is to define the tracer of movements after analyzing local correlations to follow the proper motions of an image from one moment to another, such as changes in optical flows that would be o...

  3. The Silk-protein Sericin Induces Rapid Melanization of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells by Activating the NF-κB Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    J. R. Eidet; Reppe, S.; Pasovic, L.; Olstad, O K; Lyberg, T; Khan, A. Z.; Fostad, I. G.; D. F. Chen; Utheim, T. P.

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to prevent further loss of vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration represents a promising novel treatment modality. Development of RPE transplants, however, requires up to 3 months of cell differentiation. We explored whether the silk protein sericin can induce maturation of primary human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated that sericin up-regulated RPE-associated transcripts (RPE6...

  4. Soil Borne Human Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeffery, Simon; Van der Putten, Wim H.

    2011-01-01

    Soils are home to a remarkable array of biodiversity with some estimates stating that 25% of the Earth’s species find their home in the soil. Of these organisms, the vast majority are not of any threat to human health, but rather function to provide numerous ecosystem services which emerge through

  5. Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes the etiology of retinitis pigmentosa, a visual dysfunction which results from progressive loss of the retinal photoreceptors. Sections address signs and symptoms, ancillary findings, heredity, clinical diagnosis, therapy, and research. (SBH)

  6. Peripapillary distribution of Muller cells within the retinal nerve fiber layer in human eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Shahar; Goshen, Gal; Leach, Lu; Pe'er, Jacob; Mimouni, Michael; Blumenthal, Eytan Z

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the distribution of Muller cell within the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in human eyes. Eleven unpaired normal postmortem eyes were recruited into this study. Each eye was sectioned using the "umbrella technique" to obtain a concentric peripapillary ring centered on the optic disc, with a diameter of 3.0 mm. Immunohistochemistry with anti- CRALBP stained Muller cell within each ring. The RNFL thickness measurements around the peripapillary ring were: 262.5, 339.4, 285.4 and 347.5 μm for the temporal, superior, nasal and inferior quadrants, respectively. Muller cell were found to be unevenly distributed in the peripapillary RNFL of normal eyes. The relative Muller cell staining to the thickness of each measured segment (16.6%, 15.2%, 21.3%, and 17.9% for the temporal, superior, nasal and inferior quadrants, respectively) showed a significant increase in the nasal quadrant. The RNFL thickness measurements obtained using imaging techniques reflect the amount of axonal tissue present in this layer. In this study we highlight that around 20% of RNFL thickness is composed of non-axonal contents which do not represent neuronal tissue, nor are they necessarily lost in the glaucomatous process. More so, the ratio of the Muller cell component to the total RNFL thickness varies around the peripapillary RNFL ring, demonstrating the lowest relative content of Muller cell superiorly and the highest content nasally. Further studies should compare the amount and distribution of Muller cell in normal versus glaucomatous eyes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Awareness and filling-in of the human blind spot: linking psychophysics with retinal topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Richard V; Jeffery, Glen; Murphy, Jonathan S

    2011-01-25

    To link psychophysical thresholds for blind spot awareness and filling-in with early neural components that underpin these perceptions. Blind spot dimensions were quantified, after which an intrinsic stimulus (i.e., a rectangular bar of varying length centered within the blind spot) was used to determine blind spot awareness and filling-in for five subjects. Histologic examination of six human retinas at 20-μm intervals from the temporal and nasal neural rims of the optic nerve head out to 1040 μm allowed the quantification of outer nuclear layer thickness, a direct correlate of photoreceptor density. Blind spot awareness was reported for bar extensions beyond 0.4° to 0.8° from the edge of the blind spot. Partial and total blind spot filling-in were reported between 1.1° and 1.3° and beyond 1.5°, respectively. Histologic measures of ONL thickness were correlated with previously published data of photoreceptor spatial density to determine the percentage of photoreceptor density required to trigger a 75% probability response. Blind spot awareness was achieved by stimulating 43% to 70% of the maximum photoreceptor density. Partial and total filling-in of the blind spot required between 78% and 83% and more than 85% photoreceptor spatial densities, respectively. A novel intrinsic stimulus has been used to concurrently investigate blind spot awareness and blind spot filling-in. Retinal neural correlates of each visual experience have been quantified. Future computational models will have to integrate bottom-up constraints with long-range cortical receptive field activity and higher order cognitive factors.

  8. Pharmacological implications from the adhesion-induced signaling profiles in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chuan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM plays an active and complex role in regulating cellular behaviors, including proliferation and adhesion. This study aimed at delineating the adhesion-induced signaling profiles in cultured human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells and investigating the antiadhesion effect of antiproliferative drugs in this context. RPE R-50 cells grown on various ECM molecules, such as type I and IV collagens, fibronectin, and laminin, were used for adhesion assay and for examining the phosphorylation profiles of signaling mediators including Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2, and integrin-linked kinase (ILK using Western blotting. The cells receiving antiproliferative drug treatment at subtoxic doses were used to evaluate their antiadhesive and suppressive effects on kinase activities. ECM coating enhanced adhesion and spreading of RPE cells significantly. The cellular attachment onto ECM-coated surfaces differentially induced Akt, ERK1/2, and ILK phosphorylation, and concomitantly increased p53 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression, but decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratios. Treatment with antiproliferative agents, including 5-fluorouracil, mitomycin C, and daunomycin, at subtoxic doses suppressed the ability of RPE cells to adhere to ECM substratum significantly. This suppression was in part mediated through reduction of integrin β1 and β3 expressions and interfering Akt-ILK signaling activity. Mechanistically, blockade of PI3K/Akt signaling resulted in the suppressed adhesion of RPE cells to ECM. These findings support the hypothesis that, in addition to their antimitogenic effect, antiproliferative agents also exhibit suppressive effect on the adhesiveness of cultured RPE cells. Moreover, inhibitors of the PI3K/Akt signaling mediator can potentially be used as therapeutic agents for proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

  9. Association Between Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness and Abnormalities of Vision in People With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyani, Partho S.; Holland, Gary N.; Fawzi, Amani A.; Arantes, Tiago E.F.; Yu, Fei; Sadun, Alfredo A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate relationships between contrast sensitivity (CS), color vision, and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) among people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; to evaluate the effect of time since diagnosis of HIV infection on RNFL thickness. Design Noninterventional cross-sectional study. Methods We evaluated 102 eyes of 57 HIV-infected individuals without ocular opportunistic infections. Peripapillary RNFL thickness was determined with spectraldomain optical coherence tomography in 4 quadrants. CS was measured with the Pelli-Robson technique (expressed as logCS); color vision was measured with the Lanthony desaturated 15-hue technique (expressed as color confusion index [C-index], with higher scores indicating worse color vision). Correlations between values were assessed using Spearman correlation coefficients. Results Median RNFL thickness (average of 4 quadrants) was 102.9 μm (range, 75.0–134.7 μm). Median logCS was 1.90 (range, 1.25–1.95). Median C-index was 1.58 (range, 0.96–4.07). Temporal RNFL thickness was correlated with logCS (r = 0.295, P = .003) and C-index (r = −0.338, P = .0005). Time since diagnosis of HIV infection was shorter for those with thick average RNFL than for those with thin average RNFL (P = .18). Conclusions Both worse CS and worse color vision are correlated with thinning of the temporal RNFL, with possible threshold effects. Increased prevalences of abnormal CS and abnormal color vision in this population are therefore likely attributable to neuroretinal compromise. This pattern of structural and functional losses may reflect preferential damage to small-caliber axons in the maculopapillary bundle, possibly associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, providing a potential disease mechanism for HIV-associated “neuroretinal disorder.” PMID:22245459

  10. Association between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and abnormalities of vision in people with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyani, Partho S; Holland, Gary N; Fawzi, Amani A; Arantes, Tiago E F; Yu, Fei; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2012-04-01

    To investigate relationships between contrast sensitivity (CS), color vision, and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) among people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; to evaluate the effect of time since diagnosis of HIV infection on RNFL thickness. Noninterventional cross-sectional study. We evaluated 102 eyes of 57 HIV-infected individuals without ocular opportunistic infections. Peripapillary RNFL thickness was determined with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in 4 quadrants. CS was measured with the Pelli-Robson technique (expressed as logCS); color vision was measured with the Lanthony desaturated 15-hue technique (expressed as color confusion index [C-index], with higher scores indicating worse color vision). Correlations between values were assessed using Spearman correlation coefficients. Median RNFL thickness (average of 4 quadrants) was 102.9 μm (range, 75.0-134.7 μm). Median logCS was 1.90 (range, 1.25-1.95). Median C-index was 1.58 (range, 0.96-4.07). Temporal RNFL thickness was correlated with logCS (r=0.295, P=.003) and C-index (r=-0.338, P=.0005). Time since diagnosis of HIV infection was shorter for those with thick average RNFL than for those with thin average RNFL (P=.18). Both worse CS and worse color vision are correlated with thinning of the temporal RNFL, with possible threshold effects. Increased prevalences of abnormal CS and abnormal color vision in this population are therefore likely attributable to neuroretinal compromise. This pattern of structural and functional losses may reflect preferential damage to small-caliber axons in the maculopapillary bundle, possibly associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, providing a potential disease mechanism for HIV-associated "neuroretinal disorder." Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Visual space and object space in the cerebral cortex of retinal disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfi Goesaert

    Full Text Available The lower areas of the hierarchically organized visual cortex are strongly retinotopically organized, with strong responses to specific retinotopic stimuli, and no response to other stimuli outside these preferred regions. Higher areas in the ventral occipitotemporal cortex show a weak eccentricity bias, and are mainly sensitive for object category (e.g., faces versus buildings. This study investigated how the mapping of eccentricity and category sensitivity using functional magnetic resonance imaging is affected by a retinal lesion in two very different low vision patients: a patient with a large central scotoma, affecting central input to the retina (juvenile macular degeneration, and a patient where input to the peripheral retina is lost (retinitis pigmentosa. From the retinal degeneration, we can predict specific losses of retinotopic activation. These predictions were confirmed when comparing stimulus activations with a no-stimulus fixation baseline. At the same time, however, seemingly contradictory patterns of activation, unexpected given the retinal degeneration, were observed when different stimulus conditions were directly compared. These unexpected activations were due to position-specific deactivations, indicating the importance of investigating absolute activation (relative to a no-stimulus baseline rather than relative activation (comparing different stimulus conditions. Data from two controls, with simulated scotomas that matched the lesions in the two patients also showed that retinotopic mapping results could be explained by a combination of activations at the stimulated locations and deactivations at unstimulated locations. Category sensitivity was preserved in the two patients. In sum, when we take into account the full pattern of activations and deactivations elicited in retinotopic cortex and throughout the ventral object vision pathway in low vision patients, the pattern of (deactivation is consistent with the retinal loss.

  12. Viral diseases and human evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal Élcio de Souza

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish long-lasting associations with man. Although not all viral agents cause disease and some may in fact be considered beneficial, the present situation of overpopulation, poverty and ecological inbalance may have devastating effets on human progress. Recently emerged diseases causing massive pandemics (eg., HIV-1 and HCV, dengue, etc. are becoming formidable challenges, which may have a direct impact on the fate of our species.

  13. Neonatal human retinal pigment epithelial cells secrete limited trophic factors in vitro and in vivo following striatal implantation in parkinsonian rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russ, Kaspar; Flores, Joseph; Brudek, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    -hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. The results demonstrate short-lived BDNF and FGF2 concentrations in vitro from hRPE cells grown alone or attached to gelatin microcarriers (GM)s as well as limited trophic factor concentration differences in vivo following striatal implantation of hRPE-GM in 6-hydroxydopamine......Human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cell implants into the striatum have been investigated as a potential cell-based treatment for Parkinson's disease in a Phase II clinical trial that recently failed. We hypothesize that the trophic factor potential of the hRPE cells could potentially...... influence the function and/or survival of the implants and may be involved in an alternative mechanism of action. However, it is unclear if hRPE cells secreted trophic factors when handled in the manner used in the clinical Phase II trial. To address these questions, we investigated two neonatal hRPE cell...

  14. Homozygosity mapping and targeted sanger sequencing reveal genetic defects underlying inherited retinal disease in families from pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maleeha Maria

    Full Text Available Homozygosity mapping has facilitated the identification of the genetic causes underlying inherited diseases, particularly in consanguineous families with multiple affected individuals. This knowledge has also resulted in a mutation dataset that can be used in a cost and time effective manner to screen frequent population-specific genetic variations associated with diseases such as inherited retinal disease (IRD.We genetically screened 13 families from a cohort of 81 Pakistani IRD families diagnosed with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA, retinitis pigmentosa (RP, congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB, or cone dystrophy (CD. We employed genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array analysis to identify homozygous regions shared by affected individuals and performed Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes located in the sizeable homozygous regions. In addition, based on population specific mutation data we performed targeted Sanger sequencing (TSS of frequent variants in AIPL1, CEP290, CRB1, GUCY2D, LCA5, RPGRIP1 and TULP1, in probands from 28 LCA families.Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes revealed the underlying mutations in 10 families. TSS revealed causative variants in three families. In these 13 families four novel mutations were identified in CNGA1, CNGB1, GUCY2D, and RPGRIP1.Homozygosity mapping and TSS revealed the underlying genetic cause in 13 IRD families, which is useful for genetic counseling as well as therapeutic interventions that are likely to become available in the near future.

  15. Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning: a window into rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi-Jiao; Wei, Jing; Mao, Cheng-Jie; Zhang, Jin-Ru; Chen, Jing; Ji, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Jun-Yi; Shen, Yun; Xiong, Kang-Ping; Huang, Jun-Ying; Yang, Ya-Ping; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-12-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning occurs in Parkinson's disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Idiopathic RBD (iRBD) is a well-established prodromal hallmark of synucleinopathies and occurs secondary to many neurodegenerative diseases, including PD. The aim of this study is to determine whether or not retinal structures are altered with the onset of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorders (RBD). In all, a total of 63 patients with PD, 14 patients with idiopathic RBD, and 26 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were enrolled and underwent optical coherence tomography measurements (HD-OCT (Zeiss) ) for the average and every quadrant of RNFL thickness. The REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Screening Questionnaire (RBDSQ) was used to classify PD patients with clinically probable RBD (PD + pRBD) or without probable RBD (PD - pRBD). Patients with iRBD were identified by polysomnography. For patients with RBD (idiopathic or secondary to PD), we found a significant decrease in RNFL thickness compared with groups without RBD (PD - pRBD and healthy controls) (all p treatment. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that RBDSQ score was negatively associated with average and inferior RNFL variation in PD (all p < 0.005). The findings show that RNFL was slightly but significantly thinner in idiopathic RBD. In PD, RNFL thickness may vary depending on the presence of RBD.

  16. Epoxygenated Fatty Acids Inhibit Retinal Vascular Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Megan E; Hammer, Sandra S; McCollum, Gary W; Penn, John S

    2016-12-14

    The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of elevating epoxygenated fatty acids on retinal vascular inflammation. To stimulate inflammation we utilized TNFα, a potent pro-inflammatory mediator that is elevated in the serum and vitreous of diabetic patients. In TNFα-stimulated primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells, total levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), but not epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), were significantly decreased. Exogenous addition of 11,12-EET or 19,20-EDP when combined with 12-(3-adamantane-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA), an inhibitor of epoxide hydrolysis, inhibited VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression and protein levels; conversely the diol product of 19,20-EDP hydrolysis, 19,20-DHDP, induced VCAM1 and ICAM1 expression. 11,12-EET and 19,20-EDP also inhibited leukocyte adherence to human retinal microvascular endothelial cell monolayers and leukostasis in an acute mouse model of retinal inflammation. Our results indicate that this inhibition may be mediated through an indirect effect on NFκB activation. This is the first study demonstrating a direct comparison of EET and EDP on vascular inflammatory endpoints, and we have confirmed a comparable efficacy from each isomer, suggesting a similar mechanism of action. Taken together, these data establish that epoxygenated fatty acid elevation will inhibit early pathology related to TNFα-induced inflammation in retinal vascular diseases.

  17. Thickness, phase retardation, birefringence, and reflectance of the retinal nerve fiber layer in normal and glaucomatous non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwelle, Jordan; Liu, Shuang; Wang, Bingqing; McElroy, Austin; Ho, Derek; Markey, Mia K; Milner, Thomas; Rylander, H Grady

    2012-07-01

    We identified candidate optical coherence tomography (OCT) markers for early glaucoma diagnosis. Time variation of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, phase retardation, birefringence, and reflectance using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) were measured in three non-human primates with induced glaucoma in one eye. We characterized time variation of RNFL thickness, phase retardation, birefringence, and reflectance with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). One eye of each of three non-human primates was laser treated to increase IOP. Each primate was followed for a 30-week period. PS-OCT measurements were recorded at weekly intervals. Reflectance index (RI) is introduced to characterize RNFL reflectance. Associations between elevated IOP and RNFL thickness, phase retardation, birefringence, and reflectance were characterized in seven regions (entire retina, inner and outer rings, and nasal, temporal, superior and inferior quadrants) by linear and non-linear mixed-effects models. Elevated IOP was achieved in three non-human primate eyes with an average increase of 13 mm Hg over the study period. Elevated IOP was associated with decreased RNFL thickness in the nasal region (P = 0.0002), decreased RNFL phase retardation in the superior (P = 0.046) and inferior (P = 0.021) regions, decreased RNFL birefringence in the nasal (P = 0.002) and inferior (P = 0.029) regions, and loss of RNFL reflectance in the outer rings (P = 0.018). When averaged over the entire retinal area, only RNFL reflectance showed a significant decrease (P = 0.028). Of the measured parameters, decreased RNFL reflectance was the most robust correlate with glaucomatous damage. Candidate cellular mechanisms are considered for decreased RNFL reflectance, including mitochondrial dysfunction and retinal ganglion cell apoptosis.

  18. Transcriptomic Analysis of Human Retinal Surgical Specimens Using jouRNAl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Aït-Ali, Najate; Camara, Hawa; Clérin, Emmanuelle; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Sahel, José-Alain; Léveillard, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Retinal detachment (RD) describes a separation of the neurosensory retina from the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE). The RPE is essential for normal function of the light sensitive neurons, the photoreceptors. Detachment of the retina from the RPE creates a physical gap that is filled with extracellular fluid. RD initiates cellular and molecular adverse events that affect both the neurosensory retina and the RPE since the physiological exchange of ions and metabolites is severely perturbed. The consequence for vision is related to the duration of the detachment since a rapid reapposition of the two tissues results in the restoration of vision 1. The treatment of RD is exclusively surgical. Removal of vitreous gel (vitrectomy) is followed by the removal non essential part of the retina around the detached area to favor retinal detachment. The removed retinal specimens are res nullius (nothing) and consequently normally discarded. To recover RNA from these surgical specimens, we developed the procedure jouRNAl that allows RNA conservation during the transfer from the surgical block to the laboratory. We also standardized a protocol to purify RNA by cesium chloride ultracentrifugation to assure that the purified RNAs are suitable for global gene expression analysis. The quality of the RNA was validated both by RT-PCR and microarray analysis. Analysis of the data shows a simultaneous involvement of inflammation and photoreceptor degeneration during RD. PMID:23979175

  19. Transcriptomic analysis of human retinal surgical specimens using jouRNAI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Aït-Ali, Najate; Camara, Hawa; Clérin, Emmanuelle; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Sahel, José-Alain; Léveillard, Thierry

    2013-08-14

    Retinal detachment (RD) describes a separation of the neurosensory retina from the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE). The RPE is essential for normal function of the light sensitive neurons, the photoreceptors. Detachment of the retina from the RPE creates a physical gap that is filled with extracellular fluid. RD initiates cellular and molecular adverse events that affect both the neurosensory retina and the RPE since the physiological exchange of ions and metabolites is severely perturbed. The consequence for vision is related to the duration of the detachment since a rapid reapposition of the two tissues results in the restoration of vision (1). The treatment of RD is exclusively surgical. Removal of vitreous gel (vitrectomy) is followed by the removal non essential part of the retina around the detached area to favor retinal detachment. The removed retinal specimens are res nullius (nothing) and consequently normally discarded. To recover RNA from these surgical specimens, we developed the procedure jouRNAl that allows RNA conservation during the transfer from the surgical block to the laboratory. We also standardized a protocol to purify RNA by cesium chloride ultracentrifugation to assure that the purified RNAs are suitable for global gene expression analysis. The quality of the RNA was validated both by RT-PCR and microarray analysis. Analysis of the data shows a simultaneous involvement of inflammation and photoreceptor degeneration during RD.

  20. Lack of FasL expression in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, C G; Madsen, H O; Prause, J U

    2001-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells have been proposed to play a part in maintaining the eye as an immune privileged organ. However, our knowledge of the implicated mechanism is still sparse. Fas ligand (FasL) expression of RPE cells is generally recognized to be essential for the immune...

  1. Transformation from a Retinal to a Cyclopean Representation in Human Visual Cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendregt, Martijn; Harvey, Ben M.; Rokers, Bas; Dumoulin, Serge O.

    2015-01-01

    We experience our visual world as seen from a single viewpoint, even though our two eyes receive slightly different images. One role of the visual system is to combine the two retinal images into a single representation of the visual field, sometimes called the cyclopean image [1]. Conventional

  2. Results of Automated Retinal Image Analysis for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy from the Nakuru Study, Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Bøgelund Hansen, Morten; Abramoff, M. D.; Folk, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Reading Centre on the population of Nakuru Study from Kenya. Participants Retinal images were taken from participants of the Nakuru Eye Disease Study in Kenya in 2007/08 (n = 4,381 participants [NW6 Topcon Digital Retinal Camera]). Methods First, human grading was performed for the presence or absence......Objective Digital retinal imaging is an established method of screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR). It has been established that currently about 1% of the world's blind or visually impaired is due to DR. However, the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus and DR is creating an increased...... workload on those with expertise in grading retinal images. Safe and reliable automated analysis of retinal images may support screening services worldwide. This study aimed to compare the Iowa Detection Program (IDP) ability to detect diabetic eye diseases (DED) to human grading carried out at Moorfields...

  3. Characterisation of the canine rod-cone dysplasia type one gene (rod photoreceptor cGMP phosphodiesterase beta subunit (PDEB)) - a model for human retinitis pigmentosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clements, P.J.M.; Gregory, C.Y. [Univ. of London (United Kingdom); Petersen-Jones, S.M. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Rod-cone dysplasia type one (rod-1) is an early onset, autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy segregating in the Irish setter breed. It is a model for certain forms of human autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) caused by mutations in the same gene, PDEB. We confirmed the codon 807 Trp to Stop mutation and were the first to show cosegregation of the mutant allele with disease in a pedigree. We believe that this currently represents the best animal model available for some aspects of arRP, since canine tissues are relatively easy to access compared to human and yet the canine eye is of comparable size, unlike that of the rd mouse. This facilitates therapeutic intervention particularly at the subretinal level. In order to more fully investigate this model we have been characterizing the PDEB gene in the normal dog. Using PCR we have partially mapped the intron/exon structure, demonstrating a very high degree of evolutionary conservation with the mouse and human genes. RT-PCR has been used to reveal expression in a variety of neural and non-neural tissues. A PCR product spanning exons 19 to 22 (which also contains the site for the rcd-1 mutation) is detected in retina but also in tissues such as visual cortex, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, lateral geniculate nucleus, adrenal gland, lung, kidney and ovary. All of these tissues gave a negative result with primers for rds/peripherin, a gene which is expressed in rods and cones. This raises interesting questions about the regulation of PDEB transcripts which is initially being investigated by Northern analysis. In addition, anchored PCR techniques have generated upstream genomic sequences and we are currently mapping the 5{prime} extent of the mRNA transcript in the retina. This will facilitate the analysis of potential upstream promoter elements involved in directing expression.

  4. Human organic anion transporting polypeptide 1A2 (OATP1A2) mediates cellular uptake of all-trans-retinol in human retinal pigmented epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ting; Zhu, Ling; Madigan, Michele C; Wang, Ke; Shen, Weiyong; Gillies, Mark C; Zhou, Fanfan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Vision depends on retinoid exchange between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptors. Defects in any step of the canonical visual cycle can lead to retinal degenerations. All-trans-retinol (atROL) plays an important role in visual signal transduction. However, how atROL enters human RPE from the apical membrane remains unclear. This study investigated the role of human organic anion transporting polypeptide 1A2 (OATP1A2) in atROL uptake in human RPE. Experimental Approach Immunoblotting and immunostaining elucidated the expression and localization of OATP1A2 in human RPE. Transporter functional studies were conducted to assess the interaction of OATP1A2 with atROL. Key Results Our study revealed OATP1A2 is expressed in human RPE, mainly at the apical membrane. Our data also indicated atROL inhibited the uptake of the typical OATP1A2 substrate, oestrone-3-sulfate (E3S), in over-expressing cells. Studies on the uptake of 3H-atROL in these over-expressing cells revealed atROL is a substrate of OATP1A2. We confirmed these findings in human primary RPE cells. The transport of E3S and atROL was significantly reduced in human primary RPE cells with OATP1A2 siRNA silencing. Conclusion and Implications Our data provides the first evidence of OATP1A2 expression in human RPE and more importantly, its novel role in the cellular uptake of atROL, which might be essential to the proper functioning of the canonical visual cycle. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in retinoid transport between the RPE and photoreceptors and provide novel insights into potential pharmaceutical interventions for visual cycle disruption associated with retinal degenerations. PMID:25560245

  5. Linking Microbiota to Human Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Tremaroli, Valentina; Bäckhed, F

    2015-01-01

    The human gut microbiota encompasses a densely populated ecosystem that provides essential functions for host development, immune maturation, and metabolism. Alterations to the gut microbiota have been observed in numerous diseases, including human metabolic diseases such as obesity, type 2...... may disentangle some of the mechanistic details in the complex interactions of diet, microbiota, and host metabolism and may provide testable hypotheses for advancing our current understanding of human-microbiota interaction....... diabetes (T2D), and irritable bowel syndrome, and some animal experiments have suggested causality. However, few studies have validated causality in humans and the underlying mechanisms remain largely to be elucidated. We discuss how systems biology approaches combined with new experimental technologies...

  6. MULTIMODAL IMAGING OF DISEASE-ASSOCIATED PIGMENTARY CHANGES IN RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerch, Kaspar; Marsiglia, Marcela; Lee, Winston; Tsang, Stephen H; Sparrow, Janet R

    2016-12-01

    Using multiple imaging modalities, we evaluated the changes in photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) that are associated with bone spicule-shaped melanin pigmentation in retinitis pigmentosa. In a cohort of 60 patients with retinitis pigmentosa, short-wavelength autofluorescence, near-infrared autofluorescence (NIR-AF), NIR reflectance, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and color fundus images were studied. Central AF rings were visible in both short-wavelength autofluorescence and NIR-AF images. Bone spicule pigmentation was nonreflective in NIR reflectance, hypoautofluorescent with short-wavelength autofluorescence and NIR-AF imaging, and presented as intraretinal hyperreflective foci in spectral domain optical coherence tomography images. In areas beyond the AF ring outer border, the photoreceptor ellipsoid zone band was absent in spectral domain optical coherence tomography and the visibility of choroidal vessels in short-wavelength autofluorescence, NIR-AF, and NIR reflectance images was indicative of reduced RPE pigmentation. Choroidal visibility was most pronounced in the zone approaching peripheral areas of bone spicule pigmentation; here RPE/Bruch membrane thinning became apparent in spectral domain optical coherence tomography. These findings are consistent with a process by which RPE cells vacate their monolayer and migrate into inner retina in response to photoreceptor cell degeneration. The remaining RPE spread undergo thinning and consequently become less pigmented. An explanation for the absence of NIR-AF melanin signal in relation to bone spicule pigmentation is not forthcoming.

  7. Metabolic bone disease and central retinal degeneration in a kitten due to nutritional inadequacy of an all-meat raw diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Lenox

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A 5-month-old castrated male Sphynx kitten presented with left hindlimb lameness shortly after adoption. Prior to adoption, the breeder had fed the kitten an exclusively raw chicken diet. Radiographs revealed generalized osteopenia and a left tibia–fibula fracture. Ophthalmic examination revealed corneal vascularization and opacity in the right eye, and lesions suggestive of feline central retinal degeneration in the left eye. The patient’s diagnoses included metabolic bone disease and feline central retinal degeneration, which can result from taurine deficiency. The kitten’s nutritional diseases were managed with a complete and balanced canned diet designed for kitten growth and with taurine supplementation.

  8. Metabolic bone disease and central retinal degeneration in a kitten due to nutritional inadequacy of an all-meat raw diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenox, Catherine; Becvarova, Iveta; Archipow, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    A 5-month-old castrated male Sphynx kitten presented with left hindlimb lameness shortly after adoption. Prior to adoption, the breeder had fed the kitten an exclusively raw chicken diet. Radiographs revealed generalized osteopenia and a left tibia-fibula fracture. Ophthalmic examination revealed corneal vascularization and opacity in the right eye, and lesions suggestive of feline central retinal degeneration in the left eye. The patient's diagnoses included metabolic bone disease and feline central retinal degeneration, which can result from taurine deficiency. The kitten's nutritional diseases were managed with a complete and balanced canned diet designed for kitten growth and with taurine supplementation.

  9. Case report: Aqueous and Vitreous amino-acid concentrations in a patient with maple syrup urine disease operated on rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakis, Menelaos G; Michelakakis, Helen; Petrou, Petros; Koutsandrea, Chrysanthi; Georgalas, Ilias

    2016-10-03

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare metabolic disorder, affecting the metabolism of branched chain amino-acids (Valine, Leukine, Isoleukine). We present a rare case of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) in a MSUD patient. We performed amino acid analysis of aqueous humour, vitreous and serum samples obtained during surgery from a 24 year old female MSUD patient successfully operated on RRD. Serum values for a-amino-butyric acid, valine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, ornithine and histidine were low, while values for citrulline, methionine and lysine were borderline low, all attributed to the patient's special diet. Serum glutamate was above normal, probably due to the breakdown of glutamine to glutamate. In the aqueous and vitreous the amino acids implicated in MSUD (Valine, Leukine Isoleukine), were within normal range. Glutamate was absent in the vitreous and presented low levels in the aqueous. Glutamate has been reported to play an important role in retinal damage. Elevated glutamate levels have been reported in vitreous specimens from patients subjected to vitrectomy or buckling surgery for RRD. In MSUD, glutamate has been implicated in the pathogenesis of brain damage. Low levels of glutamate have been observed in the cerebellum of experimental MSUD animals, as well as postmortem brain tissue from a child that died of leucine intoxication. The reduction was attributed to the elevation of a-ketoisocaproic which reverses the net direction of nitrogen flow. It could be argued that this could impact on amino acid concentration in aqueous and vitreous fluids. Although no definite conclusions can be drawn by this extremely rare case, the low vitreous and aqueous levels of Glutamate is an interesting finding. Further studies are needed to provide a better insight in the role of amino acids as neurotransmitters in the human eye in health and disease.

  10. Scanning laser polarimetry and spectral domain optical coherence tomography for the detection of retinal changes in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemplewitz, Birthe; Keserü, Matthias; Bittersohl, Diana; Buhmann, Carsten; Skevas, Christos; Richard, Gisbert; Hassenstein, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Whether retinal degeneration is part of the degenerative processes in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) is still unclear. This cross-sectional study was undertaken to compare the retinal morphology of patients with PD and healthy controls using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and scanning laser polarimetry (SLP). Both eyes of patients with PD (n = 108) and healthy controls (n = 165) were examined using SD-OCT and SLP on the same day. Data on the thickness of the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) of all quadrants and the macular area were acquired by OCT (Cirrus, Zeiss). The SLP device (Glaucoma diagnostics (GDx), Zeiss) measured the RNFL and calculated the nerve fibre index (NFI). All patients and probands were checked for concomitant ocular disorders by an ophthalmologist. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure (IOP), objective refraction and the anterior and posterior segment were assessed. Patients with PD showed a reduced macular volume and a reduced central subfield thickness in OCT examinations. The RNFL in the different quadrants did not differ significantly from that of controls. SLP data showed a reduced average RNFL thickness, a decreased thickness of the inferior quadrant and an increase of the NFI in patients with PD. PD may be associated with reduced thickness and volume of the macula and a reduced thickness of the RNFL in the inferior quadrant of the retina. Investigations using SD-OCT and SLP revealed distinct but significant differences between patients with PD and healthy controls. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Long-term consequences of developmental vascular defects on retinal vessel homeostasis and function in a mouse model of Norrie disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne C Beck

    Full Text Available Loss of Norrin signalling due to mutations in the Norrie disease pseudoglioma gene causes severe vascular defects in the retina, leading to visual impairment and ultimately blindness. While the emphasis of experimental work so far was on the developmental period, we focus here on disease mechanisms that induce progression into severe adult disease. The goal of this study was the comprehensive analysis of the long-term effects of the absence of Norrin on vascular homeostasis and retinal function. In a mouse model of Norrie disease retinal vascular morphology and integrity were studied by means of in vivo angiography; the vascular constituents were assessed in detailed histological analyses using quantitative retinal morphometry. Finally, electroretinographic analyses were performed to assess the retinal function in adult Norrin deficient animals. We could show that the primary developmental defects not only persisted but developed into further vascular abnormalities and microangiopathies. In particular, the overall vessel homeostasis, the vascular integrity, and also the cellular constituents of the vascular wall were affected in the adult Norrin deficient retina. Moreover, functional analyses indicated to persistent hypoxia in the neural retina which was suggested as one of the major driving forces of disease progression. In summary, our data provide evidence that the key to adult Norrie disease are ongoing vascular modifications, driven by the persistent hypoxic conditions, which are ineffective to compensate for the primary Norrin-dependent defects.

  12. HYPERREFLECTIVE FOCI AS AN INDEPENDENT VISUAL OUTCOME PREDICTOR IN MACULAR EDEMA DUE TO RETINAL VASCULAR DISEASES TREATED WITH INTRAVITREAL DEXAMETHASONE OR RANIBIZUMAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatziralli, Irini P; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Sivaprasad, Sobha

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the potential role of hyperreflective foci (HF) in predicting visual outcome in patients undergoing treatment for macular edema due to retinal vascular diseases. Data and images of 92 patients with macular edema due to diabetes mellitus or branch retinal vein occlusion, treated with either intravitreal dexamethasone implant or ranibizumab, were analyzed. All patients underwent best-corrected visual acuity measurement, slit-lamp examination, spectral domain optical coherence tomography at baseline and at all time points of the follow-up (Month 1, 2, 3, 6, and 9). Generalized least squares random effects linear or logistic regression analysis was used to investigate potential factors associated with the final best-corrected visual acuity and number of HF, respectively. Increasing age (P edema due to retinal vascular diseases. Similar reductions in HF are achieved by intravitreal steroid and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agent.

  13. Identification of a disease-causing mutation in a Chinese patient with retinitis pigmentosa by targeted next-generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Jianping; Guo, Xueqin; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    disease-causing mutations. Sanger sequencing was performed on all subjects to confirm the candidate mutations and assess cosegregation within the family. Results: Clinical examinations of the proband showed typical characteristics of RP. Three candidate heterozygous mutations in 3 genes associated with RP...... were detected in the proband by targeted NGS. The 3 mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and the deletion (c.357_358delAA) in PRPF31 was shown to cosegregate with RP phenotype in 7 affected family members, but not in 3 unaffected family members. Conclusions: The deletion (c.357_358del......Purpose: To identify disease-causing mutations in a Chinese patient with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods: A detailed clinical examination was performed on the proband. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) combined with bioinformatics analysis was performed on the proband to detect candidate...

  14. Rodent models for human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Thierry F

    2015-07-15

    One of the factors limiting the translation of knowledge from preclinical studies to the clinic has been the limitations of in vivo diseases models. Except in the case of highly controlled and regulated clinical trials, geneticists and scientists do not use humans for their experimental investigations because of the obvious risk to life. Instead, they use various animal, fungal, bacterial, and plant species as model organisms for their studies. Amongst these model organisms, rodent models are the most used due to the easiness for the experiments and the possibility to modify genetically these model animals. Nevertheless, due to the fact that animal models typically do not contract the same genetic diseases as people, so scientists must alter their genomes to induce human disease states and to know what kind of mutation causes the disease. In this brief review, we will discuss the interests of rodent models that have been developed to simulate human pathologies, focusing in models that employ xenografts and genetic modification. Within the framework of genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models, we will review some of the current genetic strategies for modeling diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Laser interferential diagnostics of retinal visual acuity of the human eye with cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussky, Anatoly A.; Ryabukho, Vladimir P.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Akchurin, Garif G.; Bakutkin, Valery V.; Radchenko, Elena Y.; Nazaryants, Vitaly

    1999-04-01

    In the paper theoretical and experimental study of forming of interference pattern with a high contrast at the retina cataractous eye is presented. The high contrast of retinal fringes is reached by control of the parameters of incident beam with regular interference fringes. Experimental result have been done for the model objects that can be described in the framework of 'random phase screen' approximation. Some recommendations for clinical application are suggested.

  16. Analysis of retinal pigment epithelium integrin expression and adhesion to aged submacular human Bruch's membrane.

    OpenAIRE

    Zarbin, Marco A.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Uncultured aged retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) does not resurface aged Bruch's membrane after 24 hours in organ culture. These experiments assess whether culturing alters RPE integrin expression and resurfacing of Bruch's membrane. METHODS: RNA was isolated from uncultured and cultured RPE of aged adult donor and fetal eyes. Integrin subunit messenger RNA (mRNA) expression was studied by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and semiquantitative analysis of the a...

  17. Human Müller Glia with Stem Cell Characteristics Differentiate into Retinal Ganglion Cell (RGC) Precursors In Vitro and Partially Restore RGC Function In Vivo Following Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Singhal, Shweta; Bhatia, Bhairavi; Jayaram, Hari; Becker, Silke; Jones, Megan F.; Cottrill, Phillippa B.; Khaw, Peng T.; Salt, Thomas E.; Limb, G. Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Müller glia with stem cell characteristics have been identified in the adult human eye, and although there is no evidence that they regenerate retina in vivo, they can be induced to grow and differentiate into retinal neurons in vitro. We differentiated human Müller stem cells into retinal ganglion cell (RGC) precursors by stimulation with fibroblast growth factor 2 together with NOTCH inhibition using the γ-secretase inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl e...

  18. cDNA sequence and gene locus of the human retinal phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase-C{beta}4 (PLCB4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, R.A.; Ghalayini, A.J.; Anderson, R.E. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Defects in the Drosophila norpA (no receptor potential A) gene encoding a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) block invertebrate phototransduction and lead to retinal degeneration. The mammalian homolog, PLCB4, is expressed in rat brain, bovine cerebellum, and the bovine retina in several splice variants. To determine a possible role of PLCB4 gene defects in human disease, we isolated several overlapping cDNA clones from a human retina library. The composite cDNA sequence predicts a human PLC{beta}4 polypeptide of 1022 amino acid residues (MW 117,000). This PLC{beta}4 variant lacks a 165-amino-acid N-terminal domain characteristic for the rat brain isoforms, but has a distinct putative exon 1 unique for human and bovine retina isoforms. A PLC{beta}4 monospecific antibody detected a major (130 kDa) and a minor (160 kDa) isoform in retina homogenates. Somatic cell hybrids and deletion panels were used to localize the PCLB4 gene to the short arm of chromosome 20. The gene was further sublocalized to 20p12 by florescence in situ hybridization. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Cytomegalovirus Retinitis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Alexander D; Orlin, Anton; Kiss, Szilard; Patel, Sarju; D'Amico, Donald J; Gupta, Mrinali P

    2017-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a ubiquitous DNA herpes virus that causes significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals. CMV retinitis is a potentially blinding manifestation of CMV infection that was commonly seen in advanced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the era before modern combination antiretroviral therapy era, but is also recognized in patients with immune deficiency from multiple causes. The advent of and advances in antiretroviral therapies for human immunodeficiency virus have decreased the incidence of CMV retinitis by over 90% among AIDS patients, and improved visual outcomes in those affected. The diagnosis is generally a clinical one, and treatment modalities include systemic and intravitreal antiviral medications. Retinal detachment and immune recovery uveitis are sight-threatening complications of CMV retinitis that require specific treatments.

  20. Foveomacular retinitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuming, B S

    1986-01-01

    A group of patients is described who developed the clinical features of foveomacular retinitis. No causative factors were isolated, and all patients strongly denied any type of sun gazing. It is possible that there is a group of patients who have the features of foveomacular retinitis but have not had any direct exposure to the sun. These patients would then constitute a primary type of foveomacular retinitis, as opposed to a secondary type which has a known cause and is synonymous with solar...

  1. Acute blindness in dogs: sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome versus neurological disease (140 cases, 2000-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Keith W; van der Woerdt, Alexandra; Cottrill, Nancy B

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate dogs with amaurosis and compare signalment, history, ophthalmic examination and neurologic abnormalities between dogs diagnosed with sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) versus neurological disease (ND). Animals Studied-140 dogs with acute vision loss and ocular abnormalities insufficient to account for visual deficits. An electroretinogram (ERG) was performed on each dog. Medical records were reviewed and information was collected for all dogs meeting the inclusion criteria. Dogs diagnosed with SARDS were compared to those with ND based on signalment, duration of clinical signs, past medical problems, clinicopathologic findings, and ophthalmic and physical examination abnormalities. 120 dogs were diagnosed with SARDS and 20 dogs with ND based on ERG results. Mixed-breed dogs were most commonly diagnosed with SARDS as well as ND. Pure breed dogs frequently diagnosed with SARDS included the Miniature Schnauzer and Dachshund. Dogs with SARDS did not differ significantly from those with ND based on age or sex distribution. Cushing's-like symptoms were reported more frequently in SARDS dogs as well as conjunctival hyperemia and retinal vascular attenuation. Papilledema and asymmetric visual deficits were observed more frequently in dogs with ND. Dogs with ND were no more likely than SARDS dogs to have additional neurological deficits. Appreciable overlap of clinical signs exists between dogs with SARDS and dogs with ND resulting in acute vision loss. As a significant portion of dogs (14%) in the present study were diagnosed with ND, an ERG to rule out ND is indicated in dogs with amaurosis.

  2. Cue-dependent memory-based smooth-pursuit in normal human subjects: importance of extra-retinal mechanisms for initial pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Norie; Barnes, Graham R; Fukushima, Junko; Fukushima, Kikuro; Warabi, Tateo

    2013-08-01

    Using a cue-dependent memory-based smooth-pursuit task previously applied to monkeys, we examined the effects of visual motion-memory on smooth-pursuit eye movements in normal human subjects and compared the results with those of the trained monkeys. These results were also compared with those during simple ramp-pursuit that did not require visual motion-memory. During memory-based pursuit, all subjects exhibited virtually no errors in either pursuit-direction or go/no-go selection. Tracking eye movements of humans and monkeys were similar in the two tasks, but tracking eye movements were different between the two tasks; latencies of the pursuit and corrective saccades were prolonged, initial pursuit eye velocity and acceleration were lower, peak velocities were lower, and time to reach peak velocities lengthened during memory-based pursuit. These characteristics were similar to anticipatory pursuit initiated by extra-retinal components during the initial extinction task of Barnes and Collins (J Neurophysiol 100:1135-1146, 2008b). We suggest that the differences between the two tasks reflect differences between the contribution of extra-retinal and retinal components. This interpretation is supported by two further studies: (1) during popping out of the correct spot to enhance retinal image-motion inputs during memory-based pursuit, pursuit eye velocities approached those during simple ramp-pursuit, and (2) during initial blanking of spot motion during memory-based pursuit, pursuit components appeared in the correct direction. Our results showed the importance of extra-retinal mechanisms for initial pursuit during memory-based pursuit, which include priming effects and extra-retinal drive components. Comparison with monkey studies on neuronal responses and model analysis suggested possible pathways for the extra-retinal mechanisms.

  3. Hereditary retinal eye diseases in childhood and youth affecting the central retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M Nentwich

    2013-01-01

    Classic examinations for patients suffering from hereditary retinal dystrophies of the central retina are funduscopy - also using red-free light - visual-field tests, electrophysiologic tests as electro-retinogram [ERG] and multifocal ERG and tests evaluating color vision. Recently, new imaging modalities have been introduced into the clinical practice. The significance of these new methods such as high-resolution spectral-domain optic coherence tomography [SD-OCT] and fundus autofluorescence will be discussed as well as "next generation sequencing" as a new method for the analysis of genetic mutations in a larger number of patients.

  4. Epiretinal transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells rescues retinal and vision function in a rat model of retinal degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Tzameret

    2015-09-01

    Our findings suggest that transplantation of hBM-MSCs as a thin epiretinal layer is effective for treatment of retinal degeneration in RCS rats, and that transplanting the cells in close proximity to the retina enhances hBM-MSC therapeutic effect compared with intravitreal injection.

  5. Stem Cell Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium : The Role of Pigmentation as Maturation Marker and Gene Expression Profile Comparison with Human Endogenous Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennis, A; Jacobs, J G; Catsburg, L A E; Ten Brink, J B; Koster, C; Schlingemann, R O; van Meurs, J; Gorgels, T G M F; Moerland, P D; Heine, V M; Bergen, A A

    2017-01-01

    In age-related macular degeneration (AMD) the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) deteriorates, leading to photoreceptor decay and severe vision loss. New therapeutic strategies aim at RPE replacement by transplantation of pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived RPE. Several protocols to generate RPE have

  6. Retinal Layers Changes in Human Preclinical and Early Clinical Diabetic Retinopathy Support Early Retinal Neuronal and Müller Cells Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Vujosevic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the changes in thickness of individual inner and outer macular and peripapillary retinal layers in diabetes. Methods. 124 subjects (124 eyes were enrolled: 74 diabetics and 50 controls. Macular edema, proliferative diabetic retinopathy (DR, any intraocular treatment and refractive error >6 diopters were the main exclusion criteria. Full ophthalmic examination, stereoscopic fundus photography, and spectral domain-OCT were performed. After automatic retinal segmentation (layering in 5 layers, the thickness of each layer was calculated, and values compared among groups. Results. Thirty patients had no DR, 44 patients had non proliferative DR. A significant increase of inner plexiform and nuclear layers was found in DR eyes versus controls (P<0.001. A significant decrease (P<0.01 of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL and at specific sites of retinal ganglion cell layer (P=0.02 was documented in the macula. In the peripapillary area there were no differences between diabetics and controls. Conclusions. Decreased RNFL thickness and increased INL/OPL thickness in diabetics without DR or with initial DR suggest early alterations in the inner retina. On the contrary, the outer retina seems not to be affected at early stages of DM. Automatic intraretinal layering by SD-OCT may be a useful tool to diagnose and monitor early intraretinal changes in DR.

  7. Influences of placental growth factor on mouse retinal vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Vanessa R; Tayade, Chandrakant; Carmeliet, Peter; Croy, B Anne

    2017-09-01

    Placental growth factor (PGF) is important for wound-healing and vascular collaterogenesis. PGF deficiency is associated with preeclampsia, a hypertensive disease of human pregnancy. Offspring born to preeclamptic mothers display cognitive impairments and brain vascular and neurostructural deviations. Low PGF production during development may contribute to alterations in offspring cerebrovascular beds. Retina is a readily accessible part of the central nervous system with a well-described pattern of vascular development in mice. Impacts of PGF deficiency were addressed during mouse retinal vascularization. Retinal vessels were compared between Pgf-/- and congenic C57BL/6 (B6) mice. PGF deficiency altered neonatal retinal vascularization patterns. Some anatomic alterations persisted into adulthood, particularly in males. Greater arterial wall collagen IV expression was found in adult Pgf-/- females. Pregnancy (studied in adult females at gestational days 11.5 or 18.5) induced subtle changes upon the mother's retinal vasculature but these pregnancy-induced changes did not differ between genotypes. Significant sex-related differences occurred between adult male and female B6 although sexually dimorphic retinal vascular differences were absent in B6 neonates. Overall, PGF has a role in retinal vascular angiogenesis and vessel organization during development but does not affect retinal vessel adaptations in adult females during pregnancy. Developmental Dynamics 246:700-712, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Herpesviruses in human periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, A; Slots, J

    2000-02-01

    Recent studies have identified various herpesviruses in human periodontal disease. Epstein-Barr virus type 1 (EBV-1) infects periodontal B-lymphocytes and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infects periodontal monocytes/ macrophages and T-lymphocytes. EBV-1, HCMV and other herpesviruses are present more frequently in periodontitis lesions and acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis-lesions than in gingivitis or periodontally healthy sites. Reactivation of HCMV in periodontitis lesions tends to be associated with progressing periodontal disease. Herpesvirus-associated periodontitis lesions harbor elevated levels of periodontopathic bacteria, including Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteriodes forsythus, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens and Treponema denticola. It may be that active periodontal herpesvirus infection impairs periodontal defenses, thereby permitting subgingival overgrowth of periodontopathic bacteria. Alteration between latent and active herpesvirus infection in the periodontium might lead to transient local immunosuppression and explain in part the episodic progressive nature of human periodontitis. Tissue tropism of herpesvirus infections might help explain the localized pattern of tissue destruction in periodontitis. Absence of herpesvirus infection or viral reactivation might explain why some individuals carry periodontopathic bacteria while still maintaining periodontal health. Further studies are warranted to delineate whether the proposed herpesvirus-periodontopathic bacteria model might account for some of the pathogenic features of human periodontal disease.

  9. Clinical research on intravitreal injection of bevacizumab in the treatment of macula lutea and retinal edema of ocular fundus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ying; Wang, Tao; Cao, Jing; Wang, Meng; Li, Fenghua

    2015-07-01

    This paper aimed to explore clinically curative effect of intravitreal injection of bevacizumab in the treatment of macula lutea and retinal edema of ocular fundus disease. The number of 300 patients (390 eyes) with ocular fundus diseases including retinal vein occlusion (RVO), diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC), choridal new vessel (CNV) received and cured in the hospital from February 2010 to February 2014 were given intravitreal injection of bevacizumab (1.5mg) with once per month and a total of 2-3 times. Results of patients' vision and fluorescence fundus angiography (FFA), optical coherence tomography (OCT) before and after treatment were compared and curative effects were evaluated. Vision of 349 eyes (89.49%) improved obviously with the average of more than 2 lines, patient's intraocular pressure (IOP) was normal and all indexes were clearly better; vision of 26 eyes (6.67%) was stable before the treatment and without any changes after the treatment, the situation of fundus got better without increased IOP; vision of 15 eyes (3.85%) decreased to some extent, and the symptoms eased slightly after symptomatic treatment. In the 1st day after intravitreal injection, best-corrected visual acuity increased to 0.239±0.175, best-corrected visual acuity in 1 m was 0.315±0.182, in 3m continuously climbed to 0.350±0.270, and in 6 m was 0.362±0.282. Compared with vision before injection, t value was t=3.184, t=7.213, t=9.274 and t=9.970 (P=0.002, P=0.000, P=0.000 and P=0.000) respectively, and all P were less than 0.01. Furthermore, the difference was significant if a=0.01, which could confirm that 1m best corrected visual acuity of patients after intravitreal injection improved clearly in combination with before injection and 3m and 6 m visions enhanced constantly after injection. To sum up, intravitreal injection of bevacizumab in treating ocular fundus disease improves patient's vision

  10. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Characterization of Retinal Disease Progression in a 1-Year Longitudinal Study of Eyes With Mild Nonproliferative Retinopathy in Diabetes Type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, Luisa; Bandello, Francesco; Tejerina, Amparo Navea; Vujosevic, Stela; Varano, Monica; Egan, Catherine; Sivaprasad, Sobha; Menon, Geeta; Massin, Pascale; Verbraak, Frank D.; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Martinez, Jose P.; Jürgens, Ignasi; Smets, Erica; Coriat, Caroline; Wiedemann, Peter; Ágoas, Victor; Querques, Giuseppe; Holz, Frank G.; Nunes, Sandrina; Neves, Catarina; Cunha-Vaz, José; Ribeiro, Luísa; Figueira, João; Pires, Isabel; Leal, Sérgio; Simão, Silvia; Santos, Ana Rita; Simões, Isabel; Souied, Eric H.; Boston, Hayley; Degli Esposti, Simona; Rocco, Vincent; Mathysen, Danny G. P.; Erginay, Ali; Fleckenstein, Monika; Cacciamani, Andrea; Parravano, Mariacristina; Cosimi, Pamela; Mourits, M.; Schlingemann, R. O.; Wezel, M.; Jansen-Kok, C.; Althoff, A.; de Vries, D.; Stam, M.; Jochmann, Claudia; Koch, Christian; Vollhardt, Daniela; Tilgner, Christina; Pinto, Gama; Camacho, Pedro; Vila, Daniel; Morilla, Antonio; Gonzalez, Lluis; Martínez, Victor; Pedrós, Gemma; García, Mireia; Aradilla, Yolanda; Martínez, Alexia; Escudé, Raimon; Midena, Edoardo; Martini, Ferdinando; Urban, Francesca; Daniele, Anna Rita; Martinez, Jose; Fernandez-Lopez, Ester; Fandiño, Adriana; Carmen, M.; Jord, Pablo Perez; Chandran, Manju; North, Lorraine; Robson, Deana; Chekuri, Maheswari; Lattanzio, Rosangela; del Turco, Claudia; Alto, Giorgio; Buzzotta, Alessio; Marelli, Marta; Ribecca, Antonella; Crosby-Nwaobi, Roxanne; Schwartz, Christian; Pita, Rui; Ecsodi, Joana; Simões, Sónia; Costa, Miguel; Martinho, Cecília; Fernandes, Rita

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE. To identify eyes of patients with diabetes type 2 that show progression of retinal disease within a 1-year period using noninvasive techniques. METHODS. Three hundred seventy-four type 2 diabetic patients with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy

  12. Correlation between Interleukin-6 and Thrombin-Antithrombin III Complex Levels in Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Rita; Zahavi, Alon; Axer-Siegel, Ruth; Budnik, Ivan; Dreznik, Ayelet; Dahbash, Mor; Nisgav, Yael; Megiddo, Elinor; Kenet, Gili; Weinberger, Dov; Livnat, Tami

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate and correlate the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT) in the vitreous of patients with different vitreoretinal pathologies. Vitreous samples were collected from 78 patients scheduled for pars plana vitrectomy at a tertiary medical center. Patients were divided by the underlying vitreoretinal pathophysiology, as follows: macular hole (MH)/epiretinal membrane (ERM) (n = 26); rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) (n = 32); and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) (n = 20). Levels of IL-6 and TAT were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and compared among the groups. A significant difference was found in the vitreal IL-6 and TAT levels between the MH/ERM group and both the PDR and RRD groups (P < 0.001 for all). Diabetes was associated with higher IL-6 levels in the RRD group. Different relationships between the IL-6 and TAT levels were revealed in patients with different ocular pathologies. Our results imply that variations in vitreal TAT level may be attributable not only to an inflammatory reaction or blood-retinal barrier breakdown, but also to intraocular tissue-dependent regulation of thrombin.

  13. Multi-nucleate retinal pigment epithelium cells of the human macula exhibit a characteristic and highly specific distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnes, Austin C; Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Sloan, Kenneth R; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Smith, R Theodore; Curcio, Christine A; Ach, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is reportedly 3% bi-nucleated. The importance to human vision of multi-nucleated (MN)-RPE cells could be clarified with more data about their distribution in central retina. Nineteen human RPE-flatmounts (9 ≤ 51 years, 10 > 80 years) were imaged at 12 locations: 3 eccentricities (fovea, perifovea, near periphery) in 4 quadrants (superior, inferior, temporal, nasal). Image stacks of lipofuscin-attributable autofluorescence and phalloidin labeled F-actin cytoskeleton were obtained using a confocal fluorescence microscope. Nuclei were devoid of autofluorescence and were marked using morphometric software. Cell areas were approximated by Voronoi regions. Mean number of nuclei per cell among eccentricity/quadrant groups and by age were compared using Poisson and binominal regression models. A total of 11,403 RPE cells at 200 locations were analyzed: 94.66% mono-, 5.31% bi-, 0.02% tri-nucleate, and 0.01% with 5 nuclei. Age had no effect on number of nuclei. There were significant regional differences: highest frequencies of MN-cells were found at the perifovea (9.9%) and near periphery (6.8%). The fovea lacked MN-cells almost entirely. The nasal quadrant had significantly more MN-cells compared to other quadrants, at all eccentricities. This study demonstrates MN-RPE cells in human macula. MN-cells may arise due to endoreplication, cell fusion, or incomplete cell division. The topography of MN-RPE cells follows the topography of photoreceptors; with near-absence at the fovea (cones only) and high frequency at perifovea (highest rod density). This distribution might reflect specific requirements of retinal metabolism or other mechanisms addressable in further studies.

  14. Characterization and mapping of the human rhodopsin kinase gene and screening of the gene for mutations in patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khani, S.C.; Lin, D.; Magovcevic, I. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Rhodopsin kinase (RK) is a cytosolic enzyme in rod photoreceptors that initiates the deactivation of the phototransductions cascade by phosphorylating photoactivated rhodopsin. Although the cDNA sequence of bovine RK has been determined previously, no human cDNA or genomic sequence has thus far been available for genetic studies. In order to investigate the possible role of this candidate gene in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and allied diseases, we have isolated and characterized human cDNA and genomic clones derived from the RK locus. The coding sequence of the human gene is 1692 nucleotides in length and is split into seven exons. The human and the bovine sequence show 84% identity at the nucleotide level and 92% identity at the amino acid level. Thus far, the intronic sequences flanking each exon except for one have been determined. We have also mapped the human RK gene to chromosome 13q34 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. To our knowledge, no RP gene has as yet been linked to this region. However, since the substrate for RK (rhodopsin) and other members of the phototransduction cascade have been implicated in the pathogenesis of RP, it is conceivable that defects in RK can also cause some forms of this disease. We are evaluating this possibility by screening DNA from 173 patients with autosomal recessive RP and 190 patients with autosomal dominant RP. So far, we have found 11 patients with variant bands. In one patient with autosomal dominant RP we discovered the missense change Ser536Leu. Cosegregation studies and further sequencing of the variant bands are currently underway.

  15. Novel Lipofuscin Bisretinoids Prominent in Human Retina and in a Model of Recessive Stargardt Disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yalin; Fishkin, Nathan E.; Pande, Ajay; Pande, Jayanti; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2009-01-01

    Bisretinoid adducts accumulate as lipofuscin in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells of the eye and are implicated in the pathology of inherited and age-related macular degeneration. Characterization of the bisretinoids A2E and the all-trans-retinal dimer series has shown that these pigments form from reactions in photoreceptor cell outer segments that involve all-trans-retinal, the product of photoisomerization of the visual chromophore 11-cis-retinal. Here we have identified two related but previously unknown RPE lipofuscin compounds. By high performance liquid chromatography-elec tro spray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry, we determined that the first of these compounds is a phosphatidyl-dihydropyridine bisretinoid; to indicate this structure and its formation from two vitamin A-aldehyde (A2), we will refer to it as A2-dihydropyridine-phosphatidyleth a nol amine (A2-DHP-PE). The second pigment, A2-dihydropyridine-eth a nol amine, forms from phosphate hydrolysis of A2-DHP-PE. The structure of A2-DHP-PE was corroborated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory confirmed the presence of a dihydropyridine ring. This lipofuscin pigment is a fluorescent compound with absorbance maxima at ∼490 and 330 nm, and it was identified in human, mouse, and bovine eyes. We found that A2-DHP-PE forms in reaction mixtures of all-trans-retinal and phosphatidyleth a nol amine, and in mouse eyecups we observed an age-related accumulation. As compared with wild-type mice, A2-DHP-PE is more abundant in mice with a null mutation in Abca4 (ATP-binding cassette transporter 4), the gene causative for recessive Stargardt macular degeneration. Efforts to clarify the composition of RPE lipofuscin are important because these compounds are targets of gene-based and drug therapies that aim to alleviate ABCA4-related retinal disease. PMID:19478335

  16. Novel lipofuscin bisretinoids prominent in human retina and in a model of recessive Stargardt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yalin; Fishkin, Nathan E; Pande, Ajay; Pande, Jayanti; Sparrow, Janet R

    2009-07-24

    Bisretinoid adducts accumulate as lipofuscin in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells of the eye and are implicated in the pathology of inherited and age-related macular degeneration. Characterization of the bisretinoids A2E and the all-trans-retinal dimer series has shown that these pigments form from reactions in photoreceptor cell outer segments that involve all-trans-retinal, the product of photoisomerization of the visual chromophore 11-cis-retinal. Here we have identified two related but previously unknown RPE lipofuscin compounds. By high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry, we determined that the first of these compounds is a phosphatidyl-dihydropyridine bisretinoid; to indicate this structure and its formation from two vitamin A-aldehyde (A2), we will refer to it as A2-dihydropyridine-phosphatidylethanolamine (A2-DHP-PE). The second pigment, A2-dihydropyridine-ethanolamine, forms from phosphate hydrolysis of A2-DHP-PE. The structure of A2-DHP-PE was corroborated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory confirmed the presence of a dihydropyridine ring. This lipofuscin pigment is a fluorescent compound with absorbance maxima at approximately 490 and 330 nm, and it was identified in human, mouse, and bovine eyes. We found that A2-DHP-PE forms in reaction mixtures of all-trans-retinal and phosphatidylethanolamine, and in mouse eyecups we observed an age-related accumulation. As compared with wild-type mice, A2-DHP-PE is more abundant in mice with a null mutation in Abca4 (ATP-binding cassette transporter 4), the gene causative for recessive Stargardt macular degeneration. Efforts to clarify the composition of RPE lipofuscin are important because these compounds are targets of gene-based and drug therapies that aim to alleviate ABCA4-related retinal disease.

  17. Targeting the cAMP and Transforming Growth Factor-β Pathway Increases Proliferation to Promote Re-Epithelialization of Human Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Parul; Gutteridge, Alex; Impey, Emma; Storer, R Ian; Owen, Robert M; Whiting, Paul J; Bictash, Magda; Benn, Caroline L

    2016-07-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell integrity is critical to the maintenance of retinal function. Many retinopathies such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are caused by the degeneration or malfunction of the RPE cell layer. Replacement of diseased RPE with healthy, stem cell-derived RPE is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating AMD. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) differentiated into RPE progeny have the potential to provide an unlimited supply of cells for transplantation, but challenges around scalability and efficiency of the differentiation process still remain. Using hESC-derived RPE as a cellular model, we sought to understand mechanisms that could be modulated to increase RPE yield after differentiation. We show that RPE epithelialization is a density-dependent process, and cells seeded at low density fail to epithelialize. We demonstrate that activation of the cAMP pathway increases proliferation of dissociated RPE in culture, in part through inhibition of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. This results in enhanced uptake of epithelial identity, even in cultures seeded at low density. In line with these findings, targeted manipulation of the TGF-β pathway with small molecules produces an increase in efficiency of RPE re-epithelialization. Taken together, these data highlight mechanisms that promote epithelial fate acquisition in stem cell-derived RPE. Modulation of these pathways has the potential to favorably impact scalability and clinical translation of hESC-derived RPE as a cell therapy. Stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is currently being evaluated as a cell-replacement therapy for macular degeneration. This work shows that the process of generating RPE in vitro is regulated by the cAMP and transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway. Modulation of these pathways by small molecules, as identified by phenotypic screening, leads to an increased efficiency of generating RPE cells with a higher

  18. Molecular features of interaction between VEGFA and anti-angiogenic drugs used in retinal diseases: a computational approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Bianca Maria Platania

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Anti-angiogenic agents are biological drugs used for treatment of retinal neovascular degenerative diseases. In this study, we aimed at in-silico analysis of interaction of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA, the main mediator of angiogenesis, with binding domains of anti-angiogenic agents used for treatment of retinal diseases, such as ranibizumab, bevacizumab and aflibercept. The analysis of anti-VEGF/VEGFA complexes was carried out by means of protein-protein docking and molecular dynamics (MD coupled to molecular mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA calculation. Molecular dynamics simulation was further analyzed by protein contact networks. Rough energetic evaluation with protein-protein docking scores revealed that aflibercept/VEGFA complex was characterized by electrostatic stabilization, whereas ranibizumab and bevacizumab complexes were stabilized by Van der Waals (VdW energy term; these results were confirmed by MM-PBSA. Comparison of MM-PBSA predicted energy terms with experimental binding parameters reported in literature indicated that the high association rate (Kon of aflibercept to VEGFA was consistent with high stabilizing electrostatic energy. On the other hand, the relatively low experimental dissociation rate (Koff of ranibizumab may be attributed to lower conformational fluctuations of the ranibizumab/VEGFA complex, higher number of contacts and hydrogen bonds in comparison to bevacizumab and aflibercept. Thus, the anti-angiogenic agents have been found to be considerably different both in terms of molecular interactions and stabilizing energy. Characterization of such features can improve the design of novel biological drugs potentially useful in clinical practice.

  19. [Alzheimer's disease and human memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustache, F; Giffard, B; Rauchs, G; Chételat, G; Piolino, P; Desgranges, B

    2006-10-01

    Memory disorders observed in Alzheimer's disease gave rise, from the eighties, to a detailed analysis into the framework of cognitive neuropsychology which aimed at describing the deficits of very specific processes. Beyond their clinical interest, these studies contributed to the modelisation of human memory thanks to the characterization of different memory systems and their relationships. The first part of this paper gives an overview of the memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease and insists on particular cognitive phenomena. Hence, several examples are developed in the domains of semantic memory (such as hyperpriming and hypopriming effects) and autobiographical memory. Recent results highlight the existence of severe autobiographical amnesia observed in all neurodegenerative diseases, though with contrasting profiles: Ribot's gradient in Alzheimer's disease (showing that remote memories are better preserved than recent ones), reverse gradient in semantic dementia and no clear gradient in the frontal variant of frontotemporal dementia. The second part of this article presents advances in cognitive neuroscience searching to disclose the cerebral substrates of these cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease. The studies using functional imaging techniques are the most informative regarding this problematic. While showing the dysfunctions of an extended network, they emphasize the selectivity of cerebral damages that are at the root of very specific cognitive dysfunctions, coming close in that way to the conceptions of cognitive neuropsychology. These neuroimaging studies unravel the existence of compensatory mechanisms, which until recently were clearly missing in the literature on neurodegenerative diseases. These different researches lead to a wide conception of human memory, not just limited to simple instrumental processes (encoding, storage, retrieval), but necessarily covering models of identity and continuity of the subject, which interact in a dynamic way

  20. Transfer RNA and human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A Abbott

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA genes are hotspots for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase, mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers, and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes. Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing. Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  1. Cytomegalovirus Retinitis in an Immunocompetent Pregnant Woman

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hemorrhage, retinal vasculitis with frosted branch angiitis pattern and multiple retinal hemorrhages can appear.[1] When the pattern is atypical, other ... this disease is frequently associated with a low cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4), below 50 cells/mm3, in AIDS patients.[1]. Here, we present a case of CMV retinitis in an.

  2. Reoperation for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment as quality indicator for disease management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajari, Javad N; Christensen, Ulrik; Kiilgaard, Jens F

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To establish a quality indicator that could be used in optimizing treatment for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). METHODS: The Danish National Patient Registry was used to identify surgery conducted in Denmark for RRD in the period 01 January 2001-31 December 2009. Cases were...... identified by diagnosis and surgical codes. RESULTS: A total of 6522 cases were operated for a primary RRD in the study period, and 22% (1434 patients) were reoperated for a redetachment. A Cox regression analysis showed that the risk of redetachment was equal to or less than detachment on the fellow eye 1...... year after primary surgery with techniques not using silicone oil. The same was true 1.5 years after surgery for techniques using silicone oil. Based on this, we established a quality indicator defining failure as the need for operation for redetachment within 1 year from initial surgery when using...

  3. Astrocyte-derived vascular endothelial growth factor stabilizes vessels in the developing retinal vasculature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Scott

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF plays a critical role in normal development as well as retinal vasculature disease. During retinal vascularization, VEGF is most strongly expressed by not yet vascularized retinal astrocytes, but also by retinal astrocytes within the developing vascular plexus, suggesting a role for retinal astrocyte-derived VEGF in angiogenesis and vessel network maturation. To test the role of astrocyte-derived VEGF, we used Cre-lox technology in mice to delete VEGF in retinal astrocytes during development. Surprisingly, this only had a minor impact on retinal vasculature development, with only small decreases in plexus spreading, endothelial cell proliferation and survival observed. In contrast, astrocyte VEGF deletion had more pronounced effects on hyperoxia-induced vaso-obliteration and led to the regression of smooth muscle cell-coated radial arteries and veins, which are usually resistant to the vessel-collapsing effects of hyperoxia. These results suggest that VEGF production from retinal astrocytes is relatively dispensable during development, but performs vessel stabilizing functions in the retinal vasculature and might be relevant for retinopathy of prematurity in humans.

  4. SERCA pumps and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovnanian, A

    2007-01-01

    Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (SER) Ca2+ ATPases represent a highly conserved family of Ca2+ pumps which actively transport Ca2+ from the cytosol to the SER against a large concentration gradient. In humans, 3 genes (ATP2A1-3) generate multiple isoforms (SERCAla,b, SERCA2a-c, SECA3a-f) by developmental or tissue-specific alternative splicing. These pumps differ by their regulatory and kinetic properties, allowing for optimized function in the tissue where they are expressed. They play a central role in calcium signalling through regenerating SER Ca2+ stores, maintaining appropriate Ca2+ levels in this organelle and shaping cytosolic and nuclear Ca2+ variations which govern cell response. Defects in ATP2A1 encoding SERCA1 cause recessive Brody myopathy, mutations in ATP2A2 coding for SERCA2 underlie a dominant skin disease, Darier disease and its clinical variants. SERCA2a expression is reduced in heart failure in human and in mice models. Gene-targeting studies in mouse confirmed the expected function of these isoforms in some cases, but also resulted in unexpected phenotypes: SERCA1 null mutants die from respiratory failure, SERCA2 heterozygous mutant mice develop skin cancer with age and SERCA3 null mice display no diabetes. These unique phenotypes have provided invaluable information on the role of these pumps in specific tissues and species, and have improved our understanding of Ca2+ regulated processes in muscles, the heart and the skin in human and in mice. Although the understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases is still incomplete, these recent advances hold the promise of improved knowledge on the disease processes and the identification of new targets for therapeutic interventions.

  5. Identification of Novel and Recurrent Disease-Causing Mutations in Retinal Dystrophies Using Whole Exome Sequencing (WES: Benefits and Limitations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Tiwari

    Full Text Available Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs are Mendelian diseases with tremendous genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Identification of the underlying genetic basis of these dystrophies is therefore challenging. In this study we employed whole exome sequencing (WES in 11 families with IRDs and identified disease-causing variants in 8 of them. Sequence analysis of about 250 IRD-associated genes revealed 3 previously reported disease-associated variants in RHO, BEST1 and RP1. We further identified 5 novel pathogenic variants in RPGRIP1 (p.Ser964Profs*37, PRPF8 (p.Tyr2334Leufs*51, CDHR1 (p.Pro133Arg and c.439-17G>A and PRPF31 (p.Glu183_Met193dup. In addition to confirming the power of WES in genetic diagnosis of IRDs, we document challenges in data analysis and show cases where the underlying genetic causes of IRDs were missed by WES and required additional techniques. For example, the mutation c.439-17G>A in CDHR1 would be rated unlikely applying the standard WES analysis. Only transcript analysis in patient fibroblasts confirmed the pathogenic nature of this variant that affected splicing of CDHR1 by activating a cryptic splice-acceptor site. In another example, a 33-base pair duplication in PRPF31 missed by WES could be identified only via targeted analysis by Sanger sequencing. We discuss the advantages and challenges of using WES to identify mutations in heterogeneous diseases like IRDs.

  6. Comparative study of human embryonic stem cells (hESC and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC as a treatment for retinal dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Riera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal dystrophies (RD are major causes of familial blindness and are characterized by progressive dysfunction of photoreceptor and/or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells. In this study, we aimed to evaluate and compare the therapeutic effects of two pluripotent stem cell (PSC-based therapies. We differentiated RPE from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs or human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs and transplanted them into the subretinal space of the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS rat. Once differentiated, cells from either source of PSC resembled mature RPE in their morphology and gene expression profile. Following transplantation, both hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells maintained the expression of specific RPE markers, lost their proliferative capacity, established tight junctions, and were able to perform phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments. Remarkably, grafted areas showed increased numbers of photoreceptor nuclei and outer segment disk membranes. Regardless of the cell source, human transplants protected retina from cell apoptosis, glial stress and accumulation of autofluorescence, and responded better to light stimuli. Altogether, our results show that hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells survived, migrated, integrated, and functioned as RPE in the RCS rat retina, providing preclinical evidence that either PSC source could be of potential benefit for treating RD.

  7. Effect of human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells administered by intravenous or intravitreal routes on cryo-induced retinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Eman M; Abdelrahman, Shaimaa A; Hussein, Samia; Shalaby, Sally M; Mosaad, Hala; Awad, Ahmed M B

    2017-03-01

    Traumatic optic neuropathy is an important cause of severe vision loss. So, many attempts were performed to transplant stem cells systemically or locally to regenerate the injured retina. In this study, we investigated the effect of human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hUBMSCs) on histological structure, apoptotic, antiapoptotic, oxidant and antioxidant markers in an experimental model of cryo-induced retinal damage in mice. Forty-eight mice were included with 4 major groups; group I contained 18 mice as controls. The others included 30 mice exposed to cryo-induced retinal injury and were subdivided into three equal groups: group II received no treatment after injury. Group III was intravenously injected with hUCBMSCs after injury and group IV received an intravitreal injection with hUCBMSCs into both eyes. Retinal tissues were used for histopathological, immunological and gene expression studies. Real time-PCR was performed to assess B-cell lymphoma 2 (bcl2), Bcl2-associated X protein (bax), heme oxygenase-1 (hmox-1) and thioredoxin-2 (tnx-2) expression and to assess the differentiation of the stem cells into the retinal tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to assess caspase-3, 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Disturbed retinal structure was seen in cryo-injured mice while hUCBMSCs treated groups showed nearly normal structure. By real time-PCR, significantly reduced mRNA expressions of Bax and notably enhanced mRNA expression of Bcl-2, hmox-1 and txn-2 were demonstrated in retinal injured mice with hUCBMSCs treatment compared to those without. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis confirmed downregulation of 3-NT and caspase-3 and upregulation of bFGF after hUCBMSCs injection in injured retina. Furthermore, there was no differentiation of transplanted stem cells into the retinal tissue. In conclusions, hUCBMSCs could improve the morphological retinal structure in cryo-induced retinal damage model by

  8. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles: Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, Anna; Gorgels, Theo G M F; Ten Brink, Jacoline B; van der Spek, Peter J; Bossers, Koen; Heine, Vivi M; Bergen, Arthur A

    2015-01-01

    The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to develop new therapeutics. This requires further in-depth knowledge of the similarities and differences between mouse and human RPE. We performed a microarray study to identify and functionally annotate RPE specific gene expression in mouse and human RPE. We used a meticulous method to determine C57BL/6J mouse RPE signature genes, correcting for possible RNA contamination from its adjacent layers: the choroid and the photoreceptors. We compared the signature genes, gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the mouse and human RPE. We defined sets of mouse (64), human (171) and mouse-human interspecies (22) RPE signature genes. Not unexpectedly, our gene expression analysis and comparative functional annotation suggested that, in general, the mouse and human RPE are very similar. For example, we found similarities for general features, like "organ development" and "disorders related to neurological tissue". However, detailed analysis of the molecular pathways and networks associated with RPE functions, suggested also multiple species-specific differences, some of which may be relevant for the development of AMD. For example, CFHR1, most likely the main complement regulator in AMD pathogenesis was highly expressed in human RPE, but almost absent in mouse RPE. Furthermore, functions assigned to mouse and human RPE expression profiles indicate (patho-) biological differences related to AMD, such as oxidative stress, Bruch's membrane, immune-regulation and outer blood retina barrier. These differences may be important for the development of new therapeutic strategies and translational studies in age-related macular degeneration.

  9. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles: Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bennis

    Full Text Available The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD. AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to develop new therapeutics. This requires further in-depth knowledge of the similarities and differences between mouse and human RPE.We performed a microarray study to identify and functionally annotate RPE specific gene expression in mouse and human RPE. We used a meticulous method to determine C57BL/6J mouse RPE signature genes, correcting for possible RNA contamination from its adjacent layers: the choroid and the photoreceptors. We compared the signature genes, gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the mouse and human RPE.We defined sets of mouse (64, human (171 and mouse-human interspecies (22 RPE signature genes. Not unexpectedly, our gene expression analysis and comparative functional annotation suggested that, in general, the mouse and human RPE are very similar. For example, we found similarities for general features, like "organ development" and "disorders related to neurological tissue". However, detailed analysis of the molecular pathways and networks associated with RPE functions, suggested also multiple species-specific differences, some of which may be relevant for the development of AMD. For example, CFHR1, most likely the main complement regulator in AMD pathogenesis was highly expressed in human RPE, but almost absent in mouse RPE. Furthermore, functions assigned to mouse and human RPE expression profiles indicate (patho- biological differences related to AMD, such as oxidative stress, Bruch's membrane, immune-regulation and outer blood retina barrier.These differences may be important for the development of new therapeutic strategies and translational studies in age-related macular degeneration.

  10. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles: Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, Anna; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Bossers, Koen; Heine, Vivi M.; Bergen, Arthur A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to develop new therapeutics. This requires further in-depth knowledge of the similarities and differences between mouse and human RPE. Methods We performed a microarray study to identify and functionally annotate RPE specific gene expression in mouse and human RPE. We used a meticulous method to determine C57BL/6J mouse RPE signature genes, correcting for possible RNA contamination from its adjacent layers: the choroid and the photoreceptors. We compared the signature genes, gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the mouse and human RPE. Results We defined sets of mouse (64), human (171) and mouse–human interspecies (22) RPE signature genes. Not unexpectedly, our gene expression analysis and comparative functional annotation suggested that, in general, the mouse and human RPE are very similar. For example, we found similarities for general features, like “organ development” and “disorders related to neurological tissue”. However, detailed analysis of the molecular pathways and networks associated with RPE functions, suggested also multiple species-specific differences, some of which may be relevant for the development of AMD. For example, CFHR1, most likely the main complement regulator in AMD pathogenesis was highly expressed in human RPE, but almost absent in mouse RPE. Furthermore, functions assigned to mouse and human RPE expression profiles indicate (patho-) biological differences related to AMD, such as oxidative stress, Bruch’s membrane, immune-regulation and outer blood retina barrier. Conclusion These differences may be important for the development of new therapeutic strategies and translational studies in age-related macular

  11. Abnormal retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and macula lutea in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, LiYan; Liu, Ying; Li, XiaoHong; Bai, QuanHao; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    We investigated possible abnormalities in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and macula lutea of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and tested for any correlation with the severity of dementia. A total of 72 subjects, comprising 25 AD patients, 26 MCI patients and 21 healthy individuals (controls) were enrolled in this study. The thickness of the RNFL and volume of the macula lutea was determined using optical coherence tomography (OCT). When compared with controls, we found statistically significant thinning of the RNFL in AD patients at all clock-hour positions except 12:00, and nasal quadrant, 2:00, 3:00 and 4:00. After adjusting several risk factors, the average thickness of the RNFL was reduced in MCI patients compared to AD patients, with specific reductions at inferior quadrant, 5:00 and 6:00. Compared to controls, MCI patients showed a significant decrease in RNFL thickness only in the temporal quadrant, 8:00, 9:00 and 10:00. We found significant reduction in the volume of the macula lutea both in AD and MCI patients. Finally, we could not establish any correlation between patient Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores (an estimation of the severity of cognitive impairment) and any OCT parameter. Retinal degeneration in AD and MCI patients results in decreased thickness of the RNFL, and reduced macular volume in AD and MCI patients. However, there seems to be no correlation between these changes and the severity of dementia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Xeno-Free and Defined Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Functionally Integrate in a Large-Eyed Preclinical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Plaza Reyes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells could replace lost tissue in geographic atrophy (GA but efficacy has yet to be demonstrated in a large-eyed model. Also, production of hESC-RPE has not yet been achieved in a xeno-free and defined manner, which is critical for clinical compliance and reduced immunogenicity. Here we describe an effective differentiation methodology using human laminin-521 matrix with xeno-free and defined medium. Differentiated cells exhibited characteristics of native RPE including morphology, pigmentation, marker expression, monolayer integrity, and polarization together with phagocytic activity. Furthermore, we established a large-eyed GA model that allowed in vivo imaging of hESC-RPE and host retina. Cells transplanted in suspension showed long-term integration and formed polarized monolayers exhibiting phagocytic and photoreceptor rescue capacity. We have developed a xeno-free and defined hESC-RPE differentiation method and present evidence of functional integration of clinically compliant hESC-RPE in a large-eyed disease model.

  13. VEGF production and signaling in Müller glia are critical to modulating vascular function and neuronal integrity in diabetic retinopathy and hypoxic retinal vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Yun-Zheng

    2017-10-01

    Müller glia (MG) are major retinal supporting cells that participate in retinal metabolism, function, maintenance, and protection. During the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR), a neurovascular disease and a leading cause of blindness, MG modulate vascular function and neuronal integrity by regulating the production of angiogenic and trophic factors. In this article, I will (1) briefly summarize our work on delineating the role and mechanism of MG-modulated vascular function through the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and on investigating VEGF signaling-mediated MG viability and neural protection in diabetic animal models, (2) explore the relationship among VEGF and neurotrophins in protecting Müller cells in in vitro models of diabetes and hypoxia and its potential implication to neuroprotection in DR and hypoxic retinal diseases, and (3) discuss the relevance of our work to the effectiveness and safety of long-term anti-VEGF therapies, a widely used strategy to combat DR, diabetic macular edema, neovascular age-related macular degeneration, retinopathy of prematurity, and other hypoxic retinal vascular disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Human Microbiota and Ophthalmic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Louise J; Liu, Ji

    2016-09-01

    The human ocular surface, consisting of the cornea and conjunctiva, is colonized by an expansive, diverse microbial community. Molecular-based methods, such as 16S rRNA sequencing, has allowed for more comprehensive and precise identification of the species composition of the ocular surface microbiota compared to traditional culture-based methods. Evidence suggests that the normal microbiota plays a protective immunological role in preventing the proliferation of pathogenic species and thus, alterations in the homeostatic microbiome may be linked to ophthalmic pathologies. Further investigation of the ocular surface microbiome, as well as the microbiome of other areas of the body such as the oral mucosa and gut, and their role in the pathophysiology of diseases is a significant, emerging field of research, and may someday enable the development of novel probiotic approaches for the treatment and prevention of ophthalmic diseases.

  15. Foveomacular retinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuming, B S

    1986-11-01

    A group of patients is described who developed the clinical features of foveomacular retinitis. No causative factors were isolated, and all patients strongly denied any type of sun gazing. It is possible that there is a group of patients who have the features of foveomacular retinitis but have not had any direct exposure to the sun. These patients would then constitute a primary type of foveomacular retinitis, as opposed to a secondary type which has a known cause and is synonymous with solar retinopathy.

  16. Human Cytomegalovirus and Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) represents a prototypic pathogenic member of the β-subgroup of the herpesvirus family. A range of HCMV features like its lytic replication in multiple tissues, the lifelong persistence through periods of latency and intermitting reactivation, the extraordinary large proteome, and extensive manipulation of adaptive and innate immunity make HCMV a high profile candidate for involvement in autoimmune disorders. We surveyed the available literature for reports on HCMV association with onset or exacerbation of autoimmune disease. A causative linkage between HCMV and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), diabetes mellitus type 1, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is suggested by the literature. However, a clear association of HCMV seroprevalence and disease could not be established, leaving the question open whether HCMV could play a coresponsible role for onset of disease. For convincing conclusions population-based prospective studies must be performed in the future. Specific immunopathogenic mechanisms by which HCMV could contribute to the course of autoimmune disease have been suggested, for example, molecular mimicry by UL94 in SSc and UL83/pp65 in SLE patients, as well as aggravation of joint inflammation by induction and expansion of CD4+/CD28− T-cells in RA patients. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to lay the grounds for targeted therapeutic intervention. PMID:24967373

  17. Human Cytomegalovirus and Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Halenius

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV represents a prototypic pathogenic member of the β-subgroup of the herpesvirus family. A range of HCMV features like its lytic replication in multiple tissues, the lifelong persistence through periods of latency and intermitting reactivation, the extraordinary large proteome, and extensive manipulation of adaptive and innate immunity make HCMV a high profile candidate for involvement in autoimmune disorders. We surveyed the available literature for reports on HCMV association with onset or exacerbation of autoimmune disease. A causative linkage between HCMV and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, systemic sclerosis (SSc, diabetes mellitus type 1, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA is suggested by the literature. However, a clear association of HCMV seroprevalence and disease could not be established, leaving the question open whether HCMV could play a coresponsible role for onset of disease. For convincing conclusions population-based prospective studies must be performed in the future. Specific immunopathogenic mechanisms by which HCMV could contribute to the course of autoimmune disease have been suggested, for example, molecular mimicry by UL94 in SSc and UL83/pp65 in SLE patients, as well as aggravation of joint inflammation by induction and expansion of CD4+/CD28− T-cells in RA patients. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to lay the grounds for targeted therapeutic intervention.

  18. Blue-light filtering alters angiogenic signaling in human retinal pigmented epithelial cells culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Natalia; Siblini, Aya; Esposito, Evangelina; Bravo-Filho, Vasco; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Aldrees, Sultan; Logan, Patrick; Arias, Lluis; Burnier, Miguel N

    2017-11-02

    Light exposure and more specifically the spectrum of blue light contribute to the oxidative stress in Age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The purpose of the study was to establish whether blue light filtering could modify proangiogenic signaling produced by retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells under different conditions simulating risk factors for AMD. Three experiments were carried out in order to expose ARPE-19 cells to white light for 48 h with and without blue light-blocking filters (BLF) in different conditions. In each experiment one group was exposed to light with no BLF protection, a second group was exposed to light with BLF protection, and a control group was not exposed to light. The ARPE-19 cells used in each experiment prior to light exposure were cultured for 24 h as follows: Experiment 1) Normoxia, Experiment 2) Hypoxia, and Experiment 3) Lutein supplemented media in normoxia. The media of all groups was harvested after light exposure for sandwich ELISA-based assays to quantify 10 pro-angiogenic cytokines. A significant decrease in angiogenin secretion levels and a significant increase in bFGF were observed following light exposure, compared to dark conditions, in both normoxia and hypoxia conditions. With the addition of a blue light-blocking filter in normoxia, a significant increase in angiogenin levels was observed. Although statistical significance was not achieved, blue light filters reduce light-induced secretion of bFGF and VEGF to near normal levels. This trend is also observed when ARPE-19 cells are grown under hypoxic conditions and when pre-treated with lutein prior to exposure to experimental conditions. Following light exposure, there is a decrease in angiogenin secretion by ARPE-19 cells, which was abrogated with a blue light - blocking filter. Our findings support the position that blue light filtering affects the secretion of angiogenic factors by retinal pigmented epithelial cells under normoxic, hypoxic, and lutein

  19. RPGR: Its role in photoreceptor physiology, human disease, and future therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megaw, Roly D; Soares, Dinesh C; Wright, Alan F

    2015-09-01

    Mammalian photoreceptors contain specialised connecting cilia that connect the inner (IS) to the outer segments (OS). Dysfunction of the connecting cilia due to mutations in ciliary proteins are a common cause of the inherited retinal dystrophy retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Mutations affecting the Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator (RPGR) protein is one such cause, affecting 10-20% of all people with RP and the majority of those with X-linked RP. RPGR is located in photoreceptor connecting cilia. It interacts with a wide variety of ciliary proteins, but its exact function is unknown. Recently, there have been important advances both in our understanding of RPGR function and towards the development of a therapy. This review summarises the existing literature on human RPGR function and dysfunction, and suggests that RPGR plays a role in the function of the ciliary gate, which controls access of both membrane and soluble proteins to the photoreceptor outer segment. We discuss key models used to investigate and treat RPGR disease and suggest that gene augmentation therapy offers a realistic therapeutic approach, although important questions still remain to be answered, while cell replacement therapy based on retinal progenitor cells represents a more distant prospect. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Cell replacement and visual restoration by retinal sheet transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Magdalene J.; Aramant, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) affect millions of people. Replacing lost cells with new cells that connect with the still functional part of the host retina might repair a degenerating retina and restore eyesight to an unknown extent. A unique model, subretinal transplantation of freshly dissected sheets of fetal-derived retinal progenitor cells, combined with its retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), has demonstrated successful results in both animals and humans. Most other approaches are restricted to rescue endogenous retinal cells of the recipient in earlier disease stages by a ‘nursing’ role of the implanted cells and are not aimed at neural retinal cell replacement. Sheet transplants restore lost visual responses in several retinal degeneration models in the superior colliculus (SC) corresponding to the location of the transplant in the retina. They do not simply preserve visual performance – they increase visual responsiveness to light. Restoration of visual responses in the SC can be directly traced to neural cells in the transplant, demonstrating that synaptic connections between transplant and host contribute to the visual improvement. Transplant processes invade the inner plexiform layer of the host retina and form synapses with presumable host cells. In a Phase II trial of RP and ARMD patients, transplants of retina together with its RPE improved visual acuity. In summary, retinal progenitor sheet transplantation provides an excellent model to answer questions about how to repair and restore function of a degenerating retina. Supply of fetal donor tissue will always be limited but the model can set a standard and provide an informative base for optimal cell replacement therapies such as embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived therapy. PMID:22771454

  1. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ-mediated retinal ganglion cell death in human tyrosinase T cell receptor transgenic mouse.

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    Shahid Husain

    Full Text Available We have recently demonstrated the characterization of human tyrosinase TCR bearing h3T-A2 transgenic mouse model, which exhibits spontaneous autoimmune vitiligo and retinal dysfunction. The purpose of current study was to determine the role of T cells and IFN-γ in retina dysfunction and retinal ganglion cell (RGC death using this model. RGC function was measured by pattern electroretinograms (ERGs in response to contrast reversal of patterned visual stimuli. RGCs were visualized by fluorogold retrograde-labeling. Expression of CD3, IFN-γ, GFAP, and caspases was measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. All functional and structural changes were measured in 12-month-old h3T-A2 mice and compared with age-matched HLA-A2 wild-type mice. Both pattern-ERGs (42%, p = 0.03 and RGC numbers (37%, p = 0.0001 were reduced in h3T-A2 mice when compared with wild-type mice. The level of CD3 expression was increased in h3T-A2 mice (h3T-A2: 174 ± 27% vs. HLA-A2: 100%; p = 0.04. The levels of effector cytokine IFN-γ were also increased significantly in h3T-A2 mice (h3T-A2: 189 ± 11% vs. HLA-A2: 100%; p = 0.023. Both CD3 and IFN-γ immunostaining were increased in nerve fiber (NF and RGC layers of h3T-A2 mice. In addition, we have seen a robust increase in GFAP staining in h3T-A2 mice (mainly localized to NF layer, which was substantially reduced in IFN-γ ((-/- knockout h3T-A2 mice. We also have seen an up-regulation of caspase-3 and -9 in h3T-A2 mice. Based on our data we conclude that h3T-A2 transgenic mice exhibit visual defects that are mostly associated with the inner retinal layers and RGC function. This novel h3T-A2 transgenic mouse model provides opportunity to understand RGC pathology and test neuroprotective strategies to rescue RGCs.

  2. Noninvasive Retinal Markers in Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Torp, Thomas Lee; Lundberg, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    The retinal vascular system is the only part of the human body available for direct, in vivo inspection. Noninvasive retinal markers are important to identity patients in risk of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Studies have correlated structural features like retinal vascular caliber...... and fractals with micro- and macrovascular dysfunction in diabetes. Likewise, the retinal metabolism can be evaluated by retinal oximetry, and higher retinal venular oxygen saturation has been demonstrated in patients with diabetic retinopathy. So far, most studies have been cross-sectional, but these can only...... disclose associations and are not able to separate cause from effect or to establish the predictive value of retinal vascular dysfunction with respect to long-term complications. Likewise, retinal markers have not been investigated as markers of treatment outcome in patients with proliferative diabetic...

  3. Multimodal Imaging of Disease-Associated Pigmentary Changes in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerch, Kaspar; Marsiglia, Marcela; Lee, Winston; Tsang, Stephen H.; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Using multiple imaging modalities we evaluated the changes in photoreceptor cells and RPE that are associated with bone spicule-shaped melanin pigmentation in retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods In a cohort of 60 RP patients, short-wavelength autofluorescence (SW-AF), near-infrared (NIR)-AF, NIR-reflectance (NIR-R), spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and color fundus images were studied. Results Central AF rings were visible in both SW-AF and NIR-AF images. Bone spicule pigmentation was non-reflective in NIR-R, hypoautofluorescent with SW-AF and NIR-AF imaging and presented as intraretinal hyperreflective foci in SD-OCT images. In areas beyond the AF ring outer border, the photoreceptor ellipsoid zone (EZ) band was absent in SD-OCT scans and the visibility of choroidal vessels in SW-AF, NIR-AF and NIR-R images was indicative of reduced RPE pigmentation. Choroidal visibility was most pronounced in the zone approaching peripheral areas of bone spicule pigmentation; here RPE/Bruch’s membrane thinning became apparent in SD-OCT scans. Conclusions These findings are consistent with a process by which RPE cells vacate their monolayer and migrate into inner retina in response to photoreceptor cell degeneration. The remaining RPE spread, undergo thinning and consequently become less pigmented. An explanation for the absence of NIR-AF melanin signal in relation to bone spicule pigmentation is not forthcoming. PMID:28005673

  4. Retinal Thickening and Photoreceptor Loss in HIV Eyes without Retinitis.

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    Cheryl A Arcinue

    Full Text Available To determine the presence of structural changes in HIV retinae (i.e., photoreceptor density and retinal thickness in the macula compared with age-matched HIV-negative controls.Cohort of patients with known HIV under CART (combination Antiretroviral Therapy treatment were examined with a flood-illuminated retinal AO camera to assess the cone photoreceptor mosaic and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT to assess retinal layers and retinal thickness.Twenty-four eyes of 12 patients (n = 6 HIV-positive and 6 HIV-negative were imaged with the adaptive optics camera. In each of the regions of interest studied (nasal, temporal, superior, inferior, the HIV group had significantly less mean cone photoreceptor density compared with age-matched controls (difference range, 4,308-6,872 cones/mm2. A different subset of forty eyes of 20 patients (n = 10 HIV-positive and 10 HIV-negative was included in the retinal thickness measurements and retinal layer segmentation with the SD-OCT. We observed significant thickening in HIV positive eyes in the total retinal thickness at the foveal center, and in each of the three horizontal B-scans (through the macular center, superior, and inferior to the fovea. We also noted that the inner retina (combined thickness from ILM through RNFL to GCL layer was also significantly thickened in all the different locations scanned compared with HIV-negative controls.Our present study shows that the cone photoreceptor density is significantly reduced in HIV retinae compared with age-matched controls. HIV retinae also have increased macular retinal thickness that may be caused by inner retinal edema secondary to retinovascular disease in HIV. The interaction of photoreceptors with the aging RPE, as well as possible low-grade ocular inflammation causing diffuse inner retinal edema, may be the key to the progressive vision changes in HIV-positive patients without overt retinitis.

  5. In vivo cellular-resolution retinal imaging in infants and children using an ultracompact handheld probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocca, Francesco; Nankivil, Derek; Dubose, Theodore; Toth, Cynthia A.; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2016-09-01

    Enabled by adaptive optics, retinal photoreceptor cell imaging is changing our understanding of retinal structure and function, as well as the pathogenesis of numerous ocular diseases. To date, use of this technology has been limited to cooperative adult subjects due to the size, weight and inconvenience of the equipment, thus excluding study of retinal maturation during human development. Here, we report the design and operation of a handheld probe that can perform both scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography of the parafoveal photoreceptor structure in infants and children without the need for adaptive optics. The probe, featuring a compact optical design weighing only 94 g, was able to quantify packing densities of parafoveal cone photoreceptors and visualize cross-sectional photoreceptor substructure in children with ages ranging from 14 months to 12 years. The probe will benefit paediatric research by improving the understanding of retinal development, maldevelopment and early onset of disease during human growth.

  6. Phosphatase inhibitor 2 promotes acetylation of tubulin in the primary cilium of human retinal epithelial cells

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    Wang Weiping

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary cilia are flagella-like projections from the centriole of mammalian cells that have a key role in cell signaling. Human diseases are linked to defects in primary cilia. Microtubules make up the axoneme of cilia and are selectively acetylated and this is thought to contribute to the stability of the structure. However, mechanisms to regulate tubulin acetylation in cilia are poorly understood. Results Endogenous phosphatase inhibitor-2 (I-2 was found concentrated in cilia of human epithelial cells, and was localized to cilia early in the process of formation, prior to the full acetylation of microtubules. Knockdown of I-2 by siRNA significantly reduced the acetylation of microtubules in cilia, without a net decrease in whole cell tubulin acetylation. There was a reduction in the percentage of I-2 knockdown cells with a primary cilium, but no apparent alteration in the cilium length, suggesting no change in microtubule-based transport processes. Inhibition of either histone deacetylases with trichostatin A, or protein phosphatase-1 with calyculin A in I-2 knockdown cells partially rescued the acetylation of microtubules in cilia and the percentage of cells with a primary cilium. Conclusion The regulatory protein I-2 localizes to the primary cilium where it affects both Ser/Thr phosphorylation and is required for full tubulin acetylation. Rescue of tubulin acetylation in I-2 knockdown cells by different chemical inhibitors shows that deacetylases and phosphatases are functionally interconnected to regulate microtubules. As a multifunctional protein, I-2 may link cell cycle progression to structure and stability of the primary cilium.

  7. PARP1 gene knock-out increases resistance to retinal degeneration without affecting retinal function.

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    Ayse Sahaboglu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is a group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases affecting photoreceptors and causing blindness in humans. Previously, excessive activation of enzymes belonging to the poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP group was shown to be involved in photoreceptor degeneration in the human homologous rd1 mouse model for RP. Since there are at least 16 different PARP isoforms, we investigated the exact relevance of the predominant isoform - PARP1 - for photoreceptor cell death using PARP1 knock-out (KO mice. In vivo and ex vivo morphological analysis using optic coherence tomography (OCT and conventional histology revealed no major alterations of retinal phenotype when compared to wild-type (wt. Likewise, retinal function as assessed by electroretinography (ERG was normal in PARP1 KO animals. We then used retinal explant cultures derived from wt, rd1, and PARP1 KO animals to test their susceptibility to chemically induced photoreceptor degeneration. Since photoreceptor degeneration in the rd1 retina is triggered by a loss-of-function in phosphodiesterase-6 (PDE6, we used selective PDE6 inhibition to emulate the rd1 situation on non-rd1 genotypes. While wt retina subjected to PDE6 inhibition showed massive photoreceptor degeneration comparable to rd1 retina, in the PARP1 KO situation, cell death was robustly reduced. Together, these findings demonstrate that PARP1 activity is in principle dispensable for normal retinal function, but is of major importance for photoreceptor degeneration under pathological conditions. Moreover, our results suggest that PARP dependent cell death or PARthanatos may play a major role in retinal degeneration and highlight the possibility to use specific PARP inhibitors for the treatment of RP.

  8. Retinal Detachment in Preeclampsia

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    Prado Renata Silva do

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is an obstetric disease of unknown cause that affects approximately 5% of pregnant women. The visual system may be affected with variable intensity, being the retinal detachment a rare complication. The retinal detachment in preeclampsia is usually bilateral and serous, and its pathogenesis is related to the choroidal ischemia secondary to an intense arteriolar vasospasm. The majority of patients have complete recovery of vision with clinical management, and surgery is unnecessary. This is a case report of a 27 year old patient who developed the severe form of preeclampsia on her first pregnancy. She had progressive blurred vision, until she could see only shadows. Ophthalmic examination diagnosed spread and bilateral retinal detachment. With blood pressure control at postpartum, the patient had her retina reattached, and recovery of vision.

  9. a Review of Retinal Prosthesis Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kien, Tran Trung; Maul, Tomas; Bargiela, Andrzej

    Age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa are two of the most common diseases that cause degeneration in the outer retina, which can lead to several visual impairments up to blindness. Vision restoration is an important goal for which several different research approaches are currently being pursued. We are concerned with restoration via retinal prosthetic devices. Prostheses can be implemented intraocularly and extraocularly, which leads to different categories of devices. Cortical Prostheses and Optic Nerve Prostheses are examples of extraocular solutions while Epiretinal Prostheses and Subretinal Prostheses are examples of intraocular solutions. Some of the prostheses that are successfully implanted and tested in animals as well as humans can restore basic visual functions but still have limitations. This paper will give an overview of the current state of art of Retinal Prostheses and compare the advantages and limitations of each type. The purpose of this review is thus to summarize the current technologies and approaches used in developing Retinal Prostheses and therefore to lay a foundation for future designs and research directions.

  10. Influence of ultraviolet A radiation on osmolytes transport in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

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    Da-Yang Wu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To demonstrate that ultraviolet A(UVAinduces osmolytes accumulation in retinal pigment epithelial(RPEcells.METHODS: Under different experimental conditions such as UVA exposure, hyperosmotic stress condition and hypoosmotic stress condition, RPE cells were cultured for different time periods. The betaine /γ-amino- n-butyric acid(GABAtransporter, the sodium-dependent myoinositol transporter and the taurine transporter(TAUTmRNA were measured by quantitative PCR. The radioactive labeled osmolytes were measured to evaluate the level of osmolytes transportation. RESULTS: This study demonstrated that RPE expressed mRNA specific for the betaine/GABA transporter, for the sodium-dependent myoinositol transporter and for the TAUT. In comparison to norm osmotic(300mosmol/Lcontrols, a 3-5-fold induction of mRNA expression for the betaine/GABA transporter, the sodium-dependent myoinositol transporter and the TAUT was observed within 6-24h after hyperosmotic exposure(400mosmol/L. Expression of osmolyte transporters was associated with an increased uptake of radioactive labeled osmolytes. Conversely, hypoosmotic(200mosmol/Lstimulation induced significant efflux of these osmolytes. UVA significantly stimulated osmolyte uptake. Increased osmolyte uptake was associated with upregulation of mRNA steady-state levels for osmolyte transporters in irradiated cells.CONCLUSION: UVA induces osmolyte uptake in RPE. It is similar reaction to hyperosmotic stress. This suggests that osmolyte uptake response by UVA may be important to maintain homeostasis.

  11. Regulation of Autophagy by High Glucose in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

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    Jin Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autophagy is a self-degradative process that is important for balancing sources of energy at critical times in development and in response to nutrient stress. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE works as the outer blood retina barrier and is vulnerable to energy stress-induced injury. However, the effect of high glucose treatment on autophagy is still unclear in RPE. Methods: Transmission electron microscopy was used to detect the generation of autophagosome. Small interfering RNA (siRNA and MTT was used to determine the effect of autophagy on cell viability. Western blots and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression pattern of autophagic markers, including LC3 and p62. Results: High glucose treatment results in a significant increase in the generation of autophagosome and altered expression of LC3 and p62. High glucose-induced autophagy is independent of mTOR signaling, but is mainly regulated via ROS-mediated ER stress signaling. Conclusion: In the scenario of high glucose-induced oxidative stress, autophagy may be required for the removal of damaged proteins, and provide a default mechanism to prevent high glucose-induced injury in RPE.

  12. Human iPS-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells exhibit ion transport, membrane potential, polarized VEGF secretion and gene expression pattern similar to native RPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinaki, Maria; Sahibzada, Niaz; Golestaneh, Nady

    2012-01-01

    Aged-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the major causes of blindness in aging population and progresses with death of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptor degeneration inducing impairment of central vision. Discovery of human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells has opened new avenues for the treatment of degenerative diseases using patient specific stem cells to generate tissues and cells for autologous cell-based therapy. Recently, RPE cells were generated from hiPS cells. However, there is no evidence that those hiPS-derived RPE possess specific RPE functions that fully distinguish them from other type of cells. Here we show for the first time that RPE generated from hiPS under defined conditions exhibit ion transport, membrane potential, polarized VEGF secretion and gene expression profile similar to those of native RPE. The hiPS-RPE could therefore be a very good candidate for RPE replacement therapy in AMD. However, these cells show rapid telomere shortening, DNA chromosomal damage and increased p21 expression that cause cell growth arrest. This rapid senescence might affect the survival of the transplanted cells in vivo and therefore, only the very early passages should be used for regeneration therapies. Future research needs to focus on the generation of “safe” as well as viable hiPS-derived somatic cells. PMID:21480547

  13. Effects of Coix seed oil on human retinal capillary endothelial cells proliferation and VEGF expression in high glucose environment

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    Min Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the effects of different concentrations of Coix seed oil on human retinal capillary endothelial cells(HRCECsproliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGFexpression in high glucose environment.METHODS: HRCECs extracted from human fresher eyeball and cultured in vitro, and ultimately used in the experiment were the growth of 3rd~4th cells, the experimental were divided into blank control group, low glucose control group, high glucose control group, high glucose +(50μL/mL, 100μL/mL, 200μL/mLdifferent concentrations Coix seed oil group. Detecting the multiplication of HRCECs by MTT, the immunocytochemical method was employed to detect the each group HRCECs of VEGF expression.RESULTS:MTT assay results showed that: different concentrations of coix seed oil acted at HRCECs for 48h, inhibition of cell proliferation was significant difference compared with high glucose control group(PP>0.05. Immunocytochemical assay showed that: 50μL/mL, 100μL/mL, 200μL/mL Coix seed oil acted at HRCECs 48h, the expression of VEGF decreased significantly compared with the high glucose control group(PPCONCLUSION:Coix seed oil can inhibit the HRCECs proliferation and suppress the VEGF expression in high glucose environment.

  14. Spontaneous generation of a novel foetal human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line available for investigation on phagocytosis and morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhihua; Wang, Haiyun; Zhou, Xuejian; Guo, Baosen; Gao, Xuehu; Xiao, Zengrong; Liu, Meng; Sha, Jihong; Jiang, Chunlian; Luo, Yuping; Liu, Zhixue; Li, Siguang

    2017-12-01

    Primary retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells have a limited capacity to re-establish epithelial morphology and to maintain native RPE function in vitro, and all commercially available RPE cell lines have drawbacks of morphology or function; therefore, the establishment of new RPE cell lines with typical characteristics of RPE would be helpful in further understanding of their physiological and pathological mechanisms. Here, we firstly report a new spontaneously generated RPE line, fhRPE-13A, from a 13-week aborted foetus. We aimed to investigate its availability as a RPE model. RNA-seq data were mapped to the human genome assembly hg19. Global transcriptional data were analysed by Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) and differentially expressed genes (DEGs). The morphology and molecular characteristics were examined by immunofluorescence, transmission electron micrographs, PCR and western blot. Photoreceptor outer segments (POS) phagocytosis assay and transepithelial resistance measurement (TER) were performed to assess phagocytic activity and barrier function, respectively. The fhRPE-13A cells showed typical polygonal morphology and normal biological processes of RPE. Meanwhile they were capable of POS phagocytosis in vitro, and the expression level of TYR and TYRP1 were significantly higher than that in ARPE-19 cells. The foetal human RPE line fhRPE-13A is a valuable system for researching phagocytosis and morphogenesis of RPE in vitro. © 2017 The Authors. Cell Proliferation published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Reversal of the Caspase-Dependent Apoptotic Cytotoxicity Pathway by Taurine from Lycium barbarum (Goji Berry in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells: Potential Benefit in Diabetic Retinopathy

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    M. K. Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is a preventable microvascular diabetic complication and a leading cause of vision loss. Retinal pigment epithelial cell apoptosis is an early event in diabetic retinopathy. Taurine is reportedly beneficial for diabetic retinopathy and is abundant in the fruit of Lycium barbarum (LB. We have investigated the effect of pure taurine and an extract of LB rich in taurine on a model of diabetic retinopathy, the retinal ARPE-19 cell line exposed to high glucose. We demonstrate for the first time that LB extract and the active ligand, taurine, dose dependently enhance cell viability following high glucose treatment in the ARPE-19 retinal epithelial cell line. This cytoprotective effect was associated with the attenuation of high glucose-induced apoptosis, which was shown by characteristic morphological staining and the dose-dependent decrease in the number of apoptotic cells, determined by flow cytometry. Moreover, we have shown that LB extract and taurine dose dependently downregulate caspase-3 protein expression and the enzymatic activity of caspase-3. We conclude that taurine, a major component of LB, and the LB extract, have a cytoprotective effect against glucose exposure in a human retinal epithelial cell line and may provide useful approaches to delaying diabetic retinopathy progression.

  16. Reversal of the Caspase-Dependent Apoptotic Cytotoxicity Pathway by Taurine from Lycium barbarum (Goji Berry) in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells: Potential Benefit in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, M K; Roufogalis, B D; Huang, T H W

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a preventable microvascular diabetic complication and a leading cause of vision loss. Retinal pigment epithelial cell apoptosis is an early event in diabetic retinopathy. Taurine is reportedly beneficial for diabetic retinopathy and is abundant in the fruit of Lycium barbarum (LB). We have investigated the effect of pure taurine and an extract of LB rich in taurine on a model of diabetic retinopathy, the retinal ARPE-19 cell line exposed to high glucose. We demonstrate for the first time that LB extract and the active ligand, taurine, dose dependently enhance cell viability following high glucose treatment in the ARPE-19 retinal epithelial cell line. This cytoprotective effect was associated with the attenuation of high glucose-induced apoptosis, which was shown by characteristic morphological staining and the dose-dependent decrease in the number of apoptotic cells, determined by flow cytometry. Moreover, we have shown that LB extract and taurine dose dependently downregulate caspase-3 protein expression and the enzymatic activity of caspase-3. We conclude that taurine, a major component of LB, and the LB extract, have a cytoprotective effect against glucose exposure in a human retinal epithelial cell line and may provide useful approaches to delaying diabetic retinopathy progression.

  17. Establishing an experimental rat model of photodynamically-induced retinal vein occlusion using erythrosin B

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    Wei Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To develop a reliable, reproducible rat model of retinal vein occlusion (RVO with a novel photosensitizer (erythrosin B and study the cellular responses in the retina.METHODS:Central and branch RVOs were created in adult male rats via photochemically-induced ischemia. Retinal changes were monitored via color fundus photography and fluorescein angiography at 1 and 3h, and 1, 4, 7, 14, and 21d after irradiation. Tissue slices were evaluated histopathologically. Retinal ganglion cell survival at different times after RVO induction was quantified by nuclear density count. Retinal thickness was also observed.RESULTS:For all rats in both the central and branch RVO groups, blood flow ceased immediately after laser irradiation and retinal edema was evident at one hour. The retinal detachment rate was 100% at 3h and developed into bullous retinal detachment within 24h. Retinal hemorrhages were not observed until 24h. Clearance of the occluded veins at 7d was observed by fluorescein angiography. Disease manifestation in the central RVO eyes was more severe than in the branch RVO group. A remarkable reduction in the ganglion cell count and retinal thickness was observed in the central RVO group by 21d, whereas moderate changes occurred in the branch RVO group.CONCLUSION: Rat RVO created by photochemically-induced ischemia using erythrosin B is a reproducible and reliable animal model for mimicking the key features of human RVO. However, considering the 100% rate of retinal detachment, this animal model is more suitable for studying RVO with chronic retinal detachment.

  18. Correlation between Retinal Changes and Visual Function in Late-Stage Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease: An Optical Coherence Tomography Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To characterize the optical coherence tomography (OCT findings in late-stage Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH disease and its correlation with visual function. Methods. The records of patients with late-stage VKH disease (defined as ≥12 months from disease onset were retrospectively reviewed. The analysis focused on the OCT findings and microperimetry, in addition to the possible correlation between morphology and functional findings. Results. Twenty-nine patients (58 eyes were included. Mean age at onset was 34.24 ± 10.67 years. The OCT revealed that the outer retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE were mainly affected. These effects included RPE thickening and breakage or disappearance of the cone outer segment tip (COST line and/or inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS junction. The COST line and IS/OS results were related to macular function and the interval between symptom onset and initiation of high-dose corticosteroid treatment (all P<0.01. Eyes with intact COST lines demonstrated intact IS/OS and normal RPE layers as well as better visual function and normal retinal sensitivity. Conclusions. The OCT findings are strongly correlated with macular function, as well as other clinical findings in late-stage VKH. With respect to the COST line and retinal sensitivity especially, the OCT and microperimetry findings may be useful for evaluating later-stage VKH.

  19. Identification of a prevalent founder mutation in an Israeli Muslim Arab village confirms the role of PRCD in the aetiology of retinitis pigmentosa in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevet, M J; Shalev, S A; Zlotogora, J; Mazzawi, N; Ben-Yosef, T

    2010-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common form of hereditary retinal degeneration. At least 32 genes and loci have been implicated in non-syndromic autosomal recessive RP. Progressive rod-cone degeneration is a canine form of autosomal recessive retinal degeneration, which serves as an animal model for human RP, and is caused by a missense mutation of the PRCD gene. The same homozygous PRCD mutation has been previously identified in a single human RP patient from Bangladesh. To date, this is the only RP-causing mutation of PRCD reported in humans. The cause of the high incidence rate of autosomal recessive RP in an isolated Muslim Arab village in Northern Israel was investigated by haplotype analysis in affected families. The underlying mutation was detected by direct sequencing of the causative gene, and its prevalence in affected and unaffected individuals from the village was determined. Patients who were homozygotes for this mutation underwent ophthalmic evaluation, including funduscopy and electroretinography. The identification of a novel pathogenic nonsense mutation of PRCD is reported. This founder mutation was found in a homozygous state in 18 patients from nine families, and its carrier frequency in the investigated village is 10%. The mutation is associated with a typical RP phenotype, including bone spicule-type pigment deposits and non-recordable electroretinograms. Additional findings include signs of macular degeneration and cataract. The identification of a second pathogenic mutation of PRCD in multiple RP patients confirms the role of PRCD in the aetiology of RP in humans.

  20. Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 24-Hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 3.0 ns Pulsed Laser Light and 1064 nm, 170 ps Pulsed Laser Light 12-Hours Post-Exposure: Results Compendium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Obringer, John

    2004-01-01

    .... We assessed the sublethal insult to human retinal pigment epithelial cells using a cadaver organ donor explant system for genes differentially expressed 12 and 24 hours post- exposure using gene...

  1. Perceiving collision impacts in Alzheimer’s disease: The effect of retinal eccentricity on optic flow deficits

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    Nam-Gyoon eKim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study explored whether the optic flow deficit in Alzheimer’s disease (AD reported in the literature transfers to different types of optic flow, in particular, one that specifies collision impacts with upcoming surfaces, with a special focus on the effect of retinal eccentricity. Displays simulated observer movement over a ground plane toward obstacles lying in the observer’s path. Optical expansion was modulated by varying tau-dot. The visual field was masked either centrally (peripheral vision or peripherally (central vision using masks ranging from 10° to 30° in diameter in steps of 10°. Participants were asked to indicate whether their approach would result in collision or no collision with the obstacles. Results showed that AD patients’ sensitivity to tau-dot was severely compromised, not only for central vision but also for peripheral vision, compared to age- and education-matched elderly controls. The results demonstrated that AD patients’ optic flow deficit is not limited to radial optic flow but includes also the optical pattern engendered by tau-dot. Further deterioration in the capacity to extract tau-dot to determine potential collisions in conjunction with the inability to extract heading information from radial optic flow would exacerbate AD patients’ difficulties in navigation and visuospatial orientation.

  2. Solar retinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHIRLEY, S Y

    1963-07-20

    Retinal burns can be produced by direct gazing at the sun. This lesion is caused by the thermal effects of the visible and near infrared rays focused on the pigment structure behind the retina. It is rarely seen, as the normal eye will tolerate only fleeting glances at the sun, but is fairly common during a solar eclipse. A case of solar retinitis is presented in which treatment with corticosteroids lessened the retinal edema but the patient suffered a bilateral central scotoma and vision reduced to the 20/40 level. In viewing a solar eclipse a No. 4 density filter is recommended; as a rough test this filter will abolish the readability of print on a 60-watt incandescent frosted electric light bulb.

  3. Psychological and educational recommendations for working with young people with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chacón López, Elena; Lopez-Justicia, M.D.; Vervloed, M.P.J.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the consequences of Retinitis Pigmentosa, a retinal degenerative disease with progressive reduction of the visual field, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and night blindness. Retinitis Pigmentosa is addressed from both a psychological and an educational standpoint, focusing

  4. Human secretory phospholipase A(2), group IB in normal eyes and in eye diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, Miriam; Prause, Jan U; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2007-01-01

    , retinitis pigmentosa and glaucoma were evaluated. RESULTS: Expression of hGIB was found in various cells of the eye. The most abundant expression was found in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, the inner photoreceptor segments, ganglion cells and the corneal endothelium. We explored diseases involving...... a downregulation of hGIB in migrating RPE cells and in diseased corneal endothelium....

  5. Retinal oxygen saturation in relation to retinal thickness in diabetic macular edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Peto, Tunde; Grauslund, Jakob

    with DME had higher retinal oxygen saturation in macular venules as compared to the global retinal venous oxygen saturation. No correlation was demonstrated between retinal thickness and retinal oxygen saturation. Retinal oximetry may become an important clinical tool to monitor disease activity...... to retinal thickness in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME). Methods: We included 18 patients with DME that all had central retinal thickness (CRT) >300 µm and were free of active proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Optical coherence tomography (Topcon 3D OCT-2000 spectral domain OCT) was used.......4 and 3.8 years. Median HbA1c was 61.5 mmol/mol and 22.2% were women. Mean oxygen saturation was higher in retinal macular venules as compared to global venous oxygen saturation (76.7% vs. 66.3%, p=0.0001), whereas there was no difference between macular and global arteriolar oxygen saturations (94.8% vs...

  6. Prosthetic vision: devices, patient outcomes and retinal research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjinicolaou, Alex E; Meffin, Hamish; Maturana, Matias I; Cloherty, Shaun L; Ibbotson, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Retinal disease and its associated retinal degeneration can lead to the loss of photoreceptors and therefore, profound blindness. While retinal degeneration destroys the photoreceptors, the neural circuits that convey information from the eye to the brain are sufficiently preserved to make it possible to restore sight using prosthetic devices. Typically, these devices consist of a digital camera and an implantable neurostimulator. The image sensor in a digital camera has the same spatiotopic arrangement as the photoreceptors of the retina. Therefore, it is possible to extract meaningful spatial information from an image and deliver it via an array of stimulating electrodes directly to the surviving retinal circuits. Here, we review the structure and function of normal and degenerate retina. The different approaches to prosthetic implant design are described in the context of human and preclinical trials. In the last section, we review studies of electrical properties of the retina and its response to electrical stimulation. These types of investigation are currently assessing a number of key challenges identified in human trials, including stimulation efficacy, spatial localisation, desensitisation to repetitive stimulation and selective activation of retinal cell populations. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2015 Optometry Australia.

  7. Gas6 stimulates angiogenesis of human retinal endothelial cells and of zebrafish embryos via ERK1/2 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Sook Kim

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine if growth arrest-specific 6 (Gas6 plays an important role in the regulation of angiogenesis in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs and in vessel development of zebrafish. METHODS: Proliferation, wound-healing cell migration, and tube formation were measured in HRMECs treated with recombinant human Gas6 (rhGas6. Sprague-Dawley rat aortas in Matrigels were treated with rhGas6, and microvessel sprouting emanating from arterial rings was analyzed. Transgenic zebrafish embryos (flk:GFP were microinjected with rhGas6 at 50 hours post-fertilization (hpf, and ectopic sprouting of subintestinal vessels (SIVs was observed under a confocal microscope. Morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs were microinjected to knockdown gas6 in zebrafish embryos, and intersegmental vessel impairment was observed. The effect of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 inhibitor on the migration of HRMECs and on vessel development in zebrafish embryos was tested. RESULTS: rhGas6 stimulated proliferation, migration, and tube formation in HRMECs in a dose-dependent manner. In rat aortas, rhGas6 induced vessel outgrowth, and the sprouting length was longer than that of controls. The rhGas6-microinjected zebrafish embryos had significantly increased vessel outgrowth in the SIVs. Recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF served as a positive control. Knockdown of gas6 inhibited angiogenesis in the developing vessels of zebrafish. The ERK1/2 inhibitor inhibited HRMEC migration and intersegmental vessel formation in zebrafish embryos. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATIONS: These data suggest that Gas6 plays a pivotal role in proliferation, migration, and sprouting of angiogenic endothelial cells in the retina and in zebrafish embryos. Furthermore, Gas6 induced angiogenic processes are induced via phosphorylation of ERK1/2.

  8. The Developmental Stage of Adult Human Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells Influences Transplant Efficacy for Vision Rescue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Davis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a common cause of central visual loss in the elderly. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cell loss occurs early in the course of AMD and RPE cell transplantation holds promise to slow disease progression. We report that subretinal transplantation of RPE stem cell (RPESC-derived RPE cells (RPESC-RPE preserved vision in a rat model of RPE cell dysfunction. Importantly, the stage of differentiation that RPESC-RPE acquired prior to transplantation influenced the efficacy of vision rescue. Whereas cells at all stages of differentiation tested rescued photoreceptor layer morphology, an intermediate stage of RPESC-RPE differentiation obtained after 4 weeks of culture was more consistent at vision rescue than progeny that were differentiated for 2 weeks or 8 weeks of culture. Our results indicate that the developmental stage of RPESC-RPE significantly influences the efficacy of RPE cell replacement, which affects the therapeutic application of these cells for AMD.

  9. Müller glia activation in response to inherited retinal degeneration is highly varied and disease-specific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Hippert

    Full Text Available Despite different aetiologies, most inherited retinal disorders culminate in photoreceptor loss, which induces concomitant changes in the neural retina, one of the most striking being reactive gliosis by Müller cells. It is typically assumed that photoreceptor loss leads to an upregulation of glial fibrilliary acidic protein (Gfap and other intermediate filament proteins, together with other gliosis-related changes, including loss of integrity of the outer limiting membrane (OLM and deposition of proteoglycans. However, this is based on a mix of both injury-induced and genetic causes of photoreceptor loss. There are very few longitudinal studies of gliosis in the retina and none comparing these changes across models over time. Here, we present a comprehensive spatiotemporal assessment of features of gliosis in the degenerating murine retina that involves Müller glia. Specifically, we assessed Gfap, vimentin and chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG levels and outer limiting membrane (OLM integrity over time in four murine models of inherited photoreceptor degeneration that encompass a range of disease severities (Crb1rd8/rd8, Prph2+/Δ307, Rho-/-, Pde6brd1/rd1. These features underwent very different changes, depending upon the disease-causing mutation, and that these changes are not correlated with disease severity. Intermediate filament expression did indeed increase with disease progression in Crb1rd8/rd8 and Prph2+/Δ307, but decreased in the Prph2+/Δ307 and Pde6brd1/rd1 models. CSPG deposition usually, but not always, followed the trends in intermediate filament expression. The OLM adherens junctions underwent significant remodelling in all models, but with differences in the composition of the resulting junctions; in Rho-/- mice, the adherens junctions maintained the typical rod-Müller glia interactions, while in the Pde6brd1/rd1 model they formed predominantly between Müller cells in late stage of degeneration. Together, these

  10. Autophagy Regulates Proteasome Inhibitor-Induced Pigmentation in Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Koskela, Ali; Kivinen, Niko; Viiri, Johanna; Hyttinen, Juha M T; Reinisalo, Mika; Koistinen, Arto; Uusitalo, Hannu; Sinha, Debasish; Skottman, Heli; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2017-05-19

    The impairment of autophagic and proteasomal cleansing together with changes in pigmentation has been documented in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell degeneration. However, the function and co-operation of these mechanisms in melanosome-containing RPE cells is still unclear. We show that inhibition of proteasomal degradation with MG-132 or autophagy with bafilomycin A1 increased the accumulation of premelanosomes and autophagic structures in human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived RPE cells. Consequently, upregulation of the autophagy marker p62 (also known as sequestosome-1, SQSTM1) was confirmed in Western blot and perinuclear staining. Interestingly, cells treated with the adenosine monophosphatedependent protein kinase activator, AICAR (5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide), decreased the proteasome inhibitor-induced accumulation of premelanosomes, increased the amount of autophagosomes and eradicated the protein expression of p62 and LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3). These results revealed that autophagic machinery is functional in hESC-RPE cells and may regulate cellular pigmentation with proteasomes.

  11. High glucose concentration induces elevated expression of anti-oxidant and proteolytic enzymes in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Tomoko; Yamane, Ken; Minamoto, Atsushi; Tsukamoto, Hidetoshi; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Izumi, Shunsuke; Hoppe, George; Sears, Jonathan E; Mishima, Hiromu K

    2006-09-01

    We investigated the differential protein expression patterns of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells exposed to increased glucose concentrations. Cultured human RPE cells (ARPE-19) were exposed for 4 days with normal blood glucose concentration (5.5 mM D-glucose), followed by exposure to either normal (5.5 mM) or high (33 mM) concentrations of D-glucose for 48h. Protein extracts of glucose-treated RPE cells were then subjected to comparative proteome analysis based on 2-D gel electrophoresis. Protein spots were visualized by silver staining. The differentially expressed proteins were excised and digested in-gel with trypsin, then analysed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The expression levels of cathepsin B, glutathione peroxidase and heat shock protein 27 were increased, and that of protein disulfide isomerase decreased in high glucose treated RPE compared to normal glucose. The isoelectric point of copper/zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) shifted toward acidic region in response to high glucose. Cu/Zn-SOD activity in high glucose group was significantly lower than that in normal glucose group (P<0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test). Systematic survey of protein expression has revealed that RPE cells respond to acute, pathologically high glucose levels by the elevated expression of anti-oxidant and proteolytic enzymes.

  12. Comparison of the in vitro toxicity of indocyanine green to that of trypan blue in human retinal pigment epithelium cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Jeffrey S; Proulx, Alain A; Gonder, John R; Mao, Alexander J; Hutnik, Cindy M L

    2004-07-01

    To compare the in vitro toxicity of indocyanine green (ICG) to that of trypan blue (TB) in human retinal pigment epithelium cell cultures. The use of ICG and TB in macular hole surgery is discussed. In vitro cell biology experimental study. The ICG dye and TB were applied to ARPE-19, a commercially available human retinal pigment epithelium cell line. Cultures were established and maintained according to supplier protocols. The ICG dye, TB or Hank's balanced salt solution (controls) were then applied to the cells at varying concentrations and over various exposure periods. Fiberoptic light was also applied to cells to assess for the possibility of a potentiating phototoxic effect. Cell viability fractions were determined using a well-studied mitochondrial dehydrogenase assay. The TB was not toxic to the retinal pigment epithelium cell cultures at any concentration or over any period of exposure, whereas ICG dye demonstrated dose-dependent and exposure-dependent toxicity. The ICG dye was found to be toxic to the cells at all tested concentrations between 5.0 mg/ml (stock concentration, 26.1% cell survival) and 0.5 mg/ml (92.8% cell survival) over a 3-minute exposure. No toxicity to TB was seen at the stock concentration of 1.5 mg/mL. Addition of light to the cultures did not significantly alter cell viability with either dye. Long periods of exposure, 2 hours, 24 hours, and 72 hours, to minute concentrations of either dye did not produce significant cell death. Indocyanine green demonstrates more toxicity than TB to human retinal pigment epithelium cell cultures. This is independent of any phototoxic potentiating effect of fiberoptic light or solvent toxicity. A clinically useful concentration of 0.5-mg/ml ICG causes low cytotoxicity at 3 minutes' exposure (cell survival 92.8%) and shows no detectable toxicity at 1-minute exposure (cell survival 102%).

  13. Possible protective role of the ABCA4 gene c.1268A>G missense variant in Stargardt disease and syndromic retinitis pigmentosa in a Sicilian family: Preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Rosalia; Donato, Luigi; Venza, Isabella; Scimone, Concetta; Aragona, Pasquale; Sidoti, Antonina

    2017-04-01

    In the wide horizon of ophthalmologically rare diseases among retinitis pigmentosa forms, Stargardt disease has gradually assumed a significant role due to its heterogeneity. In the present study, we aimed to support one of two opposite hypotheses concerning the causative or protective role of heterozygous c.1268A>G missense variant of the ABCA4 gene in Stargardt disease and in syndromic retinitis pigmentosa. This study was based on a family consisting of three members: proband, age 54, with high myopia, myopic chorioretinitis and retinal dystrophy; wife, age 65, with mild symptoms; daughter, age 29, asymptomatic. After genetic counseling, ABCA4 and RP1 gene analysis was performed. The results highlighted an important genetic picture. The proband was found to carry two variant RP1 SNPs, rs2293869 (c.2953A>T) and rs61739567 (c.6098G>A), and, a wild-type condition for four RP1 polymorphisms, rs444772 (c.2623G>A) and three SNPs in the 'hot-spot' region, exon 4. The proband's wife, instead, showed an opposite condition compared to her husband: a homozygous mutated condition for the first four SNPs analyzed, while the last two were wild-type. Regarding the ABCA4 gene, the proband evidenced a wild-type condition. Furthermore, the wife showed a heterozygous condition of ABCA4 rs3112831 (c.1268A>G). As expected, the daughter presented heterozygosity for all variants of both genes. In conclusion, even though the c.1268A>G missense variant of the ABCA4 gene has often been reported as causative of disease, and in other cases protective of disease, in our family case, the variant appears to reduce or delay the risk of onset of Stargardt disease.

  14. XLPRA: A canine retinal degeneration inherited as an X-linked trait

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acland, G.M.; Blanton, S.H.; Hershfield, B.; Aguirre, G.D.

    1994-08-01

    Breeding studies are reported of a previously undescribed hereditary retinal degeneration identified in the Siberian Husky breed of dog. This disorder clinically resembles the previously reported autosomal recessive canine hereditary retinal degenerations collectively termed progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). However, the pedigree of the propositus, a male Siberian Husky, exhibited an X-linked pattern of transmission. This dog was outcrossed to three phenotypically normal female laboratory Beagles and two of their F1 daughters were bred to a phenotypically normal male Beagle, producing affected males in the F2 generation. Subsequent inbreedings produced further affected males and affected females as well. X-linked transmission was established by exclusion of alternative modes of inheritance and, consequently, the disease has been termed X-linked progressive retinal atrophy (XLPRA). This is the first reported X-linked retinal degeneration in an animal. Because of the many similarities of PRA in dogs to retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in humans, this new disease may not only represent the first animal model of X-linked RP (XLRP) but may well be a true homolog of one of the XLRP loci (RP2, RP3, RP6). It is the first retinal degeneration in dogs that can be assigned to an identified canine chromosome, and the first for which linkage mapping offers a realistic approach to proceed by positional cloning towards identifying the responsible gene. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Dietary hyperglycemia, glycemic index and age-related metabolic retinal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glycemic index (GI) indicates how fast blood glucose is raised after consuming a carbohydrate-containing food. Human metabolic studies indicate that GI is related to patho-physiological responses after meals. Compared with a low-GI meal, a high-GI meal is characterized with hyperglycemia during ...

  16. Retinal Disease Course in Usher Syndrome 1B Due to MYO7A Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Samuel G.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Gibbs, Dan; Sumaroka, Alexander; Roman, Alejandro J.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Olivares, Melani B.; Russell, Robert C.; Steinberg, Janet D.; Kenna, Margaret A.; Kimberling, William J.; Rehm, Heidi L.; Williams, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the disease course in Usher syndrome type IB (USH1B) caused by myosin 7A (MYO7A) gene mutations. Methods. USH1B patients (n = 33, ages 2–61) representing 25 different families were studied by ocular examination, kinetic and chromatic static perimetry, dark adaptometry, and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Consequences of the mutant alleles were predicted. Results. All MYO7A patients had severely abnormal ERGs, but kinetic fields revealed regional patterns of visual loss that suggested a disease sequence. Rod-mediated vision could be lost to different degrees in the first decades of life. Cone vision followed a more predictable and slower decline. Central vision ranged from normal to reduced in the first four decades of life and thereafter was severely abnormal. Dark adaptation kinetics was normal. Photoreceptor layer thickness in a wide region of central retina could differ dramatically between patients of comparable ages; and there were examples of severe losses in childhood as well as relative preservation in patients in the third decade of life. Comparisons were made between the mutant alleles in mild versus more severe phenotypes. Conclusions. A disease sequence in USH1B leads from generally full but impaired visual fields to residual small central islands. At most disease stages, there was preserved temporal peripheral field, a potential target for early phase clinical trials of gene therapy. From data comparing patients' rod disease in this cohort, the authors speculate that null MYO7A alleles could be associated with milder dysfunction and fewer photoreceptor structural losses at ages when other genotypes show more severe phenotypes. PMID:21873662

  17. Gene Therapy in a Large Animal Model of PDE6A-Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freya M. Mowat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite mutations in the rod phosphodiesterase 6-alpha (PDE6A gene being well-recognized as a cause of human retinitis pigmentosa, no definitive treatments have been developed to treat this blinding disease. We performed a trial of retinal gene augmentation in the Pde6a mutant dog using Pde6a delivery by capsid-mutant adeno-associated virus serotype 8, previously shown to have a rapid onset of transgene expression in the canine retina. Subretinal injections were performed in 10 dogs at 29–44 days of age, and electroretinography and vision testing were performed to assess functional outcome. Retinal structure was assessed using color fundus photography, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and histology. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine transgene expression and expression of other retinal genes. Treatment resulted in improvement in dim light vision and evidence of rod function on electroretinographic examination. Photoreceptor layer thickness in the treated area was preserved compared with the contralateral control vector treated or uninjected eye. Improved rod and cone photoreceptor survival, rhodopsin localization, cyclic GMP levels and bipolar cell dendrite distribution was observed in treated areas. Some adverse effects including foci of retinal separation, foci of retinal degeneration and rosette formation were identified in both AAV-Pde6a and control vector injected regions. This is the first description of successful gene augmentation for Pde6a retinitis pigmentosa in a large animal model. Further studies will be necessary to optimize visual outcomes and minimize complications before translation to human studies.

  18. Heritability of Retinal Vascular Fractals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Broe, Rebecca; Kessel, Line

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the genetic contribution to the pattern of retinal vascular branching expressed by its fractal dimension. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 50 monozygotic and 49 dizygotic, same-sex twin pairs aged 20 to 46 years. In 50°, disc-centered fundus photographs, the reti...... vasculature may affect the retinal response to potential vascular disease in later life....

  19. Fasciculations in human hereditary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Aliyev, Rahim

    2015-06-01

    Fasciculations are a manifestation of peripheral nerve hyperexcitability in addition to myokymia, neuromyotonia, cramps, or tetany. Fasciculations occur in hereditary and non-hereditary diseases. Among the hereditary diseases, fasciculations are most frequently reported in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Among the non-hereditary diseases, fasciculations occur most frequently in peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndromes (Isaac's syndrome, voltage-gated potassium channelopathy, cramp fasciculation syndrome, Morvan syndrome). If the cause of fasciculations remains unknown, they are called benign. Systematically reviewing the literature about fasciculations in hereditary disease shows that fasciculations can be a phenotypic feature in bulbospinal muscular atrophy (BSMA), GM2-gangliosidosis, triple-A syndrome, or hereditary neuropathy. Additionally, fasciculations have been reported in familial amyloidosis, spinocerebellar ataxias, Huntington's disease, Rett syndrome, central nervous system disease due to L1-cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) mutations, Fabry's disease, or Gerstmann-Sträussler disease. Rarely, fasciculations may be a phenotypic feature in patients with mitochondrial disorders or other myopathies. Fasciculations are part of the phenotype in much more genetic disorders than commonly assumed. Fasciculations not only occur in motor neuron disease, but also in hereditary neuropathy, spinocerebellar ataxia, GM2-gangliosidosis, Huntington's disease, Rett syndrome, Fabry's disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler disease, mitochondrial disorders, or muscular dystrophies.

  20. Uncovering disease-disease relationships through the incomplete human interactome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menche, Jörg; Sharma, Amitabh; Kitsak, Maksim; Ghiassian, Susan; Vidal, Marc; Loscalzo, Joseph; Barabási, Albert-László

    2015-01-01

    According to the disease module hypothesis the cellular components associated with a disease segregate in the same neighborhood of the human interactome, the map of biologically relevant molecular interactions. Yet, given the incompleteness of the interactome and the limited knowledge of disease-associated genes, it is not obvious if the available data has sufficient coverage to map out modules associated with each disease. Here we derive mathematical conditions for the identifiability of disease modules and show that the network-based location of each disease module determines its pathobiological relationship to other diseases. For example, diseases with overlapping network modules show significant co-expression patterns, symptom similarity, and comorbidity, while diseases residing in separated network neighborhoods are clinically distinct. These tools represent an interactome-based platform to predict molecular commonalities between clinically related diseases, even if they do not share disease genes. PMID:25700523

  1. Mouse Models of NMNAT1-Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA9) Recapitulate Key Features of the Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Scott H; Charette, Jeremy R; Staniszewska, Magdalena; Shi, Lan Ying; Brown, Steve D M; Stone, Lisa; Liu, Qin; Hicks, Wanda L; Collin, Gayle B; Bowl, Michael R; Krebs, Mark P; Nishina, Patsy M; Pierce, Eric A

    2016-07-01

    The nicotinamide nucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (NMNAT1) enzyme is essential for regenerating the nuclear pool of NAD(+) in all nucleated cells in the body, and mounting evidence also suggests that it has a separate role in neuroprotection. Recently, mutations in the NMNAT1 gene were associated with Leber congenital amaurosis, a severe retinal degenerative disease that causes blindness during infancy. Availability of a reliable mammalian model of NMNAT1-Leber congenital amaurosis would assist in determining the mechanisms through which disruptions in NMNAT1 lead to retinal cell degeneration and would provide a resource for testing treatment options. To this end, we identified two separate N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-generated mouse lines that harbor either a p.V9M or a p.D243G mutation. Both mouse models recapitulate key aspects of the human disease and confirm the pathogenicity of mutant NMNAT1. Homozygous Nmnat1 mutant mice develop a rapidly progressing chorioretinal disease that begins with photoreceptor degeneration and includes attenuation of the retinal vasculature, optic atrophy, and retinal pigment epithelium loss. Retinal function deteriorates in both mouse lines, and, in the more rapidly progressing homozygous Nmnat1(V9M) mutant mice, the electroretinogram becomes undetectable and the pupillary light response weakens. These mouse models offer an opportunity for investigating the cellular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis, evaluating potential therapies for NMNAT1-Leber congenital amaurosis, and conducting in situ studies on NMNAT1 function and NAD(+) metabolism. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. High glucose-induced barrier impairment of human retinal pigment epithelium is ameliorated by treatment with Goji berry extracts through modulation of cAMP levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Barbara; Capuzzo, Antonio; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Human retinal pigment epithelium cells were used to investigate the mechanisms underlying blood-retinal barrier disruption under conditions of chronic hyperglycemia. The treatment with 25 mM glucose caused a rapid drop in the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), which was reversed by the addition of either a methanolic extract from Goji (Lycium barbarum L.) berries or its main component, taurine. Intracellular cAMP levels increased concurrently with the high glucose-induced TEER decrease, and were correlated to an increased activity of the cytosolic isoform of the enzyme adenylyl cyclase. The treatment with plant extract or taurine restored control levels. Data are discussed in view of a possible prevention approach for diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The influences of purple sweet potato anthocyanin on the growth characteristics of human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Sun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthocyanins have been proven to be beneficial to the eyes. However, information is scarce about the effects of purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas, L. anthocyanin (PSPA, a class of anthocyanins derived from purple sweet potato roots, on visual health. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether PSPA could have influences on the growth characteristics (cellular morphology, survival, and proliferation of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells, which perform essential functions for the visual process. Methods: The RPE cell line D407 was used in the present study. The cytotoxicity of PSPA was assessed by MTT assay. Then, cellular morphology, viability, cell cycle, Ki67expression, and PI3K/MAPK activation of RPE cells treated with PSPA were determined. Results: PSPA exhibited dose-dependent promotion of RPE cell proliferation at concentrations ranging from 10 to 1,000 µg/ml. RPE cells treated with PSPA demonstrated a predominantly polygonal morphology in a mosaic arrangement, and colony-like cells displayed numerous short apical microvilli and typical ultrastructure. PSPA treatment also resulted in a better platform growing status, statistically higher viability, an increase in the S-phase, and more Ki67+ cells. However, neither pAkt nor pERK were detected in either group. Conclusions: We found that PSPA maintained high cell viability, boosted DNA synthesis, and preserved a high percentage of continuously cycling cells to promote cell survival and division without changing cell morphology. This paper lays the foundation for further research about the damage-protective activities of PSPA on RPE cells or human vision.

  4. Reduced Expression of Cytoskeletal and Extracellular Matrix Genes in Human Adult Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells Exposed to Simulated Microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Corydon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Microgravity (µg has adverse effects on the eye of humans in space. The risk of visual impairment is therefore one of the leading health concerns for NASA. The impact of µg on human adult retinal epithelium (ARPE-19 cells is unknown. Methods: In this study we investigated the influence of simulated µg (s-µg; 5 and 10 days (d, using a Random Positioning Machine (RPM, on ARPE-19 cells. We performed phase-contrast/fluorescent microscopy, qRT-PCR, Western blotting and pathway analysis. Results: Following RPM-exposure a subset of ARPE-19 cells formed multicellular spheroids (MCS, whereas the majority of the cells remained adherent (AD. After 5d, alterations of F-actin and fibronectin were observed which reverted after 10d-exposure, suggesting a time-dependent adaptation to s-µg. Gene expression analysis of 12 genes involved in cell structure, shape, adhesion, migration, and angiogenesis suggested significant changes after a 10d-RPM-exposure. 11 genes were down-regulated in AD and MCS 10d-RPM-samples compared to 1g, whereas FLK1 was up-regulated in 5d- and 10d-RPM-MCS-samples. Similarly, TIMP1 was up-regulated in 5d-RPM-samples, whereas the remaining genes were down-regulated in 5d-RPM-samples. Western blotting revealed similar changes in VEGF, β-actin, laminin and fibronectin of 5d-RPM-samples compared to 10d, whereas different alterations of β-tubulin and vimentin were observed. The pathway analysis showed complementing effects of VEGF and integrin β-1. Conclusions: These findings clearly show that s-µg induces significant alterations in the F-actin-cytoskeleton and cytoskeleton-related proteins of ARPE-19, in addition to changes in cell growth behavior and gene expression patterns involved in cell structure, growth, shape, migration, adhesion and angiogenesis.

  5. Polarized Secretion of PEDF from Human Embryonic Stem Cell–Derived RPE Promotes Retinal Progenitor Cell Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Danhong; Deng, Xuemei; Spee, Christine; Sonoda, Shozo; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Barron, Ernesto; Pera, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Human embryonic stem cell–derived RPE (hES-RPE) transplantation is a promising therapy for atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD); however, future therapeutic approaches may consider co-transplantation of hES-RPE with retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) as a replacement source for lost photoreceptors. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of polarization of hES-RPE monolayers on their ability to promote survival of RPCs. Methods. The hES-3 cell line was used for derivation of RPE. Polarization of hES-RPE was achieved by prolonged growth on permeable inserts. RPCs were isolated from 16- to 18-week-gestation human fetal eyes. ELISA was performed to measure pigment epithelium–derived factor (PEDF) levels from conditioned media. Results. Pigmented RPE-like cells appeared as early as 4 weeks in culture and were subcultured at 8 weeks. Differentiated hES-RPE had a normal chromosomal karyotype. Phenotypically polarized hES-RPE cells showed expression of RPE-specific genes. Polarized hES-RPE showed prominent expression of PEDF in apical cytoplasm and a marked increase in secretion of PEDF into the medium compared with nonpolarized culture. RPCs grown in the presence of supernatants from polarized hES-RPE showed enhanced survival, which was ablated by the presence of anti-PEDF antibody. Conclusions. hES-3 cells can be differentiated into functionally polarized hES-RPE cells that exhibit characteristics similar to those of native RPE. On polarization, hES-RPE cells secrete high levels of PEDF that can support RPC survival. These experiments suggest that polarization of hES-RPE would be an important feature for promotion of RPC survival in future cell therapy for atrophic AMD. PMID:21087957

  6. Introduction of the MDM2 T309G Mutation in Primary Human Retinal Epithelial Cells Enhances Experimental Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guohong; Duan, Yajiang; Ma, Gaoen; Wu, Wenyi; Hu, Zhengping; Chen, Na; Chee, Yewlin; Cui, Jing; Samad, Arif; Matsubara, Joanne A.; Mukai, Shizuo; D'Amore, Patricia A.; Lei, Hetian

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The murine double minute (MDM)2 is a critical negative regulator of the p53 tumor suppressor, and MDM2 SNP309G is associated with a higher risk of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR); in addition, the MDM2 T309G created using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/associated endonuclease (Cas)9 enhances normal rabbit vitreous-induced expression of MDM2 and survival of primary human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells in vitro. The goal of this study was to determine whether this MDM2 T309G contributes to the development of experimental PVR. Methods hRPE cells expressing MDM2 T309G or T309T only were treated with vitreous from human PVR donors (HV). The expression of MDM2 and p53 in the treated cells was examined by Western blot. The in vitro vitreous-induced cellular responses, such as contraction were assessed, and PVR was induced by intravitreal injection of the hRPE cells with MDM2 T309G or T309T only into rabbit eyes. Results Western blot analyses indicated that treatment of hRPE cells with HV led to a significant increase (1.7 ± 0.2-fold) in the expression of MDM2 and a significant decrease in p53 in the cells expressing MDM2 T309G compared with those with MDM2 T309T. In addition, HV promoted contraction of the hRPE cells expressing MDM2 T309G significantly more than those with MDM2 T309T only. Furthermore, MDM2 T309G in the hRPE cells enhanced the development of PVR in a rabbit model. Conclusions The MDM2 SNP309 in RPE cells enhances their potential of PVR pathogenesis. PMID:29049737

  7. Does biodiversity protect humans against infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L; Lafferty, Kevin D; DeLeo, Giulio; Young, Hillary S; Hudson, Peter J; Kuris, Armand M

    2014-04-01

    Control of human infectious disease has been promoted as a valuable ecosystem service arising from the conservation of biodiversity. There are two commonly discussed mechanisms by which biodiversity loss could increase rates of infectious disease in a landscape. First, loss of competitors or predators could facilitate an increase in the abundance of competent reservoir hosts. Second, biodiversity loss could disproportionately affect non-competent, or less competent reservoir hosts, which would otherwise interfere with pathogen transmission to human populations by, for example, wasting the bites of infected vectors. A negative association between biodiversity and disease risk, sometimes called the "dilution effect hypothesis," has been supported for a few disease agents, suggests an exciting win-win outcome for the environment and society, and has become a pervasive topic in the disease ecology literature. Case studies have been assembled to argue that the dilution effect is general across disease agents. Less touted are examples in which elevated biodiversity does not affect or increases infectious disease risk for pathogens of public health concern. In order to assess the likely generality of the dilution effect, we review the association between biodiversity and public health across a broad variety of human disease agents. Overall, we hypothesize that conditions for the dilution effect are unlikely to be met for most important diseases of humans. Biodiversity probably has little net effect on most human infectious diseases but, when it does have an effect, observation and basic logic suggest that biodiversity will be more likely to increase than to decrease infectious disease risk.

  8. Long-term safety and efficacy of human-induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) grafts in a preclinical model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Erol, Deniz; Yang, Jin; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Davis, Richard J; Egli, Dieter; Tsang, Stephen H

    2012-12-06

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved phase I/II clinical trials for embryonic stem (ES) cell-based retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) transplantation, but this allograft transplantation requires lifelong immunosuppressive therapy. Autografts from patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells offer an alternative solution to this problem. However, more data are required to establish the safety and efficacy of iPS transplantation in animal models before moving iPS therapy into clinical trials. This study examines the efficacy of iPS transplantation in restoring functional vision in Rpe65(rd12)/Rpe65(rd12) mice, a clinically relevant model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Human iPS cells were differentiated into morphologically and functionally RPE-like tissue. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblots confirmed RPE fate. The iPS-derived RPE cells were injected into the subretinal space of Rpe65(rd12)/Rpe65(rd12) mice at 2 d postnatally. After transplantation, the long-term surviving iPS-derived RPE graft colocalized with the host native RPE cells and assimilated into the host retina without disruption. None of the mice receiving transplants developed tumors over their lifetimes. Furthermore, electroretinogram, a standard method for measuring efficacy in human trials, demonstrated improved visual function in recipients over the lifetime of this RP mouse model. Our study provides the first direct evidence of functional recovery in a clinically relevant model of retinal degeneration using iPS transplantation and supports the feasibility of autologous iPS cell transplantation for retinal and macular degenerations featuring significant RPE loss.

  9. Towards a Completely Implantable, Light-Sensitive Intraocular Retinal Prosthesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Humayun, M

    2001-01-01

    An electronic retinal prosthesis is under development to treat retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration, two presently incurable diseases of the outer retina that afflict millions world-wide...

  10. Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) regulates autophagy in human retinal pigment epithelial cells: A potential role for reducing UVB light-induced retinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chao-Peng; Yao, Jin; Tao, Zhi-Fu; Li, Xiu-Miao; Jiang, Qin, E-mail: jqin710@vip.sina.com; Yan, Biao, E-mail: yanbiao1982@hotmail.com

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •UVB irradiation induces RPE autophagy. •EGCG treatment represses UVB-mediated autophagy. •EGCG regulates UVB-mediated autophagy through mTOR signaling pathway. •EGCG sensitizes RPE cells to UVB-induced damage in an autophagy-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process involved in protein and organelle degradation via the lysosomal pathway that has been linked in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). UVB irradiation-mediated degeneration of the macular retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is an important hallmark of AMD, which is along with the change in RPE autophagy. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of RPE autophagy may offer an alternative therapeutic target in AMD. Here, we found that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic compound from green tea, plays a regulatory role in UVB irradiation-induced autophagy in RPE cells. UVB irradiation results in a marked increase in the amount of LC3-II protein in a dose-dependent manner. EGCG administration leads to a significant reduction in the formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes. mTOR signaling activation is required for EGCG-induced LC3-II formation, as evidenced by the fact that EGCG-induced LC3-II formation is significantly impaired by rapamycin administration. Moreover, EGCG significantly alleviates the toxic effects of UVB irradiation on RPE cells in an autophagy-dependent manner. Collectively, our study reveals a novel role of EGCG in RPE autophagy. EGCG may be exploited as a potential therapeutic reagent for the treatment of pathological conditions associated with abnormal autophagy.

  11. INTRAVITREAL DEXAMETHASONE IMPLANT FOR THE TREATMENT OF REFRACTORY MACULAR EDEMA IN RETINAL VASCULAR DISEASES: Results of the KKESH International Collaborative Retina Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshahrani, Saeed T; Dolz-Marco, Rosa; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Diaz-Llopis, Manuel; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of intravitreal dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex) for treating refractory macular edema in retinal vascular diseases. This is a retrospective consecutive series of 53 eyes with refractory macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion (13 eyes), branch retinal vein occlusion (14 eyes), and diabetic macular edema (26 eyes) treated with a single 0.7 mg dexamethasone implant. Data were collected on best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, and central macular thickness preoperatively and at 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Baseline best-corrected visual acuity was 20/160 and improved statistically significantly to 20/80 and 20/60 at 1 months and 3 months, respectively (P 0.05). The central macular thickness at baseline was 569.96 ± 178.11 μm, and it decreased statistically significantly to 305.81 ± 155.94 μm, 386 ± 210.79 μm, and 446.41 ± 221.21 μm at 1, 3 and 6 months, respectively (P < 0.05, all visits compared with baseline). Fourteen (26%) eyes developed high intraocular pressure after implantation and was successfully controlled with topical medications, and cataract progressed in 1 (1.8%) eye. The dexamethasone implant improved macular edema in refractory cases resulting in statistically significant improvements in best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness that remained stable to 3 months and 6 months, respectively.

  12. Enhancing retinal images by nonlinear registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molodij, G.; Ribak, E. N.; Glanc, M.; Chenegros, G.

    2015-05-01

    Being able to image the human retina in high resolution opens a new era in many important fields, such as pharmacological research for retinal diseases, researches in human cognition, nervous system, metabolism and blood stream, to name a few. In this paper, we propose to share the knowledge acquired in the fields of optics and imaging in solar astrophysics in order to improve the retinal imaging in the perspective to perform a medical diagnosis. The main purpose would be to assist health care practitioners by enhancing the spatial resolution of the retinal images and increase the level of confidence of the abnormal feature detection. We apply a nonlinear registration method using local correlation tracking to increase the field of view and follow structure evolutions using correlation techniques borrowed from solar astronomy technique expertise. Another purpose is to define the tracer of movements after analyzing local correlations to follow the proper motions of an image from one moment to another, such as changes in optical flows that would be of high interest in a medical diagnosis.

  13. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  14. Cytomegalovirus Retinitis and the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: Bench to Bedside: LXVII Edward Jackson Memorial Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabs, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To update information on cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and to integrate information on its pathogenesis and clinical outcomes. Design Literature review. Methods Selected articles from the medical literature, particularly large epidemiologic studies, including the Johns Hopkins Cytomegalovirus Retinitis Cohort Study, the Longitudinal Study of the Ocular Complications of AIDS, and the Cytomegalovirus Retinitis and Viral Resistance Study, were reviewed. Clinical information is discussed in light of knowledge on CMV, its pathogenesis, and its interactions with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Results Cytomegalovirus uses several mechanisms to evade the immune system and establish latent infection in immunologically normal hosts. With immune deficiency, such as late-stage AIDS, CMV reactivates, is disseminated to the eye, and establishes a productive infection, resulting in retinal necrosis. HIV and CMV potentiate each other: CMV accelerates HIV disease, and CMV retinitis is associated with increased mortality. Randomized clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of treatments for CMV retinitis. Systemically-administered treatment for CMV retinitis decreases AIDS mortality. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), effectively suppresses HIV replication, resulting in immune recovery, which, if sufficient, controls retinitis without anti-CMV therapy. Resistant CMV, detected in the blood, correlates with resistant virus in the eye and is associated with worse clinical outcomes, including mortality. Host factors, including host genetics and access to care, play a role in the development of CMV retinitis. Conclusions Clinical outcomes of CMV retinitis in patients with AIDS are dependent on characteristics of the virus and host and on HIV–CMV interactions. PMID:21168815

  15. Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells as Functional Models for the RPE In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Ablonczy, Zsolt; Dahrouj, Mohammad; Tang, Peter H.; Liu, Yueying; Sambamurti, Kumar; Marmorstein, Alan D.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of the characteristics of the most commonly used RPE models show that fetal human RPE cells resemble a functionally normal RPE, while ARPE-19 cells correspond to a pathological or aged RPE. Thus, the two cell types can be used to understand distinct aspects of RPE function.

  16. Optic nerve and retinal features in uveitis associated with juvenile systemic granulomatous disease (Blau syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreño, Ester; Guly, Catherine M; Chilov, Michael; Hinchcliffe, Annie; Arostegui, Juan I; Lee, Richard W J; Dick, Andrew D; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V

    2015-05-01

    To determine whether patients with juvenile systemic granulomatous disease (JSGD) (Blau syndrome) and uveitis have a characteristic ocular phenotype. Clinical and imaging data were collected retrospectively from patients attending the Regional Combined Paediatric Rheumatology and Ocular Inflammatory Service, Bristol Eye Hospital. General demographic information, laterality of the uveitis, age at onset, anatomical classification and course of the uveitis, clinical phenotype and specific NOD2 mutation were recorded for each patient. Seventeen eyes from nine patients (five males; four females) were included in the study. Mean age at the disease onset was 15 months, range 1-84 months. Eight patients had bilateral uveitis. Anterior uveitis was present in five eyes, intermediate uveitis in two eyes, and there were 10 eyes with panuveitis, manifesting as multifocal choroiditis. Appearance of optic disc included indistinct disc margins in six eyes, optic nerve head pallor in six eyes, optic disc vessel sheathing in four eyes, and there was peripapillary hypo/hyperpigmentation in 13 eyes accompanied with characteristic peripapillary nodular excrescences. Among NOD2 mutations, the p.R334W was the most commonly detected (n: four cases), and three patients carried novel variants, the p.E338D and p.D390V variants in one patient, and the p.H520Y and p.Q809K variants in two different patients. Chronic bilateral panuveitis and a nodular peripapillary appearance in childhood onset uveitis are characteristic features of JSGD, which support the need for an appropriate genetic NOD2 analysis. © 2014 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Optical modulation of transgene expression in retinal pigment epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanker, D.; Lavinsky, D.; Chalberg, T.; Mandel, Y.; Huie, P.; Dalal, R.; Marmor, M.

    2013-03-01

    Over a million people in US alone are visually impaired due to the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The current treatment is monthly intravitreal injections of a protein which inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, thereby slowing progression of the disease. The immense financial and logistical burden of millions of intravitreal injections signifies an urgent need to develop more long-lasting and cost-effective treatments for this and other retinal diseases. Viral transfection of ocular cells allows creation of a "biofactory" that secretes therapeutic proteins. This technique has been proven successful in non-human primates, and is now being evaluated in clinical trials for wet AMD. However, there is a critical need to down-regulate gene expression in the case of total resolution of retinal condition, or if patient has adverse reaction to the trans-gene products. The site for genetic therapy of AMD and many other retinal diseases is the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We developed and tested in pigmented rabbits, an optical method to down-regulate transgene expression in RPE following vector delivery, without retinal damage. Microsecond exposures produced by a rapidly scanning laser vaporize melanosomes and destroy a predetermined fraction of the RPE cells selectively. RPE continuity is restored within days by migration and proliferation of adjacent RPE, but since the transgene is not integrated into the nucleus it is not replicated. Thus, the decrease in transgene expression can be precisely determined by the laser pattern density and further reduced by repeated treatment without affecting retinal structure and function.

  18. Live-cell imaging: new avenues to investigate retinal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Lahne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensing and responding to our environment requires functional neurons that act in concert. Neuronal cell loss resulting from degenerative diseases cannot be replaced in humans, causing a functional impairment to integrate and/or respond to sensory cues. In contrast, zebrafish (Danio rerio possess an endogenous capacity to regenerate lost neurons. Here, we will focus on the processes that lead to neuronal regeneration in the zebrafish retina. Dying retinal neurons release a damage signal, tumor necrosis factor α, which induces the resident radial glia, the Müller glia, to reprogram and re-enter the cell cycle. The Müller glia divide asymmetrically to produce a Müller glia that exits the cell cycle and a neuronal progenitor cell. The arising neuronal progenitor cells undergo several rounds of cell divisions before they migrate to the site of damage to differentiate into the neuronal cell types that were lost. Molecular and immunohistochemical studies have predominantly provided insight into the mechanisms that regulate retinal regeneration. However, many processes during retinal regeneration are dynamic and require live-cell imaging to fully discern the underlying mechanisms. Recently, a multiphoton imaging approach of adult zebrafish retinal cultures was developed. We will discuss the use of live-cell imaging, the currently available tools and those that need to be developed to advance our knowledge on major open questions in the field of retinal regeneration.

  19. Progress in gene targeting and gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, M.M.; Erven, A. [Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we localized disease genes involved in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited retinal degeneration, close to the rhodopsin and peripherin genes on 3q and 6p. Subsequently, we and others identified mutations in these genes in RP patients. Currently animal models for human retinopathies are being generated using gene targeting by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Genomic clones for retinal genes including rhodopsin and peripherin have been obtained from a phage library carrying mouse DNA isogenic with the ES cell line (CC1.2). The peripherin clone has been sequenced to establish the genomic structure of the mouse gene. Targeting vectors for rhodopsin and peripherin including a neomycin cassette for positive selection and thymidine kinase genes enabling selection against random intergrants are under construction. Progress in vector construction will be presented. Simultaneously we are developing systems for delivery of gene therapies to retinal tissues utilizing replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad5). Efficacy of infection subsequent to various methods of intraocular injection and with varying viral titers is being assayed using an adenovirus construct containing a CMV promoter LacZ fusion as reporter and the range of tissues infected and the level of duration of LacZ expression monitored. Viral constructs with the LacZ reporter gene under the control of retinal specific promoters such as rhodopsin and IRBP cloned into pXCJL.1 are under construction. An update on developments in photoreceptor cell-directed expression of virally delivered genes will be presented.

  20. Retinal nerve fiber layer and ganglion cell complex thickness assessment in patients with Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment. Preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tiganov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to investigate the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL and the macular ganglion cell complex (GCC in patients with Alzheimer`s disease and mild cognitive impairment.Methods: this study included 10 patients (20 eyes with Alzheimer`s disease, 10 patients with mild cognitive impairment and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy controls that had no history of dementia. All the subjects underwent psychiatric examination, including the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, and complete ophthalmological examination, comprising optical coherence tomography and scanning laser polarimetry.Results: there was a significant decrease in GCC thickness in patients with Alzheimer`s disease compared to the control group, global loss volume of ganglion cells was higher than in control group. there was no significant difference among the groups in terms of RNFL thickness. Weak positive correlation of GCC thickness and MMSE results was observed.Conclusion: Our data confirm the retinal involvement in Alzheimer`s disease, as reflected by loss of ganglion cells. Further studies will clear up the role and contribution of dementia in pathogenesis of optic neuropathy.

  1. Challenges and advantages in wide-field optical coherence tomography angiography imaging of the human retinal and choroidal vasculature at 1.7-MHz A-scan rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Raju; Migacz, Justin V.; Schwartz, Daniel M.; Werner, John S.; Gorczynska, Iwona

    2017-10-01

    We present noninvasive, three-dimensional, depth-resolved imaging of human retinal and choroidal blood circulation with a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system at 1065-nm center wavelength. Motion contrast OCT imaging was performed with the phase-variance OCT angiography method. A Fourier-domain mode-locked light source was used to enable an imaging rate of 1.7 MHz. We experimentally demonstrate the challenges and advantages of wide-field OCT angiography (OCTA). In the discussion, we consider acquisition time, scanning area, scanning density, and their influence on visualization of selected features of the retinal and choroidal vascular networks. The OCTA imaging was performed with a field of view of 16 deg (5 mm×5 mm) and 30 deg (9 mm×9 mm). Data were presented in en face projections generated from single volumes and in en face projection mosaics generated from up to 4 datasets. OCTA imaging at 1.7 MHz A-scan rate was compared with results obtained from a commercial OCTA instrument and with conventional ophthalmic diagnostic methods: fundus photography, fluorescein, and indocyanine green angiography. Comparison of images obtained from all methods is demonstrated using the same eye of a healthy volunteer. For example, imaging of retinal pathology is presented in three cases of advanced age-related macular degeneration.

  2. Protein Misfolding and Human Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Bross, Peter Gerd; Vang, Søren

    2006-01-01

    phenylketonuria, Parkinson's disease, α-1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, and short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Despite the differences, an emerging paradigm suggests that the cellular effects of protein misfolding provide a common framework that may contribute...... to the elucidation of the cell pathology and guide intervention and treatment strategies of many genetic and age-dependent diseases.......Protein misfolding is a common event in living cells. In young and healthy cells, the misfolded protein load is disposed of by protein quality control (PQC) systems. In aging cells and in cells from certain individuals with genetic diseases, the load may overwhelm the PQC capacity, resulting...

  3. Vitreous-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements via the Rac1 GTPase-dependent signaling pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xionggao [State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Department of Ophthalmology, Hainan Medical College, Haikou (China); Wei, Yantao; Ma, Haizhi [State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Shaochong, E-mail: zhshaochong@163.com [State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vitreous induces morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac1 is activated in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition prevents morphological changes in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition suppresses cytoskeletal rearrangements in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The vitreous-induced effects are mediated by a Rac1 GTPase/LIMK1/cofilin pathway. -- Abstract: Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is mainly caused by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration, invasion, proliferation and transformation into fibroblast-like cells that produce the extracellular matrix (ECM). The vitreous humor is known to play an important role in PVR. An epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) of human RPE cells induced by 25% vitreous treatment has been linked to stimulation of the mesenchymal phenotype, migration and invasion. Here, we characterized the effects of the vitreous on the cell morphology and cytoskeleton in human RPE cells. The signaling pathway that mediates these effects was investigated. Serum-starved RPE cells were incubated with 25% vitreous, and the morphological changes were examined by phase-contrast microscopy. Filamentous actin (F-actin) was examined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Protein phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, Smad2/3, LIM kinase (LIMK) 1 and cofilin was analyzed by Western blot analysis. Vitreous treatment induced cytoskeletal rearrangements, activated Rac1 and enhanced the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and Smad2/3. When the cells were treated with a Rac activation-specific inhibitor, the cytoskeletal rearrangements were prevented, and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 was blocked. Vitreous treatment also enhanced the phosphorylation of LIMK1 and cofilin and the Rac inhibitor blocked this effect. We propose that vitreous

  4. Retinal Prosthetics, Optogenetics, and Chemical Photoswitches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Three technologies have emerged as therapies to restore light sensing to profoundly blind patients suffering from late-stage retinal degenerations: (1) retinal prosthetics, (2) optogenetics, and (3) chemical photoswitches. Prosthetics are the most mature and the only approach in clinical practice. Prosthetic implants require complex surgical intervention and provide only limited visual resolution but can potentially restore navigational ability to many blind patients. Optogenetics uses viral delivery of type 1 opsin genes from prokaryotes or eukaryote algae to restore light responses in survivor neurons. Targeting and expression remain major problems, but are potentially soluble. Importantly, optogenetics could provide the ultimate in high-resolution vision due to the long persistence of gene expression achieved in animal models. Nevertheless, optogenetics remains challenging to implement in human eyes with large volumes, complex disease progression, and physical barriers to viral penetration. Now, a new generation of photochromic ligands or chemical photoswitches (azobenzene-quaternary ammonium derivatives) can be injected into a degenerated mouse eye and, in minutes to hours, activate light responses in neurons. These photoswitches offer the potential for rapidly and reversibly screening the vision restoration expected in an individual patient. Chemical photoswitch variants that persist in the cell membrane could make them a simple therapy of choice, with resolution and sensitivity equivalent to optogenetics approaches. A major complexity in treating retinal degenerations is retinal remodeling: pathologic network rewiring, molecular reprogramming, and cell death that compromise signaling in the surviving retina. Remodeling forces a choice between upstream and downstream targeting, each engaging different benefits and defects. Prosthetics and optogenetics can be implemented in either mode, but the use of chemical photoswitches is currently limited to downstream

  5. Retinal prosthetics, optogenetics, and chemical photoswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Robert; Pfeiffer, Rebecca; Jones, Bryan

    2014-10-15

    Three technologies have emerged as therapies to restore light sensing to profoundly blind patients suffering from late-stage retinal degenerations: (1) retinal prosthetics, (2) optogenetics, and (3) chemical photoswitches. Prosthetics are the most mature and the only approach in clinical practice. Prosthetic implants require complex surgical intervention and provide only limited visual resolution but can potentially restore navigational ability to many blind patients. Optogenetics uses viral delivery of type 1 opsin genes from prokaryotes or eukaryote algae to restore light responses in survivor neurons. Targeting and expression remain major problems, but are potentially soluble. Importantly, optogenetics could provide the ultimate in high-resolution vision due to the long persistence of gene expression achieved in animal models. Nevertheless, optogenetics remains challenging to implement in human eyes with large volumes, complex disease progression, and physical barriers to viral penetration. Now, a new generation of photochromic ligands or chemical photoswitches (azobenzene-quaternary ammonium derivatives) can be injected into a degenerated mouse eye and, in minutes to hours, activate light responses in neurons. These photoswitches offer the potential for rapidly and reversibly screening the vision restoration expected in an individual patient. Chemical photoswitch variants that persist in the cell membrane could make them a simple therapy of choice, with resolution and sensitivity equivalent to optogenetics approaches. A major complexity in treating retinal degenerations is retinal remodeling: pathologic network rewiring, molecular reprogramming, and cell death that compromise signaling in the surviving retina. Remodeling forces a choice between upstream and downstream targeting, each engaging different benefits and defects. Prosthetics and optogenetics can be implemented in either mode, but the use of chemical photoswitches is currently limited to downstream

  6. Characterization of Retinal Disease Progression in a 1-Year Longitudinal Study of Eyes With Mild Nonproliferative Retinopathy in Diabetes Type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro, Luisa; Bandello, Francesco; Tejerina, Amparo Navea

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify eyes of patients with diabetes type 2 that show progression of retinal disease within a 1-year period using noninvasive techniques. METHODS: Three hundred seventy-four type 2 diabetic patients with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy...... (SD-OCT) were assessed by a central reading center at all visits and ETDRS severity level in the first and last visits. RESULTS: Three hundred thirty-one eyes/patients completed the study. Microaneurysm formation rate greater than or equal to 2 was present in 68.1% of the eyes and MA turnover greater...

  7. Embryonic retinal cells and support to mature retinal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, Jennifer J; Fischer, Andy J

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. There is a paucity of neuron replacement studies for retinal ganglion cells. Given the complex phenotype of these neurons, replacement of ganglion cells may be impossible. However, transplanted embryonic cells could provide factors that promote the survival of these neurons. The authors sought to determine whether transplanted embryonic retinal cells from various stages of development influence the survival of mature ganglion cells Methods. Acutely dissociated retinal cells, obtained from chick embryos, were transplanted into the vitreous chamber of posthatch chicken eyes after the ganglion cells were selectively damaged. Eight days after transplantation, numbers of ganglion cells were determined Results. Embryonic retinal cells from embryonic day (E)7, E10, and E11 promoted the survival of ganglion cells, whereas cells from earlier or later stages of development or from other tissue sources did not. The environment provided by the posthatch eye did not support the proliferation of the embryo-derived cells, unlike the environment provided by culture conditions. Furthermore, cells that migrated into the retina failed to express neuronal or glial markers; those that remained in the vitreous formed aggregates of neuronal and glial cells Conclusions. The environment provided within the mature retina does not support the differentiation and proliferation of retinal progenitors. Furthermore, embryo-derived cells likely produce secreted factors that promote the survival of damaged ganglion cells. Therefore, embryonic retinal cells could be applied as a cell-based survival therapy to treat neurodegenerative diseases of the retina.

  8. Nonlinear retinal image enhancement for vessel detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Jiang, Xudong

    2017-07-01

    Retinal vessel detection is an essential part of the computer-aided diagnosis of eye diseases. Due to non-perfect imaging environment, retinal images often appear with intensity variations and artificial noises. This work proposes a two-step nonlinear retinal image enhancement to compensate for those imperfections of retinal images. The first step reduces intensity fluctuations of the image and the second step attenuates impulsive noise while preserving retinal vessels. Classification on the feature vector extracted from the enhanced retinal images is performed by using a linear SVM classifier. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method of two-step nonlinear image enhancement visibly improves the vessel detection performance, achieving better accuracy than that without enhancement process on the both DRIVE and STARE databases.

  9. Retinitis Pigmentosa and Education Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa includes a number of inherited diseases which usually result in blindness. The disease is progressive in nature and begins with the deterioration of cells in the eye responsible for peripheral vision. As the condition worsens there is a gradual loss of peripheral vision and night blindness. Proper educational planning requires…

  10. Human Echinococcosis: A Neglected Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Menezes da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis is among the most neglected parasitic diseases. Development of new drugs and other treatment modalities receives very little attention, if any. In most developed countries, Cystic Echinococcosis (CE is an imported disease of very low incidence and prevalence and is found almost exclusively in migrants from endemic regions. In endemic regions, predominantly settings with limited resources, patient numbers are high. Whole communities do not have access to appropriate treatment. The choice of treatment modalities is limited because of poor infrastructure and shortage of equipment and drugs. In this context, CE meets the criteria for a neglected disease. Furthermore, the terminology related to the designations around the parasite, its evolution and some therapeutic procedures is not uniform and sometimes inappropriate terms and wrong designations are used based on incorrect concepts. Although all of us know the different aspects of the disease it is pertinent to remember some important points and, above all, to clarify some aspects concerning the hydatid cyst's nomenclature in order to understand better the therapeutic options in the liver locations, particularly the different surgical approaches.

  11. Melanized Fungi in Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revankar, Sanjay G.; Sutton, Deanna A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Melanized or dematiaceous fungi are associated with a wide variety of infectious syndromes. Many are soil organisms and are generally distributed worldwide, though certain species appear to have restricted geographic ranges. Though they are uncommon causes of disease, melanized fungi have been increasingly recognized as important pathogens, with most reports occurring in the past 20 years. The spectrum of diseases with which they are associated has also broadened and includes allergic disease, superficial and deep local infections, pneumonia, brain abscess, and disseminated infection. For some infections in immunocompetent individuals, such as allergic fungal sinusitis and brain abscess, they are among the most common etiologic fungi. Melanin is a likely virulence factor for these fungi. Diagnosis relies on careful microscopic and pathological examination, as well as clinical assessment of the patient, as these fungi are often considered contaminants. Therapy varies depending upon the clinical syndrome. Local infection may be cured with excision alone, while systemic disease is often refractory to therapy. Triazoles such as voriconazole, posaconazole, and itraconazole have the most consistent in vitro activity. Further studies are needed to better understand the pathogenesis and optimal treatment of these uncommon infections. PMID:20930077

  12. Advances in Retinal Stem Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S Viczian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tremendous progress has been made in recent years to generate retinal cells from pluripotent cell sources. These advances provide hope for those suffering from blindness due to lost retinal cells. Understanding the intrinsic genetic network in model organisms, like fly and frog, has led to a better understanding of the extrinsic signaling pathways necessary for retinal progenitor cell formation in mouse and human cell cultures. This review focuses on the culture methods used by different groups, which has culminated in the generation of laminated retinal tissue from both embryonic and induced pluripotent cells. The review also briefly describes advances made in transplantation studies using donor retinal progenitor and cultured retinal cells.

  13. miR-184 regulates ezrin, LAMP-1 expression, affects phagocytosis in human retinal pigment epithelium and is downregulated in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, Najiba; Kokkinaki, Maria; Gunawardena, Nishantha; Gunawan, Mia S; Hathout, Yetrib; Janczura, Karolina J; Theos, Alexander C; Golestaneh, Nady

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNA 184 (miR-184) is known to play a key role in neurological development and apoptosis and is highly expressed in mouse brain, mouse corneal epithelium, zebrafish lens and human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). However, the role of miR-184 in RPE is largely unknown. We investigated the role of miR-184 in RPE and its possible implication in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Proteomic analysis identified the ezrin (EZR) gene as a target of miR-184 in human RPE. EZR is a membrane cytoskeleton crosslinker that is also known to bind to lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1) during the formation of phagocytic vacuoles. In adult retinal pigment epithelium 19 (ARPE19) cells, inhibition of miR-184 resulted in upregulation of EZR mRNA and EZR protein, and induced downregulation of LAMP-1. The inhibition of miR-184 decreased EZR-bound LAMP-1 protein levels and affected phagocytic activity in ARPE19 cells. In primary culture of human RPE isolated from eyes of AMD donors (AMD RPE), miR-184 was significantly downregulated compared with control (normal) RPE. Downregulation of miR-184 was consistent with significantly lower levels of LAMP-1 protein in AMD RPE, and overexpression of MIR-184 in AMD RPE was able to rescue LAMP-1 protein expression to normal levels. Altogether, these observations suggest a novel role for miR-184 in RPE health and support a model proposing that downregulation of miR-184 expression during aging may result in dysregulation of RPE function, contributing to retinal degeneration. © 2014 FEBS.

  14. Physiochemical basis of human degenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeliger Harold I.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The onset of human degenerative diseases in humans, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, neurodevelopmental disease and neurodegenerative disease has been shown to be related to exposures to persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and others, as well as to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, bisphenol-A and other aromatic lipophilic species. The onset of these diseases has also been related to exposures to transition metal ions. A physiochemical mechanism for the onset of degenerative environmental disease dependent upon exposure to a combination of lipophilic aromatic hydrocarbons and transition metal ions is proposed here. The findings reported here also, for the first time, explain why aromatic hydrocarbons exhibit greater toxicity than aliphatic hydrocarbons of equal carbon numbers.

  15. Potential Human Models of Infammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen B Hanauer

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar to animal models of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, there is no single human model representative of ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. An optimal human model awaits etiopathogenetic definitions and further reclassification or depiction of clinicopathological scenarios. Current human models can be classified into models depicting risk of disease; preclinical disease; acute inflammation; and miscellaneous IBD. Family studies are the best means of pursuing patients at risk. Evolving genetic and serological markers may further identify subgroups to assess with permeability probes, leukocyte scans or endoscopy for preclinical disease. Provocation with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs may be useful in selected patients because NSAID mucosal damage may induce or mimic IBD. Alternative natural history or interventional studies in patients with human leukocyte antigen (HLA-B27 spondylarthropathy may be useful. The disease margin and pouchitis are models within the disease state of ulcerative colitis as are the aphthous ulcer, anastomotic margin and diverted fecal stream for Crohn's disease. Newly defined colitides, such as microscopic and collagenous colitis and diversion colitis, also provide potential comparative models to evaluate mucosal immune, inflammatory, reparative, secretory and absorptive regulation.

  16. Evolutionary Response to Human Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armelagos, George J.; Dewey, John R.

    1970-01-01

    Gives an overview of human history, relating cultural changes with resulting changes in population density and in ecological balance to patterns of infectious diseases in man. Discusses mechanisms of evolution of resistance. Suggests that in populations where infectious diseases can be controlled, attention should shift to degenerative diseases…

  17. Melatonin and human mitochondrial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Sharafati-Chaleshtori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the main causative factors in a wide variety of complications such as neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia/reperfusion, aging process, and septic shock. Decrease in respiratory complex activity, increase in free radical production, increase in mitochondrial synthase activity, increase in nitric oxide production, and impair in electron transport system and/or mitochondrial permeability are considered as the main factors responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction. Melatonin, the pineal gland hormone, is selectively taken up by mitochondria and acts as a powerful antioxidant, regulating the mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Melatonin increases the permeability of membranes and is the stimulator of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and catalase. It also acts as an inhibitor of lipoxygenase. Melatonin can cause resistance to oxidation damage by fixing the microsomal membranes. Melatonin has been shown to retard aging and inhibit neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia/reperfusion, septic shock, diabetes, cancer, and other complications related to oxidative stress. The purpose of the current study, other than introducing melatonin, was to present the recent findings on clinical effects in diseases related to mitochondrial dysfunction including diabetes, cancer, gastrointestinal diseases, and diseases related to brain function.

  18. Cytomegalovirus retinitis in an immunocompetent pregnant woman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here, we report one case of CMV retinitis in a pregnant woman without any obvious immunodeficiency that started with mononucleosis like syndrome at first and followed by retinal involvement. The disease was diagnosed by ophthalmologists and confirmed by aqueous PCR. The patient was treated with ganciclovir.

  19. Phlebotomine Vectors of Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-30

    sexes of L. (Trichophoromyia) napoensis, n.sp., L. (Trichophoromyia) wilkersoni, n.sp. and L. tortura , n. sp. (species group vexator) are described...which L. hartmanni has been found. 20. Lutzomyia tortura Young and Rogers, new species, Fig. 67-76. cr holotype (measurements in mm). Wing length 1.73...data. Paratypes, 34 d’ , 32 o, flight and light traps and human bait, 18-25.V.1976 (D. Young and T. Rogers). Discussion. Lutzomyia tortura n. sp

  20. The search for mutations in the gene for the beta subunit of the cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEB) in patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riess, O; Noerremoelle, A; Weber, B

    1992-01-01

    The finding of a mutation in the beta subunit of the cyclic GMP (cGMP) phosphodiesterase gene causing retinal degeneration in mice (the Pdeb gene) prompted a search for disease-causing mutations in the human phosphodiesterase gene (PDEB gene) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. All 22 exons...... including 196 bp of the 5' region of the PDEB gene have been assessed for mutations by using single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis in 14 patients from 13 unrelated families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP). No disease-causing mutations were found in this group of affected...

  1. A novel form of progressive retinal atrophy in Swedish vallhund dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann E Cooper

    Full Text Available Inherited retinal degenerations, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP and age-related macular degeneration (AMD, represent leading causes of incurable blindness in humans. This is also true in dogs, where the term progressive retinal atrophy (PRA is used to describe inherited photoreceptor degeneration resulting in progressive vision loss. Because of the similarities in ocular anatomy, including the presence of a cone photoreceptor-rich central retinal region, and the close genotype-phenotype correlation, canine models contribute significantly to the understanding of retinal disease mechanisms and the development of new therapies. The screening of the pure-bred dog population for new forms of PRA represents an important strategy to establish new large animal models. By examining 324 dogs of the Swedish vallhund breed in seven countries and across three continents, we were able to describe a new and unique form of PRA characterized by the multifocal appearance of red and brown discoloration of the tapetal fundus followed over time by thinning of the retina. We propose three stages of the disease based on the appearance of the ocular fundus and associated visual deficits. Electroretinography revealed a gradual loss of both rod and cone photoreceptor-mediated function in Stages 2 and 3 of the disease. In the few dogs that suffered from pronounced vision loss, night-blindness occurred first in late Stage 2, followed by decreased day-vision in Stage 3. Histologic examinations confirmed the loss of photoreceptor cells at Stage 3, which was associated with the accumulation of autofluorescent material in the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium. Pedigree analysis was suggestive of an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. Mutations in six known canine retinal degeneration genes as well as hypovitaminosis E were excluded as causes of the disease. The observed variability in the age of disease onset and rate of progression suggest the presence of genetic and

  2. A novel form of progressive retinal atrophy in Swedish vallhund dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ann E; Ahonen, Saija; Rowlan, Jessica S; Duncan, Alison; Seppälä, Eija H; Vanhapelto, Päivi; Lohi, Hannes; Komáromy, András M

    2014-01-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), represent leading causes of incurable blindness in humans. This is also true in dogs, where the term progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) is used to describe inherited photoreceptor degeneration resulting in progressive vision loss. Because of the similarities in ocular anatomy, including the presence of a cone photoreceptor-rich central retinal region, and the close genotype-phenotype correlation, canine models contribute significantly to the understanding of retinal disease mechanisms and the development of new therapies. The screening of the pure-bred dog population for new forms of PRA represents an important strategy to establish new large animal models. By examining 324 dogs of the Swedish vallhund breed in seven countries and across three continents, we were able to describe a new and unique form of PRA characterized by the multifocal appearance of red and brown discoloration of the tapetal fundus followed over time by thinning of the retina. We propose three stages of the disease based on the appearance of the ocular fundus and associated visual deficits. Electroretinography revealed a gradual loss of both rod and cone photoreceptor-mediated function in Stages 2 and 3 of the disease. In the few dogs that suffered from pronounced vision loss, night-blindness occurred first in late Stage 2, followed by decreased day-vision in Stage 3. Histologic examinations confirmed the loss of photoreceptor cells at Stage 3, which was associated with the accumulation of autofluorescent material in the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium. Pedigree analysis was suggestive of an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. Mutations in six known canine retinal degeneration genes as well as hypovitaminosis E were excluded as causes of the disease. The observed variability in the age of disease onset and rate of progression suggest the presence of genetic and/or environmental

  3. Prevalence, pattern and risk factors for retinal vascular occlusions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Retinal vascular occlusions are the second most common retinal vascular diseases following diabetic retinopathy. They are associated with several systemic and ocular pathologies and are significant causes of visual loss. Objective: This study aims to determine the prevalence, pattern and risk factors for retinal ...

  4. Live-cell imaging: new avenues to investigate retinal regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Lahne, Manuela; Hyde, David R.

    2017-01-01

    Sensing and responding to our environment requires functional neurons that act in concert. Neuronal cell loss resulting from degenerative diseases cannot be replaced in humans, causing a functional impairment to integrate and/or respond to sensory cues. In contrast, zebrafish (Danio rerio) possess an endogenous capacity to regenerate lost neurons. Here, we will focus on the processes that lead to neuronal regeneration in the zebrafish retina. Dying retinal neurons release a damage signal, tum...

  5. Assignment of a gene for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP12) to chromosome 1q31-q32.1 in an inbred and genetically heterogeneous disease population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Soest, S.; Ingeborgh Van Den Born, L.; Bergen, A.A.B. [Netherlands Ophthalmic Research Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1994-08-01

    Linkage analysis was carried out in a large family segregating for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP), originating from a genetically isolated population in The Netherlands. Within the family, clinical heterogeneity was observed, with a major section of the family segregating arRP with characteristic para-arteriolar preservation of the retinal pigment epithelium (PPRPE). In the remainder of the arRP patients no PPRPE was found. Initially, all branches of the family were analyzed jointly, and linkage was found between the marker F13B, located at 1q31-q32.1, and RP12 ({Zeta}{sub max} = 4.99 at 8% recombination). Analysis of linkage heterogeneity between five branches of the family yielded significant evidence for nonallelic genetic heterogeneity within this family, coinciding with the observed clinical differences. Multipoint analysis, carried out in the branches that showed linkage, favored the locus order 1cen-D1S158-(F13B, RP12)-D1S53-1qter ({Zeta}{sub max} = 9.17). The finding of a single founder allele associated with the disease phenotype supports this localization. This study reveals that even in a large family, apparently segregating for a single disease entity, genetic heterogeneity can be detected and resolved successfully. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  6. CD40-TRAF Signaling Upregulates CX3CL1 and TNF-α in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells but Not in Retinal Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jennifer A.; Portillo, Jose-Andres C.; Lopez Corcino, Yalitza; Subauste, Carlos S.

    2015-01-01

    CD40, CX3CL1 and TNF-α promote atheroma and neointima formation. CD40 and TNF-α are also central to the development of diabetic retinopathy while CX3CL1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of this retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to examine whether CD40 ligation increases CX3CL1 and TNF-α protein expression in human endothelial cells from the aorta and retina. CD154 (CD40 ligand) upregulated membrane-bound and soluble CX3CL1 in human aortic endothelial cells. CD154 triggered TNF-α production by human aortic endothelial cells. TNF Receptor Associated Factors (TRAF) are key mediators of CD40 signaling. Compared to human aortic endothelial cells that express wt CD40, cells that express CD40 with a mutation that prevents TRAF2,3 recruitment, or CD40 with a mutation that prevents TRAF6 recruitment exhibited a profound inhibition of CD154-driven upregulation of membrane bound and soluble CX3CL1 as well as of TNF-α secretion. While both CD154 and TNF-α upregulated CX3CL1 in human aortic endothelial cells, these stimuli could act independently of each other. In contrast to human aortic endothelial cells, human retinal endothelial cells did not increase membrane bound or soluble CX3CL1 expression or secrete TNF-α in response to CD154 even though CD40 ligation upregulated ICAM-1 and CCL2 in these cells. Moreover, TNF-α did not upregulate CX3CL1 in retinal endothelial cells. In conclusion, CD40 ligation increases CX3CL1 protein levels and induces TNF-α production in endothelial cells. However, endothelial cells are heterogeneous in regards to these responses. Human aortic but not retinal endothelial cells upregulated CX3CL1 and TNF-α in response to CD40 ligation, as well as upregulated CX3CL1 in response to TNF-α. These dissimilarities may contribute to differences in regulation of inflammation in large vessels versus the retina. PMID:26710229

  7. CD40-TRAF Signaling Upregulates CX3CL1 and TNF-α in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells but Not in Retinal Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Greene

    Full Text Available CD40, CX3CL1 and TNF-α promote atheroma and neointima formation. CD40 and TNF-α are also central to the development of diabetic retinopathy while CX3CL1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of this retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to examine whether CD40 ligation increases CX3CL1 and TNF-α protein expression in human endothelial cells from the aorta and retina. CD154 (CD40 ligand upregulated membrane-bound and soluble CX3CL1 in human aortic endothelial cells. CD154 triggered TNF-α production by human aortic endothelial cells. TNF Receptor Associated Factors (TRAF are key mediators of CD40 signaling. Compared to human aortic endothelial cells that express wt CD40, cells that express CD40 with a mutation that prevents TRAF2,3 recruitment, or CD40 with a mutation that prevents TRAF6 recruitment exhibited a profound inhibition of CD154-driven upregulation of membrane bound and soluble CX3CL1 as well as of TNF-α secretion. While both CD154 and TNF-α upregulated CX3CL1 in human aortic endothelial cells, these stimuli could act independently of each other. In contrast to human aortic endothelial cells, human retinal endothelial cells did not increase membrane bound or soluble CX3CL1 expression or secrete TNF-α in response to CD154 even though CD40 ligation upregulated ICAM-1 and CCL2 in these cells. Moreover, TNF-α did not upregulate CX3CL1 in retinal endothelial cells. In conclusion, CD40 ligation increases CX3CL1 protein levels and induces TNF-α production in endothelial cells. However, endothelial cells are heterogeneous in regards to these responses. Human aortic but not retinal endothelial cells upregulated CX3CL1 and TNF-α in response to CD40 ligation, as well as upregulated CX3CL1 in response to TNF-α. These dissimilarities may contribute to differences in regulation of inflammation in large vessels versus the retina.

  8. Texture Descriptors Ensembles Enable Image-Based Classification of Maturation of Human Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigmented Epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loris Nanni

    Full Text Available A fast, non-invasive and observer-independent method to analyze the homogeneity and maturity of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells is warranted to assess the suitability of hPSC-RPE cells for implantation or in vitro use. The aim of this work was to develop and validate methods to create ensembles of state-of-the-art texture descriptors and to provide a robust classification tool to separate three different maturation stages of RPE cells by using phase contrast microscopy images. The same methods were also validated on a wide variety of biological image classification problems, such as histological or virus image classification.For image classification we used different texture descriptors, descriptor ensembles and preprocessing techniques. Also, three new methods were tested. The first approach was an ensemble of preprocessing methods, to create an additional set of images. The second was the region-based approach, where saliency detection and wavelet decomposition divide each image in two different regions, from which features were extracted through different descriptors. The third method was an ensemble of Binarized Statistical Image Features, based on different sizes and thresholds. A Support Vector Machine (SVM was trained for each descriptor histogram and the set of SVMs combined by sum rule. The accuracy of the computer vision tool was verified in classifying the hPSC-RPE cell maturation level.The RPE dataset contains 1862 subwindows from 195 phase contrast images. The final descriptor ensemble outperformed the most recent stand-alone texture descriptors, obtaining, for the RPE dataset, an area under ROC curve (AUC of 86.49% with the 10-fold cross validation and 91.98% with the leave-one-image-out protocol. The generality of the three proposed approaches was ascertained with 10 more biological image datasets, obtaining an average AUC greater than 97%.Here we showed that the developed ensembles

  9. Heparanase mediates vascular endothelial growth factor gene transcription in high-glucose human retinal microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingwei; Leng, Xuan; Hu, Yijun; Shen, Huangxuan; Song, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To observe the nuclear expression and interaction of heparanase and RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II), an enzyme that catalyzes the transcription of DNA in eukaryotic cells) in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs) under high glucose condition and to investigate the association of heparanase with the transcription activity of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene promoter. Methods Cultured HRECs were maintained for 3 days in media with high or normal glucose. The expressions of heparanase and RNA Pol II in each group were analyzed with immunofluorescence. Co-immunoprecipitation was applied to detect the interaction of heparanase and Pol II proteins. Cells in both groups were used for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with anti-heparanase and anti-RNA Pol II antibodies to identify high-confidence heparanase-binding regions across the entire VEGF gene promoter. Moreover, real-time PCR was used to demonstrate the interaction between heparanase and the VEGF gene promoter region. Results The immunofluorescence studies showed that the nuclear expression of heparanase was intense in high-glucose HRECs but faint in the normal group; RNA Pol II in the nucleus was also intense in high glucose HRECs, and the distribution of heparanase was consistent with that of RNA Pol II. The co-immunoprecipitation data showed that heparanase combined with RNA Pol II in HRECs cells treated with high glucose, and the molecular size of HPA interacted with RNA Pol II was 50 kDa, while no combination of two proteins was evident in normal HRECs cells. Real-time PCR–based ChIP results showed that the high-confidence HPA-binding region was −1155 to −1018 (containing hypoxia response element) in the VEGF gene promoter, and the cells treated with high glucose showed increases in heparanase and RNA Pol II in the VEGF gene promoter region compared with the normal glucose treated cells (t = –3.244, p = 0.032; t = –6.096, p = 0.004, respectively

  10. Renal-Retinal Ciliopathy Gene Sdccag8 Regulates DNA Damage Response Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Airik, Rannar; Slaats, Gisela G; Guo, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Nephronophthisis-related ciliopathies (NPHP-RCs) are developmental and degenerative kidney diseases that are frequently associated with extrarenal pathologies such as retinal degeneration, obesity, and intellectual disability. We recently identified mutations in a gene encoding the centrosomal...... protein SDCCAG8 as causing NPHP type 10 in humans. To study the role of Sdccag8 in disease pathogenesis, we generated a Sdccag8 gene-trap mouse line. Homozygous Sdccag8(gt/gt) mice lacked the wild-type Sdccag8 transcript and protein, and recapitulated the human phenotypes of NPHP and retinal degeneration....... These mice exhibited early onset retinal degeneration that was associated with rhodopsin mislocalization in the photoreceptors and reduced cone cell numbers, and led to progressive loss of vision. By contrast, renal histologic changes occurred later, and no global ciliary defects were observed in the kidneys...

  11. Characterization of a Dominant Cone Degeneration in a Green Fluorescent Protein–Reporter Mouse with Disruption of Loci Associated with Human Dominant Retinal Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinski, Daniel M.; Yusuf, Mohammed; Barnard, Alun R.; Damant, Christopher; Issa, Peter Charbel; Singh, Mandeep S.; Lee, Edward; Davies, Wayne L.; Volpi, Emanuela V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize anatomically and functionally the retinal degeneration observed in a transgenic mouse line (OPN1LW-EGFP) expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in a subpopulation of cone photoreceptors, and to map the location of the transgenic insertion. Methods. An anatomic comparison of cone survival was carried out between wild type (WT) and transgenic mice at three postnatal time points (P80, P140, and P245). Retinal function was assessed at P245 by ERG and included an ultraviolet flicker stimulus to isolate S-cone function. Chromosomal mapping by FISH and high-resolution mapping on DNA fibers (Fiber-FISH) were performed to identify the location of the transgenic insertion. Results. GFP expression was largely absent in S-cones. Cone numbers were significantly reduced in OPN1LW-EGFP mice at all time points compared to WT, with cone loss independent of GFP expression. Anatomic loss correlated with a functional deficit in dark- and light-adapted ERG responses, including a reduction in UV-flicker response, confirming the degeneration of S-cones. The phenotype of heterozygote mice was slightly less severe than in homozygotes, consistent with a dominantly inherited cone dystrophy. The transgenic insertion mapped to a specific region on chromosome 10 orthologous with loci for progressive bifocal chorioretinal atrophy and North Carolina macular dystrophy on human chromosome 6. Conclusions. Cone loss is global in OPN1LW-EGFP mice and is independent of GFP expression. The mechanism underlying the degeneration remains elusive; however, disruption of loci associated with dominantly inherited retinal degenerations in humans makes this mouse of great interest. PMID:21705682

  12. Characterization of a dominant cone degeneration in a green fluorescent protein-reporter mouse with disruption of Loci associated with human dominant retinal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinski, Daniel M; Yusuf, Mohammed; Barnard, Alun R; Damant, Christopher; Charbel Issa, Peter; Singh, Mandeep S; Lee, Edward; Davies, Wayne L; Volpi, Emanuela V; MacLaren, Robert E

    2011-08-22

    PURPOSE. To characterize anatomically and functionally the retinal degeneration observed in a transgenic mouse line (OPN1LW-EGFP) expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in a subpopulation of cone photoreceptors, and to map the location of the transgenic insertion. METHODS. An anatomic comparison of cone survival was carried out between wild type (WT) and transgenic mice at three postnatal time points (P80, P140, and P245). Retinal function was assessed at P245 by ERG and included an ultraviolet flicker stimulus to isolate S-cone function. Chromosomal mapping by FISH and high-resolution mapping on DNA fibers (Fiber-FISH) were performed to identify the location of the transgenic insertion. RESULTS. GFP expression was largely absent in S-cones. Cone numbers were significantly reduced in OPN1LW-EGFP mice at all time points compared to WT, with cone loss independent of GFP expression. Anatomic loss correlated with a functional deficit in dark- and light-adapted ERG responses, including a reduction in UV-flicker response, confirming the degeneration of S-cones. The phenotype of heterozygote mice was slightly less severe than in homozygotes, consistent with a dominantly inherited cone dystrophy. The transgenic insertion mapped to a specific region on chromosome 10 orthologous with loci for progressive bifocal chorioretinal atrophy and North Carolina macular dystrophy on human chromosome 6. CONCLUSIONS. Cone loss is global in OPN1LW-EGFP mice and is independent of GFP expression. The mechanism underlying the degeneration remains elusive; however, disruption of loci associated with dominantly inherited retinal degenerations in humans makes this mouse of great interest.

  13. Molecular Signals Involved in Human B Cell Migration into the Retina: In Vitro Investigation of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and CXCL13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S; Stempel, Andrew J; Olivas, Antoinette; Franzese, Samone E; Ashander, Liam M; Ma, Yuefang; Lie, Shervi; Appukuttan, Binoy; Smith, Justine R

    2016-07-05

    B cells participate in diverse retinal immunopathologies. Endothelial adhesion molecules and chemokines direct leukocyte trafficking. We examined the involvement of three molecular signals in retinal transendothelial migration of human B cells: ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and CXCL13. Peripheral blood B cells were isolated by negative selection. Migration was studied in transwells populated with human retinal endothelial monolayers, using antibody to block ICAM-1 or VCAM-1. Retinal expression of CXCL13 was investigated. B cells crossed retinal endothelium. ICAM-1 blockade significantly reduced migration when results for all subjects were combined, and for a majority when results were analyzed by individual. This effect was irrespective of the presence or absence of CXCL13, although CXCL13 increased migration. CXCL13 was detected in neural retina and retinal pigment epithelium. Endothelial cells of some retinal vessels presented CXCL13 protein. ICAM-1 blockade may be an effective treatment in some patients with retinal diseases that involve B cells.

  14. Zoonotic diseases and human health: the human influenza example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoub, Barry D

    2012-06-20

    Over the past few decades a large number of new and emerging infectious diseases have been recognised in humans, partly because of improved diagnostic technologies and increased awareness and also, partly because of dynamic ecological changes between human hosts and their exposure to animals and the environment (Coker et al. 2011). Some 177 new pathogenic organisms have been recognised to be 'emerging', that is, have newly arisen or been newly introduced into human populations; almost three quarters of these, 130 (73%), have come from zoonotic origins (Cascio et al. 2011; Cutler, Fooks & Van Der Poel 2010; Taylor, Latham & Woolhouse 2001; Woolhouse & Gowtage-Sequeria 2005). One of the most prevalent and important human infectious disease is influenza, a disease responsible globally for a quarter million deaths annually. In the USA alone the toll from influenza is estimated at 36 000 deaths and 226 000 hospitalisations, and it ranks as the most important cause of vaccine preventable mortality in that country (CDC 2010). The epidemiological behaviour of human influenza clearly defines it as an emerging infectious disease and the recent understanding of its zoonotic origins has contributed much to the understanding of its behaviour in humans (Fauci 2006).

  15. Transplantation of Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived 3D Retinal Sheets into Retinal Degenerative Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juthaporn Assawachananont

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we show that mouse embryonic stem cell- or induced pluripotent stem cell-derived 3D retinal tissue developed a structured outer nuclear layer (ONL with complete inner and outer segments even in an advanced retinal degeneration model (rd1 that lacked ONL. We also observed host-graft synaptic connections by immunohistochemistry. This study provides a “proof of concept” for retinal sheet transplantation therapy for advanced retinal degenerative diseases.

  16. The complement system in human cardiometabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertle, E; Stehouwer, C D A; van Greevenbroek, M M J

    2014-10-01

    The complement system has been implicated in obesity, fatty liver, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Complement factors are produced in adipose tissue and appear to be involved in adipose tissue metabolism and local inflammation. Thereby complement links adipose tissue inflammation to systemic metabolic derangements, such as low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, complement has been implicated in pathophysiological mechanisms of diet- and alcohol induced liver damage, hyperglycaemia, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and fibrinolysis. In this review, we summarize current evidence on the role of the complement system in several processes of human cardiometabolic disease. C3 is the central component in complement activation, and has most widely been studied in humans. C3 concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, liver dysfunction, risk of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD. C3 can be activated by the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathway of complement activation; and downstream activation of C3 activates the terminal pathway. Complement may also be activated via extrinsic proteases of the coagulation, fibrinolysis and the kinin systems. Studies on the different complement activation pathways in human cardiometabolic disease are limited, but available evidence suggests that they may have distinct roles in processes underlying cardiometabolic disease. The lectin pathway appeared beneficial in some studies on type 2 diabetes and CVD, while factors of the classical and the alternative pathway were related to unfavourable cardiometabolic traits. The terminal complement pathway was also implicated in insulin resistance and liver disease, and appears to have a prominent role in acute and advanced CVD. The available human data suggest a complex and potentially causal role for the complement system in human cardiometabolic disease. Further, preferably longitudinal studies are needed to

  17. A positive circuit of VEGF increases Glut-1 expression by increasing HIF-1α gene expression in human retinal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Kyung

    2017-12-01

    Treatment of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs) with vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF 165 ) increased hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), VEGF, and glucose transporter 1 (Glut-1) mRNA expression and Glut-1 protein localization to the membrane. In contrast, treatment of human retinal pigment epithelium cells with VEGF 165 did not induce HIF-1α, VEGF, and Glut-1 gene expression. Microvascular endothelial cells are surrounded by astrocytic end feet in the retina. Astrocyte-derived A-kinase anchor protein 12 overexpression during hypoxia downregulated VEGF secretion, and this conditioned medium reduced VEGF and Glut-1 expression in HRMECs, suggesting that communications between astrocytes and endothelial cells may be the determinants of the blood vessel network. In HRMECs, HIF-1α small interfering RNA transfection blocked the VEGF 165 -mediated increase in VEGF and Glut-1 gene expression. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) with inhibitor GF109203X or with a small interfering RNA targeting PKCζ attenuated the VEGF 165 -induced Glut-1 protein expression and VEGF and Glut-1 mRNA expression. In addition, results of an immunoprecipitation assay imply an interaction between VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and PKCζ in HRMECs. Therefore, VEGF secretion by hypoxic astrocytes may upregulate HIF-1α gene expression, inducing VEGF and Glut-1 expression via the VEGFR2-PKCζ axis in HRMECs.

  18. Transplantation of rat embryonic stem cell-derived retinal progenitor cells preserves the retinal structure and function in rat retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zepeng; Guan, Yuan; Cui, Lu; Song, Jian; Gu, Junjie; Zhao, Hanzhi; Xu, Lei; Lu, Lixia; Jin, Ying; Xu, Guo-Tong

    2015-11-09

    rESCs to glia enriched RPCs and retinal neuron enriched RPCs in vitro. The retinal neuron enriched rESC-RPC2 protected the structure and function of retina in rats with genetic retinal degeneration and could be a candidate cell source for treating some degenerative retinal diseases in human trials.

  19. Changes in cortical grey matter density associated with long-standing retinal visual field defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boucard, Christine C.; Hernowo, Aditya T.; Maguire, R. Paul; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Hooymans, Johanna M.M.; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    Retinal lesions caused by eye diseases such as glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration can, over time, eliminate stimulation of parts of the visual cortex. This could lead to degeneration of inactive cortical neuronal tissue, but this has not been established in humans. Here, we used magnetic

  20. Decreased VEGF-A and sustained PEDF expression in a human retinal pigment epithelium cell line cultured under hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Takeyama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous reports have described a decrease in retinal temperature and clinical improvement of wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD after vitrectomy. We hypothesized that the retinal temperature decrease after vitrectomy plays a part in the suppression of wet AMD development. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the temperature dependence of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A and in vitro angiogen-esis in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. RESULTS: We cultured ARPE-19 cells at 37, 35, 33 and 31°C and measured the expression of VEGF-A, VEGF-A splicing variants, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF. We performed an in vitro tube formation assay. The dehydrogenase activity was also evaluated at each temperature. Expression of VEGF-A significantly decreased with decreased temperature while PEDF expression did not. VEGF165 expression and in vitro angiogenesis also were temperature dependent. The dehydrogenase activity significantly decreased as the culture temperature decreased. CONCLUSIONS: RPE cultured under hypothermia that decreased cellular metabolism also had decreased VEGF-A and sustained PEDF expression, creating an anti-angiogenic environment. This mechanism may be associated with a beneficial effect after vitrectomy in patients with wet AMD.

  1. Eupatilin prevents H2O2-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Chen, Jia; Xing, Yi-Qiao

    2017-01-01

    Eupatilin, a pharmacologically active flavone derived from the Artemisia plant species, is known to possess anti-oxidant activity. However, the effects of eupatilin on oxidative stress-induced retinal damage in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and the potential mechanisms involved have not been explored. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of eupatilin on oxidative stress-induced retinal damage in RPE cells. Our results showed that eupatilin significantly attenuated H2O2-induced cell injury and ROS production in ARPE-19 cells. In addition, eupatilin pretreatment greatly upregulated Bcl-2 expression, downregulated Bax expression, as well as suppressed caspase-3 activity in ARPE-19 cells exposed to H2O2. Furthermore, eupatilin pretreatment markedly enhanced phosphorylation levels of PI3K and Akt in ARPE-19 cells exposed to H2O2. In conclusion, our data showed that eupatilin protected against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis through the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in ARPE-19 cells. Thus, eupatilin may be useful for the prevention or treatment of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Neem in human and plant disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Udai Pratap; Singh, Dhananjaya Pratap

    2002-01-01

    As a therapeutic agent, neem is one of the most popular trees in traditional medicinal systems and is increasingly becoming important in herbal alternative therapy. The tree itself is considered a "village pharmacy" because of the well-established fact that every part of the tree has an application in curing human diseases. The tree has been a constant source of novel and structurally unique phytochemicals that can constitute the basis for the development of novel pharmaco-therapeutic agents against various human diseases. Being a prototype for the development of safer drugs and ecofriendly, pro-human health agrochemical agents against a vast variety of plant diseases, the tree always remains in the center of safe herbal drug and pesticide development in the service of mankind.

  3. Taxonomy and Biology of Phlebotomine Vectors of Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DIPTERA, *DISEASE VECTORS, *TAXONOMY, *VECTOR ANALYSIS , ANTIBODIES, BIOLOGY , BRAIN, CHROMOSOMES, COLOMBIA, COLONIES( BIOLOGY ), DISEASES, FEMALES... HUMANS , INFECTIOUS DISEASES, LABORATORIES, LEISHMANIA, LEISHMANIASIS, NEUTRALIZATION, PATIENTS, SEROLOGY, STRAINS( BIOLOGY ).

  4. Visual function improvement using photocromic and selective blue-violet light filtering spectacle lenses in patients affected by retinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, L; Melardi, E; Ferri, P; Montesano, G; Samir Attaalla, S; Patelli, F; De Cillà, S; Savaresi, G; Rossetti, L

    2017-08-22

    To evaluate functional visual parameters using photocromic and selective blue-violet light filtering spectacle lenses in patients affected by central or peripheral scotoma due to retinal diseases. Sixty patients were enrolled in this study: 30 patients affected by central scotoma, group 1, and 30 affected by peripheral scotoma, group 2. Black on White Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BW-BCVA), White on Black Best Corrected Visual Acuity (WB-BCVA), Mars Contrast Sensitivity (CS) and a Glare Test (GT) were performed to all patients. Test results with blue-violet filter, a short-pass yellow filter and with no filters were compared. All scores from test results increased significantly with blue-violet filters for all patients. The mean BW-BCVA increased from 0.30 ± 0.20 to 0.36 ± 0.21 decimals in group 1 and from 0.44 ± 0.22 to 0.51 ± 0.23 decimals in group 2 (Mean ± SD, p < 0.0001 in both cases). The mean WB-BCVA increased from 0.31 ± 0.19 to 0.38 ± 0.23 decimals in group 1 and from 0.46 ± 0.20 to 0.56 ± 0.22 decimals in group 2 (Mean ± SD, p < 0.0001 in both cases). The letter count for the CS test increased from 26.7 ± 7.9 to 30.06 ± 7.8 in group 1 (Mean ± SD, p = 0.0005) and from 31.5 ± 7.6 to 33.72 ± 7.3 in group 2 (Mean ± SD, p = 0.031). GT was significantly reduced: the letter count increased from 20.93 ± 5.42 to 22.82 ± 4.93 in group 1 (Mean ± SD, p < 0.0001) and from 24.15 ± 5.5 to 25.97 ± 4.7 in group 2 (Mean ± SD, p < 0.0001). Higher scores were recorded with the Blue filter compared to Yellow filter in all tests (p < 0.05). No significant differences in any test results could be detected between the Yellow filter and the No filter condition. The use of a combination of photocromic lens with a selective blue-violet light filter showed functional benefit in all evaluated patients.

  5. Multifocal retinitis in New Zealand sheep dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, P L; Dubielzig, R R; Kazacos, K R

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-nine percent of 1,448 working sheep dogs were affected with varying degrees of multifocal retinal disease on ophthalmoscopic examination. Lesions consisted of localized areas of hyperreflexia in the tapetal fundus, often associated with hyperpigmentation. Severely affected animals had widespread hyperreflexia with retinal vascular attenuation. Only 6% of 125 New Zealand dogs raised in urban environment were similarly affected. Both eyes of 70 dogs from New Zealand were examined histologically. Forty-seven of 70 dogs had ocular inflammatory disease. Ten other dogs had noninflammatory eye disease, and 13 dogs had normal eyes. Histologically, eyes with inflammatory disease were divided into three categories: Dogs 3 years of age or less with active inflammatory disease of the retina, uvea, and vitreous. Four dogs in this group had migrating nematode larvae identified morphologically as genus Toxocara. Diffuse retinitis and retinal atrophy in conjunction with localized retinal necrosis and choroidal fibrosis. Dogs in this category were severely, clinically affected. Chronic, low-grade retinitis with variable retinal atrophy. Most dogs in this category were over 3 years of age, and many were visually functional. The existence of a definable spectrum of morphological changes associated with inflammation, suggests that Toxocara sp. ocular larva migrans may be the cause of a highly prevalent, potentially blinding syndrome of working sheep dogs in New Zealand.

  6. [Lifestyle-related diseases and anti-aging ophthalmology: suppression of retinal and choroidal pathologies by inhibiting renin-angiotensin system and inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Susumu

    2009-03-01

    Lifestyle-related diseases cause macro-and microangiopathies in the major organs including the brain, heart, kidney, and eye, and as a result, shorten the lifespan. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has recently been shown to contribute to the processes of accelerated aging caused by lifestyle-related diseases from visceral obesity in the early stage to late-onset organ damage. Vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), associated with lifestyle-related diseases as risk factors for progression, develop retinal and choroidal neovascularization (CNV), respectively, in their advanced stages. We have found that tissue RAS is activated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and CNV, leading to angiotensin type 1 receptor(AT1-R)-mediated expression of inflammation-related molecules including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, and monocyte chemotactic protein(MCP)-1. Neuronal dysfunction in diabetic retinopathy is also shown to result from AT1-R-mediated degradation of synaptic proteins. Moreover, we revealed for the first time that the receptor for prorenin [(pro) renin receptor] is expressed in the eye, although prorenin was until recently believed to be just an inactive precursor of renin. Prorenin binds to the receptor that causes dual activation of its intracellular signaling and tissue RAS, and this pathogenic mechanism is termed receptor-associated prorenin system (RAPS)'. We have demonstrated the contribution of RAPS to the pathogenesis of CNV and dual regulation of VEGF and MCP-1 by signal transduction via (pro) renin receptor and AT1-R. Next, we report the potential validity of food factor supplements as a therapeutic strategy for preventing the retinal and choroidal pathologies driven by RAS-induced inflammatory and angiogenic molecules. Functional food factors examined include lutein in yellow-green vegetables, the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid

  7. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells: subpopulations and their difference in cell biology and effects on retinal degeneration in RCS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Li, P; Tian, Y; Li, Z; Lian, C; Ou, Q; Jin, C; Gao, F; Xu, J-Y; Wang, J; Wang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, J; Li, W; Tian, H; Lu, L; Xu, G-T

    2017-12-05

    Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are potential candidates for treating retinal degeneration (RD). To further study the biology and therapeutic effects of these cells, two hUC-MSC subpopulations, termed hUC-MSC1 and hUC-MSC2, were isolated by single-cell cloning method and their therapeutic functions were compared in RCS rat, a RD model. Although both subsets satisfied the basic requirements for hUC-MSCs, they were significantly different in morphology, proliferation rate, differentiation capacity, phenotype and gene expression. Furthermore, only the smaller, fibroblast-like, faster growing subset hUC-MSC1 displayed stronger colony forming potential as well as adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacities. When the two subsets were respectively transplanted into the subretinal spaces of RCS rats, both subsets survived, but only hUC-MSC1 expressed RPE cell markers Bestrophin and RPE65. More importantly, hUC-MSC1 showed stronger rescue effect on the retinal function as indicated by the higher b-wave amplitude on ERG examination, thicker retinal nuclear layer, and decreased apoptotic photoreceptors. When both subsets were treated with interleukin-6, mimicking the inflammatory environment when the cells were transplanted into the eyes with degenerated retina, hUC-MSC1 expressed much higher levels of trophic factors in comparison with hUC-MSC2. Therefore, data here, in addition to prove the heterogeneity of hUC-MSCs, confirmed that the stronger therapeutic effects of hUC-MSC1 were attributed to its stronger anti-apoptotic effect, paracrine of trophic factors and potentially RPE cell differentiation capacity. Thus, the subset hUC-MSC1, not the other subset or the un-grouped hUC-MSCs should be used for effective treatment of RD. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. CERKL, a retinal disease gene, encodes an mRNA-binding protein that localizes in compact and untranslated mRNPs associated with microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alihamze Fathinajafabadi

    Full Text Available The function of CERKL (CERamide Kinase Like, a causative gene of retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy, still awaits characterization. To approach its cellular role we have investigated the subcellular localization and interaction partners of the full length CERKL isoform, CERKLa of 532 amino acids, in different cell lines, including a photoreceptor-derived cell line. We demonstrate that CERKLa is a main component of compact and untranslated mRNPs and that associates with other RNP complexes such as stress granules, P-bodies and polysomes. CERKLa is a protein that binds through its N-terminus to mRNAs and interacts with other mRNA-binding proteins like eIF3B, PABP, HSP70 and RPS3. Except for eIF3B, these interactions depend on the integrity of mRNAs but not of ribosomes. Interestingly, the C125W CERKLa pathological mutant does not interact with eIF3B and is absent from these complexes. Compact mRNPs containing CERKLa also associate with microtubules and are found in neurites of neural differentiated cells. These localizations had not been reported previously for any member of the retinal disorders gene family and should be considered when investigating the pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutical approaches in these diseases.

  9. Missed retinal breaks in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Takkar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the causes and associations of missed retinal breaks (MRBs and posterior vitreous detachment (PVD in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD. METHODS: Case sheets of patients undergoing vitreo retinal surgery for RRD at a tertiary eye care centre were evaluated retrospectively. Out of the 378 records screened, 253 were included for analysis of MRBs and 191 patients were included for analysis of PVD, depending on the inclusion criteria. Features of RRD and retinal breaks noted on examination were compared to the status of MRBs and PVD detected during surgery for possible associations. RESULTS: Overall, 27% patients had MRBs. Retinal holes were commonly missed in patients with lattice degeneration while missed retinal tears were associated with presence of complete PVD. Patients operated for cataract surgery were significantly associated with MRBs (P=0.033 with the odds of missing a retinal break being 1.91 as compared to patients with natural lens. Advanced proliferative vitreo retinopathy (PVR and retinal bullae were the most common reasons for missing a retinal break during examination. PVD was present in 52% of the cases and was wrongly assessed in 16%. Retinal bullae, pseudophakia/aphakia, myopia, and horse shoe retinal tears were strongly associated with presence of PVD. Traumatic RRDs were rarely associated with PVD. CONCLUSION: Pseudophakic patients, and patients with retinal bullae or advanced PVR should be carefully screened for MRBs. Though Weiss ring is a good indicator of PVD, it may still be over diagnosed in some cases. PVD is associated with retinal bullae and pseudophakia, and inversely with traumatic RRD.

  10. Genetic architecture of human fibrotic diseases: disease risk and disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès eGardet

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic studies of human diseases have identified multiple genetic risk loci for various fibrotic diseases. This has provided insights into the myriad of biological pathways potentially involved in disease pathogenesis. These discoveries suggest that alterations in immune responses, barrier function, metabolism and telomerase activity may be implicated in the genetic risks for fibrotic diseases. In addition to genetic disease-risks, the identification of genetic disease-modifiers associated with disease complications, severity or prognosis provides crucial insights into the biological processes implicated in disease progression. Understanding the biological processes driving disease progression may be critical to delineate more effective strategies for therapeutic interventions. This review provides an overview of current knowledge and gaps regarding genetic disease-risks and genetic disease-modifiers in human fibrotic diseases.

  11. Superantigen presentation by human retinal pigment epithelial cells to T cells is dependent on CD2-CD58 and CD18-CD54 molecule interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Junker, N; Kaestel, C G

    2001-01-01

    Human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are capable of presenting bacterial superantigens (SAg) to T cells in vitro by ligation of MHC class II molecules on RPE cells with the T cell receptor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the involvement of adhesion molecules in presentation...... of SAg. Cultured human fetal and adult RPE cells were treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma, 500 U ml(-1) for 72 hr) and afterwards pulsed with the SAg staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA, 500 ng ml(-1) for 2 hr) followed by coculture with freshly obtained T cells isolated from peripheral blood....... Proliferation was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. In selected experiments, either RPE or T cells were pre-treated with blocking antibodies specific for cell surface molecules. For comparison, dendritic cells were used as superantigen presenting cells for T cells. This study showed...

  12. Modeling human disease using organotypic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Pawel J; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-12-01

    Reliable disease models are needed in order to improve quality of healthcare. This includes gaining better understanding of disease mechanisms, developing new therapeutic interventions and personalizing treatment. Up-to-date, the majority of our knowledge about disease states comes from in vivo animal models and in vitro cell culture systems. However, it has been exceedingly difficult to model disease at the tissue level. Since recently, the gap between cell line studies and in vivo modeling has been narrowing thanks to progress in biomaterials and stem cell research. Development of reliable 3D culture systems has enabled a rapid expansion of sophisticated in vitro models. Here we focus on some of the latest advances and future perspectives in 3D organoids for human disease modeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling human disease using organotypic cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiger, Pawel J; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-01-01

    Reliable disease models are needed in order to improve quality of healthcare. This includes gaining better understanding of disease mechanisms, developing new therapeutic interventions and personalizing treatment. Up-to-date, the majority of our knowledge about disease states comes from in vivo a...... culture systems has enabled a rapid expansion of sophisticated in vitro models. Here we focus on some of the latest advances and future perspectives in 3D organoids for human disease modeling....... animal models and in vitro cell culture systems. However, it has been exceedingly difficult to model disease at the tissue level. Since recently, the gap between cell line studies and in vivo modeling has been narrowing thanks to progress in biomaterials and stem cell research. Development of reliable 3D...

  14. Druse-Induced Morphology Evolution in Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzitello, K I; Chrenek, M A; Family, F; Grossniklaus, H E; Nickerson, J M; Jiang, Y

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a key site of pathogenesis for many retina diseases. The formation of drusen in the retina is characteristic of retinal degeneration. We investigate morphological changes in the RPE in the presence of soft drusen using an integrated experimental and modeling approach. We collect RPE flat mount images from donated human eyes and develop 1) statistical tools to quantify the images and 2) a cell-based model to simulate the morphology evolution. We compare three different mechanisms of RPE repair evolution, cell apoptosis, cell fusion, and expansion, and Simulations of our RPE morphogenesis model quantitatively reproduce deformations of human RPE morphology due to drusen, suggesting that a purse-string mechanism is sufficient to explain how RPE heals cell loss caused by drusen-damage. We found that drusen beneath tissue promote cell death in a number that far exceeds the cell numbers covering the drusen. Tissue deformations are studied using area distributions, Voronoi doma...

  15. Retinal Detachment Associated with AIDS-Related Cytomegalovirus Retinitis: Risk Factors in a Resource-Limited Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Michael; Chen, Jenny; Ausayakhun, Somsanguan; Kunavisarut, Paradee; Vichitvejpaisal, Pornpattana; Ausayakhun, Sakarin; Jirawison, Choeng; Shantha, Jessica; Holland, Gary N; Heiden, David; Margolis, Todd P; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine risk factors predictive of retinal detachment in patients with cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in a setting with limited access to ophthalmic care. Design Case-control study. Methods Sixty-four patients with CMV retinitis and retinal detachment were identified from the Ocular Infectious Diseases and Retina Clinics at Chiang Mai University. Three control patients with CMV retinitis but no retinal detachment were selected for each case, matched by calendar date. The medical records of each patient were reviewed, with patient-level and eye-level features recorded for the clinic visit used to match cases and controls, and also for the initial clinic visit at which CMV retinitis was diagnosed. Risk factors for retinal detachment were assessed separately for each of these time points using multivariate conditional logistic regression models that included 1 eye from each patient. Results Patients with a retinal detachment were more likely than controls to have low visual acuity (OR, 1.24 per line of worse vision on the logMAR scale; 95%CI, 1.16-1.33) and bilateral disease (OR, 2.12; 95%CI, 0.92-4.90). Features present at the time of the initial diagnosis of CMV retinitis that predicted subsequent retinal detachment included bilateral disease (OR, 2.68; 95%CI, 1.18-6.08) and lesion size (OR, 2.64 per 10% increase in lesion size; 95%CI, 1.41-4.94). Conclusion Bilateral CMV retinitis and larger lesion sizes, each of which is a marker of advanced disease, were associated with subsequent retinal detachment. Earlier detection and treatment may reduce the likelihood that patients with CMV retinitis develop a retinal detachment. PMID:25448999

  16. Presumed toxoplasmic central retinal artery occlusion and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arai H

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Haruka Arai,1 Tsutomu Sakai,1 Kiichiro Okano,1 Ranko Aoyagi,1 Ayano Imai,2 Hiroshi Takase,2 Manabu Mochizuki,2 Hiroshi Tsuneoka11Department of Ophthalmology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing are rare in ocular toxoplasmosis. We report a case of toxoplasmic CRAO and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing. A healthy 83-year-old male developed left panuveitis. Funduscopic examination of the left eye showed a swollen optic disc and sheathing of the retinal artery with a dense vitreous haze and a white retinal lesion. Serum anti-toxoplasma antibodies were positive in a latex agglutination assay. Vitrectomy was performed to improve visualization of the retinal lesions and for examination of causative microorganisms. A postoperative fundus examination revealed CRAO with optic disc involvement and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing. Qualitative multiplex polymerase chain reaction detected the Toxoplasma gondii B1 gene in ocular fluid from both the aqueous and vitreous humor. The presumed diagnosis of ocular toxoplasmosis was made and treatment was started with prednisone and acetylspiramycin with subsequent improvement. Two months later, the patient developed active retinochoroiditis in the left eye. After 6 weeks of anti-toxoplasma therapy, the disease involuted. Retinal vascular occlusions and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing are rare in toxoplasmosis. This is the first case report of toxoplasmic CRAO and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing. The diagnosis of ocular toxoplasmosis should be considered in patients with retinal artery occlusions and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing associated with inflammation.Keywords: ocular toxoplasmosis, toxoplasma retinochoroiditis

  17. Animal models for human genetic diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sharif Sons

    disturbances (including anxiety and depression). (Rosenthal and Brown, 2007). Mouse models for a rare genetic disorder of the blood platelets, May-Hegglin anomaly (MHA) showed same symptoms as occur in humans (American Institute of. Physics, 2011). Also in genetic prion disease, histopathological examination of ...

  18. Primatology. Human diseases threaten great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferber, D

    2000-08-25

    Researchers are uncovering disturbing evidence that scientists and tourists are infecting wild primates with human pathogens. In response, ape specialists, including the American Society of Primatologists, are now calling for stricter health standards for researchers and tourists. They are also urging researchers to learn how to diagnose disease in their study animals.

  19. [Retinal regeneration with iPS cells ‒ Clinical trials for retinal degenerative disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Sunao

    2015-01-01

    Potential for re-programming cells has become widely accepted as a tool for obtaining transplantation materials. There has been great interest in cell-based therapies, including retinal transplants, because there is a reduced risk of immune rejection. Stem cells have the capacity for self-renewal plus the capacity to generate several differentiated cells. They are derived from many sources including human adult-derived induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and have found early application in the context of ocular disease. In results, our established iPS-retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are high-quality RPE cells. iPS cells-derived RPE cells clearly showed polygonal morphology (mostly hexagonal) and contained melanin. Moreover, RPE cells derived from iPS cells had many characteristics of mature RPE cells in vivo, but no characteristics of pluripotent stem cells. Recently, we transplanted RPE cell sheets to treat a patient with wet age-related macular degeneration (September, 2014). In addition, we are now conducting experiments to determine whether allogeneic T cells can recognize iPS-RPE cells from HLA-A, B, DRB1 locus homozygote donors. iPS bank might be useful as allografts in retinal disorders, if the recipient T cells cannot respond to allogeneic RPE cells because of match to some of main HLA antigens.

  20. High resolution retinal image restoration with wavefront sensing and self-extracted filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuyu; Erry, Gavin; Nemeth, Sheila; Mitra, Sunanda; Soliz, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy commonly rely on a clear view of the retina. The challenge in obtaining high quality retinal image lies in the design of the imaging system that can reduce the strong aberrations of the human eye. Since the amplitudes of human eye aberrations decrease rapidly as the aberration order goes up, it is more cost-effective to correct low order aberrations with adaptive optical devices while process high order aberrations through image processing. A cost effective fundus imaging device that can capture high quality retinal images with 2-5 times higher resolution than conventional retinal images has been designed [1]. This imager improves image quality by attaching complementary adaptive optical components to a conventional fundus camera. However, images obtained with the high resolution camera are still blurred due to some uncorrected aberrations as well as defocusing resulting from non-isoplanatic effect. Therefore, advanced image restoration algorithms have been employed for further improvement in image quality. In this paper, we use wavefront-based and self-extracted blind deconvolution techniques to restore images captured by the high resolution fundus camera. We demonstrate that through such techniques, pathologies that are critical to retinal disease diagnosis but not clear or not observable in the original image can be observed clearly in the restored images. Image quality evaluation is also used to finalize the development of a cost-effective, fast, and automated diagnostic system that can be used clinically.

  1. The Silk-protein Sericin Induces Rapid Melanization of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells by Activating the NF-κB Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidet, J R; Reppe, S; Pasovic, L; Olstad, O K; Lyberg, T; Khan, A Z; Fostad, I G; Chen, D F; Utheim, T P

    2016-03-04

    Restoration of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to prevent further loss of vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration represents a promising novel treatment modality. Development of RPE transplants, however, requires up to 3 months of cell differentiation. We explored whether the silk protein sericin can induce maturation of primary human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated that sericin up-regulated RPE-associated transcripts (RPE65 and CRALBP). Upstream analysis identified the NF-κB pathway as one of the top sericin-induced regulators. ELISA confirmed that sericin stimulates the main NF-κB pathway. Increased levels of RPE-associated proteins (RPE65 and the pigment melanin) in the sericin-supplemented cultures were confirmed by western blot, spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy. Sericin also increased cell density and reduced cell death following serum starvation in culture. Inclusion of NF-κB agonists and antagonists in the culture medium showed that activation of the NF-κB pathway appears to be necessary, but not sufficient, for sericin-induced RPE pigmentation. We conclude that sericin promotes pigmentation of cultured primary hRPE ce