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Sample records for human recombinant macrophage

  1. Recombinant human lactoferrin modulates human PBMC derived macrophage responses to BCG and LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Shen-An; Kruzel, Marian L; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2016-12-01

    Lactoferrin, an iron-binding glycoprotein found in mammalian mucosal secretions and granules of neutrophils, possesses several immune modulatory properties. Published reports indicate that lactoferrin enhances the efficacy of the tuberculosis vaccine, BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin), both by increasing macrophage and dendritic cell ability to stimulate receptive T cells and by modulating the inflammatory response. This report is the first to demonstrate the effects of a recombinant human lactoferrin (10 μg/mL) on human PBMC derived CD14+ and CD16+ macrophages stimulated with a strong (LPS, 10 ng/mL) or weaker (BCG, MOI 1:1) stimulator of inflammation. After 3 days culture, LPS and human lactoferrin treated CD14+ cells significantly increased production of IL-10, IL-6, and MCP-1 compared to the LPS only group. In contrast, similarly treated CD16+ macrophages increased production of IL-12p40 and IL-10 and decreased TNF-α. Limited changes were observed in BCG stimulated CD14+ and CD16+ macrophages with and without lactoferrin. Analysis of surface expression of antigen presentation and co-stimulatory molecules demonstrated that CD14+ macrophages, when stimulated with BCG or LPS and cultured with lactoferrin, increased expression of CD86. CD16+ macrophages treated with lactoferrin showed a similar trend of increase in CD86 expression, but only when stimulated with BCG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of the Genetic Recombination Rates of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Macrophages and T Cells†

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jianbo; Rhodes, Terence D.; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exhibits a high level of genetic variation generated by frequent mutation and genetic recombination during reverse transcription. We have measured HIV-1 recombination rates in T cells in one round of virus replication. It was recently proposed that HIV-1 recombines far more frequently in macrophages than in T cells. In an attempt to delineate the mechanisms that elevate recombination, we measured HIV-1 recombination rates in macrophages at three dif...

  3. Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor as treatment for chronic leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbolla-Escoboza, J R; María-Aceves, R; López-Hernández, M A; Collados-Larumbe, M T

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a single subcutaneous perilesional administration of 300 micrograms of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (rHGM-CSF) for the treatment of chronic leg ulcers. Prospective, descriptive evaluation in an outpatient group. The Centro Médico Nacional 20 de Noviembre, ISSSTE, Mexico City. 10 patients with chronic leg ulcers. Ulcer diameter and side effects. After 4 weeks observation, 8 of the 10 ulcers had healed; the other two had a mean diameter decrease of 21%. The only side effect was found in a 58 year old female who complained of moderate perilesional pain two days after having received treatment: it was successfully treated with paracetamol. We believe that a single perilesional subcutaneous administration of rhGM-CSF is safe and effective for the treatment of chronic leg ulcers.

  4. Modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H; Hovgaard, D

    1991-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to inhibit the chemotaxis and enhance the oxidative burst response of human neutrophils in vitro. The present study describes the effect of recombinant GM-CSF on the neutrophil and monocyte function in patients with lymphoma...

  5. Safety of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in healing pediatric severe burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Y F; Chai, J K; Luo, H M; Zhang, Q X; Feng, R

    2015-03-31

    We explored the safety of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) for healing burns in children. Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: the experimental group received external rhGM-CSF gel, and the control group received rhGM-CSF gel matrix components, applied to the burn surface. Neither group was given any other drugs that promote wound healing. Each day we recorded the pulse, body temperature, and respiration status in the two groups. We detected the blood routine, urine routine, and hepatic and renal function before the patients received drug treatment and after 72 h. The wound scab and healing states in the two groups were recorded every 4 days to evaluate wound healing rate and time taken for complete healing. Adverse reactions and their rate of occurrence were also recorded. The median time of healing was 15 days in the experimental group and 19 days in the control group (log-rank χ(2) = 5.139, P 0.05). Compared with saline treatment of severe burns, rhGM-CSF can effectively shorten the healing time without significant adverse reactions, and is an effective and safe treatment for burns in children.

  6. Continuous treatment with recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis CFP-10-ESAT-6 protein activated human monocyte while deactivated LPS-stimulated macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yonghong; Yang, Xin; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yaoting; Su, Bo; Ding, Yuansheng; Qin, Lianhua; Yang, Hua; Zheng, Ruijuan; Hu, Zhongyi

    2008-01-18

    Influence of the recombinant culture filtered protein 10 (CFP-10) and early-secreted antigenic target 6kDa protein (ESAT-6) (r-CFP-10-ESAT-6, rCE) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) on human monocyte and macrophage activation was investigated using human monocyte, monocyte like THP-1 cell line and monocyte derived macrophage (MDM). rCE solely enhanced TNF-alpha release from human monocytes and THP-1 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. rCE enhanced expression of CD80 and CD40, it also synergized with IFN-gamma in induction of TNF-alpha production and HLA-DR expression. Pharmacological agents that selectively inhibit mitogen activated protein kinase activation markedly suppressed rCE-induced TNF- alpha release. However, continuous presence of rCE (>72h) during monocyte to macrophage differentiation inhibited macrophage response to LPS stimulation. Collectively, these data suggest that rCE might have differential influence on monocyte and macrophage activation, which might be correlated with Mtb immune evasion.

  7. High level of expression of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in transgenic rice cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Yun-Ji; Hong, Shin-Young; Kwon, Tae-Ho

    2003-01-01

    this problem, we sought an expression system in which heterologous gene expression could be induced at high levels. We selected a rice amylase expression system in which the promoter Ramy3D is induced to express recombinant protein by sucrose starvation. This induction system was found to give good yield......Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) has been previously produced in tobacco cell suspension cultures. However, the amount of hGM-CSF accumulated in the culture medium dropped quickly from its maximum of 150 microg/L at 5 d after incubation. To overcome...... of recombinant hGM-CSF in transgenic rice cell suspension culture and protease activity of this culture medium was low compared to that of tobacco culture system....

  8. The Combination of Fosfomycin, Metronidazole, and Recombinant Human Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor is Stable in vitro and Has Maintained Antibacterial Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonnes, Siv; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane; Gasbjerg, Lærke Smidt

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of secondary peritonitis includes surgery and antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial agents are often administered intravenously, however, the alternative route intraperitoneal administration could be considered. Investigations must be conducted prior to clinical application....... Therefore, we aimed to investigate the combination of fosfomycin, metronidazole, and recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor with regard to its chemical properties and the solution's stability. In addition, the antibacterial effect of the mixed drug solution was compared...

  9. Production of recombinant human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor in rice cell suspension culture with a human-like N-glycan structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yun-Ji; Chong, Yun-Jo; Yang, Moon-Sik; Kwon, Tae-Ho

    2011-12-01

    The rice α-amylase 3D promoter system, which is activated under sucrose-starved conditions, has emerged as a useful system for producing recombinant proteins. However, using rice as the production system for therapeutic proteins requires modifications of the N-glycosylation pattern because of the potential immunogenicity of plant-specific sugar residues. In this study, glyco-engineered rice were generated as a production host for therapeutic glycoproteins, using RNA interference (RNAi) technology to down-regulate the endogenous α-1,3-fucosyltransferase (α-1,3-FucT) and β-1,2-xylosyltransferase (β-1,2-XylT) genes. N-linked glycans from the RNAi lines were identified, and their structures were compared with those isolated from a wild-type cell suspension. The inverted-repeat chimeric RNA silencing construct of α-1,3-fucosyltransferase and β-1,2-xylosyltransferase (Δ3FT/XT)-9 glyco-engineered line with significantly reduced core α-1,3-fucosylated and/or β-1,2-xylosylated glycan structures was established. Moreover, levels of plant-specific α-1,3-fucose and/or β-1,2-xylose residues incorporated into recombinant human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) produced from the N44 + Δ3FT/XT-4 glyco-engineered line co-expressing ihpRNA of Δ3FT/XT and hGM-CSF were significantly decreased compared with those in the previously reported N44-08 transgenic line expressing hGM-CSF. None of the glyco-engineered lines differed from the wild type with respect to cell division, proliferation or ability to secrete proteins into the culture medium. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. [Effects of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on wound healing and microRNA expression in diabetic rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifeng; Liu, Dewu; Guo, Guanghua; Mao, Yuangui; Wang, Xianlin

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the effects of recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) on wound healing and microRNA expression in diabetic rats. Eighteen male SD rats of clean grade were used to reproduce diabetes model. Four weeks later, a total of 64 full-thickness skin wounds were created on the back of 16 rats with established diabetes, with 4 wounds on each rat. Two symmetrical wounds on either side of the spine were created as a pair according to paired design. Then the wounds were divided into groups A and B according to the random number table and blind method (red and blue tags on the rhGM-CSF or the gel vehicle), with 32 wounds in each group. The ointment with red tag was applied on the wounds of group A and the blue one on group B. The application was conducted once a day, with a thickness of 3 mm, up to post injury day (PID) 14. Gross observation of wound healing was conducted on PID 3, 7, 14. The wound healing rate was determined on PID 3 and 7. On PID 3, 7, 14, tissues from 2, 4, and 8 wounds were harvested from each group respectively for the observation of the histopathological changes with HE staining, and also for analyzing the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and CD31 with immunohistochemical staining (denoted as absorbance value). On PID 7, tissues from 6 wounds in each group were harvested for microarray gene chip to screen the differentially expressed microRNAs. Enrichment analysis of Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) signaling pathway on the differentially expressed microRNAs were performed after the microRNA screening results were validated by real-time fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR. Data were processed with paired t test or two-sample t test. (1) On PID 3, the wound area was significantly decreased, and the wound granulation was significantly proliferated in both groups. On PID 7, the wound area was further decreased, and the wound area was almost filled by granulation in both

  11. The immunosuppressive effects of a novel recombinant LipQ (Rv2485c) protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on human macrophage cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anjani; Manisha; Sangha, Gurkamaljit Kaur; Shrivastava, Anju; Kaur, Jagdeep

    2017-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), an intracellular pathogen, still represents a major global health challenge. A number of mycobacterial macromolecules have been shown to target biological processes within host macrophages; however, the exact mechanism for the majority of these host pathogen interactions is still poorly understood. Moreover, the lipid metabolic pathway is one of the most important physiologic pathways that plays a vital role in the survival and infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In present study, we investigated the effect of rLipQ from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv on macrophage functions in vitro.Our results demonstrate that rLipQ significantly lowers the expression level of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α& IFN-γ) and augments the level of anti inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4 & IL-10as compared to LPS stimulated macrophages. An up-regulation of anti-inflammatory and down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines levels in rLipQ pretreated macrophages implies immuno-modulatory functions in TB patients. Interestingly, rLipQ also inhibited the expression of iNOS, TLR-2 and transcription factor NF-kB in LPS stimulated macrophages whereas the expression of TLR-4 remains unchanged. The inhibition in the expression of these signaling molecules has been correlated to the inhibition of NO production in macrophages. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that rLipQ is a novel lipase that is highly immunogenic and may play an important role in the virulence and pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis infection, by altering the balance of cytokines, which might help to assess prognosis and contribute to a better understanding against host-pathogen interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High-resolution transcriptome of human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Beyer

    Full Text Available Macrophages are dynamic cells integrating signals from their microenvironment to develop specific functional responses. Although, microarray-based transcriptional profiling has established transcriptional reprogramming as an important mechanism for signal integration and cell function of macrophages, current knowledge on transcriptional regulation of human macrophages is far from complete. To discover novel marker genes, an area of great need particularly in human macrophage biology but also to generate a much more thorough transcriptome of human M1- and M1-like macrophages, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq of human macrophages. Using this approach we can now provide a high-resolution transcriptome profile of human macrophages under classical (M1-like and alternative (M2-like polarization conditions and demonstrate a dynamic range exceeding observations obtained by previous technologies, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the transcriptome of human macrophages. Using this approach, we identify important gene clusters so far not appreciated by standard microarray techniques. In addition, we were able to detect differential promoter usage, alternative transcription start sites, and different coding sequences for 57 gene loci in human macrophages. Moreover, this approach led to the identification of novel M1-associated (CD120b, TLR2, SLAMF7 as well as M2-associated (CD1a, CD1b, CD93, CD226 cell surface markers. Taken together, these data support that high-resolution transcriptome profiling of human macrophages by RNA-seq leads to a better understanding of macrophage function and will form the basis for a better characterization of macrophages in human health and disease.

  13. High-Resolution Transcriptome of Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jia; Staratschek-Jox, Andrea; Vorholt, Daniela; Krebs, Wolfgang; Sommer, Daniel; Sander, Jil; Mertens, Christina; Nino-Castro, Andrea; Schmidt, Susanne V.; Schultze, Joachim L.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are dynamic cells integrating signals from their microenvironment to develop specific functional responses. Although, microarray-based transcriptional profiling has established transcriptional reprogramming as an important mechanism for signal integration and cell function of macrophages, current knowledge on transcriptional regulation of human macrophages is far from complete. To discover novel marker genes, an area of great need particularly in human macrophage biology but also to generate a much more thorough transcriptome of human M1- and M1-like macrophages, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of human macrophages. Using this approach we can now provide a high-resolution transcriptome profile of human macrophages under classical (M1-like) and alternative (M2-like) polarization conditions and demonstrate a dynamic range exceeding observations obtained by previous technologies, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the transcriptome of human macrophages. Using this approach, we identify important gene clusters so far not appreciated by standard microarray techniques. In addition, we were able to detect differential promoter usage, alternative transcription start sites, and different coding sequences for 57 gene loci in human macrophages. Moreover, this approach led to the identification of novel M1-associated (CD120b, TLR2, SLAMF7) as well as M2-associated (CD1a, CD1b, CD93, CD226) cell surface markers. Taken together, these data support that high-resolution transcriptome profiling of human macrophages by RNA-seq leads to a better understanding of macrophage function and will form the basis for a better characterization of macrophages in human health and disease. PMID:23029029

  14. Bone marrow changes associated with recombinant granulocyte-macrophage and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors. Discrimination of granulocytic regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A C; Todd, W M; Hackney, M H; Ben-Ezra, J

    1994-06-01

    The hematopoietic growth factors recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor are associated with changes of the bone marrow. To evaluate the morphologic features and to differentiate them from leukemia, bone marrow specimens from 12 patients who had been treated with one of these agents were evaluated. The bone marrow displayed marked promyelocytic hyperplasia and a less striking increased percentage of myeloblasts. In each of the 11 patients without leukemia at the time of bone marrow biopsy, the percentage of promyelocytes in the bone marrow was greater than that of myeloblasts. Cytologic features of stimulated regeneration included diffuse cytoplasmic hypergranulation of immature neutrophilic precursors that had prominent perinuclear spherical clear areas representing the Golgi zones. With consideration of bone marrow composition and careful attention to cytologic detail, the distinction of bone marrow regeneration from acute leukemia can be made in most patients who are being treated with recombinant hematopoietic growth factors.

  15. Trafficking of Estrella lausannensis in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Brigida; Kebbi-Beghdadi, Carole; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-07-01

    Estrella lausannensis is a new member of the Chlamydiales order. Like other Chlamydia-related bacteria, it is able to replicate in amoebae and in fish cell lines. A preliminary study investigating the pathogenic potential of Chlamydia-related bacteria found a correlation between antibody response to E. lausannensis and pneumonia in children. To further investigate the pathogenic potential of E. lausannensis, we determined its ability to grow in human macrophages and its intracellular trafficking. The replication in macrophages resulted in viable E. lausannensis; however, it caused a significant cytopathic effect. The intracellular trafficking of E. lausannensis was analyzed by determining the interaction of the Estrella-containing inclusions with various endocytic markers as well as host organelles. The E. lausannensis inclusion escaped the endocytic pathway rapidly avoiding maturation into phagolysosomes by preventing both EEA-1 and LAMP-1 accumulation. Compared to Waddlia chondrophila, another Chlamydia-related bacteria, the recruitment of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum was minimal for E. lausannensis inclusions. Estrella lausannensis appears to use a distinct source of nutrients and energy compared to other members of the Chlamydiales order. In conclusion, we hypothesize that E. lausannensis has a restricted growth in human macrophages, due to its reduced capacity to control programmed cell death. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Expression and characterization of recombinant human serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was specifically recognized by the anti-human HSA antibody and CP antibody in Western blotting assay. In vitro, the recombinant HSA-CP can stimulate HEK293 cell proliferation. In Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, 12 weeks recombinant HSA-CP treatment could prevent the accumulation of glomerular extracellular matrix, ...

  17. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Macrophages for Unraveling Human Macrophage Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanrui; Reilly, Muredach P

    2017-11-01

    Despite a substantial appreciation for the critical role of macrophages in cardiometabolic diseases, understanding of human macrophage biology has been hampered by the lack of reliable and scalable models for cellular and genetic studies. Human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived macrophages (IPSDM), as an unlimited source of subject genotype-specific cells, will undoubtedly play an important role in advancing our understanding of the role of macrophages in human diseases. In this review, we summarize current literature in the differentiation and characterization of IPSDM at phenotypic, functional, and transcriptomic levels. We emphasize the progress in differentiating iPSC to tissue resident macrophages, and in understanding the ontogeny of in vitro differentiated IPSDM that resembles primitive hematopoiesis, rather than adult definitive hematopoiesis. We review the application of IPSDM in modeling both Mendelian genetic disorders and host-pathogen interactions. Finally, we highlighted the potential areas of research using IPSDM in functional validation of coronary artery disease loci in genome-wide association studies, functional genomic analyses, drug testing, and cell therapeutics in cardiovascular diseases. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) nonavalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  19. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  20. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Bivalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  1. Macrophage Immune Response Suppression by Recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens, the ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 Fusion Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghatoleslam, Atefeh; Hemmati, Mina; Ebadat, Saeedeh; Movahedi, Bahram; Mostafavi-Pour, Zohreh

    2016-07-01

    Macrophage immune responses are affected by the secretory proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). This study aimed to examine the immune responses of macrophages to Mtb secretory antigens, namely ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10. THP-1 cells (a human monocytic cell line) were cultured and differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The cytotoxicity of the recombinant Mtb proteins was assessed using the MTT assay. Two important immune responses of macrophages, namely NO and ROS production, were measured in response to the ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 antigens. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA with SPSS, version 16, and considered significant at PCFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 proteins markedly reduced macrophage immune response. The treatment of the THP-1-differentiated cells with ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 reduced NO and ROS production. The treated THP-1-differentiated cells exhibited less inducible NO synthase activity than did the untreated cells. No toxic effect on macrophage viability was observed for the applied proteins at the different concentrations. It seems that the decline in macrophage immune response is due to the suppression of NO and ROS production pathways without any effect on cell viability.

  2. Macrophage Immune Response Suppression by Recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens, the ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 Fusion Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Seghatoleslam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Macrophage immune responses are affected by the secretory proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. This study aimed to examine the immune responses of macrophages to Mtb secretory antigens, namely ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10. Methods: THP-1 cells (a human monocytic cell line were cultured and differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The cytotoxicity of the recombinant Mtb proteins was assessed using the MTT assay. Two important immune responses of macrophages, namely NO and ROS production, were measured in response to the ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 antigens. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA with SPSS, version 16, and considered significant at P<0.05. Results: The results showed that the ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 proteins markedly reduced macrophage immune response. The treatment of the THP-1-differentiated cells with ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 reduced NO and ROS production. The treated THP-1-differentiated cells exhibited less inducible NO synthase activity than did the untreated cells. No toxic effect on macrophage viability was observed for the applied proteins at the different concentrations. Conclusion: It seems that the decline in macrophage immune response is due to the suppression of NO and ROS production pathways without any effect on cell viability.

  3. Culture of human oocytes with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor has no effect on embryonic chromosomal constitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Inge; Loft, Anne; Hald, Finn

    2010-01-01

    The effect on ploidy rate in donated human oocytes after in-vitro culture with recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; 2 ng/ml) from fertilization until day 3 was examined in a multicentre, prospective placebo-controlled and double-blinded study including 73...

  4. Eplerenone promotes alternative activation in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Liber, Sebastian; Bułdak, Łukasz; Machnik, Grzegorz; Liber, Justyna; Okopień, Bogusław

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have analyzed the response of human monocyte-derived macrophages to mineralocorticoid axis modulators. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were incubated with aldosterone alone, eplerenone alone, and the combination of aldosterone and eplerenone. The analyzed variables were nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production, and the gene and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, arginase I, and mannose receptor. We showed that aldosterone promotes a classic inflammatory response in macrophages, whereas its antagonist, eplerenone, attenuates aldosterone-induced activity. Eplerenone did not quantitatively weaken the response of macrophages to aldosterone but instead qualitatively changed their behavior.

  5. Identification and manipulation of tumor associated macrophages in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heusinkveld Moniek

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Evading immune destruction and tumor promoting inflammation are important hallmarks in the development of cancer. Macrophages are present in most human tumors and are often associated with bad prognosis. Tumor associated macrophages come in many functional flavors ranging from what is known as classically activated macrophages (M1 associated with acute inflammation and T-cell immunity to immune suppressive macrophages (M2 associated with the promotion of tumor growth. The role of these functionally different myeloid cells is extensively studied in mice tumor models but dissimilarities in markers and receptors make the direct translation to human cancer difficult. This review focuses on recent reports discriminating the type of infiltrating macrophages in human tumors and the environmental cues present that steer their differentiation. Finally, immunotherapeutic approaches to interfere in this process are discussed.

  6. Recombinant human endostatin reduces hypertrophic scar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Otolaryngology, First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing,. China; pearl1984@sina.com. 3. Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University,. Chongqing, China; CQXuebin@126.com. Abstract. Background: Recombinant human ...

  7. The Role of Recombinant Genetics in Humanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Troy A.

    1983-01-01

    To eliminate the public's fear of recombinant genetics the important link between science and the humanities should be part of the educational system. Universal applied genetics guidelines are needed that encompass philosophical and technical issues. Biological advances can revitalize humankind in the future. (AM)

  8. Affinity purification of recombinant human plasminogen activator ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop processes for effective isolation and purification of recombinant human plasminogen activator (rhPA) from transgenic rabbit milk. Methods: Immunoaffinity chromatography was selected and improved by a special polyol-responsive monoclonal antibody (PR-mAb). Alteplase was used as immunogen ...

  9. De novo generation of cells within human nurse macrophages and consequences following HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Gartner

    Full Text Available Nurse cells are defined as those that provide for the development of other cells. We report here, that in vitro, human monocyte-derived macrophages can behave as nurse cells with functional capabilities that include de novo generation of CD4+ T-lymphocytes and a previously unknown small cell with monocytoid characteristics. We named these novel cells "self-renewing monocytoid cells" (SRMC, because they could develop into nurse macrophages that produced another generation of SRMC. SRMC were not detectable in blood. Their transition to nurse behavior was characterized by expression of CD10, a marker of thymic epithelium and bone marrow stroma, typically absent on macrophages. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling and immunostaining for cdc6 expression confirmed DNA synthesis within nurse macrophages. T-cell excision circles were detected in macrophages, along with expression of pre-T-cell receptor alpha and recombination activating gene 1, suggesting that genetic recombination events associated with generation of the T-cell receptor were occurring in these cells. SRMC expressed CCR5, the coreceptor for R5 HIV-1 isolates, and were highly susceptible to HIV-1 entry leading to productive infection. While expressing HIV-1, SRMC could differentiate into nurse macrophages that produced another generation of HIV-1-expressing SRMC. The infected nurse macrophage/SRMC cycle could continue in vitro for multiple generations, suggesting it might represent a mechanism whereby HIV-1 can maintain persistence in vivo. HIV-1 infection of nurse macrophages led to a decline in CD4+ T-cell production. There was severe, preferential loss of the CCR5+ CD4+ T-cell subpopulation. Confocal microscopy revealed individual HIV-1-expressing nurse macrophages simultaneously producing both HIV-1-expressing SRMC and non-expressing CD3+ cells, suggesting that nurse macrophages might be a source of latently infected CD4+ T-cells. Real-time PCR experiments confirmed this by demonstrating 10

  10. DMPD: Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-13. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534111 Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-1...):575-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-...4 and IL-13. PubmedID 10534111 Title Differential responses of human monocytes an

  11. DHRS9 Is a Stable Marker of Human Regulatory Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Paloma; Amodio, Giada; Macedo, Camila; Moreau, Aurelie; Obermajer, Nataša; Brochhausen, Christoph; Ahrens, Norbert; Kekarainen, Tuija; Fändrich, Fred; Cuturi, Cristina; Gregori, Silvia; Metes, Diana; Schlitt, Hans J; Thomson, Angus W; Geissler, Edward K; Hutchinson, James A

    2017-11-01

    The human regulatory macrophage (Mreg) has emerged as a promising cell type for use as a cell-based adjunct immunosuppressive therapy in solid organ transplant recipients. In this brief report, dehydrogenase/reductase 9 (DHRS9) is identified as a robust marker of human Mregs. The cognate antigen of a mouse monoclonal antibody raised against human Mregs was identified as DHRS9 by immunoprecipitation and MALDI-MS sequencing. Expression of DHRS9 within a panel of monocyte-derived macrophages was investigated by quantitative PCR, immunoblotting and flow cytometry. DHRS9 expression discriminated human Mregs from a panel of in vitro derived macrophages in other polarisation states. Likewise, DHRS9 expression distinguished Mregs from a variety of human monocyte-derived tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells in current development as cell-based immunotherapies, including Tol-DC, Rapa-DC, DC-10, and PGE2-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells. A subpopulation of DHRS9-expressing human splenic macrophages was identified by immunohistochemistry. Expression of DHRS9 was acquired gradually during in vitro development of human Mregs from CD14 monocytes and was further enhanced by IFN-γ treatment on day 6 of culture. Stimulating Mregs with 100 ng/mL lipopolysaccharide for 24 hours did not extinguish DHRS9 expression. Dhrs9 was not an informative marker of mouse Mregs. DHRS9 is a specific and stable marker of human Mregs.

  12. Profile of human macrophage transcripts: insights into macrophage biology and identification of novel chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantry, D; DeMaggio, A J; Brammer, H; Raport, C J; Wood, C L; Schweickart, V L; Epp, A; Smith, A; Stine, J T; Walton, K; Tjoelker, L; Godiska, R; Gray, P W

    1998-07-01

    High throughput partial sequencing of randomly selected cDNA clones has proven to be a powerful tool for examining the relative abundance of mRNAs and for the identification of novel gene products. Because of the important role played by macrophages in immune and inflammatory responses, we sequenced over 3000 randomly selected cDNA clones from a human macrophage library. These sequences represent a molecular inventory of mRNAs from macrophages and provide a catalog of highly expressed transcripts. Two of the most abundant clones encode recently identified CC chemokines. Macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) plays a complex role in immunoregulation and is a potent chemoattractant for dendritic cells, T cells, and natural killer cells. The chemokine receptor CCR4 binds MDC with high affinity and also responds by calcium flux and chemotaxis. CCR4 has been shown to be expressed by Th2 type T cells. Recent studies also implicate MDC as a major component of the host defense against human immunodeficiency virus.

  13. Paracrine interactions between primary human macrophages and human fibroblasts enhance murine mammary gland humanization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jodie M; Miller, Tyler C; Kidacki, Michal; Ginsburg, Erika; Stuelten, Christina H; Stewart, Delisha A; Troester, Melissa A; Vonderhaar, Barbara K

    2012-06-25

    Macrophages comprise an essential component of the mammary microenvironment necessary for normal gland development. However, there is no viable in vivo model to study their role in normal human breast function. We hypothesized that adding primary human macrophages to the murine mammary gland would enhance and provide a novel approach to examine immune-stromal cell interactions during the humanization process. Primary human macrophages, in the presence or absence of ectopic estrogen stimulation, were used to humanize mouse mammary glands. Mechanisms of enhanced humanization were identified by cytokine/chemokine ELISAs, zymography, western analysis, invasion and proliferation assays; results were confirmed with immunohistological analysis. The combined treatment of macrophages and estrogen stimulation significantly enhanced the percentage of the total gland humanized and the engraftment/outgrowth success rate. Timecourse analysis revealed the disappearance of the human macrophages by two weeks post-injection, suggesting that the improved overall growth and invasiveness of the fibroblasts provided a larger stromal bed for epithelial cell proliferation and structure formation. Confirming their promotion of fibroblasts humanization, estrogen-stimulated macrophages significantly enhanced fibroblast proliferation and invasion in vitro, as well as significantly increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive cells in humanized glands. Cytokine/chemokine ELISAs, zymography and western analyses identified TNFα and MMP9 as potential mechanisms by which estrogen-stimulated macrophages enhanced humanization. Specific inhibitors to TNFα and MMP9 validated the effects of these molecules on fibroblast behavior in vitro, as well as by immunohistochemical analysis of humanized glands for human-specific MMP9 expression. Lastly, glands humanized with macrophages had enhanced engraftment and tumor growth compared to glands humanized with fibroblasts alone. Herein, we

  14. Monoclonal antibody binding to the macrophage-specific receptor sialoadhesin alters the phagocytic properties of human and mouse macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schryver, Marjorie; Cappoen, Davie; Elewaut, Dirk; Nauwynck, Hans J; Maes, Louis; Caljon, Guy; Cos, Paul; Delputte, Peter L

    2017-02-01

    Sialoadhesin (Sn) is a surface receptor expressed on macrophages in steady state conditions, but during inflammation, Sn can be upregulated both on macrophages and on circulating monocytes. It was shown for different species that Sn becomes internalized after binding with monoclonal antibodies. These features suggest that Sn is a potential target for immunotherapies. In this study, human and mouse macrophages were treated with anti-Sn monoclonal antibodies or F(ab')2 fragments and the effect of their binding to Sn on phagocytosis was analyzed. Binding of antibodies to Sn resulted in delayed and reduced phagocytosis of fluorescent beads. No effect was observed on Fc-mediated phagocytosis or phagocytosis of bacteria by human macrophages. In contrast, an enhanced phagocytosis of bacteria by mouse macrophages was detected. These results showed that stimulation of Sn could have different effects on macrophage phagocytosis, depending both on the type of phagocytosis and cellular background. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sialylation of neurites inhibits complement-mediated macrophage removal in a human macrophage-neuron co-culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnartz-Gerlach, Bettina; Schuy, Christine; Shahraz, Anahita; Tenner, Andrea J.; Neumann, Harald

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been implicated in the removal of dysfunctional synapses and neurites during development and in disease processes in the mouse, but it is unclear how far the mouse data can be transferred to humans. Here, we co-cultured macrophages derived from human THP1 monocytes and neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells, to study the role of the complement system in a human model. Components of the complement system were expressed by the human macrophages and human neuronal culture, while receptors of the complement cascade were expressed by human macrophages as shown via gene transcript analysis and flow cytometry. We mimicked pathological conditions leading to an altered glycocalyx by treatment of human neurons with sialidases. Desialylated human neurites were opsonized by the complement component C1q. Furthermore, human neurites with an intact sialic acid cap remained untouched, while desialylated human neurites were removed and ingested by human macrophages. While blockage of the complement receptor 1 (CD35) had no effect, blockage of CD11b as part of the complement receptor 3 (CR3) reversed the effect on macrophage phagocytosis of desialylated human neurites. Data demonstrate that in the human system sialylation of the neuronal glycocalyx serves as an inhibitory flag for complement binding and CR3 mediated phagocytosis by macrophages. PMID:26257016

  16. Comparison of Methods for Analyzing Human Adipose Tissue Macrophage Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan-Bathke, Maria; Harteneck, Debra; Jaeger, Philippa

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The relationship between inflammation, obesity, and adverse metabolic conditions is associated with adipose tissue macrophages (ATM). This study compared the measurements of human ATM using flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of ...

  17. Highly efficient transfection of human THP-1 macrophages by nucleofection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeß, Marten B; Wittig, Berith; Lorkowski, Stefan

    2014-09-02

    Macrophages, as key players of the innate immune response, are at the focus of research dealing with tissue homeostasis or various pathologies. Transfection with siRNA and plasmid DNA is an efficient tool for studying their function, but transfection of macrophages is not a trivial matter. Although many different approaches for transfection of eukaryotic cells are available, only few allow reliable and efficient transfection of macrophages, but reduced cell vitality and severely altered cell behavior like diminished capability for differentiation or polarization are frequently observed. Therefore a transfection protocol is required that is capable of transferring siRNA and plasmid DNA into macrophages without causing serious side-effects thus allowing the investigation of the effect of the siRNA or plasmid in the context of normal cell behavior. The protocol presented here provides a method for reliably and efficiently transfecting human THP-1 macrophages and monocytes with high cell vitality, high transfection efficiency, and minimal effects on cell behavior. This approach is based on Nucleofection and the protocol has been optimized to maintain maximum capability for cell activation after transfection. The protocol is adequate for adherent cells after detachment as well as cells in suspension, and can be used for small to medium sample numbers. Thus, the method presented is useful for investigating gene regulatory effects during macrophage differentiation and polarization. Apart from presenting results characterizing macrophages transfected according to this protocol in comparison to an alternative chemical method, the impact of cell culture medium selection after transfection on cell behavior is also discussed. The presented data indicate the importance of validating the selection for different experimental settings.

  18. Visfatin is induced by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayi, Thérèse Hèrvée; Duhem, Christian; Copin, Corinne; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Rigamonti, Elena; Pattou, François; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2010-08-01

    Obesity is a low-grade chronic inflammatory disease associated with an increased number of macrophages (adipose tissue macrophages) in adipose tissue. Within the adipose tissue, adipose tissue macrophages are the major source of visfatin/pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor/nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase. The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) exerts anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages by inhibiting cytokine production and enhancing alternative differentiation. In this study, we investigated whether PPARgamma modulates visfatin expression in murine (bone marrow-derived macrophage) and human (primary human resting macrophage, classical macrophage, alternative macrophage or adipose tissue macrophage) macrophage models and pre-adipocyte-derived adipocytes. We show that synthetic PPARgamma ligands increase visfatin gene expression in a PPARgamma-dependent manner in primary human resting macrophages and in adipose tissue macrophages, but not in adipocytes. The threefold increase of visfatin mRNA was paralleled by an increase of protein expression (30%) and secretion (30%). Electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments and transient transfection assays indicated that PPARgamma induces visfatin promoter activity in human macrophages by binding to a DR1-PPARgamma response element. Finally, we show that PPARgamma ligands increase NAD(+) production in primary human macrophages and that this regulation is dampened in the presence of visfatin small interfering RNA or by the visfatin-specific inhibitor FK866. Taken together, our results suggest that PPARgamma regulates the expression of visfatin in macrophages, leading to increased levels of NAD(+).

  19. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  20. Antiproliferative activity of recombinant human interferon-λ2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... This study aimed at the generation of a stable transformed silkworm BmN cell line which can continuously express human interferon-λ2 (IFN-λ2) gene, and investigated the antiproliferative activity of this recombinant human IFN-λ2. Silkworm BmN cells were transfected with the recombinant vector.

  1. Biophysical characterisation of GlycoPEGylated recombinant human factor VIIa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Bitten; Westh, Peter; Nielsen, Anders D.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of GlycoPEGylation on the structural, kinetic and thermal stability of recombinant human FVIIa were investigated using rFVIIa and linear 10 kDa and branched 40 kDa GlycoPEGylated® recombinant human FVIIa derivatives. The secondary and tertiary structure of rFVIIa measured by circular...

  2. Antiproliferative activity of recombinant human interferon-λ2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at the generation of a stable transformed silkworm BmN cell line which can continuously express human interferon-λ2 (IFN-λ2) gene, and investigated the antiproliferative activity of this recombinant human IFN-λ2. Silkworm BmN cells were transfected with the recombinant vector pIZT/V5-His harboring the ...

  3. Feasibility of a recombinant human apolipoprotein E reference material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiele, F.; Barbier, A.; Visvikis, A.; Aggerbeck, L.; Rosseneu, M.; Havekes, L.; Huttinger, M.; Profilis, C.; Siest, G.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare a recombinant apo E material and to determine its suitability as a reference material. We produced human apo E3 using recombinant DNA technology. The cDNA of human apo E3 was cloned in the pARHS bacterial expression vector and used to transfect E. Coli BL21 (DE3)

  4. Activated macrophages control human adipocyte mitochondrial bioenergetics via secreted factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuper, Michaela; Sachs, Stephan; Walheim, Ellen; Berti, Lucia; Raedle, Bernhard; Tews, Daniel; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Wabitsch, Martin; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Tschöp, Matthias H; Jastroch, Martin; Staiger, Harald; Hofmann, Susanna M

    2017-10-01

    Obesity-associated WAT inflammation is characterized by the accumulation and local activation of macrophages (MΦs), and recent data from mouse studies suggest that macrophages are modifiers of adipocyte energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. As mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome in humans, herein we aimed to delineate how human macrophages may affect energy metabolism of white adipocytes. Human adipose tissue gene expression analysis for markers of macrophage activation and tissue inflammation (CD11c, CD40, CD163, CD206, CD80, MCP1, TNFα) in relationship to mitochondrial complex I (NDUFB8) and complex III (UQCRC2) was performed on subcutaneous WAT of 24 women (BMI 20-61 kg/m 2 ). Guided by these results, the impact of secreted factors of LPS/IFNγ- and IL10/TGFβ-activated human macrophages (THP1, primary blood-derived) on mitochondrial function in human subcutaneous white adipocytes (SGBS, primary) was determined by extracellular flux analysis (Seahorse technology) and gene/protein expression. Stepwise regression analysis of human WAT gene expression data revealed that a linear combination of CD40 and CD163 was the strongest predictor for mitochondrial complex I (NDUFB8) and complex III (UQCRC2) levels, independent of BMI. IL10/TGFβ-activated MΦs displayed high CD163 and low CD40 expression and secreted factors that decreased UQCRC2 gene/protein expression and ATP-linked respiration in human white adipocytes. In contrast, LPS/IFNγ-activated MΦs showed high CD40 and low CD163 expression and secreted factors that enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial activity resulting in a total difference of 37% in ATP-linked respiration of white adipocytes (p = 0.0024) when comparing the effect of LPS/IFNγ- vs IL10/TGFβ-activated MΦs. Our data demonstrate that macrophages modulate human adipocyte energy metabolism via an activation-dependent paracrine mechanism. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  5. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Macrophages Share Ontogeny with MYB-Independent Tissue-Resident Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchrieser, Julian; James, William; Moore, Michael D

    2017-02-14

    Tissue-resident macrophages, such as microglia, Kupffer cells, and Langerhans cells, derive from Myb-independent yolk sac (YS) progenitors generated before the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Myb-independent YS-derived resident macrophages self-renew locally, independently of circulating monocytes and HSCs. In contrast, adult blood monocytes, as well as infiltrating, gut, and dermal macrophages, derive from Myb-dependent HSCs. These findings are derived from the mouse, using gene knockouts and lineage tracing, but their applicability to human development has not been formally demonstrated. Here, we use human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a tool to model human hematopoietic development. By using a CRISPR-Cas9 knockout strategy, we show that human iPSC-derived monocytes/macrophages develop in an MYB-independent, RUNX1-, and SPI1 (PU.1)-dependent fashion. This result makes human iPSC-derived macrophages developmentally related to and a good model for MYB-independent tissue-resident macrophages, such as alveolar and kidney macrophages, microglia, Kupffer cells, and Langerhans cells. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of recombinant and purified hematopoietic growth factors on human megakaryocyte colony formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, E; Briddell, R; Hoffman, R

    1988-06-01

    The effect of a number of purified or recombinant hematopoietic growth factors, including recombinant erythropoietin (rEpo), thrombocytopoiesis stimulating factor (TSF), recombinant interleukin 1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha), recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rG-CSF), macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1), recombinant interleukin 3 (rIL-3), and recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF), on megakaryocyte (MK) colony formation by normal human marrow cells in a serum-depleted assay system was determined. Neither rEpo, TSF, CSF-1, rIL-1 alpha, nor rG-CSF alone augmented MK colony formation. Both rGM-CSF and rIL-3 at optimal doses increased MK colony formation eightfold and tenfold, respectively, above baseline values. Addition of increasing amounts of either rGM-CSF or rIL-3 led to progressively greater numbers of MK colonies formed until plateau levels were reached. Both rGM-CSF and rIL-3 also led to a dose-related increase in the number of cells per MK colony formed in culture. These molecules were equivalent stimulators of MK colony formation when their effects at optimal concentrations were compared. The effects of rGM-CSF and rIL-3 were additive at suboptimal concentrations of rIL-3 in that colony formation by a combination of the two growth factors approximated the sum of colony formation by each growth factor alone. These data suggest that rGM-CSF and rIL-3 alone and in combination are important regulators of in vitro megakaryocytopoiesis at the progenitor cell level.

  7. Replication-defective recombinant Semliki Forest virus encoding GM-CSF as a vector system for rapid and facile generation of autologous human tumor cell vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withoff, S; Glazenburg, KL; van Veen, ML; Kraak, MMJ; Hospers, GAP; Storkel, S; de Vries, EGE; Wischut, J; Daemen, T

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the production of recombinant Semliki Forest virus encoding murine or human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the capacity of these vectors to transduce murine and human tumor cells ex vivo. High-titer stocks (up to 3 x 10(9) particles/ml) of

  8. Phase II Study of Adjuvant Immunotherapy with the CSF-470 Vaccine Plus Bacillus Calmette–Guerin Plus Recombinant Human Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor vs Medium-Dose Interferon Alpha 2B in Stages IIB, IIC, and III Cutaneous Melanoma Patients: A Single Institution, Randomized Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Mordoh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The irradiated, allogeneic, cellular CSF-470 vaccine plus Bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG and recombinant human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF is being tested against medium-dose IFN-α2b in stages IIB–III cutaneous melanoma (CM patients (pts after surgery in an open, randomized, Phase II/III study. We present the results of the Phase II part of the ongoing CASVAC-0401 study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01729663. Thirty-one pts were randomized to the CSF-470 vaccine (n = 20 or to the IFN-α2b arm (n = 11. During the 2-year treatment, immunized pts should receive 13 vaccinations. On day 1 of each visit, 1.6 × 107 irradiated CSF-470 cells plus 106 colony-forming units BCG plus 100 µg rhGM-CSF were administered intradermally, followed on days 2–4 by 100 µg rhGM-CSF. IFN-α2b pts should receive 10 million units (MU/day/5 days a week for 4 weeks; then 5 MU thrice weekly for 23 months. Toxicity and quality of life (QOL were evaluated at each visit. With a mean and a maximum follow-up of 39.4 and 83 months, respectively, a significant benefit in the distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS for CSF-470 was observed (p = 0.022. Immune monitoring showed an increase in antitumoral cellular and humoral response in vaccinated pts. CSF-470 was well tolerated; 20/20 pts presented grades 1–2 dermic reactions at the vaccination site; 3/20 pts presented grade 3 allergic reactions. Other adverse events (AEs were grade 1. Pts in the IFN-α2b arm presented grades 2–3 hematological (7/11, hepatic (2/11, and cardiac (1/11 toxicity; AEs in 9/11 pts forced treatment interruptions. QOL was significantly superior in the vaccine arm (p < 0.0001. Our results suggest that CSF-470 vaccine plus BCG plus GM-CSF can significantly prolong, with lower toxicity, the DMFS of high-risk CM pts with respect to medium-dose IFN-α2b. The continuation of a Phase III part of the CASVAC-0401 study is encouraged.

  9. Oral recombinant human or mouse lactoferrin reduces Mycobacterium tuberculosis TDM induced granulomatous lung pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Shen-An; Kruzel, Marian L; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2017-02-01

    Trehalose 6'6-dimycolate (TDM) is the most abundant glycolipid on the cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). TDM is capable of inducing granulomatous pathology in mouse models that resembles those induced by MTB infection. Using the acute TDM model, this work investigates the effect of recombinant human and mouse lactoferrin to reduce granulomatous pathology. C57BL/6 mice were injected intravenously with TDM at a dose of 25 μg·mouse -1 . At day 4 and 6, recombinant human or mouse lactoferrin (1 mg·(100 μL) -1 ·mouse -1 ) were delivered by gavage. At day 7 after TDM injection, mice were evaluated for lung pathology, cytokine production, and leukocyte populations. Mice given human or mouse lactoferrin had reduced production of IL-12p40 in their lungs. Mouse lactoferrin increased IL-6 and KC (CXCL1) in lung tissue. Increased numbers of macrophages were observed in TDM-injected mice given human or mouse lactoferrin. Granulomatous pathology, composed of mainly migrated leukocytes, was visually reduced in mice that received human or mouse lactoferrin. Quantitation of granulomatous pathology demonstrated a significant decrease in mice given human or mouse lactoferrin compared with TDM control mice. This report is the first to directly compare the immune modulatory effects of both heterologous recombinant human and homologous mouse lactoferrin on the development of TDM-induced granulomas.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus impairs reverse cholesterol transport from macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahedi Mujawar

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Several steps of HIV-1 replication critically depend on cholesterol. HIV infection is associated with profound changes in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Whereas numerous studies have investigated the role of anti-HIV drugs in lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia, the effects of HIV infection on cellular cholesterol metabolism remain uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that HIV-1 impairs ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux from human macrophages, a condition previously shown to be highly atherogenic. In HIV-1-infected cells, this effect was mediated by Nef. Transfection of murine macrophages with Nef impaired cholesterol efflux from these cells. At least two mechanisms were found to be responsible for this phenomenon: first, HIV infection and transfection with Nef induced post-transcriptional down-regulation of ABCA1; and second, Nef caused redistribution of ABCA1 to the plasma membrane and inhibited internalization of apolipoprotein A-I. Binding of Nef to ABCA1 was required for down-regulation and redistribution of ABCA1. HIV-infected and Nef-transfected macrophages accumulated substantial amounts of lipids, thus resembling foam cells. The contribution of HIV-infected macrophages to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis was supported by the presence of HIV-positive foam cells in atherosclerotic plaques of HIV-infected patients. Stimulation of cholesterol efflux from macrophages significantly reduced infectivity of the virions produced by these cells, and this effect correlated with a decreased amount of virion-associated cholesterol, suggesting that impairment of cholesterol efflux is essential to ensure proper cholesterol content in nascent HIV particles. These results reveal a previously unrecognized dysregulation of intracellular lipid metabolism in HIV-infected macrophages and identify Nef and ABCA1 as the key players responsible for this effect. Our findings

  11. The macrophage marker translocator protein (TSPO) is down-regulated on pro-inflammatory 'M1' human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Nehal; Mandhair, Harpreet; Smyth, Erica; Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Kiriakidis, Serafim; Wells, Lisa; Owen, David; Sabokbar, Afsie; Taylor, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO) is a mitochondrial membrane protein, of as yet uncertain function. Its purported high expression on activated macrophages, has lent utility to TSPO targeted molecular imaging in the form of positron emission tomography (PET), as a means to detect and quantify inflammation in vivo. However, existing literature regarding TSPO expression on human activated macrophages is lacking, mostly deriving from brain tissue studies, including studies of brain malignancy, and inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here, we utilized three human sources of monocyte derived macrophages (MDM), from THP-1 monocytes, healthy peripheral blood monocytes and synovial fluid monocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, to undertake a detailed investigation of TSPO expression in activated macrophages. In this work, we demonstrate a consistent down-regulation of TSPO mRNA and protein in macrophages activated to a pro-inflammatory, or 'M1' phenotype. Conversely, stimulation of macrophages to an M2 phenotype with IL-4, dexamethasone or TGF-β1 did not alter TSPO expression, regardless of MDM source. The reasons for this are uncertain, but our study findings add some supporting evidence for recent investigations concluding that TSPO may be involved in negative regulation of inflammatory responses in macrophages.

  12. Rickettsia australis Activates Inflammasome in Human and Murine Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Smalley

    Full Text Available Rickettsiae actively escape from vacuoles and replicate free in the cytoplasm of host cells, where inflammasomes survey the invading pathogens. In the present study, we investigated the interactions of Rickettsia australis with the inflammasome in both mouse and human macrophages. R. australis induced a significant level of IL-1β secretion by human macrophages, which was significantly reduced upon treatment with an inhibitor of caspase-1 compared to untreated controls, suggesting caspase-1-dependent inflammasome activation. Rickettsia induced significant secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 in vitro by infected mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs as early as 8-12 h post infection (p.i. in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of these cytokines was accompanied by cleavage of caspase-1 and was completely abrogated in BMMs deficient in caspase-1/caspase-11 or apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain (ASC, suggesting that R. australis activate the ASC-dependent inflammasome. Interestingly, in response to the same quantity of rickettsiae, NLRP3-/- BMMs significantly reduced the secretion level of IL-1β compared to wild type (WT controls, suggesting that NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to cytosolic recognition of R. australis in vitro. Rickettsial load in spleen, but not liver and lung, of R. australis-infected NLRP3-/- mice was significantly greater compared to WT mice. These data suggest that NLRP3 inflammasome plays a role in host control of bacteria in vivo in a tissue-specific manner. Taken together, our data, for the first time, illustrate the activation of ASC-dependent inflammasome by R. australis in macrophages in which NLRP3 is involved.

  13. Absence of the TAP2 human recombination hotspot in chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E Ptak

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments using sperm typing have demonstrated that, in several regions of the human genome, recombination does not occur uniformly but instead is concentrated in "hotspots" of 1-2 kb. Moreover, the crossover asymmetry observed in a subset of these has led to the suggestion that hotspots may be short-lived on an evolutionary time scale. To test this possibility, we focused on a region known to contain a recombination hotspot in humans, TAP2, and asked whether chimpanzees, the closest living evolutionary relatives of humans, harbor a hotspot in a similar location. Specifically, we used a new statistical approach to estimate recombination rate variation from patterns of linkage disequilibrium in a sample of 24 western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus. This method has been shown to produce reliable results on simulated data and on human data from the TAP2 region. Strikingly, however, it finds very little support for recombination rate variation at TAP2 in the western chimpanzee data. Moreover, simulations suggest that there should be stronger support if there were a hotspot similar to the one characterized in humans. Thus, it appears that the human TAP2 recombination hotspot is not shared by western chimpanzees. These findings demonstrate that fine-scale recombination rates can change between very closely related species and raise the possibility that rates differ among human populations, with important implications for linkage-disequilibrium based association studies.

  14. Recombinant human erythropoietin in sports: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Maia de Almeida Bento

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin is an endogenous hormone of glicoproteic nature secreted by the kidneys and is the main regulator of the erythropoiesis. An alteration in its production generates a disturbance in the plasmatic concentration giving rise to several types of pathologies related to the hematopoietic system. The recombinant forms of erythropoietin have indiscriminately been used by athletes, mainly in endurance sports, by increasing the erythrocytes concentration, generating a better delivery of oxygen to the muscle tissue. The administration of recombinant erythropoietin was prohibited by the International Olympic Committee and its use considered as doping. This review has the intention to describe the physical, biological and pharmacokinetic properties of the endogenous erythropoietin, as well as its recombinant form, describing also its use in sports and the process of searching methodologies for its detection in doping control.

  15. Purification of human recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Escherichia coli, recombinant proteins were produced either as three dimensionally folded forms or as unfolded forms, inclusion body (IB). The formation of IB was a frequent consequence of high-level protein production and inadequacy of folding agents namely chaperones in the cytoplasm. The structure of the protein in ...

  16. Investigating the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type One-Infected Monocyte-Derived Macrophage Secretome

    OpenAIRE

    Ciborowski, Pawel; Kadiu, Irena; Rozek, Wojciech; Smith, Lynette; Bernhardt, Kristen; Fladseth, Melissa; Ricardo-Dukelow, Mary; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2007-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (bone marrow monocyte-derived macrophages, alveolar macrophages, perivascular macrophages, and microglia) are reservoirs and vehicles of dissemination for the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). How virus alters mononuclear phagocyte immunoregulatory activities to complete its life cycle and influence disease is incompletely understood. In attempts to better understanding the influence of virus on macrophage functions, we used one-dimensional electrophoresis, a...

  17. Experimental Evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Macrophages Results in Low-Frequency Mutations Not Associated with Selective Advantage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Guerrini

    Full Text Available Isolates of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis recovered from clinical samples exhibit genetic heterogeneity. Such variation may result from the stressful environment encountered by the pathogen inside the macrophage, which is the host cell tubercle bacilli parasitize. To study the evolution of the M. tuberculosis genome during growth inside macrophages, we developed a model of intracellular culture in which bacteria were serially passaged in macrophage-like THP-1 cells for about 80 bacterial generations. Genome sequencing of single bacterial colonies isolated before and after the infection cycles revealed that M. tuberculosis developed mutations at a rate of about 5.7 × 10-9 / bp/ generation, consistent with mutation rates calculated during in vivo infection. Analysis of mutant growth in macrophages and in mice showed that the mutations identified after the cyclic infection conferred no advantage to the mutants relative to wild-type. Furthermore, activity testing of the recombinant protein harboring one of these mutations showed that the presence of the mutation did not affect the enzymatic activity. The serial infection protocol developed in this work to study M. tuberculosis genome microevolution can be applied to exposure to stressors to determine their effect on genome remodeling during intra-macrophage growth.

  18. A Systematic Approach to Identify Markers of Distinctly Activated Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayan eSudan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Polarization has been a useful concept for describing activated macrophage phenotypes and gene expression profiles. However, macrophage activation status within tumors and other settings are often inferred based on only a few markers. Complicating matters for relevance to human biology, many of the best studied macrophage activation markers have been best characterized in mice and sometimes are not similarly regulated in human macrophages. To identify novel markers of activated human macrophages, gene expression profiles for human macrophages of a single donor subjected to 33 distinct activating conditions were obtained and a set of putative activation markers were subsequently evaluated in macrophages from multiple donors using integrated fluidic circuit (IFC-based RT-PCR. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the microarray screen, highly-altered transcripts (>4-fold change in expression sorted the macrophage transcription profiles into two major and 13 minor clusters. Among the 1874 highly-altered transcripts, over 100 were uniquely altered in one major or two related minor clusters. IFC PCR-derived data confirmed the microarray results and to show the kinetics of expression of potential macrophage activation markers. Transcripts encoding chemokines, cytokines, and cell surface were prominent in our analyses. The activation markers identified by this study could be used to better characterize tumor-associated macrophages from biopsies as well as other macrophage populations collected from human clinical samples.

  19. Biological functions of macrophage-derived Wnt5a, and its roles in human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yue; Zheng, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Xin, Na; Song, Xiaowen; Zhao, Chenghai

    2016-10-11

    Wnt5a is implicated in development and tissue homeostasis by activating β-catenin-independent pathway. Excessive production of Wnt5a is related to some human diseases. Macrophage recruitment is a character of inflammation and cancer, therefore macrophage-derived Wnt5a is supposed to be a player in these conditions. Actually, macrophage-derived Wnt5a maintains macrophage immune function, stimulates pro-inflammatory cytokine release, and induces angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Furthermore, macrophage-derived Wnt5a is involved in insulin resistance, atherosclerosis and cancer. These findings indicate that macrophage-derived Wnt5a may be a target in the treatment of these diseases. Notably, unlike macrophages, the exact role of macrophage-derived Wnt5a in bacterial infection remains largely unknown.

  20. Expression of ACAT-1 protein in human atherosclerotic lesions and cultured human monocytes-macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, A; Sakashita, N; Lee, O; Takahashi, K; Horiuchi, S; Hakamata, H; Morganelli, P M; Chang, C C; Chang, T Y

    1998-10-01

    The acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) gene was first cloned in 1993 (Chang et al, J Biol Chem. 1993;268:20747-20755; designated ACAT-1). Using affinity-purified antibodies raised against the N-terminal portion of human ACAT-1 protein, we performed immunohistochemical localization studies and showed that the ACAT-1 protein was highly expressed in atherosclerotic lesions of the human aorta. We also performed cell-specific localization studies using double immunostaining and showed that ACAT-1 was predominantly expressed in macrophages but not in smooth muscle cells. We then used a cell culture system in vitro to monitor the ACAT-1 expression in differentiating monocytes-macrophages. The ACAT-1 protein content increased by up to 10-fold when monocytes spontaneously differentiated into macrophages. This increase occurred within the first 2 days of culturing the monocytes and reached a plateau level within 4 days of culturing, indicating that the increase in ACAT-1 protein content is an early event during the monocyte differentiation process. The ACAT-1 protein expressed in the differentiating monocytes-macrophages was shown to be active by enzyme assay in vitro. The high levels of ACAT-1 present in macrophages maintained in culture can explain the high ACAT-1 contents found in atherosclerotic lesions. Our results thus support the idea that ACAT-1 plays an important role in differentiating monocytes and in forming macrophage foam cells during the development of human atherosclerosis.

  1. Evidence of recombination within human alpha-papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvajal-Rodríguez Antonio

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV has a causal role in cervical cancer with almost half a million new cases occurring each year. Presence of the carcinogenic HPV is necessary for the development of the invasive carcinoma of the genital tract. Therefore, persistent infection with carcinogenic HPV causes virtually all cervical cancers. Some aspects of the molecular evolution of this virus, as the putative importance of recombination in its evolutionary history, are an opened current question. In addition, recombination could also be a significant issue nowadays since the frequency of co-infection with more than one HPV type is not a rare event and, thus, new recombinant types could be currently being generated. Results We have used human alpha-PV sequences from the public database at Los Alamos National Laboratory to report evidence that recombination may exist in this virus. A model-based population genetic approach was used to infer the recombination signal from the HPV DNA sequences grouped attending to phylogenetic and epidemiological information, as well as to clinical manifestations. Our results agree with recently published ones that use a different methodology to detect recombination associated to the gene L2. In addition, we have detected significant recombination signal in the genes E6, E7, L2 and L1 at different groups, and importantly within the high-risk type HPV16. The method used has recently been shown to be one of the most powerful and reliable procedures to detect the recombination signal. Conclusion We provide new support to the recent evidence of recombination in HPV. Additionally, we performed the recombination estimation assuming the best-fit model of nucleotide substitution and rate variation among sites, of the HPV DNA sequence sets. We found that the gene with recombination in most of the groups is L2 but the highest values were detected in L1 and E6. Gene E7 was recombinant only within the HPV16 type. The

  2. Recombinational DNA repair and human disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2002-11-30

    We review the genes and proteins related to the homologous recombinational repair (HRR) pathway that are implicated in cancer through either genetic disorders that predispose to cancer through chromosome instability or the occurrence of somatic mutations that contribute to carcinogenesis. Ataxia telangiectasia (AT), Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), and an ataxia-like disorder (ATLD), are chromosome instability disorders that are defective in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), NBS, and Mre11 genes, respectively. These genes are critical in maintaining cellular resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), which kills largely by the production of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Bloom syndrome involves a defect in the BLM helicase, which seems to play a role in restarting DNA replication forks that are blocked at lesions, thereby promoting chromosome stability. The Werner syndrome gene (WRN) helicase, another member of the RecQ family like BLM, has very recently been found to help mediate homologous recombination. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically complex chromosomal instability disorder involving seven or more genes, one of which is BRCA2. FA may be at least partially caused by the aberrant production of reactive oxidative species. The breast cancer-associated BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are strongly implicated in HRR; BRCA2 associates with Rad51 and appears to regulate its activity. We discuss in detail the phenotypes of the various mutant cell lines and the signaling pathways mediated by the ATM kinase. ATM's phosphorylation targets can be grouped into oxidative stress-mediated transcriptional changes, cell cycle checkpoints, and recombinational repair. We present the DNA damage response pathways by using the DSB as the prototype lesion, whose incorrect repair can initiate and augment karyotypic abnormalities.

  3. Human macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), a novel chemoattractant for monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godiska, R; Chantry, D; Raport, C J; Sozzani, S; Allavena, P; Leviten, D; Mantovani, A; Gray, P W

    1997-05-05

    A cDNA encoding a novel human chemokine was isolated by random sequencing of cDNA clones from human monocyte-derived macrophages. This protein has been termed macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) because it appears to be synthesized specifically by cells of the macrophage lineage. MDC has the four-cysteine motif and other highly conserved residues characteristic of CC chemokines, but it shares <35% identity with any of the known chemokines. Recombinant MDC was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and purified by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. NH2-terminal sequencing and mass spectrophotometry were used to verify the NH2 terminus and molecular mass of recombinant MDC (8,081 dalton). In microchamber migration assays, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and IL-2-activated natural killer cells migrated to MDC in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximal chemotactic response at 1 ng/ml. Freshly isolated monocytes also migrated toward MDC, but with a peak response at 100 ng/ml MDC. Northern analyses indicated MDC is highly expressed in macrophages and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells, but not in monocytes, natural killer cells, or several cell lines of epithelial, endothelial, or fibroblast origin. High expression was also detected in normal thymus and less expression in lung and spleen. Unlike most other CC chemokines, MDC is encoded on human chromosome 16. MDC is thus a unique member of the CC chemokine family that may play a fundamental role in the function of dendritic cells, natural killer cells, and monocytes.

  4. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Gene Editing in Human iPSC-Derived Macrophage Reveals Lysosomal Acid Lipase Function in Human Macrophages-Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanrui; Shi, Jianting; Hachet, Melanie A; Xue, Chenyi; Bauer, Robert C; Jiang, Hongfeng; Li, Wenjun; Tohyama, Junichiro; Millar, John; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Phillips, Michael C; Razani, Babak; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P

    2017-11-01

    To gain mechanistic insights into the role of LIPA (lipase A), the gene encoding LAL (lysosomal acid lipase) protein, in human macrophages. We used CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) technology to knock out LIPA in human induced pluripotent stem cells and then differentiate to macrophage (human-induced pluripotent stem cells-derived macrophage [IPSDM]) to explore the human macrophage LIPA loss-of-function phenotypes. LIPA was abundantly expressed in monocyte-derived macrophages and was markedly induced on IPSDM differentiation to comparable levels as in human monocyte-derived macrophage. IPSDM with knockout of LIPA ( LIPA -/- ) had barely detectable LAL enzymatic activity. Control and LIPA -/- IPSDM were loaded with [ 3 H]-cholesteryl oleate-labeled AcLDL (acetylated low-density lipoprotein) followed by efflux to apolipoprotein A-I. Efflux of liberated [ 3 H]-cholesterol to apolipoprotein A-I was abolished in LIPA -/- IPSDM, indicating deficiency in LAL-mediated lysosomal cholesteryl ester hydrolysis. In cells loaded with [ 3 H]-cholesterol-labeled AcLDL, [ 3 H]-cholesterol efflux was, however, not different between control and LIPA -/- IPSDM. ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 1) expression was upregulated by AcLDL loading but to a similar extent between control and LIPA -/- IPSDM. In nonlipid loaded state, LIPA -/- IPSDM had high levels of cholesteryl ester mass compared with minute amounts in control IPSDM. Yet, with AcLDL loading, overall cholesteryl ester mass was increased to similar levels in both control and LIPA -/- IPSDM. LIPA -/- did not impact lysosomal apolipoprotein-B degradation or expression of IL1B , IL6 , and CCL5. CONCLUSIONS: LIPA -/- IPSDM reveals macrophage-specific hallmarks of LIPA deficiency. CRISPR/Cas9 and IPSDM provide important tools to study human macrophage biology and more broadly for future studies of disease-associated LIPA genetic variation in human

  5. The Bacillus anthracis cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, Anthrolysin O, kills human neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rest Richard F

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus anthracis is an animal and human pathogen whose virulence is characterized by lethal and edema toxin, as well as a poly-glutamic acid capsule. In addition to these well characterized toxins, B. anthracis secretes several proteases and phospholipases, and a newly described toxin of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC family, Anthrolysin O (ALO. Results In the present studies we show that recombinant ALO (rALO or native ALO, secreted by viable B. anthracis, is lethal to human primary polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs, monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs, lymphocytes, THP-1 monocytic human cell line and ME-180, Detroit 562, and A549 epithelial cells by trypan blue exclusion or lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release viability assays. ALO cytotoxicity is dose and time dependent and susceptibility to ALO-mediated lysis differs between cell types. In addition, the viability of monocytes and hMDMs was assayed in the presence of vegetative Sterne strains 7702 (ALO+, UT231 (ALO-, and a complemented strain expressing ALO, UT231 (pUTE544, and was dependent upon the expression of ALO. Cytotoxicity of rALO is seen as low as 0.070 nM in the absence of serum. All direct cytotoxic activity is inhibited by the addition of cholesterol or serum concentration as low as 10%. Conclusion The lethality of rALO and native ALO on human monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes supports the idea that ALO may represent a previously unidentified virulence factor of B. anthracis. The study of other factors produced by B. anthracis, along with the major anthrax toxins, will lead to a better understanding of this bacterium's pathogenesis, as well as provide information for the development of antitoxin vaccines for treating and preventing anthrax.

  6. The helminth Trichuris suis suppresses TLR4-induced inflammatory responses in human macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottow, M. K.; Klaver, E. J.; van der Pouw Kraan, T. C. T. M.

    2014-01-01

    include innate immune cells that propagate inflammation in these diseases, like pro-inflammatory macrophages. We here investigated the effects of the helminth Trichuris suis soluble products (SPs) on the phenotype and function of human inflammatory (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM......-CSF)-differentiated) macrophages. Interestingly, we here show that T. suis SPs potently skew inflammatory macrophages into a more anti-inflammatory state in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent manner, and less effects are seen when stimulating macrophages with TLR2 or -3 ligands. Gene microarray analysis of GM......-CSF-differentiated macrophages further revealed that many TLR4-induced inflammatory mediators, including interleukin (IL)-12B, CCL1 and CXCL9, are downregulated by T. suis SPs. In particular, we observed a strong reduction in the expression and function of P2RX7, a purinergic receptor involved in macrophage inflammation...

  7. Construction of retroviral recombinant containing human tissue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correct orientation was verified by restriction endonuclease digestion. Human full length TIMP-2 gene was ligated into a plasmid, which was then transfected into PA317 cell line. G418-resistant individual clones were selected to transfect human SGC-7901 cell line. Cell proliferation, cell electrophoresis, soft agar colony ...

  8. [Generation of recombinant human antibodies for EV71 virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Na; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Fu-Shun; Li, Chuan; Zhang, Quan-Fu; Li, De-Xin; Liang, Mi-Fang

    2011-06-01

    To obtain recombinant human anti-EV71 antibodies from a EV71-associated hand-foot-and-mouth disease patient-derived antibody phage library. A combinatorial human scFv library to enterovirus 71 (EV71) virus was constructed using antibody genes harvested from the blood of EV71 virus patients. The library was panned and selected by using purified VP1 protein of EV71 virus with phage display. After that the specific antibody was converted to full human IgG antibody with recombinant baculovirus/insect cell system. One unique human scFv antibody specific for EV71 virus VP1 protein was obtained by ELISA, IFA and analysis of the antibody DNA sequence. The specific anti-VP1 human scFv antibody was converted to full human IgG antibody with recombinant baculovirus/insect cell system. The full human IgG antibody was tested in vitro for EV71 virus neutralization, resulting in no neutralizing activity with EV71 A type and EV71 C4 subtype. The obtained human anti-EV71 antibodies without neutralizing activity laid the foundation for diagnosis of human EV71-associated hand-foot-and-mouth disease.

  9. Additive effect of recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESAT-6 protein and ESAT-6/CFP-10 fusion protein in adhesion of macrophages through fibronectin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Mina; Seghatoleslam, Atefeh; Rasti, Mozhgan; Ebadat, Saeedeh; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin; Mostafavi-Pour, Zohreh

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculous granulomas are the sites of interaction between the T cells, macrophages, and extracellular matrix (ECM) to control the infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). A predominant role of RD-1-encoded secretory proteins, early secreted antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6), and culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10) in the formation of granulomas has recently been emphasized. However, the precise molecular events that induce the formation of these granulomatous structures are yet to be elucidated. Macrophages use integrins to adhere to fibronectin (FN) as a major component of the ECM. The major goal of this study was to investigate whether recombinant M. tuberculosis antigens can modulate integrin-mediated macrophage adhesion. Differentiated THP-1 cell line was stimulated with recombinant ESAT-6, CFP-10, and ESAT-6/CFP-10 proteins and evaluated for alterations in the expression levels of α5β1 and α4β1 by semiquantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The role of these recombinant antigens in the cytoskeleton rearrangement was determined by adhesion assay and immunofluorescent microscopy. Our data showed that ESAT-6 and ESAT-6/CFP-10 fusion proteins could induce adhesion of macrophages to FN through α4β1 integrin. An increased expression level of α4β1 integrin in comparison with α5β1 integrin in differentiated THP-1 cells was also observed. Results of immunofluorescence studies showed that recombinant proteins-treated THP-1 cells form well-organized stress fibers and focal contacts containing vinculin compared with untreated THP-1 cells. Increased expression level of α4β1 in differentiated THP-1 cells could suggest the important role of α4β1 integrin in adhesion and focal contact formation of macrophages exposed to M. tuberculosis antigens. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Recombination in the human Pseudoautosomal region PAR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali G Hinch

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The pseudoautosomal region (PAR is a short region of homology between the mammalian X and Y chromosomes, which has undergone rapid evolution. A crossover in the PAR is essential for the proper disjunction of X and Y chromosomes in male meiosis, and PAR deletion results in male sterility. This leads the human PAR with the obligatory crossover, PAR1, to having an exceptionally high male crossover rate, which is 17-fold higher than the genome-wide average. However, the mechanism by which this obligatory crossover occurs remains unknown, as does the fine-scale positioning of crossovers across this region. Recent research in mice has suggested that crossovers in PAR may be mediated independently of the protein PRDM9, which localises virtually all crossovers in the autosomes. To investigate recombination in this region, we construct the most fine-scale genetic map containing directly observed crossovers to date using African-American pedigrees. We leverage recombination rates inferred from the breakdown of linkage disequilibrium in human populations and investigate the signatures of DNA evolution due to recombination. Further, we identify direct PRDM9 binding sites using ChIP-seq in human cells. Using these independent lines of evidence, we show that, in contrast with mouse, PRDM9 does localise peaks of recombination in the human PAR1. We find that recombination is a far more rapid and intense driver of sequence evolution in PAR1 than it is on the autosomes. We also show that PAR1 hotspot activities differ significantly among human populations. Finally, we find evidence that PAR1 hotspot positions have changed between human and chimpanzee, with no evidence of sharing among the hottest hotspots. We anticipate that the genetic maps built and validated in this work will aid research on this vital and fascinating region of the genome.

  11. Effect of recombinant human erythropoietin expressions of apoptosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of recombinant human erythropoietin expressions of apoptosis genes in rats following traumatic brain injury. Xuesong Yuan1*, Xiaoxing Bian1, Wenfeng Wei1, Yin Tang2 and Qing Bao1. 1Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Pathology, The Affiliated Wujin Hospital of Jiangsu University, Changzhou. Jiangsu ...

  12. Effects of recombinant human nerve growth factor on cervical cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a crucial role in the life of the sympathetic and sensory nervous systems. However, the roles of NGF to cervical cancer remain deeply unknown. This study investigated the effect of recombinant human nerve growth factor (rhNGF) on cervical cancer. It was found that the proliferation of hela ...

  13. Improved Refolding Efficacy of Recombinant Human Interferon α-2b ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To increase the refolding yield of Recombinant Human Interferon α-2b in order to achieve a highly potent product. Methods: Interferon α-2b inclusion body was dissolved in tris-HCl buffer containing 6 M guanidine-HCl and CuSO4. Different refolding buffers were employed for refolding the target protein.

  14. Expression and characterization of recombinant human serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-14

    Nov 14, 2011 ... HSA polyclonal antibody was purchased from the Chengdu biological products, CP antibodies and CP standard were purchased from the Jingmei Co.(Nanjing,. China). Construction of fusion gene human serum albumin-CP (HSA-. CP). The CP gene was cloned from plasmid T-CP by polymerase chain.

  15. PPARgamma activation primes human monocytes into alternative M2 macrophages with anti-inflammatory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, M Amine; Derudas, Bruno; Rigamonti, Elena; Dièvart, Rébecca; Brozek, John; Haulon, Stéphan; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Torpier, Gérard; Marx, Nikolaus; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2007-08-01

    Th1 cytokines promote monocyte differentiation into proatherogenic M1 macrophages, while Th2 cytokines lead to an "alternative" anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype. Here we show that in human atherosclerotic lesions, the expression of M2 markers and PPARgamma, a nuclear receptor controlling macrophage inflammation, correlate positively. Moreover, PPARgamma activation primes primary human monocytes into M2 differentiation, resulting in a more pronounced anti-inflammatory activity in M1 macrophages. However, PPARgamma activation does not influence M2 marker expression in resting or M1 macrophages, nor does PPARgamma agonist treatment influence the expression of M2 markers in atherosclerotic lesions, indicating that only native monocytes can be primed by PPARgamma activation to an enhanced M2 phenotype. Furthermore, PPARgamma activation significantly increases expression of the M2 marker MR in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data demonstrate that PPARgamma activation skews human monocytes toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype.

  16. Cyclic GMP protects human macrophages against peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Adriano G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO can be both pro- and anti-apoptotic in various cell types, including macrophages. This apparent paradox may result from the actions of NO-related species generated in the microenvironment of the cell, for example the formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO-. In this study we have examined the ability of NO and ONOO- to evoke apoptosis in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMϕ, and investigated whether preconditioning by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP is able to limit apoptosis in this cell type. Methods Characterisation of the NO-related species generated by (Z-1- [2-(2-aminoethyl-N-(2-ammonioethylamino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DETA/NO and 1,2,3,4-oxatriazolium, 5-amino-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-, chloride (GEA-3162 was performed by electrochemistry using an isolated NO electrode and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectrometry. Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and cultured to allow differentiation into MDMϕ. Resultant MDMϕ were treated for 24 h with DETA/NO (100 – 1000 μM or GEA-3162 (10 – 300 μM in the presence or absence of BAY 41–2272 (1 μM, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX; 1 μM, 1H- [1,2,4]oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 20 μM or 8-bromo-cGMP (1 mM. Apoptosis in MDMϕ was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of annexin V binding in combination with propidium iodide staining. Results Electrochemistry and EPR revealed that DETA/NO liberated free NO radical, whilst GEA-3162 concomitantly released NO and O2-, and is therefore a ONOO- generator. NO (DETA/NO had no effect on cell viability, but ONOO- (GEA-3162 caused a concentration-dependent induction of apoptosis in MDMϕ. Preconditioning of MDMϕ with NO in combination with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, or the NO-independent stimulator of soluble guanylate cyclase, BAY 41–2272, significantly attenuated ONOO--induced apoptosis in a cGMP-dependent manner

  17. 75 FR 18548 - In the Matter of Certain Products and Pharmaceutical Compositions Containing Recombinant Human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Products and Pharmaceutical Compositions Containing Recombinant Human... pharmaceutical compositions containing recombinant human erythropoietin by reason of infringement of claims 1 and...

  18. Phenotype Determines Nanoparticle Uptake by Human Macrophages from Liver and Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacParland, Sonya A; Tsoi, Kim M; Ouyang, Ben; Ma, Xue-Zhong; Manuel, Justin; Fawaz, Ali; Ostrowski, Mario A; Alman, Benjamin A; Zilman, Anton; Chan, Warren C W; McGilvray, Ian D

    2017-03-28

    A significant challenge to delivering therapeutic doses of nanoparticles to targeted disease sites is the fact that most nanoparticles become trapped in the liver. Liver-resident macrophages, or Kupffer cells, are key cells in the hepatic sequestration of nanoparticles. However, the precise role that the macrophage phenotype plays in nanoparticle uptake is unknown. Here, we show that the human macrophage phenotype modulates hard nanoparticle uptake. Using gold nanoparticles, we examined uptake by human monocyte-derived macrophages that had been driven to a "regulatory" M2 phenotype or an "inflammatory" M1 phenotype and found that M2-type macrophages preferentially take up nanoparticles, with a clear hierarchy among the subtypes (M2c > M2 > M2a > M2b > M1). We also found that stimuli such as LPS/IFN-γ rather than with more "regulatory" stimuli such as TGF-β/IL-10 reduce per cell macrophage nanoparticle uptake by an average of 40%. Primary human Kupffer cells were found to display heterogeneous expression of M1 and M2 markers, and Kupffer cells expressing higher levels of M2 markers (CD163) take up significantly more nanoparticles than Kupffer cells expressing lower levels of surface CD163. Our results demonstrate that hepatic inflammatory microenvironments should be considered when studying liver sequestration of nanoparticles, and that modifying the hepatic microenvironment might offer a tool for enhancing or decreasing this sequestration. Our findings also suggest that models examining the nanoparticle/macrophage interaction should include studies with primary tissue macrophages.

  19. Neisseria gonorrhoeae survives within and modulates apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine production of human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Château, Alice; Seifert, H Steven

    2016-04-01

    The human-adapted organism Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of gonorrhoea, a sexually transmitted infection. It readily colonizes the genital, rectal and nasalpharyngeal mucosa during infection. While it is well established that N. gonorrhoeae recruits and modulates the functions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes during infection, how N. gonorrhoeae interacts with macrophages present in infected tissue is not fully defined. We studied the interactions of N. gonorrhoeae with two human monocytic cell lines, THP-1 and U937, and primary monocytes, all differentiated into macrophages. Most engulfed bacteria were killed in the phagolysosome, but a subset of bacteria was able to survive and replicate inside the macrophages suggesting that those cells may be an unexplored cellular reservoir for N. gonorrhoeae during infection. N. gonorrhoeae was able to modulate macrophage apoptosis: N. gonorrhoeae induced apoptosis in THP-1 cells whereas it inhibited induced apoptosis in U937 cells and primary human macrophages. Furthermore, N. gonorrhoeae induced expression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, suggesting a role for macrophages in recruiting polymorphonuclear leukocytes to the site of infection. These results indicate macrophages may serve as a significant replicative niche for N. gonorrhoeae and play an important role in gonorrheal pathogenesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Mitochondrial fragmentation in human macrophages attenuates palmitate-induced inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zezina, Ekaterina; Snodgrass, Ryan G; Schreiber, Yannick; Zukunft, Sven; Schürmann, Christoph; Heringdorf, Dagmar Meyer Zu; Geisslinger, Gerd; Fleming, Ingrid; Brandes, Ralf P; Brüne, Bernhard; Namgaladze, Dmitry

    2018-02-02

    Macrophages in adipose tissue contribute to inflammation and the development of insulin resistance in obesity. Exposure of macrophages to saturated fatty acids alters cell metabolism and activates pro-inflammatory signaling. How fatty acids influence macrophage mitochondrial dynamics is unclear. We investigated the mechanism of palmitate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and its impact on inflammatory responses in primary human macrophages. Fatty acids, such as palmitate, caused mitochondrial fragmentation in human macrophages. Increased mitochondrial fragmentation was also observed in peritoneal macrophages from hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E knockout mice. Fatty acid-induced mitochondrial fragmentation was independent of the fatty acid chain saturation and required dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1). Mechanistically, mitochondrial fragmentation was regulated by incorporation of palmitate into mitochondrial phospholipids and their precursors. Palmitate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential did not contribute to mitochondrial fragmentation. Macrophages treated with palmitate maintained intact mitochondrial respiration and ATP levels. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of DRP1 enhanced palmitate-induced mitochondrial ROS production, c-Jun phosphorylation, and inflammatory cytokine expression. Our results indicate that mitochondrial fragmentation is a protective mechanism attenuating inflammatory responses induced by palmitate in human macrophages. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of macrophage-like cells in the external layers of human small and large intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Rumessen, J J

    1992-01-01

    vesicles and pits. However, very few secondary lysosomes were present. Birbeck granules were not observed. It is concluded that in the external muscle layer of human small and large intestine numerous macrophages of a special type are present. It is discussed whether this cell type plays a role......In the external layers of human small and large intestine macrophage-like cells were characterized by immunohistochemical, histochemical and electron-microscopical methods. Using immunohistochemistry and a number of monoclonal antibodies, the presence and distribution of phenotypic subpopulations...... of macrophages were evaluated. In all locations macrophage-like cells were identified with antibody EBM11, which recognizes CD68 antigen, C3bi which recognizes CD11b, and partly with an antibody which recognizes protein 150,95 (CD11c). Macrophage-like cells in the external muscle layer were HLA...

  2. T3 Regulates a Human Macrophage-Derived TSH-β Splice Variant: Implications for Human Bone Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliram, R; Latif, R; Morshed, S A; Zaidi, M; Davies, T F

    2016-09-01

    TSH and thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) are intimately involved in bone biology. We have previously reported the presence of a murine TSH-β splice variant (TSH-βv) expressed specifically in bone marrow-derived macrophages and that exerted an osteoprotective effect by inducing osteoblastogenesis. To extend this observation and its relevance to human bone biology, we set out to identify and characterize a TSH-β variant in human macrophages. Real-time PCR analyses using human TSH-β-specific primers identified a 364-bp product in macrophages, bone marrow, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells that was sequence verified and was homologous to a human TSH-βv previously reported. We then examined TSH-βv regulation using the THP-1 human monocyte cell line matured into macrophages. After 4 days, 46.1% of the THP-1 cells expressed the macrophage markers CD-14 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor and exhibited typical morphological characteristics of macrophages. Real-time PCR analyses of these cells treated in a dose-dependent manner with T3 showed a 14-fold induction of human TSH-βv mRNA and variant protein. Furthermore, these human TSH-βv-positive cells, induced by T3 exposure, had categorized into both M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes as evidenced by the expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor for M1 and CCL-22 for M2. These data indicate that in hyperthyroidism, bone marrow resident macrophages have the potential to exert enhanced osteoprotective effects by oversecreting human TSH-βv, which may exert its local osteoprotective role via osteoblast and osteoclast TSH receptors.

  3. Human oligoclonal recombinant antivenom against the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Karatt-­Vellatt, Aneesh; Slavny, Peter

    Snakebite envenoming is a major cause of death and morbidity in tropical parts of the world. Current therapies are based on animal-­derived antisera that are associated with a high degree of immunogenicity, high cost, and batch-to-batch variation. Here, we report the results of our ongoing efforts...... of developing the world’s first fully recombinant antivenom based on human IgGs targeting the key toxins from the notorious black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis)....

  4. Frequency of lipodystrophy induced by recombinant human insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajheydari, Z; Kashi, Z; Akha, O; Akbarzadeh, S

    2011-10-01

    Lipodystrophy is a potential clinical complication induced by insulin therapy, and it is believed that its frequency has been reduced by using recombinant human insulin. Aim of this study was to determine the frequency of recombinant human insulin induced lipodystrophy in diabetic patients. This cross sectional study was done on 220 diabetics referring to Imam Educational Hospital of Sari Township in 2007-2008 who had been under treatment with recombinant human insulin at least three months before. First, the anthropologic and clinical features of the patients were recorded in questionnaire, then all of the patients were examined clinically for lipodystrophy. In all patients, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) was measured for control of the blood glucose. The obtained data were analyzed by the descriptive statistical methods, t-test and 2 test. From the total 220 diabetics under study, 35 (15.9%) had insulin induced lipodystrophy, of them 32 (14.5%) had lipohypertrophy and 3 (1.4%) with lipoatrophy. Factors such as age, sex, level of education, body mass index (BMI), type of diabetes, period of using insulin and injection site had significant influence in development of insulin induced lipodystrophy (plipodystrophy particularly of lipohypertrophy still remained high level. Therefore, a regular examination of the diabetic patients for this complication is necessary, specially in the individuals who have a defective control on their blood glucose level.

  5. Apoptotic neutrophils augment the inflammatory response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Andersson

    Full Text Available Macrophages in the lung are the primary cells being infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb during the initial manifestation of tuberculosis. Since the adaptive immune response to Mtb is delayed, innate immune cells such as macrophages and neutrophils mount the early immune protection against this intracellular pathogen. Neutrophils are short-lived cells and removal of apoptotic cells by resident macrophages is a key event in the resolution of inflammation and tissue repair. Since anti-inflammatory activity is not compatible with effective immunity to intracellular pathogens, we therefore investigated how uptake of apoptotic neutrophils modulates the function of Mtb-activated human macrophages. We show that Mtb infection exerts a potent proinflammatory activation of human macrophages with enhanced gene activation and release of proinflammatory cytokines and that this response was augmented by apoptotic neutrophils. The enhanced macrophage response is linked to apoptotic neutrophil-driven activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and subsequent IL-1β signalling. We also demonstrate that apoptotic neutrophils not only modulate the inflammatory response, but also enhance the capacity of infected macrophages to control intracellular growth of virulent Mtb. Taken together, these results suggest a novel role for apoptotic neutrophils in the modulation of the macrophage-dependent inflammatory response contributing to the early control of Mtb infection.

  6. Cysteamine-mediated clearance of antibiotic-resistant pathogens in human cystic fibrosis macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra L Shrestha

    Full Text Available Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex are virulent, multi-drug resistant pathogens that survive and replicate intracellularly in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. We have discovered that B. cenocepacia cannot be cleared from CF macrophages due to defective autophagy, causing continued systemic inflammation and infection. Defective autophagy in CF is mediated through constitutive reactive oxygen species (ROS activation of transglutaminase-2 (TG2, which causes the sequestration (accumulation of essential autophagy initiating proteins. Cysteamine is a TG2 inhibitor and proteostasis regulator with the potential to restore autophagy. Therefore, we sought to examine the impact of cysteamine on CF macrophage autophagy and bacterial killing. Human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs and alveolar macrophages were isolated from CF and non-CF donors. Macrophages were infected with clinical isolates of relevant CF pathogens. Cysteamine caused direct bacterial growth killing of live B. cenocepacia, B. multivorans, P. aeruginosa and MRSA in the absence of cells. Additionally, B. cenocepacia, B. multivorans, and P. aeruginosa invasion were significantly decreased in CF MDMs treated with cysteamine. Finally, cysteamine decreased TG2, p62, and beclin-1 accumulation in CF, leading to increased Burkholderia uptake into autophagosomes, increased macrophage CFTR expression, and decreased ROS and IL-1β production. Cysteamine has direct anti-bacterial growth killing and improves human CF macrophage autophagy resulting in increased macrophage-mediated bacterial clearance, decreased inflammation, and reduced constitutive ROS production. Thus, cysteamine may be an effective adjunct to antibiotic regimens in CF.

  7. Interleukin-1α activation and localization in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocytes and macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Kjærsgaard, Pernille; Jørgensen, Trine Lykke

    2015-01-01

    - 1α in inflammation is only partly understood. Results: Human macrophages/monocytes, stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were analyzed for production and localization of IL-1α by use of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) generated against IL-1α pro piece. We found that IL-1α propiece was detected...... being a marker for monocytes. Conclusions: Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, a method to visualize and measure the production of IL-1α in both human monocytes and macrophages....

  8. Dual Transcriptome Profiling of Leishmania-Infected Human Macrophages Reveals Distinct Reprogramming Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecilia Fernandes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are mononuclear phagocytes that constitute a first line of defense against pathogens. While lethal to many microbes, they are the primary host cells of Leishmania spp. parasites, the obligate intracellular pathogens that cause leishmaniasis. We conducted transcriptomic profiling of two Leishmania species and the human macrophage over the course of intracellular infection by using high-throughput RNA sequencing to characterize the global gene expression changes and reprogramming events that underlie the interactions between the pathogen and its host. A systematic exclusion of the generic effects of large-particle phagocytosis revealed a vigorous, parasite-specific response of the human macrophage early in the infection that was greatly tempered at later time points. An analogous temporal expression pattern was observed with the parasite, suggesting that much of the reprogramming that occurs as parasites transform into intracellular forms generally stabilizes shortly after entry. Following that, the parasite establishes an intracellular niche within macrophages, with minimal communication between the parasite and the host cell later during the infection. No significant difference was observed between parasite species transcriptomes or in the transcriptional response of macrophages infected with each species. Our comparative analysis of gene expression changes that occur as mouse and human macrophages are infected by Leishmania spp. points toward a general signature of the Leishmania-macrophage infectome.

  9. Posttranslational modifications in human plasma MBL and human recombinant MBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia Hønnerup; Laursen, Inga; Matthiesen, Finn

    2007-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a complex serum protein that plays an important role in innate immunity. In addition to assuming several different oligomeric forms, the polypeptide itself is highly heterogeneous. This heterogeneity is due to post-translational modifications, which help to stabilize......(202)) was modified in trace amounts to dehydroalanine, as detected by a 34 Da mass loss. This impairs the formation of a disulphide bond in the carbohydrate recognition domain. The dehydroalanine was identified in similar small amounts in both recombinant and plasma-derived MBL....

  10. Spatial distribution of mast cells and macrophages around tumor glands in human breast ductal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Roberto; Guidolin, Diego; Annese, Tiziana; Tortorella, Cinzia; Ruggieri, Simona; Rega, Serena; Zito, Francesco A; Nico, Beatrice; Ribatti, Domenico

    2017-10-01

    Macrophages and mast cells are usually present in the tumor microenvironment and play an important role as regulators of inflammation, immunological response and angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we have evaluated macrophage, mast cell, and microvessel density in a selected group of different grade of invasive breast carcinoma tumor specimens. Furthermore, we have investigated the pattern of distribution of CD68-positive macrophages and tryptase-positive mast cells around tumor glands. Results have shown that: A) Macrophages are more numerous in G2 and G3 breast cancer stages respect to controls, the per cent of macrophages in G1 samples was comparable to the controls, and the spatial relationship between macrophages and glands (as indicated by the mean cell-to-gland distance) correlated with CD31-positive vessels. B) Mast cells in G2 and G3 tumor specimens show a significant increase in their number as compared to control samples, and their spatial distribution around the glands did not show any significant difference among groups. Overall, the results of this study confirm the important role of macrophages and mast cells in tumor progression and angiogenesis in human ductal breast cancer, and pointed out the spatial relationship between tumor macrophages and glands, and its correlation with microvascular density. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. TLR2 and TLR4 signaling pathways are required for recombinant Brucella abortus BCSP31-induced cytokine production, functional upregulation of mouse macrophages, and the Th1 immune response in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-Yun; Liu, Yuan; Gao, Xiao-Xue; Gao, Xiang; Cai, Hong

    2014-09-01

    Brucella abortus is a zoonotic Gram-negative pathogen that causes brucelosis in ruminants and humans. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize Brucella abortus and initiate antigen-presenting cell activities that affect both innate and adaptive immunity. In this study, we focused on recombinant Brucella cell-surface protein 31 (rBCSP31) to determine its effects on mouse macrophages. Our results demonstrated that rBCSP31 induced TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12p40 production, which depended on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) by stimulating the rapid phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and the activation of transcription factor NF-κB in macrophages. In addition, continuous exposure (>24 h) of RAW264.7 cells to rBCSP31 significantly enhanced IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC-II and the ability to present rBCSP31 peptide to CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we found that rBCSP31 could interact with both TLR2 and TLR4. The rBCSP31-induced cytokine production by macrophages from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice was lower than that from C57BL/6 macrophages, and the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs was attenuated in macrophages from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice. In addition, CD4(+) T cells from C57BL/6 mice immunized with rBCSP31 produced higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 compared with CD4(+) T cells from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice. Macrophages from immunized C57BL/6 mice produced higher levels of IL-12p40 than those from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice. Furthermore, immunization with rBCSP31 provided better protection in C57BL/6 mice than in TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice after B. abortus 2308 challenge. These results indicate that rBCSP31 is a TLR2 and TLR4 agonist that induces cytokine production, upregulates macrophage function and induces the Th1 immune response.

  12. Paroxetine suppresses recombinant human P2X7 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao-Ung, Phuong; Skarratt, Kristen K; Fuller, Stephen J; Stokes, Leanne

    2015-12-01

    P2X7 receptor (P2X7) activity may link inflammation to depressive disorders. Genetic variants of human P2X7 have been linked with major depression and bipolar disorders, and the P2X7 knockout mouse has been shown to exhibit anti-depressive-like behaviour. P2X7 is an ATP-gated ion channel and is a major regulator of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) secretion from monocytes and microglia. We hypothesised that antidepressants may elicit their mood enhancing effects in part via modulating P2X7 activity and reducing inflammatory responses. In this study, we determined whether common psychoactive drugs could affect recombinant and native human P2X7 responses in vitro. Common antidepressants demonstrated opposing effects on human P2X7-mediated responses; paroxetine inhibited while fluoxetine and clomipramine mildly potentiated ATP-induced dye uptake in HEK-293 cells stably expressing recombinant human P2X7. Paroxetine inhibited dye uptake mediated by human P2X7 in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC(50) of 24 μM and significantly reduces ATP-induced inward currents. We confirmed that trifluoperazine hydrochloride suppressed human P2X7 responses (IC(50) of 6.4 μM). Both paroxetine and trifluoperazine did not inhibit rodent P2X7 responses, and mutation of a known residue (F 95L) did not alter the effect of either drug, suggesting neither drug binds at this site. Finally, we demonstrate that P2X7-induced IL-1β secretion from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-primed human CD14(+) monocytes was suppressed with trifluoperazine and paroxetine.

  13. M2 Polarization of Human Macrophages Favors Survival of the Intracellular Pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchacher, Tanja; Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Stockinger, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens have developed various strategies to escape immunity to enable their survival in host cells, and many bacterial pathogens preferentially reside inside macrophages, using diverse mechanisms to penetrate their defenses and to exploit their high degree of metabolic diversity and plasticity. Here, we characterized the interactions of the intracellular pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae with polarized human macrophages. Primary human monocytes were pre-differentiated with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor or macrophage colony-stimulating factor for 7 days to yield M1-like and M2-like macrophages, which were further treated with interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide or with interleukin-4 for 48 h to obtain fully polarized M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 and M2 cells exhibited distinct morphology with round or spindle-shaped appearance for M1 and M2, respectively, distinct surface marker profiles, as well as different cytokine and chemokine secretion. Macrophage polarization did not influence uptake of C. pneumoniae, since comparable copy numbers of chlamydial DNA were detected in M1 and M2 at 6 h post infection, but an increase in chlamydial DNA over time indicating proliferation was only observed in M2. Accordingly, 72±5% of M2 vs. 48±7% of M1 stained positive for chlamydial lipopolysaccharide, with large perinuclear inclusions in M2 and less clearly bordered inclusions for M1. Viable C. pneumoniae was present in lysates from M2, but not from M1 macrophages. The ability of M1 to restrict chlamydial replication was not observed in M1-like macrophages, since chlamydial load showed an equal increase over time for M1-like and M2-like macrophages. Our findings support the importance of macrophage polarization for the control of intracellular infection, and show that M2 are the preferred survival niche for C. pneumoniae. M1 did not allow for chlamydial proliferation, but failed to completely eliminate chlamydial infection, giving further evidence

  14. Characterization of gene-activated human acid-beta-glucosidase: crystal structure, glycan composition, and internalization into macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumshtein, Boris; Salinas, Paul; Peterson, Brian; Chan, Victor; Silman, Israel; Sussman, Joel L; Savickas, Philip J; Robinson, Gregory S; Futerman, Anthony H

    2010-01-01

    Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disease, can be treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), in which defective acid-beta-glucosidase (GlcCerase) is supplemented by a recombinant, active enzyme. The X-ray structures of recombinant GlcCerase produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells (imiglucerase, Cerezyme) and in transgenic carrot cells (prGCD) have been previously solved. We now describe the structure and characteristics of a novel form of GlcCerase under investigation for the treatment of Gaucher disease, Gene-Activated human GlcCerase (velaglucerase alfa). In contrast to imiglucerase and prGCD, velaglucerase alfa contains the native human enzyme sequence. All three GlcCerases consist of three domains, with the active site located in domain III. The distances between the carboxylic oxygens of the catalytic residues, E340 and E235, are consistent with distances proposed for acid-base hydrolysis. Kinetic parameters (K(m) and V(max)) of velaglucerase alfa and imiglucerase, as well as their specific activities, are similar. However, analysis of glycosylation patterns shows that velaglucerase alfa displays distinctly different structures from imiglucerase and prGCD. The predominant glycan on velaglucerase alfa is a high-mannose type, with nine mannose units, while imiglucerase contains a chitobiose tri-mannosyl core glycan with fucosylation. These differences in glycosylation affect cellular internalization; the rate of velaglucerase alfa internalization into human macrophages is at least 2-fold greater than that of imiglucerase.

  15. Ethanol Extract of Mylabris phalerata Inhibits M2 Polarization Induced by Recombinant IL-4 and IL-13 in Murine Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan-Suck Chung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mylabris phalerata (MP is an insect used in oriental herbal treatments for tumor, tinea infections, and stroke. Recent studies have shown that tumor-associated macrophages (TAM have detrimental roles such as tumor progression, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Although TAM has phenotypes and characteristics in common with M2-polarized macrophages, M1 macrophages have tumor suppression and immune stimulation effects. Medicines polarizing macrophages to M1 have been suggested to have anticancer effects via the modulation of the tumor microenvironment. In this line, we screened oriental medicines to find M1 polarizing medicines in M2-polarized macrophages. Among approximately 400 types of oriental medicine, the ethanol extract of M. phalerata (EMP was the most proficient in increasing TNF-α secretion in M2-polarized macrophages and TAM. Although EMP enhanced the levels of an M1 cytokine (TNF-α and a marker (CD86, it significantly reduced the levels of an M2 marker (arginase-1 in M2-polarized macrophages. In addition, EMP-treated macrophages increased the levels of M1 markers (Inos and Tnf-α and reduced those of the enhanced M2 markers (Fizz-1, Ym-1, and arginase-1. EMP-treated macrophages significantly reduced Lewis lung carcinoma cell migration in a transwell migration assay and inhibited EL4-luc2 lymphoma proliferation. In our mechanism study, EMP was found to inhibit STAT3 phosphorylation in M2-polarized macrophages. These results suggest that EMP is effective in treating TAM-mediated tumor progression and metastasis.

  16. Macrophage-secreted factors inhibit ZAG expression and secretion by human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, D; Trayhurn, P; Bing, C

    2010-08-30

    Zinc-alpha2-glycoprotein (ZAG), a novel adipokine, is downregulated in adipose tissue in obesity, a state characterized by increased adipose tissue macrophage infiltration and chronic low-grade inflammation. This study investigated whether macrophage-secreted factors and TNF-alpha, a major product of macrophages, modulate ZAG expression and secretion by human adipocytes. ZAG was produced primarily by adipocytes, and not by preadipocytes and macrophages. Incubation of preadipocytes with macrophage-conditioned medium for up to 12 days decreased ZAG mRNA and protein release, and the expression of adipogenic markers (PPARgamma and C/EBPalpha). Adipocytes treated with macrophage-conditioned medium for 24h displayed significant reductions in ZAG mRNA and release. Chronic TNF-alpha treatment let to significant decreases in ZAG expression and secretion, but marked upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (IL-6, leptin, IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES) in adipocytes. These findings suggest that macrophage-associated inflammation may play a significant role in the downregulation of ZAG in adipose tissue in obesity. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The impact of splenectomy on human coronary artery atherosclerosis and vascular macrophage distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Stone, James R

    Splenectomy can potentially impact atherosclerosis through multiple mechanisms including altered lipid homeostasis, increased coagulation, and altered macrophage recruitment to the plaque. In patients, splenectomy has been associated with increased rates of coronary artery events, while in experimental mice, splenectomy causes increased atherosclerosis but reduces systemic monocyte supply. In this study, the direct impact of splenectomy on human coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque severity and macrophage content was investigated. Coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque severity was determined at autopsy in 18 long-term (≥10 years) splenectomy patients and 90 matched control patients. Coronary artery macrophage content was evaluated in mild atherosclerotic plaques of 11 mid- to long-term (≥1 year) splenectomy patients and 11 matched control patients. Splenectomy was associated with reduced coronary artery atherosclerosis (P=.03). The association was most pronounced for the subgroup of patients who had undergone splenectomy 20 years or more prior to death (P=.02). There was no difference in the density of macrophages in the plaque, media, or adventitia upon comparing splenectomy and control patients. In the control group, there was no correlation between the macrophage densities in the three arterial layers. However, in the splenectomy patients, there was a strong correlation in the macrophage densities across the plaque, media, and adventitia (P≤.0002), with resulting slopes that were significantly greater than seen in the control patients (P=.0007-.011). These findings indicate that, in humans, splenectomy is associated with lower coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque severity and altered coronary artery macrophage distribution. These results suggest that the spleen can modulate the recruitment of macrophages into human coronary arteries and the progression of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Vortioxetine exerts anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects on human monocytes/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmon, Maria; Rossi, Silvia; Pastore, Anna; Cattaneo, Carlo Ignazio; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Fresu, Luigia Grazia

    2018-01-01

    A crosstalk between the immune system and depression has been postulated, with monocytes/macrophages and cytokines having a key role in this interaction. In this study, we examined whether vortioxetine, a multimodal anti-depressive drug, was endowed with anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activity, leading to immunomodulatory effects on human monocytes and macrophages. Human monocytes were isolated from buffy coats and used as such or differentiated into M1 and M2 macrophages. Cells were treated with vortioxetine before or after differentiation, and their responsiveness was evaluated. This included oxy-radical and TNFα production, TNFα and PPARγ gene expression and NF-κB translocation. Vortioxetine significantly reduced the PMA-induced oxidative burst in monocytes and in macrophages (M1 and M2), causing a concomitant shift of macrophages from the M1 to the M2 phenotype, demonstrated by a significant decrease in the expression of the surface marker CD86 and an increase in CD206. Moreover, treatment of monocytes with vortioxetine rendered macrophages derived from this population less sensitive to PMA, as it reduced the oxidative burst, NF-kB translocation, TNFα release and expression while inducing PPARγ gene expression. FACS analysis showed a significant decrease in the CD14+ /CD16+ /CD86+ M1 population. These results demonstrate that in human monocytes/macrophages, vortioxetine has antioxidant activity and anti-inflammatory effects driving the polarization of macrophages towards their alternative phenotype. These findings suggest that vortioxetine, alongside its antidepressive effect, may have immunomodulatory properties. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Dual Transcriptome Profiling of Leishmania-Infected Human Macrophages Reveals Distinct Reprogramming Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Dillon, Laura A L; Belew, Ashton Trey; Bravo, Hector Corrada; Mosser, David M; El-Sayed, Najib M

    2016-05-10

    Macrophages are mononuclear phagocytes that constitute a first line of defense against pathogens. While lethal to many microbes, they are the primary host cells of Leishmania spp. parasites, the obligate intracellular pathogens that cause leishmaniasis. We conducted transcriptomic profiling of two Leishmania species and the human macrophage over the course of intracellular infection by using high-throughput RNA sequencing to characterize the global gene expression changes and reprogramming events that underlie the interactions between the pathogen and its host. A systematic exclusion of the generic effects of large-particle phagocytosis revealed a vigorous, parasite-specific response of the human macrophage early in the infection that was greatly tempered at later time points. An analogous temporal expression pattern was observed with the parasite, suggesting that much of the reprogramming that occurs as parasites transform into intracellular forms generally stabilizes shortly after entry. Following that, the parasite establishes an intracellular niche within macrophages, with minimal communication between the parasite and the host cell later during the infection. No significant difference was observed between parasite species transcriptomes or in the transcriptional response of macrophages infected with each species. Our comparative analysis of gene expression changes that occur as mouse and human macrophages are infected by Leishmania spp. points toward a general signature of the Leishmania-macrophage infectome. Little is known about the transcriptional changes that occur within mammalian cells harboring intracellular pathogens. This study characterizes the gene expression signatures of Leishmania spp. parasites and the coordinated response of infected human macrophages as the pathogen enters and persists within them. After accounting for the generic effects of large-particle phagocytosis, we observed a parasite-specific response of the human macrophages early in

  20. Modulation of Innate Host Factors by Mycobacterium avium Complex in Human Macrophages Includes Interleukin 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Nancy; Rekka, Sofia; Gliozzi, Maria; Feng, Carl G.; Amarnath, Shoba; Orenstein, Jan M.; Wahl, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Although opportunistic infections due to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) have been less common since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, globally, human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)–positive patients remain predisposed to these infections. Absence of a properly functioning acquired immune response allows MAC persistence within macrophages localized in lymph nodes coinfected with HIV and MAC. Although a deficiency in interferon γ appears to play a part in the ability of MAC to deflect the macrophage-associated antimicrobial attack, questions about this process remain. Our study examines the ability of MAC to regulate interleukin 17 (IL-17), a proinflammatory cytokine involved in host cell recruitment. Methods. Coinfected lymph nodes were examined for IL-17 by immunohistochemical analysis. In vitro, macrophages exposed to mycobacteria were evaluated for transcription activities, proteins, and signaling pathways responsible for IL-17 expression. Infected macrophages were also analyzed for expression of interleukin 21 (IL-21) and negative regulators of immune responses. Results. Infection of macrophages triggered synthesis of IL-17, correlating with IL-17 expression by macrophages in coinfected lymph nodes. Infected macrophages exposed to exogenous IL-17 expressed CXCL10, which favors recruitment of new macrophages as targets for infection. Blockade of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways suppressed mycobacteria-induced IL-17 expression. MAC triggered expression of IL-21, IRF4, and STAT3 genes related to IL-17 regulation, as well as expression of the negative immunoregulators CD274(PD-L1) and suppressors of cytokine signaling. Conclusions. MAC-infected macrophages can provide an alternative source for IL-17 that favors accumulation of new targets for perpetuating bacterial and viral infection while suppressing host antimicrobial immune responses. PMID

  1. Patterns of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 recombination ex vivo provide evidence for coadaptation of distant sites, resulting in purifying selection for intersubtype recombinants during replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Andrea; Kearney, Mary; Nikolaitchik, Olga A

    2010-01-01

    in human populations. We hypothesize that sequence diversity affects the emergence of viable recombinants by decreasing recombination events and reducing the ability of the recombinants to replicate. To test our hypothesis, we compared recombination between two viruses containing subtype B pol genes (B....../F than in B/B viruses, and the overall distribution of crossover junctions in pol was similar for the two classes of recombinants. We then examined the emergence of recombinants in a multiple cycle assay, so that functional pol gene products were selected. We found that the emerging B/B recombinants had...

  2. Recombinant human milk proteins - an opportunity and a challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerdal, B

    1996-04-01

    Several human milk proteins have physiologic functions in infants. These proteins are involved in defense against infectious agents and in the optimization of nutrient uptake from milk. Therefore, interest in producing recombinant human milk proteins to use in infant formula has been growing. Microorganisms and transgenic animals can now be used for the production of bioactive proteins. However, the benefits of each protein must be evaluated in cells, animal models, and infants before claims can be made that adding them to formula improves the health or nutrition of infants. Once benefits are shown, proper manufacturing conditions must be developed for introducing the protein or proteins into formula. Processing conditions must be evaluated to ensure that biologic activity is maintained. Dry blending, aseptic processing, sterile filtration, and other techniques will likely be necessary for introducing proteins that require specific tertiary structure for activity. The importance of posttranslational modifications must also be considered: some proteins may require proper glycosylation or phosphorylation for physiologic activity.

  3. Effects of recombinant humant erythropoietin in normal humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2011-01-01

    This review describes some of the physiological effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) in healthy humans. At the blood level EPO increases the arterial O2 content not only by increasing red blood cell volume, but also by an equally important decrease in plasma volume. Well before that...... result in suppression of endogenous EPO production through a decrease in intrarenal oxygen consumption. EPO elevates the arterial blood pressure even in healthy subjects. The receptor for EPO is present in many tissues. However, the functional effects of EPO in the skeletal muscle seem limited......, and although it has been speculated that non-erythropoietic effects of EPO (angiogenesis, shift in muscle fibre types, cognitive effects) may be responsible for the increase in exercise performance, this has not been confirmed. EPO induced haemodynamic effects call for careful monitoring during...

  4. Induction of alpha interferon by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in human monocyte-macrophage cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Szebeni, J; Dieffenbach, C; Wahl, S M; Venkateshan, C N; Yeh, A; Popovic, M.; Gartner, S; Wahl, L M; Peterfy, M; Friedman, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    The induction of interferon (IFN) by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in primary, nonstimulated monocyte-macrophage cultures was studied. HIV-1 infection, as confirmed by p24 antigen levels in the cell supernatant, led to the production of alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) over 7 to 21 days following infection. In two of seven experiments, the IFN detected was acid labile. Coupled reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the induction of IFN-alpha mRNA in cells...

  5. Cytokines and macrophage function in humans - role of stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    We have begun this study to commence the determination of the role of mild chronic stress in the effects of space flight on macrophage/monocyte function, a component of the immune response. Medical students undergoing regular periods of stress and relaxation have been shown to be an excellent model for determining the effects of stress on immune responses. We have begun using this model using the macrophage/monocyte as model leukocyte. The monocyte/macrophage plays a central role in immunoregulation. The studies to be included in this three year project are the effects of stress on: (1) interactions of monocytes with microbes, (2) monocyte production of cytokines, (3) monocyte phagocytosis and activity, and (4) monocyte expression of cell surface antigens important in immune responses. Stress hormone levels will also be carried out to determine if there is a correlation between stress effects on immune responses and hormonal levels. Psychological testing to insure subjects are actually stressed or relaxed at the time of testing will also be carried out. The results obtained from the proposed studies should be comparable with space flight studies with whole animals and isolated cell cultures. When complete this study should allow the commencement of the establishment of the role of stress as one compartment of the induction of immune alterations by space flight.

  6. Human Alveolar Macrophages May Not Be Susceptible to Direct Infection by a Human Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettensohn, David B; Frampton, Mark W; Nichols, Joan E; Roberts, Norbert J

    2016-12-01

    The current studies were undertaken to determine the susceptibility of human alveolar macrophages (AMs) to influenza A virus (IAV) infection in comparison with autologous peripheral blood-derived monocytes-macrophages (PBMs). AMs and PBMs were exposed to IAV in vitro and examined for their ability to bind and internalize IAV, and synthesize viral proteins and RNA. PBMs but not AMs demonstrated binding and internalization of the virus, synthesizing viral proteins and RNA. Exposure of AMs in the presence of a sialidase inhibitor or anti-IAV antibody resulted in viral protein synthesis by the cells. Exposure of AMs to fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled IAV in the presence of anti-fluorescein isothiocyanate antibody also resulted in viral protein synthesis. Thus, human AMs are apparently not susceptible to direct infection by a human IAV but are likely to be infected indirectly in the setting of exposure in the presence of antibody that binds the challenging strain of IAV. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Progastrin represses the alternative activation of human macrophages and modulates their influence on colon cancer epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Hernández

    Full Text Available Macrophage infiltration is a negative prognostic factor for most cancers but gastrointestinal tumors seem to be an exception. The effect of macrophages on cancer progression depends on their phenotype, which may vary between M1 (pro-inflammatory, defensive to M2 (tolerogenic, pro-tumoral. Gastrointestinal cancers often become an ectopic source of gastrins and macrophages present receptors for these peptides. The aim of the present study is to analyze whether gastrins can affect the pattern of macrophage infiltration in colorectal tumors. We have evaluated the relationship between gastrin expression and the pattern of macrophage infiltration in samples from colorectal cancer and the influence of these peptides on the phenotype of macrophages differentiated from human peripheral monocytes in vitro. The total number of macrophages (CD68+ cells was similar in tumoral and normal surrounding tissue, but the number of M2 macrophages (CD206+ cells was significantly higher in the tumor. However, the number of these tumor-associated M2 macrophages correlated negatively with the immunoreactivity for gastrin peptides in tumor epithelial cells. Macrophages differentiated from human peripheral monocytes in the presence of progastrin showed lower levels of M2-markers (CD206, IL10 with normal amounts of M1-markers (CD86, IL12. Progastrin induced similar effects in mature macrophages treated with IL4 to obtain a M2-phenotype or with LPS plus IFNγ to generate M1-macrophages. Macrophages differentiated in the presence of progastrin presented a reduced expression of Wnt ligands and decreased the number and increased cell death of co-cultured colorectal cancer epithelial cells. Our results suggest that progastrin inhibits the acquisition of a M2-phenotype in human macrophages. This effect exerted on tumor associated macrophages may modulate cancer progression and should be taken into account when analyzing the therapeutic value of gastrin immunoneutralization.

  8. Vastatins inhibit cholesterol ester accumulation in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, H.J.M.; Vermeer, M.; Wit, E.de; Havekes, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    Human monocyte-derived macrophages were incubated for 48 hours in Medium 199 with 1% human serum albumin, and with 100 μg acetyl low density lipoprotein (LDL) or β-very low density lipoprotein (β-VLDL), with or without various concentrations of compactin, lovastatin, simvastatin, or pravastatin. The

  9. Effect of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 on bisphosphonate-treated osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Taek-Kyun; Song, Jae-Min; Kim, In-Ryoung; Park, Bong-Soo; Kim, Chul-Hoon; Cheong, In-Kyo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is a side effect of bisphophonate therapy that has been reported in recent years. Osteoclastic inactivity by bisphosphonate is the known cause of BRONJ. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) plays an important role in the development of bone. Recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) is potentially useful as an activation factor for bone repair. We hypothesized that rhBMP-2 would enhance the osteoclast-osteoblast interaction related to bone remodeling. Materials and Methods Human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB 1.19) were treated with 100 µM alendronate, and 100 ng/mL rhBMP-2 was added. Cells were incubated for a further 48 hours, and cell viability was measured using an MTT assay. Expression of the three cytokines from osteoblasts, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Cell viability was decreased to 82.75%±1.00% by alendronate and then increased to 110.43%±1.35% after treatment with rhBMP-2 (PrhBMP2 does not affect OPG gene expression in hFOB, but it may increase RANKL and M-CSF gene expression. PMID:25551094

  10. Modulation of cytokine expression in human macrophages by endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanzhen; Mei, Chenfang [State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Liu, Hao [Affiliated Cancer Hospital and Cancer Research Institute, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510095 (China); Wang, Hongsheng [Department of Microbial and Biochemical Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zeng, Guoqu; Lin, Jianhui [State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Xu, Meiying, E-mail: xumy@gdim.cn [State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Effects of BPA on the cytokines expression of human macrophages were investigated. • BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 production. • BPA decreased anti-inflammation IL-10 and TGF-β production. • ERα/β/ERK/NF-κB signaling involved in BPA-mediated cytokines expression. - Abstract: Exposure to environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA) is often associated with dysregulated immune homeostasis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of BPA on the cytokines responses of human macrophages were investigated. Treatment with BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, but decreased anti-inflammation cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in THP1 macrophages, as well as in primary human macrophages. BPA effected cytokines expression through estrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β)-dependent mechanism with the evidence of ERα/β antagonist reversed the expression of cytokines. We also identified that activation of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signal cascade marked the effects of BPA on cytokines expression. Our results indicated that BPA effected inflammatory responses of macrophages via modulating of cytokines expression, and provided a new insight into the link between exposure to BPA and human health.

  11. Proteomic and Bioinformatic Characterization of Extracellular Vesicles Released from Human Macrophages upon Influenza A Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cypryk, Wojciech; Lorey, Martina; Puustinen, Anne; Nyman, Tuula A; Matikainen, Sampsa

    2017-01-06

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) are aggressive pathogens that cause acute respiratory diseases and annual epidemics in humans. Host defense against IAV infection is initiated by macrophages, which are the principal effector cells of the innate immune system. We have previously shown that IAV infection of human macrophages is associated with robust secretion of proteins via conventional and unconventional protein release pathways. Here we have characterized unconventional, extracellular vesicle (EV)-mediated protein secretion in human macrophages during IAV infection using proteomics, bioinformatics, and functional studies. We demonstrate that at 9 h postinfection a robust EV-mediated protein secretion takes place. We identified 2359 human proteins from EVs of IAV-infected macrophages compared with 1448 proteins identified from EVs of control cells. Bioinformatic analysis shows that many proteins involved in translation, like components of spliceosome machinery and the ribosome, are secreted in EVs in response to IAV infection. Our data also shows that EVs derived from IAV-infected macrophages contain fatty acid-binding proteins, antiviral cytokines, copper metabolism Murr-1 domain proteins, and autophagy-related proteins. In addition, our data suggest that secretory autophagy plays a role in activating EV-mediated protein secretion during IAV infection.

  12. Entrance and Survival of Brucella pinnipedialis Hooded Seal Strain in Human Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briquemont, Benjamin; Sørensen, Karen K.; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Marine mammal Brucella spp. have been isolated from pinnipeds (B. pinnipedialis) and cetaceans (B. ceti) from around the world. Although the zoonotic potential of marine mammal brucellae is largely unknown, reports of human disease exist. There are few studies of the mechanisms of bacterial intracellular invasion and multiplication involving the marine mammal Brucella spp. We examined the infective capacity of two genetically different B. pinnipedialis strains (reference strain; NTCT 12890 and a hooded seal isolate; B17) by measuring the ability of the bacteria to enter and replicate in cultured phagocytes and epithelial cells. Human macrophage-like cells (THP-1), two murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1), and a human malignant epithelial cell line (HeLa S3) were challenged with bacteria in a gentamicin protection assay. Our results show that B. pinnipedialis is internalized, but is then gradually eliminated during the next 72 – 96 hours. Confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain colocalized with lysosomal compartments at 1.5 and 24 hours after infection. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain was verified by transmission electron microscopy. By using a cholesterol-scavenging lipid inhibitor, entrance of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages was significantly reduced by 65.8 % (± 17.3), suggesting involvement of lipid-rafts in intracellular entry. Murine macrophages invaded by B. pinnipedialis do not release nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular bacterial presence does not induce cell death. In summary, B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain can enter human and murine macrophages, as well as human epithelial cells. Intracellular entry of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain involves, but seems not to be limited to, lipid-rafts in human macrophages. Brucella pinnipedialis does not multiply or survive for prolonged periods intracellulary. PMID:24376851

  13. Human macrophage foam cells degrade atherosclerotic plaques through cathepsin K mediated processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, Natasha; Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Register, Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proteolytic degradation of Type I Collagen by proteases may play an important role in remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques, contributing to increased risk of plaque rupture.The aim of the current study was to investigate whether human macrophage foam cells degrade the extracellular......-I in areas of intimal hyperplasia and in shoulder regions of advanced plaques. Treatment of human monocytes with M-CSF or M-CSF+LDL generated macrophages and foam cells producing CTX-I when cultured on type I collagen enriched matrix. Circulating levels of CTX-I were not significantly different in women...... with aortic calcifications compared to those without. CONCLUSIONS: Human macrophage foam cells degrade the atherosclerotic plaques though cathepsin K mediated processes, resulting in increase in levels of CTX-I. Serum CTX-I was not elevated in women with aortic calcification, likely due to the contribution...

  14. Pathobiology of HIV in the Human Monocyte-Macrophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-24

    be induced folowing infection with simian virus obtained for the humain T-celI Line 149. These data suggested ’Copy ovn +oJ 077C does oat p em bi...12. Gorman, C. M.. L. F. Moffat. and B. H. Howard. 1982. activation by Sp1: evidence for coactivators. Cell 61:1187-1197 Recombinant genomes which

  15. Interleukin-4 induces foreign body giant cells from human monocytes/macrophages. Differential lymphokine regulation of macrophage fusion leads to morphological variants of multinucleated giant cells.

    OpenAIRE

    McNally, A. K.; Anderson, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Interleukin-4 induced the formation of foreign body-type giant multinucleated cells from human monocyte-derived macrophages, an effect that was optimized with either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-3, dependent on the concentration of interleukin-4, and specifically prevented by anti-interleukin-4. Very large foreign body giant cells and, predominantly, giant cell syncytia with randomly arranged nuclei and extensive cytoplasmic spreading (285 +/- 121 nuclei and...

  16. Genetic recombination between human and animal parasites creates novel strains of human pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Gibson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic recombination between pathogens derived from humans and livestock has the potential to create novel pathogen strains, highlighted by the influenza pandemic H1N1/09, which was derived from a re-assortment of swine, avian and human influenza A viruses. Here we investigated whether genetic recombination between subspecies of the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, from humans and animals can generate new strains of human pathogen, T. b. rhodesiense (Tbr responsible for sleeping sickness (Human African Trypanosomiasis, HAT in East Africa. The trait of human infectivity in Tbr is conferred by a single gene, SRA, which is potentially transferable to the animal pathogen Tbb by sexual reproduction. We tracked the inheritance of SRA in crosses of Tbr and Tbb set up by co-transmitting genetically-engineered fluorescent parental trypanosome lines through tsetse flies. SRA was readily transferred into new genetic backgrounds by sexual reproduction between Tbr and Tbb, thus creating new strains of the human pathogen, Tbr. There was no evidence of diminished growth or transmissibility of hybrid trypanosomes carrying SRA. Although expression of SRA is critical to survival of Tbr in the human host, we show that the gene exists as a single copy in a representative collection of Tbr strains. SRA was found on one homologue of chromosome IV in the majority of Tbr isolates examined, but some Ugandan Tbr had SRA on both homologues. The mobility of SRA by genetic recombination readily explains the observed genetic variability of Tbr in East Africa. We conclude that new strains of the human pathogen Tbr are being generated continuously by recombination with the much larger pool of animal-infective trypanosomes. Such novel recombinants present a risk for future outbreaks of HAT.

  17. Either non-homologous ends joining or homologous recombination is required to repair double-strand breaks in the genome of macrophage-internalized Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Brzostek

    Full Text Available The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is constantly exposed to a multitude of hostile conditions and is confronted by a variety of potentially DNA-damaging assaults in vivo, primarily from host-generated antimicrobial toxic radicals. Exposure to reactive nitrogen species and/or reactive oxygen species causes different types of DNA damage, including oxidation, depurination, methylation and deamination, that can result in single- or double-strand breaks (DSBs. These breaks affect the integrity of the whole genome and, when left unrepaired, can lead to cell death. Here, we investigated the role of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR and non-homologous ends joining (NHEJ, in the survival of Mtb inside macrophages. To this end, we constructed Mtb strains defective for HR (ΔrecA, NHEJ [Δ(ku,ligD], or both DSB repair systems [Δ(ku,ligD,recA]. Experiments using these strains revealed that either HR or NHEJ is sufficient for the survival and propagation of tubercle bacilli inside macrophages. Inhibition of nitric oxide or superoxide anion production with L-NIL or apocynin, respectively, enabled the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant strain lacking both systems to survive intracellularly. Complementation of the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant with an intact recA or ku-ligD rescued the ability of Mtb to propagate inside macrophages.

  18. Effect of rosuvastatin treatment on cholesterol efflux from human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralova Lesna, Ivana; Adamkova, Vera; Pagacova, Libuse

    2011-01-01

    One of the positive effects of rosuvastatin is an increase in HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). An increase in HDL-C is considered as one of the positive effects of this type of statin, although it does not necessarily correspond to the actual reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) rate. We analyzed the influence of statin induced changes in HDL-C on cholesterol efflux (CHE), the key step affecting the RCT. Fourteen subjects (7 men, age: 50.9 ± 8.4 years and 7 women, age: 59.7 ± 10.6 years) with mixed dyslipidemia received 20 mg of rosuvastatin daily for 3 months. Before the initiation of statin therapy and at the end of the study period, the CHE from 14C cholesterol-labeled macrophages was determined in addition to parameters related to lipid metabolism. CHE was calculated as the percentage of radioactivity released from the macrophages into the media containing 5% of the examined plasma. The rosuvastatin administration resulted in significant reductions of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B and a significant increase in HDL-C (from 1.43 mmol/l to 1.52 mmol/l, p=0.05), while the levels of apolipoprotein A1 remained unchanged. There was no significant increase in CHE (from 16.1% to 17.6%, p for trend = 0.053). Individual changes in HDL-C correlated significantly (p<0.05) with individual changes of CHE (r=0.76). Administration of rosuvastatin increases HDL-C, and individual changes correlate with the individual increases of CHE from macrophages. © 2011 Neuroendocrinology Letters

  19. An electron microscopic study of macrophages in the meninges of the human embryonic optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, R R

    1988-01-01

    Macrophages were found in the meningeal sheath of the human optic nerve at all ages from 8 to 18 weeks post-conception. At 8 weeks the majority of macrophages contained few cytoplasmic organelles or vacuoles, but even at this age a small number of cells packed with small dense bodies were present. With increasing age the number of organelles increased and some vacuolated macrophages were present. The morphology of macrophages largely depended on the part of the meninges in which they were situated. Those lying in the subarachnoid space or loose outer layers of the dura were irregularly shaped and often vacuolated, whereas those lying in the tightly packed layer of arachnoid at its junction with the dura were elongated and contained few, if any, vacuoles. A few meningeal macrophages were observed apparently migrating along the fibrous septa which carry blood vessels into the substance of the nerve. The main structural differences between meningeal macrophages and optic nerve microglia (Sturrock, 1984) were the presence in the latter of numerous small vacuoles and long strands of endoplasmic reticulum. These structural differences may be the result of microglia being actively engaged in phagocytosis of the large number of degenerating axons which are present in the optic nerve between 8 and 10 weeks post-conception. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Figs. 9-10 Figs. 11-12 PMID:3198475

  20. Expression of YKL-40 by peritumoral macrophages in human small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Nanna; Johansen, Julia S; Andersen, Claus B

    2005-01-01

    the cellular source of YKL-40 in SCLC patient biopsies and in a panel of 20 human SCLC lines cultured in vitro and in vivo in nude mice. In general, the SCLC cell lines had no or very limited (human) YKL-40 expression, whereas, by RT-PCR a pronounced murine (i.e., stromal) YKL-40 expression was present in all...... in the cancer cells, in macrophages infiltrating the solid tumor areas, or in non-malignant tissue. In conclusion, the predominant source of elevated serum YKL-40 in SCLC is peritumoral macrophages....

  1. Intracellular phospholipase A2 expression and location in human macrophages: influence of synthetic material surface chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnes, Donna Lee M; Santerre, J Paul; Labow, Rosalind S

    2008-01-01

    Phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) enzymes participate in a potent inflammatory pathway through the liberation of arachidonic acid upon hydrolysis of membrane glycerophospholipids. The presence of implanted polycarbonate-urethane (PCNU) materials, used in several medical applications, has the ability to influence inflammatory responses of human macrophages that are recruited to a tissue-material interface; however, the specific inflammatory pathways that are activated upon macrophage attachment to PCNU are largely unknown. Previous studies suggested the participation of PLA(2) pathways in material degradation with the use of chemical inhibitors, such as aristolochic acid (ARIST), however not accurately defining the specific PLA(2) enzymes involved. The current study aimed to establish specific groups of PLA(2) involved in the macrophage foreign body response to PCNU. ARIST was assessed for specific effects on secretory PLA(2) (sPLA(2)) protein expression and non-specific effects on key proteins, beta-actin and monocyte-specific esterase, implicated in the macrophage attack on PCNU materials. Macrophage attachment to PCNU materials induced increased intracellular expression of cytosolic PLA(2) (cPLA(2)), but not sPLA(2), relative to tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) as detected by immunoblot analysis, demonstrating an early and delayed stimulation during the time course of increased cPLA(2) protein expression. Laser scanning confocal microscopy images indicated a change in location of cPLA(2) in macrophages adherent to PCNU surfaces compared to TCPS. This study has illustrated changes in macrophage cPLA(2) expression in response to cell-attachment to PCNU surfaces, demonstrating that the macrophage foreign body response to biomaterials induces a potent inflammatory pathway, which may lead to tissue damage near the site of material implantation. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Extracellular ATP induces the rapid release of HIV-1 from virus containing compartments of human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Francesca; Desdouits, Marion; Garzetti, Livia; Podini, Paola; Alfano, Massimo; Rubartelli, Anna; Furlan, Roberto; Benaroch, Philippe; Poli, Guido

    2015-06-23

    HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infects CD4(+) T lymphocytes and tissue macrophages. Infected macrophages differ from T cells in terms of decreased to absent cytopathicity and for active accumulation of new progeny HIV-1 virions in virus-containing compartments (VCC). For these reasons, infected macrophages are believed to act as "Trojan horses" carrying infectious particles to be released on cell necrosis or functional stimulation. Here we explored the hypothesis that extracellular ATP (eATP) could represent a microenvironmental signal potentially affecting virion release from VCC of infected macrophages. Indeed, eATP triggered the rapid release of infectious HIV-1 from primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) acutely infected with the CCR5-dependent HIV-1 strain. A similar phenomenon was observed in chronically infected promonocytic U1 cells differentiated to macrophage-like cells (D-U1) by costimulation with phorbol esters and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Worthy of note, eATP did not cause necrotic, apoptotic, or pyroptotic cell death, and its effect on HIV-1 release was suppressed by Imipramine (an antidepressant agent known to inhibit microvesicle formation by interfering with membrane-associated acid sphingomyelinase). Virion release was not triggered by oxidized ATP, whereas the effect of eATP was inhibited by a specific inhibitor of the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). Thus, eATP triggered the discharge of virions actively accumulating in VCC of infected macrophages via interaction with the P2X7R in the absence of significant cytopathicity. These findings suggest that the microvesicle pathway and P2X7R could represent exploitable targets for interfering with the VCC-associated reservoir of infectious HIV-1 virions in tissue macrophages.

  3. IFNγ Enhances CD64-Potentiated Phagocytosis of Treponema pallidum Opsonized with Human Syphilitic Serum by Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Kelly L.; Cruz, Adriana R.; Benjamin, Sarah J.; La Vake, Carson J.; Cervantes, Jorge L.; LeDoyt, Morgan; Ramirez, Lady G.; Mandich, Daniza; Fiel-Gan, Mary; Caimano, Melissa J.; Radolf, Justin D.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2017-01-01

    Syphilis is a multi-stage, sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum (Tp). Considered broadly, syphilis can be conceptualized as a dualistic process in which spirochete-driven inflammation, the cause of clinical manifestations, coexists to varying extents with bacterial persistence. Inflammation is elicited in the tissues, along with the persistence of spirochetes to keep driving a robust immune response while evading host defenses; this duality is best exemplified during the florid, disseminated stage called secondary syphilis (SS). SS lesions typically contain copious amounts of spirochetes along with a mixed cellular infiltrate consisting of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, NK cells, plasma cells, and macrophages. In the rabbit model, Tp are cleared by macrophages via antibody-mediated opsonophagocytosis. Previously, we demonstrated that human syphilitic serum (HSS) promotes efficient uptake of Tp by human monocytes and that opsonophagocytosis of Tp markedly enhances cytokine production. Herein, we used monocyte-derived macrophages to study Tp–macrophage interactions ex vivo. In the absence of HSS, monocyte-derived macrophages internalized low numbers of Tp and secreted little cytokine (e.g., TNF). By contrast, these same macrophages internalized large numbers of unopsonized Borrelia burgdorferi and secreted robust levels of cytokines. Maturation of macrophages with M-CSF and IFNγ resulted in a macrophage phenotype with increased expression of HLA-DR, CD14, inducible nitric oxide synthase, TLR2, TLR8, and the Fcγ receptors (FcγR) CD64 and CD16, even in the absence of LPS. Importantly, IFNγ-polarized macrophages resulted in a statistically significant increase in opsonophagocytosis of Tp accompanied by enhanced production of cytokines, macrophage activation markers (CD40, CD80), TLRs (TLR2, TLR7, TLR8), chemokines (CCL19, CXCL10, CXCL11), and TH1-promoting cytokines (IL-12, IL-15). Finally, the blockade of FcγRs, primarily CD64

  4. Biological evaluation of recombinant human erythropoietin in pharmaceutical products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos A.S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The potencies of mammalian cell-derived recombinant human erythropoietin pharmaceutical preparations, from a total of five manufacturers, were assessed by in vivo bioassay using standardized protocols. Eight-week-old normocythemic mice received a single subcutaneous injection followed by blood sampling 96 h later or multiple daily injections with blood sampling 24 h after the last injection. Reticulocyte counting by microscopic examination was employed as the end-point using the brilliant cresyl blue or selective hemolysis methods, together with automated flow cytometry. Different injection schedules were investigated and dose-response curves for the European Pharmacopoeia Biological Reference Preparation of erythropoietin were compared. Manual and automated methods of reticulocyte counting were correlated with respect to assay validity and precision. Using 8 mice per treatment group, intra-assay precision determined for all of the assays in the study showed coefficients of variation of 12.1-28.4% for the brilliant cresyl blue method, 14.1-30.8% for the selective hemolysis method and 8.5-19.7% for the flow cytometry method. Applying the single injection protocol, a combination of at least two independent assays was required to achieve the precision potency and confidence limits indicated by the manufacturers, while the multiple daily injection protocol yielded the same acceptable results within a single assay. Although the latter protocol using flow cytometry for reticulocyte counting gave more precise and reproducible results (intra-assay coefficients of variation: 5.9-14.2%, the well-characterized manual methods provide equally valid alternatives for the quality control of recombinant human erythropoietin therapeutic products.

  5. Comparison of Recombinant Human Haptocorrin Expressed in Human Embryonic Kidney Cells and Native Haptocorrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furger, Evelyne; Fedosov, Sergey N; Lildballe, Dorte Launholt

    2012-01-01

    HC, that compared to native HC contains four excessive amino acids (…LVPR) at the C-terminus, showed subtle changes in the binding kinetics of Cbl, cobinamide and the fluorescent Cbl conjugate CBC. The recombinant protein has properties very similar to native HC and although showing slightly different ligand......Haptocorrin (HC) is a circulating corrinoid binding protein with unclear function. In contrast to transcobalamin, the other transport protein in blood, HC is heavily glycosylated and binds a variety of cobalamin (Cbl) analogues. HC is present not only in blood but also in various secretions like...... milk, tears and saliva. No recombinant form of HC has been described so far. We report the expression of recombinant human HC (rhHC) in human embryonic kidney cells. We purified the protein with a yield of 6 mg (90 nmol) per litre of cell culture supernatant. The isolated rhHC behaved as native HC...

  6. Household air pollution causes dose-dependent inflammation and altered phagocytosis in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylance, Jamie; Fullerton, Duncan G; Scriven, James; Aljurayyan, Abdullah N; Mzinza, David; Barrett, Steve; Wright, Adam K A; Wootton, Daniel G; Glennie, Sarah J; Baple, Katy; Knott, Amy; Mortimer, Kevin; Russell, David G; Heyderman, Robert S; Gordon, Stephen B

    2015-05-01

    Three billion people are exposed to household air pollution from biomass fuel use. Exposure is associated with higher incidence of pneumonia, and possibly tuberculosis. Understanding mechanisms underlying these defects would improve preventive strategies. We used human alveolar macrophages obtained from healthy Malawian adults exposed naturally to household air pollution and compared them with human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed in vitro to respirable-sized particulates. Cellular inflammatory response was assessed by IL-6 and IL-8 production in response to particulate challenge; phagosomal function was tested by uptake and oxidation of fluorescence-labeled beads; ingestion and killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were measured by microscopy and quantitative culture. Particulate ingestion was quantified by digital image analysis. We were able to reproduce the carbon loading of naturally exposed alveolar macrophages by in vitro exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages. Fine carbon black induced IL-8 release from monocyte-derived and alveolar macrophages (P < 0.05) with similar magnitude responses (log10 increases of 0.93 [SEM = 0.2] versus 0.74 [SEM = 0.19], respectively). Phagocytosis of pneumococci and mycobacteria was impaired with higher particulate loading. High particulate loading corresponded with a lower oxidative burst capacity (P = 0.0015). There was no overall effect on killing of M. tuberculosis. Alveolar macrophage function is altered by particulate loading. Our macrophage model is comparable morphologically to the in vivo uptake of particulates. Wood smoke-exposed cells demonstrate reduced phagocytosis, but unaffected mycobacterial killing, suggesting defects related to chronic wood smoke inhalation limited to specific innate immune functions.

  7. IFN-γ stimulates autophagy-mediated clearance of Burkholderia cenocepacia in human cystic fibrosis macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaivon Assani

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia is a virulent pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF, survives intracellularly in macrophages, and uniquely causes systemic infections in CF. Autophagy is a physiologic process that involves engulfing non-functional organelles and proteins and delivering them for lysosomal degradation, but also plays a role in eliminating intracellular pathogens, including B. cenocepacia. Autophagy is defective in CF but can be stimulated in murine CF models leading to increased clearance of B. cenocepacia, but little is known about autophagy stimulation in human CF macrophages. IFN-γ activates macrophages and increases antigen presentation while also inducing autophagy in macrophages. We therefore, hypothesized that treatment with IFN-γ would increase autophagy and macrophage activation in patients with CF. Peripheral blood monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs were obtained from CF and non-CF donors and subsequently infected with B. cenocepacia. Basal serum levels of IFN-γ were similar between CF and non-CF patients, however after B. cenocepacia infection there is deficient IFN-γ production in CF MDMs. IFN-γ treated CF MDMs demonstrate increased co-localization with the autophagy molecule p62, increased autophagosome formation, and increased trafficking to lysosomes compared to untreated CF MDMs. Electron microscopy confirmed IFN-γ promotes double membrane vacuole formation around bacteria in CF MDMs, while only single membrane vacuoles form in untreated CF cells. Bacterial burden is significantly reduced in autophagy stimulated CF MDMs, comparable to non-CF levels. IL-1β production is decreased in CF MDMs after IFN-γ treatment. Together, these results demonstrate that IFN-γ promotes autophagy-mediated clearance of B. cenocepacia in human CF macrophages.

  8. Modulation of Stat-1 in Human Macrophages Infected with Different Species of Intracellular Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuditta Fiorella Schiavano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The infection of human macrophages by pathogenic bacteria induces different signaling pathways depending on the type of cellular receptors involved in the microorganism entry and on their mechanism(s of survival and replication in the host cell. It was reported that Stat proteins play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the changes in Stat-1 activation (phosphorylation in p-tyr701 after uptake of two Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus and two Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila characterized by their varying abilities to enter, survive, and replicate in human macrophages. Comparing the results obtained with Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, Stat-1 activation in macrophages does not seem to be related to LPS content. The p-tyr701Stat-1 expression levels were found to be independent of the internalized bacterial number and IFN-γ release. On the contrary, Jak/Stat-1 pathway activation only occurs when an active infection has been established in the host macrophage, and it is plausible that the differences in the expression levels of p-tyr701Stat-1 could be due to different survival mechanisms or to differences in bacteria life cycles within macrophages.

  9. Human CD68 promoter GFP transgenic mice allow analysis of monocyte to macrophage differentiation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Asif J; McNeill, Eileen; Kapellos, Theodore S; Regan-Komito, Daniel; Norman, Sophie; Burd, Sarah; Smart, Nicola; Machemer, Daniel E W; Stylianou, Elena; McShane, Helen; Channon, Keith M; Chawla, Ajay; Greaves, David R

    2014-10-09

    The recruitment of monocytes and their differentiation into macrophages at sites of inflammation are key events in determining the outcome of the inflammatory response and initiating the return to tissue homeostasis. To study monocyte trafficking and macrophage differentiation in vivo, we have generated a novel transgenic reporter mouse expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the human CD68 promoter. CD68-GFP mice express high levels of GFP in both monocyte and embryo-derived tissue resident macrophages in adult animals. The human CD68 promoter drives GFP expression in all CD115(+) monocytes of adult blood, spleen, and bone marrow; we took advantage of this to directly compare the trafficking of bone marrow-derived CD68-GFP monocytes to that of CX3CR1(GFP) monocytes in vivo using a sterile zymosan peritonitis model. Unlike CX3CR1(GFP) monocytes, which downregulate GFP expression on differentiation into macrophages in this model, CD68-GFP monocytes retain high-level GFP expression for 72 hours after differentiation into macrophages, allowing continued cell tracking during resolution of inflammation. In summary, this novel CD68-GFP transgenic reporter mouse line represents a powerful resource for analyzing monocyte mobilization and monocyte trafficking as well as studying the fate of recruited monocytes in models of acute and chronic inflammation. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. NLRP3 Inflammasome Expression and Signaling in Human Diabetic Wounds and in High Glucose Induced Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotian Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To investigate the contribution and mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome expression in human wounds in diabetes mellitus and in high glucose induced macrophages. Methods. In the present study, we compared the expression of NLRP3 inflammasome in debridement wound tissue from diabetic and nondiabetic patients. We also examined whether high glucose induces NLRP3 inflammasome expression in cultures THP-1-derived macrophages and the influence on IL-1β expression. Results. The expressions of NLRP3, caspase1, and IL-1β, at both the mRNA and protein level, were significantly higher in wounds of diabetic patients compared with nondiabetic wounds (P<0.05. High glucose induced a significant increase in NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β expression in THP-1-derived macrophages. M1 macrophage surface marker with CCR7 was significantly upregulated after high glucose stimulation. SiRNA-mediated silencing of NLRP3 expression downregulates the expression of IL-1β. Conclusion. The higher expression of NLRP3, caspase1, and secretion of IL-1β, signaling, and activation might contribute to the hyperinflammation in the human diabetic wound and in high glucose induced macrophages. It may be a novel target to treat the DM patients with chronic wound.

  11. Interleukin-4 induces foreign body giant cells from human monocytes/macrophages. Differential lymphokine regulation of macrophage fusion leads to morphological variants of multinucleated giant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, A K; Anderson, J M

    1995-11-01

    Interleukin-4 induced the formation of foreign body-type giant multinucleated cells from human monocyte-derived macrophages, an effect that was optimized with either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-3, dependent on the concentration of interleukin-4, and specifically prevented by anti-interleukin-4. Very large foreign body giant cells and, predominantly, giant cell syncytia with randomly arranged nuclei and extensive cytoplasmic spreading (285 +/- 121 nuclei and 1.151 +/- 0.303 mm2 per syncytium) were consistently obtained. Under otherwise identical culture conditions, relatively much smaller Langhans-type giant cells with circularly arranged nuclei were induced with a previously described combination of interferon-gamma plus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-3 (16 +/- 6 nuclei and 0.033 +/- 0.013 mm2 per giant cell); their formation was prevented by anti-interferon-gamma but not by anti-interleukin-4. Similar rates of macrophage fusion were obtained in both culture systems (72 +/- 5% and 74 +/- 6%, respectively), but these two morphological variants did not occur simultaneously or form from one another within the 10-day culture period. These findings demonstrate that interleukin-4 is a potent human macrophage fusion factor and that differential regulation of macrophage fusion by interleukin-4 and interferon-gamma may lead to morphological variants of multinucleated giant cells.

  12. M1- and M2-type macrophage responses are predictive of adverse outcomes in human atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica De Gaetano

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease caused by endothelial injury, lipid deposition and oxidative stress. This progressive disease can be converted into an acute clinical event by plaque rupture and thrombosis. In the context of atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, macrophages uniquely possess a dual functionality, regulating lipid accumulation and metabolism and sustaining the chronic inflammatory response, two of the most well documented pathways associated with the pathogenesis of the disease. Macrophages are heterogeneous cell populations and it is hypothesized that, during the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, macrophages in the developing plaque can switch from a pro-inflammatory (MΦ1 to an anti-inflammatory (MΦ2 phenotype and vice versa, depending on the microenvironment. The aim of this study was to identify changes in macrophage subpopulations in the progression of human atherosclerotic disease. Established atherosclerotic plaques from symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with existing coronary artery disease undergoing carotid endarterectomy were recruited to the study. Comprehensive histological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to quantify the cellular content and macrophage subsets of atherosclerotic lesion. In parallel, expression of MΦ1 and MΦ2 macrophage markers were analysed by real time-PCR and Western blot analysis.Gross analysis and histological staining demonstrated that symptomatic plaques presented greater haemorrhagic activity and the internal carotid was the most diseased segment, based on the predominant prevalence of fibrotic and necrotic tissue, calcifications and haemorrhagic events. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that both MΦ1 and MΦ2 macrophages are present in human plaques. However, MΦ2 macrophages are localised to more stable locations within the lesion. Importantly, gene and protein expression analysis of MΦ1/ MΦ2 markers evidenced that MΦ1

  13. Short-term effects of recombinant human growth hormone and feeding on gluconeogenesis in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    After a short-term fast, lactating women have increased rates of glucose production but not gluconeogenesis (GNG) despite relative hypoinsulinemia. We explored the effects of non-insulin-dependent increase in glucose utilization and recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on glucose production, glyc...

  14. Increasing the Stability of Recombinant Human Green Cone Pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Timothy S; Salom, David; Sun, Wenyu; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2018-01-10

    Three types of cone cells exist in the human retina, each containing a different pigment responsible for the initial step of photo-transduction. These pigments are distinguished by their specific absorbance maxima, 425 nm (blue), 530 nm (green) and 560 nm (red). Each pigment contains a common chromophore, 11-cis-retinal covalently bound to an opsin protein via a Schiff base. The 11-cis-retinal protonated Schiff base has an absorbance maxima at 440 nm in methanol. Unfortunately, the chemistry allowing the same chromophore interacting with different opsin proteins to tune the absorbance of the resulting pigments to distinct λmax values is poorly understood. Rhodopsin is the only pigment with a native structure determined at high resolution. Homology models for cone pigments have been generated, but experimentally determined structures are needed for a precise understanding of spectral tuning. The principal obstacle to solving the structures of cone pigments has been their innate instability in recombinant constructs. By inserting five different thermo-stabilizing proteins, BRIL, T4L, PGS, RUB and FLAV, into the recombinant green opsin sequence, constructs were created that were up to 9-fold more stable than WT. Using cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP), we developed a quick means of assessing the stability of the green pigment. CRALBP testing also confirmed a further 48-fold increase in pigment stability when varying the detergent used. These results suggest an efficient protocol for routine purification and stabilization of cone pigments that could be used for high-resolution determination of their structures as well as for other studies.

  15. Recombinant production of human interleukin 6 in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Nausch

    Full Text Available In this study, we compared basic expression approaches for the efficient expression of bioactive recombinant human interleukin-6 (IL6, as an example for a difficult-to-express protein. We tested these approaches in a laboratory scale in order to pioneer the commercial production of this protein in Escherichia coli (E. coli. Among the various strategies, which were tested under Research and Development (R&D conditions, aggregation-prone IL6 was solubilized most effectively by co-expressing cytoplasmic chaperones. Expression of a Glutathion-S-Transferase (GST fusion protein was not efficient to increase IL6 solubility. Alteration of the cultivation temperature significantly increased the solubility in both cases, whereas reduced concentrations of IPTG to induce expression of the T7lac-promotor only had a positive effect on chaperone-assisted expression. The biological activity was comparable to that of commercial IL6. Targeting the expressed protein to an oxidizing environment was not effective in the generation of soluble IL6. Taken together, the presence of chaperones and a lowered cultivation temperature seem effective to isolate large quantities of soluble IL6. This approach led to in vivo soluble, functional protein fractions and reduces purification and refolding requirements caused by downstream purification procedures. The final yield of soluble recombinant protein averaged approximately 2.6 mg IL6/liter of cell culture. These findings might be beneficial for the development of the large-scale production of IL6 under the conditions of current good manufacturing practice (cGMP.

  16. The importance of GLUT3 for de novo lipogenesis in hypoxia-induced lipid loading of human macrophages.

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    Lu Li

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic lesions are characterized by lipid-loaded macrophages (foam cells and hypoxic regions. Although it is well established that foam cells are produced by uptake of cholesterol from oxidized LDL, we previously showed that hypoxia also promotes foam cell formation even in the absence of exogenous lipids. The hypoxia-induced lipid accumulation results from increased triglyceride biosynthesis but the exact mechanism is unknown. Our aim was to investigate the importance of glucose in promoting hypoxia-induced de novo lipid synthesis in human macrophages. In the absence of exogenous lipids, extracellular glucose promoted the accumulation of Oil Red O-stained lipid droplets in human monocyte-derived macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner. Lipid droplet accumulation was higher in macrophages exposed to hypoxia at all assessed concentrations of glucose. Importantly, triglyceride synthesis from glucose was increased in hypoxic macrophages. GLUT3 was highly expressed in macrophage-rich and hypoxic regions of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques and in macrophages isolated from these plaques. In human monocyte-derived macrophages, hypoxia increased expression of both GLUT3 mRNA and protein, and knockdown of GLUT3 with siRNA significantly reduced both glucose uptake and lipid droplet accumulation. In conclusion, we have shown that hypoxia-induced increases in glucose uptake through GLUT3 are important for lipid synthesis in macrophages, and may contribute to foam cell formation in hypoxic regions of atherosclerotic lesions.

  17. Human adipocyte extracellular vesicles in reciprocal signaling between adipocytes and macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranendonk, Mariëtte E G; Visseren, Frank L J; van Balkom, Bas W M; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; van Herwaarden, Joost A; de Jager, Wilco; Schipper, Henk S; Brenkman, Arjan B; Verhaar, Marianne C; Wauben, Marca H M; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by human adipocytes or adipose tissue (AT)-explants play a role in the paracrine interaction between adipocytes and macrophages, a key mechanism in AT inflammation, leading to metabolic complications like insulin resistance (IR) were determined.

  18. C1q Binding to and Uptake of Apoptotic Lymphocytes by Human Monocyte-derived Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Marie E; Clarke, Elizabeth V; Tenner, Andrea J

    2013-09-05

    To characterize macrophage gene expression profiles during the uptake of autologous apoptotic cells, we developed a unique, more physiologic system using primary human monocyte derived macrophages purified via a nonactivating isolation procedure (and in the absence of contaminating platelets, which can release stimulating signals if activated) and autologous lymphocytes as a source of apoptotic cells. The use of autologous cells as the apoptotic target rather than transformed cell lines avoids antigenic stimulation from "nonself" structures at the HLA level but also from "altered self" signals due to the transformation inherent in cell lines.

  19. Lambda Interferon Inhibits Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection of Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Wei; Wang,Xu; Ye, Li; Zhou, Lin; Yang, Zhan-Qiu; Riedel, Eric; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2009-01-01

    The newly identified type III interferon (IFN-λ) has antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of viruses. We thus examined whether IFN-λ has the ability to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of blood monocyte-derived macrophages that expressed IFN-λ receptors. Both IFN-λ1 and IFN-λ2, when added to macrophage cultures, inhibited HIV-1 infection and replication. This IFN-λ-mediated anti-HIV-1 activity is broad, as IFN-λ could inhibit infection by both laboratory-ad...

  20. Long-term persistence of human donor alveolar macrophages in lung transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eguíluz-Gracia, Ibon; Schultz, Hans Henrik Lawaetz; Sikkeland, Liv I. B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alveolar macrophages (AMFs) are critical regulators of lung function, and may participate in graft rejection following lung transplantation. Recent studies in experimental animals suggest that most AMFs are self-maintaining cells of embryonic origin, but knowledge about the ontogeny...... for X/Y chromosomes and immunofluorescence staining for macrophage markers. Moreover, development of AMFs in humanised mice reconstituted with CD34+ umbilical cord-derived cells was assessed. RESULTS: The number of donor-derived AMFs was unchanged during the 2 year post-transplantation period....... CONCLUSIONS: The finding that human AMFs are maintained in the lung parenchyma for several years indicates that pulmonary macrophage transplantation can be a feasible therapeutic option for patients with diseases caused by dysfunctional AMFs. Moreover, in a lung transplantation setting, long-term persistence...

  1. Interleukin-13, but Not Indomethacin, Increases Cysteinyl-Leukotriene Synthesis in Human Lung Macrophages

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    Sarah E. Jackson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD is associated with constitutively elevated synthesis of bronchoconstrictor cysteinyl-leukotrienes, associated with increased expression of leukotriene (LTC4 synthase and Th2 cytokines and airway eosinophilia. We examined whether interleukin-13 can increase LTC4 synthase gene transcription and cysteinyl-leukotriene synthesis in macrophages isolated from resected human lung tissue and whether an NSAID (indomethacin can trigger further cysteinyl-leukotriene synthesis in these cells. Overnight culture of human lung macrophages with IL-13 (10 ng/mL increased spontaneous and ionophore-stimulated production of cysteinyl-leukotrienes by 42% (P=0.02 and 52% (P=0.005, respectively, as quantified by enzyme immunoassays, but PCR gene transcription assays did not demonstrate an effect on LTC4S mRNA. The addition of indomethacin (100 μM did not modulate cysteinyl-leukotriene production in either IL-13-treated or untreated macrophages. We conclude that while IL-13 enhances cysteinyl-leukotriene synthesis in human lung macrophages, it does not replicate the enhanced LTC4 synthase expression observed in the AERD lung nor confer sensitivity to NSAIDs.

  2. Similarity in recombination rate estimates highly correlates with genetic differentiation in humans.

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    Hafid Laayouni

    Full Text Available Recombination varies greatly among species, as illustrated by the poor conservation of the recombination landscape between humans and chimpanzees. Thus, shorter evolutionary time frames are needed to understand the evolution of recombination. Here, we analyze its recent evolution in humans. We calculated the recombination rates between adjacent pairs of 636,933 common single-nucleotide polymorphism loci in 28 worldwide human populations and analyzed them in relation to genetic distances between populations. We found a strong and highly significant correlation between similarity in the recombination rates corrected for effective population size and genetic differentiation between populations. This correlation is observed at the genome-wide level, but also for each chromosome and when genetic distances and recombination similarities are calculated independently from different parts of the genome. Moreover, and more relevant, this relationship is robustly maintained when considering presence/absence of recombination hotspots. Simulations show that this correlation cannot be explained by biases in the inference of recombination rates caused by haplotype sharing among similar populations. This result indicates a rapid pace of evolution of recombination, within the time span of differentiation of modern humans.

  3. [Effects of composite resin and glass-ionomer cements on proliferation and functional activity of human macrophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yu; Yang, Rong-qiang; Yang, Hong-li

    2013-08-01

    To study the effects of composite resin and glass-ionomer cements on cell proliferation and function of human macrophages in vitro. Macrophages were differentiated from THP-1 cells after treatment with phorbol ester and used as the model of inflammatory cells, which were treated by specimens from glass-ionomer cements(GC), composite resin Filtek Z350 (3M) and Filtek P60(3M) on culture medium for 24 hours. The cell proliferation of the tooth-colored restorative materials on human macrophages in vitro was evaluated by MTT color imetric assay, and determined for IL-1 content in these material specimens by ELISA. All statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS 17.0 software package. Compared with control group, composite resin Filtek Z350(3M) and Filtek P60(3M) significantly enhanced the proliferation of human macrophages (PGlass-ionomer had little effect on the proliferation of human macrophages (P>0.05). Glass-ionomer could promote macrophages to secrete IL-1β and the difference was statistically significant(P0.05). Composite resin enhances proliferation and function of human macrophages. The effect may be associated with hypersensitivity of dentin. Glass-ionomer cement has little effect on proliferation of macrophages, but may lead to progress of inflammation.

  4. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Activity Is Required for Coxiella burnetii Growth in Human Macrophages.

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    Punsiri M Colonne

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute flu-like illness that can progress to chronic endocarditis and liver and bone infections. Humans are typically infected by aerosol-mediated transmission, and C. burnetii initially targets alveolar macrophages wherein the pathogen replicates in a phagolysosome-like niche known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV. C. burnetii manipulates host cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA signaling to promote PV formation, cell survival, and bacterial replication. In this study, we identified the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP as a PKA substrate that is increasingly phosphorylated at S157 and S239 during C. burnetii infection. Avirulent and virulent C. burnetii triggered increased levels of phosphorylated VASP in macrophage-like THP-1 cells and primary human alveolar macrophages, and this event required the Cα subunit of PKA. VASP phosphorylation also required bacterial protein synthesis and secretion of effector proteins via a type IV secretion system, indicating the pathogen actively triggers prolonged VASP phosphorylation. Optimal PV formation and intracellular bacterial replication required VASP activity, as siRNA-mediated depletion of VASP reduced PV size and bacterial growth. Interestingly, ectopic expression of a phospho-mimetic VASP (S239E mutant protein prevented optimal PV formation, whereas VASP (S157E mutant expression had no effect. VASP (S239E expression also prevented trafficking of bead-containing phagosomes to the PV, indicating proper VASP activity is critical for heterotypic fusion events that control PV expansion in macrophages. Finally, expression of dominant negative VASP (S157A in C. burnetii-infected cells impaired PV formation, confirming importance of the protein for proper infection. This study provides the first evidence of VASP manipulation by an intravacuolar bacterial pathogen via activation of PKA

  5. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Activity Is Required for Coxiella burnetii Growth in Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonne, Punsiri M.; Winchell, Caylin G.; Graham, Joseph G.; Onyilagha, Frances I.; MacDonald, Laura J.; Doeppler, Heike R.; Storz, Peter; Kurten, Richard C.; Beare, Paul A.; Voth, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute flu-like illness that can progress to chronic endocarditis and liver and bone infections. Humans are typically infected by aerosol-mediated transmission, and C. burnetii initially targets alveolar macrophages wherein the pathogen replicates in a phagolysosome-like niche known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). C. burnetii manipulates host cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling to promote PV formation, cell survival, and bacterial replication. In this study, we identified the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a PKA substrate that is increasingly phosphorylated at S157 and S239 during C. burnetii infection. Avirulent and virulent C. burnetii triggered increased levels of phosphorylated VASP in macrophage-like THP-1 cells and primary human alveolar macrophages, and this event required the Cα subunit of PKA. VASP phosphorylation also required bacterial protein synthesis and secretion of effector proteins via a type IV secretion system, indicating the pathogen actively triggers prolonged VASP phosphorylation. Optimal PV formation and intracellular bacterial replication required VASP activity, as siRNA-mediated depletion of VASP reduced PV size and bacterial growth. Interestingly, ectopic expression of a phospho-mimetic VASP (S239E) mutant protein prevented optimal PV formation, whereas VASP (S157E) mutant expression had no effect. VASP (S239E) expression also prevented trafficking of bead-containing phagosomes to the PV, indicating proper VASP activity is critical for heterotypic fusion events that control PV expansion in macrophages. Finally, expression of dominant negative VASP (S157A) in C. burnetii-infected cells impaired PV formation, confirming importance of the protein for proper infection. This study provides the first evidence of VASP manipulation by an intravacuolar bacterial pathogen via activation of PKA in human

  6. Accelerators of Osteogenesis by Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunori Okubo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP appears to be one of the most promising cytokine and for clinical use in reconstructive surgery for bony defects and augmentation. To evaluate the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, FK506, elcatonin, and hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO on osteoinduction by recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2, 2 or 5 μg of rhBMP-2 was implanted into intramuscular sites of rats. At 21 days after implantation, the osteoinductive activity in the treatment group and control group was compared radiographically, biochemically, and histologically. The amount of new bone in the treatment group was significantly greater than that in the control group. The alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content in the treatment group were significantly higher than those in the control group. These results suggest that bFGF, FK506, elcatonin, and HBO accelerated the activity and rate of osteoinduction by rhBMP2. These results may be useful when BMP is applied clinically in near future.

  7. Accelerators of Osteogenesis by Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunori Okubo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP appears to be one of the most promising cytokine and for clinical use in reconstructive surgery for bony defects and augmentation. To evaluate the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, FK506, elcatonin, and hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO on osteoinduction by recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2, 2 or 5 μg of rhBMP-2 was implanted into intramuscular sites of rats. At 21 days after implantation, the osteoinductive activity in the treatment group and control group was compared radiographically, biochemically, and histologically. The amount of new bone in the treatment group was signifi cantly greater than that in the control group. The alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content in the treatment group were signifi cantly higher than those in the control group. These results suggest that bFGF, FK506, elcatonin, and HBO accelerated the activity and rate of osteoinduction by rhBMP2. These results may be useful when BMP is applied clinically in near future.

  8. Effects of Recombinant Human Prolactin on Breast Milk Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powe, Camille E.; Puopolo, Karen M.; Newburg, David S.; Lönnerdal, Bo; Chen, Ceng; Allen, Maureen; Merewood, Anne; Worden, Susan

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the impact of recombinant human prolactin (r-hPRL) on the nutritional and immunologic composition of breast milk. METHODS: We conducted 2 trials of r-hPRL treatment. In the first study, mothers with documented prolactin deficiency were given r-hPRL every 12 hours in a 28-day, open-label trial. In the second study, mothers with lactation insufficiency that developed while they were pumping breast milk for their preterm infants were given r-hPRL daily in a 7-day, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Breast milk characteristics were compared before and during 7 days of treatment. RESULTS: Among subjects treated with r-hPRL (N = 11), milk volumes (73 ± 36 to 146 ± 54 mL/day; P lactogenesis. r-hPRL also increased antimicrobially active oligosaccharide concentrations. These effects were achieved for women with both prolactin deficiency and lactation insufficiency. PMID:21262884

  9. Genetic heterogeneity and recombination in type-3 human astroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Tummolo, Fabio; Martella, Vito; Banyai, Krisztián; Bonerba, Elisabetta; Chezzi, Carlo; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; De Conto, Flora; Calderaro, Adriana

    2015-06-01

    Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are important enteric pathogens and can be classified genetically and antigenically into eight types. During molecular surveillance for HAstVs in Italy, sequence analysis of the diagnostic region C (about 400 nucleotide in length), located on the capsid (ORF2) gene, identified a novel type-3 strain. Upon sequencing of the full-length ORF2, the type-3 HAstV strain was characterized as a novel ORF2 genetic lineage, designated as 3c. By converse, in the ORF1b the virus was more similar to type-1 HAstVs, rather than to type-3 strains, suggesting a recombination nature, with the crossover site being mapped to the ORF1b/ORF2 junction region. Region C sequences of similar type-3 HAstV identified from European and extra-European countries were retrieved in the databases, suggesting the global distribution of this novel type-3 lineage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Purification and characterization of human recombinant interleukin-1 beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, C A; Johanson, K O; Miles, L M; McDevitt, P J; Simon, P L; Webb, R L; Chen, M J; Holskin, B P; Lillquist, J S; Young, P R

    1987-08-15

    A human interleukin-1 (IL-1) beta cDNA was cloned, and the region coding for the mature protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. The 17-kDa biologically active product was purified in 40% yield to apparent homogeneity, without chaotropes, from the soluble fraction of sonicated cell lysates. The recombinant IL-1 beta was characterized by amino acid analysis, NH2- and COOH-terminal sequence analysis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, spectroscopy, and biological assay. Specific biological activity was 4.6 X 10(8) units/mg in a co-mitogenic IL-2 induction assay using cultured EL-4 T-lymphocytes. The molar extinction coefficient was determined to be 10,300 cm-1 M-1 at 280 nm. NH2-terminal sequence analysis revealed that 70% of the product begins with the Ala corresponding to the NH2 terminus of the natural protein, while 30% begins with the following Pro. No initiator Met was observed. Both of the sulfhydryl groups are reactive to Ellman's reagent and to iodoacetamide under nonreducing conditions, indicating that the Cys residues do not form disulfide bonds. S-Carboxamidomethyl-Cys-rIL-1 beta retained biological activity in the IL-2 induction assay. Circular dichroism suggested an extensive beta sheet structure for rIL-1 beta.

  11. Recombinant Human Factor IX Produced from Transgenic Porcine Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Hwan Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of biopharmaceuticals from transgenic animal milk is a cost-effective method for highly complex proteins that cannot be efficiently produced using conventional systems such as microorganisms or animal cells. Yields of recombinant human factor IX (rhFIX produced from transgenic porcine milk under the control of the bovine α-lactalbumin promoter reached 0.25 mg/mL. The rhFIX protein was purified from transgenic porcine milk using a three-column purification scheme after a precipitation step to remove casein. The purified protein had high specific activity and a low ratio of the active form (FIXa. The purified rhFIX had 11.9 γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla residues/mol protein, which approached full occupancy of the 12 potential sites in the Gla domain. The rhFIX was shown to have a higher isoelectric point and lower sialic acid content than plasma-derived FIX (pdFIX. The rhFIX had the same N-glycosylation sites and phosphorylation sites as pdFIX, but had a higher specific activity. These results suggest that rhFIX produced from porcine milk is physiologically active and they support the use of transgenic animals as bioreactors for industrial scale production in milk.

  12. Recombinant Lipoprotein Rv1016c Derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is a TLR-2 Ligand that Induces Macrophages Apoptosis and Inhibits MHC II Antigen Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Haibo; Zhu, Shenglin; Zhu, Lin; Huang, Wei; Wang, Honghai; Zhang, Zhi; Xu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    TLR2-dependent cellular signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages causes apoptosis and inhibits class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules antigen processing, leading to evasion of surveillance. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) lipoproteins are an important class of Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand, and identified as specific components that mediate these effects. In this study, we identified and characterized MTB lipoprotein Rv1016c (lpqT) as a cell wall associated-protein that was exposed on the cell surface and enhanced the survival of recombinants M. smegmatis_Rv1016c under stress conditions. We found that Rv1016c lipoprotein was a novel TLR2 ligand and able to induce macrophage apoptosis in a both dose- and time-dependent manner. Additionally, apoptosis induced by Rv1016c was reserved in THP-1 cells blocked with anti-TLR-2 Abs or in TLR2-/- mouse macrophages, indicating that Rv1016c-induced apoptosis is dependent on TLR2. Moreover, we demonstrated that Rv1016c lipoprotein inhibited IFN-γ-induced MHC-II expression and processing of soluble antigens in a TLR2 dependent manner. Class II transactivator (CIITA) regulates MHC II expression. In this context, Rv1016c lipoprotein diminished IFN-γ-induced expression of CIITA IV through TLR2 and MAPK Signaling. TLR2-dependent apoptosis and inhibition of MHC-II Ag processing induced by Rv1016c during mycobacteria infection may promote the release of residual bacilli from apoptotic cells and decrease recognition by CD4+ T cells. These mechanisms may allow intracellular MTB to evade immune surveillance and maintain chronic infection.

  13. A systematic analysis of recombination activity and genotype-phenotype correlation in human recombination-activating gene 1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu Nee; Frugoni, Francesco; Dobbs, Kerry; Walter, Jolan E; Giliani, Silvia; Gennery, Andrew R; Al-Herz, Waleed; Haddad, Elie; LeDeist, Francoise; Bleesing, Jack H; Henderson, Lauren A; Pai, Sung-Yun; Nelson, Robert P; El-Ghoneimy, Dalia H; El-Feky, Reem A; Reda, Shereen M; Hossny, Elham; Soler-Palacin, Pere; Fuleihan, Ramsay L; Patel, Niraj C; Massaad, Michel J; Geha, Raif S; Puck, Jennifer M; Palma, Paolo; Cancrini, Caterina; Chen, Karin; Vihinen, Mauno; Alt, Frederick W; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2014-04-01

    The recombination-activating gene (RAG) 1/2 proteins play a critical role in the development of T and B cells by initiating the VDJ recombination process that leads to generation of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor repertoire. Pathogenic mutations in the RAG1/2 genes result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from T(-)B(-) severe combined immune deficiency to delayed-onset disease with granuloma formation, autoimmunity, or both. It is not clear what contributes to such heterogeneity of phenotypes. We sought to investigate the molecular basis for phenotypic diversity presented in patients with various RAG1 mutations. We have developed a flow cytometry-based assay that allows analysis of RAG recombination activity based on green fluorescent protein expression and have assessed the induction of the Ighc locus rearrangements in mouse Rag1(-/-) pro-B cells reconstituted with wild-type or mutant human RAG1 (hRAG1) using deep sequencing technology. Here we demonstrate correlation between defective recombination activity of hRAG1 mutant proteins and severity of the clinical and immunologic phenotype and provide insights on the molecular mechanisms accounting for such phenotypic diversity. Using a sensitive assay to measure the RAG1 activity level of 79 mutations in a physiologic setting, we demonstrate correlation between recombination activity of RAG1 mutants and the severity of clinical presentation and show that RAG1 mutants can induce specific abnormalities of the VDJ recombination process. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. In vivo synergy between recombinant human stem cell factor and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in baboons enhanced circulation of progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R G; Briddell, R A; Knitter, G H; Opie, T; Bronsden, M; Myerson, D; Appelbaum, F R; McNiece, I K

    1994-08-01

    Recombinant human stem cell factor (rhSCF) and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) are synergistic in vitro in stimulating the proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells and their precursors. We examined the in vivo synergy of rhSCF with rhG-CSF for stimulating hematopoiesis in vivo in baboons. Administration of low-dose (LD) rhSCF (25 micrograms/kg) alone did not stimulate changes in circulating WBCs. In comparison, administration of LD rhSCF in combination with rhG-CSF at 10 micrograms/kg or 100 micrograms/kg stimulated increases in circulating WBCs of multiple types up to twofold higher than was stimulated by administration of the same dose of rhG-CSF alone. When the dose of rhG-CSF is increased to 250 micrograms/kg, the administration of LD rhSCF does not further increase the circulating WBC counts. Administration of LD rhSCF in combination with rhG-CSF also stimulated increased circulation of hematopoietic progenitors. LD rhSCF alone stimulated less of an increase in circulating progenitors, per milliliter of blood, than did administration of rhG-CSF alone at 100 micrograms/kg. Baboons administered LD rhSCF together with rhG-CSF at 10, 100, or 250 micrograms/kg had 3.5- to 16-fold higher numbers per milliliter of blood of progenitors cells of multiple types, including colony-forming units granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM), burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E), and colony-forming and burst-forming units-megakaryocyte (CFU-MK and BFU-MK) compared with animals given the same dose of rhG-CSF without rhSCF, regardless of the rhG-CSF dose. The increased circulation of progenitor cells stimulated by the combination of rhSCF plus rhG-CSF was not necessarily directly related to the increase in WBCs, as this effect on peripheral blood progenitors was observed even at an rhG-CSF dose of 250 micrograms/kg, where coadministration of LD rhSCF did not further increase WBC counts. Administration of very-low-dose rhSCF (2.5 micrograms/kg) with

  15. Macrophage Tropism of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Facilitates In Vivo Escape from Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutten, M.; van Baalen, C. A.; Guillon, C.; Huisman, R. C.; Boers, P. H. M.; Sintnicolaas, K.; Gruters, R. A.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.

    2001-01-01

    Early after seroconversion, macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants are predominantly found, even when a mixture of macrophage-tropic and non-macrophage-tropic variants was transmitted. For virus contracted by sexual transmission, this is presently explained by selection at the port of entry, where macrophages are infected and T cells are relatively rare. Here we explore an additional mechanism to explain the selection of macrophage-tropic variants in cases where the mucosa is bypassed during transmission, such as blood transfusion, needle-stick accidents, or intravenous drug abuse. With molecularly cloned primary isolates of HIV-1 in irradiated mice that had been reconstituted with a high dose of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we found that a macrophage-tropic HIV-1 clone escaped more efficiently from specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) pressure than its non-macrophage-tropic counterpart. We propose that CTLs favor the selective outgrowth of macrophage-tropic HIV-1 variants because infected macrophages are less susceptible to CTL activity than infected T cells. PMID:11222694

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ɣ activation induces 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity in human alternative macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Copin, Corinne; Duhem, Christian; Derudas, Bruno; Neve, Bernardette; Noel, Benoit; Eeckhoute, Jerome; Lefebvre, Philippe; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Staels, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Objectives 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) catalyses the intracellular reduction of inactive cortisone to active cortisol, the natural ligand activating the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor controlling inflammation, lipid metabolism and the macrophage polarization state. In this study, we investigated the impact of macrophage polarization on the expression and activity of 11β-HSD1 and the role of PPAR therein. Methods and Results 11β-HSD1 gene expression is higher in pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages than in resting macrophages (RM), whereas its activity is highest in M2 macrophages. Interestingly, PPARγ activation induces 11β-HSD1 enzyme activity in M2 macrophages, but not in RM or M1 macrophages. Consequently, human M2 macrophages displayed enhanced responsiveness to the 11β-HSD1 substrate cortisone, an effect amplified by PPAR -induction of 11β-HSD1 activity, as illustrated by an increased expression of GR target genes. Conclusions Our data identify a positive cross-talk between PPARγ and GR in human M2 macrophages via the induction of 11β-HSD1 expression and activity. PMID:22207732

  17. Differential uptake of nanoparticles by human M1 and M2 polarized macrophages: protein corona as a critical determinant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Karin Antje; ten Hoopen, Hermina W.M.; Storm, Gerrit; Prakash, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the interaction behavior of M1- and M2-type macrophages with nanoparticles of different sizes with/without the presence of serum. Materials & methods: THP-1 human monocytes were differentiated into M1 and M2 macrophages, and the uptake of silica nanoparticle (50–1000 nm) was

  18. Next-generation sequencing of microRNAs in primary human polarized macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Cobos Jiménez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are important for mounting inflammatory responses to tissue damage or infection by invading pathogens, and therefore modulation of their cellular functions is essential for the success of the immune system as well as for maintaining tissue homeostasis. Small non-coding RNAs are important regulatory elements of gene expression and microRNAs are the most widely known to be fundamental for the proper development of cells of the immune system. Macrophages can exhibit different phenotypes, depending on the cytokine environment they encounter in the affected tissues. We have analyzed the microRNA expression profiles during maturation of human primary monocytes into macrophages and polarization by pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines. Here we describe the analysis of next-generation sequencing data deposited in EMBL–EBI ArrayExpress under accession number E-MTAB-1969 and associated with the study published by Cobos Jiménez and collaborators in Physiological Genomics in 2014 (1. The data presented here contributes to our understanding of microRNA expression profiles in human monocytes and macrophages and will also serve as a resource for novel microRNAs and other small RNA species expressed in these cells.

  19. Characterization of human platelet binding of recombinant T cell receptor ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza-Romero Roberto

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTLs are bio-engineered molecules that may serve as novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS. RTLs contain membrane distal α1 plus β1 domains of class II major histocompatibility complex linked covalently to specific peptides that can be used to regulate T cell responses and inhibit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. The mechanisms by which RTLs impede local recruitment and retention of inflammatory cells in the CNS, however, are not completely understood. Methods We have recently shown that RTLs bind strongly to B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells, but not to T cells, in an antigenic-independent manner, raising the question whether peripheral blood cells express a distinct RTL-receptor. Our study was designed to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which RTLs bind human blood platelets, and the ability of RTL to modulate platelet function. Results Our data demonstrate that human blood platelets support binding of RTL. Immobilized RTL initiated platelet intracellular calcium mobilization and lamellipodia formation through a pathway dependent upon Src and PI3 kinases signaling. The presence of RTL in solution reduced platelet aggregation by collagen, while treatment of whole blood with RTL prolonged occlusive thrombus formation on collagen. Conclusions Platelets, well-known regulators of hemostasis and thrombosis, have been implicated in playing a major role in inflammation and immunity. This study provides the first evidence that blood platelets express a functional RTL-receptor with a putative role in modulating pathways of neuroinflammation.

  20. Recombinant avian adeno-associated virus-mediated oviduct-specific expression of recombinant human tissue kallikrein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A P; Sun, H C; Wang, J Y; Wang, Y J; Yuan, W F

    2008-04-01

    Human tissue kallikrein (hK1) plays an important role in regulation of blood pressure, electrolyte and glucose transport, and renal function. To evaluate the feasibility of viral vector-mediated expression of recombinant human tissue kallikrein (rhK1) in the egg white of laying hens, human tissue kallikrein gene (hKLK1) cDNA-expression cassette was subcloned into avian adeno-associated virus (AAAV) transfer vector pAITR and transfected into AAV-293 cells with AAAV helper vector pcDNA-ARC and adenovirus helper vector pHelper. The recombinant viral particles with a typical AAAV morphology and relatively high titer were generated and identified by PCR and electron microscopy. After 1 intravenous injection of each laying hen with 2 x 10(10) viral particles, oviduct-specific expression of hKLK1 cDNA was demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR. Secretion of rhK1 into the egg white was detected by enzymatic assay from d 2, reaching the highest level of 107 U/mL in wk 3, and lasted for more than 6 wk after injection. Western blotting showed that the oviduct-expressed rhK1 had the same molecular mass with the natural enzyme. These data suggest that rAAAV can mediate high level and long-lasting transgene expression in oviduct cells, and the established expression system is useful for production of other recombinant proteins.

  1. Pharmacokinetics and leukocyte responses of recombinant human interleukin-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwanski, E; Chakraborty, A; Van Wart, S; Huhn, R D; Cutler, D L; Affrime, M B; Jusko, W J

    1998-12-01

    To study the pharmacokinetics and ex vivo leukocyte responses of recombinant human IL-10 (rHuIL-10) following single s.c. and i.v. dosing. A randomized two-way cross-over study was undertaken in 17 healthy volunteers in which rHuIL-10 was administered as 25 microg/kg s.c. and i.v. doses. Blood samples were collected for 48 hr after dosing to determine serum IL-10 concentrations. Inhibitory activity of IL-10 on ex vivo production of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-1beta) by LPS-treated peripheral blood cells were measured over 96 hr. A physiologically-relevant modeling approach was developed to determine the pharmacokinetics for two routes of administration (s.c. and i.v.). The i.v. dose showed polyexponential disposition with CL of 65 mL/kg/hr, Vss of 70 mL/kg, and t1/2 of 1.94 hr. Absolute bioavailability averaged 42% for s.c. dosing which produced lower but sustained concentrations. Substantial and prolonged suppression of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta production was achieved during IL-10 treatment. The Hill Function was used to account for the joint concentration-dependent immunosuppressive action of rHuIL-10 after both i.v. and s.c. doses. The IC50 values were about 0.03 ng/ml and Imax values were about 0.85 for both TNF-alpha and IL-1beta suppression. The degree of change as well as the duration of leukocyte response was greater after s.c. administration than after i.v. administration. rHuIL-10 shows favorable PKPD characteristics especially by the s.c. route of administration which produced prolonged suppression of cytokine production (ex vivo) which may be applicable in various immune-related disorders.

  2. Skeletal ligament healing using the recombinant human amelogenin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanhan, Salem; Ejzenberg, Ayala; Goren, Koby; Saba, Faris; Suki, Yarden; Sharon, Shay; Shilo, Dekel; Waxman, Jacob; Spitzer, Elad; Shahar, Ron; Atkins, Ayelet; Liebergall, Meir; Blumenfeld, Anat; Deutsch, Dan; Haze, Amir

    2016-05-01

    Injuries to ligaments are common, painful and debilitating, causing joint instability and impaired protective proprioception sensation around the joint. Healing of torn ligaments usually fails to take place, and surgical replacement or reconstruction is required. Previously, we showed that in vivo application of the recombinant human amelogenin protein (rHAM(+)) resulted in enhanced healing of the tooth-supporting tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether amelogenin might also enhance repair of skeletal ligaments. The rat knee medial collateral ligament (MCL) was chosen to prove the concept. Full thickness tear was created and various concentrations of rHAM(+), dissolved in propylene glycol alginate (PGA) carrier, were applied to the transected MCL. 12 weeks after transection, the mechanical properties, structure and composition of transected ligaments treated with 0.5 μg/μl rHAM(+) were similar to the normal un-transected ligaments, and were much stronger, stiffer and organized than control ligaments, treated with PGA only. Furthermore, the proprioceptive free nerve endings, in the 0.5 μg/μl rHAM(+) treated group, were parallel to the collagen fibres similar to their arrangement in normal ligament, while in the control ligaments the free nerve endings were entrapped in the scar tissue at different directions, not parallel to the axis of the force. Four days after transection, treatment with 0.5 μg/μl rHAM(+) increased the amount of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers at the injured site. In conclusion application of rHAM(+) dose dependently induced mechanical, structural and sensory healing of torn skeletal ligament. Initially the process involved recruitment and proliferation of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  3. Isolation of human monocytes by double gradient centrifugation and their differentiation to macrophages in teflon-coated cell culture bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menck, Kerstin; Behme, Daniel; Pantke, Mathias; Reiling, Norbert; Binder, Claudia; Pukrop, Tobias; Klemm, Florian

    2014-09-09

    Human macrophages are involved in a plethora of pathologic processes ranging from infectious diseases to cancer. Thus they pose a valuable tool to understand the underlying mechanisms of these diseases. We therefore present a straightforward protocol for the isolation of human monocytes from buffy coats, followed by a differentiation procedure which results in high macrophage yields. The technique relies mostly on commonly available lab equipment and thus provides a cost and time effective way to obtain large quantities of human macrophages. Briefly, buffy coats from healthy blood donors are subjected to a double density gradient centrifugation to harvest monocytes from the peripheral blood. These monocytes are then cultured in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon-coated cell culture bags in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The differentiated macrophages can be easily harvested and used for subsequent studies and functional assays. Important methods for quality control and validation of the isolation and differentiation steps will be highlighted within the protocol. In summary, the protocol described here enables scientists to routinely and reproducibly isolate human macrophages without the need for cost intensive tools. Furthermore, disease models can be studied in a syngeneic human system circumventing the use of murine macrophages.

  4. Aminopeptidase N (CD13 Is Involved in Phagocytic Processes in Human Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica I. Villaseñor-Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminopeptidase N (APN or CD13 is a membrane ectopeptidase expressed by many cell types, including myelomonocytic lineage cells: monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is known to regulate the biological activity of various peptides by proteolysis, and it has been proposed that CD13 also participates in several functions such as angiogenesis, cell adhesion, metastasis, and tumor invasion. We had previously reported that, in human monocytes and macrophages, CD13 modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors for the Fc portion of IgG antibodies (FcγRs. In this work, we analyzed the possible interaction of CD13 with other phagocytic receptors. We found out that the cross-linking of CD13 positively modulates the phagocytosis mediated by receptors of the innate immune system, since a significant increase in the phagocytosis of zymosan particles or heat-killed E. coli was observed when CD13 was cross-linked using anti-CD13 antibodies, in both macrophages and dendritic cells. Also, we observed that, during the phagocytosis of zymosan, CD13 redistributes and is internalized into the phagosome. These findings suggest that, besides its known functions, CD13 participates in phagocytic processes in dendritic cells and macrophages.

  5. Exosomes derived from human macrophages suppress endothelial cell migration by controlling integrin trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Doo; Kim, Yeon Hyang; Kim, Doo-Sik

    2014-04-01

    Integrin trafficking, including internalization, recycling, and lysosomal degradation, is crucial for the regulation of cellular functions. Exosomes, nano-sized extracellular vesicles, are believed to play important roles in intercellular communications. This study demonstrates that exosomes released from human macrophages negatively regulate endothelial cell migration through control of integrin trafficking. Macrophage-derived exosomes promote internalization of integrin β1 in primary HUVECs. The internalized integrin β1 persistently accumulates in the perinuclear region and is not recycled back to the plasma membrane. Experimental results indicate that macrophage-derived exosomes stimulate trafficking of internalized integrin β1 to lysosomal compartments with a corresponding decrease in the integrin destined for recycling endosomes, resulting in proteolytic degradation of the integrin. Moreover, ubiquitination of HUVEC integrin β1 is enhanced by the exosomes, and exosome-mediated integrin degradation is blocked by bafilomycin A, a lysosomal degradation inhibitor. Macrophage-derived exosomes were also shown to effectively suppress collagen-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway and HUVEC migration, which are both dependent on integrin β1. These observations provide new insight into the functional significance of exosomes in the regulation of integrin trafficking. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Iron Oxidation and Core Formation in Recombinant Heteropolymeric Human Ferritins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlenbacher, Matthew; Poli, Maura; Arosio, Paolo; Santambrogio, Paolo; Levi, Sonia; Chasteen, N Dennis; Bou-Abdallah, Fadi

    2017-08-01

    In animals, the iron storage and detoxification protein, ferritin, is composed of two functionally and genetically distinct subunit types, H (heavy) and L (light), which co-assemble in various ratios with tissue specific distributions to form shell-like protein structures of 24 subunits within which a mineralized iron core is stored. The H-subunit possesses a ferroxidase center (FC) that catalyzes Fe(II) oxidation, whereas the L-subunit does not. To assess the role of the L-subunit in iron oxidation and core formation, two human recombinant heteropolymeric ferritins, designated H-rich and L-rich with ratios of ∼20H:4L and ∼22L:2H, respectively, were employed and compared to the human homopolymeric H-subunit ferritin (HuHF). These heteropolymeric ferritins have a composition similar to the composition of those found in hearts and brains (i.e., H-rich) and in livers and spleens (i.e., L-rich). As for HuHF, iron oxidation in H-rich ferritin was found to proceed with a 2:1 Fe(II):O2 stoichiometry at an iron level of 2 Fe(II) atoms/H-subunit with the generation of H2O2. The H2O2 reacted with additional Fe(II) in a 2:1 Fe(II):H2O2 ratio, thus avoiding the production of hydroxyl radical. A μ-1,2-peroxo-diFe(III) intermediate was observed at the FC of H-rich ferritin as for HuHF. Importantly, the H-rich protein regenerated full ferroxidase activity more rapidly than HuHF did and additionally formed larger iron cores, indicating dual roles for the L-subunit in facilitating iron turnover at the FC and in mineralization of the core. The L-rich ferritin, while also facilitating iron oxidation at the FC, additionally promoted oxidation at the mineral surface once the iron binding capacity of the FC was exceeded.

  7. Further examination of the effects of recombinant cytokines on the proliferation of human megakaryocyte progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, E; Cooper, R J; Briddell, R A; Hoffman, R

    1991-06-01

    The effect of several recombinant cytokines, including interleukin-3 (IL-3), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-6, and IL-1 alpha, on megakaryocyte (MK) colony formation by a normal human bone marrow subpopulation (CD34+ DR+), enriched for the MK colony-forming unit (CFU-MK), was studied using a serum-depleted, fibrin clot culture system. IL-3 and GM-CSF, but not IL-6 or IL-1 alpha, stimulated MK colony formation by CD34+ DR+ cells. However, the addition of IL-1 alpha to CD34+ DR+ cultures containing IL-6 resulted in the appearance of CFU-MK-derived colonies, suggesting that IL-6 requires the presence of IL-1 alpha to exhibit its MK colony-stimulating activity (MK-CSA). Addition of neutralizing antibodies to IL-3 and GM-CSF, but not to IL-6 and IL-1 alpha, specifically inhibited the MK-CSA of IL-3 and GM-CSF, respectively. The addition of either anti-IL-6, anti-IL-1 alpha, or anti-IL-3 antisera to cultures containing both IL-6 and IL-1 alpha totally abolished the MK-CSA of the IL-6/IL-1 alpha combination. However, neither anti-IL-3 nor anti-GM-CSF antisera could totally neutralize the additive effect of the combination of IL-3 and GM-CSF on MK colony formation, indicating that these two cytokines act by affecting distinct effector pathways. These results suggest that while IL-3 and GM-CSF can directly affect CFU-MK-derived colony formation, IL-1 alpha and IL-6 act in concert to promote de novo elaboration of IL-3 and thereby promote CFU-MK proliferative capacity.

  8. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effects of β-adrenoceptor agonists on human lung macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Sharonjit K; Marriott, Helen M; Suvarna, S Kim; Peachell, Peter T

    2016-12-15

    The principal mechanism by which bronchodilator β-adrenoceptor agonists act is to relax airways smooth muscle although they may also be anti-inflammatory. However, the extent of anti-inflammatory activity and the cell types affected by these agonists are uncertain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether β-adrenoceptor agonists prevent pro-inflammatory cytokine generation from activated human lung macrophages. Macrophages were isolated and purified from human lung. The cells were pre-treated with both short-acting (isoprenaline, salbutamol, terbutaline) and long-acting (formoterol, salmeterol, indacaterol) β-agonists before activation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce cytokine (TNFα, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10) generation. The experiments showed that short-acting β-agonists were poor inhibitors of cytokine generation. Of the long-acting β-agonists studied, formoterol was also a weak inhibitor of cytokine generation whereas only indacaterol and salmeterol showed moderate inhibitory activity. Further experiments using the β2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI-118,551 suggested that the effects of indacaterol were likely to be mediated by β2-adrenoceptors whereas those of salmeterol were not. These findings were corroborated by functional desensitization studies in which the inhibitory effects of indacaterol appeared to be receptor-mediated whereas those of salmeterol were not. Taken together, the data indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of β-adrenoceptor agonists on human lung macrophages are modest. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Unlike PPARgamma, PPARalpha or PPARbeta/delta activation does not promote human monocyte differentiation toward alternative macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Brozek, John; Derudas, Bruno; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2009-08-28

    Macrophages adapt their response to micro-environmental signals. While Th1 cytokines promote pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, Th2 cytokines promote an "alternative" anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors expressed in macrophages where they control the inflammatory response. It has been shown that PPARgamma promotes the differentiation of monocytes into anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in humans and mice, while a role for PPARbeta/delta in this process has been reported only in mice and no data are available for PPARalpha. Here, we show that in contrast to PPARgamma, expression of PPARalpha and PPARbeta/delta overall does not correlate with the expression of M2 markers in human atherosclerotic lesions, whereas a positive correlation with genes of lipid metabolism exists. Moreover, unlike PPARgamma, PPARalpha or PPARbeta/delta activation does not influence human monocyte differentiation into M2 macrophages in vitro. Thus, PPARalpha and PPARbeta/delta do not appear to modulate the alternative differentiation of human macrophages.

  10. An ethyl acetate fraction of Moringa oleifera Lam. Inhibits human macrophage cytokine production induced by cigarette smoke

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kooltheat, Nateelak; Sranujit, Rungnapa Pankla; Chumark, Pilaipark; Potup, Pachuen; Laytragoon-Lewin, Nongnit; Usuwanthim, Kanchana

    2014-01-01

    ...)-induced cytokine production by human macrophages. An ethyl acetate fraction of MO (MOEF) was prepared from fresh leaves extract of Moringa and shown to consist of high levels of phenolic and antioxidant activities...

  11. 76 FR 65210 - Certain Products and Pharmaceutical Compositions Containing Recombinant Human Erythropoetin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Products and Pharmaceutical Compositions Containing Recombinant Human Erythropoetin... sale within the United States after importation of certain products and pharmaceutical compositions...

  12. Pharmacoeconomic review of recombinant human DNase in the management of cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Gerrit; Boersma, Cornelis; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Postma, Maarten J.

    For the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease I is widely used. Deoxyribonuclease I has a positive effect on lung function and the number of hospitalizations. Deoxyribonuclease I is currently administered by nebulization, which is an inefficient

  13. Is the use of recombinant human erythropoietin in anaemia of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a double-blind placebo-eontrolled study we showed a 3-fold decrease in blood transfusions (BTFs) given to preterm infants with anaemia of prematurity who received recombinant erythropoietin. However, only 50% of placebo recipients required a BTF. Data from the placebo group indicated that either mean daily weight ...

  14. Laboratory scale production of the human recombinant iduronate 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sulfate sulfatase-Like (hIDSLike) was employed for low-scale production of the recombinant enzyme in a saline culture media without phosphate. The biological activity found was between 7.3 and 29.5 nmol h-1 mg-1 of total protein. It is about 1.73 ...

  15. Recombinant expression and purification of L2 domain of human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-16

    Aug 16, 2010 ... 5Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Accepted 7 May ... extracted and used for amplification of the sequence coding for L2 domain of EGFR by reverse ... This recombinant protein can be used for the production of specific mAb, screening for.

  16. In vitro cytotoxicity of Manville Code 100 glass fibers: Effect of fiber length on human alveolar macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones William

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic vitreous fibers (SVFs are inorganic noncrystalline materials widely used in residential and industrial settings for insulation, filtration, and reinforcement purposes. SVFs conventionally include three major categories: fibrous glass, rock/slag/stone (mineral wool, and ceramic fibers. Previous in vitro studies from our laboratory demonstrated length-dependent cytotoxic effects of glass fibers on rat alveolar macrophages which were possibly associated with incomplete phagocytosis of fibers ≥ 17 μm in length. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of fiber length on primary human alveolar macrophages, which are larger in diameter than rat macrophages, using length-classified Manville Code 100 glass fibers (8, 10, 16, and 20 μm. It was hypothesized that complete engulfment of fibers by human alveolar macrophages could decrease fiber cytotoxicity; i.e. shorter fibers that can be completely engulfed might not be as cytotoxic as longer fibers. Human alveolar macrophages, obtained by segmental bronchoalveolar lavage of healthy, non-smoking volunteers, were treated with three different concentrations (determined by fiber number of the sized fibers in vitro. Cytotoxicity was assessed by monitoring cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase release and loss of function as indicated by a decrease in zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence. Results Microscopic analysis indicated that human alveolar macrophages completely engulfed glass fibers of the 20 μm length. All fiber length fractions tested exhibited equal cytotoxicity on a per fiber basis, i.e. increasing lactate dehydrogenase and decreasing chemiluminescence in the same concentration-dependent fashion. Conclusion The data suggest that due to the larger diameter of human alveolar macrophages, compared to rat alveolar macrophages, complete phagocytosis of longer fibers can occur with the human cells. Neither incomplete phagocytosis nor length-dependent toxicity was

  17. Isolation of F. novicida-Containing Phagosome from Infected Human Monocyte Derived Macrophages

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    Valentina Marecic

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Francisella is a gram-negative bacterial pathogen, which causes tularemia in humans and animals. A crucial step of Francisella infection is its invasion of macrophage cells. Biogenesis of the Francisella-containing phagosome (FCP is arrested for ~15 min at the endosomal stage, followed by gradual bacterial escape into the cytosol, where the microbe proliferates. The crucial step in pathogenesis of tularemia is short and transient presence of the bacterium within phagosome. Isolation of FCPs for further studies has been challenging due to the short period of time of bacterial residence in it and the characteristics of the FCP. Here, we will for the first time present the method for isolation of the FCPs from infected human monocytes-derived macrophages (hMDMs. For elimination of lysosomal compartment these organelles were pre-loaded with dextran coated colloidal iron particles prior infection and eliminated by magnetic separation of the post-nuclear supernatant (PNS. We encountered the challenge that mitochondria has similar density to the FCP. To separate the FCP in the PNS from mitochondria, we utilized iodophenylnitrophenyltetrazolium, which is converted by the mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase into formazan, leading to increased density of the mitochondria and allowing separation by the discontinuous sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. The purity of the FCP preparation and its acquisition of early endosomal markers was confirmed by Western blots, confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Our strategy to isolate highly pure FCPs from macrophages should facilitate studies on the FCP and its biogenesis.

  18. The transcriptome of Legionella pneumophila-infected human monocyte-derived macrophages.

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    Christopher T D Price

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that invades and replicates within alveolar macrophages through injection of ∼ 300 effector proteins by its Dot/Icm type IV translocation apparatus. The bona fide F-box protein, AnkB, is a nutritional virulence effector that triggers macrophages to generate a surplus of amino acids, which is essential for intravacuolar proliferation. Therefore, the ankB mutant represents a novel genetic tool to determine the transcriptional response of human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs to actively replicating L. pneumophila.Here, we utilized total human gene microarrays to determine the global transcriptional response of hMDMs to infection by wild type or the ankB mutant of L. pneumophila. The transcriptomes of hMDMs infected with either actively proliferating wild type or non-replicative ankB mutant bacteria were remarkably similar. The transcriptome of infected hMDMs was predominated by up-regulation of inflammatory pathways (IL-10 anti-inflammatory, interferon signaling and amphoterin signaling, anti-apoptosis, and down-regulation of protein synthesis pathways. In addition, L. pneumophila modulated diverse metabolic pathways, particularly those associated with bio-active lipid metabolism, and SLC amino acid transporters expression.Taken together, the hMDM transcriptional response to L. pneumophila is independent of intra-vacuolar replication of the bacteria and primarily involves modulation of the immune response and metabolic as well as nutritional pathways.

  19. Artificial restriction DNA cutters to promote homologous recombination in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katada, Hitoshi; Komiyama, Makoto

    2011-02-01

    Homologous recombination is almost the only way to modify the genome in a predetermined fashion, despite its quite low frequency in mammalian cells. It has been already reported that the frequency of this biological process can be notably increased by inducing a double strand break (DSB) at target site. This article presents completely chemistry-based artificial restriction DNA cutter (ARCUT) for the promotion of homologous recombination in human cells. This cutter is composed of Ce(IV)/EDTA complex (molecular scissors) and two strands of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), and contains no proteins. Its scission site in the genome is determined simply by Watson-Crick rule so that ARCUT for desired homologous recombination is easily and straightforwardly designed and synthesized. The site-specificity of the scission is high enough to cut human genome at one target site. The DSB induced by this cutter is satisfactorily recognized by the repair system in human cells and promotes the targeted homologous recombination.

  20. High-level secretion of native recombinant human calreticulin in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Čiplys, Evaldas; Žitkus, Eimantas; Gold, Leslie I.

    2015-01-01

    processes with presence both inside and outside of the ER, including the cell surface and extracellular space. These recent findings suggest the possible use of this ER chaperone in development of new therapeutic pharmaceuticals. Our study was focused on human CRT production in two yeast species...... quality of the yeast-derived CRTs, we compared yeast-secreted human recombinant CRT with native CRT isolated from human placenta. In ESI-MS (electrospray ionization mass spectrometry), both native and recombinant full-length CRT showed an identical molecular weight (mass) of 46,466 Da and were monomeric...... by non-denaturing PAGE. Moreover, limited trypsin digestion yielded identical fragment patterns of calcium-binding recombinant and native CRT suggesting that the yeast-derived CRT was correctly folded. Furthermore, both native and recombinant CRT induced cellular proliferation (MTS assay) and migration...

  1. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein by HIV protease inhibitors increases intracellular accumulation of berberine in murine and human macrophages.

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    Weibin Zha

    Full Text Available HIV protease inhibitor (PI-induced inflammatory response in macrophages is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that berberine (BBR, a traditional herbal medicine, prevents HIV PI-induced inflammatory response through inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in macrophages. We also found that HIV PIs significantly increased the intracellular concentrations of BBR in macrophages. However, the underlying mechanisms of HIV PI-induced BBR accumulation are unknown. This study examined the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp in HIV PI-mediated accumulation of BBR in macrophages.Cultured mouse RAW264.7 macrophages, human THP-1-derived macrophages, Wild type MDCK (MDCK/WT and human P-gp transfected (MDCK/P-gp cells were used in this study. The intracellular concentration of BBR was determined by HPLC. The activity of P-gp was assessed by measuring digoxin and rhodamine 123 (Rh123 efflux. The interaction between P-gp and BBR or HIV PIs was predicated by Glide docking using Schrodinger program. The results indicate that P-gp contributed to the efflux of BBR in macrophages. HIV PIs significantly increased BBR concentrations in macrophages; however, BBR did not alter cellular HIV PI concentrations. Although HIV PIs did not affect P-gp expression, P-gp transport activities were significantly inhibited in HIV PI-treated macrophages. Furthermore, the molecular docking study suggests that both HIV PIs and BBR fit the binding pocket of P-gp, and HIV PIs may compete with BBR to bind P-gp.HIV PIs increase the concentration of BBR by modulating the transport activity of P-gp in macrophages. Understanding the cellular mechanisms of potential drug-drug interactions is critical prior to applying successful combinational therapy in the clinic.

  2. Activated human mast cells induce LOX-1-specific scavenger receptor expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

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    Mervi Alanne-Kinnunen

    Full Text Available Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs.Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1 mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1, which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell -induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages.Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis.

  3. Cytoskeletal stability and metabolic alterations in primary human macrophages in long-term microgravity.

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    Svantje Tauber

    Full Text Available The immune system is one of the most affected systems of the human body during space flight. The cells of the immune system are exceptionally sensitive to microgravity. Thus, serious concerns arise, whether space flight associated weakening of the immune system ultimately precludes the expansion of human presence beyond the Earth's orbit. For human space flight, it is an urgent need to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which altered gravity influences and changes the functions of immune cells. The CELLBOX-PRIME (= CellBox-Primary Human Macrophages in Microgravity Environment experiment investigated for the first time microgravity-associated long-term alterations in primary human macrophages, one of the most important effector cells of the immune system. The experiment was conducted in the U.S. National Laboratory on board of the International Space Station ISS using the NanoRacks laboratory and Biorack type I standard CELLBOX EUE type IV containers. Upload and download were performed with the SpaceX CRS-3 and the Dragon spaceship on April 18th, 2014 / May 18th, 2014. Surprisingly, primary human macrophages exhibited neither quantitative nor structural changes of the actin and vimentin cytoskeleton after 11 days in microgravity when compared to 1g controls. Neither CD18 or CD14 surface expression were altered in microgravity, however ICAM-1 expression was reduced. The analysis of 74 metabolites in the cell culture supernatant by GC-TOF-MS, revealed eight metabolites with significantly different quantities when compared to 1g controls. In particular, the significant increase of free fucose in the cell culture supernatant was associated with a significant decrease of cell surface-bound fucose. The reduced ICAM-1 expression and the loss of cell surface-bound fucose may contribute to functional impairments, e.g. the activation of T cells, migration and activation of the innate immune response. We assume that the surprisingly small

  4. Cytoskeletal stability and metabolic alterations in primary human macrophages in long-term microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Svantje; Lauber, Beatrice A; Paulsen, Katrin; Layer, Liliana E; Lehmann, Martin; Hauschild, Swantje; Shepherd, Naomi R; Polzer, Jennifer; Segerer, Jürgen; Thiel, Cora S; Ullrich, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    The immune system is one of the most affected systems of the human body during space flight. The cells of the immune system are exceptionally sensitive to microgravity. Thus, serious concerns arise, whether space flight associated weakening of the immune system ultimately precludes the expansion of human presence beyond the Earth's orbit. For human space flight, it is an urgent need to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which altered gravity influences and changes the functions of immune cells. The CELLBOX-PRIME (= CellBox-Primary Human Macrophages in Microgravity Environment) experiment investigated for the first time microgravity-associated long-term alterations in primary human macrophages, one of the most important effector cells of the immune system. The experiment was conducted in the U.S. National Laboratory on board of the International Space Station ISS using the NanoRacks laboratory and Biorack type I standard CELLBOX EUE type IV containers. Upload and download were performed with the SpaceX CRS-3 and the Dragon spaceship on April 18th, 2014 / May 18th, 2014. Surprisingly, primary human macrophages exhibited neither quantitative nor structural changes of the actin and vimentin cytoskeleton after 11 days in microgravity when compared to 1g controls. Neither CD18 or CD14 surface expression were altered in microgravity, however ICAM-1 expression was reduced. The analysis of 74 metabolites in the cell culture supernatant by GC-TOF-MS, revealed eight metabolites with significantly different quantities when compared to 1g controls. In particular, the significant increase of free fucose in the cell culture supernatant was associated with a significant decrease of cell surface-bound fucose. The reduced ICAM-1 expression and the loss of cell surface-bound fucose may contribute to functional impairments, e.g. the activation of T cells, migration and activation of the innate immune response. We assume that the surprisingly small and non

  5. Toll-like receptor-4 mediates cigarette smoke-induced cytokine production by human macrophages

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    De Kimpe Sjef J

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major risk factor for the development of COPD is cigarette smoking. Smoking causes activation of resident cells and the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the lungs, which leads to release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemotactic factors, oxygen radicals and proteases. In the present study evidence is found for a new cellular mechanism that refers to a link between smoking and inflammation in lungs. Methods Employing human monocyte-derived macrophages, different techniques including FACS analysis, Cytometric Bead Array Assay and ELISA were achieved to evaluate the effects of CS on pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion including IL-8. Then, Toll-like receptor neutralization was performed to study the involvement of Toll-like receptor-4 in IL-8 production. Finally, signaling pathways in macrophages after exposure to CS medium were investigated performing ELISA and Western analysis. Results We demonstrate that especially human monocytes are sensitive to produce IL-8 upon cigarette smoke stimulation compared to lymphocytes or neutrophils. Moreover, monocyte-derived macrophages produce high amounts of the cytokine. The IL-8 production is dependent on Toll-like receptor 4 stimulation and LPS is not involved. Further research resolved the cellular mechanism by which cigarette smoke induces cytokine production in monocyte-derived macrophages. Cigarette smoke causes subsequently a concentration-dependent phosphorylation of IRAK and degradation of TRAF6. Moreover, IκBα was phosphorylated which suggests involvement of NF-κB. In addition, NFκB -inhibitor blocked cigarette smoke-induced IL-8 production. Conclusion These findings link cigarette smoke to inflammation and lead to new insights/therapeutic strategies in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema.

  6. [Construction expression and biologic activity of recombinant human sCR1 eucaryotic cell].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang-lan; Gong, Cui-cui; Wang, Wen-li; Zhang, Chang-yuan; Liu, Ya-li; He, Pei-xia; Zheng, Shu-na; Chen, Xiang-lin

    2008-05-01

    To express human soluble complement receptor type 1(sCR1)protein using ferment cell secreting type carrier and study the extraorgan biologic activity of recombinant human sCR1 fusion protein. Total human RNA was extracted from peripheral blood. The full length cDNA of human sCR1 gene was obtained by RT-PCR and them, cloned into Pichia pastoris eukaryotic expression vector pPIC9k to construct the recombinant plasmid pPIC9k-sCR1 containing human sCR1.After identified by DNA sequencing, the recombinant plasmid pPIC9k-sCR1 was transformed into Pichia pastoris SMD1168. The ferment cell line of the recombinant sCR1 which was chosen by G418 resistance was identified by PCR, After methanol induction, the expressed protein products were verified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot, purified by Ni(2+)-NTA agarose affinity chromatography, and its biologic activity was identified. The obtained Pichia pastoris secretion type yeast carrier pPIC9k-sCR1 was chosen by G418 and identified by PCR to get a highly copied and integral recombinant ferment cell line. The recombinant human sCR1 fusion protein was expressed by yeast cells containing pPIC9k-sCR1 induced by methanol. It was a protein band about M(r) 31 000 in gel, which could be identified by CD35 of anti-sCR1 protein monoclonal antibody with Western blotting technique. The highly purified sCR1 fusion protein and its biologic activity were detected obtained by Ni(2+)-NTA agarose affinity chromatography. The recombinant human sCR1 fusion protein can be highly expressed in the Pichia pastoris expression system, which resembles the human natural protein's antigenicity and biologic activity.

  7. Human Alternative Macrophages Populate Calcified Areas of Atherosclerotic Lesions and Display Impaired RANKL-Induced Osteoclastic Bone Resorption Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Daoudi, Mehdi; Rosa, Mickael; Vinod, Manjula; Louvet, Loïc; Copin, Corinne; Fanchon, Mélanie; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Derudas, Bruno; Belloy, Loic; Haulon, Stephan; Zawadzki, Christophe; Susen, Sophie; Massy, Ziad A; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Staels, Bart

    2017-06-23

    Vascular calcification is a process similar to bone formation leading to an inappropriate deposition of calcium phosphate minerals in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Monocyte-derived macrophages, located in atherosclerotic lesions and presenting heterogeneous phenotypes, from classical proinflammatory M1 to alternative anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, could potentially display osteoclast-like functions. To characterize the phenotype of macrophages located in areas surrounding the calcium deposits in human atherosclerotic plaques. Macrophages near calcium deposits display an alternative phenotype being both CD68 and mannose receptor-positive, expressing carbonic anhydrase type II, but relatively low levels of cathepsin K. In vitro interleukin-4-polarization of human primary monocytes into macrophages results in lower expression and activity of cathepsin K compared with resting unpolarized macrophages. Moreover, interleukin-4 polarization lowers expression levels of the osteoclast transcriptional activator nuclear factor of activated T cells type c-1, associated with increased gene promoter levels of the transcriptional repression mark H3K27me3 (histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation). Despite higher expression of the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB receptor, receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand/macrophage colony-stimulating factor induction of nuclear factor of activated T cells type c-1 and cathepsin K expression is defective in these macrophages because of reduced Erk/c-fos-mediated downstream signaling resulting in impaired bone resorption capacity. These results indicate that macrophages surrounding calcium deposits in human atherosclerotic plaques are phenotypically defective being unable to resorb calcification. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Human peritoneal macrophages show functional characteristics of M-CSF-driven anti-inflammatory type 2 macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Wei; Schlagwein, Nicole; Roos, Anja; van den Berg, Timo K.; Daha, Mohamed R.; van Kooten, Cees

    2007-01-01

    We have recently shown that in vitro polarized M-CSF-driven anti-inflammatory macrophages (MPhi2) have the unique capacity to preferentially bind and ingest early apoptotic cells. However, these data are based on in vitro polarized cells and it is unclear whether MPhi2-like cells exist in vivo. Here

  9. HSV-1-induced chemokine expression via IFI16-dependent and IFI16-independent pathways in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søby, Stine; Laursen, Rune R; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    and monocytes were differentiated to macrophages. Macrophages infected with HSV-1 were analyzed using siRNA-mediated knock-down of IFI16 by real-time PCR, ELISA, and Western blotting. RESULTS: We determined that both CXCL10 and CCL3 are induced independent of HSV-1 replication. IFI16 mediates CCL3 m......RNA accumulation during early HSV-1 infection. In contrast, CXCL10 was induced independently of IFI16. CONCLUSIONS: Our data provide the first evidence of HSV-1-induced innate immune responses via IFI16 in human primary macrophages. In addition, the data suggest that at least one additional unidentified receptor...

  10. Evidence for substantial fine-scale variation in recombination rates across the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Dana C; Bhangale, Tushar; Li, Na; Hellenthal, Garrett; Rieder, Mark J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Stephens, Matthew

    2004-07-01

    Characterizing fine-scale variation in human recombination rates is important, both to deepen understanding of the recombination process and to aid the design of disease association studies. Current genetic maps show that rates vary on a megabase scale, but studying finer-scale variation using pedigrees is difficult. Sperm-typing experiments have characterized regions where crossovers cluster into 1-2-kb hot spots, but technical difficulties limit the number of studies. An alternative is to use population variation to infer fine-scale characteristics of the recombination process. Several surveys reported 'block-like' patterns of diversity, which may reflect fine-scale recombination rate variation, but limitations of available methods made this impossible to assess. Here, we applied a new statistical method, which overcomes these limitations, to infer patterns of fine-scale recombination rate variation in 74 genes. We found extensive rate variation both within and among genes. In particular, recombination hot spots are a common feature of the human genome: 47% (35 of 74) of genes showed substantive evidence for a hot spot, and many more showed evidence for some rate variation. No primary sequence characteristics are consistently associated with precise hot-spot location, although G+C content and nucleotide diversity are correlated with local recombination rate.

  11. Ebolaviruses Associated with Differential Pathogenicity Induce Distinct Host Responses in Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnik, Judith; Forero, Adriana; Deflubé, Laure R; Hume, Adam J; Manhart, Whitney A; Nishida, Andrew; Marzi, Andrea; Katze, Michael G; Ebihara, Hideki; Rasmussen, Angela L; Mühlberger, Elke

    2017-06-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) and Reston virus (RESTV) are members of the Ebolavirus genus which greatly differ in their pathogenicity. While EBOV causes a severe disease in humans characterized by a dysregulated inflammatory response and elevated cytokine and chemokine production, there are no reported disease-associated human cases of RESTV infection, suggesting that RESTV is nonpathogenic for humans. The underlying mechanisms determining the pathogenicity of different ebolavirus species are not yet known. In this study, we dissected the host response to EBOV and RESTV infection in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). As expected, EBOV infection led to a profound proinflammatory response, including strong induction of type I and type III interferons (IFNs). In contrast, RESTV-infected macrophages remained surprisingly silent. Early activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and NF-κB was observed in EBOV-infected, but not in RESTV-infected, MDMs. In concordance with previous results, MDMs treated with inactivated EBOV and Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) induced NF-κB activation mediated by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in a glycoprotein (GP)-dependent manner. This was not the case in cells exposed to live RESTV, inactivated RESTV, or VLPs containing RESTV GP, indicating that RESTV GP does not trigger TLR4 signaling. Our results suggest that the lack of immune activation in RESTV-infected MDMs contributes to lower pathogenicity by preventing the cytokine storm observed in EBOV infection. We further demonstrate that inhibition of TLR4 signaling abolishes EBOV GP-mediated NF-κB activation. This finding indicates that limiting the excessive TLR4-mediated proinflammatory response in EBOV infection should be considered as a potential supportive treatment option for EBOV disease.IMPORTANCE Emerging infectious diseases are a major public health concern, as exemplified by the recent devastating Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak. Different ebolavirus species are

  12. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor attenuates ER stress-induced inflammation in human M2-polarized macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espada, Sandra; Stavik, Benedicte; Holm, Sverre; Sagen, Ellen Lund; Bjerkeli, Vigdis; Skjelland, Mona; Dahl, Tuva B; Espevik, Terje; Kanse, Sandip; Sandset, Per Morten; Skretting, Grethe; Halvorsen, Bente

    2017-09-16

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been shown to play a key role during the initiation and clinical progression of the cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis. We have recently shown that expression of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) was induced by cholesterol crystals (CC). In the present study we aimed to determine the role of TFPI under ER stress conditions using human MDMs. qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analysis were performed to determine the presence of the ER stress marker CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) and TFPI in human carotid plaque material and also in human MDMs polarized into pro-inflammatory M1 or anti-inflammatory M2 populations. CHOP mRNA levels were upregulated in the plaques compared to healthy vessels, and CHOP protein was localized in the same area as TFPI in the plaques. Both CHOP and TFPI mRNA levels were upregulated after CC treatment, especially in the M2 phenotype, and the ER stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) reversed this effect. Furthermore, CC treatment increased the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8, which for TNF-α and IL-8 was inhibited by PBA, and reduced the levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in M2-polarized macrophages. Knockdown of TFPI prior to CC treatment exacerbated TNF-α and IL-6 levels, but reduced IL-8 and IL-10 levels. Our results show that CC induce TFPI and cytokine expression in M2-polarized macrophages through activation of the ER stress pathway and that TFPI has a protective effect against TNF-α and IL-6 mediated inflammation. These mechanisms may have implications for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Autocrine Human Urotensin II Enhances Macrophage-Derived Foam Cell Formation in Transgenic Rabbits

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    Sihai Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating urotensin II (UII is involved in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the role of autocrine UII in the development of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that autocrine UII would promote atherosclerosis. Transgenic rabbits were created as a model to study macrophage-specific expressing human UII (hUII and used to investigate the role of autocrine UII in the development of atherosclerosis. Transgenic rabbits and their nontransgenic littermates were fed a high cholesterol diet to induce atherosclerosis. Comparing the transgenic rabbits with their nontransgenic littermates, it was observed that hUII expression increased the macrophage-positive area in the atherosclerotic lesions by 45% and the positive area ratio by 56% in the transgenic rabbits. Autocrine hUII significantly decreased the smooth muscle cell-positive area ratio in transgenic rabbits (by 54%, without affecting the plasma levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and glucose and adipose tissue contents. These results elucidated for the first time that autocrine UII plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis by increasing the accumulation of macrophage-derived foam cell.

  14. Human monocytes/macrophages are a target of Neisseria meningitidis Adhesin A (NadA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzoso, Susanna; Mazzon, Cristina; Sztukowska, Maryta; Cecchini, Paola; Kasic, Tihana; Capecchi, Barbara; Tavano, Regina; Papini, Emanuele

    2008-05-01

    Specific surface proteins of Neisseria meningitidis have been proposed to stimulate leukocytes during tissue invasion and septic shock. In this study, we demonstrate that the adhesin N. meningitidis Adhesin A (NadA) involved in the colonization of the respiratory epithelium by hypervirulent N. meningitidis B strains also binds to and activates human monocytes/macrophages. Expression of NadA on the surface on Escherichia coli does not increase bacterial-monocyte association, but a NadA-positive strain induced a significantly higher amount of TNF-alpha and IL-8 compared with the parental NadA-negative strain, suggesting that NadA has an intrinsic stimulatory action on these cells. Consistently, highly pure, soluble NadA(Delta351-405), a proposed component of an antimeningococcal vaccine, efficiently stimulates monocytes/macrophages to secrete a selected pattern of cytokines and chemotactic factors characterized by high levels of IL-8, IL-6, MCP-1, and MIP-1alpha and low levels of the main vasoactive mediators TNF-alpha and IL-1. NadA(Delta351-405) also inhibited monocyte apoptosis and determined its differentiation into a macrophage-like phenotype.

  15. Circulating Blood Monocyte Subclasses and Lipid-Laden Adipose Tissue Macrophages in Human Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecht, Tal; Haim, Yulia; Bashan, Nava; Shapiro, Hagit; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Kirshtein, Boris; Clément, Karine; Shai, Iris; Rudich, Assaf

    2016-01-01

    Visceral adipose tissue foam cells are increased in human obesity, and were implicated in adipose dysfunction and increased cardio-metabolic risk. In the circulation, non-classical monocytes (NCM) are elevated in obesity and associate with atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that circulating NCM correlate and/or are functionally linked to visceral adipose tissue foam cells in obesity, potentially providing an approach to estimate visceral adipose tissue status in the non-surgical obese patient. We preformed ex-vivo functional studies utilizing sorted monocyte subclasses from healthy donors. Moreover, we assessed circulating blood monocyte subclasses and visceral fat adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) lipid content by flow-cytometry in paired blood and omental-fat samples collected from patients (n = 65) undergoing elective abdominal surgery. Ex-vivo, NCM and NCM-derived macrophages exhibited lower lipid accumulation capacity compared to classical or intermediate monocytes/-derived macrophages. Moreover, of the three subclasses, NCM exhibited the lowest migration towards adipose tissue conditioned-media. In a cohort of n = 65, increased %NCM associated with higher BMI (r = 0.250,plipid content (r = 0.303,plipid content, particularly in men. Collectively, although circulating blood NCM are unlikely direct functional precursor cells for adipose tissue foam cells, their increased percentage in the circulation may clinically reflect higher lipid content in visceral ATMs.

  16. Activation of RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cells in vitro through treatment with recombinant ricin toxin-binding subunit B: involvement of protein tyrosine, NF-κB and JAK-STAT kinase signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Na; Yuan, Hongyan; Liu, Wensen; Li, Songyan; Liu, Yang; Wan, Jiayu; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Rui; Chang, Yaping

    2013-09-01

    Ricin toxin-binding subunit B (RTB) is a galactose-binding lectin protein. In the present study, we investigated the effects of RTB on inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, as well as the signal transduction mechanisms involved in recombinant RTB-induced macrophage activation. RAW264.7 macrophages were treated with RTB. The results revealed that the mRNA and protein expression of iNOS was increased in the recombinant RTB-treated macrophages. TNF-α production was observed to peak at 20 h, whereas the production of IL-6 peaked at 24 h. In another set of cultures, the cells were co-incubated with RTB and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY294002, the p42/44 inhibitor, PD98059, the p38 inhibitor, SB203580, the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, staurosporine, the JAK2 inhibitor, tyrphostin (AG490), or the NOS inhibitor, L-NMMA. The recombinant RTB-induced production of NO, TNF-α and IL-6 was inhibited in the macrophages treated with the pharmacological inhibitors genistein, LY294002, staurosporine, AG490, SB203580 and BAY 11-7082, indicating the possible involvement of protein tyrosine kinases, PI3K, PKC, JAK2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the above processes. A phosphoprotein analysis identified tyrosine phosphorylation targets that were uniquely induced by recombinant RTB and inhibited following treatment with genistein; some of these proteins are associated with the downstream cascades of activated JAK-STAT and NF-κB receptors. Our data may help to identify the most important target molecules for the development of novel drug therapies.

  17. Plasma and lung macrophage responsiveness to carotenoid supplementation and ozone exposure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steck-Scott, S; Arab, L; Craft, N E; Samet, J M

    2004-12-01

    To examine the effect of ozone exposure and vegetable juice supplementation on plasma and lung macrophage concentrations of carotenoids. A randomized trial. Subjects were exposed to ambient air prior to antioxidant supplementation and to ozone after antioxidant supplementation or placebo. Exposures occurred while exercising intermittently in a controlled metabolic chamber at the Human Studies Division, US EPA. In all, 23 healthy subjects between ages of 18 and 35 y. Subjects consumed a low fruit and vegetable diet for 3 weeks. After the first week, subjects underwent a sham exposure to filtered air with exercise, followed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Subjects were randomly assigned into supplement (one can vegetable juice, vitamins C and E daily) or placebo (orange soda, placebo pill daily) groups for 2 weeks. After the 2-week intervention, subjects were exposed to 0.4 ppm (784 microg/m(3)) ozone for 2 h with exercise followed by BAL. Blood samples were drawn before, immediately after and 3 h postexposure on each exposure day. The concentrations of nine carotenoids were determined by HPLC in BAL macrophages and plasma samples. Plasma concentrations of all the carotenoids that were present in the vegetable juice (except cis-beta-carotene) increased significantly in the supplemented group. Lung macrophage alpha-carotene concentrations increased significantly, lycopene isomers increased slightly, and all other carotenoids decreased (nonsignificantly) in the supplementation group following the intervention. Ozone exposure resulted in decreases in several carotenoids in plasma of the placebo group, but not in the supplemented group. Lung macrophage concentrations of carotenoids can be manipulated by diet. Ozone is a potent environmental oxidant that appears to reduce plasma carotenoids in nonsupplemented individuals.

  18. MicroRNA expression profile in human macrophages in response to Leishmania major infection.

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    Julien Lemaire

    Full Text Available Leishmania (L. are intracellular protozoan parasites able to survive and replicate in the hostile phagolysosomal environment of infected macrophages. They cause leishmaniasis, a heterogeneous group of worldwide-distributed affections, representing a paradigm of neglected diseases that are mainly embedded in impoverished populations. To establish successful infection and ensure their own survival, Leishmania have developed sophisticated strategies to subvert the host macrophage responses. Despite a wealth of gained crucial information, these strategies still remain poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, an evolutionarily conserved class of endogenous 22-nucleotide non-coding RNAs, are described to participate in the regulation of almost every cellular process investigated so far. They regulate the expression of target genes both at the levels of mRNA stability and translation; changes in their expression have a profound effect on their target transcripts.We report in this study a comprehensive analysis of miRNA expression profiles in L. major-infected human primary macrophages of three healthy donors assessed at different time-points post-infection (three to 24 h. We show that expression of 64 out of 365 analyzed miRNAs was consistently deregulated upon infection with the same trends in all donors. Among these, several are known to be induced by TLR-dependent responses. GO enrichment analysis of experimentally validated miRNA-targeted genes revealed that several pathways and molecular functions were disturbed upon parasite infection. Finally, following parasite infection, miR-210 abundance was enhanced in HIF-1α-dependent manner, though it did not contribute to inhibiting anti-apoptotic pathways through pro-apoptotic caspase-3 regulation.Our data suggest that alteration in miRNA levels likely plays an important role in regulating macrophage functions following L. major infection. These results could contribute to better understanding of the

  19. Nucleotides Regulate Secretion of the Inflammatory Chemokine CCL2 from Human Macrophages and Monocytes

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    K. R. Higgins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CCL2 is an important inflammatory chemokine involved in monocyte recruitment to inflamed tissues. The extracellular nucleotide signalling molecules UTP and ATP acting via the P2Y2 receptor are known to induce CCL2 secretion in macrophages. We confirmed this in the human THP-1 monocytic cell line showing that UTP is as efficient as LPS at inducing CCL2 at early time points (2–6 hours. Expression and calcium mobilisation experiments confirmed the presence of functional P2Y2 receptors on THP-1 cells. UTP stimulation of human peripheral CD14+ monocytes showed low responses to LPS (4-hour stimulation but a significant increase above background following 6 hours of treatment. The response to UTP in human monocytes was variable and required stimulation >6 hours. With such variability in response we looked for single nucleotide polymorphisms in P2RY2 that could affect the functional response. Sequencing of P2RY2 from THP-1 cells revealed the presence of a single nucleotide polymorphism altering amino acid 312 from arginine to serine (rs3741156. This polymorphism is relatively common at a frequency of 0.276 (n=404 subjects. Finally, we investigated CCL2 secretion in response to LPS or UTP in human macrophages expressing 312Arg-P2Y2 or 312Ser-P2Y2 where only the latter exhibited significant UTP-induced CCL2 secretion (n=5 donors per group.

  20. The influence of surface modified poly(L-lactic acid) films on the differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Clara R.; Gaifem, Joana; Oliveira, Mariana Braga; Silvestre, Ricardo Jorge Leal; Mano, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in the biological performance of biomaterials, as key factors in defining the optimal inflammation-healing balance towards tissue regeneration and implant integration. Here, we investigate how different surface modifications performed on poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) films would influence the differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages. We tested PLLA films without modification, surface-modified by plasma treatment (pPLLA) or by combining plasma treatment ...

  1. The Effects of the Recombinant CCR5 T4 Lysozyme Fusion Protein on HIV-1 Infection.

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    Qingwen Jin

    Full Text Available Insertion of T4 lysozyme (T4L into the GPCR successfully enhanced GPCR protein stability and solubilization. However, the biological functions of the recombinant GPCR protein have not been analyzed.We engineered the CCR5-T4L mutant and expressed and purified the soluble recombinant protein using an E.coli expression system. The antiviral effects of this recombinant protein in THP-1 cell lines, primary human macrophages, and PBMCs from different donors were investigated. We also explored the possible mechanisms underlying the observed antiviral effects.Our data showed the biphasic inhibitory and promotion effects of different concentrations of soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L protein on R5 tropic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 infection in THP-1 cell lines, human macrophages, and PBMCs from clinical isolates. We demonstrated that soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L acts as a HIV-1 co-receptor, interacts with wild type CCR5, down-regulates the surface CCR5 expression in human macrophages, and interacts with CCL5 to inhibit macrophage migration. Using binding assays, we further determined that recombinant CCR5-T4L and [125I]-CCL5 compete for the same binding site on wild type CCR5.Our results suggest that recombinant CCR5-T4L protein marginally promotes HIV-1 infection at low concentrations and markedly inhibits infection at higher concentrations. This recombinant protein may be helpful in the future development of anti-HIV-1 therapeutic agents.

  2. In Vitro Detection of Apoptosis in Monocytes/Macrophages Infected with Human Coronavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Arlene R.

    2002-01-01

    Human coronavirus (HCoV) strain 229E infection, but not HCoV strain OC43 infection, of monocytes/macrophages from healthy donors and patients with multiple sclerosis in remission resulted in increased apoptosis, as measured by DNA changes and annexin V staining. Apoptosis correlated with the differential release of infectious virus. HCoV strain 229E titers were 103.5 to 106 50% tissue culture-infective doses (TCID50)/ml, and HCoV strain OC43 titers were only 101.2 to 102.7 TCID50/ml.

  3. Treatment of Crohn's disease with recombinant human interleukin 10 induces the proinflammatory cytokine interferon gamma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tilg, H.; van Montfrans, C.; van den Ende, A.; Kaser, A.; van Deventer, S. J. H.; Schreiber, S.; Gregor, M.; Ludwiczek, O.; Rutgeerts, P.; Gasche, C.; Koningsberger, J. C.; Abreu, L.; Kuhn, I.; Cohard, M.; LeBeaut, A.; Grint, P.; Weiss, G.

    2002-01-01

    Interleukin 10 (IL-10) exerts anti-inflammatory actions by counteracting many biological effects of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). To investigate this in humans, we studied the effects of human recombinant IL-10 administration on IFN-gamma production by patient leucocytes. Furthermore, we assessed

  4. Tratamiento con eritropoyetina humana recombinante Human recombinant erythropoietin therapy

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    Hugo Donato

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available La eritropoyetina recombinante (rHuEPO se ha transformado en la citoquina más utilizada terapéuticamente en el mundo. Luego del éxito obtenido en pacientes con insuficiencia renal terminal, se pudo establecer la utilidad de la terapia con rHuEPO para mejorar otras anemias, incluso en pacientes pediátricos y neonatos. El tratamiento o la prevención de la anemia del prematuro mediante el uso de rHuEPO llevó a una significativa reducción en cantidad de transfusiones y en exposición a dadores. Aún debe establecerse una clara definición sobre cuáles niños prematuros deben recibir tratamiento rutinariamente. Otras indicaciones en período neonatal incluyen anemias hiporregenerativas y hemolíticas. La eficacia de la rHuEPO en niños mayores, con excepción de la insuficiencia renal crónica, no ha sido tan exhaustivamente evaluada como en adultos. Mientras que durante los últimos años se han realizado gran cantidad de estudios en adultos con anemia asociada al cáncer o a infección por HIV, permitiendo establecer conclusiones claras sobre su eficacia, sólo escasa cantidad de estudios con pequeño número de pacientes han sido realizados en niños. Hasta la fecha, los resultados sugieren que la terapia con rHuEPO en niños es tan útil como en adultos, pero la realización de estudios aleatorizados prospectivos incluyendo gran número de pacientes es esencial para alcanzar conclusiones definitivas. Los resultados de estudios dirigidos a evaluar la eficacia de la rHuEpo para mantener una dosis adecuada de ribavirina en pacientes en tratamiento por hepatitis C son alentadores. La utilización potencial de los efectos no hemopoyéticos de la rHuEPO en neonatos es un terreno novedoso y apasionante. El rol de la Epo como citoprotector para sistema nervioso central y mucosa intestinal está bajo investigación exhaustiva.Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo has become the most widely used cytokine in the world. Following the success of

  5. THP-1 macrophages and SGBS adipocytes - a new human in vitro model system of inflamed adipose tissue

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    Michaela eKeuper

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with an accumulation of macrophages in adipose tissue. This inflammation of adipose tissue is a key event in the pathogenesis of several obesity-related disorders, particularly insulin resistance.Here, we summarized existing model systems that mimic the situation of inflamed adipose tissue in vitro, most of them being murine. Importantly, we introduce our newly established human model system which combines the THP-1 monocytic cell line and the preadipocyte cell strain SGBS. THP-1 cells, which originate from an acute monocytic leukemia, differentiate easily into macrophages in vitro. The human preadipocyte cell strain SGBS (Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome was recently introduced as a unique to tool to study human fat cell functions. SGBS cells are characterized by a high capacity for adipogenic differentiation. SGBS adipocytes are capable of fat cell-specific metabolic functions such as insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, insulin-stimulated de novo lipogenesis and beta-adrenergic-stimulated lipolysis and they secrete typical adipokines including leptin, adiponectin, and RBP4. Applying either macrophage-conditioned medium or a direct co-culture of macrophages and fat cells, our model system can be used to distinguish between paracrine and cell-contact dependent effects.In conclusion, we propose this model as a useful tool to study adipose inflammation in vitro. It represents an inexpensive, highly reproducible human system. The methods described here can be easily extended for usage of primary human macrophages and fat cells.

  6. Recombinant human endostatin normalizes tumor vasculature and enhances radiation response in xenografted human nasopharyngeal carcinoma models.

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    Fang Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypoxic tumor cells can reduce the efficacy of radiation. Antiangiogenic therapy may transiently "normalize" the tumor vasculature to make it more efficient for oxygen delivery. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the recombinant human endostatin (endostar can create a "vascular normalization window" to alleviate hypoxia and enhance the inhibitory effects of radiation therapy in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transient changes in morphology of tumor vasculature and hypoxic tumor cell fraction in response to endostar were detected in mice bearing CNE-2 and 5-8F human NPC xenografts. Various treatment schedules were tested to assess the influence of endostar on the effect of radiation therapy. Several important factors relevant to the angiogenesis were identified through immunohistochemical staining. During endostar treatment, tumor vascularity decreased, while the basement membrane and pericyte coverage associated with endothelial cells increased, which supported the idea of vessel normalization. Hypoxic tumor cell fraction also decreased after the treatment. The transient modulation of tumor physiology caused by endostar improved the effect of radiation treatment compared with other treatment schedules. The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-14 decreased, while the level of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF increased. CONCLUSIONS: Endostar normalized tumor vasculature, which alleviated hypoxia and significantly sensitized the function of radiation in anti-tumor in human NPC. The results provide an important experimental basis for combining endostar with radiation therapy in human NPC.

  7. Ebola virion attachment and entry into human macrophages profoundly effects early cellular gene expression.

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    Victoria Wahl-Jensen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV infections are associated with high lethality in primates. ZEBOV primarily targets mononuclear phagocytes, which are activated upon infection and secrete mediators believed to trigger initial stages of pathogenesis. The characterization of the responses of target cells to ZEBOV infection may therefore not only further understanding of pathogenesis but also suggest possible points of therapeutic intervention. Gene expression profiles of primary human macrophages exposed to ZEBOV were determined using DNA microarrays and quantitative PCR to gain insight into the cellular response immediately after cell entry. Significant changes in mRNA concentrations encoding for 88 cellular proteins were observed. Most of these proteins have not yet been implicated in ZEBOV infection. Some, however, are inflammatory mediators known to be elevated during the acute phase of disease in the blood of ZEBOV-infected humans. Interestingly, the cellular response occurred within the first hour of Ebola virion exposure, i.e. prior to virus gene expression. This observation supports the hypothesis that virion binding or entry mediated by the spike glycoprotein (GP(1,2 is the primary stimulus for an initial response. Indeed, ZEBOV virions, LPS, and virus-like particles consisting of only the ZEBOV matrix protein VP40 and GP(1,2 (VLP(VP40-GP triggered comparable responses in macrophages, including pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic signals. In contrast, VLP(VP40 (particles lacking GP(1,2 caused an aberrant response. This suggests that GP(1,2 binding to macrophages plays an important role in the immediate cellular response.

  8. Short-term effect of recombinant human growth hormone in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Becker, U; Grønbaek, M

    1994-01-01

    , and liver function. Twenty consecutive patients with cirrhosis were randomized to recombinant human growth hormone (Norditropin, 4 I.U. twice daily) subcutaneously for 6 weeks (n = 10) or conventional medical treatment (n = 10). The serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I in the recombinant...... human growth hormone group increased after 3 (p group. The change in insulin-like growth factor-I during the treatment period was expressed as area under the curve (AUC). The AUCIGF-I was significantly larger...... in the recombinant human growth hormone group (median AUCIGF-I: 12.1, range: 0.0-54.7 weeks.nmol/l) than in the control group (median AUCIGF-I: 0.2, range: -10.6-9.9 weeks.nmol/l) (p

  9. Similarity of recombinant human perlecan domain 1 by alternative expression systems bioactive heterogenous recombinant human perlecan D1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellis, April L; Pan, Wensheng; Yang, Guang

    2010-01-01

    structure analysis suggested helices and sheets in both recombinant species. rhPln.D1 demonstrated binding to rhFGF-2 with an apparent kD of 2 ± 0.2 nM with almost complete susceptibility to digestion by heparinase III in ligand blot analysis but not to chondroitinase digestion. Additionally, we demonstrate...... HS-mediated binding of both rhPln.D1 species to several other GFs. Finally, we corroborate the augmentation of FGF-mediated cell activation by rhPln.D1 and demonstrate mitogenic signalling through the FGFR1c receptor. CONCLUSIONS: With importance especially to the emerging field of DNA...

  10. Use of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin in Renal Anemia in Children

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    Habibur Rahman

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin is a hormone highly effective as like as natural erythropoietin to maintain target hemoglobin and hematocrit level in renal anemia. Its advantage over blood transfusion has been proved by improving the quality of life and decreasing morbidity and mortality in ESRD patients. Effectiveness of r-erythropoietin depends on absences of infection, inflammation and vitamin deficiency and iron status. Iron supplementation is needed before r-erythropoietin administration and sub-cutaneous rout is better in renal anemia because of slow and sustained releases of r-erythropoietin from the site of administration. Target hemoglobin level is 11-12.5 gm/dl and hematocrit is 33% which can be achieved by this hormone therapy. Key words- Recombinant erythropoietin, renal anemia, end stage renal disease.DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v2i1.3713 BSMMU J 2009; 2(1: 50-53  

  11. Recombinant GM-CSF/IL-3 fusion protein: its effect on in vitro human megakaryocytopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, E; Briddell, R A; Cooper, R J; Brandt, J E; Hoffman, R

    1992-05-01

    An evaluation of the effectiveness of a genetically engineered recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)/interleukin 3 (IL-3) fusion protein (FP) as a means of delivering cytokine combinations to megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor cells was performed, utilizing a serum-depleted clonal assay system and a long-term bone marrow culture system. The effects of the FP, alone and in combination with a variety of other cytokines, on the primitive MK progenitor cell, the megakaryocyte burst-forming unit (BFU-MK), and the more differentiated megakaryocyte colony-forming unit (CFU-MK) were assessed. Subpopulations of bone marrow cells (CD34+ DR- for BFU-MK and CD34+ DR+ for CFU-MK) served as sources of these two classes of MK progenitor cells. The FP was equivalent to a combination of optimal concentrations of GM-CSF and IL-3 in promoting both the number and size of BFU-MK-derived colonies. The GM-CSF/IL-3 combination, however, promoted the formation of far greater CFU-MK-derived colonies than did the FP alone. The size of MK colonies formed in the presence of the FP or GM-CSF/IL-3 was similar. The ability of the FP to stimulate BFU-MK- but not CFU-MK-derived colony formation was also further augmented by the addition of interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha). The addition of c-kit ligand (KL) increased both FP-stimulated CFU-MK- and BFU-MK-derived colony numbers but only BFU-MK-derived colony size. In addition, the FP alone sustained long-term megakaryocytopoiesis in vitro to a level equivalent to that of the GM-CSF/IL-3 combination and was superior in this regard to either GM-CSF or IL-3 alone. These data indicate that FP is capable of supporting various stages of human megakaryocytopoiesis. We conclude that such genetically engineered molecules as the FP may prove to be effective means of pharmacologically delivering the biological effects of specific cytokine combinations.

  12. An NLRP7-containing inflammasome mediates recognition of microbial lipopeptides in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Sonal; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Bryan, Nicole B; Yun, Chawon; Radian, Alexander D; de Almeida, Lucia; Rojanasakul, Yon; Stehlik, Christian

    2012-03-23

    Cytosolic pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns are sensed by pattern recognition receptors, including members of the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat-containing gene family (NLR), which cause inflammasome assembly and caspase-1 activation to promote maturation and release of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 and induction of pyroptosis. However, the contribution of most of the NLRs to innate immunity, host defense, and inflammasome activation and their specific agonists are still unknown. Here we describe identification and characterization of an NLRP7 inflammasome in human macrophages, which is induced in response to microbial acylated lipopeptides. Activation of NLRP7 promoted ASC-dependent caspase-1 activation, IL-1β and IL-18 maturation, and restriction of intracellular bacterial replication, but not caspase-1-independent secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α. Our study therefore increases our currently limited understanding of NLR activation, inflammasome assembly, and maturation of IL-1β and IL-18 in human macrophages. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in human macrophages: uptake, intracellular distribution and cellular responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, A; Tentschert, J; Jungnickel, H; Goetz, M E; Luch, A [BfR - Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department of Product Safety, Thielallee 88-92, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Graf, P [University of Basel, Department of Chemistry, Klingelbergstrasse 80, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Mantion, A; Thuenemann, A F [BAM - Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter-Strasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Draude, F; Galla, S; Arlinghaus, H F [University of Muenster, Institute of Physics, Wilhelm Klemm Strasse 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Plendl, J [Free University of Berlin, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, Koserstrasse 20, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Masic, A; Taubert, A, E-mail: andrea.haase@bfr.bund.de, E-mail: alexandre.mantion@bam.de [University of Potsdam, Institute of Chemistry, Karl- Liebknecht- Strasse 24-25, 14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2011-07-06

    Silver nanoparticles (SNP) are among the most commercialized nanoparticles worldwide. They can be found in many diverse products, mostly because of their antibacterial properties. Despite its widespread use only little data on possible adverse health effects exist. It is difficult to compare biological data from different studies due to the great variety in sizes, coatings or shapes of the particles. Here, we applied a novel synthesis approach to obtain SNP, which are covalently stabilized by a small peptide. This enables a tight control of both size and shape. We applied these SNP in two different sizes of 20 or 40 nm (Ag20Pep and Ag40Pep) and analyzed responses of THP-1-derived human macrophages. Similar gold nanoparticles with the same coating (Au20Pep) were used for comparison and found to be non-toxic. We assessed the cytotoxicity of particles and confirmed their cellular uptake via transmission electron microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy. Importantly a majority of the SNP could be detected as individual particles spread throughout the cells. Furthermore we studied several types of oxidative stress related responses such as induction of heme oxygenase I or formation of protein carbonyls. In summary, our data demonstrate that even low doses of SNP exerted adverse effects in human macrophages.

  14. Splenic embolization in a Jehovah's Witness: role of recombinant human factor VIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindikoglu, Ayse L; Anantharaju, Abhinandana; George, Magdalene; Leone, Nancy; Bejna, Judy; Van Thiel, David H

    2003-01-01

    A case of a 50-year-old Jehovah's Witness with cryptogenic cirrhosis, severe portal hypertension and a coagulopathy, who underwent splenic embolization to improve the platelet count after receiving recombinant human Factor VIIa, is reported. Following the infusion of recombinant human Factor VIIa, the coagulopathy was rapidly corrected and it became possible to safely embolize her spleen. The changes in prothrombin time, international normalized ratio and activated partial thromboplastin time as well as thrombomodulin, tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor after the infusion are presented. As a result of the splenic embolization, her platelet count normalized and she has been listed for liver transplantation.

  15. Conjugation of gold nanoparticles and recombinant human endostatin modulates vascular normalization via interruption of anterior gradient 2-mediated angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fan; Yang, Wende; Li, Wei; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Shuhao; Li, Xin; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Ding, Hui; Qin, Li; Pan, Yunlong

    2017-07-01

    Several studies have revealed the potential of normalizing tumor vessels in anti-angiogenic treatment. Recombinant human endostatin is an anti-angiogenic agent which has been applied in clinical tumor treatment. Our previous research indicated that gold nanoparticles could be a nanoparticle carrier for recombinant human endostatin delivery. The recombinant human endostatin-gold nanoparticle conjugates normalized vessels, which improved chemotherapy. However, the mechanism of recombinant human endostatin-gold nanoparticle-induced vascular normalization has not been explored. Anterior gradient 2 has been reported to be over-expressed in many malignant tumors and involved in tumor angiogenesis. To date, the precise efficacy of recombinant human endostatin-gold nanoparticles on anterior gradient 2-mediated angiogenesis or anterior gradient 2-related signaling cohort remained unknown. In this study, we aimed to explore whether recombinant human endostatin-gold nanoparticles could normalize vessels in metastatic colorectal cancer xenografts, and we further elucidated whether recombinant human endostatin-gold nanoparticles could interrupt anterior gradient 2-induced angiogenesis. In vivo, it was indicated that recombinant human endostatin-gold nanoparticles increased pericyte expression while inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and anterior gradient 2 expression in metastatic colorectal cancer xenografts. In vitro, we uncovered that recombinant human endostatin-gold nanoparticles reduced cell migration and tube formation induced by anterior gradient 2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Treatment with recombinant human endostatin-gold nanoparticles attenuated anterior gradient 2-mediated activation of MMP2, cMyc, VE-cadherin, phosphorylation of p38, and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Our findings demonstrated recombinant human endostatin-gold nanoparticles might normalize

  16. Characterization of Bioactive Recombinant Human Lysozyme Expressed in Milk of Cloned Transgenic Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Wang, Jianwu; Tang, Bo; Liu, Yufang; Guo, Chengdong; Yang, Penghua; Yu, Tian; Li, Rong; Zhao, Jianmin; Zhang, Lei; Dai, Yunping; Li, Ning

    2011-01-01

    Background There is great potential for using transgenic technology to improve the quality of cow milk and to produce biopharmaceuticals within the mammary gland. Lysozyme, a bactericidal protein that protects human infants from microbial infections, is highly expressed in human milk but is found in only trace amounts in cow milk. Methodology/Principal Findings We have produced 17 healthy cloned cattle expressing recombinant human lysozyme using somatic cell nuclear transfer. In this study, we just focus on four transgenic cattle which were natural lactation. The expression level of the recombinant lysozyme was up to 25.96 mg/L, as measured by radioimmunoassay. Purified recombinant human lysozyme showed the same physicochemical properties, such as molecular mass and bacterial lysis, as its natural counterpart. Moreover, both recombinant and natural lysozyme had similar conditions for reactivity as well as for pH and temperature stability during in vitro simulations. The gross composition of transgenic and non-transgenic milk, including levels of lactose, total protein, total fat, and total solids were not found significant differences. Conclusions/Significance Thus, our study not only describes transgenic cattle whose milk offers the similar nutritional benefits as human milk but also reports techniques that could be further refined for production of active human lysozyme on a large scale. PMID:21436886

  17. Characterization of bioactive recombinant human lysozyme expressed in milk of cloned transgenic cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is great potential for using transgenic technology to improve the quality of cow milk and to produce biopharmaceuticals within the mammary gland. Lysozyme, a bactericidal protein that protects human infants from microbial infections, is highly expressed in human milk but is found in only trace amounts in cow milk. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have produced 17 healthy cloned cattle expressing recombinant human lysozyme using somatic cell nuclear transfer. In this study, we just focus on four transgenic cattle which were natural lactation. The expression level of the recombinant lysozyme was up to 25.96 mg/L, as measured by radioimmunoassay. Purified recombinant human lysozyme showed the same physicochemical properties, such as molecular mass and bacterial lysis, as its natural counterpart. Moreover, both recombinant and natural lysozyme had similar conditions for reactivity as well as for pH and temperature stability during in vitro simulations. The gross composition of transgenic and non-transgenic milk, including levels of lactose, total protein, total fat, and total solids were not found significant differences. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, our study not only describes transgenic cattle whose milk offers the similar nutritional benefits as human milk but also reports techniques that could be further refined for production of active human lysozyme on a large scale.

  18. Human atherosclerotic plaque alternative macrophages display low cholesterol handling but high phagocytosis because of distinct activities of the PPARγ and LXRα pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Baron, Morgane; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Copin, Corinne; Sebti, Yasmine; Derudas, Bruno; Mayi, Thérèse; Bories, Gael; Tailleux, Anne; Haulon, Stephane; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart

    2011-04-15

    A crucial step in atherogenesis is the infiltration of the subendothelial space of large arteries by monocytes where they differentiate into macrophages and transform into lipid-loaded foam cells. Macrophages are heterogeneous cells that adapt their response to environmental cytokines. Th1 cytokines promote monocyte differentiation into M1 macrophages, whereas Th2 cytokines trigger an "alternative" M2 phenotype. We previously reported the presence of CD68(+) mannose receptor (MR)(+) M2 macrophages in human atherosclerotic plaques. However, the function of these plaque CD68(+)MR(+) macrophages is still unknown. Histological analysis revealed that CD68(+)MR(+) macrophages locate far from the lipid core of the plaque and contain smaller lipid droplets compared to CD68(+)MR(-) macrophages. Interleukin (IL)-4-polarized CD68(+)MR(+) macrophages display a reduced capacity to handle and efflux cellular cholesterol because of low expression levels of the nuclear receptor liver x receptor (LXR)α and its target genes, ABCA1 and apolipoprotein E, attributable to the high 15-lipoxygenase activity in CD68(+)MR(+) macrophages. By contrast, CD68(+)MR(+) macrophages highly express opsonins and receptors involved in phagocytosis, resulting in high phagocytic activity. In M2 macrophages, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ activation enhances the phagocytic but not the cholesterol trafficking pathways. These data identify a distinct macrophage subpopulation with a low susceptibility to become foam cells but high phagocytic activity resulting from different regulatory activities of the PPARγ-LXRα pathways.

  19. Pharmacological inhibition of dynamin II reduces constitutive protein secretion from primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike Kockx

    Full Text Available Dynamins are fission proteins that mediate endocytic and exocytic membrane events and are pharmacological therapeutic targets. These studies investigate whether dynamin II regulates constitutive protein secretion and show for the first time that pharmacological inhibition of dynamin decreases secretion of apolipoprotein E (apoE and several other proteins constitutively secreted from primary human macrophages. Inhibitors that target recruitment of dynamin to membranes (MiTMABs or directly target the GTPase domain (Dyngo or Dynole series, dose- and time- dependently reduced the secretion of apoE. SiRNA oligo's targeting all isoforms of dynamin II confirmed the involvement of dynamin II in apoE secretion. Inhibition of secretion was not mediated via effects on mRNA or protein synthesis. 2D-gel electrophoresis showed that inhibition occurred after apoE was processed and glycosylated in the Golgi and live cell imaging showed that inhibited secretion was associated with reduced post-Golgi movement of apoE-GFP-containing vesicles. The effect was not restricted to macrophages, and was not mediated by the effects of the inhibitors on microtubules. Inhibition of dynamin also altered the constitutive secretion of other proteins, decreasing the secretion of fibronectin, matrix metalloproteinase 9, Chitinase-3-like protein 1 and lysozyme but unexpectedly increasing the secretion of the inflammatory mediator cyclophilin A. We conclude that pharmacological inhibitors of dynamin II modulate the constitutive secretion of macrophage apoE as a class effect, and that their capacity to modulate protein secretion may affect a range of biological processes.

  20. Humanizing recombinant glycoproteins from Chinese hamster ovary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Holmgaard; Amann, Thomas; Kol, Stefan

    hamster ovary (CHO) cells are making a very heterogeneous mixture of NGlycans. We speculate that the CHO pattern of N-Glycans would affect half-life and/or efficacy of the glycoprotein in the bloodstream making it unsuitable for human intravenous use, whereas our humanized version would be identical...

  1. Purification of recombinant C-terminus polyhistidine tagged human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human calcitonin (hCT) is a 32 amino acid peptide that participates in the regulation of calcium and phosphorus metabolism in human. It is used in clinics for the treatment of diseases related to bone decalcification, such as Paget disease, osteoporosis imperfecta and parathyroid gland carcinoma. In this research ...

  2. RSV Infection in Human Macrophages Promotes CXCL10/IP-10 Expression during Bacterial Co-Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Machado

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, a major etiologic agent of acute lower respiratory infection constitutes the most important cause of death in young children worldwide. Viral/bacterial mixed infections are related to severity of respiratory inflammatory diseases, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have previously investigated the intracellular mechanisms that mediate the immune response in the context of influenza virus/Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp co-infection using a model of human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs. Here, we set up and characterized a similar model of MDMs to investigate different scenarios of RSV infection and co-infection with Sp. Our results suggest that Sp contributes to a faster and possibly higher level of CXCL10/IP-10 expression induced by RSV infection in human MDMs.

  3. Inhibition of transglutaminase 2 reduces efferocytosis in human macrophages: Role of CD14 and SR-AI receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eligini, S; Fiorelli, S; Tremoli, E; Colli, S

    2016-10-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TGM2), a member of the transglutaminase family of enzymes, is a multifunctional protein involved in numerous events spanning from cell differentiation, to signal transduction, apoptosis, and wound healing. It is expressed in a variety of cells, macrophages included. Macrophage TGM2 promotes the clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) and emerging evidence suggests that defective efferocytosis contributes to the consequences of inflammation-associated diseases, including atherosclerotic lesion progression and its sequelae. Of interest, active TGM2 identified in human atherosclerotic lesions plays critical roles in plaque stability through effects on matrix cross-linking and TGFβ activity. This study explores the mechanisms by which TGM2 controls efferocytosis in human macrophages. Herein we show that TGM2 increases progressively during monocyte differentiation towards macrophages and controls their efferocytic potential as well as morphology and viability. Two experimental approaches that took advantage of the inhibition of TGM2 activity and protein silencing give proof that TGM2 reduction significantly impairs macrophage efferocytosis. Among the mechanisms involved we highlighted a role of the receptors CD14 and SR-AI whose levels were markedly reduced by TGM2 inhibition. Conversely, CD36 receptor and αvβ3 integrin levels were not influenced. Of note, lipid accumulation and IL-10 secretion were reduced in macrophages displaying defective efferocytosis. Overall, our data define a crucial role of TGM2 activity during macrophage differentiation via mechanisms involving CD14 and SR-AI receptors and show that TGM2 inhibition triggers a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The 8p23 inversion polymorphism determines local recombination heterogeneity across human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Joao M; Chikhi, Lounès; Amorim, António; Lopes, Alexandra M

    2014-04-01

    For decades, chromosomal inversions have been regarded as fascinating evolutionary elements as they are expected to suppress recombination between chromosomes with opposite orientations, leading to the accumulation of genetic differences between the two configurations over time. Here, making use of publicly available population genotype data for the largest polymorphic inversion in the human genome (8p23-inv), we assessed whether this inhibitory effect of inversion rearrangements led to significant differences in the recombination landscape of two homologous DNA segments, with opposite orientation. Our analysis revealed that the accumulation of genetic differentiation is positively correlated with the variation in recombination profiles. The observed recombination dissimilarity between inversion types is consistent across all populations analyzed and surpasses the effects of geographic structure, suggesting that both structures (orientations) have been evolving independently over an extended period of time, despite being subjected to the very same demographic history. Aside this mainly independent evolution, we also identified a short segment (350 kb, inversion) in the central region of the inversion where the genetic divergence between the two structural haplotypes is diminished. Although it is difficult to demonstrate it, this could be due to gene flow (possibly via double-crossing over events), which is consistent with the higher recombination rates surrounding this segment. This study demonstrates for the first time that chromosomal inversions influence the recombination landscape at a fine-scale and highlights the role of these rearrangements as drivers of genome evolution.

  5. Genome-Edited Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Macrophages as a Model of Reverse Cholesterol Transport--Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajat M; Meissner, Torsten B; Cowan, Chad A; Musunuru, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    To create isogenic human pluripotent stem cell-derived macrophages with and without ABCA1 expression as a model for reverse cholesterol transport. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9) genome-editing system was used to introduce frameshift mutations into the coding sequence of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 1. Individual human pluripotent stem cell clones with deleterious mutations were identified, expanded, and differentiated into mature macrophages with a cytokine-based, feeder-free differentiation protocol. Wild-type cells demonstrated effective cholesterol efflux to apoAI acceptor, whereas ABCA1(-/-) cells displayed significantly reduced efflux ability and increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived macrophages capable of reverse cholesterol transport can be rapidly generated and genetically edited with CRISPR/Cas9. Introduction of homozygous frameshift mutations results in loss of ABCA1 expression in differentiated macrophages and subsequent reduction of cholesterol efflux capability. This facile genome-editing approach and differentiation protocol pave the way for future studies of the molecular determinants of reverse cholesterol transport and other macrophage properties. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Lactoferrin-Containing Immunocomplexes Drive the Conversion of Human Macrophages from M2- into M1-like Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Hui Gao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are multifunctional cells that perform diverse roles in health and disease and considered the main source of inflammatory cytokines in affected joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. M2 macrophages are well known as anti-inflammation and wound-healing cells; however, recent evidence suggests that they can also promote inflammation in RA, although the underlying mechanism remains to be clarified. Based upon our recent finding that lactoferrin (LTF-containing IgG immunocomplex (LTF-IC, found elevated in RA sera, potent activators of human monocytes/macrophages, we herein demonstrate that LTF-IC was able to elicit immediate proinflammatory cytokine production by M2-polarized human macrophages through coligation with CD14/toll-like receptor (TLR 4 and FcγRIIa (CD32a. The LTF-IC-treated M2 cells adopted surface maker expression profile similar to that of M1 phenotype and became functionally hyperactive to subsequent stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide, zymosan and IL-1β, which could provide a positive feedback signal to promote excessive inflammation in RA. They also acquired the ability to facilitate activation of Th17 cells that are known to play critical roles in RA pathology. We propose that IgG ICs containing TLR agonizing autoantigens are able to directly switch human macrophages from M2 into M1-like phenotype, thereby promoting excessive inflammation in autoimmune diseases such as RA.

  7. Genome-scale metabolic model of Pichia pastoris with native and humanized glycosylation of recombinant proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irani, Zahra Azimzadeh; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

    2016-01-01

    native nor humanized N-glycosylation, and we therefore developed ihGlycopastoris, an extension to the iLC915 model with both native and humanized N-glycosylation for recombinant protein production, but also an estimation of N-glycosylation of P. pastoris native proteins. This new model gives a better......Pichia pastoris is used for commercial production of human therapeutic proteins, and genome-scale models of P. pastoris metabolism have been generated in the past to study the metabolism and associated protein production by this yeast. A major challenge with clinical usage of recombinant proteins...... produced by P. pastoris is the difference in N-glycosylation of proteins produced by humans and this yeast. However, through metabolic engineering, a P. pastoris strain capable of producing humanized N-glycosylated proteins was constructed. The current genome-scale models of P. pastoris do not address...

  8. Lack of enhancing effect of human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody on HIV-1 infection of human blood monocytes and peritoneal macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Shadduck, P P; Weinberg, J B; Haney, A. F.; Bartlett, J. A.; Langlois, A J; Bolognesi, D P; Matthews, T J

    1991-01-01

    The influence of human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody on HIV-1 infection of freshly isolated normal human peritoneal macrophages and blood monocytes was examined. Each of 14 HIV antibody-positive human serum samples was found to block the infection of four virus isolates (human T-cell lymphotropic virus type IIIBa-L [HTLV-IIIBa-L], HTLV-IIIB, D.U. 6587-7, and D.U. 7887-8) at serum dilutions ranging from 10(-1) to 10(-2). Three of these isolates (HTLV-IIIBa-L, D.U. 6...

  9. The response of human macrophages to β-glucans depends on the inflammatory milieu.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Municio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: β-glucans are fungal cell wall components that bind to the C-type lectin-like receptor dectin-1. Polymorphisms of dectin-1 gene are associated with susceptibility to invasive fungal infection and medically refractory ulcerative colitis. The purpose of this study has been addressing the response of human macrophages to β-glucans under different conditions mimicking the composition of the inflammatory milieu in view of the wide plasticity and large range of phenotypical changes showed by these cells, and the relevant role of dectin-1 in several pathophysiological conditions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Serum-differentiated macrophages stimulated with β-glucans showed a low production of TNFα and IL-1β, a high production of IL-6 and IL-23, and a delayed induction of cyclooxygenase-2 and PGE2 biosynthesis that resembled the responses elicited by crystals and those produced when phagosomal degradation of the phagocytic cargo increases ligand access to intracellular pattern recognition receptors. Priming with a low concentration of LPS produced a rapid induction of cyclooxygenase-2 and a synergistic release of PGE2. When the differentiation of the macrophages was carried out in the presence of M-CSF, an increased expression of dectin-1 B isoform was observed. In addition, this treatment made the cells capable to release arachidonic acid in response to β-glucan. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that the macrophage response to fungal β-glucans is strongly influenced by cytokines and microbial-derived factors that are usual components of the inflammatory milieu. These responses can be sorted into three main patterns i an elementary response dependent on phagosomal processing of pathogen-associated molecular patterns and/or receptor-independent, direct membrane binding linked to the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-bearing transmembrane adaptor DNAX-activating protein 12, ii a response primed by TLR4-dependent signals, and iii

  10. Robotics for recombinant DNA and human genetics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beugelsdijk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    In October of 1989, molecular biologists throughout the world formally embarked on ultimately determining the set of genetic instructions for a human being. Called by some the Manhattan Project'' a molecular biology, pursuit of this goal is projected to require approximately 3000 man years of effort over a 15-year period. The Humane Genome Initiative is a worldwide research effort that has the goal of analyzing the structure of human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and determining the location of all human genes. The Department of Energy (DOE) has designated three of its national laboratories as centers for the Human Genome Project. These are Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). These laboratories are currently working on different, but complementary technology development areas in support of the Human Genome Project. The robotics group at LANL is currently working at developing the technologies that address the problems associated with physical mapping. This article describes some of these problems and discusses some of the robotics approaches and engineering tolls applicable to their solution. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. A macrophage phenotype for a constitutive, class II antigen-expressing, human dermal perivascular dendritic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontheimer, R D; Matsubara, T; Seelig, L L

    1989-07-01

    A previously uncharacterized population of class II antigen-bearing dendritic cells that are intimately associated with the dermal microvasculature was identified in normal human skin using a double-label, indirect immunofluorescence technique. The only other major HLA-DR positive dermal cell type noted in these studies, the dermal microvascular endothelial cell (DMVEC), appeared to express lesser amounts of HLA-DR region gene product than did this dermal perivascular dendritic cell (DPDC). These DPDC were particularly common around small vessels in the superficial vascular plexus of the papillary dermis and were distinct from the mast cell, another cell type normally seen in a similar location. Phenotypic and ultrastructural studies have determined that the DPDC is more closely related to the monocyte/macrophage lineage than the dendritic cell lineage. The perivascular location and phenotype of this cell distinguishes it from other previously described constitutive dermal cell types such as the classic "histiocyte," veiled cell, and dendrocyte. The relatively rich expression of all three major HLA-D region gene products by this dermal perivascular dendritic macrophage would suggest that it could play a significant role in the immunobiology of the dermal microvascular unit.

  12. Probiotic Lactobacillus Strains Stimulate the Inflammatory Response and Activate Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Rocha-Ramírez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli have been shown to promote health functions. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism by which four different strains of probiotics affected innate immunity, such as regulation of ROS, cytokines, phagocytosis, bactericidal activity, signaling by NF-κB pp65, and TLR2 activation. The production of ROS was dependent on the concentration and species of Lactobacillus. The results obtained from the tested strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, L. rhamnosus KLSD, L. helveticus IMAU70129, and L. casei IMAU60214 showed that strains induced early proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-8,TNF-α, IL-12p70, and IL-6. However, IL-1β expression was induced only by L. helveticus and L. casei strains (after 24 h stimulation. Phagocytosis and bactericidal activity of macrophages against various pathogens, such as S. aureus, S. typhimurium, and E. coli, were increased by pretreatment with Lactobacillus. The nuclear translocation NF-κB pp65 and TLR2-dependent signaling were also increased by treatment with the probiotics. Taken together, the experiments demonstrate that probiotic strains of Lactobacillus exert early immunostimulatory effects that may be directly linked to the initial inflammation of the response of human macrophages.

  13. Probiotic Lactobacillus Strains Stimulate the Inflammatory Response and Activate Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Guerrero, S. S.; Ramírez Pacheco, A.; García Garibay, M.; Eslava, C.

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacilli have been shown to promote health functions. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism by which four different strains of probiotics affected innate immunity, such as regulation of ROS, cytokines, phagocytosis, bactericidal activity, signaling by NF-κB pp65, and TLR2 activation. The production of ROS was dependent on the concentration and species of Lactobacillus. The results obtained from the tested strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, L. rhamnosus KLSD, L. helveticus IMAU70129, and L. casei IMAU60214) showed that strains induced early proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-8,TNF-α, IL-12p70, and IL-6. However, IL-1β expression was induced only by L. helveticus and L. casei strains (after 24 h stimulation). Phagocytosis and bactericidal activity of macrophages against various pathogens, such as S. aureus, S. typhimurium, and E. coli, were increased by pretreatment with Lactobacillus. The nuclear translocation NF-κB pp65 and TLR2-dependent signaling were also increased by treatment with the probiotics. Taken together, the experiments demonstrate that probiotic strains of Lactobacillus exert early immunostimulatory effects that may be directly linked to the initial inflammation of the response of human macrophages. PMID:28758133

  14. Application of Recombinant Proteins for Serodiagnosis of Visceral Leishmaniasis in Humans and Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Mahin; Nahrevanian, Hossein

    2016-07-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a zoonotic disease caused by leishmania species. Dogs are considered to be the main reservoir of VL. A number of methods and antigen-based assays are used for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis. However, currently available methods are mainly based on direct examination of tissues for the presence of parasites, which is highly invasive. A variety of serological tests are commonly applied for VL diagnosis, including indirect fluorescence antibody test, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), dot-ELISA, direct agglutination test, Western-blotting, and immunochromatographic test. However, when soluble antigens are used, serological tests are less specific due to cross-reactivity with other parasitic diseases. Several studies have attempted to replace soluble antigens with recombinant proteins to improve the sensitivity and the specificity of the immunodiagnostic tests. Major technological advances in recombinant antigens as reagents for the serological diagnosis of VL have led to high sensitivity and specificity of these serological tests. A great number of recombinant proteins have been shown to be effective for the diagnosis of leishmania infection in dogs, the major reservoir of L. infantum. Although few recombinant proteins with high efficacy provide reasonable results for the diagnosis of human and canine VL, more optimization is still needed for the appropriate antigens to provide high-throughput performance. This review aims to explore the application of different recombinant proteins for the serodiagnosis of VL in humans and dogs.

  15. Structural Evolution of Human Recombinant alfaB-Crystallin under UV Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, Masaaki; Fujii, Noriko; Morimoto, Yukio

    2008-01-01

    External stresses cause certain proteins to lose their regular structure and aggregate. In order to clarify this abnormal aggregation process, a structural evolution of human recombinant aB-crystallin under UV irradiation was observed with in situ small-angle neutron scattering. The abnormal...

  16. How bio-questionable are the different recombinant human erythropoietin copy products in Thailand?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halim, Liem Andhyk|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412608294; Brinks, Vera|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31395979X; Jiskoot, Wim; Romeijn, Stefan; Praditpornsilpa, Kearkiat; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Schellekens, Huub|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068406762

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The high prevalence of pure red cell aplasia in Thailand has been associated with the sharp increase in number of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) copy products, based on a classical generic regulatory pathway, which have entered the market. This study aims to assess the quality of

  17. New insights for identification of doping with recombinant human erythropoietin micro-doses after high hydration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, L.; Ashenden, M; Bejder, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    To minimize the chances of being caught after doping with recombinant human erythropoietins (rhEPO), athletes have turned to new practices using micro-doses and excess fluid ingestion to accelerate elimination and decrease the probability of detection. Our objective was to test the sensitivity of...

  18. Modification of human beta-globin locus PAC clones by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.P. Patrinos (George); M. de Krom (Mariken); S. Bottardi; R.J. Janssens; E. Katsantoni (Eleni); A.W. Wai; D.J. Sherratt; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); A.M.A. Imam (Ali)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe report here modifications of human beta-globin PAC clones by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli DH10B, utilising a plasmid temperature sensitive for replication, the recA gene and a wild-type copy of the rpsL gene which allows for an efficient selection for

  19. Bioconversion of Mono- and Sesquiterpenoids by Recombinant Human Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Julsing, Mattijs K.; Fichera, Mario A.; Malz, Frank; Ebbelaar, Monique; Bos, Rein; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Quax, Wim J.; Kayser, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases play an important role in the biosynthesis and metabolism of terpenoids. We explored the potential of recombinant human liver cytochrome P450 monooxygenases CYP1A2, CYP2C9, and CYP3A4, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, to convert mono- and sesquiterpenoids

  20. Biodistribution and translational pharmacokinetic modeling of a human recombinant alkaline phosphatase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Esther; Stevens, Jasper; Arend, Jacques; Guan, Zheng; Raaben, Willem; Laverman, Peter; Elsas, Andrea van; Masereeuw, R.; Pickkers, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials showed renal protective effects of bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (AP) in patients with sepsis-associated Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Subsequently, a human recombinant chimeric AP (recAP) was developed as a pharmaceutically acceptable alternative. Here, we investigated the

  1. Prevention of murine experimental autoimmune orchitis by recombinant human interleukin-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lu; Itoh, Masahiro; Ablake, Maila

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effect of exogenously administered recombinant human interleukin (IL)-6 on the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in C3H/Hej mice. IL-6 significantly reduced histological signs of EAO and appearance of delayed type hypersensitivity against the immunizing testicul...

  2. Recombinant human DNase nebulisation in children with cystic fibrosis: Before bedtime or after waking up?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. van der Giessen (Lianne); R.A.A.M. Gosselink (Rik); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); H.A.W.M. Tiddens (Harm)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe present study focused on patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), who were on maintenance therapy with recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase), with the aim of comparing efficacy and possible side effects of nebulisation of rhDNase when taken before bedtime with efficacy and side

  3. Human recombinant protein C for severe sepsis and septic shock in adult and paediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Solà, Ivan; Gluud, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is a common and frequently fatal condition. Human recombinant activated protein C (APC) has been introduced to reduce the high risk of death associated with severe sepsis or septic shock. This systematic review is an update of a Cochrane review originally published in 2007....

  4. Prevention of murine experimental autoimmune orchitis by recombinant human interleukin-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lu; Itoh, Masahiro; Ablake, Maila

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effect of exogenously administered recombinant human interleukin (IL)-6 on the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in C3H/Hej mice. IL-6 significantly reduced histological signs of EAO and appearance of delayed type hypersensitivity against the immunizing testicular...

  5. Formulation and process development of (recombinant human) deoxyribonuclease I as a powder for inhalation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Gerrit S; Ponsioen, Bart J; Hummel, Sylvia A; Sanders, Niek; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; de Boer, Anne H; Frijlink, Henderik W

    2009-01-01

    A formulation and process development study was performed to formulate recombinant human deoxyribonuclease I as a powder for inhalation. First, excipient compatibility (with bovine DNase as a model substance) was examined with a stability study at stressed conditions (60 and 85 degrees C) while

  6. Recombinant human erythropoietin and hemoglobin concentration at operation and during the postoperative period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Boesby, S; Wolff, B

    1999-01-01

    In a double-blind placebo-controlled study we investigated the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO), on the perioperative hemoglobin concentration and the use of blood transfusions in patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery with a preoperative hemoglobin level

  7. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: Differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages

    KAUST Repository

    Bokil, Nilesh J.

    2011-11-01

    Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that UPEC can invade and replicate within epithelial cells, suggesting that this bacterial pathogen may occupy an intracellular niche within the host. Given that many intracellular pathogens target macrophages, we assessed the interactions between UPEC and macrophages. Colonization of the mouse bladder by UPEC strain CFT073 resulted in increased expression of myeloid-restricted genes, consistent with the recruitment of inflammatory macrophages to the site of infection. In in vitro assays, CFT073 was able to survive within primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) up to 24h post-infection. Three additional well-characterized clinical UPEC isolates associated with distinct UTI symptomatologies displayed variable long-term survival within BMM. UPEC strains UTI89 and VR50, originally isolated from patients with cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria respectively, showed elevated bacterial loads in BMM at 24h post-infection as compared to CFT073 and the asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972. These differences did not correlate with differential effects on macrophage survival or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1 + vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data suggest that some UPEC isolates may subvert macrophage anti-microbial pathways, and that host species differences may impact on intracellular UPEC survival. © 2011 Elsevier GmbH.

  8. Preservation Analysis of Macrophage Gene Coexpression Between Human and Mouse Identifies PARK2 as a Genetically Controlled Master Regulator of Oxidative Phosphorylation in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Codoni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are key players involved in numerous pathophysiological pathways and an in-depth characterization of their gene regulatory networks can help in better understanding how their dysfunction may impact on human diseases. We here conducted a cross-species network analysis of macrophage gene expression data between human and mouse to identify conserved networks across both species, and assessed whether such networks could reveal new disease-associated regulatory mechanisms. From a sample of 684 individuals processed for genome-wide macrophage gene expression profiling, we identified 27 groups of coexpressed genes (modules. Six modules were found preserved (P < 10−4 in macrophages from 86 mice of the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. One of these modules was significantly [false discovery rate (FDR = 8.9 × 10−11] enriched for genes belonging to the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS pathway. This pathway was also found significantly (FDR < 10−4 enriched in susceptibility genes for Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington diseases. We further conducted an expression quantitative trait loci analysis to identify SNP that could regulate macrophage OXPHOS gene expression in humans. This analysis identified the PARK2 rs192804963 as a trans-acting variant influencing (minimal P-value = 4.3 × 10−8 the expression of most OXPHOS genes in humans. Further experimental work demonstrated that PARK2 knockdown expression was associated with increased OXPHOS gene expression in THP1 human macrophages. This work provided strong new evidence that PARK2 participates to the regulatory networks associated with oxidative phosphorylation and suggested that PARK2 genetic variations could act as a trans regulator of OXPHOS gene macrophage expression in humans.

  9. Laboratory scale production of the human recombinant iduronate 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-04

    May 4, 2009 ... with glycine 1.7 mM). The fluorescence was determined in a fluorometer Turner 450, with wave lengths of excitation and emission of 360 and 415 nm, respectively. The control was leukocytes or human plasma (Voznyi et al., 2001). Enzyme activity was expressed as nmol of substrate converted h-1 mg-1 of ...

  10. Recombinant production of the human complement factor 5a in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Up to now, the human complement factor 5a (C5a) has only been produced in small quantities in Escherichia coli in a soluble, bioactive conformation, which is not suitable for commercial production systems. This stems from the extremely high instability of C5a, as well as its aggregation-prone nature. Therefore, we ...

  11. Production and characterisation of recombinant forms of human pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukovic, Dunja; Plasencia, Inés; Taberner, Francisco J

    2006-01-01

    -C-derived peptides or recombinant humanized SP-C for inclusion in new preparations for therapeutic use. We describe herein the recombinant production in bacterial cultures of SP-C variants containing phenylalanines instead of the palmitoylated cysteines of the native protein, as fusions to the hydrophilic nuclease...... A (SN) from Staphylococcus aureus. The resulting chimerae were partially purified by affinity chromatography and subsequently subjected to protease digestion. The SP-C forms were recovered from the digestion mixtures by organic extraction and further purified by size exclusion chromatography. The two...

  12. High-level secretion of native recombinant human calreticulin in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Čiplys, Evaldas; Žitkus, Eimantas; Gold, Leslie I.

    2015-01-01

    , Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris. RESULTS: Expression of a full-length human CRT precursor including its native signal sequence resulted in high-level secretion of mature recombinant protein into the culture medium by both S. cerevisiae and P. pastoris. To ensure the structural and functional...... recombinant CRT protein with yields reaching 75 % of total secreted protein and with production levels of 60 and 200 mg/l from S. cerevisiae and P. pastoris, respectively. Finally, cultivation of P. pastoris in a bioreactor yielded CRT secretion titer to exceed 1.5 g/l of culture medium. CONCLUSIONS: Yeasts...

  13. PAI-1 (Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1) Expression Renders Alternatively Activated Human Macrophages Proteolytically Quiescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohensinner, Philipp J; Baumgartner, Johanna; Kral-Pointner, Julia B; Uhrin, Pavel; Ebenbauer, Benjamin; Thaler, Barbara; Doberer, Konstantin; Stojkovic, Stefan; Demyanets, Svitlana; Fischer, Michael B; Huber, Kurt; Schabbauer, Gernot; Speidl, Walter S; Wojta, Johann

    2017-10-01

    Macrophages are versatile immune cells capable of polarizing into functional subsets depending on environmental stimulation. In atherosclerotic lesions, proinflammatory polarized macrophages are associated with symptomatic plaques, whereas Th2 (T-helper cell type 2) cytokine-polarized macrophages are inversely related with disease progression. To establish a functional cause for these observations, we analyzed extracellular matrix degradation phenotypes in polarized macrophages. We provide evidence that proinflammatory polarized macrophages rely on membrane-bound proteases including MMP-14 (matrix metalloproteinase-14) and the serine protease uPA (urokinase plasminogen activator) together with its receptor uPAR for extracellular matrix degradation. In contrast, Th2 cytokine alternatively primed macrophages do not show different proteolytic activity in comparison to unpolarized macrophages and lack increased localization of MMP-14 and uPA receptor to the cell membrane. Nonetheless, they express the highest amount of the serine protease uPA. However, uPA activity is blocked by similarly increased expression of its inhibitor PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1). When inhibiting PAI-1 or when analyzing macrophages deficient in PAI-1, Th2 cytokine-polarized macrophages display the same matrix degradation capability as proinflammatory-primed macrophages. Within atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages positive for the alternative activation marker CD206 express high levels of PAI-1. In addition, to test changed tissue remodeling capacities of alternatively activated macrophages, we used a bleomycin lung injury model in mice reconstituted with PAI-1(-/-) bone marrow. These results supported an enhanced remodeling phenotype displayed by increased fibrosis and elevated MMP activity in the lung after PAI-1 loss. We were able to demonstrate matrix degradation dependent on membrane-bound proteases in proinflammatory stimulated macrophages and a forced proteolytical quiescence

  14. Human primary adipocytes exhibit immune cell function: adipocytes prime inflammation independent of macrophages.

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    Kees Meijer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity promotes inflammation in adipose tissue (AT and this is implicated in pathophysiological complications such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although based on the classical hypothesis, necrotic AT adipocytes (ATA in obese state activate AT macrophages (ATM that then lead to a sustained chronic inflammation in AT, the link between human adipocytes and the source of inflammation in AT has not been in-depth and systematically studied. So we decided as a new hypothesis to investigate human primary adipocytes alone to see whether they are able to prime inflammation in AT. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using mRNA expression, human preadipocytes and adipocytes express the cytokines/chemokines and their receptors, MHC II molecule genes and 14 acute phase reactants including C-reactive protein. Using multiplex ELISA revealed the expression of 50 cytokine/chemokine proteins by human adipocytes. Upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation, most of these adipocyte-associated cytokines/chemokines and immune cell modulating receptors were up-regulated and a few down-regulated such as (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, MCP-1, IP-10, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and TNF-β highly up-regulated and IL-2, IL-7, IL-10, IL-13 and VEGF down-regulated. In migration assay, human adipocyte-derived chemokines attracted significantly more CD4+ T cells than controls and the number of migrated CD4+ cells was doubled after treating the adipocytes with LPS. Neutralizing MCP-1 effect produced by adipocytes reduced CD4+ migration by approximately 30%. CONCLUSION: Human adipocytes express many cytokines/chemokines that are biologically functional. They are able to induce inflammation and activate CD4+ cells independent of macrophages. This suggests that the primary event in the sequence leading to chronic inflammation in AT is metabolic dysfunction in adipocytes, followed by production of immunological mediators by these adipocytes, which is then exacerbated by

  15. Long-term intravenous treatment of Pompe disease with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from milk

    OpenAIRE

    Hout, Johanna; Sibbles, Barbara; Brakenhoff, Just; Cromme-Dijkhuis, Adri; Weisglas-Kuperus, Nynke; Reuser, Arnold; Boer, Marijke; Smeitink, Jan; Diggelen, Otto; Voort, Edwin; Corven, Emiel; Hirtum, Hans; Kamphoven, Joep; Ploeg, Ans; Hove, Johan

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent reports warn that the worldwide cell culture capacity is insufficient to fulfill the increasing demand for human protein drugs. Production in milk of transgenic animals is an attractive alternative. Kilogram quantities of product per year can be obtained at relatively low costs, even in small animals such as rabbits. We tested the long-term safety and efficacy of recombinant human -glucosidase (rhAGLU) from rabbit milk for the treatment of the lysosomal storage disorder Pomp...

  16. Recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase from milk of transgenic animals to protect against organophosphate poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yue-Jin; Huang, Yue; Baldassarre, Hernan; Wang, Bin; Lazaris, Anthoula; Leduc, Martin; Bilodeau, Annie S; Bellemare, Annie; Côté, Mélanie; Herskovits, Peter; Touati, Madjid; Turcotte, Carl; Valeanu, Loredana; Lemée, Nicolas; Wilgus, Harvey

    2007-01-01

    Dangerous organophosphorus (OP) compounds have been used as insecticides in agriculture and in chemical warfare. Because exposure to OP could create a danger for humans in the future, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) has been developed for prophylaxis to these chemicals. Because it is impractical to obtain sufficient quantities of plasma BChE to treat humans exposed to OP agents, the production of recombinant BChE (rBChE) in milk of transgenic animals was investigated. Transgenic mice and goats w...

  17. AhR-dependent secretion of PDGF-BB by human classically activated macrophages exposed to DEP extracts stimulates lung fibroblast proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaguin, Marie [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 Avenue du Pr Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes Cedex (France); Fardel, Olivier [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 Avenue du Pr Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes Cedex (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes Cedex (France); Lecureur, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.lecureur@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 Avenue du Pr Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2015-06-15

    Lung diseases are aggravated by exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) found in air pollution. Macrophages are thought to play a crucial role in lung immune response to these pollutants, even if the mechanisms involved remain incompletely characterized. In the present study, we demonstrated that classically and alternative human macrophages (MΦ) exhibited increased secretion of PDGF-B in response to DEP extract (DEPe). This occurred via aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-activation because DEPe-induced PDGF-B overexpression was abrogated after AhR expression knock-down by RNA interference, in both M1 and M2 polarizing MΦ. In addition, TCDD and benzo(a)pyrene, two potent AhR ligands, also significantly increased mRNA expression of PDGF-B in M1 MΦ, whereas some weak ligands of AhR did not. We next evaluated the impact of conditioned media (CM) from MΦ culture exposed to DEPe or of recombinant PDGF-B onto lung fibroblast proliferation. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG-1295, prevents phosphorylations of PDGF-Rβ, AKT and ERK1/2 and the proliferation of MRC-5 fibroblasts induced by recombinant PDGF-B and by CM from M1 polarizing MΦ, strongly suggesting that the PDGF-BB secreted by DEPe-exposed MΦ is sufficient to activate the PDGF-Rβ pathway of human lung fibroblasts. In conclusion, we demonstrated that human MΦ, whatever their polarization status, secrete PDGF-B in response to DEPe and that PDGF-B is a target gene of AhR. Therefore, induction of PDGF-B by DEP may participate in the deleterious effects towards human health triggered by such environmental urban contaminants. - Highlights: • PDGF-B expression and secretion are increased by DEPe exposure in human M1 and M2 MΦ. • DEPe-induced PDGF-B expression is aryl-hydrocarbon-dependent. • DEPe-exposed M1 MΦ secrete sufficient PDGF-B to increase lung fibroblast proliferation.

  18. Galactomannan Downregulates the Inflammation Responses in Human Macrophages via NFκB2/p100

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    Víctor Toledano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We show that galactomannan, a polysaccharide consisting of a mannose backbone with galactose side groups present on the cell wall of several fungi, induces a reprogramming of the inflammatory response in human macrophages through dectin-1 receptor. The nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells 2 (NFκB2/p100 was overexpressed after galactomannan challenge. Knocking down NFκB2/p100 using small interfering RNA (siRNA indicated that NFκB2/p100 expression is a crucial factor in the progression of the galactomannan-induced refractoriness. The data presented in this study could be used as a modulator of inflammatory response in clinical situations where refractory state is required.

  19. Frequency and genetic characterization of V(DD)J recombinants in the human peripheral blood antibody repertoire.

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    Briney, Bryan S; Willis, Jordan R; Hicar, Mark D; Thomas, James W; Crowe, James E

    2012-09-01

    Antibody heavy-chain recombination that results in the incorporation of multiple diversity (D) genes, although uncommon, contributes substantially to the diversity of the human antibody repertoire. Such recombination allows the generation of heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 (HCDR3) regions of extreme length and enables junctional regions that, because of the nucleotide bias of N-addition regions, are difficult to produce through normal V(D)J recombination. Although this non-classical recombination process has been observed infrequently, comprehensive analysis of the frequency and genetic characteristics of such events in the human peripheral blood antibody repertoire has not been possible because of the rarity of such recombinants and the limitations of traditional sequencing technologies. Here, through the use of high-throughput sequencing of the normal human peripheral blood antibody repertoire, we analysed the frequency and genetic characteristics of V(DD)J recombinants. We found that these recombinations were present in approximately 1 in 800 circulating B cells, and that the frequency was severely reduced in memory cell subsets. We also found that V(DD)J recombination can occur across the spectrum of diversity genes, indicating that virtually all recombination signal sequences that flank diversity genes are amenable to V(DD)J recombination. Finally, we observed a repertoire bias in the diversity gene repertoire at the upstream (5') position, and discovered that this bias was primarily attributable to the order of diversity genes in the genomic locus. © 2012 The Authors. Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Expression of Recombinant Streptokinase from Streptococcus Pyogenes and Its Reaction with Infected Human and Murine Sera

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    Neda Molaee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Streptokinase (SKa is an antigenic protein which is secreted by Streptococcus pyogenes. Streptokinase induces inflammation by complement activation, which may play a role in post infectious diseases. In the present study, recombinant streptokinase from S. pyogenes was produced and showed that recombinant SKa protein was recognized by infected human sera using Western blot analysis.   Materials and Methods: In this study, the ska gene from S. pyogenes was amplified and cloned into pET32a which is a prokaryotic expression vector. pET32a-ska was transformed to Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 pLysS and gene expression was induced by IPTG. Protein production was improved by modification of composition of the bacterial culture media and altering the induction time by IPTG. The expressed protein was purified by affinity chromatography using the Ni-NTA resin. The integrity of the product was confirmed by Westernblot analysis using infected mice. Serum reactivity of five infected individuals was further analyzed against the recombinant SKa protein. Results: Data indicated that recombinant SKa protein from S. pyogenes can be recognized by patient and mice sera. The concentration of the purified recombinant protein was 3.2 mg/L of initial culture. The highest amount of the expressed protein after addition of IPTG was obtained in a bacterial culture without glucose with the culture optical density of 0.8 (OD600 = 0.8. Conclusion : Present data shows, recombinant SKa protein has same epitopes with natural form of this antigen. Recombinant SKa also seemed to be a promising antigen for the serologic diagnosis of S. pyogenes infections.

  1. Properties of recombinant human plasma procarboxypeptidase U produced in mammalian and insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömqvist, Mats; Hansson, Lennart; Andersson, Jan-Olof; Johansson, Thord; Edlund, Michael; Enoksson, Maria; Goossens, Filip; Scharpé, Simon; Hendriks, Dirk

    2004-09-01

    Carboxypeptidase U (EC 3.4.17.20, TAFIa) is a new member of the metallocarboxypeptidase family circulating in human plasma as a zymogen. It is activated during coagulation and is considered as an important player in the regulation of fibrinolysis. Heterologous expression of human plasma procarboxypeptidase U (proCPU, TAFI) was obtained in mammalian cells (C127 and DON) and in insect cells (Sf21 and H5 cells). Conditioned media were purified by cation-exchange chromatography and plasminogen affinity chromatography to yield an essentially pure protein. All systems gave high expression levels (6-20 mg/l). Due to differences in glycosylation of the activation peptide, the recombinant variants of proCPU migrated differently on SDS-PAGE (52-65 kDa). However, after activation, all active recombinant enzymes migrated at 35 kDa, similar to native CPU and no evidence for post-translational modification of the catalytic domains could be detected. For the mammalian cell produced variants, activation was more efficient after desialylation. After activation, CPU showed low solubility (0.2 mg/ml) but was inhibited similarly as native CPU. Mammalian cell systems were the most efficient for the production of human plasma recombinant proCPU. The obtained zymogen differs with respect to the extent and the heterogeneity of glycosylation but, after activation, the experiments did not reveal any alteration between the recombinant and native protein.

  2. Recombinant production of human Aquaporin-1 to an exceptional high membrane density in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Julie Bomholt

    Full Text Available In the present paper we explored the capacity of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as host for heterologous expression of human Aquaporin-1. Aquaporin-1 cDNA was expressed from a galactose inducible promoter situated on a plasmid with an adjustable copy number. Human Aquaporin-1 was C-terminally tagged with yeast enhanced GFP for quantification of functional expression, determination of sub-cellular localization, estimation of in vivo folding efficiency and establishment of a purification protocol. Aquaporin-1 was found to constitute 8.5 percent of total membrane protein content after expression at 15°C in a yeast host over-producing the Gal4p transcriptional activator and growth in amino acid supplemented minimal medium. In-gel fluorescence combined with western blotting showed that low accumulation of correctly folded recombinant Aquaporin-1 at 30°C was due to in vivo mal-folding. Reduction of the expression temperature to 15°C almost completely prevented Aquaporin-1 mal-folding. Bioimaging of live yeast cells revealed that recombinant Aquaporin-1 accumulated in the yeast plasma membrane. A detergent screen for solubilization revealed that CYMAL-5 was superior in solubilizing recombinant Aquaporin-1 and generated a monodisperse protein preparation. A single Ni-affinity chromatography step was used to obtain almost pure Aquaporin-1. Recombinant Aquaporin-1 produced in S. cerevisiae was not N-glycosylated in contrast to the protein found in human erythrocytes.

  3. Volcanic Ash Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Murine and Human Macrophages

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    David E. Damby

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash is a heterogeneous mineral dust that is typically composed of a mixture of amorphous (glass and crystalline (mineral fragments. It commonly contains an abundance of the crystalline silica (SiO2 polymorph cristobalite. Inhalation of crystalline silica can induce inflammation by stimulating the NLRP3 inflammasome, a cytosolic receptor complex that plays a critical role in driving inflammatory immune responses. Ingested material results in the assembly of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 with subsequent secretion of the interleukin-1 family cytokine IL-1β. Previous toxicology work suggests that cristobalite-bearing volcanic ash is minimally reactive, calling into question the reactivity of volcanically derived crystalline silica, in general. In this study, we target the NLRP3 inflammasome as a crystalline silica responsive element to clarify volcanic cristobalite reactivity. We expose immortalized bone marrow-derived macrophages of genetically engineered mice and primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs to ash from the Soufrière Hills volcano as well as representative, pure-phase samples of its primary componentry (volcanic glass, feldspar, cristobalite and measure NLRP3 inflammasome activation. We demonstrate that respirable Soufrière Hills volcanic ash induces the activation of caspase-1 with subsequent release of mature IL-1β in a NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent manner. Macrophages deficient in NLRP3 inflammasome components are incapable of secreting IL-1β in response to volcanic ash ingestion. Cellular uptake induces lysosomal destabilization involving cysteine proteases. Furthermore, the response involves activation of mitochondrial stress pathways leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species. Considering ash componentry, cristobalite is the most reactive pure-phase with other components inducing only low-level IL-1β secretion. Inflammasome activation mediated by inhaled ash and its potential relevance in

  4. Volcanic ash activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in murine and human macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damby, David; Horwell, Claire J.; Baxter, Peter J.; Kueppers, Ulrich; Schnurr, Max; Dingwell, Donald B.; Duewell, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Volcanic ash is a heterogeneous mineral dust that is typically composed of a mixture of amorphous (glass) and crystalline (mineral) fragments. It commonly contains an abundance of the crystalline silica (SiO2) polymorph cristobalite. Inhalation of crystalline silica can induce inflammation by stimulating the NLRP3 inflammasome, a cytosolic receptor complex that plays a critical role in driving inflammatory immune responses. Ingested material results in the assembly of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 with subsequent secretion of the interleukin-1 family cytokine IL-1β. Previous toxicology work suggests that cristobalite-bearing volcanic ash is minimally reactive, calling into question the reactivity of volcanically derived crystalline silica, in general. In this study, we target the NLRP3 inflammasome as a crystalline silica responsive element to clarify volcanic cristobalite reactivity. We expose immortalized bone marrow-derived macrophages of genetically engineered mice and primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to ash from the Soufrière Hills volcano as well as representative, pure-phase samples of its primary componentry (volcanic glass, feldspar, cristobalite) and measure NLRP3 inflammasome activation. We demonstrate that respirable Soufrière Hills volcanic ash induces the activation of caspase-1 with subsequent release of mature IL-1β in a NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent manner. Macrophages deficient in NLRP3 inflammasome components are incapable of secreting IL-1β in response to volcanic ash ingestion. Cellular uptake induces lysosomal destabilization involving cysteine proteases. Furthermore, the response involves activation of mitochondrial stress pathways leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species. Considering ash componentry, cristobalite is the most reactive pure-phase with other components inducing only low-level IL-1β secretion. Inflammasome activation mediated by inhaled ash and its potential relevance in chronic pulmonary

  5. Mature eosinophils stimulated to develop in human cord blood mononuclear cell cultures supplemented with recombinant human interleukin-5. Part I. Piecemeal degranulation of specific granules and distribution of Charcot-Leyden crystal protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, A M; Furitsu, T; Letourneau, L; Ishizaka, T; Ackerman, S J

    1991-01-01

    Human cord blood mononuclear cells were cultured for 35 days in media containing recombinant human interleukin 5 (rhIL-5) supplemented with a fraction of the culture supernatant of phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human T lymphocytes from which interleukin 2 (IL-2) was eliminated. Cultured cells were studied by electron microscopy and an immunogold procedure to detect subcellular site(s) of Charcot-Leyden crystal (CLC) protein. The majority of cells (greater than 70%) developing in this system were mature eosinophils, with descending frequency of other cells, including macrophages, mature basophils, eosinophilic myelocytes, and mature neutrophils. Mature eosinophils were characterized by increased numbers of primary granules, small granules, tubulovesicular structures, and decreased secondary granules. These eosinophils showed extensive piecemeal degranulation (PMD) characterized by partially empty and empty secondary granule chambers in the cytoplasm. Small, smooth vesicles were evident within empty granule chambers as well as adjacent to them. Eosinophils formed close associations with phagocytic macrophages that contained both standard-shaped and irregularly shaped CLC within phagolysosomes. Subcellular sites of CLC protein were demonstrated by immunogold in eosinophils and macrophages arising in these cultures. Charcot-Leyden crystal protein was present in the nuclear matrix and extraorganellar cytoplasm of eosinophils. Primary granules and some cytoplasmic vesicles were labeled for CLC protein, but full and empty secondary granules and the extensive network of tubulovesicles were not. Charcot-Leyden crystals were absent from eosinophils, nor were they present in the extracellular space. Charcot-Leyden crystals were absent from eosinophils, nor were they present in the extracellular space. Charcot-Leyden crystals within phagosomes of macrophages were labeled by the immunogold procedure for CLC protein. These results demonstrate that rhIL-5-supplemented, PHA

  6. Derivation of normal macrophages from human embryonic stem (hES cells for applications in HIV gene therapy

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    Kaufman Dan S

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many novel studies and therapies are possible with the use of human embryonic stem cells (hES cells and their differentiated cell progeny. The hES cell derived CD34 hematopoietic stem cells can be potentially used for many gene therapy applications. Here we evaluated the capacity of hES cell derived CD34 cells to give rise to normal macrophages as a first step towards using these cells in viral infection studies and in developing novel stem cell based gene therapy strategies for AIDS. Results Undifferentiated normal and lentiviral vector transduced hES cells were cultured on S17 mouse bone marrow stromal cell layers to derive CD34 hematopoietic progenitor cells. The differentiated CD34 cells isolated from cystic bodies were further cultured in cytokine media to derive macrophages. Phenotypic and functional analyses were carried out to compare these with that of fetal liver CD34 cell derived macrophages. As assessed by FACS analysis, the hES-CD34 cell derived macrophages displayed characteristic cell surface markers CD14, CD4, CCR5, CXCR4, and HLA-DR suggesting a normal phenotype. Tests evaluating phagocytosis, upregulation of the costimulatory molecule B7.1, and cytokine secretion in response to LPS stimulation showed that these macrophages are also functionally normal. When infected with HIV-1, the differentiated macrophages supported productive viral infection. Lentiviral vector transduced hES cells expressing the transgene GFP were evaluated similarly like above. The transgenic hES cells also gave rise to macrophages with normal phenotypic and functional characteristics indicating no vector mediated adverse effects during differentiation. Conclusion Phenotypically normal and functionally competent macrophages could be derived from hES-CD34 cells. Since these cells are susceptible to HIV-1 infection, they provide a uniform source of macrophages for viral infection studies. Based on these results, it is also now feasible to

  7. Flagella from five Cronobacter species induce pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophage derivatives from human monocytes.

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    Ariadnna Cruz-Córdova

    Full Text Available Cronobacter spp. are opportunistic pathogens linked to lie-threatening infections in neonates and contaminated powdered infant formula that has been epidemiologically associated with these cases. Clinical symptoms of Cronobacter include necrotizing enterocolitis, bacteremia, and meningitis. Flagella from C. sakazakii are involved in biofilm formation and its adhesion to epithelial cells. We investigated the role of flagella from C. sakazakii ST1 and ST4, C. malonaticus, C. muytjensii, C. turicensis and C. dublinensis during the activation of cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 in macrophage derivatives from human monocytes, which has not been extensively studied. The production and identity of flagella from the five Cronobacter species were visualized and recognized with anti-flagella antibodies by immunogold labeling through transmission electron microscopy. Purified flagella were dissociated into monomers in 12% SDS-PAGE Coomassie blue-stained gels showing a band of ∼28 kDa and, in addition, mass spectrometry revealed the presence of several peptides that correspond to flagellin. Flagella (100 ng induced the release of IL-8 (3314-6025 pg/ml, TNF-α (39-359 pg/ml, and IL-10 (2-96 pg/ml, in macrophage isolates from human monocytes and similar results were obtained when flagella were dissociated into monomers. Inhibition assays using three dilutions of anti-flagella antibodies (1∶10, 1∶100, and 1∶200 suppressed the secretion of IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 between 95-100% using 100 ng of protein. A transfection assay using 293-hTLR5 cells showed IL-8 release of 197 pg/ml and suppression in the secretion of IL-8 when anti-hTLR5-IgA antibodies were used at different concentrations. These observations suggest that flagella and flagellin are involved in an inflammatory response dependent on TLR5 recognition, which could contribute to the pathogenesis of the bacteria.

  8. Dot/Icm Type IVB Secretion System Requirements for Coxiella burnetii Growth in Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beare, Paul A.; Gilk, Stacey D.; Larson, Charles L.; Hill, Joshua; Stead, Christopher M.; Omsland, Anders; Cockrell, Diane C.; Howe, Dale; Voth, Daniel E.; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Central to Q fever pathogenesis is replication of the causative agent, Coxiella burnetii, within a phagolysosome-like parasitophorous vacuole (PV) in mononuclear phagocytes. C. burnetii modulates PV biogenesis and other host cell functions, such as apoptotic signaling, presumably via the activity of proteins delivered to the host cytosol by a Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system (T4BSS). In this study, we utilized a C. burnetii strain carrying IcmD inactivated by the Himar1 transposon to investigate the requirements for Dot/Icm function in C. burnetii parasitism of human THP-1 macrophage-like cells. The icmD::Tn mutant failed to secrete characterized T4BSS substrates, a defect that correlated with deficient replication, PV development, and apoptosis protection. Restoration of type IVB secretion and intracellular growth of the icmD::Tn mutant required complementation with icmD, -J, and -B, indicating a polar effect of the transposon insertion on downstream dot/icm genes. Induction of icmDJB expression at 1 day postinfection resulted in C. burnetii replication and PV generation. Collectively, these data prove that T4BSS function is required for productive infection of human macrophages by C. burnetii. However, illustrating the metabolic flexibility of C. burnetti, the icmD::Tn mutant could replicate intracellularly when sequestered in a PV generated by wild-type bacteria, where Dot/Icm function is provided in trans, and within a phenotypically similar PV generated by the protozoan parasite Leishmania amazonensis, where host cells are devoid of Dot/Icm T4BSS effector proteins. PMID:21862628

  9. Degradation of amyloid beta by human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived macrophages expressing Neprilysin-2

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    Koutaro Takamatsu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cell-derived macrophage-like cells for Alzheimer's disease (AD. In previous studies, we established the technology to generate macrophage-like myeloid lineage cells with proliferating capacity from human iPS cells, and we designated the cells iPS-ML. iPS-ML reduced the level of Aβ added into the culture medium, and the culture supernatant of iPS-ML alleviated the neurotoxicity of Aβ. We generated iPS-ML expressing the Fc-receptor-fused form of a single chain antibody specific to Aβ. In addition, we made iPS-ML expressing Neprilysin-2 (NEP2, which is a protease with Aβ-degrading activity. In vitro, expression of NEP2 but not anti-Aβ scFv enhanced the effect to reduce the level of soluble Aβ oligomer in the culture medium and to alleviate the neurotoxicity of Aβ. To analyze the effect of iPS-ML expressing NEP2 (iPS-ML/NEP2 in vivo, we intracerebrally administered the iPS-ML/NEP2 to 5XFAD mice, which is a mouse model of AD. We observed significant reduction in the level of Aβ in the brain interstitial fluid following administration of iPS-ML/NEP2. These results suggested that iPS-ML/NEP2 may be a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of AD.

  10. Biliverdin Reductase A (BVRA Mediates Macrophage Expression of Interleukin-10 in Injured Kidney

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    Zhizhi Hu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Biliverdin reductase A is an enzyme, with serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase activation, converting biliverdin (BV to bilirubin (BR in heme degradation pathway. It has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect in monocytes and human glioblastoma. However, the function of BVRA in polarized macrophage was unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of BVRA on macrophage activation and polarization in injured renal microenvironment. Classically activated macrophages (M1macrophages and alternative activation of macrophages (M2 macrophages polarization of murine bone marrow derived macrophage was induced by GM-CSF and M-CSF. M1 polarization was associated with a significant down-regulation of BVRA and Interleukin-10 (IL-10, and increased secretion of TNF-α. We also found IL-10 expression was increased in BVRA over-expressed macrophages, while it decreased in BVRA knockdown macrophages. In contrast, BVRA over-expressed or knockdown macrophages had no effect on TNF-α expression level, indicating BVRA mediated IL-10 expression in macrophages. Furthermore, we observed in macrophages infected with recombinant adenoviruses BVRA gene, which BVRA over-expressed enhanced both INOS and ARG-1 mRNA expression, resulting in a specific macrophage phenotype. Through in vivo study, we found BVRA positive macrophages largely existed in mice renal ischemia perfusion injury. With the treatment of the regular cytokines GM-CSF, M-CSF or LPS, excreted in the injured renal microenvironment, IL-10 secretion was significantly increased in BVRA over-expressed macrophages. In conclusion, the BVRA positive macrophage is a source of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in injured kidney, which may provide a potential target for treatment of kidney disease.

  11. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei stimulate differential inflammatory responses from human alveolar type II cells (ATII) and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Richard; Popov, Vsevolod; Patel, Jignesh; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar type II pneumocytes (ATII) and alveolar macrophages (AM) play a crucial role in the lung's innate immune response. Burkholderia pseudomallei (BP) and Burkholderia mallei (BM) are facultative Gram-negative bacilli that cause melioidosis and glanders, respectively. The inhalation of these pathogens can cause lethal disease and death in humans. We sought to compare the pathogenesis of and host responses to BP and BM through contact with human primary ATII cells and monocytes-derived macrophages (MDM). We hypothesized that because BP and BM induce different disease outcomes, each pathogen would induce distinct, unique host immune responses from resident pulmonary cells. Our findings showed that BP adhered readily to ATII cells compared to BM. BP, but not BM, was rapidly internalized by macrophages where it replicated to high numbers. Further, BP-induced significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from ATII cells (IL-6, IL-8) and macrophages (IL-6, TNFα) at 6 h post-infection compared to BM (p < 0.05). Interestingly, BM-induced the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, in ATII cells and macrophages at 6 h post-infection, with delayed induction of inflammatory cytokines at 24 h post-infection. Because BP is flagellated and produces LPS, we confirmed that it stimulated both Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and TLR5 via NF-κb activation while the non-flagellated BM stimulated only TLR4. These data show the differences in BP and BM pathogenicity in the lung when infecting human ATII cells and macrophages and demonstrate the ability of these pathogens to elicit distinct immune responses from resident lung cells which may open new targets for therapeutic intervention to fight against these pathogens.

  12. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei stimulate differential inflammatory responses from human alveolar type II cells (ATII and macrophages.

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    Richard eLu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar type II pneumocytes (ATII and alveolar macrophages (AM play a crucial role in the lung’s innate immune response. Burkholderia pseudomallei (BP and Burkholderia mallei (BM are facultative Gram-negative bacilli that cause melioidosis and glanders, respectively. The inhalation of these pathogens can cause lethal disease and death in humans. We sought to compare the pathogenesis of and host responses to BP and BM through contact with human primary ATII cells and monocytes-derived macrophages (MDM. We hypothesized that because BP and BM induce different disease outcomes, each pathogen would induce distinct, unique host immune responses from resident pulmonary cells. Our findings showed that BP adhered readily to ATII cells compared to BM. BP, but not BM, was rapidly internalized by macrophages where it replicated to high numbers. Further, BP induced significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from ATII cells (IL-6, IL-8 and macrophages (IL-6, TNFα at 6h post-infection compared to BM (p<0.05. Interestingly, BM induced the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, in ATII cells and macrophages at 6h post-infection, with delayed induction of inflammatory cytokines at 24h post-infection. Because BP is flagellated and produces LPS, we confirmed that it stimulated both Toll-like receptor (TLR 4 and TLR5 via NF-κb activation while the non-flagellated BM stimulated only TLR4. These data show the differences in BP and BM pathogenicity in the lung when infecting human ATII cells and macrophages and demonstrate the ability of these pathogens to elicit distinct immune responses from resident lung cells which may open new targets for therapeutic intervention to fight against these pathogens.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation induces 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity in human alternative macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Copin, Corinne; Duhem, Christian; Derudas, Bruno; Neve, Bernadette; Noel, Benoit; Eeckhoute, Jerome; Lefebvre, Philippe; Seckl, Jonathan R; Staels, Bart

    2012-03-01

    11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) catalyzes the intracellular reduction of inactive cortisone to active cortisol, the natural ligand activating the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Peroxisome proliferator- activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor controlling inflammation, lipid metabolism, and the macrophage polarization state. In this study, we investigated the impact of macrophage polarization on the expression and activity of 11β-HSD1 and the role of PPARγ therein. 11β-HSD1 gene expression is higher in proinflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages than in resting macrophages, whereas its activity is highest in M2 macrophages. Interestingly, PPARγ activation induces 11β-HSD1 enzyme activity in M2 macrophages but not in resting macrophages or M1 macrophages. Consequently, human M2 macrophages displayed enhanced responsiveness to the 11β-HSD1 substrate cortisone, an effect amplified by PPARγ induction of 11β-HSD1 activity, as illustrated by an increased expression of GR target genes. Our data identify a positive cross-talk between PPARγ and GR in human M2 macrophages via the induction of 11β-HSD1 expression and activity.

  14. L-Arginine is not the limiting factor for nitric oxide synthesis by human alveolar macrophages in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijsers, RBR; ten Hacken, NHT; Van Ark, [No Value; Folkerts, G; Nijkamp, FP; Postma, DS

    2001-01-01

    Unlike murine mononuclear phagocytes, human macrophages do not release high amounts of nitric oxide (NO) in vitro despite the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). To determine whether this limited NO synthesis in vitro is due to limited availability of the NOS substrate L-arginine, and putative

  15. Human mesenchymal stem cells alter macrophage phenotype and promote regeneration via homing to the kidney following ischemia-reperfusion injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wise, Andrea F; Williams, Timothy M; Kiewiet, Mensiena B G; Payne, Natalie L; Siatskas, Christopher; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) ameliorate injury and accelerate repair in many organs, including the kidney, although the reparative mechanisms and interaction with macrophages have not been elucidated. This study investigated the reparative potential of human bone marrow-derived MSCs and traced

  16. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase in human ovarian tumors and tumor-associated macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimp, AH; Hollema, H; Kempinga, C; van der Zee, AGJ; de Vries, EGE; Daemen, T

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates whether and to what extent cyclooxygenase type-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide-synthase (iNOS), both known to have an immunosuppressive effect, are expressed in human ovarian tumors. Because COX-2 and iNOS can be expressed by activated macrophages, the presence of

  17. [EVALUATION OF THE HUMAN SENSITIVITY TO SMALLPOX VIRUS BY THE PRIMARY CULTURES OF THE MONOCYTE-MACROPHAGES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamedyanskaya, A S; Titova, K A; Sergeev, Al A; Kabanov, A S; Bulychev, L E; Sergeev, Ar A; Galakhova, D O; Nesterov, A E; Nosareva, O V; Shishkina, L N; Taranov, O S; Omigov, V V; Agafonov, A P; Sergeev, A N

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the primary cultures of granulocytes, mononuclear, and monocyte-macrophage cells derived from human blood were performed using variola virus (VARV) in the doses of 0.001-0.021 PFU/cell (plaques-forming units per cell). Positive dynamics of the virus accumulation was observed only in the monocyte-macrophages with maximum values of virus concentration (5.0-5.5 Ig PFU/ml) mainly within six days after the infection. The fact of VARV replication in the monocyte-macrophages was confirmed by the data of electron microscopy. At the same time, virus vaccines when tested in doses 3.3 and 4.2 Ig PFU/ml did not show the ability to reproduce in these human cells. The people sensitivity to VARV as assessed from the data obtained on human monocyte-macrophages corresponded to -1 PFU (taking into account the smooth interaction of the virus in the body to the cells of this type), which is consistent to previously found theoretical data on the virus sensitivity. The human susceptibility to VARV assessed experimentally can be used to predict the adequacy of developed smallpox models (in vivo) based on susceptible animals. This is necessary for reliable assessment of the efficiency of development of drugs for treatment and prophylaxis of the smallpox.

  18. Recombination in circulating Human enterovirus B: independent evolution of structural and non-structural genome regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashev, Alexander N; Lashkevich, Vasilii A; Ivanova, Olga E; Koroleva, Galina A; Hinkkanen, Ari E; Ilonen, Jorma

    2005-12-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of eight Human enterovirus B (HEV-B) strains were determined, representing five serotypes, E6, E7, E11, CVB3 and CVB5, which were isolated in the former Soviet Union between 1998 and 2002. All strains were mosaic recombinants and only the VP2-VP3-VP1 genome region was similar to that of the corresponding prototype HEV-B strains. In seven of the eight strains studied, the 2C-3D genome region was most similar to the prototype E30, EV74 and EV75 strains, whilst the remaining strain was most similar to the prototype E1 and E9 strains in the non-structural protein genome region. Most viruses also bore marks of additional recombination events in this part of the genome. In the 5' non-translated region, all strains were more similar to the prototype E9 than to other enteroviruses. In most cases, recombination mapped to the VP4 and 2ABC genome regions. This, together with the star-like topology of the phylogenetic trees for these genome regions, identified these genome parts as recombination hot spots. These findings further support the concept of independent evolution of enterovirus genome fragments and indicate a requirement for more advanced typing approaches. A range of available phylogenetic methods was also compared for efficient detection of recombination in enteroviruses.

  19. DAB389IL-2 recombinant fusion toxin effect on lymphocyte- and macrophage-producing cytokine subpopulation cells in experimentally induced demyelinating disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopale, Mahendra K; Hilliard, Brendan; Constantinescu, Cris S; Phillips, S Michael; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2017-09-20

    We have reported previously that DAB389IL-2 recombinant fusion toxin targets IL-2R bearing CD4(+) cells, and suppresses demyelinating disease in acute (A) - and chronic (C) - experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal models of multiple sclerosis. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of DAB389IL-2 treatment on various cytokine-secreting cell populations in A-EAE and C-EAE mice. The effects of DAB389IL-2 at doses of 200-, 800-, or 1600 kU administered i.v. on days 11-13 and 15 on the clinical score and cytokine-secreting cell populations were examined using flow cytometry. C-EAE mice treated with 1600kU DAB389IL-2, but not A-EAE mice treated with 800 kU had significantly reduced disease. The CD3+CD25+ sub-population in spleens and spinal cords of A-EAE mice treated with 800 kU DAB389IL-2 a was increased, whereas in C-EAE mice treated with 1600 kU this population was increased. DAB389IL-2 treatment reduced CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(+)CD8(+), CD4(+)CD8(+), CD3(+)IL-2(+), CD3(+)IFN-γ(+) and CD3(+)TNF-α(+) T cell subpopulations in the spinal cord in A-EAE, and C-EAE mice on day 16. CD11b+ macrophages that were IL-2-, IFN-γ-, and TNF-α- positive were reduced in A-EAE mice. DAB389IL-2 treatment reduced CD19(+) B-cells positive for IL-2 or CD11b(+) in the spinal cord in acute and chronic disease. DAB389IL-2 treatment also reduced lymph node CD3(+)CD8(+), CD4(+)CD8(+), CD3(+)CD25(+) populations on day 16, and lymph node CD3(+)IL-10(+) and peripheral blood CD3(+)CD25(+) populations on day 24. Our study demonstrates that DAB389IL-2 fusion toxin suppresses EAE in a dose-dependent manner, and alters inflammatory cell sub-populations during disease development.

  20. [How safe is the recombinant human growth hormone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada-León, Raúl

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, several aspects related to the safety of the use of biosynthetic human growth hormone are reviewed. For example, its classification as a biosynthetic drug, the phases that need to be performed in Mexico to verify its safety (obtaining, purification, preclinical studies, clinical trials, and finally observational clinical studies), as well as the evidence that exists in relation to the association of intracranial hypertension, muscular events, scoliosis, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, obstructive sleep apnea, pancreatitis, alterations in cortisol, thyroid hormones alterations, cardiovascular disease, metabolic risk, mortality and cancer, adverse events not related to its use, and finally dosing and safety.

  1. Learning in a simple biological system: a pilot study of classical conditioning of human macrophages in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsonne Gustav

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in cell biology and gene regulation suggest mechanisms whereby associative learning could be performed by single cells. Therefore, we explored a model of classical conditioning in human macrophages in vitro. In macrophage cultures, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; unconditioned stimulus was paired once with streptomycin (conditioned stimulus. Secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6 was used as response measure. At evocation, conditioning was not observed. Levels of IL-6 were higher only in those cultures that had been exposed to LPS in the learning phase (p's However, habituation was evident, with a 62% loss of the IL-6 response after three LPS presentations (p

  2. The membrane expression of Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA) increases the proimmune effects of MenB OMVs on human macrophages, compared with NadA- OMVs, without further stimulating their proinflammatory activity on circulating monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavano, Regina; Franzoso, Susanna; Cecchini, Paola; Cartocci, Elena; Oriente, Francesca; Aricò, Beatrice; Papini, Emanuele

    2009-07-01

    Hypervirulent MenB causing fatal human infections frequently display the oligomeric-coiled coil adhesin NadA, a 45-kDa intrinsic outer membrane protein implicated in binding to and invasion of respiratory epithelial cells. A recombinant soluble mutant lacking the 10-kDa COOH terminal membrane domain (NadA(Delta351-405)) also activates human monocytes/macrophages/DCs. As NadA is physiologically released during sepsis as part of OMVs, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that NadA(+) OMVs have an enhanced or modified proinflammatory/proimmune action compared with NadA(-) OMVs. To do this we investigated the activity of purified free NadA(Delta351-405) and of OMVs from MenB and Escherichia coli strains, expressing or not full-length NadA. NadA(Delta351-405) stimulated monocytes and macrophages to secrete cytokines (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-10) and chemokines (IL-8, MIP-1alpha, MCP-1, RANTES), and full-length NadA improved MenB OMV activity, preferentially on macrophages, and only increased cytokine release. NadA(Delta351-405) induced the lymphocyte costimulant CD80 in monocytes and macrophages, and NadA(+) OMVs induced a wider set of molecules supporting antigen presentation (CD80, CD86, HLA-DR, and ICAM-1) more efficiently than NadA(-) OMVs only in macrophages. Moreover, membrane NadA effects, unlike NadA(Delta351-405) ones, were much less IFN-gamma-sensitive. The activity of NadA-positive E. coli OMVs was similar to that of control OMVs. NadA in MenB OMVs acted at adhesin concentrations approximately 10(6) times lower than those required to stimulate cells with free NadA(Delta351-405).

  3. RI-1: a chemical inhibitor of RAD51 that disrupts homologous recombination in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budke, Brian; Logan, Hillary L; Kalin, Jay H; Zelivianskaia, Anna S; Cameron McGuire, William; Miller, Luke L; Stark, Jeremy M; Kozikowski, Alan P; Bishop, Douglas K; Connell, Philip P

    2012-08-01

    Homologous recombination serves multiple roles in DNA repair that are essential for maintaining genomic stability. We here describe RI-1, a small molecule that inhibits the central recombination protein RAD51. RI-1 specifically reduces gene conversion in human cells while stimulating single strand annealing. RI-1 binds covalently to the surface of RAD51 protein at cysteine 319 that likely destabilizes an interface used by RAD51 monomers to oligomerize into filaments on DNA. Correspondingly, the molecule inhibits the formation of subnuclear RAD51 foci in cells following DNA damage, while leaving replication protein A focus formation unaffected. Finally, it potentiates the lethal effects of a DNA cross-linking drug in human cells. Given that this inhibitory activity is seen in multiple human tumor cell lines, RI-1 holds promise as an oncologic drug. Furthermore, RI-1 represents a unique tool to dissect the network of reaction pathways that contribute to DNA repair in cells.

  4. Recombinant Production of Human Aquaporin-1 to an Exceptional High Membrane Density in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomholt, Julie; Helix Nielsen, Claus; Scharff-Poulsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper we explored the capacity of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as host for heterologous expression of human Aquaporin-1. Aquaporin-1 cDNA was expressed from a galactose inducible promoter situated on a plasmid with an adjustable copy number. Human Aquaporin-1 was C...... at 15°C in a yeast host over-producing the Gal4p transcriptional activator and growth in amino acid supplemented minimal medium. In-gel fluorescence combined with western blotting showed that low accumulation of correctly folded recombinant Aquaporin-1 at 30°C was due to in vivo mal-folding. Reduction...... and generated a monodisperse protein preparation. A single Ni-affinity chromatography step was used to obtain almost pure Aquaporin-1. Recombinant Aquaporin-1 produced in S. cerevisiae was not N-glycosylated in contrast to the protein found in human erythrocytes....

  5. Differential uptake of nanoparticles by human M1 and M2 polarized macrophages: protein corona as a critical determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnemars-Postma, Karin A; Ten Hoopen, Hetty Wm; Storm, Gert; Prakash, Jai

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the interaction behavior of M1- and M2-type macrophages with nanoparticles of different sizes with/without the presence of serum. THP-1 human monocytes were differentiated into M1 and M2 macrophages, and the uptake of silica nanoparticle (50-1000 nm) was studied using flow cytometry and different microscopies. Without serum, higher uptake of all-sized nanoparticles was observed by M1 compared with M2. With serum, uptake of nanoparticles (200-1000 nm) was dramatically increased by M2. Furthermore, serum proteins adsorbed (corona) by nanoparticles were found to be the ligands for receptors expressed by M2, as revealed by SDS-PAGE and gene profiling analyses. The observed differential uptake by M1 and M2 macrophages will help understand the fate of nanoparticles in vivo.

  6. G-CSF regulates macrophage phenotype and associates with poor overall survival in human triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmén, Maija; Karaman, Sinem; Schwager, Simon; Lisibach, Angela; Christiansen, Ailsa J; Maksimow, Mikael; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Detmar, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been implicated in the promotion of breast cancer growth and metastasis, and a strong infiltration by TAMs has been associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors and poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these observations are unclear. We investigated macrophage activation in response to co-culture with several breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF-7, BT-474, SKBR-3, Cal-51 and MDA-MB-231) and found that high granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) secretion by the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell line MDA-MB-231 gave rise to immunosuppressive HLA-DR(lo) macrophages that promoted migration of breast cancer cells via secretion of TGF-α. In human breast cancer samples (n = 548), G-CSF was highly expressed in TNBC (p CSF-1R treatment promoted MHCII(lo)F4/80(hi)MR(hi) anti-inflammatory TAMs and enhanced lung metastasis in the presence of high G-CSF levels. Combined anti-G-CSF and anti-CSF-1R therapy significantly increased lymph node metastases, possibly via depletion of the so-called "gate-keeper" subcapsular sinus macrophages. These results indicate that G-CSF promotes the anti-inflammatory phenotype of tumor-induced macrophages when CSF-1R is inhibited and therefore caution against the use of M-CSF/CSF-1R targeting agents in tumors with high G-CSF expression.

  7. Macrophages modulate migration and invasion of human tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirilä, Emma; Väyrynen, Otto; Sundquist, Elias; Päkkilä, Kaisa; Nyberg, Pia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Pääkkönen, Virve; Pesonen, Paula; Dayan, Dan; Vered, Marilena; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Salo, Tuula

    2015-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) has a high mortality rate and the incidence is rising worldwide. Despite advances in treatment, the disease lacks specific prognostic markers and treatment modality. The spreading of OTSCC is dependent on the tumor microenvironment and involves tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Although the presence of TAMs is associated with poor prognosis in OTSCC, the specific mechanisms underlying this are still unknown. The aim here was to investigate the effect of macrophages (Mfs) on HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells and NF-kappaB activity. We polarized THP-1 cells to M1 (inflammatory), M2 (TAM-like) and R848 (imidazoquinoline-treated) type Mfs. We then investigated the effect of Mfs on HSC-3 cell migration and NF-kappaB activity, cytokine production and invasion using several different in vitro migration models, a human 3D tissue invasion model, antibody arrays, confocal microscopy, immunohistochemistry and a mouse invasion model. We found that in co-culture studies all types of Mfs fused with HSC-3 cells, a process which was partially due to efferocytosis. HSC-3 cells induced expression of epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta in co-cultures with M2 Mfs. Direct cell-cell contact between M2 Mfs and HSC-3 cells induced migration and invasion of HSC-3 cells while M1 Mfs reduced HSC-3 cell invasion. M2 Mfs had an excess of NF-kappaB p50 subunit and a lack of p65 subunits both in the presence and absence of HSC-3 cells, indicating dysregulation and pro-tumorigenic NF-kappaB activation. TAM-like cells were abundantly present in close vicinity to carcinoma cells in OTSCC patient samples. We conclude that M2 Mfs/TAMs have an important role in OTSCC regulating adhesion, migration, invasion and cytokine production of carcinoma cells favouring tumor growth. These results demonstrate that OTSCC patients could benefit from therapies targeting TAMs, polarizing TAM-like M2 Mfs to inflammatory macrophages and modulating NF

  8. Effect of recombinant and purified human haematopoietic growth factors on in vitro colony formation by enriched populations of human megakaryocyte progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, L; Briddell, R A; Graham, C D; Brandt, J E; Bruno, E; Hoffman, R

    1988-10-01

    Nonadherent low density T-lymphocyte depleted (NALT-) marrow cells from normal donors were sorted on a Coulter Epics 753 Dye Laser System using Texas Red labelled My10 and phycoerythrin conjugated anti HLA-DR monoclonal antibodies in order to obtain enriched populations of colony forming unit-megakaryocyte (CFU-MK). The CFU-MK cloning efficiency (CE) was 1.1 +/- 0.5% for cells expressing both high densities of My10 and low densities of HLA-DR (My10 DR+). This procedure resulted in an 18-fold increase in CE over NALT- cells. The effect of purified or recombinant human haematopoietic growth factors including erythropoietin (Epo), thrombocytopoiesis stimulating factor (TSF), interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF or CSF-1) and interleukin MK colony formation by My10 DR+ cells was determined utilizing a serum depleted assay system. Neither Epo, TSF, CSF-1, IL-1 alpha nor G-CSF alone augmented MK colony formation above baseline (2.5 +/- 0.8/5 x 10(3) My10 DR+ cells plated). In contrast, the addition of GM-CSF and IL-3 each increased both CFU-MK colony formation and the size of colonies with maximal stimulation occurring following the addition of 200 units/ml of IL-3 and 25 units/ml of GM-CSF. At maximal concentration, IL-3 had a greater ability to promote megakaryocyte colony formation than GM-CSF. The stimulatory effects of GM-CSF and IL-3 were also additive in that the effects of a combination of the two factors approximated the sum of colony formation in the presence of each factor alone. The CFU-MK appears, therefore, to express HPCA-1 and HLA-DR antigens. These studies also indicate that GM-CSF and IL-3 are important in vitro regulators of megakaryocytopoiesis, and that these growth factors are not dependent on the presence of large numbers of macrophages or T cells for their activity since the My10 DR+ cells are largely

  9. Substrate elasticity regulates the behavior of human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlerz, Katrina M; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim; Hayenga, Heather N

    2016-05-01

    Macrophages play a key role in atherosclerosis, cancer, and in the response to implanted medical devices. In each of these situations, the mechanical environment of a macrophage can vary from soft to stiff. However, how stiffness affects macrophage behavior remains uncertain. Using substrates of varying stiffness, we show macrophage phenotype and function depends on substrate stiffness. Notably, the cell area increases slightly from a sphere after 18 h on substrates mimicking healthy arterial stiffness (1-5 kPa), whereas macrophages on stiffer substrates (280 kPa-70 GPa) increased in area by nearly eight-fold. Macrophage migration is random regardless of substrate stiffness. The total average track speed was 7.8 ± 0.5 μm/h, with macrophages traveling fastest on the 280-kPa substrate (12.0 ± 0.5 μm/h) and slowest on the 3-kPa substrate (5.0 ± 0.4 μm/h). In addition F-actin organization in macrophages depends on substrate stiffness. On soft substrates, F-actin is spread uniformly throughout the cytoplasm, whereas on stiff substrates F-actin is functionalized into stress fibers. The proliferation rate of macrophages was faster on stiff substrates. Cells plated on the 280-kPa gel had a significantly shorter doubling time than those plated on the softer substrate. However, the ability of macrophages to phagocytose 1-μm particles did not depend on substrate stiffness. In conclusion, the results herein show macrophages are mechanosensitive; they respond to changes in stiffness by modifying their area, migration speed, actin organization, and proliferation rate. These results are important to understanding how macrophages respond in complex mechanical environments such as an atherosclerotic plaque.

  10. A novel multi-epitope recombined protein for diagnosis of human brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Dehui; Li, Li; Song, Xiuling; Li, Han; Wang, Juan; Ju, Wen; Qu, Xiaofeng; Song, Dandan; Liu, Yushen; Meng, Xiangjun; Cao, Hongqian; Song, Weiyi; Meng, Rizeng; Liu, Jinhua; Li, Juan; Xu, Kun

    2016-05-21

    In epidemic regions of the world, brucellosis is a reemerging zoonosis with minimal mortality but is a serious public hygiene problem. Currently, there are various methods for brucellosis diagnosis, however few of them are available to be used to diagnose, especially for serious cross-reaction with other bacteria. To overcome this disadvantage, we explored a novel multi-epitope recombinant protein as human brucellosis diagnostic antigen. We established an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on this recombinant protein. 248 sera obtained from three different groups including patients with brucellosis (146 samples), non-brucellosis patients (82 samples), and healthy individuals (20 samples) were tested by indirect ELISA. To evaluate the assay, a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and immunoblotting were carried out using these characterized serum samples. For this test, the area under the ROC curve was 0.9409 (95 % confidence interval, 0.9108 to 0.9709), and a sensitivity of 88.89 % and a specificity of 85.54 % was given with a cutoff value of 0.3865 from this ROC analysis. The Western blot results indicate that it is feasible to differentiate human brucellosis and non-brucellosis with the newly established method based on this recombinant protein. Our results obtained high diagnostic accuracy of the ELISA assay which encourage the use of this novel recombinant protein as diagnostic antigen to implement serological diagnosis of brucellosis.

  11. The differential role of human macrophage in triggering secondary bystander effects after either gamma-ray or carbon beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chen; He, Mingyuan; Tu, Wenzhi; Konishi, Teruaki; Liu, Weili; Xie, Yuexia; Dang, Bingrong; Li, Wenjian; Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K; Shao, Chunlin

    2015-07-10

    The abscopal effect could be an underlying factor in evaluating prognosis of radiotherapy. This study established an in vitro system to examine whether tumor-generated bystander signals could be transmitted by macrophages to further trigger secondary cellular responses after different irradiations, where human lung cancer NCI-H446 cells were irradiated with either γ-rays or carbon ions and co-cultured with human macrophage U937 cells, then these U937 cells were used as a bystander signal transmitter and co-cultured with human bronchial epithelial cells BEAS-2B. Results showed that U937 cells were only activated by γ-irradiated NCI-H446 cells so that the secondary injuries in BEAS-2B cells under carbon ion irradiation were weaker than γ-rays. Both TNF-α and IL-1α were involved in the γ-irradiation induced secondary bystander effect but only TNF-α contributed to the carbon ion induced response. Further assay disclosed that IL-1α but not TNF-α was largely responsible for the activation of macrophages and the formation of micronucleus in BEAS-2B cells. These data suggest that macrophages could transfer secondary bystander signals and play a key role in the secondary bystander effect of photon irradiation, while carbon ion irradiation has conspicuous advantage due to its reduced secondary injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The differential role of human macrophage in triggering secondary bystander effects after either gamma-ray or carbon beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chen; He, Mingyuan; Tu, Wenzhi; Konishi, Teruaki; Liu, Weili; Xie, Yuexia; Dang, Bingrong; Li, Wenjian; Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K.; Shao, Chunlin

    2015-01-01

    The abscopal effect could be an underlying factor in evaluating prognosis of radiotherapy. This study established an in vitro system to examine whether tumor-generated bystander signals could be transmitted by macrophages to further trigger secondary cellular responses after different irradiations, where human lung cancer NCI-H446 cells were irradiated with either γ-rays or carbon ions and co-cultured with human macrophage U937 cells, then these U937 cells were used as a bystander signal transmitter and co-cultured with human bronchial epithelial cells BEAS-2B. Results showed that U937 cells were only activated by γ-irradiated NCI-H446 cells so that the secondary injuries in BEAS-2B cells under carbon ion irradiation were weaker than γ-rays. Both TNF-α and IL-1α were involved in γ-irradiation induced secondary bystander effect but only TNF-α contributed to the carbon ion induced response. Further assay disclosed that IL-1α but not TNF-α was largely responsible for the activation of macrophages and the formation of micronucleus in BEAS-2B cells. These data suggest that macrophages could transfer secondary bystander signals and play a key role in the secondary bystander effect of photon irradiation while carbon ion irradiation has conspicuous advantage due to its reduced secondary injury. PMID:25896631

  13. Matrix architecture dictates three-dimensional migration modes of human macrophages: differential involvement of proteases and podosome-like structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Goethem, Emeline; Poincloux, Renaud; Gauffre, Fabienne; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2010-01-15

    Tissue infiltration of macrophages, although critical for innate immunity, is also involved in pathologies, such as chronic inflammation and cancer. In vivo, macrophages migrate mostly in a constrained three-dimensional (3D) environment. However, in vitro studies, mainly focused on two dimensions, do not provide meaningful clues about the mechanisms involved in 3D macrophage migration. In contrast, tumor cell 3D migration is well documented. It comprises a protease-independent and Rho kinase (ROCK)-dependent amoeboid migration mode and a protease-dependent and ROCK-independent mesenchymal migration mode. In this study, we examined the influence of extracellular matrix (composition, architecture, and stiffness) on 3D migration of human macrophages derived from blood monocytes (MDMs). We show that: 1) MDMs use either the amoeboid migration mode in fibrillar collagen I or the mesenchymal migration mode in Matrigel and gelled collagen I, whereas HT1080 tumor cells only perform mesenchymal migration; 2) when MDMs use the mesenchymal migratory mode, they form 3D collagenolytic structures at the tips of cell protrusions that share several markers with podosomes as described in two dimensions; 3) in contrast to tumor cells, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors do not impair protease-dependent macrophage 3D migration, suggesting the involvement of other proteolytic systems; and 4) MDMs infiltrating matrices of similar composition but with variable stiffness adapt their migration mode primarily to the matrix architecture. In conclusion, although it is admitted that leukocytes 3D migration is restricted to the amoeboid mode, we show that human macrophages also perform the mesenchymal mode but in a distinct manner than tumor cells, and they naturally adapt their migration mode to the environmental constraints.

  14. Maintenance of Hepatic Functions in Primary Human Hepatocytes Cultured on Xeno-Free and Chemical Defined Human Recombinant Laminins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masaaki; Zemack, Helen; Johansson, Helene; Hagbard, Louise; Jorns, Carl; Li, Meng; Ellis, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Refined methods for maintaining specific functions of isolated hepatocytes under xeno-free and chemical defined conditions is of great importance for the development of hepatocyte research and regenerative therapy. Laminins, a large family of heterotrimeric basement membrane adhesion proteins, are highly cell and tissue type specific components of the extracellular matrix and strongly influence the behavior and function of associated cells and/or tissues. However, detailed biological functions of many laminin isoforms are still to be evaluated. In this study, we determined the distribution of laminin isoforms in human liver tissue and isolated primary human hepatocytes by western blot analysis, and investigated the efficacy of different human recombinant laminin isoforms on hepatic functions during culture. Protein expressions of laminin-chain α2, α3, α4, β1, β3, γ1, and γ2 were detected in both isolated human hepatocytes and liver tissue. No α1 and α5 expression could be detected in liver tissue or hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from five different individual livers, and cultured on human recombinant laminin isoforms -111, -211, -221, -332, -411, -421, -511, and -521 (Biolamina AB), matrigel (extracted from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma), or collagen type IV (Collagen). Hepatocytes cultured on laminin showed characteristic hexagonal shape in a flat cell monolayer. Viability, double stranded DNA concentration, and Ki67 expression for hepatocytes cultured for six days on laminin were comparable to those cultured on EHS and Collagen. Hepatocytes cultured on laminin also displayed production of human albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, bile acids, and gene expression of liver-enriched factors, such as hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, glucose-6-phosphate, cytochrome P450 3A4, and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. We conclude that all forms of human recombinant laminin tested maintain cell viability and liver-specific functions of primary human

  15. Fas/FasL pathway-mediated alveolar macrophage apoptosis involved in human silicosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, San-qiao; Rojanasakul, Liying Wang; Chen, Zhi-yuan; Xu, Ying-jun; Bai, Yu-ping; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Xi-ying; Zhang, Chun-min; Yu, Yan-qin; Shen, Fu-hai; Yuan, Ju-xiang; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that lung cell apoptosis is associated with lung fibrosis; however the relationship between apoptosis of alveolar macrophages (AMs) and human silicosis has not been addressed. In the present study, AM apoptosis was determined in whole-lung lavage fluid from 48 male silicosis patients, 13 male observers, and 13 male healthy volunteers. The relationships between apoptosis index (AI) and silica exposure history, soluble Fas (sFas)/membrane-bound Fas (mFas), and caspase-3/caspase-8 were analyzed. AI, mFas, and caspase-3 were significantly higher in lung lavage fluids from silicosis patients than those of observers or healthy volunteers, but the level of sFas demonstrated a decreasing trend. AI was related to silica exposure, upregulation of mFas, and activation of caspase-3 and -8, as well as influenced by smoking status after adjusting for confounding factors. These results indicate that AM apoptosis could be used as a potential biomarker for human silicosis, and the Fas/FasL pathway may regulate this process. The present data from human lung lavage samples may help to understand the mechanism of silicosis and in turn lead to strategies for preventing or treating this disease. PMID:21910009

  16. Role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in the effects of oxidative stress on human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ji-Ae; Sotani, Yasuyuki; Ibrahim, Diah Gemala; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is the major cause of treatment failure in individuals who undergo surgery for retinal detachment. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR. Oxidative stress is thought to play a role in the progression of retinal diseases including PVR. We have now examined the effects of oxidative stress on the EMT and related processes in the human RPE cell line. We found that H 2 O 2 induced the contraction of RPE cells in a three-dimensional collagen gel. Analysis of a cytokine array revealed that H 2 O 2 specifically increased the release of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) from RPE cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses showed that H 2 O 2 increased the expression of MIF in RPE cells. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that H 2 O 2 upregulated the expression of α-SMA and vimentin and downregulated that of ZO-1 and N-cadherin. Consistent with these observations, the transepithelial electrical resistance of cell was reduced by exposure to H 2 O 2 . The effects of oxidative stress on EMT-related and junctional protein expression as well as on transepithelial electrical resistance were inhibited by antibodies to MIF, but they were not mimicked by treatment with recombinant MIF. Finally, analysis with a profiling array for mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling revealed that H 2 O 2 specifically induced the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Our results thus suggest that MIF may play a role in induction of the EMT and related processes by oxidative stress in RPE cells and that it might thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of PVR. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy is a major complication of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, and both oxidative stress and induction of the EMT in RPE cells are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of this condition. We have now

  17. Recombinant expression of homodimeric 660 kDa human thyroglobulin in soybean seeds: an alternative source of human thyroglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Rebecca; Hudson, Laura C; Lambirth, Kevin C; Luth, Diane; Wang, Kan; Bost, Kenneth L; Piller, Kenneth J

    2011-07-01

    Soybean seeds possess many qualities that make them ideal targets for the production of recombinant proteins. However, one quality often overlooked is their ability to stockpile large amounts of complex storage proteins. Because of this characteristic, we hypothesized that soybean seeds would support recombinant expression of large and complex proteins that are currently difficult or impossible to express using traditional plant and non-plant-based host systems. To test this hypothesis, we transformed soybeans with a synthetic gene encoding human thyroglobulin (hTG)-a 660 kDa homodimeric protein that is widely used in the diagnostic industry for screening and detection of thyroid disease. In the absence of a recombinant system that can produce recombinant hTG, research and diagnostic grade hTG continues to be purified from cadaver and surgically removed thyroid tissue. These less-than-ideal tissue sources lack uniform glycosylation and iodination and therefore introduce variability when purified hTG is used in sensitive ELISA screens. In this study, we report the successful expression of recombinant hTG in soybean seeds. Authenticity of the soy-derived protein was demonstrated using commercial ELISA kits developed specifically for the detection of hTG in patient sera. Western analyses and gel filtration chromatography demonstrated that recombinant hTG and thyroid-purified hTG are biologically similar with respect to size, mass, charge and subunit interaction. The recombinant protein was stable over three generations and accumulated to ~1.5% of total soluble seed protein. These results support our hypothesis that soybeans represent a practical alternative to traditional host systems for the expression of large and complex proteins.

  18. Fasciola hepatica fatty acid binding protein induces the alternative activation of human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Santiago, Olgary; Espino, Ana M

    2014-12-01

    The liver fluke Fasciola hepatica is a highly evolved parasite that uses sophisticated mechanisms to evade the host immune response. The immunosuppressive capabilities of the parasite have been associated with antigens secreted through the parasite's tegument, called excretory-secretory products (ESPs). Proteomic studies have identified the fatty acid binding protein (FABP) as one of molecules present in the parasite ESPs. Although FABP has been investigated for potential use in the development of vaccines against fascioliasis, its direct interaction with cells of immune system has not been studied. In this study, FABP was purified in native form from soluble extracts of F. hepatica adult flukes using a combination of molecular sieving chromatography and preparative isoelectric focusing. The immunological effect of the purified protein, termed Fh12, was assayed in vitro using monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) obtained from healthy human donors. Results from the assay indicate that Fh12 produced a significantly increased arginase expression and activity and induced the expression of chitinase-3-like protein (CHI3L1). The assay also showed that Fh12 downregulated the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS2). This indicates that Fh12 induced the production of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMϕ). The results also demonstrated the ability of Fh12 to downregulate the secretion of the proinflammatory and inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-12 (IL-12), and IL-1βB, even after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as well as its ability to stimulate the overexpression of IL-10. These results suggest a potent anti-inflammatory role for Fh12, which could occur via targeting of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Hypoxic pretreatment of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells regulating macrophage polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan TONG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effect of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs on macrophage polarization under hypoxia. Methods  hUC-MSCs were obtained by explants adherent culture and cultured under normoxia (21% O2 and hypoxia (5% O2. The multi-directional differentiation of hUC-MSCs was observed by osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation induction. Live/death staining was performed to detect the cell viability, and ELISA was executed to detect the protein content in supernatant of hUC-MSCs. Transwell chamber was employed to co-culture the hUC-MSCs cultured under normoxia and hypoxia and macrophage (THP-1 stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (IPS, then the polarization of THP-1 was detected by immunofluorescence, and the secretions of inflammatory factor and anti-inflammatory factor of THP-1 were detected by ELISA. Results  hUC-MSCs cultured under hypoxia showed the ability of osteogenic and adipogenic multi-directional differentiation. Live/death staining showed the high cell viability of hUC-MSCs cultured under normoxia and hypoxia. The expression levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO were significantly higher in the hUC-MSCs cultured under hypoxia than in those cultured under normoxia. hUCMSCs cultured under hypoxia promoted the polarization of THP-1 to M2, obviously reduced the expression of TNF-α and IL-1β, and increased the expression of IL-10 significantly. Conclusion hUC-MSCs cultured under hypoxia may promote the polarization of THP-1 to M2 and improve the viability of anti-inflammatory. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.07.01

  20. [Safety of human papillomavirus 6, 11, 16 and 18 (recombinant): systematic review and meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Pedro Luiz Spinelli; da Silva Calestini, Gustavo Lacerda; Alvo, Fernando Salgueiro; de Moura Freitas, Jefferson Michel; Castro, Paula Marcela Vilela; Konstantyner, Tulio

    2015-12-01

    To identify and quantify the adverse effects associated with the recombinant human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16 and 18) vaccine in adolescents. Systematic review of randomized clinical trials from PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases. Articles investigating the safety of the vaccine in subjects under 18 years and comparing the recombinant human papillomavirus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 vaccine with a control group were included. Meta-analyses were performed for the outcomes of pain, erythema, swelling and fever, using clinical trials with maximum Jadad score. Fourteen studies were included. The most commons adverse effects related to the human papillomavirus vaccine were effects with no severity (pain, erythema, edema, and fever). Five studies were used for the meta-analyses: Pain-Risk Difference (RD)=11% (p<0.001); edema-RD=8% (p<0.001); erythema-RD=5% (p<0.001); fever-RD=2% (p<0.003). The recombinant human papillomavirus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 vaccine was safe and well tolerated. The main adverse effects related to vaccination were pain, erythema, edema and fever. The low frequency of severe adverse effects encourages the administration of the vaccine in the population at risk. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Z Q; Greenberg, L; Ertl, H C; Rupprecht, C E

    2014-02-01

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Protection of Non-Human Primates against Rabies with an Adenovirus Recombinant Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H. C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. PMID:24503087

  3. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF biological actions on human dermal fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Montagnani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are involved in all pathologies characterized by increased ExtraCellularMatrix synthesis, from wound healing to fibrosis. Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF is a cytokine isolated as an hemopoietic growth factor but recently indicated as a differentiative agent on endothelial cells. In this work we demonstrated the expression of the receptor for GM-CSF (GMCSFR on human normal skin fibroblasts from healthy subjects (NFPC and on a human normal fibroblast cell line (NHDF and we try to investigate the biological effects of this cytokine. Human normal fibroblasts were cultured with different doses of GM-CSF to study the effects of this factor on GMCSFR expression, on cell proliferation and adhesion structures. In addition we studied the production of some Extra-Cellular Matrix (ECM components such as Fibronectin, Tenascin and Collagen I. The growth rate of fibroblasts from healthy donors (NFPC is not augmented by GM-CSF stimulation in spite of increased expression of the GM-CSFR. On the contrary, the proliferation of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF cell line seems more influenced by high concentration of GM-CSF in the culture medium. The adhesion structures and the ECM components appear variously influenced by GM-CSF treatment as compared to fibroblasts cultured in basal condition, but newly only NHDF cells are really induced to increase their synthesis activity. We suggest that the in vitro treatment with GM-CSF can shift human normal fibroblasts towards a more differentiated state, due or accompanied by an increased expression of GM-CSFR and that such “differentiation” is an important event induced by such cytokine.

  4. Recombination analysis and structure prediction show correlation between breakpoint clusters and RNA hairpins in the pol gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 unique recombinant forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Andrea; Lai, Alessia; Corvasce, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Recombination is recognized as a primary force in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolution, increasing viral diversity through reshuffling of genomic portions. The strand-switching activity of reverse transcriptase is required to complete HIV-1 replication and can occur randomly thro...

  5. Gene-specific repression of proinflammatory cytokines in stimulated human macrophages by nuclear IκBα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Chandra C; Ramaswami, Sitharam; Juvekar, Ashish; Vu, Hai-Yen; Galdieri, Luciano; Davidson, Dennis; Vancurova, Ivana

    2010-09-15

    We have previously shown that increased nuclear accumulation of IkappaBalpha inhibits NF-kappaB activity and induces apoptosis in human leukocytes. In this study, we wanted to explore the possibility that the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of IkappaBalpha can be used as a therapeutic target for the regulation of NF-kappaB-dependent cytokine synthesis. Treatment of LPS-stimulated human U937 macrophages with an inhibitor of chromosome region maintenance 1-dependent nuclear export, leptomycin B, resulted in the increased nuclear accumulation of IkappaBalpha and inhibition of NF-kappaB DNA binding activity, caused by the nuclear IkappaBalpha-p65 NF-kappaB interaction. Surprisingly, however, whereas mRNA expression and cellular release of TNF-alpha, the beta form of pro-IL-1 (IL-1beta), and IL-6 were inhibited by the leptomycin B-induced nuclear IkappaBalpha, IL-8 mRNA expression and cellular release were not significantly affected. Analysis of in vivo recruitment of p65 NF-kappaB to NF-kappaB-regulated promoters by chromatin immunoprecipitation in U937 cells and human PBMCs indicated that although the p65 recruitment to TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 promoters was inhibited by the nuclear IkappaBalpha, p65 recruitment to IL-8 promoter was not repressed. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses using IkappaBalpha and S536 phosphospecific p65 NF-kappaB Abs demonstrated that although the newly synthesized IkappaBalpha induced by postinduction repression is recruited to TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 promoters but not to the IL-8 promoter, S536-phosphorylated p65 is recruited to IL-8 promoter, but not to TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, or IL-6 promoters. Together, these data indicate that the inhibition of NF-kappaB-dependent transcription by nuclear IkappaBalpha in LPS-stimulated macrophages is gene specific and depends on the S536 phosphorylation status of the recruited p65 NF-kappaB.

  6. Direct isolation of human BRCA2 gene by transformation-associated recombination in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionov, Vladimir; Kouprina, Natalya; Solomon, Gregory; Barrett, J. Carl; Resnick, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Mutant forms of the BRCA2 gene contribute significantly to hereditary breast cancer. Isolation of the normal and mutant forms of the BRCA2 gene with its natural promoter would greatly facilitate analysis of the gene and its contribution to breast cancer. We have accomplished the direct isolation of the 90-kb gene from total human DNA by transformation-associated recombination in yeast using a small amount of 5′ and 3′ BRCA2 sequence information. Because the entire isolation procedure of a single chromosomal gene could be accomplished in approximately 2 weeks, the transformation-associated recombination cloning approach is readily applicable to studies of chromosome alterations and human genetic diseases. PMID:9207100

  7. GABA and Topiramate Inhibit the Formation of Human Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells by Modulating Cholesterol-Metabolism-Associated Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter, acts on GABA receptors to play an important role in the modulation of macrophage functions. The present study examined the effects of GABA and a GABA receptor agonist on modulating cholesterol-metabolism-associated molecules in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs. Methods: ORO stain, HPLC, qRT-PCR, Western blot and EMSA were carried out using HMDMs exposed to ox-LDL with or without GABAergic agents as the experimental model. Results: GABA and topiramate reduced the percentage of cholesterol ester in lipid-laden HMDMs by down-regulating SR-A, CD36 and LOX-1 expression and up-regulating ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI expression in lipid-laden HMDMs. The production of TNF-a was decreased in GABA-and topiramate-treated lipid-laden HMDMs, and levels of interleukin (IL-6 did not change. The activation of two signaling pathways, p38MAPK and NF-γB, was repressed by GABA and topiramate in lipid-laden HMDMs. Conclusion: GABA and topiramate inhibit the formation of human macrophage-derived foam cells and may be a possibility for macrophage targeted therapy of atherosclerotic lesions.

  8. Cholesterol Oxidase Binds TLR2 and Modulates Functional Responses of Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bednarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol oxidase (ChoD is considered to be an important virulence factor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, but its influence on macrophage activity is unknown. Here we used Nocardia erythropolis ChoD, which is very similar to the Mtb enzyme (70% identity at the amino-acid level, to evaluate the impact of bacterial ChoD on the activity of THP-1-derived macrophages in vitro. We found that ChoD decreased the surface expression of Toll-like receptor type 2 (TLR2 and complement receptor 3 (CR3 on these macrophages. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that ChoD competed with lipoteichoic acid for ligand binding sites on TLR2 but not on CR3, suggesting that ChoD signaling is mediated via TLR2. Binding of ChoD to the membrane of macrophages had diverse effects on the activity of macrophages, activating p38 mitogen activated kinase and stimulating production of a large amount of interleukin-10. Moreover, ChoD primed macrophages to enhance the production of reactive oxygen species in response to the phorbol myristate acetate, which was reduced by “switching off” TLR-derived signaling through interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases 1 and 4 inhibition. Our study revealed that ChoD interacts directly with macrophages via TLR2 and influences the biological activity of macrophages during the development of the initial response to infection.

  9. Neurovirulence properties of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vectors in non-human primates

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J. Erik; Nasar, Farooq; Coleman, John W.; Price, Roger E; Javadian, Ali; Draper, Kenneth; Lee, Margaret; Reilly, Patricia A.; Clarke, David K.; Hendry, R. Michael; Udem, Stephen A.

    2007-01-01

    Although vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) neurovirulence and pathogenicity in rodents have been well studied, little is known about VSV pathogenicity in non-human primates. To address this question, we measured VSV viremia, shedding, and neurovirulence in macaques. Following intranasal inoculation, macaques shed minimal recombinant VSV (rVSV) in nasal washes for one day post-inoculation; viremia was not detected. Following intranasal inoculation of macaques, wild type (wt) VSV, rVSV, and two ...

  10. Recombinant Glycoprotein Vaccines for Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children and Their Effects on Viral Quasispecies

    OpenAIRE

    Essajee, Shaffiq M; Yogev, Ram; Pollack, Henry; Greenhouse, Bryan; Krasinski, Keith; Borkowsky, William

    2002-01-01

    In individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), specific immunity is associated with a more diverse viral repertoire and slower disease progression. Attempts to enhance antiviral immunity with therapeutic vaccination have shown that recombinant glycoprotein (RGP) vaccines are safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic, but the effect of RGP vaccines on the viral repertoire is unknown. We evaluated diversification of the viral envelope in 12 HIV-infected children who recei...

  11. Value of recombinant human epidermal growth factor in corneal wound repair after corneal foreign body elimination

    OpenAIRE

    Hong-Jie Han

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the repair efficacy of recombinant human epidermal growth factor on corneal epithelium after corneal foreign body eliminating operation. METHODS: There were 102 patients with corneal foreign body(188 affected eyes)chosen for the study. All patients were divided into treatment group and control group according to the random number table. Both groups received corneal foreign body elimination by slit lamp. Postoperatively, the treatment group was given eye drops containing ep...

  12. Application effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor derivative Eye drops in treatment of dry eye

    OpenAIRE

    Paerzhati·Tuerdi; Yan-Chun Wang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the application effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor derivative eye drops(Jinyinshu)in treatment of dry eye.METHODS:Sixty cases(87 eyes)of dry eye patients were randomly divided into control group and observation group, 42 eyes and 45 eyes respectively. The control group received Chondroitin sulfate eye drops treatment, and the observation group were used for treatment of Jinyinshu. The changes of clinical efficacy, correlation index(symptom score, BUT, S I ...

  13. Expression of human β-defensin-1 in recombinant Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) was transformed with a pHCD1 plasmid harboring the human β-defensin-1 (hBD1) gene fused in frame behind a disulfide bond isomerase (DsbC), a His-tag, and an enterokinase cleavage site. After induction, the DsbC-hBD1 was expressed as a ~36 kDa soluble fusion protein in recombinant E.

  14. Engineering the oxygen sensing regulation results in an enhanced recombinant human hemoglobin production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Ruiz, José Luis; Liu, Lifang; Petranovic, Dina

    2015-01-01

    the generation of a set of plasmids to produce functional human hemoglobin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with final titers of active hemoglobin exceeding 4% of the total cell protein. In this study, we propose a strategy for further engineering S. cerevisiae by altering the oxygen sensing pathway by deleting...... the transcription factor HAP1, which resulted in an increase of the final recombinant active hemoglobin titer exceeding 7% of the total cellular protein....

  15. Biocompatibility and Inflammatory Potential of Titanium Alloys Cultivated with Human Osteoblasts, Fibroblasts and Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Markhoff

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The biomaterials used to maintain or replace functions in the human body consist mainly of metals, ceramics or polymers. In orthopedic surgery, metallic materials, especially titanium and its alloys, are the most common, due to their excellent mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. Aside from the established Ti6Al4V alloy, shape memory materials such as nickel-titanium (NiTi have risen in importance, but are also discussed because of the adverse effects of nickel ions. These might be reduced by specific surface modifications. In the present in vitro study, the osteoblastic cell line MG-63 as well as primary human osteoblasts, fibroblasts, and macrophages were cultured on titanium alloys (forged Ti6Al4V, additive manufactured Ti6Al4V, NiTi, and Diamond-Like-Carbon (DLC-coated NiTi to verify their specific biocompatibility and inflammatory potential. Additive manufactured Ti6Al4V and NiTi revealed the highest levels of metabolic cell activity. DLC-coated NiTi appeared as a suitable surface for cell growth, showing the highest collagen production. None of the implant materials caused a strong inflammatory response. In general, no distinct cell-specific response could be observed for the materials and surface coating used. In summary, all tested titanium alloys seem to be biologically appropriate for application in orthopedic surgery.

  16. Heterogeneity of macrophage activation in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forlenza, M.; Fink, I.R.; Raes, G.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we focus on four different activation states of fish macrophages. In vitro, stimulation with microbial ligands induces the development of innate activated macrophages whereas classically activated macrophages can be induced by stimulation with LPS in combination with (recombinant)

  17. Refined genetic maps reveal sexual dimorphism in human meiotic recombination at multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhérer, Claude; Campbell, Christopher L.; Auton, Adam

    2017-04-01

    In humans, males have lower recombination rates than females over the majority of the genome, but the opposite is usually true near the telomeres. These broad-scale differences have been known for decades, yet little is known about differences at the fine scale. By combining data sets, we have collected recombination events from over 100,000 meioses and have constructed sex-specific genetic maps at a previously unachievable resolution. Here we show that, although a substantial fraction of the genome shows some degree of sexually dimorphic recombination, the vast majority of hotspots are shared between the sexes, with only a small number of putative sex-specific hotspots. Wavelet analysis indicates that most of the differences can be attributed to the fine scale, and that variation in rate between the sexes can mostly be explained by differences in hotspot magnitude, rather than location. Nonetheless, known recombination-associated genomic features, such as THE1B repeat elements, show systematic differences between the sexes.

  18. A performance evaluation of a novel human recombinant tissue factor prothrombin time reagent (Revohem™ PT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, C; Kohama, K; Patel, I; Lane, P; Dwyer, S; Machin, S J; Mackie, I J

    2017-10-01

    A new prothrombin time reagent (Revohem™ PT) based on recombinant human tissue factor produced by the silkworm-baculovirus expression system was tested. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the new PT reagent with two widely used routine PT reagents. All testing was performed on a Sysmex CS-5100 coagulometer. Revohem™ PT was tested for imprecision and stability using normal and abnormal lyophilized commercial control plasmas. Comparability was assessed with two widely used reagents: one containing recombinant human tissue factor (Reagent A) and the other a human placental thromboplastin (Reagent B) using a wide range of normal and abnormal plasmas and analyser-specific ISI values. Excellent between-day imprecision was obtained for Revohem™ PT (CV <1.0%) and acceptable open-vial on-board stability over 7 days. There was good agreement between methods in samples from patients with liver disease and patients receiving warfarin and no significant differences between methods with increasing INR values. Both recombinant reagents suffered less interference from lupus anticoagulant than the placental thromboplastin. Revohem™ PT had similar sensitivity to reagents A and B for FII, V, VII and X deficiency and demonstrated dose responsiveness to dabigatran, apixaban and rivaroxaban with steeper response curves than the comparison reagents. Revohem™ PT showed comparable or improved performance relative to two widely used reagents and is suitable for use in warfarin control, detection of inherited factor II, V, VII and X deficiency and assessment of liver disease coagulopathy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Truncated recombinant human SP-D attenuates emphysema and type II cell changes in SP-D deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Lars; Ochs, Matthias; Mackay, Rosemarie; Townsend, Paul; Deb, Roona; Mühlfeld, Christian; Richter, Joachim; Gilbert, Fabian; Hawgood, Samuel; Reid, Kenneth; Clark, Howard

    2007-10-03

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) deficient mice develop emphysema-like pathology associated with focal accumulations of foamy alveolar macrophages, an excess of surfactant phospholipids in the alveolar space and both hypertrophy and hyperplasia of alveolar type II cells. These findings are associated with a chronic inflammatory state. Treatment of SP-D deficient mice with a truncated recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rfhSP-D) has been shown to decrease the lipidosis and alveolar macrophage accumulation as well as production of proinflammatory chemokines. The aim of this study was to investigate if rfhSP-D treatment reduces the structural abnormalities in parenchymal architecture and type II cells characteristic of SP-D deficiency. SP-D knock-out mice, aged 3 weeks, 6 weeks and 9 weeks were treated with rfhSP-D for 9, 6 and 3 weeks, respectively. All mice were sacrificed at age 12 weeks and compared to both PBS treated SP-D deficient and wild-type groups. Lung structure was quantified by design-based stereology at the light and electron microscopic level. Emphasis was put on quantification of emphysema, type II cell changes and intracellular surfactant. Data were analysed with two sided non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test. After 3 weeks of treatment, alveolar number was higher and mean alveolar size was smaller compared to saline-treated SP-D knock-out controls. There was no significant difference concerning these indices of pulmonary emphysema within rfhSP-D treated groups. Type II cell number and size were smaller as a consequence of treatment. The total volume of lamellar bodies per type II cell and per lung was smaller after 6 weeks of treatment. Treatment of SP-D deficient mice with rfhSP-D leads to a reduction in the degree of emphysema and a correction of type II cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy. This supports the concept that rfhSP-D might become a therapeutic option in diseases that are characterized by decreased SP-D levels in the lung.

  20. Truncated recombinant human SP-D attenuates emphysema and type II cell changes in SP-D deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mühlfeld Christian

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant protein D (SP-D deficient mice develop emphysema-like pathology associated with focal accumulations of foamy alveolar macrophages, an excess of surfactant phospholipids in the alveolar space and both hypertrophy and hyperplasia of alveolar type II cells. These findings are associated with a chronic inflammatory state. Treatment of SP-D deficient mice with a truncated recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rfhSP-D has been shown to decrease the lipidosis and alveolar macrophage accumulation as well as production of proinflammatory chemokines. The aim of this study was to investigate if rfhSP-D treatment reduces the structural abnormalities in parenchymal architecture and type II cells characteristic of SP-D deficiency. Methods SP-D knock-out mice, aged 3 weeks, 6 weeks and 9 weeks were treated with rfhSP-D for 9, 6 and 3 weeks, respectively. All mice were sacrificed at age 12 weeks and compared to both PBS treated SP-D deficient and wild-type groups. Lung structure was quantified by design-based stereology at the light and electron microscopic level. Emphasis was put on quantification of emphysema, type II cell changes and intracellular surfactant. Data were analysed with two sided non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test. Main Results After 3 weeks of treatment, alveolar number was higher and mean alveolar size was smaller compared to saline-treated SP-D knock-out controls. There was no significant difference concerning these indices of pulmonary emphysema within rfhSP-D treated groups. Type II cell number and size were smaller as a consequence of treatment. The total volume of lamellar bodies per type II cell and per lung was smaller after 6 weeks of treatment. Conclusion Treatment of SP-D deficient mice with rfhSP-D leads to a reduction in the degree of emphysema and a correction of type II cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy. This supports the concept that rfhSP-D might become a therapeutic option in diseases that are

  1. Infiltration of Macrophages Correlates with Severity of Allograft Rejection and Outcome in Human Kidney Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Bergler

    Full Text Available Despite substantial progress in recent years, graft survival beyond the first year still requires improvement. Since modern immunosuppression addresses mainly T-cell activation and proliferation, we studied macrophage infiltration into the allografts of 103 kidney transplant recipients during acute antibody and T-cell mediated rejection. Macrophage infiltration was correlated with both graft function and graft survival until month 36 after transplantation.Macrophage infiltration was significantly elevated in antibody-mediated and T-cell mediated rejection, but not in kidneys with established IFTA. Treatment of rejection with steroids was less successful in patients with more prominent macrophage infiltration into the allografts. Macrophage infiltration was accompanied by increased cell proliferation as well as antigen presentation. With regard to the compartmental distribution severity of T-cell-mediated rejection was correlated to the amount of CD68+ cells especially in the peritubular and perivascular compartment, whereas biopsies with ABMR showed mainly peritubular CD68 infiltration. Furthermore, severity of macrophage infiltration was a valid predictor of resulting creatinine values two weeks as well as two and three years after renal transplantation as illustrated by multivariate analysis. Additionally performed ROC curve analysis showed that magnitude of macrophage infiltration (below vs. above the median was a valid predictor for the necessity to restart dialysis. Having additionally stratified biopsies in accordance to the magnitude of macrophage infiltration, differential CD68+ cell infiltration was reflected by striking differences in overall graft survival.The differences in acute allograft rejection have not only been reflected by different magnitudes of macrophage infiltration, but also by compartment-specific infiltration pattern and subsequent impact on resulting allograft function as well as need for dialysis initiation. There is

  2. IgE mediates killing of intracellular Toxoplasma gondii by human macrophages through CD23-dependent, interleukin-10 sensitive pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Vouldoukis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In addition to helminthic infections, elevated serum IgE levels were observed in many protozoal infections, while their contribution during immune response to these pathogens remained unclear. As IgE/antigen immune complexes (IgE-IC bind to human cells through FcεRI or FcεRII/CD23 surface molecules, the present study aimed to identify which functional receptor may be involved in IgE-IC interaction with human macrophages, the major effector cell during parasite infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with Toxoplasma gondii before being incubated with IgE-IC. IgE receptors were then identified using appropriate blocking antibodies. The activation of cells and parasiticidal activity were evaluated by mediator quantification and direct counting of infected macrophages. RNAs were extracted and cell supernatants were also collected for their content in tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin-10 (IL-10 and nitrites. Sera from symptomatic infected patients were also tested for their content of IgE, IL-10 and nitrites, and compared to values found in healthy donors. Results showed that IgE-IC induced intracellular elimination of parasites by human macrophages. IgE-mediated effect was FcεRI-independent, but required cross-linking of surface FcεRII/CD23, cell activation and the generation of nitric oxide (NO. Although TNF-α was shown to be produced during cell activation, this cytokine had minor contribution in this phenomenon while endogenous and exogenous IL-10 down-regulated parasite killing. Inverse relationship was found between IL-10 and NO expression by infected human macrophages at both mRNA and mediator levels. The relationship between these in vitro data and in vivo levels of various factors in T. gondii infected patients supports the involvement of CD23 antigen and IL-10 expression in disease control. CONCLUSION: Thus, IgE may be considered as immune mediator during

  3. Differential roles for pathogenicity islands SPI-13 and SPI-8 in the interaction of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhi with murine and human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Rodrigo A; Silva-Valenzuela, Cecilia A; Amaya, Fernando A; Urrutia, Ítalo M; Contreras, Inés; Santiviago, Carlos A

    2017-02-15

    Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-13 is conserved in many serovars of S. enterica, including S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium and S. Gallinarum. However, it is absent in typhoid serovars such as S. Typhi and Paratyphi A, which carry SPI-8 at the same genomic location. Because the interaction with macrophages is a critical step in Salmonella pathogenicity, in this study we investigated the role played by SPI-13 and SPI-8 in the interaction of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhi with cultured murine (RAW264.7) and human (THP-1) macrophages. Our results showed that SPI-13 was required for internalization of S. Enteritidis in murine but not human macrophages. On the other hand, SPI-8 was not required for the interaction of S. Typhi with human or murine macrophages. Of note, the presence of an intact copy of SPI-13 in a S. Typhi mutant carrying a deletion of SPI-8 did not improve its ability to be internalized by, or survive in human or murine macrophages. Altogether, our results point out to different roles for SPI-13 and SPI-8 during Salmonella infection. While SPI-13 contributes to the interaction of S. Enteritidis with murine macrophages, SPI-8 is not required in the interaction of S. Typhi with murine or human macrophages. We hypothesized that typhoid serovars have lost SPI-13 and maintained SPI-8 to improve their fitness during another phase of human infection.

  4. Macrophages inhibit human osteosarcoma cell growth after activation with the bacterial cell wall derivative liposomal muramyl tripeptide in combination with interferon-γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In osteosarcoma, the presence of tumor-infiltrating macrophages positively correlates with patient survival in contrast to the negative effect of tumor-associated macrophages in patients with other tumors. Liposome-encapsulated muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) has been introduced in the treatment of osteosarcoma patients, which may enhance the potential anti-tumor activity of macrophages. Direct anti-tumor activity of human macrophages against human osteosarcoma cells has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed osteosarcoma cell growth after co-culture with human macrophages. Methods Monocyte-derived M1-like and M2-like macrophages were polarized with LPS + IFN-γ, L-MTP-PE +/− IFN-γ or IL-10 and incubated with osteosarcoma cells. Two days later, viable tumor cell numbers were analyzed. Antibody-dependent effects were investigated using the therapeutic anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab. Results M1-like macrophages inhibited osteosarcoma cell growth when activated with LPS + IFN-γ. Likewise, stimulation of M1-like macrophages with liposomal muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) inhibited tumor growth, but only when combined with IFN-γ. Addition of the tumor-reactive anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab did not further improve the anti-tumor activity of activated M1-like macrophages. The inhibition was mediated by supernatants of activated M1-like macrophages, containing TNF-α and IL-1β. However, specific blockage of these cytokines, nitric oxide or reactive oxygen species did not inhibit the anti-tumor effect, suggesting the involvement of other soluble factors released upon macrophage activation. While LPS + IFN-γ–activated M2-like macrophages had low anti-tumor activity, IL-10–polarized M2-like macrophages were able to reduce osteosarcoma cell growth in the presence of the anti-EGFR cetuximab involving antibody-dependent tumor cell phagocytosis. Conclusion This study demonstrates that human macrophages can be induced to exert direct anti

  5. Cloning and expression of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB in Pichia Pink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babavalian, H; Latifi, A M; Shokrgozar, M A; Bonakdar, S; Tebyanian, H; Shakeri, F

    2016-07-31

    The PDGF-BB plays a key role in several pathogenesis diseases and it is believed to be an important mediator for wound healing. The recombinant human PDGF-BB is safe and effective to stimulate the healing of chronic, full thickness and lower extremity diabetic neurotrophic ulcers. In the present study, we attempted to produce a PDGF-BB growth factor and also, evaluate its functionality in cell proliferation in yeast host Pichia pink. Pichia pink yeast was used as a host for evaluation of the rhPDGF-BB expression. The coding sequence of PDGF-BB protein was synthesized after optimization and packed into the pGEM. Recombinant proteins were produced and purified. The construct of pPinkα-HC-pdgf was confirmed by sequence, the PDGF-BB protein was expressed and purified with using a nickel affinity chromatography column and then characterized by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. The biological activity of PDGF-BB was estimated with using human fibroblast cell line. The measurement of protein concentration was determined by Bradford and human PDGF-BB ELISA kit. Purified rhPDGF-BB showed similar biological activity (as the standard PDGF-BB) and suggested that the recombinant protein has a successful protein expression (as well as considerable biological activity in P. pink host). The exact amount of recombinant PDGF-BB concentrations were measured by specific ELISA test which it was about 30 μg/ml. Our study suggested that efficiency of biological activity of PDGF-BB protein may be related to its conformational similarity with standard type and also, it practically may be important in wound healing and tissue regeneration.

  6. Recombination rates and genomic shuffling in human and chimpanzee--a new twist in the chromosomal speciation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Marta; Micheletti, Diego; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2013-04-01

    A long-standing question in evolutionary biology concerns the effect of recombination in shaping the genomic architecture of organisms and, in particular, how this impacts the speciation process. Despite efforts employed in the last decade, the role of chromosomal reorganizations in the human-chimpanzee speciation process remains unresolved. Through whole-genome comparisons, we have analyzed the genome-wide impact of genomic shuffling in the distribution of human recombination rates during the human-chimpanzee speciation process. We have constructed a highly refined map of the reorganizations and evolutionary breakpoint regions in the human and chimpanzee genomes based on orthologous genes and genome sequence alignments. The analysis of the most recent human and chimpanzee recombination maps inferred from genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data revealed that the standardized recombination rate was significantly lower in rearranged than in collinear chromosomes. In fact, rearranged chromosomes presented significantly lower recombination rates than chromosomes that have been maintained since the ancestor of great apes, and this was related with the lineage in which they become fixed. Importantly, inverted regions had lower recombination rates than collinear and noninverted regions, independently of the effect of centromeres. Our observations have implications for the chromosomal speciation theory, providing new evidences for the contribution of inversions in suppressing recombination in mammals.

  7. The effect of 17β-estradiol on cholesterol content in human macrophages is influenced by the lipoprotein milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Michael P; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Meydani, Mohsen; Dillard, Alice; Schaefer, Ernst J; Lamon-Fava, Stefania

    2011-08-01

    Estrogen and testosterone are thought to modulate coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. To examine how these hormones affect human macrophage cholesterol transport, a key factor in atherogenesis, we obtained monocytes from healthy male and postmenopausal female donors (age 50–70 years). Cells were allowed to differentiate in autologous serum. Human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs) were exposed to estrogen, testosterone, or vehicle, during differentiation.Cells were cholesterol enriched with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) in the presence of treatment. Cell cholesterol mass, efflux, and the expression of proteins involved in HMDM cholesterol transport were examined.Estrogen significantly reduced cholesteryl ester (CE) content in both female and male HMDMs while having no measurable effect on cholesterol efflux. Testosterone did not affect cholesterol content or efflux. Both hormones significantly but modestly affected the gene expression of several proteins involved in HMDM transport, yet these effects did not translate into significant changes in protein expression. In THP-1 macrophages, the effect of estrogen on CE content was more potent in unloaded macrophages and was estrogen receptor dependent. A trend for a reduction in nonoxLDL uptake by estrogen was observed and was also found to be dependent upon estrogen receptor activation. Our data indicate that estrogen, but not testosterone, reduces CE accumulation in HMDMs obtained from a CHD age relevant population, independent of changes in the expression of proteins important to macrophage cholesterol transport. In THP-1 cells, this effect is reduced in the presence of oxLDL, indicating that a pro-atherogenic lipoprotein milieu is an important variable in sex hormone modulation of CHD.

  8. Oxidized LDL-Exposed Human Macrophages Display Increased MMP-9 Expression and Secretion Mediated by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, Gabriela M; Deleanu, Mariana; Toma, Laura; Stancu, Camelia S; Simionescu, Maya; Sima, Anca V

    2017-04-01

    Oxidatively modified low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) alter the proper function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), inducing ER stress (ERS), which consequently activates inflammatory pathways in macrophages. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is the main protease acting on the degradation of the extracellular matrix and the ensuing destabilization of the atherosclerotic plaque. We aimed to investigate whether ERS induced by oxLDL or tunicamycin (TM) in human macrophages is associated with the stimulation of MMP-9 expression and secretion. The results showed that oxLDL induced in THP-1 macrophages: (i) increase of MMP-9 gene expression and its pro-form secretion, (ii) intracellular accumulation of 7-ketocholesterol, (iii) ERS activation (increased eIF2α phosphorylation, XBP1 and CHOP mRNA levels, and Grp78 protein expression), and (iv) oxidative stress (increased levels of reactive oxygen species and NADPH oxidase activity). Incubation of macrophages with ERS inducer, TM determined the secretion of both pro- and active-form of MMP-9 and oxidative stress. Treatment of oxLDL or TM-incubated cells with ERS inhibitor, sodium phenylbutyrate decreased MMP-9 gene expression, secretion, and activity. The inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, apocynin, decreased XBP-1 and CHOP mRNA levels, and MMP-9 gene expression and secretion in oxLDL-exposed cells. In conclusion, oxLDL stimulate MMP-9 expression and secretion in human macrophages by mechanisms involving ERS. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 661-669, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Accumulation of functional recombinant human coagulation factor IX in transgenic soybean seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Nicolau B; Murad, André M; Ramos, Gustavo L; Maranhão, Andréia Q; Brígido, Marcelo M; Araújo, Ana Cláudia G; Lacorte, Cristiano; Aragão, Francisco J L; Covas, Dimas T; Fontes, Aparecida M; Souza, Gustavo H M F; Vianna, Giovanni R; Rech, Elíbio L

    2011-08-01

    The seed-based production of recombinant proteins is an efficient strategy to achieve the accumulation, correct folding, and increased stability of these recombinant proteins. Among potential plant molecular farming systems, soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] is a viable option for the production of recombinant proteins due to its high protein content, known regulatory sequences, efficient gene transfer protocols, and a scalable production system under greenhouse conditions. We report here the expression and stable accumulation of human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) in transgenic soybean seeds. A biolistic process was utilised to co-introduce a plasmid carrying the hFIX gene under the transcriptional control of the α' subunit of a β-conglycinin seed-specific promoter and an α-Coixin signal peptide in soybean embryonic axes from mature seeds. The 56-kDa hFIX protein was expressed in the transgenic seeds at levels of up to 0.23% (0.8 g kg(-1) seed) of the total soluble seed protein as determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot. Ultrastructural immunocytochemistry assays indicated that the recombinant hFIX in seed cotyledonary cells was efficiently directed to protein storage vacuoles. Mass spectrometry characterisation confirmed the presence of the hFIX recombinant protein sequence. Protein extracts from transgenic seeds showed a blood-clotting activity of up to 1.4% of normal plasma. Our results demonstrate the correct processing and stable accumulation of functional hFIX in soybean seeds stored for 6 years under room temperature conditions (22 ± 2°C).

  10. Virulence evolution of the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis by recombination in the core and accessory genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Joseph

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neisseria meningitidis is a naturally transformable, facultative pathogen colonizing the human nasopharynx. Here, we analyze on a genome-wide level the impact of recombination on gene-complement diversity and virulence evolution in N. meningitidis. We combined comparative genome hybridization using microarrays (mCGH and multilocus sequence typing (MLST of 29 meningococcal isolates with computational comparison of a subset of seven meningococcal genome sequences. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that lateral gene transfer of minimal mobile elements as well as prophages are major forces shaping meningococcal population structure. Extensive gene content comparison revealed novel associations of virulence with genetic elements besides the recently discovered meningococcal disease associated (MDA island. In particular, we identified an association of virulence with a recently described canonical genomic island termed IHT-E and a differential distribution of genes encoding RTX toxin- and two-partner secretion systems among hyperinvasive and non-hyperinvasive lineages. By computationally screening also the core genome for signs of recombination, we provided evidence that about 40% of the meningococcal core genes are affected by recombination primarily within metabolic genes as well as genes involved in DNA replication and repair. By comparison with the results of previous mCGH studies, our data indicated that genetic structuring as revealed by mCGH is stable over time and highly similar for isolates from different geographic origins. CONCLUSIONS: Recombination comprising lateral transfer of entire genes as well as homologous intragenic recombination has a profound impact on meningococcal population structure and genome composition. Our data support the hypothesis that meningococcal virulence is polygenic in nature and that differences in metabolism might contribute to virulence.

  11. INACTIVITY OF RECOMBINANT ELA2B PROVIDES A NEW EXAMPLE OF EVOLUTIONARY ELASTASE SILENCING IN HUMANS

    OpenAIRE

    Szepessy, Edit; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The archetypal mammalian elastase (ELA1) is not expressed in the human pancreas, because evolutionary mutations suppressed transcription of the ELA1 gene. AIMS. In this study we tested the theory that the unique duplication of the ELA2 gene in humans might compensate for the loss of ELA1. METHODS. Recombinant ELA2A and ELA2B were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their activity was tested on Glt-Ala-Ala-Pro-Leu-p-nitroanilide, DQ elastin and bovine milk protein. RESULTS. Surprisi...

  12. Modified Low Density Lipoprotein Stimulates Complement C3 Expression and Secretion via Liver X Receptor and Toll-like Receptor 4 Activation in Human Macrophages*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogilenko, Denis A.; Kudriavtsev, Igor V.; Trulioff, Andrey S.; Shavva, Vladimir S.; Dizhe, Ella B.; Missyul, Boris V.; Zhakhov, Alexander V.; Ischenko, Alexander M.; Perevozchikov, Andrej P.; Orlov, Sergey V.

    2012-01-01

    Complement C3 is a pivotal component of three cascades of complement activation. C3 is expressed in human atherosclerotic lesions and is involved in atherogenesis. However, the mechanism of C3 accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions is not well elucidated. We show that acetylated low density lipoprotein and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) increase C3 gene expression and protein secretion by human macrophages. Modified LDL (mLDL)-mediated activation of C3 expression mainly depends on liver X receptor (LXR) and partly on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), whereas C3 secretion is increased due to TLR4 activation by mLDL. LXR agonist TO901317 stimulates C3 gene expression in human monocyte-macrophage cells but not in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. We find LXR-responsive element inside of the promoter region of the human C3 gene, which binds to LXRβ in macrophages but not in HepG2 cells. We show that C3 expression and secretion is decreased in IL-4-treated (M2) and increased in IFNγ/LPS-stimulated (M1) human macrophages as compared with resting macrophages. LXR agonist TO901317 potentiates LPS-induced C3 gene expression and protein secretion in macrophages, whereas oxLDL differently modulates LPS-mediated regulation of C3 in M1 or M2 macrophages. Treatment of human macrophages with anaphylatoxin C3a results in stimulation of C3 transcription and secretion as well as increased oxLDL accumulation and augmented oxLDL-mediated up-regulation of the C3 gene. These data provide a novel mechanism of C3 gene regulation in macrophages and suggest new aspects of cross-talk between mLDL, C3, C3a, and TLR4 during development of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:22194611

  13. Pro-inflammatory activation of primary microglia and macrophages increases 18 kDa translocator protein expression in rodents but not humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, David R; Narayan, Nehal; Wells, Lisa; Healy, Luke; Smyth, Erica; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Galloway, Dylan; Williams, John B; Lehr, Joshua; Mandhair, Harpreet; Peferoen, Laura An; Taylor, Peter C; Amor, Sandra; Antel, Jack P; Matthews, Paul M; Moore, Craig S

    2017-08-01

    The 18kDa Translocator Protein (TSPO) is the most commonly used tissue-specific marker of inflammation in positron emission tomography (PET) studies. It is expressed in myeloid cells such as microglia and macrophages, and in rodent myeloid cells expression increases with cellular activation. We assessed the effect of myeloid cell activation on TSPO gene expression in both primary human and rodent microglia and macrophages in vitro, and also measured TSPO radioligand binding with (3)H-PBR28 in primary human macrophages. As observed previously, we found that TSPO expression increases (∼9-fold) in rodent-derived macrophages and microglia upon pro-inflammatory stimulation. However, TSPO expression does not increase with classical pro-inflammatory activation in primary human microglia (fold change 0.85 [95% CI 0.58-1.12], p = 0.47). In contrast, pro-inflammatory activation of human monocyte-derived macrophages is associated with a reduction of both TSPO gene expression (fold change 0.60 [95% CI 0.45-0.74], p = 0.02) and TSPO binding site abundance (fold change 0.61 [95% CI 0.49-0.73], p macrophages and microglia in humans. They are also clinically relevant for the interpretation of PET studies using TSPO targeting radioligands, as they suggest changes in TSPO expression may reflect microglial and macrophage density rather than activation phenotype.

  14. Human atherosclerotic plaque alternative macrophages display low cholesterol handling but high phagocytosis because of distinct activities of the PPARɣ and LXRα pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Baron, Morgane; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Copin, Corinne; Sebti, Yasmine; Derudas, Bruno; Mayi, Thérèse; Bories, Gael; Tailleux, Anne; Haulon, Stéphane; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Rationale A crucial step in atherogenesis is the infiltration of the sub-endothelial space of large arteries by monocytes where they differentiate into macrophages and transform into lipid-loaded foam cells. Macrophages are heterogeneous cells which adapt their response to environmental cytokines. Th1 cytokines promote monocyte differentiation into M1 macrophages, while Th2 cytokines trigger an “alternative” M2 phenotype. Objective We previously reported the presence of CD68+MR+ M2 macrophages in human atherosclerotic plaques. However, the function of these plaque CD68+MR+ macrophages is still unknown. Methods and Results Histological analysis revealed that CD68+MR+ locate far from the lipid core of the plaque and contain smaller lipid droplets compared to CD68+MR− macrophages. IL-4 polarized CD68+MR+ display a reduced capacity to handle and efflux cellular cholesterol due to low expression levels of the nuclear receptor Liver X Receptor (LXR)α and its target genes, ABCA1 and ApoE, caused by the high 15-lipoxygenase activity in CD68+MR+ macrophages. By contrast, CD68+MR+ highly express opsonins and receptors involved in phagocytosis resulting in high phagocytic activity. In M2 macrophages, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated receptor (PPAR)γ activation enhances the phagocytic, but not the cholesterol trafficking pathways. Conclusions These data identify a distinct macrophage sub-population with a low susceptibility to become foam cells, but high phagocytic activity due to different regulatory activities of the PPARγ-LXRα pathways. PMID:21350215

  15. Innervation of Tissue-Engineered Recombinant Human Collagen-Based Corneal Substitutes: A Comparative In Vivo Confocal Microscopy Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lagali, Neil; Griffith, May; Fagerholm, Per; Merrett, Kimberley; Huynh, Melissa; Munger, Rejean

    2008-01-01

    ...; and the 3 Department of Ophthalmology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden. METHODS . Pigs received a corneal allograft or a substitute made of either recombinant human type-I or -III collagen...

  16. Recombinant human activated protein C in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome : A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D. Cornet (Alexander); A.B.J. Groeneveld (Johan); J.J. Hofstra (Jorrit Jan); A.P.J. Vlaar (Alexander); S. Tuinman (Sietske); A. van Lingen (Arthur); M. Levi (Michael); A.R.J. Girbes (Armand); M.J. Schultz (Marcus); A. Beishuizen (Auke)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRationale: Pulmonary coagulopathy may play a pathogenetic role in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), by contributing to alveolocapillary inflammation and increased permeability. Recombinant human activated protein C (rh-APC) may inhibit this process and thereby improve patient

  17. Engineering the oxygen sensing regulation results in an enhanced recombinant human hemoglobin production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, José L; Liu, Lifang; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Efficient production of appropriate oxygen carriers for transfusions (blood substitutes or artificial blood) has been pursued for many decades, and to date several strategies have been used, from synthetic polymers to cell-free hemoglobin carriers. The recent advances in the field of metabolic engineering also allowed the generation of different genetically modified organisms for the production of recombinant human hemoglobin. Several studies have showed very promising results using the bacterium Escherichia coli as a production platform, reporting hemoglobin titers above 5% of the total cell protein content. However, there are still certain limitations regarding the protein stability and functionality of the recombinant hemoglobin produced in bacterial systems. In order to overcome these limitations, yeast systems have been proposed as the eukaryal alternative. We recently reported the generation of a set of plasmids to produce functional human hemoglobin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with final titers of active hemoglobin exceeding 4% of the total cell protein. In this study, we propose a strategy for further engineering S. cerevisiae by altering the oxygen sensing pathway by deleting the transcription factor HAP1, which resulted in an increase of the final recombinant active hemoglobin titer exceeding 7% of the total cellular protein. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Human macrophage differentiation induces OCTN2-mediated L-carnitine transport through stimulation of mTOR-STAT3 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingoglia, Filippo; Visigalli, Rossana; Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Barilli, Amelia; Riccardi, Benedetta; Puccini, Paola; Milioli, Marco; Di Lascia, Maria; Bernuzzi, Gino; Dall'Asta, Valeria

    2017-03-01

    l-Carnitine, in addition to playing a fundamental role in the β-oxidation of fatty acids, has been recently identified as a modulator of immune function, although the mechanisms that underlie this role remain to be clarified. In this study, we addressed the modulation of l-carnitine transport and expression of related transporters during differentiation of human monocytes to macrophages. Whereas monocytes display a modest uptake of l-carnitine, GM-CSF-induced differentiation massively increased the saturable Na + -dependent uptake of l-carnitine. Kinetic and inhibition analyses demonstrate that in macrophage l-carnitine transport is mediated by a high-affinity component (K m ∼4 µM) that is identifiable with the operation of OCTN2 transporter and a low-affinity component (K m > 10 mM) that is identifiable with system A for neutral amino acids. Consistently, both SLC22A5/OCTN2 and SLC38A2/SNAT2 are induced during the differentiation of monocytes to macrophages at gene and protein levels. Elucidation of GM-CSF signaling demonstrates that the cytokine causes the activation of mTOR kinase, leading to the phosphorylation and activation of STAT3, which, in turn, is responsible for OCTN2 transcription. SLC22A5/OCTN2 therefore emerges as a novel member of the set of genes markers of macrophage differentiation. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  19. Identification of the Common Origins of Osteoclasts, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells in Human Hematopoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Xiao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteoclasts (OCs originate from the myeloid cell lineage, but the successive steps in their lineage commitment are ill-defined, especially in humans. To clarify OC origin, we sorted cell populations from pediatric bone marrow (BM by flow cytometry and assessed their differentiation potential in vitro. Within the CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+ BM cell population, OC-differentiation potential was restricted to FLT3+ cells and enriched in an IL3 receptor (Rαhigh subset that constituted less than 0.5% of total BM. These IL3Rαhigh cells also generated macrophages (MΦs and dendritic cells (DCs but lacked granulocyte (GR-differentiation potential, as demonstrated at the clonal level. The IL3Rαlow subset was re-defined as common progenitor of GR, MΦ, OC, and DC (GMODP and gave rise to the IL3Rαhigh subset that was identified as common progenitor of MΦ, OC, and DC (MODP. Unbiased transcriptome analysis of CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+FLT3+ IL3Rαlow and IL3Rαhigh subsets corroborated our definitions of the GMODP and MODP and their developmental relationship.

  20. Surface coating mediates the toxicity of polymeric nanoparticles towards human-like macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Nadège; Hillaireau, Hervé; Vergnaud, Juliette; Tsapis, Nicolas; Pallardy, Marc; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Fattal, Elias

    2015-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the toxicity of a series of poly(lactide-co-glycolic) (PLGA) nanoparticles on human-like THP-1 macrophages. Positively-, negatively-charged and neutral nanoparticles (200 nm) were prepared using chitosan (CS), poloxamer 188 (PF68) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as stabilizer. Stabilizer-free PLGA nanoparticles were obtained as well. When used at therapeutically relevant concentrations (up to 0.1 mg/mL in vitro), all tested nanoparticles showed no or scarce signs of toxicity, as assessed by cell mitochondrial activity, induction of apoptosis and necrosis, production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. At high concentrations (above 1mg/mL), cytotoxicity was found to be induced by the presence of stabilizers, whatever the toxicological pattern of the stabilizer itself. While stabilizer-free PLGA nanoparticles exerted no cytotoxicity, the slightly cytotoxic CS polymer conferred PLGA nanoparticles significant cytotoxicity when used as nanoparticle stabilizer; more surprisingly, the otherwise innocuous PVA and PF68 polymers also conferred a significant cytotoxicity to PLGA nanoparticles. These results unveiled the critical toxicological contribution played by stabilizers used for the formulation of PLGA nanoparticles when used at high concentrations, which may have implications for local toxicities of PLGA-based nanomedicine, and provided additional insight in cytotoxic effects of internalized nanoparticles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Unsaturated fatty acids prevent activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'homme, Laurent; Esser, Nathalie; Riva, Laura; Scheen, André; Paquot, Nicolas; Piette, Jacques; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in many obesity-associated diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and gouty arthritis, through its ability to induce interleukin (IL)-1β release. The molecular link between obesity and inflammasome activation is still unclear, but free fatty acids have been proposed as one triggering event. Here we reported opposite effects of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) compared with unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) on NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages. Palmitate and stearate, both SFAs, triggered IL-1β secretion in a caspase-1/ASC/NLRP3-dependent pathway. Unlike SFAs, the UFAs oleate and linoleate did not lead to IL-1β secretion. In addition, they totally prevented the IL-1β release induced by SFAs and, with less efficiency, by a broad range of NLRP3 inducers, including nigericin, alum, and monosodium urate. UFAs did not affect the transcriptional effect of SFAs, suggesting a specific effect on the NLRP3 activation. These results provide a new anti-inflammatory mechanism of UFAs by preventing the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and, therefore, IL-1β processing. By this way, UFAs might play a protective role in NLRP3-associated diseases. PMID:24006511

  2. Human β-defensin 3 inhibits periodontitis development by suppressing inflammatory responses in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Di; Lyu, Jinglu; Li, Houxuan; Lei, Lang; Bian, Tianying; Li, Lili; Yan, Fuhua

    2017-11-01

    Human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) is a cationic peptide with immunomodulatory effects on both innate and acquired immune responses. Periodontitis, an inflammatory disease that extends deep into periodontal tissues, causes the loss of supporting structures around the tooth. The present study assessed the effects of hBD3 as a monotherapy for periodontitis in mice and explored its potential mechanism. In vivo, hBD3 inhibited the levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-6, and matrix metalloprotease-9 in periodontium exposed to Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g) in a mouse periodontitis model; reduced osteoclast formation and lower alveolar bone loss were also observed. In addition, hBD3 was related to the expression of polarization signature molecules in circulating monocytes. In vitro, hBD3 notably suppressed the production of TNF-α and interleukin-6 in RAW 264.7 cells stimulated by the lipopolysaccharide of P.g. Moreover, hBD3 attenuated polarization of RAW 264.7 cells into the M1 phenotype, with reduced activation of nuclear factor-κB signal transduction. In conclusion, hBD3 exhibits potent anti-periodontitis properties both in vitro and in vivo, and this effect may be correlated to inhibition of the nuclear factor-κB pathway and macrophage polarization. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Cd(II) and As(III) bioaccumulation by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing oligomeric human metallothioneins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yao; Lin, Jianqun; Zhang, Chengjia; Ren, Yilin; Lin, Jianqiang

    2011-01-30

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a family of metal binding proteins. Recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the human MT (hMT-1A) gene was constructed for bioaccumulation of heavy metals. In order to increase protein stability, the glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene was fused with the hMT-1A gene and coexpressed. In order to increase MT expression efficiency and metal binding capacity, two, three or four hMT-1A genes were integrated in series and overexpressed in E. coli. The recombinant E. coli expressing the GST fused trimeric hMT-1A protein exhibited the highest Cd(II) and As(III) bioaccumulation ability, 6.36 mg Cd/g dry cells and 7.59 mg As/g dry cells, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Recombinant expression in E. coli of human FGFR2 with its transmembrane and extracellular domains

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    Adam Bajinting

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs are a family of receptor tyrosine kinases containing three domains: an extracellular receptor domain, a single transmembrane helix, and an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. FGFRs are activated by fibroblast growth factors (FGFs as part of complex signal transduction cascades regulating angiogenesis, skeletal formation, cell differentiation, proliferation, cell survival, and cancer. We have developed the first recombinant expression system in E. coli to produce a construct of human FGFR2 containing its transmembrane and extracellular receptor domains. We demonstrate that the expressed construct is functional in binding heparin and dimerizing. Size exclusion chromatography demonstrates that the purified FGFR2 does not form a complex with FGF1 or adopts an inactive dimer conformation. Progress towards the successful recombinant production of intact FGFRs will facilitate further biochemical experiments and structure determination that will provide insight into how extracellular FGF binding activates intracellular kinase activity.

  5. Innervation of tissue-engineered recombinant human collagen-based corneal substitutes : A comparative in vivo confocal microscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Lagali, Neil; Griffith, May; Fagerholm, Per; Merrett, Kimberley; Huynh, Melissa; Munger, Rejean

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE. To compare reinnervation in recombinant human collagen-based corneal substitutes with allografts during a 1-year postimplantation follow-up period in pigs. A retrospective comparison to innervation in porcine collagen-based biosynthetic grafts was also performed. METHODS. Pigs received a corneal allograft or a substitute made of either recombinant human type-I or -III collagen. In vivo confocal microscopic examination of the central cornea of surgical and untouched control eyes befor...

  6. The Effect of Recombinant Human MG53 Protein on Tourniquet-induced Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Rat Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The effect of recombinant human MG53 protein on tourniquet- induced ischemia reperfusion injury in rat muscle Benjamin T. Corona , Ph.D.1, Koyal Garg...family protein , has been shown to be essential for regulating membrane repair and has been shown to be protective against cardiac I-R and various forms...effect of recombinant human MG53 protein on tourniquet-induced ischemia reperfusion injury in rat muscle. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  7. Inhibition of Apoptosis Stages of Human Blood Lymphocytes after Exposure to Carbon Monoxide in the Presence of Recombinant Interleukin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyukhov, V G; Tyunina, O I

    2017-01-01

    We studied the effect of carbon monoxide (60-, 75-, and 90-min exposure) on the expression of antiapoptotic proteins (survivin and Bcl-2) in human blood lymphocytes in the presence of recombinant IL-2 in an apoptosis-inducing dose (0.1 ng/ml). Incubation of cells in atmosphere with carbon monoxide in the presence of recombinant IL-2 was accompanied by accumulation of Bcl-2 protein with simultaneous decrease of survivin content. It was concluded that carbon monoxide plays a role in the dysregulation of apoptosis of human blood lymphocytes Bcl-2 (i.e. CO inhibits the proapoptotic effect of recombinant IL-2).

  8. An Ethyl Acetate Fraction of Moringa oleifera Lam. Inhibits Human Macrophage Cytokine Production Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    OpenAIRE

    Kooltheat, Nateelak; Sranujit, Rungnapa Pankla; Chumark, Pilaipark; Potup, Pachuen; Laytragoon-Lewin, Nongnit; Usuwanthim, Kanchana

    2014-01-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam. (MO) has been reported to harbor anti-oxidation and anti-inflammatory activity and useful in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, despite these findings there has been little work done on the effects of MO on immune cellular function. Since macrophages, TNF and related cytokines play an important pathophysiologic role in lung damage induced by cigarette smoke, we examined the effects of MO on cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced cytokine production by human ...

  9. An Ethyl Acetate Fraction of Moringa oleifera Lam. Inhibits Human Macrophage Cytokine Production Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    OpenAIRE

    Kooltheat, Nateelak; Pankla Sranujit, Rungnapa; Chumark, Pilaipark; Potup, Pachuen; Laytragoon-Lewin, Nongnit; Usuwanthim, Kanchana

    2014-01-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam. (MO) has been reported to harbor anti-oxidation and anti-inflammatory activity and useful in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, despite these findings there has been little work done on the effects of MO on immune cellular function. Since macrophages, TNF and related cytokines play an important pathophysiologic role in lung damage induced by cigarette smoke, we examined the effects of MO on cigarette smoke extract (CSE)—induced cytokine production by human...

  10. Nitrite produced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages in physiologic oxygen impacts bacterial ATP consumption and gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham-Bussel, Amy; Zhang, Tuo; Nathan, Carl F.

    2013-01-01

    Most people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) suppress the pathogen’s replication without eradicating it. It is unknown how Mtb survives for decades in a hostile host environment. Respiration of nitrate to nitrite could help Mtb survive in hypoxic tissues but was not thought to be significant at physiologic oxygen tensions, nor was the resultant nitrite considered consequential to Mtb’s physiology. We found that Mtb infecting human macrophages in vitro produces copious nitrite at...

  11. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells Is Associated with Rewiring of MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1) Protein Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Erik; Ventz, Katharina; Harms, Manuela; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cyclin-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease.

  12. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells is Associated with MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1 Protein Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eRichter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cycline-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1 acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease.

  13. Binding of recombinant human proacrosin/acrosin to zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins. I. Studies with recombinant human ZPA, ZPB, and ZPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Laura I; Harris, Jeffrey D; Vazquez-Levin, Mónica H

    2005-06-01

    To characterize proacrosin/acrosin interaction with isolated zona pellucida (ZP) components. Prospective study. Basic research laboratory. Recombinant proteins derived from human proacrosin (Rec-40, Rec-30, Rec-20, Rec-10, and Rec-6) and from human ZP glycoproteins (rec-hZPA, ZPB, and ZPC). In vitro binding assay developed to assess proacrosin/acrosin-ZP interaction. Zona pellucida glycoprotein binding to proacrosin/acrosin; estimation of binding affinity. Of all ZP proteins, rec-hZPA demonstrated the highest binding activity toward acrosin (Rec-30) (rec-hZPB: 42% of rec-hZPA; rec-hZPC: 39% of rec-hZPA; PZP components was observed (Kd: 34 nM for rec-hZPA, 38 nM for rec-hZPB, 63 nM for rec-hZPC). The rec-hZPA is the major ZP ligand for human proacrosin/acrosin. The interaction involves mannosyl, fucosyl, and sulfated glycans. Binding sites for rec-hZP would be located both at the N- and C-terminus of proacrosin, revealing a key role of the proenzyme in the interaction.

  14. Safety of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB in Augment® Bone Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A Solchaga

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses nonclinical and clinical data regarding the safety of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB as a component of the Augment® Bone Graft (Augment. Augment is a bone graft substitute intended to be used as an alternative to autologous bone graft in the fusion of hindfoot and ankle joints. Nonclinical studies included assessment of the pharmacokinetic profile of intravenously administered recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB in rat and dog, effects of intravenous administration of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB in a reproductive and development toxicity study in rats, and chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity of Augment in a 12-month implantation model. These studies showed that systemic exposure was brief and clearance was rapid. No signs of toxicity, carcinogenicity, or tumor promotion were observed even with doses far exceeding the maximum clinical dose. Results of clinical trials (605 participants and commercial use of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB containing products indicate that these products are not associated with increased incidence of adverse events or cancer. The safety data presented provide evidence that recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB is a safe therapeutic when used in combination products as a single administration during surgical procedures for bone repair and fusion. There is no evidence associating use of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB in Augment with chronic toxicity, carcinogenicity, or tumor promotion.

  15. The humanized anti-human AMHRII mAb 3C23K exerts an anti-tumor activity against human ovarian cancer through tumor-associated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougherara, Houcine; Némati, Fariba; Nicolas, André; Massonnet, Gérald; Pugnière, Martine; Ngô, Charlotte; Le Frère-Belda, Marie-Aude; Leary, Alexandra; Alexandre, Jérôme; Meseure, Didier; Barret, Jean-Marc; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle; Pèlegrin, André; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Prost, Jean-François; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Decaudin, Didier

    2017-11-21

    Müllerian inhibiting substance, also called anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of AMH type II receptor-positive tumor cells, such as human ovarian cancers (OCs). On this basis, a humanized glyco-engineered monoclonal antibody (3C23K) has been developed. The aim of this study was therefore to experimentally confirm the therapeutic potential of 3C23K in human OCs. We first determined by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and cytofluorometry analyses the expression of AMHRII in patient's tumors and found that a majority (60 to 80% depending on the detection technique) of OCs were positive for this marker. We then provided evidence that the tumor stroma of OC is enriched in tumor-associated macrophages and that these cells are responsible for 3C23K-induced killing of tumor cells through ADCP and ADCC mechanisms. In addition, we showed that 3C23K reduced macrophages induced-T cells immunosuppression. Finally, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of 3C23K alone and in combination with a carboplatin-paclitaxel chemotherapy in a panel of OC Patient-Derived Xenografts. In those experiments, we showed that 3C23K significantly increased the proportion and the quality of chemotherapy-based in vivo responses. Altogether, our data support the potential interest of AMHRII targeting in human ovarian cancers and the evaluation of 3C23K in further clinical trials.

  16. Localization of human acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) in macrophages and in various tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, N; Miyazaki, A; Takeya, M; Horiuchi, S; Chang, C C; Chang, T Y; Takahashi, K

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the distribution of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) in various human tissues, we examined tissues of autopsy cases immunohistochemically. ACAT-1 was demonstrated in macrophages, antigen-presenting cells, steroid hormone-producing cells, neurons, cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, mesothelial cells, epithelial cells of the urinary tracts, thyroid follicles, renal tubules, pituitary, prostatic, and bronchial glands, alveolar and intestinal epithelial cells, pancreatic acinar cells, and hepatocytes. These findings showed that ACAT-1 is present in a variety of human tissues examined. The immunoreactivities are particularly prominent in the macrophages, steroid hormone-producing cells, followed by hepatocytes, and intestinal epithelia. In cultured human macrophages, immunoelectron microscopy revealed that ACAT-1 was located mainly in the tubular rough endoplasmic reticulum; immunoblot analysis showed that the ACAT-1 protein content did not change with or without cholesterol loading; however, on cholesterol loading, about 30 to 40% of the total immunoreactivity appeared in small-sized vesicles. These vesicles were also enriched in 78-kd glucose-regulated protein (GRP 78), a specific marker for the endoplasmic reticulum. Immunofluorescent microscopy demonstrated extensive colocalization of ACAT-1 and GRP 78 signals in both the tubular and vesicular endoplasmic reticulum before and after cholesterol loading. These results raise the possibility that foam cell formation may activate an endoplasmic reticulum vesiculation process, producing vesicles enriched in the ACAT-1 protein.

  17. Unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not promote human monocyte differentiation toward alternative macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Brozek, John [Genfit, Loos (France); Derudas, Bruno [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte [Inserm ERI-9 and Equipe d' Accueil 2693, IFR114, Universite de Lille, Lille (France); Staels, Bart, E-mail: bart.staels@pasteur-lille.fr [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France)

    2009-08-28

    Macrophages adapt their response to micro-environmental signals. While Th1 cytokines promote pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, Th2 cytokines promote an 'alternative' anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors expressed in macrophages where they control the inflammatory response. It has been shown that PPAR{gamma} promotes the differentiation of monocytes into anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in humans and mice, while a role for PPAR{beta}/{delta} in this process has been reported only in mice and no data are available for PPAR{alpha}. Here, we show that in contrast to PPAR{gamma}, expression of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} overall does not correlate with the expression of M2 markers in human atherosclerotic lesions, whereas a positive correlation with genes of lipid metabolism exists. Moreover, unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not influence human monocyte differentiation into M2 macrophages in vitro. Thus, PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} do not appear to modulate the alternative differentiation of human macrophages.

  18. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Z.Q. [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Greenberg, L. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ertl, H.C., E-mail: ertl@wistar.upenn.edu [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rupprecht, C.E. [The Global Alliance for Rabies Control, Manhattan, KS (United States); Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Basseterre (Saint Kitts and Nevis)

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  19. Recombinant Production of Human Aquaporin-1 to an Exceptional High Membrane Density in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomholt, Julie; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus; Scharff-Poulsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper we explored the capacity of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as host for heterologous expression of human Aquaporin-1. Aquaporin-1 cDNA was expressed from a galactose inducible promoter situated on a plasmid with an adjustable copy number. Human Aquaporin-1 was C-terminally tag......In the present paper we explored the capacity of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as host for heterologous expression of human Aquaporin-1. Aquaporin-1 cDNA was expressed from a galactose inducible promoter situated on a plasmid with an adjustable copy number. Human Aquaporin-1 was C...... at 15°C in a yeast host over-producing the Gal4p transcriptional activator and growth in amino acid supplemented minimal medium. In-gel fluorescence combined with western blotting showed that low accumulation of correctly folded recombinant Aquaporin-1 at 30°C was due to in vivo mal-folding. Reduction...

  20. Experimental studies of a vaccine formulation of recombinant human VEGF antigen with aluminum phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Sánchez, Lincidio; Morera Díaz, Yanelys; Bequet-Romero, Mónica; Ramses Hernández, Gerardo; Rodríguez, Yadira; Castro Velazco, Jorge; Puente Pérez, Pedro; Ayala Avila, Marta; Gavilondo, Jorge V

    2015-01-01

    CIGB-247 is a cancer vaccine that is a formulation of a recombinant protein antigen representative of the human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) with a bacterially-derived adjuvant (VSSP). The vaccine has shown an excellent safety profile in mice, rats, rabbits, not-human primates and in recent clinical trials in cancer patients. Response to the vaccine is characterized by specific antibody titers that neutralize VEGF/VEGFR2 binding and a cytotoxic tumor-specific response. To expand our present anti-VEGF active immunotherapy strategies, we have now studied in mice and non-human primates the effects of vaccination with a formulation of our recombinant VEGF antigen and aluminum phosphate adjuvant (hereafter denominated CIGB-247-A). Administered bi-weekly, CIGB-247-A produces high titers of anti-VEGF IgG blocking antibodies in 2 mice strains. Particularly in BALB/c, the treatment impaired subcutaneous F3II mammary tumor growth and reduced the number of spontaneous lung macro metastases, increasing animals' survival. Spleen cells from specifically immunized mice directly killed F3II tumor cells in vitro. CIGB-247-A also showed to be immunogenic in non-human primates, which developed anti-VEGF blocking antibodies and the ability for specific direct cell cytotoxic responses, all without impairing the healing of deep skin wounds or other side effect. Our results support consideration of aluminum phosphate as a suitable adjuvant for the development of new vaccine formulations using VEGF as antigen.

  1. PRODUCTION OF A HUMAN RECOMBINANT ANTIBODY AGAINST SEROTYPE A CANDIDA ALBICANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A. Jafari

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available After using 3 different generations of antibodies including human and non-human hyperimmune sera, monoclonal antibodies and chimeric antibodies, more recently a newer approach has been developed in which the antibody genes are cloned directly from a patient peripheral B-lymphocytes and expressed in a host like E. coli. In this study the Candida albicans serotype A (NCTC 3153 mannan was purified using a modified Fehling method and used for selection of human recombinant antibody from a C. albicans phage antibody library. After four rounds of affinity selecting (panning, 2 predominant clones were chosen by DNA fingerprinting and ELISA. A 248 amino acid DNA fragment coding for anti-C. albicans mannan scFv was sequenced and cloned in a pBAD-TOPO cloning vector to produce a soluble and phage free antibody. The analysis of antibody sequences by V base Index (DNAPLOT confirmed the human antibody origin with the VH4 family in V segment of heavy variable chain and VL3 (Lambda 3 in J segment of the light variable chain. This antibody fragment was purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and inmmunoblotted as a 31kDa recombinant protein.

  2. The Development of Novel Recombinant Human Gelatins as Replacements for Animal-Derived Gelatin in Pharmaceutical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, David; Chang, Robert; Williams, Kim E.; Polarek, James W.

    We have developed a recombinant expression system to produce a series of novel recombinant human gelatins that can substitute for animal sourced gelatin preparations currently used in pharmaceutical and nutraceutical applications. This system allows the production of human sequence gelatins, or, if desired, gelatins from any other species depending on the availability of the cloned gene. The gelatins produced with this recombinant system are of defined molecular weight, unlike the animal-sourced gelatins, which consist of numerous polypeptides of varying size. The fermentation and purification process used to prepare these recombinant gelatins does not use any human- or animal-derived components and thus this recombinant material should be free from viruses and agents that cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The recombinant gelatins exhibit lot-to-lot reproducibility and we have performed extensive analytical testing on them. We have demonstrated the utility of these novel gelatins as biological stabilizers and plasma expanders, and we have shown they possess qualities that are important in applications where gel formation is critical. Finally, we provide examples of how our system allows the engineering of these recombinant gelatins to optimize the production process.

  3. A comparative study of recombinant and native frutalin binding to human prostate tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla; Teixeira, José A; Schmitt, Fernando; Domingues, Lucília

    2009-09-09

    Numerous studies indicate that cancer cells present an aberrant glycosylation pattern that can be detected by lectin histochemistry. Lectins have shown the ability to recognise these modifications in several carcinomas, namely in the prostate carcinoma, one of the most lethal diseases in man. Thus, the aim of this work was to investigate if the alpha-D-galactose-binding plant lectin frutalin is able to detect such changes in the referred carcinoma. Frutalin was obtained from different sources namely, its natural source (plant origin) and a recombinant source (Pichia expression system). Finally, the results obtained with the two lectins were compared and their potential use as prostate tumour biomarkers was discussed. The binding of recombinant and native frutalin to specific glycoconjugates expressed in human prostate tissues was assessed by using an immuhistochemical technique. A total of 20 cases of prostate carcinoma and 25 cases of benign prostate hyperplasia were studied. Lectins bound directly to the tissues and anti-frutalin polyclonal antibody was used as the bridge to react with the complex biotinilated anti-rabbit IgG plus streptavidin-conjugated peroxidase. DAB was used as visual indicator to specifically localise the binding of the lectins to the tissues. Both lectins bound to the cells cytoplasm of the prostate carcinoma glands. The binding intensity of native frutalin was stronger in the neoplasic cells than in hyperplasic cells; however no significant statistical correlation could be found (P = 0.051). On the other hand, recombinant frutalin bound exclusively to the neoplasic cells and a significant positive statistical correlation was obtained (P Native and recombinant frutalin yielded different binding responses in the prostate tissues due to their differences in carbohydrate-binding affinities. Also, this study shows that both lectins may be used as histochemical biomarkers for the prostate cancer. Moreover, the successful use of a recombinant

  4. A comparative study of recombinant and native frutalin binding to human prostate tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingues Lucília

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous studies indicate that cancer cells present an aberrant glycosylation pattern that can be detected by lectin histochemistry. Lectins have shown the ability to recognise these modifications in several carcinomas, namely in the prostate carcinoma, one of the most lethal diseases in man. Thus, the aim of this work was to investigate if the α-D-galactose-binding plant lectin frutalin is able to detect such changes in the referred carcinoma. Frutalin was obtained from different sources namely, its natural source (plant origin and a recombinant source (Pichia expression system. Finally, the results obtained with the two lectins were compared and their potential use as prostate tumour biomarkers was discussed. Results The binding of recombinant and native frutalin to specific glycoconjugates expressed in human prostate tissues was assessed by using an immuhistochemical technique. A total of 20 cases of prostate carcinoma and 25 cases of benign prostate hyperplasia were studied. Lectins bound directly to the tissues and anti-frutalin polyclonal antibody was used as the bridge to react with the complex biotinilated anti-rabbit IgG plus streptavidin-conjugated peroxidase. DAB was used as visual indicator to specifically localise the binding of the lectins to the tissues. Both lectins bound to the cells cytoplasm of the prostate carcinoma glands. The binding intensity of native frutalin was stronger in the neoplasic cells than in hyperplasic cells; however no significant statistical correlation could be found (P = 0.051. On the other hand, recombinant frutalin bound exclusively to the neoplasic cells and a significant positive statistical correlation was obtained (P Conclusion Native and recombinant frutalin yielded different binding responses in the prostate tissues due to their differences in carbohydrate-binding affinities. Also, this study shows that both lectins may be used as histochemical biomarkers for the prostate

  5. Comprehensive FISH probe design tool applied to imaging human immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedbal, Jakub; Hobson, Philip S; Fear, David J; Heintzmann, Rainer; Gould, Hannah J

    2012-01-01

    We present a web engine boosted fluorescence in-situ hybridization (webFISH) algorithm using a genome-wide sequence similarity search to design target-specific single-copy and repetitive DNA FISH probes. The webFISH algorithm featuring a user-friendly interface (http://www.webfish2.org/) maximizes the coverage of the examined sequences with FISH probes by considering locally repetitive sequences absent from the remainder of the genome. The highly repetitive human immunoglobulin heavy chain sequence was analyzed using webFISH to design three sets of FISH probes. These allowed direct simultaneous detection of class switch recombination in both immunoglobulin-heavy chain alleles in single cells from a population of cultured primary B cells. It directly demonstrated asynchrony of the class switch recombination in the two alleles in structurally preserved nuclei while permitting parallel readout of protein expression by immunofluorescence staining. This novel technique offers the possibility of gaining unprecedented insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in class switch recombination.

  6. Towards a more precise serological diagnosis of human tegumentary leishmaniasis using Leishmania recombinant proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Souza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposure to Leishmania induces a humoral immune response that can be used as a marker of parasite exposure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein, ELISA was used to screen sera from patients with Tegumentary Leishmaniasis (TL against different L. infantum-chagasi-derived recombinant proteins (rHSP70, rH2A, rH2B, rH3, rH4 and rKMP11. Among the recombinant proteins, rHSP70 and rH2A showed the best reactivity against human sera obtained from endemic areas of TL. Receiver-Operator Characteristics (ROC curve analysis was used to identify the effectiveness of these proteins for serodiagnosis of TL. ROC curves confirmed the superior performance of rHSP70 and rH2A, in comparison to the other tested recombinant proteins. Additionally, we evaluated the specificity of the response to rHSP70 and rH2A by testing sera obtained from patients with Chagas' disease, Tuberculosis, Leprosy or Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. In this case, rHSP70 displayed an increased ability to discriminate diseases, in comparison to SLA. CONCLUSION: Our results raise possibility of using rHSP70 for the serodiagnosis of TL.

  7. Expression of functional recombinant human growth hormone in transgenic soybean seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Nicolau B; Murad, André M; Cipriano, Thaís M; Araújo, Ana Cláudia G; Aragão, Francisco J L; Leite, Adilson; Vianna, Giovanni R; McPhee, Timothy R; Souza, Gustavo H M F; Waters, Michael J; Rech, Elíbio L

    2011-08-01

    We produced human growth hormone (hGH), a protein that stimulates growth and cell reproduction, in genetically engineered soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] seeds. Utilising the alpha prime (α') subunit of β-conglycinin tissue-specific promoter from soybean and the α-Coixin signal peptide from Coix lacryma-jobi, we obtained transgenic soybean lines that expressed the mature form of hGH in their seeds. Expression levels of bioactive hGH up to 2.9% of the total soluble seed protein content (corresponding to approximately 9 g kg(-1)) were measured in mature dry soybean seeds. The results of ultrastructural immunocytochemistry assays indicated that the recombinant hGH in seed cotyledonary cells was efficiently directed to protein storage vacuoles. Specific bioassays demonstrated that the hGH expressed in the soybean seeds was fully active. The recombinant hGH protein sequence was confirmed by mass spectrometry characterisation. These results demonstrate that the utilisation of tissue-specific regulatory sequences is an attractive and viable option for achieving high-yield production of recombinant proteins in stable transgenic soybean seeds.

  8. Antigenic assessment of a recombinant human CD90 protein expressed in prokaryotic expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi-Rad, Narges; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Behdani, Mahdi; Moradi-Kalbolandi, Shima; Motamedi-Rad, Mahdieh; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi

    2015-12-01

    Cluster of Differentiation 90 (CD90, Thy-1) has been proposed as one of the most important biomarkers in several cancer cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs). CD90 is considered as a potential normal stem cell and CSCs biomarker and also has been identified in lung cancer stem cells, hepatocellular carcinoma cells and high-grade gliomas. Using eukaryotic host systems involves complex procedures and frequently results in low protein yields. The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is comparatively easier than eukaryotic host cells. The potential of large scale production of recombinant protein has made this system an economic production platform. In this study we expressed the extra-membrane domain of human CD90 (exCD90) antigen (Gln15-Cys130) in E. coli expression host cells. The epitope integrity of purified recombinant antigen was confirmed by antibody-antigen interaction using 5E10 anti-CD90 monoclonal antibody and binding study through ELISA and florescent staining of CD90(+) cells in a flow cytometry experiment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Towards a more precise serological diagnosis of human tegumentary leishmaniasis using Leishmania recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Ana Paula; Soto, Manuel; Costa, Jackson M L; Boaventura, Viviane S; de Oliveira, Camila I; Cristal, Juqueline R; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to Leishmania induces a humoral immune response that can be used as a marker of parasite exposure. Herein, ELISA was used to screen sera from patients with Tegumentary Leishmaniasis (TL) against different L. infantum-chagasi-derived recombinant proteins (rHSP70, rH2A, rH2B, rH3, rH4 and rKMP11). Among the recombinant proteins, rHSP70 and rH2A showed the best reactivity against human sera obtained from endemic areas of TL. Receiver-Operator Characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was used to identify the effectiveness of these proteins for serodiagnosis of TL. ROC curves confirmed the superior performance of rHSP70 and rH2A, in comparison to the other tested recombinant proteins. Additionally, we evaluated the specificity of the response to rHSP70 and rH2A by testing sera obtained from patients with Chagas' disease, Tuberculosis, Leprosy or Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. In this case, rHSP70 displayed an increased ability to discriminate diseases, in comparison to SLA. Our results raise possibility of using rHSP70 for the serodiagnosis of TL.

  10. Towards a More Precise Serological Diagnosis of Human Tegumentary Leishmaniasis Using Leishmania Recombinant Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Ana Paula; Soto, Manuel; Costa, Jackson M. L.; Boaventura, Viviane S.; de Oliveira, Camila I.; Cristal, Juqueline R.; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina

    2013-01-01

    Background Exposure to Leishmania induces a humoral immune response that can be used as a marker of parasite exposure. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein, ELISA was used to screen sera from patients with Tegumentary Leishmaniasis (TL) against different L. infantum-chagasi-derived recombinant proteins (rHSP70, rH2A, rH2B, rH3, rH4 and rKMP11). Among the recombinant proteins, rHSP70 and rH2A showed the best reactivity against human sera obtained from endemic areas of TL. Receiver-Operator Characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was used to identify the effectiveness of these proteins for serodiagnosis of TL. ROC curves confirmed the superior performance of rHSP70 and rH2A, in comparison to the other tested recombinant proteins. Additionally, we evaluated the specificity of the response to rHSP70 and rH2A by testing sera obtained from patients with Chagas' disease, Tuberculosis, Leprosy or Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. In this case, rHSP70 displayed an increased ability to discriminate diseases, in comparison to SLA. Conclusion Our results raise possibility of using rHSP70 for the serodiagnosis of TL PMID:23776617

  11. Hydroxylation of recombinant human collagen type I alpha 1 in transgenic maize co-expressed with a recombinant human prolyl 4-hydroxylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pappu Kameshwari M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collagens require the hydroxylation of proline (Pro residues in their triple-helical domain repeating sequence Xaa-Pro-Gly to function properly as a main structural component of the extracellular matrix in animals at physiologically relevant conditions. The regioselective proline hydroxylation is catalyzed by a specific prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H as a posttranslational processing step. Results A recombinant human collagen type I α-1 (rCIα1 with high percentage of hydroxylated prolines (Hyp was produced in transgenic maize seeds when co-expressed with both the α- and β- subunits of a recombinant human P4H (rP4H. Germ-specific expression of rCIα1 using maize globulin-1 gene promoter resulted in an average yield of 12 mg/kg seed for the full-length rCIα1 in seeds without co-expression of rP4H and 4 mg/kg seed for the rCIα1 (rCIα1-OH in seeds with co-expression of rP4H. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS analysis revealed that nearly half of the collagenous repeating triplets in rCIα1 isolated from rP4H co-expressing maize line had the Pro residues changed to Hyp residues. The HRMS analysis determined the Hyp content of maize-derived rCIα1-OH as 18.11%, which is comparable to the Hyp level of yeast-derived rCIα1-OH (17.47% and the native human CIa1 (14.59%, respectively. The increased Hyp percentage was correlated with a markedly enhanced thermal stability of maize-derived rCIα1-OH when compared to the non-hydroxylated rCIα1. Conclusions This work shows that maize has potential to produce adequately modified exogenous proteins with mammalian-like post-translational modifications that may be require for their use as pharmaceutical and industrial products.

  12. Use of Recombination-Mediated Genetic Engineering for Construction of Rescue Human Cytomegalovirus Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Dulal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology has contributed immensely to manipulation of larger genomes in many organisms including large DNA viruses like human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. The HCMV BAC clone propagated and maintained inside E. coli allows for accurate recombinant virus generation. Using this system, we have generated a panel of HCMV deletion mutants and their rescue clones. In this paper, we describe the construction of HCMV BAC mutants using a homologous recombination system. A gene capture method, or gap repair cloning, to seize large fragments of DNA from the virus BAC in order to generate rescue viruses, is described in detail. Construction of rescue clones using gap repair cloning is highly efficient and provides a novel use of the homologous recombination-based method in E. coli for molecular cloning, known colloquially as recombineering, when rescuing large BAC deletions. This method of excising large fragments of DNA provides important prospects for in vitro homologous recombination for genetic cloning.

  13. Recombination gives a new insight in the effective population size and the history of the old world human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melé, Marta; Javed, Asif; Pybus, Marc; Zalloua, Pierre; Haber, Marc; Comas, David; Netea, Mihai G; Balanovsky, Oleg; Balanovska, Elena; Jin, Li; Yang, Yajun; Pitchappan, R M; Arunkumar, G; Parida, Laxmi; Calafell, Francesc; Bertranpetit, Jaume

    2012-01-01

    The information left by recombination in our genomes can be used to make inferences on our recent evolutionary history. Specifically, the number of past recombination events in a population sample is a function of its effective population size (Ne). We have applied a method, Identifying Recombination in Sequences (IRiS), to detect specific past recombination events in 30 Old World populations to infer their Ne. We have found that sub-Saharan African populations have an Ne that is approximately four times greater than those of non-African populations and that outside of Africa, South Asian populations had the largest Ne. We also observe that the patterns of recombinational diversity of these populations correlate with distance out of Africa if that distance is measured along a path crossing South Arabia. No such correlation is found through a Sinai route, suggesting that anatomically modern humans first left Africa through the Bab-el-Mandeb strait rather than through present Egypt.

  14. Recombinant tandem multi-linear neutralizing epitopes of human enterovirus 71 elicited protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue-Xiang; Zhao, Hui; Cao, Rui-Yuan; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Han, Jian-Feng; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Ma, Jie; Liu, Long; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2014-05-06

    Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as the leading cause of viral encephalitis in children, especially in the Asia-Pacific regions. EV71 vaccine development is of high priority at present, and neutralization antibodies have been documented to play critical roles during in vitro and in vivo protection against EV71 infection. In this study, a novel strategy to produce EV71 vaccine candidate based on recombinant multiple tandem linear neutralizing epitopes (mTLNE) was proposed. The three well identified EV71 linear neutralizing epitopes in capsid proteins, VP1-SP55, VP1-SP70 and VP2-SP28, were sequentially linked by a Gly-Ser linker ((G4S)3), and expressed in E.coli in fusion with the Trx and His tag at either terminal. The recombinant protein mTLNE was soluble and could be purified by standard affinity chromatography. Following three dosage of immunization in adult mice, EV71-specific IgG and neutralization antibodies were readily induced by recombinant mTLNE. IgG subtyping demonstrated that lgG1 antibodies dominated the mTLNE-induced humoral immune response. Especially, cytokine profiling in spleen cells from the mTLNE-immunized mice revealed high production of IL-4 and IL-6. Finally, in vivo challenge experiments showed that passive transfer with anti-mTLNE sera conferred full protection against lethal EV71 challenge in neonatal mice. Our results demonstrated that this rational designed recombinant mTLNE might have the potential to be further developed as an EV71 vaccine in the future.

  15. An Ethyl Acetate Fraction of Moringa oleifera Lam. Inhibits Human Macrophage Cytokine Production Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nateelak Kooltheat

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Moringa oleifera Lam. (MO has been reported to harbor anti-oxidation and anti-inflammatory activity and useful in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, despite these findings there has been little work done on the effects of MO on immune cellular function. Since macrophages, TNF and related cytokines play an important pathophysiologic role in lung damage induced by cigarette smoke, we examined the effects of MO on cigarette smoke extract (CSE—induced cytokine production by human macrophages. An ethyl acetate fraction of MO (MOEF was prepared from fresh leaves extract of Moringa and shown to consist of high levels of phenolic and antioxidant activities. Human monocyte derived macrophages (MDM pre-treated with varying concentrations of MOEF showed decreased production of TNF, IL-6 and IL-8 in response to both LPS and CSE. The decrease was evident at both cytokine protein and mRNA levels. Furthermore, the extract inhibited the expression of RelA, a gene implicated in the NF-κB p65 signaling in inflammation. The findings highlight the ability of MOEF to inhibit cytokines (IL-8 which promote the infiltration of neutrophils into the lungs and others (TNF, IL-6 which mediate tissue disease and damage.

  16. An ethyl acetate fraction of Moringa oleifera Lam. Inhibits human macrophage cytokine production induced by cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooltheat, Nateelak; Sranujit, Rungnapa Pankla; Chumark, Pilaipark; Potup, Pachuen; Laytragoon-Lewin, Nongnit; Usuwanthim, Kanchana

    2014-02-18

    Moringa oleifera Lam. (MO) has been reported to harbor anti-oxidation and anti-inflammatory activity and useful in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, despite these findings there has been little work done on the effects of MO on immune cellular function. Since macrophages, TNF and related cytokines play an important pathophysiologic role in lung damage induced by cigarette smoke, we examined the effects of MO on cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced cytokine production by human macrophages. An ethyl acetate fraction of MO (MOEF) was prepared from fresh leaves extract of Moringa and shown to consist of high levels of phenolic and antioxidant activities. Human monocyte derived macrophages (MDM) pre-treated with varying concentrations of MOEF showed decreased production of TNF, IL-6 and IL-8 in response to both LPS and CSE. The decrease was evident at both cytokine protein and mRNA levels. Furthermore, the extract inhibited the expression of RelA, a gene implicated in the NF-κB p65 signaling in inflammation. The findings highlight the ability of MOEF to inhibit cytokines (IL-8) which promote the infiltration of neutrophils into the lungs and others (TNF, IL-6) which mediate tissue disease and damage.

  17. Probing host pathogen cross-talk by transcriptional profiling of both Mycobacterium tuberculosis and infected human dendritic cells and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Tailleux

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional profiling using microarrays provides a unique opportunity to decipher host pathogen cross-talk on the global level. Here, for the first time, we have been able to investigate gene expression changes in both Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a major human pathogen, and its human host cells, macrophages and dendritic cells.In addition to common responses, we could identify eukaryotic and microbial transcriptional signatures that are specific to the cell type involved in the infection process. In particular M. tuberculosis shows a marked stress response when inside dendritic cells, which is in accordance with the low permissivity of these specialized phagocytes to the tubercle bacillus and to other pathogens. In contrast, the mycobacterial transcriptome inside macrophages reflects that of replicating bacteria. On the host cell side, differential responses to infection in macrophages and dendritic cells were identified in genes involved in oxidative stress, intracellular vesicle trafficking and phagosome acidification.This study provides the proof of principle that probing the host and the microbe transcriptomes simultaneously is a valuable means to accessing unique information on host pathogen interactions. Our results also underline the extraordinary plasticity of host cell and pathogen responses to infection, and provide a solid framework to further understand the complex mechanisms involved in immunity to M. tuberculosis and in mycobacterial adaptation to different intracellular environments.

  18. Radioiodine therapy of benign non-toxic goitre. Potential role of recombinant human TSH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, S; Bonnema, S J; Hegedüs, L

    2011-01-01

    This review provides an update on recombinant human TSH (rh-TSH) augmented radioiodine (¹³¹I) therapy and outlines its potential role in the treatment of symptomatic benign multinodular non-toxic goitre. In some countries, ¹³¹I has been used for three decades to reduce the size of nodular goitres......-reduction (equality) strategy is attractive in terms of minimizing post-therapeutic restrictions and in reducing the potential risk of radiation-induced malignancy. Adverse effects like temporary thyroid swelling and thyroid hormone excess are to a large extent dose-dependent and generally 0.1mg rh-TSH or less...

  19. Recombinant DNA human interferon alpha 2 in advanced breast cancer: a phase 2 trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Padmanabhan, N.; Balkwill, F. R.; Bodmer, J. G.; Rubens, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Effectiveness of recombinant DNA (rDNA) human interferon alpha 2 (IFN alpha 2) in advanced breast cancer was evaluated in 14 patients who had received prior endocrine and/or cytotoxic therapy. After randomization, 7 patients received IFN alpha 2 two million IU m-2 day-1, s.c., 3 times a week (schedule 1) and 7 patients received 50 million IU m-2 day-1, i.v., for 5 consecutive days, every 3 weeks (schedule 2). Treatment duration was 4-21 weeks in schedule 1 and 6-24 weeks (2-8 courses) in sche...

  20. Recombinant erythropoietin in humans has a prolonged effect on circulating erythropoietin isoform distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Just Christensen, Søren; Lisbjerg, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-assisted isoform immunoassay (MAIIA) quantitates erythropoietin (EPO) isoforms as percentages of migrated isoforms (PMI). We evaluated the effect of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) on the distribution of EPO isoforms in plasma in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, cross...... beta: 73.1 (17.8)% (p=0.039)). In conclusion, Epoetin beta leaves a footprint in the plasma-EPO isoform pattern. MAIIA can detect changes in EPO isoform distribution up til at least three weeks after administration of Epoetin beta even though the total EPO concentration has returned to normal....

  1. Safety of human papillomavirus 6, 11, 16 and 18 (recombinant): systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Pedro Luiz Spinelli; Calestini, Gustavo Lacerda da Silva; Alvo, Fernando Salgueiro; Freitas, Jefferson Michel de Moura; Castro, Paula Marcela Vilela; Konstantyner, Tulio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify and quantify the adverse effects associated with the recombinant human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16 and 18) vaccine in adolescents. Data source: Systematic review of randomized clinical trials from PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases. Articles investigating the safety of the vaccine in subjects under 18 years and comparing the recombinant human papillomavirus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 vaccine with a control group were included. Meta-analyses were performed for the outcomes of pain, erythema, swelling and fever, using clinical trials with maximum Jadad score. Data synthesis: Fourteen studies were included. The most common adverse effects related to the human papillomavirus vaccine were effects with no severity (pain, erythema, edema, and fever). Five studies were used for the meta-analyses: pain-risk difference (RD)=11% (phuman papillomavirus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 vaccine was safe and well tolerated. The main adverse effects related to vaccination were pain, erythema, edema and fever. The low frequency of severe adverse effects encourages the administration of the vaccine in the population at risk. PMID:26376359

  2. Generation of biologically active multi-sialylated recombinant human EPOFc in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Castilho

    Full Text Available Hyperglycosylated proteins are more stable, show increased serum half-life and less sensitivity to proteolysis compared to non-sialylated forms. This applies particularly to recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO. Recent progress in N-glycoengineering of non-mammalian expression hosts resulted in in vivo protein sialylation at great homogeneity. However the synthesis of multi-sialylated N-glycans is so far restricted to mammalian cells. Here we used a plant based expression system to accomplish multi-antennary protein sialylation. A human erythropoietin fusion protein (EPOFc was transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana ΔXTFT, a glycosylation mutant that lacks plant specific N-glycan residues. cDNA of the hormone was co-delivered into plants with the necessary genes for (i branching (ii β1,4-galactosylation as well as for the (iii synthesis, transport and transfer of sialic acid. This resulted in the production of recombinant EPOFc carrying bi- tri- and tetra-sialylated complex N-glycans. The formation of this highly complex oligosaccharide structure required the coordinated expression of 11 human proteins acting in different subcellular compartments at different stages of the glycosylation pathway. In vitro receptor binding assays demonstrate the generation of biologically active molecules. We demonstrate the in planta synthesis of one of the most complex mammalian glycoforms pointing to an outstanding high degree of tolerance to changes in the glycosylation pathway in plants.

  3. Ozone effect on respiratory syncytial virus infectivity and cytokine production by human alveolar macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukup, J.; Koren, H.S.; Becker, S.

    1993-01-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the effect of ozone (O3) exposure at 1 ppm for 2 hr on the susceptibility/resistance of adult human alveolar macrophages (AM) to infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in vitro and on RSV-induced cytokine production by the AM. AM were first exposed to O3 or to filtered air and then infected with RSV at multiplicities of infection (m.o.i.) of 0.1 1.0 and 10. The percentage RSV-infected AM and the amount of infectious virus released by the cells were determined at Days 2 and 4 after infection. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels in the supernatants were determined on Day 2. No difference in the percentage infected AM or in the amount of infectious RSV produced was found between control and O3-exposed cultures. However, O3-exposed AM infected with RSV at m.o.i. 1 produced less IL-1 in response to RSV infection than control AM:63.6 pg/ml compared with 98.5 pg/ml. No difference in IL-1 was seen with m.o.i. 10. IL-6 levels were also decreased, but only after infection with m.o.i. 0.1. At this level of infection 830 pg/ml was produced by control AM as compared to 468.2 pg/ml by O3-exposed AM. TNF production was unaffected by O3 at all multiplicities of infection. (Copyright (c) 1993 by Academic Press, Inc.)

  4. Sensing of HIV-1 Entry Triggers a Type I Interferon Response in Human Primary Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decalf, Jérémie; Desdouits, Marion; Rodrigues, Vasco; Gobert, François-Xavier; Gentili, Matteo; Marques-Ladeira, Santy; Chamontin, Célia; Mougel, Marylène; Cunha de Alencar, Bruna; Benaroch, Philippe

    2017-08-01

    Along with CD4(+) T lymphocytes, macrophages are a major cellular source of HIV-1 replication and a potential viral reservoir. Following entry and reverse transcription in macrophages, cloaking of the viral cDNA by the HIV-1 capsid limits its cytosolic detection, enabling efficient replication. However, whether incoming HIV-1 particles are sensed by macrophages prior to reverse transcription remains unclear. Here, we show that HIV-1 triggers a broad expression of interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes (ISG) in monocyte-derived macrophages within a few hours after infection. This response does not require viral reverse transcription or the presence of HIV-1 RNA within particles, but viral fusion is essential. This response is elicited by viruses carrying different envelope proteins and thus different receptors to proceed for viral entry. Expression of ISG in response to viral entry requires TBK1 activity and type I IFNs signaling. Remarkably, the ISG response is transient but affects subsequent viral spread. Together, our results shed light on an early step of HIV-1 sensing by macrophages at the level of entry, which confers an early protection through type I IFN signaling and has potential implications in controlling the infection.IMPORTANCE HIV infection is restricted to T lymphocytes and macrophages. HIV-1-infected macrophages are found in many tissues of infected patients, even under antiretroviral therapy, and are considered a viral reservoir. How HIV-1 is detected and what type of responses are elicited upon sensing remain in great part elusive. The kinetics and localization of the production of cytokines such as interferons in response to HIV is of critical importance to understanding how the infection and the immune response are established. Our study provides evidence that macrophages can detect HIV-1 as soon as it enters the cell. Interestingly, this sensing is independent of the presence of viral nucleic acids within the particles but requires their fusion

  5. Environmental Legionella spp. collected in urban test sites of South East Queensland, Australia, are virulent to human macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Amba; Eglezos, Sofroni; Huston, Wilhelmina

    2016-01-01

    Legionellae are frequent contaminants of potable water supplies, resulting in sporadic infections and occasional outbreaks. Isolates of Legionella were collected from urban test sites within South East Queensland and evaluated for their virulence potential in vitro. Two strains (from the species Legionella londiniensis and Legionella quinlivanii) were demonstrated to have the ability to infect human macrophages, while a strain from the species Legionella anisa did not maintain an infection over the same time course. This suggests that the spectrum of urban environmentally associated Legionella with potential to cause human disease might be greater than currently considered. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Nanoparticles as Antituberculosis Drugs Carriers: Effect on Activity Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisimova, Y.V.; Gelperina, S.I.; Peloquin, C.A.; Heifets, L.B. [National Jewish Medical and Research Center (United States)

    2000-06-15

    This is the first report evaluating the nanoparticle delivery system for three antituberculosis drugs: isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin. The typical particle size is 250 nm. We studied accumulation of these drugs in human monocytes as well as their antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis residing in human monocyte-derived macrophages. Nanoparticle encapsulation increased the intracellular accumulation (cell-association) of all three tested drugs, but it enhanced the antimicrobial activity of isoniazid and streptomycin only. On the other hand, the activity of encapsulated rifampin against intracellular bacteria was not higher than that of the free drug.

  7. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: Differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bokil, Nilesh J.; Totsika, Makrina; Carey, Alison J.

    2011-01-01

    or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1+ vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data......Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that UPEC can invade and replicate within epithelial cells, suggesting that this bacterial pathogen may occupy an intracellular niche within the host. Given that many intracellular...

  8. Activation of human natural killer cells by the novel innate immune modulator recombinant Eimeria antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylsworth, Charles F; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Seregin, Sergey S; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    The safe and effective activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems are crucial in the implementation of immunotherapeutic modalities for the prevention and treatment of human diseases. Eimeria antigen (EA) and its recombinantly expressed analog (rEA) are extremely effective activators of innate immunity in mice. The effects of rEA in the mouse are primarily mediated through the TLR11/12 MyD88 signaling system. Human cells lack functional TLR11 and TLR12, suggesting that rEA would not be effective in providing beneficial immune activation in humans. In the current report we provide definitive evidence that the treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures with rEA significantly up regulates CD69, CD107, NKG2D levels on NK cells. Furthermore, rEA stimulates human NK cell effector functions including increasing intracellular levels of IFNγ and Granzyme B. These responses are positively correlated with an improved capacity of rEA stimulated human PBMCs to kill NK cell-sensitive human K562 tumor cells. Importantly, rEA-triggered innate immune responses was not associated with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines production. These data confirm a previously unidentified role for rEA in human immune cell activation, and suggests the utilization of rEA in immunotherapies against a variety of infectious diseases and cancers. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Human Cord Blood and Bone Marrow CD34+ Cells Generate Macrophages That Support Erythroid Islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyayu Belay

    Full Text Available Recently, we developed a small molecule responsive hyperactive Mpl-based Cell Growth Switch (CGS that drives erythropoiesis associated with macrophages in the absence of exogenous cytokines. Here, we compare the physical, cellular and molecular interaction between the macrophages and erythroid cells in CGS expanded CD34+ cells harvested from cord blood, marrow or G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood. Results indicated that macrophage based erythroid islands could be generated from cord blood and marrow CD34+ cells but not from G-CSF-mobilized CD34+ cells. Additional studies suggest that the deficiency resides with the G-CSF-mobilized CD34+ derived monocytes. Gene expression and proteomics studies of the in vitro generated erythroid islands detected the expression of erythroblast macrophage protein (EMP, intercellular adhesion molecule 4 (ICAM-4, CD163 and DNASE2. 78% of the erythroblasts in contact with macrophages reached the pre reticulocyte orthochromatic stage of differentiation within 14 days of culture. The addition of conditioned medium from cultures of CD146+ marrow fibroblasts resulted in a 700-fold increase in total cell number and a 90-fold increase in erythroid cell number. This novel CD34+ cell derived erythroid island may serve as a platform to explore the molecular basis of red cell maturation and production under normal, stress and pathological conditions.

  10. A mature macrophage is a principal HIV-1 cellular reservoir in humanized mice after treatment with long acting antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araínga, Mariluz; Edagwa, Benson; Mosley, R Lee; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Gorantla, Santhi; Gendelman, Howard E

    2017-03-09

    Despite improved clinical outcomes seen following antiretroviral therapy (ART), resting CD4+ T cells continue to harbor latent human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1). However, such cells are not likely the solitary viral reservoir and as such defining where and how others harbor virus is imperative for eradication measures. To such ends, we used HIV-1ADA-infected NOD.Cg-Prkdc (scid) Il2rg (tm1Wjl) /SzJ mice reconstituted with a human immune system to explore two long-acting ART regimens investigating their abilities to affect viral cell infection and latency. At 6 weeks of infection animals were divided into four groups. One received long-acting (LA) cabotegravir (CAB) and rilpivirine (RVP) (2ART), a second received LA CAB, lamivudine, abacavir and RVP (4ART), a third were left untreated and a fourth served as an uninfected control. After 4 weeks of LA ART treatment, blood, spleen and bone marrow (BM) cells were collected then phenotypically characterized. CD4+ T cell subsets, macrophages and hematopoietic progenitor cells were analyzed for HIV-1 nucleic acids by droplet digital PCR. Plasma viral loads were reduced by two log10 or to undetectable levels in the 2 and 4ART regimens, respectively. Numbers and distributions of CD4+ memory and regulatory T cells, macrophages and hematopoietic progenitor cells were significantly altered by HIV-1 infection and by both ART regimens. ART reduced viral DNA and RNA in all cell and tissue compartments. While memory cells were the dominant T cell reservoir, integrated HIV-1 DNA was also detected in the BM and spleen macrophages in both regimen-treated mice. Despite vigorous ART regimens, HIV-1 DNA and RNA were easily detected in mature macrophages supporting their potential role as an infectious viral reservoir.

  11. Partial correlation analysis indicates causal relationships between GC-content, exon density and recombination rate in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberg, Jan; Wang, Mingyi; Yang, Yaning; Li, Wentian

    2009-01-30

    Several features are known to correlate with the GC-content in the human genome, including recombination rate, gene density and distance to telomere. However, by testing for pairwise correlation only, it is impossible to distinguish direct associations from indirect ones and to distinguish between causes and effects. We use partial correlations to construct partially directed graphs for the following four variables: GC-content, recombination rate, exon density and distance-to-telomere. Recombination rate and exon density are unconditionally uncorrelated, but become inversely correlated by conditioning on GC-content. This pattern indicates a model where recombination rate and exon density are two independent causes of GC-content variation. Causal inference and graphical models are useful methods to understand genome evolution and the mechanisms of isochore evolution in the human genome.

  12. Human carotid plaque phosphatidylcholine specifically interacts with paraoxonase 1, increases its activity, and enhances its uptake by macrophage at the expense of its binding to HDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Elad; Aviram, Michael; Khatib, Soliman; Artoul, Fadi; Rabin, Asaf; Mannheim, Dalit; Karmeli, Ron; Salamon, Tal; Vaya, Jacob

    2014-11-01

    Human carotid atherosclerotic plaque is in direct contact with circulatory blood components. Thus, plaque and blood components may affect each other. The current study presents the effects of plaque chloroform:methanol (C:M) extract on the HDL-associated enzyme paraoxnase 1 (PON1). This study is part of our investigation on the mutual effects of the interactions between atherosclerotic lesions and blood components. Recombinant PON1 (rePON1) was incubated with the human carotid plaques C:M extract and PON1 activities were analyzed. Lactonase and paraoxonase activities were elevated due to C:M treatment, by 140 and by 69%, respectively. Analytical chemistry analyses revealed specific phosphatidylcholines (PCs) as the plaque active components. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching assay, together with molecular docking, shows that PON1 activity is enhanced in correlation with the level of PC affinity to PON1. Molecular docking revealed that PCs interact specifically with H2-PON1 α-helix, which together with H1 enzyme α-helix links the protein to the HDL surface. These findings are supported by additional results from the PON1 ∆20 mutant that lack its H1-α-helix. Incubation of this mutant with the plaque C:M extract increased PON1 activity by only 20%, much less than the wild-type PON1 that elevated PON1 activity at the same concentration by as much as 95%. Furthermore, as much as the affinity of the enzyme to the PC was augmented, the ability of PON1 to bind to the HDL particle decreased. Finally, PON1 interaction with PC enhance its uptake into the macrophage cytoplasm. In conclusions, Specific lesion phosphatidylcholines (PCs) present in the human carotid plaque significantly enhance PON1 catalytic activities due to their interaction with the enzyme. Such a lesion׳s PC-PON1 interaction, in turn, competes with HDL PCs and enhances PON1 uptake by macrophage at the expense of PON1 binding to the HDL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Partial correlation analysis indicates causal relationships between GC-content, exon density and recombination rate in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Li Wentian; Yang Yaning; Wang Mingyi; Freudenberg Jan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Several features are known to correlate with the GC-content in the human genome, including recombination rate, gene density and distance to telomere. However, by testing for pairwise correlation only, it is impossible to distinguish direct associations from indirect ones and to distinguish between causes and effects. Results We use partial correlations to construct partially directed graphs for the following four variables: GC-content, recombination rate, exon density and ...

  14. N-glycans of recombinant human acid α-glucosidase expressed in the milk of transgenic rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Jongen, Susanne; Gerwig, Gerrit; Leeflang, Bas; Koles, Kate; Mannesse, Maurice; Berkel, Patrick; Pieper, Frank; Kroos, Marian; Reuser, Arnold; Zhou, Qun; Jin, Xiaoying; Zhang, Kate; Edmunds, Tim; Kamerling, Johannis

    2007-01-01

    textabstractPompe disease is a lysosomal glycogen storage disorder characterized by acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency. More than 110 different pathogenic mutations in the gene encoding GAA have been observed. Patients with this disease are being treated by intravenous injection of recombinant forms of the enzyme. Focusing on recombinant approaches to produce the enzyme means that specific attention has to be paid to the generated glycosylation patterns. Here, human GAA was expressed in the ...

  15. Splenic CD163(+) macrophages as targets of porcine reproductive and respiratory virus: Role of Siglecs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuste, María; Fernández-Caballero, Teresa; Prieto, Cinta; Álvarez, Belén; Martínez-Lobo, Javier; Simarro, Isabel; Castro, José María; Alonso, Fernando; Ezquerra, Ángel; Domínguez, Javier; Revilla, Concepción

    2017-01-01

    CD169 and CD163 have been involved in the process of PRRS virus attachment and infection in macrophages, although recent studies have challenged the requirement for CD169. In addition to CD169, macrophages express other siglecs, whose role in PRRS virus infection is so far unknown. Splenic CD163(+) macrophages express Siglec-3 and Siglec-5 but almost undetectable levels of CD169. Hence, we considered this cell population appropriate for analysing the role of these siglecs in the attachment and internalization of PRRS virus into macrophages. PRRS virus replicated efficiently in these macrophages, yielding even higher titres than in alveolar macrophages. Besides, a recombinant protein consisting in the ectodomain of porcine Siglec-3 fused to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 (Siglec3-Fc) was able to bind PRRS virus, while binding to Siglec-5-Fc was inconsistent. Antibodies to CD169 but not to Siglec-3 or Siglec-5 blocked the binding and infection of PRRS virus on alveolar macrophages. Unexpectedly, our antibody to CD169 also blocked the binding of PRRS virus to splenic CD163(+) macrophages, whereas antibodies to Siglec-3 or Siglec-5 had no effect. These results show that very low levels of CD169 expression are enough to support the attachment and internalization of PRRS virus into macrophages, whereas Siglec-3 and Siglec-5 do not seem to contribute to the virus entry in these cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Purification and Characterization of Recombinant Human Lysozyme from Eggs of Transgenic Chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanyu Wu

    Full Text Available Transgenic chickens as bioreactors have several advantages, such as the simple establishment procedure, correct glycosylation profile of expressed proteins, etc. Lysozyme is widely used in food industry, livestock farming, and medical field as a replacement of antibiotics because of its antibacterial and complement system-modulating activity. In this study, we used RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence to detect the expression of recombinant human lysozyme (rhLY in the transgenic chicken. We demonstrated that the transgene of rhLY was genetically stable across different generations. We next optimized the purification procedure of rhLY from the transgenic eggs by utilizing two steps of cation-exchange chromatography and one gel-filtration chromatography. About 6 mg rhLY with the purity exceeding 90% was obtained from ten eggs, and the purification efficiency was about 75%. The purified rhLY had similar physicochemical and biological properties in molecular mass and antibacterial activity compared to the commercial human lysozyme. Additionally, both of them exhibited thermal stability at 60°C and tolerated an extensive pH range of 2 to 11. In conclusion, our study proved that the transgenic chickens we have previously generated were genetically stable and suitable for the production of active rhLY. We also provided a pipeline for purifying the recombinant proteins from transgenic eggs, which could be useful for other studies.

  17. Value of recombinant human epidermal growth factor in corneal wound repair after corneal foreign body elimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Jie Han

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the repair efficacy of recombinant human epidermal growth factor on corneal epithelium after corneal foreign body eliminating operation. METHODS: There were 102 patients with corneal foreign body(188 affected eyeschosen for the study. All patients were divided into treatment group and control group according to the random number table. Both groups received corneal foreign body elimination by slit lamp. Postoperatively, the treatment group was given eye drops containing epidermal growth factor(JinYinShucombined with tobramycin while the control group was only administrated with tobramycin. Treatment effects were compared 3d after treatment. RESULTS: Three days after treatment, the cure rate in the treatment group(93.7%, was significantly higher than that in the control group(76.6%(PPCONCLUSION: The recombinant human epidermal growth factor is capable of integrating with corneal epithelial cells and endothelial cell receptor, shortening healing time of corneal epithelial wound, thus making it an effective treatment of traumatic corneal epithelial defect.

  18. Inhibitory effects of pomegranate extracts on recombinant human maltase-glucoamylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kayoko; Li, Peng; Uraji, Misugi; Hatanaka, Tadashi; Ito, Hideyuki

    2014-09-01

    α-Glucosidase inhibitors are currently used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory activities of aril and pericarp extracts from pomegranates obtained various regions against recombinant human maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM). The inhibitory activities of the aril extracts tended to be stronger than those of the pericarp extracts. The Iranian aril extract was the most effective inhibitor. We investigated the polyphenol content of the pomegranate extracts using the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Among the aril extracts, the Iranian aril extract showed the highest polyphenol content. We further evaluated inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase from the rat small intestine. Pomegranate extract used in this study showed slightly different inhibitory activities according to α-glucosidase origin. Iranian aril extract was the most effective inhibitor of α-glucosidases, especially recombinant human MGAM. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the pomegranate arils led to identification of punicalagin and oenothein B as potent inhibitors of α-glucosidase. Oenothein B showed inhibitory activity with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value of 174 μM. Its potency was comparable to that of the α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose with an IC(50) value of 170 μM. Dixon plot kinetic analysis of oenothein B showed a noncompetitive inhibition with a K(i) value of 102 μM. These results suggest that pomegranate arils would be useful for suppressing postprandial hyperglycemia. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. A Butter Aroma Recombinate Activates Human Class-I Odorant Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithe, Christiane; Andersen, Gaby; Malki, Agne; Krautwurst, Dietmar

    2015-11-04

    With ∼400 olfactory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), humans sensitively perceive ∼230 key aroma compounds as best natural agonists of ∼10000 food volatiles. An understanding of odorant coding, thus, critically depends on the knowledge about interactions of key food aroma chemicals and their mixtures with their cognate receptors. Genetically designed test cell systems enable the screening, deorphaning, and characterization of single odorant receptors (OR). This study shows for the food aroma-specific and quantitative butter aroma recombinate, and its single components, specific in vitro class-I OR activity patterns, as well as the activation of selected OR in a concentration-dependent manner. Recently, chemosensory receptors, especially class-I OR, were demonstrated to be expressed on blood leukocytes, which may encounter foodborne aroma compounds postprandially. This study shows that butter aroma recombinate induced chemotaxis of isolated human neutrophils in a defined gradient, and in a concentration-dependent and pertussis toxin-sensitive manner, suggesting at least a GPCR-mediated activation of blood leukocytes by key food odorants.

  20. The toxicity of rifampicin polylactic acid nanoparticles against Mycobacterium bovis BCG and human macrophage THP-1 cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhina, M.; Rybalkina, E.; Barsegyan, G.; Onishchenko, G.; Lepekha, L.

    2015-11-01

    Tuberculosis is rapidly becoming a major health problem. The rise in tuberculosis incidence stimulates efforts to develop more effective delivery systems for the existing antituberculous drugs while decreasing the side effects. The nanotechnology may provide novel drug delivery tools allowing controlled drug release. Rifampicin is one of the main antituberculous drugs, characterized by high toxicity, and Poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) is a biodegradable polymer used for the preparation of encapsulated drugs. The aim of our work was to evaluate the toxicity of rifampicin-PLLA nanoparticles against Mycobacterium bovis BCG using human macrophage THP-1 cell line. Our data demonstrate that rifampicin-PLLA is effective against M. bovis BCG in the infected macrophages. The drug is inducing the dysfunction of mitochondria and apoptosis in the macrophages and is acting as a potential substrate of Pgp thereby modulating cell chemosensitivity. The severity of the toxic effects of the rifampicin-PLLA nanoparticles is increasing in a dose-dependent manner. We suggest that free rifampicin induces death of M. bovis BCG after PLLA degradation and diffusion from phago-lysosomes to cytoplasm causing mitochondria dysfunction and affecting the Pgp activity.

  1. Physical Characterization of human centromeric regions using transformation-associated recombination cloning technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladimir Larionov, Ph D

    2007-06-05

    A special interest in the organization of human centromeric DNA was stimulated a few years ago when two independent groups succeeded in reconstituting a functional human centromere, using constructs carrying centromere-specific alphoid DNA arrays. This work demonstrated the importance of DNA components in mammalian centromeres and opened a way for studying the structural requirements for de novo kinetochore formation and for construction of human artificial chromosomes (HACs) with therapeutic potential. To elucidate the structural requirements for formation of HACs with a functional kinetochore, we developed a new method for cloning of large DNA fragments for human centromeric regions that can be used as a substrate for HAC formation. This method exploits in vivo recombination in yeast (TAR cloning). In addition, a new strategy for the construction of alphoid DNA arrays was developed in our lab. The strategy involves the construction of uniform or hybrid synthetic alphoid DNA arrays by the RCA-TAR technique. This technique comprises two steps: rolling circle amplification of an alphoid DNA dimer and subsequent assembling of the amplified fragments by in vivo homologous recombination in yeast (Figure 1). Using this system, we constructed a set of different synthetic alphoid DNA arrays with a predetermined sequence varying in size from 30 to 140 kb and demonstrated that some of the arrays are competent in HAC formation. Because any nucleotide can be changed in a dimer before its amplification, this new technique is optimal for identifying the structural requirements for de novo kinetochore formation in HACs. Moreover, the technique makes possible to introduce into alphoid DNA arrays recognition sites for DNA-binding proteins. We have made the following progress on the studying of human centromeric regions using transformation-associated recombination cloning technology: i) minimal size of alphoid DNA array required for de novo kinetochore formation was estimated; ii

  2. Improvement of lymphocyte proliferation in human immunodeficiency virus infection after recombinant interleukin-2 treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, P; Nielsen, S D; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    1999-01-01

    In this study, the effect of recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) on the function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients was examined. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), an impaired ability of PBMC from 8 patients to respond upon...... mitogen stimulation with expression of IL-2 and IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) was found compared with healthy donors (p = 0.02 and p = 0.05, respectively). Flow cytometry was used to determine the expression of p55 interleukin-2 alpha-receptor (CD25) after phytohaemagglutinin......, the induced gene expressions for IL-2 and IL-2R were positively correlated (p IL-2 and IL-2R genes in humans may share a common activation pathway, as has been found in monkeys infected by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). These results indicate...

  3. The basic N-terminal domain of TRF2 limits recombination endonuclease action at human telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Léger, Adélaïde; Koelblen, Melanie; Civitelli, Livia; Bah, Amadou; Djerbi, Nadir; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Gilson, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The stability of mammalian telomeres depends upon TRF2, which prevents inappropriate repair and checkpoint activation. By using a plasmid integration assay in yeasts carrying humanized telomeres, we demonstrated that TRF2 possesses the intrinsic property to both stimulate initial homologous recombination events and to prevent their resolution via its basic N-terminal domain. In human cells, we further showed that this TRF2 domain prevents telomere shortening mediated by the resolvase-associated protein SLX4 as well as GEN1 and MUS81, 2 different types of endonucleases with resolvase activities. We propose that various types of resolvase activities are kept in check by the basic N-terminal domain of TRF2 in order to favor an accurate repair of the stalled forks that occur during telomere replication.

  4. Recombinant Production of Human Aquaporin-1 to an Exceptional High Membrane Density in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomholt, Julie; Helix Nielsen, Claus; Scharff-Poulsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    of solutes. Aquaporins constitute a family of physiologically very important integral membrane proteins that are found in all three kingdoms, eubacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. As protein channels, they facilitate passive transport of water across cell membranes. In the present study the yeast Saccharomyces...... cerevisiae was exploited as a host for heterologous expression of human aquaporins. Aquaporin cDNA was expressed from a galactose inducible promoter situated on a plasmid with an adjustable copy number. Human aquaporin was C-terminally tagged with yeast-enhanced GFP to quantify functional expression...... transcription factor and growth in amino acid supplemented minimal medium. In-gel fluorescence combined with western blotting showed that low accumulation of correctly folded recombinant Aquaporin-1 at 30oC was due to in vivo mal-folding. Reduction of the expression temperature to 15oC almost completely...

  5. Preparation and validation of radio iodinated recombinant human IL-10 for the measurement of natural human antibodies against IL-10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lemos Rieper, Carina; Galle, Pia; Svenson, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Radio iodinated recombinant human IL-10 was prepared and validated for the measurement of natural human anti-IL-10 antibodies. Iodination of IL-10 was accomplished by means of the chloramine-T method. The crude tracer was purified by size chromatography as homo-dimeric IL-10 with a specific...... activity of 75 cpm/pg. Validation of the tracer confirmed preserved antibody epitopes and receptor binding ability. A robust Radio Immuno Assay (RIA) was developed and validated to detect natural human anti-IL-10 antibodies based on the formation of (125)I-labeled IL-10-IgG complexes in solution...... and separation of the complexes by chromatography on mini-columns. The RIA was applied to 3360 plasma samples derived from normal Danish blood donors. Generally, IL-10 did not bind to plasma factors other than natural anti-IL-10 IgG antibodies. The prevalence of donors high positive for antibodies against IL-10...

  6. Expression and characterization of bioactive recombinant human alpha-lactalbumin in the milk of transgenic cloned cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Yang, P; Tang, B; Sun, X; Zhang, R; Guo, C; Gong, G; Liu, Y; Li, R; Zhang, L; Dai, Y; Li, N

    2008-12-01

    Improvement of the nutritional value of cow milk with transgenic expression of recombinant human alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) has been previously attempted. However, the detailed characterization of the recombinant protein and analysis of the transgenic milk components are not explored yet. Here, we first report production of healthy transgenic cows by somatic cell nuclear transfer, in which expression of up to 1.55 g/L of recombinant human alpha-LA was achieved. The recombinant human alpha-LA was purified from transgenic milk and displayed physicochemical properties similar to its natural counterpart with respect to molecular weight, structure, and regulatory activity for beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase. Additionally, no N-glycosylation was found in the recombinant human alpha-LA, whereas the endogenous bovine alpha-LA was glycosylated at the unusual site (71)Asn-Ile-(73)Cys. Compared with milk from nontransgenic cows, expression of the transgene did not materially alter milk composition, such as fat and protein content. Our research thus provides scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of humanizing cow milk.

  7. Human Placenta-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal-Like Cells Enhance Angiogenesis via T Cell-Dependent Reprogramming of Macrophage Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shuyang; Gleason, Joseph; Fik-Rymarkiewicz, Ewa; DiFiglia, Andrea; Bharathan, Mini; Morschauser, Andrew; Djuretic, Ivana; Xu, Yan; Krakovsky, Michael; Jankovic, Vladimir; Buensuceso, Charito; Edinger, James; Herzberg, Uri; Hofgartner, Wolfgang; Hariri, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a leading cause of limb loss and mortality worldwide with limited treatment options. Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) therapy has demonstrated positive effects on angiogenesis in preclinical models and promising therapeutic efficacy signals in early stage clinical studies; however, the mechanisms underlying MSC-mediated angiogenesis remain largely undefined. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of human placenta-derived MSC-like cells (PDA-002) in inducing angiogenesis using mice hind limb ischemia model. We showed that PDA-002 improved blood flow and promoted collateral vessel formation in the injured limb. Histological analysis demonstrated that PDA-002 increased M2-like macrophages in ischemic tissue. Analysis of the changes in functional T cell phenotype in the draining lymph nodes revealed that PDA-002 treatment was associated with the induction of cytokine and gene expression signatures of Th2 response. Angiogenic effect of PDA-002 was markedly reduced in Balb/c nude mice compared with wild type. This reduction in efficacy was reversed by T cell reconstitution, suggesting T cells are essential for PDA-002-mediated angiogenesis. Furthermore, effect of PDA-002 on macrophage differentiation was also T cell-dependent as a PDA-002-mediated M2-like macrophage skewing was only observed in wild type and T cell reconstituted nude mice, but not in nude mice. Finally, we showed that PDA-002-treated animals had enhanced angiogenic recovery in response to the second injury when PDA-002 no longer persisted in vivo. These results suggest that PDA-002 enhances angiogenesis through an immunomodulatory mechanism involving T cell-dependent reprogramming of macrophage differentiation toward M2-like phenotype. Stem Cells 2017;35:1603-1613. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  8. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H T; Housley, Gary D; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  9. Enhanced uptake of multiple sclerosis-derived myelin by THP-1 macrophages and primary human microglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, Debbie A E; Schuurman, Karianne G; van Draanen, Michael; Hamann, Jörg; Huitinga, I.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathological hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS) is myelin phagocytosis. It remains unclear why microglia and macrophages demyelinate axons in MS, but previously found or yet-unknown changes in the myelin of MS patients could contribute to this process. We therefore studied whether

  10. Endothelial lipase is highly expressed in macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D; Nielsen, John E; Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk

    2007-01-01

    on sections of carotid endarterectomy specimens from patients with symptomatic cerebrovascular disease. In each of eight patients, EL mRNA and/or protein were seen in areas between the necrotic core and the fibrotic cap where they colocalized with LPL and macrophage-specific CD68. Moreover...

  11. Dexamethasone promotes phagocytosis and bacterial killing by human monocytes/macrophages in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Goes, A.; Hoekstra, K.; van den Berg, T. K.; Dijkstra, C. D.

    2000-01-01

    One of the actions of glucocorticoids (GC) in multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inhibitory effect on demyelination. This can be caused by a reduction in the number of infiltrating macrophages and/or by an effect on the phagocytosis of myelin. Here we investigate the effect of GC on the phagocytosis of

  12. The role of substrate morphology for the cytokine release profile of immature human primary macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartneck, Matthias [Department of Medicine III, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstr. 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Heffels, Karl-Heinz [Department and Chair of Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, 97070 Würzburg (Germany); Bovi, Manfred [Electron Microscopic Facility, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Groll, Jürgen [Department and Chair of Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, 97070 Würzburg (Germany); Zwadlo-Klarwasser, Gabriele [Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research and Dept. of Dermatology, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstr. 30, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that the physicochemical nature of any given material is a dominant factor for the release of cytokines by innate immune cells, specifically of macrophages, and thus majorly influences their interaction with other cell types. Recently, we could show that the 3D structure of star shaped polytheylene oxide–polypropylene oxide co-polymers (sP(EO-stat-PO))-hydrogel coated substrates has a stronger influence on the release pattern of cytokines after 7 days of culture than surface chemistry. Here, we focused on the analysis of cytokine release over time and a more detailed analysis of cell morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Therefore, we compared different strategies for SEM sample preparation and found that using osmium tetroxide combined with aqua bidest led to best preparation results. For cytokine release we show significant changes from day 3 to day 7 of cell culture. After 3 days, the sP(EO-stat-PO)-coated substrates led to an induction of pro-angiogenic CCL3 and CCL4, and of low amounts of the anti-inflammatory IL10, which declined at day 7. In contrast, pleiotropic IL6 and the pro-inflammatory TNFα and IL1β were expressed stronger at day 7 than at day 3. - Highlights: • Strategies for the preparation of macrophages on hydrogel materials (Fig. 1) • Cytokine release of immature macrophages on the substrates (Fig. 2 and Table 1) • Changes in cytokine release during macrophage maturation (Table 2)

  13. Human macrophages primed with angiogenic factors show dynamic plasticity, irrespective of extracellular matrix components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeger, Diana T. A.; van Putten, Sander M.; Koerts, Jasper A.; van Luyn, Marja J. A.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    Macrophages are important in inflammation as well as in tissue repair processes. They can be activated by various stimuli and classified into two major groups: M1 (classically activated) or M2 (alternatively activated). Inflammation, angiogenesis and matrix remodeling play a major role in tissue

  14. Albinism-causing mutations in recombinant human tyrosinase alter intrinsic enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinska, Monika B; Kovaleva, Elena; Backlund, Peter; Wingfield, Paul T; Brooks, Brian P; Sergeev, Yuri V

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosinase (TYR) catalyzes the rate-limiting, first step in melanin production and its gene (TYR) is mutated in many cases of oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1), an autosomal recessive cause of childhood blindness. Patients with reduced TYR activity are classified as OCA1B; some OCA1B mutations are temperature-sensitive. Therapeutic research for OCA1 has been hampered, in part, by the absence of purified, active, recombinant wild-type and mutant human enzymes. The intra-melanosomal domain of human tyrosinase (residues 19-469) and two OCA1B related temperature-sensitive mutants, R422Q and R422W were expressed in insect cells and produced in T. ni larvae. The short trans-membrane fragment was deleted to avoid potential protein insolubility, while preserving all other functional features of the enzymes. Purified tyrosinase was obtained with a yield of >1 mg per 10 g of larval biomass. The protein was a monomeric glycoenzyme with maximum enzyme activity at 37°C and neutral pH. The two purified mutants when compared to the wild-type protein were less active and temperature sensitive. These differences are associated with conformational perturbations in secondary structure. The intramelanosomal domains of recombinant wild-type and mutant human tyrosinases are soluble monomeric glycoproteins with activities which mirror their in vivo function. This advance allows for the structure - function analyses of different mutant TYR proteins and correlation with their corresponding human phenotypes; it also provides an important tool to discover drugs that may improve tyrosinase activity and treat OCA1.

  15. Albinism-causing mutations in recombinant human tyrosinase alter intrinsic enzymatic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika B Dolinska

    Full Text Available Tyrosinase (TYR catalyzes the rate-limiting, first step in melanin production and its gene (TYR is mutated in many cases of oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1, an autosomal recessive cause of childhood blindness. Patients with reduced TYR activity are classified as OCA1B; some OCA1B mutations are temperature-sensitive. Therapeutic research for OCA1 has been hampered, in part, by the absence of purified, active, recombinant wild-type and mutant human enzymes.The intra-melanosomal domain of human tyrosinase (residues 19-469 and two OCA1B related temperature-sensitive mutants, R422Q and R422W were expressed in insect cells and produced in T. ni larvae. The short trans-membrane fragment was deleted to avoid potential protein insolubility, while preserving all other functional features of the enzymes. Purified tyrosinase was obtained with a yield of >1 mg per 10 g of larval biomass. The protein was a monomeric glycoenzyme with maximum enzyme activity at 37°C and neutral pH. The two purified mutants when compared to the wild-type protein were less active and temperature sensitive. These differences are associated with conformational perturbations in secondary structure.The intramelanosomal domains of recombinant wild-type and mutant human tyrosinases are soluble monomeric glycoproteins with activities which mirror their in vivo function. This advance allows for the structure - function analyses of different mutant TYR proteins and correlation with their corresponding human phenotypes; it also provides an important tool to discover drugs that may improve tyrosinase activity and treat OCA1.

  16. Population Pharmacokinetic Modelling of FE 999049, a Recombinant Human Follicle-Stimulating Hormone, in Healthy Women After Single Ascending Doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Trine Høyer; Röshammar, Daniel; Erichsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this analysis was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for a novel recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (FE 999049) expressed from a human cell line of foetal retinal origin (PER.C6) developed for controlled ovarian stimulation prior to assisted...

  17. Nicotinic Acid Receptor GPR109A Is Down-Regulated in Human Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Joshua T.; Digby, Janet E.; Ruparelia, Neil; Jefferson, Andrew; Handa, Ashok; Choudhury, Robin P.

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA) regresses atherosclerosis in human imaging studies and reduces atherosclerosis in mice, mediated by myeloid cells, independent of lipoproteins. Since GPR109A is expressed by human monocytes, we hypothesized that NA may drive cholesterol efflux from foam cells. In THP-1 cells NA suppressed LPS-induced mRNA transcription of MCP-1 by 76.6±12.2% (Pfoam cells by 37.7±3.1% (Pfoam cells on either cholesterol efflux or key RCT genes transcription. Upon foam cell induction, NA lost its effect on PPARγ and cAMP pathways, since its receptor, GPR109A, was down-regulated by foam cell transformation. This observation was confirmed in explanted human carotid plaques. In conclusion, despite NA’s anti-inflammatory effect on human macrophages, it has no effect on foam cells in reverse cholesterol transport; due to GPR109A down-regulation. PMID:23658787

  18. Evidence for Within-Host Genetic Recombination among the Human Pegiviral Strains in HIV Infected Subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoming Wu

    Full Text Available The non-pathogenic Human Pegivirus (HPgV, formerly GBV-C/HGV, the most prevalent RNA virus worldwide, is known to be associated with reduced morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected individuals. Although previous studies documented its ubiquity and important role in HIV-infected individuals, little is known about the underlying genetic mechanisms that maintain high genetic diversity of HPgV within the HIV-infected individuals. To assess the within-host genetic diversity of HPgV and forces that maintain such diversity within the co-infected hosts, we performed phylogenetic analyses taking into account 229 HPgV partial E1-E2 clonal sequences representing 15 male and 8 female co-infected HIV patients from Hubei province of central China. Our results revealed the presence of eleven strongly supported clades. While nine clades belonged to genotype 3, two clades belonged to genotype 2. Additionally, four clades that belonged to genotype 3 exhibited inter-clade recombination events. The presence of clonal sequences representing multiple clades within the HIV-infected individual provided the evidence of co-circulation of HPgV strains across the region. Of the 23 patients, six patients (i.e., five males and one female were detected to have HPgV recombinant sequences. Our results also revealed that while male patients shared the viral strains with other patients, viral strains from the female patients had restricted dispersal. Taken together, the present study revealed that multiple infections with divergent HPgV viral strains may have caused within-host genetic recombination, predominantly in male patients, and therefore, could be the major driver in shaping genetic diversity of HPgV.

  19. Recombinant human proinsulin from transgenic corn endosperm: solvent screening and extraction studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Farinas

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant pharmaceutical proteins are being produced in different systems such as bacteria and mammalian cell cultures. The use of transgenic plants as bioreactors has recently arisen as an alternative system offering many practical and economic advantages. However, finding an optimum strategy for the downstream processing (DSP of recombinant proteins from plants still remains a challenge. In this work, we studied the extraction of recombinant human proinsulin (rhProinsulin produced in the endosperm of transgenic corn seeds. An efficient extraction solvent was selected and the effects of temperature, solvent-to-solid ratio, time, and impeller rotational speed on the extraction were evaluated using an experimental design. After an extraction kinetics study, temperature was further evaluated to maximize rhProinsulin concentration in the extracts and to minimize the native corn components carbohydrates, phenolic compounds, and proteins. A high efficiency condition for extracting rhProinsulin with the selected solvent - 50 mM sodium bicarbonate buffer pH 10.0 and 5 mM DTT - was an extraction time of 2 h at a solvent-to-solid ratio of 10:1 and 25º C. The maximum rhProinsulin concentration in the extracts at that condition was 18.87 mg l-1 or 0.42% of the total soluble protein. These values are within the range in which the production of pharmaceutical proteins in plants can be competitive with other expression systems. The results presented provide information for the development of an additional production platform for the hormone insulin.

  20. Ozone effect on respiratory syncytial virus infectivity and cytokine production by human alveolar macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukup, J.; Koren, H.S.; Becker, S. (TRC Alliance Inc., Chapel Hill, NC (United States))

    1993-02-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of ozone (O3) exposure at 1 ppm for 2 hr on the susceptibility/resistance of adult human alveolar macrophages (AM) to infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in vitro and on RSV-induced cytokine production by the AM. AM were first exposed to O3 or to filtered air and then infected with RSV at multiplicities of infection (m.o.i.) of 0.1, 1.0, and 10. The percentage RSV-infected AM and the amount of infectious virus released by the cells were determined at Days 2 and 4 after infection. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels in the supernatants were determined on Day 2. No difference in the percentage infected AM or in the amount of infectious RSV produced was found between control and O3-exposed cultures. However, O3-exposed AM infected with RSV at m.o.i. 1 produced less IL-1 in response to RSV infection than control AM: 63.6 pg/ml compared with 98.5 pg/ml. No difference in IL-1 was seen with m.o.i. 10. IL-6 levels were also decreased, but only after infection with m.o.i. 0.1. At this level of infection 830 pg/ml was produced by control AM as compared to 468.2 pg/ml by O3-exposed AM. TNF production was unaffected by O3 at all multiplicities of infection. Statistical analysis of the O3 effect on AM cytokine production induced by the different multiplicities, however, revealed no significant effect of O3. Based on these observations it appears unlikely that O3 alters susceptibility of AM to infection with RSV, nor does O3 dramatically alter cytokine production in response to RSV since effects on IL-1 and IL-6 secretion were only found with the lowest levels of infection which induced cytokine release.

  1. Quaternary structures of recombinant, cellular, and serum forms of Thymidine Kinase 1 from dogs and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Sharif

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1 is a salvage enzyme involved in DNA precursor synthesis, and its expression is proliferation dependent. A serum form of TK1 has been used as a biomarker in human medicine for many years and more recently to monitor canine lymphoma. Canine TK1 has not been cloned and studied. Therefore, dog and human TK1 cDNA were cloned and expressed, and the recombinant enzymes characterized. The serum and cellular forms of canine and human TK1 were studied by size-exclusion chromatography and the level of TK1 protein was determined using polyclonal and monoclonal anti-TK1 antibodies. Results Canine TK1 phosphorylated the thymidine (dThd analog 3'-azido-thymidine (AZT as efficiently as it did dThd, whereas AZT phosphorylation by human TK1 was less efficient than that of dThd. Dog TK1 was also more thermostable and pH tolerant than the human enzyme. Oligomeric forms were observed with both enzymes in addition to the tetrameric and dimeric forms. Cellular TK1 was predominantly seen in dimeric and tetrameric forms, in the case of both dog TK1 from MDCK cells and human TK1 from CEM cells. Active serum TK1 was found mainly in a high molecular weight form, and treatment with a reducing agent shifted the high molecular weight complex to lower molecular weight forms with reduced total activity. Western blot analysis demonstrated a polypeptide of 26 kDa (dog and 25 kDa (human for cellular and serum TK1. There was no direct correlation between serum TK1 activity and protein level. It appears that a substantial fraction of serum TK1 is not enzymatically active. Conclusions These results suggest that the serum TK1 protein differs from cellular or recombinant forms, is more active in high molecular weight complexes, and is sensitive to reducing agents. The results presented here provide important information for the future development and use of serum TK1 as a diagnostic biomarker in human and veterinary medicine.

  2. Long-chain metabolites of α-tocopherol occur in human serum and inhibit macrophage foam cell formation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallert, Maria; Mosig, Sandy; Rennert, Knut; Funke, Harald; Ristow, Michael; Pellegrino, Roberto Maria; Cruciani, Gabriele; Galli, Francesco; Lorkowski, Stefan; Birringer, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Despite intensive research the physiological role and molecular mechanisms of action of the lipophilic antioxidant α-tocopherol (α-TOH) are still poorly understood. Hepatic α-TOH catabolism results in intermediate formation of the long-chain metabolites (α-LCMs) α-13'-hydroxy- and α-13'-carboxychromanol (α-13'-OH and α-13'-COOH). We propose that α-LCMs have biological functions that need further exploration. Here we report that α-13'-COOH, as detected by LC/MS Q-TOF, occurs in human serum, providing evidence for its systemic bioavailability. Using semisynthetically derived α-LCMs we performed flow cytometric analyses and found that α-LCMs decrease oxidized LDL (oxLDL) uptake (α-13'-OH, 24±6%, α-13'-COOH, 20±5% vs control) and oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in human macrophages in vitro (α-13'-OH, 26±4%, α-13'-COOH, 21±9% vs oxLDL), probably owing to α-LCM-mediated reduction in phagocytosis of oxLDL (α-13'-OH, 16±6%, α-13'-COOH, 41±3% vs oxLDL). At the same time, α-LCMs induced expression of CD36, the major scavenger receptor for oxLDL, in human macrophages by about 4.5-fold. Blocking experiments provided evidence that α-LCMs influence oxLDL uptake independent of CD36. A key finding of our study is that bioactivity of the α-LCMs occurs at lower concentrations and with mechanisms distinct from those of their metabolic precursor α-TOH. Our findings shed new light on the mechanistic aspects of α-TOH function in macrophages, which seem to be complicated by circulating α-LCMs. We speculate that α-LCMs represent a new class of regulatory metabolites. Further studies are required to elucidate their physiological role and contribution to cardiovascular disease. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dual prognostic significance of tumour-associated macrophages in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated or untreated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Caro, Giuseppe; Cortese, Nina; Castino, Giovanni Francesco; Grizzi, Fabio; Gavazzi, Francesca; Ridolfi, Cristina; Capretti, Giovanni; Mineri, Rossana; Todoric, Jelena; Zerbi, Alessandro; Allavena, Paola; Mantovani, Alberto; Marchesi, Federica

    2016-10-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) play key roles in tumour progression. Recent evidence suggests that TAMs critically modulate the efficacy of anticancer therapies, raising the prospect of their targeting in human cancer. In a large retrospective cohort study involving 110 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we assessed the density of CD68-TAM immune reactive area (%IRA) at the tumour-stroma interface and addressed their prognostic relevance in relation to postsurgical adjuvant chemotherapy (CTX). In vitro, we dissected the synergism of CTX and TAMs. In human PDAC, TAMs predominantly exhibited an immunoregulatory profile, characterised by expression of scavenger receptors (CD206, CD163) and production of interleukin 10 (IL-10). Surprisingly, while the density of TAMs associated to worse prognosis and distant metastasis, CTX restrained their protumour prognostic significance. High density of TAMs at the tumour-stroma interface positively dictated prognostic responsiveness to CTX independently of T-cell density. Accordingly, in vitro, gemcitabine-treated macrophages became tumoricidal, activating a cytotoxic gene expression programme, inhibiting their protumoural effect and switching to an antitumour phenotype. In patients with human PDAC, neoadjuvant CTX was associated to a decreased density of CD206(+) and IL-10(+) TAMs at the tumour-stroma interface. Overall, our data highlight TAMs as critical determinants of prognostic responsiveness to CTX and provide clinical and in vitro evidence that CTX overall directly re-educates TAMs to restrain tumour progression. These results suggest that the quantification of TAMs could be exploited to select patients more likely to respond to CTX and provide the basis for novel strategies aimed at re-educating macrophages in the context of CTX. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Expression of CYP4V2 in human THP1 macrophages and its transcriptional regulation by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Myeongjin; Shin, Jae-Gook; Lee, Su-Jun

    2017-09-01

    Because macrophages respond to a variety of pathological and pharmacological reagents, understanding the role of P450s in macrophages is important for therapeutic intervention. There has been a lack of research on CYP4 in macrophages, but fatty acid accumulation and lipid trafficking in macrophages have been suggested to be a main cause of atherosclerosis. All human CYP4 genes (n=12) were screened in THP1 macrophages by gene-specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Only CYP4V2 exhibited strong expression of both mRNA and protein. Expression levels of both CYP4V2 mRNA and protein were significantly reduced after treatment with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) antagonist GW9662. However, the expression levels of CYP4V2 were not changed by PPARα antagonist (GW6471) and liver X receptor alpha antagonist (22-S hydroxycholesterol). A metabolite of the CYP4V2 enzyme, 12-hydroxydodecanoic acid, was detected in THP1 macrophages, and this metabolite was significantly decreased after treatment with the PPARγ inhibitor GW9662 (>80% decreased, pmacrophages, and its expression was regulated by PPARγ. Further study is required to understand the role of CYP4V2 with regard to fat accumulation in the activated macrophage and atherosclerotic plaque development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative Quantitative Analysis of Macrophage Populations Defined by CD68 and Carbohydrate Antigens in Normal and Pathologically Altered Human Liver Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan E. Baldus

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver macrophages, which are involved in the different types of hepatitis, may indirectly induce hepatic fibrogenesis, since they have the possibility to activate hepatic stellate cells and fibroblasts by secretion of TGF-β , TNF-α and IL-1. To evaluate variations of the number of liver macrophages and their subpopulations, a quantification was carried out in normal human liver tissue, fatty liver, fatty liver hepatitis and hepatitis B. Identification was performed by the mab PG-M1 (anti-CD68 and, comparatively, four lectins, Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin I (GSA-I, Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA, peanut agglutinin (PNA and soybean agglutinin (SBA. A slight decrease in the frequency of macrophages in pericentral fields was observable in fatty liver and fatty liver hepatitis as compared to normal liver tissue. On the other hand, the number of CD68+ cells was significantly enhanced in hepatitis B with moderate and severe inflammatory activity. The highest incidence of macrophages was found in portal tracts of liver with fatty liver hepatitis and, particularly, hepatitis B. The fraction of cells stained by ECA, PNA or SBA did not increase significantly under pathological conditions. In contrast, the percentage of GSA-I binding macrophages was higher in liver parenchyma of hepatitis B and in portal tract macrophages in fatty liver hepatitis and also hepatitis B. In conclusion, our results indicate that GSA-I may aid in the detection of the subpopulation of activated macrophages which are assumed to play a pivotal role in liver pathology.

  6. In vitro and clinical studies of gene therapy with recombinant human adenovirus-p53 injection for oral leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Li, Long-Jiang; Zhang, Song-Tao; Wang, Li-Juan; Zhang, Zhuang; Gao, Ning; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Qian-Ming

    2009-11-01

    Oral leukoplakia is a well-recognized precancerous lesion of squamous cell carcinoma. When accompanied with abnormal p53 expression, it suffered a higher risk of canceration. The present study was carried out to test whether the recombinant human adenovirus-p53 could introduce wild-type p53 gene to oral leukoplakia cells and induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We select p53(-) oral dysplastic keratinocyte POE-9n, to observe the growth inhibition, cell cycle change, apoptosis-induced effects, and elaborate the corresponding molecular mechanism of recombinant adenovirus-p53 on POE-9n cells. Meanwhile, we evaluate the feasibility, safety, and biological activity of multipoints intraepithelial injections of recombinant adenovirus-p53 in 22 patients with dysplastic oral leukoplakia. Exogenous p53 could be successfully transduced into POE-9n cells by recombinant adenovirus-p53. The optimal infecting titer in this study was multiplicity of infection (MOI) = 100. Recombinant adenovirus-p53 could strongly inhibit cell proliferation, induce apoptosis, and arrest cell cycle in stage G(1) in POE-9n cells by inducing p21(CIP/WAF) and downregulating bcl-2 expression. In the posttreatment patients, p53 protein and p21(CIP/WAF) protein expression were significantly enhanced, yet bcl-2 protein presented low expression. Sixteen patients showed clinical response to the treatment, and 14 patients showed obvious histopathologic improvement. Intraepithelial injections of recombinant human adenovirus-p53 were safe, feasible, and biologically active for patients with dysplastic oral leukoplakia.

  7. UCLA1 aptamer inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C primary isolates in macrophages and selection of resistance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mufhandu, Hazel T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available HIV-seronegative blood donors using the Ficoll-Hypaque method [10] and re-suspended in Lonza X-VIVO-10 culture media (Whitehead Scientific, S.A), supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS, Gibco Invitrogen, South Africa). Cells were incubated...-suspended monocytes were cultured in Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) medium supplemented with 10% FBS (10% RPMI growth media) and 5 ng/ml human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM- 5 CSF) (Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany) for 5...

  8. Evolutionary dynamics and temporal/geographical correlates of recombination in the human enterovirus echovirus types 9, 11, and 30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliam Leitch, E C; Cabrerizo, M; Cardosa, J; Harvala, H; Ivanova, O E; Kroes, A C M; Lukashev, A; Muir, P; Odoom, J; Roivainen, M; Susi, P; Trallero, G; Evans, D J; Simmonds, P

    2010-09-01

    The relationship between virus evolution and recombination in species B human enteroviruses was investigated through large-scale genetic analysis of echovirus type 9 (E9) and E11 isolates (n = 85 and 116) from 16 European, African, and Asian countries between 1995 and 2008. Cluster 1 E9 isolates and genotype D5 and A E11 isolates showed evidence of frequent recombination between the VP1 and 3Dpol regions, the latter falling into 23 (E9) and 43 (E11) clades interspersed phylogenetically with 46 3Dpol clades of E30 and with those of other species B serotypes. Remarkably, only 2 of the 112 3Dpol clades were shared by more than one serotype (E11 and E30), demonstrating an extremely large and genetically heterogeneous recombination pool of species B nonstructural-region variants. The likelihood of recombination increased with geographical separation and time, and both were correlated with VP1 divergence, whose substitution rates allowed recombination half-lives of 1.3, 9.8, and 3.1 years, respectively, for E9, E11, and E30 to be calculated. These marked differences in recombination dynamics matched epidemiological patterns of periodic epidemic cycles of 2 to 3 (E9) and 5 to 6 (E30) years and the longer-term endemic pattern of E11 infections. Phylotemporal analysis using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method, which placed recombination events within the evolutionary reconstruction of VP1, showed a close relationship with VP1 lineage expansion, with defined recombination events that correlated with their epidemiological periodicity. Whether recombination events contribute directly to changes in transmissibility that drive epidemic behavior or occur stochastically during periodic population bottlenecks is an unresolved issue vital to future understanding of enterovirus molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis.

  9. Evolutionary Dynamics and Temporal/Geographical Correlates of Recombination in the Human Enterovirus Echovirus Types 9, 11, and 30▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliam Leitch, E. C.; Cabrerizo, M.; Cardosa, J.; Harvala, H.; Ivanova, O. E.; Kroes, A. C. M.; Lukashev, A.; Muir, P.; Odoom, J.; Roivainen, M.; Susi, P.; Trallero, G.; Evans, D. J.; Simmonds, P.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between virus evolution and recombination in species B human enteroviruses was investigated through large-scale genetic analysis of echovirus type 9 (E9) and E11 isolates (n = 85 and 116) from 16 European, African, and Asian countries between 1995 and 2008. Cluster 1 E9 isolates and genotype D5 and A E11 isolates showed evidence of frequent recombination between the VP1 and 3Dpol regions, the latter falling into 23 (E9) and 43 (E11) clades interspersed phylogenetically with 46 3Dpol clades of E30 and with those of other species B serotypes. Remarkably, only 2 of the 112 3Dpol clades were shared by more than one serotype (E11 and E30), demonstrating an extremely large and genetically heterogeneous recombination pool of species B nonstructural-region variants. The likelihood of recombination increased with geographical separation and time, and both were correlated with VP1 divergence, whose substitution rates allowed recombination half-lives of 1.3, 9.8, and 3.1 years, respectively, for E9, E11, and E30 to be calculated. These marked differences in recombination dynamics matched epidemiological patterns of periodic epidemic cycles of 2 to 3 (E9) and 5 to 6 (E30) years and the longer-term endemic pattern of E11 infections. Phylotemporal analysis using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method, which placed recombination events within the evolutionary reconstruction of VP1, showed a close relationship with VP1 lineage expansion, with defined recombination events that correlated with their epidemiological periodicity. Whether recombination events contribute directly to changes in transmissibility that drive epidemic behavior or occur stochastically during periodic population bottlenecks is an unresolved issue vital to future understanding of enterovirus molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis. PMID:20610722

  10. Treatment of Crohn's disease with recombinant human interleukin 10 induces the proinflammatory cytokine interferon γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilg, H; van Montfrans, C; van den Ende, A; Kaser, A; van Deventer, S J H; Schreiber, S; Gregor, M; Ludwiczek, O; Rutgeerts, P; Gasche, C; Koningsberger, J C; Abreu, L; Kuhn, I; Cohard, M; LeBeaut, A; Grint, P; Weiss, G

    2002-01-01

    Background: Interleukin 10 (IL-10) exerts anti-inflammatory actions by counteracting many biological effects of interferon γ (IFN-γ). Aims: To investigate this in humans, we studied the effects of human recombinant IL-10 administration on IFN-γ production by patient leucocytes. Furthermore, we assessed the IFN-γ inducible molecule neopterin and nitrite/nitrate serum levels, which are indicative of endogenous nitric oxide formation. Methods: As part of two placebo controlled double blind studies, we analysed patients with chronic active Crohn's disease (CACD) who received either subcutaneous recombinant human IL-10 (n=44) or placebo (n=10) daily for 28 days, and patients with mild to moderate Crohn's disease (MCD) treated with either subcutaneous IL-10 (n=52) or placebo (n=16) daily for 28 days. Neopterin and nitrite/nitrate concentrations were measured in serum, and ex vivo IFN-γ formation by lipopolysaccharide or phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulated whole blood cells were investigated before, during, and after IL-10 therapy. Results: In patients with CACD, the highest dose of 20 μg/kg IL-10 caused a significant increase in serum neopterin on days +15 and +29 of therapy compared with pretreatment levels. No changes were observed for nitrite/nitrate levels under either condition. In MCD, treatment with 20 μg/kg IL-10 resulted in a significant increase in PHA induced IFN-γ production. Conclusions: High doses of IL-10 upregulate the production of IFN-γ and neopterin. This phenomenon may be responsible for the lack of efficacy of high doses of IL-10 in the treatment of CACD and MCD. PMID:11788558

  11. Treatment of Crohn's disease with recombinant human interleukin 10 induces the proinflammatory cytokine interferon gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilg, H; van Montfrans, C; van den Ende, A; Kaser, A; van Deventer, S J H; Schreiber, S; Gregor, M; Ludwiczek, O; Rutgeerts, P; Gasche, C; Koningsberger, J C; Abreu, L; Kuhn, I; Cohard, M; LeBeaut, A; Grint, P; Weiss, G

    2002-02-01

    Interleukin 10 (IL-10) exerts anti-inflammatory actions by counteracting many biological effects of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). To investigate this in humans, we studied the effects of human recombinant IL-10 administration on IFN-gamma production by patient leucocytes. Furthermore, we assessed the IFN-gamma inducible molecule neopterin and nitrite/nitrate serum levels, which are indicative of endogenous nitric oxide formation. As part of two placebo controlled double blind studies, we analysed patients with chronic active Crohn's disease (CACD) who received either subcutaneous recombinant human IL-10 (n=44) or placebo (n=10) daily for 28 days, and patients with mild to moderate Crohn's disease (MCD) treated with either subcutaneous IL-10 (n=52) or placebo (n=16) daily for 28 days. Neopterin and nitrite/nitrate concentrations were measured in serum, and ex vivo IFN-gamma formation by lipopolysaccharide or phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulated whole blood cells were investigated before, during, and after IL-10 therapy. In patients with CACD, the highest dose of 20 microg/kg IL-10 caused a significant increase in serum neopterin on days +15 and +29 of therapy compared with pretreatment levels. No changes were observed for nitrite/nitrate levels under either condition. In MCD, treatment with 20 microg/kg IL-10 resulted in a significant increase in PHA induced IFN-gamma production. High doses of IL-10 upregulate the production of IFN-gamma and neopterin. This phenomenon may be responsible for the lack of efficacy of high doses of IL-10 in the treatment of CACD and MCD.

  12. Kinetic analysis and binding studies of a new recombinant human factor VIIa for treatment of haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandoni, J; Perret, G; Forier, C

    2017-03-01

    LR769 is a new second-generation recombinant human Factor VIIa (rhFVIIa) developed for haemophilia treatment. We determined enzymatic properties of LR769 and its interaction with antithrombin, tissue factor, platelets and endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR), compared with NovoSevenRT. Kinetic enzyme assays and active site titration were used for enzymatic studies. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) was used for determination of binding constants. Cellular binding was determined for platelets and cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The dissociation constant (Kd ) for activated platelet binding was in the 1 μm range for both products. At saturation, more LR769 than NovoSevenRT was bound to the platelets. Binding to HUVEC was 25-50% higher for LR769 than for NovoSevenRT. Protein C, soluble EPCR, and anti-EPCR antibody all reduced the binding, indicating specificity for EPCR. LR769 was similar to NovoSevenRT in all kinetic assays. Active site titration demonstrated 0.7 mole of active site/mole of protein. The kcat /Km values for activation of FX and FIX with purified recombinant tissue factor and phospholipids were 10.5 s(-1) /0.32 μm and 3.3 s(-1) /0.44 μm respectively. The apparent second-order rate constant for inactivation by human plasma AT was 5.9 ± 0.4 × 10(3) m(-1) s(-1) . The Kd values for binding of LR769 to soluble tissue factor and full-length tissue factor were 8.1 nm and 0.9 nm, respectively, and the Kd for binding to soluble EPCR was 41 nm. Overall, LR769 exhibited characteristics similar to NovoSevenRT, but bound EPCR on HUVEC with somewhat higher affinity than NovoSevenRT. © 2016 LFB Biotechnologies. Haemophilia Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Involvement of recombination in x-ray mutagenesis of human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amundson, S.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Xia, F.; Liber, H.L. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from WI-L2 differ greatly in their responses to X-irradiation. Compared with TK6 (ATCC CRL 8015), WI-L2-NS (ATCC CRL 8155) has an enhanced X-ray survival. The induction of mutation by X-rays is also markedly different. The hemizygous hprt locus is slightly more mutable in WI-L2-NS than in TK6, and the dose response fits best to a linear-quadratic curve rather than the linear fit of TK6X-ray induced mutation at the autosomal tk locus in heterozygotes derived from WI-L2-NS is 20-50 fold higher than in heterozygotes derived from TK6. A larger proportion of WI-L2-NS mutants had lost heterozygosity compared with mutants of TK6. , Fluorescence in situ hybridization indicated that loss of heterozygosity was due almost uniformly to deletion of an allele in mutants of TK6, and to recombination or gene conversion in mutants of WI-L2-NS. These results indicate that recombinational repair contributes to both cell survival and mutation following exposure to ionizing radiation.

  14. Involvement of recombination in x-ray mutagenesis of human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amundson, S.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Xia, F.; Liber, H.L. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from WI-L2 differ greatly in their responses to X-irradiation. Compared with TK6 (ATCC CRL 8015), WI-L2-NS (ATCC CRL 8155) has an enhanced X-ray survival. The induction of mutation by X-rays is also markedly different. The hemizygous hprt locus is slightly more mutable in WI-L2-NS than in TK6, and the dose response fits best to a linear-quadratic curve rather than the linear fit of TK6X-ray induced mutation at the autosomal tk locus in heterozygotes derived from WI-L2-NS is 20-50 fold higher than in heterozygotes derived from TK6. A larger proportion of WI-L2-NS mutants had lost heterozygosity compared with mutants of TK6. , Fluorescence in situ hybridization indicated that loss of heterozygosity was due almost uniformly to deletion of an allele in mutants of TK6, and to recombination or gene conversion in mutants of WI-L2-NS. These results indicate that recombinational repair contributes to both cell survival and mutation following exposure to ionizing radiation.

  15. Construction and Characterization of Human Rotavirus Recombinant VP8* Subunit Parenteral Vaccine Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaobo; Cao, Dianjun; Jones, Ronald W.; Li, Jianping; Szu, Shousun; Hoshino, Yasutaka

    2012-01-01

    Two currently licensed live oral rotavirus vaccines (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) are highly efficacious against severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, the efficacy of such vaccines in selected low-income African and Asian countries is much lower than that in middle or high-income countries. Additionally, these two vaccines have recently been associated with rare case of intussusception in vaccinated infants. We developed a novel recombinant subunit parenteral rotavirus vaccine which may be more effective in low-income countries and also avert the potential problem of intussusception. Truncated recombinant VP8* (ΔVP8*) protein of human rotavirus strain Wa P[8], DS-1 P[4] or 1076 P[6] expressed in E. coli was highly soluble and was generated in high yield. Guinea pigs hyperimmunized intramuscularly with each of the ΔVP8* proteins (i.e., (P[8], P[4] or P[6]) developed high levels of homotypic as well as variable levels of heterotypic neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, the selected ΔVP8* proteins when administered to mice at a clinically relevant dosage, route and schedule, elicited high levels of serum anti-VP8* IgG and/or neutralizing antibodies. Our data indicated that the ΔVP8* proteins may be a plausible additional candidate as new parenteral rotavirus vaccines. PMID:22885016

  16. Generation of a Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Line Producing Recombinant Human Glucocerebrosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Branco Novo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCR results in the inherited metabolic disorder known as Gaucher disease. Current treatment consists of enzyme replacement therapy by administration of exogenous GCR. Although effective, it is exceptionally expensive, and patients worldwide have a limited access to this medicine. In Brazil, the public healthcare system provides the drug free of charge for all Gaucher’s patients, which reaches the order of $ 84 million per year. However, the production of GCR by public institutions in Brazil would reduce significantly the therapy costs. Here, we describe a robust protocol for the generation of a cell line producing recombinant human GCR. The protein was expressed in CHO-DXB11 (dhfr− cells after stable transfection and gene amplification with methotrexate. As expected, glycosylated GCR was detected by immunoblotting assay both as cell-associated (~64 and 59 kDa and secreted (63–69 kDa form. Analysis of subclones allowed the selection of stable CHO cells producing a secreted functional enzyme, with a calculated productivity of 5.14 pg/cell/day for the highest producer. Although being laborious, traditional methods of screening high-producing recombinant cells may represent a valuable alternative to generate expensive biopharmaceuticals in countries with limited resources.

  17. Recombinant Lucilia sericata chymotrypsin in a topical hydrogel formulation degrades human wound eschar ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britland, Stephen; Smith, Annie; Finter, Wayne; Eagland, Donald; Vowden, Kath; Vowden, Peter; Telford, Gary; Brown, Alan; Pritchard, David

    2011-01-01

    Larval biotherapy is a debridement tool used in wound management. The mechanism of action involves degradation of eschar by serine proteases including chymotrypsin within the alimentary fluids of first instar Lucilia sericata. With the rationale of obviating some limitations of biotherapy, including cost, complexity of use, and patient reticence, the present study describes a mobile hydrogel formulation containing freeze-dried recombinant L. sericata chymotrypsin designed for topical application. Neither freeze-drying nor formulation into the hydrogel significantly attenuated the measured activity of released enzyme compared to fresh-frozen enzyme in aqueous solution. Gel electrophoresis confirmed qualitatively that the chymotrypsin/hydrogel formulation both with and without supplementary urea at 10% (w) /(v) degraded human chronic wound eschar ex vivo. Mindful that the hallmark of intractability of chronic wounds is aberrant biochemistry, the pH activity profile for the enzyme/hydrogel formulation was compared with exudate pH in chronic wounds of mixed aetiology in a cohort of 48 hospital in-patients. Five patients' wounds were acidic, however, the remainder were predominantly alkaline and coincided with the pH optimum for the insect enzyme. Thus, a recombinant L. sericata chymotrypsin and hydrogel formulation could represent a pragmatic alternative to larval therapy for the management of chronic wounds. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  18. Construction and characterization of human rotavirus recombinant VP8* subunit parenteral vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaobo; Cao, Dianjun; Jones, Ronald W; Li, Jianping; Szu, Shousun; Hoshino, Yasutaka

    2012-09-21

    Two currently licensed live oral rotavirus vaccines (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) are highly efficacious against severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, the efficacy of such vaccines in selected low-income African and Asian countries is much lower than that in middle or high-income countries. Additionally, these two vaccines have recently been associated with rare case of intussusception in vaccinated infants. We developed a novel recombinant subunit parenteral rotavirus vaccine which may be more effective in low-income countries and also avert the potential problem of intussusception. Truncated recombinant VP8* (ΔVP8*) protein of human rotavirus strain Wa P[8], DS-1 P[4] or 1076 P[6] expressed in Escherichia coli was highly soluble and was generated in high yield. Guinea pigs hyperimmunized intramuscularly with each of the ΔVP8* proteins (i.e., P[8], P[4] or P[6]) developed high levels of homotypic as well as variable levels of heterotypic neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, the selected ΔVP8* proteins when administered to mice at a clinically relevant dosage, route and schedule, elicited high levels of serum anti-VP8* IgG and/or neutralizing antibodies. Our data indicated that the ΔVP8* proteins may be a plausible additional candidate as new parenteral rotavirus vaccines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Generation of a Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Line Producing Recombinant Human Glucocerebrosidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Juliana Branco; Morganti, Ligia; Moro, Ana Maria; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Serrano, Solange Maria de Toledo; Raw, Isaias; Ho, Paulo Lee

    2012-01-01

    Impaired activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCR) results in the inherited metabolic disorder known as Gaucher disease. Current treatment consists of enzyme replacement therapy by administration of exogenous GCR. Although effective, it is exceptionally expensive, and patients worldwide have a limited access to this medicine. In Brazil, the public healthcare system provides the drug free of charge for all Gaucher's patients, which reaches the order of $ 84 million per year. However, the production of GCR by public institutions in Brazil would reduce significantly the therapy costs. Here, we describe a robust protocol for the generation of a cell line producing recombinant human GCR. The protein was expressed in CHO-DXB11 (dhfr−) cells after stable transfection and gene amplification with methotrexate. As expected, glycosylated GCR was detected by immunoblotting assay both as cell-associated (~64 and 59 kDa) and secreted (63–69 kDa) form. Analysis of subclones allowed the selection of stable CHO cells producing a secreted functional enzyme, with a calculated productivity of 5.14 pg/cell/day for the highest producer. Although being laborious, traditional methods of screening high-producing recombinant cells may represent a valuable alternative to generate expensive biopharmaceuticals in countries with limited resources. PMID:23091360

  20. Rapid engraftment by peripheral blood progenitor cells mobilized by recombinant human stem cell factor and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R G; Briddell, R A; Knitter, G H; Rowley, S D; Appelbaum, F R; McNiece, I K

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that administration of low-dose recombinant human stem cell factor (rhSCF) plus recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to baboons mobilizes greater numbers of progenitor cells in the blood than does administration of rhG-CSF alone. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether marrow repopulating cells are present in the blood of nonhuman primates administered low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF, and if present, whether these cells engraft lethally irradiated recipients as rapidly as blood cells mobilized by treatment with rhG-CSF alone. One group of baboons was administered low-dose rhSCF (25 micrograms/kg/d) plus rhG-CSF (100 micrograms/kg/d) while a second group received rhG-CSF alone (100 micrograms/kg/d). Each animal underwent a single 2-hour leukapheresis occurring the day when the number of progenitor cells per volume of blood was maximal. For baboons administered low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF, the leukapheresis products contained 1.8-fold more mononuclear cells and 14.0-fold more progenitor cells compared to the leukapheresis products from animals treated with rhG-CSF alone. All animals successfully engrafted after transplantation of cryopreserved autologous blood cells. In animals transplanted with low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF mobilized blood cells, we observed a time to a platelet count of > 20,000 was 8 days +/- 0, to a white blood cell count (WBC) of > 1,000 was 11 +/- 1 days, and to an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of > 500 was 12 +/- 1 days. These results compared with 42 +/- 12, 16 +/- 1, and 24 +/- 4 days to achieve platelets > 20,000, WBC > 1,000, and ANC > 500, respectively, for baboons transplanted with rhG-CSF mobilized blood cells. Animals transplanted with low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF mobilized blood cells had blood counts equivalent to pretransplant values within 3 weeks after transplant. The results suggest that the combination of low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF mobilizes greater numbers of

  1. Different dynamics of NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated IL‑1β production in GM-CSF- and M-CSF-differentiated human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budai, Marietta Margit; Tőzsér, József; Benkő, Szilvia

    2017-06-01

    IL-1β is a "master" cytokine regulating a wide variety of physiologic and immunologic processes. The most frequently studied models for NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated IL-1β production are the macrophages; however, depending on their microenvironment, they can develop into functionally different cells. Several protocols have been developed to model the diversity of these cells in vitro. Here, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, a comparative study about the dynamics and molecular mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome priming and activation in LPS-stimulated, human, monocyte-derived GM- or M-macrophages, differentiated in the presence of GM-CSF or M-CSF, respectively. Our results show that IL-1β production by LPS-stimulated M-macrophages is a rapid and short event that requires ATP supplementation and is attenuated, in part, by the presence of IL-10, which reduces Akt signaling. However, IL-1β production by GM-macrophages develops gradually, and these cells produce IL-1β, even in the absence of ATP supplementation, because of the constitutively active caspase-1 enzyme. We show that the membrane-bound ectonucleotidases have an important regulatory role on the IL-1β secretion in GM-macrophages. Furthermore, we provide evidence that adenosine treatment enhances LPS-primed IL-1β secretion by GM-macrophages, but not by M-macrophages. These results show that, because of the different activation status and expression levels of the NLRP3 inflammasome components, as well as the signaling activity of the pathways, the two subtypes of macrophages respond very differently to the same stimuli. For this reason, the molecular composition of the microenvironment that shapes macrophage development should be considered when research or therapeutic methods are planned to control IL-1β production. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  2. Artificial extracellular matrices composed of collagen I and high-sulfated hyaluronan promote phenotypic and functional modulation of human pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Sandra; Allenstein, Francie; Kajahn, Jennifer; Forstreuter, Inka; Hintze, Vera; Möller, Stephanie; Simon, Jan C

    2013-03-01

    The sequential phases of biomaterial integration and wound healing require different macrophage functions mediated by distinct macrophage subsets. During the initial phase of healing, pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages (MΦ1) are required to clear the wound from microbes and debris; however, their unopposed, persistent activation often leads to disturbed integration of biomaterials and perturbed wound healing. Here we investigated whether pro-inflammatory macrophage functions are affected by immunomodulatory biomaterials based on artificial extracellular matrices (aECM). To address this issue, we tested the capacity of two-dimensional aECM consisting of collagen I and hyaluronan or sulfated derivatives of hyaluronan to affect functions of in vitro polarized human pro-inflammatory MΦ1. The aECM containing high-sulfated hyaluronan substantially decreased inflammatory macrophage functions, including pathogen uptake and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-12 due to impaired activation of nuclear factor "kappa-light-chain-enhancer" of activated B-cells. Moreover, these macrophages secreted immunregulatory IL-10 and showed reduced activity of the transcription factors signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 and interferon-regulating factor 5, both controlling macrophage polarization to MΦ1 subsets. Our data reveal that the collagen I matrix containing high-sulfated hyaluronan possesses immunomodulating properties and dampens inflammatory macrophage activities by impeding signaling pathways crucial for polarization of pro-inflammatory MΦ1. We therefore suggest this aECM as a promising coating for biomaterials to modulate inflammatory macrophage functions during the healing response and recommend its further testing as a three-dimensional construct and in in vivo models. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Insulin resistance is associated with MCP1-mediated macrophage accumulation in skeletal muscle in mice and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Patsouris

    Full Text Available Inflammation is now recognized as a major factor contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2D. However, while the mechanisms and consequences associated with white adipose tissue inflammation are well described, very little is known concerning the situation in skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate, in vitro and in vivo, how skeletal muscle inflammation develops and how in turn it modulates local and systemic insulin sensitivity in different mice models of T2D and in humans, focusing on the role of the chemokine MCP1. Here, we found that skeletal muscle inflammation and macrophage markers are increased and associated with insulin resistance in mice models and humans. In addition, we demonstrated that intra-muscular TNFα expression is exclusively restricted to the population of intramuscular leukocytes and that the chemokine MCP1 was associated with skeletal muscle inflammatory markers in these models. Furthermore, we demonstrated that exposure of C2C12 myotubes to palmitate elevated the production of the chemokine MCP1 and that the muscle-specific overexpression of MCP1 in transgenic mice induced the local recruitment of macrophages and altered local insulin sensitivity. Overall our study demonstrates that skeletal muscle inflammation is clearly increased in the context of T2D in each one of the models we investigated, which is likely consecutive to the lipotoxic environment generated by peripheral insulin resistance, further increasing MCP1 expression in muscle. Consequently, our results suggest that MCP1-mediated skeletal muscle macrophages recruitment plays a role in the etiology of T2D.

  4. Metabolism of (/sup 3/H)benzo(a)pyrene by cultured human bronchus and cultured human pulmonary alveolar macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Harris, C.C.; Stoner, G.D.

    1978-01-01

    culture dishes. After 7 days in culture the bronchus explant and the macrophages were exposed to (/sup 3/H)benzo(a)pyrene, and the binding to cellular macromolecules was studied. Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity was determined by the release of tritiated water into the culture medium from metabolized...... activity were dependent on the length of time in culture and length of exposure to benzo(a)pyrene. Pretreatment of the macrophages with benz(..cap alpha..)anthracene increased both binding level of benzo(a)pyrene and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity. When coincubated with benzo(a)pyrene, cycloheximide...

  5. Recombinant human thyrotropin in veterinary medicine: current use and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, M; van Hoek, I; Peremans, K; Daminet, S

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) was developed after bovine thyrotropin (bTSH) was no longer commercially available. It was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) as an aid to diagnostic follow-up of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in humans and for thyroid remnant ablation with radioiodine. In addition, rhTSH is used in human medicine to evaluate thyroid reserve capacity and to enhance radioiodine uptake in patients with metastatic thyroid cancer and multinodular goiter. Likewise, rhTSH has been used in veterinary medicine over the last decade. The most important veterinary use of rhTSH is thyroidal functional reserve testing for the diagnosis of canine hypothyroidism. Recent pilot studies performed at Ghent University in Belgium have investigated the use of rhTSH to optimize radioiodine treatment of canine thyroid carcinoma and feline hyperthyroidism. Radioiodine treatment optimization may allow a decreased therapeutic dosage of radioiodine and thus may improve radioprotection. This review outlines the current uses of rhTSH in human and veterinary medicine, emphasizing research performed in dogs and cats, as well as potential future applications. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase from milk of transgenic animals to protect against organophosphate poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yue-Jin; Huang, Yue; Baldassarre, Hernan; Wang, Bin; Lazaris, Anthoula; Leduc, Martin; Bilodeau, Annie S; Bellemare, Annie; Côté, Mélanie; Herskovits, Peter; Touati, Madjid; Turcotte, Carl; Valeanu, Loredana; Lemée, Nicolas; Wilgus, Harvey; Bégin, Isabelle; Bhatia, Bhim; Rao, Khalid; Neveu, Nathalie; Brochu, Eric; Pierson, Janice; Hockley, Duncan K; Cerasoli, Douglas M; Lenz, David E; Karatzas, Costas N; Langermann, Solomon

    2007-08-21

    Dangerous organophosphorus (OP) compounds have been used as insecticides in agriculture and in chemical warfare. Because exposure to OP could create a danger for humans in the future, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) has been developed for prophylaxis to these chemicals. Because it is impractical to obtain sufficient quantities of plasma BChE to treat humans exposed to OP agents, the production of recombinant BChE (rBChE) in milk of transgenic animals was investigated. Transgenic mice and goats were generated with human BChE cDNA under control of the goat beta-casein promoter. Milk from transgenic animals contained 0.1-5 g/liter of active rBChE. The plasma half-life of PEGylated, goat-derived, purified rBChE in guinea pigs was 7-fold longer than non-PEGylated dimers. The rBChE from transgenic mice was inhibited by nerve agents at a 1:1 molar ratio. Transgenic goats produced active rBChE in milk sufficient for prophylaxis of humans at risk for exposure to OP agents.

  7. Production of functional human insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) using recombinant expression in HEK293 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanscher, Anne Sofie Molsted; Williamson, Michael; Ebersole, Tasja Wainani

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) display many functions in humans including regulation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway. The various roles of human IGFBPs make them attractive protein candidates in drug discovery. Structural and functional knowledge...... on human proteins with therapeutic relevance is needed to design and process the next generation of protein therapeutics. In order to conduct structural and functional investigations large quantities of recombinant proteins are needed. However, finding a suitable recombinant production system for proteins...... such as full-length human IGFBPs, still remains a challenge. Here we present a mammalian HEK293 expression method suitable for over-expression of secretory full-length human IGFBP-1 to -7. Protein purification of full-length human IGFBP-1, -2, -3 and -5 was conducted using a two-step chromatography procedure...

  8. IRF5 and IRF5 Disease-Risk Variants Increase Glycolysis and Human M1 Macrophage Polarization by Regulating Proximal Signaling and Akt2 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedl, Matija; Yan, Jie; Abraham, Clara

    2016-08-30

    Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) regulates inflammatory M1 macrophage polarization, and disease-associated IRF5 genetic variants regulate pattern-recognition-receptor (PRR)-induced cytokines. PRR-stimulated macrophages and M1 macrophages exhibit enhanced glycolysis, a central mediator of inflammation. We find that IRF5 is needed for PRR-enhanced glycolysis in human macrophages and in mice in vivo. Upon stimulation of the PRR nucleotide binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD2) in human macrophages, IRF5 binds RIP2, IRAK1, and TRAF6. IRF5, in turn, is required for optimal Akt2 activation, which increases expression of glycolytic pathway genes and HIF1A as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 polarization. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines and glycolytic pathways co-regulate each other. Rs2004640/rs2280714 TT/TT IRF5 disease-risk-carrier cells demonstrate increased IRF5 expression and increased PRR-induced Akt2 activation, glycolysis, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and M1 polarization relative to GG/CC carrier macrophages. Our findings identify that IRF5 disease-associated polymorphisms regulate diverse immunological and metabolic outcomes and provide further insight into mechanisms contributing to the increasingly recognized important role for glycolysis in inflammation. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnesium corrosion particles do not interfere with the immune function of primary human and murine macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Isabelle; Schumacher, Stephan; Basler, Tina; Baumert, Kathrin; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Evertz, Florian; Mueller, Peter Paul; Baeumer, Wolfgang; Kietzmann, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is currently under investigation as a prospective biodegradable implant material. Biodegradation of magnesium causes a release of magnesium, hydroxide ions and hydrogen gas but it can also lead to the formation of particulate debris. Implant-derived particles may have immunotoxic effects. To investigate the influence of magnesium-derived particles on the immune functions of primary macrophages, up to 500 mu g/ml magnesium or magnesium corrosion particles were added to the cell cultu...

  10. Antitumor protection from the murine T-cell leukemia/lymphoma EL4 by the continuous subcutaneous coadministration of recombinant macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallera, D A; Taylor, P A; Aukerman, S L; Blazar, B R

    1993-09-15

    Combined continuous s.c. coadministration of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) plus interleukin-2 (IL-2) by osmotic pump protected mice given i.v. injections of a lethal dose of EL4 T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Antitumor protection was significantly greater than that afforded by treatment with either cytokine alone. Since neither IL-2 receptors nor M-CSF receptors were expressed on EL4, the antitumor effect was likely attributed to murine effector cells. To determine how M-CSF+IL-2 provided this effect, we performed immunophenotypic and functional analyses as well as in vivo depletion studies of putative antitumor effector cells. Splenic phenotyping experiments revealed that the highest levels of macrophages and natural killer cells were observed in mice given the cytokine combination rather than either M-CSF or IL-2 alone. In vivo depletion of natural killer cells ablated the antitumor protective effect of M-CSF and IL-2. T-cells were also important for M-CSF+IL-2 efficacy, since adult thymectomy/T-cell depletion significantly inhibited the ability of cytokine coadministration to protect against EL4. Coadministration of the 2 cytokines significantly elevated in vivo levels of CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, CD3+NK1.1+ T-cells, and CD3+CD25+ (activated) T-cells, and elevated anti-EL4 cytotoxic T-cell activity measured in vitro. Although WBC counts and fluorescence-activated cell sorter studies showed that M-CSF+IL-2 treatment significantly elevated neutrophils, s.c. delivery of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor at doses sufficient to induce neutrophilia was unable to confer anti-EL4 protection. These studies indicate that macrophages, T-cells, and natural killer cells are all important in the M-CSF+IL-2 anti-EL4 response. The superior antitumor effect of this cytokine combination along with the ability of M-CSF to diminish the toxicity of IL-2 in this model suggests that further investigations into the clinical potential of this combination treatment are warranted.

  11. Update on human health concerns of recombinant bovine somatotropin use in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, R J; Bauman, D E

    2014-04-01

    The 20 yr of commercial use of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) in the United States provide the backdrop for reviewing the outcome of use on human health issues by the upcoming 78th meeting of the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)/World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Food Additives. These results and further advancements in scientific knowledge indicate there are no new human health issues related to the use of rbST by the dairy industry. Use of rbST has no effect on the micro- and macrocomposition of milk. Also, no evidence exists that rbST use has increased human exposure to antibiotic residues in milk. Concerns that IGF-I present in milk could have biological effects on humans have been allayed by studies showing that oral consumption of IGF-I by humans has little or no biological activity. Additionally, concentrations of IGF-I in digestive tract fluids of humans far exceed any IGF-I consumed when drinking milk. Furthermore, chronic supplementation of cows with rbST does not increase concentrations of milk IGF-I outside the range typically observed for effects of farm, parity, or stage of lactation. Use of rbST has not affected expression of retroviruses in cattle or posed an increased risk to human health from retroviruses in cattle. Furthermore, risk for development of type 1 or type 2 diabetes has not increased in children or adults consuming milk and dairy products from rbST-supplemented cows. Overall, milk and dairy products provide essential nutrients and related benefits in health maintenance and the prevention of chronic diseases.

  12. Sesquiterpene lactones induce distinct forms of cell death that modulate human monocyte-derived macrophage responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Antón, Nancy; Hermann, Corinna; Murillo, Renato; Merfort, Irmgard; Wanner, Gerhard; Vollmar, Angelika M; Dirsch, Verena M

    2007-01-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SQTLs) are shown to possess anti-inflammatory as well as cytotoxic activity. No study, however, links both activities. We, therefore, hypothesized that SQTL-treated, dying cells might induce an anti-inflammatory response in cocultured THP-1 macrophages. Here we show that SQTLs bearing either an alpha,beta-unsaturated cyclopentenone or an alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone induce different forms of cell death. Whereas the cyclopentenone SQTL induced typical apoptosis, the alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone SQTLs-induced cell death lacked partly classical signs of apoptosis, such as DNA fragmentation. All SQTLs, however, activated caspases and the nuclear morphology of cell death was dependent on caspase activation. Most interestingly, alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone SQTLs induced a more pronounced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure than the cyclopentenone SQTL. Especially, 7-hydroxycostunolide (HC), with an alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone substituted with a hydroxyl group, showed a striking fast and pronounced PS translocation. This result was in agreement with a strong activation of phagocytosis in cocultured THP-1 macrophages. Interestingly, HC-treated Jurkat cells led to an early (3.5 h) but transient increase in TNF-alpha levels in macrophage coculture. Release of TGF-beta remained unaffected after 18 h. We propose that this type of SQTL may influence local inflammation by transiently activating the immune system and help to clear cells by inducing a form of cell death that promotes phagocytosis.

  13. Enhanced sialylation and in vivo efficacy of recombinant human α-galactosidase through in vitro glycosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngsoo Sohn

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human α-galactosidase A (GLA has been used in enzymereplacement therapy for patients with Fabry disease. Weexpressed recombinant GLA from Chinese hamster ovary cellswith very high productivity. When compared to an approvedGLA (agalsidase beta, its size and charge were found to besmaller and more neutral. These differences resulted from thelack of terminal sialic acids playing essential roles in the serumhalf-life and proper tissue targeting. Because a simplesialylation reaction was not enough to increase the sialic acidcontent, a combined reaction using galactosyltransferase,sialyltransferase, and their sugar substrates at the same timewas developed and optimized to reduce the incubation time.The product generated by this reaction had nearly the samesize, isoelectric points, and sialic acid content as agalsidasebeta. Furthermore, it had better in vivo efficacy to degrade theaccumulated globotriaosylceramide in target organs of Fabrymice compared to an unmodified version. [BMB Reports 2013;46(3: 157-162

  14. Oximes: Inhibitors of Human Recombinant Acetylcholinesterase. A Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepsova, Vendula; Karasova, Jana Zdarova; Korabecny, Jan; Dolezal, Rafael; Zemek, Filip; Bennion, Brian J.; Kuca, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) reactivators were developed for the treatment of organophosphate intoxication. Standard care involves the use of anticonvulsants (e.g., diazepam), parasympatolytics (e.g., atropine) and oximes that restore AChE activity. However, oximes also bind to the active site of AChE, simultaneously acting as reversible inhibitors. The goal of the present study is to determine how oxime structure influences the inhibition of human recombinant AChE (hrAChE). Therefore, 24 structurally different oximes were tested and the results compared to the previous eel AChE (EeAChE) experiments. Structural factors that were tested included the number of pyridinium rings, the length and structural features of the linker, and the number and position of the oxime group on the pyridinium ring. PMID:23959117

  15. Prolonged administration of recombinant human erythropoietin increases submaximal performance more than maximal aerobic capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, J J; Rentsch, R L; Robach, P

    2007-01-01

    The effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) treatment on aerobic power (VO2max) are well documented, but little is known about the effects of rHuEpo on submaximal exercise performance. The present study investigated the effect on performance (ergometer cycling, 20-30 min at 80......HuEpo treatment VO2max increased (PVO2max) was increased by 54.0 and 54.3% (P... week 11), TTE was decreased by 26.8% as compared to pre rHuEpo administration. In conclusion, in healthy non-athlete subjects rHuEpo administration prolongs submaximal exercise performance by about 54% independently of the approximately 12% increase in VO2max....

  16. Application effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor derivative Eye drops in treatment of dry eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paerzhati·Tuerdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the application effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor derivative eye drops(Jinyinshuin treatment of dry eye.METHODS:Sixty cases(87 eyesof dry eye patients were randomly divided into control group and observation group, 42 eyes and 45 eyes respectively. The control group received Chondroitin sulfate eye drops treatment, and the observation group were used for treatment of Jinyinshu. The changes of clinical efficacy, correlation index(symptom score, BUT, S I t, FLbefore and after treatment, quality of life after treatment and the incidence of adverse reactions were compared.RESULTS: In the control group, the total clinical effective rate was 71%, which was significantly lower than that in the observation group(91%, the difference was statistically significant(PPPPP>0.05.CONCLUSION: Jinyinshu is significantly effective in the treatment of dry eye, and its clinical efficacy is better than chondroitin sulfate.

  17. Recombinant human erythropoietin increases survival and reduces neuronal apoptosis in a murine model of cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiese, Lothar; Hempel, Casper; Penkowa, Milena

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM) is an acute encephalopathy with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines, sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes and localized ischaemia. In children CM induces cognitive impairment in about 10% of the survivors. Erythropoietin (Epo) has - besides of its well known...... with recombinant human Epo (rhEpo; 50-5000 U/kg/OD, i.p.) at different time points. The effect on survival was measured. Brain pathology was investigated by TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP)-digoxigenin nick end labelling), as a marker of apoptosis. Gene...... expression in brain tissue was measured by real time PCR. RESULTS: Treatment with rhEpo increased survival in mice with CM in a dose- and time-dependent manner and reduced apoptotic cell death of neurons as well as the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the brain. This neuroprotective effect...

  18. PRELIMINARY MODELING OF AN INDUSTRIAL RECOMBINANT HUMAN ERYTHROPOIETIN PURIFICATION PROCESS BY ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. R. Garcel1

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn the present study a preliminary neural network modelling to improve our understanding of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin purification process in a plant was explored. A three layer feed-forward back propagation neural network was constructed for predicting the efficiency of the purification section comprising four chromatographic steps as a function of eleven operational variables. The neural network model performed very well in the training and validation phases. Using the connection weight method the predictor variables were ranked based on their estimated explanatory importance in the neural network and five input variables were found to be predominant over the others. These results provided useful information showing that the first chromatographic step and the third chromatographic step are decisive to achieve high efficiencies in the purification section, thus enriching the control strategy of the plant.

  19. Early postnatal treatment of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with recombinant human FSH and LH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, Katharina M; Schmidt, Ida M; Toppari, Jorma

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism may be diagnosed shortly after birth because of micropenis and cryptorchidism, combined with subnormal LH and FSH concentrations during the postnatal period. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether treating these patients with gonadotropins...... postnatally, to mimic the physiological development, would improve testicular growth and fertility potential later in life. DESIGN: Our patient presented with micropenis. Serum hormone concentrations were measured monthly after delivery: LH and testosterone were undetectable, and FSH and inhibin B were below...... the normal range (0.05-0.17 IU/l and 79-112 pg/ml respectively). METHODS: From 7.9 to 13.7 months of age, the patient was treated with recombinant human LH and FSH in doses of 20 and 21.3 IU s.c. twice weekly respectively. RESULTS: During treatment concentrations of LH, FSH, inhibin B and estradiol increased...

  20. Annulated heterocyclic bioisosteres of norarecoline. Synthesis and molecular pharmacology at five recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R

    1995-01-01

    = 0.011 microM), and 4d (IC50 = 0.0008 microM). Pharmacological effects (EC50 or Ki values) and intrinsic activities (per cent of maximal carbachol responses) were determined using five recombinant human mAChRs (m1-m5) and the functional assay, receptor selection and amplification technology (R......]QNB (brain) and [3H]Oxo-M (brain) binding data, were shown to be predictive of pharmacologically determined intrinsic activities at m1-m5, the same rank order of intrinsic activity being observed at all five mAChRs (4a > 4d > 4b > 4c). It is concluded that within this class of high-affinity mAChR (m1-m5...

  1. Homologous recombination and human health: the roles of BRCA1, BRCA2, and associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Rohit; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Weiran; Jasin, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells, the defining step of which is homologous strand exchange directed by the RAD51 protein. The physiological importance of HR is underscored by the observation of genomic instability in HR-deficient cells and, importantly, the association of cancer predisposition and developmental defects with mutations in HR genes. The tumor suppressors BRCA1 and BRCA2, key players at different stages of HR, are frequently mutated in familial breast and ovarian cancers. Other HR proteins, including PALB2 and RAD51 paralogs, have also been identified as tumor suppressors. This review summarizes recent findings on BRCA1, BRCA2, and associated proteins involved in human disease with an emphasis on their molecular roles and interactions. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone for Osteoporosis: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Hayden F; Moyer, Rebecca F; Yacoub, Daniel; Coughlin, Dexter; Birmingham, Trevor B

    2017-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of recombinant human growth hormone (GH) on bone mineral density (BMD) in persons age 50 and older, with normal pituitary function, with or at risk for developing osteoporosis. We systematically reviewed randomized clinical trials (RCTs), searching six databases, and conducted meta-analyses to examine GH effects on BMD of the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Data for fracture incidence, bone metabolism biomarkers, and adverse events were also extracted and analysed. Thirteen RCTs met the eligibility criteria. Pooled effect sizes suggested no significant GH effect on BMD. Pooled effect sizes were largest, but nonsignificant, when compared to placebo. GH had a significant effect on several bone metabolism biomarkers. A significantly higher rate of adverse events was observed in the GH groups. Meta-analysis of RCTs suggests that GH treatment for persons with or at risk for developing osteoporosis results in very small, nonsignificant increases in BMD.

  3. Mass spectrometric analysis of innovator, counterfeit, and follow-on recombinant human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haitao; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Karger, Barry L; Hancock, William S

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a detailed characterization of recombinant human growth hormone that included the identification of the entire sequence with disulfide linkages as well as subtle modifications by a sensitive liquid chromatography coupled online with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach using the accurate peptide mass (FTICR MS) and sequence assignment (MS/MS measurement). The extent of oxidation, deamidation, and chain cleavages were measured by the ratio of peak areas of the nonmodified peptide vs. the sum of peak area of the nonmodified and modified peptides in the same LC-MS analysis. The subtle but distinct differences were found in the recombinant human growth from the three manufacturers (the follow-on, counterfeit, and the original innovator products). In relative comparison, the follow-on product had the highest degree of oxidation at methionine residues, followed by the counterfeit product, and the original innovator product had the least amount of oxidation at all three sites with the similar oxidation order. In cases, the oxidation order was Met14 > Met125 > Met170. In contrast, the follow-on had the least amount of deamidation at aspargine (Asn149), and the counterfeit had the highest degree of deamidation at this site. For the chain cleavage, the follow-on product had the highest cleavage occurring at T 10 peptide (between Asn99 and Ser100), the counterfeit had the highest cleavage on T4 peptide, (between Glu30 and Phe31), and the original innovator product with the least amount of cleavages on both sites. These subtle but distinct differences are likely because of nonidentical manufacturing, formulation procedures, and storage conditions.

  4. Evaluation of three recombinant Leishmania infantum antigens in human and canine visceral leishmaniasis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Aliani Moura; Faria, Angélica Rosa; Rodrigues, Fernandes Tenório Gomes; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto; Magalhães, Rubens Daniel Miserani; Cunha, João Luís Reis; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; de Andrade, Hélida Monteiro

    2014-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a neglected disease and is fatal if untreated. Dogs serve as reservoirs for Leishmania infantum (syn. L. chagasi) due to their susceptibility to infection and high skin parasitism. Therefore, VL control in Brazil involves the elimination of seropositive dogs, among other actions. However, the most frequently used serological tests have limitations regarding sensitivity and specificity. In this study, we have selected three Leishmania antigens (C1, C8 and C9) and have produced them as recombinant proteins using pET-28a-TEV vector and Escherichia coli BL-21 as expression system. When tested in ELISA with human samples, the C9 antigen was the one showing the most promising results, with 68% sensitivity and 78% specificity. When testing canine samples, the C1, C8 and C9 antigens showed a sensitivity range from 70% to 80% and specificity range from 60% to 90%. The C1 antigen presented higher sensitivity (80%) and the C8 antigen presented higher specificity (90%). Due to it, we decided to mix and test C1 and C8 antigens together, resulting in the C18 antigen. The mix also yielded high percentages of detected symptomatic and asymptomatic dogs however it did not improve the performance of the diagnostic. Comparison of our tests with the tests recommended by the Brazilian Ministry of Health revealed that our antigens' sensitivities and the percentage of detected asymptomatic dogs were much higher. Our results suggest that the C1, C8, C18 and C9 recombinant proteins are good antigens to diagnose canine visceral leishmaniasis and could potentially be used in screening tests. To diagnose human visceral leishmaniasis, the C9 antigen presented reasonable results, but more optimization must be performed for this antigen to provide better performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Automated production of recombinant human proteins as resource for proteome research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poustka Annemarie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An arbitrary set of 96 human proteins was selected and tested to set-up a fully automated protein production strategy, covering all steps from DNA preparation to protein purification and analysis. The target proteins are encoded by functionally uncharacterized open reading frames (ORF identified by the German cDNA consortium. Fusion proteins were produced in E. coli with four different fusion tags and tested in five different purification strategies depending on the respective fusion tag. The automated strategy relies on standard liquid handling and clone picking equipment. Results A robust automated strategy for the production of recombinant human proteins in E. coli was established based on a set of four different protein expression vectors resulting in NusA/His, MBP/His, GST and His-tagged proteins. The yield of soluble fusion protein was correlated with the induction temperature and the respective fusion tag. NusA/His and MBP/His fusion proteins are best expressed at low temperature (25°C, whereas the yield of soluble GST fusion proteins was higher when protein expression was induced at elevated temperature. In contrast, the induction of soluble His-tagged fusion proteins was independent of the temperature. Amylose was not found useful for affinity-purification of MBP/His fusion proteins in a high-throughput setting, and metal chelating chromatography is recommended instead. Conclusion Soluble fusion proteins can be produced in E. coli in sufficient qualities and μg/ml culture quantities for downstream applications like microarray-based assays, and studies on protein-protein interactions employing a fully automated protein expression and purification strategy. Future applications might include the optimization of experimental conditions for the large-scale production of soluble recombinant proteins from libraries of open reading frames.

  6. Functional selectivity of G-protein-coupled receptors: from recombinant systems to native human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Roland

    2013-10-01

    In the mid 1990s, it was assumed that a two-state model, postulating an inactive (R) state and an active (R*) state provides the molecular basis for GPCR activation. However, it became clear that this model could not accommodate many experimental observations. Accordingly, the two-state model was superseded by a multi-state model according to which any given ligand stabilizes a unique receptor conformation with distinct capabilities of activating down-stream G-proteins and β-arrestin. Much of this research was conducted with the β2-adrenoceptor in recombinant systems. At the molecular level, there is now no doubt anymore that ligand-specific receptor conformations, also referred to as functional selectivity, exist. This concept holds great potential for drug discovery in terms of developing drugs with higher selectivity for specific cells and/or cell functions and fewer side effects. A major challenge is the analysis for functional selectivity in native cells. Here, I discuss our current knowledge on functional selectivity of three representative GPCRs, the β2-adrenoceptor and the histamine H2- and H4-receptors, in recombinant systems and native human cells. Studies with human neutrophils and eosinophils support the concept of functional selectivity. A major strategy for the analysis of functional selectivity in native cells is to generate complete concentration/response curves with a large set of structurally diverse ligands for multiple parameters. Next, correlations of potencies and efficacies are analyzed, and deviations of the correlations from linearity are indicative for functional selectivity. Additionally, pharmacological inhibitors are used to dissect cell functions from each other. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Human recombinant resistin protein displays a tendency to aggregate by forming intermolecular disulfide linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruna, Battu; Ghosh, Sudip; Singh, Anil K; Mande, Shekhar C; Srinivas, V; Chauhan, Radha; Ehtesham, Nasreen Z

    2003-09-16

    Resistin, a small cysteine rich protein secreted by adipocytes, has been proposed to be a link between obesity and type II diabetes by modulating the insulin signaling pathway and thus inducing insulin resistance. Resistin protein, with 11 cysteine residues, was not significantly homologous at the amino acid level to any other known cysteine rich proteins. Resistin cDNA derived from human subcutaneous adipose tissue was expressed in Escherichia coli as an N-terminal six-His-tag fusion protein. The overexpressed recombinant resistin was purified to homogeneity from inclusion bodies, after solubilization in 8 M urea, using a metal affinity column. While MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis of the purified protein generated a single peak corresponding to the estimated size of 11.3 kDa, the protein exhibited a concentration-dependent oligomerization which is evident from size exclusion chromatography. The oligomeric structure was SDS-insensitive but beta-mercaptoethanol-sensitive, pointing to the importance of disulfide linkages in resistin oligomerization. Estimation of free cysteine residues using the NBD-Cl assay revealed a concentration- and time-dependent increase in the extent of formation of disulfide linkages. The presence of intermolecular disulfide bond(s), crucial in maintaining the global conformation of resistin, was further evident from fluorescence emission spectra. Circular dichroism spectra revealed that recombinant resistin has a tendency to reversibly convert from alpha-helical to beta-sheet structure as a direct function of protein concentration. Our novel observations on the biophysical and biochemical features of human resistin, particularly those shared with prion proteins, may have a bearing on its likely physiological function.

  8. Pro-inflammatory macrophages increase in skeletal muscle of high fat-fed mice and correlate with metabolic risk markers in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Lisbeth N; Costford, Sheila R; Lee, Yun S; Jensen, Thomas E; Bilan, Philip J; Oberbach, Andreas; Blüher, Matthias; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Sams, Anette; Klip, Amira

    2014-03-01

    In obesity, immune cells infiltrate adipose tissue. Skeletal muscle is the major tissue of insulin-dependent glucose disposal, and indices of muscle inflammation arise during obesity, but whether and which immune cells increase in muscle remain unclear. Immune cell presence in quadriceps muscle of wild type mice fed high-fat diet (HFD) was studied for 3 days to 10 weeks, in CCL2-KO mice fed HFD for 1 week, and in human muscle. Leukocyte presence was assessed by gene expression of lineage markers, cyto/chemokines and receptors; immunohistochemistry; and flow cytometry. After 1 week HFD, concomitantly with glucose intolerance, muscle gene expression of Ly6b, Emr1 (F4/80), Tnf, Ccl2, and Ccr2 rose, as did pro- and anti-inflammatory markers Itgax (CD11c) and Mgl2. CD11c+ proinflammatory macrophages in muscle increased by 76%. After 10 weeks HFD, macrophages in muscl