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Sample records for human protein tyrosine

  1. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin, E-mail: binli@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Eyer, Peter, E-mail: peter.eyer@lrz.uni-muenchen.de [Walther-Straub-Institut Für Pharmakologie und Toxikologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, 80336 München (Germany); Eddleston, Michael, E-mail: M.Eddleston@ed.ac.uk [Clinical Pharmacology Unit, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Jiang, Wei, E-mail: wjiang@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Schopfer, Lawrence M., E-mail: lmschopf@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Lockridge, Oksana, E-mail: olockrid@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos-poisoned patients have adducts on protein tyrosine. • Diethoxyphosphate-tyrosine does not lose an alkyl group. • Proteins in addition to AChE and BChE are modified by organophosphates.

  2. Evolutionary conservation of mammalian sperm proteins associates with overall, not tyrosine, phosphorylation in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Julia; Ramljak, Sanja; Asif, Abdul R; Schaffrath, Michael; Zischler, Hans; Herlyn, Holger

    2013-12-06

    We investigated possible associations between sequence evolution of mammalian sperm proteins and their phosphorylation status in humans. As a reference, spermatozoa from three normozoospermic men were analyzed combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry. We identified 99 sperm proteins (thereof 42 newly described) and determined the phosphorylation status for most of them. Sequence evolution was studied across six mammalian species using nonsynonymous/synonymous rate ratios (dN/dS) and amino acid distances. Site-specific purifying selection was assessed employing average ratios of evolutionary rates at phosphorylated versus nonphosphorylated amino acids (α). According to our data, mammalian sperm proteins do not show statistically significant sequence conservation difference, no matter if the human ortholog is a phosphoprotein with or without tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation. In contrast, overall phosphorylation of human sperm proteins, i.e., phosphorylation at serine (S), threonine (T), and/or Y residues, associates with above-average conservation of sequences. Complementary investigations suggest that numerous protein-protein interactants constrain sequence evolution of sperm phosphoproteins. Although our findings reject a special relevance of Y phosphorylation for sperm functioning, they still indicate that overall phosphorylation substantially contributes to proper functioning of sperm proteins. Hence, phosphorylated sperm proteins might be considered as prime candidates for diagnosis and treatment of reduced male fertility.

  3. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    enzymes that are unique in exploiting the ATP/GTP-binding Walker motif to catalyze phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues. Characterized for the first time only a decade ago, BY-kinases have now come to the fore. Important regulatory roles have been linked with these enzymes, via their involvement......Bacteria and Eukarya share essentially the same family of protein-serine/threonine kinases, also known as the Hanks-type kinases. However, when it comes to protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, bacteria seem to have gone their own way. Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are bacterial...... in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by tyrosine...

  4. The role of small adaptor proteins in the control of oncogenic signaling driven by tyrosine kinases in human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Cécile; Chevalier, Clément; Roche, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine (Tyr) residues has evolved as an important mechanism to coordinate cell communication in multicellular organisms. The importance of this process has been revealed by the discovery of the prominent oncogenic properties of tyrosine kinases (TK) upon deregulation of their physiological activities, often due to protein overexpression and/or somatic mutation. Recent reports suggest that TK oncogenic signaling is also under the control of small adaptor proteins. These cytosolic proteins lack intrinsic catalytic activity and signal by linking two functional members of a catalytic pathway. While most adaptors display positive regulatory functions, a small group of this family exerts negative regulatory functions by targeting several components of the TK signaling cascade. Here, we review how these less studied adaptor proteins negatively control TK activities and how their loss of function induces abnormal TK signaling, promoting tumor formation. We also discuss the therapeutic consequences of this novel regulatory mechanism in human oncology. PMID:26788993

  5. The role of small adaptor proteins in the control of oncogenic signalingr driven by tyrosine kinases in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Cécile; Chevalier, Clément; Roche, Serge

    2016-03-08

    Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine (Tyr) residues has evolved as an important mechanism to coordinate cell communication in multicellular organisms. The importance of this process has been revealed by the discovery of the prominent oncogenic properties of tyrosine kinases (TK) upon deregulation of their physiological activities, often due to protein overexpression and/or somatic mutation. Recent reports suggest that TK oncogenic signaling is also under the control of small adaptor proteins. These cytosolic proteins lack intrinsic catalytic activity and signal by linking two functional members of a catalytic pathway. While most adaptors display positive regulatory functions, a small group of this family exerts negative regulatory functions by targeting several components of the TK signaling cascade. Here, we review how these less studied adaptor proteins negatively control TK activities and how their loss of function induces abnormal TK signaling, promoting tumor formation. We also discuss the therapeutic consequences of this novel regulatory mechanism in human oncology.

  6. Protein tyrosine phosphatase variants in human hereditary disorders and disease susceptibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2013-10-01

    Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins is a key regulatory mechanism to steer normal development and physiological functioning of multicellular organisms. Phosphotyrosine dephosphorylation is exerted by members of the super-family of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) enzymes and many play such essential roles that a wide variety of hereditary disorders and disease susceptibilities in man are caused by PTP alleles. More than two decades of PTP research has resulted in a collection of PTP genetic variants with corresponding consequences at the molecular, cellular and physiological level. Here we present a comprehensive overview of these PTP gene variants that have been linked to disease states in man. Although the findings have direct bearing for disease diagnostics and for research on disease etiology, more work is necessary to translate this into therapies that alleviate the burden of these hereditary disorders and disease susceptibilities in man. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein tyrosine phosphatases as potential therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rong-Jun; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2014-10-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a key regulatory process in virtually all aspects of cellular functions. Dysregulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a major cause of human diseases, such as cancers, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, and neurological diseases. Indeed, protein tyrosine phosphorylation-mediated signaling events offer ample therapeutic targets, and drug discovery efforts to date have brought over two dozen kinase inhibitors to the clinic. Accordingly, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are considered next-generation drug targets. For instance, PTP1B is a well-known targets of type 2 diabetes and obesity, and recent studies indicate that it is also a promising target for breast cancer. SHP2 is a bona-fide oncoprotein, mutations of which cause juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and solid tumors. In addition, LYP is strongly associated with type 1 diabetes and many other autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes recent findings on several highly recognized PTP family drug targets, including PTP1B, Src homology phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2(SHP2), lymphoid-specific tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), CD45, Fas associated phosphatase-1 (FAP-1), striatal enriched tyrosine phosphatases (STEP), mitogen-activated protein kinase/dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (MKP-1), phosphatases of regenerating liver-1 (PRL), low molecular weight PTPs (LMWPTP), and CDC25. Given that there are over 100 family members, we hope this review will serve as a road map for innovative drug discovery targeting PTPs.

  8. Protein tyrosine phosphatases in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, W.J.; Elson, A.; Harroch, S.; Pulido, R.; Stoker, A.; den Hertog, J.

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) represent a super-family of enzymes that play essential roles in normal development and physiology. In this review, we will discuss the PTPs that have a causative role in hereditary diseases in humans. In addition, recent progress in the development and analysis

  9. Studying Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatases in Zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hale, Alexander James; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a large family of signal transduction regulators that have an essential role in normal development and physiology. Aberrant activation or inactivation of PTPs is at the basis of many human diseases. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is being used extensively to

  10. A novel role of protein tyrosine kinase2 in mediating chloride secretion in human airway epithelial cells.

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    Lihua Liang

    Full Text Available Ca(2+ activated Cl(- channels (CaCC are up-regulated in cystic fibrosis (CF airway surface epithelia. The presence and functional properties of CaCC make it a possible therapeutic target to compensate for the deficiency of Cl(- secretion in CF epithelia. CaCC is activated by an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+, which not only activates epithelial CaCCs, but also inhibits epithelial Na(+ hyperabsorption, which may also be beneficial in CF. Our previous study has shown that spiperone, a known antipsychotic drug, activates CaCCs and stimulates Cl(- secretion in polarized human non-CF and CF airway epithelial cell monolayers in vitro, and in Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR knockout mice in vivo. Spiperone activates CaCC not by acting in its well-known role as an antagonist of either 5-HT2 or D2 receptors, but through a protein tyrosine kinase-coupled phospholipase C-dependent pathway. Moreover, spiperone independently activates CFTR through a novel mechanism. Herein, we performed a mass spectrometry analysis and identified the signaling molecule that mediates the spiperone effect in activating chloride secretion through CaCC and CFTR. Proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2 is a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, which belongs to the focal adhesion kinase family. The inhibition of PYK2 notably reduced the ability of spiperone to increase intracellular Ca(2+ and Cl(- secretion. In conclusion, we have identified the tyrosine kinase, PYK2, as the modulator, which plays a crucial role in the activation of CaCC and CFTR by spiperone. The identification of this novel role of PYK2 reveals a new signaling pathway in human airway epithelial cells.

  11. Tyrosine phosphorylation in human lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haralambieva, E; Jones, M.; Roncador, GM; Cerroni, L; Lamant, L; Ott, G; Rosenwald, A; Sherman, C; Thorner, P; Kusec, R; Wood, KM; Campo, E; Falini, B; Ramsay, A; Marafioti, T; Stein, H; Kluin, PM; Pulford, K; Mason, DY

    2002-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that the high level of protein tyrosine phosphorylation present in lymphomas containing an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) can be demonstrated in routinely processed paraffin tissue sections using immunolabelling techniques. In the present study we investigated

  12. MHC-I-induced apoptosis in human B-lymphoma cells is dependent on protein tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Bregenholt, S; Johansen, B

    1999-01-01

    B lymphoma cells, is dependent on protein tyrosine kinases and the phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI-3) kinase. Functional studies showed that MHC-I crosslinking induced almost complete inhibition of the spontaneous proliferation of the B lymphoma cells as early as 6 h post-crosslinking and apoptosis 24 h...... post-crosslinking. Preincubation with either protein tyrosine kinase or protein serine/threonine kinase inhibitors reduced the MHC-I-induced apoptosis to background levels, whereas inhibition of PI-3 kinase had no effect. These data demonstrate a pivotal role for protein tyrosine and serine....../threonine kinases in MHC-I-mediated apoptosis in human B-cells and suggest the presence of several MHC-I signaling pathways leading to diverse effects in these cells....

  13. Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Movement of the Wpd Flexible Loop of Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTP1B in Complex with Halide Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Aline; Saenz-Méndez, Patricia; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Podjarny, Alberto D.; Ventura, Oscar N.

    2012-11-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a post-translational modification mechanism, crucial for the regulation of nearly all aspects of cell life. This dynamic, reversible process is regulated by the balanced opposing activity of protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases. In particular, the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is implicated in the regulation of the insulin-receptor activity, leptin-stimulated signal transduction pathways and other clinically relevant metabolic routes, and it has been found overexpressed or overregulated in human breasts, colon and ovary cancers. The WPD loop of the enzyme presents an inherent flexibility, and it plays a fundamental role in the enzymatic catalysis, turning it into a potential target in the design of new efficient PTP1B inhibitors. In order to determine the interactions that control the spatial conformation adopted by the WPD loop, complexes between the enzyme and halide ions (Br- and I- in particular) were crystallized and their crystallographic structure determined, and the collective movements of the aforementioned complexes were studied through Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. Both studies yielded concordant results, indicating the existence of a relationship between the identity of the ion present in the complex and the strength of the interactions it establishes with the surrounding protein residues.

  14. Chemical Inhibition of Bacterial Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Suppresses Capsule Production

    OpenAIRE

    Standish, Alistair J.; Salim, Angela A; Hua Zhang; Capon, Robert J.; Renato Morona

    2012-01-01

    Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to dat...

  15. A rapid lateral flow immunoassay for the detection of tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 autoantibodies in human serum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Kikkas

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D results from the destruction of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells and is strongly associated with the presence of islet autoantibodies. Autoantibodies to tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 (IA-2As are considered to be highly predictive markers of T1D. We developed a novel lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA based on a bridging format for the rapid detection of IA-2As in human serum samples. In this assay, one site of the IA-2As is bound to HA-tagged-IA-2, which is subsequently captured on the anti-HA-Tag antibody-coated test line on the strip. The other site of the IA-2As is bound to biotinylated IA-2, allowing the complex to be visualized using colloidal gold nanoparticle-conjugated streptavidin. For this study, 35 serum samples from T1D patients and 44 control sera from non-diabetic individuals were analyzed with our novel assay and the results were correlated with two IA-2A ELISAs. Among the 35 serum samples from T1D patients, the IA-2A LFIA, the in-house IA-2A ELISA and the commercial IA-2A ELISA identified as positive 21, 29 and 30 IA-2A-positive sera, respectively. The major advantages of the IA-2A LFIA are its rapidity and simplicity.

  16. A rapid lateral flow immunoassay for the detection of tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 autoantibodies in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkas, Ingrid; Mallone, Roberto; Larger, Etienne; Volland, Hervé; Morel, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from the destruction of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells and is strongly associated with the presence of islet autoantibodies. Autoantibodies to tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 (IA-2As) are considered to be highly predictive markers of T1D. We developed a novel lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) based on a bridging format for the rapid detection of IA-2As in human serum samples. In this assay, one site of the IA-2As is bound to HA-tagged-IA-2, which is subsequently captured on the anti-HA-Tag antibody-coated test line on the strip. The other site of the IA-2As is bound to biotinylated IA-2, allowing the complex to be visualized using colloidal gold nanoparticle-conjugated streptavidin. For this study, 35 serum samples from T1D patients and 44 control sera from non-diabetic individuals were analyzed with our novel assay and the results were correlated with two IA-2A ELISAs. Among the 35 serum samples from T1D patients, the IA-2A LFIA, the in-house IA-2A ELISA and the commercial IA-2A ELISA identified as positive 21, 29 and 30 IA-2A-positive sera, respectively. The major advantages of the IA-2A LFIA are its rapidity and simplicity.

  17. Identification of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins associated with metastasis and functional analysis of FER in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

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    Wang Yan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Aberrant activity of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins is commonly associated with HCC metastasis. Cell signaling events driven by these proteins are implicated in numerous processes that alter cancer cell behavior. Exploring the activities and signaling pathways of these proteins in HCC metastasis may help in identifying new candidate molecules for HCC-targeted therapy. Methods- Hep3B (a nonmetastatic HCC cell line and MHCC97H (a highly metastatic HCC cell line were used in this study, and the tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins expressed in these cell lines were profiled by a phosphoproteomics technique based on LC-MS/MS. Protein-protein interaction and functional clustering analyses were performed to determine the activities of the identified proteins and the signaling pathways closely related to HCC metastasis. Results- In both cell lines, a total of 247 phosphotyrosine (pTyr proteins containing 281 pTyr sites were identified without any stimulation. The involvement of almost 30% of these in liver or liver cancer has not been reported previously. Biological process clustering analysis indicated that pTyr proteins involved in cell motility, migration, protein autophosphorylation, cell-cell communication, and antiapoptosis functions were overexpressed during metastasis. Pathway clustering analysis revealed that signaling pathways such as those involved in EGFR signaling, cytokine- and chemokine-mediated signal transduction, and the PI3K and JAK-STAT cascades were significantly activated during HCC metastasis. Moreover, noncanonical regulation of the JNK cascade might also provide new targets for HCC metastasis. After comparing the pTyr proteins that were differentially expressed during HCC cell metastasis, we selected FER, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, and validated its role in terms of both expression and function. The data confirmed that FER might play a critical role in the invasion and metastasis of HCC. Conclusion- The

  18. Expression of the vitamin K-dependent proteins GAS6 and protein S and the TAM receptor tyrosine kinases in human atherosclerotic carotid plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, B; Muñoz, X; Recarte-Pelz, P; García, N; Luque, A; Krupinski, J; Sala, N; García de Frutos, P

    2011-05-01

    The GAS6/ProS-TAM system is composed of two vitamin K-dependent ligands (GAS6 and protein S) and their three protein tyrosine kinase receptors TYRO3, AXL and MERTK, known as the TAM receptors. The system plays a prominent role in conditions of injury, inflammation and repair. In murine models of atherosclerotic plaque formation, mutations in its components affect atherosclerosis severity. Here we used Taqman low-density arrays and immunoblotting to study mRNA and protein expression of GAS6, ProS and the TAM receptors in human carotid arteries with different degrees of atherosclerosis. The results show a clear down-regulation of the expression of AXL in atheroma plaques with respect to normal carotids that is matched by decreased abundance of AXL in protein extracts detected by immunoblotting. A similar decrease was observed in PROS1 mRNA expression in atherosclerotic carotids compared to the normal ones, but in this case protein S (ProS) was clearly increased in protein extracts of carotid arteries with increasing grade of atherosclerosis, suggesting that ProS is carried into the plaque. MERTK was also increased in atherosclerotic carotid arteries with respect to the normal ones, suggesting that the ProS-MERTK axis is functional in advanced human atherosclerotic plaques. MERTK was expressed in macrophages, frequently in association with ProS, while ProS was abundant also in the necrotic core. Our data suggest that the ProS-MERTK ligand-receptor pair was active in advanced stages of atherosclerosis, while AXL signalling is probably down-regulated.

  19. Tyrosine-Nitrated Proteins: Proteomic and Bioanalytical Aspects.

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    Batthyány, Carlos; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Mastrogiovanni, Mauricio; Lima, Analía; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael

    2017-03-01

    "Nitroproteomic" is under active development, as 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins constitutes a footprint left by the reactions of nitric oxide-derived oxidants that are usually associated to oxidative stress conditions. Moreover, protein tyrosine nitration can cause structural and functional changes, which may be of pathophysiological relevance for human disease conditions. Biological protein tyrosine nitration is a free radical process involving the intermediacy of tyrosyl radicals; in spite of being a nonenzymatic process, nitration is selectively directed toward a limited subset of tyrosine residues. Precise identification and quantitation of 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins has represented a "tour de force" for researchers. Recent Advances: A small number of proteins are preferential targets of nitration (usually less than 100 proteins per proteome), contrasting with the large number of proteins modified by other post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, acetylation, and, notably, S-nitrosation. Proteomic approaches have revealed key features of tyrosine nitration both in vivo and in vitro, including selectivity, site specificity, and effects in protein structure and function. Identification of 3-nitrotyrosine-containing proteins and mapping nitrated residues is challenging, due to low abundance of this oxidative modification in biological samples and its unfriendly behavior in mass spectrometry (MS)-based technologies, that is, MALDI, electrospray ionization, and collision-induced dissociation. The use of (i) classical two-dimensional electrophoresis with immunochemical detection of nitrated proteins followed by protein ID by regular MS/MS in combination with (ii) immuno-enrichment of tyrosine-nitrated peptides and (iii) identification of nitrated peptides by a MIDAS™ experiment is arising as a potent methodology to unambiguously map and quantitate tyrosine-nitrated proteins in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 313-328.

  20. Enzyme kinetic characterization of protein tyrosine phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Branner, S.; Møller, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play a central role in cellular signaling processes, resulting in an increased interest in modulating the activities of PTPs. We therefore decided to undertake a detailed enzyme kinetic evaluation of various transmembrane and cytosolic PTPs (PTPalpha, PTPbeta...

  1. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Petranovic, Dina; Bottini, N.

    2005-01-01

    phosphorylation, indicating that this post-translational modifi cation could regulate physiological processes ranging from stress response and exopolysaccharide synthesis to DNA metabolism. Some interesting work in this fi eld was done in Bacillus subtilis , and we here present the current state of knowledge...... on protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in this gram-positive model organism. With its two kinases, two kinase modulators, three phosphatases and at least four different tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates, B. subtilis is the bacterium with the highest number of presently known participants in the global network...

  2. Downregulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-BL represses adipogenesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glondu-Lassis, M.; Dromard, M.; Chavey, C.; Puech, C.; Fajas, L.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Freiss, G.

    2009-01-01

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling pathway is a major regulator of adipose tissue growth and differentiation. We recently demonstrated that human protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) L1, a large cytoplasmic phosphatase also known as PTP-BAS/PTPN13/PTP-1E, is a negative

  3. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Type I Diabetes Patients Define Multiple Epitopes in the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-Like IA-2 Antigen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolm-Litty, Verena; Berlo, Suzanne; Bonifacio, Ezio; Bearzatto, Massimo; Engel, Alfred M; Christie, Michael; Ziegler, Anette-G; Wild, Thomas; Endl, Josef

    2000-01-01

    ...‘s College School of Medicine, London, United Kingdom Protein tyrosine phosphatase-like IA-2 autoantigen is one of the major targets of humoral autoimmunity in patients with insulin-dependant diabetes mellitus (IDDM...

  4. The human cytomegalovirus UL11 protein interacts with the receptor tyrosine phosphatase CD45, resulting in functional paralysis of T cells.

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    Ildar Gabaev

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (CMV exerts diverse and complex effects on the immune system, not all of which have been attributed to viral genes. Acute CMV infection results in transient restrictions in T cell proliferative ability, which can impair the control of the virus and increase the risk of secondary infections in patients with weakened or immature immune systems. In a search for new immunomodulatory proteins, we investigated the UL11 protein, a member of the CMV RL11 family. This protein family is defined by the RL11 domain, which has homology to immunoglobulin domains and adenoviral immunomodulatory proteins. We show that pUL11 is expressed on the cell surface and induces intercellular interactions with leukocytes. This was demonstrated to be due to the interaction of pUL11 with the receptor tyrosine phosphatase CD45, identified by mass spectrometry analysis of pUL11-associated proteins. CD45 expression is sufficient to mediate the interaction with pUL11 and is required for pUL11 binding to T cells, indicating that pUL11 is a specific CD45 ligand. CD45 has a pivotal function regulating T cell signaling thresholds; in its absence, the Src family kinase Lck is inactive and signaling through the T cell receptor (TCR is therefore shut off. In the presence of pUL11, several CD45-mediated functions were inhibited. The induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple signaling proteins upon TCR stimulation was reduced and T cell proliferation was impaired. We therefore conclude that pUL11 has immunosuppressive properties, and that disruption of T cell function via inhibition of CD45 is a previously unknown immunomodulatory strategy of CMV.

  5. Biochemistry of protein tyrosine nitration in cardiovascular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluffo, Gonzalo; Radi, Rafael

    2007-07-15

    Several pathologies of the cardiovascular system are associated with an augmented production of nitric oxide and/or superoxide-derived oxidants and/or alteration in the antioxidant detoxification pathways that lead to nitroxidative stress. One important consequence of these reactive intermediates at the biochemical level is the nitration of protein tyrosines, which is performed through either of two of the relevant nitration pathways that operate in vivo, namely peroxynitrite and heme peroxidase-dependent nitration. Proteins nitrated at tyrosine residues have been detected in several compartments of the cardiovascular system. In this review a selection of nitrated proteins in plasma (fibrinogen, plasmin, Apo-1), vessel wall (Apo-B, cyclooxygenase, prostaglandin synthase, Mn-superoxide dismutase) and myocardium (myofibrillar creatine kinase, alpha-actinin, sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase) are analyzed in the context of cardiovascular disease. Nitration of tyrosine can affect protein function, which could directly link nitroxidative stress to the molecular alterations found in disease. While some proteins are inactivated by nitration (e.g. Mn-SOD) others undergo a gain-of-function (e.g. fibrinogen) that can have an ample impact on the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system. Nitrotyrosine is also emerging as a novel independent marker of cardiovascular disease. Pharmacological strategies directed towards inhibiting protein nitration will assist to shed light on the relevance of this post-translational modification to human cardiovascular pathology.

  6. The human tyrosine hydroxylase gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Mark A; Yang, Ming; Gollomp, Kandace L; Jin, Hao; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2003-04-10

    13.329 kilobases of the single copy human tyrosine hydroxylase (hTH) gene were isolated from a genomic library. The 5' flanking 11 kilobases fused to the reporter green fluorescent protein (GFP) drove high level expression in TH+ cells of the substantia nigra of embryonic and adult transgenic mice as determined by double label fluorescence microscopy. To provide a basis for future analysis of polymorphisms and structure-function studies, the previously unreported distal 10.5 kilobases of the hTH promoter were sequenced with an average coverage of 20-fold, the remainder with 4-fold coverage. Sequence features identified included four perfect matches to the bicoid binding element (BBE, consensus: BBTAATCYV) all of which exhibited specific binding by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Comparison to published sequences of mouse and rat TH promoters revealed five areas of exceptional homology shared by these species in the upstream TH promoter region -2 kb to -9 kb relative to the transcription start site. Within these conserved regions (CRs I-V), potential recognition sites for NR4A2 (Nurr1), HNF-3beta, HOXA4, and HOXA5 were shared across human, mouse, and rat TH promoters.

  7. Activation of focal adhesion kinase enhances the adhesion of Fusarium solani to human corneal epithelial cells via the tyrosine-specific protein kinase signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaojing; Wang, Ye; Zhou, Qingjun; Chen, Peng; Xu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Hao; Xie, Lixin

    2011-03-05

    To determine the role of the integrin-FAK signaling pathway triggered by the adherence of F. solani to human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). After pretreatment with/without genistein, HCECs were incubated with F. solani spores at different times (0-24 h). Cell adhesion assays were performed by optical microscopy. Changes of the ultrastructure were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The expression of F-actin and Paxillin (PAX) were detected by immunofluorescence and western blotting to detect the expression of these key proteins with/without genistein treatment. Cell adhesion assays showed that the number of adhered spores began to rise at 6 h after incubation and peaked at 8 h. SEM and TEM showed that the HCECs exhibited a marked morphological alteration induced by the attachment and entry of the spores. The expression of PAX increased, while the expression of F-actin decreased by stimulation with F. solani. The interaction of F. solani with HCECs causes actin rearrangement in HCECs. Genistein strongly inhibited FAK phosphorylation and the activation of the downstream protein (PAX). F. solani-induced enhancement of cell adhesion ability was inhibited along with the inhibition of FAK phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the integrin-FAK signaling pathway is involved in the control of F. solani adhesion to HCECs and that the activation of focal adhesion kinase enhances the adhesion of human corneal epithelial cells to F. solani via the tyrosine-specific protein kinase signaling pathway.

  8. Marine sponge polyketide inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R H; Slate, D L; Moretti, R; Alvi, K A; Crews, P

    1992-04-30

    The marine polyketide natural product, halenaquinone, was shown to be an irreversible inhibitor of pp60v-src, the oncogenic protein tyrosine kinase encoded by the Rous sarcoma virus. This compound had an IC50 of approximately 1.5 microM against pp60v-src and also inhibited the ligand-stimulated kinase activity of the human epidermal growth factor receptor with an IC50 of approximately 19 microM. Halenaquinone blocked the proliferation of a number of cultured cell lines, including several transformed by oncogenic protein tyrosine kinases. Halenaquinol, xestoquinone, halenaquinol sulfate, and several simple synthetic quinone analogs were also shown to inhibit pp60v-src.

  9. Human NACHT, LRR, and PYD domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activity is regulated by and potentially targetable through Bruton tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Pichulik, Tica; Wolz, Olaf-Oliver; Dang, Truong-Minh; Stutz, Andrea; Dillen, Carly; Delmiro Garcia, Magno; Kraus, Helene; Dickhöfer, Sabine; Daiber, Ellen; Münzenmayer, Lisa; Wahl, Silke; Rieber, Nikolaus; Kümmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Yazdi, Amir; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Macek, Boris; Radsak, Markus; Vogel, Sebastian; Schulte, Berit; Walz, Juliane Sarah; Hartl, Dominik; Latz, Eicke; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Grimbacher, Bodo; Miller, Lloyd; Brunner, Cornelia; Wolz, Christiane; Weber, Alexander N R

    2017-10-01

    The Nod-like receptor NACHT, LRR, and PYD domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) and Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) are protagonists in innate and adaptive immunity, respectively. NLRP3 senses exogenous and endogenous insults, leading to inflammasome activation, which occurs spontaneously in patients with Muckle-Wells syndrome; BTK mutations cause the genetic immunodeficiency X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). However, to date, few proteins that regulate NLRP3 inflammasome activity in human primary immune cells have been identified, and clinically promising pharmacologic targeting strategies remain elusive. We sought to identify novel regulators of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human cells with a view to exploring interference with inflammasome activity at the level of such regulators. After proteome-wide phosphoproteomics, the identified novel regulator BTK was studied in human and murine cells by using pharmacologic and genetic BTK ablation. Here we show that BTK is a critical regulator of NLRP3 inflammasome activation: pharmacologic (using the US Food and Drug Administration-approved inhibitor ibrutinib) and genetic (in patients with XLA and Btk knockout mice) BTK ablation in primary immune cells led to reduced IL-1β processing and secretion in response to nigericin and the Staphylococcus aureus toxin leukocidin AB (LukAB). BTK affected apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) speck formation and caspase-1 cleavage and interacted with NLRP3 and ASC. S aureus infection control in vivo and IL-1β release from cells of patients with Muckle-Wells syndrome were impaired by ibrutinib. Notably, IL-1β processing and release from immune cells isolated from patients with cancer receiving ibrutinib therapy were reduced. Our data suggest that XLA might result in part from genetic inflammasome deficiency and that NLRP3 inflammasome-linked inflammation could potentially be targeted pharmacologically through BTK. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy

  10. A dimeric urea of the bisabolene sesquiterpene from the Okinawan marine sponge Axinyssa sp. inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity in Huh-7 human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdjul, Delfly B; Kanno, Syu-Ichi; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ukai, Kazuyo; Namikoshi, Michio

    2016-01-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) plays an important role as a negative regulator of the insulin and leptin signaling pathways. Therefore, this enzyme is regarded as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Our screening program for PTP1B inhibitors led to the isolation of four sesquiterpenes and sterol: N,N'-bis[(6R,7S)-7-amino-7,8-dihydro-α-bisabolen-7-yl]urea (1), (6R,7S)-7-amino-7,8-dihydro-α-bisabolene (2), (1R,6S,7S,10S)-10-isothiocyanato-4-amorphene (3), axinisothiocyanate J (4), and axinysterol (5) from the marine sponge Axinyssa sp. collected at Iriomote Island. Of these, compound 1 was the most potent inhibitor of PTP1B activity (IC50=1.9μM) without cytotoxicity at 50μM in two human cancer cell lines, hepatoma Huh-7 and bladder carcinoma EJ-1 cells. Compound 1 also moderately enhanced the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation levels of Akt in Huh-7 cells. Therefore, compound 1 has potential as a new type of anti-diabetic drug candidate possessing PTP1B inhibitory activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Tyrosine-Based Trafficking Motif of the Tegument Protein pUL71 Is Crucial for Human Cytomegalovirus Secondary Envelopment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Andrea N; Villinger, Clarissa; Becker, Stefan; Frick, Manfred; von Einem, Jens

    2018-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) tegument protein pUL71 is required for efficient secondary envelopment and accumulates at the Golgi compartment-derived viral assembly complex (vAC) during infection. Analysis of various C-terminally truncated pUL71 proteins fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) identified amino acids 23 to 34 as important determinants for its Golgi complex localization. Sequence analysis and mutational verification revealed the presence of an N-terminal tyrosine-based trafficking motif (YXXΦ) in pUL71. This led us to hypothesize a requirement of the YXXΦ motif for the function of pUL71 in infection. Mutation of both the tyrosine residue and the entire YXXΦ motif resulted in an altered distribution of mutant pUL71 at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm during infection. Both YXXΦ mutant viruses exhibited similarly decreased focal growth and reduced virus yields in supernatants. Ultrastructurally, mutant-virus-infected cells exhibited impaired secondary envelopment manifested by accumulations of capsids undergoing an envelopment process. Additionally, clusters of capsid accumulations surrounding the vAC were observed, similar to the ultrastructural phenotype of a UL71-deficient mutant. The importance of endocytosis and thus the YXXΦ motif for targeting pUL71 to the Golgi complex was further demonstrated when clathrin-mediated endocytosis was inhibited either by coexpression of the C-terminal part of cellular AP180 (AP180-C) or by treatment with methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Both conditions resulted in a plasma membrane accumulation of pUL71. Altogether, these data reveal the presence of a functional N-terminal endocytosis motif that is an important determinant for intracellular localization of pUL71 and that is furthermore required for the function of pUL71 during secondary envelopment of HCMV capsids at the vAC. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the leading cause of birth defects among congenital virus infections and can

  12. Protein Tyrosine Nitration: Selectivity, physicochemical and biological consequences, denitration and proteomics methods for the identification of tyrosine-nitrated proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abello, N.; Kerstjens, H.A.M.; Postma, D.S; Bischoff, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a post-translational modification occurring under the action of a nitrating agent. Tyrosine is modified in the 3-position of the phenolic ring through the addition of a nitro group (NO2). In the present article, we review the main nitration reactions and elucidate

  13. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Alistair J; Salim, Angela A; Zhang, Hua; Capon, Robert J; Morona, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  14. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair J Standish

    Full Text Available Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  15. Intramolecular Photogeneration of a Tyrosine Radical in a Designed Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebo, Alison G.; Quaranta, Annamaria; Herrero, Christian; Pecoraro, Vincent L.; Aukauloo, Ally

    2017-01-01

    Long-distance biological electron transfer occurs through a hopping mechanism and often involves tyrosine as a high potential intermediate, for example in the early charge separation steps during photosynthesis. Protein design allows for the development of minimal systems to study the underlying principles of complex systems. Herein, we report the development of the first ruthenium-linked designed protein for the photogeneration of a tyrosine radical by intramolecular electron transfer. PMID:29046892

  16. Promising Inhibitory Effects of Anthraquinones, Naphthopyrone, and Naphthalene Glycosides, from Cassia obtusifolia on α-Glucosidase and Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases 1B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ah Jung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to evaluate the anti-diabetic potentials of 16 anthraquinones, two naphthopyrone glycosides, and one naphthalene glycoside from Cassia obtusifolia via inhibition against the protein tyrosine phosphatases 1B (PTP1B and α-glucosidase. Among them, anthraquinones emodin and alaternin exhibited the highest inhibitory activities on PTP1B and α-glucosidase, respectively. Moreover, we examined the effects of alaternin and emodin on stimulation of glucose uptake by insulin-resistant human HepG2 cells. The results showed that alaternin and emodin significantly increased the insulin-provoked glucose uptake. In addition, our kinetic study revealed that alaternin competitively inhibited PTP1B, and showed mixed-type inhibition against α-glucosidase. In order to confirm enzyme inhibition, we predicted the 3D structure of PTP1B using Autodock 4.2 to simulate the binding of alaternin. The docking simulation results demonstrated that four residues of PTP1B (Gly183, Arg221, Ile219, Gly220 interact with three hydroxyl groups of alaternin and that the binding energy was negative (−6.30 kcal/mol, indicating that the four hydrogen bonds stabilize the open form of the enzyme and potentiate tight binding of the active site of PTP1B, resulting in more effective PTP1B inhibition. The results of the present study clearly demonstrate that C. obtusifolia and its constituents have potential anti-diabetic activity and can be used as a functional food for the treatment of diabetes and associated complications.

  17. Tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase-1 and tyrosine sulfation of chemokine receptor 4 are induced by Epstein-Barr virus encoded latent membrane protein 1 and associated with the metastatic potential of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xu

    Full Text Available The latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1, which is encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, is an important oncogenic protein that is closely related to carcinogenesis and metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC, a prevalent cancer in China. We previously reported that the expression of the functional chemokine receptor CXCR4 is associated with human NPC metastasis. In this study, we show that LMP1 induces tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4 through tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase-1 (TPST-1, an enzyme that is responsible for catalysis of tyrosine sulfation in vivo, which is likely to contribute to the highly metastatic character of NPC. LMP1 could induce tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4 and its associated cell motility and invasiveness in a NPC cell culture model. In contrast, the expression of TPST-1 small interfering RNA reversed LMP1-induced tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4. LMP1 conveys signals through the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR pathway, and EGFR-targeted siRNA inhibited the induction of TPST-1 by LMP1. We used a ChIP assay to show that EGFR could bind to the TPST-1 promoter in vivo under the control of LMP1. A reporter gene assay indicated that the activity of the TPST-1 promoter could be suppressed by deleting the binding site between EGFR and TPST-1. Finally, in human NPC tissues, the expression of TPST-1 and LMP1 was directly correlated and clinically, the expression of TPST-1 was associated with metastasis. These results suggest the up-regulation of TPST-1 and tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4 by LMP1 might be a potential mechanism contributing to NPC metastasis.

  18. Structural basis for the binding specificity of human Recepteur d'Origine Nantais (RON) receptor tyrosine kinase to macrophage-stimulating protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Kinlin L; Gorlatova, Natalia V; Eisenstein, Edward; Herzberg, Osnat

    2014-10-24

    Recepteur d'origine nantais (RON) receptor tyrosine kinase and its ligand, serum macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP), play important roles in inflammation, cell growth, migration, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition during tumor development. The binding of mature MSPαβ (disulfide-linked α- and β-chains) to RON ectodomain modulates receptor dimerization, followed by autophosphorylation of tyrosines in the cytoplasmic receptor kinase domains. Receptor recognition is mediated by binding of MSP β-chain (MSPβ) to the RON Sema. Here we report the structure of RON Sema-PSI-IPT1 (SPI1) domains in complex with MSPβ at 3.0 Å resolution. The MSPβ serine protease-like β-barrel uses the degenerate serine protease active site to recognize blades 2, 3, and 4 of the β-propeller fold of RON Sema. Despite the sequence homology between RON and MET receptor tyrosine kinase and between MSP and hepatocyte growth factor, it is well established that there is no cross-reactivity between the two receptor-ligand systems. Comparison of the structure of RON SPI1 in complex with MSPβ and that of MET receptor tyrosine kinase Sema-PSI in complex with hepatocyte growth factor β-chain reveals the receptor-ligand selectivity determinants. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies of the SPI1-MSPβ interaction confirm the formation of a 1:1 complex. SPI1 and MSPαβ also associate primarily as a 1:1 complex with a binding affinity similar to that of SPI1-MSPβ. In addition, the SPI1-MSPαβ ultracentrifuge studies reveal a low abundance 2:2 complex with ∼ 10-fold lower binding affinity compared with the 1:1 species. These results support the hypothesis that the α-chain of MSPαβ mediates RON dimerization. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Structural Basis for the Binding Specificity of Human Recepteur d'Origine Nantais (RON) Receptor Tyrosine Kinase to Macrophage-stimulating Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Kinlin L.; Gorlatova, Natalia V.; Eisenstein, Edward; Herzberg, Osnat

    2014-01-01

    Recepteur d'origine nantais (RON) receptor tyrosine kinase and its ligand, serum macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP), play important roles in inflammation, cell growth, migration, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition during tumor development. The binding of mature MSPαβ (disulfide-linked α- and β-chains) to RON ectodomain modulates receptor dimerization, followed by autophosphorylation of tyrosines in the cytoplasmic receptor kinase domains. Receptor recognition is mediated by binding of MSP β-chain (MSPβ) to the RON Sema. Here we report the structure of RON Sema-PSI-IPT1 (SPI1) domains in complex with MSPβ at 3.0 Å resolution. The MSPβ serine protease-like β-barrel uses the degenerate serine protease active site to recognize blades 2, 3, and 4 of the β-propeller fold of RON Sema. Despite the sequence homology between RON and MET receptor tyrosine kinase and between MSP and hepatocyte growth factor, it is well established that there is no cross-reactivity between the two receptor-ligand systems. Comparison of the structure of RON SPI1 in complex with MSPβ and that of MET receptor tyrosine kinase Sema-PSI in complex with hepatocyte growth factor β-chain reveals the receptor-ligand selectivity determinants. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies of the SPI1-MSPβ interaction confirm the formation of a 1:1 complex. SPI1 and MSPαβ also associate primarily as a 1:1 complex with a binding affinity similar to that of SPI1-MSPβ. In addition, the SPI1-MSPαβ ultracentrifuge studies reveal a low abundance 2:2 complex with ∼10-fold lower binding affinity compared with the 1:1 species. These results support the hypothesis that the α-chain of MSPαβ mediates RON dimerization. PMID:25193665

  20. The role of oestrogen receptor {alpha} in human thyroid cancer: contributions from coregulatory proteins and the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Dara O

    2012-02-01

    Epidemiological, clinical, and molecular studies suggest a role for oestrogen in thyroid cancer. How oestrogen mediates its effects and the consequence of it on clinical outcome has not been fully elucidated. The participation of coregulatory proteins in modulating oestrogen receptor (ER) function and input of crosstalk with the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2 was investigated. Oestrogen induced cell proliferation in the follicular thyroid cancer (FTC)-133 cells, but not in the anaplastic 8305C cell line. Knockdown of the coactivator steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-1 inhibited FTC-133 basal, but not oestrogen induced, cell proliferation. Oestrogen also increased protein expression of SRC-1 and the ER target gene cyclin D1 in the FTC-133 cell line. ERalpha, ERbeta, the coregulatory proteins SRC-1 and nuclear corepressor (NCoR), and the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2 were localised by immunohistochemistry and immnofluorescence in paraffin-embedded tissue from thyroid tumour patients (n=111). ERalpha was colocalised with both SRC-1 and NCoR to the nuclei of the tumour epithelial cells. Expression of ERalpha and NCoR was found predominantly in non-anaplastic tumours and was significantly associated with well-differentiated tumours and reduced incidence of disease recurrence. In non-anaplastic tumours, HER2 was significantly associated with SRC-1, and these proteins were associated with poorly differentiated tumours, capsular invasion and disease recurrence. Totally, 87% of anaplastic tumours were positive for SRC-1. Kaplan-Meier estimates of disease-free survival indicated that in thyroid cancer, SRC-1 strongly correlates with reduced disease-free survival (P<0.001), whereas NCoR predicted increased survival (P<0.001). These data suggest opposing roles for the coregulators SRC-1 and NCoR in thyroid tumour progression.

  1. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase R-PTP-alpha is tyrosine-phosphorylated and associated with the adaptor protein Grb2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Batzer, A; Sap, J

    1994-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPases) have generated interest because of their suspected involvement in cellular signal transduction. The adaptor protein Grb2 has been implicated in coupling receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras. We report that a ubiquitous R-PTPase, R-PTP-alpha, is tyrosine......-phosphorylated and associated in vivo with the Grb2 protein. This association can be reproduced in stably and transiently transfected cells, as well as in vitro using recombinant Grb2 protein. Association requires the presence of an intact SH2 domain in Grb2, as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of R-PTP-alpha. This observation...

  2. Structure-based optimization of benzoic acids as inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B and low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Rosanna; Ottanà, Rosaria; Ciurleo, Rosella; Paoli, Paolo; Manao, Giampaolo; Camici, Guido; Laggner, Christian; Langer, Thierry

    2009-06-01

    We have optimized previously discovered benzoic acids 1, which are active as inhibitors of PTP1B and LMW-PTP, two protein tyrosine phosphatases that have emerged as attractive targets for the development of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Our efforts led to the identification of new and more potent analogues with appreciable selectivity toward human PTP1B and the IF1 isoform of human LMW-PTP.

  3. Exposure of tropoelastin to peroxynitrous acid gives high yields of nitrated tyrosine residues, di-tyrosine cross-links and altered protein structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degendorfer, Georg; Chuang, Christine Yu-Nung; Mariotti, Michele

    2018-01-01

    -protein di-tyrosine cross-links have been characterized by mass spectrometry. Examination of human atherosclerotic lesions shows colocalization of 3-nitroTyr with elastin epitopes, consistent with TE or elastin modification in vivo, and also an association of 3-nitroTyr containing proteins and elastin...

  4. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation during meiotic divisions of starfish oocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peaucellier, G.; Andersen, A.C.; Kinsey, W.H. (Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (USA))

    1990-04-01

    We have used an antibody specific for phosphotyrosine to investigate protein phosphorylation on tyrosine during hormone-induced maturation of starfish oocytes. Analysis of immunoprecipitates from cortices of in vivo labeled Marthasterias glacialis oocytes revealed the presence of labeled phosphotyrosine-containing proteins only after hormone addition. Six major phosphoproteins of 195, 155, 100, 85, 45, and 35 kDa were detected. Total activity in immunoprecipitates increased until first polar body emission and was greatly reduced upon completion of meiosis but some proteins exhibited different kinetics. The labeling of the 155-kDa protein reached a maximum at germinal vesicle breakdown, while the 35-kDa appeared later and disappeared after polar body emission. Similar results were obtained with Asterias rubens oocytes. In vitro phosphorylation of cortices showed that tyrosine kinase activity is a major protein kinase activity in this fraction, the main endogenous substrate being a 68-kDa protein. The proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine in vitro were almost similar in extracts from oocytes treated or not with the hormone.

  5. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is involved in osmoregulation of ionic conductances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C. Tilly (Bernard); N. van den Berghe (Nina); L.G. Tertoolen; M.J. Edixhoven (Marcel); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractUsing the human Intestine 407 cell line as a model, we investigated a possible role for tyrosine kinase(s) in regulating the ion efflux pathways induced by hyposmotic stimulation (regulatory volume decrease, RVD). Pretreatment of 125I(-)-and 86Rb(+)-loaded

  6. NLRP3 tyrosine phosphorylation is controlled by protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; Kasper, Stephanie; Gottier, Claudia; Lang, Silvia; Atrott, Kirstin; Vavricka, Stephan R.; Scharl, Sylvie; Gutte, Petrus M.; Grütter, Markus G.; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Contassot, Emmanuel; Chan, Andrew C.; Dai, Xuezhi; Rawlings, David J.; Mair, Florian; Becher, Burkhard; Falk, Werner; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes form as the result of the intracellular presence of danger-associated molecular patterns and mediate the release of active IL-1β, which influences a variety of inflammatory responses. Excessive inflammasome activation results in severe inflammatory conditions, but physiological IL-1β secretion is necessary for intestinal homeostasis. Here, we have described a mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome regulation by tyrosine phosphorylation of NLRP3 at Tyr861. We demonstrated that protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN22), variants in which are associated with chronic inflammatory disorders, dephosphorylates NLRP3 upon inflammasome induction, allowing efficient NLRP3 activation and subsequent IL-1β release. In murine models, PTPN22 deficiency resulted in pronounced colitis, increased NLRP3 phosphorylation, but reduced levels of mature IL-1β. Conversely, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that carried an autoimmunity-associated PTPN22 variant had increased IL-1β levels. Together, our results identify tyrosine phosphorylation as an important regulatory mechanism for NLRP3 that prevents aberrant inflammasome activation. PMID:27043286

  7. Regulation of cell adhesion by protein-tyrosine phosphatases: II. Cell-cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Jennifer L; Wittchen, Erika S; Burridge, Keith

    2006-06-16

    Cell-cell adhesion is critical to the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. The stability of many adhesions is regulated by protein tyrosine phosphorylation of cell adhesion molecules and their associated components, with high levels of phosphorylation promoting disassembly. The level of tyrosine phosphorylation reflects the balance between protein-tyrosine kinase and protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity. Many protein-tyrosine phosphatases associate with the cadherin-catenin complex, directly regulating the phosphorylation of these proteins, thereby affecting their interactions and the integrity of cell-cell junctions. Tyrosine phosphatases can also affect cell-cell adhesions indirectly by regulating the signaling pathways that control the activities of Rho family G proteins. In addition, receptor-type tyrosine phosphatases can mediate outside-in signaling through both ligand binding and dimerization of their extracellular domains. This review will discuss the role of protein-tyrosine phosphatases in cell-cell interactions, with an emphasis on cadherin-mediated adhesions.

  8. Protein Tyrosine Kinase Signaling During Oocyte Maturation and Fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Lynda K.; Carroll, David J.; Kinsey, William H.

    2011-01-01

    The oocyte is a highly specialized cell capable of accumulating and storing energy supplies as well as maternal transcripts and pre-positioned signal transduction components needed for zygotic development, undergoing meiosis under control of paracrine signals from the follicle, fusing with a single sperm during fertilization, and zygotic development. The oocyte accomplishes this diverse series of events by establishing an array of signal transduction pathway components that include a select collection of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) that are expressed at levels significantly higher than most other cell types. This array of PTKs includes cytosolic kinases such as SRC-family PTKs (FYN and YES), and FAK kinases, as well as FER. These kinases typically exhibit distinct patterns of localization and in some cases are translocated from one subcellular compartment to another during meiosis. Significant differences exist in the extent to which PTK-mediated pathways are used by oocytes from species that fertilize externally versus internally. The PTK activation profiles as well as calcium signaling pattern seems to correlate with the extent to which a rapid block to polyspermy is required by the biology of each species. Suppression of each of the SRC-family PTKs as well as FER kinase results in failure of meiotic maturation or zygote development, indicating that these PTKs are important for oocyte quality and developmental potential. Future studies will hopefully reveal the extent to which these factors impact clinical assisted reproductive techniques in domestic animals and humans. PMID:21681843

  9. Expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) in human breast cancer correlates with low tumor grade, and inhibits tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardini, E; Agresti, R; Tagliabue, E

    2000-01-01

    of Src family kinases, and regulation of integrin signaling, cell adhesion, and growth factor responsiveness. To explore its potential contribution to human neoplasia, we surveyed RPTPalpha protein levels in primary human breast cancer. We found RPTPalpha levels to vary widely among tumors, with 29......% of cases manifesting significant overexpression. High RPTPalpha protein levels correlated significantly with low tumor grade and positive estrogen receptor status. Expression of RPTPalpha in breast carcinoma cells led to growth inhibition, associated with increased accumulation in G0 and G1, and delayed...... tumor growth and metastasis. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a study correlating expression level of a specific bona fide PTP with neoplastic disease status in humans....

  10. Tyrosine Sulfation as a Protein Post-Translational Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Shyong Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Integration of inorganic sulfate into biological molecules plays an important role in biological systems and is directly involved in the instigation of diseases. Protein tyrosine sulfation (PTS is a common post-translational modification that was first reported in the literature fifty years ago. However, the significance of PTS under physiological conditions and its link to diseases have just begun to be appreciated in recent years. PTS is catalyzed by tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST through transfer of an activated sulfate from 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate to tyrosine in a variety of proteins and peptides. Currently, only a small fraction of sulfated proteins is known and the understanding of the biological sulfation mechanisms is still in progress. In this review, we give an introductory and selective brief review of PTS and then summarize the basic biochemical information including the activity and the preparation of TPST, methods for the determination of PTS, and kinetics and reaction mechanism of TPST. This information is fundamental for the further exploration of the function of PTS that induces protein-protein interactions and the subsequent biochemical and physiological reactions.

  11. [Research progress of several protein tyrosine phosphatases in diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Sun, Jin-Peng; Liu, Jing; Yu, Xiao

    2010-04-25

    Diabetes mellitus is caused by deficiency of insulin secretion from the pancreatic islet beta cells and/or insulin resistance in liver, muscle and adipocytes, resulting in glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Several protein tyrosine phosphatases, such as PTP1B (PTPN1), TCPTP (PTPN2), LYP (PTPN22), PTPIA-2, PTPMEG2 (PTPN9) or OSTPTP are involved in insulin signaling pathway, insulin secretion and autoreactive attack to pancreatic beta cells. Genetic mutation or overexpression of these phosphotases has been found to cause or increase the risk of diabetes mellitus. Some population with high risk for type 2 diabetes has overexpressed PTP1B, a prototypical tyrosine phosphatase which down-regulates insulin and leptin signal transduction. Animal PTP1B knockout model and PTP1B specific inhibitor cellular studies indicate PTP1B may serve as a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes. TCPTP shares more than 70% sequence identity with PTP1B in their catalytic domain. TCPTP dephosphorylates tyrosine phosphorylated substrates overlapping with PTP1B but also has its own distinct dephosphorylation sites and functions. Recent research indicates TCPTP may have role in type 1 diabetes via dysregultaion of cytokine-mediated immune responses or pancreatic beta cell apoptosis. The tyrosine phosphatase LYP, which down-regulates LCK activity in T cell response, can become mutated as R620W which is highly correlated to type 1 diabetes. LYP R620W may be a gain of function mutation which suppresses TCR signaling. Patients bearing the R620W mutant have impaired T cell responses and increased populations of (CD45RO+CD45RA-) CD4+ T cells. A detailed elucidation of mechanism of R620W in type 1 diabetes and specific LYP inhibitor development will help characterize LYP R620W as a therapeutic target. A receptor tyrosine phosphatase, PTPIA-2/beta is a major autoantigen of type 1 diabetes. A diagnosis kit identifying PTPIA-2/beta autoantibodies is valuable in early detection and prevention of type

  12. Structure determination of T-cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, L.F.; Møller, K. B.; Pedersen, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    homologous T cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP) has received much less attention, and no x-ray structure has been provided. We have previously co-crystallized PTP1B with a number of low molecular weight inhibitors that inhibit TC-PTP with similar efficiency. Unexpectedly, we were not able to co...... the high degree of functional and structural similarity between TC-PTP and PTP1B, we have been able to identify areas close to the active site that might be addressed to develop selective inhibitors of each enzyme....

  13. G-protein-coupled receptors and tyrosine kinases: crossroads in cell signaling and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavi, Shai; Shumay, Elena; Wang, Hsien-yu; Malbon, Craig C

    2006-03-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors and protein tyrosine kinases represent two prominent pathways for cellular signaling. As our knowledge of cell signaling pathways mediated by the superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors and the smaller family of receptor tyrosine kinases expands, so does our appreciation of how these two major signaling platforms share information and modulate each other, otherwise termed "cross-talk". Cross-talk between G-protein-coupled receptors and tyrosine kinases can occur at several levels, including the receptor-to-receptor level, and at crucial downstream points (e.g. phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, Akt/protein kinase B and the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade). Regulation of G-protein-coupled receptors by non-receptor tyrosine kinases, such as Src family members, also operates in signaling. A broader understanding of how G-protein-coupled receptors and tyrosine kinases cross-talk reveals new insights into signaling modalities in both health and disease.

  14. Proteomic analysis of tyrosine phosphorylation during human liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutros Tarek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R causes a dramatic reprogramming of cell metabolism during liver transplantation and can be linked to an alteration of the phosphorylation level of several cellular proteins. Over the past two decades, it became clear that tyrosine phosphorylation plays a pivotal role in a variety of important signalling pathways and was linked to a wide spectrum of diseases. Functional profiling of the tyrosine phosphoproteome during liver transplantation is therefore of great biological significance and is likely to lead to the identification of novel targets for drug discovery and provide a basis for novel therapeutic strategies. Results Using liver biopsies collected during the early phases of organ procurement and transplantation, we aimed at characterizing the global patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation during hepatic I/R. A proteomic approach, based on the purification of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins followed by their identification using mass spectrometry, allowed us to identify Nck-1, a SH2/SH3 adaptor, as a potential regulator of I/R injury. Using immunoblot, cell fractionation and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrate that Nck-1 phosphorylation, expression and localization were affected in liver tissue upon I/R. In addition, mass spectrometry identification of Nck-1 binding partners during the course of the transplantation also suggested a dynamic interaction between Nck-1 and actin during I/R. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggest that Nck-1 may play a role in I/R-induced actin reorganization, which was previously reported to be detrimental for the hepatocytes of the transplanted graft. Nck-1 could therefore represent a target of choice for the design of new organ preservation strategies, which could consequently help to reduce post-reperfusion liver damages and improve transplantation outcomes.

  15. 5-Arylidene-2,4-thiazolidinediones as inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Rosanna; Paoli, Paolo; Ottanà, Rosaria; Jacomelli, Michela; Ciurleo, Rosella; Manao, Giampaolo; Steindl, Theodora; Langer, Thierry; Vigorita, Maria Gabriella; Camici, Guido

    2007-08-01

    4-(5-Arylidene-2,4-dioxothiazolidin-3-yl)methylbenzoic acids (2) were synthesized and evaluated in vitro as inhibitors of PTP1B and LMW-PTP, two protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) which act as negative regulators of the metabolic and mitotic signalling of insulin. The synthesis of compounds 2 represents an example of utilizing phosphotyrosine-mimetics to identify effective low molecular weight nonphosphorus inhibitors of PTPs. Several thiazolidinediones 2 exhibited PTP1B inhibitory activity in the low micromolar range with moderate selectivity for human PTP1B and IF1 isoform of human LMW-PTP compared with other related PTPs.

  16. Expression of protein-tyrosine phosphatases in the major insulin target tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norris, K; Norris, F; Kono, D H

    1997-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key regulators of the insulin receptor signal transduction pathway. We have performed a detailed analysis of PTP expression in the major human insulin target tissues or cells (liver, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and endothelial cells). To obtain...... a representative picture, all tissues were analyzed by PCR using three different primer sets corresponding to conserved regions of known PTPs. A total of 24 different PTPs were identified. A multiprobe RNase protection assay was developed to obtain a semiquantitative measure of the expression levels of selected...... PTPs. Surprisingly, PTP-LAR, previously suggested to be a major regulator of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, was expressed in extremely low levels in skeletal muscle, whereas the related receptor-type PTP-sigma and PTP-alpha were expressed in relatively high levels in all four tissues. The low...

  17. Design, Synthesis, Biological Activity and Molecular Dynamics Studies of Specific Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitors over SHP-2

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Su-Xia; Li, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Wen-Bo; Ma, Ying; Wang, Run-Ling; Cheng, Xian-Chao; Wang, Shu-Qing; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Over expressing in PTPN1 (encoding Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, PTP1B), a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) that plays an overall positive role in insulin signaling, is linked to the pathogenesis of diabetes and obesity. The relationship between PTP1B and human diseases exhibits PTP1B as the target to treat these diseases. In this article, small weight molecules of the imidazolidine series were screened from databases and optimized on silicon as the inhibitors of PTP1B based on the steri...

  18. Frameshift mutations in coding repeats of protein tyrosine phosphatase genes in colorectal tumors with microsatellite instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korff, Sebastian; Woerner, Stefan M; Yuan, Yan P; Bork, Peer; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Gebert, Johannes

    2008-11-10

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) like their antagonizing protein tyrosine kinases are key regulators of signal transduction thereby assuring normal control of cellular growth and differentiation. Increasing evidence suggests that mutations in PTP genes are associated with human malignancies. For example, mutational analysis of the tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) gene superfamily uncovered genetic alterations in about 26% of colorectal tumors. Since in these studies tumors have not been stratified according to genetic instability status we hypothesized that colorectal tumors characterized by high-level of microsatellite instability (MSI-H) might show an increased frequency of frameshift mutations in those PTP genes that harbor long mononucleotide repeats in their coding region (cMNR). Using bioinformatic analysis we identified 16 PTP candidate genes with long cMNRs that were examined for genetic alterations in 19 MSI-H colon cell lines, 54 MSI-H colorectal cancers, and 17 MSI-H colorectal adenomas. Frameshift mutations were identified only in 6 PTP genes, of which PTPN21 show the highest mutation frequency at all in MSI-H tumors (17%). Although about 32% of MSI-H tumors showed at least one affected PTP gene, and cMNR mutation rates in PTPN21, PTPRS, and PTPN5 are higher than the mean mutation frequency of MNRs of the same length, mutations within PTP genes do not seem to play a common role in MSI tumorigenesis, since no cMNR mutation frequency reached statistical significance and therefore, failed prediction as a Positive Selective Target Gene.

  19. Role of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiebaut, Pierre-Alain; Besnier, Marie; Gomez, Elodie; Richard, Vincent

    2016-12-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is mostly involved in negative regulation of signaling mediated by Tyrosine Kinase Receptors, especially the insulin and leptin receptors. This enzyme thus plays a major role in the development of diseases associated with insulin resistance, such as obesity and diabetes. PTP1B inhibition is currently considered as an attractive treatment of insulin resistance and associated metabolic disorders. In parallel, emerging evidence also suggests that PTP1B is widely expressed in cardiovascular tissues, notably in the heart and the endothelium, and that it could also be a potential treatment of several cardiovascular diseases. PTP1B is especially present in endothelial cells, and appears to contribute to endothelial dysfunction. Indeed, preclinical evidence shows that pharmacological inhibition of gene deletion of PTP1B reduces endothelial dysfunction in various cardiovascular diseases associated or not with insulin resistance. In parallel, because PTP1B also negatively modulates VEGF signaling, inhibition of this enzyme also tends to favor cardiac angiogenesis. Importantly, blocking PTP1B also results in beneficial effects on cardiac dysfunction and remodeling not only in metabolic diseases but also in the context of heart failure, thus this enzyme represents an attractive new target for the treatment of this disease. This beneficial effect in heart failure may to a large extent result from the endothelial protective and/or proangiogenic effects of PTP1B blockade. Finally, PTP1B inhibition also reduces cardiac dysfunction, but also systemic inflammation and mortality in experimental models of septic shock, and thus may also constitute a new treatment of this disease. Altogether, accumulating preclinical evidence suggests that PTP1B represents an interesting molecular target to treat both cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, which often share the same risk factors. This concept now deserves to be tested in clinical studies that

  20. C-terminal tyrosine residues modulate the fusion activity of the Hendra virus fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Andreea; Pager, Cara Teresia; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2011-02-15

    The paramyxovirus family includes important human pathogens such as measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial virus, and the recently emerged, highly pathogenic Hendra and Nipah viruses. The viral fusion (F) protein plays critical roles in infection, promoting both the virus-cell membrane fusion events needed for viral entry as well as cell-cell fusion events leading to syncytia formation. We describe the surprising finding that addition of the short epitope HA tag to the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Hendra virus F protein leads to a significant increase in the extent of cell-cell membrane fusion. This increase was not due to alterations in surface expression, cleavage state, or association with lipid microdomains. Addition of a Myc tag of similar length did not alter Hendra F protein fusion activity, indicating that the observed stimulation was not solely a result of lengthening the CT. Three tyrosine residues within the HA tag were critical for the increase in the extent of fusion, suggesting C-terminal tyrosines may modulate Hendra fusion activity. The effects of addition of the HA tag varied with other fusion proteins, as parainfluenza virus 5 F-HA showed a decreased level of surface expression and no stimulation of fusion. These results indicate that additions to the C-terminal end of the F protein CT can modulate protein function in a sequence specific manner, reinforcing the need for careful analysis of epitope-tagged glycoproteins. In addition, our results implicate C-terminal tyrosine residues in the modulation of the membrane fusion reaction promoted by these viral glycoproteins.

  1. Novel Mixed-Type Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B. Kinetic and Computational Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marie Jazmín Sarabia-Sanchez; Pedro Josue Trejo-Soto; Jose Miguel Velazquez-López; Carlos Carvente-García; Rafael Castillo; Alicia Hernandez-Campos; Claudia Avitia-Domínguez; Daniel Enríquez-Mendiola; Erick Sierra-Campos; Mónica Valdez-Solana; Jose Manuel Salas-Pacheco; Alfredo Tellez-Valencia

    2017-01-01

    .... In this sense, attention has been centered in the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a protein whose overexpression or increase of its activity has been related in many studies with insulin resistance...

  2. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Kurup, Pradeep; Nairn, Angus C; Lombroso, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the elderly, affecting millions of people worldwide and representing a substantial economic burden. AD is a progressive disease associated with memory loss and impaired cognitive function. The neuropathology is characterized by cortical accumulation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Amyloid plaques are small, aggregated peptides called beta amyloid (Aβ) and NFTs are aggregates of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein. Because Aβ disrupts multiple intracellular signaling pathways, resulting in some of the clinical symptoms of AD, understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms has implications for the diagnosis and treatment of AD. Recent studies have demonstrated that Aβ regulates striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) (PTPN5). Aβ accumulation is associated with increases in STEP levels and activity that in turn disrupts glutamate receptor trafficking to and from the neuronal membrane. These findings indicate that modulating STEP levels or inhibiting its activity may have beneficial effects for patients with AD, making it an important target for drug discovery. This article reviews the biology of STEP and its role in AD as well as the potential clinical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 1: basic principles and properties of tyrosine chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    2016-06-01

    Spectroscopic properties of tyrosine residues may be employed in structural studies of proteins. Here we discuss several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, like normal, difference and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, and corresponding optical properties of the tyrosine chromophore, phenol, which are used to study protein structure.

  4. Protein tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways contribute to differences in heterophil-mediated innate immune responsiveness between two lines of broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation mediates signal transduction of cellular processes, with protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulating virtually all signaling events. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) super-family consists of three conserved pathways that convert receptor activation into ce...

  5. Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatases control antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohoni, Sujata Vijay; Lieder, Sarah; Bapat, Prashant Madhusudhan

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) possesses a low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMW-PTP),PtpA, that affects the production of undecylprodigionsin (RED) and actinorhodin (ACT). In this study we identifiedanother LMW-PTP called sco3700. Tyrosine phosphatase activity of the purified Sco...

  6. Mapping of the receptor protein-tyrosine kinase 10 to human chromosome 1q21-q23 and mouse chromosome 1H1-5 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M. [Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Lai, C. [Scripps Research Inst., LaJolla, CA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Receptor protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play a critical role in the transduction of signals important to cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Mutations affecting the expression of receptor PTK genes have been associated with a number of vertebrate and invertebrate developmental abnormalities, and the aberrant regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation is implicated in a variety of neoplasias. One estimate suggests that approximately 100 receptor PTK genes exist in the mammalian genome, about half of which have been identified. The tyro-10 receptor protein-tyrosine kinase, first identified in a PCR-based survey for novel tyrosine kinases in the rat nervous system, defines a new subfamily of PTKs. It exhibits a catalytic domain most closely related to those found in the trk PTK receptor subfamily, which transduces signals for nerve growth factor and the related molecules brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3, and neurotrophin-4 (NT-3 and NT-4). Trk and the related PTK receptors trkB and trkC play a critical role in the neurotrophin-dependent survival of subsets of sensory and motor neurons. The predicted tyro-10 extracellular region is, however, distinct from that of the trk subfamily and is unique except for a domain shared with the blood coagulation factors V and VIII, thought to be involved in phospholipid binding. Although tyro-10 RNA is most abundant in heart and skeletal muscle in the adult rat, it is expressed in a wide variety of tissues, including the developing and mature brain. Tyro-10 appears identical to the murine TKT sequence reported by Karn et al. and exhibits a high degree of similarity with the CaK, DDR, and Nep PTKs. A ligand for tyro-10 has not yet been identified. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors isolated from Artemisia roxburghiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Muhammad Raza; Ishtiaq; Hizbullah, Syed Muhammad; Habtemariam, Solomon; Zarrelli, Armando; Muhammad, Akhtar; Collina, Simona; Khan, Inamulllah

    2016-08-01

    Artemisia roxburghiana is used in traditional medicine for treating various diseases including diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of active constituents by using protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a validated target for management of diabetes. Various compounds were isolated as active principles from the crude methanolic extract of aerial parts of A. roxburghiana. All compounds were screened for PTP1B inhibitory activity. Molecular docking simulations were performed to investigate the mechanism behind PTP1B inhibition of the isolated compound and positive control, ursolic acid. Betulinic acid, betulin and taraxeryl acetate were the active PTP1B principles with IC50 values 3.49 ± 0.02, 4.17 ± 0.03 and 87.52 ± 0.03 µM, respectively. Molecular docking studies showed significant molecular interactions of the triterpene inhibitors with Gly220, Cys215, Gly218 and Asp48 inside the active site of PTP1B. The antidiabetic activity of A. roxburghiana could be attributed due to PTP1B inhibition by its triterpene constituents, betulin, betulinic acid and taraxeryl acetate. Computational insights of this study revealed that the C-3 and C-17 positions of the compounds needs extensive optimization for the development of new lead compounds.

  8. Involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenesis: new anti-obesity targets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Won Kon; Lee, Sang Chul

    2012-12-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic as well as being a major risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and several types of cancers. Obesity is mainly due to the overgrowth of adipose tissue arising from an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure. Adipose tissue, primarily composed of adipocytes, plays a key role in maintaining whole body energy homeostasis. In view of the treatment of obesity and obesity-related diseases, it is critical to understand the detailed signal transduction mechanisms of adipogenic differentiation. Adipogenic differentiation is tightly regulated by many key signal cascades, including insulin signaling. These signal cascades generally transfer or amplify the signal by using serial tyrosine phosphorylations. Thus, protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases are closely related to adipogenic differentiation. Compared to protein tyrosine kinases, protein tyrosine phosphatases have received little attention in adipogenic differentiation. This review aims to highlight the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenic differentiation and the possibility of protein tyrosine phosphatases as drugs to target obesity.

  9. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Pattern in Sperm Proteins Isolated from Normospermic and Teratospermic Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Sepideh; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mahdi; Ebrahim Habibi, Azadeh; Amirjanati, Naser; Lakpour, Niknam; Asgharpour, Lima; Ardekani, Ali M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In mammalian system, spermatozoa are not able to fertilize the oocyte immediately upon ejaculation, thus they undergo a series of biochemical and molecular changes which is termed capacitation. During sperm capacitation, signal transduction pathways are activated which lead to protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Tyrosine phosphorylated proteins have an important role in sperm capacitation such as hyperactive motility, interaction with zona pellucida and acrosome reaction. Evaluation of tyrosine phosphorylation pattern is important for further understanding of molecular mechanisms of fertilization and the etiology of sperm dysfunctions and abnormalities such as teratospermia. The goal of this study is to characterize tyrosine phosphorylation pattern in sperm proteins isolated from normospermic and teratospermic infertile men attending Avicenna Infertility Clinic in Tehran. Materials and Methods Semen samples were collected and the spermatozoa were isolated using Percoll gradient centrifugation. Then the spermatozoa were incubated up to 6h at 37°C with 5% CO2 in 3% Bovine Serum Albumin-supplemented Ham's F-10 for capacitation to take place. The total proteins from spermatozoa were extracted and were subjected to SDS-PAGE before and after capacitation. To evaluate protein tyrosine phosphorylation pattern, western blotting with specific antibody against phosphorylated tyrosines was performed. Results The results upon western blotting showed: 1) at least six protein bands were detected before capacitation in the spermatozoa from normospermic samples. However, comparable levels of tyrosine phosphorylation was not observed in the spermatozoa from teratospermic samples. 2) The intensity of protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to have been increased during capacitation in the normospermic relative to the teratospermic group. Conclusion For the first time, these findings demonstrate and suggest that the differences in the types of proteins and diminished

  10. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Based Homo-dimerization of Arabidopsis RACK1A Proteins Regulates Oxidative Stress Signaling Pathways in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercy eSabila

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Scaffold proteins are known as important cellular regulators that can interact with multiple proteins to modulate diverse signal transduction pathways. RACK1 (Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 is a WD-40 type scaffold protein, conserved in eukaryotes, from Chlamydymonas to plants and humans, plays regulatory roles in diverse signal transduction and stress response pathways. RACK1 in humans has been implicated in myriads of neuropathological diseases including Alzheimer and alcohol addictions. Model plant Arabidopsis thaliana genome maintains three different RACK1 genes termed RACK1A, RACK1B, and RACK1C with a very high (85-93% sequence identity between them. Loss of function mutant in Arabidopsis indicates that RACK1 proteins regulate diverse environmental stress signaling pathways including drought and salt stress resistance pathway. Recently deduced crystal structure of Arabidopsis RACK1A- very first among all of the RACK1 proteins, indicates that it can potentially be regulated by post-translational modifications, like tyrosine phosphorylations and sumoylation at key residues. Here we show evidence that RACK1A proteins, depending on diverse environmental stresses, are tyrosine phosphorylated. Utilizing site-directed mutagenesis of key tyrosine residues, it is found that tyrosine phosphorylation can potentially dictate the homo-dimerization of RACK1A proteins. The homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins play a role in providing UV-B induced oxidative stress resistance. It is proposed that RACK1A proteins ability to function as scaffold protein may potentially be regulated by the homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins to mediate diverse stress signaling pathways.

  11. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Based Homo-dimerization of Arabidopsis RACK1A Proteins Regulates Oxidative Stress Signaling Pathways in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabila, Mercy; Kundu, Nabanita; Smalls, Deana; Ullah, Hemayet

    2016-01-01

    Scaffold proteins are known as important cellular regulators that can interact with multiple proteins to modulate diverse signal transduction pathways. RACK1 (Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1) is a WD-40 type scaffold protein, conserved in eukaryotes, from Chlamydymonas to plants and humans, plays regulatory roles in diverse signal transduction and stress response pathways. RACK1 in humans has been implicated in myriads of neuropathological diseases including Alzheimer and alcohol addictions. Model plant Arabidopsis thaliana genome maintains three different RACK1 genes termed RACK1A, RACK1B, and RACK1C with a very high (85-93%) sequence identity among them. Loss of function mutation in Arabidopsis indicates that RACK1 proteins regulate diverse environmental stress signaling pathways including drought and salt stress resistance pathway. Recently deduced crystal structure of Arabidopsis RACK1A- very first among all of the RACK1 proteins, indicates that it can potentially be regulated by post-translational modifications, like tyrosine phosphorylations and sumoylation at key residues. Here we show evidence that RACK1A proteins, depending on diverse environmental stresses, are tyrosine phosphorylated. Utilizing site-directed mutagenesis of key tyrosine residues, it is found that tyrosine phosphorylation can potentially dictate the homo-dimerization of RACK1A proteins. The homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins play a role in providing UV-B induced oxidative stress resistance. It is proposed that RACK1A proteins ability to function as scaffold protein may potentially be regulated by the homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins to mediate diverse stress signaling pathways.

  12. Stretch-Induced Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation in Lung Fibroblasts Is Independent of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Boudreault, Francis; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Lung growth and remodeling are modulated by mechanical stress, with fibroblasts thought to play a leading role. Little mechanistic information is available about how lung fibroblasts respond to mechanical stress. We exposed cultured lung fibroblasts to tonic stretch and measured changes in phosphorylation status of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), selected receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), and phospholipase Cγ1 (PLCγ1) and activation of the small G-protein Ras. Human lung fibroblast...

  13. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the human guanylyl cyclase C receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Tyrosine phosphorylation events are key components of several cellular signal transduction pathways. This study describes a novel method for identification of substrates for tyrosine kinases. Co-expression of the tyrosine kinase. EphB1 with the intracellular domain of guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) in Escherichia coli cells ...

  14. Human ether-à-go-go gene potassium channels are regulated by EGFR tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Dong, Ming-Qing; Wu, Xing-Gang; Sun, Hai-Ying; Tse, Hung-Fat; Lau, Chu-Pak; Li, Gui-Rong

    2012-02-01

    Human ether á-go-go gene potassium channels (hEAG1 or Kv10.1) are expressed in brain and various human cancers and play a role in neuronal excitement and tumor progression. However, the functional regulation of hEAG channels by signal transduction is not fully understood. The present study was therefore designed to investigate whether hEAG1 channels are regulated by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in HEK 293 cells stably expressing hEAG1 gene using whole-cell patch voltage-clamp, immunoprecipitation, Western blot, and mutagenesis approaches. We found that the selective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitor AG556 (10 μM), but not the platelet growth factor receptor (PDGFR) kinase inhibitor AG1295 (10 μM) or the Src-family inhibitor PP2 (10 μM), can inhibit hEAG1 current, and the inhibitory effect can be reversed by the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor orthovanadate. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis revealed that tyrosine phosphorylation level of hEAG1 channels was reduced by AG556, and the reduction was significantly countered by orthovanadate. The hEAG1 mutants Y90A, Y344A and Y485A, but not Y376A and Y479A, exhibited reduced response to AG556. Interestingly, the inhibition effect of AG556 was lost in triple mutant hEAG1 channels at Y90, Y344, and Y485 with alanine. These results demonstrate for the first time that hEAG1 channel activity is regulated by EGFR kinase at the tyrosine residues Tyr90, Try344, and Try485. This effect is likely involved in regulating neuronal activity and/or tumor growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenesis: New anti-obesity targets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Hee Bae

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a worldwide epidemic as well as being a major riskfactor for diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and several types ofcancers. Obesity is mainly due to the overgrowth of adiposetissue arising from an imbalance between energy intake andenergy expenditure. Adipose tissue, primarily composed ofadipocytes, plays a key role in maintaining whole body energyhomeostasis. In view of the treatment of obesity andobesity-related diseases, it is critical to understand the detailedsignal transduction mechanisms of adipogenic differentiation.Adipogenic differentiation is tightly regulated by many keysignal cascades, including insulin signaling. These signalcascades generally transfer or amplify the signal by using serialtyrosine phosphorylations. Thus, protein tyrosine kinases andprotein tyrosine phosphatases are closely related to adipogenicdifferentiation. Compared to protein tyrosine kinases, proteintyrosine phosphatases have received little attention inadipogenic differentiation. This review aims to highlight theinvolvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenicdifferentiation and the possibility of protein tyrosinephosphatases as drugs to target obesity.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of interaction between protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B and a bidentate inhibitor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gui-xia LIU Jin-zhi TAN Chun-ying NIU Jian-hua SHEN Xiao-min LUO Xu SHEN Kai-xian CHEN Hua-liang JIANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the dynamic properties of protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) IB and reveal the structural factors responsible for the high inhibitory potency and selectivity of the inhibitor SNA for PTPIB. Methods...

  17. Alterations in lens protein tyrosine phosphorylation and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling during selenite cataract formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekher, Gudiseva; Sailaja, Dasetty

    2004-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is an important event in the cell signal transduction process. Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K) is an intracellular signal mediator and plays a key role in many cellular functions. In this study we have examined the changes in lens protein tyrosine phosphorylation and its impact on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K) signaling during selenite cataract development. Cataract was induced in 10 days old rat pups by a single sub-cutaneous injection of sodium selenite (30 microM/Kg body weight) and lenses were collected at different stages of cataract development. Immunoprecipitation and Western immunoblotting were employed to determine protein tyrosine phosphorylation, PI-3K activity and protein in lens cell extracts. Tyrosine kinase activity in lens membrane preparations was assayed in the presence of a synthetic substrate peptide and [32P]ATP. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the lens was disrupted before the onset of cataract. A decrease in tyrosine phosphorylation of lens proteins was observed within 2-3 days of selenite injection (pre-cataract stage). The effect was much more prominent with the progression of cataract. The decrease in protein tyrosine phosphorylation correlated with the decrease in tyrosine kinase activity associated with the lens membrane fraction. Stimulation of normal rat lenses in organ culture with insulin and IGF-1 caused an increase in the phosphorylation of proteins, whose tyrosine phosphorylation status appeared to be diminished during cataract development. Insulin and IGF-1 also stimulated rat lens PI-3K activity. While there was no change in total PI-3K activity during the onset of cataract, the activity of PI-3K associated with tyrosine phosphorylated proteins decreased markedly in pre-cataract lenses. Further, the ability of IGF-1 to stimulate PI-3K activity was significantly reduced in lens epithelial cells treated with selenium. These studies show that signaling events involving the protein

  18. Frameshift mutations in coding repeats of protein tyrosine phosphatase genes in colorectal tumors with microsatellite instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bork Peer

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs like their antagonizing protein tyrosine kinases are key regulators of signal transduction thereby assuring normal control of cellular growth and differentiation. Increasing evidence suggests that mutations in PTP genes are associated with human malignancies. For example, mutational analysis of the tyrosine phosphatase (PTP gene superfamily uncovered genetic alterations in about 26% of colorectal tumors. Since in these studies tumors have not been stratified according to genetic instability status we hypothesized that colorectal tumors characterized by high-level of microsatellite instability (MSI-H might show an increased frequency of frameshift mutations in those PTP genes that harbor long mononucleotide repeats in their coding region (cMNR. Results Using bioinformatic analysis we identified 16 PTP candidate genes with long cMNRs that were examined for genetic alterations in 19 MSI-H colon cell lines, 54 MSI-H colorectal cancers, and 17 MSI-H colorectal adenomas. Frameshift mutations were identified only in 6 PTP genes, of which PTPN21 show the highest mutation frequency at all in MSI-H tumors (17%. Conclusion Although about 32% of MSI-H tumors showed at least one affected PTP gene, and cMNR mutation rates in PTPN21, PTPRS, and PTPN5 are higher than the mean mutation frequency of MNRs of the same length, mutations within PTP genes do not seem to play a common role in MSI tumorigenesis, since no cMNR mutation frequency reached statistical significance and therefore, failed prediction as a Positive Selective Target Gene.

  19. Mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of arsenic compounds on protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Kanwal [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Zhe [Zhejiang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou (China); Wang, Wen Wen; Wang, Yan Wei [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Sakamoto, Akira [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260‐8675 (Japan); Zhang, Yan Fang [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Naranmandura, Hua, E-mail: narenman@zju.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Suzuki, Noriyuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260‐8675 (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Arsenic binding to biomolecules is considered one of the major toxic mechanisms, which may also be related to the carcinogenic risks of arsenic in humans. At the same time, arsenic is also known to activate the phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor, the mitogen-activated protein kinase and insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 pathways. These signaling pathways originate at the level of receptor tyrosine kinases whose phosphorylation status is regulated by opposing protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation, which is governed by the balanced action of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases, regulates important signaling pathways that are involved in the control of cell proliferation, adhesion and migration. In the present study, we have focused on the interaction of cellular PTPs with toxic trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and its intermediate metabolites such as monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) in vitro, and then determined the arsenic binding site in PTP by the use of recombinant PTPs (e.g., PTP1B and CD45). Interestingly, the activities of PTP1B (cytoplasm-form) or CD45 (receptor-linked form) were observed to be strongly inhibited by both methylated metabolites (i.e., MMA{sup III} and DMA{sup III}) but not by iAs{sup III}. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has clearly confirmed that the organic intermediate, DMA{sup III} directly bound to the active site cysteine residue of PTP1B (e.g., Cys215), resulting in inhibition of enzyme activity. These results suggest that arsenic exposure may disturb the cellular signaling pathways through PTP inactivation. Highlights: ► This study focused on the interaction of PTPs with trivalent arsenicals in vitro. ► We for the first time confirmed that DMA{sup III} strongly inhibited activity of PTP1B. ► DMA{sup III} directly

  20. Protein tyrosine kinases p53/56lyn and p72syk in MHC class I-mediated signal transduction in B lymphoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Bregenholt, S; Skov, S

    1998-01-01

    Crosslinking of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on the surface of human B lymphoma cells was shown to induce protein tyrosine phosphorylation and mobilization of intracellular free calcium. Immunoprecipitations indicated that the protein tyrosine kinases p53/56lyn and p72......syk are among the tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. The kinetics of phosphorylation of these kinases after MHC-I crosslinking differ from the kinetics observed after crosslinking of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR). Additional experiments were performed with chicken lyn- and syk-negative DT40 B cells...... and the results indicate that these two kinases have different substrate specificity and regulate intracellular free calcium differently in response to MHC-I crosslinking. In addition MHC-I crosslinking of a sIgM-negative DT40 chicken B cell variant results in less activity of tyrosine kinases and less...

  1. Protein tyrosine nitration in plants: Present knowledge, computational prediction and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Feigl, Gábor; Bordé, Ádám; Molnár, Árpád; Erdei, László

    2017-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and related molecules (reactive nitrogen species) regulate diverse physiological processes mainly through posttranslational modifications such as protein tyrosine nitration (PTN). PTN is a covalent and specific modification of tyrosine (Tyr) residues resulting in altered protein structure and function. In the last decade, great efforts have been made to reveal candidate proteins, target Tyr residues and functional consequences of nitration in plants. This review intends to evaluate the accumulated knowledge about the biochemical mechanism, the structural and functional consequences and the selectivity of plants' protein nitration and also about the decomposition or conversion of nitrated proteins. At the same time, this review emphasizes yet unanswered or uncertain questions such as the reversibility/irreversibility of tyrosine nitration, the involvement of proteasomes in the removal of nitrated proteins or the effect of nitration on Tyr phosphorylation. The different NO producing systems of algae and higher plants raise the possibility of diversely regulated protein nitration. Therefore studying PTN from an evolutionary point of view would enrich our present understanding with novel aspects. Plant proteomic research can be promoted by the application of computational prediction tools such as GPS-YNO 2 and iNitro-Tyr software. Using the reference Arabidopsis proteome, Authors performed in silico analysis of tyrosine nitration in order to characterize plant tyrosine nitroproteome. Nevertheless, based on the common results of the present prediction and previous experiments the most likely nitrated proteins were selected thus recommending candidates for detailed future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Quercetin inhibits human sperm functions by reducing sperm [Ca2+]i and tyrosine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaolei; Xia, Zhili; Yan, Jiexi; Wang, Yiqing; Xue, Shilong; Zhang, Xuehong

    2016-11-01

    Quercetin is widely known as potent natural antioxidant and scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide both in vitro and in vivo. Quercetin has a wide range of biological functions and health-promoting effects. There are more and more interests in the addition of this flavonol to various traditional food products. However, the in vitro toxicity of quercetin to mature human sperm remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the in vitro effects of quercetin on human sperm functions. The results showed that the total sperm motility were significantly inhibited compared to the controls following exposure to 100, 200 and 400µM quercetin for 6 and 12h; quercetin did not affect human sperm viability. The acrosome reaction and capacitation induced by progesterone were dose-dependently inhibited by quercetin. Furthermore, quercetin induced a significantly decrease of human sperm [Ca2+]i after 2 min above 50 μM, and dose-dependently decreased the protein-tyrosine phosphorylation of human sperm. Our results indicated that quercetin may decrease sperm [Ca2+]i, suppresse tyrosine phosphorylation, and subsequently inhibit sperm functions.

  3. Identification of a Fungi-Specific Lineage of Protein Kinases Closely Related to Tyrosine Kinases.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhongtao Zhao; Qiaojun Jin; Jin-Rong Xu; Huiquan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases (TKs) specifically catalyze the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in proteins and play essential roles in many cellular processes. Although TKs mainly exist in animals, recent studies revealed that some organisms outside the Opisthokont clade also contain TKs. The fungi, as the sister group to animals, are thought to lack TKs. To better understand the origin and evolution of TKs, it is important to investigate if fungi have TK or TK-related genes. We therefore systematical...

  4. Ionization of tyrosine residues in human serum albumin and in its complexes with bilirubin and laurate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Brodersen, R

    1992-01-01

    Spectrophotometric titration of human serum albumin indicates that ionization of the 18 tyrosine residues takes place between pH 9 and 12.7. A Hill plot indicates that protons dissociate co-operatively from tyrosine residues, in pure albumin between pH 11.0 and 11.4 with a Hill coefficient 1.7, a...

  5. Treatment with Tyrosine a Neurotransmitter Precursor Reduces Environmental Stress in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    ELECTE Treatment with Tyrosine, DEC 0 1989 a Neurotransmitter Precursor, Reduces Environmental Stress in Humans LOUIS E. BANDERET* AND HARRIS R...Check List, and the Profile of Mood States. During exposure to the TYROSINE REDUCES ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS 761 MOOD STATES COGNITIVE, REACTION TIME

  6. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha specifically inhibits insulin-increased prolactin gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, K K; Sap, J; Stanley, F M

    1998-01-01

    A physiologically relevant response to insulin, stimulation of prolactin promoter activity in GH4 pituitary cells, was used as an assay to study the specificity of protein-tyrosine phosphatase function. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) blocks the effect of insulin...... to increase prolactin gene expression but potentiates the effects of epidermal growth factor and cAMP on prolactin promoter activity. RPTPalpha was the only protein-tyrosine phosphatase tested that did this. Thus, the effect of RPTPalpha on prolactin-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) promoter activity...... is specific by two criteria. A number of potential RPTPalpha targets were ruled out by finding (a) that they are not affected or (b) that they are not on the pathway to insulin-increased prolactin-CAT activity. The negative effect of RPTPalpha on insulin activation of the prolactin promoter is not due...

  7. Protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in Bacillus subtilis: a 10-year retrospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef eDeutscher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in Bacillus subtilis in the year 2003 was followed by a decade of intensive research activity. Here we provide an overview of the lessons learned in that period. While the number of characterized kinases and phosphatases involved in reversible protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in B. subtilis has remained essentially unchanged, the number of proteins known to be targeted by this post-translational modification has increased dramatically. This is mainly due to phosphoproteomics and interactomics studies, which were instrumental in identifying new tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. Despite their structural similarity, the two B. subtilis protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases, PtkA and PtkB (EpsB, seem to accomplish different functions in the cell. The PtkB is encoded by a large operon involved in exopolysaccharide production, and its main role appears to be the control of this process. The PtkA seems to have a more complex role; it phosphorylates and regulates a large number of proteins involved in the DNA, fatty acid and carbon metabolism and engages in physical interaction with other types of kinases (Ser/Thr kinases, leading to mutual phosphorylation. PtkA also seems to respond to several activator proteins, which direct its activity towards different substrates. In that respect PtkA seems to function as a highly connected signal integration device.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B. I. Ligand-Induced Changes in the Protein Motions

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Günther H.; Frimurer, Thomas M.; Andersen, Jannik N.; Olsen, Ole H.

    1999-01-01

    Activity of enzymes, such as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), is often associated with structural changes in the enzyme, resulting in selective and stereospecific reactions with the substrate. To investigate the effect of a substrate on the motions occurring in PTPs, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of PTP1B and PTP1B complexed with a high-affinity peptide DADEpYL, where pY stands for phosphorylated tyrosine. The peptide sequence is derived from the epidermal growth facto...

  9. Effect of acute maternal starvation on tyrosine metabolism and protein synthesis in fetal sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurti, C.R.; Schaefer, A.L.

    To determine the effects of acute maternal starvation on intrauterine growth, tyrosine concentration and specific activity values in plasma, intracellular free and protein bound pools were determined in catheterized ovine fetuses following an 8 h continuous infusion of L-(2,3,5,6 /sup 3/H) or L-(U-/sup 14/C) tyrosine into the ewe and fetus respectively at 115-125 days of gestation. From the kinetic data the rates of whole body and tissue fractional protein synthesis were calculated. Although placental protein synthesis was not significantly changed as a result of acute maternal starvation, fetal whole body protein synthesis was reduced from 63 g/d/kg in the fed to 25 g/d/kg in the starved condition. There was also a 10 fold reduction in the net placental transfer of tyrosine to the fetus in the starved ewes. In addition, a three fold increase was observed in the quantity of tyrosine used for oxidation by the fetuses of starved ewes, changing from 5.2% of tyrosine net utilization in the fed to 13.7% in the starved condition. Significant reductions in tissue fractional protein synthesis rates were also seen in the liver, brain, lung kidney and GIT tissues from 78, 37, 65, 45 and 71%/d respectively in the fed to 12, 10, 23, 22 and 35%/d in the fetuses of starved ewes. The data indicate that during acute maternal starvation the sheep fetus utilizes more tyrosine for oxidation and less for anabolic purposes which is reflected in a decrease both in whole body and tissue fractional rates of protein synthesis.

  10. Oxidative Stress-Associated Protein Tyrosine Kinases and Phosphatases in Fanconi Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Qishen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder featuring chromosomal instability, developmental defects, progressive bone marrow failure, and predisposition to cancer. Besides the predominant role in DNA damage response and/or repair, many studies have linked FA proteins to oxidative stress. Oxidative stress, defined as imbalance in pro-oxidant and antioxidant homeostasis, has been considered to contribute to disease development, including FA. Recent Advances: A variety of signaling pathways may be influenced by oxidative stress, particularly the equilibrium between protein kinases and phosphatases, consequently leading to an aberrant phosphorylation state of cellular proteins. Dysfunction of kinases/phosphatases has been implicated in the pathophysiology of human diseases. In FA, evidence is emerging that links abnormal phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation of signaling molecules to clinical complications and malformations. Critical Issues: In this study, we review the recent findings on the oxidative stress-related kinases and phosphatases, particularly tyrosine phosphatases in FA. Future Directions: Understanding the role of oxidative stress-related kinases and phosphatases in FA may provide unique and generic possibilities for the future development of therapeutic strategies by targeting the dysregulated protein kinases and phosphatases in a clinical setting. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2290–2301. PMID:24206276

  11. Protein-Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in the Biological Functions Associated with Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi W. Ijiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In sexual reproduction, two gamete cells (i.e., egg and sperm fuse (fertilization to create a newborn with a genetic identity distinct from those of the parents. In the course of these developmental processes, a variety of signal transduction events occur simultaneously in each of the two gametes, as well as in the fertilized egg/zygote/early embryo. In particular, a growing body of knowledge suggests that the tyrosine kinase Src and/or other protein-tyrosine kinases are important elements that facilitate successful implementation of the aforementioned processes in many animal species. In this paper, we summarize recent findings on the roles of protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in many sperm-related processes (from spermatogenesis to epididymal maturation, capacitation, acrosomal exocytosis, and fertilization.

  12. A Novel Molecular Diagnostic of Glioblastomas: Detection of an Extracellular Fragment of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase μ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Burden-Gulley

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We recently found that normal human brain and low-grade astrocytomas express the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ and that the more invasive astrocytomas, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, downregulate full-length PTPμ expression. Loss of PTPμ expression in GBMs is due to proteolytic cleavage that generates an intracellular and potentially a cleaved and released extracellular fragment of PTPμ. Here, we identify that a cleaved extracellular fragment containing the domains required for PTPμ-mediated adhesion remains associated with GBM tumor tissue. We hypothesized that detection of this fragment would make an excellent diagnostic tool for the localization of tumor tissue within the brain. To this end, we generated a series of fluorescently tagged peptide probes that bind the PTPμ fragment. The peptide probes specifically recognize GBM cells in tissue sections of surgically resected human tumors. To test whether the peptide probes are able to detect GBM tumors in vivo, the PTPμ peptide probes were tested in both mouse flank and intracranial xenograft human glioblastoma tumor model systems. The glial tumors were molecularly labeled with the PTPμ peptide probes within minutes of tail vein injection using the Maestro FLEX In Vivo Imaging System. The label was stable for at least 3 hours. Together, these results indicate that peptide recognition of the PTPμ extracellular fragment provides a novel molecular diagnostic tool for detection of human glioblastomas. Such a tool has clear translational applications and may lead to improved surgical resections and prognosis for patients with this devastating disease.

  13. Glutathione-Responsive Selenosulfide Prodrugs as a Platform Strategy for Potent and Selective Mechanism-Based Inhibition of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjin, Caroline Chandra; Otley, Kate D; Baguley, Tyler D; Kurup, Pradeep; Xu, Jian; Nairn, Angus C; Lombroso, Paul J; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2017-12-27

    Dysregulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation has been implicated in a number of human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. As a result of their essential role in regulating protein tyrosine phosphorylation levels, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have emerged as important yet challenging therapeutic targets. Here we report on the development and application of a glutathione-responsive motif to facilitate the efficient intracellular delivery of a novel class of selenosulfide phosphatase inhibitors for the selective active site directed inhibition of the targeted PTP by selenosulfide exchange with the active site cysteine. The strategy leverages the large difference in extracellular and intracellular glutathione levels to deliver selenosulfide phosphatase inhibitors to cells. As an initial exploration of the prodrug platform and the corresponding selenosulfide covalent inhibitor class, potent and selective inhibitors were developed for two therapeutically relevant PTP targets: the Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence factor mPTPA and the CNS-specific tyrosine phosphatase, striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP). The lead selenosulfide inhibitors enable potent and selective inhibition of their respective targets over a panel of human PTPs and a representative cysteine protease. Kinetic parameters of the inhibitors were characterized, including reversibility of inhibition and rapid rate of GSH exchange at intracellular GSH concentrations. Additionally, active site covalent inhibitor-labeling with an mPTPA inhibitor was rigorously confirmed by mass spectrometry, and cellular activity was demonstrated with a STEP prodrug inhibitor in cortical neurons.

  14. Free Fatty Acids Inhibit Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B and Activate Akt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisuke Shibata

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Accumulating evidence has suggested that free fatty acids (FFAs interact with protein kinases and protein phosphatases. The present study examined the effect of FFAs on protein phosphatases and Akt. Methods: Activities of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B were assayed under the cell-free conditions. Phosphorylation of Akt was monitored in MSTO-211H human malignant pleural mesothelioma cells without and with knocking-down phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K or 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1. Results: In the cell-free assay, unsaturated FFAs (uFFAs such as oleic, linoleic and linolenic acid and saturated FFAs (sFFAs such as stearic, palmitic, myristic, and behenic acid markedly reduced PTP1B activity, with the potential for uFFAs greater than that for sFFAs. All the investigated sFFAs inhibited PP2A activity, but otherwise no inhibition was obtained with uFFAs. Both uFFAs and sFFAs had no effect on PP1 activity. Oleic acid phosphorylated Akt both on Thr308 and Ser473, while stearic acid phosphorylated Akt on Thr308 alone. The effects of oleic and stearic acid on Akt phosphorylation were abrogated by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin or the PDK1 inhibitor BX912 and also by knocking-down PI3K or PDK1. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that uFFAs and sFFAs could activate Akt through a pathway along a PI3K/PDK1/Akt axis in association with PTP1B inhibition.

  15. Efficient expression of tyrosine-sulfated proteins in E. coli using an expanded genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang C; Cellitti, Susan E; Geierstanger, Bernhard H; Schultz, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Tyrosine sulfation is an important post-translational modification that occurs in higher eukaryotes and is involved in cell-cell communication, viral entry and adhesion. We describe a protocol for the heterologous expression of selectively tyrosine-sulfated proteins in Escherichia coli through the use of an expanded genetic code that co-translationally inserts sulfotyrosine in response to the amber nonsense codon, TAG. The components required for this process, an orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase specific for sulfotyrosine and its cognate orthogonal tRNA that recognizes the amber codon, are encoded on the plasmid pSUPAR6-L3-3SY, and their use, along with a simple chemical synthesis of sulfotyrosine, are outlined in this protocol. Specifically, the gene for a protein of interest is mutated such that the codon corresponding to the desired location of tyrosine sulfate is TAG. Co-transformation of an expression vector containing this gene and pSUPAR6-L3-3SY into an appropriate E. coli strain allows the overexpression of the site-specifically sulfated protein with high efficiency and fidelity. The resulting protein contains tyrosine sulfate at any location specified by a TAG codon, making this method significantly simpler and more versatile than competing methods such as in vitro enzymatic sulfation, chemical sulfation and peptide synthesis. Once the proper expression vectors are cloned, our protocol should allow the production of the desired sulfated proteins in <1 week.

  16. STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) Regulates the PTPα/Fyn Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Kurup, Pradeep; Foscue, Ethan; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase Fyn has two regulatory tyrosine residues that when phosphorylated either activate (Tyr420) or inhibit (Tyr531) Fyn activity. Within the central nervous system, two protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) target these regulatory tyrosines in Fyn. PTPα dephosphorylates Tyr531 and activates Fyn, while STEP (STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase) dephosphorylates Tyr420 and inactivates Fyn. Thus, PTPα and STEP have opposing functions in the regulation of Fyn; however, whether there is cross talk between these two PTPs remains unclear. Here, we used molecular techniques in primary neuronal cultures and in vivo to demonstrate that STEP negatively regulates PTPα by directly dephosphorylating PTPα at its regulatory Tyr789. Dephosphorylation of Tyr789 prevents the translocation of PTPα to synaptic membranes, blocking its ability to interact with and activate Fyn. Genetic or pharmacologic reduction of STEP61 activity increased the phosphorylation of PTPα at Tyr789, as well as increased translocation of PTPα to synaptic membranes. Activation of PTPα and Fyn and trafficking of GluN2B to synaptic membranes are necessary for ethanol intake behaviors in rodents. We tested the functional significance of STEP61 in this signaling pathway by ethanol administration to primary cultures as well as in vivo, and demonstrated that the inactivation of STEP61 by ethanol leads to the activation of PTPα, its translocation to synaptic membranes, and the activation of Fyn. These findings indicate a novel mechanism by which STEP61 regulates PTPα and suggest that STEP and PTPα coordinate the regulation of Fyn. PMID:25951993

  17. SOCS proteins in regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazi, Julhash U.; Kabir, Nuzhat N.; Flores Morales, Amilcar

    2014-01-01

    proteins, SOCS1-7, and cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CIS). A key feature of this family of proteins is the presence of an SH2 domain and a SOCS box. Recent studies suggest that SOCS proteins also play a role in RTK signaling. Activation of RTK results in transcriptional activation of SOCS......-encoding genes. These proteins associate with RTKs through their SH2 domains and subsequently recruit the E3 ubiquitin machinery through the SOCS box, and thereby limit receptor stability by inducing ubiquitination. In a similar fashion, SOCS proteins negatively regulate mitogenic signaling by RTKs. It is also...

  18. Cadmium inhibits mouse sperm motility through inducing tyrosine phosphorylation in a specific subset of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lirui; Li, Yuhua; Fu, Jieli; Zhen, Linqing; Zhao, Na; Yang, Qiangzhen; Li, Sisi; Li, Xinhong

    2016-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) has been reported to impair male fertility, primarily by disrupting sperm motility, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we investigated the effects of Cd on sperm motility, tyrosine phosphorylation, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity, and ATP levels in vitro. Our results demonstrated that Cd inhibited sperm motility, GAPDH activity, AMPK activity and ATP production, and induced tyrosine phosphorylation of 55-57KDa proteins. Importantly, all the parameters affected by Cd were restored to normal levels when incubated with 10μM Cd in the presence of 30μM ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Interestingly, changes of tyrosine phosphorylation levels of 55-57KDa proteins are completely contrary to that of other parameters. These results suggest that Cd-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of 55-57KDa proteins might act as an engine to block intracellular energy metabolism and thus decrease sperm motility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of multiple transcripts and isoforms derived from the mouse protein tyrosine phosphatase gene Ptprr.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chirivi, R.G.S.; Dilaver, G.; Vorstenbosch, R.A. van de; Wanschers, B.F.J.; Schepens, J.T.G.; Croes, H.J.E.; Fransen, J.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.

    2004-01-01

    The use of alternative splice sites, promoters and translation start sites considerably adds to the complexity of organisms. Four mouse cDNAs (PTPBR7, PTP-SL, PTPPBSgamma+ and PTPPBSgamma-) have been cloned that contain different 5' parts but encode identical protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRR

  20. Residue 182 influences the second step of protein-tyrosine phosphatase-mediated catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.K.; Guo, X.; Møller, K.B.

    2004-01-01

    Previous enzyme kinetic and structural studies have revealed a critical role for Asp(181) (PTP1B numbering) in PTP (protein-tyrosine phosphatase)-mediated catalysis. In the E-P (phosphoenzyme) formation step, Asp(181) functions as a general acid, while in the E-P hydrolysis step it acts as a gene...

  1. Hamster oviductin regulates tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm proteins during in vitro capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccary, Laurelle; She, Yi-Min; Oko, Richard; Kan, Frederick W K

    2013-08-01

    Oviductin or OVGP1, also known as oviduct-specific glycoprotein, has been shown to enhance sperm capacitation in addition to its other beneficial effects on fertilization and early embryo development. We hypothesized that estrus stage-specific hamster oviductin (eHamOVGP1) can potentiate the enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm proteins during capacitation. Immunofluorescent staining and confocal microscopy as well as immunocytochemistry and surface replica technique localized tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins to the equatorial segment and midpiece after incubation of hamster sperm in capacitation medium in the presence or absence of eHamOVGP1. Increase of tyrosine phosphorylation level in the equatorial segment occurred as early as 5 min after incubation in the presence of eHamOVGP1. Immunostaining for eHamOVGP1 further increased upon prolonged incubation of sperm in medium containing the glycoprotein. Regardless of the presence or absence of eHamOVGP1, phosphotyrosine expression was observed along the tail, particularly at the midpiece. Western blotting of NP40-extracted sperm proteins (25, 37, and 44 kDa) and NP40-non-extractable sperm proteins (70, 83, 90 kDa) showed increased immunolabeling intensity after 5, 60, 120, and 180 min of capacitation in the presence of eHamOVGP1. Mass spectrometric analysis identified several proteins of functions known to be involved in metabolic pathways responsible for enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation in its presence. The present investigation provides evidence that eHamOVGP1 regulates the expression of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm capacitated in vitro, further supporting an important role of the presence of OVGP1 in the oviductal milieu during the process of fertilization.

  2. The expression of COX-2 in VEGF-treated endothelial cells is mediated through protein tyrosine kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravit Akarasereenont

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenase (COX, existing as the COX-1 and COX-2 isoforms, converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2, which is then further metabolized to various prostaglandins. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has been shown to play important roles in inflammation and is upregulated by the prostaglandin E series through COX-2 in several cell types. Here, we have investigated the effects of VEGF on the COX isoform expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. The signalling mechanism of the COX isoform expressed in endothelial cells activated with VEGF will be also investigated using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, and protein kinase C inhibitor, staurosporine. The activity of COX2 was assessed by measuring the production of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α in the presence of exogenous arachidonic acids (10 μM, 10 min by enzyme immunoassay. The expression of COX isoform protein was detected by immunoblot using specific antibodies. Untreated HUVEC contained no COX-2 protein. In HUVEC treated with VEGF (0.01-50 ng/ml, COX-2 protein, but not COX-1, and COX activity were increased in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the increased COX-2 protein and activity in response to VEGF (10 ng/ml was inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein (0.05-5 μg/ml, but not by the protein kinase C inhibitor, staurosporine (0.1-10 ng/ml. Thus, the induction of COX-2 by VEGF in endothelial cells was mediated through protein tyrosine kinase, and the uses of specific COX-2 inhibitors in these conditions, in which VEGF was involved, might have a role.

  3. Mechanism of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B-mediated inhibition of leptin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, I K; Hansen, J A; Andersen, H S

    2005-01-01

    Upon leptin binding, the leptin receptor is activated, leading to stimulation of the JAK/STAT signal transduction cascade. The transient character of the tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 suggests the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) as negative regulators...... PTP1B mediates the cessation of the leptin signal transduction. Leptin-induced activation of a STAT3 responsive reporter was dose-dependently inhibited by co-transfection with PTP1B. No inhibition was observed when a catalytically inactive mutant of PTP1B was used or when other PTPs were co...

  4. Incorporation of Ortho- and Meta-Tyrosine Into Cellular Proteins Leads to Erythropoietin-Resistance in an Erythroid Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esztella Mikolás

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Erythropoietin-resistance is an unsolved concern in the treatment of renal anaemia. We aimed to investigate the possible role of ortho- and meta-tyrosine - the hydroxyl free radical products of L-phenylalanine - in the development of erythropoietin-resistance. Methods: TF-1 erythroblast cell line was used. Cell concentration was determined on day 1; 2 and 3 by two independent observers simultaneously in Bürker cell counting chambers. Protein concentration was determined with colorimetric method. Para-, ortho- and meta-tyrosine levels were measured using reverse phase-HPLC with fluorescence detection. Using Western blot method activating phosphorylation of STAT5 and ERK1/2 were investigated. Results: We found a time- and concentration-dependent decrease of erythropoietin-induced proliferative activity in case of ortho- and meta-tyrosine treated TF-1 erythroblasts, compared to the para-tyrosine cultured cells. Decreased erythropoietin-response could be regained with a competitive dose of para-tyrosine. Proteins of erythroblasts treated by ortho- or meta-tyrosine had lower para-tyrosine and higher ortho- or meta-tyrosine content. Activating phosphorylation of ERK and STAT5 due to erythropoietin was practically prevented by ortho- or meta-tyrosine treatment. Conclusion: According to this study elevated ortho- and meta-tyrosine content of erythroblasts may lead to the dysfunction of intracellular signaling, resulting in erythropoietin-hyporesponsiveness.

  5. Activation of the low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase in keratinocytes exposed to hyperosmotic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A Silva

    Full Text Available Herein, we provide new contribution to the mechanisms involved in keratinocytes response to hyperosmotic shock showing, for the first time, the participation of Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP activity in this event. We reported that sorbitol-induced osmotic stress mediates alterations in the phosphorylation of pivotal cytoskeletal proteins, particularly Src and cofilin. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of the phosphorylated form of LMWPTP, which was followed by an augment in its catalytic activity, was observed. Of particular importance, these responses occurred in an intracellular milieu characterized by elevated levels of reduced glutathione (GSH and increased expression of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. Altogether, our results suggest that hyperosmostic stress provides a favorable cellular environment to the activation of LMWPTP, which is associated with increased expression of antioxidant enzymes, high levels of GSH and inhibition of Src kinase. Finally, the real contribution of LMWPTP in the hyperosmotic stress response of keratinocytes was demonstrated through analysis of the effects of ACP1 gene knockdown in stressed and non-stressed cells. LMWPTP knockdown attenuates the effects of sorbitol induced-stress in HaCaT cells, mainly in the status of Src kinase, Rac and STAT5 phosphorylation and activity. These results describe for the first time the participation of LMWPTP in the dynamics of cytoskeleton rearrangement during exposure of human keratinocytes to hyperosmotic shock, which may contribute to cell death.

  6. Emerging issues in receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase function: lifting fog or simply shifting?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrone, A; Sap, J

    2000-01-01

    Transmembrane (receptor) tyrosine phosphatases are intimately involved in responses to cell-cell and cell-matrix contact. Several important issues regarding the targets and regulation of this protein family are now emerging. For example, these phosphatases exhibit complex interactions...... with signaling pathways involving SRC family kinases, which result from their ability to control phosphorylation of both activating and inhibitory sites in these kinases and possibly also their substrates. Similarly, integrin signaling illustrates how phosphorylation of a single protein, or the activity...

  7. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase regulates the PTPα/Fyn signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Kurup, Pradeep; Foscue, Ethan; Lombroso, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    The tyrosine kinase Fyn has two regulatory tyrosine residues that when phosphorylated either activate (Tyr(420)) or inhibit (Tyr(531)) Fyn activity. Within the central nervous system, two protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) target these regulatory tyrosines in Fyn. PTPα dephosphorylates Tyr(531) and activates Fyn, while STEP (STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase) dephosphorylates Tyr(420) and inactivates Fyn. Thus, PTPα and STEP have opposing functions in the regulation of Fyn; however, whether there is cross talk between these two PTPs remains unclear. Here, we used molecular techniques in primary neuronal cultures and in vivo to demonstrate that STEP negatively regulates PTPα by directly dephosphorylating PTPα at its regulatory Tyr(789). Dephosphorylation of Tyr(789) prevents the translocation of PTPα to synaptic membranes, blocking its ability to interact with and activate Fyn. Genetic or pharmacologic reduction in STEP61 activity increased the phosphorylation of PTPα at Tyr(789), as well as increased translocation of PTPα to synaptic membranes. Activation of PTPα and Fyn and trafficking of GluN2B to synaptic membranes are necessary for ethanol (EtOH) intake behaviors in rodents. We tested the functional significance of STEP61 in this signaling pathway by EtOH administration to primary cultures as well as in vivo, and demonstrated that the inactivation of STEP61 by EtOH leads to the activation of PTPα, its translocation to synaptic membranes, and the activation of Fyn. These findings indicate a novel mechanism by which STEP61 regulates PTPα and suggest that STEP and PTPα coordinate the regulation of Fyn. STEP61 , PTPα, Fyn, and NMDA receptor (NMDAR) have been implicated in ethanol intake behaviors in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) in rodents. Here, we report that PTPα is a novel substrate for STEP61. Upon ethanol exposure, STEP61 is phosphorylated and inactivated by protein kinase A (PKA) signaling in the DMS. As a result of STEP61

  8. Inactivation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases by Peracids Correlates with the Hydrocarbon Chain Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Kuban-Jankowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Protein tyrosine phosphatases are crucial enzymes controlling numerous physiological and pathophysiological events and can be regulated by oxidation of the catalytic domain cysteine residue. Peracids are highly oxidizing compounds, and thus may induce inactivation of PTPs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of peracids with different length of hydrocarbon chain on the activity of selected PTPs. Methods: The enzymatic activity of human CD45, PTP1B, LAR, bacterial YopH was assayed under the cell-free conditions, and activity of cellular CD45 in human Jurkat cell lysates. The molecular docking and molecular dynamics were performed to evaluate the peracids binding to the CD45 active site. Results: Here we demonstrate that peracids reduce enzymatic activity of recombinant CD45, PTP1B, LAR, YopH and cellular CD45. Our studies indicate that peracids are more potent inhibitors of CD45 than hydrogen peroxide (with an IC50 value equal to 25 nM for peroctanoic acid and 8 µM for hydrogen peroxide. The experimental data show that the inactivation caused by peracids is dependent on hydrocarbon chain length of peracids with maximum inhibitory effect of medium-chain peracids (C8-C12 acyl chain, which correlates with calculated binding affinities to the CD45 active site. Conclusion: Peracids are potent inhibitors of PTPs with the strongest inhibitory effect observed for medium-chain peracids.

  9. Exposure of tropoelastin to peroxynitrous acid gives high yields of nitrated tyrosine residues, di-tyrosine cross-links and altered protein structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degendorfer, Georg; Chuang, Christine Y; Mariotti, Michele; Hammer, Astrid; Hoefler, Gerald; Hägglund, Per; Malle, Ernst; Wise, Steven G; Davies, Michael J

    2018-02-01

    Elastin is an abundant extracellular matrix protein in elastic tissues, including the lungs, skin and arteries, and comprises 30-57% of the aorta by dry mass. The monomeric precursor, tropoelastin (TE), undergoes complex processing during elastogenesis to form mature elastic fibres. Peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH), a potent oxidising and nitrating agent, is formed in vivo from superoxide and nitric oxide radicals. Considerable evidence supports ONOOH formation in the inflamed artery wall, and a role for this species in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions, with ONOOH-damaged extracellular matrix implicated in lesion rupture. We demonstrate that TE is highly sensitive to ONOOH, with this resulting in extensive dimerization, fragmentation and nitration of Tyr residues to give 3-nitrotyrosine (3-nitroTyr). This occurs with equimolar or greater levels of oxidant and increases in a dose-dependent manner. Quantification of Tyr loss and 3-nitroTyr formation indicates extensive Tyr modification with up to two modified Tyr per protein molecule, and up to 8% conversion of initial ONOOH to 3-nitroTyr. These effects were modulated by bicarbonate, an alternative target for ONOOH. Inter- and intra-protein di-tyrosine cross-links have been characterized by mass spectrometry. Examination of human atherosclerotic lesions shows colocalization of 3-nitroTyr with elastin epitopes, consistent with TE or elastin modification in vivo, and also an association of 3-nitroTyr containing proteins and elastin with lipid deposits. These data suggest that exposure of TE to ONOOH gives marked chemical and structural changes to TE and altered matrix assembly, and that such damage accumulates in human arterial tissue during the development of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 modulates NOD2-induced cytokine release and autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne R Spalinger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Variations within the gene locus encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22 are associated with the risk to develop inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. PTPN22 is involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell receptor signaling, but although it is highly expressed in innate immune cells, its function in other signaling pathways is less clear. Here, we study whether loss of PTPN22 controls muramyl-dipeptide (MDP-induced signaling and effects in immune cells. MATERIAL & METHODS: Stable knockdown of PTPN22 was induced in THP-1 cells by shRNA transduction prior to stimulation with the NOD2 ligand MDP. Cells were analyzed for signaling protein activation and mRNA expression by Western blot and quantitative PCR; cytokine secretion was assessed by ELISA, autophagosome induction by Western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC were obtained from PTPN22 knockout mice or wild-type animals. RESULTS: MDP-treatment induced PTPN22 expression and activity in human and mouse cells. Knockdown of PTPN22 enhanced MDP-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK-isoforms p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase as well as canonical NF-κB signaling molecules in THP-1 cells and BMDC derived from PTPN22 knockout mice. Loss of PTPN22 enhanced mRNA levels and secretion of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8 and TNF in THP-1 cells and PTPN22 knockout BMDC. Additionally, loss of PTPN22 resulted in increased, MDP-mediated autophagy in human and mouse cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that PTPN22 controls NOD2 signaling, and loss of PTPN22 renders monocytes more reactive towards bacterial products, what might explain the association of PTPN22 variants with IBD pathogenesis.

  11. Protein tyrosine kinase but not protein kinase C inhibition blocks receptor induced alveolar macrophage activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Pollock

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The selective enzyme inhibitors genistein and Ro 31-8220 were used to assess the importance of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK and protein kinase C (PKC, respectively, in N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP induced generation of superoxide anion and thromboxane B2 (TXB2 in guinea-pig alveolar macrophages (AM. Genistein (3–100 μM dose dependently inhibited FMLP (3 nM induced superoxide generation in non-primed AM and TXB2 release in non-primed or in lipopolysaccharide (LPS (10 ng/ml primed AM to a level > 80% but had litle effect up to 100 μM on phorbol myristate acetate (PMA (10 nM induced superoxide release. Ro 31-8220 inhibited PMA induced superoxide generation (IC50 0.21 ± 0.10 μM but had no effect on or potentiated (at 3 and 10 μM FMLP responses in non-primed AM. In contrast, when present during LPS priming as well as during FMLP challenge Ro 31-8220 (10 μM inhibited primed TXB2 release by > 80%. The results indicate that PTK activation is required for the generation of these inflammatory mediators by FMLP in AM. PKC activation appears to be required for LPS priming but not for transducing the FMLP signal; rather, PKC activation may modulate the signal by a negative feedback mechanism.

  12. Crystal structure of the Sema-PSI extracellular domain of human RON receptor tyrosine kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinlin L Chao

    Full Text Available Human RON (Recepteur d'Origine Nantais receptor tyrosine kinase is a cell surface receptor for Macrophage Stimulating Protein (MSP. RON mediates signal transduction pathways that regulate cell adhesion, invasion, motility and apoptosis processes. Elevated levels of RON and its alternatively spliced variants are implicated in the progression and metastasis of tumor cells. The binding of MSP α/β heterodimer to the extracellular region of RON receptor induces receptor dimerization and activation by autophosphorylation of the intracellular kinase domains. The ectodomain of RON, containing the ligand recognition and dimerization domains, is composed of a semaphorin (Sema, Plexins-Semaphorins-Integrins domain (PSI, and four Immunoglobulins-Plexins-Transcription factor (IPT domains. High affinity association between MSP and RON is mediated by the interaction between MSP β-chain and RON Sema, although RON activation requires intact RON and MSP proteins. Here, we report the structure of RON Sema-PSI domains at 1.85 Å resolution. RON Sema domain adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller fold, followed by disulfide bond rich, cysteine-knot PSI motif. Comparison with the homologous Met receptor tyrosine kinase reveals that RON Sema-PSI contains distinguishing secondary structural features. These define the receptors' exclusive selectivity towards their respective ligands, RON for MSP and Met for HGF. The RON Sema-PSI crystal packing generates a homodimer with interface formed by the Sema domain. Mapping of the dimer interface using the RON homology to Met, MSP homology to Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, and the structure of the Met/HGF complex shows the dimer interface overlapping with the putative MSPβ binding site. The crystallographically determined RON Sema-PSI homodimer may represent the dimer assembly that occurs during ligand-independent receptor activation and/or the inhibition of the constitutive activity of RONΔ160 splice variant by the soluble RON

  13. Serotonin stimulates protein tyrosyl phosphorylation and vascular contraction via tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, S W; Yeum, C H; Campbell, G; Webb, R C

    1996-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptamine) is a mitogen in vascular smooth muscle and vascular reactivity to 5-HT is significantly enhanced in hypertension and atherosclerosis. We have tested the hypothesis that tyrosine kinases, enzymes important for mitogenesis, may play a role in 5-HT-induced vascular smooth muscle contractility. Helical strips of rat carotid artery and aorta denuded of endothelium were mounted in tissue baths for measurement of contractile force. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein (5 x 10(-6) M) decreased the potency of 5-HT approximately 4-fold and reduced maximal contraction to 5-HT in carotid arterial strips denuded of endothelium (58% control). Genistein's inactive congener daidzein (5 x 10(-6) M) did not reduce maximal contraction to 5-HT in carotid arteries but did shift the 5-HT concentration response curve 3-fold to the right. Tyrphostin 23 (5 x 10(-5) M), another tyrosine kinase inhibitor, decreased the potency of 5-HT 4-fold and reduced the maximal contraction to 5-HT in the carotid artery (10% control). Contractions induced by phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (10(-9) to 10(-5) M) were not reduced or shifted by either tyrosine kinase inhibitor, indicating that phorbolester-sensitive protein kinase C isoforms were not affected. KCl-induced contraction was shifted 2-fold and the maximum significantly inhibited by tyrphostin 23 (38.6% control) but not genistein or daidzein, indicating that tyrphostin 23 but not genistein may inhibit voltage-gated calcium channels to reduce contractility. Western blot analysis using antiphosphotyrosine antibody confirmed that 5-HT produced a time- and concentration-dependent increase in the phosphotyrosine immunoreactivity of a 42-kD protein in cultured aortic smooth muscle cells. Lysate immunoprecipitation with an antimitogen-activated-protein (MAP)-kinase antibody indicated that the 42-kD protein was most likely a MAP kinase. 5-HT (10(-5) M) stimulated contraction and increased antiphosphotyrosine

  14. Disruption of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) function in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Takatoshi; Lombroso, Paul J

    2014-12-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific tyrosine phosphatase that plays a major role in the development of synaptic plasticity. Recent findings have implicated STEP in several psychiatric and neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, fragile X syndrome, Huntington's disease, stroke/ischemia, and stress-related psychiatric disorders. In these disorders, STEP protein expression levels and activity are dysregulated, contributing to the cognitive deficits that are present. In this review, we focus on the most recent findings on STEP, discuss how STEP expression and activity are maintained during normal cognitive function, and how disruptions in STEP activity contribute to a number of illnesses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha is essential for hippocampal neuronal migration and long-term potentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrone, Angiola; Battaglia, Fortunato; Wang, Cheng

    2003-01-01

    Despite clear indications of their importance in lower organisms, the contributions of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) to development or function of the mammalian nervous system have been poorly explored. In vitro studies have indicated that receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPa....... However, these synapses are unable to undergo long-term potentiation. Mice lacking RPTPalpha also underperform in the radial-arm water-maze test. These studies identify RPTPalpha as a key mediator of neuronal migration and synaptic plasticity....... neuronal migration. The migratory abnormality likely results from a radial glial dysfunction rather than from a neuron-autonomous defect. In spite of this aberrant development, basic synaptic transmission from the Schaffer collateral pathway to CA1 pyramidal neurons remains intact in Ptpra(-/-) mice...

  16. Striatal-enriched protein-tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) regulates Pyk2 kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Kurup, Pradeep; Bartos, Jason A; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Hell, Johannes W; Lombroso, Paul J

    2012-06-15

    Proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) is a member of the focal adhesion kinase family and is highly expressed in brain and hematopoietic cells. Pyk2 plays diverse functions in cells, including the regulation of cell adhesion, migration, and cytoskeletal reorganization. In the brain, it is involved in the induction of long term potentiation through regulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor trafficking. This occurs through the phosphorylation and activation of Src family tyrosine kinase members, such as Fyn, that phosphorylate GluN2B at Tyr(1472). Phosphorylation at this site leads to exocytosis of GluN1-GluN2B receptors to synaptic membranes. Pyk2 activity is modulated by phosphorylation at several critical tyrosine sites, including Tyr(402). In this study, we report that Pyk2 is a substrate of striatal-enriched protein-tyrosine phosphatase (STEP). STEP binds to and dephosphorylates Pyk2 at Tyr(402). STEP KO mice showed enhanced phosphorylation of Pyk2 at Tyr(402) and of the Pyk2 substrates paxillin and ASAP1. Functional studies indicated that STEP opposes Pyk2 activation after KCl depolarization of cortical slices and blocks Pyk2 translocation to postsynaptic densities, a key step required for Pyk2 activation and function. This is the first study to identify Pyk2 as a substrate for STEP.

  17. Global tyrosine kinome profiling of human thyroid tumors identifies Src as a promising target for invasive cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nancy L., E-mail: nlcho@partners.org [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Lin, Chi-Iou [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Du, Jinyan [Broad Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States); Whang, Edward E. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Ito, Hiromichi [Department of Surgery, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI 48912 (United States); Moore, Francis D.; Ruan, Daniel T. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinome profiling is a novel technique for identifying activated kinases in human cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Src activity is increased in invasive thyroid cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Src activity decreased proliferation and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Further investigation of Src targeted therapies in thyroid cancer is warranted. -- Abstract: Background: Novel therapies are needed for the treatment of invasive thyroid cancers. Aberrant activation of tyrosine kinases plays an important role in thyroid oncogenesis. Because current targeted therapies are biased toward a small subset of tyrosine kinases, we conducted a study to reveal novel therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer using a bead-based, high-throughput system. Methods: Thyroid tumors and matched normal tissues were harvested from twenty-six patients in the operating room. Protein lysates were analyzed using the Luminex immunosandwich, a bead-based kinase phosphorylation assay. Data was analyzed using GenePattern 3.0 software and clustered according to histology, demographic factors, and tumor status regarding capsular invasion, size, lymphovascular invasion, and extrathyroidal extension. Survival and invasion assays were performed to determine the effect of Src inhibition in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) cells. Results: Tyrosine kinome profiling demonstrated upregulation of nine tyrosine kinases in tumors relative to matched normal thyroid tissue: EGFR, PTK6, BTK, HCK, ABL1, TNK1, GRB2, ERK, and SRC. Supervised clustering of well-differentiated tumors by histology, gender, age, or size did not reveal significant differences in tyrosine kinase activity. However, supervised clustering by the presence of invasive disease showed increased Src activity in invasive tumors relative to non-invasive tumors (60% v. 0%, p < 0.05). In vitro, we found that Src inhibition in PTC cells decreased cell invasion and proliferation

  18. Dynamics of the WPD Loop of the Yersinia Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xin; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2006-01-01

    The bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH is an essential virulence determinant in Yersinia spp., causing gastrointestinal diseases and the plague. Like eukaryotic PTPases, YopH catalyzes the hydrolysis of the phosphate moiety of phosphotyrosine within a highly conserved binding pocket, which is also characterized by the closure of the so-called “WPD loop” upon ligand binding. In this study, we investigate the conformational changes and dynamics of the WPD loop by molecular dynamics sim...

  19. Small-molecule protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibition as a neuroprotective treatment after spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Shojiro; Arnold, Sheila A; Mahoney, Edward T; Sithu, Srinivas D; Zhang, Y Ping; D'Souza, Stanley E; Shields, Christopher B; Hagg, Theo

    2008-07-16

    Spinal cord injury causes progressive secondary tissue degeneration, leaving many injured people with neurological disabilities. There are no satisfactory neuroprotective treatments. Protein tyrosine phosphatases inactivate neurotrophic factor receptors and downstream intracellular signaling molecules. Thus, we tested whether the peroxovanadium compound potassium bisperoxo(1,10-phenanthroline)oxovanadate (V) [bpV(phen)], a stable, potent and selective protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, would be neuroprotective after a thoracic spinal cord contusion in adult rats. Intrathecal bpV(phen) infusions through a lumbar puncture rescued dorsal column sensory axons innervating the nucleus gracilis and white matter at the injury epicenter. At the most effective dose, essentially all of these axons and most of the white matter at the epicenter were spared (vs approximately 60% with control infusions). bpV(phen) treatments started 4 h after contusion were fully effective. This treatment greatly improved and normalized sensorimotor function in a grid-walking test and provided complete axonal protection over 6 weeks. The treatment rescued sensory-evoked potentials that disappeared after dorsal column transection. bpV(phen) affected early degenerative mechanisms, because the main effects were seen at 7 d and lasted beyond the treatment period. The neuroprotection appeared to be mediated by rescue of blood vessels. bpV(phen) reduced apoptosis of cultured endothelial cells. These results show that a small molecule, used in a clinically relevant manner, reduces loss of long-projecting axons, myelin, blood vessels, and function in a model relevant to the most common type of spinal cord injury in humans. They reveal a novel mechanism of spinal cord degeneration involving protein tyrosine phosphatases that can be targeted with therapeutic drugs.

  20. Cryopreservation of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) sperm induces protein phosphorylation in tyrosine and threonine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P; Hulak, M; Li, Z H; Sulc, M; Psenicka, M; Rodina, M; Gela, D; Linhart, O

    2013-07-15

    The effect of cryopreservation on the protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation pattern of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) sperm is described. Sperm was diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethylene glycol (EG)-based extenders, followed by equilibration, freezing, and thawing. Proteins extracted from fresh and cryopreserved spermatozoa were separated on SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, blotted on polyvinylidene difluoride membrane, and treated with anti-phosphotyrosine, anti-phosphothreonine, or anti-phosphoserine antibodies. For the subsequent protein identification we used matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The results demonstrated that cryopreservation with either DMSO or EG extender significantly altered the phosphorylation state of sperm proteins on tyrosine or threonine residues. A dramatic decrease in tyrosine phosphorylation was detected in the cryopreservation procedures with DMSO extender. Endoplasmin, transketolase, and S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase were identified as proteins that play a key role in cellular stress responses and oxidation and/or reduction reactions. Results indicate that the phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation modifications of sperm proteins that occur during cryopreservation could stimulate a series of biochemical effects interfering with spermatozoa function and leading to a loss of motility and fertilization ability. Our findings indicated that use of EG extender provided superior protein preservation during sperm storage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B. I. Ligand-induced changes in the protein motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H. J.; Frimurer, T.M.; Andersen, J.N.

    1999-01-01

    molecular dynamics simulations of PTP1B and PTP1B complexed with a high-affinity peptide DADEpYL, where pY stands for phosphorylated tyrosine. The peptide sequence is derived from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR(988-993)). Simulations were performed in water for 1 ns, and the concerted motions...... in the protein were analyzed using the essential dynamics technique. Our results indicate that the predominately internal motions in PTP1B occur in a subspace of only a few degrees of freedom. Upon substrate binding, the flexibility of the protein is reduced by similar to 10%. The largest effect is found......Activity of enzymes, such as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), is often associated with structural changes in the enzyme, resulting in selective and stereospecific reactions with the substrate. To investigate the effect of a substrate on the motions occurring in PTPs, we have performed...

  2. Differential regulation of protein tyrosine kinase signalling by Dock and the PTP61F variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Lee F; Manent, Jan; Allan, Kirsten; Lee, Han; Portela, Marta; Wiede, Florian; Warr, Coral; Meng, Tzu-Ching; Tiganis, Tony; Richardson, Helena E

    2017-07-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent signalling is coordinated by the opposing actions of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). There is a growing list of adaptor proteins that interact with PTPs and facilitate the dephosphorylation of substrates. The extent to which any given adaptor confers selectivity for any given substrate in vivo remains unclear. Here we have taken advantage of Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism to explore the influence of the SH3/SH2 adaptor protein Dock on the abilities of the membrane (PTP61Fm)- and nuclear (PTP61Fn)-targeted variants of PTP61F (the Drosophila othologue of the mammalian enzymes PTP1B and TCPTP respectively) to repress PTK signalling pathways in vivo. PTP61Fn effectively repressed the eye overgrowth associated with activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), PTK, or the expression of the platelet-derived growth factor/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (PVR) or insulin receptor (InR) PTKs. PTP61Fn repressed EGFR and PVR-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling and attenuated PVR-induced STAT92E signalling. By contrast, PTP61Fm effectively repressed EGFR- and PVR-, but not InR-induced tissue overgrowth. Importantly, coexpression of Dock with PTP61F allowed for the efficient repression of the InR-induced eye overgrowth, but did not enhance the PTP61Fm-mediated inhibition of EGFR and PVR-induced signalling. Instead, Dock expression increased, and PTP61Fm coexpression further exacerbated the PVR-induced eye overgrowth. These results demonstrate that Dock selectively enhances the PTP61Fm-mediated attenuation of InR signalling and underscores the specificity of PTPs and the importance of adaptor proteins in regulating PTP function in vivo. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. Protein targets of tyrosine nitration in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) hypocotyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Mounira; Valderrama, Raquel; Fernández-Ocaña, Ana M; Carreras, Alfonso; López-Jaramillo, Javier; Luque, Francisco; Palma, José M; Pedrajas, José R; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Gómez-Rodríguez, María V; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2009-01-01

    Tyrosine nitration is recognized as an important post-translational protein modification in animal cells that can be used as an indicator of a nitrosative process. However, in plant systems, there is scant information on proteins that undergo this process. In sunflower hypocotyls, the content of tyrosine nitration (NO(2)-Tyr) and the identification of nitrated proteins were studied by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and proteomic approaches, respectively. In addition, the cell localization of nitrotyrosine proteins and peroxynitrite were analysed by confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) using antibodies against 3-nitrotyrosine and 3'-(p-aminophenyl) fluorescein (APF) as the fluorescent probe, in that order. The concentration of Tyr and NO(2)-Tyr in hypocotyls was 0.56 micromol mg(-1) protein and 0.19 pmol mg(-1) protein, respectively. By proteomic analysis, a total of 21 nitrotyrosine-immunopositive proteins were identified. These targets include proteins involved in photosynthesis, and in antioxidant, ATP, carbohydrate, and nitrogen metabolism. Among the proteins identified, S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) was selected as a model to evaluate the effect of nitration on SAHH activity using SIN-1 (a peroxynitrite donor) as the nitrating agent. When the hypocotyl extracts were exposed to 0.5 mM, 1 mM, and 5 mM SIN-1, the SAHH activity was inhibited by some 49%, 89%, and 94%, respectively. In silico analysis of the barley SAHH sequence, characterized Tyr448 as the most likely potential target for nitration. In summary, the present data are the first in plants concerning the content of nitrotyrosine and the identification of candidates of protein nitration. Taken together, the results suggest that Tyr nitration occurs in plant tissues under physiological conditions that could constitute an important process of protein regulation in such a way that, when it is overproduced in adverse circumstances, it can be

  4. Overexpression of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in INS-1 cells.

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    Lu, Bin; Gu, Ping; Xu, Yixin; Ye, Xiaozhen; Wang, Yingzhijie; DU, Hong; Shao, Jiaqing

    2016-03-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been implicated as a negative regulator of insulin signaling. We reported previously that impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in rats fed high-fat diet was associated with higher PTP1B protein levels in islets. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of increasing PTP1B on insulin secretion in β-cells. INS-1 cells were transduced with recombinant adenoviruses containing human PTP1B cDNA (Ad-PTP1B), or no exogenous gene (Ad-ctrl). The expression levels of PTP1B, insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate-1(IRS-1), glucokinase and glucose transporter-2 were evaluated by Western blot. Then insulin-stimulated IR and IRS tyrosine phosphorylation, and Akt pathway activation were measured. GSIS was also performed to evaluate INS-1 cells function. PTP1B expression level was increased 5.9-fold at 48h post-transduction. The overexpression of PTP1B had no effect on proliferation and apoptosis of INS-1 cells. Compared with control cells, INS-1 cells overexpressing PTP1B showed decrease in insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR) and insulin receptor substrate-1(IRS-1) by 56.4% and 53.1%, respectively. In addition, Akt phosphorylation was reduced 59.6%. Moreover, in Ad-PTP1B-transduced cells, 16.7mM glucose caused a 1.6±0.2 fold increase (vs. 3.9±0.7 fold in nontransduced cells) in insulin secretion relative to secretion at 2.8mM glucose. Further analysis determined that overexpression of PTP1B induced down-regulated expression of glucokinase (42%) and glucose transporter-2 (48%). Our findings suggested that overexpression of PTP1B can inhibit GSIS in INS-1 cells through negatively regulating insulin signaling.

  5. Modulation of catalytic activity in multi-domain protein tyrosine phosphatases.

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    Lalima L Madan

    Full Text Available Signaling mechanisms involving protein tyrosine phosphatases govern several cellular and developmental processes. These enzymes are regulated by several mechanisms which include variation in the catalytic turnover rate based on redox stimuli, subcellular localization or protein-protein interactions. In the case of Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (RPTPs containing two PTP domains, phosphatase activity is localized in their membrane-proximal (D1 domains, while the membrane-distal (D2 domain is believed to play a modulatory role. Here we report our analysis of the influence of the D2 domain on the catalytic activity and substrate specificity of the D1 domain using two Drosophila melanogaster RPTPs as a model system. Biochemical studies reveal contrasting roles for the D2 domain of Drosophila Leukocyte antigen Related (DLAR and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase on Drosophila chromosome band 99A (PTP99A. While D2 lowers the catalytic activity of the D1 domain in DLAR, the D2 domain of PTP99A leads to an increase in the catalytic activity of its D1 domain. Substrate specificity, on the other hand, is cumulative, whereby the individual specificities of the D1 and D2 domains contribute to the substrate specificity of these two-domain enzymes. Molecular dynamics simulations on structural models of DLAR and PTP99A reveal a conformational rationale for the experimental observations. These studies reveal that concerted structural changes mediate inter-domain communication resulting in either inhibitory or activating effects of the membrane distal PTP domain on the catalytic activity of the membrane proximal PTP domain.

  6. Dimerization of Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase alpha in living cells

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    Gadella Theodorus WJ

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dimerization is an important regulatory mechanism of single membrane-spanning receptors. For instance, activation of receptor protein-tyrosine kinases (RPTKs involves dimerization. Structural, functional and biochemical studies suggested that the enzymatic counterparts of RPTKs, the receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs, are inhibited by dimerization, but whether RPTPs actually dimerize in living cells remained to be determined. Results In order to assess RPTP dimerization, we have assayed Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET between chimeric proteins of cyan- and yellow-emitting derivatives of green fluorescent protein, fused to RPTPα, using three different techniques: dual wavelength excitation, spectral imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging. All three techniques suggested that FRET occurred between RPTPα -CFP and -YFP fusion proteins, and thus that RPTPα dimerized in living cells. RPTPα dimerization was constitutive, extensive and specific. RPTPα dimerization was consistent with cross-linking experiments, using a non-cell-permeable chemical cross-linker. Using a panel of deletion mutants, we found that the transmembrane domain was required and sufficient for dimerization. Conclusions We demonstrate here that RPTPα dimerized constitutively in living cells, which may be mediated by the transmembrane domain, providing strong support for the model that dimerization is involved in regulation of RPTPs.

  7. The differentiation of skeletal muscle cells involves a protein-tyrosine phosphatase-alpha-mediated C-Src signaling pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Huogen; Shah, Poonam; Ennis, David

    2002-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase-alpha (PTPalpha) plays an important role in various cellular signaling events, including proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we established L6 cell lines either underexpressing or overexpressing PTPalpha by stable transfection of cells with antisense PTP....... Moreover, enhanced expression of PTPalpha and activation of Src was detected during myogenesis. Together, these data indicate that PTPalpha is involved in the regulation of L6 myoblast growth and skeletal muscle cell differentiation via an Src-mediated signaling pathway.......Protein-tyrosine phosphatase-alpha (PTPalpha) plays an important role in various cellular signaling events, including proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we established L6 cell lines either underexpressing or overexpressing PTPalpha by stable transfection of cells with antisense...... PTPalpha or with full-length wild-type human or mouse or double catalytic site Cys --> Ala mutant (DM8) PTPalpha cDNA. Expression of PTPalpha in these cell lines was determined by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. Cells harboring antisense PTPalpha exhibited a significantly reduced growth rate...

  8. Design, synthesis, biological activity and molecular dynamics studies of specific protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors over SHP-2.

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    Sun, Su-Xia; Li, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Wen-Bo; Ma, Ying; Wang, Run-Ling; Cheng, Xian-Chao; Wang, Shu-Qing; Liu, Wei

    2013-06-17

    Over expressing in PTPN1 (encoding Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, PTP1B), a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) that plays an overall positive role in insulin signaling, is linked to the pathogenesis of diabetes and obesity. The relationship between PTP1B and human diseases exhibits PTP1B as the target to treat these diseases. In this article, small weight molecules of the imidazolidine series were screened from databases and optimized on silicon as the inhibitors of PTP1B based on the steric conformation and electronic configuration of thiazolidinedione (TZD) compounds. The top three candidates were tested using an in vitro biological assay after synthesis. Finally, we report a novel inhibitor, Compound 13, that specifically inhibits PTP1B over the closely related phosphatase Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) at 80 μΜ. Its IC50 values are reported in this paper as well. This compound was further verified by computer analysis for its ability to combine the catalytic domains of PTP1B and SHP-2 by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

  9. Design, Synthesis, Biological Activity and Molecular Dynamics Studies of Specific Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitors over SHP-2

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    Wei Liu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Over expressing in PTPN1 (encoding Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, PTP1B, a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP that plays an overall positive role in insulin signaling, is linked to the pathogenesis of diabetes and obesity. The relationship between PTP1B and human diseases exhibits PTP1B as the target to treat these diseases. In this article, small weight molecules of the imidazolidine series were screened from databases and optimized on silicon as the inhibitors of PTP1B based on the steric conformation and electronic configuration of thiazolidinedione (TZD compounds. The top three candidates were tested using an in vitro biological assay after synthesis. Finally, we report a novel inhibitor, Compound 13, that specifically inhibits PTP1B over the closely related phosphatase Src homology 2 (SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2 at 80 μΜ. Its IC50 values are reported in this paper as well. This compound was further verified by computer analysis for its ability to combine the catalytic domains of PTP1B and SHP-2 by molecular dynamics (MD simulations.

  10. Gene expression analysis after receptor tyrosine kinase activation reveals new potential melanoma proteins

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    Krause Michael

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoma is an aggressive tumor with increasing incidence. To develop accurate prognostic markers and targeted therapies, changes leading to malignant transformation of melanocytes need to be understood. In the Xiphophorus melanoma model system, a mutated version of the EGF receptor Xmrk (Xiphophorus melanoma receptor kinase triggers melanomagenesis. Cellular events downstream of Xmrk, such as the activation of Akt, Ras, B-Raf or Stat5, were also shown to play a role in human melanomagenesis. This makes the elucidation of Xmrk downstream targets a useful method for identifying processes involved in melanoma formation. Methods Here, we analyzed Xmrk-induced gene expression using a microarray approach. Several highly expressed genes were confirmed by realtime PCR, and pathways responsible for their induction were revealed using small molecule inhibitors. The expression of these genes was also monitored in human melanoma cell lines, and the target gene FOSL1 was knocked down by siRNA. Proliferation and migration of siRNA-treated melanoma cell lines were then investigated. Results Genes with the strongest upregulation after receptor activation were FOS-like antigen 1 (Fosl1, early growth response 1 (Egr1, osteopontin (Opn, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (Igfbp3, dual-specificity phosphatase 4 (Dusp4, and tumor-associated antigen L6 (Taal6. Interestingly, most genes were blocked in presence of a SRC kinase inhibitor. Importantly, we found that FOSL1, OPN, IGFBP3, DUSP4, and TAAL6 also exhibited increased expression levels in human melanoma cell lines compared to human melanocytes. Knockdown of FOSL1 in human melanoma cell lines reduced their proliferation and migration. Conclusion Altogether, the data show that the receptor tyrosine kinase Xmrk is a useful tool in the identification of target genes that are commonly expressed in Xmrk-transgenic melanocytes and melanoma cell lines. The identified molecules constitute

  11. Gene expression analysis after receptor tyrosine kinase activation reveals new potential melanoma proteins.

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    Teutschbein, Janka; Haydn, Johannes M; Samans, Birgit; Krause, Michael; Eilers, Martin; Schartl, Manfred; Meierjohann, Svenja

    2010-07-21

    Melanoma is an aggressive tumor with increasing incidence. To develop accurate prognostic markers and targeted therapies, changes leading to malignant transformation of melanocytes need to be understood. In the Xiphophorus melanoma model system, a mutated version of the EGF receptor Xmrk (Xiphophorus melanoma receptor kinase) triggers melanomagenesis. Cellular events downstream of Xmrk, such as the activation of Akt, Ras, B-Raf or Stat5, were also shown to play a role in human melanomagenesis. This makes the elucidation of Xmrk downstream targets a useful method for identifying processes involved in melanoma formation. Here, we analyzed Xmrk-induced gene expression using a microarray approach. Several highly expressed genes were confirmed by realtime PCR, and pathways responsible for their induction were revealed using small molecule inhibitors. The expression of these genes was also monitored in human melanoma cell lines, and the target gene FOSL1 was knocked down by siRNA. Proliferation and migration of siRNA-treated melanoma cell lines were then investigated. Genes with the strongest upregulation after receptor activation were FOS-like antigen 1 (Fosl1), early growth response 1 (Egr1), osteopontin (Opn), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (Igfbp3), dual-specificity phosphatase 4 (Dusp4), and tumor-associated antigen L6 (Taal6). Interestingly, most genes were blocked in presence of a SRC kinase inhibitor. Importantly, we found that FOSL1, OPN, IGFBP3, DUSP4, and TAAL6 also exhibited increased expression levels in human melanoma cell lines compared to human melanocytes. Knockdown of FOSL1 in human melanoma cell lines reduced their proliferation and migration. Altogether, the data show that the receptor tyrosine kinase Xmrk is a useful tool in the identification of target genes that are commonly expressed in Xmrk-transgenic melanocytes and melanoma cell lines. The identified molecules constitute new possible molecular players in melanoma development

  12. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SAP-1 protects against colitis through regulation of CEACAM20 in the intestinal epithelium.

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    Murata, Yoji; Kotani, Takenori; Supriatna, Yana; Kitamura, Yasuaki; Imada, Shinya; Kawahara, Kohichi; Nishio, Miki; Daniwijaya, Edwin Widyanto; Sadakata, Hisanobu; Kusakari, Shinya; Mori, Munemasa; Kanazawa, Yoshitake; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okawa, Katsuya; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Azuma, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akira; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-08-04

    Intestinal epithelial cells contribute to regulation of intestinal immunity in mammals, but the detailed molecular mechanisms of such regulation have remained largely unknown. Stomach-cancer-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SAP-1, also known as PTPRH) is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase that is localized specifically at microvilli of the brush border in gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Here we show that SAP-1 ablation in interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice, a model of inflammatory bowel disease, resulted in a marked increase in the severity of colitis in association with up-regulation of mRNAs for various cytokines and chemokines in the colon. Tyrosine phosphorylation of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 20, an intestinal microvillus-specific transmembrane protein of the Ig superfamily, was greatly increased in the intestinal epithelium of the SAP-1-deficient animals, suggesting that this protein is a substrate for SAP-1. Tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM20 by the protein tyrosine kinase c-Src and the consequent association of CEACAM20 with spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) promoted the production of IL-8 in cultured cells through the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, SAP-1 and CEACAM20 were found to form a complex through interaction of their ectodomains. SAP-1 and CEACAM20 thus constitute a regulatory system through which the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal immunity.

  13. Evolutionary conservation of an atypical glucocorticoid-responsive element in the human tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

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    Sheela Rani, C S; Soto-Pina, Alexandra; Iacovitti, Lorraine; Strong, Randy

    2013-07-01

    The human tyrosine hydroxylase (hTH) gene has a 42 bp evolutionarily conserved region designated (CR) II at -7.24 kb, which bears 93% homology to the region we earlier identified as containing the glucocorticoid response element, a 7 bp activator protein-1 (AP-1)-like motif in the rat TH gene. We cloned this hTH-CRII region upstream of minimal basal hTH promoter in luciferase (Luc) reporter vector, and tested glucocorticoid responsiveness in human cell lines. Dexamethasone (Dex) stimulated Luc activity of hTH-CRII in HeLa cells, while mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist, prevented Dex stimulation. Deletion of the 7 bp 5'-TGACTAA at -7243 bp completely abolished the Dex-stimulated Luc activity of hTH-CRII construct. The AP-1 agonist, tetradeconoyl-12,13-phorbol acetate (TPA), also stimulated hTH promoter activity, and Dex and TPA together further accentuated this response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed the presence of both GR and AP-1 proteins, especially Jun family members, at this hTH promoter site. Dex did not stimulate hTH promoter activity in a catecholaminergic cell line, which had low endogenous GR levels, but did activate the response when GR was expressed exogenously. Thus, our studies have clearly identified a glucocorticoid-responsive element in a 7 bp AP-1-like motif in the promoter region at -7.24 kb of the human TH gene. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  14. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

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    Lei eShi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells.

  15. An evolutionarily conserved glycine-tyrosine motif forms a folding core in outer membrane proteins.

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    Marcin Michalik

    Full Text Available An intimate interaction between a pair of amino acids, a tyrosine and glycine on neighboring β-strands, has been previously reported to be important for the structural stability of autotransporters. Here, we show that the conservation of this interacting pair extends to nearly all major families of outer membrane β-barrel proteins, which are thought to have originated through duplication events involving an ancestral ββ hairpin. We analyzed the function of this motif using the prototypical outer membrane protein OmpX. Stopped-flow fluorescence shows that two folding processes occur in the millisecond time regime, the rates of which are reduced in the tyrosine mutant. Folding assays further demonstrate a reduction in the yield of folded protein for the mutant compared to the wild-type, as well as a reduction in thermal stability. Taken together, our data support the idea of an evolutionarily conserved 'folding core' that affects the folding, membrane insertion, and thermal stability of outer membrane protein β-barrels.

  16. The Cytoplasmic Adaptor Protein Dok7 Activates the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase MuSK via Dimerization

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    Bergamin, E.; Hallock, P; Burden, S; Hubbard, S

    2010-01-01

    Formation of the vertebrate neuromuscular junction requires, among others proteins, Agrin, a neuronally derived ligand, and the following muscle proteins: LRP4, the receptor for Agrin; MuSK, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK); and Dok7 (or Dok-7), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein. Dok7 comprises a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain, a phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, and C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. Unique among adaptor proteins recruited to RTKs, Dok7 is not only a substrate of MuSK, but also an activator of MuSK's kinase activity. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Dok7 PH-PTB domains in complex with a phosphopeptide representing the Dok7-binding site on MuSK. The structure and biochemical data reveal a dimeric arrangement of Dok7 PH-PTB that facilitates trans-autophosphorylation of the kinase activation loop. The structure provides the molecular basis for MuSK activation by Dok7 and for rationalizing several Dok7 loss-of-function mutations found in patients with congenital myasthenic syndromes.

  17. Protein-tyrosine phosphorylation interaction network in Bacillus subtilis reveals new substrates, kinase activators and kinase cross-talk.

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    Lei eShi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Signal transduction in eukaryotes is generally transmitted through phosphorylation cascades that involve a complex interplay of transmembrane receptors, protein kinases, phosphatases and their targets. Our previous work indicated that bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases may exhibit similar properties, since they act on many different substrates. To capture the complexity of this phosphorylation-based network, we performed a comprehensive interactome study focused on the protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. The resulting network identified many potential new substrates of kinases and phosphatases, some of which were experimentally validated. Our study highlighted the role of tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases and phosphatases in DNA metabolism, transcriptional control and cell division. This interaction network reveals significant crosstalk among different classes of kinases. We found that tyrosine kinases can bind to several modulators, transmembrane or cytosolic, consistent with a branching of signaling pathways. Most particularly, we found that the division site regulator MinD can form a complex with the tyrosine kinase PtkA and modulate its activity in vitro. In vivo, it acts as a scaffold protein which anchors the kinase at the cell pole. This network highlighted a role of tyrosine phosphorylation in the spatial regulation of the Z-ring during cytokinesis.

  18. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type z negatively regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

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    Kazuya Kuboyama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fyn tyrosine kinase-mediated down-regulation of Rho activity through activation of p190RhoGAP is crucial for oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Therefore, the loss of function of its counterpart protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP may enhance myelination during development and remyelination in demyelinating diseases. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether Ptprz, a receptor-like PTP (RPTP expressed abuntantly in oligodendrocyte lineage cells, is involved in this process, because we recently revealed that p190RhoGAP is a physiological substrate for Ptprz. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found an early onset of the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP, a major protein of the myelin sheath, and early initiation of myelination in vivo during development of the Ptprz-deficient mouse, as compared with the wild-type. In addition, oligodendrocytes appeared earlier in primary cultures from Ptprz-deficient mice than wild-type mice. Furthermore, adult Ptprz-deficient mice were less susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE induced by active immunization with myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG peptide than were wild-type mice. After EAE was induced, the tyrosine phosphorylation of p190RhoGAP increased significantly, and the EAE-induced loss of MBP was markedly suppressed in the white matter of the spinal cord in Ptprz-deficient mice. Here, the number of T-cells and macrophages/microglia infiltrating into the spinal cord did not differ between the two genotypes after MOG immunization. All these findings strongly support the validity of our hypothesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ptprz plays a negative role in oligodendrocyte differentiation in early central nervous system (CNS development and remyelination in demyelinating CNS diseases, through the dephosphorylation of substrates such as p190RhoGAP.

  19. Oviduct binding and elevated environmental ph induce protein tyrosine phosphorylation in stallion spermatozoa.

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    Leemans, Bart; Gadella, Bart M; Sostaric, Edita; Nelis, Hilde; Stout, Tom A E; Hoogewijs, Maarten; Van Soom, Ann

    2014-07-01

    Sperm-oviduct binding is an essential step in the capacitation process preparing the sperm for fertilization in several mammalian species. In many species, capacitation can be induced in vitro by exposing spermatozoa to bicarbonate, Ca(2+), and albumin; however, these conditions are insufficient in the horse. We hypothesized that binding to the oviduct epithelium is an essential requirement for the induction of capacitation in stallion spermatozoa. Sperm-oviduct binding was established by coincubating equine oviduct explants for 2 h with stallion spermatozoa (2 × 10(6) spermatozoa/ml), during which it transpired that the highest density (per mm(2)) of oviduct-bound spermatozoa was achieved under noncapacitating conditions. In subsequent experiments, sperm-oviduct incubations were performed for 6 h under noncapacitating versus capacitating conditions. The oviduct-bound spermatozoa showed a time-dependent protein tyrosine phosphorylation response, which was not observed in unbound spermatozoa or spermatozoa incubated in oviduct explant conditioned medium. Both oviduct-bound and unbound sperm remained motile with intact plasma membrane and acrosome. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation can be induced in equine spermatozoa by media with high pH, the intracellular pH (pHi) of oviduct explant cells and bound spermatozoa was monitored fluorometrically after staining with BCECF-AM dye. The epithelial secretory cells contained large, alkaline vesicles. Moreover, oviduct-bound spermatozoa showed a gradual increase in pHi, presumably due to an alkaline local microenvironment created by the secretory epithelial cells, given that unbound spermatozoa did not show pHi changes. Thus, sperm-oviduct interaction appears to facilitate equine sperm capacitation by creating an alkaline local environment that triggers intracellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation in bound sperm. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  20. In vitro characterization of the Bacillus subtilis protein tyrosine phosphatase YwqE

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    Mijakovic, Ivan; Musumeci, Lucia; Tautz, Lutz

    2005-01-01

    Both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria possess protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) with a catalytic Cys residue. In addition, many gram-positive bacteria have acquired a new family of PTPs, whose first characterized member was CpsB from Streptococcus pneumoniae. Bacillus subtilis contains......, we characterize YwqE, compare the activities of the three B. subtilis PTPs (YwqE, YwlE, and YfkJ), and demonstrate that the two B. subtilis class II PTPs do not dephosphorylate the physiological substrates of YwqE....

  1. The Role of Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) in Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Christopher James; Lombroso, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) has recently been implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders with significant cognitive impairments, including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and fragile X syndrome. A model has emerged by which STEP normally opposes the development of synaptic strengthening and that disruption in STEP activity leads to aberrant synaptic function. We review the mechanisms by which STEP contributes to the etiology of these and other neuropsychiatric disorders. These findings suggest that disruptions in STEP activity may be a common mechanism for cognitive impairments in diverse illnesses.

  2. The role of STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphastase (STEP in cognition

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    Christopher James Fitzpatrick

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP has recently been implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders with significant cognitive impairments, including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, and fragile X syndrome. A model has emerged by which STEP normally opposes the development of synaptic strengthening and that disruption in STEP activity leads to aberrant synaptic function. We review the mechanisms by which STEP contributes to the etiology of these and other neuropsychiatric disorders. These findings suggest that disruptions in STEP activity may be a common mechanism for cognitive impairments in diverse illnesses.

  3. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Modulates the Vascular Responses of Mesenteric Arteries from Human Colorectal Tumors

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    Eduardo Ferrero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze whether tyrosine phosphorylation in tumoral arteries may modulate their vascular response. To do this, mesenteric arteries supplying blood flow to colorectal tumors or to normal intestine were obtained during surgery and prepared for isometric tension recording in an organ bath. Increasing tyrosine phosphorylation with the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate produced arterial contraction which was lower in tumoral than in control arteries, whereas it reduced the contraction to noradrenaline in tumoral but not in control arteries and reduced the relaxation to bradykinin in control but not in tumoral arteries. Protein expression of VEGF-A and of the VEGF receptor FLT1 was similar in control and tumoral arteries, but expression of the VEGF receptor KDR was increased in tumoral compared with control arteries. This suggests that tyrosine phosphorylation may produce inhibition of the contraction in tumoral mesenteric arteries, which may increase blood flow to the tumor when tyrosine phosphorylation is increased by stimulation of VEGF receptors.

  4. Effect of cooling (4°C) and cryopreservation on cytoskeleton actin and protein tyrosine phosphorylation in buffalo spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, Sai

    2016-02-01

    Semen cryopreservation is broadly utilized as a part of the bovine reproducing industry, a large portion of the spermatozoa does not survive and the majority of those that do survive experience various molecular and physiological changes that influence their fertilizing capacity. The main aim of this study is to determine the effect of cooling (4 °C) and cryopreservation on cytoskeleton actin, tyrosine phosphorylation and quality of buffalo spermatozoa, and to determine the similarity between in vitro capacitation and cryopreservation induced capacitation like changes. To achieve this, Western blot was used to examine the changes in actin expression and protein tyrosine phosphorylation, whereas changes in actin polymerization, localization of actin and protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation and cryopreservation were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence technique. Localization studies revealed that the actin localized to flagella and acrosome membrane regions and following, capacitation it migrated towards the acrosome region of sperm. Time dependent increase in actin polymerization and protein tyrosine phosphorylation was observed during in vitro capacitation. The cooling phase (4 °C) and cryopreservation processes resulted in the loss/damage of cytoskeleton actin. In addition, we performed the actin polymerization and protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cooled and cryopreserved buffalo spermatozoa. Interestingly, cooling and cryopreservation induces actin polymerization and protein tyrosine phosphorylation, which were similar to in vitro capacitation (cryo-capacitation). These changes showed 1.3 folds reduction in the sperm quality parameters which includes motility, viability and plasma membrane integrity. Furthermore, our findings indicate that cooling and cryopreservation damages the cytoskeleton actin and also induces capacitation like changes such as protein tyrosine phosphorylation and actin polymerization. This could be one of the

  5. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) knockout mice have enhanced hippocampal memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Moura, Paula J; Picciotto, Marina R; Lombroso, Paul J

    2011-06-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific phosphatase that opposes synaptic strengthening by the regulation of key synaptic signaling proteins. Previous studies suggest a possible role for STEP in learning and memory. To demonstrate the functional importance of STEP in learning and memory, we generated STEP knockout (KO) mice and examined the effect of deletion of STEP on behavioral performance, as well as the phosphorylation and expression of its substrates. Here we report that loss of STEP leads to significantly enhanced performance in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory tasks. In addition, STEP KO mice displayed greater dominance behavior, although they were normal in their motivation, motor coordination, visual acuity and social interactions. STEP KO mice displayed enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), the NR2B subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and proline-rich tyrosine kinase (Pyk2), as well as an increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 substrates. Concomitant with the increased phosphorylation of NR2B, synaptosomal expression of NR1/NR2B NMDARs was increased in STEP KO mice, as was the GluR1/GluR2 containing α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs), providing a potential molecular mechanism for the improved cognitive performance. The data support a role for STEP in the regulation of synaptic strengthening. The absence of STEP improves cognitive performance, and may do so by the regulation of downstream effectors necessary for synaptic transmission. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Coumarins from Angelica decursiva inhibit α-glucosidase activity and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Md Yousof; Jannat, Susoma; Jung, Hyun Ah; Jeong, Hyong Oh; Chung, Hae Young; Choi, Jae Sue

    2016-05-25

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-diabetic potential of six natural coumarins, 4-hydroxy Pd-C-III (1), 4'-methoxy Pd-C-I (2), decursinol (3), decursidin (4), umbelliferone 6-carboxylic acid (5), and 2'-isopropyl psoralene (6) isolated from Angelica decursiva and evaluated their inhibitory activities against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), α-glucosidase, and ONOO(-)-mediated protein tyrosine nitration. Coumarins 1-6 showed potent PTP1B and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities with ranges of IC50 values of 5.39-58.90 μM and 65.29-172.10 μM, respectively. In the kinetic study for PTP1B enzyme inhibition, compounds 1, 5, and 6 were competitive, whereas 2 and 4 showed mixed type, and 3 displayed noncompetitive type inhibition. For α-glucosidase enzyme inhibition, compounds 1 and 3 exhibited good mixed-type, while 2, 5, and 6 showed noncompetitive and 4 displayed competitive type inhibition. Furthermore, these coumarins also effectively suppressed ONOO(-)-mediated tyrosine nitration in a dose-dependent manner. To further investigate PTP1B inhibition, we generated a 3D structure of PTP1B using Autodock 4.2 and simulated the binding of compounds 1-6. Docking simulations showed that different residues of PTP1B interacted with different functional groups of compounds 1-6 through hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions. In addition, the binding energies of compounds 1-6 were negative, suggesting that hydrogen bonding may stabilize the open form of the enzyme and potentiate tight binding of the active site of PTP1B, thereby resulting in more effective PTP1B inhibition. These results demonstrate that the whole plant of A. decursiva and its coumarins are useful as potential functional food ingredients for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. axl, a transforming gene isolated from primary human myeloid leukemia cells, encodes a novel receptor tyrosine kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, J.P.; Frye, R.A.; Cogswell, P.C.; Neubauer, A.; Kitch, B.; Prokop, C.; Earp, H.S.; Liu, E.T. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States)); Espinosa, R. III; Le Beau, M.M. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States))

    1991-10-01

    Using a sensitive transfection-tumorigenicity assay, the authors have isolated a novel transforming gene from the DNA of two patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia. Sequence analysis indicates that the product of this gene, axl, is a receptor tyrosine kinase. Overexpression of axl cDNA in NIH 3T3 cells induces neoplastic transformation with the concomitant appearance of a 140-kDa axl tyrosine-phosphorylated protein. Expression of axl cDNA in the baculovirus system results in the expression of the appropriate recombinant protein that is recognized by antophosphotyrosine antibodies, confirming that the axl protein is a tyrosine kinase. The juxtaposition of fibronectin type II and immunoglobulinlike repeats in the extracellular domain, as well as distinct amino acid sequences in the kinase domain, indicate that the axl protein represents a novel subclass of receptor tyrosine kinases.

  8. Therapeutic implications for striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel-Goody, Susan M; Baum, Matthew; Paspalas, Constantinos D; Fernandez, Stephanie M; Carty, Niki C; Kurup, Pradeep; Lombroso, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific phosphatase that modulates key signaling molecules involved in synaptic plasticity and neuronal function. Targets include extracellular-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), stress-activated protein kinase p38 (p38), the Src family tyrosine kinase Fyn, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs). STEP-mediated dephosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and Fyn leads to inactivation of these enzymes, whereas STEP-mediated dephosphorylation of surface NMDARs and AMPARs promotes their endocytosis. Accordingly, the current model of STEP function posits that it opposes long-term potentiation and promotes long-term depression. Phosphorylation, cleavage, dimerization, ubiquitination, and local translation all converge to maintain an appropriate balance of STEP in the central nervous system. Accumulating evidence over the past decade indicates that STEP dysregulation contributes to the pathophysiology of several neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, fragile X syndrome, epileptogenesis, alcohol-induced memory loss, Huntington's disease, drug abuse, stroke/ischemia, and inflammatory pain. This comprehensive review discusses STEP expression and regulation and highlights how disrupted STEP function contributes to the pathophysiology of diverse neuropsychiatric disorders.

  9. Molecular mechanism of T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP) activation by mitoxantrone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylilauri, Mikko; Mattila, Elina; Nurminen, Elisa M; Käpylä, Jarmo; Niinivehmas, Sanna P; Määttä, Juha A; Pentikäinen, Ulla; Ivaska, Johanna; Pentikäinen, Olli T

    2013-10-01

    T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP) is a ubiquitously expressed non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase. It is involved in the negative regulation of many cellular signaling pathways. Thus, activation of TCPTP could have important therapeutic applications in diseases such as cancer and inflammation. We have previously shown that the α-cytoplasmic tail of integrin α1β1 directly binds and activates TCPTP. In addition, we have identified in a large-scale high-throughput screen six small molecules that activate TCPTP. These small molecule activators include mitoxantrone and spermidine. In this study, we have investigated the molecular mechanism behind agonist-induced TCPTP activation. By combining several molecular modeling and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that α1-peptide and mitoxantrone activate TCPTP via direct binding to the catalytic domain, whereas spermidine does not interact with the catalytic domain of TCPTP in vitro. Furthermore, we have identified a hydrophobic groove surrounded by negatively charged residues on the surface of TCPTP as a putative binding site for the α1-peptide and mitoxantrone. Importantly, these data have allowed us to identify a new molecule that binds to TCPTP, but interestingly cannot activate its phosphatase activity. Accordingly, we describe here mechanism of TCPTP activation by mitoxantrone, the cytoplasmic tail of α1-integrin, and a mitoxantrone-like molecule at the atomic level. These data provide invaluable insight into the development of novel TCPTP activators, and may facilitate the rational discovery of small-molecule cancer therapeutics. © 2013.

  10. Selective binding modes and allosteric inhibitory effects of lupane triterpenes on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tiantian; Yu, Haibo; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-02-11

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a promising therapeutic target for treating obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers for over a decade. Previous drug design has focused on inhibitors targeting the active site of PTP1B. However, this has not been successful because the active site is positively charged and conserved among the protein tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, it is important to develop PTP1B inhibitors with alternative inhibitory strategies. Using computational studies including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations, we found that lupane triterpenes selectively inhibited PTP1B by targeting its more hydrophobic and less conserved allosteric site. These findings were verified using two enzymatic assays. Furthermore, the cell culture studies showed that lupeol and betulinic acid inhibited the PTP1B activity stimulated by TNFα in neurons. Our study indicates that lupane triterpenes are selective PTP1B allosteric inhibitors with significant potential for treating those diseases with elevated PTP1B activity.

  11. Role of nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases during phospholipase C-gamma 1-related uterine contractions in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillippe, Mark; Sweet, Leigh M; Bradley, Diana F; Engle, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    Activated phospholipase C1, produced in response to tyrosine phosphorylation, appears to play an important role during uterine contractions. These studies sought to determine which non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases are involved in the activation of phospholipase C1 in rat uterine tissue. In vitro contraction studies were performed utilizing isoform specific protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Western blots were performed utilizing antibodies to phosphotyrosine-phospholipase C1, total phospholipase C1, c-Src kinase and Lck kinase. Spontaneous, stretch-stimulated, and bpV(phen) (tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor) enhanced uterine contractions were significantly suppressed in response to Damnacanthal (Lck kinase inhibitor) and PP1 (c-Src kinase inhibitor). Damnacanthal and PP1 also significantly suppressed bpV(phen)-enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C1. Western blots confirmed expression of Lck kinase and c-Src kinase in uterine tissue. In conclusion, the Lck and c-Src kinases appear to play an important role in regulating tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C1 and contractile activity in the rat uterus.

  12. Association between receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha and the Grb2 adaptor. Dual Src homology (SH) 2/SH3 domain requirement and functional consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Yang, L T; Sap, J

    1996-01-01

    Receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha is found associated in vivo with the adaptor protein Grb2. Formation of this complex, which contains no detectable levels of Sos, is known to depend on a C-terminal phosphorylated tyrosine residue (Tyr798) in RPTPalpha and on the Src homology (SH) 2...... in vivo. These observations constitute a novel mode of Grb2 association and suggest a model in which association with a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein restricts the repertoire of SH3 binding proteins with which Grb2 can simultaneously interact. The function of the Tyr798 tyrosine phosphorylation/Grb2...

  13. Protein tyrosine nitration of aldolase in mast cells: a plausible pathway in nitric oxide-mediated regulation of mast cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Yokananth; Moon, Tae Chul; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Befus, A Dean

    2010-07-01

    NO is a short-lived free radical that plays a critical role in the regulation of cellular signaling. Mast cell (MC)-derived NO and exogenous NO regulate MC activities, including the inhibition of MC degranulation. At a molecular level, NO acts to modify protein structure and function through several mechanisms, including protein tyrosine nitration. To begin to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of NO in MCs, we investigated protein tyrosine nitration in human MC lines HMC-1 and LAD2 treated with the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione. Using two-dimensional gel Western blot analysis with an anti-nitrotyrosine Ab, together with mass spectrometry, we identified aldolase A, an enzyme of the glycolytic pathway, as a target for tyrosine nitration in MCs. The nitration of aldolase A was associated with a reduction in the maximum velocity of aldolase in HMC-1 and LAD2. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis showed that despite these changes in the activity of a critical enzyme in glycolysis, there was no significant change in total cellular ATP content, although the AMP/ATP ratio was altered. Elevated levels of lactate and pyruvate suggested that S-nitrosoglutathione treatment enhanced glycolysis. Reduced aldolase activity was associated with increased intracellular levels of its substrate, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. Interestingly, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate inhibited IgE-mediated MC degranulation in LAD2 cells. Thus, for the first time we report evidence of protein tyrosine nitration in human MC lines and identify aldolase A as a prominent target. This posttranslational nitration of aldolase A may be an important pathway that regulates MC phenotype and function.

  14. Behavioral and cognitive effects of tyrosine intake in healthy human adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hase, Adrian; Jung, Sophie E.; aan het Rot, Marije

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid tyrosine is the precursor to the catecholamine neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine. Increasing tyrosine uptake may positively influence catecholamine-related psychological functioning. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effects of tyrosine on behavior and

  15. Identification of Tyrosine Phosphorylated Proteins by SH2 Domain Affinity Purification and Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhs, Sophia; Gerull, Helwe; Nollau, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Phosphotyrosine signaling plays a major role in the control of many important biological functions such as cell proliferation and apoptosis. Deciphering of phosphotyrosine-dependent signaling is therefore of great interest paving the way for the understanding of physiological and pathological processes of signal transduction. On the basis of the specific binding of SH2 domains to phosphotyrosine residues, we here present an experimental workflow for affinity purification and subsequent identification of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins by mass spectrometry. In combination with SH2 profiling, a broadly applicable platform for the characterization of phosphotyrosine profiles in cell extracts, our pull down strategy enables researchers by now to identify proteins in signaling cascades which are differentially phosphorylated and selectively recognized by distinct SH2 domains.

  16. TEC protein tyrosine kinase is involved in the Erk signaling pathway induced by HGF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Feifei; Jiang, Yinan [Department of Pathophysiology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032 (China); Zheng, Qiping [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Yang, Xiaoming [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing 100850 (China); Wang, Siying, E-mail: sywang@ahmu.edu.cn [Department of Pathophysiology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032 (China)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} TEC is rapidly tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated by HGF-stimulation in vivo or after partial hepatectomy in mice. {yields} TEC enhances the activity of Elk and serum response element (SRE) in HGF signaling pathway in hepatocyte. {yields} TEC promotes hepatocyte proliferation through the Erk-MAPK pathway. -- Abstract: Background/aims: TEC, a member of the TEC family of non-receptor type protein tyrosine kinases, has recently been suggested to play a role in hepatocyte proliferation and liver regeneration. This study aims to investigate the putative mechanisms of TEC kinase regulation of hepatocyte differentiation, i.e. to explore which signaling pathway TEC is involved in, and how TEC is activated in hepatocyte after hepatectomy and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) stimulation. Methods: We performed immunoprecipitation (IP) and immunoblotting (IB) to examine TEC tyrosine phosphorylation after partial hepatectomy in mice and HGF stimulation in WB F-344 hepatic cells. The TEC kinase activity was determined by in vitro kinase assay. Reporter gene assay, antisense oligonucleotide and TEC dominant negative mutant (TEC{sup KM}) were used to examine the possible signaling pathways in which TEC is involved. The cell proliferation rate was evaluated by {sup 3}H-TdR incorporation. Results: TEC phosphorylation and kinase activity were increased in 1 h after hepatectomy or HGF treatment. TEC enhanced the activity of Elk and serum response element (SRE). Inhibition of MEK1 suppressed TEC phosphorylation. Blocking TEC activity dramatically decreased the activation of Erk. Reduced TEC kinase activity also suppressed the proliferation of WB F-344 cells. These results suggest TEC is involved in the Ras-MAPK pathway and acts between MEK1 and Erk. Conclusions: TEC promotes hepatocyte proliferation and regeneration and is involved in HGF-induced Erk signaling pathway.

  17. The tyrosine kinase Hck is an inhibitor of HIV-1 replication counteracted by the viral vif protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassaïne, G; Courcoul, M; Bessou, G; Barthalay, Y; Picard, C; Olive, D; Collette, Y; Vigne, R; Decroly, E

    2001-05-18

    The virus infectivity factor (Vif) protein facilitates the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in primary lymphocytes and macrophages. Its action is strongly dependent on the cellular environment, and it has been proposed that the Vif protein counteracts cellular activities that would otherwise limit HIV-1 replication. Using a glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay, we identified that Vif binds specifically to the Src homology 3 domain of Hck, a tyrosine kinase from the Src family. The interaction between Vif and the full-length Hck was further assessed by co-precipitation assays in vitro and in human cells. The Vif protein repressed the kinase activity of Hck and was not itself a substrate for Hck phosphorylation. Within one single replication cycle of HIV-1, Hck was able to inhibit the production and the infectivity of vif-deleted virus but not that of wild-type virus. Accordingly, HIV-1 vif- replication was delayed in Jurkat T cell clones stably expressing Hck. Our data demonstrate that Hck controls negatively HIV-1 replication and that this inhibition is suppressed by the expression of Vif. Hck, which is present in monocyte-macrophage cells, represents the first identified cellular inhibitor of HIV-1 replication overcome by Vif.

  18. Identification of a fungi-specific lineage of protein kinases closely related to tyrosine kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongtao Zhao

    Full Text Available Tyrosine kinases (TKs specifically catalyze the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in proteins and play essential roles in many cellular processes. Although TKs mainly exist in animals, recent studies revealed that some organisms outside the Opisthokont clade also contain TKs. The fungi, as the sister group to animals, are thought to lack TKs. To better understand the origin and evolution of TKs, it is important to investigate if fungi have TK or TK-related genes. We therefore systematically identified possible TKs across the fungal kingdom by using the profile hidden Markov Models searches and phylogenetic analyses. Our results confirmed that fungi lack the orthologs of animal TKs. We identified a fungi-specific lineage of protein kinases (FslK that appears to be a sister group closely related to TKs. Sequence analysis revealed that members of the FslK clade contain all the conserved protein kinase sub-domains and thus are likely enzymatically active. However, they lack key amino acid residues that determine TK-specific activities, indicating that they are not true TKs. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the last common ancestor of fungi may have possessed numerous members of FslK. The ancestral FslK genes were lost in Ascomycota and Ustilaginomycotina and Pucciniomycotina of Basidiomycota during evolution. Most of these ancestral genes, however, were retained and expanded in Agaricomycetes. The discovery of the fungi-specific lineage of protein kinases closely related to TKs helps shed light on the origin and evolution of TKs and also has potential implications for the importance of these kinases in mushroom fungi.

  19. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase modulates nociception: evidence from genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azkona, Garikoitz; Saavedra, Ana; Aira, Zigor; Aluja, David; Xifró, Xavier; Baguley, Tyler; Alberch, Jordi; Ellman, Jonathan A; Lombroso, Paul J; Azkue, Jon J; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2016-02-01

    The information from nociceptors is processed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by complex circuits involving excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. It is well documented that GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation contributes to central sensitization. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) dephosphorylates GluN2B and ERK1/2, promoting internalization of GluN2B and inactivation of ERK1/2. The activity of STEP was modulated by genetic (STEP knockout mice) and pharmacological (recently synthesized STEP inhibitor, TC-2153) approaches. STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord were determined in male and female mice of different ages. Inflammatory pain was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant injection. Behavioral tests, immunoblotting, and electrophysiology were used to analyze the effect of STEP on nociception. Our results show that both genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of STEP induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, which were accompanied by increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase heterozygous and knockout mice presented a similar phenotype. Furthermore, electrophysiological experiments showed that TC-2153 increased C fiber-evoked spinal field potentials. Interestingly, we found that STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord inversely correlated with thermal hyperalgesia associated with age and female gender in mice. Consistently, STEP knockout mice failed to show age-related thermal hyperalgesia, although gender-related differences were preserved. Moreover, in a model of inflammatory pain, hyperalgesia was associated with increased phosphorylation-mediated STEP(61) inactivation and increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Collectively, the present results underscore an important role of spinal STEP activity in the modulation of nociception.

  20. Photo-oxidation of tyrosine in a bio-engineered bacterioferritin 'reaction centre'-a protein model for artificial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingorani, Kastoori; Pace, Ron; Whitney, Spencer; Murray, James W; Smith, Paul; Cheah, Mun Hon; Wydrzynski, Tom; Hillier, Warwick

    2014-10-01

    The photosynthetic reaction centre (RC) is central to the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy and is a model for bio-mimetic engineering approaches to this end. We describe bio-engineering of a Photosystem II (PSII) RC inspired peptide model, building on our earlier studies. A non-photosynthetic haem containing bacterioferritin (BFR) from Escherichia coli that expresses as a homodimer was used as a protein scaffold, incorporating redox-active cofactors mimicking those of PSII. Desirable properties include: a di-nuclear metal binding site which provides ligands for bivalent metals, a hydrophobic pocket at the dimer interface which can bind a photosensitive porphyrin and presence of tyrosine residues proximal to the bound cofactors, which can be utilised as efficient electron-tunnelling intermediates. Light-induced electron transfer from proximal tyrosine residues to the photo-oxidised ZnCe6(•+), in the modified BFR reconstituted with both ZnCe6 and Mn(II), is presented. Three site-specific tyrosine variants (Y25F, Y58F and Y45F) were made to localise the redox-active tyrosine in the engineered system. The results indicate that: presence of bound Mn(II) is necessary to observe tyrosine oxidation in all BFR variants; Y45 the most important tyrosine as an immediate electron donor to the oxidised ZnCe6(•+) and that Y25 and Y58 are both redox-active in this system, but appear to function interchangebaly. High-resolution (2.1Å) crystal structures of the tyrosine variants show that there are no mutation-induced effects on the overall 3-D structure of the protein. Small effects are observed in the Y45F variant. Here, the BFR-RC represents a protein model for artificial photosynthesis. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. BDNF Induces Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 61 Degradation Through the Proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Ana; Puigdellívol, Mar; Tyebji, Shiraz; Kurup, Pradeep; Xu, Jian; Ginés, Silvia; Alberch, Jordi; Lombroso, Paul J; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2016-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes synaptic strengthening through the regulation of kinase and phosphatase activity. Conversely, striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) opposes synaptic strengthening through inactivation or internalization of signaling molecules. Here, we investigated whether BDNF regulates STEP levels/activity. BDNF induced a reduction of STEP61 levels in primary cortical neurons, an effect that was prevented by inhibition of tyrosine kinases, phospholipase C gamma, or the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). The levels of pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204), two STEP substrates, increased in BDNF-treated cultures, and blockade of the UPS prevented STEP61 degradation and reduced BDNF-induced GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, brief or sustained cell depolarization reduced STEP61 levels in cortical neurons by different mechanisms. BDNF also promoted UPS-mediated STEP61 degradation in cultured striatal and hippocampal neurons. In contrast, nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3 had no effect on STEP61 levels. Our results thus indicate that STEP61 degradation is an important event in BDNF-mediated effects.

  2. Role of Non-receptor Protein Tyrosine Kinases During Phospholipase C-γ1 Related Uterine Contractions in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillippe, Mark; Sweet, Leigh M.; Bradley, Diana F.; Engle, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Activated phospholipase Cγ1 (PLC-γ1), produced in response to tyrosine phosphorylation, appears to play an important role during uterine contractions. These studies sought to determine which non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) are involved in the tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of PLC-γ1 in uterine tissue from the rat. In vitro uterine contraction studies were performed utilizing isoform specific PTK inhibitors. Western blots were performed utilizing antibodies to phosphotyrosine-PLC-γ1, total PLC-γ1, c-Src kinase and Lck kinase. Spontaneous, stretch-stimulated, and bpV(phen) (a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor) enhanced uterine contractions were significantly suppressed in response to Damnacanthal (a Lck kinase inhibitor) and PP1 (a c-Src kinase inhibitor); whereas, several other PTK isoform inhibitors had no significant effect. Damnacanthal and PP1 also significantly suppressed bpV(phen)-enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 compared to other PTK isoform inhibitors. Western blots confirmed expression of the Lck and c-Src kinases in uterine tissue. In conclusion, the Lck and c-Src kinases appear to play an important role in regulating tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 and contractile activity in the rat uterus. PMID:19208792

  3. Downregulation of tyrosine threonine kinase inhibits tumor growth via G2/M arrest in human endometrioid endometrial adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiamiao; Jiang, Yan; Zhao, Yu; Wang, Wanxue; Xie, Yiran; Wang, Huating; Yang, Yihua

    2017-07-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy, about 80% of which is endometrial endometrioid carcinoma. Dysregulation of spindle assembly checkpoint plays a vital role in endometrial endometrioid carcinoma tumorigenesis and progression. The purpose of this study was to explore how tyrosine threonine kinase, a spindle assembly checkpoint-related protein, promotes the endometrial endometrioid carcinoma progression. We found that both messenger RNA and protein levels of tyrosine threonine kinase in endometrial endometrioid carcinoma tissues are higher than those in normal endometrial tissues, and its expression is associated with tumor stages. Genetic depletion of tyrosine threonine kinase by RNA interference in two endometrial endometrioid carcinoma cell lines significantly inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Mechanistically, depletion of tyrosine threonine kinase induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and triggers caspase-dependent cell apoptosis. Collectively, tyrosine threonine kinase is significantly upregulated in endometrial endometrioid carcinoma, and downregulation of tyrosine threonine kinase can suppress endometrial endometrioid carcinoma cell proliferation and promote apoptosis via G2/M cell cycle arrest. Our study demonstrates that tyrosine threonine kinase can be a potential therapeutic target for endometrial endometrioid carcinoma treatment.

  4. The Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Rptpζ Suppresses Osteosarcoma Development in Trp53-Heterozygous Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Baldauf

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS, a highly aggressive primary bone tumor, belongs to the most common solid tumors in growing children. Since specific molecular targets for OS treatment remain to be identified, surgical resection combined with multimodal (neo-adjuvant chemotherapy is still the only way to help respective individuals. We have previously identified the protein tyrosine phosphatase Rptpζ as a marker of terminally differentiated osteoblasts, which negatively regulates their proliferation in vitro. Here we have addressed the question if Rptpζ can function as a tumor suppressor protein inhibiting OS development in vivo. We therefore analyzed the skeletal phenotype of mice lacking Ptprz1, the gene encoding Rptpζ on a tumor-prone genetic background, i.e. Trp53-heterozygosity. By screening a large number of 52 week old Trp53-heterozygous mice by contact radiography we found that Ptprz1-deficiency significantly enhanced OS development with 19% of the mice being affected. The tumors in Ptprz1-deficient Trp53-heterozygous mice were present in different locations (spine, long bones, ribs, and their OS nature was confirmed by undecalcified histology. Likewise, cell lines derived from the tumors were able to undergo osteogenic differentiation ex vivo. A comparison between Ptprz1-heterozygous and Ptprz1-deficient cultures further revealed that the latter ones displayed increased proliferation, a higher abundance of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins and resistance towards the influence of the growth factor Midkine. Our findings underscore the relevance of Rptpζ as an attenuator of proliferation in differentiated osteoblasts and raise the possibility that activating Rptpζ-dependent signaling could specifically target osteoblastic tumor cells.

  5. Characterization and kinetic analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatase-H2 from Microplitis demolitor bracovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Jai-Hoon; Bottjen, Rachel C; Pruijssers, Andrea J; Clark, Kevin D; Strand, Michael R

    2010-09-01

    The polydnavirus Microplitis demolitor bracovirus (MdBV) encodes 13 genes that share homology with classical protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Prior sequence analysis suggested that five members of the MdBV PTP gene family (ptp-H2, -H3, -H5, -N1 and -N2) encode PTPs, seven family members encode pseudophosphatases, and one family member is a pseudogene. Prior experimental studies further implicated PTP-H2 in disabling the function of host hemocytes following infection by MdBV. Here we report expression of PTP-H2 and selected mutants in Escherichia coli cells as non-fusion or thioredoxin-fusion proteins. Following purification by nickel affinity chromatography, the full-length and mutant proteins ran as single bands of predicted size on SDS-PAGE gels under reducing conditions. The non-fusion form of PTP-H2 exhibited classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics using the phosphopeptide END(pY)INASL and difluoro-4-methylumbiliferyl phosphate (DiFMUP) as substrates. As expected, the non-fusion mutant PTP-H2(C236S) had no enzymatic activity, while the thioredoxin-fusion form of PTP-H2 had low levels of activity. PTP-H2 exhibited optimal activity at pH 4.0 and 26 degrees C in sodium acetate buffer, and its activity was diminished by increasing buffer ionic strength. Activity was also greatly reduced by the presence of copper, heparin, and the classical PTP inhibitor vanadate. Using an anti-PTP-H2 antibody, immunoblotting and immunocytochemical studies only detected PTP-H2 in hemocytes from MdBV-infected Pseudoplusia includens. Overall, our results indicate that PTP-H2 is a functional tyrosine phosphatase that is specifically expressed in MdBV-infected hemocytes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta acts as a neuroblastoma tumor suppressor by destabilizing the aurora kinase a oncogene

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meehan, Maria

    2012-02-05

    Abstract Background Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta (PTPRD) is a member of a large family of protein tyrosine phosphatases which negatively regulate tyrosine phosphorylation. Neuroblastoma is a major childhood cancer arising from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system which is known to acquire deletions and alterations in the expression patterns of PTPRD, indicating a potential tumor suppressor function for this gene. The molecular mechanism, however, by which PTPRD renders a tumor suppressor effect in neuroblastoma is unknown. Results As a molecular mechanism, we demonstrate that PTPRD interacts with aurora kinase A (AURKA), an oncogenic protein that is over-expressed in multiple forms of cancer, including neuroblastoma. Ectopic up-regulation of PTPRD in neuroblastoma dephosphorylates tyrosine residues in AURKA resulting in a destabilization of this protein culminating in interfering with one of AURKA\\'s primary functions in neuroblastoma, the stabilization of MYCN protein, the gene of which is amplified in approximately 25 to 30% of high risk neuroblastoma. Conclusions PTPRD has a tumor suppressor function in neuroblastoma through AURKA dephosphorylation and destabilization and a downstream destabilization of MYCN protein, representing a novel mechanism for the function of PTPRD in neuroblastoma.

  7. An iterative compound screening contest method for identifying target protein inhibitors using the tyrosine-protein kinase Yes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Shuntaro; Ishida, Takashi; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Mochizuki, Masahiro; Teramoto, Reiji; Taguchi, Y-H; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Umeyama, Hideaki; Ramakrishnan, Chandrasekaran; Thangakani, A Mary; Velmurugan, D; Gromiha, M Michael; Okuno, Tatsuya; Kato, Koya; Minami, Shintaro; Chikenji, George; Suzuki, Shogo D; Yanagisawa, Keisuke; Shin, Woong-Hee; Kihara, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Kazuki Z; Moriwaki, Yoshitaka; Yasuo, Nobuaki; Yoshino, Ryunosuke; Zozulya, Sergey; Borysko, Petro; Stavniichuk, Roman; Honma, Teruki; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Akiyama, Yutaka; Sekijima, Masakazu

    2017-09-20

    We propose a new iterative screening contest method to identify target protein inhibitors. After conducting a compound screening contest in 2014, we report results acquired from a contest held in 2015 in this study. Our aims were to identify target enzyme inhibitors and to benchmark a variety of computer-aided drug discovery methods under identical experimental conditions. In both contests, we employed the tyrosine-protein kinase Yes as an example target protein. Participating groups virtually screened possible inhibitors from a library containing 2.4 million compounds. Compounds were ranked based on functional scores obtained using their respective methods, and the top 181 compounds from each group were selected. Our results from the 2015 contest show an improved hit rate when compared to results from the 2014 contest. In addition, we have successfully identified a statistically-warranted method for identifying target inhibitors. Quantitative analysis of the most successful method gave additional insights into important characteristics of the method used.

  8. Proteins from Avastin® (bevacizumab show tyrosine nitrations for which the consequences are completely unclear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wan

    Full Text Available Avastin® (bevacizumab is a protein drug widely used for cancer treatment although its further use is questionable due to serious side effects reported. As no systematic proteomic study on posttranslational modifications (PTMs was reported so far, it was the aim of the current study to use a gel-based proteomics method for determination of Avastin®-protein(s. Avastin® was run on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE, spots were picked, followed by multi-enzyme in-gel digestion. Subsequently, the resulting peptides and posttranslational modifications were identified by mass spectrometry (nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS; HCT and LTQ Orbitrap MS. Heavy and light chains were observed and the 9 spots that were picked from 2DE-gels were identified as bevacizumab with high sequence coverage. MS/MS results showed multiple tyrosine nitrations on the Avastin® light and heavy chains that were either represented as nitrotyrosine or as aminotyrosine, which was shown to be generated from nitrotyrosine under reducing conditions. Protein nitration is known to significantly change protein functions and interactions and it may well be that some of the adverse effects of the protein drug Avastin® may be due to this PTM, which may have been generated during production--thus, nitration of Avastin® is a challenge for the pharmaceutical industry.

  9. INHIBITORY POTENTIAL OF POLYHYDROXYLATED FULLERENES AGAINST PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobzar, O L; Trush, V V; Tanchuk, V Yu; Vovk, A I

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of PTP1B by polyhydroxylated fullerenes was studied in silico and in vitro. The enzyme kinetics in the presence of polyhydroxy small gap fullerenes showed that reciprocal value of maximum velocity non-linearly increases with increasing the inhibitor concentration. Analysis of the dose-dependent curve of PTP1B inhibition suggests an apparent positive cooperativity with involvement of at least two binding sites for the hydroxylated fullerene cages. Molecular docking calculations indicated that highly hydroxylated fullerene C60 may occupy the active site and additional allosteric binding site with similar affinity. In silico analysis of a number of fullerenols with 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 hydroxyl groups showed that the inhibitory activity may depend on the degree of hydroxylation of the nanoparticles surface. These data provide some understanding of the mechanisms of inhibitory action of fullerenols on activity of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

  10. Water molecule network and active site flexibility of apo protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.K.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Møller, K.B.

    2004-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) plays a key role as a negative regulator of insulin and leptin signalling and is therefore considered to be an important molecular target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Detailed structural information about the structure of PTP1B, including...... the conformation and flexibility of active-site residues as well as the water-molecule network, is a key issue in understanding ligand binding and enzyme kinetics and in structure-based drug design. A 1.95 Angstrom apo PTP1B structure has been obtained, showing four highly coordinated water molecules in the active......-site pocket of the enzyme; hence, the active site is highly solvated in the apo state. Three of the water molecules are located at positions that approximately correspond to the positions of the phosphate O atoms of the natural substrate phosphotyrosine and form a similar network of hydrogen bonds. The active...

  11. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B by lupeol and lupenone isolated from Sorbus commixta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Minkyun; Kim, Bo Yeon; Osada, Hiroyuki; Ahn, Jong Seog

    2009-08-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) appears to be an attractive target for the development of new drugs for type 2 diabetes and obesity. In our preliminary test, a MeOH extract of the stem barks of Sorbus commixta Hedl. (Rosaceae) showed strong PTP1B inhibitory activity. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the MeOH extract resulted in the isolation of two lupane-type triterpenes, lupenone (1) and lupeol (2). Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited PTP1B with IC(50) values of 13.7 +/- 2.1 and 5.6 +/- 0.9 microM, respectively. Kinetic studies revealed that both the compounds 1 and 2 are non-competitive inhibitors of PTP1B that decrease V(max) values with no effect on K(m) values.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of the interaction between protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B and aryl diketoacid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Gao, Jun; Liu, Yongjun; Liu, Chengbu

    2012-09-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP-1B) is acknowledged as an outstanding therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes, obesity and cancer. In this work, six aryl diketoacid compounds have been studied on the basis of molecular dynamics simulations. Hydrogen bonds, binding energies and conformation changes of the WPD loop have been analyzed. The results indicated that their activation model falls into two parts: the target region of the monomeric aryl diketoacid compounds is the active site, whereas the target region of the dimeric aryl diketoacid compounds is the WPD loop or the R loop. The van der Waals interactions exhibit stronger effects than the short-range electrostatic interactions. The van der Waals interaction energy and the IC50 values exhibit an approximately exponential relationship. Furthermore, the van der Waals interactions cooperate with the hydrogen bond interactions. This study provides a more thorough understanding of the PTP-1B inhibitor binding processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of nuclear protein targets for six leukemogenic tyrosine kinases governed by post-translational regulation.

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    Andrew Pierce

    Full Text Available Mutated tyrosine kinases are associated with a number of different haematological malignancies including myeloproliferative disorders, lymphoma and acute myeloid leukaemia. The potential commonalities in the action of six of these leukemogenic proteins on nuclear proteins were investigated using systematic proteomic analysis. The effects on over 3600 nuclear proteins and 1500 phosphopeptide sites were relatively quantified in seven isogenic cell lines. The effects of the kinases were diverse although some commonalities were found. Comparison of the nuclear proteomic data with transcriptome data and cytoplasmic proteomic data indicated that the major changes are due to post-translational mechanisms rather than changes in mRNA or protein distribution. Analysis of the promoter regions of genes whose protein levels changed in response to the kinases showed the most common binding site found was that for NFκB whilst other sites such as those for the glucocorticoid receptor were also found. Glucocorticoid receptor levels and phosphorylation were decreased by all 6 PTKs. Whilst Glucocorticoid receptor action can potentiate NFκB action those proteins where genes have NFκB binding sites were in often regulated post-translationally. However all 6 PTKs showed evidence of NFkB pathway modulation via activation via altered IkB and NFKB levels. Validation of a common change was also undertaken with PMS2, a DNA mismatch repair protein. PMS2 nuclear levels were decreased in response to the expression of all 6 kinases, with no concomitant change in mRNA level or cytosolic protein level. Response to thioguanine, that requires the mismatch repair pathway, was modulated by all 6 oncogenic kinases. In summary common targets for 6 oncogenic PTKs have been found that are regulated by post-translational mechanisms. They represent potential new avenues for therapies but also demonstrate the post-translational regulation is a key target of leukaemogenic kinases.

  14. Protein tyrosine and serine–threonine phosphatases in the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus: Identification and potential functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrum, C.A.; Walton, K.D.; Robertson, A.J.; Carbonneau, S.; Thomason, R.T.; Coffman, J.A.; McClay, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphatases, in coordination with protein kinases, play crucial roles in regulation of signaling pathways. To identify protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and serine–threonine (ser–thr) phosphatases in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome, 179 annotated sequences were studied (122 PTPs, 57 ser–thr phosphatases). Sequence analysis identified 91 phosphatases (33 conventional PTPs, 31 dual specificity phosphatases, 1 Class III Cysteine-based PTP, 1 Asp-based PTP, and 25 ser–thr phosphatases). Using catalytic sites, levels of conservation and constraint in amino acid sequence were examined. Nine of 25 receptor PTPs (RPTPs) corresponded to human, nematode, or fly homologues. Domain structure revealed that sea urchin-specific RPTPs including two, PTPRLec and PTPRscav, may act in immune defense. Embryonic transcription of each phosphatase was recorded from a high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarray experiment. Most RPTPs are expressed at very low levels, whereas nonreceptor PTPs (NRPTPs) are generally expressed at moderate levels. High expression was detected in MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs) and numerous ser–thr phosphatases. For several expressed NRPTPs, MKPs, and ser–thr phosphatases, morpholino antisense-mediated knockdowns were performed and phenotypes obtained. Finally, to assess roles of annotated phosphatases in endomesoderm formation, a literature review of phosphatase functions in model organisms was superimposed on sea urchin developmental pathways to predict areas of functional activity. PMID:17087928

  15. Characterization of the interactions between the active site of a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayrapetov Marina K

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tyrosine kinases are important enzymes for cell signalling and key targets for anticancer drug discovery. The catalytic mechanisms of protein tyrosine kinase-catalysed phosphorylation are not fully understood. Protein tyrosine kinase Csk requires two Mg2+ cations for activity: one (M1 binds to ATP, and the other (M2 acts as an essential activator. Results Experiments in this communication characterize the interaction between M2 and Csk. Csk activity is sensitive to pH in the range of 6 to 7. Kinetic characterization indicates that the sensitivity is not due to altered substrate binding, but caused by the sensitivity of M2 binding to pH. Several residues in the active site with potential of binding M2 are mutated and the effect on metal activation studied. An active mutant of Asn319 is generated, and this mutation does not alter the metal binding characteristics. Mutations of Glu236 or Asp332 abolish the kinase activity, precluding a positive or negative conclusion on their role in M2 coordination. Finally, the ability of divalent metal cations to activate Csk correlates to a combination of ionic radius and the coordination number. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that M2 binding to Csk is sensitive to pH, which is mainly responsible for Csk activity change in the acidic arm of the pH response curve. They also demonstrate critical differences in the metal activator coordination sphere in protein tyrosine kinase Csk and a protein Ser/Thr kinase, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. They shed light on the physical interactions between a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator.

  16. Demonstration of tyrosinase in the vitiligo skin of human beings by a sensitive fluorometric method as well as by 14C(U)-L-tyrosine incorporation into melanin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, I.; Vijayan, E.; Ramaiah, A.; Pasricha, J.S.; Madan, N.C.

    1982-03-01

    Tyrosinase activity (Monophenol, dihydroxyphenylalanine: oxygen oxidoreductase EC 1.14.18.1) in vitiligo and normal epidermal homogenates of skin from human beings was measured by estimating beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) by a highly sensitive fluorometric method described in this paper. The tyrosine activity in the vitiligo skin was about 4 to 37% of corresponding normal skin. The activity of tyrosinase in normal human skin from different individuals and from different regions of the body was in the range of 4 to 140 picomoles of beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine formed per min/mg protein of epidermal homogenate. The enzyme from vitiligo and normal skin was severely inhibited by substance(s) of low molecular weight. The enzyme exhibits a lag of about 4 hr in the absence of added beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 1 hr in presence of 5 microM dopa. Tyrosinase from the normal and vitiligo skin was inhibited by excess concentration of tyrosine. The homogenates from vitiligo skin could synthesize melanin from C14(U)-L-Tyrosine. The rate of tyrosine incorporation into melanin by the epidermal homogenates is increased by 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) disproportionate to its effect on tyrosinase activity. Based on the data presented in this paper it is concluded that melanocytes are present in the vitiligo skin. A tentative hypothesis is put forward to explain the lack of melanin synthesis by the vitiligo skin under in vivo conditions, although melanocytes are present.

  17. Primary structure of bovine calpactin I heavy chain (p36), a major cellular substrate for retroviral protein-tyrosine kinases: homology with the human phospholipase A2 inhibitor lipocortin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torsten; Sarin, C J; Hunter, T

    1986-01-01

    peptide sequences generated during the course of these studies. The largest p36 cDNA insert (p36/6 of 1.6 kilobase pairs) was fully sequenced by the dideoxy method. The DNA sequence of this insert had an open reading frame of 1014 base pairs and coded for a protein with a molecular weight of 38 481...

  18. UBC9-dependent Association between Calnexin and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) at the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dukgyu; Kraus, Allison; Prins, Daniel; Groenendyk, Jody; Aubry, Isabelle; Liu, Wen-Xin; Li, Hao-Dong; Julien, Olivier; Touret, Nicolas; Sykes, Brian D.; Tremblay, Michel L.; Michalak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Calnexin is a type I integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, molecular chaperone, and a component of the translocon. We discovered a novel interaction between the calnexin cytoplasmic domain and UBC9, a SUMOylation E2 ligase, which modified the calnexin cytoplasmic domain by the addition of SUMO. We demonstrated that calnexin interaction with the SUMOylation machinery modulates an interaction with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), an ER-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in the negative regulation of insulin and leptin signaling. We showed that calnexin and PTP1B form UBC9-dependent complexes, revealing a previously unrecognized contribution of calnexin to the retention of PTP1B at the ER membrane. This work shows that the SUMOylation machinery links two ER proteins from divergent pathways to potentially affect cellular protein quality control and energy metabolism. PMID:25586181

  19. UBC9-dependent association between calnexin and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) at the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dukgyu; Kraus, Allison; Prins, Daniel; Groenendyk, Jody; Aubry, Isabelle; Liu, Wen-Xin; Li, Hao-Dong; Julien, Olivier; Touret, Nicolas; Sykes, Brian D; Tremblay, Michel L; Michalak, Marek

    2015-02-27

    Calnexin is a type I integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, molecular chaperone, and a component of the translocon. We discovered a novel interaction between the calnexin cytoplasmic domain and UBC9, a SUMOylation E2 ligase, which modified the calnexin cytoplasmic domain by the addition of SUMO. We demonstrated that calnexin interaction with the SUMOylation machinery modulates an interaction with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), an ER-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in the negative regulation of insulin and leptin signaling. We showed that calnexin and PTP1B form UBC9-dependent complexes, revealing a previously unrecognized contribution of calnexin to the retention of PTP1B at the ER membrane. This work shows that the SUMOylation machinery links two ER proteins from divergent pathways to potentially affect cellular protein quality control and energy metabolism. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. The tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in cultured primary astrocytes is strongly accelerated by the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostin 23

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Blumrich, Eva-Maria; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-01-01

    Tyrphostin 23 (T23) is a well-known inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases and has been considered as potential anti-cancer drug. T23 was recently reported to acutely stimulate the glycolytic flux in primary cultured astrocytes. To investigate whether T23 also affects the tricarboxylic acid (TCA...

  1. DMPD: Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available regulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. Wang MH, Zhou YQ, Chen YQ. Scand J Immunol. 2002 Dec;56(6)... potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. PubmedID 12472665 Tit...le Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities

  2. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 2: selected applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    2016-06-01

    In Part 2 we discuss application of several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, such as normal, difference, and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, of the side-chain of tyrosine residues in different molecular environments. We review the ways these spectroscopies can be used to probe complex protein structures.

  3. Role of protein tyrosine kinase in the effect of IP6 on IL-8 secretion in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawszczyk, Joanna; Orchel, Arkadiusz; Kapral, Małgorzata; Wéglarz, Ludmiła

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (IP6) is a major fiber-associated component of a diet physiologically present in human intestines. Studies showed that this phytochemical can modulate immune functions of intestinal epithelium through regulation of proinflammatory cytokines secretion but mechanisms underlying these cellular response to IP6 have weakly been examined, as yet. The aim of this study was to determine the role of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) in secretion of IL-8, a central proinflammatory cytokine, by unstimulated and IL-1beta-stimulated intestinal epithelial cells Caco-2 treated with IP6 (1 and 2.5 mM). To study the involvement of PTK signal pathway in IL-8 secretion, inhibitors of phosphotyrosine phosphatase (sodium orthovanadate, OV) and tyrosine kinase (genistein, GEN) were incubated with Caco-2 cells prior to IP6 treatment. IP6 had suppressive effect on basal and IL-1beta-stimulated IL-8 secretion by cells. The effect of OV on IL-8 release by cells treated with IP6 was different under constitutive and stimulated conditions. Secretion of IL-8 was significantly down-regulated in cells with GEN and GEN plus IP6 treatment. In addition, total PTK activity in both unstimulated and IL-1beta stimulated cells was determined in the presence of IP6. The results suggest that physiological intestinal concentrations of IP6 may have an inhibitory effect on IL-8 secretion by Caco-2 cells and one of the mechanisms of its action is the inhibition of PTK signaling cascade. The study revealed for the first time that PTKs could be one of the molecular targets for IP6 effects in the intestinal epithelial cells.

  4. Recruitment of SHP-1 protein tyrosine phosphatase and signalling by a chimeric T-cell receptor-killer inhibitory receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M D; Geisler, C

    2000-01-01

    recognize MHC class I molecules. Following coligation of KIR with an activating receptor, the tyrosine in the ITIM is phosphorylated and the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 is recruited to the ITIM via its SH2 domains. It is still not clear how SHP-1 affects T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling....... In this study, we constructed a chimeric TCR-KIR receptor. We demonstrated that SHP-1 is recruited to the chimeric TCR-KIR receptor following T-cell stimulation with either anti-TCR monoclonal antibody (MoAb) or superantigen. However, in spite of this we could not detect any effect of SHP-1 on TCR signalling...

  5. Novel Mixed-Type Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B. Kinetic and Computational Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Jazmín Sarabia-Sánchez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Atlas of Diabetes reports 415 million diabetics in the world, a number that has surpassed in half the expected time the twenty year projection. Type 2 diabetes is the most frequent form of the disease; it is characterized by a defect in the secretion of insulin and a resistance in its target organs. In the search for new antidiabetic drugs, one of the principal strategies consists in promoting the action of insulin. In this sense, attention has been centered in the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B, a protein whose overexpression or increase of its activity has been related in many studies with insulin resistance. In the present work, a chemical library of 250 compounds was evaluated to determine their inhibition capability on the protein PTP1B. Ten molecules inhibited over the 50% of the activity of the PTP1B, the three most potent molecules were selected for its characterization, reporting Ki values of 5.2, 4.2 and 41.3 µM, for compounds 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Docking and molecular dynamics studies revealed that the three inhibitors made interactions with residues at the secondary binding site to phosphate, exclusive for PTP1B. The data reported here support these compounds as hits for the design more potent and selective inhibitors against PTP1B in the search of new antidiabetic treatment.

  6. Translation of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) after beta1-adrenergic receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaer; Zhang, Yang; Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Lombroso, Paul J

    2007-10-01

    The beta-adrenergic system is implicated in long-term synaptic plasticity in the CNS, a process that requires protein synthesis. To identify proteins that are translated in response to beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation and the pathways that regulate this process, we investigated the effects of isoproterenol on the translation of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in both cortico-striatal slices and primary neuronal cultures. Isoproterenol stimulation induced a rapid dose-dependent increase in STEP expression. Anisomycin blocked the increase in STEP expression while actinomycin D had no effect, suggesting a translation-dependent mechanism. Isoproterenol-induced STEP translation required activation of beta1-receptors. Application of the MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor SL327 blocked both isoproterenol-induced activation of pERK and subsequent STEP translation. Inhibitors of PI3K (LY294002) or mTOR (rapamycin) also completely blocked STEP translation. These results suggest that co-activation of both the ERK and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways are required for STEP translation. As one of the substrates of STEP includes ERK itself, these results suggest that STEP is translated upon beta-adrenergic activation as part of a negative feedback mechanism.

  7. Isolation of Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase-like Member-a Variant from Cementum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés De Hoyos, A.; Hoz-Rodríguez, L.; Arzate, H.; Narayanan, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Cementum has been shown to contain unique polypeptides that participate in cell recruitment and differentiation during cementum formation. We report the isolation of a cDNA variant for protein-tyrosine phosphatase-like (proline instead of catalytic arginine) member-a (PTPLA) from cementum. A cementifying fibroma-derived λ-ZAP expression library was screened by panning with a monoclonal antibody to cementum attachment protein (CAP), and 1435 bp cDNA (gb AC093525.3) was isolated. This cDNA encodes a 140-amino-acid polypeptide, and its N-terminal 125 amino acids are identical to those of PTPLA. This isoform, designated as PTPLA-CAP, results from a read-through of the PTPLA exon 2 splice donor site, truncating after the second putative transmembrane domain. It contains 15 amino acids encoded within the intron between PTPLA exons 2 and 3, which replace the active site for PTPLA phosphatase activity. The recombinant protein, rhPTPLA-CAP, has Mr 19 kDa and cross-reacts with anti-CAP antibody. Anti-rhPTPLA-CAP antibody immunostained cementum cells, cementum, heart, and liver. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that PTPLA was expressed in all periodontal cells; however, PTPLA-CAP expression was limited to cementum cells. The rhPTPLA-CAP promoted gingival fibroblast attachment. We conclude that PTPLA-CAP is a splice variant of PTPLA, and that, in the periodontium, cementum and cementum cells express this variant. PMID:22067203

  8. Identification of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B and casein as substrates for 124-v-Mos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stabel Silvia

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mos proto-oncogene encodes a cytoplasmic serine/threonine-specific protein kinase with crucial function during meiotic cell division in vertebrates. Based on oncogenic amino acid substitutions the viral derivative, 124-v-Mos, displays constitutive protein kinase activity and functions independent of unknown upstream effectors of mos protein kinase. We have utilized this property of 124-v-Mos and screened for novel mos substrates in immunocomplex kinase assays in vitro. Results We generated recombinant 124-v-Mos using the baculovirus expression system in Spodoptera frugiperda cells and demonstrated constitutive kinase activity by the ability of 124-v-Mos to auto-phosphorylate and to phosphorylate vimentin, a known substrate of c-Mos. Using this approach we analyzed a panel of acidic and basic substrates in immunocomplex protein kinase assays and identified novel in vitro substrates for 124-v-Mos, the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B, alpha-casein and beta-casein. We controlled mos-specific phosphorylation of PTP1B and casein in comparative assays using a synthetic kinase-inactive 124-v-Mos mutant and further, tryptic digests of mos-phosphorylated beta-casein identified a phosphopeptide specifically targeted by wild-type 124-v-Mos. Two-dimensional phosphoamino acid analyses showed that 124-v-mos targets serine and threonine residues for phosphorylation in casein at a 1:1 ratio but auto-phosphorylation occurs predominantly on serine residues. Conclusion The mos substrates identified in this study represent a basis to approach the identification of the mos-consensus phosphorylation motif, important for the development of specific inhibitors of the Mos protein kinase.

  9. A role for the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 in macrophage adhesion through the regulation of paxillin degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joëlle St-Pierre

    Full Text Available CD45 is a protein tyrosine phosphatase expressed on all cells of hematopoietic origin that is known to regulate Src family kinases. In macrophages, the absence of CD45 has been linked to defects in adhesion, however the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly defined. In this study, we show that bone marrow derived macrophages from CD45-deficient mice exhibit abnormal cell morphology and defective motility. These defects are accompanied by substantially decreased levels of the cytoskeletal-associated protein paxillin, without affecting the levels of other proteins. Degradation of paxillin in CD45-deficient macrophages is calpain-mediated, as treatment with a calpain inhibitor restores paxillin levels in these cells and enhances cell spreading. Inhibition of the tyrosine kinases proline-rich tyrosine kinase (Pyk2 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK, kinases that are capable of mediating tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin, also restored paxillin levels, indicating a role for these kinases in the CD45-dependent regulation of paxillin. These data demonstrate that CD45 functions to regulate Pyk2/FAK activity, likely through the activity of Src family kinases, which in turn regulates the levels of paxillin to modulate macrophage adhesion and migration.

  10. Characterization of a protein tyrosine phosphatase as a host factor promoting baculovirus replication in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Xue, Renju; Li, Xianyang; Hu, Cuimei; Xia, Qingyou

    2016-04-01

    The relevance of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) to host-pathogen interaction is highlighted in mammalian studies, whereas less is known in insects. Here we presented the categorization of the PTP complement of silkworm and characterized their homologous relationship with human and fruit fly PTPs. Among the 36 PTP genes, ptp-h, which was proposed to be the origin of baculovirus ptp belongs to atypical VH1-like dual-specific PTP subset and encodes a catalytic active protein. The maximum expression level of Bmptp-h was at 5th instar and in fat body. Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) infection potently induced its expression in silkworm larvae and in BmE cells. Knock-down of Bmptp-h by RNA interference significantly inhibited viral replication, and over-expression enhanced viral replication as determined by viral DNA abundance and BmNPV-GFP positive cells. These results suggest that BmPTP-h might be one of the host factors that is beneficial to baculovirus infection by promoting viral replication. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Human albumin prevents 6-hydroxydopamine-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase in in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Juan Zhang

    Full Text Available Human albumin has recently been demonstrated to protect brain neurons from injury in rat ischemic brain. However, there is no information available about whether human albumin can prevent loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH expression of dopaminergic (DA neurons induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA toxicity that is most commonly used to create a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD. In the present study, two microliters of 1.25% human albumin were stereotaxically injected into the right striatum of rats one day before or 7 days after the 6-OHDA lesion in the same side. D-Amphetamine-induced rotational asymmetry was measured 7 days, 3 and 10 weeks after 6-OHDA lesion. We observed that intrastriatal administration of human albumin significantly reduced the degree of rotational asymmetry. The number of TH-immunoreactive neurons present in the substantia nigra was greater in 6-OHDA lesioned rats following human albumin-treatment than non-human albumin treatment. TH-immunoreactivity in the 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum was also significantly increased in the human albumin-treated rats. To examine the mechanisms underlying the effects of human albumin, we challenged PC12 cells with 6-OHDA as an in vitro model of PD. Incubation with human albumin prevented 6-OHDA-induced reduction of cell viability in PC12 cell cultures, as measured by MTT assay. Furthermore, human albumin reduced 6-OHDA-induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and apoptosis in cultured PC12 cells, as assessed by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis showed that human albumin inhibited 6-OHDA-induced activation of JNK, c-Jun, ERK, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK signaling in PC12 cultures challenged with 6-OHDA. Human albumin may protect against 6-OHDA toxicity by influencing MAPK pathway followed by anti-ROS formation and anti-apoptosis.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B. II. Substrate-Enzyme Interactions and Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Günther H.; Frimurer, Thomas M.; Andersen, Jannik N.; Olsen, Ole H.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) complexed with the phosphorylated peptide substrate DADEpYL and the free substrate have been conducted to investigate 1) the physical forces involved in substrate-protein interactions, 2) the importance of enzyme and substrate flexibility for binding, 3) the electrostatic properties of the enzyme, and 4) the contribution from solvation. The simulations were performed for 1 ns, using explicit water molecules. The last 70...

  13. The role of protein-tyrosine phosphorylation and gelatinase production in the migration and proliferation of smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzui, H; Lee, J D; Shimizu, H; Tsutani, H; Ueda, T

    2000-03-01

    It has been reported that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) was expressed in coronary arterial atherosclerotic lesions. However, not much is known about the relationship between the production of MMP and the progression of atherosclerosis. To demonstrate the association between the protein-tyrosine phosphorylation (PTP) and the activation of extracellular MMP in the proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), the effect of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and vanadate (an inhibitor of protein-tyrosine phosphatase and an activator of certain protein-tyrosine kinases) on mitogenesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation after 24 hours), migration, PTP (Western blot analysis using anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies), and production of MMP (gelatin zymography) was examined in cultured VSMCs. Both vanadate (1-5 micromol/l) and PDGF (1-10 ng/ml) caused a dose-dependent increase in thymidine incorporation and migration and produced 72-kDa type IV gelatinase (MMP-2) in VSMCs. The combination of vanadate and PDGF resulted in a dose-dependent synergistic effect on thymidine incorporation and MMP-2 production. Western blot analysis revealed that PDGF caused an increase in PTP, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1, ERK2) and PDGF receptor in VSMCs. Vanadate given together with PDGF induced a marked increase in the intensity of tyrosine phosphorylation in these proteins. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and herbimycin A) and a synthetic inhibitor of MMP (1,10-phenanthroline) and an anti-MMP-2 neutralizing antibody inhibited the mitogenic effect induced by vanadate and/or PDGF. The data suggest that the proliferation and migration of cultured VSMCs was closely related to the stimulation of MMP-2 production that was induced through activation of PTK.

  14. Status Epilepticus-Induced Somatostatinergic Hilar Interneuron Degeneration Is Regulated by Striatal Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Sik; Lin, Stanley L.; Lee, Boyoung; Kurup, Pradeep; Cho, Hee-Yeon; Naegele, Janice R.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Obrietan, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Excitotoxic cell death is one of the precipitating events in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. Of particular prominence is the loss of GABAergic hilar neurons. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for the selective vulnerability of these cells are not well understood, activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathway has been implicated in neuroprotective responses to excitotoxicity in other neuronal populations. Here, we report that high levels of the striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), a key regulator of ERK/MAPK signaling, are found in vulnerable somatostatin-immunoreactive hilar interneurons. Under both control conditions and after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE), ERK/MAPK activation was repressed in STEP-immunoreactive hilar neurons. This contrasts with robust SE-induced ERK/MAPK activation in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus, a cell region that does not express STEP. During pilocarpine-induced SE, in vivo disruption of STEP activity allowed activation of the MAPK pathway, leading to immediate-early gene expression and significant rescue from cell death. Thus, STEP increases the sensitivity of neurons to SE-induced excitotoxicity by specifically blocking a latent neuroprotective response initiated by the MAPK pathway. These findings identify a key set of signaling events that render somatostatinergic hilar interneurons vulnerable to SE-induced cell death. PMID:17360923

  15. Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Kurup, Pradeep; Nairn, Angus C.; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the elderly, affecting millions of people worldwide and representing a substantial economic burden. AD is a progressive disease associated with memory loss and impaired cognitive function. The neuropathology is characterized by cortical accumulation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Amyloid plaques are small, aggregated peptides called beta amyloid (Aβ) and NFTs are aggregates of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein. Because Aβ disrupts multiple intracellular signaling pathways, resulting in some of the clinical symptoms of AD, understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms has implications for the diagnosis and treatment of AD. Recent studies have demonstrated that Aβ regulates striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) (PTPN5). Aβ accumulation is associated with increases in STEP levels and activity that in turn disrupts glutamate receptor trafficking to and from the neuronal membrane. These findings indicate that modulating STEP levels or inhibiting its activity may have beneficial effects for patients with AD, making it an important target for drug discovery. This article reviews the biology of STEP and its role in AD as well as the potential clinical applications. PMID:22840751

  16. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors and multidrug resistance proteins: interactions and biological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzariti, Amalia; Porcelli, Letizia; Simone, Grazia M; Quatrale, Anna E; Colabufo, Nicola A; Berardi, Francesco; Perrone, Roberto; Zucchetti, Massimo; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Xu, Jian Ming; Paradiso, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    Although multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins are known to play a role in drug resistance and modification pharmacodynamic characteristics of certain conventional chemotherapeutics, information about their interactions with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) remains fragmentary and somewhat controversial. The chronic administration of TKIs in many clinical situations strongly suggests that any possible interactions with MDR transporters should be studied as a function of time. For example, short periods of exposure to TKIs could provide insights into the nature of the binding to MDR-related proteins, either as substrates or as inhibitors, whereas prolonged exposure to TKIs could provide insights into cellular responses to binding/inhibition of MDR-related proteins. In this report, we provide evidence that suggests that both Gefitinib and Vandetanib may act as transported substrates for Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP, ABCG2). Conversely, the interaction of Gefitinib and Vandetanib with P-glycoprotein (PgP, MDR1) appeared to be as inhibitors alone. Consistent with this, short periods of exposure (≤24 h) to either Gefitinib or Vandetanib increased the effectiveness of SN-38, the active metabolite of CPT-11. Conversely, prolonged exposure (5 days) decreased SN-38 effectiveness, and was associated with BCRP up-regulation and reduced cell accumulation in S-phase, possibly though reduced intracellular accumulation of SN-38. This report underlines the needs for more detailed characterisation new biologically targeted anticancer drugs, in particular analysing periods of both short and prolonged drug exposure reflecting potentially distinct situations in the clinic in order to optimise future development in combination with established chemotherapeutic approaches.

  17. Optimized logic rules reveal interferon-γ-induced modes regulated by histone deacetylases and protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Twisk, Daniel; Murphy, Shawn P; Thakar, Juilee

    2017-05-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is critical for activating innate and adaptive immunity against tumours and intracellular pathogens. Interferon-γ is secreted at the fetal-maternal interface in pregnant women and mice. The outer layer of the placenta in contact with maternal blood is composed of semi-allogeneic trophoblast cells, which constitute the fetal component of the fetal-maternal interface. The simultaneous presence of pro-inflammatory IFN-γ and trophoblast cells at the fetal-maternal interface appears to represent an immunological paradox, for trophoblastic responses to IFN-γ could potentially lead to activation of maternal immunity and subsequent attack of the placenta. However, our previous studies demonstrate that IFN-γ responsive gene (IRG) expression is negatively regulated in human and mouse trophoblast cells. In human cytotrophoblast and trophoblast-derived choriocarcinoma cells, janus kinase signalling is blocked by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), whereas in mouse trophoblast, histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibit IRG expression. Here, we used genome-wide transcriptional profiling to investigate the collective roles of PTPs and HDACs on regulation of IRG expression in human choriocarcinoma cells. Logic-rules were optimized to derive regulatory modes governing gene expression patterns observed upon different combinations of treatment with PTP and HDAC inhibitors. The results demonstrate that IRGs can be divided into several categories in human choriocarcinoma cells, each of which is subject to distinct mechanisms of repression. Hence, the regulatory modes identified in this study suggest that human trophoblast and choriocarcinoma cells may evade the potentially deleterious consequences of exposure to IFN-γ by using several overlapping mechanisms to block IRG expression. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A protein-binding domain, EH, identified in the receptor tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 and conserved in evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, W T; Schumacher, C; Salcini, A E

    1995-01-01

    In this report we structurally and functionally define a binding domain that is involved in protein association and that we have designated EH (for Eps15 homology domain). This domain was identified in the tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 on the basis of regional conservation with several heteroge...... (for Eps15-related). Structural comparison of Eps15 and Eps15r defines a family of signal transducers possessing extensive networking abilities including EH-mediated binding and association with Src homology 3-containing proteins.......In this report we structurally and functionally define a binding domain that is involved in protein association and that we have designated EH (for Eps15 homology domain). This domain was identified in the tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 on the basis of regional conservation with several...

  19. Deficient tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl and associated proteins in phorbol ester-resistant EL4 mouse thymoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, X; Sando, J J

    1997-05-02

    Two tyrosine phosphoproteins in phorbol ester-sensitive EL4 (S-EL4) mouse thymoma cells have been identified as the p120 c-Cbl protooncogene product and the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p120 and p85 increased rapidly after phorbol ester stimulation. Phorbol ester-resistant EL4 (R-EL4) cells expressed comparable amounts of c-Cbl and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase protein but greatly diminished tyrosine phosphorylation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed complexes of c-Cbl with p85, and of p85 with the tyrosine kinase Lck in phorbol ester-stimulated S-EL4 but not in unstimulated S-EL4 or in R-EL4 cells. In vitro binding of c-Cbl with Lck SH2 or SH3 domains was detected in both S-EL4 and R-EL4 cells, suggesting that c-Cbl, p85, and Lck may form a ternary complex. In vitro kinase assays revealed phosphorylation of p85 by Lck only in phorbol ester-stimulated S-EL4 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Cbl-p85 and Lck-p85 complexes may form in unstimulated S-EL4 and R-EL4 cells but were not detected due to absence of tyrosine phosphorylation of p85. Greatly decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl and p85 in the complexes may contribute to the failure of R-EL4 cells to respond to phorbol ester.

  20. Dual Inhibition of Topoisomerase II and Tyrosine Kinases by the Novel Bis-Fluoroquinolone Chalcone-Like Derivative HMNE3 in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Chao Ma

    Full Text Available Both tyrosine kinase and topoisomerase II (TopII are important anticancer targets, and their respective inhibitors are widely used in cancer therapy. However, some combinations of anticancer drugs could exhibit mutually antagonistic actions and drug resistance, which further limit their therapeutic efficacy. Here, we report that HMNE3, a novel bis-fluoroquinolone chalcone-like derivative that targets both tyrosine kinase and TopII, induces tumor cell proliferation and growth inhibition. The viabilities of 6 different cancer cell lines treated with a range of HMNE3 doses were detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Cellular apoptosis was determined using Hoechst 33258 fluorescence staining and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL assay. The expression of activated Caspase-3 was examined by immunocytochemistry. The tyrosine kinase activity was measured with a human receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK detection kit using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP-conjugated phosphotyrosine (pY20 antibody as the substrate. The topoisomerase II activity was measured using agarose gel electrophoresis with the DNA plasmid pBR322 as the substrate. The expression levels of the P53, Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3, -8, -9, p-cSrc, c-Src and topoisomerase II proteins were detected by western blot analysis. The proliferation of five of the six cancer cell lines was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 at 0.312 to 10 μmol/L in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment of the Capan-1 and Panc-1 cells with 1.6 to 3.2 μM HMNE3 for 48 h significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells (P<0.05, and this effect was accompanied by a decrease in tyrosine kinase activity. HMNE3 potentially inhibited tyrosine kinase activity in vitro with an IC50 value of 0.64±0.34 μmol/L in Capan-1 cells and 3.1±0.86 μmol/L in Panc-1 cells. The activity of c-Src was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 in a dose

  1. Coexpression of receptor tyrosine kinase AXL and EGFR in human primary lung adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenzhou; Bai, Fan; Fan, Liyun; Pang, Wenshuai; Han, Ruiyu; Wang, Juan; Liu, Yueping; Yan, Xia; Duan, Huijun; Xing, Lingxiao

    2015-12-01

    AXL has been identified as a tyrosine kinase switch that causes resistance to inhibitors targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the relationship between 2 receptor tyrosine kinases, AXL and EGFR, and the relevance of AXL expression with EGFR mutation status in treatment-naive human NSCLCs remain uncertain. In this study, we evaluated the coexpression pattern of AXL, EGFR, and pEGFR(1068) in 109 lung adenocarcinoma patients with or without an EGFR mutation. There were 68 (62.4%) patients with tumors harboring EGFR mutations such as 19 del and/or L858R; 2 patients were T790M positive. The expression of AXL, EGFR, and pEGFR(1068) was detected in 60 (55%), 68 (62.4%), and 57 (52.3%) of 109 patients, respectively. The positive rates of EGFR and pEGFR(1068) were associated with the L858R mutation alone or with the 19 del and L858R mutation status. Further analysis indicated that the percentage of AXL(+)/EGFR(+)/pEGFR(1068) coexpression in 68 EGFR-activating mutations patients was significantly higher than that in 39 EGFR wild-type patients (30.9% versus 10.3%, P=.015). Furthermore, in the subgroup of AXL(+) patients (35 mutation(+) and 23 wild-type patients), the coexpression rates of AXL(+)/pEGFR(1068+) and AXL(+)/EGFR(+)/pEGFR(1068+) in patients with EGFR mutations were significantly higher compared with those in wild-type patients (both P<.05). Our study emphasized that the AXL and EGFR receptor tyrosine kinases were coexpressed in a subgroup of treatment-naive lung adenocarcinomas with or without EGFR mutations. Anti-AXL therapeutics delivered up front in combination with an EGFR inhibitor might prevent or delay resistance in patients with AXL-positive, EGFR-mutant, or wild-type NSCLC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Protein-tyrosine kinase activity profiling in knock down zebrafish embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Lemeer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs regulate virtually all biological processes. PTKs phosphorylate substrates in a sequence-specific manner and relatively short peptide sequences determine selectivity. Here, we developed new technology to determine PTK activity profiles using peptide arrays. The zebrafish is an excellent model system to investigate signaling in the whole organism, given its wealth of genetic tools, including morpholino-mediated knock down technology. We used zebrafish embryo lysates to determine PTK activity profiles, thus providing the unique opportunity to directly compare the effect of protein knock downs on PTK activity profiles on the one hand and phenotypic changes on the other. METHODOLOGY: We used multiplex arrays of 144 distinct peptides, spotted on a porous substrate, allowing the sample to be pumped up and down, optimizing reaction kinetics. Kinase reactions were performed using complex zebrafish embryo lysates or purified kinases. Peptide phosphorylation was detected by fluorescent anti-phosphotyrosine antibody binding and the porous chips allowed semi-continuous recording of the signal. We used morpholinos to knock down protein expression in the zebrafish embryos and subsequently, we determined the effects on the PTK activity profiles. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Reproducible PTK activity profiles were derived from one-day-old zebrafiish embryos. Morpholino-mediated knock downs of the Src family kinases, Fyn and Yes, induced characteristic phenotypes and distinct changes in the PTK activity profiles. Interestingly, the peptide substrates that were less phosphorylated upon Fyn and Yes knock down were preferential substrates of purified Fyn and Yes. Previously, we demonstrated that Wnt11 knock down phenocopied Fyn/Yes knock down. Interestingly, Wnt11 knock down induced similar changes in the PTK activity profile as Fyn/Yes knock down. The control Nacre/Mitfa knock down did not affect the PTK activity profile

  3. Expression and function of striatal enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase is profoundly altered in cerebral ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Steven P.; Xu, Jian; Leung, John; Urfer, Roman; Nikolich, Karoly; Oksenberg, Donna; Lombroso, Paul J.; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2009-01-01

    Striatal enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) acts in the central nervous system to dephosphorylate a number of important proteins involved in synaptic function including ERK and NMDA receptor subunits. These proteins are also linked to stroke, in which cerebral ischemia triggers a complex cascade of events. Here we demonstrate that STEP is regulated at both the transcriptional and the post-transcriptional levels in rat models of cerebral ischemia and that its regulation may play a role in the outcome of ischemic insults. After transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, there are profound decreases in the levels of STEP mRNA, whilst in global ischemia STEP mRNA is selectively down-regulated in areas susceptible to ischemic damage. In a neuroprotective preconditioning paradigm, and in regions of the brain that are relatively resistant to ischemic damage, STEP mRNA levels are increased. Furthermore, there is a significant processing of STEP after ischemia to generate a novel species, STEP33, resulting in a redistribution of STEP from membrane-bound to soluble compartments. Concomitant with the cleavage of mature forms of STEP, there are changes in the phosphorylation state of ERK. We show that the cleavage of STEP leads to a catalytically active form, but this cleaved form no longer binds to and dephosphorylates its substrate pERK. Therefore, in response to ischemic insults, there are profound reductions in both the amount and the activity of STEP, its localization, as well as the activity of one of its key substrates, pERK. These changes in STEP may reflect a critical role in the outcomes of ischemic brain injury. PMID:18445231

  4. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in newly differentiated neurons from a human cell line (hNT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovitti, L; Stull, N D

    1997-04-14

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the synergistic interaction of acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) and a number of co-activator molecules (dopamine, TPA, IBMX/forskolin) can induce the novel expression of the catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in non-TH-expressing neurons. To date, TH gene induction has been achieved only in cultures of primary brain neurons. In the present study, we investigated whether TH expression could similarly be induced in a cell line derived from human teratocarcinoma cells. Treatment with aFGF and its co-activators resulted in the prolonged expression of TH in newly differentiating human neurons (hNT) but not in their undifferentiated precursors (NT2). These findings suggest that hNTs may serve as a continual source of TH-expressing neurons for cell transplantation and developmental studies.

  5. Discovery and study of novel protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Chen, Xi; Feng, Changgen

    2017-10-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is considered to be a target for therapy of type II diabetes and obesity. So it is of great significance to take advantage of a computer aided drug design protocol involving the structured-based virtual screening with docking simulations for fast searching small molecule PTP1B inhibitors. Based on optimized complex structure of PTP1B bound with specific inhibitor of IX1, structured-based virtual screening against a library of natural products containing 35308 molecules, which was constructed based on Traditional Chinese Medicine database@ Taiwan (TCM database@ Taiwan), was conducted to determine the occurrence of PTP1B inhibitors using the Lubbock module and CDOCKER module from Discovery Studio 3.1 software package. The results were further filtered by predictive ADME simulation and predictive toxic simulation. As a result, 2 good drug-like molecules, namely para-benzoquinone compound 1 and Clavepictine analogue 2 were identified ultimately with the dock score of original inhibitor (IX1) and the receptor as a threshold. Binding model analyses revealed that these two candidate compounds have good interactions with PTP1B. The PTP1B inhibitory activity of compound 2 hasn't been reported before. The optimized compound 2 has higher scores and deserves further study.

  6. The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRB negatively regulates FGF2-dependent branching morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soady, Kelly J; Tornillo, Giusy; Kendrick, Howard; Meniel, Valerie; Olijnyk-Dallis, Daria; Morris, Joanna S; Stein, Torsten; Gusterson, Barry A; Isacke, Clare M; Smalley, Matthew J

    2017-10-15

    PTPRB is a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase known to regulate blood vessel remodelling and angiogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that PTPRB negatively regulates branching morphogenesis in the mouse mammary epithelium. We show that Ptprb is highly expressed in adult mammary stem cells and also, although at lower levels, in oestrogen receptor-positive luminal cells. During mammary development, Ptprb expression is downregulated during puberty, a period of extensive ductal outgrowth and branching. In vivo shRNA knockdown of Ptprb in the cleared mammary fat pad transplant assay resulted in smaller epithelial outgrowths with an increased branching density and also increased branching in an in vitro organoid assay. Organoid branching was dependent on stimulation by FGF2, and Ptprb knockdown in mammary epithelial cells resulted in a higher level of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) activation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, both at baseline and following FGF2 stimulation. Therefore, PTPRB regulates branching morphogenesis in the mammary epithelium by modulating the response of the FGFR signalling pathway to FGF stimulation. Considering the importance of branching morphogenesis in multiple taxa, our findings have general importance outside mammary developmental biology. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Protection from impulse noise-induced hearing loss with novel Src-protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeld, Eric C; Hangauer, David; Henderson, Donald

    2011-12-01

    Apoptosis is a significant mechanism of cochlear hair cell loss from noise. Molecules that inhibit apoptotic intracellular signaling reduce cochlear damage and hearing loss from noise. The current study is an extension of a previous study of the protective value of Src-protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors against noise (Harris et al., 2005). The current study tested three Src-inhibitors: the indole-based KX1-141, the biaryl-based KX2-329, and the ATP-competitive KX2-328. Each of the three drugs was delivered into the chinchillas' cochleae by allowing the solutions to diffuse across the round window membrane thirty minutes prior to exposure to impulse noise. Hearing thresholds were measured using auditory evoked responses from electrodes in the inferior colliculi. Ears treated with KX2-329 showed significantly lower threshold shifts and outer hair cell losses than the control group. The cochleae treated with KX1-141 and KX2-328 did not show statistically significant protection from the impulse noise. The finding of protection with KX2-329 demonstrates that a biaryl-based Src inhibitor has protective capacity against noise-induced hearing loss that is as good as that demonstrated by KX1-004, a Src inhibitor drug that has been studied extensively as an otoprotectant against noise, and suggests that KX2-329 could be useful for protection against noise. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Mammalian motoneuron axon targeting requires receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases sigma and delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetani, Noriko; Chagnon, Mélanie J; Kennedy, Timothy E; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Tremblay, Michel L

    2006-05-31

    The leukocyte common antigen-related (LAR) subfamily of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), LAR, RPTP-sigma, and RPTP-delta, regulate neuroendocrine development, axonal regeneration, and hippocampal long-term potentiation in mammals. In Drosophila, RPTPs are required for appropriate axon targeting during embryonic development. In contrast, deletion of any one of the three LAR-RPTP family members in mammals does not result in gross axon targeting defects. Both RPTP-sigma and RPTP-delta are highly expressed in the developing mammalian nervous system, suggesting they might be functionally redundant. To test this hypothesis, we generated RPTP-sigma and RPTP-delta (RPTP-sigma/delta) double-mutant mice. Although embryonic day 18.5 RPTP-sigma and RPTP-delta single-mutant embryos were viable, RPTP-sigma/delta double mutants were paralyzed, were never observed to draw a breath, and died shortly after cesarean section. RPTP-sigma/delta double mutants exhibit severe muscle dysgenesis and severe loss of motoneurons in the spinal cord. Detailed analysis of the projections of phrenic nerves in RPTP-sigma/delta double mutants indicated that these motoneuron axons emerge normally from the cervical spinal cord, but stall on reaching the diaphragm. Our results demonstrate that RPTP-sigma and RPTP-delta complement each other functionally during mammalian development, and reveal an essential contribution of RPTP-sigma and RPTP-delta to appropriate motoneuron axon targeting during mammalian axonogenesis.

  9. Protein tyrosine phosphatase α in the dorsomedial striatum promotes excessive ethanol-drinking behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hamida, Sami; Darcq, Emmanuel; Wang, Jun; Wu, Su; Phamluong, Khanhky; Kharazia, Viktor; Ron, Dorit

    2013-09-04

    We previously found that excessive ethanol drinking activates Fyn in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) (Wang et al., 2010; Gibb et al., 2011). Ethanol-mediated Fyn activation in the DMS leads to the phosphorylation of the GluN2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, to the enhancement of the channel's activity, and to the development and/or maintenance of ethanol drinking behaviors (Wang et al., 2007, 2010). Protein tyrosine phosphatase α (PTPα) is essential for Fyn kinase activation (Bhandari et al., 1998), and we showed that ethanol-mediated Fyn activation is facilitated by the recruitment of PTPα to synaptic membranes, the compartment where Fyn resides (Gibb et al., 2011). Here we tested the hypothesis that PTPα in the DMS is part of the Fyn/GluN2B pathway and is thus a major contributor to the neuroadaptations underlying excessive ethanol intake behaviors. We found that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated PTPα knockdown in the DMS reduces excessive ethanol intake and preference in rodents. Importantly, no alterations in water, saccharine/sucrose, or quinine intake were observed. Furthermore, downregulation of PTPα in the DMS of mice significantly reduces ethanol-mediated Fyn activation, GluN2B phosphorylation, and ethanol withdrawal-induced long-term facilitation of NMDAR activity without altering the intrinsic features of DMS neurons. Together, these results position PTPα upstream of Fyn within the DMS and demonstrate the important contribution of the phosphatase to the maladaptive synaptic changes that lead to excessive ethanol intake.

  10. Teratogenicity study of the dihydroorotate-dehydrogenase inhibitor and protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor Leflunomide in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Ryou; Kanamori, Susumu; Hirashiba, Masahiro; Hishikawa, Atsuko; Muranaka, Ri-Ich; Kaneto, Masako; Nakamura, Kazuichi; Kato, Ikuo

    2007-01-01

    Leflunomide is an immunosuppressive agent that inhibits de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides and the activity of protein tyrosine kinase. This study examined the teratogenicity of Leflunomide in mice. Pregnant mice were treated orally with Leflunomide at a dose of 10, 30 or 70 mg/kg/day from day 6 to 15 of pregnancy. At 70 mg/kg, all embryos were resorbed and no live fetuses were detected. At 30 mg/kg, Leflunomide reduced fetal viability, and increased the incidence of multiple external, skeletal and visceral malformations. Characteristic external malformations were neural tube defects, cleft palate and tail deformities. Limb malformations were observed in a small number of fetuses. Skeletal examinations revealed malformations of cervical to sacral vertebrae, ribs and sternebrae. In the viscerae, the main anomalies were membranous ventricular septum defect and persistent truncus arteriosus. The results of this study indicate that Leflunomide administered at 30 mg/kg on days 6 to 15 of pregnancy can induce craniofacial malformations and deformities of the axial skeleton, heart and great vessels in mice.

  11. Discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein tyrosine phosphatase B (PtpB inhibitors from natural products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Mascarello

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase B (PtpB is one of the virulence factors secreted into the host cell by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PtpB attenuates host immune defenses by interfering with signal transduction pathways in macrophages and, therefore, it is considered a promising target for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs. Here we report the discovery of natural compound inhibitors of PtpB among an in house library of more than 800 natural substances by means of a multidisciplinary approach, mixing in silico screening with enzymatic and kinetics studies and MS assays. Six natural compounds proved to inhibit PtpB at low micromolar concentrations (< 30 µM with Kuwanol E being the most potent with K i = 1.6 ± 0.1 µM. To the best of our knowledge, Kuwanol E is the most potent natural compound PtpB inhibitor reported so far, as well as it is the first non-peptidic PtpB inhibitor discovered from natural sources. Compounds herein identified may inspire the design of novel specific PtpB inhibitors.

  12. Discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase B (PtpB) Inhibitors from Natural Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise Domeneghini; Menegatti, Angela Camila Orbem; Monache, Franco Delle; Ferrari, Franco; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Nunes, Ricardo José; Terenzi, Hernán; Botta, Bruno; Botta, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase B (PtpB) is one of the virulence factors secreted into the host cell by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PtpB attenuates host immune defenses by interfering with signal transduction pathways in macrophages and, therefore, it is considered a promising target for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs. Here we report the discovery of natural compound inhibitors of PtpB among an in house library of more than 800 natural substances by means of a multidisciplinary approach, mixing in silico screening with enzymatic and kinetics studies and MS assays. Six natural compounds proved to inhibit PtpB at low micromolar concentrations (< 30 µM) with Kuwanol E being the most potent with Ki = 1.6 ± 0.1 µM. To the best of our knowledge, Kuwanol E is the most potent natural compound PtpB inhibitor reported so far, as well as it is the first non-peptidic PtpB inhibitor discovered from natural sources. Compounds herein identified may inspire the design of novel specific PtpB inhibitors. PMID:24155919

  13. Molecular underpinnings of neurodegenerative disorders: striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase signaling and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombroso, Paul J; Ogren, Marilee; Kurup, Pradeep; Nairn, Angus C

    2016-01-01

    This commentary focuses on potential molecular mechanisms related to the dysfunctional synaptic plasticity that is associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Specifically, we focus on the role of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in modulating synaptic function in these illnesses. STEP affects neuronal communication by opposing synaptic strengthening and does so by dephosphorylating several key substrates known to control synaptic signaling and plasticity. STEP levels are elevated in brains from patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Studies in model systems have found that high levels of STEP result in internalization of glutamate receptors as well as inactivation of ERK1/2, Fyn, Pyk2, and other STEP substrates necessary for the development of synaptic strengthening. We discuss the search for inhibitors of STEP activity that may offer potential treatments for neurocognitive disorders that are characterized by increased STEP activity. Future studies are needed to examine the mechanisms of differential and region-specific changes in STEP expression pattern, as such knowledge could lead to targeted therapies for disorders involving disrupted STEP activity.

  14. The mechanism of allosteric inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Li

    Full Text Available As the prototypical member of the PTP family, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is an attractive target for therapeutic interventions in type 2 diabetes. The extremely conserved catalytic site of PTP1B renders the design of selective PTP1B inhibitors intractable. Although discovered allosteric inhibitors containing a benzofuran sulfonamide scaffold offer fascinating opportunities to overcome selectivity issues, the allosteric inhibitory mechanism of PTP1B has remained elusive. Here, molecular dynamics (MD simulations, coupled with a dynamic weighted community analysis, were performed to unveil the potential allosteric signal propagation pathway from the allosteric site to the catalytic site in PTP1B. This result revealed that the allosteric inhibitor compound-3 induces a conformational rearrangement in helix α7, disrupting the triangular interaction among helix α7, helix α3, and loop11. Helix α7 then produces a force, pulling helix α3 outward, and promotes Ser190 to interact with Tyr176. As a result, the deviation of Tyr176 abrogates the hydrophobic interactions with Trp179 and leads to the downward movement of the WPD loop, which forms an H-bond between Asp181 and Glu115. The formation of this H-bond constrains the WPD loop to its open conformation and thus inactivates PTP1B. The discovery of this allosteric mechanism provides an overall view of the regulation of PTP1B, which is an important insight for the design of potent allosteric PTP1B inhibitors.

  15. Characterization of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibition by Chlorogenic Acid and Cichoric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipchock, James M; Hendrickson, Heidi P; Douglas, Bonnie B; Bird, Kelly E; Ginther, Patrick S; Rivalta, Ivan; Ten, Nicholas S; Batista, Victor S; Loria, J Patrick

    2017-01-10

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a known regulator of the insulin and leptin signaling pathways and is an active target for the design of inhibitors for the treatment of type II diabetes and obesity. Recently, cichoric acid (CHA) and chlorogenic acid (CGA) were predicted by docking methods to be allosteric inhibitors that bind distal to the active site. However, using a combination of steady-state inhibition kinetics, solution nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that CHA is a competitive inhibitor that binds in the active site of PTP1B. CGA, while a noncompetitive inhibitor, binds in the second aryl phosphate binding site, rather than the predicted benzfuran binding pocket. The molecular dynamics simulations of the apo enzyme and cysteine-phosphoryl intermediate states with and without bound CGA suggest CGA binding inhibits PTP1B by altering hydrogen bonding patterns at the active site. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the allosteric inhibition of PTP1B.

  16. Structure and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor 12 Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism of the Enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Dong; Francesco Zonta; Shanshan Wang; Ke Song; Xin He; Miaomiao He; Yan Nie; Sheng Li

    2017-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 12 (PTPN12) is an important protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in regulating cell adhesion and migration as well as tumorigenesis. Here, we solved a crystal structure of the native PTPN12 catalytic domain with the catalytic cysteine (residue 231) in dual conformation (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated). Combined with molecular dynamics simulation data, we concluded that those two conformations represent different states of the protein which are r...

  17. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a key regulator of IFNAR1 endocytosis and a target for antiviral therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Christopher J; Zheng, Hui; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi; Lewis, John R; Reiter, Alexander M; Henthorn, Paula; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Baker, Darren P; Ukkiramapandian, Radha; Bence, Kendra K; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2012-11-20

    Type 1 interferons (IFN1) elicit antiviral defenses by activating the cognate receptor composed of IFN-α/β receptor chain 1 (IFNAR1) and IFNAR2. Down-regulation of this receptor occurs through IFN1-stimulated IFNAR1 ubiquitination, which exposes a Y466-based linear endocytic motif within IFNAR1 to recruitment of the adaptin protein-2 complex (AP2) and ensuing receptor endocytosis. Paradoxically, IFN1-induced Janus kinase-mediated phosphorylation of Y466 is expected to decrease its affinity for AP2 and to inhibit the endocytic rate. To explain how IFN1 promotes Y466 phosphorylation yet stimulates IFNAR1 internalization, we proposed that the activity of a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) is required to enable both events by dephosphorylating Y466. An RNAi-based screen identified PTP1B as a specific regulator of IFNAR1 endocytosis stimulated by IFN1, but not by ligand-independent inducers of IFNAR1 ubiquitination. PTP1B is a promising target for treatment of obesity and diabetes; numerous research programs are aimed at identification and characterization of clinically relevant inhibitors of PTP1B. PTP1B is capable of binding and dephosphorylating IFNAR1. Genetic or pharmacologic modulation of PTP1B activity regulated IFN1 signaling in a manner dependent on the integrity of Y466 within IFNAR1 in human cells. These effects were less evident in mouse cells whose IFNAR1 lacks an analogous motif. PTP1B inhibitors robustly augmented the antiviral effects of IFN1 against vesicular stomatitis and hepatitis C viruses in human cells and proved beneficial in feline stomatitis patients. The clinical significance of these findings in the context of using PTP1B inhibitors to increase the therapeutic efficacy of IFN against viral infections is discussed.

  18. An Evolution-Guided Analysis Reveals a Multi-Signaling Regulation of Fas by Tyrosine Phosphorylation and its Implication in Human Cancers.

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    Krittalak Chakrabandhu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Demonstrations of both pro-apoptotic and pro-survival abilities of Fas (TNFRSF6/CD95/APO-1 have led to a shift from the exclusive "Fas apoptosis" to "Fas multisignals" paradigm and the acceptance that Fas-related therapies face a major challenge, as it remains unclear what determines the mode of Fas signaling. Through protein evolution analysis, which reveals unconventional substitutions of Fas tyrosine during divergent evolution, evolution-guided tyrosine-phosphorylated Fas proxy, and site-specific phosphorylation detection, we show that the Fas signaling outcome is determined by the tyrosine phosphorylation status of its death domain. The phosphorylation dominantly turns off the Fas-mediated apoptotic signal, while turning on the pro-survival signal. We show that while phosphorylations at Y232 and Y291 share some common functions, their contributions to Fas signaling differ at several levels. The findings that Fas tyrosine phosphorylation is regulated by Src family kinases (SFKs and the phosphatase SHP-1 and that Y291 phosphorylation primes clathrin-dependent Fas endocytosis, which contributes to Fas pro-survival signaling, reveals for the first time the mechanistic link between SFK/SHP-1-dependent Fas tyrosine phosphorylation, internalization route, and signaling choice. We also demonstrate that levels of phosphorylated Y232 and Y291 differ among human cancer types and differentially respond to anticancer therapy, suggesting context-dependent involvement of Fas phosphorylation in cancer. This report provides a new insight into the control of TNF receptor multisignaling by receptor phosphorylation and its implication in cancer biology, which brings us a step closer to overcoming the challenge in handling Fas signaling in treatments of cancer as well as other pathologies such as autoimmune and degenerative diseases.

  19. PAH- and PCB-induced Alterations of Protein Tyrosine Kinase and Cytokine Gene Transcription in Harbor Seal (Phoca Vitulina PBMC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C. C. Neale

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms underlying in vitro immunomodulatory effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs were investigated in harbor seal peripheral leukocytes, via real-time PCR. We examined the relative genetic expression of the protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs Fyn and Itk, which play a critical role in T cell activation, and IL-2, a cytokine of central importance in initiating adaptive immune responses. IL-1, the macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokine of innate immunity, was also included as a measure of macrophage function. Harbor seal PBMC were exposed to the prototypic immunotoxic PAH benzo[a]pyrene (BaP, 3,3',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-169, a model immunotoxic PCB, or DMSO (vehicle control. Exposure of Con A-stimulated harbor seal PBMC to both BaP and CB-169 produced significantly altered expression in all four targets relative to vehicle controls. The PTKs Fyn and Itk were both up-regulated following exposure to BaP and CB-169. In contrast, transcripts for IL-2 and IL-1 were decreased relative to controls by both treatments. Our findings are consistent with those of previous researchers working with human and rodent systems and support a hypothesis of contaminant-altered lymphocyte function mediated (at least in part by disruption of T cell receptor (TCR signaling and cytokine production.

  20. Protein kinase C-dependent dephosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase requires the B56δ heterotrimeric form of protein phosphatase 2A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hyuck Ahn

    Full Text Available Tyrosine hydroxylase, which plays a critical role in regulation of dopamine synthesis, is known to be controlled by phosphorylation at several critical sites. One of these sites, Ser40, is phosphorylated by a number of protein kinases, including protein kinase A. The major protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates Ser40 is protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A. A recent study has also linked protein kinase C to the dephosphorylation of Ser40 [1], but the mechanism is unclear. PP2A isoforms are comprised of catalytic, scaffold, and regulatory subunits, the regulatory B subunits being able to influence cellular localization and substrate selection. In the current study, we find that protein kinase C is able to phosphorylate a key regulatory site in the B56δ subunit leading to activation of PP2A. In turn, activation of the B56δ-containing heterotrimeric form of PP2A is responsible for enhanced dephosphorylation of Ser40 of tyrosine hydroylase in response to stimulation of PKC. In support of this mechanism, down-regulation of B56δ expression in N27 cells using RNAi was found to increase dopamine synthesis. Together these studies reveal molecular details of how protein kinase C is linked to reduced tyrosine hydroxylase activity via control of PP2A, and also add to the complexity of protein kinase/protein phosphatase interactions.

  1. Src-family tyrosine kinase activities are essential for differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

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    Xiong Zhang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem (ES cells are characterized by pluripotency, defined as the developmental potential to generate cell lineages derived from all three primary germ layers. In the past decade, great progress has been made on the cell culture conditions, transcription factor programs and intracellular signaling pathways that control both murine and human ES cell fates. ES cells of mouse vs. human origin have distinct culture conditions, responding to some tyrosine kinase signaling pathways in opposite ways. Previous work has implicated the Src family of non-receptor protein–tyrosine kinases in mouse ES cell self-renewal and differentiation. Seven members of the Src kinase family are expressed in mouse ES cells, and individual family members appear to play distinct roles in regulating their developmental fate. Both Hck and c-Yes are important in self-renewal, while c-Src activity alone is sufficient to induce differentiation. While these findings implicate Src-family kinase signaling in mouse ES cell renewal and differentiation, the role of this kinase family in human ES cells is largely unknown. Here, we explored Src-family kinase expression patterns and signaling in human ES cells during self-renewal and differentiation. Of the eleven Src-related kinases in the human genome, Fyn, c-Yes, c-Src, Lyn, Lck and Hck were expressed in H1, H7 and H9 hES cells, while Fgr, Blk, Srm, Brk, and Frk transcripts were not detected. Of these, c-Yes, Lyn, and Hck transcript levels remained constant in self-renewing human ES cells vs. differentiated EBs, while c-Src and Fyn showed a modest increase in expression as a function of differentiation. In contrast, Lck expression levels dropped dramatically as a function of EB differentiation. To assess the role of overall Src-family kinase activity in human ES cell differentiation, cultures were treated with inhibitors specific for the Src kinase family. Remarkably, human ES cells maintained in the presence of the potent

  2. BIOLUMINISCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER (BRET) METHODS TO STUDY G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR - RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASE HETERORECEPTOR COMPLEXES

    OpenAIRE

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Flajolet, Marc; Agnati, Luigi F.; Greengard, Paul; Fuxe, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can form heteroreceptor complexes. In these complexes, the signalling from each interacting protomer is modulated to produce an integrated and therefore novel response upon agonist(s) activation. In the GPCR-RTK heteroreceptor complexes, GPCRs can activate RTK in the absence of added growth factor through the use of RTK signalling molecules. This integrative phenomenon is reciproca...

  3. Phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 4 is associated with breast cancer metastasis through Src-mediated Akt tyrosine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Huang, F; Fan, L; Jiang, Y; Wang, X; Li, J; Wang, Q; Pan, H; Sun, J; Cao, X; Wang, X

    2014-09-11

    Metastasis is responsible for more than 90% of the mortality observed among patients with breast cancer. Human phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 4 (hPEBP4) is a novel member of the PEBP family and functions as an anti-apoptotic molecule. Here, we found that the metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells expressed much higher levels of hPEBP4 than the nonmetastatic MCF-7 breast cancer cells and that the expression levels of hPEBP4 were positively correlated with the metastasis of clinical breast cancer. The hPEBP4 overexpression in the MDA-MB-231 cells significantly promoted cell invasion in vitro and increased the development of lymph node metastasis in vivo. Conversely, the silencing of hPEBP4 suppressed the cell-invasive ability both in vitro and in vivo. Further investigation showed that hPEBP4 promoted the expression or activity of the metastasis-related proteinases MMP (matrix metalloproteinase) 2, MMP9 and MMP13. This hPEBP4-potentiated cell invasion and MMP expression is due to an increase in Akt activation. Knockdown of Akt restored hPEBP4-induced breast tumor metastasis in the hPEBP4-MDA-MB-231 xenograft mouse model. Moreover, we found that hPEBP4 functioned as a scaffolding molecule and enhanced the association of Akt with Src to promote Akt tyrosine phosphorylation, a prerequisite for the full activation of Akt, in a phosphatidylethanolamine-binding domain-dependent manner. Given the present information about human breast cancer, these functional data from cell culture and animal studies suggest that, in human breast cancer hPEBP4 is a novel and clinically relevant metastasis accelerator gene and may be a new diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for breast cancer metastasis.

  4. The receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase DEP-1 is constitutively associated with a 64-kDa protein serine/threonine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallal, B; Mossie, K; Vasiloudis, G; Knyazev, P; Zachwieja, J; Clairvoyant, F; Schilling, J; Ullrich, A

    1997-05-02

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes and may function as positive effectors as well as negative regulators of intracellular signaling. Recent data demonstrate that malignant transformation of cells is frequently associated with changes in PTP expression or activity. Our analysis of PTP expression in mammary carcinoma cell lines resulted in the molecular cloning of a receptor-like PTP, also known as DEP-1. DEP-1 was found to be expressed at varying levels in mammary carcinoma cell lines and A431 cells. In all tumor cell lines analyzed, DEP-1 was constitutively phosphorylated on tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of DEP-1 increased significantly after treatment of cells with the PTP inhibitor pervanadate. In A431 cells, tyrosine phosphorylation of DEP-1 was also observed after stimulation with epidermal growth factor, however, only after prolonged exposure of the cells to the ligand, suggesting an indirect mechanism of phosphorylation. In addition, DEP-1 coprecipitated with several tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins from pervanadate-treated cells. In vitro binding experiments using a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the catalytically inactive PTP domain of DEP-1 (Gst-DEP-1-C/S) identify these proteins as potential substrates of DEP-1. In addition, we found a 64-kDa serine/threonine kinase to be constitutively associated with DEP-1 in all tumor cell lines tested. The 64-kDa kinase forms a stable complex with DEP-1 and phosphorylates DEP-1 and DEP-1-interacting proteins in vitro. These data suggest a possible mechanism of DEP-1 regulation in tumor cell lines involving serine/threonine and/or tyrosine phosphorylation.

  5. Stretch-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in lung fibroblasts is independent of receptor tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreault, Francis; Tschumperlin, Daniel J

    2010-07-01

    Lung growth and remodeling are modulated by mechanical stress, with fibroblasts thought to play a leading role. Little mechanistic information is available about how lung fibroblasts respond to mechanical stress. We exposed cultured lung fibroblasts to tonic stretch and measured changes in phosphorylation status of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), selected receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), and phospholipase Cgamma1 (PLCgamma1) and activation of the small G-protein Ras. Human lung fibroblasts (LFs) were seeded on matrix-coated silicone membranes and exposed to equibiaxial 10 to 40% static stretch or 20% contraction. LFs were stimulated with EGF, FGF2, or PDGF-BB or exposed to stretch in the presence of inhibitors of EGFR (AG1478), FGFR (PD173074), and PDGFR (AG1296). Phospho-MAPK, phospho-RTK, and phospho-PLCgamma1 levels were measured by Western blotting. Active GTP-Ras was quantified by immunoblotting after pull-down with a glutathione S-transferase-Raf-RBD construct. Normalized p-ERK1/2, p-JNK, and p-p38 levels increased after stretch but not contraction. Ligands to RTKs broadly stimulated MAPKs, with the responses to EGF and PDGF most similar to stretch in terms of magnitude and rank order of MAPK responses. Stretching cells failed to elicit measurable activation of EGFR, FGFR (FRS2alpha phosphorylation), or PDGFR. Potent inhibitors of the kinase activity of each receptor failed to attenuate stretch-induced MAPK activation. PLCgamma1 and Ras, prominent effectors downstream of RTKs, were not activated by stretch. Our findings demonstrate that MAPKs are potently activated by stretch in lung fibroblasts, but, in contrast to stress responses observed in other cell types, RTKs are not necessary for stretch-induced MAPK activation in LFs.

  6. Protein tyrosine kinase 7 is essential for tubular morphogenesis of the Wolffian duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingfang; Washington, Angela M; Domeniconi, Raquel Fantin; Ferreira Souza, Ana Cláudia; Lu, Xiaowei; Sutherland, Ann; Hinton, Barry T

    2016-04-15

    The Wolffian duct, the proximal end of the mesonephric duct, undergoes non-branching morphogenesis to achieve an optimal length and size for sperm maturation. It is important to examine the mechanisms by which the developing mouse Wolffian duct elongates and coils for without proper morphogenesis, male infertility will result. Here we show that highly proliferative epithelial cells divide in a random orientation relative to the elongation axis in the developing Wolffian duct. Convergent extension (CE)-like of cell rearrangements is required for elongating the duct while maintaining a relatively unchanged duct diameter. The Wolffian duct epithelium is planar polarized, which is characterized by oriented cell elongation, oriented cell rearrangements, and polarized activity of regulatory light chain of myosin II. Conditional deletion of protein tyrosine kinase 7 (PTK7), a regulator of planar cell polarity (PCP), from mesoderm results in loss of the PCP characteristics in the Wolffian duct epithelium. Although loss of Ptk7 does not alter cell proliferation or division orientation, it affects CE and leads to the duct with significantly shortened length, increased diameter, and reduced coiling, which eventually results in loss of sperm motility, a key component of sperm maturation. In vitro experiments utilizing inhibitors of myosin II results in reduced elongation and coiling, similar to the phenotype of Ptk7 knockout. This data suggest that PTK7 signaling through myosin II regulates PCP, which in turn ensures CE-like of cell rearrangements to drive elongation and coiling of the Wolffian duct. Therefore, PTK7 is essential for Wolffian duct morphogenesis and male fertility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulation of brown fat adipogenesis by protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

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    Kosuke Matsuo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is a physiological regulator of insulin signaling and energy balance, but its role in brown fat adipogenesis requires additional investigation.To precisely determine the role of PTP1B in adipogenesis, we established preadipocyte cell lines from wild type and PTP1B knockout (KO mice. In addition, we reconstituted KO cells with wild type, substrate-trapping (D/A and sumoylation-resistant (K/R PTP1B mutants, then characterized differentiation and signaling in these cells. KO, D/A- and WT-reconstituted cells fully differentiated into mature adipocytes with KO and D/A cells exhibiting a trend for enhanced differentiation. In contrast, K/R cells exhibited marked attenuation in differentiation and lipid accumulation compared with WT cells. Expression of adipogenic markers PPARγ, C/EBPα, C/EBPδ, and PGC1α mirrored the differentiation pattern. In addition, the differentiation deficit in K/R cells could be reversed completely by the PPARγ activator troglitazone. PTP1B deficiency enhanced insulin receptor (IR and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1 tyrosyl phosphorylation, while K/R cells exhibited attenuated insulin-induced IR and IRS1 phosphorylation and glucose uptake compared with WT cells. In addition, substrate-trapping studies revealed that IRS1 is a substrate for PTP1B in brown adipocytes. Moreover, KO, D/A and K/R cells exhibited elevated AMPK and ACC phosphorylation compared with WT cells.These data indicate that PTP1B is a modulator of brown fat adipogenesis and suggest that adipocyte differentiation requires regulated expression of PTP1B.

  8. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase controls responses to aversive stimuli: implication for ethanol drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legastelois, Rémi; Darcq, Emmanuel; Wegner, Scott A; Lombroso, Paul J; Ron, Dorit

    2015-01-01

    The STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific phosphatase whose dysregulation in expression and/or activity is associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently showed that long-term excessive consumption of ethanol induces a sustained inhibition of STEP activity in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) of mice. We further showed that down-regulation of STEP expression in the DMS, and not in the adjacent dorsolateral striatum, increases ethanol intake, suggesting that the inactivation of STEP in the DMS contributes to the development of ethanol drinking behaviors. Here, we compared the consequence of global deletion of the STEP gene on voluntary ethanol intake to the consumption of an appetitive rewarding substance (saccharin) or an aversive solution (quinine or denatonium). Whereas saccharin intake was similar in STEP knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) littermate mice, the consumption of ethanol as well as quinine and denatonium was increased in STEP KO mice. These results suggested that the aversive taste of these substances was masked upon deletion of the STEP gene. We therefore hypothesized that STEP contributes to the physiological avoidance towards aversive stimuli. To further test this hypothesis, we measured the responses of STEP KO and WT mice to lithium-induced conditioned place aversion (CPA) and found that whereas WT mice developed lithium place aversion, STEP KO mice did not. In contrast, conditioned place preference (CPP) to ethanol was similar in both genotypes. Together, our results indicate that STEP contributes, at least in part, to the protection against the ingestion of aversive agents.

  9. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase controls responses to aversive stimuli: implication for ethanol drinking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Legastelois

    Full Text Available The STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP is a brain-specific phosphatase whose dysregulation in expression and/or activity is associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently showed that long-term excessive consumption of ethanol induces a sustained inhibition of STEP activity in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS of mice. We further showed that down-regulation of STEP expression in the DMS, and not in the adjacent dorsolateral striatum, increases ethanol intake, suggesting that the inactivation of STEP in the DMS contributes to the development of ethanol drinking behaviors. Here, we compared the consequence of global deletion of the STEP gene on voluntary ethanol intake to the consumption of an appetitive rewarding substance (saccharin or an aversive solution (quinine or denatonium. Whereas saccharin intake was similar in STEP knockout (KO and wild type (WT littermate mice, the consumption of ethanol as well as quinine and denatonium was increased in STEP KO mice. These results suggested that the aversive taste of these substances was masked upon deletion of the STEP gene. We therefore hypothesized that STEP contributes to the physiological avoidance towards aversive stimuli. To further test this hypothesis, we measured the responses of STEP KO and WT mice to lithium-induced conditioned place aversion (CPA and found that whereas WT mice developed lithium place aversion, STEP KO mice did not. In contrast, conditioned place preference (CPP to ethanol was similar in both genotypes. Together, our results indicate that STEP contributes, at least in part, to the protection against the ingestion of aversive agents.

  10. Cellular settings mediating Src Substrate switching between focal adhesion kinase tyrosine 861 and CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) tyrosine 734.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, Andreas; He, Yaowu; Christensen, Melinda E; Linn, Mayla; Lumley, John W; Pollock, Pamela M; Waterhouse, Nigel J; Hooper, John D

    2011-12-09

    Reciprocal interactions between Src family kinases (SFKs) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) are critical during changes in cell attachment. Recently it has been recognized that another SFK substrate, CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1), is differentially phosphorylated during these events. However, the molecular processes underlying SFK-mediated phosphorylation of CDCP1 are poorly understood. Here we identify a novel mechanism in which FAK tyrosine 861 and CDCP1-Tyr-734 compete as SFK substrates and demonstrate cellular settings in which SFKs switch between these sites. Our results show that stable CDCP1 expression induces robust SFK-mediated phosphorylation of CDCP1-Tyr-734 with concomitant loss of p-FAK-Tyr-861 in adherent HeLa cells. SFK substrate switching in these cells is dependent on the level of expression of CDCP1 and is also dependent on CDCP1-Tyr-734 but is independent of CDCP1-Tyr-743 and -Tyr-762. In HeLa CDCP1 cells, engagement of SFKs with CDCP1 is accompanied by an increase in phosphorylation of Src-Tyr-416 and a change in cell morphology to a fibroblastic appearance dependent on CDCP1-Tyr-734. SFK switching between FAK-Tyr-861 and CDCP1-Tyr-734 also occurs during changes in adhesion of colorectal cancer cell lines endogenously expressing these two proteins. Consistently, increased p-FAK-Tyr-861 levels and a more epithelial morphology are seen in colon cancer SW480 cells silenced for CDCP1. Unlike protein kinase Cδ, FAK does not appear to form a trimeric complex with Src and CDCP1. These data demonstrate novel aspects of the dynamics of SFK-mediated cell signaling that may be relevant during cancer progression.

  11. Putaminal mosaic visualized by tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry in the human neostriatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoma eMorigaki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits, the putamen plays a critical role in the ‘motor’ circuits that control voluntary movements and motor learning. The human neostriatum comprises two functional subdivisions known as the striosome (patch and matrix compartments. Accumulating evidence suggests that compartment-specific dysregulations of dopamine activity might be involved in the disease-specific pathology and symptoms of human striatal diseases including movement disorders. This study was undertaken to examine whether or how striatal dopaminergic innervations are organized into the compartmentalized architecture found in the putamen of adult human brains. For this purpose, we used a highly sensitive immunohistochemistry technique to identify tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, EC 1.14.16.2, a marker for striatal dopaminergic axons and terminals, in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from autopsied human brains. Herein, we report that discrete compartmentalization of TH-labeled innervations occurs in the putamen, as in the caudate nucleus, with a higher density of TH labeling in the matrix compared to the striosomes. Our results provide anatomical evidence to support the hypothesis that compartment-specific dysfunction of the striosome-matrix dopaminergic systems might contribute to the genesis of movement disorders.

  12. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha activates Src-family kinases and controls integrin-mediated responses in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Muranjan, M; Sap, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fyn and c-Src are two of the most widely expressed Src-family kinases. Both are strongly implicated in the control of cytoskeletal organization and in the generation of integrin-dependent signalling responses in fibroblasts. These proteins are representative of a large family of tyros......BACKGROUND: Fyn and c-Src are two of the most widely expressed Src-family kinases. Both are strongly implicated in the control of cytoskeletal organization and in the generation of integrin-dependent signalling responses in fibroblasts. These proteins are representative of a large family...... of tyrosine kinases, the activity of which is tightly controlled by inhibitory phosphorylation of a carboxyterminal tyrosine residue (Tyr527 in chicken c-Src); this phosphorylation induces the kinases to form an inactive conformation. Whereas the identity of such inhibitory Tyr527 kinases has been well...... these RPTPalpha-/- mice had impaired tyrosine kinase activity of both c-Src and Fyn, and this was accompanied by a concomitant increase in c-Src Tyr527 phosphorylation. RPTPalpha-/- fibroblasts also showed a reduction in the rate of spreading on fibronectin substrates, a trait that is a phenocopy of the effect...

  13. Substrate-based fragment identification for the development of selective, nonpeptidic inhibitors of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguley, Tyler D; Xu, Hai-Chao; Chatterjee, Manavi; Nairn, Angus C; Lombroso, Paul J; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2013-10-10

    High levels of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) activity are observed in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Overexpression of STEP results in the dephosphorylation and inactivation of many key neuronal signaling molecules, including ionotropic glutamate receptors. Moreover, genetically reducing STEP levels in AD mouse models significantly reversed cognitive deficits and decreased glutamate receptor internalization. These results support STEP as a potential target for drug discovery for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Herein, a substrate-based approach for the discovery and optimization of fragments called substrate activity screening (SAS) has been applied to the development of low molecular weight (<450 Da) and nonpeptidic, single-digit micromolar mechanism-based STEP inhibitors with greater than 20-fold selectivity across multiple tyrosine and dual specificity phosphatases. Significant levels of STEP inhibition in rat cortical neurons are also observed.

  14. Targeting FMS-related tyrosine kinase receptor 3 with the human immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody IMC-EB10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssoufian, Hagop; Rowinsky, Eric K; Tonra, James; Li, Yiwen

    2010-02-15

    FMS-related tyrosine kinase receptor 3 (FLT3) is a class III receptor tyrosine kinase that holds considerable promise as a therapeutic target in hematologic malignancies. Current efforts directed toward the development of small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors of FLT3 may be limited by off-target toxicities and the development of drug resistance. Target-specific antibodies could overcome these hurdles and provide additional mechanisms to enhance the antitumor efficacy of FLT3 inhibitors. IMC-EB10 is a novel antibody directed against FLT3. The binding of IMC-EB10 to FLT3 results in antiproliferative effects in vitro and in mouse models engrafted with human leukemia cells that harbor wild-type or constitutively activated FLT3. Future clinical trials will test these notions formally and will identify the most appropriate opportunities for this member of a new generation of antileukemic therapies. (c) 2010 American Cancer Society.

  15. Regulation of serotonin transport in human platelets by tyrosine kinase Syk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavanetto, Martina; Zarpellon, Alessandro; Borgo, Christian; Donella-Deana, Arianna; Deana, Renzo

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a neurotransmitter involved in the regulation of numerous neuro-physiological processes. The circulating level of 5-HT is regulated by the membrane transporter SERT present both in the presynaptic nerve terminals and blood platelets. 5-HT transport is a process tightly regulated by a variety of factors including protein phosphorylation. Aim of this study was to ascertain if also the SERT Tyr-phosphorylation mediated by Syk-kinase concurs to the regulation of SERT activity. Indeed we found that 5-HT uptake decreased upon platelet exposure to piceatannol or Syk-inhibitor II, two structurally unrelated inhibitors of the tyrosine-kinase Syk. Tyr-phosphorylation of anti-SERT-immuno-stained proteins in membrane extracts and in anti-SERT-immuno-precipitates, decreased upon platelet treatment with piceatannol, in parallel with a reduction of Syk-activity. Syk was immuno-revealed in the anti-SERT immuno-precipitates, which displayed a piceatannol-sensitive kinase activity towards SERT itself and the Syk-substrate α-sinuclein. Syk inhibitors also caused a decrease of the monensin-induced 5-HT-efflux from platelets and of imipramine binding to them. It is concluded that, in addition to the phosphorylation of SERT mediated by various other kinases, also that catalyzed by Syk might play an important role in the 5-HT transport, likely favoring the transporter conformation exposing the neurotransmitter binding sites. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Microvillus-Specific Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase SAP-1 Plays a Role in Regulating the Intestinal Paracellular Transport of Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shingo; Kamei, Noriyasu; Murata, Yoji; Takayama, Kozo; Matozaki, Takashi; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2017-09-01

    The stomach cancer-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SAP-1) is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase that is specifically expressed on the apical membrane of the intestinal epithelium. SAP-1 is known to maintain the balance of phosphorylation of proteins together with protein kinases; however, its biological function and impact on pharmacokinetics in the intestine remain unclear. The present study, therefore, aimed at clarifying the relationship between SAP-1 and the intestinal absorption behaviors of typical transporter substrates and macromolecules. The endogenous levels of glucose and total cholesterol in the blood were similar between wild-type and SAP-1-deficient mice (Sap1(-/-)), suggesting no contribution of SAP-1 to biogenic influx. Moreover, in vitro transport study with everted ileal sacs demonstrated that there was no difference in the absorption of breast cancer resistance protein, P-glycoprotein, and peptide transporter substrates between both mice. However, absorptive clearance of macromolecular model dextrans (FD-4 and FD-10) in Sap1(-/-) mice was significantly higher than that in wild-type mice, and this was confirmed by the trend of increased FD-4 absorption from colonic loops of Sap1(-/-) mice. Therefore, the results of this study suggest the partial contribution of SAP-1 to the regulated transport of hydrophilic macromolecules through paracellular tight junctions. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential hepatic protein tyrosine nitration of mouse due to aging - effect on mitochondrial energy metabolism, quality control machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum and metabolism of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Adrienne; Lutfeali, Reshma; Raval, Alpan; Chakravarti, Deb N; Chakravarti, Bulbul

    2013-01-04

    Aging is the inevitable fate of life which leads to the gradual loss of functions of different organs and organelles of all living organisms. The liver is no exception. Oxidative damage to proteins and other macromolecules is widely believed to be the primary cause of aging. One form of oxidative damage is tyrosine nitration of proteins, resulting in the potential loss of their functions. In this study, the effect of age on the nitration of tyrosine in mouse liver proteins was examined. Liver proteins from young (19-22 weeks) and old (24 months) C57/BL6 male mice were separated using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and electroblotted onto nitrocellulose membranes. Proteins undergoing tyrosine nitration were identified using anti-nitrotyrosine antibody. Three different protein bands were found to contain significantly increased levels of nitrotyrosine in old mice (Wilconxon rank-sum test, phepatic activity and have been discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Eps15R is a tyrosine kinase substrate with characteristics of a docking protein possibly involved in coated pits-mediated internalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coda, L; Salcini, A E; Confalonieri, S

    1998-01-01

    eps15R was identified because of its relatedness to eps15, a gene encoding a tyrosine kinase substrate bearing a novel protein-protein interaction domain, called EH. In this paper, we report a biochemical characterization of the eps15R gene product(s). In NIH-3T3 cells, three proteins of 125, 108...

  19. A Pan-BCL2 inhibitor renders bone-marrow-resident human leukemia stem cells sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Daniel J; Court Recart, Angela; Sadarangani, Anil; Chun, Hye-Jung; Barrett, Christian L; Krajewska, Maryla; Leu, Heather; Low-Marchelli, Janine; Ma, Wenxue; Shih, Alice Y; Wei, Jun; Zhai, Dayong; Geron, Ifat; Pu, Minya; Bao, Lei; Chuang, Ryan; Balaian, Larisa; Gotlib, Jason; Minden, Mark; Martinelli, Giovanni; Rusert, Jessica; Dao, Kim-Hien; Shazand, Kamran; Wentworth, Peggy; Smith, Kristen M; Jamieson, Christina A M; Morris, Sheldon R; Messer, Karen; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Hudson, Thomas J; Marra, Marco; Frazer, Kelly A; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Reed, John C; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2013-03-07

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) play a pivotal role in the resistance of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and its progression to blast crisis (BC), in part, through the alternative splicing of self-renewal and survival genes. To elucidate splice-isoform regulators of human BC LSC maintenance, we performed whole-transcriptome RNA sequencing, splice-isoform-specific quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), nanoproteomics, stromal coculture, and BC LSC xenotransplantation analyses. Cumulatively, these studies show that the alternative splicing of multiple prosurvival BCL2 family genes promotes malignant transformation of myeloid progenitors into BC LSCS that are quiescent in the marrow niche and that contribute to therapeutic resistance. Notably, sabutoclax, a pan-BCL2 inhibitor, renders marrow-niche-resident BC LSCs sensitive to TKIs at doses that spare normal progenitors. These findings underscore the importance of alternative BCL2 family splice-isoform expression in BC LSC maintenance and suggest that the combinatorial inhibition of prosurvival BCL2 family proteins and BCR-ABL may eliminate dormant LSCs and obviate resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Involvement of PTPN5, the gene encoding the striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase, in schizophrenia and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelov, Ilana; Teltsh, Omri; Greenbaum, Lior; Rigbi, Amihai; Kanyas-Sarner, Kyra; Lerer, Bernard; Lombroso, Paul; Kohn, Yoav

    2012-08-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific member of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family that has been implicated in learning and memory. In this study, we examined the association of the protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 5 (PTPN5) gene, which encodes for STEP, with both schizophrenia and cognitive functioning in the Israeli Jewish population. A schizophrenia (SZ) case-control study of 868 participants was carried out (286 patients and 582 controls). Eleven PTPN5 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected and single markers and haplotype association analyses were carried out. A cognitive variability study included 437 healthy women who completed a computerized cognitive battery. We performed univariate associations between the SNPs and cognitive performance. The possible functional role of these variants was examined by studying their association with gene expression levels in the brain. In the SZ study, we found a nominal association in the whole sample between rs4075664 and SZ. Male patients with SZ showed a more significant association for three SNPs (rs4075664, rs2278732, and rs4757710). Haplotypes of the studied SNPs were associated with SZ both in the overall sample and within the male subsample. Expression analysis provided some support for the effects of the associated SNPs on PTPN5 expression level. The cognitive variability study showed positive associations between PTPN5 SNPs and different cognitive subtests. Principal component analysis showed an 'attention index' neurocognitive component that was associated with two SNP pairs (rs10832983 × rs10766504 and rs7932938 × rs4757718). The results imply a model in which PTPN5 may play a role in normal cognitive functioning and contribute to aspects of the neuropathology of SZ.

  1. Regulation of Discrete Functional Responses by Syk and Src Family Tyrosine Kinases in Human Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornin Ear

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play a critical role in innate immunity and also influence adaptive immune responses. This occurs in good part through their production of inflammatory and immunomodulatory cytokines, in conjunction with their prolonged survival at inflamed foci. While a picture of the signaling machinery underlying these neutrophil responses is now emerging, much remains to be uncovered. In this study, we report that neutrophils constitutively express various Src family isoforms (STKs, as well as Syk, and that inhibition of these protein tyrosine kinases selectively hinders inflammatory cytokine generation by acting posttranscriptionally. Accordingly, STK or Syk inhibition decreases the phosphorylation of signaling intermediates (e.g., eIF-4E, S6K, and MNK1 involved in translational control. By contrast, delayed apoptosis appears to be independent of either STKs or Syk. Our data therefore significantly extend our understanding of which neutrophil responses are governed by STKs and Syk and pinpoint some signaling intermediates that are likely involved. In view of the foremost role of neutrophils in several chronic inflammatory conditions, our findings identify potential molecular targets that could be exploited for future therapeutic intervention.

  2. The linkage between β1 integrin and the actin cytoskeleton is differentially regulated by tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphorylation of β1 integrin in normal and cancerous human breast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Kazuhide

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural requirements for the β1 integrin functions in cell adhesion, spreading and signaling have been well documented mainly for fibroblasts. In this study, we examined the reason for the reduced surface expression of β1 integrin in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells compared to normal human breast epithelial (HBE cells, both of which adhered to collagen type IV. Results The β1 integrin immunoprecipitates from either HBE or MCF-7 cells involved α-actinin while actin coprecipitated with β1 integrin from HBE cells but not from MCF-7 cells. Immunoblotting using the anti-phosphotyrosine (PY antibody indicated the phosphorylation of β1 integrin at least at tyrosine in both cells. Dephosphorylation of β1 integrin from HBE cells by protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP, but not by protein serine/threonine phosphatase (PP, caused dissociation of actin from β1 integrin, although dephosphorylation of it from MCF-7 cells by either PTP or PP caused association of the two proteins. In MCF-7 cells β1 integrin coprecipitated doublet of proteins having the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK II activity that was susceptible to KN-62, a specific inhibitor of CaMKII. Conclusion The results suggest that β1 integrin is tyrosine phosphorylated and links with actin via α-actinin in HBE cells but prevented from linking with actin in MCF-7 cells by phosphorylation at both tyrosine and serine/threonine of β1 integrin which forms a complex with α-actinin and CaMKII. Thus the linkage formation of β1 integrin with actin may be differentially regulated by its tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphorylation in normal HBE cells and breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

  3. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase beta is expressed in the form of proteoglycan and binds to the extracellular matrix protein tenascin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnea, G; Grumet, M; Milev, P

    1994-01-01

    The extracellular domain of receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTP beta) exhibits striking sequence similarity with a soluble, rat brain chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (3F8 PG). Immunoprecipitation experiments of cells transfected with RPTP beta expression vector and metabolically...... labeled with [35S]sulfate and [35S]methionine indicate that the transmembrane form of RPTP beta is indeed a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The 3F8 PG is therefore a variant form composed of the entire extracellular domain of RPTP beta probably generated by alternative RNA splicing. Previous...

  4. In vitro screening for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B and dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors from selected Nigerian medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Saidu, Yusuf; Muhammad, Suleiman Alhaji; Abbas, Abdullahi Yahaya; Onu, Andrew; Tsado, Ibrahim Mohammed; Muhammad, Luba

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP 1B) and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) have been identified as one of the drug targets for the treatment of Type-2 diabetes. This study was designed to screen for PTP 1B and DPP-IV inhibitors from some Nigerian medicinal plants. Materials and Methods: PTP 1B and DPP-IV drug discovery kits from Enzo Life Sciences were used to investigate in vitro inhibitory effect of crude methanolic extract of 10 plants; Mangifera indica, Moringa oleifera...

  5. Derivation of mouse embryonic stem cell lines from tyrosine hydroxylase reporter mice crossed with a human SNCA transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumarina, Margarita; Azevedo, Carla; Bigarreau, Julie; Vignon, Clémentine; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Li, Jia-Yi; Roybon, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) lines were derived by crossing heterozygous transgenic (tg) mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the rat tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter, with homozygous alpha-synuclein (aSYN) mice expressing human mutant SNCA(A53T) under the control of the mouse Prion promoter (MoPrP), or wildtype (WT) mice. The expression of GFP and human aSYN was validated by immunocytochemistry in midbrain neuron cultures upon differentiation of mESC lines using stromal cell-derived inducing activity. These mESC lines can help to study the impact of human aSYN expression in neurons and oligodendrocytes, and also trace GFP-expressing midbrain neurons. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Derivation of mouse embryonic stem cell lines from tyrosine hydroxylase reporter mice crossed with a human SNCA transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Chumarina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC lines were derived by crossing heterozygous transgenic (tg mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the control of the rat tyrosine hydroxylase (TH promoter, with homozygous alpha-synuclein (aSYN mice expressing human mutant SNCAA53T under the control of the mouse Prion promoter (MoPrP, or wildtype (WT mice. The expression of GFP and human aSYN was validated by immunocytochemistry in midbrain neuron cultures upon differentiation of mESC lines using stromal cell-derived inducing activity. These mESC lines can help to study the impact of human aSYN expression in neurons and oligodendrocytes, and also trace GFP-expressing midbrain neurons.

  7. Association of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 +1858C→T polymorphism and susceptibility to vitiligo: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Silky; Changotra, Harish

    2017-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 gene, which translates to lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase, is considered to be a susceptibility gene marker associated with several autoimmune diseases. Several studies have demonstrated the association of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 +1858C→T polymorphism with vitiligo. However, these studies showed conflicting results. Meta-analysis of the same was conducted earlier that included fewer number of publications in their study. We performed a meta-analysis of a total of seven studies consisting of 2094 cases and 3613 controls to evaluate the possible association of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 +1858C>T polymorphism with vitiligo susceptibility. We conducted a literature search in PubMed, Google Scholar and Dogpile for all published paper on protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 +1858C→T polymorphism and vitiligo risk till June 2016. Data analysis was performed by RevMan 5.3 and comprehensive meta-analysis v3.0 software. Meta-analysis showed an overall significant association of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non- receptor type 22 +1858C→T polymorphism with vitiligo in all models (allelic model [T vs. C]: odds ratio = 1.50, 95% confidence interval [1.32-1.71], Pvitiligo-type are some limitations of the present meta-analysis. Stratifying data by ethnicity showed an association of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 +1858C→T with vitiligo in European population (odds ratio = 1.53, 95% confidence interval [1.34-1.75], Pvitiligo.

  8. Functional interaction between nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl and SR-Rich protein RBM39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mai, Sanyue [Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, 27 Taiping Rd, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Qu, Xiuhua [General Navy Hospital of PLA, 6 Fucheng Rd, Haidian District, Beijing 100037 (China); Li, Ping; Ma, Qingjun [Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, 27 Taiping Rd, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Liu, Xuan, E-mail: liux931932@163.com [Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, 27 Taiping Rd, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Cao, Cheng, E-mail: cao_c@sohu.com [Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, 27 Taiping Rd, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2016-04-22

    RBM39, also known as splicing factor HCC1.4, acts as a transcriptional coactivator for the steroid nuclear receptors JUN/AP-1, ESR1/ER-α and ESR2/ER-β. RBM39 is involved in the regulation of the transcriptional responses of these steroid nuclear receptors and promotes transcriptional initiation. In this paper, we report that RBM39 interacts with the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl. Both the Src homology (SH) 2 and SH3 domains of c-Abl interact with RBM39. The major tyrosine phosphorylation sites on RBM39 that are phosphorylated by c-Abl are Y95 and Y99, as demonstrated by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and mutational analysis. c-Abl was shown boost the transcriptional coactivation activity of RBM39 for ERα and PRβ in a tyrosine kinase-dependent manner. The results suggest that mammalian c-Abl plays an important role in steroid hormone receptor-mediated transcription by regulating RBM39. - Highlights: • c-Abl interacts with RBM39. • RBM39 is phosphorylated by c-Abl. • c-Abl regulates transcriptional coactivation activity of RBM39 on the ERα and PRβ.

  9. Immunoreactivity of protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) in sera from sheep infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Ratna B; Begg, Douglas J; Purdie, Auriol C; Bach, Horacio; Whittington, Richard J

    2014-07-15

    Evasion of host defense mechanisms and survival inside infected host macrophages are features of pathogenic mycobacteria including Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants. Protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) has been identified as a secreted protein critical for survival of mycobacteria within infected macrophages. The host may mount an immune response to such secreted proteins. In this study, the humoral immune response to purified recombinant M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis PtpA was investigated using sera from a cohort of sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and compared with uninfected healthy controls. A significantly higher level of reactivity to PtpA was observed in sera collected from M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis infected sheep when compared to those from uninfected healthy controls. PtpA could be a potential candidate antigen for detection of humoral immune responses in sheep infected with M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B: II. Substrate-enzyme interactions and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.j.; Frimurer, T. M.; Andersen, J. N.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) complexed with the phosphorylated peptide substrate DADEpYL and the free substrate have been conducted to investigate 1) the physical forces involved in substrate-protein interactions, 2) the importance of enzyme...... to substrate binding. Based on essential dynamics analysis of the PTP1B/DADEpYL trajectory, it is shown that internal motions in the binding pocket occur in a subspace of only a few degrees of freedom. in particular, relatively large flexibilities are observed along several eigenvectors in the segments: Arg(24...... for catalysis. Analysis of the individual enzyme-substrate interaction energies revealed that mainly electrostatic forces contribute to binding. Indeed, calculation of the electrostatic field of the enzyme reveals that only the field surrounding the binding pocket is positive, while the remaining protein...

  11. In vivo modification of tyrosine residues in recombinant mussel adhesive protein by tyrosinase co-expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Yang, Yun Jung; Yang, Byeongseon; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2012-10-24

    In nature, mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) show remarkable adhesive properties, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Thus, they have been considered promising adhesive biomaterials for various biomedical and industrial applications. However, limited production of natural MAPs has hampered their practical applications. Recombinant production in bacterial cells could be one alternative to obtain useable amounts of MAPs, although additional post-translational modification of tyrosine residues into 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (Dopa) and Dopaquinone is required. The superior properties of MAPs are mainly attributed to the introduction of quinone-derived intermolecular cross-links. To solve this problem, we utilized a co-expression strategy of recombinant MAP and tyrosinase in Escherichia coli to successfully modify tyrosine residues in vivo. A recombinant hybrid MAP, fp-151, was used as a target for in vivo modification, and a dual vector system of pET and pACYC-Duet provided co-expression of fp-151 and tyrosinase. As a result, fp-151 was over-expressed and mainly obtained from the soluble fraction in the co-expression system. Without tyrosinase co-expression, fp-151 was over-expressed in an insoluble form in inclusion bodies. The modification of tyrosine residues in the soluble-expressed fp-151 was clearly observed from nitroblue tetrazolium staining and liquid-chromatography-mass/mass spectrometry analyses. The purified, in vivo modified, fp-151 from the co-expression system showed approximately 4-fold higher bulk-scale adhesive strength compared to in vitro tyrosinase-treated fp-151. Here, we reported a co-expression system to obtain in vivo modified MAP; additional in vitro tyrosinase modification was not needed to obtain adhesive properties and the in vivo modified MAP showed superior adhesive strength compared to in vitro modified protein. It is expected that this co-expression strategy will accelerate the use of functional MAPs in practical applications and

  12. The roles of the conserved tyrosine in the β2-α2 loop of the prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Danzhi; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    Prions cause neurodegenerative diseases for which no cure exists. Despite decades of research activities the function of the prion protein (PrP) in mammalians is not known. Moreover, little is known on the molecular mechanisms of the self-assembly of the PrP from its monomeric state (cellular PrP, PrP(C)) to the multimeric state. The latter state includes the toxic species (scrapie PrP, PrP(Sc)) knowledge of which would facilitate the development of drugs against prion diseases. Here we analyze the role of a tyrosine residue (Y169) which is strictly conserved in mammalian PrPs. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy studies of many mammalian PrP(C) proteins have provided evidence of a conformational equilibrium between a 3(10)-helical turn and a type I β turn conformation in the β2-α2 loop (residues 165-175). In vitro cell-free experiments of the seeded conversion of PrP(C) indicate that non-aromatic residues at position 169 reduce the formation of proteinase K-resistant PrP. Recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of monomeric PrP and several single-point mutants show that Y169 stabilizes the 3(10)-helical turn conformation more than single-point mutants at position 169 or residues in contact with it. In the 3(10)-helical turn conformation the hydrophobic and aggregation-prone segment 169-YSNQNNF-175 is buried and thus not-available for self-assembly. From the combined analysis of simulation and experimental results it emerges that Y169 is an aggregation gatekeeper with a twofold role. Mutations related to 3 human prion diseases are interpreted on the basis of the gatekeeper role in the monomeric state. Another potential role of the Y169 side chain is the stabilization of the ordered aggregates, i.e., reduction of frangibility of filamentous protofibrils and fibrils, which is likely to reduce the generation of toxic species.

  13. Structure and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor 12 Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism of the Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Zonta, Francesco; Wang, Shanshan; Song, Ke; He, Xin; He, Miaomiao; Nie, Yan; Li, Sheng

    2017-12-26

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 12 (PTPN12) is an important protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in regulating cell adhesion and migration as well as tumorigenesis. Here, we solved a crystal structure of the native PTPN12 catalytic domain with the catalytic cysteine (residue 231) in dual conformation (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated). Combined with molecular dynamics simulation data, we concluded that those two conformations represent different states of the protein which are realized during the dephosphorylation reaction. Together with docking and mutagenesis data, our results provide a molecular basis for understanding the catalytic mechanism of PTPN12 and its role in tumorigenesis.

  14. Structure and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor 12 Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism of the Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Dong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 12 (PTPN12 is an important protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in regulating cell adhesion and migration as well as tumorigenesis. Here, we solved a crystal structure of the native PTPN12 catalytic domain with the catalytic cysteine (residue 231 in dual conformation (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated. Combined with molecular dynamics simulation data, we concluded that those two conformations represent different states of the protein which are realized during the dephosphorylation reaction. Together with docking and mutagenesis data, our results provide a molecular basis for understanding the catalytic mechanism of PTPN12 and its role in tumorigenesis.

  15. Multiple forms of the human tyrosine phosphatase RPTP alpha. Isozymes and differences in glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daum, G; Regenass, S; Sap, J

    1994-01-01

    ., Jaye, M., and Schlessinger, J. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 87, 7000-7004). Using the polymerase chain reaction technique, simultaneous expression of both isoforms was demonstrated in human T-cell and vascular smooth muscle libraries, as well as in the A431 human epidermal cancer cell line....... Following transient expression in COS-1 cells, each isoform gave rise to two proteins of 100 and 130 kDa, respectively. Endoglycosidase treatment showed that the 100-kDa species corresponded to a molecule exclusively glycosylated on N-residues, whereas the 130-kDa species contained both, N- and O......-linked carbohydrates. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the smaller RPTP alpha protein is a precursor of the larger one. A high affinity antibody was generated that recognizes the immature protein only; however, both proteins can be detected by Western blot analysis after a simple chemical hydrolysis...

  16. Isothiazolidinone (IZD) as a phosphoryl mimetic in inhibitors of the Yersinia pestis protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Eun; Bahta, Medhanit; Lountos, George T. [National Cancer Institute at Frederick, PO Box B, Frederick, MD 21702-1201 (United States); Ulrich, Robert G. [United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Burke, Terrence R. Jr, E-mail: tburke@helix.nih.gov; Waugh, David S., E-mail: tburke@helix.nih.gov [National Cancer Institute at Frederick, PO Box B, Frederick, MD 21702-1201 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The first X-ray crystal structure of the Y. pestis protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH in complex with an isothiazolidinone-based lead-fragment compound is reported. Isothiazolidinone (IZD) heterocycles can act as effective components of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitors by simultaneously replicating the binding interactions of both a phosphoryl group and a highly conserved water molecule, as exemplified by the structures of several PTP1B–inhibitor complexes. In the first unambiguous demonstration of IZD interactions with a PTP other than PTP1B, it is shown by X-ray crystallography that the IZD motif binds within the catalytic site of the Yersinia pestis PTP YopH by similarly displacing a highly conserved water molecule. It is also shown that IZD-based bidentate ligands can inhibit YopH in a nonpromiscuous fashion at low micromolar concentrations. Hence, the IZD moiety may represent a useful starting point for the development of YopH inhibitors.

  17. The beneficial effects of protein tyrosine kinase inhibition on the circulatory failure induced by endotoxin in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, Mohammad; Anvari, Khaleda; Fatehi-Hassanabad, Zahra

    2002-11-01

    Implication of enhanced activity of tyrosine kinases has been established in the pathophysiology of many diseases associated with local (e.g., atherosclerosis) or systemic (e.g., septic shock) inflammation. The main objective of this study was to elucidate whether tyrosine kinase and nitric oxide were involved in endotoxin-induced impairment of vascular responses to sympathetic nerve stimulation (SNS) in rat isolated mesenteric bed. Therefore, the effects of genistein, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinase, and L-NAME (N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, on endotoxin-induced shock were investigated in the thiopental-anesthetized rats. We also studied the effects of endotoxin on the vasoconstrictor responses to SNS in the rat isolated perfused mesenteric bed. Endotoxin injection (10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) produced a marked hypotension and a reduction of the pressor responses elicited by phenylephrine (0.1, 0.3, and 3 microg kg(-1), i.v.). Pretreatment of the rats with either genistein (10 mg kg(-1) i.p., 2 h before endotoxin injection), L-NAME (0.1 mg kg(-1), i.p., 30 min before endotoxin injection), or a combination of both attenuated the hypotension caused by endotoxin. SNS in the rat isolated perfused mesenteric bed caused a frequency-dependent vasoconstrictor response, which was abolished by tetrodotoxin (10(-7) M), prazoscin (10(-7) M), and guanethidine (10(-7)M). In mesenteric vascular beds removed from rats injected with endotoxin, the vasoconstrictor responses to SNS were markedly impaired. Although genistein and L-NAME pretreatment attenuated the vascular hyporeactivity to phenylephrine, they did not improve the impaired SNS response of the isolated vascular bed of endotoxin-treated animals. These results indicate that genistein and L-NAME pretreatment prevent the hypotension and the delayed hyporeactivity to phenylephrine induced by endotoxin, but they failed to restore the vascular hyporeactivity to SNS.

  18. A tyrosine-rich cell surface protein in the diatom Amphora coffeaeformis identified through transcriptome analysis and genetic transformation.

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    Matthias T Buhmann

    Full Text Available Diatoms are single-celled eukaryotic microalgae that are ubiquitously found in almost all aquatic ecosystems, and are characterized by their intricately structured SiO2 (silica-based cell walls. Diatoms with a benthic life style are capable of attaching to any natural or man-made submerged surface, thus contributing substantially to both microbial biofilm communities and economic losses through biofouling. Surface attachment of diatoms is mediated by a carbohydrate- and protein- based glue, yet no protein involved in diatom underwater adhesion has been identified so far. In the present work, we have generated a normalized transcriptome database from the model adhesion diatom Amphora coffeaeformis. Using an unconventional bioinformatics analysis we have identified five proteins that exhibit unique amino acid sequences resembling the amino acid composition of the tyrosine-rich adhesion proteins from mussel footpads. Establishing the first method for the molecular genetic transformation of A. coffeaeformis has enabled investigations into the function of one of these proteins, AC3362, through expression as YFP fusion protein. Biochemical analysis and imaging by fluorescence microscopy revealed that AC3362 is not involved in adhesion, but rather plays a role in biosynthesis and/or structural stability of the cell wall. The methods established in the present study have paved the way for further molecular studies on the mechanisms of underwater adhesion and biological silica formation in the diatom A. coffeaeformis.

  19. Mussel-inspired new approach for polymerization and cross-linking of peptides and proteins containing tyrosines by Fremy's salt oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilchek, Meir; Miron, Talia

    2015-03-18

    Our objective was to develop a method mimicking the natural process of coherence in marine mollusks, by direct chemical conversion of protein tyrosine residues to DOPA-o-quinones, which consequently generates polymerization and cross-linking. Fremy's salt, (ON(SO3K)2, was used to convert tyrosine residues in peptides and proteins to reactive o-quinones. The conversion of tyrosines to DOPA-o-quinones, and their ability to polymerize or cross-link, was tested on tyramine, peptides, and proteins. The peptides tested were as follows: biotin-PEG4-tyramine (PEG-BT), and two decapeptides (identical to the repeating units comprising the mussel's adhesive protein). The proteins tested were as follows: bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase), lysozyme, IgG, avidin, and streptavidin. The oxidized peptides and proteins were all shown to incorporate oxygen atoms and undergo polymerization and cross-linking, depending on the availability of nucleophiles, mostly lysine amino groups of proteins. All the peptides and the noninteracting proteins such as RNase and lysozyme underwent homopolymerization upon Fremy's salt oxidation. When Fremy's salt oxidaized PEG-BT was mixed with the above proteins, it did not react with any of these proteins because PEG-BT underwent fast self-polymerization. Conversely, streptavidin or avidin cross-linked with PEG-BT after preincubation, thus showing that biorecognition is a prerequisite for cross-linking. Polymerization and cross-linking also occurred, following Fremy's salt oxidation of interacting proteins such as avidin and strepavidin with biotinyilated lysozyme or biotinylated RNase. This indicates that only proteins in very close proximity readily cross-link and polymerize via tyrosine residues. Attempts to convert DOPA-quinone to DOPA by reduction with sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4), was successful as far as small peptides were used. Fremy's salt oxidation can serve as an easy and useful tool to polymerize and cross-link proteins, for

  20. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the

  1. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B deficiency potentiates PERK/eIF2α signaling in brown adipocytes.

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    Ahmed Bettaieb

    Full Text Available Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is a physiological regulator of glucose homeostasis and body mass, and has been implicated in endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Herein, we assess the role of PTP1B in ER stress in brown adipocytes, which are key regulators of thermogenesis and metabolic response.To determine the role of PTP1B in ER stress, we utilized brown adipose tissue (BAT from mice with adipose-specific PTP1B deletion, and brown adipocytes deficient in PTP1B and reconstituted with PTP1B wild type (WT or the substrate-trapping PTP1B D181A (D/A mutant. PTP1B deficiency led to upregulation of PERK-eIF2α phosphorylation and IRE1α-XBP1 sub-arms of the unfolded protein response. In addition, PTP1B deficiency sensitized differentiated brown adipocytes to chemical-induced ER stress. Moreover, PERK activation and tyrosine phosphorylation were increased in BAT and adipocytes lacking PTP1B. Increased PERK activity resulted in the induction of eIF2α phosphorylation at Ser51 and better translatability of ATF4 mRNA in response to ER stress. At the molecular level, we demonstrate direct interaction between PTP1B and PERK and identify PERK Tyr615 as a mediator of this association.Collectively, the data demonstrate that PTP1B is a physiologically-relevant modulator of ER stress in brown adipocytes and that PTP1B deficiency modulates PERK-eIF2α phosphorylation and protein synthesis.

  2. Interleukin-2 induces tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of stat3 in human T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Svejgaard, A; Skov, S

    1994-01-01

    An early biochemical event associated with T cell activation through the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) is tyrosine phosphorylation of several intracellular substrates. The exact mechanism by which IL-2 regulates transcription of different genes is presently unknown. Here, we report that stimulat...

  3. Alterations in STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase expression, activation, and downstream signaling in early and late stages of the YAC128 Huntington's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Clare M; Fan, Jing; Zhang, Lily Y J; Wang, Liang; Xu, Jian; Li, Edward H Y; Lombroso, Paul J; Raymond, Lynn A

    2014-07-01

    Striatal neurodegeneration and synaptic dysfunction in Huntington's disease are mediated by the mutant huntingtin (mHtt) protein. MHtt disrupts calcium homeostasis and facilitates excitotoxicity, in part by altering NMDA receptor (NMDAR) trafficking and function. Pre-symptomatic (excitotoxin-sensitive) transgenic mice expressing full-length human mHtt with 128 polyglutamine repeats (YAC128 Huntington's disease mice) show increased calpain activity and extrasynaptic NMDAR (Ex-NMDAR) localization and signaling. Furthermore, Ex-NMDAR stimulation facilitates excitotoxicity in wild-type cortical neurons via calpain-mediated cleavage of STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase 61 (STEP61). The cleavage product, STEP33, cannot dephosphorylate p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), thereby augmenting apoptotic signaling. Here, we show elevated extrasynaptic calpain-mediated cleavage of STEP61 and p38 phosphorylation, as well as STEP61 inactivation and reduced extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 phosphorylation (ERK1/2) in the striatum of 6-week-old, excitotoxin-sensitive YAC128 mice. Calpain inhibition reduced basal and NMDA-induced STEP61 cleavage. However, basal p38 phosphorylation was normalized by a peptide disrupting NMDAR-post-synaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) binding but not by calpain inhibition. In 1-year-old excitotoxin-resistant YAC128 mice, STEP33 levels were not elevated, but STEP61 inactivation and p38 and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation levels were increased. These results show that in YAC128 striatal tissue, enhanced NMDAR-PSD-95 interactions contributes to elevated p38 signaling in early, excitotoxin-sensitive stages, and suggest that STEP61 inactivation enhances MAPK signaling at late, excitotoxin-resistant stages. The YAC128 Huntington's disease mouse model shows early, enhanced susceptibility to NMDA receptor-mediated striatal apoptosis, progressing to late-stage excitotoxicity resistance. This study shows that elevated NMDA

  4. Use of an Anaerobic Chamber Environment for the Assay of Endogenous Cellular Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase Activities

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    Zhu Li

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases have a catalytic cysteine residue whose reduced state is integral to the reaction mechanism. Since exposure to air can artifactually oxidize this highly reactive thiol, PTPase assays have typically used potent reducing agents to reactivate the enzymes present; however, this approach does not allow for the measurement of the endogenous PTPase activity directly isolated from the in vivo cellular environment. Here we provide a method for using an anaerobic chamber to preserve the activity of the total PTPase complement in a tissue lysate or of an immunoprecipitated PTPase homolog to characterize their endogenous activation state. Comparison with a sample treated with biochemical reducing agents allows the determination of the activatable (reducible fraction of the endogenous PTPase pool.

  5. X-ray Characterization and Structure-Based Optimization of Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Michael R; Wissler, Lisa; Snow, Melanie; Geschwindner, Stefan; Read, Jon A; Brandon, Nicholas J; Nairn, Angus C; Lombroso, Paul J; Käck, Helena; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2017-11-22

    Excessive activity of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in the brain has been detected in numerous neuropsychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Notably, knockdown of STEP in an Alzheimer mouse model effected an increase in the phosphorylation levels of downstream STEP substrates and a significant reversal in the observed cognitive and memory deficits. These data point to the promising potential of STEP as a target for drug discovery in Alzheimer's treatment. We previously reported a substrate-based approach to the development of low molecular weight STEP inhibitors with Ki values as low as 7.8 μM. Herein, we disclose the first X-ray crystal structures of inhibitors bound to STEP and the surprising finding that they occupy noncoincident binding sites. Moreover, we utilize this structural information to optimize the inhibitor structure to achieve a Ki of 110 nM, with 15-60-fold selectivity across a series of phosphatases.

  6. Discovery and evaluation of the hybrid of bromophenol and saccharide as potent and selective protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Renshuai; Yu, Rilei; Xu, Qi; Li, Xiangqian; Luo, Jiao; Jiang, Bo; Wang, Lijun; Guo, Shuju; Wu, Ning; Shi, Dayong

    2017-07-07

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of insulin signaling pathway. Inhibition of PTP1B is expected to improve insulin action. Appropriate selectivity and permeability are the gold standard for excellent PTP1B inhibitors. In this work, molecular hybridization-based screening identified a selective competitive PTP1B inhibitor. Compound 10a has IC50 values of 199 nM against PTP1B, and shows 32-fold selectivity for PTP1B over the closely related phosphatase TCPTP. Molecule docking and molecular dynamics studies reveal the reason of selectivity for PTP1B over TCPTP. Moreover, the cell permeability and cellular activity of compound 10a are demonstrated respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo modification of tyrosine residues in recombinant mussel adhesive protein by tyrosinase co-expression in Escherichia coli

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    Choi Yoo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In nature, mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs show remarkable adhesive properties, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Thus, they have been considered promising adhesive biomaterials for various biomedical and industrial applications. However, limited production of natural MAPs has hampered their practical applications. Recombinant production in bacterial cells could be one alternative to obtain useable amounts of MAPs, although additional post-translational modification of tyrosine residues into 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (Dopa and Dopaquinone is required. The superior properties of MAPs are mainly attributed to the introduction of quinone-derived intermolecular cross-links. To solve this problem, we utilized a co-expression strategy of recombinant MAP and tyrosinase in Escherichia coli to successfully modify tyrosine residues in vivo. Results A recombinant hybrid MAP, fp-151, was used as a target for in vivo modification, and a dual vector system of pET and pACYC-Duet provided co-expression of fp-151 and tyrosinase. As a result, fp-151 was over-expressed and mainly obtained from the soluble fraction in the co-expression system. Without tyrosinase co-expression, fp-151 was over-expressed in an insoluble form in inclusion bodies. The modification of tyrosine residues in the soluble-expressed fp-151 was clearly observed from nitroblue tetrazolium staining and liquid-chromatography-mass/mass spectrometry analyses. The purified, in vivo modified, fp-151 from the co-expression system showed approximately 4-fold higher bulk-scale adhesive strength compared to in vitro tyrosinase-treated fp-151. Conclusion Here, we reported a co-expression system to obtain in vivo modified MAP; additional in vitro tyrosinase modification was not needed to obtain adhesive properties and the in vivo modified MAP showed superior adhesive strength compared to in vitro modified protein. It is expected that this co-expression strategy will accelerate

  8. Apoptosis-related molecular differences for response to tyrosin kinase inhibitors in drug-sensitive and drug-resistant human bladder cancer cells

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    Jixia Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR family is reportedly overexpressed in bladder cancer, and tyrosine kinaseinhibitors (TKIs have been suggested as treatment. Gefitinib is a selective inhibitor of the EGFR and lapatinib is a dual inhibitor of both the EGFR and HER2 (human EGFR type 2 receptor. Both compounds compete with the binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP to the tyrosine kinase domain of the respective receptors to inhibit receptor autophosphorylation causing suppression of signal transduction. Unfortunately, resistance to these inhibitors is a major clinical problem. Aims: To compare the apoptosis signaling pathway(s induced by gefitinib and lapatinib, in UM-UC-5 (drug-sensitive and UM-UC-14 (drug-resistant bladder cancer cells and to identify molecular differences that might be useful predictors of their efficacy. Materials and Methods: Cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis assay were used to detect the effect of TKIs on UM-UC-5 and UM-UC-14 cells. Molecular differences for response to TKIs were examined by protein array. Results: TKIs strongly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell cycle G1 arrest and apoptosis in UM-UC-5 cells. Most notable apoptosis molecular differences included decreased claspin, trail, and survivin by TKIs in the sensitive cells. In contrast, TKIs had no effect on resistant cells. Conclusions: Claspin, trail, and survivin might be used to determine the sensitivity of bladder cancers to TKIs.

  9. A proximity ligation assay using transiently transfected, epitope-tagged proteins: application for in situ detection of dimerized receptor tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajadhar, Aaron; Guha, Abhijit

    2010-02-01

    The development of small molecule and antibody inhibitors targeting the interaction of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is of high pharmacological and biological interest. Unfortunately, conventional biochemical techniques using cell or tissue lysates and co-immunoprecipitation experiments to investigate EGFR dimerization are not always conclusive. Here we describe a series of technical and biological validation experiments demonstrating the utility of a proximity ligation assay (PLA)-based methodology for in situ visualization and quantification of ligand-dependent EGFR receptor dimerization in intact cells. Using the PLA approach combined with a universally applicable epitope tagging strategy, we detected EGFR dimers in cells transiently co-expressing FLAG-tagged and MYC-tagged human EGFRs. Our data strongly suggest that PLA can be used to detect ligand-dependent EGFR dimerization and this signal is generated in a protein interaction-based manner, rather than solely due to proximity of target proteins. This application represents a generalized RTK expression strategy for protein-interaction analysis in a transient expression system where antibody epitopes are not known or not unique enough to discriminate between interaction partners. This assay also holds promise as a general RTK dimerization screening tool in tissue specimens to identify potential dimerization inhibitors with clinical relevance.

  10. Involvement of PTPN5, the gene encoding the STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP), in schizophrenia and cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelov, Ilana; Teltsh, Omri; Greenbaum, Lior; Rigbi, Amihai; Kanyas-Sarner, Kyra; Lerer, Bernard; Lombroso, Paul; Kohn, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    Objective STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific member of the PTP family that has been implicated in learning and memory. In this study, we examined the association of the PTPN5 (protein-tyrosine-phosphatase non-receptor 5) gene, which encodes for STEP, with both schizophrenia and cognitive functioning in the Israeli Jewish population. Methods A 868 subjects schizophrenia (SZ) case-control study was performed (286 cases and 582 controls). Eleven STEP tagging SNPs were selected, and single markers and haplotypes association analyses were performed. A cognitive variability study included 437 healthy females who completed a computerized cognitive battery. We performed univariate associations between the SNPs and cognitive performance. The possible functional role of these variants was examined by studying their association with gene expression levels in the brain. Results In the SZ study, we found nominal association in the whole sample between rs4075664 and SZ. SZ males showed a more significant association for 3 SNPs (rs4075664, rs2278732, rs4757710). Haplotypes of the studied SNPs were associated with SZ both in the overall sample and within the male sub-sample. Expression analysis provided some support for the effects of the associated SNPs on PTPN5 expression level. The cognitive variability study showed positive associations between PTPN5 SNPs and different cognitive subtests. Principal component analysis demonstrated an “Attention Index” neurocognitive component that was associated with two SNP pairs (rs10832983*rs10766504 and rs7932938*rs4757718). Conclusion The results imply a model in which PTPN5 may play a role in normal cognitive functioning and contributes to aspects of the neuropathology of schizophrenia. PMID:22555153

  11. Identification of c-Src tyrosine kinase substrates using mass spectrometry and peptide microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amanchy, Ramars; Zhong, Jun; Molina, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    c-Src tyrosine kinase plays a critical role in signal transduction downstream of growth factor receptors, integrins and G protein-coupled receptors. We used stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) approach to identify additional substrates of c-Src tyrosine kinase in human...

  12. Structural genomics of human proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Khan Tanjid; Edwards, Aled

    2014-01-01

    Structural genomics efforts focused on the human proteome have had three aims: to understand the structural and functional variations within protein families; to understand the structural basis of disease and genetic variation; and to determine the structures of human integral membrane proteins. The overarching theme is to advance the understanding of human health and to provide a structural platform to aid in the development of therapeutics. A decade or more of work in this field has identified optimal experimental strategies that can be used to expedite expression and crystallization of human proteins-and we provide some guidance to this end.

  13. Mice lacking leukocyte common antigen-related (LAR) protein tyrosine phosphatase domains demonstrate spatial learning impairment in the two-trial water maze and hyperactivity in multiple behavioural tests.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, M.J.M.; Streijger, F.; Linkels, M.; Bloemen, M.; Heeren, D.J.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Zee, C.E.E.M. van der

    2004-01-01

    Leukocyte common antigen-related (LAR) protein is a cell adhesion molecule-like receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase. We previously reported that in LAR tyrosine phosphatase-deficient (LAR-Delta P) mice the number and size of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons as well as their innervation of

  14. Exploring oxidative modifications of tyrosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houée-Lévin, C; Bobrowski, K; Horakova, L

    2015-01-01

    Protein oxidation is increasingly recognised as an important modulator of biochemical pathways controlling both physiological and pathological processes. While much attention has focused on cysteine modifications in reversible redox signalling, there is increasing evidence that other protein...... residues are oxidised in vivo with impact on cellular homeostasis and redox signalling pathways. A notable example is tyrosine, which can undergo a number of oxidative post-translational modifications to form 3-hydroxy-tyrosine, tyrosine crosslinks, 3-nitrotyrosine and halogenated tyrosine, with different...... effects on cellular functions. Tyrosine oxidation has been studied extensively in vitro, and this has generated detailed information about the molecular mechanisms that may occur in vivo. An important aspect of studying tyrosine oxidation both in vitro and in biological systems is the ability to monitor...

  15. The role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in the regulation of allergic asthma: implication of TC-PTP and PTP-1B in the modulation of disease development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Philippe; Bergeron, Sébastien; Marette, André; Olivier, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is an important early event in the signal transduction of numerous cell receptors involved in the immune response. The implication of protein tyrosine kinases in allergic asthma is well recognized, but the role of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) remains poorly understood. However, we recently reported that global inhibition of PTPs during either the allergen-sensitization phase or the allergen-challenge phase reduced the development of asthma and that this correlated with an increased T helper 1 (Th1) response in both lung and spleen tissues. Therefore, in this study we investigated individual roles of PTPs involved in regulating the immune response. We observed that genetic deficiency for PTP-1B resulted in increased recruitment of lung inflammatory cells, while protein tyrosine phosphatase-phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted (PTP-PEST)-deficient mice exhibited a phenotype similar to that of wild-type mice. Importantly, we found that a heterozygous mutation of T cell PTP (TC-PTP) dramatically abrogates immunoglobulin E production and reduces the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the lung, conferring an important role for TC-PTP in the development of allergic asthma. As opposed to other studies on Src homology phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) deficiency, specific acute SHP-1 inhibition during allergen challenge did not affect disease outcome. Collectively, our results underscore the importance of PTPs in the development of allergic asthma. PMID:19930043

  16. IN-VIVO PROTEIN-SYNTHESIS RATE DETERMINATION IN PRIMARY OR RECURRENT BRAIN-TUMORS USING L-[1-C-11]-TYROSINE AND PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WILLEMSEN, ATM; VANWAARDE, A; PAANS, AMJ; PRUIM, J; LUURTSEMA, G; GO, KG; VAALBURG, W

    The applicability of protein synthesis rate (PSR) determination with L-[1-C-11]tyrosine (C-11-TYR) and PET was assessed in patients suspected of a primary or recurrent brain tumor. Methods: Simultaneous to intravenous injection of 265 MBq of C-11-TYR, dynamic PET acquisition was started and

  17. Induction of Tyrosine Phosphorylation of UV-Activated EGFR by the Beta-Human Papillomavirus Type 8 E6 Leads to Papillomatosis

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    Stefanie Taute

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological evidence is accumulating that beta-human papillomaviruses (HPV synergize with UV-light in the development of precancerous actinic keratosis, and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCC, one of the most common cancers in the Caucasian population. We previously demonstrated the tumorigenic activity of beta-HPV type 8 (HPV8 in the skin of transgenic mice and its cooperation with UV-light. Analysis of underlying mechanisms now showed that in keratinocytes expressing the HPV8E6 protein a transient increase of tyrosine phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in response to UV-irradiation occurred, while EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation, i.e., receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK-activity was hardly affected in empty vector control cells. FACS and immunofluorescences revealed that the EGFR was internalized into early endosomes in response to UV-exposure in both, HPV8E6 positive and in control cells, yet with a higher rate in the presence of HPV8E6. Moreover, only in HPV8E6 expressing keratinocytes the EGFR was further sorted into CD63+ intraluminal vesicles, indicative for trafficking to late endosomes. The latter requires the ubiquitination of the EGFR, and in correlation, we could show that only in HPV8E6 positive keratinocytes the EGFR was ubiquitinated upon UV-exposure. HPV8E6 and tyrosine phosphorylated EGFR directly interacted which was enhanced by UV-irradiation. The treatment of K14-HPV8E6 transgenic mice with Canertinib, an inhibitor of the RTK-activity of the EGFR, suppressed skin papilloma growth in response to UV-irradiation. This confirms the crucial role of the RTK-activity of the EGFR in HPV8E6 and UV-mediated papillomatosis in transgenic mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that HPV8E6 alters the signaling of the UV-activated EGFR and this is a critical step in papilloma formation in response to UV-light in transgenic mice. Our results provide a molecular basis how a beta-HPV type may support early steps of

  18. Inactivation and unfolding of protein tyrosine phosphatase from Thermus thermophilus HB27 during urea and guanidine hydrochloride denaturation.

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    Yejing Wang

    Full Text Available The effects of urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl on the activity, conformation and unfolding process of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase, a thermostable low molecular weight protein from Thermus thermophilus HB27, have been studied. Enzymatic activity assays showed both urea and GdnHCl resulted in the inactivation of PTPase in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Inactivation kinetics analysis suggested that the inactivation of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl were both monophasic and reversible processes, and the effects of urea and GdnHCl on PTPase were similar to that of mixed-type reversible inhibitors. Far-ultraviolet (UV circular dichroism (CD, Tryptophan and 1-anilinonaphthalene -8-sulfonic acid (ANS fluorescence spectral analyses indicated the existence of a partially active and an inactive molten globule-like intermediate during the unfolding processes induced by urea and GdnHCl, respectively. Based on the sequence alignment and the homolog Tt1001 protein structure, we discussed the possible conformational transitions of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl and compared the conformations of these unfolding intermediates with the transient states in bovine PTPase and its complex structures in detail. Our results may be able to provide some valuable clues to reveal the relationship between the structure and enzymatic activity, and the unfolding pathway and mechanism of PTPase.

  19. Knockout of striatal enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase in mice results in increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Paul, Surojit; Zhang, Yongfang; Kurup, Pradeep; Ding, Li; Tressler, Lyal; Allen, Melanie; Sacca, Rosalba; Picciotto, Marina R; Lombroso, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    STriatal Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific protein that is thought to play a role in synaptic plasticity. This hypothesis is based on previous findings demonstrating a role for STEP in the regulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2). We have now generated a STEP knockout mouse and investigated the effect of knocking out STEP in the regulation of ERK1/2 activity. Here, we show that the STEP knockout mice are viable and fertile and have no detectable cytoarchitectural abnormalities in the brain. The homozygous knockout mice lack the expression of all STEP isoforms, whereas the heterozygous mice have reduced STEP protein levels when compared with the wild-type mice. The STEP knockout mice show enhanced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in the striatum, CA2 region of the hippocampus, as well as central and lateral nuclei of the amygdala. In addition, the cultured neurons from KO mice showed significantly higher levels of pERK1/2 following synaptic stimulation when compared with wild-type controls. These data demonstrate more conclusively the role of STEP in the regulation of ERK1/2 activity.

  20. Flavonoids as potent allosteric inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B: molecular dynamics simulation and free energy calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargari, Farshid; Lotfi, Maryam; Shahraki, Omolbanin; Nikfarjam, Zahra; Shahraki, Jafar

    2017-12-11

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a member of the PTP superfamily which is considered to be a negative regulator of insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathway. PTP1B is a promising drug target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cancer. The existence of allosteric site in PTP1B has turned the researcher's attention to an alternate strategy for inhibition of this enzyme. Herein, the molecular interactions between the allosteric site of PTP1B with three non-competitive flavonoids, (MOR), (MOK), and (DPO) have been investigated. Three ligands were docked into allosteric site of the enzyme. The resulting protein-ligand complexes were used for molecular dynamics studies. Principal component and free-energy landscape (FEL) as well as cluster analyses were used to investigate the conformational and dynamical properties of the protein and identify representative enzyme substrates bounded to the inhibitors. Per residue energy decomposition analysis attributed dissimilar affinities of three inhibitors to the several hydrogen bonds and non-bonded interactions. In conclusion, our results exhibited an inhibitory pattern of the ligands against PTP1B.

  1. A point mutation at tyrosine-809 in the human colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor impairs mitogenesis without abrogating tyrosine kinase activity, association with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, or induction of c-fos and junB genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel, M.F. (Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis (USA)); Shurtleff, S.A.; Downing, J.R. (Saint Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA)); Sherr, C.J. (Univ. of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis (USA) Saint Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Substitution of phenylalanine for tyrosine-809 in the human colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) inhibited its ability to transduce ligand-dependent mitogenic signals in mouse NIH 3T3 cells. When combined with an activating mutation at codon 301 that induces constitutive CSF-1R tyrosine kinase activity, the codon 809 mutation suppressed ligand-independent cell transformation. Comparative mapping tryptic phosphopeptides from mutant and wild-type CSF-1R indicated that tyrosine-809 is a site of ligand-dependent receptor phosphorylation in vivo. The mutant receptor was active as a tyrosine kinase in vitro and in vivo, underwent CSF-1-dependent association with a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and induced expression of the protooncogenes c-fos and junB, underscoring its ability to trigger some of the known cellular responses to CSF-1. The mutant receptor is likely to be impaired in its ability to interact with critical cellular effectors whose activity is required for mitogenesis.

  2. The striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase gates long-term potentiation and fear memory in the lateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Surojit; Olausson, Peter; Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Ruchkina, Irina; Moran, Timothy D; Tronson, Natalie; Mills, Evan; Hakim, Shawn; Salter, Michael W; Taylor, Jane R; Lombroso, Paul J

    2007-05-01

    Formation of long-term memories is critically dependent on extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling. Activation of the ERK pathway by the sequential recruitment of mitogen-activated protein kinases is well understood. In contrast, the proteins that inactivate this pathway are not as well characterized. Here we tested the hypothesis that the brain-specific striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) plays a key role in neuroplasticity and fear memory formation by its ability to regulate ERK1/2 activation. STEP co-localizes with the ERKs within neurons of the lateral amygdala. A substrate-trapping STEP protein binds to the ERKs and prevents their nuclear translocation after glutamate stimulation in primary cell cultures. Administration of TAT-STEP into the lateral amygdala (LA) disrupts long-term potentiation (LTP) and selectively disrupts fear memory consolidation. Fear conditioning induces a biphasic activation of ERK1/2 in the LA with an initial activation within 5 minutes of training, a return to baseline levels by 15 minutes, and an increase again at 1 hour. In addition, fear conditioning results in the de novo translation of STEP. Inhibitors of ERK1/2 activation or of protein translation block the synthesis of STEP within the LA after fear conditioning. Together, these data imply a role for STEP in experience-dependent plasticity and suggest that STEP modulates the activation of ERK1/2 during amygdala-dependent memory formation. The regulation of emotional memory by modulating STEP activity may represent a target for the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), panic, and anxiety disorders.

  3. The Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase STEP Gates Long-term Potentiation and Fear Memory in the Lateral Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Surojit; Olausson, Peter; Venkitaramani, Deepa V.; Ruchkina, Irina; Moran, Timothy D; Tronson, Natalie; Mills, Evan; Hakim, Shawn; Salter, Michael W; Taylor, Jane R.; Lombroso, Paul J

    2006-01-01

    Background Formation of long-term memories is critically dependent on extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling. Activation of the ERK pathway by the sequential recruitment of mitogen-activated protein kinases is well understood. In contrast, the proteins that inactivate this pathway are not as well characterized. Methods Here we tested the hypothesis that the brain-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase STEP plays a key role in neuroplasticity and fear memory formation by its ability to regulate ERK1/2 activation. Results STEP co-localizes with the ERKs within neurons of the lateral amygdala. A substrate-trapping STEP protein (TAT-STEP) binds to the ERKs and prevents their nuclear translocation after glutamate stimulation in primary cell cultures. Administration of TAT-STEP into the lateral amygdala disrupts long-term potentiation (LTP) and selectively disrupts fear memory consolidation. Fear conditioning induces a bi-phasic activation of ERK1/2 in the lateral amygdala (LA) with an initial activation within 5 minutes of training, a return to baseline levels by 15 minutes, and an increase again at 1 hour. In addition, fear conditioning results in the de novo translation of STEP. Inhibitors of ERK1/2 activation or of protein translation block the synthesis of STEP within the LA after fear conditioning. Conclusions Together, these data imply a role for STEP in experience-dependent plasticity, and suggest that STEP modulates the activation of ERK1/2 during amygdala–dependent memory formation. The regulation of emotional memory by modulating STEP activity may represent a target for the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as PTSD, panic, and anxiety disorders. PMID:17081505

  4. The SHP-1 protein tyrosine phosphatase negatively modulates Akt signaling in the ghrelin/GHSR1a system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodeiro, Maria; Alén, Begoña O.; Mosteiro, Carlos S.; Beiroa, Daniel; Nogueiras, Rubén; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Pardo, María; Gallego, Rosalía; Pazos, Yolanda; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Camiña, Jesus P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the signaling mechanism(s) responsible for the modulation of growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHSR1a)-associated Akt activity. Ghrelin leads to the activation of Akt through the interplay of distinct signaling mechanisms: an early Gi/o protein-dependent pathway and a late pathway mediated by β-arrestins. We found that the Src homology 2–containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-1) was an essential molecule in both Gi/o protein–dependent and β-arrestin–mediated pathways. More specifically, the role of SHP-1 in the Gi/o protein–dependent pathway was demonstrated by the fact that the overexpression of a catalytically defective SHP-1 augments tyrosine phosphorylation of the PI3K regulatory subunit p85, leading to an increase in the phosphorylation of cSrc and phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1, and finally activating Akt. The presence of SHP-1 in the β-arrestin–scaffolded complex and its attenuating effect on the cSrc and Akt activities verified that SHP-1 regulates not only the Gi/o protein–dependent pathway but also the β-arrestin–mediated pathway. Assays performed in preadipocyte and adipocyte 3T3-L1 cells showed SHP-1 expression. According to our results in HEK-GHSR1a cells, ghrelin stimulated SHP-1 phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 cells. The increase in ghrelin-induced Akt activity was enhanced by small interfering RNA of SHP-1 in preadipocyte 3T3-L1 cells. These results were reproduced in white adipose tissue obtained from mice, in which SHP-1 exhibited higher expression in omental than in subcutaneous tissue. Furthermore, this pattern of expression was inverted in mice fed a high-fat diet, suggesting a role for SHP-1 in controlling ghrelin sensitivity in adipose tissue. Indeed, SHP-1 deficiency was associated with augmented ghrelin-evoked Akt phosphorylation in omental tissue, as well as decreased phosphorylation under overexpression of SHP-1 in subcutaneous tissue. These findings

  5. Viral organization of human proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Wuchty

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Although maps of intracellular interactions are increasingly well characterized, little is known about large-scale maps of host-pathogen protein interactions. The investigation of host-pathogen interactions can reveal features of pathogenesis and provide a foundation for the development of drugs and disease prevention strategies. A compilation of experimentally verified interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins and a set of HIV-dependency factors (HDF allowed insights into the topology and intricate interplay between viral and host proteins on a large scale. We found that targeted and HDF proteins appear predominantly in rich-clubs, groups of human proteins that are strongly intertwined among each other. These assemblies of proteins may serve as an infection gateway, allowing the virus to take control of the human host by reaching protein pathways and diversified cellular functions in a pronounced and focused way. Particular transcription factors and protein kinases facilitate indirect interactions between HDFs and viral proteins. Discerning the entanglement of directly targeted and indirectly interacting proteins may uncover molecular and functional sites that can provide novel perspectives on the progression of HIV infection and highlight new avenues to fight this virus.

  6. Amination of tyrosine in liver cytosol protein of male F344 rats treated with 2-nitropropane, 2-nitrobutane, 3-nitropentane, or acetoxime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodum, R S; Fiala, E S

    1997-12-01

    Previously, the secondary nitroalkane 2-nitropropane, a strong hepatocarcinogen in rats, had been shown to induce the formation of 8-aminoguanine in both DNA and RNA of rat liver through a sulfotransferase-mediated pathway. This pathway was postulated to convert the carcinogen into an aminating species [Sodum, R. S., et al. (1994) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 7, 344-351]. To submit this postulate to further test, we examined liver proteins of rats treated with 2-nitropropane, other carcinogenic secondary nitroalkanes, or the related rat liver tumorigen acetoxime for the presence of 3-aminotyrosine, the expected product of tyrosine amination. Using ion-pair and/or cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, we found that the liver cytosolic proteins of these animals contained 0.1-1.5 mol of 3-aminotyrosine/10(3) mol of tyrosine. Treatment with the noncarcinogenic primary nitroalkane 1-nitropropane or with other primary nitroalkanes did not produce an analogous increase in the aminated amino acid (level of detection estimated at approximately 0.01 mol/10(3) mol of tyrosine). To our knowledge, this is the first report of the modification of protein tyrosine in vivo by a carcinogen. In vitro studies with acetoxime-O-sulfonate and hydroxylamine-O-sulfonate showed that these proposed intermediates in the activation pathway of 2-nitropropane react with guanosine to give 8-aminoguanosine, N1-aminoguanosine, and 8-oxoguanosine and also react with tyrosine to give 3-aminotyrosine and 3-hydroxytyrosine. The in vitro amination and oxidation of guanosine at C8 were also produced by acetophenoxime-O-sulfonate and 2-heptanoxime-O-sulfonate. These results provide additional evidence for the production of a reactive species capable of aminating nucleic acids and proteins from 2-nitropropane and other carcinogenic secondary nitroalkanes by a pathway involving oxime- and hydroxylamine-O-sulfonates as intermediates.

  7. The LAR protein tyrosine phosphatase enables PDGF beta-receptor activation through attenuation of the c-Abl kinase activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, W.; Lennartsson, J.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Heldin, C.H.; Hellberg, C.

    2011-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP) LAR negatively regulates the activity of several receptor tyrosine kinases. To investigate if LAR affects the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor signaling, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from mice where the LAR phosphatase domains were deleted

  8. Tyrosine Modifications in Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Feeney, Maria B.; Schöneich, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Significance: The understanding of physiological and pathological processes involving protein oxidation, particularly under conditions of aging and oxidative stress, can be aided by proteomic identification of proteins that accumulate oxidative post-translational modifications only if these detected modifications are connected to functional consequences. The modification of tyrosine (Tyr) residues can elicit significant changes in protein structure and function, which, in some cases, may cont...

  9. Decreased expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 12 is involved in the proliferation and recurrence of bladder transitional cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    PIAO, YONGRUI; LIU, XIANKUI; LIN, ZHENHUA; JIN, ZHEHU; JIN, XUANSHUN; YUAN, KUICHANG; WU, WENYUAN

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 12 (PTPN12) has been shown to be involved in the development of a number of types of carcinoma. However, the effect of PTPN12 on the proliferation and recurrence of human bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the expression and function of PTPN12 in human TCC. Samples from 164 patients with TCC, in addition to 146 patients undergoing bladder surgery for indications other than TCC, were examined. PTPN12 protein expression was examined using immunohistochemistry and western blotting, and PTPN12 mRNA expression was examined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. PTPN12 expression was increased following transfection with the PTPN12-expressing, pcDEF3 vector, and PTPN12 expression was decreased by RNA interference, in four TCC cell lines. The proliferation of TCC cells was analyzed by a WST-1 assay and in xenografts on BALB/C nude mice. The effect of PTPN12 on tumor recurrence was analyzed by adhesion, migration and invasion assays in TCC cell lines. PTPN12 expression was significantly decreased in TCC tissues compared with that in normal urothelium, and the level of PTPN12 expression was negatively correlated with tumor size, pathological grade, clinical stage and tumor recurrence. Furthermore, decreased expression of PTPN12 significantly enhanced the proliferation of TCC cells in vitro and in vivo. TCC cells with lower levels of PTPN12 exhibited greater adhesion, migration and invasion. In conclusion, PTPN12 expression is downregulated in human TCC. Restoring PTPN12 activity may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for this disease. PMID:26622721

  10. A Dual Role for the Nonreceptor Tyrosine Kinase Pyk2 during the Intracellular Trafficking of Human Papillomavirus 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Elinor Y; Meneses, Patricio I

    2015-09-01

    The infectious process of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) has been studied considerably, and many cellular components required for viral entry and trafficking continue to be revealed. In this study, we investigated the role of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Pyk2 during HPV16 pseudovirion infection of human keratinocytes. We found that Pyk2 is necessary for infection and appears to be involved in the intracellular trafficking of the virus. Small interfering RNA-mediated reduction of Pyk2 resulted in a significant decrease in infection but did not prevent viral entry at the plasma membrane. Pyk2 depletion resulted in altered endolysosomal trafficking of HPV16 and accelerated unfolding of the viral capsid. Furthermore, we observed retention of the HPV16 pseudogenome in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) in Pyk2-depleted cells, suggesting that the kinase could be required for the viral DNA to exit the TGN. While Pyk2 has previously been shown to function during the entry of enveloped viruses at the plasma membrane, the kinase has not yet been implicated in the intracellular trafficking of a nonenveloped virus such as HPV. Additionally, these data enrich the current literature on Pyk2's function in human keratinocytes. In this study, we investigated the role of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Pyk2 during human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of human skin cells. Infections with high-risk types of HPV such as HPV16 are the leading cause of cervical cancer and a major cause of genital and oropharyngeal cancer. As a nonenveloped virus, HPV enters cells by interacting with cellular receptors and established cellular trafficking routes to ensure that the viral DNA reaches the nucleus for productive infection. This study identified Pyk2 as a cellular component required for the intracellular trafficking of HPV16 during infection. Understanding the infectious pathways of HPVs is critical for developing additional preventive therapies. Furthermore, this study advances our knowledge of

  11. A defined medium supports changes consistent with capacitation in stallion sperm, as evidenced by increases in protein tyrosine phosphorylation and high rates of acrosomal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartlin, L A; Littell, J; Mark, E; Nelson, J L; Travis, A J; Bedford-Guaus, S J

    2008-03-15

    Efficient in vitro capacitation of stallion sperm has not yet been achieved, as suggested by low sperm penetration rates reported in in vitro fertilization (IVF) studies. Our objectives were to evaluate defined incubation conditions that would support changes consistent with capacitation in stallion sperm. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation events and the ability of sperm to undergo acrosomal exocytosis under various incubation conditions were used as end points for capacitation. Sperm incubated 4-6h in modified Whitten's (MW) with the addition of 25 mM NaHCO3 and 7 mg/mL BSA (capacitating medium) yielded high rates of protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Either HCO3(-) or BSA was required to support these changes, with the combination of both providing the most intense results. When a membrane-permeable form of cAMP and a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (IBMX) were added to MW in the absence of HCO3(-) and BSA, the tyrosine phosphorylation results obtained in our capacitating conditions could not be replicated, suggesting either effects apart from cAMP were responsible for tyrosine phosphorylation, or that stallion sperm might respond differently to these reagents as compared to sperm from other mammals. Sperm incubation in capacitating conditions was also associated with high percentages (Phorse.

  12. Visualisation and assessment of the protein synthesis rate of lung cancer using carbon-11 tyrosine and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieterman, R. [PET Center, Groningen University Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Groningen University Hospital (Netherlands); Willemsen, A.; Pruim, J.; Vaalburg, W. [PET Center, Groningen University Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands); Appel, M.; Koeter, G.; Groen, H. [Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Groningen University Hospital (Netherlands)

    2002-02-01

    This study evaluated the potential role of L-(1-{sup 11}C)-tyrosine positron emission tomography (TYR PET) for visualisation and quantification of protein metabolism in lung cancer. Dynamic TYR PET scans of the thorax were performed in 17 patients with lung cancer. Protein synthesis rate (PSR in {mu}mol/min.l) and standardised uptake value (SUV, corrected for body measurements) of tumour tissue and contralateral normal tissue were calculated before and after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. All tumours [11 non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs), five small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs), and one pleural mesothelioma] were visualised as a hot spot. The median PSR in tumour tissue was higher than that in corresponding contralateral normal lung tissue before [1.88 {mu}mol/min.l (range 1.10-3.42) vs 0.40 {mu}mol/min.l (range 0.12-0.86); P=0.003] and after treatment [1.33 {mu}mol/min.l (range 0.45-2.21) vs 0.28 {mu}mol/min.l (range 0.18-0.51); P<0.02]. In contrast to PSR of normal lung tissue, PSR of tumour tissue decreased significantly after therapy (P=0.03). Before therapy, no significant difference in PSR between NSCLCs and SCLCs was observed, but after therapy the PSR differed significantly between the subgroups [1.69 {mu}mol/min.l (range 0.63-2.78) for NSCLC vs 0.67 {mu}mol/min.l (range 0.45-0.92) for SCLC; P=0.03], irrespective of the treatment modality. The median SUV of tumour tissue was higher than that in corresponding contralateral normal lung both before and after therapy. Only a weak correlation between PSR and SUV was found when the latter was corrected for body surface area or lean body mass. Carbon-11 labelled tyrosine appears to be a good tracer for visualising lung cancer. PSR of tumour tissue can be used to quantify reduction in the metabolic rate of the tumour. Future studies need to be performed to determine whether TYR PET will supply additional clinical information with treatment implications in patients with lung cancer. (orig.)

  13. Activation of c-Src and Fyn kinases by protein tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha is substrate-specific and compatible with lipid raft localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vacaresse, Nathalie; Møller, Bente; Danielsen, Erik Michael

    2008-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases of the Src family (SFKs) function in multiple signaling pathways, raising the question of how appropriate regulation and substrate choice are achieved. SFK activity is modulated by several protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), among which RPTPa and SHP2 are the best established. We...... studied how RPTPa affects substrate specificity and regulation of c-Src and Fyn in response to EGF and PDGF. We find that RPTPa, in a growth factor-specific manner, directs the specificity of these kinases towards a specific subset of SFK substrates, particularly the focal adhesion protein Paxillin...... and the lipid raft scaffolding protein Cbp/PAG. A significant fraction of RPTPa is present in lipid rafts, where its targets Fyn and Cbp/PAG reside, and growth factor-mediated SFK activation within this compartment is strictly dependent on RPTPa. Forced concentration of RPTPa into lipid rafts is compatible...

  14. Thrombin-mediated Proteoglycan Synthesis Utilizes Both Protein-tyrosine Kinase and Serine/Threonine Kinase Receptor Transactivation in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Micah L.; Getachew, Robel; Osman, Narin; Febbraio, Mark A.; Little, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor signaling is mediated by three main mechanisms of action; these are the classical pathway, β-arrestin scaffold signaling, and the transactivation of protein-tyrosine kinase receptors such as those for EGF and PDGF. Recently, it has been demonstrated that G protein-coupled receptors can also mediate signals via transactivation of serine/threonine kinase receptors, most notably the transforming growth factor-β receptor family. Atherosclerosis is characterized by the development of lipid-laden plaques in blood vessel walls. Initiation of plaque development occurs via low density lipoprotein retention in the neointima of vessels due to binding with modified proteoglycans secreted by vascular smooth muscle cells. Here we show that transactivation of protein-tyrosine kinase receptors is mediated by matrix metalloproteinase triple membrane bypass signaling. In contrast, serine/threonine kinase receptor transactivation is mediated by a cytoskeletal rearrangement-Rho kinase-integrin system, and both protein-tyrosine kinase and serine/threonine kinase receptor transactivation concomitantly account for the total proteoglycan synthesis stimulated by thrombin in vascular smooth muscle. This work provides evidence of thrombin-mediated proteoglycan synthesis and paves the way for a potential therapeutic target for plaque development and atherosclerosis. PMID:23335513

  15. Changes in Carboxy Methylation and Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase PP2A Are Associated with Epididymal Sperm Maturation and Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudiki, Tejasvi; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Ferrara, John K; Kline, Douglas W; Vijayaraghavan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sperm contain the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1γ2 and PP2A. The role of sperm PP1γ2 is relatively well studied. Here we confirm the presence of PP2A in sperm and show that it undergoes marked changes in methylation (leucine 309), tyrosine phosphorylation (tyrosine 307) and catalytic activity during epididymal sperm maturation. Spermatozoa isolated from proximal caput, distal caput and caudal regions of the epididymis contain equal immuno-reactive amounts of PP2A. Using demethyl sensitive antibodies we show that PP2A is methylated at its carboxy terminus in sperm from the distal caput and caudal regions but not in sperm from the proximal caput region of the epididymis. The methylation status of PP2A was confirmed by isolation of PP2A with microcystin agarose followed by alkali treatment, which causes hydrolysis of protein carboxy methyl esters. Tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm PP2A varied inversely with methylation. That is, PP2A was tyrosine phosphorylated when it was demethylated but not when methylated. PP2A demethylation and its reciprocal tyrosine phosphorylation were also affected by treatment of sperm with L-homocysteine and adenosine, which are known to elevate intracellular S-adenosylhomocysteine, a feedback inhibitor of methyltransferases. Catalytic activity of PP2A declined during epididymal sperm maturation. Inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid or by incubation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa with L-homocysteine and adenosine resulted in increase of sperm motility parameters including percent motility, velocity, and lateral head amplitude. Demethylation or pharmacological inhibition of PP2A also leads to an increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). Our results show for the first time that changes in PP2A activity due to methylation and tyrosine phosphorylation occur in sperm and that these changes may play an important role in the regulation of sperm function.

  16. A novel strategy for the development of selective active-site inhibitors of the protein tyrosine phosphatase-like proteins islet-cell antigen 512 (IA-2) and phogrin (IA-2 beta)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drake, P.G.; Peters, Günther H.j.; Andersen, H.S.

    2003-01-01

    Islet-cell antigen 512 (IA-2) and phogrin (IA-2) are atypical members of he receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family that are characterized by a lack of activity against conventional PTP substrates. The physiological role(s) of these proteins remain poorly defined, although recent studi...

  17. Human conglutinin-like protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensenius, J C; Thiel, S; Baatrup, G

    1985-01-01

    The presence in human plasma of a molecule homologous to bovine conglutinin is indicated by the results of biological and immunochemical analysis. The human conglutinin-like protein shows calcium-dependent binding to complement-treated solid phase IgG and immunological cross-reaction with chicken...... anti-bovine conglutinin. The binding of the human protein to complement-treated IgG was inhibited by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine but not by other sugars. Analysis by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting showed reaction of anti-conglutinin with molecules of similar mobility to the monomer and hexamer of bovine...

  18. Bacterial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins are phosphorylated on tyrosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Petranovic, Dina; Macek, B

    2006-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) are required for repair, recombination and replication in all organisms. Eukaryotic SSBs are regulated by phosphorylation on serine and threonine residues. To our knowledge, phosphorylation of SSBs in bacteria has not been reported. A systematic search ...... of SSBs is a conserved process of post-translational modification in taxonomically distant bacteria....

  19. Modulation of Src Activity by Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase During Osteoblast Differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Granjeiro, Jose M.; Parikh, Kaushal; Yuvaraj, Saravanan; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Ferreira, Carmen V.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Src kinase plays a critical role in bone metabolism, particularly in osteoclasts. However, the ability of Src kinase to modulate the activity of other bone cells is less well understood. In this work, we examined the expression and activity of Src and low molecular weight protein

  20. ARQ 197, a novel and selective inhibitor of the human c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase with antitumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Neru; Jeay, Sébastien; Li, Youzhi; Chen, Chang-Rung; France, Dennis S; Ashwell, Mark A; Hill, Jason; Moussa, Magdi M; Leggett, David S; Li, Chiang J

    2010-06-01

    The met proto-oncogene is functionally linked with tumorigenesis and metastatic progression. Validation of the receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met as a selective anticancer target has awaited the emergence of selective c-Met inhibitors. Herein, we report ARQ 197 as the first non-ATP-competitive small molecule that selectively targets the c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase. Exposure to ARQ 197 resulted in the inhibition of proliferation of c-Met-expressing cancer cell lines as well as the induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis in cell lines with constitutive c-Met activity. These cellular responses to ARQ 197 were phenocopied by RNAi-mediated c-Met depletion and further demonstrated by the growth inhibition of human tumors following oral administration of ARQ 197 in multiple mouse xenograft efficacy studies. Cumulatively, these data suggest that ARQ 197, currently in phase II clinical trials, is a promising agent for targeting cancers in which c-Met-driven signaling is important for their survival and proliferation.

  1. Phenylketonuria : tyrosine supplementation in phenylalanine-restricted diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, FJ; van Rijn, M; Bekhof, J; Koch, R; Smit, PGA

    Treatment of phenylketonuria (PKU) consists of restriction of natural protein and provision of a protein substitute that lacks phenylalanine but is enriched in tyrosine. Large and unexplained differences exist, however, in the tyrosine enrichment of the protein substitutes. Furthermore, some

  2. Activation of proacrosin accompanies upregulation of sp32 protein tyrosine phosphorylation in pig sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, P L; Yang, L X; Cui, J-J; Tian, Y; Liu, Y; Jin, Y

    2013-12-11

    This study investigated the relationship between acrosin activation and pig sperm proacrosin binding protein (sp32) phosphorylation levels. Differently processed pig spermatozoa (fresh semen sperm, capacitation sperm, acrosome reaction sperm, capacitation-like sperm, and thawed sperm) were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis. The fresh semen and capacitation sperm groups both produced proacrosin protein bands of 55 kDa; however, the result of the fresh semen sperm group was clearer than that of the capacitation sperm group. The thawed sperm group showed a shallow strip at 55 kDa. The capacitation and acrosome reaction sperm groups produced obvious proacrosin protein bands at 35 kDa, and the strips of the capacitation sperm group were again clearer. A faint band was visible at 32 kDa in the acrosome reaction sperm group. The capacitation, thawed, and acrosome reaction sperm groups showed significant strips in sp32, and the bands of the acrosome reaction sperm group were shallower than those of the 2 other groups. The capacitation and thawed sperm groups produced significant strips at 40 kDa, and the capacitation sperm group produced an additional strip at 55 kDa. In conclusion, sp32 phosphorylation levels can promote proacrosin activation into the active acrosin.

  3. Identification of the tyrosine-protein phosphatase non-receptor type 2 as a rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility locus in europeans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna E Cobb

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Genome-wide association studies have facilitated the identification of over 30 susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, evidence for a number of potential susceptibility genes have not so far reached genome-wide significance in studies of Caucasian RA. METHODS: A cohort of 4286 RA patients from across Europe and 5642 population matched controls were genotyped for 25 SNPs, then combined in a meta-analysis with previously published data. RESULTS: Significant evidence of association was detected for nine SNPs within the European samples. When meta-analysed with previously published data, 21 SNPs were associated with RA susceptibility. Although SNPs in the PTPN2 gene were previously reported to be associated with RA in both Japanese and European populations, we show genome-wide evidence for a different SNP within this gene associated with RA susceptibility in an independent European population (rs7234029, P = 4.4×10(-9. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides further genome-wide evidence for the association of the PTPN2 locus (encoding the T cell protein tyrosine phosphastase with Caucasian RA susceptibility. This finding adds to the growing evidence for PTPN2 being a pan-autoimmune susceptibility gene.

  4. Identification of the Tyrosine-Protein Phosphatase Non-Receptor Type 2 as a Rheumatoid Arthritis Susceptibility Locus in Europeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Joanna E.; Plant, Darren; Flynn, Edward; Tadjeddine, Meriem; Dieudé, Philippe; Cornélis, François; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää; Goulielmos, George; Boumpas, Dimitrios T.; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos; Krintel, Sophine B.; Ørnbjerg, Lykke M.; Hetland, Merete L.; Klareskog, Lars; Haeupl, Thomas; Filer, Andrew; Buckley, Christopher D.; Raza, Karim; Witte, Torsten; Schmidt, Reinhold E.; FitzGerald, Oliver; Veale, Douglas; Eyre, Stephen; Worthington, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Genome-wide association studies have facilitated the identification of over 30 susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, evidence for a number of potential susceptibility genes have not so far reached genome-wide significance in studies of Caucasian RA. Methods A cohort of 4286 RA patients from across Europe and 5642 population matched controls were genotyped for 25 SNPs, then combined in a meta-analysis with previously published data. Results Significant evidence of association was detected for nine SNPs within the European samples. When meta-analysed with previously published data, 21 SNPs were associated with RA susceptibility. Although SNPs in the PTPN2 gene were previously reported to be associated with RA in both Japanese and European populations, we show genome-wide evidence for a different SNP within this gene associated with RA susceptibility in an independent European population (rs7234029, P = 4.4×10−9). Conclusions This study provides further genome-wide evidence for the association of the PTPN2 locus (encoding the T cell protein tyrosine phosphastase) with Caucasian RA susceptibility. This finding adds to the growing evidence for PTPN2 being a pan-autoimmune susceptibility gene. PMID:23840476

  5. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer methods to study G protein-coupled receptor-receptor tyrosine kinase heteroreceptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Flajolet, Marc; Agnati, Luigi F; Greengard, Paul; Fuxe, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can form heteroreceptor complexes. In these complexes, the signaling from each interacting protomer is modulated to produce an integrated and therefore novel response upon agonist(s) activation. In the GPCR-RTK heteroreceptor complexes, GPCRs can activate RTK in the absence of added growth factor through the use of RTK signaling molecules. This integrative phenomenon is reciprocal and can place also RTK signaling downstream of GPCR. Formation of either stable or transient complexes by these two important classes of membrane receptors is involved in regulating all aspects of receptor function, from ligand binding to signal transduction, trafficking, desensitization, and downregulation among others. Functional phenomena can be modulated with conformation-specific inhibitors that stabilize defined GPCR states to abrogate both GPCR agonist- and growth factor-stimulated cell responses or by means of small interfering heteroreceptor complex interface peptides. The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technology has emerged as a powerful method to study the structure of heteroreceptor complexes closely associated with the study of receptor-receptor interactions in such complexes. In this chapter, we provide an overview of different BRET(2) assays that can be used to study the structure of GPCR-RTK heteroreceptor complexes and their functions. Various experimental designs for optimization of these experiments are also described. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A complex between contactin-1 and the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRZ controls the development of oligodendrocyte precursor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamprianou, Smaragda; Chatzopoulou, Elli; Thomas, Jean-Léon; Bouyain, Samuel; Harroch, Sheila (IP-Korea); (UPMC); (UMKC)

    2013-09-23

    The six members of the contactin (CNTN) family of neural cell adhesion molecules are involved in the formation and maintenance of the central nervous system (CNS) and have been linked to mental retardation and neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism. Five of the six CNTNs bind to the homologous receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases gamma (PTPRG) and zeta (PTPRZ), but the biological roles of these interactions remain unclear. We report here the cocrystal structure of the carbonic anhydrase-like domain of PTPRZ bound to tandem Ig repeats of CNTN1 and combine these structural data with binding assays to show that PTPRZ binds specifically to CNTN1 expressed at the surface of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Furthermore, analyses of glial cell populations in wild-type and PTPRZ-deficient mice show that the binding of PTPRZ to CNTN1 expressed at the surface of oligodendrocyte precursor cells inhibits their proliferation and promotes their development into mature oligodendrocytes. Overall, these results implicate the PTPRZ/CNTN1 complex as a previously unknown modulator of oligodendrogenesis.

  7. Acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in cancer cells is mediated by loss of IGF-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guix, Marta; Faber, Anthony C.; Wang, Shizhen Emily; Olivares, Maria Graciela; Song, Youngchul; Qu, Sherman; Rinehart, Cammie; Seidel, Brenda; Yee, Douglas; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Although some cancers are initially sensitive to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), resistance invariably develops. We investigated mechanisms of acquired resistance to the EGFR TKI gefitinib by generating gefitinib-resistant (GR) A431 squamous cancer cells. In GR cells, gefitinib reduced phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB-3, and Erk but not Akt. These cells also showed hyperphosphorylation of the IGFI receptor (IGFIR) and constitutive association of IRS-1 with PI3K. Inhibition of IGFIR signaling disrupted the association of IRS-1 with PI3K and restored the ability of gefitinib to downregulate PI3K/Akt signaling and to inhibit GR cell growth. Gene expression analyses revealed that GR cells exhibited markedly reduced IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) and IGFBP-4 RNA. Addition of recombinant IGFBP-3 restored the ability of gefitinib to downregulate PI3K/Akt signaling and to inhibit cell growth. Finally, gefitinib treatment of mice with A431 xenografts in combination with an IGFIR-specific monoclonal antibody prevented tumor recurrence, whereas each drug given alone was unable to do so. These data suggest that loss of expression of IGFBPs in tumor cells treated with EGFR TKIs derepresses IGFIR signaling, which in turn mediates resistance to EGFR antagonists. Moreover, combined therapeutic inhibition of EGFR and IGFIR may abrogate this acquired mechanism of drug resistance and is thus worthy of prospective clinical investigation. PMID:18568074

  8. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP1B) and α-glucosidase by geranylated flavonoids from Paulownia tomentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yeong Hun; Uddin, Zia; Jin, Young Min; Li, Zuopeng; Curtis-Long, Marcus John; Kim, Kwang Dong; Cho, Jung Keun; Park, Ki Hun

    2017-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and α-glucosidase are important targets to treat obesity and diabetes, due to their deep correlation with insulin and leptin signalling, and glucose regulation. The methanol extract of Paulownia tomentosa fruits showed potent inhibition against both enzymes. Purification of this extract led to eight geranylated flavonoids (1-8) displaying dual inhibition of PTP1B and α-glucosidase. The isolated compounds were identified as flavanones (1-5) and dihydroflavonols (6-8). Inhibitory potencies of these compounds varied accordingly, but most of the compounds were highly effective against PTP1B (IC50 = 1.9-8.2 μM) than α-glucosidase (IC50 = 2.2-78.9 μM). Mimulone (1) was the most effective against PTP1B with IC50 = 1.9 μM, whereas 6-geranyl-3,3',5,5',7-pentahydroxy-4'-methoxyflavane (8) displayed potent inhibition against α-glucosidase (IC50 = 2.2 μM). All inhibitors showed mixed type Ι inhibition toward PTP1B, and were noncompetitive inhibitors of α-glucosidase. This mixed type behavior against PTP1B was fully demonstrated by showing a decrease in Vmax, an increase of Km, and Kik/Kiv ratio ranging between 2.66 and 3.69.

  9. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase-1B Mediates Sleep Fragmentation-Induced Insulin Resistance and Visceral Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozal, David; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Qiao, Zhuanghong; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Maccari, Rosanna; Ottanà, Rosaria

    2017-09-01

    Sleep fragmentation (SF) is highly prevalent and has emerged as an important contributing factor to obesity and metabolic syndrome. We hypothesized that SF-induced increases in protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B) expression and activity underlie increased food intake, inflammation, and leptin and insulin resistance. Wild-type (WT) and ObR-PTP-1b-/- mice (Tg) were exposed to SF and control sleep (SC), and food intake was monitored. WT mice received a PTP-1B inhibitor (RO-7d; Tx) or vehicle (Veh). Upon completion of exposures, systemic insulin and leptin sensitivity tests were performed as well as assessment of visceral white adipose tissue (vWAT) insulin receptor sensitivity and macrophages (ATM) polarity. SF increased food intake in either untreated or Veh-treated WT mice. Leptin-induced hypothalamic STAT3 phosphorylation was decreased, PTP-1B activity was increased, and reduced insulin sensitivity emerged both systemic and in vWAT, with the latter displaying proinflammatory ATM polarity changes. All of the SF-induced effects were abrogated following PTP-1B inhibitor treatment and in Tg mice. SF induces increased food intake, reduced leptin signaling in hypothalamus, systemic insulin resistance, and reduced vWAT insulin sensitivity and inflammation that are mediated by increased PTP-1B activity. Thus, PTP-1B may represent a viable therapeutic target in the context of SF-induced weight gain and metabolic dysfunction.

  10. Naturally occurring Diels-Alder-type adducts from Morus nigra as potent inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein tyrosine phosphatase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarello, Alessandra; Orbem Menegatti, Angela Camila; Calcaterra, Andrea; Martins, Priscila Graziela Alves; Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise Domeneghini; D'Acquarica, Ilaria; Ferrari, Franco; Pau, Valentina; Sanna, Adriana; De Logu, Alessandro; Botta, Maurizio; Botta, Bruno; Terenzi, Hernán; Mori, Mattia

    2017-12-07

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) protein tyrosine phosphatases A and B (PtpA and PtpB) have been recognized as potential molecular targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies against tuberculosis (TB). In this context, we have recently reported that the naturally occurring Diels-Alder-type adduct Kuwanol E is an inhibitor of PtpB (Ki = 1.6 ± 0.1 μM). Here, we describe additional Diels-Alder-type adducts isolated from Morus nigra roots bark that inhibit PtpB at sub-micromolar concentrations. The two most potent compounds, namely Kuwanon G and Kuwanon H, showed Ki values of 0.39 ± 0.27 and 0.20 ± 0.01 μM, respectively, and interacted with the active site of the enzyme as suggested by kinetics and mass spectrometry studies. Molecular docking coupled with intrinsic fluorescence analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) further characterized the interaction of these promising PtpB inhibitors. Notably, in an Mtb survival assay inside macrophages, Kuwanon G showed inhibition of Mtb growth by 61.3%. All these results point to the common Diels-Alder-type adduct scaffold, and highlight its relevance for the development of PtpB inhibitors as candidate therapeutics for TB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Computational revelation of binding mechanisms of inhibitors to endocellular protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fangfang; Liu, Xinguo; Zhang, Shaolong; Su, Jing; Zhang, Qinggang; Chen, Jianzhong

    2017-11-06

    Endocellular protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is one of the most promising target for designing and developing drugs to cure type-II diabetes and obesity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) and solvated interaction energy methods were applied to study binding differences of three inhibitors (ID: 901, 941, and 968) to PTP1B, the calculated results show that the inhibitor 901 has the strongest binding ability to PTP1B among the current inhibitors. Principal component (PC) analysis was also carried out to investigate the conformational change of PTP1B, and the results indicate that the associations of inhibitors with PTP1B generate a significant effect on the motion of the WPD-loop. Free energy decomposition method was applied to study the contributions of individual residues to inhibitor bindings, it is found that three inhibitors can generate hydrogen bonding interactions and hydrophobic interactions with different residues of PTP1B, which provide important forces for associations of inhibitors with PTP1B. This research is expected to give a meaningfully theoretical guidance to design and develop of effective drugs curing type-II diabetes and obesity.

  12. A genomic perspective on protein tyrosine phosphatases: gene structure, pseudogenes, and genetic disease linkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jannik N; Jansen, Peter G; Echwald, Søren M

    2004-01-01

    and provide predicted amino acid sequences for four human PTPs that are currently defined by fragments only. Finally, we correlated each PTP locus with genetic disease markers and identified 4 PTPs that map to known susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes and 19 PTPs that map to regions frequently deleted...

  13. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-II binding to an IGF binding protein. An investigation using chemical modification of tyrosine residues as a structural probe for the sites of interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, J A; Francis, G L; Ross, M; Wallace, J C; Ballard, F J

    1991-01-15

    We have investigated insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-II binding to bovine insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (bIGFBP-2) using chemical modification to locate sites on the IGF involved in the binding interaction. bIGFBP-2 was incubated with either recombinant human (hIGF-I) or purified ovine (oIGF-II) to form a mixture of bound and free IGF. Sites of interaction between the binding protein and IGF were then probed by iodination of the available tyrosine residues. Subsequently, the mixture of free IGF and IGF.bIGFBP-2 complex was resolved by neutral chromatography, and the IGF component of the complex with bIGFBP-2 was recovered by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography at pH 2.1. The tyrosine labeling patterns of the two populations of IGF, one iodinated while free and the other iodinated while associated with binding protein, were determined following endoproteinase Glu-C peptide mapping. Binding of hIGF-I or oIGF-II to bIGFBP-2 resulted in reduced iodination of the tyrosines in both hIGF-I and oIGF-II that are near the carboxyl-terminal, Tyr-60 and Tyr-59, respectively. The reduction in labeling of these tyrosine residues was 2-fold and 6-fold for hIGF-I and oIGF-II, respectively. On the other hand, labeling of the other 2 tyrosines in hIGF-I and oIGF-II was not different between the free and complexed growth factors. From these results we conclude that Tyr-60 and Tyr-59 in the carboxyl-terminal regions of hIGF-I and oIGF-II, respectively, are either directly involved in the binding reaction or lie in a region of the IGF molecule encompassed by the association with bIGFBP-2. Conversely, the labeling pattern of the other tyrosines, Tyr-24 and Tyr-31 in hIGF-I and Tyr-2 and Tyr-27 in oIGF-II, implies that they are not involved in binding to bIGFBP-2. To examine the role of IGF tyrosine residues in the association with bIGFBP-2, we prepared nonradioactive 127I-labeled oIGF-II. In bIGFBP-2 competition binding assays, 127I-labeled o

  14. Stimulation of receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha activity and phosphorylation by phorbol ester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    den Hertog, J; Sap, J; Pals, C E

    1995-01-01

    with the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate, a direct activator of protein kinase C, induced a rapid, transient increase in RPTP alpha activity due to a 2- to 3-fold increase in substrate affinity. A transient increase in RPTP alpha serine phosphorylation was concomitant with the enhanced activity....... Tryptic phosphopeptide mapping of RPTP alpha demonstrated that phosphorylation of three tryptic peptides was enhanced in response to phorbol ester. In vitro dephosphorylation of RPTP alpha from phorbol ester-treated cells reduced RPTP alpha activity to prestimulation levels, indicating that enhanced...

  15. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Csk-Induced Phosphorylation of Src at Tyrosine 530 is Essential for H2O2-Mediated Suppression of ERK1/2 in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bo Kyung; Kwon, Kihwan; Kang, Jihee Lee; Choi, Youn-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key signal transducers involved in various cellular events such as growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Previous studies have reported that H2O2 leads to phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), one of the MAPKs in endothelial cells. The current study shows that H2O2 suppressed ERK1/2 activation and phosphorylation at specific concentrations and times in human umbilical vein endothelial cells but not in immortalized mouse aortic endothelial cells or human astrocytoma cell line CRT-MG. Phosphorylation of other MAPK family members (i.e., p38 and JNK) was not suppressed by H2O2. The decrease in ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by H2O2 was inversely correlated with the level of phosphorylation of Src tyrosine 530. Using siRNA, it was found that H2O2-induced suppression of ERK1/2 was dependent on Csk. Physiological laminar flow abrogated, but oscillatory flow did not affect, the H2O2-induced suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In conclusion, H2O2-induced Csk translocation to the plasma membrane leads to phosphorylation of Src at the tyrosine 530 residue resulting in a reduction of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Physiological laminar flow abrogates this effect of H2O2 by inducing phosphorylation of Src tyrosine 419. These findings broaden our understanding of signal transduction mechanisms in the endothelial cells against oxidative stress. PMID:26234813

  17. Asperterpenoid A, a new sesterterpenoid as an inhibitor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein tyrosine phosphatase B from the culture of Aspergillus sp. 16-5c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xishan; Huang, Hongbo; Li, Hanxiang; Sun, Xuefeng; Huang, Huarong; Lu, Yongjun; Lin, Yongcheng; Long, Yuhua; She, Zhigang

    2013-02-15

    Asperterpenoid A (1), a novel sesterterpenoid with a new carbon skeleton, has been isolated from a mangrove endophytic fungus Aspergillus sp. 16-5c. Its structure was characterized by extensive spectroscopic methods, and the absolute configuration was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Asperterpenoid A (1) exhibited strong inhibitory activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein tyrosine phosphatase B (mPTPB) with an IC(50) value of 2.2 μM.

  18. PET 6-[18F]fluoro-L-m-tyrosine studies of dopaminergic function in human and nonhuman primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie L Eberling

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Although positron emission tomography (PET and the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC tracer 6-[18F]fluoro-L-m-tyrosine (FMT has been used to assess the integrity of the presynaptic dopamine system in the brain, relatively little has been published in terms of brain FMT uptake values especially for normal human subjects. Twelve normal volunteer subjects were scanned using PET and FMT to determine the range of normal striatal uptake values using Patlak graphical analysis. For comparison, seven adult rhesus monkeys were studied and the data analyzed in the same way. A subset of monkeys that were treated with a unilateral intracarotid artery infusion of the dopamine neurotoxin MPTP showed an 87% decrease in striatal FMT uptake. These findings support the use of PET and FMT to image AADC distribution in both normal and diseased brains using Patlak graphical analysis and tissue input functions.

  19. Defining the molecular basis of interaction between R3 receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatases and VE-cadherin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Dorofejeva

    Full Text Available Receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs of the R3 subgroup play key roles in the immune, vascular and nervous systems. They are characterised by a large ectodomain comprising multiple FNIII-like repeats, a transmembrane domain, and a single intracellular phosphatase domain. The functional role of the extracellular region has not been clearly defined and potential roles in ligand interaction, dimerization, and regulation of cell-cell contacts have been reported. Here bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC in live cells was used to examine the molecular basis for the interaction of VE-PTP with VE-cadherin, two proteins involved in endothelial cell contact and maintenance of vascular integrity. The potential of other R3-PTPs to interact with VE-cadherin was also explored using this method. Quantitative BiFC analysis, using a VE-PTP construct expressing only the ectodomain and transmembrane domain, revealed a specific interaction with VE-cadherin, when compared with controls. Controls were sialophorin, an unrelated membrane protein with a large ectodomain, and a membrane anchored C-terminal Venus-YFP fragment, lacking both ectodomain and transmembrane domains. Truncation of the first 16 FNIII-like repeats from the ectodomain of VE-PTP indicated that removal of this region is not sufficient to disrupt the interaction with VE-cadherin, although it occurs predominantly in an intracellular location. A construct with a deletion of only the 17th domain of VE-PTP was, in contrast to previous studies, still able to interact with VE-cadherin, although this also was predominantly intracellular. Other members of the R3-PTP family (DEP-1, GLEPP1 and SAP-1 also exhibited the potential to interact with VE-cadherin. The direct interaction of DEP-1 with VE-cadherin is likely to be of physiological relevance since both proteins are expressed in endothelial cells. Together the data presented in the study suggest a role for both the ectodomain and

  20. A single human gene encoding multiple tyrosine hydroxylases with different predicted functional characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grima, B; Lamouroux, A; Boni, C; Julien, J F; Javoy-Agid, F; Mallet, J

    Catecholaminergic systems in discrete regions of the brain are thought to be important in affective psychoses, learning and memory, reinforcement and sleep-wake cycle regulation. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the first enzyme in the pathway of catecholamine synthesis. Its importance is reflected in the diversity of the mechanisms that have been described which control its activity; TH levels vary both during development and as a function of the activity of the nervous system. Recently, we deduced the complete amino-acid sequence of rat TH from a complementary DNA clone encoding a functional enzyme. Here we demonstrate that, in man, TH molecules are encoded by at least three distinct messenger RNAs. The expression of these mRNAs varies in different parts of the nervous system. The sequence differences observed are confined to the 5' termini of the messengers and involve alternative splicing events. This variation has clear functional consequences for each putative form of the enzyme and could represent a novel means of regulating catecholamine levels in normal and pathological neurons.

  1. Deletion of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B Enhances Endothelial Cyclooxygenase 2 Expression and Protects Mice from Type 1 Diabetes-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Herren

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B dephosphorylates receptors tyrosine kinase and acts as a molecular brake on insulin signaling pathway. Conditions of metabolic dysfunction increase PTP1B, when deletion of PTP1B protects against metabolic disorders by increasing insulin signaling. Although vascular insulin signaling contributes to the control of glucose disposal, little is known regarding the direct role of PTP1B in the control of endothelial function. We hypothesized that metabolic dysfunctions increase PTP1B expression in endothelial cells and that PTP1B deletion prevents endothelial dysfunction in situation of diminished insulin secretion. Type I diabetes (T1DM was induced in wild-type (WT and PTP1B-deficient mice (KO with streptozotocin (STZ injection. After 28 days of T1DM, KO mice exhibited a similar reduction in body weight and plasma insulin levels and a comparable increase in glycemia (WT: 384 ± 20 vs. Ko: 432 ± 29 mg/dL, cholesterol and triglycerides, as WT mice. T1DM increased PTP1B expression and impaired endothelial NO-dependent relaxation, in mouse aorta. PTP1B deletion did not affect baseline endothelial function, but preserved endothelium-dependent relaxation, in T1DM mice. NO synthase inhibition with L-NAME abolished endothelial relaxation in control and T1DM WT mice, whereas L-NAME and the cyclooxygenases inhibitor indomethacin were required to abolish endothelium relaxation in T1DM KO mice. PTP1B deletion increased COX-2 expression and PGI2 levels, in mouse aorta and plasma respectively, in T1DM mice. In parallel, simulation of diabetic conditions increased PTP1B expression and knockdown of PTP1B increased COX-2 but not COX-1 expression, in primary human aortic endothelial cells. Taken together these data indicate that deletion of PTP1B protected endothelial function by compensating the reduction in NO bioavailability by increasing COX-2-mediated release of the vasodilator prostanoid PGI2, in T1DM mice.

  2. Fully automated synthesis of (phosphopeptide arrays in microtiter plate wells provides efficient access to protein tyrosine kinase characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldstein David J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic peptides have played a useful role in studies of protein kinase substrates and interaction domains. Synthetic peptide arrays and libraries, in particular, have accelerated the process. Several factors have hindered or limited the applicability of various techniques, such as the need for deconvolution of combinatorial libraries, the inability or impracticality of achieving full automation using two-dimensional or pin solid phases, the lack of convenient interfacing with standard analytical platforms, or the difficulty of compartmentalization of a planar surface when contact between assay components needs to be avoided. This paper describes a process for synthesis of peptides and phosphopeptides on microtiter plate wells that overcomes previous limitations and demonstrates utility in determination of the epitope of an autophosphorylation site phospho-motif antibody and utility in substrate utilization assays of the protein tyrosine kinase, p60c-src. Results The overall reproducibility of phospho-peptide synthesis and multiplexed EGF receptor (EGFR autophosphorylation site (pY1173 antibody ELISA (9H2 was within 5.5 to 8.0%. Mass spectrometric analyses of the released (phosphopeptides showed homogeneous peaks of the expected molecular weights. An overlapping peptide array of the complete EGFR cytoplasmic sequence revealed a high redundancy of 9H2 reactive sites. The eight reactive phospopeptides were structurally related and interestingly, the most conserved antibody reactive peptide motif coincided with a subset of other known EGFR autophosphorylation and SH2 binding motifs and an EGFR optimal substrate motif. Finally, peptides based on known substrate specificities of c-src and related enzymes were synthesized in microtiter plate array format and were phosphorylated by c-Src with the predicted specificities. The level of phosphorylation was proportional to c-Src concentration with sensitivities below 0.1 Units of

  3. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B deficiency ameliorates murine experimental colitis via the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is a key molecule in modulating low-degree inflammatory conditions such as diabetes. The role of PTP1B in other chronic inflammations, however, remains unknown. Here, we report that PTP1B deficiency ameliorates Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS-induced murine experimental colitis via expanding CD11b(+Gr-1(+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs. Employing DSS-induced murine experimental colitis as inflammatory animal model, we found that, compared with wild-type littermates, PTP1B-null mice demonstrated greater resistance to DSS-induced colitis, as reflected by slower weight-loss, greater survival rates and decreased PMN and macrophage infiltration into the colon. The evidence collectively also demonstrated that the resistance of PTP1B-null mice to DSS-induced colitis is based on the expansion of MDSCs. First, PTP1B-null mice exhibited a greater frequency of MDSCs in the bone marrow (BM, peripheral blood and spleen when compared with wild-type littermates. Second, PTP1B levels in BM leukocytes were significantly decreased after cells were induced into MDSCs by IL-6 and GM-CSF, and the MDSC induction occurred more rapidly in PTP1B-null mice than in wild-type littermates, suggesting PTP1B as a negative regulator of MDSCs. Third, the adoptive transfer of MDSCs into mice with DSS-colitis significantly attenuated colitis, which accompanies with a decreased serum IL-17 level. Finally, PTP1B deficiency increased the frequency of MDSCs from BM cells likely through enhancing the activities of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and Janus kinase 2 (JAK2. In conclusion, our study provides the first evidences that PTP1B deficiency ameliorates murine experimental colitis via expanding MDSCs.

  4. PYK2: A Calcium-sensitive Protein Tyrosine Kinase Activated in Response to Fertilization of the Zebrafish Oocyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dipika; Kinsey, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Fertilization begins with binding and fusion of a sperm with the oocyte, a process that triggers a high amplitude calcium transient which propagates through the oocyte and stimulates a series of preprogrammed signal transduction events critical for zygote development. Identification of the pathways downstream of this calcium transient remains an important step in understanding the basis of zygote quality. The present study demonstrates that the calcium-calmodulin sensitive protein tyrosine kinase PYK2 is a target of the fertilization-induced calcium transient in the zebrafish oocyte and that it plays an important role in actin-mediated events critical for sperm incorporation. At fertilization, PYK2 was activated initially at the site of sperm-oocyte interaction and was closely associated with actin filaments forming the fertilization cone. Later PYK2 activation was evident throughout the entire oocyte cortex, however activation was most intense over the animal hemisphere. Fertilization-induced PYK2 activation could be blocked by suppressing calcium transients in the ooplasm via injection of BAPTA as a calcium chelator. PYK2 activation could be artificially induced in unfertilized oocytes by injection of IP3 at concentrations sufficient to induce calcium release. Functionally, suppression of PYK2 activity by chemical inhibition or by injection of a dominant-negative construct encoding the N-terminal ERM domain of PKY2 inhibited formation of an organized fertilization cone and reduced the frequency of successful sperm incorporation. Together, the above findings support a model in which PYK2 responds to the fertilization-induced calcium transient by promoting reorganization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton to form the fertilization cone. PMID:23084926

  5. Beneficial Effect of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Inhibitor and Phytoestrogen in Dyslipidemia-Induced Vascular Dementia in Ovariectomized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Aditi; Sharma, Saurabh

    2015-11-01

    Estrogen deficiency and increase in protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) activity may be a key mechanism in postmenopausal dyslipidemia-induced vascular dysfunction and dementia. Thus, the present study has been designed to investigate the effect of biochanin A (BCA, a phytoestrogen) and sodium orthovanadate (SOV), an inhibitor of PTPase in dyslipidemia-induced vascular dementia in ovariectomized rats. Female Wistar rats were ovariectomized and fed on high fat diet for 4 weeks to produce dyslipidemia. Dyslipidemia was assessed by estimation of serum lipid levels including total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL, and LDL levels. Dementia was assessed in terms of increase in brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and attenuation of learning ability (escape latency time) and memory retention (time spent in target quadrant) using Morris water maze. Vascular dysfunction was assessed in terms of attenuation of acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation (isolated carotid ring preparation), mRNA expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and increase in serum thiobarbituric acid reactive species, superoxide anion level. Neurodegeneration was assessed in hippocampus by hematoxylin and eosin staining. BCA (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) and SOV (5 and 10 mg/kg) were administered alone and in low-dose combination to ovariectomized dyslipidemic rats. BCA (2.5 and 5 mg/kg), SOV (5 and 10 mg/kg), and donepezil (1 mg/kg) significantly improves vascular function, and learning and memory ability and decreases the neuronal cell death, oxidative stress, and AChE in ovariectomized dyslipidemic rats. Thus, it may be concluded that BCA and SOV attenuate vascular dysfunction and dementia in dyslipidemic ovariectomized rats. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. In vitro screening for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B and dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors from selected Nigerian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidu, Yusuf; Muhammad, Suleiman Alhaji; Abbas, Abdullahi Yahaya; Onu, Andrew; Tsado, Ibrahim Mohammed; Muhammad, Luba

    2017-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP 1B) and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) have been identified as one of the drug targets for the treatment of Type-2 diabetes. This study was designed to screen for PTP 1B and DPP-IV inhibitors from some Nigerian medicinal plants. PTP 1B and DPP-IV drug discovery kits from Enzo Life Sciences were used to investigate in vitro inhibitory effect of crude methanolic extract of 10 plants; Mangifera indica, Moringa oleifera, Acacia nilotica, Arachis hypogaea, Senna nigricans, Azadirachta indica, Calotropis procera, Leptadenia hastata, Ziziphus mauritiana, and Solanum incanum. The results indicated PTP IB inhibition by S. nigricans (68.2 ± 2.29%), A. indica (67.4 ± 2.80%), A. hypogaea (57.2 ± 2.50%), A. nilotica (55.1 ± 2.19%), and M. oleifera (41.2 ± 1.87%) were significantly (P 0.05) different from that of sumarin. The DPP-IV inhibition by S. incanum (68.1 ± 2.71%) was significantly higher as compared with a known inhibitor, P32/98. S. nigrican (57.0±1.91%), Z. mauritiana (56.6±2.01%), A. hypogaea (51.0±1.30%), M. indica (44.6 ± 2.40%), C. procera (36.2 ± 2.00%), A. nilotica (35.4 ± 2.10%), and A. indica (33.6 ± 1.50%) show significantly (P < 0.05) lower inhibitions toward DPP-IV. The work demonstrated that these plant materials could serve as sources of lead compounds in the development of anti-diabetic agent(s) targeting PTP 1B and/or DPP-IV.

  7. Haematopoietic protein tyrosine phosphatase (HePTP) phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase in T-cells: dynamics and subcellular location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nika, Konstantina; Hyunh, Huong; Williams, Scott; Paul, Surojit; Bottini, Nunzio; Taskén, Kjetil; Lombroso, Paul J; Mustelin, Tomas

    2004-01-01

    The HePTP (haematopoietic protein tyrosine phosphatase) is a negative regulator of the ERK2 (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 2) and p38 MAP kinases (mitogen-activated protein kinases) in T-cells. This inhibitory function requires a physical association of HePTP through an N-terminal KIM (kinase-interaction motif) with ERK and p38. We previously reported that PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase) phosphorylates Ser-23 within the KIM of HePTP, resulting in dissociation of HePTP from ERK2. Here we follow the phosphorylation of this site in intact T-cells. We find that HePTP is phosphorylated at Ser-23 in resting T-cells and that this phosphorylation increases upon treatment of the cells with agents that elevate intracellular cAMP, such as prostaglandin E2. HePTP phosphorylation occurred at discrete regions at the cell surface. Phosphorylation was reduced by inhibitors of PKA and increased by inhibitors of protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A, but not by inhibitors of calcineurin. In vitro, PP1 efficiently dephosphorylated HePTP at Ser-23, while PP2A was much less efficient. Activation of PP1 by treatment of the cells with ceramide suppressed Ser-23 phosphorylation, as did transfection of the catalytic subunit of PP1. Phosphorylation at Ser-23 is also increased in a transient manner upon T-cell antigen receptor ligation. In contrast, treatment of cells with phorbol ester had no effect on HePTP phosphorylation at Ser-23. We conclude from these results that HePTP is under continuous control by PKA and a serine-specific phosphatase, probably PP1, in T-cells and that this basal phosphorylation at Ser-23 can rapidly change in response to external stimuli. This, in turn, will affect the ability of HePTP to inhibit the ERK and p38 MAP kinases. PMID:14613483

  8. Dietary tyrosine/phenylalanine depletion effects on behavioral and brain signatures of human motivational processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjork, James M; Grant, Steven J; Chen, Gang; Hommer, Daniel W

    2014-02-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission is critical for motivational processing. We assessed whether disruption of DA synthesis in healthy controls using an amino-acid beverage devoid of catecholamine precursors (tyrosine-phenylalanine depletion (TPD)) would blunt recruitment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) by rewards. Sixteen controls ingested each of a tyr/phe-depleting beverage (DEP) or a tyr/phe-balanced (BAL) control beverage in two laboratory visits. Five hours after consumption of each drink, subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while they viewed anticipatory cues to respond to a target to either win money or avoid losing money. TPD did not exert main effects on mood or on task behavior, but affected brain activation. In right NAcc, TPD blunted activation by anticipation of high rewards. In left NAcc, recruitment anticipating high rewards was modulated by individual differences in mood change across the DEP drink day, where subjects whose mood worsened following TPD (relative to within-day mood change under BAL conditions) also showed lower activation under DEP conditions relative to BAL conditions. Exploratory analysis indicated that TPD qualitatively blunted the voxel-wise spatial extent of suprathreshold activation by reward anticipation. Finally, loss outcomes activated anterior insula under DEP conditions but not under BAL conditions. These data indicate that: (1) dietary depletion of catacholamine precursors will blunt dopaminergic mesolimbic activity, and (2) in controls, synthetic pathways of this neurocircuitry maintain sufficient buffering capacity to resist an effect on motivated behavior. Additional studies are needed to determine if clinical populations would show similar resistance to behavioral effects of TPD.

  9. Neisseria meningitidis Opc invasin binds to the sulphated tyrosines of activated vitronectin to attach to and invade human brain endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Sa E Cunha

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The host vasculature is believed to constitute the principal route of dissemination of Neisseria meningitidis (Nm throughout the body, resulting in septicaemia and meningitis in susceptible humans. In vitro, the Nm outer membrane protein Opc can enhance cellular entry and exit, utilising serum factors to anchor to endothelial integrins; but the mechanisms of binding to serum factors are poorly characterised. This study demonstrates that Nm Opc expressed in acapsulate as well as capsulate bacteria can increase human brain endothelial cell line (HBMEC adhesion and entry by first binding to serum vitronectin and, to a lesser extent, fibronectin. This study also demonstrates that Opc binds preferentially to the activated form of human vitronectin, but not to native vitronectin unless the latter is treated to relax its closed conformation. The direct binding of vitronectin occurs at its Connecting Region (CR requiring sulphated tyrosines Y(56 and Y(59. Accordingly, Opc/vitronectin interaction could be inhibited with a conformation-dependent monoclonal antibody 8E6 that targets the sulphotyrosines, and with synthetic sulphated (but not phosphorylated or unmodified peptides spanning the vitronectin residues 43-68. Most importantly, the 26-mer sulphated peptide bearing the cell-binding domain (45RGD(47 was sufficient for efficient meningococcal invasion of HBMECs. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing the binding of a bacterial adhesin to sulphated tyrosines of the host receptor. Our data also show that a single region of Opc is likely to interact with the sulphated regions of both vitronectin and of heparin. As such, in the absence of heparin, Opc-expressing Nm interact directly at the CR but when precoated with heparin, they bind via heparin to the heparin-binding domain of the activated vitronectin, although with a lower affinity than at the CR. Such redundancy suggests the importance of Opc/vitronectin interaction in meningococcal

  10. Detection of a rare BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase fusion protein in H929 multiple myeloma cells using immunoprecipitation (IP)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkopf, Susanne B; Yuan, Min; Pihan, German A; Asara, John M

    2012-10-02

    Hypothesis directed proteomics offers higher throughput over global analyses. We show that immunoprecipitation (IP)-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in H929 multiple myeloma (MM) cancer cells led to the discovery of a rare and unexpected BCR-ABL fusion, informing a therapeutic intervention using imatinib (Gleevec). BCR-ABL is the driving mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and is uncommon to other cancers. Three different IP-MS experiments central to cell signaling pathways were sufficient to discover a BCR-ABL fusion in H929 cells: phosphotyrosine (pY) peptide IP, p85 regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) IP, and the GRB2 adaptor IP. The pY peptides inform tyrosine kinase activity, p85 IP informs the activating adaptors and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) involved in AKT activation and GRB2 IP identifies RTKs and adaptors leading to ERK activation. Integration of the bait-prey data from the three separate experiments identified the BCR-ABL protein complex, which was confirmed by biochemistry, cytogenetic methods, and DNA sequencing revealed the e14a2 fusion transcript. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 and the GAB2 adaptor protein, important for MAPK signaling, were common to all three IP-MS experiments. The comparative treatment of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) drugs revealed only imatinib, the standard of care in CML, was inhibitory to BCR-ABL leading to down-regulation of pERK and pS6K and inhibiting cell proliferation. These data suggest a model for directed proteomics from patient tumor samples for selecting the appropriate TKI drug(s) based on IP and LC-MS/MS. The data also suggest that MM patients, in addition to CML patients, may benefit from BCR-ABL diagnostic screening.

  11. Tyrosine and aurora kinase inhibitors diminish transport function of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP 4 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiannon N. Hardwick

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine and aurora kinases are important effectors in signal transduction pathways that are often involved in aberrant cancer cell growth. Tyrosine (TKI and aurora (AKI kinase inhibitors are anti-cancer agents specifically designed to target such signaling pathways through TKI/AKI binding to the ATP-binding pocket of kinases thereby leading to diminished kinase activity. Some TKIs have been identified as inhibitors of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, which are commonly upregulated in malignant cells. TKI/AKIs have been investigated as ABC transporter inhibitors in order to facilitate the accumulation of concomitantly administered chemo-therapeutics within cancer cells. However, ABC transporters are prominently expressed in the liver and other eliminating organs, and their inhibition has been linked to intracellular accumulation of drugs, altered disposition, and toxicity. The potential for TKIs/AKIs to inhibit other important hepatic efflux transporters, particularly multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs, remains unknown. The aim of the current study was to compare the inhibitory potency of 20 selected TKI/AKIs against MRP4 and BCRP through the use of inverted membrane vesicle assays. Relative IC50 values were estimated by determining TKI/AKI inhibition of MRP4-mediated [3H]-dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate uptake and BCRP-mediated [3H]-estrone sulfate uptake. To provide insight to the clinical relevance of TKI/AKI inhibition of ABC efflux transporters, the ratio of the steady-state maximum total plasma concentration (Css to the IC50 for each compound was calculated with Css/IC50 ratio >0.1 deemed potentially clinically relevant. Such analysis identified several potentially clinically relevant inhibitors of MRP4: alisertib, danusertib, erlotinib, lapatinib, neratinib, nilotinib, pazopanib, sorafenib, and tozasertib. The potentially clinically relevant inhibition of

  12. Anti-Group B Streptococcus Glycan-Conjugate Vaccines Using Pilus Protein GBS80 As Carrier and Antigen: Comparing Lysine and Tyrosine-directed Conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilo, Alberto; Morelli, Laura; Passalacqua, Irene; Brogioni, Barbara; Allan, Martin; Carboni, Filippo; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Zerbini, Francesca; Maione, Domenico; Fabbrini, Monica; Romano, Maria Rosaria; Hu, Qi-Ying; Margarit, Immaculada; Berti, Francesco; Adamo, Roberto

    2015-07-17

    Gram-positive Streptococcus agalactiae or group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of invasive infections in pregnant women, newborns, and elderly people. Vaccination of pregnant women represents the best strategy for prevention of neonatal disease, and GBS polysaccharide-based conjugate vaccines are currently under clinical testing. The potential of GBS pilus proteins selected by genome-based reverse vaccinology as protective antigens for anti-streptococcal vaccines has also been demonstrated. Dressing pilus proteins with surface glycan antigens could be an attractive approach to extend vaccine coverage. We have recently developed an efficient method for tyrosine-directed ligation of large glycans to proteins via copper-free azide-alkyne [3 + 2] cycloaddition. This method enables targeting of predetermined sites of the protein, ensuring that protein epitopes are preserved prior to glycan coupling and a higher consistency in glycoconjugate batches. Herein, we compared conjugates of the GBS type II polysaccharide (PSII) and the GBS80 pilus protein obtained by classic lysine random conjugation and by the recently developed tyrosine-directed ligation. PSII conjugated to CRM197, a carrier protein used for vaccines in the market, was used as a control. We found that the constructs made from PSII and GBS80 were able to elicit murine antibodies recognizing individually the glycan and protein epitopes on the bacterial surface. The generated antibodies were efficacious in mediating opsonophagocytic killing of strains expressing exclusively PSII or GBS80 proteins. The two glycoconjugates were also effective in protecting newborn mice against GBS infection following vaccination of the dams. Altogether, these results demonstrated that polysaccharide-conjugated GBS80 pilus protein functions as a carrier comparably to CRM197, while maintaining its properties of protective protein antigen. Glycoconjugation and reverse vaccinology can, therefore, be combined to design

  13. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  14. Tyrosine hydroxylase gene regulation in human neuronal progenitor cells does not depend on Nurr1 as in the murine and rat systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hao; Romano, Gaetano; Marshall, Cheryl; Donaldson, Angela E; Suon, Sokreine; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2006-04-01

    A previous study on the human tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter revealed remarkable differences in the mechanism of TH gene regulation between the human and murine models. Indeed, a low degree of homology was observed in the sequence of TH promoters among human, mouse, and rat systems. Only five short conserved regions (CRs) could be identified among the three species. A human TH minimal promoter was engineered and assembled into a self-inactivating lentiviral vector system. This human TH minimal promoter contained the five CRs plus the first -194 bp from the transcription start of the human TH promoter and the first 35 bp of the untranslated messenger RNA leader of the human TH gene. A significant degree of specificity for this human TH minimal promoter was observed only for human neuronal progenitor cells (hNPCs), but not for TH-positive differentiated mouse primary striatal and substantia nigra cells, indicating a significant difference in TH gene regulation between the human and mouse systems. Not only is the degree of homology between the human and mouse promoters in the range of only 46%, but also those few elements that share a high degree of homology display totally different functions in human and mouse brain-derived cells. In the rodent system, NR4A2 (Nurr1) is required for the transactivation of TH minimal promoters. Intriguingly, neither the dimeric nor the heterodimeric binding sites for Nurr1 are present in the 13 kb DNA sequence that contains the human TH promoter. Instead, the CRs termed one and four of the human TH promoter encode only for a half palindromic binding site sequence for Nurr1, which failed to bind Nurr1 in an in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Additionally, of the three monomeric NGFI-B response element (NBRE) core sites (AGGTCA) and two NBRE-related sites present in the human TH promoter, only one core and two NBRE-related sites formed protein binding complexes. Interestingly, there was no increase of protein

  15. MHC class I ligation of human T cells activates the ZAP70 and p56lck tyrosine kinases, leads to an alternative phenotype of the TCR/CD3 zeta-chain, and induces apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Bregenholt, S; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1997-01-01

    Cross-linking of MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules on human T cells induces signal-transduction events, including activation of tyrosine kinases, tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma 1, and elevation of the intracellular free calcium concentration. In this study, we demonstrate that the ...

  16. Tyrosine phosphorylation on capacitated human sperm tail detected by immunofluorescence correlates strongly with sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) binding but not with the ZP-induced acrosome reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D Y; Clarke, G N; Baker, H W G

    2006-04-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation (TP) of human sperm is related to sperm capacitation and zona pellucida (ZP) binding. The aim of this study was to determine whether the TP of capacitated sperm is a useful marker for the ability of sperm to bind to the ZP and undergo the ZP-induced acrosome reaction (AR). Semen samples were obtained from 115 subfertile men with sperm count > or =20 x 10(6)/ml, motility > or =25% and variable morphology. Motile sperm (2 x 10(6)/ml) selected by swim-up were incubated with four oocytes for 2 h, and the number of sperm bound to the ZP and the ZP-induced AR was examined. TP of sperm tail was assessed by immunofluorescence (IF) with anti-phosphotyrosine monoclonal antibody. The time course and effects of dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dbcAMP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) on TP were also studied. TP was stimulated more by dbcAMP (P ZP binding but not with the ZP-induced AR. Sperm TP detected by IF correlates strongly with sperm-ZP binding capacity but not with the ZP-induced AR. This simple IF assay of TP may be a clinically useful test of sperm function that is predictive of normal sperm ZP-binding capacity.

  17. Endometrial Cancers Harboring Mutated Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 Protein Are Successfully Treated With a New Small Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor in an Orthotopic Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurin, Sebastien; Yang, Chieh-Hsiang; Reyes, Maria; Cho, Sungpil; Coombs, Demetrius M; Jarboe, Elke A; Werner, Theresa L; Peterson, C Matthew; Janát-Amsbury, Margit M

    2017-09-26

    AL3818 (anlotinib) is a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR1, VEGFR2/KDR, and VEGFR3), stem cell factor receptor (C-kit), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGFβ), and fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR1, FGFR2, and FGFR3). This study evaluates the efficacy of AL3818 studying tumor regression in an orthotopic murine endometrial cancer model. We tested the cytotoxicity of AL3818 on a panel of 7 human endometrial cancer cell lines expressing either wild-type or mutant FGFR2 and also assessed the in vivo antitumor efficacy in a murine, orthotopic AN3CA endometrial cancer model. AL3818 was administered daily per os either alone or in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel, which represent the current standard of adjuvant care for endometrial cancer. AL3818 significantly reduces AN3CA cell number in vitro, characterized by high expression of a mutated FGFR2 protein. Daily oral administration of AL3818 (5 mg/kg) resulted in a complete response in 55% of animals treated and in a reduced tumor volume, as well as decreased tumor weights of AN3CA tumors by 94% and 96%, respectively, following a 29-day treatment cycle. Whereas carboplatin and paclitaxel failed to alter tumor growth, the combination with AL3818 did not seem to exhibit a superior effect when compared with AL3818 treatment alone. AL3818 shows superior efficacy for the treatment of endometrial cancer irresponsive to conventional carboplatin and paclitaxel combination and warrants further investigation.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  18. Cancer Cell-derived Exosomes Induce Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase-dependent Monocyte Survival by Transport of Functional Receptor Tyrosine Kinases*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao; Ding, Yanping; Liu, Gang; Yang, Xiao; Zhao, Ruifang; Zhang, Yinlong; Zhao, Xiao; Anderson, Gregory J.; Nie, Guangjun

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) play pivotal roles in cancer initiation and progression. Monocytes, the precursors of TAMs, normally undergo spontaneous apoptosis within 2 days, but can subsist in the inflammatory tumor microenvironment for continuous survival and generation of sufficient TAMs. The mechanisms underlying tumor-driving monocyte survival remain obscure. Here we report that cancer cell-derived exosomes were crucial mediators for monocyte survival in the inflammatory niche. Analysis of the survival-promoting molecules in monocytes revealed that cancer cell-derived exosomes activated Ras and extracellular signal-regulated kinases in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, resulting in the prevention of caspase cleavage. Phosphorylated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), such as phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2), were abundantly expressed in cancer cell-derived exosomes. Knock-out of EGFR or/and HER-2, or alternatively, inhibitors against their phosphorylation significantly disturbed the exosome-mediated activation of the MAPK pathway, inhibition of caspase cleavage, and increase in survival rate in monocytes. Moreover, the deprived survival-stimulating activity of exosomes due to null expression of EGFR and HER-2 could be restored by activation of another RTK, insulin receptor. Overall, our study uncovered a mechanism of tumor-associated monocyte survival and demonstrated that cancer cell-derived exosomes can stimulate the MAPK pathway in monocytes through transport of functional RTKs, leading to inactivation of apoptosis-related caspases. This work provides insights into the long sought question on monocyte survival prior to formation of plentiful TAMs in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26895960

  19. Effect of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor lapatinib on CUB-domain containing protein (CDCP1)-mediated breast cancer cell survival and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Jeanette; Kunc, Klaudia; Possinger, Kurt; Jehn, Christian; Lüftner, Diana

    2011-10-14

    The surface receptor CUB domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) is highly expressed in several adenocarcinomas and speculated to participate in anchorage-independent cell survival and cell motility. Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation seems to be crucial for intracellular signaling of CDCP1. Lapatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), is approved for treatment of HER-2/neu overexpressing metastatic breast cancer and functions by preventing autophosphorylation following HER-2/neu receptor activation. This study aimed to investigate the effect of CDCP1 expression on anchorage-independent growth and cell motility of breast cancer cells. Moreover, studies were performed to examine if lapatinib provided any beneficial effect on HER-2/neu((+)/-)/CDCP1(+) breast cancer cell lines. In our studies, we affirmed that CDCP1 prevents cells from undergoing apoptosis when cultured in the absence of cell-substratum anchorage and that migratory and invasive properties of these cells were decreased when CDCP1 was down-regulated. However, only HER-2/neu(+), but not HER-2/neu((+)/-) cells showed decreased proliferation and invasion and an enhanced level of apoptosis towards loss of anchorage when treated with lapatinib. Therefore, we conclude that CDCP1 might be involved in regulating adhesion and motility of breast cancer cells but that lapatinib has no effect on tyrosine kinases regulating CDCP1. Nonetheless, other TKIs might offer therapeutic approaches for CDCP1-targeted breast cancer therapy and should be studied considering this aspect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The R3 receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase subfamily inhibits insulin signalling by dephosphorylating the insulin receptor at specific sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Takafumi; Higashi, Satoru; Takeuchi, Yasushi; Gaudio, Eugenio; Trapasso, Francesco; Fusco, Alfredo; Noda, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    The autophosphorylation of specific tyrosine residues occurs in the cytoplasmic region of the insulin receptor (IR) upon insulin binding, and this in turn initiates signal transduction. The R3 subfamily (Ptprb, Ptprh, Ptprj and Ptpro) of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) is characterized by an extracellular region with 6-17 fibronectin type III-like repeats and a cytoplasmic region with a single phosphatase domain. We herein identified the IR as a substrate for R3 RPTPs by using the substrate-trapping mutants of R3 RPTPs. The co-expression of R3 RPTPs with the IR in HEK293T cells suppressed insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the IR. In vitro assays using synthetic phosphopeptides revealed that R3 RPTPs preferentially dephosphorylated a particular phosphorylation site of the IR: Y960 in the juxtamembrane region and Y1146 in the activation loop. Among four R3 members, only Ptprj was co-expressed with the IR in major insulin target tissues, such as the skeletal muscle, liver and adipose tissue. Importantly, the activation of IR and Akt by insulin was enhanced, and glucose and insulin tolerance was improved in Ptprj-deficient mice. These results demonstrated Ptprj as a physiological enzyme that attenuates insulin signalling in vivo, and indicate that an inhibitor of Ptprj may be an insulin-sensitizing agent. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  1. α-Glucosidase and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitory Activity of Plastoquinones from Marine Brown Alga Sargassum serratifolium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Yousof Ali

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sargassum serratifolium C. Agardh (Phaeophyceae, Fucales is a marine brown alga that belongs to the family Sargassaceae. It is widely distributed throughout coastal areas of Korea and Japan. S. serratifolium has been found to contain high concentrations of plastoquinones, which have strong anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective activity. This study aims to investigate the anti-diabetic activity of S. serratifolium and its major constituents through inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B, α-glucosidase, and ONOO−-mediated albumin nitration. S. serratifolium ethanolic extract and fractions exhibited broad PTP1B and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50, 1.83~7.04 and 3.16~24.16 µg/mL for PTP1B and α-glucosidase, respectively. In an attempt to identify bioactive compounds, three plastoquinones (sargahydroquinoic acid, sargachromenol and sargaquinoic acid were isolated from the active n-hexane fraction of S. serratifolium. All three plastoquinones exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity against PTP1B in the IC50 range of 5.14–14.15 µM, while sargachromenol and sargaquinoic acid showed dose-dependent inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase (IC50 42.41 ± 3.09 and 96.17 ± 3.48 µM, respectively. In the kinetic study of PTP1B enzyme inhibition, sargahydroquinoic acid and sargaquinoic acid led to mixed-type inhibition, whereas sargachromenol displayed noncompetitive-type inhibition. Moreover, plastoquinones dose-dependently inhibited ONOO−-mediated albumin nitration. Docking simulations of these plastoquinones demonstrated negative binding energies and close proximity to residues in the binding pocket of PTP1B and α-glucosidase, indicating that these plastoquinones have high affinity and tight binding capacity towards the active site of the enzymes. These results demonstrate that S. serratifolium and its major plastoquinones may have the potential as functional food ingredients for the

  2. Coarse-grained molecular simulation of epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase multi-site self-phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G Koland

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Upon the ligand-dependent dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase (PTK activity of one receptor monomer is activated, and the dimeric receptor undergoes self-phosphorylation at any of eight candidate phosphorylation sites (P-sites in either of the two C-terminal (CT domains. While the structures of the extracellular ligand binding and intracellular PTK domains are known, that of the ∼225-amino acid CT domain is not, presumably because it is disordered. Receptor phosphorylation on CT domain P-sites is critical in signaling because of the binding of specific signaling effector molecules to individual phosphorylated P-sites. To investigate how the combination of conventional substrate recognition and the unique topological factors involved in the CT domain self-phosphorylation reaction lead to selectivity in P-site phosphorylation, we performed coarse-grained molecular simulations of the P-site/catalytic site binding reactions that precede EGFR self-phosphorylation events. Our results indicate that self-phosphorylation of the dimeric EGFR, although generally believed to occur in trans, may well occur with a similar efficiency in cis, with the P-sites of both receptor monomers being phosphorylated to a similar extent. An exception was the case of the most kinase-proximal P-site-992, the catalytic site binding of which occurred exclusively in cis via an intramolecular reaction. We discovered that the in cis interaction of P-site-992 with the catalytic site was facilitated by a cleft between the N-terminal and C-terminal lobes of the PTK domain that allows the short CT domain sequence tethering P-site-992 to the PTK core to reach the catalytic site. Our work provides several new mechanistic insights into the EGFR self-phosphorylation reaction, and demonstrates the potential of coarse-grained molecular simulation approaches for investigating the complexities of self-phosphorylation in

  3. Optimization of extraction parameters of PTP1β (protein tyrosine phosphatase 1β), inhibitory polyphenols, and anthocyanins from Zea mays L. using response surface methodology (RSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kwon, Shin Hwa; Wang, Zhiqiang; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung

    2016-08-26

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase expressed in insulin-sensitive tissues (such as liver, muscle, and adipose tissue) has a key role in the regulation of insulin signaling and pathway activation, making protein tyrosine phosphatase a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity and response surface methodology (RSM) is an effective statistical technique for optimizing complex processes using a multi-variant approach. In this study, Zea mays L. (Purple corn kernel, PCK) and its constituents were investigated for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1β (PTP1β) inhibitory activity including enzyme kinetic study and to improve total yields of anthocyanins and polyphenols, four extraction parameters, including temperature, time, solid-liquid ratio, and solvent volume, were optimized by RSM. Isolation of seven polyphenols and five anthocyanins was achieved by PTP1β assay. Among them, cyanidin-3-(6"malonylglucoside) and 3'-methoxyhirsutrin showed the highest PTP1β inhibition with IC50 values of 54.06 and 64.04 μM, respectively and 4.52 mg gallic acid equivalent/g (GAE/g) of total polyphenol content (TPC) and 43.02 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalent/100 g (C3GE/100g) of total anthocyanin content (TAC) were extracted at 40 °C for 8 h with a 33 % solid-liquid ratio and a 1:15 solvent volume. Yields were similar to predictions of 4.58 mg GAE/g of TPC and 42.28 mg C3GE/100 g of TAC. These results indicated that PCK and 3'-methoxyhirsutrin and cyanidin-3-(6"malonylglucoside) might be active natural compounds and could be apply by optimizing of extraction process using response surface methodology.

  4. Antitumor activity of sorafenib in human cancer cell lines with acquired resistance to EGFR and VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriana Morgillo

    Full Text Available Treatment of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and colorectal cancer (CRC have substantially changed in the last years with the introduction of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors in the clinical practice. The understanding of mechanisms which regulate cells sensitivity to these drugs is necessary for their optimal use.An in vitro model of acquired resistance to two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI targeting the EGFR, erlotinib and gefitinib, and to a TKI targeting EGFR and VEGFR, vandetanib, was developed by continuously treating the human NSCLC cell line CALU-3 and the human CRC cell line HCT116 with escalating doses of each drug. MTT, western blot analysis, migration, invasion and anchorage-independent colony forming assays were conducted in vitro and experiments with established xenografts in athymic nude mice were performed in vivo in sensitive, wild type (WT and TKI-resistant CALU-3 and HCT116 cell lines.As compared to WT CALU-3 and HCT116 human cancer cells, TKI-resistant cell lines showed a significant increase in the levels of activated, phosphorylated AKT, MAPK, and of survivin. Considering the role of RAS and RAF as downstream signals of both the EGFR and VEGFR pathways, we treated resistant cells with sorafenib, an inhibitor of C-RAF, B-RAF, c-KIT, FLT-3, RET, VEGFR-2, VEGFR-3, and PDGFR-β. Sorafenib reduced the activation of MEK and MAPK and caused an inhibition of cell proliferation, invasion, migration, anchorage-independent growth in vitro and of tumor growth in vivo of all TKI-resistant CALU-3 and HCT116 cell lines.These data suggest that resistance to EGFR inhibitors is predominantly driven by the RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway and can be overcame by treatment with sorafenib.

  5. Cloning and partial characterization of the human tie-2 receptor tyrosine kinase gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, P W; Daft, E L; Murray, J C

    1998-11-27

    The Tie-2 receptor plays a key role in vascular development, although little is known about the factors controlling its expression. Here we report the first cloning and characterisation of the 5' regulatory region of human tie-2. Multiple transcription start sites were identified between -414 and -265 bp upstream of the start codon using 5' RACE, fluorescent primer extension, and RNase protection assays. The human tie-2 promoter contains several transcription factor-binding sequences including ets, SP-1, AP-1, and GATA-1, but there are no canonical TATA or CCAAT initiation sequences proximal to the transcription start sites. Human tie-2 reporter constructs demonstrated approximately 10-fold greater activity in endothelial cells compared with fibroblasts. In endothelial cells the tie-2 promoter exhibited 5 and 16% of the activity of human tie-1 (830 bp) and KDR (1.1 kb) promoters, respectively. This promoter will be a useful tool for studying factors that regulate tie-2 expression and targeting the vasculature. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  6. Calcium-dependant binding proteins associated with human placental syncytiotrophoblast microvillous cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, P D; Mahadevan, L C

    1987-12-18

    Isolated human placental syncytiotrophoblast microvillous plasma membrane vesicles were extracted with Triton X-100 to yield a detergent-insoluble residue. The residue contained approx. 50% of the total membrane protein and was qualitatively different from untreated trophoblast on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blots and dot-immunobinding assay. Three major proteins, with molecular weights of 68, 36 and 34 kDa, dissociated from this non-ionic detergent-insoluble submembranous cytoskeletal fraction in the presence of calcium chelators. They were immunologically related to human lymphocyte cytoskeletal calcium-binding proteins, and the 36 kDa component reacted with antisera to the phospholipase A2 inhibitor, lipocortin II. Anti-lipocortin I sera did not recognise the 34 kDa protein, but did react with a series of trophoblast cytoskeletal proteins in the 34-37 kDa region. Incubation of epidermal growth factor with isolated trophoblast membrane vesicles stimulated the phosphorylation of a 36 kDa protein on tyrosine residues. Immunoprecipitation studies further showed there was no phosphorylation of the 34 kDa protein, but the 68 kDa protein was a major phosphorylated component of isolated syncytiotrophoblast membranes. p68 was principally phosphorylated on serine with slight tyrosine phosphorylation which showed an apparent increase after epidermal growth factor treatment. These results indicate a family of calcium-dependant binding proteins, some of which are phosphorylated, associated with the submembranous cytoskeleton of syncytiotrophoblast microvilli.

  7. A selective Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe, SfBP, for vaccinia H1-related phosphatase--a dual-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Myeong Seon; Kim, Eunha; Kang, Hyo Jin; Choi, Eun Joung; Cho, Alvin R; Chung, Sang J; Park, Seung Bum

    2012-07-04

    We report a Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe, SfBP, for selective monitoring of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). A rational design based on the structures at the active site of dual-specific PTPs can enable SfBP to selectively monitor the activity of these PTPs with a 93-fold change in brightness. Moreover, screening results of SfBP against 30 classical PTPs and 35 dual-specific PTPs show that it is selective toward vaccinia H1-related (VHR) phosphatase, a dual-specific PTP (DUSP-3).

  8. SILAC-based quantification of changes in protein tyrosine phosphorylation induced by Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-15 in T-lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osinalde, Nerea; Sánchez-Quiles, Virginia; Akimov, Vyacheslav

    2015-01-01

    This data article presents the first large-scale quantitative phosphoproteomics dataset generated to decipher the signaling networks initiated by IL-2 and IL-15 in T-lymphocytes. Data was collected by combining immunoprecipitation of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and TiO2-based phosphopeptide...... enrichment with SILAC-based quantitative mass spectrometry. We report all the proteins and phosphotyrosine-containing peptides identified and quantified in IL-2- and IL-15-stimulated T-lymphocytes. The gene ontology analysis of IL-2 and IL-15 effector proteins detected in the present work is also included....... The data supplied in this article is related to the research work entitled "Simultaneous dissection and comparison of IL-2 and IL-15 signaling pathways by global quantitative phosphoproteomics" [1]. All mass spectrometry data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD001129....

  9. Polymeric Immunoglobulin Receptor-mediated Invasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae into Host Cells Requires a Coordinate Signaling of SRC Family of Protein-tyrosine Kinases, ERK, and c-Jun N-terminal Kinase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Asmat, Tauseef M.; Dierdorf, Nina I.; Hauck, Christof R.; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae are commensals of the human nasopharynx with the capacity to invade mucosal respiratory cells. PspC, a pneumococcal surface protein, interacts with the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) to promote bacterial adherence to and invasion into epithelial cells. Internalization of pneumococci requires the coordinated action of actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and the retrograde machinery of pIgR. Here, we demonstrate the involvement of Src protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in pneumococcal invasion via pIgR. Pharmacological inhibitors of PTKs and MAPKs and genetic interference with Src PTK and FAK functions caused a significant reduction of pIgR-mediated pneumococcal invasion but did not influence bacterial adhesion to host cells. Furthermore, pneumococcal ingestion by host cells induces activation of ERK1/2 and JNK. In agreement with activated JNK, its target molecule and DNA-binding protein c-Jun was phosphorylated. We also show that functionally active Src PTK is essential for activation of ERK1/2 upon pneumococcal infections. In conclusion, these data illustrate the importance of a coordinated signaling between Src PTKs, ERK1/2, and JNK during PspC-pIgR-mediated uptake of pneumococci by host epithelial cells. PMID:20829350

  10. Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-mediated invasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae into host cells requires a coordinate signaling of SRC family of protein-tyrosine kinases, ERK, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Asmat, Tauseef M; Dierdorf, Nina I; Hauck, Christof R; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2010-11-12

    Streptococcus pneumoniae are commensals of the human nasopharynx with the capacity to invade mucosal respiratory cells. PspC, a pneumococcal surface protein, interacts with the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) to promote bacterial adherence to and invasion into epithelial cells. Internalization of pneumococci requires the coordinated action of actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and the retrograde machinery of pIgR. Here, we demonstrate the involvement of Src protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in pneumococcal invasion via pIgR. Pharmacological inhibitors of PTKs and MAPKs and genetic interference with Src PTK and FAK functions caused a significant reduction of pIgR-mediated pneumococcal invasion but did not influence bacterial adhesion to host cells. Furthermore, pneumococcal ingestion by host cells induces activation of ERK1/2 and JNK. In agreement with activated JNK, its target molecule and DNA-binding protein c-Jun was phosphorylated. We also show that functionally active Src PTK is essential for activation of ERK1/2 upon pneumococcal infections. In conclusion, these data illustrate the importance of a coordinated signaling between Src PTKs, ERK1/2, and JNK during PspC-pIgR-mediated uptake of pneumococci by host epithelial cells.

  11. Human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H; Nielsen, B B

    1997-01-01

    The recombinant human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin (TN) and the C-type lectin CRD of this protein (TN3) have been crystallized. TN3 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4(2)2(1)2 with cell dimensions a = b = 64.0, c = 75.7 A and with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals...... to at least 2.5 A. A full data set has been collected to 3.0 A. The asymmetric unit contains one monomer of TN. Molecular replacement solutions for TN3 and TN have been obtained using the structure of the C-type lectin CRD of rat mannose-binding protein as search model. The rhombohedral space group indicates...... diffract X-rays to at least 2.0 A resolution. A complete diffraction data set has been collected to 2.7 A resolution. The crystals of TN, obtained by the vapour-diffusion reverse salting-in method at 280 K, are rhombohedral, space group R3, with the hexagonal axes a = b = 89.1, c = 75.8 A, and diffract...

  12. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32 can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized

  13. Phosphorylation of actin-binding protein (ABP-280; filamin) by tyrosine kinase p56lck modulates actin filament cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal Sharma, C; Goldmann, Wolfgang H

    2004-01-01

    Actin-binding protein (ABP-280; filamin) is a phosphoprotein present in the periphery of the cytoplasm where it can cross-link actin filaments, associate with lipid membranes, and bind to membrane surface receptors. Given its function and localization in the cell, we decided to investigate the possibility of whether it serves as substrate for p56lck, a lymphocyte-specific member of the src family of protein tyrosine kinases associated with cell surface glycoproteins. The interaction of p56lck with membrane glycoproteins is important for cell development and functional activation. Here, we show that purified p56lck interacts and catalyzes in vitro kinase reactions. Tyrosine phosphorylation by p56lck is restricted to a single peptide of labeled ABP-280 shown by protease digest. The addition of phorbol ester to cells results in the inhibition of phosphorylation of ABP-280 by p56lck. These results show a decrease in phosphorylation suggesting conformationally induced regulation. Dynamic light scattering confirmed increased actin filament cross-linking due to phosphorylation of ABP-280 by p56lck.

  14. Co-Expression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase and GTP Cyclohydrolase I in Arginine Vasopressin-Synthesizing Neurons of the Human Supraoptic Nucleus Demonstrated by Laser Microdissection and Real-Time PCR.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kontostavlaki, D.P.; Sluijs, J.A.; Unmehopa, U.A.; Huitinga, I.; Hol, E.M.; Swaab, D.F.

    2006-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the first and limiting enzyme for catecholamine synthesis, has been identified immunohistochemically (IHC) in human neurosecretory neurons where it is found to colocalize with vasopressin (AVP) or oxytocin. TH expression shows striking interindividual variability and

  15. Self-complementary adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV)-T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase vectors as helper viruses to improve transduction efficiency of conventional single-stranded AAV vectors in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li; Chen, Linyuan; Li, Yanjun; Qing, Keyun; Weigel-Kelley, Kirsten A; Chan, Rebecca J; Yoder, Mervin C; Srivastava, Arun

    2004-11-01

    Recombinant vectors based on adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) target the liver efficiently, but the transgene expression is limited to approximately 5% of hepatocytes. The lack of efficient transduction is due, in part, to the presence of a cellular protein, FKBP52, phosphorylated forms of which inhibit the viral second-strand DNA synthesis. We have documented that dephosphorylation of FKBP52 at tyrosine residues by the cellular T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP) enhances AAV-mediated transduction in primary murine hematopoietic cells from TC-PTP-transgenic mice. We have also documented that AAV-mediated transduction is significantly enhanced in hepatocytes in TC-PTP-transgenic as well as in FKBP52-deficient mice because of efficient viral second-strand DNA synthesis. In this study, we evaluated whether co-infection of conventional single-stranded AAV vectors with self-complementary AAV-TC-PTP vectors leads to increased transduction efficiency of conventional AAV vectors in established human cell lines in vitro and in primary murine hepatocytes in vivo. We demonstrate here that scAAV-TC-PTP vectors serve as a helper virus in augmenting the transduction efficiency of conventional AAV vectors in vitro as well as in vivo which correlates directly with the extent of second-strand DNA synthesis of conventional single-stranded AAV vectors. Toxicological studies following tail-vein injections of scAAV-TC-PTP vectors in experimental mice show no evidence of any adverse effect in any of the organs in any of the mice for up to 13 weeks. Thus, this novel co-infection strategy should be useful in circumventing one of the major obstacles in the optimal use of recombinant AAV vectors in human gene therapy.

  16. Tyrosine agonists reverse the molecular defects associated with dominant-negative mutations in human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Maura; Gurnell, Mark; Savage, David B; Wood, Emily M; Smith, Aaron G; Rajanayagam, Odelia; Garnes, Keith T; Levinson, Sidney H; Xu, H Eric; Schwabe, John W R; Willson, Timothy M; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Chatterjee, V Krishna

    2004-04-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the ligand-binding domain of human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) are associated with a novel syndrome characterized by partial lipodystrophy and severe insulin resistance. Here we have further characterized the properties of natural dominant-negative PPARgamma mutants (P467L, V290M) and evaluated the efficacy of putative natural ligands and synthetic thiazolidinedione (TZD) or tyrosine-based (TA) receptor agonists in rescuing mutant receptor function. A range of natural ligands failed to activate the PPARgamma mutants and their transcriptional responses to TZDs (e.g. pioglitazone, rosiglitazone) were markedly attenuated, whereas TAs (e.g. farglitazar) corrected defects in ligand binding and coactivator recruitment by the PPARgamma mutants, restoring transcriptional function comparable with wild-type receptor. Transcriptional silencing via recruitment of corepressor contributes to dominant-negative inhibition of wild type by the P467L and V290M mutants and the introduction of an artificial mutation (L318A) disrupting corepressor interaction abrogated their dominant-negative activity. More complete ligand-dependent corepressor release and reversal of dominant-negative inhibition was achieved with TA than TZD agonists. Modeling suggests a structural basis for these observations: both mutations destabilize helix 12 to favor receptor-corepressor interaction; conversely, farglitazar makes more extensive contacts than rosiglitazone within the ligand-binding pocket, to stabilize helix 12, facilitating corepressor release and transcriptional activation. Farglitazar was a more potent inducer of PPARgamma target gene (aP2) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells with the P467L mutation. Having shown that rosiglitazone is of variable and limited efficacy in these subjects, we suggest that TAs may represent a more rational therapeutic approach.

  17. Giant hub Src and Syk tyrosine kinase thermodynamic profiles recapitulate evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2017-10-01

    Thermodynamic scaling theory, previously applied mainly to small proteins, here analyzes quantitative evolution of the titled functional network giant hub enzymes. The broad domain structure identified homologically is confirmed hydropathically using amino acid sequences only. The most surprising results concern the evolution of the tyrosine kinase globular surface roughness from avians to mammals, which is first order, compared to the evolution within mammals from rodents to humans, which is second order. The mystery of the unique amide terminal region of proto oncogene tyrosine protein kinase is resolved by the discovery there of a rare hydroneutral septad targeting cluster, which is paralleled by an equally rare octad catalytic cluster in tyrosine kinase in humans and a few other species (cat and dog). These results, which go far towards explaining why these proteins are among the largest giant hubs in protein interaction networks, use no adjustable parameters.

  18. Previously undescribed fridooleanenes and oxygenated labdanes from the brown seaweed Sargassum wightii and their protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneesh, Anusree; Chakraborty, Kajal

    2017-12-01

    Previously undescribed fridooleanene triterpenoids 2α-hydroxy-(28,29)-frido-olean-12(13), 21(22)-dien-20-propyl-21-hex-4'(Z)-enoate, 2α-hydroxy-(28,29)-frido-olean-12(13), 21(22)-dien-20-prop-2(E)-en-21-butanoate and oxygenated labdane diterpenoids 2α-hydroxy-8(17), (12E), 14-labdatriene, 3β, 6β, 13α-tri hydroxy 8(17), 12E, 14-labdatriene were purified from the ethyl acetate-methanol and dichloromethane fractions of the air-dried thalli of Sargassum wightii (Sargassaceae), a brown seaweed collected from the Gulf-of-Mannar of Penninsular India. Inhibitory potential of Δ12 oleanenes towards protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B, the critical regulator of insulin-receptor activity were found to be significantly greater (IC50 0.1 × 10-2 and 0.09 × 10-2 mg/mL, respectively) than the standard sodium metavanadate (IC50 0.31 × 10-2 mg/mL). Fridooleanene triterpenoids displayed greater antioxidant activities (IC50DPPH 0.16-0.18 mg/mL) than the commercially available antioxidants, butylated hydroxytoluene and α-tocopherol (IC50DPPH 0.25 and 0.63 mg/mL, respectively). In general, the oxygenated labdane diterpenoids displayed significantly lesser antioxidant and tyrosine phosphatase-1B inhibitory properties than those exhibited by the fridooleanenes. Bioactivities of the titled compounds were primarily determined by the electronic and lipophilic parameters and not by the steric descriptors. Molecular docking simulations and kinetic studies were employed to describe the tyrosine phosphatase-1B inhibitory mechanism. The previously undescribed fridooleanene triterpenoids might be used as potential anti-hyperglycaemic pharmacophore leads to reduce the risk of elevated postprandial glucose levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of five evolutionary conserved regions of the human tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter: implications for the engineering of a human TH minimal promoter assembled in a self-inactivating lentiviral vector system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Gaetano; Suon, Sokreine; Jin, Hao; Donaldson, Angela E; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2005-08-01

    A DNA fragment of about 13 kb containing the human tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter was previously isolated from a genomic DNA library and sequenced. The 11 kb from the transcription start of the human TH promoter was successively joined to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to generate a transgenic mouse model. High levels of GFP expression could be observed in TH-positive cells of the Substantia nigra of embryonic and adult mice. Intriguingly, the sequence of the human TH promoter showed a low degree of homology with the mouse and rat TH promoters. In fact, comparative analysis of the sequences of human, rat, and mouse TH promoters revealed only five small regions of high homology. These five evolutionarily conserved regions were numbered in numeric progression from the 5' end of human TH promoter. In the present study, a panel of minimal human TH promoters was generated to analyze the transcriptional activity and specificity of gene expression conferred by the five conserved regions (CRs). The series of constructs was termed 250 bp and contained the first -194 bp of the human TH promoter immediately upstream of the transcription start, the first 35 bp the human TH messenger RNA leader, plus one or more of the five CRs. All the constructs were assembled in a self-inactivating form of the latest series of lentiviral vector system based on the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Lentiviral-mediated gene transfer was highly efficient for the in vitro transduction of human neuronal progenitor cells (hNPCs). Since a subset of hNPCs express TH following in vitro treatment with a mixture of differentiating agents, it was possible to assess specificity of expression for all the minimal human TH promoters. Overall, the successive addition of the five conserved regions produced a greater degree of specificity in induced TH-positive hNPCs, in particular after the addition of CRI (-8,917, -8,876). However, the human TH minimal promoters did not show any

  20. Nuclear localization of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) and its role in regulating LIM domain only 2 (Lmo2) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkitachalam, Srividya; Chueh, Fu-Yu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, H. M. Bligh Cancer Research Laboratories, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States); Yu, Chao-Lan, E-mail: chaolan.yu@rosalindfranklin.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, H. M. Bligh Cancer Research Laboratories, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lmo2 expression is elevated in Lck-transformed cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both endogenous and exogenous Lck localize in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear Lck is active in Lck-transformed cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lck binds to the promoter region of Lmo2 gene in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In contrast to JAK2, Lck does not increase histone H3 phosphorylation on Tyr 41. -- Abstract: LIM domain only protein 2 (Lmo2) is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in the development of T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). A previous report established a link between Lmo2 expression and the nuclear presence of oncogenic Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase. The oncogenic JAK2 kinase phosphorylates histone H3 on Tyr 41 that leads to the relief of Lmo2 promoter repression and subsequent gene expression. Similar to JAK2, constitutive activation of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) has been implicated in lymphoid malignancies. However, it is not known whether oncogenic Lck regulates Lmo2 expression through a similar mechanism. We show here that Lmo2 expression is significantly elevated in T cell leukemia LSTRA overexpressing active Lck kinase and in HEK 293 cells expressing oncogenic Y505FLck kinase. Nuclear localization of active Lck kinase was confirmed in both Lck-transformed cells by subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy. More importantly, in contrast to oncogenic JAK2, oncogenic Lck kinase does not result in significant increase in histone H3 phosphorylation on Tyr 41. Instead, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiment shows that oncogenic Y505FLck kinase binds to the Lmo2 promoter in vivo. This result raises the possibility that oncogenic Lck may activate Lmo2 promoter through direct interaction.

  1. Calpain and STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) activation contribute to extrasynaptic NMDA receptor localization in a Huntington's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Clare M; Sepers, Marja D; Xu, Jian; Zhang, Lily Y J; Milnerwood, Austen J; Lombroso, Paul J; Raymond, Lynn A

    2012-09-01

    In Huntington's disease (HD), the mutant huntingtin (mhtt) protein is associated with striatal dysfunction and degeneration. Excitotoxicity and early synaptic defects are attributed, in part, to altered NMDA receptor (NMDAR) trafficking and function. Deleterious extrasynaptic NMDAR localization and signalling are increased early in yeast artificial chromosome mice expressing full-length mhtt with 128 polyglutamine repeats (YAC128 mice). NMDAR trafficking at the plasma membrane is regulated by dephosphorylation of the NMDAR subunit GluN2B tyrosine 1472 (Y1472) residue by STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP). NMDAR function is also regulated by calpain cleavage of the GluN2B C-terminus. Activation of both STEP and calpain is calcium-dependent, and disruption of calcium homeostasis occurs early in the HD striatum. Here, we show increased calpain cleavage of GluN2B at both synaptic and extrasynaptic sites, and elevated extrasynaptic total GluN2B expression in the YAC128 striatum. Calpain inhibition significantly reduced extrasynaptic GluN2B expression in the YAC128 but not wild-type striatum. Furthermore, calpain inhibition reduced whole-cell NMDAR current and the surface/internal GluN2B ratio in co-cultured striatal neurons, without affecting synaptic GluN2B localization. Synaptic STEP activity was also significantly higher in the YAC128 striatum, correlating with decreased GluN2B Y1472 phosphorylation. A substrate-trapping STEP protein (TAT-STEP C-S) significantly increased VGLUT1-GluN2B colocalization, as well as increasing synaptic GluN2B expression and Y1472 phosphorylation. Moreover, combined calpain inhibition and STEP inactivation reduced extrasynaptic, while increasing synaptic GluN2B expression in the YAC128 striatum. These results indicate that increased STEP and calpain activation contribute to altered NMDAR localization in an HD mouse model, suggesting new therapeutic targets for HD.

  2. Reishi immuno-modulation protein induces interleukin-2 expression via protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways within human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Wu, Wei-Chi; Hsu, Jason; Weng, Shih-Ting; Lin, Tsai-Leng; Liu, Chun-Yi; Hseu, Ruey-Shyang; Huang, Ching-Tsan

    2008-04-01

    Ganoderma lucidum, a medicinal fungus is thought to possess and enhance a variety of human immune functions. An immuno-modulatory protein, Ling Zhi-8 (LZ-8) isolated from G. lucidum exhibited potent mitogenic effects upon human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). However, LZ-8-mediated signal transduction in the regulation of interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene expression within human T cells is largely unknown. Here we cloned the LZ-8 gene of G. lucidum, and expressed the recombinant LZ-8 protein (rLZ-8) by means of a yeast Pichia pastoris protein expression system. We found that rLZ-8 induces IL-2 gene expression via the Src-family protein tyrosine kinase (PTK), via reactive oxygen species (ROS), and differential protein kinase-dependent pathways within human primary T cells and cultured Jurkat T cells. In essence, we have established the nature of the rLZ-8-mediated signal-transduction pathways, such as PTK/protein kinase C (PKC)/ROS, PTK/PLC/PKCalpha/ERK1/2, and PTK/PLC/PKCalpha/p38 pathways in the regulation of IL-2 gene expression within human T cells. Our current results of analyzing rLZ-8-mediated signal transduction in T cells might provide a potential application for rLZ-8 as a pharmacological immune-modulating agent. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Molecular principles of human virus protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halehalli, Rachita Ramachandra; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu Adimurthy

    2015-04-01

    Viruses, from the human protein-protein interaction network perspective, target hubs, bottlenecks and interconnected nodes enriched in certain biological pathways. However, not much is known about the general characteristic features of the human proteins interacting with viral proteins (referred to as hVIPs) as well as the motifs and domains utilized by human-virus protein-protein interactions (referred to as Hu-Vir PPIs). Our study has revealed that hVIPs are mostly disordered proteins, whereas viral proteins are mostly ordered proteins. Protein disorder in viral proteins and hVIPs varies from one subcellular location to another. In any given viral-human PPI pair, at least one of the two proteins is structurally disordered suggesting that disorder associated conformational flexibility as one of the characteristic features of virus-host interaction. Further analyses reveal that hVIPs are (i) slowly evolving proteins, (ii) associated with high centrality scores in human-PPI network, (iii) involved in multiple pathways, (iv) enriched in eukaryotic linear motifs (ELMs) associated with protein modification, degradation and regulatory processes, (v) associated with high number of splice variants and (vi) expressed abundantly across multiple tissues. These aforementioned findings suggest that conformational flexibility, spatial diversity, abundance and slow evolution are the characteristic features of the human proteins targeted by viral proteins. Hu-Vir PPIs are mostly mediated via domain-motif interactions (DMIs) where viral proteins employ motifs that mimic host ELMs to bind to domains in human proteins. DMIs are shared among viruses belonging to different families indicating a possible convergent evolution of these motifs to help viruses to adopt common strategies to subvert host cellular pathways. Hu-Vir PPI data, DDI and DMI data for human-virus PPI can be downloaded from http://cdfd.org.in/labpages/computational_biology_datasets.html. Supplementary data are

  4. Sequential Proton Loss Electron Transfer in Deactivation of Iron(IV) Binding Protein by Tyrosine Based Food Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2017-01-01

    and epinephrine are the most efficient food components reducing ferrylmyoglobin to oxymyoglobin, MbFe(II)O2, and metmyoglobin, MbFe(III), as revealed by multivariate curve resolution alternating least-squares with second order rate constants of 33.6 ± 2.3 L/mol/s (ΔH† of 19 ± 5 kJ/mol, ΔS† of -136 ± 18 J/mol K......) and 228.9 ± 13.3 L/mol/s (ΔH† of 110 ± 7 kJ/mol, ΔS† of 131 ± 25 J/mol K), respectively, at pH 7.4 and 25 °C. The other tyrosine based food components were found to reduce ferrylmyoglobin to metmyoglobin with similar reduction rates at pH 7.4 and 25 °C. These reduction reactions were enhanced...

  5. Facile and stabile linkages through tyrosine: bioconjugation strategies with the tyrosine-click reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Hitoshi; Nagano, Masanobu; Gavrilyuk, Julia; Hakamata, Wataru; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Barbas, Carlos F

    2013-04-17

    The scope, chemoselectivity, and utility of the click-like tyrosine labeling reaction with 4-phenyl-3H-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5(4H)-diones (PTADs) is reported. To study the utility and chemoselectivity of PTAD derivatives in peptide and protein chemistry, we synthesized PTAD derivatives possessing azide, alkyne, and ketone groups and studied their reactions with amino acid derivatives and peptides of increasing complexity. With proteins we studied the compatibility of the tyrosine click reaction with cysteine and lysine-targeted labeling approaches and demonstrate that chemoselective trifunctionalization of proteins is readily achieved. In particular cases, we noted that PTAD decomposition resulted in formation of a putative isocyanate byproduct that was promiscuous in labeling. This side reaction product, however, was readily scavenged by the addition of a small amount of 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-propane-1,3-diol (Tris) to the reaction medium. To study the potential of the tyrosine click reaction to introduce poly(ethylene glycol) chains onto proteins (PEGylation), we demonstrate that this novel reagent provides for the selective PEGylation of chymotrypsinogen, whereas traditional succinimide-based PEGylation targeting lysine residues provided a more diverse range of PEGylated products. Finally, we applied the tyrosine click reaction to create a novel antibody-drug conjugate. For this purpose, we synthesized a PTAD derivative linked to the HIV entry inhibitor aplaviroc. Labeling of the antibody trastuzumab with this reagent provided a labeled antibody conjugate that demonstrated potent HIV-1 neutralization activity demonstrating the potential of this reaction in creating protein conjugates with small molecules. The tyrosine click linkage demonstrated stability to extremes of pH, temperature, and exposure to human blood plasma indicating that this linkage is significantly more robust than maleimide-type linkages that are commonly employed in bioconjugations. These

  6. Overexpression of protein tyrosine phosphatase-alpha (PTP-alpha) but not PTP-kappa inhibits translocation of GLUT4 in rat adipose cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cong, L N; Chen, H; Li, Y

    1999-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) are likely to play important roles in insulin action. We recently demonstrated that the nontransmembrane PTPase PTP1B can act as a negative modulator of insulin-stimulated translocation of GLUT4. We now examine the role of PTP-alpha and PTP-kappa (two...... transmembrane PTPases) in this metabolic action of insulin. Rat adipose cells were transfected with either PTP-alpha or PTP-kappa and effects of these PTPases on the translocation of a cotransfected epitope-tagged GLUT4 were studied. Cells overexpressing wild-type PTP-alpha had significantly lower levels...... of cell surface GLUT4 in response to insulin and a threefold decrease in insulin sensitivity when compared with control cells expressing only tagged GLUT4. Co-overexpression of PTP-alpha and PTP1B did not have additive effects, suggesting that these PTPases share common substrates. Cells overexpressing...

  7. Characterization of the specific interaction between the DNA aptamer sgc8c and protein tyrosine kinase-7 receptors at the surface of T-cells by biosensing AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Michael; Poturnayova, Alexandra; Lamprecht, Constanze; Weich, Sabine; Snejdarkova, Maja; Karpisova, Ivana; Hianik, Tibor; Ebner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    We studied the interaction of the specific DNA aptamer sgc8c immobilized at the AFM tip with its corresponding receptor, the protein tyrosine kinase-7 (PTK7) embedded in the membrane of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells (Jurkat T-cells). Performing single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) experiments, we showed that the aptamer sgc8c bound with high probability (38.3 ± 7.48%) and high specificity to PTK7, as demonstrated by receptor blocking experiments and through comparison with the binding behavior of a nonspecific aptamer. The determined kinetic off-rate (koff = 5.16 s-1) indicates low dissociation of the sgc8c-PTK7 complex. In addition to the pulling force experiments, simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) experiments using AFM tips functionalized with sgc8c aptamers were realized on the outer regions surface of surface-immobilized Jurkat cells for the first time. This allowed determination of the distribution of PTK7 without any labeling and at near physiological conditions. As a result, we could show a homogeneous distribution of PTK7 molecules on the outer regions of ALL cells with a surface density of 325 ± 12 PTK7 receptors (or small receptor clusters) per μm2. Graphical Abstract The specific interaction of the DNA aptamer sgc8c and protein tyrosine kinase-7 (PTK7) on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells was characterized. AFM based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) yielded a kinetic off-rate of 5.16 s-1 of the complex. Simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) revealed a PTK7 density of 325 ± 12 molecules or clusters per μm2 in the cell membrane.

  8. The Effect of 12-Week Aerobic Training on Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Gene Expression and Insulin Resistance in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Soori

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is a key enzyme in dephosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR and it is a central factor to induce the insulin resistance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of 12-week aerobic training on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B gene expression and insulin resistance in diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: In this study, 16 Wistar rats were divided into aerobic training and control groups. After inducing diabetes intra protaneally, aerobic training group performed training protocol for 12 weeks and 5 session/week. The duration and speed of each session increased progressively as 18 to 26 m/min and 10 to 55 min, respectively. Then, blood and tissue (from gastrocnemius sampling were carried out in diabetic rats. Insulin resistance markers and PTP1B gene expression were evaluated by commercial kits and Real-Time PCR method, respectively. Results: Findings showed that PTP1B significantly was decreased in diabetic rats of aerobic training group (p=0.0001. Also, glucose and insulin resistance significantly was decreased in aerobic training groups (p=0.02 and p=0.006, respectively. However, insulin in control rats was significantly increased (p=0.015. Conclusion: It seems that, current aerobic training protocol has capability to decrease PTP1B and insulin resistance in diabetic rats. Furthermore, the direct correlation between PTP1B and insulin illustrated that any changes in insulin resistance due to exercise training associated with diminution of negative regulation of insulin signaling pathway.

  9. Integrin-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation and cytokine message induction in monocytic cells. A possible signaling role for the Syk tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T H; Rosales, C; Mondal, K; Bolen, J B; Haskill, S; Juliano, R L

    1995-07-07

    Activation of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases is an important aspect of signal transduction mediated by integrins. In the human monocytic cell line THP-1, either integrin-dependent cell adhesion to fibronectin or ligation of beta 1 integrins with antibodies causes a rapid and intense tyrosine phosphorylation of two sets of proteins of about 65-75 and 120-125 kDa. In addition, integrin ligation leads to nuclear translocation of the p50 and p65 subunits of the NF-kappa B transcription factor, to activation of a reporter gene driven by a promoter containing NF-kappa B sites, and to increased levels of mRNAs for immediate-early genes, including the cytokine interleukin (IL)-1 beta. The tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A block both integrin-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation and increases in IL-1 beta message levels, indicating a causal relationship between the two events. The components tyrosine phosphorylated subsequent to cell adhesion include paxillin, pp125FAK, and the SH2 domain containing tyrosine kinase Syk. In contrast, integrin ligation with antibodies induces tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk but not of FAK or paxillin. In adhering cells, pre-treatment with cytochalasin D suppresses tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin but not of Syk, while IL-1 beta message induction is unaffected. These observations indicate that the Syk tyrosine kinase may be an important component of an integrin signaling pathway in monocytic cells, leading to activation of NF-kappa B and to increased levels of cytokine messages.

  10. Epithelial mesenchymal transition status is associated with anti-cancer responses towards receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibition by dovitinib in human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänze, Jörg; Henrici, Marcus; Hegele, Axel; Hofmann, Rainer; Olbert, Peter J

    2013-12-11

    Dovitinib (TKI-258) is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and further related RTKs. TKI-258 is under investigation as anticancer drug for the treatment of various cancers including bladder cancer with aberrant RTK signaling. Here, we analyzed the responses of ten human bladder cancer cell lines towards TKI-258 treatment in relation to the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) status of the cells. Expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin as well as mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and vimentin was determined by quantitative RT-PCR and Western-blot in RNA and protein extracts from the cultured cell lines. The cell responses were analyzed upon addition of TKI-258 by viability/proliferation (XTT assay) and colony formation assay for measurement of cell contact independent growth. The investigated bladder cancer cell lines turned out to display quite different EMT patterns as indicated by the abundance of E-cadherin or N-cadherin and vimentin. Protein and mRNA levels of the respective components strongly correlated. Based on E-cadherin and N-cadherin mRNA levels that were expressed approximately mutual exclusively, an EMT-score was calculated for each cell line. A high EMT-score indicated mesenchymal-like cells and a low EMT-score epithelial-like cells. Then, we determined the IC₅₀ values for TKI-258 by dose response curves (0-12 μM TKI-258) in XTT assays for each cell line. Also, we measured the clonogenic survival fraction after adding TKI-258 (1 μM) by colony formation assay. We observed significant correlations between EMT-score and IC₅₀ values (r = 0.637, p = 0.0474) and between EMT-score and clonogenic survival fraction (r = 0.635, p = 0.0483) as analyzed by linear regression analyses. In sum, we demonstrated that the EMT status based on E-cadherin and N-cadherin mRNA levels may be useful to predict responses towards TKI-258 treatment in bladder cancer.

  11. Role for protein-protein interaction databases in human genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattin, Kristine A; Moore, Jason H

    2009-12-01

    Proteomics and the study of protein-protein interactions are becoming increasingly important in our effort to understand human diseases on a system-wide level. Thanks to the development and curation of protein-interaction databases, up-to-date information on these interaction networks is accessible and publicly available to the scientific community. As our knowledge of protein-protein interactions increases, it is important to give thought to the different ways that these resources can impact biomedical research. In this article, we highlight the importance of protein-protein interactions in human genetics and genetic epidemiology. Since protein-protein interactions demonstrate one of the strongest functional relationships between genes, combining genomic data with available proteomic data may provide us with a more in-depth understanding of common human diseases. In this review, we will discuss some of the fundamentals of protein interactions, the databases that are publicly available and how information from these databases can be used to facilitate genome-wide genetic studies.

  12. Protein Misfolding and Human Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Bross, Peter Gerd; Vang, Søren

    2006-01-01

    phenylketonuria, Parkinson's disease, α-1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, and short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Despite the differences, an emerging paradigm suggests that the cellular effects of protein misfolding provide a common framework that may contribute...... to the elucidation of the cell pathology and guide intervention and treatment strategies of many genetic and age-dependent diseases.......Protein misfolding is a common event in living cells. In young and healthy cells, the misfolded protein load is disposed of by protein quality control (PQC) systems. In aging cells and in cells from certain individuals with genetic diseases, the load may overwhelm the PQC capacity, resulting...

  13. HMPAS: Human Membrane Protein Analysis System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Sung; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2013-11-07

    Membrane proteins perform essential roles in diverse cellular functions and are regarded as major pharmaceutical targets. The significance of membrane proteins has led to the developing dozens of resources related with membrane proteins. However, most of these resources are built for specific well-known membrane protein groups, making it difficult to find common and specific features of various membrane protein groups. We collected human membrane proteins from the dispersed resources and predicted novel membrane protein candidates by using ortholog information and our membrane protein classifiers. The membrane proteins were classified according to the type of interaction with the membrane, subcellular localization, and molecular function. We also made new feature dataset to characterize the membrane proteins in various aspects including membrane protein topology, domain, biological process, disease, and drug. Moreover, protein structure and ICD-10-CM based integrated disease and drug information was newly included. To analyze the comprehensive information of membrane proteins, we implemented analysis tools to identify novel sequence and functional features of the classified membrane protein groups and to extract features from protein sequences. We constructed HMPAS with 28,509 collected known membrane proteins and 8,076 newly predicted candidates. This system provides integrated information of human membrane proteins individually and in groups organized by 45 subcellular locations and 1,401 molecular functions. As a case study, we identified associations between the membrane proteins and diseases and present that membrane proteins are promising targets for diseases related with nervous system and circulatory system. A web-based interface of this system was constructed to facilitate researchers not only to retrieve organized information of individual proteins but also to use the tools to analyze the membrane proteins. HMPAS provides comprehensive information about

  14. Investigation of the vitamin D receptor gene (VDR) and its interaction with protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 2 gene (PTPN2) on risk of islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes : The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederiksen, B.; Liu, E.; Romanos, J.; Steck, A. K.; Yin, X.; Kroehl, M.; Fingerlin, T. E.; Erlich, H.; Eisenbarth, G. S.; Rewers, M.; Norris, J. M.

    The present study investigated the association between variants in the vitamin D receptor gene (VDR) and protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 2 gene (PTPN2), as well as an interaction between VDR and PTPN2 and the risk of islet autoimmunity (IA) and progression to type 1 diabetes (T1D).

  15. [Case report: tyrosine deposits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, R; Tholen, R; Untermann, F

    1996-01-01

    Whitish precipitations in three samples of raw cured ham, which appeared in the stereomicroscope as piles of crystals, were confirmed as tyrosine crystals. Tyrosine is readily soluble in nitric acid (yellowish discoloration) and, after addition of potash lye, it precipitates as yellow-orange picrate. Factors that influence the formation of tyrosine crystals are largely unknown. In raw cured ham of Parma experience has shown that tyrosine crystals are found in ham stored for a very long time.

  16. Tyrosine modifications in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Maria B; Schöneich, Christian

    2012-12-01

    The understanding of physiological and pathological processes involving protein oxidation, particularly under conditions of aging and oxidative stress, can be aided by proteomic identification of proteins that accumulate oxidative post-translational modifications only if these detected modifications are connected to functional consequences. The modification of tyrosine (Tyr) residues can elicit significant changes in protein structure and function, which, in some cases, may contribute to biological aging and age-related pathologies, such as atherosclerosis, neurodegeneration, and cataracts. Studies characterizing proteins in which Tyr has been modified to 3-nitrotyrosine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, 3,3'-dityrosine and other cross-links, or 3-chlorotyrosine are reviewed, with an emphasis on structural and functional consequences. Distinguishing between inconsequential modifications and functionally significant ones requires careful biochemical and biophysical analysis of target proteins, as well as innovative methods for isolating the effects of the multiple modifications that often occur under oxidizing conditions. The labor-intensive task of isolating and characterizing individual modified proteins must continue, especially given the expanding list of known modifications. Emerging approaches, such as genetic and metabolic incorporation of unnatural amino acids, hold promise for additional focused studies of this kind.

  17. Identification of a neuregulin and protein-tyrosine phosphatase response element in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor epsilon subunit gene: regulatory role of an Rts transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapru, M K; Florance, S K; Kirk, C; Goldman, D

    1998-02-03

    At the neuromuscular synapse, innervation induces endplate-specific expression of adult-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by selective expression of their subunit-encoding genes (alpha2betaepsilondelta) in endplate-associated myonuclei. These genes are specifically regulated by protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) activity. In addition, neuregulin/acetylcholine-receptor-inducing activity, a nerve-derived factor that stimulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor synthesis, induces adult-type specific epsilon subunit gene expression via activation of a Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. However, the DNA regulatory elements and the binding proteins that mediate PTPase and neuregulin-dependent gene expression remain unknown. Herein we report that PTPase, neuregulin, and Ras-dependent regulation of the epsilon subunit gene map to a 15-bp promoter sequence. Interestingly, this same 15-bp sequence appears to be necessary for low epsilon subunit gene expression in extrajunctional regions of the muscle fiber. Site-directed mutagenesis of a putative Ets binding site located within this 15-bp sequence, reduced PTPase, neuregulin, and Ras-dependent regulation. Overexpression of the rat muscle Ets-2 transcription factor resulted in a sequence-specific induction of epsilon subunit promoter activity. Further, a dominant negative mutant of Ets-2 abolished neuregulin-dependent induction of epsilon subunit gene expression. Thus, these results indicate a crucial role for the 15-bp element in determining synapse-specific and neuregulin-mediated motor neuron control of epsilon subunit gene expression and suggest the participation of Ets transcription factor(s) in this control.

  18. A substrate trapping mutant form of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase prevents amphetamine-induced stereotypies and long-term potentiation in the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashev, Roman; Moura, Paula J; Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Prosperetti, Chiara; Centonze, Diego; Paul, Surojit; Lombroso, Paul J

    2009-04-15

    Chronic, intermittent exposure to psychostimulant drugs results in striatal neuroadaptations leading to an increase in an array of behavioral responses on subsequent challenge days. A brain-specific striatal-enriched tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) regulates synaptic strengthening by dephosphorylating and inactivating several key synaptic proteins. This study tests the hypothesis that a substrate-trapping form of STEP will prevent the development of amphetamine-induced stereotypies. A substrate-trapping STEP protein, TAT-STEP (C-S), was infused into the ventrolateral striatum on each of 5 consecutive exposure days and 1 hour before amphetamine injection. Animals were challenged to see whether sensitization to the stereotypy-producing effects of amphetamine developed. The same TAT-STEP (C-S) protein was used on acute striatal slices to determine the impact on long-term potentiation and depression. Infusion of TAT-STEP (C-S) blocks the increase of amphetamine-induced stereotypies when given during the 5-day period of sensitization. The TAT-STEP (C-S) has no effect if only infused on the challenge day. Treatment of acute striatal slices with TAT-STEP (C-S) blocks the induction of long-term potentiation and potentates long-term depression. A substrate trapping form of STEP blocks the induction of amphetamine-induced neuroplasticity within the ventrolateral striatum and supports the hypothesis that STEP functions as a tonic break on synaptic strengthening.

  19. Protein kinase C activators work in synergy with specific growth factors to initiate tyrosine hydroxylase expression in striatal neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X; Iacovitti, L

    1997-02-01

    Our previous studies indicate that, in the noncatecholamine (non-CA) neurons of the striatum, expression of the gene for the CA biosynthetic enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) can be initiated by the synergistic interaction of acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) and a second partner molecule. In this study, we sought to determine whether the activators of protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways, either alone or in conjunction with various growth factors, is sufficient to induce TH in striatal neurons. We found that when the active beta from of 4 beta-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), but not the inactive alpha analogue, was incubated in the presence of aFGF, basic FGF, or brain-derived neurotrophic factor, TH expression was initiated. Activation of the PKC pathways alone (in the absence of growth factors) did not mimic these effects, suggesting that multiple pathway activation is required for novel TH expression. Although other specific activators of PKC were effective growth factor partners, TPA was the most potent with an ED50 of 0.008 muM. Conversely, inhibitors of protein kinases, such as H7, H8, or H89, prevented the expression of TH by aFGF and TPA. Because pretreatment with protein (cycloheximide) or RNA synthesis (amanitin and actinomycin D) inhibitors eliminated the inductive effect of aFGF and TPA, we conclude that de novo transcription and translation are necessary for the expression of TH after convergence of both PKC and growth factor pathways.

  20. Synthesis, Protein Levels, Activity and Phosphorylation State of Tyrosine Hydroxylase in Mesoaccumbens and Nigrostriatal Dopamine Pathways of Chronically Food-restricted Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yan; Berman, Yemiliya; Haberny, Sandra; Meller, Emanuel; Carr, Kenneth D.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic food restriction (FR) enhances the rewarding and motor-activating effects of abused drugs, and is accompanied by changes in dopamine (DA) dynamics and increased D-1 DA receptor-mediated cell signaling and transcriptional responses in nucleus accumbens (NAc). However, little is known about effects of FR on DA synthetic activity in the mesoaccumbens and nigrostriatal pathways. In Experiment 1 of the present study, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression was measured in ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra, using real time RT-PCR and in situ hybridization; no differences were observed between FR and ad libitum fed (AL) rats. In Experiment 2, TH protein levels, determined by Western blot, were found to be elevated in NAc and caudate-putamen (CPu) of FR relative to AL rats. In the absence of increased transcription, this may reflect a slowing of TH degradation. In Experiments 3 and 4, DA synthetic activity was assessed by Western blot measurement of TH phosphorylation at Ser-40, and HPLC measurement of in vivo tyrosine hydroxylation rate, as reflected by DOPA accumulation following administration of a decarboxylase inhibitor (NSD-1015; 100 mg/kg, i.p.). Basal phospho-Ser(40)-TH levels did not differ between groups but DOPA accumulation was decreased by FR. Decreased DOPA synthesis, despite increased levels of TH protein, may reflect the inhibitory effect of increased DA binding to TH protein or decreased concentrations of cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin. Finally, in response to d-amphetamine (0.5 and 5.0 mg/kg, i.p.), phospho-Ser(40)-TH was selectively decreased in NAc of FR rats. This suggests increased feedback inhibition of DA synthesis - a possible consequence of postsynaptic receptor hypersensitivity, or increased extracellular DA concentration. These results indicate that FR increases TH protein levels, but may decrease the capacity for DA synthesis by decreasing TH activity. According to this scheme, the previously observed upregulation of striatal

  1. Nuclear Matrix Proteins in Human Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesee, Susan K.; Meneghini, Marc D.; Szaro, Robert P.; Wu, Ying-Jye

    1994-03-01

    The nuclear matrix is the nonchromatin scaffolding of the nucleus. This structure confers nuclear shape, organizes chromatin, and appears to contain important regulatory proteins. Tissue specific nuclear matrix proteins have been found in the rat, mouse, and human. In this study we compared high-resolution two-dimensional gel electropherograms of nuclear matrix protein patterns found in human colon tumors with those from normal colon epithelia. Tumors were obtained from 18 patients undergoing partial colectomy for adenocarcinoma of the colon and compared with tissue from 10 normal colons. We have identified at least six proteins which were present in 18 of 18 colon tumors and 0 of 10 normal tissues, as well as four proteins present in 0 of 18 tumors and in 10 of 10 normal tissues. These data, which corroborate similar findings of cancer-specific nuclear matrix proteins in prostate and breast, suggest that nuclear matrix proteins may serve as important markers for at least some types of cancer.

  2. Cloning and characterization of R-PTP-kappa, a new member of the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase family with a proteolytically cleaved cellular adhesion molecule-like extracellular region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Y P; Wang, H; D'Eustachio, P

    1993-01-01

    We describe a new member of the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase family, R-PTP-kappa, cDNA cloning predicts that R-PTP-kappa is synthesized from a precursor protein of 1,457 amino acids. Its intracellular domain displays the classical tandemly repeated protein tyrosine phosphatase homology......, separated from the transmembrane segment by an uncharacteristically large juxta-membrane region. The extracellular domain of the R-PTP-kappa precursor protein contains an immunoglobulin-like domain and four fibronectin type III-like repeats, preceded by a signal peptide and a region of about 150 amino acids...... processing, following which both cleavage products remain associated. By site-directed mutagenesis, the likely cleavage site was shown to be a consensus sequence for cleavage by the processing endopeptidase furin, located in the fourth fibronectin type III-like repeat. In situ hybridization analysis...

  3. Novel tyrosine phosphorylation sites in rat skeletal muscle revealed by phosphopeptide enrichment and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Højlund, Kurt; Luo, Moulun

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a fundamental role in many cellular processes including differentiation, growth and insulin signaling. In insulin resistant muscle, aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins has been detected. However, due to the low abundance of tyrosine phosphorylation (...

  4. Internalization and down-regulation of the human epidermal growth factor receptor are regulated by the carboxyl-terminal tyrosines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Beguinot, L

    1991-01-01

    of EGF. The specific rate of internalization of the triple point mutant was reduced. By contrast, intracellular processing of ligand previously internalized at 20 degrees C was similar between wild type and mutant receptors. Taken together the data indicate that the delay in degradation observed in cells...... expressing the triple point mutant EGF-R can be attributed mainly to a slower removal from the cell surface. Our results show that in the full-length EGF-R all three C-terminal tyrosines are necessary for rapid internalization, suggesting that autophosphorylation is required for efficient EGF...

  5. Gene expression patterns that predict sensitivity to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer cell lines and human lung tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haura Eric B

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased focus surrounds identifying patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC who will benefit from treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI. EGFR mutation, gene copy number, coexpression of ErbB proteins and ligands, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition markers all correlate with EGFR TKI sensitivity, and while prediction of sensitivity using any one of the markers does identify responders, individual markers do not encompass all potential responders due to high levels of inter-patient and inter-tumor variability. We hypothesized that a multivariate predictor of EGFR TKI sensitivity based on gene expression data would offer a clinically useful method of accounting for the increased variability inherent in predicting response to EGFR TKI and for elucidation of mechanisms of aberrant EGFR signalling. Furthermore, we anticipated that this methodology would result in improved predictions compared to single parameters alone both in vitro and in vivo. Results Gene expression data derived from cell lines that demonstrate differential sensitivity to EGFR TKI, such as erlotinib, were used to generate models for a priori prediction of response. The gene expression signature of EGFR TKI sensitivity displays significant biological relevance in lung cancer biology in that pertinent signalling molecules and downstream effector molecules are present in the signature. Diagonal linear discriminant analysis using this gene signature was highly effective in classifying out-of-sample cancer cell lines by sensitivity to EGFR inhibition, and was more accurate than classifying by mutational status alone. Using the same predictor, we classified human lung adenocarcinomas and captured the majority of tumors with high levels of EGFR activation as well as those harbouring activating mutations in the kinase domain. We have demonstrated that predictive models of EGFR TKI sensitivity can

  6. Studies of the mechanism of selectivity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) bidentate inhibitors using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lei; Zhang, Huai; Cui, Wei; Ji, Mingjun

    2008-10-01

    Bidentate inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) are considered as a group of ideal inhibitors with high binding potential and high selectivity in treating type II diabetes. In this paper, the binding models of five bidentate inhibitors to PTP1B, TCPTP, and SHP-2 were investigated and compared by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and free energy calculations. The binding free energies were computed using the Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM/PBSA) methodology. The calculation results show that the predicted free energies of the complexes are well consistent with the experimental data. The Molecular Mechanics/Generalized Born Surface Area (MM/GBSA) free energy decomposition analysis indicates that the residues ARG24, ARG254, and GLN262 in the second binding site of PTP1B are essential for the high selectivity of inhibitors. Furthermore, the residue PHE182 close to the active site is also important for the selectivity and the binding affinity of the inhibitors. According to our analysis, it can be concluded that in most cases the polarity of the portion of the inhibitor that binds to the second binding site of the protein is positive to the affinity of the inhibitors while negative to the selectivity of the inhibitors. We expect that the information we obtained here can help to develop potential PTP1B inhibitors with more promising specificity.

  7. Human cancer protein-protein interaction network: a structural perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozde Kar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interaction networks provide a global picture of cellular function and biological processes. Some proteins act as hub proteins, highly connected to others, whereas some others have few interactions. The dysfunction of some interactions causes many diseases, including cancer. Proteins interact through their interfaces. Therefore, studying the interface properties of cancer-related proteins will help explain their role in the interaction networks. Similar or overlapping binding sites should be used repeatedly in single interface hub proteins, making them promiscuous. Alternatively, multi-interface hub proteins make use of several distinct binding sites to bind to different partners. We propose a methodology to integrate protein interfaces into cancer interaction networks (ciSPIN, cancer structural protein interface network. The interactions in the human protein interaction network are replaced by interfaces, coming from either known or predicted complexes. We provide a detailed analysis of cancer related human protein-protein interfaces and the topological properties of the cancer network. The results reveal that cancer-related proteins have smaller, more planar, more charged and less hydrophobic binding sites than non-cancer proteins, which may indicate low affinity and high specificity of the cancer-related interactions. We also classified the genes in ciSPIN according to phenotypes. Within phenotypes, for breast cancer, colorectal cancer and leukemia, interface properties were found to be discriminating from non-cancer interfaces with an accuracy of 71%, 67%, 61%, respectively. In addition, cancer-related proteins tend to interact with their partners through distinct interfaces, corresponding mostly to multi-interface hubs, which comprise 56% of cancer-related proteins, and constituting the nodes with higher essentiality in the network (76%. We illustrate the interface related affinity properties of two cancer-related hub

  8. Butyrylcholinesterase In Human Protein Data,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    BuChE . CHE. ChE Classifications EC 3.1.1.8. acylcholine acylhydrolase Description Found in human serum or plasma where it is a soluble glycoprotein...developing chicken retina and monkey visual pathway. Physiology!Pathology Clinically important for diagnosis of poisoning by insecticides of the...gene for BCHE in man as well as in monkey, cow. sheep, pig. rabbit, dog. rat. mouse, guinea pig and chicken . The human gene is located on the long arm

  9. Functional Diversity of the Schistosoma mansoni Tyrosine Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia G. A. Avelar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of schistosomiasis, has a complex life cycle infecting over 200 million people worldwide. Such a successful and prolific parasite life cycle has been shown to be dependent on the adaptive interaction between the parasite and hosts. Tyrosine kinases (TKs play a key role in signaling pathways as demonstrated by a large body of experimental work in eukaryotes. Furthermore, comparative genomics have allowed the identification of TK homologs and provided insights into the functional role of TKs in several biological systems. Finally, TK structural biology has provided a rational basis for obtaining selective inhibitors directed to the treatment of human diseases. This paper covers the important aspects of the phospho-tyrosine signaling network in S. mansoni, Caenorhabditis elegans, and humans, the main process of functional diversification of TKs, that is, protein-domain shuffling, and also discusses TKs as targets for the development of new anti-schistosome drugs.

  10. Hypothyroidism attenuates protein tyrosine nitration, oxidative stress and renal damage induced by ischemia and reperfusion: effect unrelated to antioxidant enzymes activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Velázquez, Verónica M; Barrera, Diana; Franco, Martha; Tapia, Edilia; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2005-01-01

    Background It has been established that hypothyroidism protects rats against renal ischemia and reperfusion (IR) oxidative damage. However, it is not clear if hypothyroidism is able to prevent protein tyrosine nitration, an index of nitrosative stress, induced by IR or if antioxidant enzymes have involved in this protective effect. In this work it was explored if hypothyroidism is able to prevent the increase in nitrosative and oxidative stress induced by IR. In addition the activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase was studied. Control and thyroidectomized (HTX) rats were studied 24 h of reperfusion after 60 min ischemia. Methods Male Wistar rats weighing 380 ± 22 g were subjected to surgical thyroidectomy. Rats were studied 15 days after surgery. Euthyroid sham-operated rats were used as controls (CT). Both groups of rats underwent a right kidney nephrectomy and suffered a 60 min left renal ischemia with 24 h of reperfusion. Rats were divided in four groups: CT, HTX, IR and HTX+IR. Rats were sacrificed and samples of plasma and kidney were obtained. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine were measured in blood plasma. Kidney damage was evaluated by histological analysis. Oxidative stress was measured by immunohistochemical localization of protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal modified proteins. The protein carbonyl content was measured using antibodies against dinitrophenol (DNP)-modified proteins. Nitrosative stress was measured by immunohistochemical analysis of 3-nitrotyrosine modified proteins. The activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase was measured by spectrophotometric methods. Multiple comparisons were performed with ANOVA followed by Bonferroni t test. Results The histological damage and the rise in plasma creatinine and BUN induced by IR were significantly lower in HTX+IR group. The increase in protein carbonyls and in 3-nitrotyrosine and 4

  11. Hypothyroidism attenuates protein tyrosine nitration, oxidative stress and renal damage induced by ischemia and reperfusion: effect unrelated to antioxidant enzymes activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina-Campos Omar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been established that hypothyroidism protects rats against renal ischemia and reperfusion (IR oxidative damage. However, it is not clear if hypothyroidism is able to prevent protein tyrosine nitration, an index of nitrosative stress, induced by IR or if antioxidant enzymes have involved in this protective effect. In this work it was explored if hypothyroidism is able to prevent the increase in nitrosative and oxidative stress induced by IR. In addition the activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase was studied. Control and thyroidectomized (HTX rats were studied 24 h of reperfusion after 60 min ischemia. Methods Male Wistar rats weighing 380 ± 22 g were subjected to surgical thyroidectomy. Rats were studied 15 days after surgery. Euthyroid sham-operated rats were used as controls (CT. Both groups of rats underwent a right kidney nephrectomy and suffered a 60 min left renal ischemia with 24 h of reperfusion. Rats were divided in four groups: CT, HTX, IR and HTX+IR. Rats were sacrificed and samples of plasma and kidney were obtained. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN and creatinine were measured in blood plasma. Kidney damage was evaluated by histological analysis. Oxidative stress was measured by immunohistochemical localization of protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal modified proteins. The protein carbonyl content was measured using antibodies against dinitrophenol (DNP-modified proteins. Nitrosative stress was measured by immunohistochemical analysis of 3-nitrotyrosine modified proteins. The activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase was measured by spectrophotometric methods. Multiple comparisons were performed with ANOVA followed by Bonferroni t test. Results The histological damage and the rise in plasma creatinine and BUN induced by IR were significantly lower in HTX+IR group. The increase in protein carbonyls and

  12. Molecular mechanisms of the synergy between cysteinyl-leukotrienes and receptor tyrosine kinase growth factors on human bronchial fibroblast proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Yoshisue

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We have reported that cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs synergise not only with epidermal growth factor (EGF but also with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF and fibroblast growth factor (FGF to induce mitogenesis in human bronchial fibroblasts. We now describe the molecular mechanisms underlying this synergism. Mitogenesis was assessed by incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA and changes in protein phosphorylation by Western blotting. Surprisingly, no CysLT receptor antagonists (MK-571, montelukast, BAY u9773 prevented the synergistic mitogenesis. LTD4 did not cause phosphorylation of EGFR nor did it augment EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR, and the synergy between LTD4 and EGF was not blocked by the metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001 or by an HB-EGF neutralising antibody. The EGFR-selective kinase inhibitor, AG1478, suppressed the synergy by LTD4 and EGF, but had no effect on the synergy with PDGF and FGF. While inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein kinase C (PKC prevented the synergy, these drugs also inhibited mitogenesis elicited by EGF alone. In contrast, pertussis toxin (PTX efficiently inhibited the potentiating effect of LTD4 on EGF-induced mitogenesis, as well as that provoked by PDGF or FGF, but had no effect on mitogenesis elicited by the growth factors alone. Whereas LTD4 alone did not augment phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk-1/2 and Akt, it increased phosphorylation of PKC in a Gi-dependent manner. Addition of LTD4 prolonged the duration of EGF-induced phosphorylation of Erk-1/2 and Akt, both of which were sensitive to PTX. The effect of cys-LTs involves a PTX-sensitive and PKC-mediated intracellular pathway leading to sustained growth factor-dependent phosphorylation of Erk-1/2 and Akt.

  13. Staphylococcal enterotoxins modulate interleukin 2 receptor expression and ligand-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the Janus protein-tyrosine kinase 3 (Jak3) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat proteins)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Svejgaard, A; Röpke, C

    1995-01-01

    . In addition, SE can induce an interleukin-2 (IL-2) nonresponsive state and apoptosis. Here, we show that SE induce dynamic changes in the expression of and signal transduction through the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) beta and gamma chains (IL-2R beta and IL-2R gamma) in human antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell lines. Thus...

  14. Bacillus subtilis strain deficient for the protein-tyrosine kinase PtkA exhibits impaired DNA replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petranovic, Dina; Michelsen, Ole; Zahradka, K

    2007-01-01

    A/PtpZ was previously shown to regulate the phosphorylation state of UDP-glucose dehydrogenases and single-stranded DNA-binding proteins. This promiscuity towards substrates is reminiscent of eukaryal kinases and has prompted us to investigate possible physiological effects of ptkA and ptpZ gene inactivations...

  15. Anti-VEGF strategies - from antibodies to tyrosine kinase inhibitors: background and clinical development in human cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Korpanty, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    Tumour angiogenesis (formation of new blood vessels supporting tumour growth and metastasis) is a result of complex interactions between the tumour and the surrounding microenvironment. Targeting tumours with anti-angiogenic therapy remains an exciting area of preclinical and clinical studies. Although many significant advances have been achieved and the clinical use of anti-angiogenic drugs is now well recognized in many solid malignancies, these therapies fall short of their anticipated clinical benefits and leave many unanswered questions like exact mechanism of action, patients\\' selection and monitoring response to anti-angiogenic drugs. Tumour angiogenesis is controlled by complex signaling cascades and ongoing research into molecular mechanisms of tumour angiogenesis not only helps to understand its basic mechanisms but hopefully will identify new therapeutic targets. In 2012, both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors remain the two major clinically useful therapeutic options that interfere with tumour angiogenesis in many solid malignancies.

  16. Protein tyrosine nitration in chronic intramuscular parasitism: immunohistochemical evaluation of relationships between nitration, and fiber type-specific responses to infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted H. Elsasser

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine whether preferential muscle catabolism [psoas major (PM > rectus femoris (RF] observed during the chronic intramuscular stage of Sarcocystis cruzi infection could be associated with the pathological consequences of increased protein tyrosine nitration in fibers characteristically more metabolically active due to higher mitochondrial density. Holstein calves were assigned to control (C, or S. cruzi-infected (I groups, n=5/group. Calves were euthanized on day 63 of infection. Samples of RF and PM were prepared for metabolic fiber typing (MFT: slow oxidative, SO – Type I; fast oxidative glycolytic, FOG - Type IIa; fast glycolytic, FG – Type IIb, fiber area, and immunohistochemical localization of fast myosin heavy chain 2a and 2b, nitrotyrosine (NT, and mitochondrial Complex V ATP-synthase. MFT analysis documented that PM contained twice the number of SO fibers compared to RF (32 v 16%, P<0.002. SO and FOG fibers (Both higher in mitochondrial density than FG fibers in both PM and RF were significantly smaller in area in I calves with mean FG areas not different between C and I. Muscle NT content (Western blot of myofibrillar protein fraction increased with infection; NT was immunohistochemically localized into three distinct patterns in fibers: i sparse fiber staining, ii dense punctuate intrafiber staining, and iii pericystic staining. By image analysis, the greatest punctuate intrafiber pixel density of NT was associated with SO fibers from I calves with the NT colocalizing with mitochondrial Complex V – F1F0 ATP synthase. More fibers were positive for the colocalization in PM than RF (P<0.04. The data are consistent with the concept that fibers rich in mitochondria possessing more inherent oxidative energy capacity generate more nitrated proteins than glycolytic fibers and as such are more affected by the proinflammatory response to infections like Sarcocystosis.

  17. Hepatitis B viral core protein disrupts human host gene expression by binding to promoter regions

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    Guo Yanhai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The core protein (HBc of hepatitis B virus (HBV has been implicated in the malignant transformation of chronically-infected hepatocytes and displays pleiotropic functions, including RNA- and DNA-binding activities. However, the mechanism by which HBc interacts with the human genome to exert effects on hepatocyte function remains unknown. This study investigated the distribution of HBc binding to promoters in the human genome and evaluated its effects on the related genes’ expression. Results Whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation microarray (ChIP-on-chip analysis was used to identify HBc-bound human gene promoters. Gene Ontology and pathway analyses were performed on related genes. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was used to verify ChIP-on-chip results. Five novel genes were selected for luciferase reporter assay evaluation to assess the influence of HBc promoter binding. The HBc antibody immunoprecipitated approximately 3100 human gene promoters. Among these, 1993 are associated with known biological processes, and 2208 regulate genes with defined molecular functions. In total, 1286 of the related genes mediate primary metabolic processes, and 1398 encode proteins with binding activity. Sixty-four of the promoters regulate genes related to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways, and 41 regulate Wnt/beta-catenin pathway genes. The reporter gene assay indicated that HBc binding up-regulates proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase (SRC, type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R, and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (NTRK2, and down-regulates v-Ha-ras Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene (HRAS. Conclusion HBc has the ability to bind a large number of human gene promoters, and can disrupt normal host gene expression. Manipulation of the transcriptional profile in HBV-infected hepatocytes may represent a key pathogenic mechanism of HBV infection.

  18. BET protein antagonist JQ1 is synergistically lethal with FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) and overcomes resistance to FLT3-TKI in AML cells expressing FLT-ITD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiskus, Warren; Sharma, Sunil; Qi, Jun; Shah, Bhavin; Devaraj, Santhana G. T.; Leveque, Christopher; Portier, Bryce P.; Iyer, Swaminathan; Bradner, James E.; Bhalla, Kapil N.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, treatment with BET (bromodomain and extraterminal) protein antagonist (BA) such as JQ1 has been shown to inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of human AML cells, including those expressing FLT3-ITD. Here, we demonstrate that co-treatment with JQ1 and the FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) ponatinib or AC220 synergistically induce apoptosis of cultured and primary CD34+ human AML blast progenitor cells (BPCs) expressing FLT3-ITD. Concomitantly, as compared to each agent alone, co-treatment with JQ1 and the FLT3-TKI caused greater attenuation of c-MYC, BCL2 and CDK4/6. Simultaneously, co-treatment with JQ1 and the FLT3-TKI increased the levels of p21, BIM and cleaved PARP, as well as mediated marked attenuation of p-STAT5, p-AKT and p-ERK1/2 levels in AML BPCs. Conversely, co-treatment with JQ1 and FLT3-TKI was significantly less active against CD34+ normal bone marrow progenitor cells. Knockdown of BRD4 by shRNA also sensitized AML cells to FLT3-TKI. JQ1 treatment induced apoptosis of mouse Ba/F3 cells ectopically expressing FLT3-ITD with or without FLT3-TKI resistant mutations F691L and D835V. Compared to the parental human AML FLT3-ITD-expressing MOLM13, MOLM13-TKIR cells resistant to AC220 were markedly more sensitive to JQ1-induced apoptosis. Further, co-treatment with JQ1 and the pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDI) panobinostat synergistically induced apoptosis of FLT3-TKI resistant MOLM13-TKIR and MV4-11-TKIR cells. Collectively, these findings support the rationale for determining the in vivo activity of combined therapy with BA and FLT3-TKI against human AML cells expressing FLT3-ITD or with BA and HDI against AML cells resistant to FLT3-TKI. PMID:25053825

  19. Expression of a truncated receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase kappa in the brain of an adult transgenic mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, P; Canoll, P D; Sap, J

    1999-01-01

    processes such as axonal growth and target recognition, as has been demonstrated for certain Drosophila RPTPs. The brain distribution of RPTP-kappa-expressing cells has not been determined, however. In a gene-trap mouse model with a beta-gal+neo (beta-geo) insertion in the endogenous RPTP-kappa gene......, the consequent loss of RPTP-kappa's enzymatic activity does not produce any obvious phenotypic defects [W.C. Skarnes, J.E. Moss, S.M. Hurtley, R.S.P. Beddington, Capturing genes encoding membrane and secreted proteins important for mouse development, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 92 (1995) 6592...... that goal, we have used this mouse model to map the distribution of the truncated RPTP-kappa/beta-geo fusion protein in the adult mouse brain using beta-galactosidase as a marker enzyme. Visualization of the beta-galactosidase activity revealed a non-random pattern of expression, and identified cells...

  20. Extrinsic Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor 22 Signals Contribute to CD8 T Cell Exhaustion and Promote Persistence of Chronic Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Jofra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A genetic variant of the protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN22 is associated with a wide range of autoimmune diseases; however, the reasons behind its prevalence in the general population remain not completely understood. Recent evidence highlights an important role of autoimmune susceptibility genetic variants in conferring resistance against certain pathogens. In this study, we examined the role of PTPN22 in persistent infection in mice lacking PTPN22 infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus clone 13. We found that lack of PTPN22 in mice resulted in viral clearance 30 days after infection, which was reflected in their reduced weight loss and overall improved health. PTPN22−/− mice exhibited enhanced virus-specific CD8 and CD4 T cell numbers and functionality and reduced exhausted phenotype. Moreover, mixed bone marrow chimera studies demonstrated no differences in virus-specific CD8 T cell accumulation and function between the PTPN22+/+ and PTPN22−/− compartments, showing that the effects of PTPN22 on CD8 T cells are T cell-extrinsic. Together, these findings identify a CD8 T cell-extrinsic role for PTPN22 in weakening early CD8 T cell responses to collectively promote persistence of a chronic viral infection.

  1. Extrinsic Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor 22 Signals Contribute to CD8 T Cell Exhaustion and Promote Persistence of Chronic Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofra, Tatiana; Galvani, Giuseppe; Kuka, Mirela; Di Fonte, Roberta; Mfarrej, Bechara G; Iannacone, Matteo; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Battaglia, Manuela; Fousteri, Georgia

    2017-01-01

    A genetic variant of the protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN22) is associated with a wide range of autoimmune diseases; however, the reasons behind its prevalence in the general population remain not completely understood. Recent evidence highlights an important role of autoimmune susceptibility genetic variants in conferring resistance against certain pathogens. In this study, we examined the role of PTPN22 in persistent infection in mice lacking PTPN22 infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus clone 13. We found that lack of PTPN22 in mice resulted in viral clearance 30 days after infection, which was reflected in their reduced weight loss and overall improved health. PTPN22(-/-) mice exhibited enhanced virus-specific CD8 and CD4 T cell numbers and functionality and reduced exhausted phenotype. Moreover, mixed bone marrow chimera studies demonstrated no differences in virus-specific CD8 T cell accumulation and function between the PTPN22(+/+) and PTPN22(-/-) compartments, showing that the effects of PTPN22 on CD8 T cells are T cell-extrinsic. Together, these findings identify a CD8 T cell-extrinsic role for PTPN22 in weakening early CD8 T cell responses to collectively promote persistence of a chronic viral infection.

  2. Structure of the Trypanosoma cruzi protein tyrosine phosphatase TcPTP1, a potential therapeutic target for Chagas' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lountos, George T.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S. [FNL

    2013-06-05

    Chagas’ disease, a neglected tropical affliction transmitted by the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is prevalent in Latin America and affects nearly 18 million people worldwide, yet few approved drugs are available to treat the disease. Moreover, the currently available drugs exhibit severe toxicity or are poorly effective in the chronic phase of the disease. This limitation, along with the large population at risk, underscores the urgent need to discover new molecular targets and novel therapeutic agents. Recently, the T. cruzi protein tyrosine phosphatase TcPTP1 has been implicated in the cellular differentiation and infectivity of the parasite and is therefore a promising target for the design of novel anti-parasitic drugs. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of TcPTP1 refined to a resolution of 2.18 Å, which provides structural insights into the active site environment that can be used to initiate structure-based drug design efforts to develop specific TcPTP1 inhibitors. Potential strategies to develop such inhibitors are also discussed.

  3. Molecular cloning of L-JAK, a Janus family protein-tyrosine kinase expressed in natural killer cells and activated leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, M; McVicar, D W; Johnston, J A; Blake, T B; Chen, Y Q; Lal, B K; Lloyd, A R; Kelvin, D J; Staples, J E; Ortaldo, J R

    1994-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) are critical enzymes for receptor-mediated signaling in lymphocytes. Because natural killer (NK) cells are large granular lymphocytes with specialized effector function, we set out to identify PTKs preferentially expressed in these cells. One such PTK was identified and molecularly cloned. The predicted amino acid sequence shows that this kinase lacks SH2 or SH3 domains typical of src family kinases but has tandem nonidentical catalytic domains, indicating that it is a member of the Janus family of PTKs. Immunoprecipitation using antiserum generated against a peptide corresponding to the deduced amino acid sequence of this gene revealed a kinase with a molecular weight of approximately 125,000. The pattern of expression of this kinase contrasted sharply with that of other Janus kinases, which are ubiquitously expressed. The kinase described in the present study was found to be more limited in its expression; expression was found in NK cells and an NK-like cell line but not in resting T cells or in other tissues. In contrast, stimulated and transformed T cells expressed the gene, suggesting a role in lymphoid activation. Because of its homology and tissue expression, we have tentatively termed this PTK gene L-JAK for leukocyte Janus kinase. Images PMID:8022790

  4. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 associates with CUB domain-containing protein-1 (CDCP1), regulating its expression at the cell surface in a phosphorylation-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandji, Leslie Yewakon; Proust, Richard; Larue, Lionel; Gesbert, Franck

    2015-01-01

    CUB domain-containing protein-1 (CDCP1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is phosphorylated by SRC family kinases (SFK) before recruiting and activating PKCδ. CDCP1 is overproduced in many cancers. It promotes metastasis and resistance to anoïkis. The robust production of CDCP1 would be associated with stemness and has been proposed as a novel prognosis marker. The natural transmembrane location of CDCP1 makes it an ideal therapeutic target and treatments based on the use of appropriate antibodies are currently being evaluated. However, we still know very little about the molecular fate of CDCP1 and its downstream signaling events. Improvements in our understanding of the molecular events occurring downstream of CDCP1 are required to make use of changes of CDCP1 production or functions for therapeutic purposes. By the mean of co-immunoprecipitation and affinity precipitation we show here, for the first time, that CDCP1 interacts directly, with the cytosolic tyrosine phosphatase SHP2. Point mutants of CDCP1 show that residues Y734 and Y743 are responsible for its interaction with SHP2. It may therefore compete with SFK. We also demonstrate that a shRNA-mediated down regulation of SHP2 is associated with a stronger CDCP1 phosphorylation and an impairment of antibody-mediated CDCP1 internalization.

  5. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 associates with CUB domain-containing protein-1 (CDCP1, regulating its expression at the cell surface in a phosphorylation-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Yewakon Gandji

    Full Text Available CUB domain-containing protein-1 (CDCP1 is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is phosphorylated by SRC family kinases (SFK before recruiting and activating PKCδ. CDCP1 is overproduced in many cancers. It promotes metastasis and resistance to anoïkis. The robust production of CDCP1 would be associated with stemness and has been proposed as a novel prognosis marker. The natural transmembrane location of CDCP1 makes it an ideal therapeutic target and treatments based on the use of appropriate antibodies are currently being evaluated. However, we still know very little about the molecular fate of CDCP1 and its downstream signaling events. Improvements in our understanding of the molecular events occurring downstream of CDCP1 are required to make use of changes of CDCP1 production or functions for therapeutic purposes. By the mean of co-immunoprecipitation and affinity precipitation we show here, for the first time, that CDCP1 interacts directly, with the cytosolic tyrosine phosphatase SHP2. Point mutants of CDCP1 show that residues Y734 and Y743 are responsible for its interaction with SHP2. It may therefore compete with SFK. We also demonstrate that a shRNA-mediated down regulation of SHP2 is associated with a stronger CDCP1 phosphorylation and an impairment of antibody-mediated CDCP1 internalization.

  6. Subcellular Partitioning of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B to the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondria Depends Sensitively on the Composition of Its Tail Anchor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueller, Julia; Egorov, Mikhail V.; Walther, Kirstin A.; Sabet, Ola; Mallah, Jana; Grabenbauer, Markus; Kinkhabwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The canonical protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is an important regulator of diverse cellular signaling networks. PTP1B has long been thought to exert its influence solely from its perch on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); however, an additional subpopulation of PTP1B has recently been detected in mitochondria extracted from rat brain tissue. Here, we show that PTP1B’s mitochondrial localization is general (observed across diverse mammalian cell lines) and sensitively dependent on the transmembrane domain length, C-terminal charge and hydropathy of its short (≤35 amino acid) tail anchor. Our electron microscopy of specific DAB precipitation revealed that PTP1B localizes via its tail anchor to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM), with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy establishing that this OMM pool contributes to the previously reported cytoplasmic interaction of PTP1B with endocytosed epidermal growth factor receptor. We additionally examined the mechanism of PTP1B’s insertion into the ER membrane through heterologous expression of PTP1B’s tail anchor in wild-type yeast and yeast mutants of major conserved ER insertion pathways: In none of these yeast strains was ER targeting significantly impeded, providing in vivo support for the hypothesis of spontaneous membrane insertion (as previously demonstrated in vitro). Further functional elucidation of the newly recognized mitochondrial pool of PTP1B will likely be important for understanding its complex roles in cellular responses to external stimuli, cell proliferation and diseased states. PMID:26431424

  7. Early response of C-reactive protein as a predictor of survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Yosuke; Saito, Kazutaka; Yuasa, Takeshi; Uehara, Sho; Kawamura, Naoko; Yokoyama, Minato; Ishioka, Junichiro; Matsuoka, Yoh; Yamamoto, Shinya; Okuno, Tetsuo; Yonese, Junji; Kihara, Kazunori; Fujii, Yasuhisa

    2017-12-01

    Pretreatment C-reactive protein (CRP) has been shown to be an independent prognostic factor for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). We further evaluated the early response of CRP after the initiation of TKIs. A total of 103 patients (80 men and 23 women) were treated with TKIs for mRCC from 2008-2013. Patients were divided into three groups according to their early CRP kinetics-patients whose baseline CRP levels were 20% at 4 weeks after the initiation of TKIs (early CRP responder), and the remaining patients (non-early CRP responder). The endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The median follow-up period was 21 (interquartile range 10-34) months. The numbers of patients classified as non-elevated, early CRP responder, and non-early CRP responder were 62, 19, and 22, respectively. The 1-year PFS rates of patients in the non-elevated, early CRP responder, and non-early CRP responder groups were 50, 23, and 9.7%, respectively (p < 0.001). The 1-year OS rates of patients in these three groups were 79, 62, and 36%, respectively (p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the early CRP kinetics assessment was a significant independent factor for PFS and OS. Early CRP response at 4 weeks is predictive of survival for patients with mRCC treated with TKI.

  8. Oleanane triterpenes with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity from aerial parts of Lantana camara collected in Indonesia and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdjul, Delfly B; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Maarisit, Wilmar; Rotinsulu, Henki; Wewengkang, Defny S; Sumilat, Deiske A; Kapojos, Magie M; Losung, Fitje; Ukai, Kazuyo; Namikoshi, Michio

    2017-09-13

    During the search for new protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1B inhibitors, EtOH extracts from the aerial parts of Lantana camara L. (lantana) collected at Manado (Indonesia) and two subtropical islands in Japan (Ishigaki and Iriomote Islands, Okinawa) exhibited potent inhibitory activities against PTP1B in an enzyme assay. Four previously undescribed oleanane triterpenes were isolated together with known triterpenes and flavones from the Indonesian lantana. The EtOH extracts of lantana collected in Ishigaki and Iriomote Islands exhibited different phytochemical profiles from each other and the Indonesian lantana. Triterpenes with a 24-OH group were isolated from the Indonesian lantana only. Five known triterpene compounds were detected in the Ishigaki lantana, and two oleanane triterpenes with an ether linkage between 3β and 25 were the main components together with five known triterpenes as minor components in the Iriomote lantana. The structures of previously undescribed compounds were assigned on the basis of their spectroscopic data. Among the compounds obtained in this study, oleanolic acid exhibited the most potent activity against PTP1B, and is used as a positive control in studies on PTP1B. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) in twins with a Rett syndrome-like phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Sarah L; Ellaway, Carolyn J; Peters, Greg B; Pelka, Gregory J; Tam, Patrick PL; Christodoulou, John

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects females, is primarily caused by variants in MECP2. Variants in other genes such as CDKL5 and FOXG1 are usually associated with individuals who manifest distinct phenotypes that may overlap with RTT. Individuals with phenotypes suggestive of RTT are typically screened for variants in MECP2 and then subsequently the other genes dependent on the specific phenotype. Even with this screening strategy, there are individuals in whom no causative variant can be identified, suggesting that there are other novel genes that contribute to the RTT phenotype. Here we report a de novo deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) in identical twins with a RTT-like phenotype. We also demonstrate the reduced expression of Ptpn4 in a Mecp2 null mouse model of RTT, as well as the activation of the PTPN4 promoter by MeCP2. Our findings suggest that PTPN4 should be considered for addition to the growing list of genes that warrant screening in individuals with a RTT-like phenotype. PMID:25424712

  10. Computational Insight into Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibition: A Case Study of the Combined Ligand- and Structure-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is an attractive target for treating cancer, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. In our work, the way of combined ligand- and structure-based approach was applied to analyze the characteristics of PTP1B enzyme and its interaction with competitive inhibitors. Firstly, the pharmacophore model of PTP1B inhibitors was built based on the common feature of sixteen compounds. It was found that the pharmacophore model consisted of five chemical features: one aromatic ring (R region, two hydrophobic (H groups, and two hydrogen bond acceptors (A. To further elucidate the binding modes of these inhibitors with PTP1B active sites, four docking programs (AutoDock 4.0, AutoDock Vina 1.0, standard precision (SP Glide 9.7, and extra precision (XP Glide 9.7 were used. The characteristics of the active sites were then described by the conformations of the docking results. In conclusion, a combination of various pharmacophore features and the integration information of structure activity relationship (SAR can be used to design novel potent PTP1B inhibitors.

  11. Structural Basis of Fullerene Derivatives as Novel Potent Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B: Insight into the Inhibitory Mechanism through Molecular Modeling Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Mengdan; Shan, Yaming; Guan, Shanshan; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Song; Han, Weiwei

    2016-10-24

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has become an outstanding target for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. Recent research has demonstrated that some fullerene derivatives serve as a new nanoscale-class of potent inhibitors of PTP1B, but the specific mechanism remains unclear. Several molecular modeling methods (molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and molecular mechanics/generalized Born surface area calculations) were integrated to provide insight into the binding mode and inhibitory mechanism of the new class of fullerene inhibitors. The results reveal that PTP1B with an open WPD loop is more susceptible to the combination with the fullerene inhibitor because of their comparable shapes and sizes. When the WPD loop fluctuates to the open conformation, the inhibitor falls into the active pocket and induces conformational rotation of the WPD loop. This rotation is closely related to the reduction of the catalytic activity of PTP1B. In addition, it is suggested that compound 1, like compound 2, is a competitive inhibitor since it blocks the active site to prevent the binding of the substrate. The high binding affinity of fullerene-based compounds and the transition of the WPD loop, caused by the specific structural property of the hydrophobic fullerene core and the appended polar groups, make these fullerene derivatives efficient competitive inhibitors. The theoretical results provide useful clues for further investigation of the noval inhibitors of PTP1B at the nanoscale.

  12. Uptake mechanisms of L-3-[I-125]iodo-alpha-methyl-tyrosine in a human small-cell lung cancer cell line : comparison with L-1-[C-14]tyrosine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, PL; De Vries, EGE; Piers, DA; Timmer-Bosscha, H

    The radiolabelled amino acid analogue L-3-[I-125]iodo-alpha-methyl-tyrosine (IMT) is under evaluation in brain tumours, where it reflects amino acid transport activity, but is also taken up in many other tumour types. This study investigated the uptake mechanism of IMT in tumour cells not derived

  13. Down-regulation of BDNF in cell and animal models increases striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase 61 (STEP61 ) levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Kurup, Pradeep; Azkona, Garikoitz; Baguley, Tyler D; Saavedra, Ana; Nairn, Angus C; Ellman, Jonathan A; Pérez-Navarro, Esther; Lombroso, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates synaptic strengthening and memory consolidation, and altered BDNF expression is implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. BDNF potentiates N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function through activation of Fyn and ERK1/2. STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) is also implicated in many of the same disorders as BDNF but, in contrast to BDNF, STEP opposes the development of synaptic strengthening. STEP-mediated dephosphorylation of the NMDA receptor subunit GluN2B promotes internalization of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors, while dephosphorylation of the kinases Fyn, Pyk2, and ERK1/2 leads to their inactivation. Thus, STEP and BDNF have opposing functions. In this study, we demonstrate that manipulation of BDNF expression has a reciprocal effect on STEP61 levels. Reduced BDNF signaling leads to elevation of STEP61 both in BDNF(+/-) mice and after acute BDNF knockdown in cortical cultures. Moreover, a newly identified STEP inhibitor reverses the biochemical and motor abnormalities in BDNF(+/-) mice. In contrast, increased BDNF signaling upon treatment with a tropomyosin receptor kinase B agonist results in degradation of STEP61 and a subsequent increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation of STEP substrates in cultured neurons and in mouse frontal cortex. These findings indicate that BDNF-tropomyosin receptor kinase B signaling leads to degradation of STEP61 , while decreased BDNF expression results in increased STEP61 activity. A better understanding of the opposing interaction between STEP and BDNF in normal cognitive functions and in neuropsychiatric disorders will hopefully lead to better therapeutic strategies. Altered expression of BDNF and STEP61 has been implicated in several neurological disorders. BDNF and STEP61 are known to regulate synaptic strengthening, but in opposite directions. Here, we report that reduced BDNF signaling leads to elevation of STEP61 both in

  14. Effects of inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and downstream pathways of receptor tyrosine kinases involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin or mitogen-activated protein kinase in canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Mami; Hoshino, Yuki; Izumi, Yusuke; Sakai, Hiroki; Takagi, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is a progressive malignant neoplasm with no current effective treatment. Previous studies showed that receptor tyrosine kinases and molecules within their downstream pathways involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR) or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were overexpressed in canine, human, and murine tumors, including HSA. The present study investigated the effects of inhibitors of these pathways in canine splenic and hepatic HSA cell lines using assays of cell viability and apoptosis. Inhibitors of the MAPK pathway did not affect canine HSA cell viability. However, cell viability was significantly reduced by exposure to inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and the PI3K/Akt/m-TOR pathway; these inhibitors also induced apoptosis in these cell lines. These results suggest that these inhibitors reduce the proliferation of canine HSA cells by inducing apoptosis. Further study of these inhibitors, using xenograft mouse models of canine HSA, are warranted to explore their potential for clinical application.

  15. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 regulates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α protein levels in endothelial cells under hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan K Alig

    Full Text Available The tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 negatively influences endothelial function, such as VEGF signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, and has been shown to influence angiogenesis during tissue ischemia. In ischemic tissues, hypoxia induced angiogenesis is crucial for restoring oxygen supply. However, the exact mechanism how SHP-1 affects endothelial function during ischemia or hypoxia remains unclear. We performed in vitro endothelial cell culture experiments to characterize the role of SHP-1 during hypoxia.SHP-1 knock-down by specific antisense oligodesoxynucleotides (AS-Odn increased cell growth as well as VEGF synthesis and secretion during 24 hours of hypoxia compared to control AS-Odn. This was prevented by HIF-1α inhibition (echinomycin and apigenin. SHP-1 knock-down as well as overexpression of a catalytically inactive SHP-1 (SHP-1 CS further enhanced HIF-1α protein levels, whereas overexpression of a constitutively active SHP-1 (SHP-1 E74A resulted in decreased HIF-1α levels during hypoxia, compared to wildtype SHP-1. Proteasome inhibition (MG132 returned HIF-1α levels to control or wildtype levels respectively in these cells. SHP-1 silencing did not alter HIF-1α mRNA levels. Finally, under hypoxic conditions SHP-1 knock-down enhanced intracellular endothelial reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, as measured by oxidation of H2-DCF and DHE fluorescence.SHP-1 decreases half-life of HIF-1α under hypoxic conditions resulting in decreased cell growth due to diminished VEGF synthesis and secretion. The regulatory effect of SHP-1 on HIF-1α stability may be mediated by inhibition of endothelial ROS formation stabilizing HIF-1α protein. These findings highlight the importance of SHP-1 in hypoxic signaling and its potential as therapeutic target in ischemic diseases.

  16. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase - STEPs toward understanding chronic stress-induced activation of CRF neurons in the rat BNST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, Joanna; Hazra, Rimi; Guo, Ji-Dong; Li, ChenChen; DeWitt, Sarah; Xu, Jian; Lombroso, Paul J.; Rainnie, Donald G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND STEP is a brain-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase that opposes the development of synaptic strengthening and the consolidation of fear memories. In contrast, stress facilitates fear memory formation, potentially by activating corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) neurons in the anterolateral cell group of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTALG). METHODS Here, using dual-immunofluorescence, single-cell RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, and whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiology, we examined the expression and role of STEP in regulating synaptic plasticity in rat BNSTALG neurons, and its modulation by stress. RESULTS STEP was selectively expressed in CRF neurons in the oval nucleus of the BNSTALG. Following repeated restraint stress (RRS), animals displayed a significant increase in anxiety-like behavior, which was associated with a down-regulation of STEP mRNA and protein expression in the BNSTALG as well as selectively enhanced magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP) induced in Type III, putative CRF neurons. To determine if the changes in STEP expression following RRS were mechanistically related to the facilitation of synaptic strengthening, we examined the effects of intracellular application of STEP on the induction of LTP. STEP completely blocked the RRS-induced facilitation of LTP in BNSTALG neurons. CONCLUSIONS Hence, STEP acts to buffer CRF neurons against excessive activation, while down-regulation of STEP after chronic stress may result in pathological activation of CRF neurons in the BNSTALG and contribute to prolonged states of anxiety. Thus, targeted manipulations of STEP activity might represent a novel treatment strategy for stress-induced anxiety disorders. PMID:24012328

  17. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 sensitizes EGFR/HER-2 positive breast cancer cells to trastuzumab through modulating phosphorylation of EGFR and HER-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yifen; Li, Rong; Zhang, Junyi; Wang, Gang; Liu, Bin; Huang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Tao; Luo, Rongcheng

    2015-01-01

    Trastuzumab resistance in HER-2 positive breast cancer cells is closely related to overexpression of both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal receptor (HER-2). SHP-1 has been demonstrated to downregulate tyrosine kinase activity including EGFR via its phosphatase function, but its effect on HER-2 activity is still unknown. Here, we examined the hypothesis that SHP-1 enhances the anticancer efficacy of trastuzumab in EGFR/HER-2 positive breast cancer cells through combining dual inhibition of EGFR and HER-2. Trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer SKBr-3 cells were generated by long-term in vitro culture of SKBr-3cells in the presence of trastuzumab. The SHP-1 was ectopically expressed by stable transfection. The activity and expression of EGFR, HER-2, and downstream signaling pathways were tested by Western blot. Cell viability was examined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry. The binding between SHP-1 and EGFR/HER-2 was evaluated by immunoprecipitation assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation. The effects of SHP-1 on tumorigenicity and trastuzumab sensitivity were confirmed via in vivo xenograft model. Trastuzumab-resistant SKBr-3 cells showed aberrant co-expression of EGFR and HER-2. Introduction of wild-type SHP-1 inhibited cell proliferation, clone formation, and promoted the apoptosis induced by trastuzumab. Meanwhile, SHP-1 overexpression reduced phosphorylation levels of EGFR and HER-2 both in parental and trastuzumab-resistant SKBr-3 cells. In vivo study showed an increased antitumor effect of trastuzumab in SHP-1 overexpressed xenografts. At last, we discovered that SHP-1 can make complexes with both EGFR and HER-2, and both phospho-EGFR and phosphor-HER-2 levels in wild-type SHP-1 immunoprecipitates were less than those in phosphatase-inactive SHP-1 (C453S) immunoprecipitates, indicating that EGFR and HER-2 are potential substrates of

  18. Lack of pharmacokinetic interaction for ISIS 113715, a 2'-0-methoxyethyl modified antisense oligonucleotide targeting protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B messenger RNA, with oral antidiabetic compounds metformin, glipizide or rosiglitazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Richard S; Bradley, JoAnn D; Watanabe, Tanya; Kwon, Younggil; Wedel, Mark; van Lier, Jan J; VanVliet, André A

    2006-01-01

    ISIS 113715 is a 20-mer phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) that is complementary to the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP-1B) messenger RNA and subsequently reduces translation of the PTP-1B protein, a negative regulator of insulin receptor. ISIS 113715 is currently being studied in early phase II clinical studies to determine its ability to improve or restore insulin receptor sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Future work will investigate the combination of ISIS 113715 with antidiabetic compounds. In vitro ultrafiltration human plasma protein binding displacement studies and a phase I clinical study were used to characterise the potential for pharmacokinetic interaction of ISIS 113715 and three marketed oral antidiabetic agents. ISIS 113715 was co-incubated with glipizide and rosiglitazone in whole human plasma and tested for increased free drug concentrations. In a phase I clinical study, 23 healthy volunteers received a single oral dose of an antidiabetic compound (either metformin, glipizide or rosiglitazone) both alone and together with subcutaneous ISIS 113715 200 mg in a sequential crossover design. A comparative pharmacokinetic analysis was performed to determine if there were any effects that resulted from coadministration of ISIS 113715 with these antidiabetic compounds. In vitro human plasma protein binding displacement studies showed only minor effects on rosiglitazone and no effect on glipizide when co-incubated with ISIS 113715. The results of the phase I clinical study further indicate that there were no measurable changes in glipizide (5 mg), metformin (500 mg) or rosiglitazone (2 mg) exposure parameters, maximum plasma concentration and the area under the concentration-time curve, or pharmacokinetic parameter, elimination half-life when coadministered with ISIS 113715. Furthermore, there was no effect of ISIS 113715, administered in combination with metformin, on the urinary excretion of metformin. Conversely

  19. Facile and Stabile Linkages through Tyrosine: Bioconjugation Strategies with the Tyrosine-Click Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ban, Hitoshi; Nagano, Masanobu; Gavrilyuk, Julia; Hakamata, Wataru; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Barbas, Carlos F.

    2013-01-01

    The scope, chemoselectivity, and utility of the click-like tyrosine labeling reaction with 4-phenyl-3H-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5(4H)-diones (PTADs) is reported. To study the utility and chemoselectivity of PTAD derivatives in peptide and protein chemistry, we synthesized PTAD derivatives possessing azide, alkyne, and ketone groups and studied their reactions with amino acid derivatives and peptides of increasing complexity. With proteins we studied the compatibility of the tyrosine click reaction ...

  20. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in hematological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Kosior

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently novel treatment modalities has focused on targeted therapies. Tyrosine kinases represent a good target for cancer treatment since they are involved in transferring phosphate groups from ATP to tyrosine residues in specific substrate proteins transducing intracellular signals engaged in the many mechanisms, playing an important role in the modulation of growth factors signaling that are strongly related to carcinogenesis. Deregulation of tyrosine kinases activity was also found in hematological malignancies, particularly overexpression of tyrosine kinases was observed in chronic myeloid leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Herein we show that tyrosine kinase inhibitors have revolutionized hematology malignancies therapy in a very short period of time and they still remain one of the most interesting anticancer compounds that could give a hope for cure and not only long-lasting complete remission. This manuscript summarizes current view on the first generation tyrosine kinase inhibititor – imatinib, second generation – dasatinib, nilotinib and bosutnib as well as new generation tyrosine kinase inhibititors – ponatinib and danusertib in hematooncology.

  1. The second catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase delta (PTP delta) binds to and inhibits the first catalytic domain of PTP sigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, M J; Fladd, C; Batt, J; Rotin, D

    1998-05-01

    The LAR family protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), including LAR, PTP delta, and PTP sigma, are transmembrane proteins composed of a cell adhesion molecule-like ectodomain and two cytoplasmic catalytic domains: active D1 and inactive D2. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen with the first catalytic domain of PTP sigma (PTP sigma-D1) as bait to identify interacting regulatory proteins. Using this screen, we identified the second catalytic domain of PTP delta (PTP delta-D2) as an interactor of PTP sigma-D1. Both yeast two-hybrid binding assays and coprecipitation from mammalian cells revealed strong binding between PTP sigma-D1 and PTP delta-D2, an association which required the presence of the wedge sequence in PTP sigma-D1, a sequence recently shown to mediate D1-D1 homodimerization in the phosphatase RPTP alpha. This interaction was not reciprocal, as PTP delta-D1 did not bind PTP sigma-D2. Addition of a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-PTP delta-D2 fusion protein (but not GST alone) to GST-PTP sigma-D1 led to approximately 50% inhibition of the catalytic activity of PTP sigma-D1, as determined by an in vitro phosphatase assay against p-nitrophenylphosphate. A similar inhibition of PTP sigma-D1 activity was obtained with coimmunoprecipitated PTP delta-D2. Interestingly, the second catalytic domains of LAR (LAR-D2) and PTP sigma (PTP sigma-D2), very similar in sequence to PTP delta-D2, bound poorly to PTP sigma-D1. PTP delta-D1 and LAR-D1 were also able to bind PTP delta-D2, but more weakly than PTP sigma-D1, with a binding hierarchy of PTP sigma-D1 > PTP delta-D1 > LAR-D1. These results suggest that association between PTP sigma-D1 and PTP delta-D2, possibly via receptor heterodimerization, provides a negative regulatory function and that the second catalytic domains of this and likely other receptor PTPs, which are often inactive, may function instead to regulate the activity of the first catalytic domains.

  2. [Cow's milk protein allergy through human milk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, M; Loras-Duclaux, I; Lachaux, A

    2012-03-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is the first allergy that affects infants. In this population, the incidence rate reaches 7.5%. The multiplicity and aspecificity of the symptoms makes its diagnosis sometimes complicated, especially in the delayed type (gastrointestinal, dermatological, and cutaneous). CMPA symptoms can develop in exclusively breastfed infants with an incidence rate of 0.5%. It, therefore, raises questions about sensitization to cow's milk proteins through breast milk. Transfer of native bovine proteins such as β-lactoglobulin into the breast milk is controversial: some authors have found bovine proteins in human milk but others point to cross-reactivity between human milk proteins and cow's milk proteins. However, it seems that a small percentage of dietary proteins can resist digestion and become potentially allergenic. Moreover, some authors suspect the transfer of some of these dietary proteins from the maternal bloodstream to breast milk, but the mechanisms governing sensitization are still being studied. Theoretically, CMPA diagnosis is based on clinical observations, prick-test or patch-test results, and cow's milk-specific IgE antibody concentration. A positive food challenge test usually confirms the diagnosis. No laboratory test is available to make a certain diagnosis, but the detection of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in the mother's milk, for example, seems to be advantageous since it is linked to CMA. Excluding cow's milk from the mother's diet is the only cure when she still wants to breastfeed. Usually, cow's milk proteins are reintroduced after 6 months of exclusion. Indeed, the prognosis for infants is very good: 80% acquire a tolerance before the age of 3 or 4 years. Mothers should not avoid dairy products during pregnancy and breastfeeding as preventive measures against allergy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Dual Coordination of Post Translational Modifications in Human Protein Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodsmith, Jonathan; Kamburov, Atanas; Stelzl, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein activity, stability and interaction profiles and are critical for cellular functioning. Further regulation is gained through PTM interplay whereby modifications modulate the occurrence of other PTMs or act in combination. Integration of global acetylation, ubiquitination and tyrosine or serine/threonine phosphorylation datasets with protein interaction data identified hundreds of protein complexes that selectively accumulate each PTM, indicating coordinated targeting of specific molecular functions. A second layer of PTM coordination exists in these complexes, mediated by PTM integration (PTMi) spots. PTMi spots represent very dense modification patterns in disordered protein regions and showed an equally high mutation rate as functional protein domains in cancer, inferring equivocal importance for cellular functioning. Systematic PTMi spot identification highlighted more than 300 candidate proteins for combinatorial PTM regulation. This study reveals two global PTM coordination mechanisms and emphasizes dataset integration as requisite in proteomic PTM studies to better predict modification impact on cellular signaling. PMID:23505349

  4. Dataset of protein species from human liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Naryzhny

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article contains data related to the research article entitled “Zipf׳s law in proteomics” (Naryzhny et al., 2017 [1]. The protein composition in the human liver or hepatocarcinoma (HepG2 cells extracts was estimated using a filter-aided sample preparation (FASP protocol. The protein species/proteoform composition in the human liver was determined by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE followed by Electrospray Ionization Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (ESI LC-MS/MS. In the case of two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE, the gel was stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue R350, and image analysis was performed with ImageMaster 2D Platinum software (GE Healthcare. The 96 sections in the 2D gel were selected and cut for subsequent ESI LC-MS/MS and protein identification. If the same protein was detected in different sections, it was considered to exist as different protein species/proteoforms. A list of human liver proteoforms detected in this way is presented.

  5. Inferring High-Confidence Human Protein-Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    bound 2 44 33.2 15615 9129.8 FANCA 217 Fanconi anemia , complementation A FANCG 143 Fanconi anemia , complementation G 43 117.3 1808 2226.3 EGFR 626...Degree), as well as the overall de - gree distribution for the entire network (All). Selecting highly ranked subsets of PPIs, using either IDBOS or...help clarify the de - pendence on confidence on topological and biological prop- erties associated with human protein networks. Materials and methods

  6. Growth inhibitory effects of the dual ErbB1/ErbB2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor PKI-166 on human prostate cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Tran, Chris; Sawyers, Charles L

    2002-09-15

    Experiments with human prostate cancer cell lines have shown that forced overexpression of the ErbB2-receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) promotes androgen-independent growth and increases androgen receptor-transcriptional activity in a ligand-independent fashion. To investigate the relationship between ErbB-RTK signaling and androgen in genetically unmanipulated human prostate cancer, we performed biochemical and biological studies with the dual ErbB1/ErbB2 RTK inhibitor PKI-166 using human prostate cancer xenograft models with isogenic sublines reflecting the transition from androgen-dependent to androgen-independent growth. In the presence of low androgen concentrations, PKI-166 showed profound growth-inhibitory effects on tumor growth, which could be partially reversed by androgen add-back. At physiological androgen concentrations, androgen withdrawal greatly enhanced the ability of PKI-166 to retard tumor growth. The level of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation correlated with the response to PKI-166 treatment, whereas the expression levels of ErbB1 and ErbB2 did not. These results suggest that ErbB1/ErbB2 RTKs play an important role in the biology of androgen-independent prostate cancer and provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of inhibitors targeted to this pathway.

  7. Dissecting specificity in the Janus kinases: the structures of JAK-specific inhibitors complexed to the JAK1 and JAK2 protein tyrosine kinase domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Neal K; Bamert, Rebecca S; Patel, Onisha; Wang, Christina; Walden, Patricia M; Wilks, Andrew F; Fantino, Emmanuelle; Rossjohn, Jamie; Lucet, Isabelle S

    2009-03-20

    The Janus kinases (JAKs) are a pivotal family of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) that play prominent roles in numerous cytokine signaling pathways, with aberrant JAK activity associated with a variety of hematopoietic malignancies, cardiovascular diseases and immune-related disorders. Whereas the structures of the JAK2 and JAK3 PTK domains have been determined, the structure of the JAK1 PTK domain is unknown. Here, we report the high-resolution crystal structures of the "active form" of the JAK1 PTK domain in complex with two JAK inhibitors, a tetracyclic pyridone 2-t-butyl-9-fluoro-3,6-dihydro-7H-benz[h]-imidaz[4,5-f]isoquinoline-7-one (CMP6) and (3R,4R)-3-[4-methyl-3-[N-methyl-N-(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino]piperidin-1-yl]-3-oxopropionitrile (CP-690,550), and compare them with the corresponding JAK2 PTK inhibitor complexes. Both inhibitors bound in a similar manner to JAK1, namely buried deep within a constricted ATP-binding site, thereby providing a basis for the potent inhibition of JAK1. As expected, the mode of inhibitor binding in JAK1 was very similar to that observed in JAK2, highlighting the challenges in developing JAK-specific inhibitors that target the ATP-binding site. Nevertheless, differences surrounding the JAK1 and JAK2 ATP-binding sites were apparent, thereby providing a platform for the rational design of JAK2- and JAK1-specific inhibitors.

  8. Activation of RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cells in vitro through treatment with recombinant ricin toxin-binding subunit B: involvement of protein tyrosine, NF-κB and JAK-STAT kinase signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Na; Yuan, Hongyan; Liu, Wensen; Li, Songyan; Liu, Yang; Wan, Jiayu; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Rui; Chang, Yaping

    2013-09-01

    Ricin toxin-binding subunit B (RTB) is a galactose-binding lectin protein. In the present study, we investigated the effects of RTB on inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, as well as the signal transduction mechanisms involved in recombinant RTB-induced macrophage activation. RAW264.7 macrophages were treated with RTB. The results revealed that the mRNA and protein expression of iNOS was increased in the recombinant RTB-treated macrophages. TNF-α production was observed to peak at 20 h, whereas the production of IL-6 peaked at 24 h. In another set of cultures, the cells were co-incubated with RTB and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY294002, the p42/44 inhibitor, PD98059, the p38 inhibitor, SB203580, the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, staurosporine, the JAK2 inhibitor, tyrphostin (AG490), or the NOS inhibitor, L-NMMA. The recombinant RTB-induced production of NO, TNF-α and IL-6 was inhibited in the macrophages treated with the pharmacological inhibitors genistein, LY294002, staurosporine, AG490, SB203580 and BAY 11-7082, indicating the possible involvement of protein tyrosine kinases, PI3K, PKC, JAK2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the above processes. A phosphoprotein analysis identified tyrosine phosphorylation targets that were uniquely induced by recombinant RTB and inhibited following treatment with genistein; some of these proteins are associated with the downstream cascades of activated JAK-STAT and NF-κB receptors. Our data may help to identify the most important target molecules for the development of novel drug therapies.

  9. Autophosphorylation of JAK2 on tyrosines 221 and 570 regulates its activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argetsinger, Lawrence S; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K; Steen, Hanno

    2004-01-01

    or which of the 49 tyrosines in JAK2 are autophosphorylated. In this study, mass spectrometry and two-dimensional peptide mapping were used to determine that tyrosines 221, 570, and 1007 in JAK2 are autophosphorylated. Phosphorylation of tyrosine 570 is particularly robust. In response to growth hormone......, JAK2 was rapidly and transiently phosphorylated at tyrosines 221 and 570, returning to basal levels by 60 min. Analysis of the sequences surrounding tyrosines 221 and 570 in JAK2 and tyrosines in other proteins that are phosphorylated in response to ligands that activate JAK2 suggests that the YXX......[L/I/V] motif is one of the motifs recognized by JAK2. Experiments using JAK2 with tyrosines 221 and 570 mutated to phenylalanine suggest that tyrosines 221 and 570 in JAK2 may serve as regulatory sites in JAK2, with phosphorylation of tyrosine 221 increasing kinase activity and phosphorylation of tyrosine 570...

  10. Pyridoxine improves hippocampal cognitive function via increases of serotonin turnover and tyrosine hydroxylase, and its association with CB1 cannabinoid receptor-interacting protein and the CB1 cannabinoid receptor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyo Young; Kim, Dae Won; Nam, Sung Min; Kim, Jong Whi; Chung, Jin Young; Won, Moo-Ho; Seong, Je Kyung; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Yoo, Dae Young; Hwang, In Koo

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of pyridoxine on hippocampal functions and changes in protein profiles based on the proteomic approach. Eight-week-old mice received intraperitoneal injections of physiological saline (vehicle) or 350mg/kg pyridoxine twice a day for 21days. Phosphoglycerate mutase 1 was up-regulated, while CB1 cannabinoid receptor-interacting protein 1 (CRIP1) was down-regulated, in the pyridoxine-treated group. Additionally, the serotonin and tyrosine hydroxylase was increased in the hippocampus of the pyridoxine-treated group than in that of the vehicle-treated group. Furthermore, discrimination indices based on the novel object recognition test were significantly higher in the pyridoxine-treated group than in the vehicle-treated group. Administration of CRIP1a siRNA significantly increases the discrimination index as well as cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus. In addition, the administration of rimonabant, a CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist, for 3weeks significantly decreased the novel object recognition memory, the tyrosine hydroxylase level, the amount of cell proliferation, and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus. Treatment with pyridoxine significantly increased novel object recognition memory, but slightly ameliorated rimonabant-induced reduction in serotonin, the tyrosine hydroxylase level, the amount of cell proliferation, and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus. These results suggest that pyridoxine promotes hippocampal functions by increasing serotonin and tyrosine hydroylase immunoreactivity in the hippocampus. This positive effect may be associated with CRIP1a and CB1 cannabinoid receptor function. Vitamin-B6 enhances hippocampal functions and this is closely associated with CRIP1a and CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A role for the non-receptor tyrosine kinase ACK1 in TNF-alpha-mediated apoptosis and proliferation in human intestinal epithelial caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinmei; Lv, Chaolan; Chen, Shengbo; Zhi, Fachao

    2017-09-16

    The roles of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and its mediators in cellular processes related to intestinal diseases remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to determine the biological role of activated Cdc42-associated kinase 1 (ACK1) in TNF-alpha-mediated apoptosis and proliferation in Caco-2 cells. ACK1 expression was knocked down using ACK1-specific siRNAs, and ACK1 activity was disrupted using a small molecule ACK1 inhibitor. The Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) and the BrdU incorporation assays were used to measure apoptosis and cell proliferation, respectively. ACK1-specific siRNA and the pharmacological ACK1 inhibitor significantly abrogated the TNF-alpha-mediated anti-apoptotic effects and proliferation of Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, TNF-alpha activated ACK1 at tyrosine 284 (Tyr284), and the ErbB family of proteins was implicated in ACK1 activation in Caco-2 cells. ACK1-Tyr284 was required for protein kinase B (AKT) activation, and ACK1 signaling was mediated through recruiting and phosphorylating the down-stream adaptor protein AKT, which likely promoted cell proliferation in response to TNF-alpha. Moreover, ACK1 activated AKT and Src enhanced nuclear factor-кB (NF-кB) activity, suggesting a correlation between NF-кB signaling and TNF-alpha-mediated apoptosis in Caco-2 cells. Our results demonstrate that ACK1 plays an important role in modulating TNF-alpha-induced aberrant cell proliferation and apoptosis, mediated in part by ACK1 activation. ACK1 and its down-stream effectors may hold promise as therapeutic targets in the prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal cancers, in particular, those induced by chronic intestinal inflammation. © 2017 The Authors. Cell Biology International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Federation of Cell Biology.

  12. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be...

  13. Genetic Mapping and Functional Studies of a Natural Inhibitor of the Insulin Receptor Tyrosine Kinase: The Mouse Ortholog of Human α2-HS Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintrón, Vivian J.; Ko, Minoru S. H.; Chi, Kenneth D.; Gross, Jason P.; Srinivas, Pothur R.; Goustin, Anton Scott

    2000-01-01

    Fetuin/α2-HS glycoprotein (α2-HSG) homologs have been identified in several species including rat, sheep, pig, rabbit, guinea pig, cattle, mouse and human. Multiple physiological roles for these homologs have been suggested, including ability to bind to hydroxyapatite crystals and to specifically inhibit the tyrosine kinase (TK) activity of the insulin receptor (IR). In this study we report the identification, cloning, and characterization of the mouse Ahsg gene and its function as an IR-TK inhibitor. Genomic clones derived from a mouse Svj 129 genomic library were sequenced in order to characterize the intron–exon organization of the mouse Ahsg gene, including an 875 bp subclone containing 154 bp upstream from the transcription start site, the first exon, and part of the first intron. A second genomic subclone harboring a 3.45 kb Bgl II fragment contained exons 2, 3 and 4 in addition to two adjacent elements within the first intron-a repetitive element of the B1 family (92 bp) and a 271 bp tract of (T,C)n * (A,G)n. We have mapped mouse Ahsg at 16 cM adjacent to the Diacylglycerol kinase 3 (Dagk3) gene on chromosome 16 by genotyping interspecific backcross panels between C57BL/6J and Mus spretus. The position is syntenic with human chromosome 3q27, where the human AHSG gene resides. Using recombinant mouse α2-HSG expressed from a recombinant baculovirus, we demonstrate that mouse α2-HSG inhibits insulin–stimulated IR autophosphorylation and IR-TKA in vitro. In addition, mouse α2-HSG (25μg/ml) completely abolishes insulin-induced DNA synthesis in H-35 rat hepatoma cells. Based on the sequence data and functional analysis, we conclude that the mouse Ahsg gene is the true ortholog of the human AHSG gene. PMID:11467416

  14. MHC class I ligation of human T cells activates the ZAP70 and p56lck tyrosine kinases, leads to an alternative phenotype of the TCR/CD3 zeta-chain, and induces apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Bregenholt, S; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1997-01-01

    after TCR/CD3 stimulation. The phosphorylation of ZAP70 after MHC-I ligation was dependent on TCR/CD3 surface expression. One of the natural substrates for ZAP70 is the zeta-chain dimer of the TCR/CD3 complex. MHC-I cross-linking induces a phosphorylated zeta-protein that migrates as a dimer at 42 k......Da in SDS-PAGE and differs from the 38-kDa phosphorylated zeta-protein dimer induced by TCR/CD3 cross-linking. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the p56lck tyrosine kinase is tyrosine phosphorylated following MHC-I ligation, and that a p56lck-negative Jurkat T cell mutant does not induce phosphorylation...

  15. Cow's milk proteins in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, A; Orrù, S; Di Nicola, P; Giuliani, F; Rovelli, I; Peila, C; Martano, C; Chiale, F; Bertino, E

    2012-01-01

    Cow's milk proteins (CMPs) are among the best characterized food allergens. Cow's milk contains more than twenty five different proteins, but only whey proteins alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lactoferrin, as well as the four caseins, have been identified as allergens. Aim of this study was to investigate by proteomics techniques cow's milk allergens in human colostrum of term and preterm newborns' mothers, not previously detected, in order to understand if such allergens could be cause of sensitization during lactation. Term colostrum samples from 62 healthy mothers and preterm colostrum samples from 11 healthy mothers were collected for this purpose. The most relevant finding was the detection of the intact bovine alpha-S1-casein in both term and preterm colostrum. Using this method, which allows direct proteins identification, beta-lactoglobulin was not detected in any of colostrum samples. According to our results bovine alpha 1 casein that is considered a major cow's milk allergen is readily secreted in human milk: further investigations are needed in order to clarify if alpha-1-casein has a major role in sensitization or tolerance to cow's milk of exclusively breastfed predisposed infants.

  16. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase-STEPs toward understanding chronic stress-induced activation of corticotrophin releasing factor neurons in the rat bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, Joanna; Hazra, Rimi; Guo, Ji-Dong; Li, Chenchen; Dewitt, Sarah; Xu, Jian; Lombroso, Paul J; Rainnie, Donald G

    2013-12-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase that opposes the development of synaptic strengthening and the consolidation of fear memories. In contrast, stress facilitates fear memory formation, potentially by activating corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) neurons in the anterolateral cell group of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTALG). Here, using dual-immunofluorescence, single-cell reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology, we examined the expression and role of STEP in regulating synaptic plasticity in rat BNSTALG neurons and its modulation by stress. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase was selectively expressed in CRF neurons in the oval nucleus of the BNSTALG. Following repeated restraint stress (RRS), animals displayed a significant increase in anxiety-like behavior, which was associated with a downregulation of STEP messenger RNA and protein expression in the BNSTALG, as well as selectively enhancing the magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP) induced in Type III, putative CRF neurons. To determine if the changes in STEP expression following RRS were mechanistically related to LTP facilitation, we examined the effects of intracellular application of STEP on the induction of LTP. STEP completely blocked the RRS-induced facilitation of LTP in BNSTALG neurons. Hence, STEP acts to buffer CRF neurons against excessive activation, while downregulation of STEP after chronic stress may result in pathologic activation of CRF neurons in the BNSTALG and contribute to prolonged states of anxiety. Thus, targeted manipulations of STEP activity might represent a novel treatment strategy for stress-induced anxiety disorders. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  17. Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) contributes to Dectin-1-induced TNF-α production and complexes with caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9), spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), and Dectin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroza, Luis A; Kumar, Vipul; Sanborn, Keri B; Mace, Emily M; Niinikoski, Harri; Nadeau, Kari; Vasconcelos, Dewton de Moraes; Perez, Elena; Jyonouchi, Soma; Jyonouchi, Harumi; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Ruuskanen, Olli; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Orange, Jordan S

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome is a complex immunologic disease caused by mutation of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. Autoimmunity in patients with APECED syndrome has been shown to result from deficiency of AIRE function in transcriptional regulation of thymic peripheral tissue antigens, which leads to defective T-cell negative selection. Candidal susceptibility in patients with APECED syndrome is thought to result from aberrant adaptive immunity. To determine whether AIRE could function in anticandidal innate immune signaling, we investigated an extrathymic role for AIRE in the immune recognition of β-glucan through the Dectin-1 pathway, which is required for defense against Candida species. Innate immune signaling through the Dectin-1 pathway was assessed in both PBMCs from patients with APECED syndrome and a monocytic cell line. Subcellular localization of AIRE was assessed by using confocal microscopy. PBMCs from patients with APECED syndrome had reduced TNF-α responses after Dectin-1 ligation but in part used a Raf-1-mediated pathway to preserve function. In the THP-1 human monocytic cell line, reducing AIRE expression resulted in significantly decreased TNF-α release after Dectin-1 ligation. AIRE formed a transient complex with the known Dectin-1 pathway components phosphorylated spleen tyrosine kinase and caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 after receptor ligation and localized with Dectin-1 at the cell membrane. AIRE can participate in the Dectin-1 signaling pathway, indicating a novel extrathymic role for AIRE and a defect that likely contributes to fungal susceptibility in patients with APECED syndrome. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcription and epigenetic profile of the promoter, first exon and first intron of the human tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Gaetano; Macaluso, Marcella; Lucchetti, Chiara; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2007-05-01

    The transcriptional and chromatin profile of the promoter, first exon and first intron of the human TH gene were analyzed in human neuroblastoma BE(2)-C-16 and human renal carcinoma 293FT cell lines. The latter is a cell culture system that is not permissive for TH gene expression, whereas the former has a 50% cell fraction that tests positive for TH. The engineering of a 6.3 kb recombinant human TH promoter revealed the presence of repressors of transcription between positions (-6,244/-194). The addition of a 1.2 kb fragment of the first intron of the human TH gene (+730/+1,653) enhanced transcriptional activity of the recombinant promoter. However, both constructs were not specific for TH-positive BE(2)-C-16 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (Chip) analysis was carried out on BE(2)-C-16 and 293FT cells to probe sequences of promoter, first exon and first intron of the human TH gene from position (-448/+1,204). The presence of nucleosomes was observed approximately from position (-20/+473) in both cell lines. Chip analysis was then conducted to determine the acetylation of various lysine residues of H3 and H4 in both cell lines. All analyzed lysine residues of H3 and H4 were acetylated in BE(2)-C-16 cells, whereas 293FT cells tested positive for acetylation only in the external lysine residues of the histone tail. Our data are compatible with an active TH gene expression in a 50% cell fraction of BE(2)-C-16 cells. Further analysis of epigenetic programming might lead to the identification of the factors that determine TH gene expression specifically in dopaminergic neurons. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. LST1/A is a myeloid leukocyte-specific transmembrane adaptor protein recruiting protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 to the plasma membrane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Peter; Štěpánek, Ondřej; Hrdinka, Matouš; Drobek, Aleš; Chmátal, Lukáš; Malá, Linda; Ormsby, Tereza; Angelisová, Pavla; Hořejší, Václav; Brdička, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 287, č. 27 (2012), s. 22812-228221 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GEMEM/09/E011; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA MŠk 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : adaptor proteins * myeloid cell * signal transduction * tetraspanins * LST1/A Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.651, year: 2012

  20. Chimeric design, synthesis, and biological assays of a new nonpeptide insulin-mimetic vanadium compound to inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Scior

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Scior1, José Antonio Guevara-García2, FJ Melendez2, Hassan H Abdallah3, Quoc-Tuan Do4, Philippe Bernard41Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Pue, Puebla, Mexico; 2Faculty of Basic Sciences, Technology and Engineering, Laboratory of Research in Bioinorganic and Bioremediation, Universidad Autónoma de Tlaxcala, Apizaco, Tlaxcala, México; 3School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia; 4GreenPharma S.A., 3 Allée du Titane, Orléans, FranceAbstract: Prior to its total synthesis, a new vanadium coordination compound, called TSAG0101, was computationally designed to inhibit the enzyme protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B. The PTP1B acts as a negative regulator of insulin signaling by blocking the active site where phosphate hydrolysis of the insulin receptor takes place. TSAG001, [VVO2(OH(picolinamide], was characterized by infrared (IR and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy; IR: ν/cm-1 3,570 (NH, 1,627 (C=O, coordinated, 1,417 (C-N, 970/842 (O=V=O, 727 δ (pyridine ring; 13C NMR: 5 bands between 122 and 151 ppm and carbonyl C shifted to 180 ppm; and 1H NMR: 4 broad bands from 7.6 to 8.2 ppm and NH2 shifted to 8.8 ppm. In aqueous solution, in presence or absence of sodium citrate as a biologically relevant and ubiquitous chelator, TSAG0101 undergoes neither ligand exchange nor reduction of its central vanadium atom during 24 hours. TSAG0101 shows blood glucose lowering effects in rats but it produced no alteration of basal- or glucose-induced insulin secretion on β cells during in vitro tests, all of which excludes a direct mechanism evidencing the extrapancreatic nature of its activity. The lethal dose (LD50 of TSAG0101 was determined in Wistar mice yielding a value of 412 mg/Kg. This value is one of the highest among vanadium compounds and classifies it as a mild toxicity agent when compared with literature data. Due to its nonsubstituted, small-sized scaffold design

  1. Upregulation of ICAM-1 Expression on J774.2 Macrophages by Endotoxin Involves Activation of NF-κB but not Protein Tyrosine Kinase: Comparison to Induction of iNOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmut Ruetten

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the signal transduction pathway which leads to the upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 expression with that of the increase in the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS protein and activity caused by endotoxin in cultured J774.2 macrophages. Treatment of J774.2 cells with lipopolysaccharide E. coli (LPS induced a concentration-dependent increase in the expression of ICAM-1 on the cell surface within 4 h and an increase in iNOS protein and activity at 24 h. The upregulation of ICAM-1 expression on J774.2 macrophages caused by LPS was significantly inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with inhibitors of the activation of the nuclear transcription factor NF-κB, such as L-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethylchloromethyl ketone (TPCK, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, rotenone or calpain inhibitor I, but not by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, tyrphostin AG126 or genistein. In contrast, genistein or tyrphostin AG126 also prevented the induction of iNOS protein and activity in J774.2 macrophages elicited by LPS. Thus, the increase in the expression of ICAM-1 on J774.2 macrophages by endotoxin involves the activation of NFκB, but not of protein tyrosine kinase.

  2. Analysis of tyrosine-O-sulfation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, J.R.; Sen, J.W.; Johnsen, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Tyrosine O-sulfation was first described about 50 years ago as a post-translational modification of fibrinogen. In the following 30 years it was considered to be a rare modification affecting only a few proteins and peptides. However, in the beginning of the 1980s tyrosine (Tyr) sulfation was shown...... to be a common modification and since then an increasing number of proteins have been identified as sulfated. The target proteins belong to the classes of secretory, plasma membrane, and lysosomal proteins, which reflects the intracellular localization of the enzymes catalyzing Tyr sulfation, the tyrosylprotein...... sulfotransferases (TPSTs).Traditionally, Tyr sulfation has been analyzed by incorporation of radiolabeled sulfate into target cells followed by purification of the target protein. Subsequently, the protein is degraded enzymatically or by alkaline hydrolysis followed by thin-layer electrophoresis to demonstrate...

  3. Ror receptor tyrosine kinases: orphans no more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer L; Kuntz, Steven G; Sternberg, Paul W

    2008-11-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor (Ror) proteins are a conserved family of tyrosine kinase receptors that function in developmental processes including skeletal and neuronal development, cell movement and cell polarity. Although Ror proteins were originally named because the associated ligand and signaling pathway were unknown, recent studies in multiple species have now established that Ror proteins are Wnt receptors. Depending on the cellular context, Ror proteins can either activate or repress transcription of Wnt target genes and can modulate Wnt signaling by sequestering Wnt ligands. New evidence implicates Ror proteins in planar cell polarity, an alternative Wnt pathway. Here, we review the progress made in understanding these mysterious proteins and, in particular, we focus on their function as Wnt receptors.

  4. RNA-Seq Differentiates Tumour and Host mRNA Expression Changes Induced by Treatment of Human Tumour Xenografts with the VEGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Cediranib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, James R; Farren, Matthew; Powell, Steve J; Runswick, Sarah; Weston, Susie L; Brown, Helen; Delpuech, Oona; Wappett, Mark; Smith, Neil R; Carr, T Hedley; Dry, Jonathan R; Gibson, Neil J; Barry, Simon T

    2013-01-01

    Pre-clinical models of tumour biology often rely on propagating human tumour cells in a mouse. In order to gain insight into the alignment of these models to human disease segments or investigate the effects of different therapeutics, approaches such as PCR or array based expression profiling are often employed despite suffering from biased transcript coverage, and a requirement for specialist experimental protocols to separate tumour and host signals. Here, we describe a computational strategy to profile transcript expression in both the tumour and host compartments of pre-clinical xenograft models from the same RNA sample using RNA-Seq. Key to this strategy is a species-specific mapping approach that removes the need for manipulation of the RNA population, customised sequencing protocols, or prior knowledge of the species component ratio. The method demonstrates comparable performance to species-specific RT-qPCR and a standard microarray platform, and allowed us to quantify gene expression changes in both the tumour and host tissue following treatment with cediranib, a potent vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, including the reduction of multiple murine transcripts associated with endothelium or vessels, and an increase in genes associated with the inflammatory response in response to cediranib. In the human compartment, we observed a robust induction of hypoxia genes and a reduction in cell cycle associated transcripts. In conclusion, the study establishes that RNA-Seq can be applied to pre-clinical models to gain deeper understanding of model characteristics and compound mechanism of action, and to identify both tumour and host biomarkers.

  5. RNA-Seq Differentiates Tumour and Host mRNA Expression Changes Induced by Treatment of Human Tumour Xenografts with the VEGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Cediranib.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Bradford

    Full Text Available Pre-clinical models of tumour biology often rely on propagating human tumour cells in a mouse. In order to gain insight into the alignment of these models to human disease segments or investigate the effects of different therapeutics, approaches such as PCR or array based expression profiling are often employed despite suffering from biased transcript coverage, and a requirement for specialist experimental protocols to separate tumour and host signals. Here, we describe a computational strategy to profile transcript expression in both the tumour and host compartments of pre-clinical xenograft models from the same RNA sample using RNA-Seq. Key to this strategy is a species-specific mapping approach that removes the need for manipulation of the RNA population, customised sequencing protocols, or prior knowledge of the species component ratio. The method demonstrates comparable performance to species-specific RT-qPCR and a standard microarray platform, and allowed us to quantify gene expression changes in both the tumour and host tissue following treatment with cediranib, a potent vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, including the reduction of multiple murine transcripts associated with endothelium or vessels, and an increase in genes associated with the inflammatory response in response to cediranib. In the human compartment, we observed a robust induction of hypoxia genes and a reduction in cell cycle associated transcripts. In conclusion, the study establishes that RNA-Seq can be applied to pre-clinical models to gain deeper understanding of model characteristics and compound mechanism of action, and to identify both tumour and host biomarkers.

  6. A validated assay for the simultaneous quantification of six tyrosine kinase inhibitors and two active metabolites in human serum using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, N. van; Wit, D. de; Guchelaar, H.J.; Gelderblom, H.; Hessing, T.J.; Hartigh, J. den

    2013-01-01

    A sensitive, sophisticated and practical bioanalytical assay for the simultaneous determination of six tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib, sunitinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, pazopanib, regorafenib) and two active metabolites (N-desmethyl imatinib and N-desethyl sunitinib) was developed and

  7. Inferring modules from human protein interactome classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, Elisabetta; Travaglione, Antonella; Chaurasia, Gautam; Futschik, Matthias; Capobianco, Enrico

    2010-07-23

    The integration of protein-protein interaction networks derived from high-throughput screening approaches and complementary sources is a key topic in systems biology. Although integration of protein interaction data is conventionally performed, the effects of this procedure on the result of network analyses has not been examined yet. In particular, in order to optimize the fusion of heterogeneous interaction datasets, it is crucial to consider not only their degree of coverage and accuracy, but also their mutual dependencies and additional salient features. We examined this issue based on the analysis of modules detected by network clustering methods applied to both integrated and individual (disaggregated) data sources, which we call interactome classes. Due to class diversity, we deal with variable dependencies of data features arising from structural specificities and biases, but also from possible overlaps. Since highly connected regions of the human interactome may point to potential protein complexes, we have focused on the concept of modularity, and elucidated the detection power of module extraction algorithms by independent validations based on GO, MIPS and KEGG. From the combination of protein interactions with gene expressions, a confidence scoring scheme has been proposed before proceeding via GO with further classification in permanent and transient modules. Disaggregated interactomes are shown to be informative for inferring modularity, thus contributing to perform an effective integrative analysis. Validation of the extracted modules by multiple annotation allows for the assessment of confidence measures assigned to the modules in a protein pathway context. Notably, the proposed multilayer confidence scheme can be used for network calibration by enabling a transition from unweighted to weighted interactomes based on biological evidence.

  8. Inferring modules from human protein interactome classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaurasia Gautam

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of protein-protein interaction networks derived from high-throughput screening approaches and complementary sources is a key topic in systems biology. Although integration of protein interaction data is conventionally performed, the effects of this procedure on the result of network analyses has not been examined yet. In particular, in order to optimize the fusion of heterogeneous interaction datasets, it is crucial to consider not only their degree of coverage and accuracy, but also their mutual dependencies and additional salient features. Results We examined this issue based on the analysis of modules detected by network clustering methods applied to both integrated and individual (disaggregated data sources, which we call interactome classes. Due to class diversity, we deal with variable dependencies of data features arising from structural specificities and biases, but also from possible overlaps. Since highly connected regions of the human interactome may point to potential protein complexes, we have focused on the concept of modularity, and elucidated the detection power of module extraction algorithms by independent validations based on GO, MIPS and KEGG. From the combination of protein interactions with gene expressions, a confidence scoring scheme has been proposed before proceeding via GO with further classification in permanent and transient modules. Conclusions Disaggregated interactomes are shown to be informative for inferring modularity, thus contributing to perform an effective integrative analysis. Validation of the extracted modules by multiple annotation allows for the assessment of confidence measures assigned to the modules in a protein pathway context. Notably, the proposed multilayer confidence scheme can be used for network calibration by enabling a transition from unweighted to weighted interactomes based on biological evidence.

  9. Mitochondrial Fusion Proteins and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Ranieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic, complex organelles that continuously alter their shape, ranging between two opposite processes, fission and fusion, in response to several stimuli and the metabolic demands of the cell. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics due to mutations in proteins involved in the fusion-fission machinery represent an important pathogenic mechanism of human diseases. The most relevant proteins involved in the mitochondrial fusion process are three GTPase dynamin-like proteins: mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and 2 (MFN2, located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, and optic atrophy protein 1 (OPA1, in the inner membrane. An expanding number of degenerative disorders are associated with mutations in the genes encoding MFN2 and OPA1, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. While these disorders can still be considered rare, defective mitochondrial dynamics seem to play a significant role in the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of more common neurodegenerative diseases, for example, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This review provides an overview of the basic molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial fusion and focuses on the alteration in mitochondrial DNA amount resulting from impairment of mitochondrial dynamics. We also review the literature describing the main disorders associated with the disruption of mitochondrial fusion.

  10. Concurrent Autophagy Inhibition Overcomes the Resistance of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Human Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyong Kang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the potential therapeutic efficacy of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors in the treatment of advanced stage bladder cancer, there currently is no clear evidence to support this hypothesis. In this study, we investigate whether the concurrent treatment of autophagy-blocking agents with EGFR inhibitors exerts synergistic anti-cancer effects in T24 and J82 human bladder cancer cells. Lapatinib and gefitinib were used as EGFR inhibitors, and bafilomycin A1 (BFA1, chloroquine (CQ and 3-methyladenine (3-MA were used as the pharmacologic inhibitors of autophagy activities. To assess the proliferative and self-renewal capabilities, the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 assay and a clonogenic assay were performed, respectively. To examine apoptotic cell death, flow cytometry using annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI was used. To measure the autophagy activities, the expression levels of LC3I and II was determined by Western blot analysis. To validate the synergistic effects of autophagy inhibition with EGFR inhibitors, we specifically blocked key autophagy regulatory gene ATG12 by transfection of small interference RNA and examined the phenotypic changes. Of note, lapatinib and gefitinib triggered autophagy activities in T24 and J82 human bladder cancer cells, as indicated by upregulation of LC3II. More importantly, inhibiting autophagy activities with pharmacologic inhibitors (BFA1, CQ or 3-MA remarkably reduced the cell viabilities and clonal proliferation of T24 and J82 cells, compared to those treated with either of the agents alone. We also obtained similar results of the enhanced anti-cancer effects of EGFR inhibitors by suppressing the expression of ATG12. Notably, the apoptotic assay showed that synergistic anti-cancer effects were induced via the increase of apoptotic cell death. In summary, concomitant inhibition of autophagy activities potentiated the anti-cancer effects of EGFR inhibitors in human bladder cancer cells, indicating

  11. Involvement of Src tyrosine kinase and protein kinase C in the expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in HL-1 mouse cardiac muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, F. [Department of Cardiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou (China); Research Center of Medical Sciences, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou (China); Deng, C.Y. [Research Center of Medical Sciences, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Q.H.; Xue, Y.M. [Department of Cardiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou (China); Xiao, D.Z.; Kuang, S.J.; Lin, Q.X.; Shan, Z.X.; Liu, X.Y.; Zhu, J.N. [Research Center of Medical Sciences, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou (China); Yu, X.Y. [Department of Cardiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou (China); Research Center of Medical Sciences, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou (China); Wu, S.L. [Department of Cardiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-09-06

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a pleiotropic cytokine, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation; however, the upstream regulation of MIF in atrial myocytes remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether and how MIF is regulated in response to the renin-angiotensin system and oxidative stress in atrium myocytes (HL-1 cells). MIF protein and mRNA levels in HL-1 cells were assayed using immunofluorescence, real-time PCR, and Western blot. The result indicated that MIF was expressed in the cytoplasm of HL-1 cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), but not angiotensin II, stimulated MIF expression in HL-1 cells. H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced MIF protein and gene levels increased in a dose-dependent manner and were completely abolished in the presence of catalase. H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced MIF production was completely inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and PP1, as well as by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X, suggesting that redox-sensitive MIF production is mediated through tyrosine kinase and PKC-dependent mechanisms in HL-1 cells. These results suggest that MIF is upregulated by HL-1 cells in response to redox stress, probably by the activation of Src and PKC.

  12. Expression, refolding and spectroscopic characterization of fibronectin type III (FnIII)-homology domains derived from human fibronectin leucine rich transmembrane protein (FLRT)-1,-2, and-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Lila; Falkesgaard, Maria Hansen; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben

    2017-01-01

    The fibronectin leucine rich transmembrane (FLRT) protein family consists in humans of 3 proteins, FLRT1, -2, and -3. The FLRT proteins contain two extracellular domains separated by an unstructured linker. The most membrane distal part is a leucine rich repeat (LRR) domain responsible for both cis......- and trans-interactions, whereas the membrane proximal part is a fibronectin type III (FnIII) domain responsible for a cis-interaction with members of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) family, which results in FGFR tyrosine kinase activation. Whereas the structures of FLRT LRR domains from...

  13. Protein analysis through Western blot of cells excised individually from human brain and muscle tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koob, A O; Bruns, L; Prassler, C; Masliah, E; Klopstock, T; Bender, A

    2012-06-15

    Comparing protein levels from single cells in tissue has not been achieved through Western blot. Laser capture microdissection allows for the ability to excise single cells from sectioned tissue and compile an aggregate of cells in lysis buffer. In this study we analyzed proteins from cells excised individually from brain and muscle tissue through Western blot. After we excised individual neurons from the substantia nigra of the brain, the accumulated surface area of the individual cells was 120,000, 24,000, 360,000, 480,000, 600,000 μm2. We used an optimized Western blot protocol to probe for tyrosine hydroxylase in this cell pool. We also took 360,000 μm2 of astrocytes (1700 cells) and analyzed the specificity of the method. In muscle we were able to analyze the proteins of the five complexes of the electron transport chain through Western blot from 200 human cells. With this method, we demonstrate the ability to compare cell-specific protein levels in the brain and muscle and describe for the first time how to visualize proteins through Western blot from cells captured individually. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tyrosine metabolic enzymes from insects and mammals: a comparative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavricka, Christopher John; Han, Qian; Mehere, Prajwalini; Ding, Haizhen; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2014-02-01

    Differences in the metabolism of tyrosine between insects and mammals present an interesting example of molecular evolution. Both insects and mammals possess fine-tuned systems of enzymes to meet their specific demands for tyrosine metabolites; however, more homologous enzymes involved in tyrosine metabolism have emerged in many insect species. Without knowledge of modern genomics, one might suppose that mammals, which are generally more complex than insects and require tyrosine as a precursor for important catecholamine neurotransmitters and for melanin, should possess more enzymes to control tyrosine metabolism. Therefore, the question of why insects actually possess more tyrosine metabolic enzymes is quite interesting. It has long been known that insects rely heavily on tyrosine metabolism for cuticle hardening and for innate immune responses, and these evolutionary constraints are likely the key answers to this question. In terms of melanogenesis, mammals also possess a high level of regulation; yet mammalian systems possess more mechanisms for detoxification whereas insects accelerate pathways like melanogenesis and therefore must bear increased oxidative pressure. Our research group has had the opportunity to characterize the structure and function of many key proteins involved in tyrosine metabolism from both insects and mammals. In this mini review we will give a brief overview of our research on tyrosine metabolic enzymes in the scope of an evolutionary perspective of mammals in comparison to insects. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Phosphoproteomics identified Endofin, DCBLD2, and KIAA0582 as novel tyrosine phosphorylation targets of EGF signaling and Iressa in human cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunhao; Low, Teck-Yew; Choong, Lee-Yee

    2007-01-01

    With the completion of the human genome project, analysis of enriched phosphotyrosyl proteins from epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced phosphotyrosine proteome permits the identification of novel downstream substrates of the EGF receptor (EGFR). Using cICAT-based LC-MS/MS method, we identified ...

  16. 123I-2-iodo-tyrosine, a new tumour imaging agent: human biodistribution, dosimetry and initial clinical evaluation in glioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyaerts, Marleen; Lahoutte, Tony; Neyns, Bart; Caveliers, Vicky; Vanhove, Chris; Everaert, Hendrik; Kersemans, Ken; Franken, Philippe R; Mertens, John; Bossuyt, Axel

    2007-07-01

    123I-2-iodo-tyrosine (123I-2IT) has been identified as a promising new amino acid tracer in animals. Uptake is mediated by LAT1 transport, which is increased in tumour cells. In this study we present the human biodistribution and first clinical results in glioma patients. For the biodistribution study, six male volunteers received 60-95 MBq 123I-2IT. Whole-body scans and blood and urine samples were obtained up to 24 h after injection; dosimetry was calculated using OLINDA 1.0 software. Initial clinical evaluation of 123I-2IT SPECT was performed in 35 patients with suspected or known glioma, either as primary diagnosis or for detection of recurrence. Tumour-to-background (T/B) ratios were calculated for semi-quantitative analysis. The results were correlated with clinical and MRI follow-up data or histology. 123I-2IT showed both renal and intestinal clearance. Bladder (0.12 mGy/MBq) and small intestine (0.03 mGy/MBq) received the highest absorbed doses. The effective dose equivalent and effective dose were estimated at 0.020 and 0.016 mSv/MBq, respectively. In patients, 123I-2IT SPECT did not differentiate between neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions after an indeterminate MRI. In follow-up of known glioma, 13/15 patients with disease recurrence had increased T/B values (range 1.39-3.91). Out of seven recurrence-negative patients, two showed an important increase in T/B, in one case due to radionecrosis (T/B 1.59) and in the other probably due to residual but stable disease (T/B 2.07). 123I-2IT has a favourable biodistribution for a tumour imaging agent. It shows increased uptake in central nervous system glioma and is potentially useful in the follow-up of glioma patients.

  17. Human milk protein and medium-chain triglyceride oil supplementation of human milk: plasma amino acids in very low-birth-weight infants.