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Sample records for human protein phosphatase

  1. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  2. Protein Phosphatase 2A Signaling in Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    phosphatidylinositol 3’-kinase and Akt/protein kinase B. Cancer Res 1999;59:1449-53. (14) Grethe S, Porn -Ares MI. p38 MAPK regulates phosphorylation of Bad...growth and sig- nalling. Biochem J 2001;353:417–39. 15. Grethe S, Porn -Ares MI. p38 MAPK regulates phosphorylation of Bad via PP2A-dependent suppression of

  3. Sodium arsenite induces chromosome endoreduplication and inhibits protein phosphatase activity in human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong-Nan Huang; I-Ching Ho; Ling-Hui Yih [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Taiwan (China)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Arsenic, strongly associated with increased risks of human cancers, is a potent clastogen in a variety of mammalian cell systems. The effect of sodium arsenite (a trivalent arsenic compound) on chromatid separation was studied in human skin fibroblasts (HFW). Human fibroblasts were arrested in S phase by the aid of serum starvation and aphidicolin blocking and then these cells were allowed to synchronously progress into G2 phase. Treatment of the G2-enriched HFW cells with sodium arsenite (0-200 {mu}M) resulted in arrest of cells in the G2 phase, interference with mitotic division, inhibition of spindle assembly, and induction of chromosome endoreduplication in their second mitosis. Sodium arsenite treatment also inhibited the activities of serine/threonine protein phosphatases and enhanced phosphorylation levels of a small heat shock protein (HSP27). These results suggest that sodium arsenite may mimic okadaic acid to induce chromosome endoreduplication through its inhibitory effect on protein phosphatase activity. 61 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Human RIF1 and protein phosphatase 1 stimulate DNA replication origin licensing but suppress origin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Shin-Ichiro; Ly, Tony; Garzón, Javier; Hořejší, Zuzana; Ohkubo, Yoshi-Nobu; Endo, Akinori; Obuse, Chikashi; Boulton, Simon J; Lamond, Angus I; Donaldson, Anne D

    2017-03-01

    The human RIF1 protein controls DNA replication, but the molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that human RIF1 negatively regulates DNA replication by forming a complex with protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) that limits phosphorylation-mediated activation of the MCM replicative helicase. We identify specific residues on four MCM helicase subunits that show hyperphosphorylation upon RIF1 depletion, with the regulatory N-terminal domain of MCM4 being particularly strongly affected. In addition to this role in limiting origin activation, we discover an unexpected new role for human RIF1-PP1 in mediating efficient origin licensing. Specifically, during the G1 phase of the cell cycle, RIF1-PP1 protects the origin-binding ORC1 protein from untimely phosphorylation and consequent degradation by the proteasome. Depletion of RIF1 or inhibition of PP1 destabilizes ORC1, thereby reducing origin licensing. Consistent with reduced origin licensing, RIF1-depleted cells exhibit increased spacing between active origins. Human RIF1 therefore acts as a PP1-targeting subunit that regulates DNA replication positively by stimulating the origin licensing step, and then negatively by counteracting replication origin activation. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  5. Protein tyrosine phosphatases as potential therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rong-Jun; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2014-10-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a key regulatory process in virtually all aspects of cellular functions. Dysregulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a major cause of human diseases, such as cancers, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, and neurological diseases. Indeed, protein tyrosine phosphorylation-mediated signaling events offer ample therapeutic targets, and drug discovery efforts to date have brought over two dozen kinase inhibitors to the clinic. Accordingly, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are considered next-generation drug targets. For instance, PTP1B is a well-known targets of type 2 diabetes and obesity, and recent studies indicate that it is also a promising target for breast cancer. SHP2 is a bona-fide oncoprotein, mutations of which cause juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and solid tumors. In addition, LYP is strongly associated with type 1 diabetes and many other autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes recent findings on several highly recognized PTP family drug targets, including PTP1B, Src homology phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2(SHP2), lymphoid-specific tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), CD45, Fas associated phosphatase-1 (FAP-1), striatal enriched tyrosine phosphatases (STEP), mitogen-activated protein kinase/dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (MKP-1), phosphatases of regenerating liver-1 (PRL), low molecular weight PTPs (LMWPTP), and CDC25. Given that there are over 100 family members, we hope this review will serve as a road map for innovative drug discovery targeting PTPs.

  6. Protein tyrosine phosphatase variants in human hereditary disorders and disease susceptibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2013-10-01

    Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins is a key regulatory mechanism to steer normal development and physiological functioning of multicellular organisms. Phosphotyrosine dephosphorylation is exerted by members of the super-family of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) enzymes and many play such essential roles that a wide variety of hereditary disorders and disease susceptibilities in man are caused by PTP alleles. More than two decades of PTP research has resulted in a collection of PTP genetic variants with corresponding consequences at the molecular, cellular and physiological level. Here we present a comprehensive overview of these PTP gene variants that have been linked to disease states in man. Although the findings have direct bearing for disease diagnostics and for research on disease etiology, more work is necessary to translate this into therapies that alleviate the burden of these hereditary disorders and disease susceptibilities in man. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein tyrosine phosphatases in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, W.J.; Elson, A.; Harroch, S.; Pulido, R.; Stoker, A.; den Hertog, J.

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) represent a super-family of enzymes that play essential roles in normal development and physiology. In this review, we will discuss the PTPs that have a causative role in hereditary diseases in humans. In addition, recent progress in the development and analysis

  8. Studying Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatases in Zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hale, Alexander James; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a large family of signal transduction regulators that have an essential role in normal development and physiology. Aberrant activation or inactivation of PTPs is at the basis of many human diseases. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is being used extensively to

  9. Interleukin 2 induces a transient downregulation of protein phosphatase 1 and 2A activity in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockdorff, J; Nielsen, M; Dobson, P

    1997-01-01

    /threonine phosphatases in antigen specific, CD4+ human T cell lines. Using inhibitors of protein phosphatases 1 (PP1, PP2A, and PP2B, we provide evidence, that IL-2 induces a downregulation of PP activity in the cytoplasmic/membrane fraction. Thus, IL-2R ligation for 30 min triggers a 16 percent decrease in total PP2A...... activity (p 2A activity reaches a maximum 60 min after IL-2R ligation, and returns to baseline levels within two hours. Downregulation of PPI activity reaches a maximum after 30 min...... and is largely reversed one hour after IL-2 stimulation. As determined from immunoblotting experiments using a specific anti-PP1 or anti-PP2A antibody, the amount of PPI and PP2A recovered from cytosolic/membrane fraction remains unchanged after IL-2 treatment suggesting that the drop in PP1/PP2A activity might...

  10. Protein phosphatases and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Steven P; Stock, Jeffry B; Lombroso, Paul J; Nairn, Angus C

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is characterized by progressive loss of cognitive function, linked to marked neuronal loss. Pathological hallmarks of the disease are the accumulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the form of amyloid plaques and the intracellular formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Accumulating evidence supports a key role for protein phosphorylation in both the normal and pathological actions of Aβ as well as the formation of NFTs. NFTs contain hyperphosphorylated forms of the microtubule-binding protein tau, and phosphorylation of tau by several different kinases leads to its aggregation. The protein kinases involved in the generation and/or actions of tau or Aβ are viable drug targets to prevent or alleviate AD pathology. However, it has also been recognized that the protein phosphatases that reverse the actions of these protein kinases are equally important. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of serine/threonine and tyrosine protein phosphatases in the pathology of AD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Metal ions mediate the binding of cyanobacterial toxins to human protein phosphatase I:a computational study

    OpenAIRE

    Mattila, K. (Kimmo); Annila, A. (Arto); Rantala, T. T. (Tapio T.)

    2000-01-01

    Abstract The binding mechanisms of two cyanobacterial toxins, Microcystin-LR and Nodularin, to Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) were studied with molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. The models of the two toxin-phosphatase complexes are based on the structure of PP1-microcystin complex determined by X-ray crystallography, and on the conformation of nodularin in water determined by NMR. The binding site of PP1 including the ligated toxin and the surrounding ...

  12. Downregulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-BL represses adipogenesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glondu-Lassis, M.; Dromard, M.; Chavey, C.; Puech, C.; Fajas, L.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Freiss, G.

    2009-01-01

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling pathway is a major regulator of adipose tissue growth and differentiation. We recently demonstrated that human protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) L1, a large cytoplasmic phosphatase also known as PTP-BAS/PTPN13/PTP-1E, is a negative

  13. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection in humanized mice and metabolic stability of protein phosphatase-1-targeting small molecule 1E7-03

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Xionghao; Kumari, Namita; DeMarino, Catherine; Kont, Yasemin Saygideğer; Ammosova, Tatiana; Kulkarni, Amol; Jerebtsova, Marina; Vazquez-Meves, Guelaguetza; Ivanov, Andrey; Dmytro, Kovalskyy; Üren, Aykut; Kashanchi, Fatah; Nekhai, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    We recently identified the protein phosphatase-1 - targeting compound, 1E7-03 which inhibited HIV-1 in vitro. Here, we investigated the effect of 1E7-03 on HIV-1 infection in vivo by analyzing its metabolic stability and antiviral activity of 1E7-03 and its metabolites in HIV-1 infected NSG-humanized mice. 1E7-03 was degraded in serum and formed two major degradation products, DP1 and DP3, which bound protein phosphatase-1 in vitro. However, their anti-viral activities were significantly redu...

  14. Hypothermic Preconditioning Reverses Tau Ontogenesis in Human Cortical Neurons and is Mimicked by Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibition

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    Nina M. Rzechorzek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypothermia is potently neuroprotective, but the molecular basis of this effect remains obscure. Changes in neuronal tau protein are of interest, since tau becomes hyperphosphorylated in injury-resistant, hypothermic brains. Noting inter-species differences in tau isoforms, we have used functional cortical neurons differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hCNs to interrogate tau modulation during hypothermic preconditioning at clinically-relevant temperatures. Key tau developmental transitions (phosphorylation status and splicing shift are recapitulated during hCN differentiation and subsequently reversed by mild (32 °C to moderate (28 °C cooling — conditions which reduce oxidative and excitotoxic stress-mediated injury in hCNs. Blocking a major tau kinase decreases hCN tau phosphorylation and abrogates hypothermic neuroprotection, whilst inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A mimics cooling-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and protects normothermic hCNs from oxidative stress. These findings indicate a possible role for phospho-tau in hypothermic preconditioning, and suggest that cooling drives human tau towards an earlier ontogenic phenotype whilst increasing neuronal resilience to common neurotoxic insults. This work provides a critical step forward in understanding how we might exploit the neuroprotective benefits of cooling without cooling patients.

  15. cAMP response element binding protein (CREB activates transcription via two distinct genetic elements of the human glucose-6-phosphatase gene

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    Stefano Luisa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of glucose-6-phosphatase to glucose, the final step in the gluconeogenic and glycogenolytic pathways. Expression of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene is induced by glucocorticoids and elevated levels of intracellular cAMP. The effect of cAMP in regulating glucose-6-phosphatase gene transcription was corroborated by the identification of two genetic motifs CRE1 and CRE2 in the human and murine glucose-6-phosphatase gene promoter that resemble cAMP response elements (CRE. Results The cAMP response element is a point of convergence for many extracellular and intracellular signals, including cAMP, calcium, and neurotrophins. The major CRE binding protein CREB, a member of the basic region leucine zipper (bZIP family of transcription factors, requires phosphorylation to become a biologically active transcriptional activator. Since unphosphorylated CREB is transcriptionally silent simple overexpression studies cannot be performed to test the biological role of CRE-like sequences of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. The use of a constitutively active CREB2/CREB fusion protein allowed us to uncouple the investigation of target genes of CREB from the variety of signaling pathways that lead to an activation of CREB. Here, we show that this constitutively active CREB2/CREB fusion protein strikingly enhanced reporter gene transcription mediated by either CRE1 or CRE2 derived from the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. Likewise, reporter gene transcription was enhanced following expression of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA in the nucleus of transfected cells. In contrast, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2, known to compete with CREB for binding to the canonical CRE sequence 5'-TGACGTCA-3', did not transactivate reporter genes containing CRE1, CRE2, or both CREs derived from the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. Conclusions Using a constitutively active CREB2

  16. A rapid lateral flow immunoassay for the detection of tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 autoantibodies in human serum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Kikkas

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D results from the destruction of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells and is strongly associated with the presence of islet autoantibodies. Autoantibodies to tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 (IA-2As are considered to be highly predictive markers of T1D. We developed a novel lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA based on a bridging format for the rapid detection of IA-2As in human serum samples. In this assay, one site of the IA-2As is bound to HA-tagged-IA-2, which is subsequently captured on the anti-HA-Tag antibody-coated test line on the strip. The other site of the IA-2As is bound to biotinylated IA-2, allowing the complex to be visualized using colloidal gold nanoparticle-conjugated streptavidin. For this study, 35 serum samples from T1D patients and 44 control sera from non-diabetic individuals were analyzed with our novel assay and the results were correlated with two IA-2A ELISAs. Among the 35 serum samples from T1D patients, the IA-2A LFIA, the in-house IA-2A ELISA and the commercial IA-2A ELISA identified as positive 21, 29 and 30 IA-2A-positive sera, respectively. The major advantages of the IA-2A LFIA are its rapidity and simplicity.

  17. A rapid lateral flow immunoassay for the detection of tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 autoantibodies in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkas, Ingrid; Mallone, Roberto; Larger, Etienne; Volland, Hervé; Morel, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from the destruction of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells and is strongly associated with the presence of islet autoantibodies. Autoantibodies to tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 (IA-2As) are considered to be highly predictive markers of T1D. We developed a novel lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) based on a bridging format for the rapid detection of IA-2As in human serum samples. In this assay, one site of the IA-2As is bound to HA-tagged-IA-2, which is subsequently captured on the anti-HA-Tag antibody-coated test line on the strip. The other site of the IA-2As is bound to biotinylated IA-2, allowing the complex to be visualized using colloidal gold nanoparticle-conjugated streptavidin. For this study, 35 serum samples from T1D patients and 44 control sera from non-diabetic individuals were analyzed with our novel assay and the results were correlated with two IA-2A ELISAs. Among the 35 serum samples from T1D patients, the IA-2A LFIA, the in-house IA-2A ELISA and the commercial IA-2A ELISA identified as positive 21, 29 and 30 IA-2A-positive sera, respectively. The major advantages of the IA-2A LFIA are its rapidity and simplicity.

  18. Alkaline Phosphatase, an Unconventional Immune Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A. Rader

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen an increase in the number of studies focusing on alkaline phosphatases (APs, revealing an expanding complexity of function of these enzymes. Of the four human AP (hAP proteins, most is known about tissue non-specific AP (TNAP and intestinal AP (IAP. This review highlights current understanding of TNAP and IAP in relation to human health and disease. TNAP plays a role in multiple processes, including bone mineralization, vitamin B6 metabolism, and neurogenesis, is the genetic cause of hypophosphatasia, influences inflammation through regulation of purinergic signaling, and has been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. IAP regulates fatty acid absorption and has been implicated in the regulation of diet-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome. IAP and TNAP can dephosphorylate bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharide, and IAP has been identified as a potential regulator of the composition of the intestinal microbiome, an evolutionarily conserved function. Endogenous and recombinant bovine APs and recombinant hAPs are currently being explored for their potential as pharmacological agents to treat AP-associated diseases and mitigate multiple sources of inflammation. Continued research on these versatile proteins will undoubtedly provide insight into human pathophysiology, biochemistry, and the human holobiont.

  19. Protein phosphatase 2A plays a critical role in interleukin-2-induced beta 2-integrin dependent homotypic adhesion in human CD4+ T cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockdorff, J; Nielsen, M; Svejgaard, A

    1997-01-01

    A, blocks PP1/PP2A activity and IL-2 induced adhesion, whereas cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2B (PP2B), does not, suggesting that PP1 and/or PP2A are involved in IL-2 induced adhesion. Endothall, which preferentially inhibits PP2A, strongly inhibited cytokine...... modulates enzymatic activity and/or subcellular distribution of serine/threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1/PP2A) in T cells, we examined the role of these phosphatases in IL-2 induced homotypic adhesion in antigen specific human CD4+ T cell lines. We show that calyculin A, a potent inhibitor of PP1 and PP2...... induced adhesion, whereas the structurally related compound 1,4-dimethylendothall had no effect on either phosphatase activity or the adhesion response. Okadaic acid, which preferentially inhibits PP2A, almost completely blocked IL-2-induced adhesion, whereas tautomycin, a potent inhibitor of PP1, had...

  20. Enzyme kinetic characterization of protein tyrosine phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Branner, S.; Møller, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play a central role in cellular signaling processes, resulting in an increased interest in modulating the activities of PTPs. We therefore decided to undertake a detailed enzyme kinetic evaluation of various transmembrane and cytosolic PTPs (PTPalpha, PTPbeta...

  1. Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Movement of the Wpd Flexible Loop of Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTP1B in Complex with Halide Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Aline; Saenz-Méndez, Patricia; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Podjarny, Alberto D.; Ventura, Oscar N.

    2012-11-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a post-translational modification mechanism, crucial for the regulation of nearly all aspects of cell life. This dynamic, reversible process is regulated by the balanced opposing activity of protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases. In particular, the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is implicated in the regulation of the insulin-receptor activity, leptin-stimulated signal transduction pathways and other clinically relevant metabolic routes, and it has been found overexpressed or overregulated in human breasts, colon and ovary cancers. The WPD loop of the enzyme presents an inherent flexibility, and it plays a fundamental role in the enzymatic catalysis, turning it into a potential target in the design of new efficient PTP1B inhibitors. In order to determine the interactions that control the spatial conformation adopted by the WPD loop, complexes between the enzyme and halide ions (Br- and I- in particular) were crystallized and their crystallographic structure determined, and the collective movements of the aforementioned complexes were studied through Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. Both studies yielded concordant results, indicating the existence of a relationship between the identity of the ion present in the complex and the strength of the interactions it establishes with the surrounding protein residues.

  2. Chemical Inhibition of Bacterial Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Suppresses Capsule Production

    OpenAIRE

    Standish, Alistair J.; Salim, Angela A; Hua Zhang; Capon, Robert J.; Renato Morona

    2012-01-01

    Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to dat...

  3. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Type I Diabetes Patients Define Multiple Epitopes in the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-Like IA-2 Antigen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolm-Litty, Verena; Berlo, Suzanne; Bonifacio, Ezio; Bearzatto, Massimo; Engel, Alfred M; Christie, Michael; Ziegler, Anette-G; Wild, Thomas; Endl, Josef

    2000-01-01

    ...‘s College School of Medicine, London, United Kingdom Protein tyrosine phosphatase-like IA-2 autoantigen is one of the major targets of humoral autoimmunity in patients with insulin-dependant diabetes mellitus (IDDM...

  4. Biophysical Analysis of the N-Terminal Domain from the Human Protein Phosphatase 1 Nuclear Targeting Subunit PNUTS Suggests an Extended Transcription Factor TFIIS-Like Fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharchenko, Thomas; Barsukov, Igor; Rigden, Daniel J; Bennett, Daimark; Mayans, Olga

    2016-10-01

    Human protein phosphatase 1 nuclear targeting subunit (PNUTS) plays critical roles in DNA repair, cell growth and survival. The N-terminal domain of PNUTS mediates interactions with Tox4 and the phosphatase and tensin homolog PTEN, which are essential for the roles of this protein. To study this N-terminal domain, we have established its recombinant overproduction in E. coli utilizing NusA fusion. Upon removal of the tag, the remaining PNUTS sample is soluble and highly pure. We have characterized the domain using circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance and analyzed its sequence using bioinformatics. All data agree in suggesting that the PNUTS N-terminal segment adopts a compact, globular fold rich in α-helical content, where the folded fraction is substantially larger than the previously annotated fold. We conclude that this domain adopts a single fold, likely being an extended form of the transcription factor S-II leucine/tryptophan conserved-motif. Thermal denaturation yielded a melting temperature of ~49.5 °C, confirming the stability of the fold. These findings pave the way for the molecular characterization of functional interactions mediated by the N-terminal region of PNUTS.

  5. Characterization of human placental alkaline phosphatase by activity and protein assays, capillary electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, H J; Somsen, G W; Hinrichs, W L; Frijlink, H W; de Jong, G J

    2001-01-01

    Placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) that had been isolated from human placenta was further purified using subsequent ion-exchange chromatography (IEC), affinity chromatography (AC) and centrifugal membrane concentration (CMC). During the process, the PLAP samples from the different stages of

  6. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Alistair J; Salim, Angela A; Zhang, Hua; Capon, Robert J; Morona, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  7. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair J Standish

    Full Text Available Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  8. Human and rat hepatocyte toxicity and protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitory activity of naturally occurring desmethyl-microcystins and nodularins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufelmann, Helena; Krüger, Thomas; Luckas, Bernd; Schrenk, Dieter

    2012-03-11

    Contamination of water, foods and food supplements by various genera of cyanobacteria is a serious health problem worldwide for humans and animals, largely due to the toxic effects of microcystins (MCs) and nodularin (NOD), a group of hepatotoxic cyclic peptides. The toxins occur in variable structures resulting in more than 90 different MCs and 8 different NODs, many of them not having been investigated for their toxic potency. Potent MCs such as MC-LR have been shown to elicit their hepatotoxic potency via inhibition of hepatic protein phosphatases (PP) 1 and 2A leading to over-phosphorylation of vital cellular proteins. This mechanism of action is also thought to be responsible for the long term tumor promoting action of certain MCs and NOD in the liver. Here, we report on the isolation of certain MCs and NOD as well as a number of their desmethylated derivatives from algae bloom. Subsequently, we determined the cytotoxicity of these compounds in isolated primary human and rat hepatocytes in culture. In parallel experiments, we analyzed the inhibitory potency of these congeners on PP1 and 2A using commercially available enzymes. We found in primary rat hepatocytes that MC-LR, -YR and NOD were cytotoxic, namely in the 10 to >50 nM range, while MC-RR was not. The desmethylated congeners of MC-LR, -YR, and NOD were equally or more-toxic as/than their fully methylated counterparts. In primary human hepatocytes we could show that MC-LR, NOD and the desmethylated variants [³Asp]MC-LR, [⁷Dha]MC-LR and [¹Asp]NOD were cytotoxic in the 20 to >600 nM range. Inhibition data with human, bovine and rabbit protein phosphatases 1 and 2A were roughly in accordance with the cytotoxicity findings in human and rat hepatocytes, i.e. desmethylation had no pronounced effects on the inhibitory potencies. Thus, a variety of naturally occurring desmethylated MC and NOD congeners have to be considered as being at least as toxic as the corresponding fully methylated derivatives

  9. ETS1 mediates MEK1/2-dependent overexpression of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anchit Khanna

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available EGFR-MEK-ERK signaling pathway has an established role in promoting malignant growth and disease progression in human cancers. Therefore identification of transcriptional targets mediating the oncogenic effects of the EGFR-MEK-ERK pathway would be highly relevant. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A is a recently characterized human oncoprotein. CIP2A promotes malignant cell growth and is over expressed at high frequency (40-80% in most of the human cancer types. However, the mechanisms inducing its expression in cancer still remain largely unexplored. Here we present systematic analysis of contribution of potential gene regulatory mechanisms for high CIP2A expression in cancer. Our data shows that evolutionary conserved CpG islands at the proximal CIP2A promoter are not methylated both in normal and cancer cells. Furthermore, sequencing of the active CIP2A promoter region from altogether seven normal and malignant cell types did not reveal any sequence alterations that would increase CIP2A expression specifically in cancer cells. However, treatment of cancer cells with various signaling pathway inhibitors revealed that CIP2A mRNA expression was sensitive to inhibition of EGFR activity as well as inhibition or activation of MEK-ERK pathway. Moreover, MEK1/2-specific siRNAs decreased CIP2A protein expression. Series of CIP2A promoter-luciferase constructs were created to identify proximal -27 to -107 promoter region responsible for MEK-dependent stimulation of CIP2A expression. Additional mutagenesis and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed ETS1 as the transcription factor mediating stimulation of CIP2A expression through EGFR-MEK pathway. Thus, ETS1 is probably mediating high CIP2A expression in human cancers with increased EGFR-MEK1/2-ERK pathway activity. These results also suggest that in addition to its established role in invasion and angiogenesis, ETS1 may support malignant cellular growth via regulation of

  10. The human cytomegalovirus UL11 protein interacts with the receptor tyrosine phosphatase CD45, resulting in functional paralysis of T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildar Gabaev

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (CMV exerts diverse and complex effects on the immune system, not all of which have been attributed to viral genes. Acute CMV infection results in transient restrictions in T cell proliferative ability, which can impair the control of the virus and increase the risk of secondary infections in patients with weakened or immature immune systems. In a search for new immunomodulatory proteins, we investigated the UL11 protein, a member of the CMV RL11 family. This protein family is defined by the RL11 domain, which has homology to immunoglobulin domains and adenoviral immunomodulatory proteins. We show that pUL11 is expressed on the cell surface and induces intercellular interactions with leukocytes. This was demonstrated to be due to the interaction of pUL11 with the receptor tyrosine phosphatase CD45, identified by mass spectrometry analysis of pUL11-associated proteins. CD45 expression is sufficient to mediate the interaction with pUL11 and is required for pUL11 binding to T cells, indicating that pUL11 is a specific CD45 ligand. CD45 has a pivotal function regulating T cell signaling thresholds; in its absence, the Src family kinase Lck is inactive and signaling through the T cell receptor (TCR is therefore shut off. In the presence of pUL11, several CD45-mediated functions were inhibited. The induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple signaling proteins upon TCR stimulation was reduced and T cell proliferation was impaired. We therefore conclude that pUL11 has immunosuppressive properties, and that disruption of T cell function via inhibition of CD45 is a previously unknown immunomodulatory strategy of CMV.

  11. Protein phosphatase 2A: the Trojan Horse of cellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontag, E

    2001-01-01

    Dynamic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of proteins are fundamental mechanisms utilized by cells to transduce signals. Whereas transduction by protein kinases has been a major focus of studies in the last decade, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) enzymes emerge in this millenium as the most fashionable players in cellular signaling. Viral proteins target specific PP2A enzymes in order to deregulate chosen cellular pathways in the host and promote viral progeny. The observation that a variety of viruses utilize PP2A to alienate cellular behavior emphasizes the fundamental importance of PP2A in signal transduction. This review will primarily focus on discussing the uniqueness of PP2A regulation and uncovering the critical role played by protein-protein interactions in the modulation of PP2A signaling. Moreover, the place of PP2A in signaling pathways and its functional significance for human diseases will be discussed.

  12. Phosphatase and tensin homologue/protein kinase B pathway linked to motor neuron survival in human superoxide dismutase 1-related amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Janine; Ning, Ke; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Heath, Paul R; Ismail, Azza; Kuo, Su-Wei; Valori, Chiara F; Cox, Laura; Sharrack, Basil; Wharton, Stephen B; Ince, Paul G; Shaw, Pamela J; Azzouz, Mimoun

    2011-02-01

    Gene expression profiling has been used previously with spinal cord homogenates and laser capture microdissected motor neurons to determine the mechanisms involved in neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, while cellular and animal model work has focused on superoxide dismutase 1-related amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the transcriptional profile of human mutant superoxide dismutase 1 motor neurons has remained undiscovered. The aim of this study was to apply gene expression profiling to laser captured motor neurons from human superoxide dismutase 1-related amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and neurologically normal control cases, in order to determine those pathways dysregulated in human superoxide dismutase 1-related neurodegeneration and to establish potential pathways suitable for therapeutic intervention. Identified targets were then validated in cultured cell models using lentiviral vectors to manipulate the expression of key genes. Microarray analysis identified 1170 differentially expressed genes in spinal cord motor neurons from superoxide dismutase 1-related amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, compared with controls. These genes encoded for proteins in multiple functional categories, including those involved in cell survival and cell death. Further analysis determined that multiple genes involved in the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signalling cascade were differentially expressed in motor neurons that survived the disease process. Functional experiments in cultured cells and primary motor neurons demonstrate that manipulating this pathway by reducing the expression of a single upstream target, the negative phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase regulator phosphatase and tensin homology, promotes a marked pro-survival effect. Therefore, these data indicate that proteins in the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase pathway could represent a target for therapeutic manipulation in motor neuron degeneration.

  13. Protein phosphatase 2A inhibition and subsequent cytoskeleton reorganization contributes to cell migration caused by microcystin-LR in human laryngeal epithelial cells (Hep-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beilei; Liu, Jinghui; Huang, Pu; Xu, Kailun; Wang, Hanying; Wang, Xiaofeng; Guo, Zonglou; Xu, Lihong

    2017-03-01

    The major toxic mechanism of Microcystin-LR is inhibition of the activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), resulting in a series of cytotoxic effects. Our previous studies have demonstrated that microcystin-LR (MCLR) induced very different molecular effects in normal cells and the tumor cell line SMMC7721. To further explore the MCLR toxicity mechanism in tumor cells, human laryngeal epithelial cells (Hep-2) was examined in this study. Western blot, immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and transwell migration assay were used to detect the effects of MCLR on PP2A activity, PP2A substrates, cytoskeleton, and cell migration. The results showed that the protein level of PP2A subunits and the posttranslational modification of the catalytic subunit were altered and that the binding of the AC core enzyme as well as the binding of PP2A/C and α4, was also affected. As PP2A substrates, the phosphorylation of MAPK pathway members, p38, ERK1/2, and the cytoskeleton-associated proteins, Hsp27, VASP, Tau, and Ezrin were increased. Furthermore, MCLR induced reorganization of the cytoskeleton and promoted cell migration. Taken together, direct covalent binding to PP2A/C, alteration of the protein levels and posttranslational modification, as well as the binding of subunits, are the main pattern for the effects of MCLR on PP2A in Hep-2. A dose-dependent change in p-Tau and p-Ezrin due to PP2A inhibition may contribute to the changes in the cytoskeleton and be related to the cell migration in Hep-2. Our data provide a comprehensive exposition of the MCLR mechanism on tumor cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 890-903, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A dimeric urea of the bisabolene sesquiterpene from the Okinawan marine sponge Axinyssa sp. inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity in Huh-7 human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdjul, Delfly B; Kanno, Syu-Ichi; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ukai, Kazuyo; Namikoshi, Michio

    2016-01-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) plays an important role as a negative regulator of the insulin and leptin signaling pathways. Therefore, this enzyme is regarded as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Our screening program for PTP1B inhibitors led to the isolation of four sesquiterpenes and sterol: N,N'-bis[(6R,7S)-7-amino-7,8-dihydro-α-bisabolen-7-yl]urea (1), (6R,7S)-7-amino-7,8-dihydro-α-bisabolene (2), (1R,6S,7S,10S)-10-isothiocyanato-4-amorphene (3), axinisothiocyanate J (4), and axinysterol (5) from the marine sponge Axinyssa sp. collected at Iriomote Island. Of these, compound 1 was the most potent inhibitor of PTP1B activity (IC50=1.9μM) without cytotoxicity at 50μM in two human cancer cell lines, hepatoma Huh-7 and bladder carcinoma EJ-1 cells. Compound 1 also moderately enhanced the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation levels of Akt in Huh-7 cells. Therefore, compound 1 has potential as a new type of anti-diabetic drug candidate possessing PTP1B inhibitory activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Serum proteins, trace metals and phosphatases in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatnagar M

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum proteins, zinc, copper, acid phosphatase (AcPase and alkaline phosphatase (AlPase were studied in both active and remission phases of psoriasis. Data were compared with healthy controls, ?1, ? and ? globulins were high in active phase while ?1 and ? globulins were at par in remission phase. Serum copper was low but zinc and alkaline phosphatase were significantly high in both active and remission phases of the disease. Acid phosphatase level was at par in all the experimental groups. Study suggests a positive correlation of globulin, zinc and Alpase in active and remission phase of psoriasis.

  16. Insights into the key interactions between human protein phosphatase 5 and cantharidin using molecular dynamics and site-directed mutagenesis bioassays

    OpenAIRE

    Ji-Yuan Liu; Xi-En Chen; Ya-Lin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is a promising novel target for anticancer therapies. This work aims to uncover the key interactions at the atomic level between PP5 and three inhibitors (cantharidin, norcantharidin and endothall). We found that, unlike previous report, Arg 100 contributes less to PP5-inhibitor binding, and the residues His 69, Asn 128, His 129, Arg 225, His 252 and Arg 250 are of importance to PP5-inhibitor binding. The hydrophobic interactions established betwee...

  17. Protein tyrosine and serine–threonine phosphatases in the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus: Identification and potential functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrum, C.A.; Walton, K.D.; Robertson, A.J.; Carbonneau, S.; Thomason, R.T.; Coffman, J.A.; McClay, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphatases, in coordination with protein kinases, play crucial roles in regulation of signaling pathways. To identify protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and serine–threonine (ser–thr) phosphatases in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome, 179 annotated sequences were studied (122 PTPs, 57 ser–thr phosphatases). Sequence analysis identified 91 phosphatases (33 conventional PTPs, 31 dual specificity phosphatases, 1 Class III Cysteine-based PTP, 1 Asp-based PTP, and 25 ser–thr phosphatases). Using catalytic sites, levels of conservation and constraint in amino acid sequence were examined. Nine of 25 receptor PTPs (RPTPs) corresponded to human, nematode, or fly homologues. Domain structure revealed that sea urchin-specific RPTPs including two, PTPRLec and PTPRscav, may act in immune defense. Embryonic transcription of each phosphatase was recorded from a high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarray experiment. Most RPTPs are expressed at very low levels, whereas nonreceptor PTPs (NRPTPs) are generally expressed at moderate levels. High expression was detected in MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs) and numerous ser–thr phosphatases. For several expressed NRPTPs, MKPs, and ser–thr phosphatases, morpholino antisense-mediated knockdowns were performed and phenotypes obtained. Finally, to assess roles of annotated phosphatases in endomesoderm formation, a literature review of phosphatase functions in model organisms was superimposed on sea urchin developmental pathways to predict areas of functional activity. PMID:17087928

  18. Promising Inhibitory Effects of Anthraquinones, Naphthopyrone, and Naphthalene Glycosides, from Cassia obtusifolia on α-Glucosidase and Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases 1B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ah Jung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to evaluate the anti-diabetic potentials of 16 anthraquinones, two naphthopyrone glycosides, and one naphthalene glycoside from Cassia obtusifolia via inhibition against the protein tyrosine phosphatases 1B (PTP1B and α-glucosidase. Among them, anthraquinones emodin and alaternin exhibited the highest inhibitory activities on PTP1B and α-glucosidase, respectively. Moreover, we examined the effects of alaternin and emodin on stimulation of glucose uptake by insulin-resistant human HepG2 cells. The results showed that alaternin and emodin significantly increased the insulin-provoked glucose uptake. In addition, our kinetic study revealed that alaternin competitively inhibited PTP1B, and showed mixed-type inhibition against α-glucosidase. In order to confirm enzyme inhibition, we predicted the 3D structure of PTP1B using Autodock 4.2 to simulate the binding of alaternin. The docking simulation results demonstrated that four residues of PTP1B (Gly183, Arg221, Ile219, Gly220 interact with three hydroxyl groups of alaternin and that the binding energy was negative (−6.30 kcal/mol, indicating that the four hydrogen bonds stabilize the open form of the enzyme and potentiate tight binding of the active site of PTP1B, resulting in more effective PTP1B inhibition. The results of the present study clearly demonstrate that C. obtusifolia and its constituents have potential anti-diabetic activity and can be used as a functional food for the treatment of diabetes and associated complications.

  19. Cloning of a human insulin-stimulated protein kinase (ISPK-1) gene and analysis of coding regions and mRNA levels of the ISPK-1 and the protein phosphatase-1 genes in muscle from NIDDM patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørbaek, C; Vik, T A; Echwald, S M

    1995-01-01

    Complementary DNA encoding three catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 alpha, PP1 beta, and PP1 gamma) and the insulin-stimulated protein kinase 1 (ISPK-1) was analyzed for variations in the coding regions related to insulin-resistant glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle of 30 patient...

  20. Protein phosphatases decrease their activity during capacitation: a new requirement for this event.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janetti R Signorelli

    Full Text Available There are few reports on the role of protein phosphatases during capacitation. Here, we report on the role of PP2B, PP1, and PP2A during human sperm capacitation. Motile sperm were resuspended in non-capacitating medium (NCM, Tyrode's medium, albumin- and bicarbonate-free or in reconstituted medium (RCM, NCM plus 2.6% albumin/25 mM bicarbonate. The presence of the phosphatases was evaluated by western blotting and the subcellular localization by indirect immunofluorescence. The function of these phosphatases was analyzed by incubating the sperm with specific inhibitors: okadaic acid, I2, endothall, and deltamethrin. Different aliquots were incubated in the following media: 1 NCM; 2 NCM plus inhibitors; 3 RCM; and 4 RCM plus inhibitors. The percent capacitated sperm and phosphatase activities were evaluated using the chlortetracycline assay and a phosphatase assay kit, respectively. The results confirm the presence of PP2B and PP1 in human sperm. We also report the presence of PP2A, specifically, the catalytic subunit and the regulatory subunits PR65 and B. PP2B and PP2A were present in the tail, neck, and postacrosomal region, and PP1 was present in the postacrosomal region, neck, middle, and principal piece of human sperm. Treatment with phosphatase inhibitors rapidly (≤1 min increased the percent of sperm depicting the pattern B, reaching a maximum of ∼40% that was maintained throughout incubation; after 3 h, the percent of capacitated sperm was similar to that of the control. The enzymatic activity of the phosphatases decreased during capacitation without changes in their expression. The pattern of phosphorylation on threonine residues showed a sharp increase upon treatment with the inhibitors. In conclusion, human sperm express PP1, PP2B, and PP2A, and the activity of these phosphatases decreases during capacitation. This decline in phosphatase activities and the subsequent increase in threonine phosphorylation may be an important

  1. Structural and biochemical characterization of human PR70 in isolation and in complex with the scaffolding subunit of protein phosphatase 2A.

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    Rebecca Dovega

    Full Text Available Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a major Ser/Thr phosphatase involved in the regulation of various cellular processes. PP2A assembles into diverse trimeric holoenzymes, which consist of a scaffolding (A subunit, a catalytic (C subunit and various regulatory (B subunits. Here we report a 2.0 Å crystal structure of the free B''/PR70 subunit and a SAXS model of an A/PR70 complex. The crystal structure of B''/PR70 reveals a two domain elongated structure with two Ca2+ binding EF-hands. Furthermore, we have characterized the interaction of both binding partner and their calcium dependency using biophysical techniques. Ca2+ biophysical studies with Circular Dichroism showed that the two EF-hands display different affinities to Ca2+. In the absence of the catalytic C-subunit, the scaffolding A-subunit remains highly mobile and flexible even in the presence of the B''/PR70 subunit as judged by SAXS. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry studies and SAXS data support that PR70 and the A-subunit have high affinity to each other. This study provides additional knowledge about the structural basis for the function of B'' containing holoenzymes.

  2. Human placental alkaline phosphatase in liver and intestine.

    OpenAIRE

    Garattini, E; Margolis, J; Heimer, E; Felix, A.; Udenfriend, S

    1985-01-01

    Three distinct forms of human alkaline phosphatase, presumably isozymes, are known, each apparently associated with a specific tissue. These are placental, intestinal, and liver (kidney and bone). We have used a specific immunoassay and HPLC to show that placental alkaline phosphatase is also present in extracts of liver and intestine in appreciable amounts.

  3. Oxidative Stress-Associated Protein Tyrosine Kinases and Phosphatases in Fanconi Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Qishen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder featuring chromosomal instability, developmental defects, progressive bone marrow failure, and predisposition to cancer. Besides the predominant role in DNA damage response and/or repair, many studies have linked FA proteins to oxidative stress. Oxidative stress, defined as imbalance in pro-oxidant and antioxidant homeostasis, has been considered to contribute to disease development, including FA. Recent Advances: A variety of signaling pathways may be influenced by oxidative stress, particularly the equilibrium between protein kinases and phosphatases, consequently leading to an aberrant phosphorylation state of cellular proteins. Dysfunction of kinases/phosphatases has been implicated in the pathophysiology of human diseases. In FA, evidence is emerging that links abnormal phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation of signaling molecules to clinical complications and malformations. Critical Issues: In this study, we review the recent findings on the oxidative stress-related kinases and phosphatases, particularly tyrosine phosphatases in FA. Future Directions: Understanding the role of oxidative stress-related kinases and phosphatases in FA may provide unique and generic possibilities for the future development of therapeutic strategies by targeting the dysregulated protein kinases and phosphatases in a clinical setting. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2290–2301. PMID:24206276

  4. Structure-based optimization of benzoic acids as inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B and low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Rosanna; Ottanà, Rosaria; Ciurleo, Rosella; Paoli, Paolo; Manao, Giampaolo; Camici, Guido; Laggner, Christian; Langer, Thierry

    2009-06-01

    We have optimized previously discovered benzoic acids 1, which are active as inhibitors of PTP1B and LMW-PTP, two protein tyrosine phosphatases that have emerged as attractive targets for the development of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Our efforts led to the identification of new and more potent analogues with appreciable selectivity toward human PTP1B and the IF1 isoform of human LMW-PTP.

  5. Displacement affinity chromatography of protein phosphatase one (PP1 complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourlay Robert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein phosphatase one (PP1 is a ubiquitously expressed, highly conserved protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates target protein serine and threonine residues. PP1 is localized to its site of action by interacting with targeting or regulatory proteins, a majority of which contains a primary docking site referred to as the RVXF/W motif. Results We demonstrate that a peptide based on the RVXF/W motif can effectively displace PP1 bound proteins from PP1 retained on the phosphatase affinity matrix microcystin-Sepharose. Subsequent co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that each identified binding protein was either a direct PP1 interactor or was in a complex that contains PP1. Our results have linked PP1 to numerous new nuclear functions and proteins, including Ki-67, Rif-1, topoisomerase IIα, several nuclear helicases, NUP153 and the TRRAP complex. Conclusion This modification of the microcystin-Sepharose technique offers an effective means of purifying novel PP1 regulatory subunits and associated proteins and provides a simple method to uncover a link between PP1 and additional cellular processes.

  6. Protein phosphatase 1 and its complexes in carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Joao; da Cruz E Silva, Odete A B; Fardilha, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms and the signaling pathways that underlie the pathology of cancer progression is crucial for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools. A major common mechanism used by cells to regulate intracellular signal transduction pathways is reversible protein phosphorylation which results in profound changes in cellular responses. This mechanism relies on the coordinated action of two families of proteins: protein kinases and protein phosphatases. Interestingly, there are 3 to 5 times fewer phosphatases than kinases, suggesting that the specificity of substrates is not only due to the variety of the catalytic subunits but also to the diversity of the regulatory subunits. This is particularly true for PhosphoProtein Phosphatase 1 (PPP1) for which more than 200 PPP1 Interacting Proteins (PIPs) have thus far been identified. PIPs can act as targeting subunits, substrates and activity regulators. Many PPP1/PIPs complexes are involved in signaling pathways that regulate cellular growth, cell cycle and apoptosis; processes known to be deregulated in cancer. This review will describe the cellular pathways, many of which involve PPP1/PIP complexes, that when deregulated lead to cancer. Furthermore, the possibility of PPP1/PIP complexes being considered novel targets to cancer diagnostic and therapy will be addressed.

  7. Insights into the key interactions between human protein phosphatase 5 and cantharidin using molecular dynamics and site-directed mutagenesis bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ji-Yuan; Chen, Xi-En; Zhang, Ya-Lin

    2015-07-20

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is a promising novel target for anticancer therapies. This work aims to uncover the key interactions at the atomic level between PP5 and three inhibitors (cantharidin, norcantharidin and endothall). We found that, unlike previous report, Arg 100 contributes less to PP5-inhibitor binding, and the residues His 69, Asn 128, His 129, Arg 225, His 252 and Arg 250 are of importance to PP5-inhibitor binding. The hydrophobic interactions established between the residues Val 254, Phe 271 and Tyr 276, especially Glu 253, are very important to enhance the inhibitive interaction. We suggested that, to increase the inhibitory activity, the interactions of inhibitor with three negatively charged unfavorable interaction residues, Asp 99, Glu 130 and Asp 213, should be avoided. However, the interactions of inhibitor with favorable interaction residue Arg 250 could enhance the inhibitory activity. The Manganese ion 2 (MN2) unfavorably contribute to the total interaction free energies. The coordination between MN2 and chemical group of inhibitor should be eliminated. This work provides insight into how cantharidin and its analogs bind to PP5c at the atomic level and will facilitate modification of cantharidin-like chemicals to rationally develop more specific and less cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs.

  8. TORC1 regulates Pah1 phosphatidate phosphatase activity via the Nem1/Spo7 protein phosphatase complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Dubots

    Full Text Available The evolutionarily conserved target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1 controls growth-related processes such as protein, nucleotide, and lipid metabolism in response to growth hormones, energy/ATP levels, and amino acids. Its deregulation is associated with cancer, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. Among other substrates, mammalian TORC1 directly phosphorylates and inhibits the phosphatidate phosphatase lipin-1, a central enzyme in lipid metabolism that provides diacylglycerol for the synthesis of membrane phospholipids and/or triacylglycerol as neutral lipid reserve. Here, we show that yeast TORC1 inhibits the function of the respective lipin, Pah1, to prevent the accumulation of triacylglycerol. Surprisingly, TORC1 regulates Pah1 in part indirectly by controlling the phosphorylation status of Nem1 within the Pah1-activating, heterodimeric Nem1-Spo7 protein phosphatase module. Our results delineate a hitherto unknown TORC1 effector branch that controls lipin function in yeast, which, given the recent discovery of Nem1-Spo7 orthologous proteins in humans, may be conserved.

  9. Determinants for Substrate Specificity of Protein Phosphatase 2A

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    Andrew M. Slupe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A- (PP2A- catalyzed dephosphorylation of target substrate proteins is widespread and critical for cellular function. PP2A is predominantly found as a heterotrimeric complex of a catalytic subunit (C, a scaffolding subunit (A, and one member of 4 families of regulatory subunits (B. Substrate specificity of the holoenzyme complex is determined by the subcellular locale the complex is confined to, selective incorporation of the B subunit, interactions with endogenous inhibitory proteins, and specific intermolecular interactions between PP2A and target substrates. Here, we discuss recent studies that have advanced our understanding of the molecular determinants for PP2A substrate specificity.

  10. Searching for the role of protein phosphatases in eukaryotic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da-Silva A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Preference for specific protein substrates together with differential sensitivity to activators and inhibitors has allowed classification of serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PPs into four major types designated types 1, 2A, 2B and 2C (PP1, PP2A, PP2B and PP2C, respectively. Comparison of sequences within their catalytic domains has indicated that PP1, PP2A and PP2B are members of the same gene family named PPP. On the other hand, the type 2C enzyme does not share sequence homology with the PPP members and thus represents another gene family, known as PPM. In this report we briefly summarize some of our studies about the role of serine/threonine phosphatases in growth and differentiation of three different eukaryotic models: Blastocladiella emersonii, Neurospora crassa and Dictyostelium discoideum. Our observations suggest that PP2C is the major phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of amidotransferase, an enzyme that controls cell wall synthesis during Blastocladiella emersonii zoospore germination. We also report the existence of a novel acid- and thermo-stable protein purified from Neurospora crassa mycelia, which specifically inhibits the PP1 activity of this fungus and mammals. Finally, we comment on our recent results demonstrating that Dictyostelium discoideum expresses a gene that codes for PP1, although this activity has never been demonstrated biochemically in this organism.

  11. Protein Phosphatase Methyl-Esterase PME-1 Protects Protein Phosphatase 2A from Ubiquitin/Proteasome Degradation.

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    Ryotaro Yabe

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a conserved essential enzyme that is implicated as a tumor suppressor based on its central role in phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways. Protein phosphatase methyl esterase (PME-1 catalyzes specifically the demethylation of the C-terminal Leu309 residue of PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac. It has been shown that PME-1 affects the activity of PP2A by demethylating PP2Ac, but also by directly binding to the phosphatase active site, suggesting loss of PME-1 in cells would enhance PP2A activity. However, here we show that PME-1 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs exhibit lower PP2A activity than wild type MEFs. Loss of PME-1 enhanced poly-ubiquitination of PP2Ac and shortened the half-life of PP2Ac protein resulting in reduced PP2Ac levels. Chemical inhibition of PME-1 and rescue experiments with wild type and mutated PME-1 revealed methyl-esterase activity was necessary to maintain PP2Ac protein levels. Our data demonstrate that PME-1 methyl-esterase activity protects PP2Ac from ubiquitin/proteasome degradation.

  12. Expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) in human breast cancer correlates with low tumor grade, and inhibits tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardini, E; Agresti, R; Tagliabue, E

    2000-01-01

    of Src family kinases, and regulation of integrin signaling, cell adhesion, and growth factor responsiveness. To explore its potential contribution to human neoplasia, we surveyed RPTPalpha protein levels in primary human breast cancer. We found RPTPalpha levels to vary widely among tumors, with 29......% of cases manifesting significant overexpression. High RPTPalpha protein levels correlated significantly with low tumor grade and positive estrogen receptor status. Expression of RPTPalpha in breast carcinoma cells led to growth inhibition, associated with increased accumulation in G0 and G1, and delayed...... tumor growth and metastasis. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a study correlating expression level of a specific bona fide PTP with neoplastic disease status in humans....

  13. A Protein Phosphatase Methylesterase (PME-1) Is One of Several Novel Proteins Stably Associating with Two Inactive Mutants of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Egon Ogris; Xianxing Du; Kasey C. Nelson; Elsa K. Mak; Xing Xian Yu; William S. Lane; David C. Pallas

    1999-01-01

    .... The protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic (C) subunit is reversibly methylated at its carboxyl terminus by specific methyltransferase and methylesterase enzymes which have been purified, but not cloned...

  14. Free Fatty Acids Inhibit Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B and Activate Akt

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    Eisuke Shibata

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Accumulating evidence has suggested that free fatty acids (FFAs interact with protein kinases and protein phosphatases. The present study examined the effect of FFAs on protein phosphatases and Akt. Methods: Activities of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B were assayed under the cell-free conditions. Phosphorylation of Akt was monitored in MSTO-211H human malignant pleural mesothelioma cells without and with knocking-down phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K or 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1. Results: In the cell-free assay, unsaturated FFAs (uFFAs such as oleic, linoleic and linolenic acid and saturated FFAs (sFFAs such as stearic, palmitic, myristic, and behenic acid markedly reduced PTP1B activity, with the potential for uFFAs greater than that for sFFAs. All the investigated sFFAs inhibited PP2A activity, but otherwise no inhibition was obtained with uFFAs. Both uFFAs and sFFAs had no effect on PP1 activity. Oleic acid phosphorylated Akt both on Thr308 and Ser473, while stearic acid phosphorylated Akt on Thr308 alone. The effects of oleic and stearic acid on Akt phosphorylation were abrogated by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin or the PDK1 inhibitor BX912 and also by knocking-down PI3K or PDK1. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that uFFAs and sFFAs could activate Akt through a pathway along a PI3K/PDK1/Akt axis in association with PTP1B inhibition.

  15. Identification of a non-purple tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase: an evolutionary link to Ser/Thr protein phosphatases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hume David A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatases (TRAcPs, also known as purple acid phosphatases (PAPs, are a family of binuclear metallohydrolases that have been identified in plants, animals and fungi. The human enzyme is a major histochemical marker for the diagnosis of bone-related diseases. TRAcPs can occur as a small form possessing only the ~35 kDa catalytic domain, or a larger ~55 kDa form possessing both a catalytic domain and an additional N-terminal domain of unknown function. Due to its role in bone resorption the 35 kDa TRAcP has become a promising target for the development of anti-osteoporotic chemotherapeutics. Findings A new human gene product encoding a metallohydrolase distantly related to the ~55 kDa plant TRAcP was identified and characterised. The gene product is found in a number of animal species, and is present in all tissues sampled by the RIKEN mouse transcriptome project. Construction of a homology model illustrated that six of the seven metal-coordinating ligands in the active site are identical to that observed in the TRAcP family. However, the tyrosine ligand associated with the charge transfer transition and purple color of TRAcPs is replaced by a histidine. Conlusion The gene product identified here may represent an evolutionary link between TRAcPs and Ser/Thr protein phosphatases. Its biological function is currently unknown but is unlikely to be associated with bone metabolism.

  16. Sequence of the human glycogen-associated regulatory subunit of type 1 protein phosphatase and analysis of its coding region and mRNA level in muscle from patients with NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y H; Hansen, L; Chen, Min

    1994-01-01

    of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 G-subunit) plays a key role in the insulin stimulation of glycogen synthesis and the activity of PP1 is decreased in insulin-resistant subjects, we have now cloned the human G-subunit cDNA to search for abnormalities in the corresponding gene (designated PPP1R3 in the human...... genome nomenclature) in patients with NIDDM. The human cDNA was isolated from a skeletal muscle cDNA library and was found to encode a 126-kDa protein, which shows 73% amino acid identity to the rabbit PP1 G-subunit. The human G-subunit cDNA from 30 insulin-resistant NIDDM patients was analyzed...... for genetic variations in the G-subunit by using single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) scanning of reversely transcribed mRNA. One variant SSCP profile was detected in the region encoding the COOH-terminal part of the PP1 G-subunit in only one NIDDM patient, and subsequent nucleotide sequencing...

  17. [Research progress of several protein tyrosine phosphatases in diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Sun, Jin-Peng; Liu, Jing; Yu, Xiao

    2010-04-25

    Diabetes mellitus is caused by deficiency of insulin secretion from the pancreatic islet beta cells and/or insulin resistance in liver, muscle and adipocytes, resulting in glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Several protein tyrosine phosphatases, such as PTP1B (PTPN1), TCPTP (PTPN2), LYP (PTPN22), PTPIA-2, PTPMEG2 (PTPN9) or OSTPTP are involved in insulin signaling pathway, insulin secretion and autoreactive attack to pancreatic beta cells. Genetic mutation or overexpression of these phosphotases has been found to cause or increase the risk of diabetes mellitus. Some population with high risk for type 2 diabetes has overexpressed PTP1B, a prototypical tyrosine phosphatase which down-regulates insulin and leptin signal transduction. Animal PTP1B knockout model and PTP1B specific inhibitor cellular studies indicate PTP1B may serve as a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes. TCPTP shares more than 70% sequence identity with PTP1B in their catalytic domain. TCPTP dephosphorylates tyrosine phosphorylated substrates overlapping with PTP1B but also has its own distinct dephosphorylation sites and functions. Recent research indicates TCPTP may have role in type 1 diabetes via dysregultaion of cytokine-mediated immune responses or pancreatic beta cell apoptosis. The tyrosine phosphatase LYP, which down-regulates LCK activity in T cell response, can become mutated as R620W which is highly correlated to type 1 diabetes. LYP R620W may be a gain of function mutation which suppresses TCR signaling. Patients bearing the R620W mutant have impaired T cell responses and increased populations of (CD45RO+CD45RA-) CD4+ T cells. A detailed elucidation of mechanism of R620W in type 1 diabetes and specific LYP inhibitor development will help characterize LYP R620W as a therapeutic target. A receptor tyrosine phosphatase, PTPIA-2/beta is a major autoantigen of type 1 diabetes. A diagnosis kit identifying PTPIA-2/beta autoantibodies is valuable in early detection and prevention of type

  18. Protein kinase and phosphatase activities of thylakoid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, H.; Shaw, E.K.; Bennett, J.

    1987-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of the 25 and 27 kDa light-harvesting Chl a/b proteins (LHCII) of the thylakoid membranes is catalyzed by a phosphatase which differs from previously reported thylakoid-bound phosphatases in having an alkaline pH optimum (9.0) and a requirement for Mg/sup 2 +/ ions. Dephosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa psb H gene product requires a Mg/sup 2 +/ ion concentration more than 200 fold higher than that for dephosphorylation of LHC II. The 8.3 kDa and 27 kDa proteins appear to be phosphorylated by two distinct kinases, which differ in substrate specificity and sensitivity to inhibitors. The plastoquinone antagonist 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB) inhibits phosphorylation of the 27 kDa LHC II much more readily than phosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa protein. A similar pattern of inhibition is seen for two synthetic oligopeptides (MRKSATTKKAVC and ATQTLESSSRC) which are analogs of the phosphorylation sites of the two proteins. Possible modes of action of DBMIB are discussed. 45 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Lipid accumulation and alkaline phosphatase activity in human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) controls intracellular lipid accumulation in human preadipocytes, but it is not known whether ALP is expressed in all body fat depots, or whether it has a similar role at all sites. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting and subjects: Subjects undergoing breast reduction and abdominal fat ...

  20. Structure determination of T-cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, L.F.; Møller, K. B.; Pedersen, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    homologous T cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP) has received much less attention, and no x-ray structure has been provided. We have previously co-crystallized PTP1B with a number of low molecular weight inhibitors that inhibit TC-PTP with similar efficiency. Unexpectedly, we were not able to co...... the high degree of functional and structural similarity between TC-PTP and PTP1B, we have been able to identify areas close to the active site that might be addressed to develop selective inhibitors of each enzyme....

  1. Identification of a novel shrimp protein phosphatase and its association with latency-related ORF427 of white spot syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liqun; Kwang, Jimmy

    2004-11-05

    To characterize the role of latency-associated ORF427 of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), a shrimp cDNA library was constructed to screen interacting proteins of ORF427. Employing the yeast two-hybrid system, a novel shrimp protein phosphatase (named PPs), sharing 93% homology with human protein phosphatase 1, has been identified able to bind ORF427 in yeast. Through co-immunoprecipitation assays, the interaction between PPs and ORF427 was further confirmed both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, the novel shrimp protein phosphatase consists of only 199 aa and contains almost all the functional catalytic domains of human protein phosphatase, while it lacks the corresponding C-terminal non-catalytic sequence. Transcription and translation products of the identified cDNA can be detected in both normal and WSSV-infected shrimps; and PPs was found to localize mainly in the lysosome of shrimp cells. To characterize its function, the PPs cDNA was highly expressed in bacteria and the purified protein showed phosphatase activity when tested against pNPP in a standard phosphatase assay. Our results suggest that the identified protein phosphatase, PPs, may represent a novel member of protein phosphatase family and might be involved in the regulation of WSSV's life cycle through interaction with latency-related ORF427 of WSSV.

  2. Protein Phosphatase-1 Inhibitor-2 Is a Novel Memory Suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongtian; Hou, Hailong; Pahng, Amanda; Gu, Hua; Nairn, Angus C; Tang, Ya-Ping; Colombo, Paul J; Xia, Houhui

    2015-11-11

    Reversible phosphorylation, a fundamental regulatory mechanism required for many biological processes including memory formation, is coordinated by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases. Type I protein phosphatase (PP1), in particular, has been shown to constrain learning and memory formation. However, how PP1 might be regulated in memory is still not clear. Our previous work has elucidated that PP1 inhibitor-2 (I-2) is an endogenous regulator of PP1 in hippocampal and cortical neurons (Hou et al., 2013). Contrary to expectation, our studies of contextual fear conditioning and novel object recognition in I-2 heterozygous mice suggest that I-2 is a memory suppressor. In addition, lentiviral knock-down of I-2 in the rat dorsal hippocampus facilitated memory for tasks dependent on the hippocampus. Our data indicate that I-2 suppresses memory formation, probably via negatively regulating the phosphorylation of cAMP/calcium response element-binding protein (CREB) at serine 133 and CREB-mediated gene expression in dorsal hippocampus. Surprisingly, the data from both biochemical and behavioral studies suggest that I-2, despite its assumed action as a PP1 inhibitor, is a positive regulator of PP1 function in memory formation. We found that inhibitor-2 acts as a memory suppressor through its positive functional influence on type I protein phosphatase (PP1), likely resulting in negative regulation of cAMP/calcium response element-binding protein (CREB) and CREB-activated gene expression. Our studies thus provide an interesting example of a molecule with an in vivo function that is opposite to its in vitro function. PP1 plays critical roles in many essential physiological functions such as cell mitosis and glucose metabolism in addition to its known role in memory formation. PP1 pharmacological inhibitors would thus not be able to serve as good therapeutic reagents because of its many targets. However, identification of PP1 inhibitor-2 as a critical

  3. Structural and biochemical analysis of atypically low dephosphorylating activity of human dual-specificity phosphatase 28.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonsu Ku

    Full Text Available Dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs constitute a subfamily of protein tyrosine phosphatases, and are intimately involved in the regulation of diverse parameters of cellular signaling and essential biological processes. DUSP28 is one of the DUSP subfamily members that is known to be implicated in the progression of hepatocellular and pancreatic cancers, and its biological functions and enzymatic characteristics are mostly unknown. Herein, we present the crystal structure of human DUSP28 determined to 2.1 Å resolution. DUSP28 adopts a typical DUSP fold, which is composed of a central β-sheet covered by α-helices on both sides and contains a well-ordered activation loop, as do other enzymatically active DUSP proteins. The catalytic pocket of DUSP28, however, appears hardly accessible to a substrate because of the presence of nonconserved bulky residues in the protein tyrosine phosphatase signature motif. Accordingly, DUSP28 showed an atypically low phosphatase activity in the biochemical assay, which was remarkably improved by mutations of two nonconserved residues in the activation loop. Overall, this work reports the structural and biochemical basis for understanding a putative oncological therapeutic target, DUSP28, and also provides a unique mechanism for the regulation of enzymatic activity in the DUSP subfamily proteins.

  4. Protein phosphatase 2A dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie eSontag

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a large family of enzymes that account for the majority of brain Ser/Thr phosphatase activity. While PP2A enzymes collectively modulate most cellular processes, sophisticated regulatory mechanisms are ultimately responsible for ensuring isoform-specific substrate specificity. Of particular interest to the Alzheimer’s disease (AD field, alterations in PP2A regulators and PP2A catalytic activity, subunit expression, methylation and/or phosphorylation, have been reported in AD-affected brain regions. PP2A dysfunction has been linked to Tau hyperphosphorylation, amyloidogenesis and synaptic deficits that are pathological hallmarks of this neurodegenerative disorder. Deregulation of PP2A enzymes also affects the activity of many Ser/Thr protein kinases implicated in AD. This review will more specifically discuss the role of the PP2A/B holoenzyme and PP2A methylation in AD pathogenesis. The PP2A/B isoform binds to tau and is the primary tau phosphatase. Its deregulation correlates with increased tau phosphorylation in vivo and in AD. Disruption of PP2A/B-Tau protein interactions likely contribute to Tau deregulation in AD. Significantly, alterations in one-carbon metabolism that impair PP2A methylation are associated with increased risk for sporadic AD, and enhanced AD-like pathology in animal models. Experimental studies have linked deregulation of PP2A methylation with down-regulation of PP2A/B, enhanced phosphorylation of Tau and amyloid precursor protein, Tau mislocalization, microtubule destabilization and neuritic defects. While it remains unclear what are the primary events that underlie PP2A dysfunction in AD, deregulation of PP2A enzymes definitely affects key players in the pathogenic process. As such, there is growing interest in developing PP2A-centric therapies for AD, but this may be a daunting task without a better understanding of the regulation and function of specific PP2A enzymes.

  5. FAS activation induces dephosphorylation of SR proteins - Dependence on the de novo generation of ceramide and activation of protein phosphatase 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalfant, CE; Ogretmen, B; Galadari, S; Kroesen, BJ; Pettus, BJ; Hannun, YA

    2001-01-01

    The search for potential targets for ceramide action led to the identification of ceramide-activated protein phosphatases (CAPP). To date, two serine/threonine protein phosphatases, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), have been demonstrated to function as

  6. Regulation of cell adhesion by protein-tyrosine phosphatases: II. Cell-cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Jennifer L; Wittchen, Erika S; Burridge, Keith

    2006-06-16

    Cell-cell adhesion is critical to the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. The stability of many adhesions is regulated by protein tyrosine phosphorylation of cell adhesion molecules and their associated components, with high levels of phosphorylation promoting disassembly. The level of tyrosine phosphorylation reflects the balance between protein-tyrosine kinase and protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity. Many protein-tyrosine phosphatases associate with the cadherin-catenin complex, directly regulating the phosphorylation of these proteins, thereby affecting their interactions and the integrity of cell-cell junctions. Tyrosine phosphatases can also affect cell-cell adhesions indirectly by regulating the signaling pathways that control the activities of Rho family G proteins. In addition, receptor-type tyrosine phosphatases can mediate outside-in signaling through both ligand binding and dimerization of their extracellular domains. This review will discuss the role of protein-tyrosine phosphatases in cell-cell interactions, with an emphasis on cadherin-mediated adhesions.

  7. TCTEX1D4, a novel protein phosphatase 1 interactor: connecting the phosphatase to the microtubule network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Korrodi-Gregório

    2013-03-01

    Reversible phosphorylation plays an important role as a mechanism of intracellular control in eukaryotes. PPP1, a major eukaryotic Ser/Thr-protein phosphatase, acquires its specificity by interacting with different protein regulators, also known as PPP1 interacting proteins (PIPs. In the present work we characterized a physiologically relevant PIP in testis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen with a human testis cDNA library, we identified a novel PIP of PPP1CC2 isoform, the T-complex testis expressed protein 1 domain containing 4 (TCTEX1D4 that has recently been described as a Tctex1 dynein light chain family member. The overlay assays confirm that TCTEX1D4 interacts with the different spliced isoforms of PPP1CC. Also, the binding domain occurs in the N-terminus, where a consensus PPP1 binding motif (PPP1BM RVSF is present. The distribution of TCTEX1D4 in testis suggests its involvement in distinct functions, such as TGFβ signaling at the blood–testis barrier and acrosome cap formation. Immunofluorescence in human ejaculated sperm shows that TCTEX1D4 is present in the flagellum and in the acrosome region of the head. Moreover, TCTEX1D4 and PPP1 co-localize in the microtubule organizing center (MTOC and microtubules in cell cultures. Importantly, the TCTEX1D4 PPP1BM seems to be relevant for complex formation, for PPP1 retention in the MTOC and movement along microtubules. These novel results open new avenues to possible roles of this dynein, together with PPP1. In essence TCTEX1D4/PPP1C complex appears to be involved in microtubule dynamics, sperm motility, acrosome reaction and in the regulation of the blood–testis barrier.

  8. Specific dephosphorylation by phosphatases 1 and 2A of a nuclear protein structurally and immunologically related to nucleolin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, H R; Mieskes, G; Issinger, O G

    1989-01-01

    to a complete dephosphorylation of N-60. The two other phosphatases tested (2B and 2C) did not dephosphorylate protein N-60 to the same extent as phosphatases 1 and 2Ac. In the case of nucleolin only 18% phosphate was released by all four phosphatases tested. The activity of both phosphatases, 1 and 2A, could......A new nuclear substrate (N-60) for phosphatase 1 and 2Ac has been described. In contrast to nucleolin (C23), to which it is structurally and immunologically related, N-60 becomes dephosphorylated to 51% and 41% by phosphatases 1 and 2Ac, respectively, within 10 min. Incubation up to 20 min led...... be blocked by tumour promoter okadaic acid (100 nM) when N-60 was used as a substrate. These results support the notion that the observed okadaic-acid-induced hyperphosphorylation of N-60 in intact human fibroblasts may be caused by specific inhibition of phosphatases involved in the process of r...

  9. 5-Arylidene-2,4-thiazolidinediones as inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Rosanna; Paoli, Paolo; Ottanà, Rosaria; Jacomelli, Michela; Ciurleo, Rosella; Manao, Giampaolo; Steindl, Theodora; Langer, Thierry; Vigorita, Maria Gabriella; Camici, Guido

    2007-08-01

    4-(5-Arylidene-2,4-dioxothiazolidin-3-yl)methylbenzoic acids (2) were synthesized and evaluated in vitro as inhibitors of PTP1B and LMW-PTP, two protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) which act as negative regulators of the metabolic and mitotic signalling of insulin. The synthesis of compounds 2 represents an example of utilizing phosphotyrosine-mimetics to identify effective low molecular weight nonphosphorus inhibitors of PTPs. Several thiazolidinediones 2 exhibited PTP1B inhibitory activity in the low micromolar range with moderate selectivity for human PTP1B and IF1 isoform of human LMW-PTP compared with other related PTPs.

  10. Protein Phosphatase-1 Regulates Expression of Neuregulin-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Ammosova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1, a cellular serine/threonine phosphatase, is targeted to cellular promoters by its major regulatory subunits, PP1 nuclear targeting subunit, nuclear inhibitor of PP1 (NIPP1 and RepoMan. PP1 is also targeted to RNA polymerase II (RNAPII by NIPP1 where it can dephosphorylate RNAPII and cycle-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9. Here, we show that treatment of cells with a small molecule activator of PP1 increases the abundance of a neuregulin-1 (NRG-1-derived peptide. NRG-1 mRNA and protein levels were increased in the cells stably or transiently expressing mutant NIPP1 (mNIPP1 that does not bind PP1, but not in the cells expressing NIPP1. Expression of mNIPP1 also activated the NRG-1 promoter in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Analysis of extracts from mNIPP1 expressing cells by glycerol gradient centrifugation showed a redistribution of PP1 and CDK9 between large and small molecular weight complexes, and increased CDK9 Thr-186 phosphorylation. This correlated with the increased CDK9 activity. Further, RNAPII co-precipitated with mNIPP1, and phosphorylation of RNAPII C-terminal domain (CTD Ser-2 residues was greater in cells expressing mNIPP1. In mNIPP1 expressing cells, okadaic acid, a cell-permeable inhibitor of PP1, did not increase Ser-2 CTD phosphorylation inhibited by flavopiridol, in contrast to the NIPP1 expressing cells, suggesting that PP1 was no longer involved in RNAPII dephosphorylation. Finally, media conditioned with mNIPP1 cells induced the proliferation of wild type 84-31 cells, consistent with a role of neuregulin-1 as a growth promoting factor. Our study indicates that deregulation of PP1/NIPP1 holoenzyme activates NRG-1 expression through RNAPII and CDK9 phosphorylation in a NF-κB dependent manner.

  11. B56δ-related protein phosphatase 2A dysfunction identified in patients with intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houge, Gunnar; Haesen, Dorien; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Mehta, Sarju; Parker, Michael J.; Wright, Michael; Vogt, Julie; McKee, Shane; Tolmie, John L.; Cordeiro, Nuno; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Reijnders, Margot R F; Berland, Siren; Hayman, Eli; Lahat, Eli; Brilstra, Eva H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/23639195X; Van Gassen, Koen L I|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304819417; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304818291; De Bie, Charlotte I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/350419973; Hoischen, Alexander; Eichler, Evan E.; Holdhus, Rita; Steen, Vidar M.; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Hurles, Matthew E.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Janssens, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Here we report inherited dysregulation of protein phosphatase activity as a cause of intellectual disability (ID). De novo missense mutations in 2 subunits of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) were identified in 16 individuals with mild to severe ID, long-lasting hypotonia,

  12. B56delta-related protein phosphatase 2A dysfunction identified in patients with intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houge, G.; Haesen, D.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Mehta, S.; Parker, M.J.; Wright, M.; Vogt, J.; McKee, S.; Tolmie, J.L.; Cordeiro, N.; Kleefstra, T.; Willemsen, M.H.; Reijnders, M.R.F.; Berland, S.; Hayman, E.; Lahat, E.; Brilstra, E.H.; Gassen, K.L. van; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, E.; Bie, C.I. De; Hoischen, A.; Eichler, E.E.; Holdhus, R.; Steen, V.M.; Doskeland, S.O.; Hurles, M.E.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Janssens, V.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report inherited dysregulation of protein phosphatase activity as a cause of intellectual disability (ID). De novo missense mutations in 2 subunits of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) were identified in 16 individuals with mild to severe ID, long-lasting hypotonia,

  13. Design, Synthesis, Biological Activity and Molecular Dynamics Studies of Specific Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitors over SHP-2

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Su-Xia; Li, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Wen-Bo; Ma, Ying; Wang, Run-Ling; Cheng, Xian-Chao; Wang, Shu-Qing; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Over expressing in PTPN1 (encoding Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, PTP1B), a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) that plays an overall positive role in insulin signaling, is linked to the pathogenesis of diabetes and obesity. The relationship between PTP1B and human diseases exhibits PTP1B as the target to treat these diseases. In this article, small weight molecules of the imidazolidine series were screened from databases and optimized on silicon as the inhibitors of PTP1B based on the steri...

  14. Therapeutic reactivation of protein phosphatase 2A in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha eRamaswamy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a serine/threonine phosphatase that is required for normal cell growth and development. PP2A is a potent tumor suppressor, which is inactivated in cancer cells as a result of genetic deletions and mutations. In myeloid leukemias, genes encoding PP2A subunits are generally intact. Instead, PP2A is functionally inhibited by post-translational modifications of its catalytic C subunit, and interactions with negative regulators by its regulatory B and scaffold A subunits. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of genetic and functional inactivation of PP2A in human cancers, with a particular focus on human acute myeloid leukemias (AML. By analyzing expression of genes encoding PP2A subunits using transcriptome sequencing, we find that PP2A dysregulation in AML is characterized by silencing and overexpression of distinct A scaffold and B regulatory subunits, respectively. We review the mechanisms of functional PP2A activation by drugs such as fingolimod, forskolin, OP449, and perphenazine. This analysis yields two non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for therapeutic PP2A re-activation: i allosteric activation of the phosphatase activity, and ii stabilization of active holo-enzyme assembly and displacement of negative regulatory factors from A and B subunits. Future studies should allow the development of specific and potent pharmacologic activators of PP2A, and definition of susceptible disease subsets based on specific mechanisms of PP2A dysregulation.

  15. Novel Mixed-Type Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B. Kinetic and Computational Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marie Jazmín Sarabia-Sanchez; Pedro Josue Trejo-Soto; Jose Miguel Velazquez-López; Carlos Carvente-García; Rafael Castillo; Alicia Hernandez-Campos; Claudia Avitia-Domínguez; Daniel Enríquez-Mendiola; Erick Sierra-Campos; Mónica Valdez-Solana; Jose Manuel Salas-Pacheco; Alfredo Tellez-Valencia

    2017-01-01

    .... In this sense, attention has been centered in the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a protein whose overexpression or increase of its activity has been related in many studies with insulin resistance...

  16. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Kurup, Pradeep; Nairn, Angus C; Lombroso, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the elderly, affecting millions of people worldwide and representing a substantial economic burden. AD is a progressive disease associated with memory loss and impaired cognitive function. The neuropathology is characterized by cortical accumulation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Amyloid plaques are small, aggregated peptides called beta amyloid (Aβ) and NFTs are aggregates of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein. Because Aβ disrupts multiple intracellular signaling pathways, resulting in some of the clinical symptoms of AD, understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms has implications for the diagnosis and treatment of AD. Recent studies have demonstrated that Aβ regulates striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) (PTPN5). Aβ accumulation is associated with increases in STEP levels and activity that in turn disrupts glutamate receptor trafficking to and from the neuronal membrane. These findings indicate that modulating STEP levels or inhibiting its activity may have beneficial effects for patients with AD, making it an important target for drug discovery. This article reviews the biology of STEP and its role in AD as well as the potential clinical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatases control antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohoni, Sujata Vijay; Lieder, Sarah; Bapat, Prashant Madhusudhan

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) possesses a low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMW-PTP),PtpA, that affects the production of undecylprodigionsin (RED) and actinorhodin (ACT). In this study we identifiedanother LMW-PTP called sco3700. Tyrosine phosphatase activity of the purified Sco...

  18. Structural Mechanism of Demethylation and Inactivation of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing,Y.; Li, Z.; Chen, Y.; Stock, J.; Jeffrey, P.; Shi, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is an important serine/threonine phosphatase that plays a role in many biological processes. Reversible carboxyl methylation of the PP2A catalytic subunit is an essential regulatory mechanism for its function. Demethylation and negative regulation of PP2A is mediated by a PP2A-specific methylesterase PME-1, which is conserved from yeast to humans. However, the underlying mechanism of PME-1 function remains enigmatic. Here we report the crystal structures of PME-1 by itself and in complex with a PP2A heterodimeric core enzyme. The structures reveal that PME-1 directly binds to the active site of PP2A and that this interaction results in the activation of PME-1 by rearranging the catalytic triad into an active conformation. Strikingly, these interactions also lead to inactivation of PP2A by evicting the manganese ions that are required for the phosphatase activity of PP2A. These observations identify a dual role of PME-1 that regulates PP2A activation, methylation, and holoenzyme assembly in cells.

  19. Protein phosphatase 1ß limits ring canal constriction during Drosophila germline cyst formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Germline cyst formation is essential for the propagation of many organisms including humans and flies. The cytoplasm of germline cyst cells communicate with each other directly via large intercellular bridges called ring canals. Ring canals are often derived from arrested contractile rings during incomplete cytokinesis. However how ring canal formation, maintenance and growth are regulated remains unclear. To better understand this process, we carried out an unbiased genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster germ cells and identified multiple alleles of flapwing (flw, a conserved serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase. Flw had previously been reported to be unnecessary for early D. melanogaster oogenesis using a hypomorphic allele. We found that loss of Flw leads to over-constricted nascent ring canals and subsequently tiny mature ring canals, through which cytoplasmic transfer from nurse cells to the oocyte is impaired, resulting in small, non-functional eggs. Flw is expressed in germ cells undergoing incomplete cytokinesis, completely colocalized with the Drosophila myosin binding subunit of myosin phosphatase (DMYPT. This colocalization, together with genetic interaction studies, suggests that Flw functions together with DMYPT to negatively regulate myosin activity during ring canal formation. The identification of two subunits of the tripartite myosin phosphatase as the first two main players required for ring canal constriction indicates that tight regulation of myosin activity is essential for germline cyst formation and reproduction in D. melanogaster and probably other species as well.

  20. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors isolated from Artemisia roxburghiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Muhammad Raza; Ishtiaq; Hizbullah, Syed Muhammad; Habtemariam, Solomon; Zarrelli, Armando; Muhammad, Akhtar; Collina, Simona; Khan, Inamulllah

    2016-08-01

    Artemisia roxburghiana is used in traditional medicine for treating various diseases including diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of active constituents by using protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a validated target for management of diabetes. Various compounds were isolated as active principles from the crude methanolic extract of aerial parts of A. roxburghiana. All compounds were screened for PTP1B inhibitory activity. Molecular docking simulations were performed to investigate the mechanism behind PTP1B inhibition of the isolated compound and positive control, ursolic acid. Betulinic acid, betulin and taraxeryl acetate were the active PTP1B principles with IC50 values 3.49 ± 0.02, 4.17 ± 0.03 and 87.52 ± 0.03 µM, respectively. Molecular docking studies showed significant molecular interactions of the triterpene inhibitors with Gly220, Cys215, Gly218 and Asp48 inside the active site of PTP1B. The antidiabetic activity of A. roxburghiana could be attributed due to PTP1B inhibition by its triterpene constituents, betulin, betulinic acid and taraxeryl acetate. Computational insights of this study revealed that the C-3 and C-17 positions of the compounds needs extensive optimization for the development of new lead compounds.

  1. Potential Protein Phosphatase 2A Agents from Traditional Chinese Medicine against Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Chung Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is an important phosphatase which regulates various cellular processes, such as protein synthesis, cell growth, cellular signaling, apoptosis, metabolism, and stress responses. It is a holoenzyme composed of the structural A and catalytic C subunits and a regulatory B subunit. As an environmental toxin, okadaic acid, is a tumor promoter and binds to PP2A catalytic C subunit and the cancer-associated mutations in PP2A structural A subunit in human tumor tissue; PP2A may have tumor-suppressing function. It is a potential drug target in the treatment of cancer. In this study, we screen the TCM compounds in TCM Database@Taiwan to investigate the potent lead compounds as PP2A agent. The results of docking simulation are optimized under dynamic conditions by MD simulations after virtual screening to validate the stability of H-bonds between PP2A-α protein and each ligand. The top TCM candidates, trichosanatine and squamosamide, have potential binding affinities and interactions with key residues Arg89 and Arg214 in the docking simulation. In addition, these interactions were stable under dynamic conditions. Hence, we propose the TCM compounds, trichosanatine and squamosamide, as potential candidates as lead compounds for further study in drug development process with the PP2A-α protein.

  2. Discovery and Optimization of Sulfonyl Acrylonitriles as Selective, Covalent Inhibitors of Protein Phosphatase Methylesterase-1

    OpenAIRE

    Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Zuhl, Andrea M.; Speers, Anna E.; Wolfe, Monique R.; Weerapana, Eranthie; Brown, Steven J.; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2011-01-01

    The serine hydrolase protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) regulates the methylesterification state of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and has been implicated in cancer and Alzheimer's disease. We recently reported a fluorescence polarization-activity-based protein profiling (fluopol-ABPP) high-throughput screen for PME-1 that uncovered a remarkably potent and selective class of aza-β-lactam (ABL) PME-1 inhibitors. Here, we describe a distinct set of sulfonyl acrylonitrile inhibitors tha...

  3. The ubiquitin E3 ligase NOSIP modulates protein phosphatase 2A activity in craniofacial development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Hoffmeister

    Full Text Available Holoprosencephaly is a common developmental disorder in humans characterised by incomplete brain hemisphere separation and midface anomalies. The etiology of holoprosencephaly is heterogeneous with environmental and genetic causes, but for a majority of holoprosencephaly cases the genes associated with the pathogenesis could not be identified so far. Here we report the generation of knockout mice for the ubiquitin E3 ligase NOSIP. The loss of NOSIP in mice causes holoprosencephaly and facial anomalies including cleft lip/palate, cyclopia and facial midline clefting. By a mass spectrometry based protein interaction screen we identified NOSIP as a novel interaction partner of protein phosphatase PP2A. NOSIP mediates the monoubiquitination of the PP2A catalytic subunit and the loss of NOSIP results in an increase in PP2A activity in craniofacial tissue in NOSIP knockout mice. We conclude, that NOSIP is a critical modulator of brain and craniofacial development in mice and a candidate gene for holoprosencephaly in humans.

  4. Protein Ser/ Thr phosphatases – the ugly ducklings of cell signalling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brautigan, David L

    2013-01-01

    ...’ was identified as an enzyme that inactivates glycogen phosphorylase, although it took 10 years before this ugly duckling was recognized for its true identity as a protein Ser/Thr phosphatase...

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of interaction between protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B and a bidentate inhibitor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gui-xia LIU Jin-zhi TAN Chun-ying NIU Jian-hua SHEN Xiao-min LUO Xu SHEN Kai-xian CHEN Hua-liang JIANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the dynamic properties of protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) IB and reveal the structural factors responsible for the high inhibitory potency and selectivity of the inhibitor SNA for PTPIB. Methods...

  6. Role of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiebaut, Pierre-Alain; Besnier, Marie; Gomez, Elodie; Richard, Vincent

    2016-12-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is mostly involved in negative regulation of signaling mediated by Tyrosine Kinase Receptors, especially the insulin and leptin receptors. This enzyme thus plays a major role in the development of diseases associated with insulin resistance, such as obesity and diabetes. PTP1B inhibition is currently considered as an attractive treatment of insulin resistance and associated metabolic disorders. In parallel, emerging evidence also suggests that PTP1B is widely expressed in cardiovascular tissues, notably in the heart and the endothelium, and that it could also be a potential treatment of several cardiovascular diseases. PTP1B is especially present in endothelial cells, and appears to contribute to endothelial dysfunction. Indeed, preclinical evidence shows that pharmacological inhibition of gene deletion of PTP1B reduces endothelial dysfunction in various cardiovascular diseases associated or not with insulin resistance. In parallel, because PTP1B also negatively modulates VEGF signaling, inhibition of this enzyme also tends to favor cardiac angiogenesis. Importantly, blocking PTP1B also results in beneficial effects on cardiac dysfunction and remodeling not only in metabolic diseases but also in the context of heart failure, thus this enzyme represents an attractive new target for the treatment of this disease. This beneficial effect in heart failure may to a large extent result from the endothelial protective and/or proangiogenic effects of PTP1B blockade. Finally, PTP1B inhibition also reduces cardiac dysfunction, but also systemic inflammation and mortality in experimental models of septic shock, and thus may also constitute a new treatment of this disease. Altogether, accumulating preclinical evidence suggests that PTP1B represents an interesting molecular target to treat both cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, which often share the same risk factors. This concept now deserves to be tested in clinical studies that

  7. Effects of Newly Synthesized DCP-LA-Phospholipids on Protein Kinase C and Protein Phosphatases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kanno

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA selectively activates PKCε and inhibits protein phosphatase 1 (PP1. In the present study, we have newly synthesized phosphatidyl-ethanolamine, -serine, -choline, and -inositol containing DCP-LA at the α and β position (diDCP-LA-PE, -PS, PC, and -PI, respectively, and examined the effects of these compounds on activities of PKC isozymes and protein phosphatases. Methods: Activities of PKC isozymes PKCα, -βΙ, -βΙΙ, -γ, -δ, -ε-, ι, and -ζ and protein phosphatases PP1, PP2A, and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B were assayed under the cell-free conditions. Results: All the compounds activated PKC, with the different potential, but only PKCγ inhibition was obtained with diDCP-LA-PC. Of compounds diDCP-LA-PE alone significantly activated PKCι and -ζ. diDCP-LA-PE and diDCP-LA-PI suppressed PP1 activity, but otherwise diDCP-LA-PI enhanced PP2A activity. diDCP-LA-PE, diDCP-LA-PS, and diDCP-LA-PI strongly reduced PTP1B activity, while diDCP-LA-PC enhanced the activity. Conclusion: All the newly synthesized DCP-LA-phospholipids serve as a PKC activator and of them diDCP-LA-PE alone has the potential to activate the atypical PKC isozymes PKCι and -ζ. diDCP-LA-PE and diDCP-LA-PI serve as an inhibitor for PP1 and PTP1B, diDCP-LA-PS as a PTP1B inhibitor, diDCP-LA-PI as a PP2A enhancer, and diDCP-LA-PC as a PTP1B enhancer.

  8. Emerging issues in receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase function: lifting fog or simply shifting?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrone, A; Sap, J

    2000-01-01

    Transmembrane (receptor) tyrosine phosphatases are intimately involved in responses to cell-cell and cell-matrix contact. Several important issues regarding the targets and regulation of this protein family are now emerging. For example, these phosphatases exhibit complex interactions...... with signaling pathways involving SRC family kinases, which result from their ability to control phosphorylation of both activating and inhibitory sites in these kinases and possibly also their substrates. Similarly, integrin signaling illustrates how phosphorylation of a single protein, or the activity...

  9. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the

  10. Frameshift mutations in coding repeats of protein tyrosine phosphatase genes in colorectal tumors with microsatellite instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korff, Sebastian; Woerner, Stefan M; Yuan, Yan P; Bork, Peer; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Gebert, Johannes

    2008-11-10

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) like their antagonizing protein tyrosine kinases are key regulators of signal transduction thereby assuring normal control of cellular growth and differentiation. Increasing evidence suggests that mutations in PTP genes are associated with human malignancies. For example, mutational analysis of the tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) gene superfamily uncovered genetic alterations in about 26% of colorectal tumors. Since in these studies tumors have not been stratified according to genetic instability status we hypothesized that colorectal tumors characterized by high-level of microsatellite instability (MSI-H) might show an increased frequency of frameshift mutations in those PTP genes that harbor long mononucleotide repeats in their coding region (cMNR). Using bioinformatic analysis we identified 16 PTP candidate genes with long cMNRs that were examined for genetic alterations in 19 MSI-H colon cell lines, 54 MSI-H colorectal cancers, and 17 MSI-H colorectal adenomas. Frameshift mutations were identified only in 6 PTP genes, of which PTPN21 show the highest mutation frequency at all in MSI-H tumors (17%). Although about 32% of MSI-H tumors showed at least one affected PTP gene, and cMNR mutation rates in PTPN21, PTPRS, and PTPN5 are higher than the mean mutation frequency of MNRs of the same length, mutations within PTP genes do not seem to play a common role in MSI tumorigenesis, since no cMNR mutation frequency reached statistical significance and therefore, failed prediction as a Positive Selective Target Gene.

  11. Response to DNA damage: why do we need to focus on protein phosphatases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midori eShimada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells are continuously threatened by unavoidable errors during normal DNA replication or various sources of genotoxic stresses that cause DNA damage or stalled replication. To maintain genomic integrity, cells have developed a coordinated signaling network, known as the DNA damage response (DDR. Following DNA damage, sensor molecules detect the presence of DNA damage and transmit signals to downstream transducer molecules. This in turn conveys the signals to numerous effectors, which initiate a large number of specific biological responses, including transient cell cycle arrest mediated by checkpoints, DNA repair, and apoptosis. It is recently becoming clear that dephosphorylation events are involved in keeping DDR factors inactive during normal cell growth. Moreover, dephosphorylation is required to shut off checkpoint arrest following DNA damage and has been implicated in the activation of the DDR. Spatial and temporal regulation of phosphorylation events is essential for the DDR, and fine-tuning of phosphorylation is partly mediated by protein phosphatases. While the role of kinases in the DDR has been well documented, the complex roles of protein dephosphorylation have only recently begun to be investigated. Therefore, it is important to focus on the role of phosphatases and to determine how their activity is regulated upon DNA damage. In this work, we summarize current knowledge on the involvement of serine/threonine phosphatases, especially the protein phosphatase 1, protein phosphatase 2A, and protein phosphatase Mg2+/Mn2+-dependent families, in the DDR.

  12. Structural and mechanistic characterization of L-histidinol phosphate phosphatase from the polymerase and histidinol phosphatase family of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodge, Swapnil V; Fedorov, Alexander A; Fedorov, Elena V; Hillerich, Brandan; Seidel, Ronald; Almo, Steven C; Raushel, Frank M

    2013-02-12

    L-Histidinol phosphate phosphatase (HPP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-histidinol phosphate to L-histidinol and inorganic phosphate, the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of L-histidine. HPP from the polymerase and histidinol phosphatase (PHP) family of proteins possesses a trinuclear active site and a distorted (β/α)(7)-barrel protein fold. This group of enzymes is closely related to the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes. The mechanism of phosphomonoester bond hydrolysis by the PHP family of HPP enzymes was addressed. Recombinant HPP from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis that was expressed in Escherichia coli contained a mixture of iron and zinc in the active site and had a catalytic efficiency of ~10(3) M(-1) s(-1). Expression of the protein under iron-free conditions resulted in the production of an enzyme with a 2 order of magnitude improvement in catalytic efficiency and a mixture of zinc and manganese in the active site. Solvent isotope and viscosity effects demonstrated that proton transfer steps and product dissociation steps are not rate-limiting. X-ray structures of HPP were determined with sulfate, L-histidinol phosphate, and a complex of L-histidinol and arsenate bound in the active site. These crystal structures and the catalytic properties of variants were used to identify the structural elements required for catalysis and substrate recognition by the HPP family of enzymes within the amidohydrolase superfamily.

  13. Assignment of human protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit genes B56{alpha}, B56{beta}, B56{gamma}, B56{delta}, and B56{epsilon} (PPP2R5A-PPP2R5E), highly expressed in muscle and brain, to chromosome regions 1q41, 11q12, 3p21, 6p21.1, and 7p11.1 {r_arrow} p12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCright, B.; Virshup, D.M.; Brothman, A.R. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-08-15

    The activity of the major intracellular protein phosphatase, protein phosphatase 2A WPM, is determined by the nature of the associated regulatory subunit. A new family of human PP2A regulatory subunits has recently been identified. Three of these subunits, B56{beta}, B56{delta}, and B56{epsilon}, are most highly expressed in brain, while the B56{alpha} and B56{gamma} isoforms are highly expressed in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Genes PPP2R5A-PPP2R5E encoding the phosphatase regulatory proteins B56{alpha}, B56{beta}, B56{gamma}, B56{delta}, and B56{epsilon} have now been mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to chromosome regions 1q41, 11q12, 3p21, 6p21.1, and 7p11.2-p12, respectively. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 and Its Regulatory Protein Inhibitor 2 Negatively Regulate ABA Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Xie, Shaojun; Batelli, Giorgia; Wang, Bangshing; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Xingang; Xing, Lu; Lei, Mingguang; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The core ABA signaling pathway consists of three major components: ABA receptor (PYR1/PYLs), type 2C Protein Phosphatase (PP2C) and SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2). Nevertheless, the complexity of ABA signaling remains to be explored. To uncover new components of ABA signal transduction pathways, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen for SnRK2-interacting proteins. We found that Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 (TOPP1) and its regulatory protein, At Inhibitor-2 (AtI-2), physically interact with SnRK2s and also with PYLs. TOPP1 inhibited the kinase activity of SnRK2.6, and this inhibition could be enhanced by AtI-2. Transactivation assays showed that TOPP1 and AtI-2 negatively regulated the SnRK2.2/3/6-mediated activation of the ABA responsive reporter gene RD29B, supporting a negative role of TOPP1 and AtI-2 in ABA signaling. Consistent with these findings, topp1 and ati-2 mutant plants displayed hypersensitivities to ABA and salt treatments, and transcriptome analysis of TOPP1 and AtI-2 knockout plants revealed an increased expression of multiple ABA-responsive genes in the mutants. Taken together, our results uncover TOPP1 and AtI-2 as negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:26943172

  15. Phosphatase inhibitor 2 promotes acetylation of tubulin in the primary cilium of human retinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Weiping

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary cilia are flagella-like projections from the centriole of mammalian cells that have a key role in cell signaling. Human diseases are linked to defects in primary cilia. Microtubules make up the axoneme of cilia and are selectively acetylated and this is thought to contribute to the stability of the structure. However, mechanisms to regulate tubulin acetylation in cilia are poorly understood. Results Endogenous phosphatase inhibitor-2 (I-2 was found concentrated in cilia of human epithelial cells, and was localized to cilia early in the process of formation, prior to the full acetylation of microtubules. Knockdown of I-2 by siRNA significantly reduced the acetylation of microtubules in cilia, without a net decrease in whole cell tubulin acetylation. There was a reduction in the percentage of I-2 knockdown cells with a primary cilium, but no apparent alteration in the cilium length, suggesting no change in microtubule-based transport processes. Inhibition of either histone deacetylases with trichostatin A, or protein phosphatase-1 with calyculin A in I-2 knockdown cells partially rescued the acetylation of microtubules in cilia and the percentage of cells with a primary cilium. Conclusion The regulatory protein I-2 localizes to the primary cilium where it affects both Ser/Thr phosphorylation and is required for full tubulin acetylation. Rescue of tubulin acetylation in I-2 knockdown cells by different chemical inhibitors shows that deacetylases and phosphatases are functionally interconnected to regulate microtubules. As a multifunctional protein, I-2 may link cell cycle progression to structure and stability of the primary cilium.

  16. Arabidopsis protein phosphatase DBP1 nucleates a protein network with a role in regulating plant defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Carrasco

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana DBP1 belongs to the plant-specific family of DNA-binding protein phosphatases. Although recently identified as a novel host factor mediating susceptibility to potyvirus, little is known about DBP1 targets and partners and the molecular mechanisms underlying its function. Analyzing changes in the phosphoproteome of a loss-of-function dbp1 mutant enabled the identification of 14-3-3λ isoform (GRF6, a previously reported DBP1 interactor, and MAP kinase (MAPK MPK11 as components of a small protein network nucleated by DBP1, in which GRF6 stability is modulated by MPK11 through phosphorylation, while DBP1 in turn negatively regulates MPK11 activity. Interestingly, grf6 and mpk11 loss-of-function mutants showed altered response to infection by the potyvirus Plum pox virus (PPV, and the described molecular mechanism controlling GRF6 stability was recapitulated upon PPV infection. These results not only contribute to a better knowledge of the biology of DBP factors, but also of MAPK signalling in plants, with the identification of GRF6 as a likely MPK11 substrate and of DBP1 as a protein phosphatase regulating MPK11 activity, and unveils the implication of this protein module in the response to PPV infection in Arabidopsis.

  17. Design, synthesis, biological activity and molecular dynamics studies of specific protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors over SHP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Su-Xia; Li, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Wen-Bo; Ma, Ying; Wang, Run-Ling; Cheng, Xian-Chao; Wang, Shu-Qing; Liu, Wei

    2013-06-17

    Over expressing in PTPN1 (encoding Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, PTP1B), a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) that plays an overall positive role in insulin signaling, is linked to the pathogenesis of diabetes and obesity. The relationship between PTP1B and human diseases exhibits PTP1B as the target to treat these diseases. In this article, small weight molecules of the imidazolidine series were screened from databases and optimized on silicon as the inhibitors of PTP1B based on the steric conformation and electronic configuration of thiazolidinedione (TZD) compounds. The top three candidates were tested using an in vitro biological assay after synthesis. Finally, we report a novel inhibitor, Compound 13, that specifically inhibits PTP1B over the closely related phosphatase Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) at 80 μΜ. Its IC50 values are reported in this paper as well. This compound was further verified by computer analysis for its ability to combine the catalytic domains of PTP1B and SHP-2 by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

  18. Design, Synthesis, Biological Activity and Molecular Dynamics Studies of Specific Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitors over SHP-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Over expressing in PTPN1 (encoding Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, PTP1B, a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP that plays an overall positive role in insulin signaling, is linked to the pathogenesis of diabetes and obesity. The relationship between PTP1B and human diseases exhibits PTP1B as the target to treat these diseases. In this article, small weight molecules of the imidazolidine series were screened from databases and optimized on silicon as the inhibitors of PTP1B based on the steric conformation and electronic configuration of thiazolidinedione (TZD compounds. The top three candidates were tested using an in vitro biological assay after synthesis. Finally, we report a novel inhibitor, Compound 13, that specifically inhibits PTP1B over the closely related phosphatase Src homology 2 (SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2 at 80 μΜ. Its IC50 values are reported in this paper as well. This compound was further verified by computer analysis for its ability to combine the catalytic domains of PTP1B and SHP-2 by molecular dynamics (MD simulations.

  19. Involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenesis: New anti-obesity targets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Hee Bae

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a worldwide epidemic as well as being a major riskfactor for diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and several types ofcancers. Obesity is mainly due to the overgrowth of adiposetissue arising from an imbalance between energy intake andenergy expenditure. Adipose tissue, primarily composed ofadipocytes, plays a key role in maintaining whole body energyhomeostasis. In view of the treatment of obesity andobesity-related diseases, it is critical to understand the detailedsignal transduction mechanisms of adipogenic differentiation.Adipogenic differentiation is tightly regulated by many keysignal cascades, including insulin signaling. These signalcascades generally transfer or amplify the signal by using serialtyrosine phosphorylations. Thus, protein tyrosine kinases andprotein tyrosine phosphatases are closely related to adipogenicdifferentiation. Compared to protein tyrosine kinases, proteintyrosine phosphatases have received little attention inadipogenic differentiation. This review aims to highlight theinvolvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenicdifferentiation and the possibility of protein tyrosinephosphatases as drugs to target obesity.

  20. Expression of protein-tyrosine phosphatases in the major insulin target tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norris, K; Norris, F; Kono, D H

    1997-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key regulators of the insulin receptor signal transduction pathway. We have performed a detailed analysis of PTP expression in the major human insulin target tissues or cells (liver, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and endothelial cells). To obtain...... a representative picture, all tissues were analyzed by PCR using three different primer sets corresponding to conserved regions of known PTPs. A total of 24 different PTPs were identified. A multiprobe RNase protection assay was developed to obtain a semiquantitative measure of the expression levels of selected...... PTPs. Surprisingly, PTP-LAR, previously suggested to be a major regulator of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, was expressed in extremely low levels in skeletal muscle, whereas the related receptor-type PTP-sigma and PTP-alpha were expressed in relatively high levels in all four tissues. The low...

  1. Protein phosphatase 1 and LTD: synapses are the architects of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, J

    2001-12-20

    NMDAR-dependent long-term depression involves the activation of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and 2B (calcineurin) and the subsequent dephosphorylation of synaptic proteins. In this issue of Neuron, Morishita et al. (2001) provide evidence that precise targeting of PP1 to synaptic substrates is critical for the expression of LTD.

  2. The Arabidopsis kinase-associated protein phosphatase controls internalization of the somatic embryogenesis receptor kinase 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, K.; Russinova, E.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Willemse, J.; Vries, de S.C.

    2002-01-01

    The AtSERK1 protein is a plasma membrane-located LRR receptor-like serine threonine kinase that is transiently expressed during plant embryogenesis. Our results show that AtSERK1 interacts with the kinase-associated protein phosphatase (KAPP) in vitro. The kinase interaction (KI) domain of KAPP does

  3. Mapping of protein phosphatase-6 association with its SAPS domain regulatory subunit using a model of helical repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edelson Jessica R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helical repeat motifs are common among regulatory subunits for type-1 and type-2A protein Ser/Thr phosphatases. Yeast Sit4 is a distinctive type-2A phosphatase that has dedicated regulatory subunits named Sit4-Associated Proteins (SAPS. These subunits are conserved, and three human SAPS-related proteins are known to associate with PP6 phosphatase, the Sit4 human homologue. Results Here we show that endogenous SAPS subunit PP6R3 co-precipitates half of PP6 in cell extracts, and the SAPS region of PP6R3 is sufficient for binding PP6. The SAPS domain of recombinant GST-PP6R3 is relatively resistant to trypsin despite having many K and R residues, and the purified SAPS domain (residues 1-513 has a circular dichroic spectrum indicative of mostly alpha helical structure. We used sequence alignments and 3D-jury methods to develop alternative models for the SAPS domain, based on available structures of other helical repeat proteins. The models were used to select sites for charge-reversal substitutions in the SAPS domain of PP6R3 that were tested by co-precipitation of endogenous PP6c with FLAG-tagged PP6R3 from mammalian cells. Mutations that reduced binding with PP6 suggest that SAPS adopts a helical repeat similar to the structure of p115 golgin, but distinct from the PP2A-A subunit. These mutations did not cause perturbations in overall PP6R3 conformation, evidenced by no change in kinetics or preferential cleavage by chymotrypsin. Conclusion The conserved SAPS domain in PP6R3 forms helical repeats similar to those in golgin p115 and negatively charged residues in interhelical loops are used to associate specifically with PP6. The results advance understanding of how distinctive helical repeat subunits uniquely distribute and differentially regulate closely related Ser/Thr phosphatases.

  4. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha specifically inhibits insulin-increased prolactin gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, K K; Sap, J; Stanley, F M

    1998-01-01

    A physiologically relevant response to insulin, stimulation of prolactin promoter activity in GH4 pituitary cells, was used as an assay to study the specificity of protein-tyrosine phosphatase function. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) blocks the effect of insulin...... to increase prolactin gene expression but potentiates the effects of epidermal growth factor and cAMP on prolactin promoter activity. RPTPalpha was the only protein-tyrosine phosphatase tested that did this. Thus, the effect of RPTPalpha on prolactin-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) promoter activity...... is specific by two criteria. A number of potential RPTPalpha targets were ruled out by finding (a) that they are not affected or (b) that they are not on the pathway to insulin-increased prolactin-CAT activity. The negative effect of RPTPalpha on insulin activation of the prolactin promoter is not due...

  5. Protein Phosphatase 2A in the Regulation of Wnt Signaling, Stem Cells, and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J. Thompson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation is a ubiquitous cellular process that allows for the nuanced and reversible regulation of protein activity. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a heterotrimeric serine-threonine phosphatase—composed of a structural, regulatory, and catalytic subunit—that controls a variety of cellular events via protein dephosphorylation. While much is known about PP2A and its basic biochemistry, the diversity of its components—especially the multitude of regulatory subunits—has impeded the determination of PP2A function. As a consequence of this complexity, PP2A has been shown to both positively and negatively regulate signaling networks such as the Wnt pathway. Wnt signaling modulates major developmental processes, and is a dominant mediator of stem cell self-renewal, cell fate, and cancer stem cells. Because PP2A affects Wnt signaling both positively and negatively and at multiple levels, further understanding of this complex dynamic may ultimately provide insight into stem cell biology and how to better treat cancers that result from alterations in Wnt signaling. This review will summarize literature that implicates PP2A as a tumor suppressor, explore PP2A mutations identified in human malignancy, and focus on PP2A in the regulation of Wnt signaling and stem cells so as to better understand how aberrancy in this pathway can contribute to tumorigenesis.

  6. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  7. Frameshift mutations in coding repeats of protein tyrosine phosphatase genes in colorectal tumors with microsatellite instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bork Peer

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs like their antagonizing protein tyrosine kinases are key regulators of signal transduction thereby assuring normal control of cellular growth and differentiation. Increasing evidence suggests that mutations in PTP genes are associated with human malignancies. For example, mutational analysis of the tyrosine phosphatase (PTP gene superfamily uncovered genetic alterations in about 26% of colorectal tumors. Since in these studies tumors have not been stratified according to genetic instability status we hypothesized that colorectal tumors characterized by high-level of microsatellite instability (MSI-H might show an increased frequency of frameshift mutations in those PTP genes that harbor long mononucleotide repeats in their coding region (cMNR. Results Using bioinformatic analysis we identified 16 PTP candidate genes with long cMNRs that were examined for genetic alterations in 19 MSI-H colon cell lines, 54 MSI-H colorectal cancers, and 17 MSI-H colorectal adenomas. Frameshift mutations were identified only in 6 PTP genes, of which PTPN21 show the highest mutation frequency at all in MSI-H tumors (17%. Conclusion Although about 32% of MSI-H tumors showed at least one affected PTP gene, and cMNR mutation rates in PTPN21, PTPRS, and PTPN5 are higher than the mean mutation frequency of MNRs of the same length, mutations within PTP genes do not seem to play a common role in MSI tumorigenesis, since no cMNR mutation frequency reached statistical significance and therefore, failed prediction as a Positive Selective Target Gene.

  8. Metal ligand affinity pipettes and bioreactive alkaline phosphatase probes: tools for characterization of phosphorylated proteins and peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieber, Allan L; Tubbs, Kemmons A; Nelson, Randall W

    2004-03-01

    An alkaline phosphatase-bioreactive probe, in which the enzyme is covalently bound to the mass spectrometry target, has been developed for studies of phosphoproteins. The bioreactive probe was used in combination with affinity capture and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry to study hydrolysis of several phosphoproteins found in human saliva. Human salivary proteins were extracted from diluted human saliva with immobilized metal-affinity pipettes, which under defined conditions bound the phosphoproteins of interest preferentially over histatins. Phosphoproteins were eluted directly from the affinity pipettes to the bioreactive probe with diluted ammonium hydroxide, which provided conditions appropriate for hydrolysis by the alkaline phosphatase covalently bound to the probe surface. Results indicate the combination of metal-affinity pipette extraction, alkaline phosphatase-bioreactive probes, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry is an effective way to find and characterize phosphoproteins, known and unknown, in complex mixtures. Facile hydrolysis of human salivary phosphoproteins by the bioreactive probes was readily observed.

  9. Involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenesis: new anti-obesity targets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Won Kon; Lee, Sang Chul

    2012-12-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic as well as being a major risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and several types of cancers. Obesity is mainly due to the overgrowth of adipose tissue arising from an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure. Adipose tissue, primarily composed of adipocytes, plays a key role in maintaining whole body energy homeostasis. In view of the treatment of obesity and obesity-related diseases, it is critical to understand the detailed signal transduction mechanisms of adipogenic differentiation. Adipogenic differentiation is tightly regulated by many key signal cascades, including insulin signaling. These signal cascades generally transfer or amplify the signal by using serial tyrosine phosphorylations. Thus, protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases are closely related to adipogenic differentiation. Compared to protein tyrosine kinases, protein tyrosine phosphatases have received little attention in adipogenic differentiation. This review aims to highlight the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenic differentiation and the possibility of protein tyrosine phosphatases as drugs to target obesity.

  10. Interaction of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit (MYPT1) with Myosin Phosphatase-RhoA Interacting Protein (MRIP): A Role of Glutamic Acids in the Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunhee; Stafford, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins bind to and functionally link protein members of signaling pathways. Interaction of the scaffold proteins, myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), causes co-localization of myosin phosphatase and RhoA to actomyosin. To examine biophysical properties of interaction of MYPT1 with MRIP, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation and surface plasmon resonance. In regard to MRIP, its residues 724-837 are sufficient for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Moreover, MRIP binds to MYPT1 as either a monomer or a dimer. With respect to MYPT1, its leucine repeat region, LR (residues 991-1030) is sufficient to account for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Furthermore, point mutations that replace glutamic acids 998-1000 within LR reduced the binding affinity toward MRIP. This suggests that the glutamic acids of MYPT1 play an important role in the interaction.

  11. A Novel Molecular Diagnostic of Glioblastomas: Detection of an Extracellular Fragment of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase μ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Burden-Gulley

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We recently found that normal human brain and low-grade astrocytomas express the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ and that the more invasive astrocytomas, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, downregulate full-length PTPμ expression. Loss of PTPμ expression in GBMs is due to proteolytic cleavage that generates an intracellular and potentially a cleaved and released extracellular fragment of PTPμ. Here, we identify that a cleaved extracellular fragment containing the domains required for PTPμ-mediated adhesion remains associated with GBM tumor tissue. We hypothesized that detection of this fragment would make an excellent diagnostic tool for the localization of tumor tissue within the brain. To this end, we generated a series of fluorescently tagged peptide probes that bind the PTPμ fragment. The peptide probes specifically recognize GBM cells in tissue sections of surgically resected human tumors. To test whether the peptide probes are able to detect GBM tumors in vivo, the PTPμ peptide probes were tested in both mouse flank and intracranial xenograft human glioblastoma tumor model systems. The glial tumors were molecularly labeled with the PTPμ peptide probes within minutes of tail vein injection using the Maestro FLEX In Vivo Imaging System. The label was stable for at least 3 hours. Together, these results indicate that peptide recognition of the PTPμ extracellular fragment provides a novel molecular diagnostic tool for detection of human glioblastomas. Such a tool has clear translational applications and may lead to improved surgical resections and prognosis for patients with this devastating disease.

  12. Glutathione-Responsive Selenosulfide Prodrugs as a Platform Strategy for Potent and Selective Mechanism-Based Inhibition of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjin, Caroline Chandra; Otley, Kate D; Baguley, Tyler D; Kurup, Pradeep; Xu, Jian; Nairn, Angus C; Lombroso, Paul J; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2017-12-27

    Dysregulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation has been implicated in a number of human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. As a result of their essential role in regulating protein tyrosine phosphorylation levels, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have emerged as important yet challenging therapeutic targets. Here we report on the development and application of a glutathione-responsive motif to facilitate the efficient intracellular delivery of a novel class of selenosulfide phosphatase inhibitors for the selective active site directed inhibition of the targeted PTP by selenosulfide exchange with the active site cysteine. The strategy leverages the large difference in extracellular and intracellular glutathione levels to deliver selenosulfide phosphatase inhibitors to cells. As an initial exploration of the prodrug platform and the corresponding selenosulfide covalent inhibitor class, potent and selective inhibitors were developed for two therapeutically relevant PTP targets: the Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence factor mPTPA and the CNS-specific tyrosine phosphatase, striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP). The lead selenosulfide inhibitors enable potent and selective inhibition of their respective targets over a panel of human PTPs and a representative cysteine protease. Kinetic parameters of the inhibitors were characterized, including reversibility of inhibition and rapid rate of GSH exchange at intracellular GSH concentrations. Additionally, active site covalent inhibitor-labeling with an mPTPA inhibitor was rigorously confirmed by mass spectrometry, and cellular activity was demonstrated with a STEP prodrug inhibitor in cortical neurons.

  13. A new fluorescence-based method identifies protein phosphatases regulating lipid droplet metabolism.

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    Bruno L Bozaquel-Morais

    Full Text Available In virtually every cell, neutral lipids are stored in cytoplasmic structures called lipid droplets (LDs and also referred to as lipid bodies or lipid particles. We developed a rapid high-throughput assay based on the recovery of quenched BODIPY-fluorescence that allows to quantify lipid droplets. The method was validated by monitoring lipid droplet turnover during growth of a yeast culture and by screening a group of strains deleted in genes known to be involved in lipid metabolism. In both tests, the fluorimetric assay showed high sensitivity and good agreement with previously reported data using microscopy. We used this method for high-throughput identification of protein phosphatases involved in lipid droplet metabolism. From 65 yeast knockout strains encoding protein phosphatases and its regulatory subunits, 13 strains revealed to have abnormal levels of lipid droplets, 10 of them having high lipid droplet content. Strains deleted for type I protein phosphatases and related regulators (ppz2, gac1, bni4, type 2A phosphatase and its related regulator (pph21 and sap185, type 2C protein phosphatases (ptc1, ptc4, ptc7 and dual phosphatases (pps1, msg5 were catalogued as high-lipid droplet content strains. Only reg1, a targeting subunit of the type 1 phosphatase Glc7p, and members of the nutrient-sensitive TOR pathway (sit4 and the regulatory subunit sap190 were catalogued as low-lipid droplet content strains, which were studied further. We show that Snf1, the homologue of the mammalian AMP-activated kinase, is constitutively phosphorylated (hyperactive in sit4 and sap190 strains leading to a reduction of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. In conclusion, our fast and highly sensitive method permitted us to catalogue protein phosphatases involved in the regulation of LD metabolism and present evidence indicating that the TOR pathway and the SNF1/AMPK pathway are connected through the Sit4p-Sap190p pair in the control of lipid droplet biogenesis.

  14. Protein Phosphatase 2A Dephosphorylates CaBP4 and Regulates CaBP4 Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeseleer, Françoise; Sokal, Izabela; Gregory, Frederick D.; Lee, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. CaBP4 is a neuronal Ca2+-binding protein that is expressed in the retina and in the cochlea, and is essential for normal photoreceptor synaptic function. CaBP4 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ) in the retina at serine 37, which affects its interaction with and modulation of voltage-gated Cav1 Ca2+ channels. In this study, we investigated the potential role and functional significance of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in CaBP4 dephosphorylation. Methods. The effect of protein phosphatase inhibitors, light, and overexpression of PP2A subunits on CaBP4 dephosphorylation was measured in in vitro assays. Pull-down experiments using retinal or transfected HEK293 cell lysates were used to investigate the association between CaBP4 and PP2A subunits. Electrophysiologic recordings of cotransfected HEK293 cells were performed to analyze the effect of CaBP4 dephosphorylation in modulating Cav1.3 currents. Results. PP2A inhibitors, okadaic acid (OA), and fostriecin, but not PP1 selective inhibitors, NIPP-1, and inhibitor 2, block CaBP4 dephosphorylation in retinal lysates. Increased phosphatase activity in light-dependent conditions reverses phosphorylation of CaBP4 by PKCζ. In HEK293 cells, overexpression of PP2A enhances the rate of dephosphorylation of CaBP4. In addition, inhibition of protein phosphatase activity by OA increases CaBP4 phosphorylation and potentiates the modulatory effect of CaBP4 on Cav1.3 Ca2+ channels in HEK293T cells. Conclusions. This study provides evidence that CaBP4 is dephosphorylated by PP2A in the retina. Our findings reveal a novel role for protein phosphatases in regulating CaBP4 function in the retina, which may fine tune presynaptic Ca2+ signals at the photoreceptor synapse. PMID:23341017

  15. Expression of the scaffolding subunit A of protein phosphatase 2A during rat testicular development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Ham, R.; van Dissel-Emiliani, F. M. F.; van Pelt, A. M. M.

    2003-01-01

    Previously, we found that the poly(A)+ RNA of the scaffolding subunit A (alpha isoform) of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-Aalpha) was clearly expressed by fetal gonocytes but weakly expressed by adult single (As), paired (Apr), and aligned (Aal) A spermatogonia. The scaffolding subunit A of PP2A

  16. Dysregulation of protein phosphatase 2A in parkinson disease and dementia with lewy bodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Hye‐Jin; Lee, Kang‐Woo; Park, Eun S; Oh, Stephanie; Yan, Run; Zhang, Jie; Beach, Thomas G; Adler, Charles H; Voronkov, Michael; Braithwaite, Steven P; Stock, Jeffry B; Mouradian, M. Maral

    2016-01-01

    ... specificities on the resulting trimeric holoenzymes. The binding of different B subunits to the AC dimer is regulated by reversible carboxyl methylation of the C subunit. Thus, PP2A methylation is critical for its selective phosphatase activity toward different phospho‐protein substrates. The methylation status of PP2A is governed by the opposing activ...

  17. Characterization of multiple transcripts and isoforms derived from the mouse protein tyrosine phosphatase gene Ptprr.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chirivi, R.G.S.; Dilaver, G.; Vorstenbosch, R.A. van de; Wanschers, B.F.J.; Schepens, J.T.G.; Croes, H.J.E.; Fransen, J.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.

    2004-01-01

    The use of alternative splice sites, promoters and translation start sites considerably adds to the complexity of organisms. Four mouse cDNAs (PTPBR7, PTP-SL, PTPPBSgamma+ and PTPPBSgamma-) have been cloned that contain different 5' parts but encode identical protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRR

  18. Residue 182 influences the second step of protein-tyrosine phosphatase-mediated catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.K.; Guo, X.; Møller, K.B.

    2004-01-01

    Previous enzyme kinetic and structural studies have revealed a critical role for Asp(181) (PTP1B numbering) in PTP (protein-tyrosine phosphatase)-mediated catalysis. In the E-P (phosphoenzyme) formation step, Asp(181) functions as a general acid, while in the E-P hydrolysis step it acts as a gene...

  19. Mechanism of dephosphorylation of the SR protein ASF/SF2 by protein phosphatase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chen-Ting; Ghosh, Gourisankar; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Adams, Joseph A

    2010-10-29

    SR proteins are essential splicing factors whose function is controlled by multi-site phosphorylation of a C-terminal domain rich in arginine-serine repeats (RS domain). The protein kinase SRPK1 has been shown to polyphosphorylate the N-terminal portion of the RS domain (RS1) of the SR protein ASF/SF2, a modification that promotes nuclear entry of this splicing factor and engagement in splicing function. Later, dephosphorylation is required for maturation of the spliceosome and other RNA processing steps. While phosphates are attached to RS1 in a sequential manner by SRPK1, little is known about how they are removed. To investigate factors that control dephosphorylation, we monitored region-specific mapping of phosphorylation sites in ASF/SF2 as a function of the protein phosphatase PP1. We showed that 10 phosphates added to the RS1 segment by SRPK1 are removed in a preferred N-to-C manner, directly opposing the C-to-N phosphorylation by SRPK1. Two N-terminal RNA recognition motifs in ASF/SF2 control access to the RS domain and guide the directional mechanism. Binding of RNA to the RNA recognition motifs protects against dephosphorylation, suggesting that engagement of the SR protein with exonic splicing enhancers can regulate phosphoryl content in the RS domain. In addition to regulation by N-terminal domains, phosphorylation of the C-terminal portion of the RS domain (RS2) by the nuclear protein kinase Clk/Sty inhibits RS1 dephosphorylation and disrupts the directional mechanism. The data indicate that both RNA-protein interactions and phosphorylation in flanking sequences induce conformations of ASF/SF2 that increase the lifetime of phosphates in the RS domain. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Protein phosphatase 2Cm is a critical regulator of branched-chain amino acid catabolism in mice and cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gang; Sun, Haipeng; She, Pengxiang; Youn, Ji-Youn; Warburton, Sarah; Ping, Peipei; Vondriska, Thomas M; Cai, Hua; Lynch, Christopher J; Wang, Yibin

    2009-06-01

    The branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are essential amino acids required for protein homeostasis, energy balance, and nutrient signaling. In individuals with deficiencies in BCAA, these amino acids can be preserved through inhibition of the branched-chain-alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, the rate-limiting step in their metabolism. BCKD is inhibited by phosphorylation of its E1alpha subunit at Ser293, which is catalyzed by BCKD kinase. During BCAA excess, phosphorylated Ser293 (pSer293) becomes dephosphorylated through the concerted inhibition of BCKD kinase and the activity of an unknown intramitochondrial phosphatase. Using unbiased, proteomic approaches, we have found that a mitochondrial-targeted phosphatase, PP2Cm, specifically binds the BCKD complex and induces dephosphorylation of Ser293 in the presence of BCKD substrates. Loss of PP2Cm completely abolished substrate-induced E1alpha dephosphorylation both in vitro and in vivo. PP2Cm-deficient mice exhibited BCAA catabolic defects and a metabolic phenotype similar to the intermittent or intermediate types of human maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), a hereditary disorder caused by defects in BCKD activity. These results indicate that PP2Cm is the endogenous BCKD phosphatase required for nutrient-mediated regulation of BCKD activity and suggest that defects in PP2Cm may be responsible for a subset of human MSUD.

  1. Activation of the low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase in keratinocytes exposed to hyperosmotic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A Silva

    Full Text Available Herein, we provide new contribution to the mechanisms involved in keratinocytes response to hyperosmotic shock showing, for the first time, the participation of Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP activity in this event. We reported that sorbitol-induced osmotic stress mediates alterations in the phosphorylation of pivotal cytoskeletal proteins, particularly Src and cofilin. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of the phosphorylated form of LMWPTP, which was followed by an augment in its catalytic activity, was observed. Of particular importance, these responses occurred in an intracellular milieu characterized by elevated levels of reduced glutathione (GSH and increased expression of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. Altogether, our results suggest that hyperosmostic stress provides a favorable cellular environment to the activation of LMWPTP, which is associated with increased expression of antioxidant enzymes, high levels of GSH and inhibition of Src kinase. Finally, the real contribution of LMWPTP in the hyperosmotic stress response of keratinocytes was demonstrated through analysis of the effects of ACP1 gene knockdown in stressed and non-stressed cells. LMWPTP knockdown attenuates the effects of sorbitol induced-stress in HaCaT cells, mainly in the status of Src kinase, Rac and STAT5 phosphorylation and activity. These results describe for the first time the participation of LMWPTP in the dynamics of cytoskeleton rearrangement during exposure of human keratinocytes to hyperosmotic shock, which may contribute to cell death.

  2. Raft partitioning and dynamic behavior of human placental alkaline phosphatase in giant unilamellar vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahya, Nicoletta; Brown, Deborah A; Schwille, Petra

    2005-05-24

    Much attention has recently been drawn to the hypothesis that cellular membranes organize in functionalized platforms called rafts, enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol. The notion that glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are strongly associated with rafts is based on their insolubility in nonionic detergents. However, detergent-based methodologies for identifying raft association are indirect and potentially prone to artifacts. On the other hand, rafts have proven to be difficult to visualize and investigate in living cells. A number of studies have demonstrated that model membranes provide a valuable tool for elucidating some of the raft properties. Here, we present a model membrane system based on domain-forming giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), in which the GPI-anchored protein, human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), has been functionally reconstituted. Raft morphology, protein raft partitioning, and dynamic behavior have been characterized by fluorescence confocal microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Approximately 20-30% of PLAP associate with sphingomyelin-enriched domains. The affinity of PLAP for the liquid-ordered (l(o)) phase is compared to that of a nonraft protein, bacteriorhodopsin. Next, detergent extraction was carried out on PLAP-containing GUVs as a function of temperature, to relate the lipid and protein organization in distinct phases of the GUVs to the composition of detergent resistant membranes (DRMs). Finally, antibody-mediated cross-linking of PLAP induces a shift of its partition coefficient in favor of the l(o) phase.

  3. Functional Analysis of Mouse G6pc1 Mutations Using a Novel In Situ Assay for Glucose-6-Phosphatase Activity and the Effect of Mutations in Conserved Human G6PC1/G6PC2 Amino Acids on G6PC2 Protein Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla A Boortz

    Full Text Available Elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG has been associated with increased risk for development of type 2 diabetes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in G6PC2 are the most important common determinants of variations in FBG in humans. Studies using G6pc2 knockout mice suggest that G6pc2 regulates the glucose sensitivity of insulin secretion. G6PC2 and the related G6PC1 and G6PC3 genes encode glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunits. This study describes a functional analysis of 22 non-synonymous G6PC2 SNPs, that alter amino acids that are conserved in human G6PC1, mouse G6pc1 and mouse G6pc2, with the goal of identifying variants that potentially affect G6PC2 activity/expression. Published data suggest strong conservation of catalytically important amino acids between all four proteins and the related G6PC3 isoform. Because human G6PC2 has very low glucose-6-phosphatase activity we used an indirect approach, examining the effect of these SNPs on mouse G6pc1 activity. Using a novel in situ functional assay for glucose-6-phosphatase activity we demonstrate that the amino acid changes associated with the human G6PC2 rs144254880 (Arg79Gln, rs149663725 (Gly114Arg and rs2232326 (Ser324Pro SNPs reduce mouse G6pc1 enzyme activity without affecting protein expression. The Arg79Gln variant alters an amino acid mutation of which, in G6PC1, has previously been shown to cause glycogen storage disease type 1a. We also demonstrate that the rs368382511 (Gly8Glu, rs138726309 (His177Tyr, rs2232323 (Tyr207Ser rs374055555 (Arg293Trp, rs2232326 (Ser324Pro, rs137857125 (Pro313Leu and rs2232327 (Pro340Leu SNPs confer decreased G6PC2 protein expression. In summary, these studies identify multiple G6PC2 variants that have the potential to be associated with altered FBG in humans.

  4. Molecular cloning of the human homolog of a striatum-enriched phosphatase (STEP) gene and chromosomal mapping of the human and murine loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xu; Luna, J. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States); Francke, U. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States)]|[Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    1995-08-10

    A gene for a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) was isolated from a human fetal brain cDNA library by PCR amplification. Sequence analysis revealed that the PTPase has a single phosphatase catalytic domain located at the C-terminus that includes the highly conserved amino acid domain [I/V]HCXAGXXR[S/T]GX[F/Y] found in all tyrosine phosphatases. Two proline-rich regions located at the N-terminus may contain putative Src homology domain 3 (SH3) binding motifs. Comparison of the PTPase with a previously cloned striatum enriched phosphatase (STEP) from rat and from mouse exhibited a high degree of identity ({approximately}85-90%) at both the nucleotide and the amino acid levels, indicating that the human PTPase is the homolog of the rat and murine STEP gene. By using a combination of somatic cell hybrid analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have mapped the human STEP locus to chromosome 11p15.2-p15.1 and the murine STEP gene to chromosome 7B3-B5. These are two regions of known conserved synteny, providing further evidence that the human STEP is a true homolog of the murine STEP gene. Candidate disease genes in the vicinity include Usher syndrome type 1C in human and a mouse mutant locus, twister (twt). 50 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Inactivation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases by Peracids Correlates with the Hydrocarbon Chain Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Kuban-Jankowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Protein tyrosine phosphatases are crucial enzymes controlling numerous physiological and pathophysiological events and can be regulated by oxidation of the catalytic domain cysteine residue. Peracids are highly oxidizing compounds, and thus may induce inactivation of PTPs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of peracids with different length of hydrocarbon chain on the activity of selected PTPs. Methods: The enzymatic activity of human CD45, PTP1B, LAR, bacterial YopH was assayed under the cell-free conditions, and activity of cellular CD45 in human Jurkat cell lysates. The molecular docking and molecular dynamics were performed to evaluate the peracids binding to the CD45 active site. Results: Here we demonstrate that peracids reduce enzymatic activity of recombinant CD45, PTP1B, LAR, YopH and cellular CD45. Our studies indicate that peracids are more potent inhibitors of CD45 than hydrogen peroxide (with an IC50 value equal to 25 nM for peroctanoic acid and 8 µM for hydrogen peroxide. The experimental data show that the inactivation caused by peracids is dependent on hydrocarbon chain length of peracids with maximum inhibitory effect of medium-chain peracids (C8-C12 acyl chain, which correlates with calculated binding affinities to the CD45 active site. Conclusion: Peracids are potent inhibitors of PTPs with the strongest inhibitory effect observed for medium-chain peracids.

  6. Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 modulates NOD2-induced cytokine release and autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne R Spalinger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Variations within the gene locus encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22 are associated with the risk to develop inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. PTPN22 is involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell receptor signaling, but although it is highly expressed in innate immune cells, its function in other signaling pathways is less clear. Here, we study whether loss of PTPN22 controls muramyl-dipeptide (MDP-induced signaling and effects in immune cells. MATERIAL & METHODS: Stable knockdown of PTPN22 was induced in THP-1 cells by shRNA transduction prior to stimulation with the NOD2 ligand MDP. Cells were analyzed for signaling protein activation and mRNA expression by Western blot and quantitative PCR; cytokine secretion was assessed by ELISA, autophagosome induction by Western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC were obtained from PTPN22 knockout mice or wild-type animals. RESULTS: MDP-treatment induced PTPN22 expression and activity in human and mouse cells. Knockdown of PTPN22 enhanced MDP-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK-isoforms p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase as well as canonical NF-κB signaling molecules in THP-1 cells and BMDC derived from PTPN22 knockout mice. Loss of PTPN22 enhanced mRNA levels and secretion of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8 and TNF in THP-1 cells and PTPN22 knockout BMDC. Additionally, loss of PTPN22 resulted in increased, MDP-mediated autophagy in human and mouse cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that PTPN22 controls NOD2 signaling, and loss of PTPN22 renders monocytes more reactive towards bacterial products, what might explain the association of PTPN22 variants with IBD pathogenesis.

  7. Mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of arsenic compounds on protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Kanwal [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Zhe [Zhejiang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou (China); Wang, Wen Wen; Wang, Yan Wei [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Sakamoto, Akira [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260‐8675 (Japan); Zhang, Yan Fang [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Naranmandura, Hua, E-mail: narenman@zju.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Suzuki, Noriyuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260‐8675 (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Arsenic binding to biomolecules is considered one of the major toxic mechanisms, which may also be related to the carcinogenic risks of arsenic in humans. At the same time, arsenic is also known to activate the phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor, the mitogen-activated protein kinase and insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 pathways. These signaling pathways originate at the level of receptor tyrosine kinases whose phosphorylation status is regulated by opposing protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation, which is governed by the balanced action of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases, regulates important signaling pathways that are involved in the control of cell proliferation, adhesion and migration. In the present study, we have focused on the interaction of cellular PTPs with toxic trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and its intermediate metabolites such as monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) in vitro, and then determined the arsenic binding site in PTP by the use of recombinant PTPs (e.g., PTP1B and CD45). Interestingly, the activities of PTP1B (cytoplasm-form) or CD45 (receptor-linked form) were observed to be strongly inhibited by both methylated metabolites (i.e., MMA{sup III} and DMA{sup III}) but not by iAs{sup III}. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has clearly confirmed that the organic intermediate, DMA{sup III} directly bound to the active site cysteine residue of PTP1B (e.g., Cys215), resulting in inhibition of enzyme activity. These results suggest that arsenic exposure may disturb the cellular signaling pathways through PTP inactivation. Highlights: ► This study focused on the interaction of PTPs with trivalent arsenicals in vitro. ► We for the first time confirmed that DMA{sup III} strongly inhibited activity of PTP1B. ► DMA{sup III} directly

  8. Dual specificity phosphatase 5 and 6 are oppositely regulated in human skeletal muscle by acute exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourteymour, Shirin; Hjorth, Marit; Lee, Sindre; Holen, Torgeir; Langleite, Torgrim M; Jensen, Jørgen; Birkeland, Kåre I; Drevon, Christian A; Eckardt, Kristin

    2017-10-01

    Physical activity promotes specific adaptations in most tissues including skeletal muscle. Acute exercise activates numerous signaling cascades including pathways involving mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, which returns to pre-exercise level after exercise. The expression of MAPK phosphatases (MKPs) in human skeletal muscle and their regulation by exercise have not been investigated before. In this study, we used mRNA sequencing to monitor regulation of MKPs in human skeletal muscle after acute cycling. In addition, primary human myotubes were used to gain more insights into the regulation of MKPs. The two ERK1/2-specific MKPs, dual specificity phosphatase 5 (DUSP5) and DUSP6, were the most regulated MKPs in skeletal muscle after acute exercise. DUSP5 expression was ninefold higher immediately after exercise and returned to pre-exercise level within 2 h, whereas DUSP6 expression was reduced by 43% just after exercise and remained below pre-exercise level after 2 h recovery. Cultured myotubes express both MKPs, and incubation with dexamethasone (Dex) mimicked the in vivo expression pattern of DUSP5 and DUSP6 caused by exercise. Using a MAPK kinase inhibitor, we showed that stimulation of ERK1/2 activity by Dex was required for induction of DUSP5 However, maintaining basal ERK1/2 activity was required for basal DUSP6 expression suggesting that the effect of Dex on DUSP6 might involve an ERK1/2-independent mechanism. We conclude that the altered expression of DUSP5 and DUSP6 in skeletal muscle after acute endurance exercise might affect ERK1/2 signaling of importance for adaptations in skeletal muscle during exercise. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  9. Bacterial expression of a human monoclonal antibody-alkaline phosphatase conjugate specific for Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Hiroshi; Takekoshi, Masataka; Cheng, Xun-Jia; Nakata, Yuta; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Ihara, Seiji

    2004-01-01

    We previously produced human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments specific to Entamoeba histolytica in Escherichia coli. In order to use these Fab fragments for diagnostic purposes, an expression vector to produce a fusion protein of Fab and alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) in E. coli was designed and constructed. The E. coli PhoA gene was fused to the 3' terminus of the gene encoding the heavy-chain Fd region. The kappa and Fd genes from a previously prepared antibody clone, CP33, which is specific for the 260-kDa lectin of E. histolytica, were used as human antibody genes. When the fusion protein of CP33 and PhoA was incubated with paraformaldehyde-fixed trophozoites of E. histolytica and developed with a substrate, the trophozoites appeared to be stained. These results demonstrate the feasibility of bacterial expression of a human monoclonal antibody-PhoA conjugate specific for E. histolytica and that the antibody can be used to detect E. histolytica antigen without the use of chemically conjugated secondary antibodies.

  10. Loss of catalytically inactive lipid phosphatase myotubularin-related protein 12 impairs myotubularin stability and promotes centronuclear myopathy in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana A Gupta

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM is a congenital disorder caused by mutations of the myotubularin gene, MTM1. Myotubularin belongs to a large family of conserved lipid phosphatases that include both catalytically active and inactive myotubularin-related proteins (i.e., "MTMRs". Biochemically, catalytically inactive MTMRs have been shown to form heteroligomers with active members within the myotubularin family through protein-protein interactions. However, the pathophysiological significance of catalytically inactive MTMRs remains unknown in muscle. By in vitro as well as in vivo studies, we have identified that catalytically inactive myotubularin-related protein 12 (MTMR12 binds to myotubularin in skeletal muscle. Knockdown of the mtmr12 gene in zebrafish resulted in skeletal muscle defects and impaired motor function. Analysis of mtmr12 morphant fish showed pathological changes with central nucleation, disorganized Triads, myofiber hypotrophy and whorled membrane structures similar to those seen in X-linked myotubular myopathy. Biochemical studies showed that deficiency of MTMR12 results in reduced levels of myotubularin protein in zebrafish and mammalian C2C12 cells. Loss of myotubularin also resulted in reduction of MTMR12 protein in C2C12 cells, mice and humans. Moreover, XLMTM mutations within the myotubularin interaction domain disrupted binding to MTMR12 in cell culture. Analysis of human XLMTM patient myotubes showed that mutations that disrupt the interaction between myotubularin and MTMR12 proteins result in reduction of both myotubularin and MTMR12. These studies strongly support the concept that interactions between myotubularin and MTMR12 are required for the stability of their functional protein complex in normal skeletal muscles. This work highlights an important physiological function of catalytically inactive phosphatases in the pathophysiology of myotubular myopathy and suggests a novel therapeutic approach through

  11. Gardenia jasminoides Encodes an Inhibitor-2 Protein for Protein Phosphatase Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lan; Li, Hao-Ming

    2017-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) regulates diverse, essential cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, protein synthesis, muscle contraction, carbohydrate metabolism, transcription and neuronal signaling. Inhibitor-2 (I-2) can inhibit the activity of PP1 and has been found in diverse organisms. In this work, a Gardenia jasminoides fruit cDNA library was constructed, and the GjI-2 cDNA was isolated from the cDNA library by sequencing method. The GjI-2 cDNA contains a predicted 543 bp open reading frame that encodes 180 amino acids. The bioinformatics analysis suggested that the GjI-2 has conserved PP1c binding motif, and contains a conserved phosphorylation site, which is important in regulation of its activity. The three-dimensional model structure of GjI-2 was buite, its similar with the structure of I-2 from mouse. The results suggest that GjI-2 has relatively conserved RVxF, FxxR/KxR/K and HYNE motif, and these motifs are involved in interaction with PP1.

  12. The physiological relevance of protein phosphatase 1 and its interacting proteins to health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardilha, M; Esteves, S L C; Korrodi-Gregório, L; da Cruz e Silva, O A B; da Cruz e Silva, F F

    2010-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a major regulatory mechanism of signal transduction cascades in eukaryotic cells, catalysed by kinases and reversed by protein phosphatases (PPs). Sequencing of entire genomes has revealed that ~3% of all eukaryotic genes encode kinases or PPs. Surprisingly, there appear to be 2-5 times fewer PPs than kinases. Over the past two decades it has become apparent that the diversity of Ser/Thr-specific PPs (STPP) was achieved not only by the evolution of new catalytic subunits, but also by the ability of a single catalytic subunit to interact with multiple interacting proteins. PP1, a STPP, is involved in the control of important cellular mechanisms. Several isoforms of PP1 are known in mammals: PP1α, PP1β and PP1γ. The various isoforms are highly similar, except for the N- and C-termini. The current view is that since PPs possess exquisite specificities in vivo, the key control mechanism must reside in the nature of the PP1 Interacting Protein (PIP) to which they bind. An increasing number of PIPs have been identified that are responsible for regulating the catalytic activity of PPs. Indeed, the diversity of such PIPs explains the need for relatively few catalytic subunit types, and makes them attractive targets for pharmacological intervention. This review will summarize the PIPs identified using the Yeast Two Hybrid methodology and alternative techniques, for instance bioinformatic and proteomic approaches. Further, it compiles 129 PP1-PIP relevant physiological interactions that are well documented in the literature. Finally, the use of PIPs as therapeutic targets will be addressed.

  13. A selective Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe, SfBP, for vaccinia H1-related phosphatase--a dual-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Myeong Seon; Kim, Eunha; Kang, Hyo Jin; Choi, Eun Joung; Cho, Alvin R; Chung, Sang J; Park, Seung Bum

    2012-07-04

    We report a Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe, SfBP, for selective monitoring of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). A rational design based on the structures at the active site of dual-specific PTPs can enable SfBP to selectively monitor the activity of these PTPs with a 93-fold change in brightness. Moreover, screening results of SfBP against 30 classical PTPs and 35 dual-specific PTPs show that it is selective toward vaccinia H1-related (VHR) phosphatase, a dual-specific PTP (DUSP-3).

  14. Modulation of catalytic activity in multi-domain protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalima L Madan

    Full Text Available Signaling mechanisms involving protein tyrosine phosphatases govern several cellular and developmental processes. These enzymes are regulated by several mechanisms which include variation in the catalytic turnover rate based on redox stimuli, subcellular localization or protein-protein interactions. In the case of Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (RPTPs containing two PTP domains, phosphatase activity is localized in their membrane-proximal (D1 domains, while the membrane-distal (D2 domain is believed to play a modulatory role. Here we report our analysis of the influence of the D2 domain on the catalytic activity and substrate specificity of the D1 domain using two Drosophila melanogaster RPTPs as a model system. Biochemical studies reveal contrasting roles for the D2 domain of Drosophila Leukocyte antigen Related (DLAR and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase on Drosophila chromosome band 99A (PTP99A. While D2 lowers the catalytic activity of the D1 domain in DLAR, the D2 domain of PTP99A leads to an increase in the catalytic activity of its D1 domain. Substrate specificity, on the other hand, is cumulative, whereby the individual specificities of the D1 and D2 domains contribute to the substrate specificity of these two-domain enzymes. Molecular dynamics simulations on structural models of DLAR and PTP99A reveal a conformational rationale for the experimental observations. These studies reveal that concerted structural changes mediate inter-domain communication resulting in either inhibitory or activating effects of the membrane distal PTP domain on the catalytic activity of the membrane proximal PTP domain.

  15. Interactions of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) proteins with phosphatidylinositol phosphates: insights from molecular dynamics simulations of PTEN and voltage sensitive phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalli, Antreas C; Devaney, Isabel; Sansom, Mark S P

    2014-03-25

    The phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP) are both phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) phosphatases that contain a C2 domain. PTEN is a tumor suppressor protein that acts as a phosphatase on PIP3 in mammalian cell membranes. It contains two principal domains: a phosphatase domain (PD) and a C2 domain. Despite detailed structural and functional characterization, less is known about its mechanism of interaction with PIP-containing lipid bilayers. Ci-VSP consists of an N-terminal transmembrane voltage sensor domain and a C-terminal PTEN domain, which in turn contains a PD and a C2 domain. The nature of the interaction of the PTEN domain of Ci-VSP with membranes has not been well established. We have used multiscale molecular dynamics simulations to define the interaction mechanisms of PTEN and of the Ci-VSP PTEN domains with PIP-containing lipid bilayers. Our results suggest a novel mechanism of association of the PTEN with such bilayers, in which an initial electrostatics-driven encounter of the protein and bilayer is followed by reorientation of the protein to optimize its interactions with PIP molecules in the membrane. Although a PIP3 molecule binds close to the active site of PTEN, our simulations suggest a further conformational change of the protein may be required for catalytically productive binding to occur. Ci-VSP interacted with membranes in an orientation comparable to that of PTEN but bound directly to PIP-containing membranes without a subsequent reorientation step. Again, PIP3 bound close to the active site of the Ci-VSP PD, but not in a catalytically productive manner. Interactions of Ci-VSP with the bilayer induced clustering of PIP molecules around the protein.

  16. [Polymorphism of placental alkaline phosphatase on the level of DNA and protein in the Mordovian population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekman, G; Vennberg, K; Bekman, L; Spitsyn, V A; Novoradovskiĭ, A G

    1996-03-01

    Data on DNA and enzyme polymorphisms of human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) in Mordvinian populations are presented. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was detected after the digestion of DNA samples with Rsa I and Pst I endounucleases. The frequencies of the second (2) allele for PLAP Pst I and Rsa I were 0.53 and 0.192, respectively. Comparative data suggest that there are no population differences between Mordvinians and Scandinavian ethnic groups. In Mordvinians gene frequencies measured at the level of gene products were PLAP*1(S) = 0.681, PLAP*2(F) = 0.244, PLAP*3(I) = 0.069, and PLAP*18(D) = 0.006, indicating the similarity of the corresponding values in Scandinavians. The observed RFLP and "protein" genotype frequencies were in good agreement with that expected according to the Hardy-Weinberg equation. In the Mordvinian population, as in those, surveyed previously, a strong linkage disequilibrium between Pst I and Rsa I PLAP alleles was observed.

  17. Characterization of protein phosphatase 2A acting on phosphorylated plasma membrane aquaporin of tulip petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2004-05-01

    A protein phosphatase holo-type enzyme (38, 65, and 75 kDa) preparation and a free catalytic subunit (38 kDa) purified from tulip petals were characterized as protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) by immunological and biochemical approaches. The plasma membrane containing the putative plasma membrane aquaporin (PM-AQP) was prepared from tulip petals, phosphorylated in vitro, and used as the substrate for both of the purified PP2A preparations. Although both preparations dephosphorylated the phosphorylated PM-AQP at 20 degrees C, only the holo-type enzyme preparation acted at 5 degrees C on the phosphorylated PM-AQP with higher substrate specificity, suggesting that regulatory subunits are required for low temperature-dependent dephosphorylation of PM-AQP in tulip petals.

  18. Disruption of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) function in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Takatoshi; Lombroso, Paul J

    2014-12-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific tyrosine phosphatase that plays a major role in the development of synaptic plasticity. Recent findings have implicated STEP in several psychiatric and neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, fragile X syndrome, Huntington's disease, stroke/ischemia, and stress-related psychiatric disorders. In these disorders, STEP protein expression levels and activity are dysregulated, contributing to the cognitive deficits that are present. In this review, we focus on the most recent findings on STEP, discuss how STEP expression and activity are maintained during normal cognitive function, and how disruptions in STEP activity contribute to a number of illnesses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha is essential for hippocampal neuronal migration and long-term potentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrone, Angiola; Battaglia, Fortunato; Wang, Cheng

    2003-01-01

    Despite clear indications of their importance in lower organisms, the contributions of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) to development or function of the mammalian nervous system have been poorly explored. In vitro studies have indicated that receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPa....... However, these synapses are unable to undergo long-term potentiation. Mice lacking RPTPalpha also underperform in the radial-arm water-maze test. These studies identify RPTPalpha as a key mediator of neuronal migration and synaptic plasticity....... neuronal migration. The migratory abnormality likely results from a radial glial dysfunction rather than from a neuron-autonomous defect. In spite of this aberrant development, basic synaptic transmission from the Schaffer collateral pathway to CA1 pyramidal neurons remains intact in Ptpra(-/-) mice...

  20. Glc7/Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulatory Subunits Can Oppose the Ipl1/Aurora Protein Kinase by Redistributing Glc7

    OpenAIRE

    Pinsky, Benjamin A.; Kotwaliwale, Chitra V.; Tatsutani, Sean Y.; Breed, Christopher A.; Biggins, Sue

    2006-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation depends on the opposing activities of the budding yeast Glc7/PP1 protein phosphatase and Ipl1/Aurora protein kinase. We explored the relationship between Glc7 and Ipl1 and found that the phosphorylation of the Ipl1 substrate, Dam1, was altered by decreased Glc7 activity, whereas Ipl1 levels, localization, and kinase activity were not. These data strongly suggest that Glc7 ensures accurate chromosome segregation by dephosphorylating Ipl1 targets rather than regu...

  1. Protein phosphatase 2A isotypes regulate cell surface expression of the T cell receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst; Menné, C; Kastrup, J

    2001-01-01

    show that inhibition of the serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP2A family had a biphasic effect on TCR expression. Thus, low concentrations of PP2A inhibitors induced TCR down-regulation, whereas higher concentrations of PP2A inhibitors induced TCR up-regulation. The effect of PP2A inhibition...... regulatory role for PP2A in both exocytosis and endocytosis....

  2. Dynamics of the WPD Loop of the Yersinia Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xin; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2006-01-01

    The bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH is an essential virulence determinant in Yersinia spp., causing gastrointestinal diseases and the plague. Like eukaryotic PTPases, YopH catalyzes the hydrolysis of the phosphate moiety of phosphotyrosine within a highly conserved binding pocket, which is also characterized by the closure of the so-called “WPD loop” upon ligand binding. In this study, we investigate the conformational changes and dynamics of the WPD loop by molecular dynamics sim...

  3. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of two Streptococcus agalactiae proteins: the family II inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantanen, Mika K.; Lehtiö, Lari [Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 65, FIN-00014, Helsinki (Finland); Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Rubens, Craig E. [Division of Infectious Disease, Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98105 (United States); Goldman, Adrian, E-mail: adrian.goldman@helsinki.fi [Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 65, FIN-00014, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-09-01

    Two S. agalactiae proteins, the inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase, were crystallized and diffraction data were collected and processed from these crystals. The data from the two protein crystals extended to 2.80 and 2.65 Å, respectively. Streptococcus agalactiae, which infects human neonates and causes sepsis and meningitis, has recently been shown to possess a eukaryotic-like serine/threonine protein phosphorylation signalling cascade. Through their target proteins, the S. agalactiae Ser/Thr kinase and Ser/Thr phosphatase together control the growth as well as the morphology and virulence of this organism. One of the targets is the S. agalactiae family II inorganic pyrophosphatase. The inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase have therefore been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected from their crystals. The data were processed using XDS. The inorganic pyrosphosphatase crystals diffracted to 2.80 Å and the Ser/Thr phosphatase crystals to 2.65 Å. Initial structure-solution experiments indicate that structure solution will be successful in both cases. Solving the structure of the proteins involved in this cascade is the first step towards understanding this phenomenon in atomic detail.

  4. Phosphorylation and Ubiquitination Regulate Protein Phosphatase 5 Activity and Its Prosurvival Role in Kidney Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natela Dushukyan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5 regulates multiple cellular signaling networks. A number of cellular factors, including heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90, promote the activation of PP5. However, it is unclear whether post-translational modifications also influence PP5 phosphatase activity. Here, we show an “on/off switch” mechanism for PP5 regulation. The casein kinase 1δ (CK1δ phosphorylates T362 in the catalytic domain of PP5, which activates and enhances phosphatase activity independent of Hsp90. Overexpression of the phosphomimetic T362E-PP5 mutant hyper-dephosphorylates substrates such as the co-chaperone Cdc37 and glucocorticoid receptor in cells. Our proteomic approach revealed that the tumor suppressor von Hippel-Lindau protein (VHL interacts with and ubiquitinates K185/K199-PP5 for proteasomal degradation in a hypoxia- and prolyl-hydroxylation-independent manner. Finally, VHL-deficient clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC cell lines and patient tumors exhibit elevated PP5 levels. Downregulation of PP5 causes ccRCC cells to undergo apoptosis, suggesting a prosurvival role for PP5 in kidney cancer.

  5. Protein Phosphatase 2A Mediates Oxidative Stress Induced Apoptosis in Osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chong-xin; Lv, Bo; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common bone diseases, which is characterized by a systemic impairment of bone mass and fragility fractures. Age-related oxidative stress is highly associated with impaired osteoblastic dysfunctions and subsequent osteoporosis. In osteoblasts (bone formation cells), reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated and further cause lipid peroxidation, protein damage, and DNA lesions, leading to osteoblastic dysfunctions, dysdifferentiations, and apoptosis. Although much progress has been made, the mechanism responsible for oxidative stress induced cellular alternations and osteoblastic toxicity is still not fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major protein phosphatase in mammalian cells, mediates oxidative stress induced apoptosis in osteoblasts. Our results showed that lipid peroxidation products (4-HNE) may induce dramatic oxidative stress, inflammatory reactions, and apoptosis in osteoblasts. These oxidative stress responses may ectopically activate PP2A phosphatase activity, which may be mediated by inactivation of AKT/mTOR pathway. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A activity by okadaic acid might partly prevent osteoblastic apoptosis under oxidative conditions. These findings may reveal a novel mechanism to clarify the role of oxidative stress for osteoblastic apoptosis and provide new possibilities for the treatment of related bone diseases, such as osteoporosis.

  6. Small-molecule protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibition as a neuroprotective treatment after spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Shojiro; Arnold, Sheila A; Mahoney, Edward T; Sithu, Srinivas D; Zhang, Y Ping; D'Souza, Stanley E; Shields, Christopher B; Hagg, Theo

    2008-07-16

    Spinal cord injury causes progressive secondary tissue degeneration, leaving many injured people with neurological disabilities. There are no satisfactory neuroprotective treatments. Protein tyrosine phosphatases inactivate neurotrophic factor receptors and downstream intracellular signaling molecules. Thus, we tested whether the peroxovanadium compound potassium bisperoxo(1,10-phenanthroline)oxovanadate (V) [bpV(phen)], a stable, potent and selective protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, would be neuroprotective after a thoracic spinal cord contusion in adult rats. Intrathecal bpV(phen) infusions through a lumbar puncture rescued dorsal column sensory axons innervating the nucleus gracilis and white matter at the injury epicenter. At the most effective dose, essentially all of these axons and most of the white matter at the epicenter were spared (vs approximately 60% with control infusions). bpV(phen) treatments started 4 h after contusion were fully effective. This treatment greatly improved and normalized sensorimotor function in a grid-walking test and provided complete axonal protection over 6 weeks. The treatment rescued sensory-evoked potentials that disappeared after dorsal column transection. bpV(phen) affected early degenerative mechanisms, because the main effects were seen at 7 d and lasted beyond the treatment period. The neuroprotection appeared to be mediated by rescue of blood vessels. bpV(phen) reduced apoptosis of cultured endothelial cells. These results show that a small molecule, used in a clinically relevant manner, reduces loss of long-projecting axons, myelin, blood vessels, and function in a model relevant to the most common type of spinal cord injury in humans. They reveal a novel mechanism of spinal cord degeneration involving protein tyrosine phosphatases that can be targeted with therapeutic drugs.

  7. Characterization of Enterococcus faecalis alkaline phosphatase and use in identifying Streptococcus agalactiae secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M H; Nittayajarn, A; Ross, R P; Rothschild, C B; Parsonage, D; Claiborne, A; Rubens, C E

    1999-09-01

    We have identified and characterized an Enterococcus faecalis alkaline phosphatase (AP, encoded by phoZ). The predicted gene product shows homology with alkaline phosphatases from a variety of species; it has especially high similarity with two alkaline phosphatases from Bacillus subtilis. Expression of phoZ in Escherichia coli, E. faecalis, Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]), or Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) produces a blue-colony phenotype on plates containing a chromogenic substrate, 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolylphosphate (XP or BCIP). Two tests were made to determine if the activity of the enzyme is dependent upon the enzyme's subcellular location. First, elimination of the signal sequence reduced AP activity to 3% of the wild-type activity (or less) in three species of gram-positive bacteria. Restoration of export, using the signal sequence from C5a peptidase, restored AP activity to at least 50% of that of the wild type. Second, we engineered two chimeric proteins in which AP was fused to either a periplasmic domain or a cytoplasmic domain of lactose permease (a membrane protein). In E. coli, the periplasmic fusion had 17-fold-higher AP activity than the cytoplasmic fusion. We concluded that AP activity is export dependent. The signal sequence deletion mutant, phoZDeltass, was used to identify random genomic fragments from GBS that encode exported proteins or integral membrane proteins. Included in this set of fragments were genes that exhibited homology with the Rib protein (a cell wall protein from GBS) or with DppB (an integral membrane protein from GAS). AP acts as a reporter enzyme in GBS, GAS, and E. faecalis and is expected to be useful in a variety of gram-positive bacteria.

  8. The neurosecretory vesicle protein phogrin functions as a phosphatidylinositol phosphatase to regulate insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caromile, Leslie A; Oganesian, Anush; Coats, Scott A; Seifert, Ronald A; Bowen-Pope, Daniel F

    2010-04-02

    Phogrin is a transmembrane protein expressed in cells with stimulus-coupled peptide hormone secretion, including pancreatic beta cells, in which it is localized to the membrane of insulin-containing dense-core vesicles. By sequence, phogrin is a member of the family of receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatases, but it contains substitutions in conserved catalytic sequences, and no significant enzymatic activity for phogrin has ever been reported. We report here that phogrin is able to dephosphorylate specific inositol phospholipids, including phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-phosphate and PI 4,5-diphosphate but not PI 3,4,5-trisphosphate. The phosphatidylinositol phosphatase (PIPase) activity of phogrin was measurable but low when evaluated by the ability of a catalytic domain fusion protein to hydrolyze soluble short-chain phosphatidylinositol phospholipids. Unlike most PIPases, which are cytoplasmic proteins that associate with membranes, mature phogrin is a transmembrane protein. When the transmembrane form of phogrin was overexpressed in mammalian cells, it reduced plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-disphosphate levels in a dose-dependent manner. When purified and assayed in vitro, the transmembrane form had a specific activity of 142 mol/min/mol, 75-fold more active than the catalytic domain fusion protein and comparable with the specific activities of the other PIPases. The PIPase activity of phogrin depended on the catalytic site cysteine and correlated with effects on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. We propose that phogrin functions as a phosphatidylinositol phosphatase that contributes to maintaining subcellular differences in levels of PIP that are important for regulating stimulus-coupled exocytosis of insulin.

  9. Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 is a post-translational regulator of the mammalian circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Schmutz

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks coordinate the timing of important biological processes. Interconnected transcriptional and post-translational feedback loops based on a set of clock genes generate and maintain these rhythms with a period of about 24 hours. Many clock proteins undergo circadian cycles of post-translational modifications. Among these modifications, protein phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating activity, stability and intracellular localization of clock components. Several protein kinases were characterized as regulators of the circadian clock. However, the function of protein phosphatases, which balance phosphorylation events, in the mammalian clock mechanism is less well understood. Here, we identify protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 as regulator of period and light-induced resetting of the mammalian circadian clock. Down-regulation of PP1 activity in cells by RNA interference and in vivo by expression of a specific inhibitor in the brain of mice tended to lengthen circadian period. Moreover, reduction of PP1 activity in the brain altered light-mediated clock resetting behavior in mice, enhancing the phase shifts in either direction. At the molecular level, diminished PP1 activity increased nuclear accumulation of the clock component PER2 in neurons. Hence, PP1, may reduce PER2 phosphorylation thereby influencing nuclear localization of this protein. This may at least partially influence period and phase shifting properties of the mammalian circadian clock.

  10. A novel function of twins, B subunit of protein phosphatase 2A, in regulating actin polymerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-An Yeh

    Full Text Available Actin is an important component of the cytoskeleton and its polymerization is delicately regulated by several kinases and phosphatases. Heterotrimeric protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a potent phosphatase that is crucial for cell proliferation, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, signal transduction, cytoskeleton arrangement, and neurodegeneration. To facilitate these varied functions, different regulators determine the different targets of PP2A. Among these regulators of PP2A, the B subunits in particular may be involved in cytoskeleton arrangement. However, little is known about the role of PP2A in actin polymerization in vivo. Using sophisticated fly genetics, we demonstrated a novel function for the fly B subunit, twins, to promote actin polymerization in varied tissue types, suggesting a broad and conserved effect. Furthermore, our genetic data suggest that twins may act upstream of the actin-polymerized-proteins, Moesin and Myosin-light-chain, and downstream of Rho to promote actin polymerization. This work opens a new avenue for exploring the biological functions of a PP2A regulator, twins, in cytoskeleton regulation.

  11. A novel function of twins, B subunit of protein phosphatase 2A, in regulating actin polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Actin is an important component of the cytoskeleton and its polymerization is delicately regulated by several kinases and phosphatases. Heterotrimeric protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a potent phosphatase that is crucial for cell proliferation, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, signal transduction, cytoskeleton arrangement, and neurodegeneration. To facilitate these varied functions, different regulators determine the different targets of PP2A. Among these regulators of PP2A, the B subunits in particular may be involved in cytoskeleton arrangement. However, little is known about the role of PP2A in actin polymerization in vivo. Using sophisticated fly genetics, we demonstrated a novel function for the fly B subunit, twins, to promote actin polymerization in varied tissue types, suggesting a broad and conserved effect. Furthermore, our genetic data suggest that twins may act upstream of the actin-polymerized-proteins, Moesin and Myosin-light-chain, and downstream of Rho to promote actin polymerization. This work opens a new avenue for exploring the biological functions of a PP2A regulator, twins, in cytoskeleton regulation. PMID:28977036

  12. Molecular mechanism of T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP) activation by mitoxantrone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylilauri, Mikko; Mattila, Elina; Nurminen, Elisa M; Käpylä, Jarmo; Niinivehmas, Sanna P; Määttä, Juha A; Pentikäinen, Ulla; Ivaska, Johanna; Pentikäinen, Olli T

    2013-10-01

    T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP) is a ubiquitously expressed non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase. It is involved in the negative regulation of many cellular signaling pathways. Thus, activation of TCPTP could have important therapeutic applications in diseases such as cancer and inflammation. We have previously shown that the α-cytoplasmic tail of integrin α1β1 directly binds and activates TCPTP. In addition, we have identified in a large-scale high-throughput screen six small molecules that activate TCPTP. These small molecule activators include mitoxantrone and spermidine. In this study, we have investigated the molecular mechanism behind agonist-induced TCPTP activation. By combining several molecular modeling and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that α1-peptide and mitoxantrone activate TCPTP via direct binding to the catalytic domain, whereas spermidine does not interact with the catalytic domain of TCPTP in vitro. Furthermore, we have identified a hydrophobic groove surrounded by negatively charged residues on the surface of TCPTP as a putative binding site for the α1-peptide and mitoxantrone. Importantly, these data have allowed us to identify a new molecule that binds to TCPTP, but interestingly cannot activate its phosphatase activity. Accordingly, we describe here mechanism of TCPTP activation by mitoxantrone, the cytoplasmic tail of α1-integrin, and a mitoxantrone-like molecule at the atomic level. These data provide invaluable insight into the development of novel TCPTP activators, and may facilitate the rational discovery of small-molecule cancer therapeutics. © 2013.

  13. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) regulates interleukin-4-mediated STAT6 signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woetmann, Anders; Brockdorff, Johannes; Lovato, Paola

    2002-01-01

    of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) induces serine phosphorylation of STAT6 and severely inhibits DNA binding of STAT6. In contrast, IL-4-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Janus kinase-1 and STAT6 is not affected, suggesting that PP2A acts downstream of Janus kinases in IL-4 signaling. In conclusion, we...... provide the first evidence that PP2A plays a crucial role in the regulation of STAT6 function....... tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT6, which in turn leads to transcription of IL-4-specific genes. In addition, serine phosphorylation of STAT6 has recently been reported. Here we study the functional role of STAT6 serine phosphorylation and the kinases and phosphatases involved. We show that inhibition...

  14. Identification of protein phosphatase interacting proteins from normal and UVA-irradiated HaCaT cell lysates by surface plasmon resonance based binding technique using biotin-microcystin-LR as phosphatase capturing molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bécsi, Bálint; Dedinszki, Dóra; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Máthé, Csaba; Vasas, Gábor; Lontay, Beáta; Erdődi, Ferenc

    2014-09-05

    Identification of the interacting proteins of protein phosphatases is crucial to understand the cellular roles of these enzymes. Microcystin-LR (MC-LR), a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), -2A (PP2A), PP4, PP5 and PP6, was biotinylated, immobilized to streptavidin-coupled sensorchip surface and used in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based binding experiments to isolate phosphatase binding proteins. Biotin-MC-LR captured PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c) stably and the biotin-MC-LR-PP1c complex was able to further interact with the regulatory subunit (MYPT1) of myosin phosphatase. Increased biotin-MC-LR coated sensorchip surface in the Surface Prep unit of Biacore 3000 captured PP1c, PP2Ac and their regulatory proteins including MYPT1, MYPT family TIMAP, inhibitor-2 as well as PP2A-A and -Bα-subunits from normal and UVA-irradiated HaCaT cell lysates as revealed by dot blot analysis of the recovered proteins. Biotin-MC-LR was used for the subcellular localization of protein phosphatases in HaCaT cells by identification of phosphatase-bound biotin-MC-LR with fluorescent streptavidin conjugates. Partial colocalization of the biotin-MC-LR signals with those obtained using anti-PP1c and anti-PP2Ac antibodies was apparent as judged by confocal microscopy. Our results imply that biotin-MC-LR is a suitable capture molecule in SPR for isolation of protein phosphatase interacting proteins from cell lysates in sufficient amounts for immunological detection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biodistribution and translational pharmacokinetic modeling of a human recombinant alkaline phosphatase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Esther; Stevens, Jasper; Arend, Jacques; Guan, Zheng; Raaben, Willem; Laverman, Peter; Elsas, Andrea van; Masereeuw, R.; Pickkers, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials showed renal protective effects of bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (AP) in patients with sepsis-associated Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Subsequently, a human recombinant chimeric AP (recAP) was developed as a pharmaceutically acceptable alternative. Here, we investigated the

  16. Carboxyl-terminal receptor domains control the differential dephosphorylation of somatostatin receptors by protein phosphatase 1 isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lehmann

    Full Text Available We have recently identified protein phosphatase 1β (PP1β as G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR phosphatase for the sst2 somatostatin receptor using siRNA knockdown screening. By contrast, for the sst5 somatostatin receptor we identified protein phosphatase 1γ (PP1γ as GPCR phosphatase using the same approach. We have also shown that sst2 and sst5 receptors differ substantially in the temporal dynamics of their dephosphorylation and trafficking patterns. Whereas dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst2 receptor requires extended time periods of ∼30 min, dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst5 receptor is completed in less than 10 min. Here, we examined which receptor domains determine the selection of phosphatases for receptor dephosphorylation. We found that generation of tail-swap mutants between sst2 and sst5 was required and sufficient to reverse the patterns of dephosphorylation and trafficking of these two receptors. In fact, siRNA knockdown confirmed that the sst5 receptor carrying the sst2 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1β, whereas the sst2 receptor carrying the sst5 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1γ. Thus, the GPCR phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of individual somatostatin receptor subtypes is primarily determined by their different carboxyl-terminal receptor domains. This phosphatase specificity has in turn profound consequences for the dephosphorylation dynamics and trafficking patterns of GPCRs.

  17. Different in vitro and in vivo activity of low Mr phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase on epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigacci, S; Marzocchini, R; Bucciantini, M; Berti, A

    1998-09-29

    Low Mr phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase is a cytosolic enzyme which dephosphorylates platelet-derived growth factor and insulin receptor in vivo, thus reducing cellular mitogenic response to such growth factors. Following cell stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor the phosphatase undergoes a redistribution from the citosol to the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction where its activity upon the growth factor receptor is intense. Previous research uncovered evidence that low Mr phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase dephosphorylates the epidermal growth factor receptor in vitro. Here we demonstrate that in vivo the enzyme is not active on the phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor and it does not influence the mitogenic response of cells. Since the enzyme distribution is not affected by epidermal growth factor stimulation, involvement of a recruitment mechanism in the definition of low Mr phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase substrate specificity is hypothesized. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  18. The differentiation of skeletal muscle cells involves a protein-tyrosine phosphatase-alpha-mediated C-Src signaling pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Huogen; Shah, Poonam; Ennis, David

    2002-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase-alpha (PTPalpha) plays an important role in various cellular signaling events, including proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we established L6 cell lines either underexpressing or overexpressing PTPalpha by stable transfection of cells with antisense PTP....... Moreover, enhanced expression of PTPalpha and activation of Src was detected during myogenesis. Together, these data indicate that PTPalpha is involved in the regulation of L6 myoblast growth and skeletal muscle cell differentiation via an Src-mediated signaling pathway.......Protein-tyrosine phosphatase-alpha (PTPalpha) plays an important role in various cellular signaling events, including proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we established L6 cell lines either underexpressing or overexpressing PTPalpha by stable transfection of cells with antisense...... PTPalpha or with full-length wild-type human or mouse or double catalytic site Cys --> Ala mutant (DM8) PTPalpha cDNA. Expression of PTPalpha in these cell lines was determined by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. Cells harboring antisense PTPalpha exhibited a significantly reduced growth rate...

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B. I. Ligand-Induced Changes in the Protein Motions

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Günther H.; Frimurer, Thomas M.; Andersen, Jannik N.; Olsen, Ole H.

    1999-01-01

    Activity of enzymes, such as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), is often associated with structural changes in the enzyme, resulting in selective and stereospecific reactions with the substrate. To investigate the effect of a substrate on the motions occurring in PTPs, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of PTP1B and PTP1B complexed with a high-affinity peptide DADEpYL, where pY stands for phosphorylated tyrosine. The peptide sequence is derived from the epidermal growth facto...

  20. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 reverses alcohol-induced ciliary dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Michael E; Pavlik, Jacqueline A; Sisson, Joseph H; Wyatt, Todd A

    2015-03-15

    Airway mucociliary clearance is a first-line defense of the lung against inhaled particles and debris. Among individuals with alcohol use disorders, there is an increase in lung diseases. We previously identified that prolonged alcohol exposure impairs mucociliary clearance, known as alcohol-induced ciliary dysfunction (AICD). Cilia-localized enzymes, known as the ciliary metabolon, are key to the pathogenesis of AICD. In AICD, cyclic nucleotide-dependent ciliary kinases, which modulate phosphorylation to regulate cilia beat, are desensitized. We hypothesized that alcohol activates cilia-associated protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) activity, driving phosphorylation changes of cilia motility regulatory proteins. To test this hypothesis we identified the effects of prolonged alcohol exposure on phosphatase activity, cilia beat, and kinase responsiveness and cilia-associated phosphorylation targets when stimulated by β-agonist or cAMP. Prolonged alcohol activated PP1 and blocked cAMP-dependent cilia beat and protein kinase A (PKA) responsiveness and phosphorylation of a 29-kDa substrate of PKA. Importantly, prolonged alcohol-induced phosphatase activation was inhibited by the PP1 specific inhibitor, inhibitor-2 (I-2), restoring cAMP-stimulated cilia beat and PKA responsiveness and phosphorylation of the 29-kDa substrate. The I-2 inhibitory effect persisted in tissue, cell, and isolated cilia-organelle models, highlighting the association of ciliary metabolon-localized enzymes to AICD. Prolonged alcohol exposure drives ciliary metabolon-localized PP1 activation. PP1 activation modifies phosphorylation of a 29-kDa protein related to PKA activity. These data reinforce our previous findings that alcohol is acting at the level of the ciliary metabolon to cause ciliary dysfunction and identifies PP1 as a therapeutic target to prevent or reverse AICD.

  1. Physical association of GPR54 C-terminal with protein phosphatase 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Barry J; Wang, Zixuan; Mobley, La'Tonya; Khosravi, Davood; Fujii, Nobutaka; Navenot, Jean-Marc; Peiper, Stephen C

    2008-12-26

    KiSS1 was discovered as a metastasis suppressor gene and subsequently found to encode kisspeptins (KP), ligands for a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR), GPR54. This ligand-receptor pair was later shown to play a critical role in the neuro-endocrine regulation of puberty. The C-terminal cytoplasmic (C-ter) domain of GPR54 contains a segment rich in proline and arginine residues that corresponds to the primary structure of four overlapping SH3 binding motifs. Yeast two hybrid experiments identified the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-C) as an interacting protein. Pull-down experiments with GST fusion proteins containing the GPR54 C-ter confirmed binding to PP2A-C in cell lysates and these complexes contained phosphatase activity. The proline arginine rich segment is necessary for these interactions. The GPR54 C-ter bound directly to purified recombinant PP2A-C, indicating the GPR54 C-ter may form complexes involving the catalytic subunit of PP2A that regulate phosphorylation of critical signaling intermediates.

  2. A novel transcription factor involved in plant defense endowed with protein phosphatase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, José L.; Ancillo, Gema; Mayda, Esther; Vera, Pablo

    2003-01-01

    In plants, expression of a disease-resistance character following perception of a pathogen involves massive deployment of transcription-dependent defenses. Thus, if rapid and effective defense responses have to be achieved, it is crucial that the pathogenic signal is transduced and amplified through pre-existing signaling pathways. Reversible phosphorylation of specific transcription factors, by a concerted action of protein kinases and phosphatases, may represent a mechanism for rapid and flexible regulation of selective gene expression by environmental stimuli. Here we identified a novel DNA-binding protein from tobacco plants, designated DBP1, with protein phosphatase activity, which binds in a sequence-specific manner to a cis- acting element of a defense-related gene and participates in its transcriptional regulation. This finding helps delineate a terminal event in a signaling pathway for the selective activation of early transcription-dependent defense responses in plants, and suggests that stimulus-dependent reversible phosphorylation of regulatory proteins may occur directly in a transcription protein–DNA complex. PMID:12839999

  3. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase regulates the PTPα/Fyn signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Kurup, Pradeep; Foscue, Ethan; Lombroso, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    The tyrosine kinase Fyn has two regulatory tyrosine residues that when phosphorylated either activate (Tyr(420)) or inhibit (Tyr(531)) Fyn activity. Within the central nervous system, two protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) target these regulatory tyrosines in Fyn. PTPα dephosphorylates Tyr(531) and activates Fyn, while STEP (STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase) dephosphorylates Tyr(420) and inactivates Fyn. Thus, PTPα and STEP have opposing functions in the regulation of Fyn; however, whether there is cross talk between these two PTPs remains unclear. Here, we used molecular techniques in primary neuronal cultures and in vivo to demonstrate that STEP negatively regulates PTPα by directly dephosphorylating PTPα at its regulatory Tyr(789). Dephosphorylation of Tyr(789) prevents the translocation of PTPα to synaptic membranes, blocking its ability to interact with and activate Fyn. Genetic or pharmacologic reduction in STEP61 activity increased the phosphorylation of PTPα at Tyr(789), as well as increased translocation of PTPα to synaptic membranes. Activation of PTPα and Fyn and trafficking of GluN2B to synaptic membranes are necessary for ethanol (EtOH) intake behaviors in rodents. We tested the functional significance of STEP61 in this signaling pathway by EtOH administration to primary cultures as well as in vivo, and demonstrated that the inactivation of STEP61 by EtOH leads to the activation of PTPα, its translocation to synaptic membranes, and the activation of Fyn. These findings indicate a novel mechanism by which STEP61 regulates PTPα and suggest that STEP and PTPα coordinate the regulation of Fyn. STEP61 , PTPα, Fyn, and NMDA receptor (NMDAR) have been implicated in ethanol intake behaviors in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) in rodents. Here, we report that PTPα is a novel substrate for STEP61. Upon ethanol exposure, STEP61 is phosphorylated and inactivated by protein kinase A (PKA) signaling in the DMS. As a result of STEP61

  4. Mechanism of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B-mediated inhibition of leptin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, I K; Hansen, J A; Andersen, H S

    2005-01-01

    Upon leptin binding, the leptin receptor is activated, leading to stimulation of the JAK/STAT signal transduction cascade. The transient character of the tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 suggests the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) as negative regulators...... PTP1B mediates the cessation of the leptin signal transduction. Leptin-induced activation of a STAT3 responsive reporter was dose-dependently inhibited by co-transfection with PTP1B. No inhibition was observed when a catalytically inactive mutant of PTP1B was used or when other PTPs were co...

  5. In vitro characterization of the Bacillus subtilis protein tyrosine phosphatase YwqE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Musumeci, Lucia; Tautz, Lutz

    2005-01-01

    Both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria possess protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) with a catalytic Cys residue. In addition, many gram-positive bacteria have acquired a new family of PTPs, whose first characterized member was CpsB from Streptococcus pneumoniae. Bacillus subtilis contains......, we characterize YwqE, compare the activities of the three B. subtilis PTPs (YwqE, YwlE, and YfkJ), and demonstrate that the two B. subtilis class II PTPs do not dephosphorylate the physiological substrates of YwqE....

  6. The Role of Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) in Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Christopher James; Lombroso, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) has recently been implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders with significant cognitive impairments, including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and fragile X syndrome. A model has emerged by which STEP normally opposes the development of synaptic strengthening and that disruption in STEP activity leads to aberrant synaptic function. We review the mechanisms by which STEP contributes to the etiology of these and other neuropsychiatric disorders. These findings suggest that disruptions in STEP activity may be a common mechanism for cognitive impairments in diverse illnesses.

  7. Fundamental role of the fostriecin unsaturated lactone and implications for selective protein phosphatase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Suzanne B; Hardouin, Christophe; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Soenen, Danielle R; Gauss, C-M; Hwang, Inkyu; Swingle, Mark R; Bonness, Kathy M; Honkanen, Richard E; Boger, Dale L

    2003-12-24

    Key derivatives and analogues of fostriecin were prepared and examined that revealed a fundamental role for the unsaturated lactone and confirmed the essential nature of the phosphate monoester. Thus, an identical 200-fold reduction in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibition is observed with either the saturated lactone (7) or with an analogue that lacks the entire lactone (15). This 200-fold increase in PP2A inhibition attributable to the unsaturated lactone potentially may be due to reversible C269 alkylation within the PP beta12-beta13 active site loop accounting for PP2A/4 potency and selectivity.

  8. Regulation of protein phosphatase 2A during embryonic diapause process in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shi-Hong; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Lin, Pei-Ling

    2017-11-01

    Regulation of protein phosphorylation requires coordinated interactions between protein kinases and protein phosphatases. In the present study, we investigated regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) during the embryonic diapause process of B. mori. An immunoblotting analysis showed that Bombyx eggs contained a catalytic C subunit, a major regulatory B subunit (B55/PR55 subunit), and a structural A subunit, with the A and B subunits undergoing differential changes between diapause and non-diapause eggs during embryonic process. In non-diapause eggs, eggs whose diapause initiation was prevented by HCl, and eggs in which diapause had been terminated by chilling of diapausing eggs at 5°C for 70days and then were transferred to 25°C, protein levels of the A and B subunits of PP2A gradually increased toward embryonic development. However, protein levels of the A and B subunits in diapause eggs remained at low levels during the first 8days after oviposition. The direct determination of PP2A enzymatic activity showed that the activity remained at low levels in diapause eggs during the first 8days after oviposition. However, in non-diapause eggs, eggs whose diapause initiation was prevented by HCl, and eggs in which diapause had been terminated by chilling, PP2A enzymatic activity sharply increased during the first several days, reached a peak during the middle embryonic development, and then greatly decreased 3 or 4days before hatching. Examination of temporal changes in mRNA expression levels of the catalytic β subunit and regulatory subunit of PP2A showed high levels in eggs whose diapause initiation was prevented by HCl compared to those in diapause eggs. These results demonstrate that the higher PP2A gene expression and PP2A A and B subunit protein levels and increased enzymatic activity are related to embryonic development of B. mori. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Discovery and optimization of sulfonyl acrylonitriles as selective, covalent inhibitors of protein phosphatase methylesterase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachovchin, Daniel A; Zuhl, Andrea M; Speers, Anna E; Wolfe, Monique R; Weerapana, Eranthie; Brown, Steven J; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2011-07-28

    The serine hydrolase protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) regulates the methylesterification state of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and has been implicated in cancer and Alzheimer's disease. We recently reported a fluorescence polarization-activity-based protein profiling (fluopol-ABPP) high-throughput screen for PME-1 that uncovered a remarkably potent and selective class of aza-β-lactam (ABL) PME-1 inhibitors. Here, we describe a distinct set of sulfonyl acrylonitrile inhibitors that also emerged from this screen. The optimized compound, 28 (AMZ30), selectively inactivates PME-1 and reduces the demethylated form of PP2A in living cells. Considering that 28 is structurally unrelated to ABL inhibitors of PME-1, these agents, together, provide a valuable set of pharmacological probes to study the role of methylation in regulating PP2A function. We furthermore observed that several serine hydrolases were sensitive to analogues of 28, suggesting that more extensive structural exploration of the sulfonyl acrylonitrile chemotype may result in useful inhibitors for other members of this large enzyme class.

  10. Isolation of Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase-like Member-a Variant from Cementum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés De Hoyos, A.; Hoz-Rodríguez, L.; Arzate, H.; Narayanan, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Cementum has been shown to contain unique polypeptides that participate in cell recruitment and differentiation during cementum formation. We report the isolation of a cDNA variant for protein-tyrosine phosphatase-like (proline instead of catalytic arginine) member-a (PTPLA) from cementum. A cementifying fibroma-derived λ-ZAP expression library was screened by panning with a monoclonal antibody to cementum attachment protein (CAP), and 1435 bp cDNA (gb AC093525.3) was isolated. This cDNA encodes a 140-amino-acid polypeptide, and its N-terminal 125 amino acids are identical to those of PTPLA. This isoform, designated as PTPLA-CAP, results from a read-through of the PTPLA exon 2 splice donor site, truncating after the second putative transmembrane domain. It contains 15 amino acids encoded within the intron between PTPLA exons 2 and 3, which replace the active site for PTPLA phosphatase activity. The recombinant protein, rhPTPLA-CAP, has Mr 19 kDa and cross-reacts with anti-CAP antibody. Anti-rhPTPLA-CAP antibody immunostained cementum cells, cementum, heart, and liver. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that PTPLA was expressed in all periodontal cells; however, PTPLA-CAP expression was limited to cementum cells. The rhPTPLA-CAP promoted gingival fibroblast attachment. We conclude that PTPLA-CAP is a splice variant of PTPLA, and that, in the periodontium, cementum and cementum cells express this variant. PMID:22067203

  11. A Role for Protein Phosphatase 2A in Regulating p38 Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Activation and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha Expression during Influenza Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna H. Y. Law

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses of avian origin continue to pose pandemic threats to human health. Some of the H5N1 and H9N2 virus subtypes induce markedly elevated cytokine levels when compared with the seasonal H1N1 virus. We previously showed that H5N1/97 hyperinduces tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha through p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK. However, the detailed mechanisms of p38MAPK activation and TNF-alpha hyperinduction following influenza virus infections are not known. Negative feedback regulations of cytokine expression play important roles in avoiding overwhelming production of proinflammatory cytokines. Here we hypothesize that protein phosphatases are involved in the regulation of cytokine expressions during influenza virus infection. We investigated the roles of protein phosphatases including MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1 and protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A in modulating p38MAPK activation and downstream TNF-alpha expressions in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (PBMac infected with H9N2/G1 or H1N1 influenza virus. We demonstrate that H9N2/G1 virus activated p38MAPK and hyperinduced TNF-alpha production in PBMac when compared with H1N1 virus. H9N2/G1 induced PP2A activity in PBMac and, with the treatment of a PP2A inhibitor, p38MAPK phosphorylation and TNF-alpha production were further increased in the virus-infected macrophages. However, H9N2/G1 did not induce the expression of PP2A indicating that the activation of PP2A is not mediated by p38MAPK in virus-infected PBMac. On the other hand, PP2A may not be the targets of H9N2/G1 in the upstream of p38MAPK signaling pathways since H1N1 also induced PP2A activation in primary macrophages. Our results may provide new insights into the control of cytokine dysregulation.

  12. Protein Phosphatase 2A Regulates Innate Immune and Proteolytic Responses to Cigarette Smoke Exposure in the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Alison M.; Hardigan, Andrew; Geraghty, Patrick; Salim, Shaneeza; Gaffney, Adam; Thankachen, Jincy; Arellanos, Leo; D'Armiento, Jeanine M.; Foronjy, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is the primary serine-threonine phosphatase of eukaryotic cells, and changes in its activity have been linked to neoplastic and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the role of PP2A in noncancerous lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has not been previously examined. This study determined that PP2A activity was significantly increased in the lungs of advanced emphysema subjects compared with age-matched controls. Furthermore, we found that cigarette smoke exposure increases PP2A activity in mouse lung in vivo and in primary human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells in vitro. In mice, intratracheal transfection of PP2A protein prior to cigarette smoke exposure prevented acute smoke–induced lung inflammation. Conversely, inhibiting PP2A activity during smoke exposure exacerbated inflammatory responses in the lung. To further determine how PP2A modulates the responses to cigarette smoke in the lung, enzyme levels were manipulated in SAE cells using protein transfection and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) techniques. Increasing PP2A activity in SAE cells via PP2A protein transfection downregulated cytokine expression and prevented the induction of proteases following cigarette smoke extract (CSE) treatment. Conversely, decreasing enzymatic activity by stably transfecting SAE cells with shRNA for the A subunit of PP2A exacerbated these smoke-mediated responses. This study establishes that PP2A induction by cigarette smoke modulates immune and proteolytic responses to cigarette smoke exposure. Together, these findings suggest that manipulation of PP2A activity may be a plausible means to treat COPD and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:22223484

  13. Protein phosphatase 2C is involved in the cAMP-dependent ciliary control in Paramecium caudatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Munenori; Sasaki, Jun-Ya; Kamachi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2003-02-01

    Forward swimming of the Triton-extracted model of Paramecium is stimulated by cAMP. Backward swimming of the model induced by Ca(2+) is depressed by cAMP. Cyclic AMP and Ca(2+) act antagonistically in setting the direction of the ciliary beat. Some ciliary axonemal proteins from Paramecium caudatum are phosphorylated in a cAMP-dependent manner. In the presence of cAMP, axonemal 29- and 65-kDa polypeptides were phosphorylated by endogenous A-kinase in vitro. These phosphoproteins, however, were not dephosphorylated after in vitro phosphorylation, presumably because of the low endogenous phosphoprotein phosphatase activity associated with isolated axonemes. We purified the protein phosphatase that specifically dephosphorylated the 29- and 65-kDa phosphoproteins from Paramecium caudatum. The molecular weight of the protein phosphatase was 33 kDa. The protein phosphatase had common characteristics as protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C). The characteristics of the protein phosphatase were the same as those of the PP2C from Paramecium tetraurelia (PtPP2C) [Grothe et al., 1998: J. Biol. Chem. 273:19167-19172]. We concluded that the phosphoprotein phosphatase is the PP2C from Paramecium caudatum (PcPP2C). The PcPP2C markedly accelerated the backward swimming of the Triton-extracted model in the presence of Ca(2+). On the other hand, the PcPP2C slightly depressed the forward swimming speed. This indicates that the PP2C plays a role in the cAMP-dependent regulation of ciliary movement in Paramecium caudatum through dephosphorylation of 29- and/or 65-kDa regulatory phosphoproteins by terminating the action of cAMP. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Glucose-induced posttranslational activation of protein phosphatases PP2A and PP1 in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castermans, Dries; Somers, Ils; Kriel, Johan; Louwet, Wendy; Wera, Stefaan; Versele, Matthias; Janssens, Veerle; Thevelein, Johan M

    2012-01-01

    The protein phosphatases PP2A and PP1 are major regulators of a variety of cellular processes in yeast and other eukaryotes. Here, we reveal that both enzymes are direct targets of glucose sensing. Addition of glucose to glucose-deprived yeast cells triggered rapid posttranslational activation of both PP2A and PP1. Glucose activation of PP2A is controlled by regulatory subunits Rts1, Cdc55, Rrd1 and Rrd2. It is associated with rapid carboxymethylation of the catalytic subunits, which is necessary but not sufficient for activation. Glucose activation of PP1 was fully dependent on regulatory subunits Reg1 and Shp1. Absence of Gac1, Glc8, Reg2 or Red1 partially reduced activation while Pig1 and Pig2 inhibited activation. Full activation of PP2A and PP1 was also dependent on subunits classically considered to belong to the other phosphatase. PP2A activation was dependent on PP1 subunits Reg1 and Shp1 while PP1 activation was dependent on PP2A subunit Rts1. Rts1 interacted with both Pph21 and Glc7 under different conditions and these interactions were Reg1 dependent. Reg1-Glc7 interaction is responsible for PP1 involvement in the main glucose repression pathway and we show that deletion of Shp1 also causes strong derepression of the invertase gene SUC2. Deletion of the PP2A subunits Pph21 and Pph22, Rrd1 and Rrd2, specifically enhanced the derepression level of SUC2, indicating that PP2A counteracts SUC2 derepression. Interestingly, the effect of the regulatory subunit Rts1 was consistent with its role as a subunit of both PP2A and PP1, affecting derepression and repression of SUC2, respectively. We also show that abolished phosphatase activation, except by reg1Δ, does not completely block Snf1 dephosphorylation after addition of glucose. Finally, we show that glucose activation of the cAMP-PKA (protein kinase A) pathway is required for glucose activation of both PP2A and PP1. Our results provide novel insight into the complex regulatory role of these two major protein

  15. The Rab27a-binding protein, JFC1, regulates androgen-dependent secretion of prostate-specific antigen and prostatic-specific acid phosphatase1

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jennifer L.; Ellis, Beverly A.; Noack, Deborah; Seabra, Miguel C.; Catz, Sergio D.

    2005-01-01

    Two of the major proteins secreted by the prostate epithelium secretory cells are PSA (prostate-specific antigen) and PSAP (prostatic-specific acid phosphatase). The molecules involved in the secretory machinery of PSA and PSAP, and the regulation of this machinery, remain unknown. In the present paper, we provide evidence that JFC1 [synaptotagmin-like protein (slp1)], a Rab27a- and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-binding protein, regulates the androgen-dependent secretion of PSAP and PSA in human LNCaP pros...

  16. Structural Basis for Recognizing Phosphoarginine and Evolving Residue-Specific Protein Phosphatases in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Fuhrmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Many cellular pathways are regulated by the competing activity of protein kinases and phosphatases. The recent identification of arginine phosphorylation as a protein modification in bacteria prompted us to analyze the molecular basis of targeting phospho-arginine. In this work, we characterize an annotated tyrosine phosphatase, YwlE, that counteracts the protein arginine kinase McsB. Strikingly, structural studies of YwlE reaction intermediates provide a direct view on a captured arginine residue. Together with biochemical data, the crystal structures depict the evolution of a highly specific phospho-arginine phosphatase, with the use of a size-and-polarity filter for distinguishing phosphorylated arginine from other phosphorylated side chains. To confirm the proposed mechanism, we performed bioinformatic searches for phosphatases, employing a similar selectivity filter, and identified a protein in Drosophila melanogaster exhibiting robust arginine phosphatase activity. In sum, our findings uncover the molecular framework for specific targeting of phospho-arginine and suggest that protein arginine (dephosphorylation may be relevant in eukaryotes.

  17. Transcriptome analyses of chronic traumatic encephalopathy show alterations in protein phosphatase expression associated with tauopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong-Sun; Lee, Seungbok; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Hwang, Yu Jin; Cho, Hyesun; Yoo, Seong-Keun; Kim, Yunha; Lim, Sungsu; Kim, Yun Kyung; Hwang, Eun Mi; Kim, Su Hyun; Kim, Chong-Hyun; Hyeon, Seung Jae; Yun, Ji-Young; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Yona; Alvarez, Victor E; Stein, Thor D; Lee, Junghee; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Jong-Il; Kowall, Neil W; Ryu, Hoon; McKee, Ann C

    2017-05-19

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is associated with repetitive head injury and has distinctive neuropathological features that differentiate this disease from other neurodegenerative diseases. Intraneuronal tau aggregates, although they occur in different patterns, are diagnostic neuropathological features of CTE, but the precise mechanism of tauopathy is not known in CTE. We performed whole RNA sequencing analysis of post-mortem brain tissue from patients with CTE and compared the results to normal controls to determine the transcriptome signature changes associated with CTE. The results showed that the genes related to the MAP kinase and calcium-signaling pathways were significantly downregulated in CTE. The altered expression of protein phosphatases (PPs) in these networks further suggested that the tauopathy observed in CTE involves common pathological mechanisms similar to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using cell lines and animal models, we also showed that reduced PPP3CA/PP2B phosphatase activity is directly associated with increases in phosphorylated (p)-tau proteins. These findings provide important insights into PP-dependent neurodegeneration and may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to reduce the tauopathy associated with CTE.

  18. Transcriptome analyses of chronic traumatic encephalopathy show alterations in protein phosphatase expression associated with tauopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong-Sun; Lee, Seungbok; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Hwang, Yu Jin; Cho, Hyesun; Yoo, Seong-Keun; Kim, Yunha; Lim, Sungsu; Kim, Yun Kyung; Hwang, Eun Mi; Kim, Su Hyun; Kim, Chong-Hyun; Hyeon, Seung Jae; Yun, Ji-Young; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Yona; Alvarez, Victor E; Stein, Thor D; Lee, Junghee; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Jong-Il; Kowall, Neil W; Ryu, Hoon; McKee, Ann C

    2017-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is associated with repetitive head injury and has distinctive neuropathological features that differentiate this disease from other neurodegenerative diseases. Intraneuronal tau aggregates, although they occur in different patterns, are diagnostic neuropathological features of CTE, but the precise mechanism of tauopathy is not known in CTE. We performed whole RNA sequencing analysis of post-mortem brain tissue from patients with CTE and compared the results to normal controls to determine the transcriptome signature changes associated with CTE. The results showed that the genes related to the MAP kinase and calcium-signaling pathways were significantly downregulated in CTE. The altered expression of protein phosphatases (PPs) in these networks further suggested that the tauopathy observed in CTE involves common pathological mechanisms similar to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using cell lines and animal models, we also showed that reduced PPP3CA/PP2B phosphatase activity is directly associated with increases in phosphorylated (p)-tau proteins. These findings provide important insights into PP-dependent neurodegeneration and may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to reduce the tauopathy associated with CTE. PMID:28524178

  19. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  20. Therapeutic implications for striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel-Goody, Susan M; Baum, Matthew; Paspalas, Constantinos D; Fernandez, Stephanie M; Carty, Niki C; Kurup, Pradeep; Lombroso, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific phosphatase that modulates key signaling molecules involved in synaptic plasticity and neuronal function. Targets include extracellular-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), stress-activated protein kinase p38 (p38), the Src family tyrosine kinase Fyn, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs). STEP-mediated dephosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and Fyn leads to inactivation of these enzymes, whereas STEP-mediated dephosphorylation of surface NMDARs and AMPARs promotes their endocytosis. Accordingly, the current model of STEP function posits that it opposes long-term potentiation and promotes long-term depression. Phosphorylation, cleavage, dimerization, ubiquitination, and local translation all converge to maintain an appropriate balance of STEP in the central nervous system. Accumulating evidence over the past decade indicates that STEP dysregulation contributes to the pathophysiology of several neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, fragile X syndrome, epileptogenesis, alcohol-induced memory loss, Huntington's disease, drug abuse, stroke/ischemia, and inflammatory pain. This comprehensive review discusses STEP expression and regulation and highlights how disrupted STEP function contributes to the pathophysiology of diverse neuropsychiatric disorders.

  1. STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) Regulates the PTPα/Fyn Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Kurup, Pradeep; Foscue, Ethan; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase Fyn has two regulatory tyrosine residues that when phosphorylated either activate (Tyr420) or inhibit (Tyr531) Fyn activity. Within the central nervous system, two protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) target these regulatory tyrosines in Fyn. PTPα dephosphorylates Tyr531 and activates Fyn, while STEP (STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase) dephosphorylates Tyr420 and inactivates Fyn. Thus, PTPα and STEP have opposing functions in the regulation of Fyn; however, whether there is cross talk between these two PTPs remains unclear. Here, we used molecular techniques in primary neuronal cultures and in vivo to demonstrate that STEP negatively regulates PTPα by directly dephosphorylating PTPα at its regulatory Tyr789. Dephosphorylation of Tyr789 prevents the translocation of PTPα to synaptic membranes, blocking its ability to interact with and activate Fyn. Genetic or pharmacologic reduction of STEP61 activity increased the phosphorylation of PTPα at Tyr789, as well as increased translocation of PTPα to synaptic membranes. Activation of PTPα and Fyn and trafficking of GluN2B to synaptic membranes are necessary for ethanol intake behaviors in rodents. We tested the functional significance of STEP61 in this signaling pathway by ethanol administration to primary cultures as well as in vivo, and demonstrated that the inactivation of STEP61 by ethanol leads to the activation of PTPα, its translocation to synaptic membranes, and the activation of Fyn. These findings indicate a novel mechanism by which STEP61 regulates PTPα and suggest that STEP and PTPα coordinate the regulation of Fyn. PMID:25951993

  2. Selective binding modes and allosteric inhibitory effects of lupane triterpenes on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tiantian; Yu, Haibo; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-02-11

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a promising therapeutic target for treating obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers for over a decade. Previous drug design has focused on inhibitors targeting the active site of PTP1B. However, this has not been successful because the active site is positively charged and conserved among the protein tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, it is important to develop PTP1B inhibitors with alternative inhibitory strategies. Using computational studies including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations, we found that lupane triterpenes selectively inhibited PTP1B by targeting its more hydrophobic and less conserved allosteric site. These findings were verified using two enzymatic assays. Furthermore, the cell culture studies showed that lupeol and betulinic acid inhibited the PTP1B activity stimulated by TNFα in neurons. Our study indicates that lupane triterpenes are selective PTP1B allosteric inhibitors with significant potential for treating those diseases with elevated PTP1B activity.

  3. Diversity in genomic organisation, developmental regulation and distribution of the murine PR72/B" subunits of protein phosphatase 2A

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    Janssens Veerle

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a serine/threonine-specific phosphatase displaying vital functions in growth and development through its role in various signalling pathways. PP2A holoenzymes comprise a core dimer composed of a catalytic C and a structural A subunit, which can associate with a variable B-type subunit. The importance of the B-type subunits for PP2A regulation cannot be overestimated as they determine holoenzyme localisation, activity and substrate specificity. Three B-type subunit families have been identified: PR55/B, PR61/B' and PR72/B", of which the latter is currently the least characterised. Results We deduced the sequences and genomic organisation of the different murine PR72/B" isoforms: three genes encode nine isoforms, five of which are abundantly expressed and give rise to genuine PP2A subunits. Thereby, one novel subunit was identified. Using Northern blotting, we examined the tissue-specific and developmental expression of these subunits. All subunits are highly expressed in heart, suggesting an important cardiac function. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a striated expression pattern of PR72 and PR130 in heart and skeletal muscle, but not in bladder smooth muscle. The subcellular localisation and cell cycle regulatory ability of several PR72/B" isoforms were determined, demonstrating differences as well as similarities. Conclusion In contrast to PR55/B and PR61/B', the PR72/B" family seems evolutionary more divergent, as only two of the murine genes have a human orthologue. We have integrated these results in a more consistent nomenclature of both human and murine PR72/B" genes and their transcripts/proteins. Our results provide a platform for the future generation of PR72/B" knockout mice.

  4. An in silico structural, functional and phylogenetic analysis with three dimensional protein modeling of alkaline phosphatase enzyme of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Krishnendu Pramanik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus is a primary macronutrient required for normal plant health, metabolism and survival. It is present in soil in compound insoluble form for which plant cannot uptake it directly from the soil. Some phosphate solubilizing bacteria possess some important enzymes for phosphate solubilization as well as mineralization. Alkaline (or basic phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1 is a type of zinc containing dimeric hydrolase enzyme responsible for removing the phosphate groups from various kinds of molecules including nucleotides, proteins, and alkaloids. Unlike acid phosphatases alkaline phosphatases are most effective in an alkaline environment. Alkaline phosphatases (ALPs are of immense importance in various agricultural industries including dairy industries for testing successful pasteurization process. In this present study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphatase was selected for a detailed computational investigation to exploit its physicochemical characteristics, structural properties including 3D model, model quality analysis, phylogenetic assessment and functional analysis using a number of available standard bioinformatics tools. The protein having average molecular weight about 51 kDa, was found thermostable and alkaline in nature belonging to metalloenzyme superfamily. Specifically, the thermostable behavior of the protein is suitable for the dairy industry. Moreover, this theoretical overview will help researchers to get an idea about the predicted protein structure and it may also help to design genetically engineered phosphate solubilizing bacteria by designing specific primers.

  5. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase modulates nociception: evidence from genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azkona, Garikoitz; Saavedra, Ana; Aira, Zigor; Aluja, David; Xifró, Xavier; Baguley, Tyler; Alberch, Jordi; Ellman, Jonathan A; Lombroso, Paul J; Azkue, Jon J; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2016-02-01

    The information from nociceptors is processed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by complex circuits involving excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. It is well documented that GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation contributes to central sensitization. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) dephosphorylates GluN2B and ERK1/2, promoting internalization of GluN2B and inactivation of ERK1/2. The activity of STEP was modulated by genetic (STEP knockout mice) and pharmacological (recently synthesized STEP inhibitor, TC-2153) approaches. STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord were determined in male and female mice of different ages. Inflammatory pain was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant injection. Behavioral tests, immunoblotting, and electrophysiology were used to analyze the effect of STEP on nociception. Our results show that both genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of STEP induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, which were accompanied by increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase heterozygous and knockout mice presented a similar phenotype. Furthermore, electrophysiological experiments showed that TC-2153 increased C fiber-evoked spinal field potentials. Interestingly, we found that STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord inversely correlated with thermal hyperalgesia associated with age and female gender in mice. Consistently, STEP knockout mice failed to show age-related thermal hyperalgesia, although gender-related differences were preserved. Moreover, in a model of inflammatory pain, hyperalgesia was associated with increased phosphorylation-mediated STEP(61) inactivation and increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Collectively, the present results underscore an important role of spinal STEP activity in the modulation of nociception.

  6. Protein Kinase C Controls Binding of Igo/ENSA Proteins to Protein Phosphatase 2A in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Vu; Dephoure, Noah; Weiss, Amit; Ferguson, Jacqueline; Leitao, Ricardo; Gygi, Steven P; Kellogg, Douglas R

    2017-03-24

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays important roles in controlling mitosis in all eukaryotic cells. The form of PP2A that controls mitosis is associated with a conserved regulatory subunit that is called B55 in vertebrates and Cdc55 in budding yeast. The activity of this form of PP2A can be inhibited by binding of conserved Igo/ENSA proteins. Although the mechanisms that activate Igo/ENSA to bind and inhibit PP2A are well understood, little is known about how Igo/Ensa are inactivated. Here, we have analyzed regulation of Igo/ENSA in the context of a checkpoint pathway that links mitotic entry to membrane growth in budding yeast. Protein kinase C (Pkc1) relays signals in the pathway by activating PP2ACdc55 We discovered that constitutively active Pkc1 can drive cells through a mitotic checkpoint arrest, which suggests that Pkc1-dependent activation of PP2ACdc55 plays a critical role in checkpoint signaling. We therefore used mass spectrometry to determine how Pkc1 modifies the PP2ACdc55 complex. This revealed that Pkc1 induces changes in the phosphorylation of multiple subunits of the complex, as well as dissociation of Igo/ENSA. Pkc1 directly phosphorylates Cdc55 and Igo/ENSA, and phosphorylation site mapping and mutagenesis indicate that phosphorylation of Cdc55 contributes to Igo/ENSA dissociation. Association of Igo2 with PP2ACdc55 is regulated during the cell cycle, yet mutation of Pkc1-dependent phosphorylation sites on Cdc55 and Igo2 did not cause defects in mitotic progression. Together, the data suggest that Pkc1 controls PP2ACdc55 by multiple overlapping mechanisms. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Genome-wide functional analysis of plasmodium protein phosphatases reveals key regulators of parasite development and differentiation

    KAUST Repository

    Guttery, David S.

    2014-07-09

    Reversible protein phosphorylation regulated by kinases and phosphatases controls many cellular processes. Although essential functions for the malaria parasite kinome have been reported, the roles of most protein phosphatases (PPs) during Plasmodium development are unknown. We report a functional analysis of the Plasmodium berghei protein phosphatome, which exhibits high conservation with the P. falciparum phosphatome and comprises 30 predicted PPs with differential and distinct expression patterns during various stages of the life cycle. Gene disruption analysis of P. berghei PPs reveals that half of the genes are likely essential for asexual blood stage development, whereas six are required for sexual development/sporogony in mosquitoes. Phenotypic screening coupled with transcriptome sequencing unveiled morphological changes and altered gene expression in deletion mutants of two N-myristoylated PPs. These findings provide systematic functional analyses of PPs in Plasmodium, identify how phosphatases regulate parasite development and differentiation, and can inform the identification of drug targets for malaria. © 2014 The Authors.

  8. pSKAP/S: An expression vector for the production of single-chain Fv alkaline phosphatase fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griep, R A; van Twisk, C; Kerschbaumer, R J; Harper, K; Torrance, L; Himmler, G; van der Wolf, J M; Schots, A

    1999-06-01

    The vector pSKAP/S was constructed to enable overexpression of single-chain variable fragment antibody (scFv)-alkaline phosphatase fusion proteins. In pSKAP/S, the scFv were genetically fused to the mutated Escherichia coli PhoA/S gene that encodes an alkaline phosphatase with increased specific activity. The restriction sites incorporated into pSKAP/S allowed the scFv genes to be easily transferred from pUC119-derived phagemid vectors that are used frequently in phage display antibody library technology. Strong transcriptional control of expression was achieved using the tetracycline promoter, and induction of different individual clones with anhydrotetracycline resulted in secretion of most of the scFv-alkaline phosphatase fusion proteins into the culture medium. Although some of the clones secreted fusion proteins that were retained in the periplasm, these proteins could be isolated with a simple extraction procedure. Increased amounts of a scFv-alkaline phosphatase fusion protein were obtained when expressed in the pSKAP/S vector compared with expression in a vector incorporating the lac promoter. Testing for binding of the scFv-alkaline phosphatase fusion proteins to antigen was possible in an ELISA without the need for additional enzyme-conjugated antibodies. The pSKAP/S vector was successfully used to obtain scFv fragments from a preparation of phage-antibody clones after subcloning and expression of individual clones as scFv-alkaline phosphatase fusions, whereas fewer clones (and clones with different properties) were obtained from the same phage-antibody preparations when expressed as soluble scFv fragments. Therefore, the pSKAP/S vector was shown to be useful in extending the range of scFv obtained from phage display libraries. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. Protein phosphatase 2A enables expression of interleukin 17 (IL-17) through chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolidis, Sokratis A; Rauen, Thomas; Hedrich, Christian M; Tsokos, George C; Crispín, José C

    2013-09-13

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a heterotrimeric serine/threonine phosphatase involved in essential cellular functions. T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) express high levels of the catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2Ac). A mouse overexpressing PP2Ac in T cells develops glomerulonephritis in an IL-17-dependent manner. Here, using microarray analyses, we demonstrate that increased expression of PP2Ac grants T cells the capacity to produce an array of proinflammatory effector molecules. Because IL-17 is important in the expression of glomerulonephritis, we studied the mechanism through which PP2Ac dysregulation facilitates its production. We report that PP2Ac is involved in the regulation of the Il17 locus by enhancing histone 3 acetylation through a mechanism that involves activation of interferon regulatory factor 4. Increased histone 3 acetylation of the Il17 locus is shared between T cells of PP2Ac transgenic mice and patients with SLE. We propose that, by promoting the inflammatory capacity of T cells, PP2Ac dysregulation contributes to the pathogenesis of SLE.

  10. Visualization of subunit interactions and ternary complexes of protein phosphatase 2A in mammalian cells.

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    Shu-Ting Mo

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a ubiquitous phospho-serine/threonine phosphatase that controls many diverse cellular functions. The predominant form of PP2A is a heterotrimeric holoenzyme consisting of a scaffolding A subunit, a variable regulatory B subunit, and a catalytic C subunit. The C subunit also associates with other interacting partners, such as α4, to form non-canonical PP2A complexes. We report visualization of PP2A complexes in mammalian cells. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC analysis of PP2A subunit interactions demonstrates that the B subunit plays a key role in directing the subcellular localization of PP2A, and confirms that the A subunit functions as a scaffold in recruiting the B and C subunits to form a heterotrimeric holoenzyme. BiFC analysis also reveals that α4 promotes formation of the AC core dimer. Furthermore, we demonstrate visualization of specific ABC holoenzymes in cells by combining BiFC and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BiFC-FRET. Our studies not only provide direct imaging data to support previous biochemical observations on PP2A complexes, but also offer a promising approach for studying the spatiotemporal distribution of individual PP2A complexes in cells.

  11. Protein tyrosine phosphatase α in the dorsomedial striatum promotes excessive ethanol-drinking behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hamida, Sami; Darcq, Emmanuel; Wang, Jun; Wu, Su; Phamluong, Khanhky; Kharazia, Viktor; Ron, Dorit

    2013-09-04

    We previously found that excessive ethanol drinking activates Fyn in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) (Wang et al., 2010; Gibb et al., 2011). Ethanol-mediated Fyn activation in the DMS leads to the phosphorylation of the GluN2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, to the enhancement of the channel's activity, and to the development and/or maintenance of ethanol drinking behaviors (Wang et al., 2007, 2010). Protein tyrosine phosphatase α (PTPα) is essential for Fyn kinase activation (Bhandari et al., 1998), and we showed that ethanol-mediated Fyn activation is facilitated by the recruitment of PTPα to synaptic membranes, the compartment where Fyn resides (Gibb et al., 2011). Here we tested the hypothesis that PTPα in the DMS is part of the Fyn/GluN2B pathway and is thus a major contributor to the neuroadaptations underlying excessive ethanol intake behaviors. We found that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated PTPα knockdown in the DMS reduces excessive ethanol intake and preference in rodents. Importantly, no alterations in water, saccharine/sucrose, or quinine intake were observed. Furthermore, downregulation of PTPα in the DMS of mice significantly reduces ethanol-mediated Fyn activation, GluN2B phosphorylation, and ethanol withdrawal-induced long-term facilitation of NMDAR activity without altering the intrinsic features of DMS neurons. Together, these results position PTPα upstream of Fyn within the DMS and demonstrate the important contribution of the phosphatase to the maladaptive synaptic changes that lead to excessive ethanol intake.

  12. Protein Phosphatase 1 Recruitment by Rif1 Regulates DNA Replication Origin Firing by Counteracting DDK Activity

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    Anoushka Davé

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The firing of eukaryotic origins of DNA replication requires CDK and DDK kinase activities. DDK, in particular, is involved in setting the temporal program of origin activation, a conserved feature of eukaryotes. Rif1, originally identified as a telomeric protein, was recently implicated in specifying replication timing in yeast and mammals. We show that this function of Rif1 depends on its interaction with PP1 phosphatases. Mutations of two PP1 docking motifs in Rif1 lead to early replication of telomeres in budding yeast and misregulation of origin firing in fission yeast. Several lines of evidence indicate that Rif1/PP1 counteract DDK activity on the replicative MCM helicase. Our data suggest that the PP1/Rif1 interaction is downregulated by the phosphorylation of Rif1, most likely by CDK/DDK. These findings elucidate the mechanism of action of Rif1 in the control of DNA replication and demonstrate a role of PP1 phosphatases in the regulation of origin firing.

  13. BDNF Induces Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 61 Degradation Through the Proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Ana; Puigdellívol, Mar; Tyebji, Shiraz; Kurup, Pradeep; Xu, Jian; Ginés, Silvia; Alberch, Jordi; Lombroso, Paul J; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2016-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes synaptic strengthening through the regulation of kinase and phosphatase activity. Conversely, striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) opposes synaptic strengthening through inactivation or internalization of signaling molecules. Here, we investigated whether BDNF regulates STEP levels/activity. BDNF induced a reduction of STEP61 levels in primary cortical neurons, an effect that was prevented by inhibition of tyrosine kinases, phospholipase C gamma, or the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). The levels of pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204), two STEP substrates, increased in BDNF-treated cultures, and blockade of the UPS prevented STEP61 degradation and reduced BDNF-induced GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, brief or sustained cell depolarization reduced STEP61 levels in cortical neurons by different mechanisms. BDNF also promoted UPS-mediated STEP61 degradation in cultured striatal and hippocampal neurons. In contrast, nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3 had no effect on STEP61 levels. Our results thus indicate that STEP61 degradation is an important event in BDNF-mediated effects.

  14. Protein phosphatase 5 is necessary for ATR-mediated DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yoonsung [Department of Pharmacology, DNA Repair Research Center, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Hyang-Min [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heuksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Hee [Department of Pharmacology, DNA Repair Research Center, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Peter I. [Department of Dermatology, University of Arkansas for Medical Science, 4301 West Markham, Slot 576, Little Rock, AR 72205 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwang-Ho [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heuksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Yong [Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Jae Yeoul [Department of Physiology, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); You, Ho Jin, E-mail: hjyou@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, DNA Repair Research Center, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) has been shown to participate in ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)- and ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related)-mediated checkpoint pathways, which plays an important role in the DNA damage response and maintenance of genomic stability. {yields} However, it is not clear exactly how PP5 participates in this process. {yields} Our results indicate that PP5 is more closely related with ATR-mediated pathway than ATM-mediated pathway in DNA damage repair. -- Abstract: Several recent studies have shown that protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) participates in cell cycle arrest after DNA damage, but its roles in DNA repair have not yet been fully characterized. We investigated the roles of PP5 in the repair of ultraviolet (UV)- and neocarzinostatin (NCS)-induced DNA damage. The results of comet assays revealed different repair patterns in UV- and NCS-exposed U2OS-PS cells. PP5 is only essential for Rad3-related (ATR)-mediated DNA repair. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of 53BP1 and BRCA1, important mediators of DNA damage repair, and substrates of ATR and ATM decreased in U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation. In contrast, the cell cycle arrest proteins p53, CHK1, and CHK2 were normally phosphorylated in U2OS and U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation or treated with NCS. In view of these results, we suggest that PP5 plays a crucial role in ATR-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA damage.

  15. Generation of active protein phosphatase 2A is coupled to holoenzyme assembly.

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    Hans Hombauer

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a prime example of the multisubunit architecture of protein serine/threonine phosphatases. Until substrate-specific PP2A holoenzymes assemble, a constitutively active, but nonspecific, catalytic C subunit would constitute a risk to the cell. While it has been assumed that the severe proliferation impairment of yeast lacking the structural PP2A subunit, TPD3, is due to the unrestricted activity of the C subunit, we recently obtained evidence for the existence of the C subunit in a low-activity conformation that requires the RRD/PTPA proteins for the switch into the active conformation. To study whether and how maturation of the C subunit is coupled with holoenzyme assembly, we analyzed PP2A biogenesis in yeast. Here we show that the generation of the catalytically active C subunit depends on the physical and functional interaction between RRD2 and the structural subunit, TPD3. The phenotype of the tpd3Delta strain is therefore caused by impaired, rather than increased, PP2A activity. TPD3/RRD2-dependent C subunit maturation is under the surveillance of the PP2A methylesterase, PPE1, which upon malfunction of PP2A biogenesis, prevents premature generation of the active C subunit and holoenzyme assembly by counteracting the untimely methylation of the C subunit. We propose a novel model of PP2A biogenesis in which a tightly controlled activation cascade protects cells from untargeted activity of the free catalytic PP2A subunit.

  16. Characterization and kinetic analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatase-H2 from Microplitis demolitor bracovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Jai-Hoon; Bottjen, Rachel C; Pruijssers, Andrea J; Clark, Kevin D; Strand, Michael R

    2010-09-01

    The polydnavirus Microplitis demolitor bracovirus (MdBV) encodes 13 genes that share homology with classical protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Prior sequence analysis suggested that five members of the MdBV PTP gene family (ptp-H2, -H3, -H5, -N1 and -N2) encode PTPs, seven family members encode pseudophosphatases, and one family member is a pseudogene. Prior experimental studies further implicated PTP-H2 in disabling the function of host hemocytes following infection by MdBV. Here we report expression of PTP-H2 and selected mutants in Escherichia coli cells as non-fusion or thioredoxin-fusion proteins. Following purification by nickel affinity chromatography, the full-length and mutant proteins ran as single bands of predicted size on SDS-PAGE gels under reducing conditions. The non-fusion form of PTP-H2 exhibited classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics using the phosphopeptide END(pY)INASL and difluoro-4-methylumbiliferyl phosphate (DiFMUP) as substrates. As expected, the non-fusion mutant PTP-H2(C236S) had no enzymatic activity, while the thioredoxin-fusion form of PTP-H2 had low levels of activity. PTP-H2 exhibited optimal activity at pH 4.0 and 26 degrees C in sodium acetate buffer, and its activity was diminished by increasing buffer ionic strength. Activity was also greatly reduced by the presence of copper, heparin, and the classical PTP inhibitor vanadate. Using an anti-PTP-H2 antibody, immunoblotting and immunocytochemical studies only detected PTP-H2 in hemocytes from MdBV-infected Pseudoplusia includens. Overall, our results indicate that PTP-H2 is a functional tyrosine phosphatase that is specifically expressed in MdBV-infected hemocytes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Type 2C protein phosphatase ABI1 is a negative regulator of strawberry fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hai-Feng; Lu, Dong; Sun, Jing-Hua; Li, Chun-Li; Xing, Yu; Qin, Ling; Shen, Yuan-Yue

    2013-04-01

    Although a great deal of progress has been made toward understanding the role of abscisic acid (ABA) in fruit ripening, many components in the ABA signalling pathway remain to be elucidated. Here, a strawberry gene homologous to the Arabidopsis gene ABI1, named FaABI1, was isolated and characterized. The 1641bp cDNA includes an intact open reading frame that encodes a deduced protein of 546 amino acids, in which putative conserved domains were determined by homology analysis. Transcriptional analysis showed that the levels of FaABI1 mRNA expression declined rapidly during strawberry fruit development as evidenced by real-time PCR, semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and northern blotting analyses, suggesting that the Ser/Thr protein phosphatase PP2C1 encoded by FaABI1 may be involved in fruit ripening as a negative regulator. The results of Tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing and PBI121 vector-mediated overexpression suggested that the down- and up-regulation of FaABI1 mRNA expression levels in degreening strawberry fruit could promote and inhibit ripening, respectively. Furthermore, alteration of FaABI1 expression could differentially regulate the transcripts of a set of both ABA-responsive and ripening-related genes, including ABI3, ABI4, ABI5, SnRK2, ABRE1, CHS, PG1, PL, CHI, F3H, DFR, ANS, and UFGT. Taken together, the data provide new evidence for an important role for ABA in regulating strawberry fruit ripening in the processes of which the type 2C protein phosphatase ABI1 serves as a negative regulator. Finally, a possible core mechanism underlying ABA perception and signalling transduction in strawberry fruit ripening is discussed.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B. I. Ligand-induced changes in the protein motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H. J.; Frimurer, T.M.; Andersen, J.N.

    1999-01-01

    molecular dynamics simulations of PTP1B and PTP1B complexed with a high-affinity peptide DADEpYL, where pY stands for phosphorylated tyrosine. The peptide sequence is derived from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR(988-993)). Simulations were performed in water for 1 ns, and the concerted motions...... in the protein were analyzed using the essential dynamics technique. Our results indicate that the predominately internal motions in PTP1B occur in a subspace of only a few degrees of freedom. Upon substrate binding, the flexibility of the protein is reduced by similar to 10%. The largest effect is found......Activity of enzymes, such as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), is often associated with structural changes in the enzyme, resulting in selective and stereospecific reactions with the substrate. To investigate the effect of a substrate on the motions occurring in PTPs, we have performed...

  19. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity in subcellular fractions of normal and dystrophic human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, D; Rüstow, B; Olthoff, D; Jung, K

    1985-03-15

    Biopsy samples from normal and dystrophic human muscle (Duchenne type) were fractionated by differential centrifugation and microsomes, mitochondria and cytosol were assayed for phosphatidic acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.4) and marker enzymes of mitochondria and cytosol. The activity of phosphatidic acid phosphatase was significantly lower in microsomes and higher in cytosol and mitochondria of dystrophic muscle than in the corresponding subcellular fractions of normal muscle. The results support an explanation of earlier findings that there is reduced G3P incorporation into diglycerides and phosphatidylcholine and a qualitative and quantitative change in the amount of phosphatidylcholine in dystrophic microsomes. The possible reasons for the reduction in the activity of only microsomal PA-P-ase were discussed.

  20. Dimerization of Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase alpha in living cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadella Theodorus WJ

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dimerization is an important regulatory mechanism of single membrane-spanning receptors. For instance, activation of receptor protein-tyrosine kinases (RPTKs involves dimerization. Structural, functional and biochemical studies suggested that the enzymatic counterparts of RPTKs, the receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs, are inhibited by dimerization, but whether RPTPs actually dimerize in living cells remained to be determined. Results In order to assess RPTP dimerization, we have assayed Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET between chimeric proteins of cyan- and yellow-emitting derivatives of green fluorescent protein, fused to RPTPα, using three different techniques: dual wavelength excitation, spectral imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging. All three techniques suggested that FRET occurred between RPTPα -CFP and -YFP fusion proteins, and thus that RPTPα dimerized in living cells. RPTPα dimerization was constitutive, extensive and specific. RPTPα dimerization was consistent with cross-linking experiments, using a non-cell-permeable chemical cross-linker. Using a panel of deletion mutants, we found that the transmembrane domain was required and sufficient for dimerization. Conclusions We demonstrate here that RPTPα dimerized constitutively in living cells, which may be mediated by the transmembrane domain, providing strong support for the model that dimerization is involved in regulation of RPTPs.

  1. Knockdown of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A may sensitize metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer cells to cabazitaxel chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinming; Jia, Jiaoyuan; Tong, Qiang; Liu, Jun; Qiu, Jun; Sun, Rong; Yao, Lixin; Yang, Chun

    2015-03-01

    Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is a recently identified human oncoprotein that can stabilize some proteins by inhibiting degradation mediated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), and its level in cancer is associated with resistance to chemotherapy. However, whether CIP2A could increase chemoresistance of prostate cancer (PCa) cells to chemotherapeutic agent cabazitaxel remains unclear. To determine whether CIP2A serves as a potential therapeutic target of human PCa, we utilized small interference RNA (siRNA) to knock down CIP2A expression in human PCa cells and analyzed their phenotypic changes. The data demonstrated that CIP2A was significantly elevated in mCRPC cell lines C4-2 and ARCaP(M) at both the mRNA and protein levels. CIP2A silencing led to decreased proliferation and enhanced chemosensitivity and apoptosis to cabazitaxel in human PCa cells, as well as reduced Akt phosphorylation. Our data suggesting critical roles of CIP2A in PCa cells chemoresistance to cabazitaxel and raising the possibility of CIP2A inhibition as a promising approach for chemosensitization of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

  2. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Serine Threonine Protein Phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglel, Mark; Honkanel, Richard; Ciszak, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues is a well-recognized mechanism in eukaryotic cells for the regulation of cell-cycle progression, cell growth and metabolism. Human serine/threonine phosphatases can be placed into two major families, PPP and PPM. To date the structure on one PPP family member (PPl) has been determined. Here we present the structure of a 323-residue catalytic domain of a second phosphatase belonging to the PPP family of enzyme. catalytic domain of the enzyme has been determined to 1.60Angstrom resolution and refined to R=17.5 and Rfree = 20.8%. The catalytic domain possesses a unique fold consisting of a largely monolithic structure, divisible into closely-associated helical and sheet regions. The catalytic site contains two manganese ions that are involved in substrate binding and catalysis. The enzyme crystallizes as a dimer that completely buries catalytic surfaces of both monomers, Also, the structure shows evidence of some flexibility around the active site cleft that may be related to substrate specificity of this enzyme.

  3. INHIBITORY POTENTIAL OF POLYHYDROXYLATED FULLERENES AGAINST PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobzar, O L; Trush, V V; Tanchuk, V Yu; Vovk, A I

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of PTP1B by polyhydroxylated fullerenes was studied in silico and in vitro. The enzyme kinetics in the presence of polyhydroxy small gap fullerenes showed that reciprocal value of maximum velocity non-linearly increases with increasing the inhibitor concentration. Analysis of the dose-dependent curve of PTP1B inhibition suggests an apparent positive cooperativity with involvement of at least two binding sites for the hydroxylated fullerene cages. Molecular docking calculations indicated that highly hydroxylated fullerene C60 may occupy the active site and additional allosteric binding site with similar affinity. In silico analysis of a number of fullerenols with 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 hydroxyl groups showed that the inhibitory activity may depend on the degree of hydroxylation of the nanoparticles surface. These data provide some understanding of the mechanisms of inhibitory action of fullerenols on activity of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

  4. Water molecule network and active site flexibility of apo protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.K.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Møller, K.B.

    2004-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) plays a key role as a negative regulator of insulin and leptin signalling and is therefore considered to be an important molecular target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Detailed structural information about the structure of PTP1B, including...... the conformation and flexibility of active-site residues as well as the water-molecule network, is a key issue in understanding ligand binding and enzyme kinetics and in structure-based drug design. A 1.95 Angstrom apo PTP1B structure has been obtained, showing four highly coordinated water molecules in the active......-site pocket of the enzyme; hence, the active site is highly solvated in the apo state. Three of the water molecules are located at positions that approximately correspond to the positions of the phosphate O atoms of the natural substrate phosphotyrosine and form a similar network of hydrogen bonds. The active...

  5. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B by lupeol and lupenone isolated from Sorbus commixta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Minkyun; Kim, Bo Yeon; Osada, Hiroyuki; Ahn, Jong Seog

    2009-08-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) appears to be an attractive target for the development of new drugs for type 2 diabetes and obesity. In our preliminary test, a MeOH extract of the stem barks of Sorbus commixta Hedl. (Rosaceae) showed strong PTP1B inhibitory activity. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the MeOH extract resulted in the isolation of two lupane-type triterpenes, lupenone (1) and lupeol (2). Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited PTP1B with IC(50) values of 13.7 +/- 2.1 and 5.6 +/- 0.9 microM, respectively. Kinetic studies revealed that both the compounds 1 and 2 are non-competitive inhibitors of PTP1B that decrease V(max) values with no effect on K(m) values.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of the interaction between protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B and aryl diketoacid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Gao, Jun; Liu, Yongjun; Liu, Chengbu

    2012-09-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP-1B) is acknowledged as an outstanding therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes, obesity and cancer. In this work, six aryl diketoacid compounds have been studied on the basis of molecular dynamics simulations. Hydrogen bonds, binding energies and conformation changes of the WPD loop have been analyzed. The results indicated that their activation model falls into two parts: the target region of the monomeric aryl diketoacid compounds is the active site, whereas the target region of the dimeric aryl diketoacid compounds is the WPD loop or the R loop. The van der Waals interactions exhibit stronger effects than the short-range electrostatic interactions. The van der Waals interaction energy and the IC50 values exhibit an approximately exponential relationship. Furthermore, the van der Waals interactions cooperate with the hydrogen bond interactions. This study provides a more thorough understanding of the PTP-1B inhibitor binding processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) knockout mice have enhanced hippocampal memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Moura, Paula J; Picciotto, Marina R; Lombroso, Paul J

    2011-06-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific phosphatase that opposes synaptic strengthening by the regulation of key synaptic signaling proteins. Previous studies suggest a possible role for STEP in learning and memory. To demonstrate the functional importance of STEP in learning and memory, we generated STEP knockout (KO) mice and examined the effect of deletion of STEP on behavioral performance, as well as the phosphorylation and expression of its substrates. Here we report that loss of STEP leads to significantly enhanced performance in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory tasks. In addition, STEP KO mice displayed greater dominance behavior, although they were normal in their motivation, motor coordination, visual acuity and social interactions. STEP KO mice displayed enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), the NR2B subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and proline-rich tyrosine kinase (Pyk2), as well as an increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 substrates. Concomitant with the increased phosphorylation of NR2B, synaptosomal expression of NR1/NR2B NMDARs was increased in STEP KO mice, as was the GluR1/GluR2 containing α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs), providing a potential molecular mechanism for the improved cognitive performance. The data support a role for STEP in the regulation of synaptic strengthening. The absence of STEP improves cognitive performance, and may do so by the regulation of downstream effectors necessary for synaptic transmission. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Purification and characterization of protein phosphatase 2A from petals of the tulip Tulipa gesnerina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Md Abul Kalam; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2006-11-30

    The holoenzyme of protein phosphatase (PP) from tulip petals was purified by using hydrophobic interaction, anion exchange and microcystin affinity chromatography to analyze activity towards p-nitrophenyl phosphate (p-NPP). The catalytic subunit of PP was released from its endogenous regulatory subunits by ethanol precipitation and further purified. Both preparations were characterized by immunological and biochemical approaches to be PP2A. On SDS-PAGE, the final purified holoenzyme preparation showed three protein bands estimated at 38, 65, and 75 kDa while the free catalytic subunit preparation showed only the 38 kDa protein. In both preparations, the 38 kDa protein was identified immunologically as the catalytic subunit of PP2A by using a monoclonal antibody against the PP2A catalytic subunit. The final 623- and 748- fold purified holoenzyme and the free catalytic preparations, respectively, exhibited high sensitivity to inhibition by 1 nM okadaic acid when activity was measured with p-NPP. The holoenzyme displayed higher stimulation in the presence of ammonium sulfate than the free catalytic subunit did by protamine, thereby suggesting different enzymatic behaviors.

  9. Regulation of merlin by protein phosphatase 1-TIMAP and EBP50 in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boratkó, Anita; Péter, Margit; Csortos, Csilla

    2017-01-01

    Merlin (moesin-ezrin-radixin like protein), the product of neurofibromatosis type 2 gene, was primarily recognized as a tumor suppressor, but it also functions as a membrane-cytoskeletal linker and regulator of multiple signaling pathways. The activity and localization of merlin is regulated by head to tail folding that is controlled by phosphorylation of the Ser518 side chain. Merlin localizes in the nucleus when the Ser518 side chain is not phosphorylated, while the phosphorylated form is present in the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane. In this work interactions and their impact on the subcellular localization and phosphorylation state of the Ser518 side chain of merlin were investigated in endothelial cells. It is shown that merlin (dephospho-Ser518 form) interacts in the nucleus of endothelial cells with the scaffolding protein EBP50, a member of the Na+/H+exchanger regulatory factor family. Upon EBP50 depletion, merlin translocated from the nucleus, suggesting that binding of merlin to EBP50 is critical in the nuclear localization of merlin. Along with the translocation, the phosphorylation level of phospho-Ser518-merlin was increased in EBP50 depleted cells. TIMAP (TGFβ-inhibited membrane-associated protein), a type 1 protein phosphatase (PP1) regulatory subunit, was newly recognized as an interacting partner for merlin. Domain mapping using truncated mutant forms in GST pull down revealed that the N-terminal half of TIMAP (aa 1-290) and the FERM domain of merlin are the regions responsible for the interaction.The catalytic subunit of PP1 (PP1c) was present in all merlin-TIMAP pull down or immunoprecipitation samples demonstrating that merlin actually interacts with the PP1c-TIMAP holoenzyme. On the other hand, from TIMAP depleted cells, without its targeting protein, PP1c could not bind to merlin. Also, when the phosphatase activity of PP1c-TIMAP was inhibited either with depletion of TIMAP or by treatment of the cells with specific PP1 inhibitor, there

  10. UBC9-dependent Association between Calnexin and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) at the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dukgyu; Kraus, Allison; Prins, Daniel; Groenendyk, Jody; Aubry, Isabelle; Liu, Wen-Xin; Li, Hao-Dong; Julien, Olivier; Touret, Nicolas; Sykes, Brian D.; Tremblay, Michel L.; Michalak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Calnexin is a type I integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, molecular chaperone, and a component of the translocon. We discovered a novel interaction between the calnexin cytoplasmic domain and UBC9, a SUMOylation E2 ligase, which modified the calnexin cytoplasmic domain by the addition of SUMO. We demonstrated that calnexin interaction with the SUMOylation machinery modulates an interaction with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), an ER-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in the negative regulation of insulin and leptin signaling. We showed that calnexin and PTP1B form UBC9-dependent complexes, revealing a previously unrecognized contribution of calnexin to the retention of PTP1B at the ER membrane. This work shows that the SUMOylation machinery links two ER proteins from divergent pathways to potentially affect cellular protein quality control and energy metabolism. PMID:25586181

  11. UBC9-dependent association between calnexin and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) at the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dukgyu; Kraus, Allison; Prins, Daniel; Groenendyk, Jody; Aubry, Isabelle; Liu, Wen-Xin; Li, Hao-Dong; Julien, Olivier; Touret, Nicolas; Sykes, Brian D; Tremblay, Michel L; Michalak, Marek

    2015-02-27

    Calnexin is a type I integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, molecular chaperone, and a component of the translocon. We discovered a novel interaction between the calnexin cytoplasmic domain and UBC9, a SUMOylation E2 ligase, which modified the calnexin cytoplasmic domain by the addition of SUMO. We demonstrated that calnexin interaction with the SUMOylation machinery modulates an interaction with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), an ER-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in the negative regulation of insulin and leptin signaling. We showed that calnexin and PTP1B form UBC9-dependent complexes, revealing a previously unrecognized contribution of calnexin to the retention of PTP1B at the ER membrane. This work shows that the SUMOylation machinery links two ER proteins from divergent pathways to potentially affect cellular protein quality control and energy metabolism. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Identification of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B and casein as substrates for 124-v-Mos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stabel Silvia

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mos proto-oncogene encodes a cytoplasmic serine/threonine-specific protein kinase with crucial function during meiotic cell division in vertebrates. Based on oncogenic amino acid substitutions the viral derivative, 124-v-Mos, displays constitutive protein kinase activity and functions independent of unknown upstream effectors of mos protein kinase. We have utilized this property of 124-v-Mos and screened for novel mos substrates in immunocomplex kinase assays in vitro. Results We generated recombinant 124-v-Mos using the baculovirus expression system in Spodoptera frugiperda cells and demonstrated constitutive kinase activity by the ability of 124-v-Mos to auto-phosphorylate and to phosphorylate vimentin, a known substrate of c-Mos. Using this approach we analyzed a panel of acidic and basic substrates in immunocomplex protein kinase assays and identified novel in vitro substrates for 124-v-Mos, the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B, alpha-casein and beta-casein. We controlled mos-specific phosphorylation of PTP1B and casein in comparative assays using a synthetic kinase-inactive 124-v-Mos mutant and further, tryptic digests of mos-phosphorylated beta-casein identified a phosphopeptide specifically targeted by wild-type 124-v-Mos. Two-dimensional phosphoamino acid analyses showed that 124-v-mos targets serine and threonine residues for phosphorylation in casein at a 1:1 ratio but auto-phosphorylation occurs predominantly on serine residues. Conclusion The mos substrates identified in this study represent a basis to approach the identification of the mos-consensus phosphorylation motif, important for the development of specific inhibitors of the Mos protein kinase.

  13. Yeast Endosulfines Control Entry into Quiescence and Chronological Life Span by Inhibiting Protein Phosphatase 2A

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    Séverine Bontron

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The TORC1 and PKA protein kinases are central elements of signaling networks that regulate eukaryotic cell proliferation in response to growth factors and/or nutrients. In yeast, attenuation of signaling by these kinases following nitrogen and/or carbon limitation activates the protein kinase Rim15, which orchestrates the initiation of a reversible cellular quiescence program to ensure normal chronological life span. The molecular elements linking Rim15 to distal readouts including the expression of Msn2/4- and Gis1-dependent genes involve the endosulfines Igo1/2. Here, we show that Rim15, analogous to the greatwall kinase in Xenopus, phosphorylates endosulfines to directly inhibit the Cdc55-protein phosphatase 2A (PP2ACdc55. Inhibition of PP2ACdc55 preserves Gis1 in a phosphorylated state and consequently promotes its recruitment to and activation of transcription from promoters of specific nutrient-regulated genes. These results close a gap in our perception of and delineate a role for PP2ACdc55 in TORC1-/PKA-mediated regulation of quiescence and chronological life span.

  14. Cell cycle dependent association of EBP50 with protein phosphatase 2A in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Boratkó

    Full Text Available Ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50 is a phosphorylatable PDZ domain-containing adaptor protein that is abundantly expressed in epithelium but was not yet studied in the endothelium. We report unusual nuclear localization of EBP50 in bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (BPAEC. Immunofluorescent staining and cellular fractionation demonstrated that EBP50 is present in the nuclear and perinuclear region in interphase cells. In the prophase of mitosis EBP50 redistributes to the cytoplasmic region in a phosphorylation dependent manner and during mitosis EBP50 co-localizes with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A. Furthermore, in vitro wound healing of BPAEC expressing phospho-mimic mutant of EBP50 was accelerated indicating that EBP50 is involved in the regulation of the cell division. Cell cycle dependent specific interactions were detected between EBP50 and the subunits of PP2A (A, C, and Bα with immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments. The interaction of EBP50 with the Bα containing form of PP2A suggests that this holoenzyme of PP2A can be responsible for the dephosphorylation of EBP50 in cytokinesis. Moreover, the results underline the significance of EBP50 in cell division via reversible phosphorylation of the protein with cyclin dependent kinase and PP2A in normal cells.

  15. Protein phosphatase 1 regulates the histone code for long-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshibu, Kyoko; Gräff, Johannes; Beullens, Monique; Heitz, Fabrice D; Berchtold, Dominik; Russig, Holger; Farinelli, Mélissa; Bollen, Mathieu; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2009-10-14

    Chromatin remodeling through histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and DNA methylation has recently been implicated in cognitive functions, but the mechanisms involved in such epigenetic regulation remain poorly understood. Here, we show that protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a critical regulator of chromatin remodeling in the mammalian brain that controls histone PTMs and gene transcription associated with long-term memory. Our data show that PP1 is present at the chromatin in brain cells and interacts with enzymes of the epigenetic machinery including HDAC1 (histone deacetylase 1) and histone demethylase JMJD2A (jumonji domain-containing protein 2A). The selective inhibition of the nuclear pool of PP1 in forebrain neurons in transgenic mice is shown to induce several histone PTMs that include not only phosphorylation but also acetylation and methylation. These PTMs are residue-specific and occur at the promoter of genes important for memory formation like CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) and NF-kappaB (nuclear factor-kappaB). These histone PTMs further co-occur with selective binding of RNA polymerase II and altered gene transcription, and are associated with improved long-term memory for objects and space. Together, these findings reveal a novel mechanism for the epigenetic control of gene transcription and long-term memory in the adult brain that depends on PP1.

  16. Novel Mixed-Type Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B. Kinetic and Computational Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Jazmín Sarabia-Sánchez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Atlas of Diabetes reports 415 million diabetics in the world, a number that has surpassed in half the expected time the twenty year projection. Type 2 diabetes is the most frequent form of the disease; it is characterized by a defect in the secretion of insulin and a resistance in its target organs. In the search for new antidiabetic drugs, one of the principal strategies consists in promoting the action of insulin. In this sense, attention has been centered in the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B, a protein whose overexpression or increase of its activity has been related in many studies with insulin resistance. In the present work, a chemical library of 250 compounds was evaluated to determine their inhibition capability on the protein PTP1B. Ten molecules inhibited over the 50% of the activity of the PTP1B, the three most potent molecules were selected for its characterization, reporting Ki values of 5.2, 4.2 and 41.3 µM, for compounds 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Docking and molecular dynamics studies revealed that the three inhibitors made interactions with residues at the secondary binding site to phosphate, exclusive for PTP1B. The data reported here support these compounds as hits for the design more potent and selective inhibitors against PTP1B in the search of new antidiabetic treatment.

  17. Beyond the Dopamine Receptor: Regulation and Roles of Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven I Walaas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine plays an important modulatory role in the central nervous system, helping to control critical aspects of motor function and reward learning. Alteration in normal dopaminergic neurotransmission underlies multiple neurological diseases including schizophrenia, Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. Modulation of dopamine-regulated signaling pathways is also important in the addictive actions of most drugs of abuse. Our studies over the last 30 years have focused on the molecular actions of dopamine acting on medium spiny neurons, the predominant neurons of the neostriatum. Striatum-enriched phosphoproteins, particularly DARPP-32, RCS (Regulator of Calmodulin Signaling and ARPP-16, mediate pleiotropic actions of dopamine. Notably, each of these proteins, either directly or indirectly, regulates the activity of one of the three major subclasses of serine/threonine protein phosphatases, PP1, PP2B and PP2A, respectively. For example, phosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Thr34 by protein kinase A results in potent inhibition of PP1, leading to potentiation of dopaminergic signaling at multiple steps from the dopamine receptor to the nucleus. The discovery of DARPP-32 and its emergence as a critical molecular integrator of striatal signaling will be discussed, as will more recent studies that highlight novel roles for RCS and ARPP-16 in dopamine-regulated striatal signaling pathways.

  18. Translation of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) after beta1-adrenergic receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaer; Zhang, Yang; Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Lombroso, Paul J

    2007-10-01

    The beta-adrenergic system is implicated in long-term synaptic plasticity in the CNS, a process that requires protein synthesis. To identify proteins that are translated in response to beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation and the pathways that regulate this process, we investigated the effects of isoproterenol on the translation of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in both cortico-striatal slices and primary neuronal cultures. Isoproterenol stimulation induced a rapid dose-dependent increase in STEP expression. Anisomycin blocked the increase in STEP expression while actinomycin D had no effect, suggesting a translation-dependent mechanism. Isoproterenol-induced STEP translation required activation of beta1-receptors. Application of the MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor SL327 blocked both isoproterenol-induced activation of pERK and subsequent STEP translation. Inhibitors of PI3K (LY294002) or mTOR (rapamycin) also completely blocked STEP translation. These results suggest that co-activation of both the ERK and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways are required for STEP translation. As one of the substrates of STEP includes ERK itself, these results suggest that STEP is translated upon beta-adrenergic activation as part of a negative feedback mechanism.

  19. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in retinal ischemic preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreixler, John C; Bratton, Anthony; Du, Eugenie; Shaikh, Afzhal R; Savoie, Brian; Alexander, Michael; Marcet, Marcus M; Roth, Steven

    2011-10-01

    We previously described the phenomenon of retinal ischemic pre-conditioning (IPC) and we have shown the role of various signaling proteins in the protective pathways, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38. In this study we examined the role in IPC of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), which inactivates p38. Ischemia was produced by elevation of intraocular pressure above systolic arterial blood pressure in adult Wistar rats. Preconditioning was produced by transient retinal ischemia for 5 min, 24 h prior to ischemia. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) to MKP-1 or a control non-silencing siRNA, was injected into the vitreous 6 h prior to IPC. Recovery was assessed by electroretinography (ERG) and histology. The a-and b-waves, and oscillatory potentials (OPs), measured before and 1 week after ischemia, were then normalized relative to pre-ischemic baseline, and corrected for diurnal variation in the normal non-ischemic eye. The P2, or post-photoreceptor component of the ERG (which reflects function of the rod bipolar cells in the inner retina), was derived using the Hood-Birch model. MKP-1 was localized in specific retinal cells using immunohistochemistry; levels of mitogen-activated protein kinases were measured using Western blotting. Injection of siRNA to MKP-1 significantly attenuated the protective effect of IPC as reflected by decreased recovery of the electroretinogram a and b-waves and the P2 after ischemia. The injection of siRNA to MKP-1 reduced the number of cells in the retinal ganglion cell and outer nuclear layers after IPC and ischemia. Blockade of MKP-1 by siRNA also increased the activation of p38 at 24 h following IPC. MKP-1 siRNA did not alter the levels of phosphorylated jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) after IPC. The results suggest the involvement of dual-specificity phosphatase MKP-1 in IPC and that MKP-1 is involved in IPC by regulating levels of activated MAPK p38

  20. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase controls responses to aversive stimuli: implication for ethanol drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legastelois, Rémi; Darcq, Emmanuel; Wegner, Scott A; Lombroso, Paul J; Ron, Dorit

    2015-01-01

    The STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific phosphatase whose dysregulation in expression and/or activity is associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently showed that long-term excessive consumption of ethanol induces a sustained inhibition of STEP activity in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) of mice. We further showed that down-regulation of STEP expression in the DMS, and not in the adjacent dorsolateral striatum, increases ethanol intake, suggesting that the inactivation of STEP in the DMS contributes to the development of ethanol drinking behaviors. Here, we compared the consequence of global deletion of the STEP gene on voluntary ethanol intake to the consumption of an appetitive rewarding substance (saccharin) or an aversive solution (quinine or denatonium). Whereas saccharin intake was similar in STEP knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) littermate mice, the consumption of ethanol as well as quinine and denatonium was increased in STEP KO mice. These results suggested that the aversive taste of these substances was masked upon deletion of the STEP gene. We therefore hypothesized that STEP contributes to the physiological avoidance towards aversive stimuli. To further test this hypothesis, we measured the responses of STEP KO and WT mice to lithium-induced conditioned place aversion (CPA) and found that whereas WT mice developed lithium place aversion, STEP KO mice did not. In contrast, conditioned place preference (CPP) to ethanol was similar in both genotypes. Together, our results indicate that STEP contributes, at least in part, to the protection against the ingestion of aversive agents.

  1. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase controls responses to aversive stimuli: implication for ethanol drinking.

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    Rémi Legastelois

    Full Text Available The STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP is a brain-specific phosphatase whose dysregulation in expression and/or activity is associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently showed that long-term excessive consumption of ethanol induces a sustained inhibition of STEP activity in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS of mice. We further showed that down-regulation of STEP expression in the DMS, and not in the adjacent dorsolateral striatum, increases ethanol intake, suggesting that the inactivation of STEP in the DMS contributes to the development of ethanol drinking behaviors. Here, we compared the consequence of global deletion of the STEP gene on voluntary ethanol intake to the consumption of an appetitive rewarding substance (saccharin or an aversive solution (quinine or denatonium. Whereas saccharin intake was similar in STEP knockout (KO and wild type (WT littermate mice, the consumption of ethanol as well as quinine and denatonium was increased in STEP KO mice. These results suggested that the aversive taste of these substances was masked upon deletion of the STEP gene. We therefore hypothesized that STEP contributes to the physiological avoidance towards aversive stimuli. To further test this hypothesis, we measured the responses of STEP KO and WT mice to lithium-induced conditioned place aversion (CPA and found that whereas WT mice developed lithium place aversion, STEP KO mice did not. In contrast, conditioned place preference (CPP to ethanol was similar in both genotypes. Together, our results indicate that STEP contributes, at least in part, to the protection against the ingestion of aversive agents.

  2. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase as a differentiation marker for the human mononuclear phagocyte system.

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    Radzun, H J; Kreipe, H; Parwaresch, M R

    1983-01-01

    Human blood monocytes (BM) were stimulated with various immune modulators in short-term cultures. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TAcP) activity was demonstrated with an enzyme cytochemical method. Other members of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS), such as peritoneal (PM) and alveolar macrophages (AM), were also tested. Unstimulated BM and physiologic functional forms of macrophages, with the exception of AM, were invariably TAcP negative. On appropriate stimulation, particularly with media containing lymphokines, cultured BM became TAcP positive. The results suggest that TAcP is an inducible differentiation marker that indicates transformation of monocytes into cells belonging to a distinct subset of the MPS.

  3. Characterization of a protein tyrosine phosphatase as a host factor promoting baculovirus replication in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

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    Wang, Fei; Xue, Renju; Li, Xianyang; Hu, Cuimei; Xia, Qingyou

    2016-04-01

    The relevance of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) to host-pathogen interaction is highlighted in mammalian studies, whereas less is known in insects. Here we presented the categorization of the PTP complement of silkworm and characterized their homologous relationship with human and fruit fly PTPs. Among the 36 PTP genes, ptp-h, which was proposed to be the origin of baculovirus ptp belongs to atypical VH1-like dual-specific PTP subset and encodes a catalytic active protein. The maximum expression level of Bmptp-h was at 5th instar and in fat body. Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) infection potently induced its expression in silkworm larvae and in BmE cells. Knock-down of Bmptp-h by RNA interference significantly inhibited viral replication, and over-expression enhanced viral replication as determined by viral DNA abundance and BmNPV-GFP positive cells. These results suggest that BmPTP-h might be one of the host factors that is beneficial to baculovirus infection by promoting viral replication. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Human prostatic acid phosphatase: purification, characterization, and optimization of conditions for radioimmunoassay

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    McCarthy, R.C.; Jakubowski, H.V.; Markowitz, H. (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1983-08-31

    Prostatic acid phosphatase was isolated from benign hypertrophic prostate tissue by ammonium sulfate precipitation and affinity chromatography procedures. The purified enzyme was characterized by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and shown to have a cluster of protein spots with an apparent molecular weight of 48000 at pI 5.9 to 6.3 in 9 mol/l urea. The specific activity of the purified enzyme was 723 and 659 U/mg protein with ..cap alpha..-naphthyl phosphate at 30/sup 0/C and para-nitrophenyl phosphate at 37/sup 0/C respectively. An antibody to the purified enzyme was raised in rabbits and used in a radioimmunoassay (RIA). The use of a phosphate buffer, pH 6.6, and iodination of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) by the Bolton-Hunter procedure improved the precision of the assay when compared to RIA's using a phosphate buffer, pH 7.0 or 7.3, or PAP iodinated by a chloramine-T procedure. The former RIA displaced 50% of the tracer at 2 ..mu..g of enzyme per liter of serum. The between-run coefficient of variation for 11 assays ranged from 3.9-7.7% with serum at 1.3 to 5.6 ..mu..g PAP/l.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B. II. Substrate-Enzyme Interactions and Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Günther H.; Frimurer, Thomas M.; Andersen, Jannik N.; Olsen, Ole H.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) complexed with the phosphorylated peptide substrate DADEpYL and the free substrate have been conducted to investigate 1) the physical forces involved in substrate-protein interactions, 2) the importance of enzyme and substrate flexibility for binding, 3) the electrostatic properties of the enzyme, and 4) the contribution from solvation. The simulations were performed for 1 ns, using explicit water molecules. The last 70...

  6. Immunohistochemical Expression of Dual-Specificity Protein Phosphatase 4 in Patients with Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

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    Jongmin Sim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of dual-specificity protein phosphatase 4 (DUSP4 appears to vary with the type of malignant tumors and is still controversial. The purpose of our study was to clarify the exact role of DUSP4 expression in colorectal adenocarcinoma. We constructed tissue microarrays and investigated DUSP4 expression by immunohistochemistry. DUSP4 was more frequently expressed in adenocarcinomas and lymph node/distant metastases compared to that in normal colorectal tissues and tubular adenomas (P<0.001. Mean DUSP4 expression score was significantly higher in malignant tumors than in benign lesions (P<0.001. DUSP4 expression was significantly correlated with older age (P=0.017, male gender (P=0.036, larger tumor size (P=0.014, nonmucinous tumor type (P=0.023, and higher T stage (P=0.040. Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed a significant effect of DUSP4 expression on both overall survival and disease-free survival in AJCC stage I (P=0.008 and P=0.003, resp., log-rank test and male gender (P=0.017 and P=0.049, resp., log-rank test. DUSP4 protein is frequently upregulated in colorectal adenocarcinoma and may play an important role in carcinogenesis and cancer progression and may be a marker of adverse prognosis.

  7. Mechanisms of the scaffold subunit in facilitating protein phosphatase 2A methylation.

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    Vitali Stanevich

    Full Text Available The function of the biologically essential protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A relies on formation of diverse heterotrimeric holoenzymes, which involves stable association between PP2A scaffold (A and catalytic (C or PP2Ac subunits and binding of variable regulatory subunits. Holoenzyme assembly is highly regulated by carboxyl methylation of PP2Ac-tail; methylation of PP2Ac and association of the A and C subunits are coupled to activation of PP2Ac. Here we showed that PP2A-specific methyltransferase, LCMT-1, exhibits a higher activity toward the core enzyme (A-C heterodimer than free PP2Ac, and the A-subunit facilitates PP2A methylation via three distinct mechanisms: 1 stabilization of a proper protein fold and an active conformation of PP2Ac; 2 limiting the space of PP2Ac-tail movement for enhanced entry into the LCMT-1 active site; and 3 weak electrostatic interactions between LCMT-1 and the N-terminal HEAT repeats of the A-subunit. Our results revealed a new function and novel mechanisms of the A-subunit in PP2A methylation, and coherent control of PP2A activity, methylation, and holoenzyme assembly.

  8. Status Epilepticus-Induced Somatostatinergic Hilar Interneuron Degeneration Is Regulated by Striatal Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase

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    Choi, Yun-Sik; Lin, Stanley L.; Lee, Boyoung; Kurup, Pradeep; Cho, Hee-Yeon; Naegele, Janice R.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Obrietan, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Excitotoxic cell death is one of the precipitating events in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. Of particular prominence is the loss of GABAergic hilar neurons. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for the selective vulnerability of these cells are not well understood, activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathway has been implicated in neuroprotective responses to excitotoxicity in other neuronal populations. Here, we report that high levels of the striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), a key regulator of ERK/MAPK signaling, are found in vulnerable somatostatin-immunoreactive hilar interneurons. Under both control conditions and after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE), ERK/MAPK activation was repressed in STEP-immunoreactive hilar neurons. This contrasts with robust SE-induced ERK/MAPK activation in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus, a cell region that does not express STEP. During pilocarpine-induced SE, in vivo disruption of STEP activity allowed activation of the MAPK pathway, leading to immediate-early gene expression and significant rescue from cell death. Thus, STEP increases the sensitivity of neurons to SE-induced excitotoxicity by specifically blocking a latent neuroprotective response initiated by the MAPK pathway. These findings identify a key set of signaling events that render somatostatinergic hilar interneurons vulnerable to SE-induced cell death. PMID:17360923

  9. Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase in Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Xu, Jian; Kurup, Pradeep; Nairn, Angus C.; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the elderly, affecting millions of people worldwide and representing a substantial economic burden. AD is a progressive disease associated with memory loss and impaired cognitive function. The neuropathology is characterized by cortical accumulation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Amyloid plaques are small, aggregated peptides called beta amyloid (Aβ) and NFTs are aggregates of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein. Because Aβ disrupts multiple intracellular signaling pathways, resulting in some of the clinical symptoms of AD, understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms has implications for the diagnosis and treatment of AD. Recent studies have demonstrated that Aβ regulates striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) (PTPN5). Aβ accumulation is associated with increases in STEP levels and activity that in turn disrupts glutamate receptor trafficking to and from the neuronal membrane. These findings indicate that modulating STEP levels or inhibiting its activity may have beneficial effects for patients with AD, making it an important target for drug discovery. This article reviews the biology of STEP and its role in AD as well as the potential clinical applications. PMID:22840751

  10. On the regulation of protein phosphatase 2A and its role in controlling entry into and exit from mitosis.

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    Hunt, Tim

    2013-05-01

    The process of mitosis involves a comprehensive reorganization of the cell: chromosomes condense, the nuclear envelope breaks down, the mitotic spindle is assembled, cells round up and release their ties to the substrate and so on and so forth. This reorganization is triggered by the activation of the protein kinase, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1 (CDK1). The end of mitosis is marked by the proteolysis of the cyclin subunit of CDK1, which terminates kinase activity. At this point, the phosphate moieties that altered the properties of hundreds of proteins to bring about the cellular reorganization are removed by protein phosphatases. At least one protein phosphatase, PP2A-B55, is completely shut off in mitosis. Depletion of this particular form of PP2A accelerates entry into mitosis, and blocks exit from mitosis. Control of this phosphatase is achieved by an inhibitor protein (α-endosulfine or ARPP-19) that becomes inhibitory when phosphorylated by a protein kinase called Greatwall, which is itself a substrate of CDK1. Failure to inhibit PP2A-B55 causes arrest of the cell cycle in G2 phase. I will discuss the role of this control mechanism in the control of mitosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimized logic rules reveal interferon-γ-induced modes regulated by histone deacetylases and protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Twisk, Daniel; Murphy, Shawn P; Thakar, Juilee

    2017-05-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is critical for activating innate and adaptive immunity against tumours and intracellular pathogens. Interferon-γ is secreted at the fetal-maternal interface in pregnant women and mice. The outer layer of the placenta in contact with maternal blood is composed of semi-allogeneic trophoblast cells, which constitute the fetal component of the fetal-maternal interface. The simultaneous presence of pro-inflammatory IFN-γ and trophoblast cells at the fetal-maternal interface appears to represent an immunological paradox, for trophoblastic responses to IFN-γ could potentially lead to activation of maternal immunity and subsequent attack of the placenta. However, our previous studies demonstrate that IFN-γ responsive gene (IRG) expression is negatively regulated in human and mouse trophoblast cells. In human cytotrophoblast and trophoblast-derived choriocarcinoma cells, janus kinase signalling is blocked by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), whereas in mouse trophoblast, histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibit IRG expression. Here, we used genome-wide transcriptional profiling to investigate the collective roles of PTPs and HDACs on regulation of IRG expression in human choriocarcinoma cells. Logic-rules were optimized to derive regulatory modes governing gene expression patterns observed upon different combinations of treatment with PTP and HDAC inhibitors. The results demonstrate that IRGs can be divided into several categories in human choriocarcinoma cells, each of which is subject to distinct mechanisms of repression. Hence, the regulatory modes identified in this study suggest that human trophoblast and choriocarcinoma cells may evade the potentially deleterious consequences of exposure to IFN-γ by using several overlapping mechanisms to block IRG expression. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Avicin D: a protein reactive plant isoprenoid dephosphorylates Stat 3 by regulating both kinase and phosphatase activities.

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    Valsala Haridas

    Full Text Available Avicins, a class of electrophilic triterpenoids with pro-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, have been shown to induce redox-dependant post-translational modification of cysteine residues to regulate protein function. Based on (a the cross-talk that occurs between redox and phosphorylation processes, and (b the role of Stat3 in the process of apoptosis and carcinogenesis, we chose to study the effects of avicins on the processes of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in Stat3. Avicins dephosphorylate Stat3 in a variety of human tumor cell lines, leading to a decrease in the transcriptional activity of Stat3. The expression of Stat3-regulated proteins such as c-myc, cyclin D1, Bcl2, survivin and VEGF were reduced in response to avicin treatment. Underlying avicin-induced dephosphorylation of Stat3 was dephosphorylation of JAKs, as well as activation of protein phosphatase-1. Downregulation of both Stat3 activity and expression of Stat 3-controlled pro-survival proteins, contributes to the induction of apoptosis in avicin treated tumor cells. Based on the role of Stat3 in inflammation and wounding, and the in vivo inhibition of VEGF by avicins in a mouse skin carcinogenesis model, it is likely that avicin-induced inhibition of Stat3 activity results in the suppression of the pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant stromal environment of tumors. Activation of PP-1, which also acts as a cellular economizer, combined with the redox regulation by avicins, can aid in redirecting metabolism from growth promoting anabolic to energy sparing pathways.

  13. Nuclear localization of CPI-17, a protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, affects histone H3 phosphorylation and corresponds to proliferation of cancer and smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Masumi, E-mail: masumi.eto@jefferson.edu [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, 1020 Locust Street, PA 19107 (United States); Kirkbride, Jason A.; Chugh, Rishika; Karikari, Nana Kofi [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, 1020 Locust Street, PA 19107 (United States); Kim, Jee In [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, 1020 Locust Street, PA 19107 (United States); Cardiovascular Research Institute, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Non-canonical roles of the myosin phosphatase inhibitor (CPI-17) were studied. •CPI-17 is localized in the nucleus of hyperplastic cancer and smooth muscle cells. •CPI-17 Ser12 phosphorylation may regulate the nuclear import. •CPI-17 regulates histone H3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation. •The nuclear CPI-17-PP1 axis plays a proliferative role in cells. -- Abstract: CPI-17 (C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) inhibitor, 17 kDa) is a cytoplasmic protein predominantly expressed in mature smooth muscle (SM) that regulates the myosin-associated PP1 holoenzyme (MLCP). Here, we show CPI-17 expression in proliferating cells, such as pancreatic cancer and hyperplastic SM cells. Immunofluorescence showed that CPI-17 was concentrated in nuclei of human pancreatic cancer (Panc1) cells. Nuclear accumulation of CPI-17 was also detected in the proliferating vascular SM cell culture and cells at neointima of rat vascular injury model. The N-terminal 21-residue tail domain of CPI-17 was necessary for the nuclear localization. Phospho-mimetic Asp-substitution of CPI-17 at Ser12 attenuated the nuclear import. CPI-17 phosphorylated at Ser12 was not localized at nuclei, suggesting a suppressive role of Ser12 phosphorylation in the nuclear import. Activated CPI-17 bound to all three isoforms of PP1 catalytic subunit in Panc1 nuclear extracts. CPI-17 knockdown in Panc1 resulted in dephosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3, Ser10 and Thr11, whereas it had no effects on the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and merlin, the known targets of MLCP. In parallel, CPI-17 knockdown suppressed Panc1 proliferation. We propose that CPI-17 accumulated in the nucleus through the N-terminal tail targets multiple PP1 signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation.

  14. The Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Rptpζ Suppresses Osteosarcoma Development in Trp53-Heterozygous Mice.

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    Christina Baldauf

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS, a highly aggressive primary bone tumor, belongs to the most common solid tumors in growing children. Since specific molecular targets for OS treatment remain to be identified, surgical resection combined with multimodal (neo-adjuvant chemotherapy is still the only way to help respective individuals. We have previously identified the protein tyrosine phosphatase Rptpζ as a marker of terminally differentiated osteoblasts, which negatively regulates their proliferation in vitro. Here we have addressed the question if Rptpζ can function as a tumor suppressor protein inhibiting OS development in vivo. We therefore analyzed the skeletal phenotype of mice lacking Ptprz1, the gene encoding Rptpζ on a tumor-prone genetic background, i.e. Trp53-heterozygosity. By screening a large number of 52 week old Trp53-heterozygous mice by contact radiography we found that Ptprz1-deficiency significantly enhanced OS development with 19% of the mice being affected. The tumors in Ptprz1-deficient Trp53-heterozygous mice were present in different locations (spine, long bones, ribs, and their OS nature was confirmed by undecalcified histology. Likewise, cell lines derived from the tumors were able to undergo osteogenic differentiation ex vivo. A comparison between Ptprz1-heterozygous and Ptprz1-deficient cultures further revealed that the latter ones displayed increased proliferation, a higher abundance of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins and resistance towards the influence of the growth factor Midkine. Our findings underscore the relevance of Rptpζ as an attenuator of proliferation in differentiated osteoblasts and raise the possibility that activating Rptpζ-dependent signaling could specifically target osteoblastic tumor cells.

  15. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type z negatively regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

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    Kazuya Kuboyama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fyn tyrosine kinase-mediated down-regulation of Rho activity through activation of p190RhoGAP is crucial for oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Therefore, the loss of function of its counterpart protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP may enhance myelination during development and remyelination in demyelinating diseases. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether Ptprz, a receptor-like PTP (RPTP expressed abuntantly in oligodendrocyte lineage cells, is involved in this process, because we recently revealed that p190RhoGAP is a physiological substrate for Ptprz. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found an early onset of the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP, a major protein of the myelin sheath, and early initiation of myelination in vivo during development of the Ptprz-deficient mouse, as compared with the wild-type. In addition, oligodendrocytes appeared earlier in primary cultures from Ptprz-deficient mice than wild-type mice. Furthermore, adult Ptprz-deficient mice were less susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE induced by active immunization with myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG peptide than were wild-type mice. After EAE was induced, the tyrosine phosphorylation of p190RhoGAP increased significantly, and the EAE-induced loss of MBP was markedly suppressed in the white matter of the spinal cord in Ptprz-deficient mice. Here, the number of T-cells and macrophages/microglia infiltrating into the spinal cord did not differ between the two genotypes after MOG immunization. All these findings strongly support the validity of our hypothesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ptprz plays a negative role in oligodendrocyte differentiation in early central nervous system (CNS development and remyelination in demyelinating CNS diseases, through the dephosphorylation of substrates such as p190RhoGAP.

  16. Trichinella spp.: differential expression of acid phosphatase and myofibrillar proteins in infected muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmer, D P; Bohnet, S; Prieur, D J

    1991-04-01

    Major alterations are induced in muscle cells infected by either Trichinella spiralis or Trichinella pseudospiralis. To investigate the response of muscle to these infections we have analyzed the expression of acid phosphatase (ACP, EC 3.1.3.2), adult skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain, and muscle tropomyosin proteins in infected mouse skeletal muscle cells. Using T. spiralis-infected cells, we provide strong evidence that the tartrate-sensitive ACP of these cells was synthesized by the infected cell and localized in lysosomes. Isoenzyme analysis indicated that the ACP activity was of host muscle cell origin and the specific activity of this ACP was 2.5 times greater than that in associated inflammatory cells. Increased ACP activity was also demonstrated in muscle cells infected by T. pseudospiralis. In synchronized muscle infections, increased ACP activity was detected at 5 days post-muscle infection for both parasites. ACP activity was further increased in infected muscle cells at later times tested. This increased infected cell ACP activity represents the earliest positive enzyme marker yet described indicating expression of the infected cell phenotype. In contrast, myofibrillar proteins were not detected in muscle cells chronically infected by T. spiralis but were detected in muscle cells infected by T. pseudospiralis. Decrease in myofibrillar protein levels was detected by 10 days post-muscle infection by T. spiralis. The data presented demonstrate significant differences and similarities in the phenotypes of muscle cells infected by these two parasites and establish criteria that could facilitate identification of parasite factors that may be involved in these phenomena.

  17. Serine / threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5 participates in the regulation of glucocorticoid receptor nucleocytoplasmic shuttling

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    Bueno Manuel

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In most cells glucocorticoid receptors (GR reside predominately in the cytoplasm. Upon hormone binding, the GR translocates into the nucleus, where the hormone-activated GR-complex regulates the transcription of GR-responsive genes. Serine/threonine protein phosphatase type 5 (PP5 associates with the GR-heat-shock protein-90 complex, and the suppression of PP5 expression with ISIS 15534 stimulates the activity of GR-responsive reporter plasmids, without affecting the binding of hormone to the GR. Results To further characterize the mechanism by which PP5 affects GR-induced gene expression, we employed immunofluorescence microscopy to track the movement of a GR-green fluorescent fusion protein (GR-GFP that retained hormone binding, nuclear translocation activity and specific DNA binding activity, but is incapable of transactivation. In the absence of glucocorticoids, GR-GFP localized mainly in the cytoplasm. Treatment with dexamethasone results in the efficient translocation of GR-GFPs into the nucleus. The nuclear accumulation of GR-GFP, without the addition of glucocorticoids, was also observed when the expression of PP5 was suppressed by treatment with ISIS 15534. In contrast, ISIS 15534 treatment had no apparent effect on calcium induced nuclear translocation of NFAT-GFP. Conclusion These studies suggest that PP5 participates in the regulation of glucocorticoid receptor nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and that the GR-induced transcriptional activity observed when the expression of PP5 is suppressed by treatment with ISIS 15534 results from the nuclear accumulation of GR in a form that is capable of binding DNA yet still requires agonist to elicit maximal transcriptional activation.

  18. Expression and function of striatal enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase is profoundly altered in cerebral ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Steven P.; Xu, Jian; Leung, John; Urfer, Roman; Nikolich, Karoly; Oksenberg, Donna; Lombroso, Paul J.; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2009-01-01

    Striatal enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) acts in the central nervous system to dephosphorylate a number of important proteins involved in synaptic function including ERK and NMDA receptor subunits. These proteins are also linked to stroke, in which cerebral ischemia triggers a complex cascade of events. Here we demonstrate that STEP is regulated at both the transcriptional and the post-transcriptional levels in rat models of cerebral ischemia and that its regulation may play a role in the outcome of ischemic insults. After transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, there are profound decreases in the levels of STEP mRNA, whilst in global ischemia STEP mRNA is selectively down-regulated in areas susceptible to ischemic damage. In a neuroprotective preconditioning paradigm, and in regions of the brain that are relatively resistant to ischemic damage, STEP mRNA levels are increased. Furthermore, there is a significant processing of STEP after ischemia to generate a novel species, STEP33, resulting in a redistribution of STEP from membrane-bound to soluble compartments. Concomitant with the cleavage of mature forms of STEP, there are changes in the phosphorylation state of ERK. We show that the cleavage of STEP leads to a catalytically active form, but this cleaved form no longer binds to and dephosphorylates its substrate pERK. Therefore, in response to ischemic insults, there are profound reductions in both the amount and the activity of STEP, its localization, as well as the activity of one of its key substrates, pERK. These changes in STEP may reflect a critical role in the outcomes of ischemic brain injury. PMID:18445231

  19. Age-related Changes in the Alkaline Phosphatase Activity of Healthy and Inflamed Human Dental Pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslantas, Eda E; Buzoglu, Hatice Dogan; Karapinar, Senem Pinar; Cehreli, Zafer C; Muftuoglu, Sevda; Atilla, Pergin; Aksoy, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) plays an important role in inducing mineralization events in the dental pulp. This study investigated and compared the ALP levels in healthy and inflamed pulp in young and old human pulp. Tissue samples were collected from young (60 years) donors. In both age groups, healthy human pulp (n = 18) were collected from extracted wisdom teeth. For reversible and irreversible pulpitis, pulp samples (n = 18 each) were obtained during endodontic treatment. ALP activity was assessed by spectrophotometry and immunhistochemistry. Regardless of age, reversible pulpitis group samples showed a slight elevation in ALP activity compared with normal healthy pulp. In elderly patients, ALP expression with irreversible pulpitis was significantly higher than those with a healthy pulp (P irreversible pulpitis, only the old pulp shows significantly elevated ALP levels. Such an increase may trigger calcification events, which may eventually cause difficulties in endodontic treatment procedures in elderly individuals. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Discovery and study of novel protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Chen, Xi; Feng, Changgen

    2017-10-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is considered to be a target for therapy of type II diabetes and obesity. So it is of great significance to take advantage of a computer aided drug design protocol involving the structured-based virtual screening with docking simulations for fast searching small molecule PTP1B inhibitors. Based on optimized complex structure of PTP1B bound with specific inhibitor of IX1, structured-based virtual screening against a library of natural products containing 35308 molecules, which was constructed based on Traditional Chinese Medicine database@ Taiwan (TCM database@ Taiwan), was conducted to determine the occurrence of PTP1B inhibitors using the Lubbock module and CDOCKER module from Discovery Studio 3.1 software package. The results were further filtered by predictive ADME simulation and predictive toxic simulation. As a result, 2 good drug-like molecules, namely para-benzoquinone compound 1 and Clavepictine analogue 2 were identified ultimately with the dock score of original inhibitor (IX1) and the receptor as a threshold. Binding model analyses revealed that these two candidate compounds have good interactions with PTP1B. The PTP1B inhibitory activity of compound 2 hasn't been reported before. The optimized compound 2 has higher scores and deserves further study.

  1. The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRB negatively regulates FGF2-dependent branching morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soady, Kelly J; Tornillo, Giusy; Kendrick, Howard; Meniel, Valerie; Olijnyk-Dallis, Daria; Morris, Joanna S; Stein, Torsten; Gusterson, Barry A; Isacke, Clare M; Smalley, Matthew J

    2017-10-15

    PTPRB is a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase known to regulate blood vessel remodelling and angiogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that PTPRB negatively regulates branching morphogenesis in the mouse mammary epithelium. We show that Ptprb is highly expressed in adult mammary stem cells and also, although at lower levels, in oestrogen receptor-positive luminal cells. During mammary development, Ptprb expression is downregulated during puberty, a period of extensive ductal outgrowth and branching. In vivo shRNA knockdown of Ptprb in the cleared mammary fat pad transplant assay resulted in smaller epithelial outgrowths with an increased branching density and also increased branching in an in vitro organoid assay. Organoid branching was dependent on stimulation by FGF2, and Ptprb knockdown in mammary epithelial cells resulted in a higher level of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) activation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, both at baseline and following FGF2 stimulation. Therefore, PTPRB regulates branching morphogenesis in the mammary epithelium by modulating the response of the FGFR signalling pathway to FGF stimulation. Considering the importance of branching morphogenesis in multiple taxa, our findings have general importance outside mammary developmental biology. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Hepatic mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 selectively regulates glucose metabolism and energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawan, Ahmed; Zhang, Lei; Gatzke, Florian; Min, Kisuk; Jurczak, Michael J; Al-Mutairi, Mashael; Richter, Patric; Camporez, Joao Paulo G; Couvillon, Anthony; Pesta, Dominik; Roth Flach, Rachel J; Shulman, Gerald I; Bennett, Anton M

    2015-01-01

    The liver plays a critical role in glucose metabolism and communicates with peripheral tissues to maintain energy homeostasis. Obesity and insulin resistance are highly associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the precise molecular details of NAFLD remain incomplete. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) regulate liver metabolism. However, the physiological contribution of MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) as a nuclear antagonist of both p38 MAPK and JNK in the liver is unknown. Here we show that hepatic MKP-1 becomes overexpressed following high-fat feeding. Liver-specific deletion of MKP-1 enhances gluconeogenesis and causes hepatic insulin resistance in chow-fed mice while selectively conferring protection from hepatosteatosis upon high-fat feeding. Further, hepatic MKP-1 regulates both interleukin-6 (IL-6) and fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21). Mice lacking hepatic MKP-1 exhibit reduced circulating IL-6 and FGF21 levels that were associated with impaired skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidation and susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. Hence, hepatic MKP-1 serves as a selective regulator of MAPK-dependent signals that contributes to the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and peripheral tissue energy balance. These results also demonstrate that hepatic MKP-1 overexpression in obesity is causally linked to the promotion of hepatosteatosis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. The Arabidopsis Protein Phosphatase PP2C38 Negatively Regulates the Central Immune Kinase BIK1.

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    Daniel Couto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs via cell surface-localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs, leading to PRR-triggered immunity (PTI. The Arabidopsis cytoplasmic kinase BIK1 is a downstream substrate of several PRR complexes. How plant PTI is negatively regulated is not fully understood. Here, we identify the protein phosphatase PP2C38 as a negative regulator of BIK1 activity and BIK1-mediated immunity. PP2C38 dynamically associates with BIK1, as well as with the PRRs FLS2 and EFR, but not with the co-receptor BAK1. PP2C38 regulates PAMP-induced BIK1 phosphorylation and impairs the phosphorylation of the NADPH oxidase RBOHD by BIK1, leading to reduced oxidative burst and stomatal immunity. Upon PAMP perception, PP2C38 is phosphorylated on serine 77 and dissociates from the FLS2/EFR-BIK1 complexes, enabling full BIK1 activation. Together with our recent work on the control of BIK1 turnover, this study reveals another important regulatory mechanism of this central immune component.

  4. Mammalian motoneuron axon targeting requires receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases sigma and delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetani, Noriko; Chagnon, Mélanie J; Kennedy, Timothy E; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Tremblay, Michel L

    2006-05-31

    The leukocyte common antigen-related (LAR) subfamily of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), LAR, RPTP-sigma, and RPTP-delta, regulate neuroendocrine development, axonal regeneration, and hippocampal long-term potentiation in mammals. In Drosophila, RPTPs are required for appropriate axon targeting during embryonic development. In contrast, deletion of any one of the three LAR-RPTP family members in mammals does not result in gross axon targeting defects. Both RPTP-sigma and RPTP-delta are highly expressed in the developing mammalian nervous system, suggesting they might be functionally redundant. To test this hypothesis, we generated RPTP-sigma and RPTP-delta (RPTP-sigma/delta) double-mutant mice. Although embryonic day 18.5 RPTP-sigma and RPTP-delta single-mutant embryos were viable, RPTP-sigma/delta double mutants were paralyzed, were never observed to draw a breath, and died shortly after cesarean section. RPTP-sigma/delta double mutants exhibit severe muscle dysgenesis and severe loss of motoneurons in the spinal cord. Detailed analysis of the projections of phrenic nerves in RPTP-sigma/delta double mutants indicated that these motoneuron axons emerge normally from the cervical spinal cord, but stall on reaching the diaphragm. Our results demonstrate that RPTP-sigma and RPTP-delta complement each other functionally during mammalian development, and reveal an essential contribution of RPTP-sigma and RPTP-delta to appropriate motoneuron axon targeting during mammalian axonogenesis.

  5. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase (Mkp)-1 Protects Mice against Acetaminophen-induced Hepatic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wancket, Lyn M.; Meng, Xiaomei; Rogers, Lynette K.; Liu, Yusen

    2012-01-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation promotes hepatocyte death during acetaminophen overdose, a common cause of drug-induced liver failure. While mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase (Mkp)-1 is a critical negative regulator of JNK MAPK, little is known about the role of Mkp-1 during hepatotoxicity. In this study, we evaluated the role of Mkp-1 during acute acetaminophen toxicity. Mkp-1+/+ and Mkp-1−/− mice were dosed ip with vehicle or acetaminophen at 300 mg/kg (for mechanistic studies) or 400 mg/kg (for survival studies). Tissues were collected 1–6 hr post 300 mg/kg dosing to assess glutathione levels, organ damage, and MAPK activation. Mkp-1−/− mice exhibited more rapid plasma clearance of acetaminophen than did Mkp-1+/+ mice, indicated by a quicker decline of plasma acetaminophen level. Moreover, Mkp-1−/− mice suffered more severe liver injury, indicated by higher plasma alanine transaminase activity and more extensive centrilobular apoptosis and necrosis. Hepatic JNK activity in Mkp-1−/− mice was higher than in Mkp-1+/+ mice. Finally, Mkp-1−/− mice displayed a lower overall survival rate and shorter median survival time after dosing with 400 mg/kg acetaminophen. The more severe phenotype exhibited by Mkp-1−/− mice indicates that Mkp-1 plays a protective role during acute acetaminophen overdose, potentially through regulation of JNK. PMID:22623522

  6. Discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein tyrosine phosphatase B (PtpB inhibitors from natural products.

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    Alessandra Mascarello

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase B (PtpB is one of the virulence factors secreted into the host cell by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PtpB attenuates host immune defenses by interfering with signal transduction pathways in macrophages and, therefore, it is considered a promising target for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs. Here we report the discovery of natural compound inhibitors of PtpB among an in house library of more than 800 natural substances by means of a multidisciplinary approach, mixing in silico screening with enzymatic and kinetics studies and MS assays. Six natural compounds proved to inhibit PtpB at low micromolar concentrations (< 30 µM with Kuwanol E being the most potent with K i = 1.6 ± 0.1 µM. To the best of our knowledge, Kuwanol E is the most potent natural compound PtpB inhibitor reported so far, as well as it is the first non-peptidic PtpB inhibitor discovered from natural sources. Compounds herein identified may inspire the design of novel specific PtpB inhibitors.

  7. NLRP3 tyrosine phosphorylation is controlled by protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; Kasper, Stephanie; Gottier, Claudia; Lang, Silvia; Atrott, Kirstin; Vavricka, Stephan R.; Scharl, Sylvie; Gutte, Petrus M.; Grütter, Markus G.; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Contassot, Emmanuel; Chan, Andrew C.; Dai, Xuezhi; Rawlings, David J.; Mair, Florian; Becher, Burkhard; Falk, Werner; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes form as the result of the intracellular presence of danger-associated molecular patterns and mediate the release of active IL-1β, which influences a variety of inflammatory responses. Excessive inflammasome activation results in severe inflammatory conditions, but physiological IL-1β secretion is necessary for intestinal homeostasis. Here, we have described a mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome regulation by tyrosine phosphorylation of NLRP3 at Tyr861. We demonstrated that protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN22), variants in which are associated with chronic inflammatory disorders, dephosphorylates NLRP3 upon inflammasome induction, allowing efficient NLRP3 activation and subsequent IL-1β release. In murine models, PTPN22 deficiency resulted in pronounced colitis, increased NLRP3 phosphorylation, but reduced levels of mature IL-1β. Conversely, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that carried an autoimmunity-associated PTPN22 variant had increased IL-1β levels. Together, our results identify tyrosine phosphorylation as an important regulatory mechanism for NLRP3 that prevents aberrant inflammasome activation. PMID:27043286

  8. Discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase B (PtpB) Inhibitors from Natural Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise Domeneghini; Menegatti, Angela Camila Orbem; Monache, Franco Delle; Ferrari, Franco; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Nunes, Ricardo José; Terenzi, Hernán; Botta, Bruno; Botta, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase B (PtpB) is one of the virulence factors secreted into the host cell by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PtpB attenuates host immune defenses by interfering with signal transduction pathways in macrophages and, therefore, it is considered a promising target for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs. Here we report the discovery of natural compound inhibitors of PtpB among an in house library of more than 800 natural substances by means of a multidisciplinary approach, mixing in silico screening with enzymatic and kinetics studies and MS assays. Six natural compounds proved to inhibit PtpB at low micromolar concentrations (< 30 µM) with Kuwanol E being the most potent with Ki = 1.6 ± 0.1 µM. To the best of our knowledge, Kuwanol E is the most potent natural compound PtpB inhibitor reported so far, as well as it is the first non-peptidic PtpB inhibitor discovered from natural sources. Compounds herein identified may inspire the design of novel specific PtpB inhibitors. PMID:24155919

  9. Protein Phosphatase 1 inactivates Mps1 to ensure efficient Spindle Assembly Checkpoint silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Margarida; Osswald, Mariana; Leça, Nelson; Barbosa, João; Pereira, António J; Maiato, Helder; Sunkel, Claudio E; Conde, Carlos

    2017-05-02

    Faithfull genome partitioning during cell division relies on the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC), a conserved signaling pathway that delays anaphase onset until all chromosomes are attached to spindle microtubules. Mps1 kinase is an upstream SAC regulator that promotes the assembly of an anaphase inhibitor through a sequential multi-target phosphorylation cascade. Thus, the SAC is highly responsive to Mps1, whose activity peaks in early mitosis as a result of its T-loop autophosphorylation. However, the mechanism controlling Mps1 inactivation once kinetochores attach to microtubules and the SAC is satisfied remains unknown. Here we show in vitro and in Drosophila that Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) inactivates Mps1 by dephosphorylating its T-loop. PP1-mediated dephosphorylation of Mps1 occurs at kinetochores and in the cytosol, and inactivation of both pools of Mps1 during metaphase is essential to ensure prompt and efficient SAC silencing. Overall, our findings uncover a mechanism of SAC inactivation required for timely mitotic exit.

  10. Methylation of protein phosphatase 2A-Influence of regulators and environmental stress factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Maria T; Kolton, Anna; Kataya, Amr R A; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Averkina, Irina O; Heidari, Behzad; Lillo, Cathrine

    2017-10-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2A-C) has a terminal leucine subjected to methylation, a regulatory mechanism conserved from yeast to mammals and plants. Two enzymes, LCMT1 and PME1, methylate and demethylate PP2A-C, respectively. The physiological importance of these posttranslational modifications is still enigmatic. We investigated these processes in Arabidopsis thaliana by mutant phenotyping, by global expression analysis, and by monitoring methylation status of PP2A-C under different environmental conditions. The lcmt1 mutant, possessing essentially only unmethylated PP2A-C, had less dense rosettes, and earlier flowering than wild type (WT). The pme1 mutant, with 30% reduction in unmethylated PP2A-C, was phenotypically comparable with WT. Approximately 200 overlapping genes were twofold upregulated, and 200 overlapping genes were twofold downregulated in both lcmt1 and pme1 relative to WT. Differences between the 2 mutants were also striking; 97 genes were twofold upregulated in pme1 compared with lcmt1, indicating that PME1 acts as a negative regulator for these genes. Analysis of enriched GO terms revealed categories of both abiotic and biotic stress genes. Furthermore, methylation status of PP2A-C was influenced by environmental stress, especially by hypoxia and salt stress, which led to increased levels of unmethylated PP2A-C, and highlights the importance of PP2A-C methylation/demethylation in environmental responses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Molecular underpinnings of neurodegenerative disorders: striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase signaling and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombroso, Paul J; Ogren, Marilee; Kurup, Pradeep; Nairn, Angus C

    2016-01-01

    This commentary focuses on potential molecular mechanisms related to the dysfunctional synaptic plasticity that is associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Specifically, we focus on the role of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in modulating synaptic function in these illnesses. STEP affects neuronal communication by opposing synaptic strengthening and does so by dephosphorylating several key substrates known to control synaptic signaling and plasticity. STEP levels are elevated in brains from patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Studies in model systems have found that high levels of STEP result in internalization of glutamate receptors as well as inactivation of ERK1/2, Fyn, Pyk2, and other STEP substrates necessary for the development of synaptic strengthening. We discuss the search for inhibitors of STEP activity that may offer potential treatments for neurocognitive disorders that are characterized by increased STEP activity. Future studies are needed to examine the mechanisms of differential and region-specific changes in STEP expression pattern, as such knowledge could lead to targeted therapies for disorders involving disrupted STEP activity.

  12. Striatal-enriched protein-tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) regulates Pyk2 kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Kurup, Pradeep; Bartos, Jason A; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Hell, Johannes W; Lombroso, Paul J

    2012-06-15

    Proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) is a member of the focal adhesion kinase family and is highly expressed in brain and hematopoietic cells. Pyk2 plays diverse functions in cells, including the regulation of cell adhesion, migration, and cytoskeletal reorganization. In the brain, it is involved in the induction of long term potentiation through regulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor trafficking. This occurs through the phosphorylation and activation of Src family tyrosine kinase members, such as Fyn, that phosphorylate GluN2B at Tyr(1472). Phosphorylation at this site leads to exocytosis of GluN1-GluN2B receptors to synaptic membranes. Pyk2 activity is modulated by phosphorylation at several critical tyrosine sites, including Tyr(402). In this study, we report that Pyk2 is a substrate of striatal-enriched protein-tyrosine phosphatase (STEP). STEP binds to and dephosphorylates Pyk2 at Tyr(402). STEP KO mice showed enhanced phosphorylation of Pyk2 at Tyr(402) and of the Pyk2 substrates paxillin and ASAP1. Functional studies indicated that STEP opposes Pyk2 activation after KCl depolarization of cortical slices and blocks Pyk2 translocation to postsynaptic densities, a key step required for Pyk2 activation and function. This is the first study to identify Pyk2 as a substrate for STEP.

  13. The mechanism of allosteric inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

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    Shuai Li

    Full Text Available As the prototypical member of the PTP family, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is an attractive target for therapeutic interventions in type 2 diabetes. The extremely conserved catalytic site of PTP1B renders the design of selective PTP1B inhibitors intractable. Although discovered allosteric inhibitors containing a benzofuran sulfonamide scaffold offer fascinating opportunities to overcome selectivity issues, the allosteric inhibitory mechanism of PTP1B has remained elusive. Here, molecular dynamics (MD simulations, coupled with a dynamic weighted community analysis, were performed to unveil the potential allosteric signal propagation pathway from the allosteric site to the catalytic site in PTP1B. This result revealed that the allosteric inhibitor compound-3 induces a conformational rearrangement in helix α7, disrupting the triangular interaction among helix α7, helix α3, and loop11. Helix α7 then produces a force, pulling helix α3 outward, and promotes Ser190 to interact with Tyr176. As a result, the deviation of Tyr176 abrogates the hydrophobic interactions with Trp179 and leads to the downward movement of the WPD loop, which forms an H-bond between Asp181 and Glu115. The formation of this H-bond constrains the WPD loop to its open conformation and thus inactivates PTP1B. The discovery of this allosteric mechanism provides an overall view of the regulation of PTP1B, which is an important insight for the design of potent allosteric PTP1B inhibitors.

  14. Characterization of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibition by Chlorogenic Acid and Cichoric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipchock, James M; Hendrickson, Heidi P; Douglas, Bonnie B; Bird, Kelly E; Ginther, Patrick S; Rivalta, Ivan; Ten, Nicholas S; Batista, Victor S; Loria, J Patrick

    2017-01-10

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a known regulator of the insulin and leptin signaling pathways and is an active target for the design of inhibitors for the treatment of type II diabetes and obesity. Recently, cichoric acid (CHA) and chlorogenic acid (CGA) were predicted by docking methods to be allosteric inhibitors that bind distal to the active site. However, using a combination of steady-state inhibition kinetics, solution nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that CHA is a competitive inhibitor that binds in the active site of PTP1B. CGA, while a noncompetitive inhibitor, binds in the second aryl phosphate binding site, rather than the predicted benzfuran binding pocket. The molecular dynamics simulations of the apo enzyme and cysteine-phosphoryl intermediate states with and without bound CGA suggest CGA binding inhibits PTP1B by altering hydrogen bonding patterns at the active site. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the allosteric inhibition of PTP1B.

  15. Protein Phosphatase 2A Signaling in Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    How To 8 I PubMed H.__ ________________________ ----, Advanced Display Settings: 8 Abstract Mol Cancer Ther. 2011 May;1 0(5):720-31. doi: 10.11 58...alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of advanced androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID: 21393425 [ PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE...PMCID: PMC3669395 Free PMC Article Images from this publication. See all images (61 Free text Publication TYpes, MeSH Terms, Substances, Grant

  16. The role of protein phosphatase 2A in regulating Wnt signaling and apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinghai

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major serine/threonine-specific phosphatase and regulates a significant array of cellular events. This dissertation primarily describes the novel role of PP2A in Wnt signaling and apoptosis. First, PP2A and its B56 regulatory subunit inhibit Wnt signaling in Xenopus. PP2A is required for β- catenin degradation in vitro. A PP2A heterotrimer containing A, C, and B56 subunits was co- immunoprecipitated with axin. A, C, and B56 subunits each have ventralizing ability in Xenopus embryos. B56 was epistatically positioned downstream of GSK3β and axin but upstream of β-catenin. Second, B56-targeted PP2A is required for survival and protects from apoptosis in Drosophila. Loss of A, C, or B56 subunits by RNA interference (RNAi) induced apoptosis in S2 cells, which requires the presence of specific caspases. Epistasis analysis placed B56-targeted PP2A functionally upstream of Apaf-1, Reaper and Hid, and p53. Loss of B56-targeted PP2A in Drosophila embryos by RNAi resulted in abortion of embryo development and this phenotype was rescued by co-RNAi of Drice. Third, two conserved domains in B subunits mediate binding to the A subunit of PP2A. B subunits have no detectable sequence homology among different families. In vitro expression of a series of B56α fragments identified two distinct domains that independently bound to the A subunit. Sequence alignment of these A subunit-binding domains recognized conserved residues in B/PR55 and B'/PR72 family members that serve a similar function. Fourth, to examine whether the B56β gene within 11q12 is a tumor suppressor mutated in neuroblastoma, the DNA and RNA samples from neuroblastoma patients and cell lines were analyzed and no mutations were identified in the coding regions of the B56β gene. Finally, to identify novel regulatory subunits of PP2A in S. cerevisiae , biochemical approaches for purifying PP2A-associated novel regulators were undertaken. Although the A and C subunit complex in the

  17. Protein phosphatase 2A regulates central sensitization in the spinal cord of rats following intradermal injection of capsaicin

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    Fang Li

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intradermal injection of capsaicin into the hind paw of rats induces spinal cord central sensititzation, a process in which the responsiveness of central nociceptive neurons is amplified. In central sensitization, many signal transduction pathways composed of several cascades of intracellular enzymes are involved. As the phosphorylation state of neuronal proteins is strictly controlled and balanced by the opposing activities of protein kinases and phosphatases, the involvement of phosphatases in these events needs to be investigated. This study is designed to determine the influence of serine/threonine protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A on the central nociceptive amplification process, which is induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats. Results In experiment 1, the expression of PP2A protein in rat spinal cord at different time points following capsaicin or vehicle injection was examined using the Western blot method. In experiment 2, an inhibitor of PP2A (okadaic acid, 20 nM or fostriecin, 30 nM was injected into the subarachnoid space of the spinal cord, and the spontaneous exploratory activity of the rats before and after capsaicin injection was recorded with an automated photobeam activity system. The results showed that PP2A protein expression in the spinal cord was significantly upregulated following intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats. Capsaicin injection caused a significant decrease in exploratory activity of the rats. Thirty minutes after the injection, this decrease in activity had partly recovered. Infusion of a phosphatase inhibitor into the spinal cord intrathecal space enhanced the central sensitization induced by capsaicin by making the decrease in movement last longer. Conclusion These findings indicate that PP2A plays an important role in the cellular mechanisms of spinal cord central sensitization induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats, which may have implications in

  18. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a key regulator of IFNAR1 endocytosis and a target for antiviral therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Christopher J; Zheng, Hui; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi; Lewis, John R; Reiter, Alexander M; Henthorn, Paula; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Baker, Darren P; Ukkiramapandian, Radha; Bence, Kendra K; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2012-11-20

    Type 1 interferons (IFN1) elicit antiviral defenses by activating the cognate receptor composed of IFN-α/β receptor chain 1 (IFNAR1) and IFNAR2. Down-regulation of this receptor occurs through IFN1-stimulated IFNAR1 ubiquitination, which exposes a Y466-based linear endocytic motif within IFNAR1 to recruitment of the adaptin protein-2 complex (AP2) and ensuing receptor endocytosis. Paradoxically, IFN1-induced Janus kinase-mediated phosphorylation of Y466 is expected to decrease its affinity for AP2 and to inhibit the endocytic rate. To explain how IFN1 promotes Y466 phosphorylation yet stimulates IFNAR1 internalization, we proposed that the activity of a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) is required to enable both events by dephosphorylating Y466. An RNAi-based screen identified PTP1B as a specific regulator of IFNAR1 endocytosis stimulated by IFN1, but not by ligand-independent inducers of IFNAR1 ubiquitination. PTP1B is a promising target for treatment of obesity and diabetes; numerous research programs are aimed at identification and characterization of clinically relevant inhibitors of PTP1B. PTP1B is capable of binding and dephosphorylating IFNAR1. Genetic or pharmacologic modulation of PTP1B activity regulated IFN1 signaling in a manner dependent on the integrity of Y466 within IFNAR1 in human cells. These effects were less evident in mouse cells whose IFNAR1 lacks an analogous motif. PTP1B inhibitors robustly augmented the antiviral effects of IFN1 against vesicular stomatitis and hepatitis C viruses in human cells and proved beneficial in feline stomatitis patients. The clinical significance of these findings in the context of using PTP1B inhibitors to increase the therapeutic efficacy of IFN against viral infections is discussed.

  19. Structure and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor 12 Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism of the Enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Dong; Francesco Zonta; Shanshan Wang; Ke Song; Xin He; Miaomiao He; Yan Nie; Sheng Li

    2017-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 12 (PTPN12) is an important protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in regulating cell adhesion and migration as well as tumorigenesis. Here, we solved a crystal structure of the native PTPN12 catalytic domain with the catalytic cysteine (residue 231) in dual conformation (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated). Combined with molecular dynamics simulation data, we concluded that those two conformations represent different states of the protein which are r...

  20. Comparison of Protein Phosphatase Inhibition Assay with LC-MS/MS for Diagnosis of Microcystin Toxicosis in Veterinary Cases

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    Caroline E. Moore

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins are acute hepatotoxins of increasing global concern in drinking and recreational waters and are a major health risk to humans and animals. Produced by cyanobacteria, microcystins inhibit serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 (PP1. A cost-effective PP1 assay using p-nitrophenyl phosphate was developed to quickly assess water and rumen content samples. Significant inhibition was determined via a linear model, which compared increasing volumes of sample to the log-transformed ratio of the exposed rate over the control rate of PP1 activity. To test the usefulness of this model in diagnostic case investigations, samples from two veterinary cases were tested. In August 2013 fifteen cattle died around two ponds in Kentucky. While one pond and three tested rumen contents had significant PP1 inhibition and detectable levels of microcystin-LR, the other pond did not. In August 2013, a dog became fatally ill after swimming in Clear Lake, California. Lake water samples collected one and four weeks after the dog presented with clinical signs inhibited PP1 activity. Subsequent analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS detected microcystin congeners -LR, -LA, -RR and -LF but not -YR. These diagnostic investigations illustrate the advantages of using functional assays in combination with LC-MS/MS.

  1. Comparison of Protein Phosphatase Inhibition Assay with LC-MS/MS for Diagnosis of Microcystin Toxicosis in Veterinary Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Caroline E.; Juan, Jeanette; Lin, Yanping; Gaskill, Cynthia L.; Puschner, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Microcystins are acute hepatotoxins of increasing global concern in drinking and recreational waters and are a major health risk to humans and animals. Produced by cyanobacteria, microcystins inhibit serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). A cost-effective PP1 assay using p-nitrophenyl phosphate was developed to quickly assess water and rumen content samples. Significant inhibition was determined via a linear model, which compared increasing volumes of sample to the log-transformed ratio of the exposed rate over the control rate of PP1 activity. To test the usefulness of this model in diagnostic case investigations, samples from two veterinary cases were tested. In August 2013 fifteen cattle died around two ponds in Kentucky. While one pond and three tested rumen contents had significant PP1 inhibition and detectable levels of microcystin-LR, the other pond did not. In August 2013, a dog became fatally ill after swimming in Clear Lake, California. Lake water samples collected one and four weeks after the dog presented with clinical signs inhibited PP1 activity. Subsequent analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) detected microcystin congeners -LR, -LA, -RR and -LF but not -YR. These diagnostic investigations illustrate the advantages of using functional assays in combination with LC-MS/MS. PMID:27005635

  2. Kinetic comparison of tissue non-specific and placental human alkaline phosphatases expressed in baculovirus infected cells: application to screening for Down's syndrome

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    Grozdea Jean J

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In humans, there are four alkaline phosphatases, and each form exibits a characteristic pattern of tissue distribution. The availability of an easy method to reveal their activity has resulted in large amount of data reporting correlations between variations in activity and illnesses. For example, alkaline phosphatase from neutrophils of mothers pregnent with a trisomy 21 fetus (Down's syndrome displays significant differences both in its biochemical and immunological properties, and in its affinity for some specific inhibitors. Results To analyse these differences, the biochemical characteristics of two isozymes (non specific and placental alkaline phosphatases were expressed in baculovirus infected cells. Comparative analysis of the two proteins allowed us to estimate the kinetic constants of denaturation and sensitivity to two inhibitors (L-p-bromotetramisole and thiophosphate, allowing better discrimination between the two enzymes. These parameters were then used to estimate the ratio of the two isoenzymes in neutrophils of pregnant mothers with or without a trisomy 21 fetus. It appeared that the placental isozyme represented 13% of the total activity of neutrophils of non pregnant women. This proportion did not significantly increase with normal pregnancy. By contrast, in pregnancies with trisomy 21 fetus, the proportion reached 60–80% of activity. Conclusion Over-expression of the placental isozyme compared with the tissue-nonspecific form in neutrophils of mother with a trisomy 21 fetus may explain why the characteristics of the alkaline phosphatase in these cells is different from normal. Application of this knowledge could improve the potential of using alkaline phosphatase measurements to screen for Down's syndrome.

  3. Protein Phosphatase 2A in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Murine Lymphatic Endothelial Cells.

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    Yu-Fan Chuang

    Full Text Available The lymphatic endothelium plays an important role in the maintenance of tissue fluid homeostasis. It also participates in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms by which lymphatic endothelial cell responds to inflammatory stimuli. In this study, we explored the mechanisms by which lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces cyclooxygenase (COX-2 expression in murine lymphatic endothelial cells (SV-LECs. LPS caused increases in cox-2 mRNA and protein levels, as well as in COX-2 promoter luciferase activity in SV-LECs. These actions were associated with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1, JNK1/2 and p38MAPK activation, and NF-κB subunit p65 and C/EBPβ phosphorylation. PP2A-ASK1 signaling blockade reduced LPS-induced JNK1/2, p38MAPK, p65 and C/EBPβ phosphorylation. Transfection with PP2A siRNA reduced LPS's effects on p65 and C/EBPβ binding to the COX-2 promoter region. Transfected with the NF-κB or C/EBPβ site deletion of COX-2 reporter construct also abrogated LPS's enhancing effect on COX-2 promoter luciferase activity in SV-LECs. Taken together, the induction of COX-2 in SV-LECs exposed to LPS may involve PP2A-ASK1-JNK and/or p38MAPK-NF-κB and/or C/EBPβ cascade.

  4. Coumarins from Angelica decursiva inhibit α-glucosidase activity and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Md Yousof; Jannat, Susoma; Jung, Hyun Ah; Jeong, Hyong Oh; Chung, Hae Young; Choi, Jae Sue

    2016-05-25

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-diabetic potential of six natural coumarins, 4-hydroxy Pd-C-III (1), 4'-methoxy Pd-C-I (2), decursinol (3), decursidin (4), umbelliferone 6-carboxylic acid (5), and 2'-isopropyl psoralene (6) isolated from Angelica decursiva and evaluated their inhibitory activities against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), α-glucosidase, and ONOO(-)-mediated protein tyrosine nitration. Coumarins 1-6 showed potent PTP1B and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities with ranges of IC50 values of 5.39-58.90 μM and 65.29-172.10 μM, respectively. In the kinetic study for PTP1B enzyme inhibition, compounds 1, 5, and 6 were competitive, whereas 2 and 4 showed mixed type, and 3 displayed noncompetitive type inhibition. For α-glucosidase enzyme inhibition, compounds 1 and 3 exhibited good mixed-type, while 2, 5, and 6 showed noncompetitive and 4 displayed competitive type inhibition. Furthermore, these coumarins also effectively suppressed ONOO(-)-mediated tyrosine nitration in a dose-dependent manner. To further investigate PTP1B inhibition, we generated a 3D structure of PTP1B using Autodock 4.2 and simulated the binding of compounds 1-6. Docking simulations showed that different residues of PTP1B interacted with different functional groups of compounds 1-6 through hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions. In addition, the binding energies of compounds 1-6 were negative, suggesting that hydrogen bonding may stabilize the open form of the enzyme and potentiate tight binding of the active site of PTP1B, thereby resulting in more effective PTP1B inhibition. These results demonstrate that the whole plant of A. decursiva and its coumarins are useful as potential functional food ingredients for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Protein kinase C-dependent dephosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase requires the B56δ heterotrimeric form of protein phosphatase 2A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hyuck Ahn

    Full Text Available Tyrosine hydroxylase, which plays a critical role in regulation of dopamine synthesis, is known to be controlled by phosphorylation at several critical sites. One of these sites, Ser40, is phosphorylated by a number of protein kinases, including protein kinase A. The major protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates Ser40 is protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A. A recent study has also linked protein kinase C to the dephosphorylation of Ser40 [1], but the mechanism is unclear. PP2A isoforms are comprised of catalytic, scaffold, and regulatory subunits, the regulatory B subunits being able to influence cellular localization and substrate selection. In the current study, we find that protein kinase C is able to phosphorylate a key regulatory site in the B56δ subunit leading to activation of PP2A. In turn, activation of the B56δ-containing heterotrimeric form of PP2A is responsible for enhanced dephosphorylation of Ser40 of tyrosine hydroylase in response to stimulation of PKC. In support of this mechanism, down-regulation of B56δ expression in N27 cells using RNAi was found to increase dopamine synthesis. Together these studies reveal molecular details of how protein kinase C is linked to reduced tyrosine hydroxylase activity via control of PP2A, and also add to the complexity of protein kinase/protein phosphatase interactions.

  6. An Ancient Protein Phosphatase, SHLP1, Is Critical to Microneme Development in Plasmodium Ookinetes and Parasite Transmission

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    Eva-Maria Patzewitz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Signaling pathways controlled by reversible protein phosphorylation (catalyzed by kinases and phosphatases in the malaria parasite Plasmodium are of great interest, for both increased understanding of parasite biology and identification of novel drug targets. Here, we report a functional analysis in Plasmodium of an ancient bacterial Shewanella-like protein phosphatase (SHLP1 found only in bacteria, fungi, protists, and plants. SHLP1 is abundant in asexual blood stages and expressed at all stages of the parasite life cycle. shlp1 deletion results in a reduction in ookinete (zygote development, microneme formation, and complete ablation of oocyst formation, thereby blocking parasite transmission. This defect is carried by the female gamete and can be rescued by direct injection of mutant ookinetes into the mosquito hemocoel, where oocysts develop. This study emphasizes the varied functions of SHLP1 in Plasmodium ookinete biology and suggests that it could be a novel drug target for blocking parasite transmission.

  7. Influence of protein conformation and adjuvant aggregation on the effectiveness of aluminum hydroxide adjuvant in a model alkaline phosphatase vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausi, Amber L; Morin, Andrea; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism(s) of the enhancement of the immune response by addition of aluminum salt adjuvants to parenterally administered protein-based vaccines is still the subject of debate. It has been hypothesized, however, that destabilization of the antigen structure on the surface of the adjuvant may be important for eliciting immune response. Also, it has been suggested that immune response to adjuvanted vaccines is reduced if the adjuvant particles become aggregated before administration because of processing steps such as freeze-drying. In this study, we tested these hypotheses and examined the immune response in a murine model to various liquid, freeze-dried, and spray freeze-dried formulations of a model vaccine, bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase adsorbed on aluminum hydroxide. Enzymatic activity of the alkaline phosphatase was used as a sensitive indicator of intact native antigen structure. By manipulating the secondary drying temperature during lyophilization, vaccines were produced with varying levels of alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activity and varying degrees of adjuvant aggregation, as assessed by particle size distribution. Anti-alkaline phosphatase titers observed in immunized mice were independent of both the antigen's retained enzymatic activity and the vaccine formulation's mean particle diameter. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  8. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase R-PTP-alpha is tyrosine-phosphorylated and associated with the adaptor protein Grb2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Batzer, A; Sap, J

    1994-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPases) have generated interest because of their suspected involvement in cellular signal transduction. The adaptor protein Grb2 has been implicated in coupling receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras. We report that a ubiquitous R-PTPase, R-PTP-alpha, is tyrosine......-phosphorylated and associated in vivo with the Grb2 protein. This association can be reproduced in stably and transiently transfected cells, as well as in vitro using recombinant Grb2 protein. Association requires the presence of an intact SH2 domain in Grb2, as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of R-PTP-alpha. This observation...

  9. 1-Step Versus 2-Step Immobilization of Alkaline Phosphatase and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 onto Implant Surfaces Using Polydopamine

    OpenAIRE

    Nijhuis, Arnold W.G.; van den Beucken, Jeroen J. J. P.; Boerman, Otto C; Jansen, John A.; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C. G.

    2013-01-01

    Immobilization of biomolecules onto implant surfaces is highly relevant in many areas of biomaterial research. Recently, a 2-step immobilization procedure was developed for the facile conjugation of biomolecules onto various surfaces using self-polymerization of dopamine into polydopamine. In the current study, a 1-step polydopamine-based approach was applied for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) immobilization, and compared to the conventional 2-step polydop...

  10. Insights into the phosphatase and the synthase activities of human bisphosphoglycerate mutase: a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2014-03-07

    Bisphosphoglycerate mutase (BPGM) is a multi-activity enzyme. Its main function is to synthesize the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, the allosteric effector of hemoglobin. This enzyme can also catalyze the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate to the 3-phosphoglycerate. In this study, the reaction mechanisms of both the phosphatase and the synthase activities of human bisphosphoglycerate mutase were theoretically calculated by using the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method based on the metadynamics and umbrella sampling simulations. The simulation results not only show the free energy curve of the phosphatase and the synthase reactions, but also reveal the important role of some residues in the active site. Additionally, the energy barriers of the two reactions indicate that the activity of the synthase in human bisphosphoglycerate mutase is much higher than that of the phosphatase. The estimated reaction barriers are consistent with the experimental data. Therefore, our work can give important information to understand the catalytic mechanism of the bisphosphoglycerate mutase family.

  11. The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 accelerates the degradation of CDC25A phosphatase through the checkpoint kinase Chk1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzer, Jan Nicolas; Guerra, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Human CDC25 phosphatases play an important role in cell cycle regulation by removing inhibitory phosphate groups on cyclin-CDKs. Chk1 has been shown to phosphorylate CDC25 family members down-regulating their phosphatase activity through distinct mechanisms. The kinase activity of Chk1 is evident...

  12. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) protein is involved in centrosome separation through the regulation of NIMA (never in mitosis gene A)-related kinase 2 (NEK2) protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ae Lee; Lee, Sunyi; Park, Jeong Su; Han, Sora; Jang, Chang-Young; Lim, Jong-Seok; Lee, Myung Sok; Yang, Young

    2014-01-03

    Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most human cancers and has been described as being involved in the progression of several human malignancies via the inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity toward c-Myc. However, with the exception of this role, the cellular function of CIP2A remains poorly understood. On the basis of yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate here that NIMA (never in mitosis gene A)-related kinase 2 (NEK2) is a binding partner for CIP2A. CIP2A exhibited dynamic changes in distribution, including the cytoplasm and centrosome, depending on the cell cycle stage. When CIP2A was depleted, centrosome separation and the mitotic spindle dynamics were impaired, resulting in the activation of spindle assembly checkpoint signaling and, ultimately, extension of the cell division time. Our data imply that CIP2A strongly interacts with NEK2 during G2/M phase, thereby enhancing NEK2 kinase activity to facilitate centrosome separation in a PP1- and PP2A-independent manner. In conclusion, CIP2A is involved in cell cycle progression through centrosome separation and mitotic spindle dynamics.

  13. Overexpression of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in INS-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Gu, Ping; Xu, Yixin; Ye, Xiaozhen; Wang, Yingzhijie; DU, Hong; Shao, Jiaqing

    2016-03-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been implicated as a negative regulator of insulin signaling. We reported previously that impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in rats fed high-fat diet was associated with higher PTP1B protein levels in islets. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of increasing PTP1B on insulin secretion in β-cells. INS-1 cells were transduced with recombinant adenoviruses containing human PTP1B cDNA (Ad-PTP1B), or no exogenous gene (Ad-ctrl). The expression levels of PTP1B, insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate-1(IRS-1), glucokinase and glucose transporter-2 were evaluated by Western blot. Then insulin-stimulated IR and IRS tyrosine phosphorylation, and Akt pathway activation were measured. GSIS was also performed to evaluate INS-1 cells function. PTP1B expression level was increased 5.9-fold at 48h post-transduction. The overexpression of PTP1B had no effect on proliferation and apoptosis of INS-1 cells. Compared with control cells, INS-1 cells overexpressing PTP1B showed decrease in insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR) and insulin receptor substrate-1(IRS-1) by 56.4% and 53.1%, respectively. In addition, Akt phosphorylation was reduced 59.6%. Moreover, in Ad-PTP1B-transduced cells, 16.7mM glucose caused a 1.6±0.2 fold increase (vs. 3.9±0.7 fold in nontransduced cells) in insulin secretion relative to secretion at 2.8mM glucose. Further analysis determined that overexpression of PTP1B induced down-regulated expression of glucokinase (42%) and glucose transporter-2 (48%). Our findings suggested that overexpression of PTP1B can inhibit GSIS in INS-1 cells through negatively regulating insulin signaling.

  14. Antagonistic regulation of flowering time through distinct regulatory subunits of protein phosphatase 2A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Heidari

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A consists of three types of subunits: a catalytic (C, a scaffolding (A, and a regulatory (B subunit. In Arabidopsis thaliana and other organisms the regulatory B subunits are divided into at least three non-related groups, B55, B' and B″. Flowering time in plants mutated in B55 or B' genes were investigated in this work. The PP2A-b55α and PP2A-b55β (knockout lines showed earlier flowering than WT, whereas a PP2A-b'γ (knockdown line showed late flowering. Average advancements of flowering in PP2A-b55 mutants were 3.4 days in continuous light, 6.6 days in 12 h days, and 8.2 days in 8 h days. Average delays in the PP2A-b'γ mutant line were 7.1 days in 16 h days and 4.7 days in 8 h days. Expression of marker genes of genetically distinct flowering pathways (CO, FLC, MYB33, SPL3, and the floral integrator (FT, SOC1 were tested in WT, pp2a mutants, and two known flowering time mutants elf6 and edm2. The results are compatible with B55 acting at and/or downstream of the floral integrator, in a non-identified pathway. B' γ was involved in repression of FLC, the main flowering repressor gene. For B'γ the results are consistent with the subunit being a component in the major autonomous flowering pathway. In conclusion PP2A is both a positive and negative regulator of flowering time, depending on the type of regulatory subunit involved.

  15. Regulation of brown fat adipogenesis by protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Matsuo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is a physiological regulator of insulin signaling and energy balance, but its role in brown fat adipogenesis requires additional investigation.To precisely determine the role of PTP1B in adipogenesis, we established preadipocyte cell lines from wild type and PTP1B knockout (KO mice. In addition, we reconstituted KO cells with wild type, substrate-trapping (D/A and sumoylation-resistant (K/R PTP1B mutants, then characterized differentiation and signaling in these cells. KO, D/A- and WT-reconstituted cells fully differentiated into mature adipocytes with KO and D/A cells exhibiting a trend for enhanced differentiation. In contrast, K/R cells exhibited marked attenuation in differentiation and lipid accumulation compared with WT cells. Expression of adipogenic markers PPARγ, C/EBPα, C/EBPδ, and PGC1α mirrored the differentiation pattern. In addition, the differentiation deficit in K/R cells could be reversed completely by the PPARγ activator troglitazone. PTP1B deficiency enhanced insulin receptor (IR and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1 tyrosyl phosphorylation, while K/R cells exhibited attenuated insulin-induced IR and IRS1 phosphorylation and glucose uptake compared with WT cells. In addition, substrate-trapping studies revealed that IRS1 is a substrate for PTP1B in brown adipocytes. Moreover, KO, D/A and K/R cells exhibited elevated AMPK and ACC phosphorylation compared with WT cells.These data indicate that PTP1B is a modulator of brown fat adipogenesis and suggest that adipocyte differentiation requires regulated expression of PTP1B.

  16. Activity increase after extraction of alkaline phosphatase from human osteoblastic membranes by nonionic detergents: influence of age and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourrat, C; Radisson, J; Chavassieux, P; Azzar, G; Roux, B; Meunier, P J

    2000-01-01

    The solubilization of alkaline phosphatase (AP) from osteoblastic cell membranes obtained from human primary bone cell cultures was studied according to the age and sex of the donors (17 females, 11 males; age range: 2-77 years). Cell membranes were treated by non-ionic (n-octyl beta-D-glucopyranoside, OG), ionic or zwitterionic detergents, then centrifuged. When OG was used almost all the AP was solubilized. AP activity in supernatant of solubilization was compared to the activity of the suspension before centrifugation. The activity ratio (AR) increased in function of age for subjects between 65 and 74. Neither total nor specific AP activities were influenced by age or sex. Electrophoresis studies showed that the AP released was a GPI (glycosyl phosphatidylinositol)-anchored protein, amphipathic form, with 140 kDa as apparent molecular mass. The activity change of AP in the presence of OG may result from age-related modifications either in the AP structure or in the constituents of the plasma membranes (proteins or phospholipids).

  17. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta acts as a neuroblastoma tumor suppressor by destabilizing the aurora kinase a oncogene

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meehan, Maria

    2012-02-05

    Abstract Background Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta (PTPRD) is a member of a large family of protein tyrosine phosphatases which negatively regulate tyrosine phosphorylation. Neuroblastoma is a major childhood cancer arising from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system which is known to acquire deletions and alterations in the expression patterns of PTPRD, indicating a potential tumor suppressor function for this gene. The molecular mechanism, however, by which PTPRD renders a tumor suppressor effect in neuroblastoma is unknown. Results As a molecular mechanism, we demonstrate that PTPRD interacts with aurora kinase A (AURKA), an oncogenic protein that is over-expressed in multiple forms of cancer, including neuroblastoma. Ectopic up-regulation of PTPRD in neuroblastoma dephosphorylates tyrosine residues in AURKA resulting in a destabilization of this protein culminating in interfering with one of AURKA\\'s primary functions in neuroblastoma, the stabilization of MYCN protein, the gene of which is amplified in approximately 25 to 30% of high risk neuroblastoma. Conclusions PTPRD has a tumor suppressor function in neuroblastoma through AURKA dephosphorylation and destabilization and a downstream destabilization of MYCN protein, representing a novel mechanism for the function of PTPRD in neuroblastoma.

  18. X-ray Characterization and Structure-Based Optimization of Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Michael R; Wissler, Lisa; Snow, Melanie; Geschwindner, Stefan; Read, Jon A; Brandon, Nicholas J; Nairn, Angus C; Lombroso, Paul J; Käck, Helena; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2017-11-22

    Excessive activity of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in the brain has been detected in numerous neuropsychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Notably, knockdown of STEP in an Alzheimer mouse model effected an increase in the phosphorylation levels of downstream STEP substrates and a significant reversal in the observed cognitive and memory deficits. These data point to the promising potential of STEP as a target for drug discovery in Alzheimer's treatment. We previously reported a substrate-based approach to the development of low molecular weight STEP inhibitors with Ki values as low as 7.8 μM. Herein, we disclose the first X-ray crystal structures of inhibitors bound to STEP and the surprising finding that they occupy noncoincident binding sites. Moreover, we utilize this structural information to optimize the inhibitor structure to achieve a Ki of 110 nM, with 15-60-fold selectivity across a series of phosphatases.

  19. Substrate-based fragment identification for the development of selective, nonpeptidic inhibitors of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguley, Tyler D; Xu, Hai-Chao; Chatterjee, Manavi; Nairn, Angus C; Lombroso, Paul J; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2013-10-10

    High levels of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) activity are observed in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Overexpression of STEP results in the dephosphorylation and inactivation of many key neuronal signaling molecules, including ionotropic glutamate receptors. Moreover, genetically reducing STEP levels in AD mouse models significantly reversed cognitive deficits and decreased glutamate receptor internalization. These results support STEP as a potential target for drug discovery for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Herein, a substrate-based approach for the discovery and optimization of fragments called substrate activity screening (SAS) has been applied to the development of low molecular weight (<450 Da) and nonpeptidic, single-digit micromolar mechanism-based STEP inhibitors with greater than 20-fold selectivity across multiple tyrosine and dual specificity phosphatases. Significant levels of STEP inhibition in rat cortical neurons are also observed.

  20. Discovery and evaluation of the hybrid of bromophenol and saccharide as potent and selective protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Renshuai; Yu, Rilei; Xu, Qi; Li, Xiangqian; Luo, Jiao; Jiang, Bo; Wang, Lijun; Guo, Shuju; Wu, Ning; Shi, Dayong

    2017-07-07

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of insulin signaling pathway. Inhibition of PTP1B is expected to improve insulin action. Appropriate selectivity and permeability are the gold standard for excellent PTP1B inhibitors. In this work, molecular hybridization-based screening identified a selective competitive PTP1B inhibitor. Compound 10a has IC50 values of 199 nM against PTP1B, and shows 32-fold selectivity for PTP1B over the closely related phosphatase TCPTP. Molecule docking and molecular dynamics studies reveal the reason of selectivity for PTP1B over TCPTP. Moreover, the cell permeability and cellular activity of compound 10a are demonstrated respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. The effects of protein phosphatase inhibitors on the duration of central sensitization of rat dorsal horn neurons following injection of capsaicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Li

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Protein kinases and phosphatases catalyze opposing reactions of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which may modulate the function of crucial signaling proteins in central nervous system. This is an important mechanism in the regulation of intracellular signal transduction pathways in nociceptive neurons. To explore the role of protein phosphatase in central sensitization of spinal nociceptive neurons following peripheral noxious stimulation, using electrophysiological recording techniques, we investigated the role of two inhibitors of protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A, fostriecin and okadaic acid (OA, on the responses of dorsal horn neurons to mechanical stimuli in anesthetized rats following intradermal injection of capsaicin. Central sensitization was initiated by injection of capsaicin into the plantar surface of the left paw. A microdialysis fiber was implanted in the spinal cord dorsal horn for perfusion of ACSF and inhibitors of PP2A, fostriecin and okadaic acid. We found that in ACSF pretreated animals, the responses to innocuous and noxious stimuli following capsaicin injection increased over a period of 15 min after injection and had mostly recovered by 60 min later. However, pre- or post-treatment with the phosphatase inhibitors, fostriecin or OA, significantly enhanced the effects of capsaicin injection by prolonging the responses to more than 3 hours. These results confirm that blockade of protein phosphatase activity may potentiate central sensitization of nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord following capsaicin injection and indicate that protein phosphatase type 2A may be involved in determining the duration of capsaicin-induced central sensitization.

  2. Microvillus-Specific Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase SAP-1 Plays a Role in Regulating the Intestinal Paracellular Transport of Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shingo; Kamei, Noriyasu; Murata, Yoji; Takayama, Kozo; Matozaki, Takashi; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2017-09-01

    The stomach cancer-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SAP-1) is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase that is specifically expressed on the apical membrane of the intestinal epithelium. SAP-1 is known to maintain the balance of phosphorylation of proteins together with protein kinases; however, its biological function and impact on pharmacokinetics in the intestine remain unclear. The present study, therefore, aimed at clarifying the relationship between SAP-1 and the intestinal absorption behaviors of typical transporter substrates and macromolecules. The endogenous levels of glucose and total cholesterol in the blood were similar between wild-type and SAP-1-deficient mice (Sap1(-/-)), suggesting no contribution of SAP-1 to biogenic influx. Moreover, in vitro transport study with everted ileal sacs demonstrated that there was no difference in the absorption of breast cancer resistance protein, P-glycoprotein, and peptide transporter substrates between both mice. However, absorptive clearance of macromolecular model dextrans (FD-4 and FD-10) in Sap1(-/-) mice was significantly higher than that in wild-type mice, and this was confirmed by the trend of increased FD-4 absorption from colonic loops of Sap1(-/-) mice. Therefore, the results of this study suggest the partial contribution of SAP-1 to the regulated transport of hydrophilic macromolecules through paracellular tight junctions. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SAP-1 protects against colitis through regulation of CEACAM20 in the intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yoji; Kotani, Takenori; Supriatna, Yana; Kitamura, Yasuaki; Imada, Shinya; Kawahara, Kohichi; Nishio, Miki; Daniwijaya, Edwin Widyanto; Sadakata, Hisanobu; Kusakari, Shinya; Mori, Munemasa; Kanazawa, Yoshitake; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okawa, Katsuya; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Azuma, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akira; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-08-04

    Intestinal epithelial cells contribute to regulation of intestinal immunity in mammals, but the detailed molecular mechanisms of such regulation have remained largely unknown. Stomach-cancer-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SAP-1, also known as PTPRH) is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase that is localized specifically at microvilli of the brush border in gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Here we show that SAP-1 ablation in interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice, a model of inflammatory bowel disease, resulted in a marked increase in the severity of colitis in association with up-regulation of mRNAs for various cytokines and chemokines in the colon. Tyrosine phosphorylation of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 20, an intestinal microvillus-specific transmembrane protein of the Ig superfamily, was greatly increased in the intestinal epithelium of the SAP-1-deficient animals, suggesting that this protein is a substrate for SAP-1. Tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM20 by the protein tyrosine kinase c-Src and the consequent association of CEACAM20 with spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) promoted the production of IL-8 in cultured cells through the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, SAP-1 and CEACAM20 were found to form a complex through interaction of their ectodomains. SAP-1 and CEACAM20 thus constitute a regulatory system through which the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal immunity.

  4. Purification and characterization of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase from a human osteosarcoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, M; Gorai, I; Minaguchi, H; Rosenquist, C; Qvist, P

    1998-01-01

    Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (bone ALP) levels are considered to reflect osteoblastic activity and can therefore be used as a marker of bone formation. However, bone ALP is difficult to distinguish from other ALP isoforms since the kidney, liver, and bone isoenzymes are encoded by the same gene and only differ because of post-translational modification of their carbohydrate side chains. The aim of this study was to purify and separate bone ALP which could be used to raise specific antisera against human bone ALP, from Saos-2, a human osteogenic sarcoma cell line. The procedure involved two steps. The first step, cultivation of 10(5) Saos-2 cells, yielded approximately 1 U ALP. Subsequent butanol extraction achieved 1.82-fold purification. For the second step, separating bone ALP, we used serial lectin affinity chromatography to distinguish between the carbohydrate side chains of the various ALP isoforms. A sample of the butanol extract was fractionated into three peaks (I, II, and III) by concanavalin A. Peaks II and III were subsequently identified as types IIa and IIIb bone ALP using pea lectin and wheat germ agglutinin columns, respectively. The specific activity of bone ALP was measured using commercial kits. Since bone ALP accounted for at least 84% of the total ALP activity after the final separation, this method appears more convenient and reproducible than others using bone or Pagetic sera. The bone ALP purified in this study could be used to raise monoclonal antibodies against bone-specific ALP.

  5. Phosphatidylinositol 5-Phosphatase Oculocerebrorenal Syndrome of Lowe Protein (OCRL) Controls Actin Dynamics during Early Steps of Listeria monocytogenes Infection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühbacher, Andreas; Dambournet, Daphné; Echard, Arnaud; Cossart, Pascale; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen that induces its own entry into a broad range of mammalian cells through interaction of the bacterial surface protein InlB with the cellular receptor Met, promoting an actin polymerization/depolymerization process that leads to pathogen engulfment. Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PI[4,5]P2) and trisphosphate (PI[3,4,5]P3) are two major phosphoinositide species that function as molecular scaffolds, recruiting cellular effectors that regulate actin dynamics during L. monocytogenes infection. Because the phosphatidylinositol 5′-phosphatase OCRL dephosphorylates PI(4,5)P2 and to a lesser extent PI(3,4,5)P3, we investigated whether this phosphatase modulates cell invasion by L. monocytogenes. Inactivation of OCRL by small interfering RNA (siRNA) leads to an increase in the internalization levels of L. monocytogenes in HeLa cells. Interestingly, OCRL depletion does not increase but rather decreases the surface expression of the receptor Met, suggesting that OCRL controls bacterial internalization by modulating signaling cascades downstream of Met. Immuno-fluorescence microscopy reveals that endogenous and overexpressed OCRL are present at L. monocytogenes invasion foci; live-cell imaging additionally shows that actin depolymerization coincides with EGFP-OCRL-a accumulation around invading bacteria. Together, these observations suggest that OCRL promotes actin depolymerization during L. monocytogenes infection; in agreement with this hypothesis, OCRL depletion leads to an increase in actin, PI(4,5)P2, and PI(3,4,5)P3 levels at bacterial internalization foci. Furthermore, in cells knocked down for OCRL, transfection of enzymatically active EGFP-OCRL-a (but not of a phosphatase-dead enzyme) decreases the levels of intracellular L. monocytogenes and of actin associated with invading bacteria. These results demonstrate that through its phosphatase activity, OCRL restricts L. monocytogenes invasion by modulating actin

  6. Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphatase oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe protein (OCRL) controls actin dynamics during early steps of Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühbacher, Andreas; Dambournet, Daphné; Echard, Arnaud; Cossart, Pascale; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier

    2012-04-13

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen that induces its own entry into a broad range of mammalian cells through interaction of the bacterial surface protein InlB with the cellular receptor Met, promoting an actin polymerization/depolymerization process that leads to pathogen engulfment. Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PI[4,5]P(2)) and trisphosphate (PI[3,4,5]P(3)) are two major phosphoinositide species that function as molecular scaffolds, recruiting cellular effectors that regulate actin dynamics during L. monocytogenes infection. Because the phosphatidylinositol 5'-phosphatase OCRL dephosphorylates PI(4,5)P(2) and to a lesser extent PI(3,4,5)P(3), we investigated whether this phosphatase modulates cell invasion by L. monocytogenes. Inactivation of OCRL by small interfering RNA (siRNA) leads to an increase in the internalization levels of L. monocytogenes in HeLa cells. Interestingly, OCRL depletion does not increase but rather decreases the surface expression of the receptor Met, suggesting that OCRL controls bacterial internalization by modulating signaling cascades downstream of Met. Immuno-fluorescence microscopy reveals that endogenous and overexpressed OCRL are present at L. monocytogenes invasion foci; live-cell imaging additionally shows that actin depolymerization coincides with EGFP-OCRL-a accumulation around invading bacteria. Together, these observations suggest that OCRL promotes actin depolymerization during L. monocytogenes infection; in agreement with this hypothesis, OCRL depletion leads to an increase in actin, PI(4,5)P(2), and PI(3,4,5)P(3) levels at bacterial internalization foci. Furthermore, in cells knocked down for OCRL, transfection of enzymatically active EGFP-OCRL-a (but not of a phosphatase-dead enzyme) decreases the levels of intracellular L. monocytogenes and of actin associated with invading bacteria. These results demonstrate that through its phosphatase activity, OCRL restricts L. monocytogenes invasion by modulating

  7. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Ser/Thr phosphatase T1 and comparison to its mammalian homolog PP5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jung-Min

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein Ser/Thr phosphatase 5 (PP5 and its Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog protein phosphatase T1 (Ppt1p each contain an N-terminal domain consisting of several tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs and a C-terminal catalytic domain that is related to the catalytic subunits of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, and calcineurin. Analysis of yeast Ppt1p could provide important clues to the function of PP5 and its homologs, however it has not yet been characterized at the biochemical or cellular level. Results The specific activity of recombinant Ppt1p toward the artificial substrates 32P-myelin basic protein (MBP and 32P-casein was similar to that of PP5. Dephosphorylation of 32P-MBP, but not 32P-casein, was stimulated by unsaturated fatty acids and by arachidoyl coenzyme A. Limited proteolysis of Ppt1p removed the TPR domain and abrogated lipid stimulation. The remaining catalytic fragment exhibited a two-fold increase in activity toward 32P-MBP, but not 32P-casein. Removal of the C terminus increased Ppt1p activity toward both substrates two fold, but did not prevent further stimulation of activity toward 32P-MBP by lipid treatment. Ppt1p was localized throughout the cell including the nucleus. Levels of PPT1 mRNA and protein peaked in early log phase growth. Conclusions Many characteristics of Ppt1p are similar to those of PP5, including stimulation of phosphatase activity with some substrates by lipids, and peak expression during periods of rapid cell growth. Unlike PP5, however, proteolytic removal of the TPR domain or C-terminal truncation only modestly increased its activity. In addition, C-terminal truncation did not prevent further activation by lipid. This suggests that these regions play only a minor role in controlling its activity compared to PP5. Ppt1p is present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, indicating that it may function in multiple compartments. The observation that Ppt1p is most highly expressed during early log

  8. Solution structure and Rpn1 interaction of the UBL domain of human RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hye Yun

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-like modifier (UBL domain of ubiquitin-like domain proteins (UDPs interacts specifically with subunits of the 26 S proteasome. A novel UDP, ubiquitin-like domain-containing C-terminal domain phosphatase (UBLCP1, has been identified as an interacting partner of the 26 S proteasome. We determined the high-resolution solution structure of the UBL domain of human UBLCP1 by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The UBL domain of hUBLCP1 has a unique β-strand (β3 and β3-α2 loop, instead of the canonical β4 observed in other UBL domains. The molecular topology and secondary structures are different from those of known UBL domains including that of fly UBLCP1. Data from backbone dynamics shows that the β3-α2 loop is relatively rigid although it might have intrinsic dynamic profile. The positively charged residues of the β3-α2 loop are involved in interacting with the C-terminal leucine-rich repeat-like domain of Rpn1.

  9. Involvement of PTPN5, the gene encoding the striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase, in schizophrenia and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelov, Ilana; Teltsh, Omri; Greenbaum, Lior; Rigbi, Amihai; Kanyas-Sarner, Kyra; Lerer, Bernard; Lombroso, Paul; Kohn, Yoav

    2012-08-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific member of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family that has been implicated in learning and memory. In this study, we examined the association of the protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 5 (PTPN5) gene, which encodes for STEP, with both schizophrenia and cognitive functioning in the Israeli Jewish population. A schizophrenia (SZ) case-control study of 868 participants was carried out (286 patients and 582 controls). Eleven PTPN5 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected and single markers and haplotype association analyses were carried out. A cognitive variability study included 437 healthy women who completed a computerized cognitive battery. We performed univariate associations between the SNPs and cognitive performance. The possible functional role of these variants was examined by studying their association with gene expression levels in the brain. In the SZ study, we found a nominal association in the whole sample between rs4075664 and SZ. Male patients with SZ showed a more significant association for three SNPs (rs4075664, rs2278732, and rs4757710). Haplotypes of the studied SNPs were associated with SZ both in the overall sample and within the male subsample. Expression analysis provided some support for the effects of the associated SNPs on PTPN5 expression level. The cognitive variability study showed positive associations between PTPN5 SNPs and different cognitive subtests. Principal component analysis showed an 'attention index' neurocognitive component that was associated with two SNP pairs (rs10832983 × rs10766504 and rs7932938 × rs4757718). The results imply a model in which PTPN5 may play a role in normal cognitive functioning and contribute to aspects of the neuropathology of SZ.

  10. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase beta is expressed in the form of proteoglycan and binds to the extracellular matrix protein tenascin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnea, G; Grumet, M; Milev, P

    1994-01-01

    The extracellular domain of receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTP beta) exhibits striking sequence similarity with a soluble, rat brain chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (3F8 PG). Immunoprecipitation experiments of cells transfected with RPTP beta expression vector and metabolically...... labeled with [35S]sulfate and [35S]methionine indicate that the transmembrane form of RPTP beta is indeed a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The 3F8 PG is therefore a variant form composed of the entire extracellular domain of RPTP beta probably generated by alternative RNA splicing. Previous...

  11. Recruitment of SHP-1 protein tyrosine phosphatase and signalling by a chimeric T-cell receptor-killer inhibitory receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M D; Geisler, C

    2000-01-01

    recognize MHC class I molecules. Following coligation of KIR with an activating receptor, the tyrosine in the ITIM is phosphorylated and the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 is recruited to the ITIM via its SH2 domains. It is still not clear how SHP-1 affects T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling....... In this study, we constructed a chimeric TCR-KIR receptor. We demonstrated that SHP-1 is recruited to the chimeric TCR-KIR receptor following T-cell stimulation with either anti-TCR monoclonal antibody (MoAb) or superantigen. However, in spite of this we could not detect any effect of SHP-1 on TCR signalling...

  12. In vitro screening for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B and dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors from selected Nigerian medicinal plants

    OpenAIRE

    Saidu, Yusuf; Muhammad, Suleiman Alhaji; Abbas, Abdullahi Yahaya; Onu, Andrew; Tsado, Ibrahim Mohammed; Muhammad, Luba

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP 1B) and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) have been identified as one of the drug targets for the treatment of Type-2 diabetes. This study was designed to screen for PTP 1B and DPP-IV inhibitors from some Nigerian medicinal plants. Materials and Methods: PTP 1B and DPP-IV drug discovery kits from Enzo Life Sciences were used to investigate in vitro inhibitory effect of crude methanolic extract of 10 plants; Mangifera indica, Moringa oleifera...

  13. Protein phosphatase 2A regulates deoxycytidine kinase activity via Ser-74 dephosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsailale, Rachid; Beyaert, Maxime; Smal, Caroline; Janssens, Veerle; Van Den Neste, Eric; Bontemps, Françoise

    2014-03-03

    Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) is a critical enzyme for activation of anticancer nucleoside analogs. Its activity is controlled via Ser-74 phosphorylation. Here, we investigated which Ser/Thr phosphatase dephosphorylates Ser-74. In cells, the PP1/PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid increased both dCK activity and Ser-74 phosphorylation at concentrations reported to specifically target PP2A. In line with this, purified PP2A, but not PP1, dephosphorylated recombinant pSer-74-dCK. In cell lysates, the Ser-74-dCK phosphatase activity was found to be latent, Mn(2+)-activated, responsive to PP2A inhibitors, and diminished after PP2A-immunodepletion. Use of siRNAs allowed concluding definitively that PP2A constitutively dephosphorylates dCK in cells and negatively regulates its activity. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Deprotonation states of the two active site water molecules regulate the binding of protein phosphatase 5 with its substrate: A molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyun; Yan, Feng

    2017-10-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), mainly localized in human brain, can dephosphorylate tau protein whose high level of phosphorylation is related to Alzheimer's disease. Similar to other protein phosphatases, PP5 has a conserved motif in the catalytic domain that contains two binding sites for manganese (Mn2+ ) ions. Structural data indicate that two active site water molecules, one bridging the two Mn2+ ions and the other terminally coordinated with one of the Mn2+ ions (Mn1), are involved in catalysis. Recently, a density functional theory study revealed that the two water molecules can be both deprotonated to keep a neutral active site for catalysis. The theoretical study gives us an insight into the catalytic mechanism of PP5, but the knowledge of how the deprotonation states of the two water molecules affect the binding of PP5 with its substrate is still lacking. To approach this problem, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to model the four possible deprotonation states. Through structural, dynamical and energetic analyses, the results demonstrate that the deprotonation states of the two water molecules affect the structure of the active site including the distance between the two Mn2+ ions and their coordination, impact the interaction energy of residues R275, R400 and H304 which directly interact with the substrate phosphoserine, and mediate the dynamics of helix αJ which is involved in regulation of the enzyme's activity. Furthermore, the deprotonation state that is preferable for PP5 binding of its substrate has been identified. These findings could provide new design strategy for PP5 inhibitor. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  15. Relevance of laser irradiance threshold in the induction of alkaline phosphatase in human osteoblast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxsen, V; Schikora, D; Sommer, U; Remppis, A; Greten, J; Kasperk, C

    2008-10-01

    Induction of matrix synthesis by low-level laser has been demonstrated extensively. However, the question of dose- or power intensity-dependency is under-investigated. To address this issue we chose human osteoblast cell cultures and measured their alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity after laser irradiation. The cell cultures were irradiated periodically by 690 nm radiation via optical transmission fiber-based laser needles, reaching into the culture dishes. The osteoblasts showed no induction of ALP activity when we used a single laser needle stimulation with a laser irradiance of 51 mW/cm(2), an increase of approximately 43% at 102 mW/cm(2) irradiance (two needles per well) and a ninefold increase at 204 mW/cm(2) irradiance (four needles per well), leaving the temperature of the culture medium unaffected. We concluded that the osteoblastic response in ALP activity to a laser stimulus shows a logarithmic relationship, with a distinct threshold, rather than a linear dose-dependency. Secondly, the laser irradiance, rather than the dose, is relevant for the impact of the laser.

  16. Caffeine alters mitochondrial dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase activity of human gingival fibroblasts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozchaloei, Shabnam Soltani; Gong, Siew-Ging; Dehpour, Ahmad R; Farrokh, Parisa; Khoshayand, Mohammad R; Oskoui, Mahvash

    2013-11-01

    Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed behaviorally active substances in the world. Although its effects on the central nervous system and bone metabolism have been documented, as yet there is no report on its effect on tissues in the oral cavity. In this study we analyzed the viability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzyme activity after exposure to different concentrations of caffeine for different exposure time periods. The HGF were cultured with different concentrations of caffeine. Viability of cells exposed to caffeine was analyzed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay to assess mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. The activity of ALP was analyzed at specific time intervals after caffeine addition. Our results showed that caffeine of concentrations caffeine at 5 and 10 mm dramatically decreased the viability and ALP activity of the cells after 4 days such that, by day 9, the viability of cells declined to near zero in the 10 mm group. These results provided evidence that caffeine in high concentrations can decrease cellular viability and ALP activity in HGF. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Effects of hydrogen sulfide on the expression of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and collagen type I in human periodontal ligament cells induced by tension force stimulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Qin, Jing; Hua, Yongmei

    2016-01-01

    .... The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on periodontal tissue remodeling by examining the mRNA and protein expression levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OCN...

  18. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A induces serine/threonine phosphorylation, subcellular redistribution, and functional inhibition of STAT3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woetmann, A; Nielsen, M; Christensen, S T

    1999-01-01

    STAT3. We show that an inhibitor of protein phosphatases (PPs) PP1/PP2A, calyculin A, induces (i) phosphorylation of STAT3 on serine and threonine residues, (ii) inhibition of STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation and DNA binding activity, and (iii) relocation of STAT3 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm......, whereas inhibitors of serine/threonine kinases, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase-1 extracellular-regulated kinase-kinase, mitogen-activated protein p38 kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, did not. In conclusion, we provide evidence that PP2A plays a crucial role in the regulation of STAT3....... Similar results were obtained with other PP2A inhibitors (okadaic acid, endothall thioanhydride) but not with inhibitors of PP1 (tautomycin) or PP2B (cyclosporine A). Pretreatment with the broad serine/threonine kinase inhibitor staurosporine partly blocked the calyculin A-induced STAT3 phosphorylation...

  19. Immunoreactivity of protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) in sera from sheep infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Ratna B; Begg, Douglas J; Purdie, Auriol C; Bach, Horacio; Whittington, Richard J

    2014-07-15

    Evasion of host defense mechanisms and survival inside infected host macrophages are features of pathogenic mycobacteria including Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants. Protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) has been identified as a secreted protein critical for survival of mycobacteria within infected macrophages. The host may mount an immune response to such secreted proteins. In this study, the humoral immune response to purified recombinant M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis PtpA was investigated using sera from a cohort of sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and compared with uninfected healthy controls. A significantly higher level of reactivity to PtpA was observed in sera collected from M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis infected sheep when compared to those from uninfected healthy controls. PtpA could be a potential candidate antigen for detection of humoral immune responses in sheep infected with M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B: II. Substrate-enzyme interactions and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.j.; Frimurer, T. M.; Andersen, J. N.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) complexed with the phosphorylated peptide substrate DADEpYL and the free substrate have been conducted to investigate 1) the physical forces involved in substrate-protein interactions, 2) the importance of enzyme...... to substrate binding. Based on essential dynamics analysis of the PTP1B/DADEpYL trajectory, it is shown that internal motions in the binding pocket occur in a subspace of only a few degrees of freedom. in particular, relatively large flexibilities are observed along several eigenvectors in the segments: Arg(24...... for catalysis. Analysis of the individual enzyme-substrate interaction energies revealed that mainly electrostatic forces contribute to binding. Indeed, calculation of the electrostatic field of the enzyme reveals that only the field surrounding the binding pocket is positive, while the remaining protein...

  1. Association of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 +1858C→T polymorphism and susceptibility to vitiligo: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Silky; Changotra, Harish

    2017-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 gene, which translates to lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase, is considered to be a susceptibility gene marker associated with several autoimmune diseases. Several studies have demonstrated the association of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 +1858C→T polymorphism with vitiligo. However, these studies showed conflicting results. Meta-analysis of the same was conducted earlier that included fewer number of publications in their study. We performed a meta-analysis of a total of seven studies consisting of 2094 cases and 3613 controls to evaluate the possible association of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 +1858C>T polymorphism with vitiligo susceptibility. We conducted a literature search in PubMed, Google Scholar and Dogpile for all published paper on protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 +1858C→T polymorphism and vitiligo risk till June 2016. Data analysis was performed by RevMan 5.3 and comprehensive meta-analysis v3.0 software. Meta-analysis showed an overall significant association of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non- receptor type 22 +1858C→T polymorphism with vitiligo in all models (allelic model [T vs. C]: odds ratio = 1.50, 95% confidence interval [1.32-1.71], Pvitiligo-type are some limitations of the present meta-analysis. Stratifying data by ethnicity showed an association of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 +1858C→T with vitiligo in European population (odds ratio = 1.53, 95% confidence interval [1.34-1.75], Pvitiligo.

  2. Protein phosphatase 2A is regulated by PKCα-dependent phosphorylation of its targeting subunit B56α at Ser41

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhefer, Uwe; Heinick, Alexander; König, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a family of multifunctional serine/threonine phosphatases consisting of a catalytic C, a structural A, and a regulatory B subunit. The substrate and therefore the functional specificity of PP2A are determined by the assembly of the enzyme complex...... with the appropriate regulatory B subunit families, namely B55, B56, PR72 or PR93/PR110. It has been suggested that additional levels of regulating PP2A function may result from the phosphorylation of B56 isoforms. In this study, we identified a novel phosphorylation site at Ser41 of B56α. This phosphoamino acid...... residue was efficiently phosphorylated in vitro by PKCα. We detected a 7-fold higher phosphorylation of B56α in failing human hearts compared to non-failing hearts. Purified PP2A dimeric holoenzyme (subunits C and A) was able to dephosphorylate PKCα-phosphorylated B56α. The potency of B56α for PP2A...

  3. Identification and functional analysis of variant haplotypes in the 5'-flanking region of protein phosphatase 2A-Bδ gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Feng Chen

    Full Text Available Serine-threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a trimeric holoenzyme that plays an integral role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. The substrate specificity and (subcellular localization of the PP2A holoenzymes are highly regulated by interaction with a family of regulatory B subunits (PP2A-Bs. The regulatory subunit PP2A-B/PR55δ (PP2A-Bδ is involving in the dephosphorylation of PP2A substrates and is crucial for controlling entry into and exit from mitosis. The molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of expression of PP2A-Bδ gene (PPP2R2D remain largely unknown. To explore genetic variations in the 5'-flanking region of PPP2R2D gene as well as their frequent haplotypes in the Han Chinese population and determine whether such variations have an impact on transcriptional activity, DNA samples were collected from 70 healthy Chinese donors and sequenced for identifying genetic variants in the 5'-flanking region of PPP2R2D. Four genetic variants were identified in the 1836 bp 5'-flanking region of PPP2R2D. Linkage disequilibrium (LD patterns and haplotype profiles were constructed for the genetic variants. Using serially truncated human PPP2R2D promoter luciferase constructs, we found that a 601 bp (-540 nt to +61 nt fragment constitutes the core promoter region. The subcloning of individual 5'-flanking fragment revealed the existence of three haplotypes in the distal promoter of PPP2R2D. The luciferase reporter assay showed that different haplotypes exhibited distinct promoter activities. The EMSA revealed that the -462 G>A variant influences DNA-protein interactions involving the nuclear factor 1 (NF1. In vitro reporter gene assay indicated that cotransfection of NF1/B expression plasmid could positively regulate the activity of PPP2R2D proximal promoter. Introduction of exogenous NF1/B expression plasmid further confirmed that the NF1 involves in the regulation of PPP2R2D gene expression. Our findings

  4. Multiple forms of the human tyrosine phosphatase RPTP alpha. Isozymes and differences in glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daum, G; Regenass, S; Sap, J

    1994-01-01

    ., Jaye, M., and Schlessinger, J. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 87, 7000-7004). Using the polymerase chain reaction technique, simultaneous expression of both isoforms was demonstrated in human T-cell and vascular smooth muscle libraries, as well as in the A431 human epidermal cancer cell line....... Following transient expression in COS-1 cells, each isoform gave rise to two proteins of 100 and 130 kDa, respectively. Endoglycosidase treatment showed that the 100-kDa species corresponded to a molecule exclusively glycosylated on N-residues, whereas the 130-kDa species contained both, N- and O......-linked carbohydrates. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the smaller RPTP alpha protein is a precursor of the larger one. A high affinity antibody was generated that recognizes the immature protein only; however, both proteins can be detected by Western blot analysis after a simple chemical hydrolysis...

  5. Structure and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor 12 Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism of the Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Zonta, Francesco; Wang, Shanshan; Song, Ke; He, Xin; He, Miaomiao; Nie, Yan; Li, Sheng

    2017-12-26

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 12 (PTPN12) is an important protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in regulating cell adhesion and migration as well as tumorigenesis. Here, we solved a crystal structure of the native PTPN12 catalytic domain with the catalytic cysteine (residue 231) in dual conformation (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated). Combined with molecular dynamics simulation data, we concluded that those two conformations represent different states of the protein which are realized during the dephosphorylation reaction. Together with docking and mutagenesis data, our results provide a molecular basis for understanding the catalytic mechanism of PTPN12 and its role in tumorigenesis.

  6. Structure and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor 12 Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism of the Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Dong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 12 (PTPN12 is an important protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in regulating cell adhesion and migration as well as tumorigenesis. Here, we solved a crystal structure of the native PTPN12 catalytic domain with the catalytic cysteine (residue 231 in dual conformation (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated. Combined with molecular dynamics simulation data, we concluded that those two conformations represent different states of the protein which are realized during the dephosphorylation reaction. Together with docking and mutagenesis data, our results provide a molecular basis for understanding the catalytic mechanism of PTPN12 and its role in tumorigenesis.

  7. Arctigenin inhibits triple-negative breast cancers by targeting CIP2A to reactivate protein phosphatase 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiuyue; Qin, Shanshan; Yuan, Xiaoning; Zhang, Liang; Ji, Juanli; Liu, Xuewen; Ma, Wenjing; Zhang, Yunfei; Liu, Pengfei; Sun, Zhiting; Zhang, Jingxuan; Liu, Ying

    2017-07-01

    We have shown that a novel STAT3 inhibitor arctigenin (Atn) induces significant cytotoxicity in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. This study further delineated molecular mechanisms where by Atn triggered cytotoxicity in TNBC cells. We found Atn can also inhibit metastasis in TNBC cells through cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) pathway. CIP2A is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), which can increase the migration and invasion of various cancer cells. PP2A is a tumor suppressor, which is functionally defective in various cancers. Atn-induced metastasis inhibition was associated with reactivation of PP2A, downregulation of CIP2A and Akt phosphorylation. Silencing CIP2A enhanced Atn-induced metastasis inhibition and apoptosis in TNBCs. Furthermore, ectopic expression of CIP2A or inhibition of PP2A in TNBC cells abolished the effects of Atn. In conclusion, we found that enhancement of PP2A activity by inhibition of CIP2A, at least in part, promotes the anti-metastasis effect induced by Atn. Our findings disclose the novel therapeutic mechanism of this targeted agent, and suggest the therapeutic potential and feasibility of developing PP2A enhancers as a novel anticancer strategy.

  8. Isothiazolidinone (IZD) as a phosphoryl mimetic in inhibitors of the Yersinia pestis protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Eun; Bahta, Medhanit; Lountos, George T. [National Cancer Institute at Frederick, PO Box B, Frederick, MD 21702-1201 (United States); Ulrich, Robert G. [United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Burke, Terrence R. Jr, E-mail: tburke@helix.nih.gov; Waugh, David S., E-mail: tburke@helix.nih.gov [National Cancer Institute at Frederick, PO Box B, Frederick, MD 21702-1201 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The first X-ray crystal structure of the Y. pestis protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH in complex with an isothiazolidinone-based lead-fragment compound is reported. Isothiazolidinone (IZD) heterocycles can act as effective components of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitors by simultaneously replicating the binding interactions of both a phosphoryl group and a highly conserved water molecule, as exemplified by the structures of several PTP1B–inhibitor complexes. In the first unambiguous demonstration of IZD interactions with a PTP other than PTP1B, it is shown by X-ray crystallography that the IZD motif binds within the catalytic site of the Yersinia pestis PTP YopH by similarly displacing a highly conserved water molecule. It is also shown that IZD-based bidentate ligands can inhibit YopH in a nonpromiscuous fashion at low micromolar concentrations. Hence, the IZD moiety may represent a useful starting point for the development of YopH inhibitors.

  9. Molecular investigations of the structure and function of the protein phosphatase 1-spinophilin-inhibitor 2 heterotrimeric complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancheck, Barbara; Ragusa, Michael J; Allaire, Marc; Nairn, Angus C; Page, Rebecca; Peti, Wolfgang

    2011-02-22

    Regulation of the major Ser/Thr phosphatase protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is controlled by a diverse array of targeting and inhibitor proteins. Though many PP1 regulatory proteins share at least one PP1 binding motif, usually the RVxF motif, it was recently discovered that certain pairs of targeting and inhibitor proteins bind PP1 simultaneously to form PP1 heterotrimeric complexes. To date, structural information for these heterotrimeric complexes and, in turn, how they direct PP1 activity is entirely lacking. Using a combination of NMR spectroscopy, biochemistry, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we show that major structural rearrangements in both spinophilin (targeting) and inhibitor 2 (I-2, inhibitor) are essential for the formation of the heterotrimeric PP1-spinophilin-I-2 (PSI) complex. The RVxF motif of I-2 is released from PP1 during the formation of PSI, making the less prevalent SILK motif of I-2 essential for complex stability. The release of the I-2 RVxF motif allows for enhanced flexibility of both I-2 and spinophilin in the heterotrimeric complex. In addition, we used inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy to show that PP1 contains two metals in both heterodimeric complexes (PP1-spinophilin and PP1-I-2) and PSI, demonstrating that PSI retains the biochemical characteristics of the PP1-I-2 holoenzyme. Finally, we combined the NMR and biochemical data with SAXS and molecular dynamics simulations to generate a structural model of the full heterotrimeric PSI complex. Collectively, these data reveal the molecular events that enable PP1 heterotrimeric complexes to exploit both the targeting and inhibitory features of the PP1-regulatory proteins to form multifunctional PP1 holoenzymes.

  10. LB-100, a novel Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibitor, sensitizes malignant meningioma cells to the therapeutic effects of radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Winson S; Sizdahkhani, Saman; Hao, Shuyu; Song, Hua; Seldomridge, Ashlee; Tandle, Anita; Maric, Dragan; Kramp, Tamalee; Lu, Rongze; Heiss, John D; Camphausen, Kevin; Gilbert, Mark R; Zhuang, Zhengping; Park, Deric M

    2018-02-28

    Atypical and anaplastic meningiomas (AAM) represent 20% of all meningiomas. They are associated with poor outcomes due to their tendency to recur. While surgery and radiation (RT) are first line therapy, no effective systemic medical treatment has been identified. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine phosphatase involved in cell cycle regulation and DNA repair. Here, we examined radiosensitizing effects of LB-100, a novel inhibitor of PP2A against AAM as a novel treatment strategy. Three human-derived immortalized meningioma cell lines, IOMM-LEE, GAR, and CH-157, were used to investigate the radio-sensitizing potential of LB-100 in AAM. Survival fraction by clonogenic assay, immunofluorescence, cell cycle analysis and protein expression were evaluated in vitro. The antitumor effects of combining LB-100 with RT were verified in vivo by using intracranial orthotopic xenograft mouse model. Pharmacologic PP2A inhibition with LB-100 prior to RT enhanced the radiosensitivity of meningioma cells and reduced survival fraction in clonogenic assays. LB-100 increased DNA double-strand breakage (measured by γ-H2AX), mitotic catastrophe cell death, and G2/M cell cycle arrest in irradiated meningioma cells. Also, LB-100 decreased activation of STAT3 and expression of its downstream proteins. In vivo, LB-100 and RT combined treatment prolonged the survival of mice with xenografts compared to RT alone. Taken together, these results provide convincing preclinical data to support the use of LB-100 as a radiosensitizing agent for treatment of malignant meningioma. Its potential for clinical application deserves further investigation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Regulation of the abscisic acid response by protein phosphatase 2C-interacting proteins ABP7 and ABP9 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Ma-Lauer, Yue

    2011-01-01

    The protein phosphatases 2C ABI1 and ABI2 are negative regulators in signal transduction of the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). The aim of this work is to characterize two homologous proteins ABP7 and ABP9, which were identified as interacting partners of ABI2 in the yeast two-hybrid system. In protoplasts, ABP7 and ABP9 interacted with both ABI1 and ABI2 in the nucleus and the cytosol. Overexpression of ABP7 and ABP9 resulted in dramatic inductions of ABA-induced gene expression in div...

  12. Negative Feed-forward Control of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) by Tristetraprolin (ZFP36) Is Limited by the Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase, Dual-specificity Phosphatase 1 (DUSP1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Suharsh; Mostafa, Mahmoud M.; McWhae, Andrew; Traves, Suzanne L.; Newton, Robert

    2016-01-01

    TNF is central to inflammation and may play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The 3′-untranslated region of the TNF transcript contains AU-rich elements (AREs) that are targeted by the RNA-binding protein, tristetraprolin (also known as zinc finger protein 36 (ZFP36)), which is itself up-regulated by inflammatory stimuli, to promote mRNA degradation. Using primary human bronchial epithelial and pulmonary epithelial A549 cells, we confirm that interleukin-1β (IL1B) induces expression of dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), ZFP36, and TNF. Whereas IL1B-induced DUSP1 is involved in feedback control of MAPK pathways, ZFP36 exerts negative (incoherent) feed-forward control of TNF mRNA and protein expression. DUSP1 silencing increased IL1B-induced ZFP36 expression at 2 h and profoundly repressed TNF mRNA at 6 h. This was partly due to increased TNF mRNA degradation, an effect that was reduced by ZFP36 silencing. This confirms a regulatory network, whereby DUSP1-dependent negative feedback control reduces feed-forward control by ZFP36. Conversely, whereas DUSP1 overexpression and inhibition of MAPKs prevented IL1B-induced expression of ZFP36, this was associated with increased TNF mRNA expression at 6 h, an effect that was predominantly due to elevated transcription. This points to MAPK-dependent feed-forward control of TNF involving ZFP36-dependent and -independent mechanisms. In terms of repression by dexamethasone, neither silencing of DUSP1, silencing of ZFP36, nor silencing of both together prevented the repression of IL1B-induced TNF expression, thereby demonstrating the need for further repressive mechanisms by anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids. In summary, these data illustrate why understanding the competing effects of feedback and feed-forward control is relevant to the development of novel anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:26546680

  13. Recent insights into Protein Phosphatase 2A structure and regulation: the reasons why PP2A is no longer considered as a lazy passive housekeeping enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although intracellular signal transduction is often portrayed as a protein kinase "domino effect", the counterbalancing function of phosphatases, and thus the control of phosphatase activity, is equally relevant to proper regulation of cellular function. Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a widely expressed family of protein phosphatases made of a core dimer, composed of a catalytic (C subunit and a structural (A subunit, in association with a third variable regulatory (B subunit. Although viewed as a constitutive housekeeping enzyme in the past, PP2A is a highly regulated phosphatase and is emerging as an important regulator of multiple cellular processes involving protein phosphorylation. The regulation of PP2A is mainly accomplished by the identity of the regulatory B-type subunit, which determines substrate specificity, subcellular localization and catalytic activity of the PP2A holoenzyme. In agreement with this, recent findings on the structure and post-translational modifications of PP2A emphasize the importance of PP2A holoenzyme composition in its regulation and pleiotropic activities.

  14. Haematopoietic protein tyrosine phosphatase (HePTP) phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase in T-cells: dynamics and subcellular location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nika, Konstantina; Hyunh, Huong; Williams, Scott; Paul, Surojit; Bottini, Nunzio; Taskén, Kjetil; Lombroso, Paul J; Mustelin, Tomas

    2004-01-01

    The HePTP (haematopoietic protein tyrosine phosphatase) is a negative regulator of the ERK2 (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 2) and p38 MAP kinases (mitogen-activated protein kinases) in T-cells. This inhibitory function requires a physical association of HePTP through an N-terminal KIM (kinase-interaction motif) with ERK and p38. We previously reported that PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase) phosphorylates Ser-23 within the KIM of HePTP, resulting in dissociation of HePTP from ERK2. Here we follow the phosphorylation of this site in intact T-cells. We find that HePTP is phosphorylated at Ser-23 in resting T-cells and that this phosphorylation increases upon treatment of the cells with agents that elevate intracellular cAMP, such as prostaglandin E2. HePTP phosphorylation occurred at discrete regions at the cell surface. Phosphorylation was reduced by inhibitors of PKA and increased by inhibitors of protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A, but not by inhibitors of calcineurin. In vitro, PP1 efficiently dephosphorylated HePTP at Ser-23, while PP2A was much less efficient. Activation of PP1 by treatment of the cells with ceramide suppressed Ser-23 phosphorylation, as did transfection of the catalytic subunit of PP1. Phosphorylation at Ser-23 is also increased in a transient manner upon T-cell antigen receptor ligation. In contrast, treatment of cells with phorbol ester had no effect on HePTP phosphorylation at Ser-23. We conclude from these results that HePTP is under continuous control by PKA and a serine-specific phosphatase, probably PP1, in T-cells and that this basal phosphorylation at Ser-23 can rapidly change in response to external stimuli. This, in turn, will affect the ability of HePTP to inhibit the ERK and p38 MAP kinases. PMID:14613483

  15. Effects of root canal sealers on alkaline phosphatase in human osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fu-Mei; Yang, Shun-Fa; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2010-07-01

    Histologic investigations have demonstrated that root canal sealers can induce mild to severe bone resorption. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is a membrane-bound glycoprotein, which is one of the osteogenic differentiation markers considered to indicate the formation of new bone. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an epoxy resin-based sealer AH26, a zinc oxide-eugenol-based sealer Canals, and a paste sealer N2 on the expression of ALP in human osteoblastic cell line U2OS cells. Freshly mixed materials were filled in glass rings and eluted in 10 mL of culture medium for 1 day. Subsequently, various dilutions (final dilution: 1/2, 1/4, and 1/8) of these extraction media were prepared for this study. Cytotoxicity was measured by the almar blue dye assay. Gene expression of ALP was examined by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. ALP activity was further evaluated by using substrate assay. The results showed that AH26, Canals, and N2 were cytotoxic to U2OS cells in a concentration-dependent manner (P < .05). The exposure of U2OS cells to AH26 and N2 resulted in the down-regulation of ALP mRNA gene expression (P < .05). ALP activity was significantly suppressed by 3 root canal sealers (P < .05). The inhibition of ALP expression might play an important role in the pathogenesis of root canal sealer-induced periapical bone destruction. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Different distributions of human bone alkaline phosphatase isoforms in serum and bone tissue extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Per; Sharp, Christopher A; Farley, John R

    2002-11-01

    In vitro, bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) is released from the osteoblast membrane with its glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor still attached (i.e., in an anchor-intact form); however, in vivo, BALP circulates as a variable mixture of anchorless isoforms, which can be identified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Previous studies have shown that the relative abundance of these BALP isoforms in serum may be clinically useful for the diagnosis and management of metabolic bone disease. In the current studies, we describe a method for the determination of anchorless BALP isoforms in extracts of bone and we present novel data on the conversion of anchor-intact to anchorless BALP by incubation with endogenous circulating GPI-specific phospholipase D (GPI-PLD). A 72-h extraction with 0.1% Triton X-100 released approximately 90% of the BALP activity from powdered bone. An average of 19% of this activity was anchorless, but essentially all of the activity could be converted to the anchorless form by incubation with partially purified GPI-PLD from human serum. Using HPLC, we detected four BALP isoforms (B/I, B1x, B1, and B2) in these GPI-PLD-treated extracts of bone. An additional BALP fraction was also detected in the samples during the initial phase of GPI-PLD treatment. The abundance of the BALP isoforms differed between bone and serum, particularly for the B/I isoform, which comprised, on average, 18% of the BALP in GPI-PLD-treated extracts of healthy bone tissue, but only 6% of the total BALP activity in serum from healthy individuals. Based on our recent finding of differences in the number of sialic acid residues between the BALP isoforms, we hypothesize that this difference between BALP isoforms in serum and extracts of bone is due to the different patterns of glycosylation, which results in different biological half-lives in the circulation. A preliminary application of our method to the extraction of BALP isoforms from a small number of human

  17. Salmeterol attenuates chemotactic responses in rhinovirus-induced exacerbation of allergic airways disease by modulating protein phosphatase 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchwell, Luke; Girkin, Jason; Dun, Matthew D; Morten, Matthew; Verrills, Nicole; Toop, Hamish D; Morris, Jonathan C; Johnston, Sebastian L; Foster, Paul S; Collison, Adam; Mattes, Joerg

    2014-06-01

    β-Agonists are used for relief and control of asthma symptoms by reversing bronchoconstriction. They might also have anti-inflammatory properties, but the underpinning mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recently, a direct interaction between formoterol and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) has been described in vitro. We sought to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which β-agonists exert anti-inflammatory effects in allergen-driven and rhinovirus 1B-exacerbated allergic airways disease (AAD). Mice were sensitized and then challenged with house dust mite to induce AAD while receiving treatment with salmeterol, formoterol, or salbutamol. Mice were also infected with rhinovirus 1B to exacerbate lung inflammation and therapeutically administered salmeterol, dexamethasone, or the PP2A-activating drug (S)-2-amino-4-(4-[heptyloxy]phenyl)-2-methylbutan-1-ol (AAL[S]). Systemic or intranasal administration of salmeterol protected against the development of allergen- and rhinovirus-induced airway hyperreactivity and decreased eosinophil recruitment to the lungs as effectively as dexamethasone. Formoterol and salbutamol also showed anti-inflammatory properties. Salmeterol, but not dexamethasone, increased PP2A activity, which reduced CCL11, CCL20, and CXCL2 expression and reduced levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and active nuclear factor κB subunits in the lungs. The anti-inflammatory effect of salmeterol was blocked by targeting the catalytic subunit of PP2A with small RNA interference. Conversely, increasing PP2A activity with AAL(S) abolished rhinovirus-induced airway hyperreactivity, eosinophil influx, and CCL11, CCL20, and CXCL2 expression. Salmeterol also directly activated immunoprecipitated PP2A in vitro isolated from human airway epithelial cells. Salmeterol exerts anti-inflammatory effects by increasing PP2A activity in AAD and rhinovirus-induced lung inflammation, which might potentially account for some of its clinical benefits

  18. The M. tuberculosis HAD phosphatase (Rv3042c) interacts with host proteins and is inhibited by Clofazimine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shree, Sonal; Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Saxena, Richa; Kumar, Harish; Agarwal, Aparna; Sharma, Vijay Kumar; Srivastava, Kanchan; Srivastava, Kishore Kumar; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis codes for a HAD-phosphatase, Rv3042c (MtSerB2), that has earlier been characterized as a metabolic enzyme. Here we demonstrate that MtSerB2 is secreted into the cytosol of infected macrophages and is found in bronchoalveolar lavage samples of tuberculosis patients. MtSerB2 induces significant cytoskeleton rearrangements through cofilin activation and affects the expression of genes that regulate actin dynamics. It specifically interacts with HSP90, HSP70 and HSP27 that block apoptotic pathways and not with other HSPs. It actively dephosphorylates MAPK-p38 and NF-kappa B p65 that play crucial roles in inflammatory and immune responses. This in turn leads to down-regulation of Interleukin 8, a chemotactic and inflammatory cytokine. Finally, during evaluation of inhibitors against MtSerB2 we found that Clofazimine, a drug being evaluated for XDR and MDR tuberculosis, inhibits MtSerB2 phosphatase activity and reverses the above effects and interactions with host proteins. Overall, the study identifies that MtSerB2 has new functions that might help the pathogen to evade the host's immune response.

  19. Metformin lowers Ser-129 phosphorylated α-synuclein levels via mTOR-dependent protein phosphatase 2A activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Revuelta, B I; Hettich, M M; Ciociaro, A; Rotermund, C; Kahle, P J; Krauss, S; Di Monte, D A

    2014-05-08

    Phospho-Ser129 α-synuclein is the modified form of α-synuclein that occurs most frequently within Parkinson's disease pathological inclusions. Here we demonstrate that the antidiabetic drug metformin significantly reduces levels of phospho-Ser129 α-synuclein and the ratio of phospho-Ser129 α-synuclein to total α-synuclein. This effect was documented in vitro in SH-SY5Y and HeLa cells as well as in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. In vitro work also elucidated the mechanisms underlying metformin's action. Following metformin exposure, decreased phospho-Ser129 α-synuclein was not strictly dependent on induction of AMP-activated protein kinase, a primary target of the drug. On the other hand, metformin-induced phospho-Ser129 α-synuclein reduction was consistently associated with inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and activation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Evidence supporting a key role of mTOR/PP2A signaling included the finding that, similar to metformin, the canonical mTOR inhibitor rapamycin was capable of lowering the ratio of phospho-Ser129 α-synuclein to total α-synuclein. Furthermore, no decrease in phosphorylated α-synuclein occurred with either metformin or rapamycin when phosphatase activity was inhibited, supporting a direct relationship between mTOR inhibition, PP2A activation and protein dephosphorylation. A final set of experiments confirmed the effectiveness of metformin in vivo in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Addition of the drug to food or drinking water lowered levels of phospho-Ser129 α-synuclein in the brain of treated animals. These data reveal a new mechanism leading to α-synuclein dephosphorylation that could be targeted for therapeutic intervention by drugs like metformin and rapamycin.

  20. Protein phosphatase CaPpz1 is involved in cation homeostasis, cell wall integrity and virulence of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adám, Csaba; Erdei, Eva; Casado, Carlos; Kovács, László; González, Asier; Majoros, László; Petrényi, Katalin; Bagossi, Péter; Farkas, Ilona; Molnar, Monika; Pócsi, István; Ariño, Joaquín; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2012-05-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans has a single protein phosphatase Z (PPZ) candidate gene termed CaPPZ1, which shows significant allele variability. We demonstrate here that bacterially expressed CaPpz1 protein exhibits phosphatase activity which can be inhibited by recombinant Hal3, a known inhibitor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ppz1. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments based on natural polymorphisms allowed the identification of three amino acid residues that affect enzyme activity or stability. The expression of CaPPZ1 in ppz1 S. cerevisiae and pzh1 Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells partially rescued the salt and caffeine phenotypes of the deletion mutants. CaPpz1 also complemented the slt2 S. cerevisiae mutant, which is crippled in the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase that mediates the cell wall integrity signalling pathway. Collectively, our results suggest that the orthologous PPZ enzymes have similar but not identical functions in different fungi. The deletion of the CaPPZ1 gene in C. albicans resulted in a mutant that was sensitive to salts such as LiCl and KCl, to caffeine, and to agents that affect cell wall biogenesis such as Calcofluor White and Congo red, but was tolerant to spermine and hygromycin B. Reintegration of the CaPPZ1 gene into the deletion mutant alleviated all of the mutant phenotypes tested. Thus CaPpz1 is involved in cation homeostasis, cell wall integrity and the regulation of the membrane potential of C. albicans. In addition, the germ tube growth rate, and virulence in the BALB/c mouse model, were reduced in the null mutant, suggesting a novel function for CaPpz1 in the yeast to hypha transition that may have medical relevance.

  1. Functional analysis of the glycogen binding subunit CG9238/Gbs-70E of protein phosphatase 1 in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerekes, Éva; Kókai, Endre; Páldy, Ferenc Sándor; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2014-06-01

    The product of the CG9238 gene that we termed glycogen binding subunit 70E (Gbs-70E) was characterized by biochemical and molecular genetics methods. The interaction between Gbs-70E and all catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (Pp1-87B, Pp1-9C, Pp1-96A and Pp1-13C) of Drosophila melanogaster was confirmed by pairwise yeast two-hybrid tests, co-immunoprecipitation and pull down experiments. The binding of Gbs-70E to glycogen was demonstrated by sedimentation analysis. With RT-PCR we found that the mRNAs coding for the longer Gbs-70E PB/PC protein were expressed in all developmental stages of the fruit flies while the mRNA for the shorter Gbs-70E PA was restricted to the eggs and the ovaries of the adult females. The development specific expression of the shorter splice variant was not conserved in different Drosophila species. The expression level of the gene was manipulated by P-element insertions and gene deletion to analyze the functions of the gene product. A small or moderate reduction in the gene expression resulted in no significant changes, however, a deletion mutant expressing very low level of the transcript lived shorter and exhibited reduced glycogen content in the imagos. In addition, the gene deletion decreased the fertility of the fruit flies. Our results prove that Gbs-70E functions as the glycogen binding subunit of protein phosphatase 1 that regulates glycogen content and plays a role in the development of eggs in D. melanogaster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Alcohol drives S-nitrosylation and redox activation of protein phosphatase 1, causing bovine airway cilia dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Michael E; Pavlik, Jacqueline A; Liu, Miao; Ding, Shi-Jian; Wyatt, Todd A; Sisson, Joseph H

    2017-03-01

    Individuals with alcohol (ethanol)-use disorders are at increased risk for lung infections, in part, due to defective mucociliary clearance driven by motile cilia in the airways. We recently reported that isolated, demembranated bovine cilia (axonemes) are capable of producing nitric oxide (∙NO) when exposed to biologically relevant concentrations of alcohol. This increased presence of ∙NO can lead to protein S-nitrosylation, a posttranslational modification signaling mechanism involving reversible adduction of nitrosonium cations or ∙NO to thiolate or thiyl radicals, respectively, of proteins forming S-nitrosothiols (SNOs). We quantified and compared SNO content between isolated, demembranated axonemes extracted from bovine tracheae, with or without in situ alcohol exposure (100 mM × 24 h). We demonstrate that relevant concentrations of alcohol exposure shift the S-nitrosylation status of key cilia regulatory proteins, including 20-fold increases in S-nitrosylation of proteins that include protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). With the use of an ATP-reactivated axoneme motility system, we demonstrate that alcohol-driven S-nitrosylation of PP1 is associated with PP1 activation and dysfunction of axoneme motility. These new data demonstrate that alcohol can shift the S-nitrothiol balance at the level of the cilia organelle and highlight S-nitrosylation as a novel signaling mechanism to regulate PP1 and cilia motility.

  3. Docking flexible peptide to flexible protein by molecular dynamics using two implicit-solvent models: an evaluation in protein kinase and phosphatase systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zunnan; Wong, Chung F

    2009-10-29

    Reliable prediction of protein-ligand docking pose requires proper account of induced fit effects. Treating both the ligand and the protein as flexible molecules is still challenging because many degrees of freedom are involved. Peptides are one type of ligand that are particularly difficult to study because of their extreme flexibility. In this study, we tested a molecular dynamics-based simulated-annealing cycling protocol in docking peptides to four protein kinases and two phosphatases using two implicit-solvent models: a distance-dependent dielectric model (epsilon(r) = 4r) and a version of the Generalized Born model termed GBMV. We found that the simpler epsilon(r) = 4r model identified docking pose better than the more expensive GBMV model. In addition, rescoring structures obtained from one implicit-solvent model with the other identified good docking poses for all six systems studied. Including protein energy in scoring also improved results.

  4. The Down syndrome critical region protein RCAN1 regulates long-term potentiation and memory via inhibition of phosphatase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeffer, Charles A; Dey, Asim; Sachan, Nita; Wong, Helen; Patterson, Richard J; Shelton, John M; Richardson, James A; Klann, Eric; Rothermel, Beverly A

    2007-11-28

    Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1/MCIP1/DSCR1) regulates the calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. Because it is located on human chromosome 21, RCAN1 has been postulated to contribute to mental retardation in Down syndrome and has been reported to be associated with neuronal degeneration in Alzheimer's disease. The studies herein are the first to assess the role of RCAN1 in memory and synaptic plasticity by examining the behavioral and electrophysiological properties of RCAN1 knock-out mice. These mice exhibit deficits in spatial learning and memory, reduced associative cued memory, and impaired late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP), phenotypes similar to those of transgenic mice with increased calcineurin activity. Consistent with this, the RCAN1 knock-out mice display increased enzymatic calcineurin activity, increased abundance of a cleaved calcineurin fragment, and decreased phosphorylation of the calcineurin substrate dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein-32. We propose a model in which RCAN1 plays a positive role in L-LTP and memory by constraining phosphatase signaling.

  5. Lipid phosphate phosphatase 3 participates in transport carrier formation and protein trafficking in the early secretory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Martínez, Enric; Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Johannes, Ludger; Pyne, Susan; Sarri, Elisabet; Egea, Gustavo

    2013-06-15

    The inhibition of phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) activity by propanolol indicates that diacylglycerol (DAG) is required for the formation of transport carriers at the Golgi and for retrograde trafficking to the ER. Here we report that the PAP2 family member lipid phosphate phosphatase 3 (LPP3, also known as PAP2b) localizes in compartments of the secretory pathway from ER export sites to the Golgi complex. The depletion of human LPP3: (i) reduces the number of tubules generated from the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment and the Golgi, with those formed from the Golgi being longer in LPP3-silenced cells than in control cells; (ii) impairs the Rab6-dependent retrograde transport of Shiga toxin subunit B from the Golgi to the ER, but not the anterograde transport of VSV-G or ssDsRed; and (iii) induces a high accumulation of Golgi-associated membrane buds. LPP3 depletion also reduces levels of de novo synthesized DAG and the Golgi-associated DAG contents. Remarkably, overexpression of a catalytically inactive form of LPP3 mimics the effects of LPP3 knockdown on Rab6-dependent retrograde transport. We conclude that LPP3 participates in the formation of retrograde transport carriers at the ER-Golgi interface, where it transitorily cycles, and during its route to the plasma membrane.

  6. Alterations in STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase expression, activation, and downstream signaling in early and late stages of the YAC128 Huntington's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Clare M; Fan, Jing; Zhang, Lily Y J; Wang, Liang; Xu, Jian; Li, Edward H Y; Lombroso, Paul J; Raymond, Lynn A

    2014-07-01

    Striatal neurodegeneration and synaptic dysfunction in Huntington's disease are mediated by the mutant huntingtin (mHtt) protein. MHtt disrupts calcium homeostasis and facilitates excitotoxicity, in part by altering NMDA receptor (NMDAR) trafficking and function. Pre-symptomatic (excitotoxin-sensitive) transgenic mice expressing full-length human mHtt with 128 polyglutamine repeats (YAC128 Huntington's disease mice) show increased calpain activity and extrasynaptic NMDAR (Ex-NMDAR) localization and signaling. Furthermore, Ex-NMDAR stimulation facilitates excitotoxicity in wild-type cortical neurons via calpain-mediated cleavage of STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase 61 (STEP61). The cleavage product, STEP33, cannot dephosphorylate p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), thereby augmenting apoptotic signaling. Here, we show elevated extrasynaptic calpain-mediated cleavage of STEP61 and p38 phosphorylation, as well as STEP61 inactivation and reduced extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 phosphorylation (ERK1/2) in the striatum of 6-week-old, excitotoxin-sensitive YAC128 mice. Calpain inhibition reduced basal and NMDA-induced STEP61 cleavage. However, basal p38 phosphorylation was normalized by a peptide disrupting NMDAR-post-synaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) binding but not by calpain inhibition. In 1-year-old excitotoxin-resistant YAC128 mice, STEP33 levels were not elevated, but STEP61 inactivation and p38 and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation levels were increased. These results show that in YAC128 striatal tissue, enhanced NMDAR-PSD-95 interactions contributes to elevated p38 signaling in early, excitotoxin-sensitive stages, and suggest that STEP61 inactivation enhances MAPK signaling at late, excitotoxin-resistant stages. The YAC128 Huntington's disease mouse model shows early, enhanced susceptibility to NMDA receptor-mediated striatal apoptosis, progressing to late-stage excitotoxicity resistance. This study shows that elevated NMDA

  7. Cloning and sequence analysis of a full-length cDNA of SmPP1cb encoding turbot protein phosphatase 1 beta catalytic subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Fei; Guo, Huarong; Wang, Jian

    2008-02-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by protein kinases and phosphatases, is an important and versatile mechanism by which eukaryotic cells regulate almost all the signaling processes. Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is the first and well-characterized member of the protein serine/threonine phosphatase family. In the present study, a full-length cDNA encoding the beta isoform of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1(PP1cb), was for the first time isolated and sequenced from the skin tissue of flatfish turbot Scophthalmus maximus, designated SmPP1cb, by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. The cDNA sequence of SmPP1cb we obtained contains a 984 bp open reading frame (ORF), flanked by a complete 39 bp 5' untranslated region and 462 bp 3' untranslated region. The ORF encodes a putative 327 amino acid protein, and the N-terminal section of this protein is highly acidic, Met-Ala-Glu-Gly-Glu-Leu-Asp-Val-Asp, a common feature for PP1 catalytic subunit but absent in protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B). And its calculated molecular mass is 37 193 Da and pI 5.8. Sequence analysis indicated that, SmPP1cb is extremely conserved in both amino acid and nucleotide acid levels compared with the PP1cb of other vertebrates and invertebrates, and its Kozak motif contained in the 5'UTR around ATG start codon is GXXAXXGXX ATGG, which is different from mammalian in two positions A-6 and G-3, indicating the possibility of different initiation of translation in turbot, and also the 3'UTR of SmPP1cb is highly diverse in the sequence similarity and length compared with other animals, especially zebrafish. The cloning and sequencing of SmPP1cb gene lays a good foundation for the future work on the biological functions of PP1 in the flatfish turbot.

  8. Use of an Anaerobic Chamber Environment for the Assay of Endogenous Cellular Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Li

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases have a catalytic cysteine residue whose reduced state is integral to the reaction mechanism. Since exposure to air can artifactually oxidize this highly reactive thiol, PTPase assays have typically used potent reducing agents to reactivate the enzymes present; however, this approach does not allow for the measurement of the endogenous PTPase activity directly isolated from the in vivo cellular environment. Here we provide a method for using an anaerobic chamber to preserve the activity of the total PTPase complement in a tissue lysate or of an immunoprecipitated PTPase homolog to characterize their endogenous activation state. Comparison with a sample treated with biochemical reducing agents allows the determination of the activatable (reducible fraction of the endogenous PTPase pool.

  9. Protein Phosphatase 1 Down Regulates ZYG-1 Levels to Limit Centriole Duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Nina; Iyer, Jyoti; Naik, Anar; Dougherty, Michael P; Decker, Markus; O'Connell, Kevin F

    2017-01-01

    In humans perturbations of centriole number are associated with tumorigenesis and microcephaly, therefore appropriate regulation of centriole duplication is critical. The C. elegans homolog of Plk4, ZYG-1, is required for centriole duplication, but our understanding of how ZYG-1 levels are regulated remains incomplete. We have identified the two PP1 orthologs, GSP-1 and GSP-2, and their regulators I-2SZY-2 and SDS-22 as key regulators of ZYG-1 protein levels. We find that down-regulation of PP1 activity either directly, or by mutation of szy-2 or sds-22 can rescue the loss of centriole duplication associated with a zyg-1 hypomorphic allele. Suppression is achieved through an increase in ZYG-1 levels, and our data indicate that PP1 normally regulates ZYG-1 through a post-translational mechanism. While moderate inhibition of PP1 activity can restore centriole duplication to a zyg-1 mutant, strong inhibition of PP1 in a wild-type background leads to centriole amplification via the production of more than one daughter centriole. Our results thus define a new pathway that limits the number of daughter centrioles produced each cycle.

  10. Protein Phosphatase 1 Down Regulates ZYG-1 Levels to Limit Centriole Duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Peel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In humans perturbations of centriole number are associated with tumorigenesis and microcephaly, therefore appropriate regulation of centriole duplication is critical. The C. elegans homolog of Plk4, ZYG-1, is required for centriole duplication, but our understanding of how ZYG-1 levels are regulated remains incomplete. We have identified the two PP1 orthologs, GSP-1 and GSP-2, and their regulators I-2SZY-2 and SDS-22 as key regulators of ZYG-1 protein levels. We find that down-regulation of PP1 activity either directly, or by mutation of szy-2 or sds-22 can rescue the loss of centriole duplication associated with a zyg-1 hypomorphic allele. Suppression is achieved through an increase in ZYG-1 levels, and our data indicate that PP1 normally regulates ZYG-1 through a post-translational mechanism. While moderate inhibition of PP1 activity can restore centriole duplication to a zyg-1 mutant, strong inhibition of PP1 in a wild-type background leads to centriole amplification via the production of more than one daughter centriole. Our results thus define a new pathway that limits the number of daughter centrioles produced each cycle.

  11. Involvement of PTPN5, the gene encoding the STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP), in schizophrenia and cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelov, Ilana; Teltsh, Omri; Greenbaum, Lior; Rigbi, Amihai; Kanyas-Sarner, Kyra; Lerer, Bernard; Lombroso, Paul; Kohn, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    Objective STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific member of the PTP family that has been implicated in learning and memory. In this study, we examined the association of the PTPN5 (protein-tyrosine-phosphatase non-receptor 5) gene, which encodes for STEP, with both schizophrenia and cognitive functioning in the Israeli Jewish population. Methods A 868 subjects schizophrenia (SZ) case-control study was performed (286 cases and 582 controls). Eleven STEP tagging SNPs were selected, and single markers and haplotypes association analyses were performed. A cognitive variability study included 437 healthy females who completed a computerized cognitive battery. We performed univariate associations between the SNPs and cognitive performance. The possible functional role of these variants was examined by studying their association with gene expression levels in the brain. Results In the SZ study, we found nominal association in the whole sample between rs4075664 and SZ. SZ males showed a more significant association for 3 SNPs (rs4075664, rs2278732, rs4757710). Haplotypes of the studied SNPs were associated with SZ both in the overall sample and within the male sub-sample. Expression analysis provided some support for the effects of the associated SNPs on PTPN5 expression level. The cognitive variability study showed positive associations between PTPN5 SNPs and different cognitive subtests. Principal component analysis demonstrated an “Attention Index” neurocognitive component that was associated with two SNP pairs (rs10832983*rs10766504 and rs7932938*rs4757718). Conclusion The results imply a model in which PTPN5 may play a role in normal cognitive functioning and contributes to aspects of the neuropathology of schizophrenia. PMID:22555153

  12. Serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 1 α levels are paralleling olfactory memory formation in the CD1 mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winding, Christiana; Sun, Yanwei; Höger, Harald; Bubna-Littitz, Hermann; Pollak, Arnold; Schmidt, Peter; Lubec, Gert

    2011-06-01

    Although olfactory discrimination has already been studied in several mouse strains, data on protein levels linked to olfactory memory are limited. Wild mouse strains Mus musculus musculus, Mus musculus domesticus and CD1 laboratory outbred mice were tested in a conditioned odor preference task and trained to discriminate between two odors, Rose and Lemon, by pairing one odor with a sugar reward. Six hours following the final test, mice were sacrificed and olfactory bulbs (OB) were taken for gel-based proteomics analyses and immunoblotting. OB proteins were extracted, separated by 2-DE and quantified using specific software (Proteomweaver). Odor-trained mice showed a preference for the previously rewarded odor suggesting that conditioned odor preference occurred. In CD1 mice levels, one out of 482 protein spots was significantly increased in odor-trained mice as compared with the control group; it was in-gel digested by trypsin and chymotrypsin and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (nano-ESI-LC-MS/MS). The spot was unambiguously identified as serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PP1-α catalytic subunit (PP-1A) and differential levels observed in gel-based proteomic studies were verified by immunoblotting. PP-1A is a key signalling element in synaptic plasticity and memory processes and is herein shown to be paralleling olfactory discrimination representing olfactory memory. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Structural genomics of human proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Khan Tanjid; Edwards, Aled

    2014-01-01

    Structural genomics efforts focused on the human proteome have had three aims: to understand the structural and functional variations within protein families; to understand the structural basis of disease and genetic variation; and to determine the structures of human integral membrane proteins. The overarching theme is to advance the understanding of human health and to provide a structural platform to aid in the development of therapeutics. A decade or more of work in this field has identified optimal experimental strategies that can be used to expedite expression and crystallization of human proteins-and we provide some guidance to this end.

  14. Production and characterization of a single-chain Fv antibody-alkaline phosphatase fusion protein specific for clenbuterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xixia; Wang, Hong; Liang, Yan; Yang, Jinyi; Zhang, Hongbin; Lei, Hongtao; Shen, Yudong; Sun, Yuanming

    2010-05-01

    The production and characterization of an anti-clenbuterol single-chain Fv antibody (CBLscFv)-bacterial alkaline phosphatase (AP) fusion protein are described. The CBLscFv and the phoA gene of Escherichia coli strain K12 chromosomal DNA were cloned by PCR and sequentially inserted into the expression vector pBV220 to express the CBLscFv-AP fusion protein in E. coli strain BL21(DE3)pLysS. SDS-PAGE and western blot analyses revealed that the fusion protein showed a molecular weight of 73 kDa and bound with the antibacterial AP monoclonal antibody. Determination of enzymatic activity indicated that k(cat) and K(m) values of the fusion protein were 113.60 s(-1) and 29.82 microM, respectively. Competitive direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the obtained fusion protein indicated that the average concentration required for 50% inhibition of binding (IC(50)) and the limit of detection for CBL were 4.74 +/- 0.003 (n = 3) and 0.54 +/- 0.004 (n = 3) microg/l, respectively, and the linear response range extended from 1.13 to 69.68 microg/l. Cross-reactivity studies showed that the fusion protein did not cross-react with CBL analogs. The present findings indicate that the production of the CBLscFv-AP fusion protein in E. coli strain BL21(DE3)pLysS is feasible and suggest that it could be further used to develop a one-step ELISA for the specific detection of CBL.

  15. Mice lacking leukocyte common antigen-related (LAR) protein tyrosine phosphatase domains demonstrate spatial learning impairment in the two-trial water maze and hyperactivity in multiple behavioural tests.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, M.J.M.; Streijger, F.; Linkels, M.; Bloemen, M.; Heeren, D.J.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Zee, C.E.E.M. van der

    2004-01-01

    Leukocyte common antigen-related (LAR) protein is a cell adhesion molecule-like receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase. We previously reported that in LAR tyrosine phosphatase-deficient (LAR-Delta P) mice the number and size of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons as well as their innervation of

  16. The structure of the protein phosphatase 2A PR65/A subunit reveals the conformation of its 15 tandemly repeated HEAT motifs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groves, M R; Hanlon, N; Turowski, P; Hemmings, B A; Barford, D

    1999-01-01

    The PR65/A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A serves as a scaffolding molecule to coordinate the assembly of the catalytic subunit and a variable regulatory B subunit, generating functionally diverse heterotrimers. Mutations of the beta isoform of PR65 are associated with lung and colon tumors. The

  17. A widespread amino acid polymorphism at codon 905 of the glycogen-associated regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase-1 is associated with insulin resistance and hypersecretion of insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Hansen, T; Vestergaard, H

    1995-01-01

    The regulatory G-subunit of the glycogen-associated form of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) plays a crucial part in muscle tissue glycogen synthesis and breakdown. As impaired insulin stimulated glycogen synthesis in peripheral tissues is considered to be a pathogenic factor in subsets of non-insulin...

  18. The role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in the regulation of allergic asthma: implication of TC-PTP and PTP-1B in the modulation of disease development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Philippe; Bergeron, Sébastien; Marette, André; Olivier, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is an important early event in the signal transduction of numerous cell receptors involved in the immune response. The implication of protein tyrosine kinases in allergic asthma is well recognized, but the role of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) remains poorly understood. However, we recently reported that global inhibition of PTPs during either the allergen-sensitization phase or the allergen-challenge phase reduced the development of asthma and that this correlated with an increased T helper 1 (Th1) response in both lung and spleen tissues. Therefore, in this study we investigated individual roles of PTPs involved in regulating the immune response. We observed that genetic deficiency for PTP-1B resulted in increased recruitment of lung inflammatory cells, while protein tyrosine phosphatase-phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted (PTP-PEST)-deficient mice exhibited a phenotype similar to that of wild-type mice. Importantly, we found that a heterozygous mutation of T cell PTP (TC-PTP) dramatically abrogates immunoglobulin E production and reduces the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the lung, conferring an important role for TC-PTP in the development of allergic asthma. As opposed to other studies on Src homology phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) deficiency, specific acute SHP-1 inhibition during allergen challenge did not affect disease outcome. Collectively, our results underscore the importance of PTPs in the development of allergic asthma. PMID:19930043

  19. Differentiation-dependent activation of the human intestinal alkaline phosphatase promoter by HNF-4 in intestinal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Line; Bressendorff, Simon; Troelsen, Jesper T

    2005-01-01

    The intestinal alkaline phosphatase gene (ALPI) encodes a digestive brush-border enzyme, which is highly upregulated during small intestinal epithelial cell differentiation. To identify new putative promoter motifs responsible for the regulation of ALPI expression during differentiation...... of the enterocytes, we have conducted a computer-assisted cis-element search of the proximal human ALPI promoter sequence. A putative recognition site for the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4 was predicted at the positions from -94 to -82 in relation to the translational start site. The ability...

  20. Human Cdc14A Phosphatase Modulates the G2/M Transition through Cdc25A and Cdc25B*

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez-Novelle, María D.; Ovejero, Sara; Bueno, Avelino; María P. Sacristán

    2010-01-01

    The Cdc14 family of serine-threonine phosphatases antagonizes CDK activity by reversing CDK-dependent phosphorylation events. It is well established that the yeast members of this family bring about the M/G1 transition. Budding yeast Cdc14 is essential for CDK inactivation at the end of mitosis and fission yeast Cdc14 homologue Flp1/Clp1 down-regulates Cdc25 to ensure the inactivation of mitotic CDK complexes to trigger cell division. However, the functions of human Cdc14 homologues remain po...

  1. The mycotoxin patulin decreases expression of density-enhanced phosphatase-1 by down-regulating PPARγ in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuyama, Akihiro; Konno, Tomomi; Shimoyama, Shuji; Kikuchi, Hideaki

    2014-08-01

    Patulin is a mycotoxin that is found mainly in apple products and causes symptoms such as bleeding from the digestive tract and diarrhea. Efforts to elucidate the mechanism of its toxicity have focused on protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which regulate the function of tight junctions (TJs) in colon epithelial cells. Patulin reacts with the conserved cysteine residues in the catalytic domains of PTP isoforms. Treatment of Caco-2 human colon cancer cells, used as a colon epithelial model, with 50 µM patulin decreased the level of density-enhanced phosphatase-1 (DEP-1) protein to 30% of the control level after 6 h. The level of DEP-1 mRNA was also decreased during 24 h after treatment with patulin. Moreover, knockdown of DEP-1 increased the level of phosphorylated claudin-4. Destruction of TJs by patulin treatment was observed by immunostaining with an antibody against zonula occludens (ZO)-1. To better understand the mechanistic basis of the decrease in DEP-1 mRNA levels, we searched for a cis-element upstream of the DEP-1 gene and found an element responsive to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) protein. Using a PPARγ-specific antibody, we showed a decrease in PPARγ abundance to 42% of the control level within 6 h after treatment with patulin. PPARγ has four cysteine residues that are involved in zinc finger formation. Our data suggest that DEP-1 affects TJ function and that PPARγ might control DEP-1 expression. Therefore, the toxicity of patulin to cellular functions might be attributable to its ability to down-regulate the expression of DEP-1 and PPARγ.

  2. 14-3-3 mediates transcriptional regulation by modulating nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of tobacco DNA-binding protein phosphatase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, José L; Castelló, María José; Vera, Pablo

    2006-08-11

    Tobacco DBP1 is the founding member of a novel class of plant transcription factors featuring sequence-specific DNA binding and protein phosphatase activity. To understand the mechanisms underlying the function of this family of transcriptional regulators, we have identified the tobacco 14-3-3 isoform G as the first protein interacting with a DBP factor. 14-3-3 recognition involves the N-terminal region of DBP1, which also supports the DNA binding activity attributed to DBP1. The relevance of this interaction is reinforced by its conservation in Arabidopsis plants, where the closest relative of DBP1 in this species also interacts with a homologous 14-3-3 protein through its N-terminal region. Furthermore, we show that in planta 14-3-3 G is directly involved in regulating DBP1 function by promoting nuclear export and subsequent cytoplasmic retention of DBP1 under conditions that in turn alleviate DBP1-mediated repression of target gene expression.

  3. A role for the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 in macrophage adhesion through the regulation of paxillin degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joëlle St-Pierre

    Full Text Available CD45 is a protein tyrosine phosphatase expressed on all cells of hematopoietic origin that is known to regulate Src family kinases. In macrophages, the absence of CD45 has been linked to defects in adhesion, however the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly defined. In this study, we show that bone marrow derived macrophages from CD45-deficient mice exhibit abnormal cell morphology and defective motility. These defects are accompanied by substantially decreased levels of the cytoskeletal-associated protein paxillin, without affecting the levels of other proteins. Degradation of paxillin in CD45-deficient macrophages is calpain-mediated, as treatment with a calpain inhibitor restores paxillin levels in these cells and enhances cell spreading. Inhibition of the tyrosine kinases proline-rich tyrosine kinase (Pyk2 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK, kinases that are capable of mediating tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin, also restored paxillin levels, indicating a role for these kinases in the CD45-dependent regulation of paxillin. These data demonstrate that CD45 functions to regulate Pyk2/FAK activity, likely through the activity of Src family kinases, which in turn regulates the levels of paxillin to modulate macrophage adhesion and migration.

  4. Inactivation and unfolding of protein tyrosine phosphatase from Thermus thermophilus HB27 during urea and guanidine hydrochloride denaturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yejing Wang

    Full Text Available The effects of urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl on the activity, conformation and unfolding process of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase, a thermostable low molecular weight protein from Thermus thermophilus HB27, have been studied. Enzymatic activity assays showed both urea and GdnHCl resulted in the inactivation of PTPase in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Inactivation kinetics analysis suggested that the inactivation of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl were both monophasic and reversible processes, and the effects of urea and GdnHCl on PTPase were similar to that of mixed-type reversible inhibitors. Far-ultraviolet (UV circular dichroism (CD, Tryptophan and 1-anilinonaphthalene -8-sulfonic acid (ANS fluorescence spectral analyses indicated the existence of a partially active and an inactive molten globule-like intermediate during the unfolding processes induced by urea and GdnHCl, respectively. Based on the sequence alignment and the homolog Tt1001 protein structure, we discussed the possible conformational transitions of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl and compared the conformations of these unfolding intermediates with the transient states in bovine PTPase and its complex structures in detail. Our results may be able to provide some valuable clues to reveal the relationship between the structure and enzymatic activity, and the unfolding pathway and mechanism of PTPase.

  5. Chlamydia trachomatis Inclusion Membrane Protein CT228 Recruits Elements of the Myosin Phosphatase Pathway to Regulate Release Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika I. Lutter

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis replicates within a membrane-bound compartment termed an inclusion. The inclusion membrane is modified by the insertion of multiple proteins known as Incs. In a yeast two-hybrid screen, an interaction was found between the inclusion membrane protein CT228 and MYPT1, a subunit of myosin phosphatase. MYPT1 was recruited peripherally around the inclusion, whereas the phosphorylated, inactive form was localized to active Src-family kinase-rich microdomains. Phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 (MLC2, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK, myosin IIA, and myosin IIB also colocalized with inactive MYPT1. The role of these proteins was examined in the context of host-cell exit mechanisms (i.e., cell lysis and extrusion of intact inclusions. Inhibition of myosin II or small interfering RNA depletion of myosin IIA, myosin IIB, MLC2, or MLCK reduced chlamydial extrusion, thus favoring lytic events as the primary means of release. These studies provide insights into the regulation of egress mechanisms by C. trachomatis.

  6. Knockout of striatal enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase in mice results in increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Paul, Surojit; Zhang, Yongfang; Kurup, Pradeep; Ding, Li; Tressler, Lyal; Allen, Melanie; Sacca, Rosalba; Picciotto, Marina R; Lombroso, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    STriatal Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific protein that is thought to play a role in synaptic plasticity. This hypothesis is based on previous findings demonstrating a role for STEP in the regulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2). We have now generated a STEP knockout mouse and investigated the effect of knocking out STEP in the regulation of ERK1/2 activity. Here, we show that the STEP knockout mice are viable and fertile and have no detectable cytoarchitectural abnormalities in the brain. The homozygous knockout mice lack the expression of all STEP isoforms, whereas the heterozygous mice have reduced STEP protein levels when compared with the wild-type mice. The STEP knockout mice show enhanced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in the striatum, CA2 region of the hippocampus, as well as central and lateral nuclei of the amygdala. In addition, the cultured neurons from KO mice showed significantly higher levels of pERK1/2 following synaptic stimulation when compared with wild-type controls. These data demonstrate more conclusively the role of STEP in the regulation of ERK1/2 activity.

  7. Flavonoids as potent allosteric inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B: molecular dynamics simulation and free energy calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargari, Farshid; Lotfi, Maryam; Shahraki, Omolbanin; Nikfarjam, Zahra; Shahraki, Jafar

    2017-12-11

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a member of the PTP superfamily which is considered to be a negative regulator of insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathway. PTP1B is a promising drug target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cancer. The existence of allosteric site in PTP1B has turned the researcher's attention to an alternate strategy for inhibition of this enzyme. Herein, the molecular interactions between the allosteric site of PTP1B with three non-competitive flavonoids, (MOR), (MOK), and (DPO) have been investigated. Three ligands were docked into allosteric site of the enzyme. The resulting protein-ligand complexes were used for molecular dynamics studies. Principal component and free-energy landscape (FEL) as well as cluster analyses were used to investigate the conformational and dynamical properties of the protein and identify representative enzyme substrates bounded to the inhibitors. Per residue energy decomposition analysis attributed dissimilar affinities of three inhibitors to the several hydrogen bonds and non-bonded interactions. In conclusion, our results exhibited an inhibitory pattern of the ligands against PTP1B.

  8. Roles for the Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Phosphatase, DUSP1, in Feedback Control of Inflammatory Gene Expression and Repression by Dexamethasone*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Suharsh; King, Elizabeth M.; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Newton, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids act on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) to repress inflammatory gene expression. This is central to their anti-inflammatory effectiveness and rational improvements in therapeutic index depend on understanding the mechanism. Human pulmonary epithelial A549 cells were used to study the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), in the dexamethasone repression of 11 inflammatory genes induced, in a MAPK-dependent manner, by interleukin-1β (IL1B). Adenoviral over-expression of DUSP1 inactivated MAPK pathways and reduced expression of all 11 inflammatory genes. IL1B rapidly induced DUSP1 expression and RNA silencing revealed a transient role in feedback inhibition of MAPKs and inflammatory gene expression. With dexamethasone, which induced DUSP1 expression, plus IL1B (co-treatment), DUSP1 expression was further enhanced. At 1 h, this was responsible for the dexamethasone inhibition of IL1B-induced MAPK activation and CXCL1 and CXCL2 mRNA expression, with a similar trend for CSF2. Whereas, CCL20 mRNA was not repressed by dexamethasone at 1 h, repression of CCL2, CXCL3, IL6, and IL8 was unaffected, and PTGS2 repression was partially affected by DUSP1 knockdown. At later times, dexamethasone repression of MAPKs was unaffected by DUSP1 silencing. Likewise, 6 h post-IL1B, dexamethasone repression of all 11 mRNAs was essentially unaffected by DUSP1 knockdown. Qualitatively similar data were obtained for CSF2, CXCL1, IL6, and IL8 release. Thus, despite general roles in feedback inhibition, DUSP1 plays a transient, often partial, role in the dexamethasone-dependent repression of certain inflammatory genes. Therefore this also illustrates key roles for DUSP1-independent effectors in mediating glucocorticoid-dependent repression. PMID:24692548

  9. Defining the molecular basis of interaction between R3 receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatases and VE-cadherin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Dorofejeva

    Full Text Available Receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs of the R3 subgroup play key roles in the immune, vascular and nervous systems. They are characterised by a large ectodomain comprising multiple FNIII-like repeats, a transmembrane domain, and a single intracellular phosphatase domain. The functional role of the extracellular region has not been clearly defined and potential roles in ligand interaction, dimerization, and regulation of cell-cell contacts have been reported. Here bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC in live cells was used to examine the molecular basis for the interaction of VE-PTP with VE-cadherin, two proteins involved in endothelial cell contact and maintenance of vascular integrity. The potential of other R3-PTPs to interact with VE-cadherin was also explored using this method. Quantitative BiFC analysis, using a VE-PTP construct expressing only the ectodomain and transmembrane domain, revealed a specific interaction with VE-cadherin, when compared with controls. Controls were sialophorin, an unrelated membrane protein with a large ectodomain, and a membrane anchored C-terminal Venus-YFP fragment, lacking both ectodomain and transmembrane domains. Truncation of the first 16 FNIII-like repeats from the ectodomain of VE-PTP indicated that removal of this region is not sufficient to disrupt the interaction with VE-cadherin, although it occurs predominantly in an intracellular location. A construct with a deletion of only the 17th domain of VE-PTP was, in contrast to previous studies, still able to interact with VE-cadherin, although this also was predominantly intracellular. Other members of the R3-PTP family (DEP-1, GLEPP1 and SAP-1 also exhibited the potential to interact with VE-cadherin. The direct interaction of DEP-1 with VE-cadherin is likely to be of physiological relevance since both proteins are expressed in endothelial cells. Together the data presented in the study suggest a role for both the ectodomain and

  10. Effects of deletion of different PP2C protein phosphatase genes on stress responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin, Dilruba; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2014-10-01

    A key mechanism of signal transduction in eukaryotes is reversible protein phosphorylation, mediated through protein kinases and protein phosphatases (PPases). Modulation of signal transduction by this means regulates many biological processes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has 40 PPases, including seven protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C PPase) genes (PTC1-PTC7). However, their precise functions remain poorly understood. To elucidate their cellular functions and to identify those that are redundant, we constructed 127 strains with deletions of all possible combinations of the seven PP2C PPase genes. All 127 disruptants were viable under nutrient-rich conditions, demonstrating that none of the combinations induced synthetic lethality under these conditions. However, several combinations exhibited novel phenotypes, e.g. the Δptc5Δptc7 double disruptant and the Δptc2Δptc3Δptc5Δptc7 quadruple disruptant exhibited low (13°C) and high (37°C) temperature-sensitive growth, respectively. Interestingly, the septuple disruptant Δptc1Δptc2Δptc3Δptc4Δptc5Δptc6Δptc7 showed an essentially normal growth phenotype at 37°C. The Δptc2Δptc3Δptc5Δptc7 quadruple disruptant was sensitive to LiCl (0.4 m). Two double disruptants, Δptc1Δptc2 and Δptc1Δptc4, displayed slow growth and Δptc1Δptc2Δptc4 could not grow on medium containing 1.5 m NaCl. The Δptc1Δptc6 double disruptant showed increased sensitivity to caffeine, congo red and calcofluor white compared to each single deletion. Our observations indicate that S. cerevisiae PP2C PPases have a shared and important role in responses to environmental stresses. These disruptants also provide a means for exploring the molecular mechanisms of redundant PTC gene functions under defined conditions. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is involved in hippocampal synapse formation and learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Fuentes

    Full Text Available ER-bound PTP1B is expressed in hippocampal neurons, and accumulates among neurite contacts. PTP1B dephosphorylates ß-catenin in N-cadherin complexes ensuring cell-cell adhesion. Here we show that endogenous PTP1B, as well as expressed GFP-PTP1B, are present in dendritic spines of hippocampal neurons in culture. GFP-PTP1B overexpression does not affect filopodial density or length. In contrast, impairment of PTP1B function or genetic PTP1B-deficiency leads to increased filopodia-like dendritic spines and a reduction in mushroom-like spines, while spine density is unaffected. These morphological alterations are accompanied by a disorganization of pre- and post-synapses, as judged by decreased clustering of synapsin-1 and PSD-95, and suggest a dynamic synaptic phenotype. Notably, levels of ß-catenin-Tyr-654 phosphorylation increased ∼5-fold in the hippocampus of adult PTP1B(-/- (KO mice compared to wild type (WT mice and this was accompanied by a reduction in the amount of ß-catenin associated with N-cadherin. To determine whether PTP1B-deficiency alters learning and memory, we generated mice lacking PTP1B in the hippocampus and cortex (PTP1B(fl/fl-Emx1-Cre. PTP1B(fl/fl-Emx1-Cre mice displayed improved performance in the Barnes maze (decreased time to find and enter target hole, utilized a more efficient strategy (cued, and had better recall compared to WT controls. Our results implicate PTP1B in structural plasticity within the hippocampus, likely through modulation of N-cadherin function by ensuring dephosphorylation of ß-catenin on Tyr-654. Disruption of hippocampal PTP1B function or expression leads to elongation of dendritic filopodia and improved learning and memory, demonstrating an exciting novel role for this phosphatase.

  12. Complex regulation of Arabidopsis AGR1/PIN2-mediated root gravitropic response and basipetal auxin transport by cantharidin-sensitive protein phosphatases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Heungsop; Shin, Hwa-Soo; Guo, Zibiao; Blancaflor, Elison B.; Masson, Patrick H.; Chen, Rujin

    2005-01-01

    Polar auxin transport, mediated by two distinct plasma membrane-localized auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins/complexes, plays an important role in many plant growth and developmental processes including tropic responses to gravity and light, development of lateral roots and patterning in embryogenesis. We have previously shown that the Arabidopsis AGRAVITROPIC 1/PIN2 gene encodes an auxin efflux component regulating root gravitropism and basipetal auxin transport. However, the regulatory mechanism underlying the function of AGR1/PIN2 is largely unknown. Recently, protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases, respectively, have been implicated in regulating polar auxin transport and root gravitropism. Here, we examined the effects of chemical inhibitors of protein phosphatases on root gravitropism and basipetal auxin transport, as well as the expression pattern of AGR1/PIN2 gene and the localization of AGR1/PIN2 protein. We also examined the effects of inhibitors of vesicle trafficking and protein kinases. Our data suggest that protein phosphatases, sensitive to cantharidin and okadaic acid, are likely involved in regulating AGR1/PIN2-mediated root basipetal auxin transport and gravitropism, as well as auxin response in the root central elongation zone (CEZ). BFA-sensitive vesicle trafficking may be required for the cycling of AGR1/PIN2 between plasma membrane and the BFA compartment, but not for the AGR1/PIN2-mediated root basipetal auxin transport and auxin response in CEZ cells.

  13. Negative Feed-forward Control of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) by Tristetraprolin (ZFP36) Is Limited by the Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase, Dual-specificity Phosphatase 1 (DUSP1): IMPLICATIONS FOR REGULATION BY GLUCOCORTICOIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Suharsh; Mostafa, Mahmoud M; McWhae, Andrew; Traves, Suzanne L; Newton, Robert

    2016-01-01

    TNF is central to inflammation and may play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The 3'-untranslated region of the TNF transcript contains AU-rich elements (AREs) that are targeted by the RNA-binding protein, tristetraprolin (also known as zinc finger protein 36 (ZFP36)), which is itself up-regulated by inflammatory stimuli, to promote mRNA degradation. Using primary human bronchial epithelial and pulmonary epithelial A549 cells, we confirm that interleukin-1β (IL1B) induces expression of dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), ZFP36, and TNF. Whereas IL1B-induced DUSP1 is involved in feedback control of MAPK pathways, ZFP36 exerts negative (incoherent) feed-forward control of TNF mRNA and protein expression. DUSP1 silencing increased IL1B-induced ZFP36 expression at 2 h and profoundly repressed TNF mRNA at 6 h. This was partly due to increased TNF mRNA degradation, an effect that was reduced by ZFP36 silencing. This confirms a regulatory network, whereby DUSP1-dependent negative feedback control reduces feed-forward control by ZFP36. Conversely, whereas DUSP1 overexpression and inhibition of MAPKs prevented IL1B-induced expression of ZFP36, this was associated with increased TNF mRNA expression at 6 h, an effect that was predominantly due to elevated transcription. This points to MAPK-dependent feed-forward control of TNF involving ZFP36-dependent and -independent mechanisms. In terms of repression by dexamethasone, neither silencing of DUSP1, silencing of ZFP36, nor silencing of both together prevented the repression of IL1B-induced TNF expression, thereby demonstrating the need for further repressive mechanisms by anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids. In summary, these data illustrate why understanding the competing effects of feedback and feed-forward control is relevant to the development of novel anti-inflammatory therapies. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. The striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase gates long-term potentiation and fear memory in the lateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Surojit; Olausson, Peter; Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Ruchkina, Irina; Moran, Timothy D; Tronson, Natalie; Mills, Evan; Hakim, Shawn; Salter, Michael W; Taylor, Jane R; Lombroso, Paul J

    2007-05-01

    Formation of long-term memories is critically dependent on extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling. Activation of the ERK pathway by the sequential recruitment of mitogen-activated protein kinases is well understood. In contrast, the proteins that inactivate this pathway are not as well characterized. Here we tested the hypothesis that the brain-specific striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) plays a key role in neuroplasticity and fear memory formation by its ability to regulate ERK1/2 activation. STEP co-localizes with the ERKs within neurons of the lateral amygdala. A substrate-trapping STEP protein binds to the ERKs and prevents their nuclear translocation after glutamate stimulation in primary cell cultures. Administration of TAT-STEP into the lateral amygdala (LA) disrupts long-term potentiation (LTP) and selectively disrupts fear memory consolidation. Fear conditioning induces a biphasic activation of ERK1/2 in the LA with an initial activation within 5 minutes of training, a return to baseline levels by 15 minutes, and an increase again at 1 hour. In addition, fear conditioning results in the de novo translation of STEP. Inhibitors of ERK1/2 activation or of protein translation block the synthesis of STEP within the LA after fear conditioning. Together, these data imply a role for STEP in experience-dependent plasticity and suggest that STEP modulates the activation of ERK1/2 during amygdala-dependent memory formation. The regulation of emotional memory by modulating STEP activity may represent a target for the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), panic, and anxiety disorders.

  15. The Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase STEP Gates Long-term Potentiation and Fear Memory in the Lateral Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Surojit; Olausson, Peter; Venkitaramani, Deepa V.; Ruchkina, Irina; Moran, Timothy D; Tronson, Natalie; Mills, Evan; Hakim, Shawn; Salter, Michael W; Taylor, Jane R.; Lombroso, Paul J

    2006-01-01

    Background Formation of long-term memories is critically dependent on extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling. Activation of the ERK pathway by the sequential recruitment of mitogen-activated protein kinases is well understood. In contrast, the proteins that inactivate this pathway are not as well characterized. Methods Here we tested the hypothesis that the brain-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase STEP plays a key role in neuroplasticity and fear memory formation by its ability to regulate ERK1/2 activation. Results STEP co-localizes with the ERKs within neurons of the lateral amygdala. A substrate-trapping STEP protein (TAT-STEP) binds to the ERKs and prevents their nuclear translocation after glutamate stimulation in primary cell cultures. Administration of TAT-STEP into the lateral amygdala disrupts long-term potentiation (LTP) and selectively disrupts fear memory consolidation. Fear conditioning induces a bi-phasic activation of ERK1/2 in the lateral amygdala (LA) with an initial activation within 5 minutes of training, a return to baseline levels by 15 minutes, and an increase again at 1 hour. In addition, fear conditioning results in the de novo translation of STEP. Inhibitors of ERK1/2 activation or of protein translation block the synthesis of STEP within the LA after fear conditioning. Conclusions Together, these data imply a role for STEP in experience-dependent plasticity, and suggest that STEP modulates the activation of ERK1/2 during amygdala–dependent memory formation. The regulation of emotional memory by modulating STEP activity may represent a target for the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as PTSD, panic, and anxiety disorders. PMID:17081505

  16. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyuan Ren

    Full Text Available A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes.

  17. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhongyuan; Do, Le Duy; Bechkoff, Géraldine; Mebarek, Saida; Keloglu, Nermin; Ahamada, Saandia; Meena, Saurabh; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Wu, Yuqing; Buchet, René

    2015-01-01

    A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes.

  18. Viral organization of human proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Wuchty

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Although maps of intracellular interactions are increasingly well characterized, little is known about large-scale maps of host-pathogen protein interactions. The investigation of host-pathogen interactions can reveal features of pathogenesis and provide a foundation for the development of drugs and disease prevention strategies. A compilation of experimentally verified interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins and a set of HIV-dependency factors (HDF allowed insights into the topology and intricate interplay between viral and host proteins on a large scale. We found that targeted and HDF proteins appear predominantly in rich-clubs, groups of human proteins that are strongly intertwined among each other. These assemblies of proteins may serve as an infection gateway, allowing the virus to take control of the human host by reaching protein pathways and diversified cellular functions in a pronounced and focused way. Particular transcription factors and protein kinases facilitate indirect interactions between HDFs and viral proteins. Discerning the entanglement of directly targeted and indirectly interacting proteins may uncover molecular and functional sites that can provide novel perspectives on the progression of HIV infection and highlight new avenues to fight this virus.

  19. A protein phosphatase 2A complex spatially controls plant cell division

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spinner, Lara; Gadeyne, Astrid; Belcram, Katia; Goussot, Magali; Moison, Michaël; Duroc, Yann; Eeckhout, Dominique; De Winne, Nancy; Schaefer, Estelle; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Persiau, Geert; Witters, Erwin; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Bouchez, David; Van Damme, Daniël; Pastuglia, Martine

    2013-01-01

    .... This complex, which comprises TONNEAU1 and a PP2A heterotrimeric holoenzyme with FASS as regulatory subunit, is recruited to the cytoskeleton via the TONNEAU1-recruiting motif family of proteins...

  20. Upregulation of protein phosphatase 2A and NR3A-pleiotropic effect of simvastatin on ischemic stroke rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minxia Zhu

    Full Text Available Ca(2+ influxes are regulated by the functional state of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs. Dephosphorylation of NMDARs subunits decreases Ca(2+ influxes. NR3, a novel subunit of NMDARs, also decreases Ca(2+ influxes by forming new NMDARs with NR1 and NR2. It is meaningful to uncover whether protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A and NR3A play a role in the protective effect of Simvastatin on ischemic stroke. In the present study, the Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with Simvastatin for 7 days before middle cerebral artery occlusion was performed to mimic ischemic stroke. The results showed that Simvastatin decreased brain ischemic infarct area significantly while increasing the expression levels of PP2A and NR3A, thus dephosphorylating the serine sites of NR1 (ser896 and ser897 along with increased enzymatic activities of PP2A. The protein levels of NR3A decreased as the enzymatic activities of PP2A were inhibited by okadaic acid. The results indicated that Simvastatin could protect the cerebrum from ischemic injury through a signaling mechanism involving elevated levels of PP2A and NR3A, and that PP2A might involve in the regulatory mechanism of NR3A expression.

  1. The carboxy-terminal fragment of inhibitor-2 of protein phosphatase-2A induces Alzheimer disease pathology and cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochuan; Blanchard, Julie; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Clement, Nathalie; Linden, R Michael; Radu, Aurelian; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2010-11-01

    Development of rational therapeutic treatments of Alzheimer disease (AD) requires the elucidation of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of neurofibrillary degeneration and β-amyloidosis, the two hallmarks of this disease. Here we show, employing an adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1)-induced expression of the C-terminal fragment (I(2CTF)) of I(2)(PP2A), also called SET, in rat brain, decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity, abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, and neurodegeneration; littermates treated identically but with vector only, i.e., AAV1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), served as a control. Furthermore, there was an increase in the level of activated glycogen synthase kinase-3β and enhanced expression of intraneuronal Aβ in AAV1-I(2CTF) animals. Morris water maze behavioral test revealed that infection with AAV1-I(2CTF) induced spatial reference memory and memory consolidation deficits and a decrease in the brain level of pSer133-CREB. These findings suggest a novel etiopathogenic mechanism of AD, which is initiated by the cleavage of I(2)(PP2A), producing I(2CTF), and describe a novel disease-relevant nontransgenic animal model of AD.

  2. Rif1 controls DNA replication by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 to reverse Cdc7-mediated phosphorylation of the MCM complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Shin-Ichiro; Alvino, Gina M; Chang, Fujung; Lian, Hui-Yong; Sridhar, Akila; Kubota, Takashi; Brewer, Bonita J; Weinreich, Michael; Raghuraman, M K; Donaldson, Anne D

    2014-02-15

    Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires phosphorylation of the MCM complex by Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), composed of Cdc7 kinase and its activator, Dbf4. We report here that budding yeast Rif1 (Rap1-interacting factor 1) controls DNA replication genome-wide and describe how Rif1 opposes DDK function by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-mediated dephosphorylation of the MCM complex. Deleting RIF1 partially compensates for the limited DDK activity in a cdc7-1 mutant strain by allowing increased, premature phosphorylation of Mcm4. PP1 interaction motifs within the Rif1 N-terminal domain are critical for its repressive effect on replication. We confirm that Rif1 interacts with PP1 and that PP1 prevents premature Mcm4 phosphorylation. Remarkably, our results suggest that replication repression by Rif1 is itself also DDK-regulated through phosphorylation near the PP1-interacting motifs. Based on our findings, we propose that Rif1 is a novel PP1 substrate targeting subunit that counteracts DDK-mediated phosphorylation during replication. Fission yeast and mammalian Rif1 proteins have also been implicated in regulating DNA replication. Since PP1 interaction sites are evolutionarily conserved within the Rif1 sequence, it is likely that replication control by Rif1 through PP1 is a conserved mechanism.

  3. The C. elegans RSA complex localizes protein phosphatase 2A to centrosomes and regulates mitotic spindle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaitz, Anne-Lore; Srayko, Martin; Dammermann, Alexander; Quintin, Sophie; Wielsch, Natalie; MacLeod, Ian; de Robillard, Quentin; Zinke, Andrea; Yates, John R; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Shevchenko, Andrei; Oegema, Karen; Hyman, Anthony A

    2007-01-12

    Microtubule behavior changes during the cell cycle and during spindle assembly. However, it remains unclear how these changes are regulated and coordinated. We describe a complex that targets the Protein Phosphatase 2A holoenzyme (PP2A) to centrosomes in C. elegans embryos. This complex includes Regulator of Spindle Assembly 1 (RSA-1), a targeting subunit for PP2A, and RSA-2, a protein that binds and recruits RSA-1 to centrosomes. In contrast to the multiple functions of the PP2A catalytic subunit, RSA-1 and RSA-2 are specifically required for microtubule outgrowth from centrosomes and for spindle assembly. The centrosomally localized RSA-PP2A complex mediates these functions in part by regulating two critical mitotic effectors: the microtubule destabilizer KLP-7 and the C. elegans regulator of spindle assembly TPXL-1. By regulating a subset of PP2A functions at the centrosome, the RSA complex could therefore provide a means of coordinating microtubule outgrowth from centrosomes and kinetochore microtubule stability during mitotic spindle assembly.

  4. Acute effect of tea, wine, beer, and polyphenols on ecto-alkaline phosphatase activity in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrão, Maria R; Keating, Elisa; Faria, Ana; Azevedo, Isabel; Martins, Maria J

    2006-07-12

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is an ecto-enzyme widely distributed across species. It modulates a series of transmembranar transport systems, has an important role in bone mineralization, and can also be involved in vascular calcification. Polyphenol-rich diets seem to have protective effects on human health, namely, in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate the effects of polyphenols and polyphenol-rich beverages upon membranar alkaline phosphatase (ecto-ALP) activity in intact human vascular smooth muscle cells (AALTR). The ecto-ALP activity was determined at pH 7.8, with p-nitrophenyl phosphate as the substrate, by absorbance spectrophotometry at 410 nm. Cell viability was assessed by the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) method, and the polyphenol content of beverages was assessed using the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. All polyphenols tested inhibited ecto-ALP activity, in a concentration-dependent way. Teas, wines, and beers also inhibited ecto-ALP activity, largely according to their polyphenol content. All tested compounds and beverages improved or did not change AALTR cell viability. Stout beer was an exception to the described behavior. Although more studies must be done, the inhibition of AALTR ecto-ALP activity by polyphenolic compounds and polyphenol-containing beverages may contribute to their cardiovascular protective effects.

  5. Expression of a gibberellin-induced leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase in deepwater rice and its interaction with kinase-associated protein phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaap, E. van der; Sauter, M.; Kende, H. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). DOE Plant Research Lab.); Song, W.Y.; Ruan, D.L.; Ronald, P.C. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1999-06-01

    The authors identified in deepwater rice (Oryza sativa L.) a gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like transmembrane protein kinase, OsTMK (O. sativa transmembrane kinase). The transcript levels of OsTMK increased in the rice internode in response to gibberellin. Expression of OsTMK was especially high in regions undergoing cell division and elongation. The kinase domain of OsTMK was enzymatically active autophosphorylating on serine and threonine residues. A cDNA encoding a rice ortholog of a kinase-associated type 2C protein phosphatase (OsKAPP) was cloned. KAPPs are putative downstream components in kinase-mediated signal transduction pathways. The kinase interaction domain of OsKAPP was phosphorylated in vitro by the kinase domain of OsTMK. RNA gel-blot analysis indicated that the expression of OsTMK and OsKAPP was similar in different tissues of the rice plant. In protein-binding assays, OsKAPP interacted with a receptor-like protein kinase, RLK5 of Arabidopsis, but not with the protein kinase domains of the rice and maize receptor-like protein kinases Xa21 and ZmPK1, respectively.

  6. The LAR protein tyrosine phosphatase enables PDGF beta-receptor activation through attenuation of the c-Abl kinase activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, W.; Lennartsson, J.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Heldin, C.H.; Hellberg, C.

    2011-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP) LAR negatively regulates the activity of several receptor tyrosine kinases. To investigate if LAR affects the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor signaling, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from mice where the LAR phosphatase domains were deleted

  7. Decreased expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 12 is involved in the proliferation and recurrence of bladder transitional cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    PIAO, YONGRUI; LIU, XIANKUI; LIN, ZHENHUA; JIN, ZHEHU; JIN, XUANSHUN; YUAN, KUICHANG; WU, WENYUAN

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 12 (PTPN12) has been shown to be involved in the development of a number of types of carcinoma. However, the effect of PTPN12 on the proliferation and recurrence of human bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the expression and function of PTPN12 in human TCC. Samples from 164 patients with TCC, in addition to 146 patients undergoing bladder surgery for indications other than TCC, were examined. PTPN12 protein expression was examined using immunohistochemistry and western blotting, and PTPN12 mRNA expression was examined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. PTPN12 expression was increased following transfection with the PTPN12-expressing, pcDEF3 vector, and PTPN12 expression was decreased by RNA interference, in four TCC cell lines. The proliferation of TCC cells was analyzed by a WST-1 assay and in xenografts on BALB/C nude mice. The effect of PTPN12 on tumor recurrence was analyzed by adhesion, migration and invasion assays in TCC cell lines. PTPN12 expression was significantly decreased in TCC tissues compared with that in normal urothelium, and the level of PTPN12 expression was negatively correlated with tumor size, pathological grade, clinical stage and tumor recurrence. Furthermore, decreased expression of PTPN12 significantly enhanced the proliferation of TCC cells in vitro and in vivo. TCC cells with lower levels of PTPN12 exhibited greater adhesion, migration and invasion. In conclusion, PTPN12 expression is downregulated in human TCC. Restoring PTPN12 activity may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for this disease. PMID:26622721

  8. Protein Phosphatase Inhibitor-1 Gene Therapy in a Swine Model of Nonischemic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shin; Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Fish, Kenneth; Oh, Jae Gyun; Motloch, Lukas J; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Lee, Philyoung; Xie, Chaoqin; Lee, Ahyoung; Liang, Lifan; Kho, Changwon; Leonardson, Lauren; McIntyre, Maritza; Wilson, Scott; Samulski, R Jude; Kranias, Evangelia G; Weber, Thomas; Akar, Fadi G; Hajjar, Roger J

    2017-10-03

    Increased protein phosphatase-1 in heart failure (HF) induces molecular changes deleterious to the cardiac cell. Inhibiting protein phosphatase-1 through the overexpression of a constitutively active inhibitor-1 (I-1c) has been shown to reverse cardiac dysfunction in a model of ischemic HF. This study sought to determine the therapeutic efficacy of a re-engineered adenoassociated viral vector carrying I-1c (BNP116.I-1c) in a preclinical model of nonischemic HF, and to assess thoroughly the safety of BNP116.I-1c gene therapy. Volume-overload HF was created in Yorkshire swine by inducing severe mitral regurgitation. One month after mitral regurgitation induction, pigs were randomized to intracoronary delivery of either BNP116.I-1c (n = 6) or saline (n = 7). Therapeutic efficacy and safety were evaluated 2 months after gene delivery. Additionally, 24 naive pigs received different doses of BNP116.I-1c for safety evaluation. At 1 month after mitral regurgitation induction, pigs developed HF as evidenced by increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and left ventricular volume indexes. Treatment with BNP116.I-1c resulted in improved left ventricular ejection fraction (-5.9 ± 4.2% vs. 5.5 ± 4.0%; p pigs also exhibited a significant increase in left atrial ejection fraction at 2 months after gene delivery (-4.3 ± 3.1% vs. 7.5 ± 3.1%; p = 0.02). In vitro I-1c gene transfer in isolated left atrial myocytes from both pigs and rats increased calcium transient amplitude, consistent with its positive impact on left atrial contraction. We found no evidence of adverse electrical remodeling, arrhythmogenicity, activation of a cellular immune response, or off-target organ damage by BNP116.I-1c gene therapy in pigs. Intracoronary delivery of BNP116.I-1c was safe and improved contractility of the left ventricle and atrium in a large animal model of nonischemic HF. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  9. RNA interference against cancer/testis genes identifies dual specificity phosphatase 21 as a potential therapeutic target in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qing; Li, Kun-Yu; Chen, Hui; Dai, Ji-Hong; Zhai, Yang-Yang; Wang, Qun; Li, Niu; Wang, Yu-Ping; Han, Ze-Guang

    2014-02-01

    Cancer/testis (CT) antigens have been considered therapeutic targets for treating cancers. However, a central question is whether their expression contributes to tumorigenesis or if they are functionally irrelevant by-products derived from the process of cellular transformation. In any case, these CT antigens are essential for cancer cell survival and may serve as potential therapeutic targets. Recently, the cell-based RNA interference (RNAi) screen has proven to be a powerful approach for identifying potential therapeutic targets. In this study we sought to identify new CT antigens as potential therapeutic targets for human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and 179 potential CT genes on the X chromosome were screened through a bioinformatics analysis of gene expression profiles. Then an RNAi screen against these potential CT genes identified nine that were required for sustaining the survival of Focus and PLC/PRF/5 cells. Among the nine genes, the physiologically testis-restricted dual specificity phosphatase 21 (DUSP21) encoding a dual specificity phosphatase was up-regulated in 39 (33%) of 118 human HCC specimens. Ectopic DUSP21 had no obvious impact on proliferation and colony formation in HCC cells. However, DUSP21 silencing significantly suppressed cell proliferation, colony formation, and in vivo tumorigenicity in HCC cells. The administration of adenovirus-mediated RNAi and an atelocollagen/siRNA mixture against endogenous DUSP21 significantly suppressed xenograft HCC tumors in mice. Further investigations showed that DUSP21 knockdown led to arrest of the cell cycle in G1 phase, cell senescence, and expression changes of some factors with functions in the cell cycle and/or senescence. Furthermore, the antiproliferative role of DUSP21 knockdown is through activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in HCC. DUSP21 plays an important role in sustaining HCC cell proliferation and may thus act as a potential therapeutic target in HCC treatment. © 2013 by

  10. Protein Phosphatase 1-Dependent Transcriptional Programs for Long-Term Memory and Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Johannes; Koshibu, Kyoko; Jouvenceau, Anne; Dutar, Patrick; Mansuy, Isabelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Gene transcription is essential for the establishment and the maintenance of long-term memory (LTM) and for long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity. The molecular mechanisms that control gene transcription in neuronal cells are complex and recruit multiple signaling pathways in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Protein kinases (PKs) and…

  11. Modulation of Src Activity by Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase During Osteoblast Differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Granjeiro, Jose M.; Parikh, Kaushal; Yuvaraj, Saravanan; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Ferreira, Carmen V.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Src kinase plays a critical role in bone metabolism, particularly in osteoclasts. However, the ability of Src kinase to modulate the activity of other bone cells is less well understood. In this work, we examined the expression and activity of Src and low molecular weight protein

  12. Human conglutinin-like protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensenius, J C; Thiel, S; Baatrup, G

    1985-01-01

    The presence in human plasma of a molecule homologous to bovine conglutinin is indicated by the results of biological and immunochemical analysis. The human conglutinin-like protein shows calcium-dependent binding to complement-treated solid phase IgG and immunological cross-reaction with chicken...... anti-bovine conglutinin. The binding of the human protein to complement-treated IgG was inhibited by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine but not by other sugars. Analysis by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting showed reaction of anti-conglutinin with molecules of similar mobility to the monomer and hexamer of bovine...

  13. Association between receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha and the Grb2 adaptor. Dual Src homology (SH) 2/SH3 domain requirement and functional consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Yang, L T; Sap, J

    1996-01-01

    Receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha is found associated in vivo with the adaptor protein Grb2. Formation of this complex, which contains no detectable levels of Sos, is known to depend on a C-terminal phosphorylated tyrosine residue (Tyr798) in RPTPalpha and on the Src homology (SH) 2...... in vivo. These observations constitute a novel mode of Grb2 association and suggest a model in which association with a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein restricts the repertoire of SH3 binding proteins with which Grb2 can simultaneously interact. The function of the Tyr798 tyrosine phosphorylation/Grb2...

  14. TYPE-ONE PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE4 regulates pavement cell interdigitation by modulating PIN-FORMED1 polarity and trafficking in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaola; Qin, Qianqian; Yan, Jia; Niu, Yali; Huang, Bingyao; Guan, Liping; Li, Yuan; Ren, Dongtao; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2015-03-01

    In plants, cell morphogenesis is dependent on intercellular auxin accumulation. The polar subcellular localization of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein is crucial for this process. Previous studies have shown that the protein kinase PINOID (PID) and protein phosphatase6-type phosphatase holoenzyme regulate the phosphorylation status of PIN1 in root tips and shoot apices. Here, we show that a type-one protein phosphatase, TOPP4, is essential for the formation of interdigitated pavement cell (PC) pattern in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf. The dominant-negative mutant topp4-1 showed severely inhibited interdigitated PC growth. Expression of topp4-1 gene in wild-type plants recapitulated the PC defects in the mutant. Genetic analyses suggested that TOPP4 and PIN1 likely function in the same pathway to regulate PC morphogenesis. Furthermore, colocalization, in vitro and in vivo protein interaction studies, and dephosphorylation assays revealed that TOPP4 mediated PIN1 polar localization and endocytic trafficking in PCs by acting antagonistically with PID to modulate the phosphorylation status of PIN1. In addition, TOPP4 affects the cytoskeleton pattern through the Rho of Plant GTPase-dependent auxin-signaling pathway. Therefore, we conclude that TOPP4-regulated PIN1 polar targeting through direct dephosphorylation is crucial for PC morphogenesis in the Arabidopsis leaf. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Benzene Polyphosphates as Tools for Cell Signalling: Inhibition of Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate 5-Phosphatase and Interaction with the PH Domain of Protein Kinase Bα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Stephen J; Vandeput, Fabrice; Trusselle, Melanie N.; Safrany, Stephen T.; Erneux, Christophe; Potter, Barry V. L.

    2009-01-01

    Novel benzene polyphosphates were synthesised as inositol polyphosphate mimics and evaluated against both type-I inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 5-phosphatase, which only binds soluble inositol polyphosphates, and the PH domain of protein kinase Bα (PKBα), which can bind both soluble inositol polyphosphates and inositol phospholipids. The most potent trisphosphate 5-phosphatase inhibitor is benzene 1,2,4-trisphosphate 2, (IC50 of 14 μm) a potential mimic of d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and the most potent tetrakisphosphate Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase inhibitor is benzene 1,2,4,5-tetrakisphosphate, with an IC50 of 4 μm. Biphenyl 2,3′,4,5′,6-pentakisphosphate 4 was the most potent inhibitor evaluated against type I Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase (IC50 of 1 μm). All new benzene polyphosphates are resistant to dephosphorylation by type I Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase. Unexpectedly, all benzene polyphosphates studied bind to the PH domain of PKBα with apparent higher affinity than type 1 Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase. The most potent ligand for PKBα PH domain is biphenyl 2,3′,4,5′,6-pentakisphosphate 4 (Ki = 27 nm), measured by inhibition of biotinylated diC8-PtdIns(3,4)P2 binding. The ca 80-fold enhancement of binding relative to parent benzene trisphosphate is rationalised by the involvement of a cation–π interaction. These new molecular tools will be of potential use in structural and cell signalling studies. PMID:18574825

  16. A novel strategy for the development of selective active-site inhibitors of the protein tyrosine phosphatase-like proteins islet-cell antigen 512 (IA-2) and phogrin (IA-2 beta)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drake, P.G.; Peters, Günther H.j.; Andersen, H.S.

    2003-01-01

    Islet-cell antigen 512 (IA-2) and phogrin (IA-2) are atypical members of he receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family that are characterized by a lack of activity against conventional PTP substrates. The physiological role(s) of these proteins remain poorly defined, although recent studi...

  17. Inhibitors of Protein Phosphatases 1 and 2A Block the Sugar-Inducible Gene Expression in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, S.; Mano, S.; Ohto, Ma.; Nakamura, K.

    1994-10-01

    Genes coding for two major proteins of the tuberous root of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), namely, sporamin and [beta]-amylase, are inducible in leaves and petioles when they are supplied with high concentrations of sucrose or other metabolizable sugars, such as glucose and fructose, and the accumulation of a large amount of starch accompanies this induction. Three inhibitors of protein phosphatases 1 (PP1) and 2A (PP2A), namely, okadaic acid, microcystin-LR, and calyculin A, strongly inhibited the sucrose-inducible accumulation of mRNAs for sporamin, [beta]-amylase, and the small subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in petioles. However, these inhibitors did not have any major effect on the steady-state levels of mRNAs for catalase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and the sucrose-inducible increase in the level of sucrose synthase mRNA was enhanced by okadaic acid. Inhibitors of PP1 and PP2A also inhibited sucrose-inducible expression of a fusion gene, consisting of the promoter of the sweet potato gene for [beta]-amylase and the coding sequence for [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS), in leaves of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The inhibition was not due to inhibition of uptake and cleavage of sucrose, since okadaic acid also inhibited induction of the fusion gene by glucose or fructose. Addition of okadaic acid to leaves that had been treated with sucrose for 6 h inhibited further increases in GUS activity. These results suggest that the continuous dephosphorylation of proteins is required in the transduction of carbohydrate metabolic signals to the transcriptional activation of at least some sugar-inducible genes in plant.

  18. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B deficiency potentiates PERK/eIF2α signaling in brown adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Bettaieb

    Full Text Available Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is a physiological regulator of glucose homeostasis and body mass, and has been implicated in endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Herein, we assess the role of PTP1B in ER stress in brown adipocytes, which are key regulators of thermogenesis and metabolic response.To determine the role of PTP1B in ER stress, we utilized brown adipose tissue (BAT from mice with adipose-specific PTP1B deletion, and brown adipocytes deficient in PTP1B and reconstituted with PTP1B wild type (WT or the substrate-trapping PTP1B D181A (D/A mutant. PTP1B deficiency led to upregulation of PERK-eIF2α phosphorylation and IRE1α-XBP1 sub-arms of the unfolded protein response. In addition, PTP1B deficiency sensitized differentiated brown adipocytes to chemical-induced ER stress. Moreover, PERK activation and tyrosine phosphorylation were increased in BAT and adipocytes lacking PTP1B. Increased PERK activity resulted in the induction of eIF2α phosphorylation at Ser51 and better translatability of ATF4 mRNA in response to ER stress. At the molecular level, we demonstrate direct interaction between PTP1B and PERK and identify PERK Tyr615 as a mediator of this association.Collectively, the data demonstrate that PTP1B is a physiologically-relevant modulator of ER stress in brown adipocytes and that PTP1B deficiency modulates PERK-eIF2α phosphorylation and protein synthesis.

  19. New Functions of the Inositol Polyphosphate 5-Phosphatases in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erneux, Christophe; Ghosh, Somadri; Ramos, Ana Raquel; Edimo, William's Elong

    2016-01-01

    Inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases act on inositol phosphates and phosphoinositides as substrates. They are 10 different isoenzymes and several splice variants in the human genome that are involved in a series of human pathologies such as the Lowe syndrome, the Joubert and MORM syndromes, breast cancer, glioblastoma, gastric cancer and several other type of cancers. Inositol 5-phosphatases can be amplified in human cancer cells, whereas the 3- and 4- phosphatase tumor suppressor PTEN and INPP4B, repectively are often repressed or deleted. The inositol 5-phosphatases are critically involved in a complex network of higly regulated phosphoinositides, affecting the lipid content of PI(3, 4, 5)P3, PI(4, 5)P2 and PI(3, 4)P2. This has an impact on the normal behavior of many intracellular target proteins e.g. protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) or actin binding proteins and final biological responses. The production of PI(3, 4P)2 by dephosphorylation of the substrate PI(3, 4, 5)P3 is particularly important as it produces a new signal messenger in the control of cell migration, invasion and endocytosis. New inhibitors/activators of inositol 5- phosphatases have recently been identified for the possible control of their activity in several human pathologies such as inflamation and cancer.

  20. A genomic perspective on protein tyrosine phosphatases: gene structure, pseudogenes, and genetic disease linkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jannik N; Jansen, Peter G; Echwald, Søren M

    2004-01-01

    and provide predicted amino acid sequences for four human PTPs that are currently defined by fragments only. Finally, we correlated each PTP locus with genetic disease markers and identified 4 PTPs that map to known susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes and 19 PTPs that map to regions frequently deleted...

  1. Effect of chlorination on the protein phosphatase inhibition activity for several microcystins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microcystins are of particular concern due to their toxicity to both humans and animals and are likely the most prominent cyanotoxin observed in freshwater. Although a number of studies have investigated the fate of microcystins and other algal toxins through drinking water trea...

  2. Protein phosphatase 2A holoenzyme is targeted to peroxisomes by piggybacking and positively affects peroxisomal β-oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataya, Amr R A; Heidari, Behzad; Hagen, Lars; Kommedal, Roald; Slupphaug, Geir; Lillo, Cathrine

    2015-02-01

    The eukaryotic, highly conserved serine (Ser)/threonine-specific protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) functions as a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic (C), scaffolding (A), and regulatory (B) subunit. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), five, three, and 17 genes encode different C, A, and B subunits, respectively. We previously found that a B subunit, B'θ, localized to peroxisomes due to its C-terminal targeting signal Ser-Ser-leucine. This work shows that PP2A C2, C5, andA2 subunits interact and colocalize with B'θ in peroxisomes. C and A subunits lack peroxisomal targeting signals, and their peroxisomal import depends on B'θ and appears to occur by piggybacking transport. B'θ knockout mutants were impaired in peroxisomal β-oxidation as shown by developmental arrest of seedlings germinated without sucrose, accumulation of eicosenoic acid, and resistance to protoauxins indole-butyric acid and 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid. All of these observations strongly substantiate that a full PP2A complex is present in peroxisomes and positively affects β-oxidation of fatty acids and protoauxins. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Protein Phosphatase 2A Holoenzyme Is Targeted to Peroxisomes by Piggybacking and Positively Affects Peroxisomal β-Oxidation1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataya, Amr R.A.; Heidari, Behzad; Hagen, Lars; Kommedal, Roald; Slupphaug, Geir; Lillo, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic, highly conserved serine (Ser)/threonine-specific protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) functions as a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic (C), scaffolding (A), and regulatory (B) subunit. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), five, three, and 17 genes encode different C, A, and B subunits, respectively. We previously found that a B subunit, B′θ, localized to peroxisomes due to its C-terminal targeting signal Ser-Ser-leucine. This work shows that PP2A C2, C5, andA2 subunits interact and colocalize with B′θ in peroxisomes. C and A subunits lack peroxisomal targeting signals, and their peroxisomal import depends on B′θ and appears to occur by piggybacking transport. B′θ knockout mutants were impaired in peroxisomal β-oxidation as shown by developmental arrest of seedlings germinated without sucrose, accumulation of eicosenoic acid, and resistance to protoauxins indole-butyric acid and 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid. All of these observations strongly substantiate that a full PP2A complex is present in peroxisomes and positively affects β-oxidation of fatty acids and protoauxins. PMID:25489022

  4. A complex between contactin-1 and the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRZ controls the development of oligodendrocyte precursor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamprianou, Smaragda; Chatzopoulou, Elli; Thomas, Jean-Léon; Bouyain, Samuel; Harroch, Sheila (IP-Korea); (UPMC); (UMKC)

    2013-09-23

    The six members of the contactin (CNTN) family of neural cell adhesion molecules are involved in the formation and maintenance of the central nervous system (CNS) and have been linked to mental retardation and neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism. Five of the six CNTNs bind to the homologous receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases gamma (PTPRG) and zeta (PTPRZ), but the biological roles of these interactions remain unclear. We report here the cocrystal structure of the carbonic anhydrase-like domain of PTPRZ bound to tandem Ig repeats of CNTN1 and combine these structural data with binding assays to show that PTPRZ binds specifically to CNTN1 expressed at the surface of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Furthermore, analyses of glial cell populations in wild-type and PTPRZ-deficient mice show that the binding of PTPRZ to CNTN1 expressed at the surface of oligodendrocyte precursor cells inhibits their proliferation and promotes their development into mature oligodendrocytes. Overall, these results implicate the PTPRZ/CNTN1 complex as a previously unknown modulator of oligodendrogenesis.

  5. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP1B) and α-glucosidase by geranylated flavonoids from Paulownia tomentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yeong Hun; Uddin, Zia; Jin, Young Min; Li, Zuopeng; Curtis-Long, Marcus John; Kim, Kwang Dong; Cho, Jung Keun; Park, Ki Hun

    2017-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and α-glucosidase are important targets to treat obesity and diabetes, due to their deep correlation with insulin and leptin signalling, and glucose regulation. The methanol extract of Paulownia tomentosa fruits showed potent inhibition against both enzymes. Purification of this extract led to eight geranylated flavonoids (1-8) displaying dual inhibition of PTP1B and α-glucosidase. The isolated compounds were identified as flavanones (1-5) and dihydroflavonols (6-8). Inhibitory potencies of these compounds varied accordingly, but most of the compounds were highly effective against PTP1B (IC50 = 1.9-8.2 μM) than α-glucosidase (IC50 = 2.2-78.9 μM). Mimulone (1) was the most effective against PTP1B with IC50 = 1.9 μM, whereas 6-geranyl-3,3',5,5',7-pentahydroxy-4'-methoxyflavane (8) displayed potent inhibition against α-glucosidase (IC50 = 2.2 μM). All inhibitors showed mixed type Ι inhibition toward PTP1B, and were noncompetitive inhibitors of α-glucosidase. This mixed type behavior against PTP1B was fully demonstrated by showing a decrease in Vmax, an increase of Km, and Kik/Kiv ratio ranging between 2.66 and 3.69.

  6. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase-1B Mediates Sleep Fragmentation-Induced Insulin Resistance and Visceral Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozal, David; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Qiao, Zhuanghong; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Maccari, Rosanna; Ottanà, Rosaria

    2017-09-01

    Sleep fragmentation (SF) is highly prevalent and has emerged as an important contributing factor to obesity and metabolic syndrome. We hypothesized that SF-induced increases in protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B) expression and activity underlie increased food intake, inflammation, and leptin and insulin resistance. Wild-type (WT) and ObR-PTP-1b-/- mice (Tg) were exposed to SF and control sleep (SC), and food intake was monitored. WT mice received a PTP-1B inhibitor (RO-7d; Tx) or vehicle (Veh). Upon completion of exposures, systemic insulin and leptin sensitivity tests were performed as well as assessment of visceral white adipose tissue (vWAT) insulin receptor sensitivity and macrophages (ATM) polarity. SF increased food intake in either untreated or Veh-treated WT mice. Leptin-induced hypothalamic STAT3 phosphorylation was decreased, PTP-1B activity was increased, and reduced insulin sensitivity emerged both systemic and in vWAT, with the latter displaying proinflammatory ATM polarity changes. All of the SF-induced effects were abrogated following PTP-1B inhibitor treatment and in Tg mice. SF induces increased food intake, reduced leptin signaling in hypothalamus, systemic insulin resistance, and reduced vWAT insulin sensitivity and inflammation that are mediated by increased PTP-1B activity. Thus, PTP-1B may represent a viable therapeutic target in the context of SF-induced weight gain and metabolic dysfunction.

  7. Naturally occurring Diels-Alder-type adducts from Morus nigra as potent inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein tyrosine phosphatase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarello, Alessandra; Orbem Menegatti, Angela Camila; Calcaterra, Andrea; Martins, Priscila Graziela Alves; Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise Domeneghini; D'Acquarica, Ilaria; Ferrari, Franco; Pau, Valentina; Sanna, Adriana; De Logu, Alessandro; Botta, Maurizio; Botta, Bruno; Terenzi, Hernán; Mori, Mattia

    2017-12-07

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) protein tyrosine phosphatases A and B (PtpA and PtpB) have been recognized as potential molecular targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies against tuberculosis (TB). In this context, we have recently reported that the naturally occurring Diels-Alder-type adduct Kuwanol E is an inhibitor of PtpB (Ki = 1.6 ± 0.1 μM). Here, we describe additional Diels-Alder-type adducts isolated from Morus nigra roots bark that inhibit PtpB at sub-micromolar concentrations. The two most potent compounds, namely Kuwanon G and Kuwanon H, showed Ki values of 0.39 ± 0.27 and 0.20 ± 0.01 μM, respectively, and interacted with the active site of the enzyme as suggested by kinetics and mass spectrometry studies. Molecular docking coupled with intrinsic fluorescence analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) further characterized the interaction of these promising PtpB inhibitors. Notably, in an Mtb survival assay inside macrophages, Kuwanon G showed inhibition of Mtb growth by 61.3%. All these results point to the common Diels-Alder-type adduct scaffold, and highlight its relevance for the development of PtpB inhibitors as candidate therapeutics for TB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Computational revelation of binding mechanisms of inhibitors to endocellular protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fangfang; Liu, Xinguo; Zhang, Shaolong; Su, Jing; Zhang, Qinggang; Chen, Jianzhong

    2017-11-06

    Endocellular protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is one of the most promising target for designing and developing drugs to cure type-II diabetes and obesity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) and solvated interaction energy methods were applied to study binding differences of three inhibitors (ID: 901, 941, and 968) to PTP1B, the calculated results show that the inhibitor 901 has the strongest binding ability to PTP1B among the current inhibitors. Principal component (PC) analysis was also carried out to investigate the conformational change of PTP1B, and the results indicate that the associations of inhibitors with PTP1B generate a significant effect on the motion of the WPD-loop. Free energy decomposition method was applied to study the contributions of individual residues to inhibitor bindings, it is found that three inhibitors can generate hydrogen bonding interactions and hydrophobic interactions with different residues of PTP1B, which provide important forces for associations of inhibitors with PTP1B. This research is expected to give a meaningfully theoretical guidance to design and develop of effective drugs curing type-II diabetes and obesity.

  9. Stimulation of receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha activity and phosphorylation by phorbol ester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    den Hertog, J; Sap, J; Pals, C E

    1995-01-01

    with the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate, a direct activator of protein kinase C, induced a rapid, transient increase in RPTP alpha activity due to a 2- to 3-fold increase in substrate affinity. A transient increase in RPTP alpha serine phosphorylation was concomitant with the enhanced activity....... Tryptic phosphopeptide mapping of RPTP alpha demonstrated that phosphorylation of three tryptic peptides was enhanced in response to phorbol ester. In vitro dephosphorylation of RPTP alpha from phorbol ester-treated cells reduced RPTP alpha activity to prestimulation levels, indicating that enhanced...

  10. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  11. 1-step versus 2-step immobilization of alkaline phosphatase and bone morphogenetic protein-2 onto implant surfaces using polydopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhuis, Arnold W G; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Boerman, Otto C; Jansen, John A; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G

    2013-08-01

    Immobilization of biomolecules onto implant surfaces is highly relevant in many areas of biomaterial research. Recently, a 2-step immobilization procedure was developed for the facile conjugation of biomolecules onto various surfaces using self-polymerization of dopamine into polydopamine. In the current study, a 1-step polydopamine-based approach was applied for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) immobilization, and compared to the conventional 2-step polydopamine-based immobilization and plain adsorption. To this end, ALP and BMP-2 were immobilized onto titanium and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrates. The absolute quantity and biological activity of immobilized ALP were assessed quantitatively to compare the three types of immobilization. Plain adsorption of both ALP and BMP-2 was inferior to both polydopamine-based immobilization approaches. ALP was successfully immobilized onto titanium and PTFE surfaces via the 1-step approach, and the immobilized ALP retained its enzymatic activity. Using the 1-step approach, the amount of immobilized ALP was increased twofold to threefold compared to the conventional 2-step immobilization process. In contrast, more BMP-2 was immobilized using the conventional 2-step immobilization approach. Retention of ALP and BMP-2 was measured over a period of 4 weeks and was found to be similar for the 1-step and 2-step methods and far superior to the retention of adsorbed biomolecules due to the formation of covalent linkages between catechol moieties and immobilized proteins. The biological behavior of ALP and BMP-2 coatings immobilized using polydopamine (1- and 2-step) as well as adsorption was assessed by culturing rat bone marrow cells, which revealed that the cell responses to the various experimental groups were not statistically different. In conclusion, the 1-step polydopamine-based immobilization method was shown to be more efficient for immobilization of ALP, whereas the conventional 2

  12. Fat storage-inducing transmembrane (FIT or FITM proteins are related to lipid phosphatase/phosphotransferase enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Hayes

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fat storage-inducing transmembrane (FIT or FITM proteins have been implicated in the partitioning of triacylglycerol to lipid droplets and the budding of lipid droplets from the ER. At the molecular level, the sole relevant interaction is that FITMs directly bind to triacyglycerol and diacylglycerol, but how they function at the molecular level is not known. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two FITM homologues: Scs3p and Yft2p. Scs3p was initially identified because deletion leads to inositol auxotrophy, with an unusual sensitivity to addition of choline. This strongly suggests a role for Scs3p in phospholipid biosynthesis. Looking at the FITM family as widely as possible, we found that FITMs are widespread throughout eukaryotes, indicating presence in the last eukaryotic common ancestor. Protein alignments also showed that FITM sequences contain the active site of lipid phosphatase/phosphotransferase (LPT enzymes. This large family transfers phosphate-containing headgroups either between lipids or in exchange for water. We confirmed the prediction that FITMs are related to LPTs by showing that single amino-acid substitutions in the presumptive catalytic site prevented their ability to rescue growth of the mutants on low inositol/high choline media when over-expressed. The substitutions also prevented rescue of other phenotypes associated with loss of FITM in yeast, including mistargeting of Opi1p, defective ER morphology, and aberrant lipid droplet budding. These results suggest that Scs3p, Yft2p and FITMs in general are LPT enzymes involved in an as yet unknown critical step in phospholipid metabolism.

  13. Penostatin Derivatives, a Novel Kind of Protein Phosphatase 1B Inhibitors Isolated from Solid Cultures of the Entomogenous Fungus Isaria tenuipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Peng Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is implicated as a negative regulator of insulin receptor (IR signaling and a potential drug target for the treatment of type II diabetes and other associated metabolic syndromes. Therefore, small molecular inhibitors of PTP1B can be considered as an attractive approach for the design of new therapeutic agents of type II diabetes diseases. In a continuing search for new protein phosphatase inhibitors from fungi, we have isolated a new compound, named penostatin J (1, together with three known ones, penostatin C (2, penostatin A (3, and penostatin B (4, from cultures of the entomogenous fungus Isaria tenuipes. The structure of penostatin J (1 was elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis. We also demonstrate for the first time that penostatin derivatives exhibit the best PTP1B inhibitory action. These findings suggest that penostatin derivatives are a potential novel kind of PTP1B inhibitors.

  14. Asperterpenoid A, a new sesterterpenoid as an inhibitor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein tyrosine phosphatase B from the culture of Aspergillus sp. 16-5c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xishan; Huang, Hongbo; Li, Hanxiang; Sun, Xuefeng; Huang, Huarong; Lu, Yongjun; Lin, Yongcheng; Long, Yuhua; She, Zhigang

    2013-02-15

    Asperterpenoid A (1), a novel sesterterpenoid with a new carbon skeleton, has been isolated from a mangrove endophytic fungus Aspergillus sp. 16-5c. Its structure was characterized by extensive spectroscopic methods, and the absolute configuration was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Asperterpenoid A (1) exhibited strong inhibitory activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein tyrosine phosphatase B (mPTPB) with an IC(50) value of 2.2 μM.

  15. A widespread family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases shares a common regulatory switch with proteasomal proteases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, Niels [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, United States; Levdikov, Vladimir M. [Structural Biology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of York, York, United Kingdom; Zimanyi, Christina M. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, United States; Gaudet, Rachelle [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, United States; Wilkinson, Anthony J. [Structural Biology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of York, York, United Kingdom; Losick, Richard [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, United States

    2017-05-20

    PP2C phosphatases control biological processes including stress responses, development, and cell division in all kingdoms of life. Diverse regulatory domains adapt PP2C phosphatases to specific functions, but how these domains control phosphatase activity was unknown. We present structures representing active and inactive states of the PP2C phosphatase SpoIIE from Bacillus subtilis. Based on structural analyses and genetic and biochemical experiments, we identify an α-helical switch that shifts a carbonyl oxygen into the active site to coordinate a metal cofactor. Our analysis indicates that this switch is widely conserved among PP2C family members, serving as a platform to control phosphatase activity in response to diverse inputs. Remarkably, the switch is shared with proteasomal proteases, which we identify as evolutionary and structural relatives of PP2C phosphatases. Although these proteases use an unrelated catalytic mechanism, rotation of equivalent helices controls protease activity by movement of the equivalent carbonyl oxygen into the active site.

  16. Transition of serum alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes during liver regeneration in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Izumi; Soyama, Akihiko; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Tomonaga, Tetsuo; Hidaka, Masaaki; Kanematsu, Takashi; Eguchi, Susumu

    2013-09-01

    Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels tend to increase after hepatectomy, however, no previous examinations have yet focused on the relationship between liver regeneration and the individual ALP isoenzymes levels. Forty living liver transplantation donors who underwent hemi-hepatectomy were herein investigated. We evaluated the serum ALP levels and ALP isoenzyme levels preoperatively and postoperatively. The liver regeneration rate (LRR) was calculated using volumetry. According to the LRR, we divided the donors into two groups, consisting of a high regeneration group (HG) and a low regeneration group (LG). The total serum ALP levels increased gradually after hepatectomy and peaked on postoperative days (POD) 14. ALP-1 was not detected in any donor preoperatively; however it was detected after hepatectomy, peaking on POD 7. The serum ALP-2 level increased after hepatectomy, reaching a peak level on POD 14. The ALP-2 levels gradually increased after hepatectomy and reached peak levels on POD 14 in both groups. However, the ALP-2 level on POD 14 was significantly higher in HG than LG. The serum ALP- 2 levels after POD 14 might therefore be a useful indicator of favorable liver regeneration following hepatectomy, especially in patients who have a normal liver function.

  17. Automated quantification of bone and liver alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes of human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitz, J; Daigle, G; Petitclerc, C; Schiele, F; Siest, G

    1980-11-06

    Coupling two Technicon AAII samplers synchronised at 50 per hour with a 2 : 1 sample to wash ratio, sera are denatured and collected automatically. The incubation is done in continuous flow by passage through a U device made of large metallic needles soaked in a water bath at 60 +/- 0.1 degree C. This allows a very quick temperature equilibration and a very reproducible incubation time of 35 sec. Initial and residual activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP: EC 3.1.3.1) are measured on a Rotochem II (Aminco) with the procedure recommended by the Société Française de Biologie Clinique (SFBC). For a mixture of bone and liver ALP, the initial rate constant of heat denaturation Kapp = (A X Kb) + (B X Kl), where A and B are the fractions of each isoenzyme in the mixture, and Kb and Kl the rate constants for bone (b) and liver (l) experimentally determined as 1.8 min-1 and 0.45 min-1 respectively. An equation was derived which converts the percent residual activity to a percentage of bone and liver isoenzyme: % bone ALP = 183--2.38 X % residual activity. This automated method was applied to 2700 people of both sexes from 4 to 100 years old.

  18. The Small C-terminal Domain Phosphatase 1 Inhibits Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion by Dephosphorylating Ser(P)68-Twist1 to Accelerate Twist1 Protein Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tong; Fu, Junjiang; Shen, Tao; Lin, Xia; Liao, Lan; Feng, Xin-Hua; Xu, Jianming

    2016-05-27

    Twist1 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that strongly promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, migration, invasion, and metastasis of cancer cells. The MAPK-phosphorylated Twist1 on its serine 68 (Ser(P)(68)-Twist1) has a significantly enhanced stability and function to drive cancer cell invasion and metastasis. However, the phosphatase that dephosphorylates Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 and destabilizes Twist1 has not been identified and characterized. In this study, we screened a serine/threonine phosphatase cDNA expression library in HEK293T cells with ectopically coexpressed Twist1. We found that the small C-terminal domain phosphatase 1 (SCP1) specifically dephosphorylates Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 in both cell-free reactions and living cells. SCP1 uses its amino acid residues 43-63 to interact with the N terminus of Twist1. Increased SCP1 expression in cells decreased Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 and total Twist1 proteins, whereas knockdown of SCP1 increased Ser(P)(68)-Twist1 and total Twist1 proteins. Furthermore, the levels of SCP1 are negatively correlated with Twist1 protein levels in several cancer cell lines. SCP1-dephosphorylated Twist1 undergoes fast degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Importantly, an increase in SCP1 expression in breast cancer cells with either endogenous or ectopically expressed Twist1 largely inhibits the Twist1-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotype and the migration and invasion capabilities of these cells. These results indicate that SCP1 is the phosphatase that counterregulates the MAPK-mediated phosphorylation of Ser(68)-Twist1. Thus, an increase in SCP1 expression and activity may be a useful strategy for eliminating the detrimental roles of Twist1 in cancer cells. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. The cellular prion protein interacts with the tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase in membrane microdomains of bioaminergic neuronal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Ermonval

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cellular prion protein, PrP(C, is GPI anchored and abundant in lipid rafts. The absolute requirement of PrP(C in neurodegeneration associated to prion diseases is well established. However, the function of this ubiquitous protein is still puzzling. Our previous work using the 1C11 neuronal model, provided evidence that PrP(C acts as a cell surface receptor. Besides a ubiquitous signaling function of PrP(C, we have described a neuronal specificity pointing to a role of PrP(C in neuronal homeostasis. 1C11 cells, upon appropriate induction, engage into neuronal differentiation programs, giving rise either to serotonergic (1C11(5-HT or noradrenergic (1C11(NE derivatives. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The neuronal specificity of PrP(C signaling prompted us to search for PrP(C partners in 1C11-derived bioaminergic neuronal cells. We show here by immunoprecipitation an association of PrP(C with an 80 kDa protein identified by mass spectrometry as the tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP. This interaction occurs in lipid rafts and is restricted to 1C11-derived neuronal progenies. Our data indicate that TNAP is implemented during the differentiation programs of 1C11(5-HT and 1C11(NE cells and is active at their cell surface. Noteworthy, TNAP may contribute to the regulation of serotonin or catecholamine synthesis in 1C11(5-HT and 1C11(NE bioaminergic cells by controlling pyridoxal phosphate levels. Finally, TNAP activity is shown to modulate the phosphorylation status of laminin and thereby its interaction with PrP. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The identification of a novel PrP(C partner in lipid rafts of neuronal cells favors the idea of a role of PrP in multiple functions. Because PrP(C and laminin functionally interact to support neuronal differentiation and memory consolidation, our findings introduce TNAP as a functional protagonist in the PrP(C-laminin interplay. The partnership between TNAP and PrP(C in neuronal cells may

  20. Small molecules targeted to a non-catalytic "RVxF" binding site of protein phosphatase-1 inhibit HIV-1.

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    Tatiana Ammosova

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Tat protein recruits host cell factors including CDK9/cyclin T1 to HIV-1 TAR RNA and thereby induces HIV-1 transcription. An interaction with host Ser/Thr protein phosphatase-1 (PP1 is critical for this function of Tat. PP1 binds to a Tat sequence, Q(35VCF(38, which resembles the PP1-binding "RVxF" motif present on PP1-binding regulatory subunits. We showed that expression of PP1 binding peptide, a central domain of Nuclear Inhibitor of PP1, disrupted the interaction of HIV-1 Tat with PP1 and inhibited HIV-1 transcription and replication. Here, we report small molecule compounds that target the "RVxF"-binding cavity of PP1 to disrupt the interaction of PP1 with Tat and inhibit HIV-1 replication. Using the crystal structure of PP1, we virtually screened 300,000 compounds and identified 262 small molecules that were predicted to bind the "RVxF"-accommodating cavity of PP1. These compounds were then assayed for inhibition of HIV-1 transcription in CEM T cells. One of the compounds, 1H4, inhibited HIV-1 transcription and replication at non-cytotoxic concentrations. 1H4 prevented PP1-mediated dephosphorylation of a substrate peptide containing an RVxF sequence in vitro. 1H4 also disrupted the association of PP1 with Tat in cultured cells without having an effect on the interaction of PP1 with the cellular regulators, NIPP1 and PNUTS, or on the cellular proteome. Finally, 1H4 prevented the translocation of PP1 to the nucleus. Taken together, our study shows that HIV- inhibition can be achieved through using small molecules to target a non-catalytic site of PP1. This proof-of-principle study can serve as a starting point for the development of novel antiviral drugs that target the interface of HIV-1 viral proteins with their host partners.

  1. The SHP-1 protein tyrosine phosphatase negatively modulates Akt signaling in the ghrelin/GHSR1a system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodeiro, Maria; Alén, Begoña O.; Mosteiro, Carlos S.; Beiroa, Daniel; Nogueiras, Rubén; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Pardo, María; Gallego, Rosalía; Pazos, Yolanda; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Camiña, Jesus P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the signaling mechanism(s) responsible for the modulation of growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHSR1a)-associated Akt activity. Ghrelin leads to the activation of Akt through the interplay of distinct signaling mechanisms: an early Gi/o protein-dependent pathway and a late pathway mediated by β-arrestins. We found that the Src homology 2–containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-1) was an essential molecule in both Gi/o protein–dependent and β-arrestin–mediated pathways. More specifically, the role of SHP-1 in the Gi/o protein–dependent pathway was demonstrated by the fact that the overexpression of a catalytically defective SHP-1 augments tyrosine phosphorylation of the PI3K regulatory subunit p85, leading to an increase in the phosphorylation of cSrc and phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1, and finally activating Akt. The presence of SHP-1 in the β-arrestin–scaffolded complex and its attenuating effect on the cSrc and Akt activities verified that SHP-1 regulates not only the Gi/o protein–dependent pathway but also the β-arrestin–mediated pathway. Assays performed in preadipocyte and adipocyte 3T3-L1 cells showed SHP-1 expression. According to our results in HEK-GHSR1a cells, ghrelin stimulated SHP-1 phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 cells. The increase in ghrelin-induced Akt activity was enhanced by small interfering RNA of SHP-1 in preadipocyte 3T3-L1 cells. These results were reproduced in white adipose tissue obtained from mice, in which SHP-1 exhibited higher expression in omental than in subcutaneous tissue. Furthermore, this pattern of expression was inverted in mice fed a high-fat diet, suggesting a role for SHP-1 in controlling ghrelin sensitivity in adipose tissue. Indeed, SHP-1 deficiency was associated with augmented ghrelin-evoked Akt phosphorylation in omental tissue, as well as decreased phosphorylation under overexpression of SHP-1 in subcutaneous tissue. These findings

  2. Molecular cloning, expression and single nucleotide polymorphisms of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) in mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi).

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    Cheng, Xiao-Yan; He, Shan; Liang, Xu-Fang; Song, Yi; Yuan, Xiao-Chen; Li, Ling; Wen, Zheng-Yong; Cai, Wen-Jing; Tao, Ya-Xiong

    2015-11-01

    In the wild, mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi) only feed on live prey fish, refusing dead prey. When reared in ponds, training will result in some mandarin fish accepting artificial diets. However, little is currently known about the molecular mechanism of the individual difference. Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a suppressor of learning and long-term memory (LTM) in mammals. In the present study, the relationship between PP1 and the individual difference in acceptance of artificial diets in mandarin fish was investigated. The complete CDS (coding sequence) of four PP1 isoforms (PP1caa, PP1cab, PP1cb and PP1cc) were cloned in mandarin fish. The amino acid sequences of these PP1 isoforms are highly conserved in different species. The mRNA expressions of PP1caa and PP1cb in brain of artificial diet feeders were significantly higher than those in nonfeeders, suggesting the deficiency in the maintenance of long-term memory of its natural food habit (live prey fish). The SNP loci in PP1caa and PP1cb were also found to be associated with the individual difference in acceptance of artificial diets in mandarin fish. These SNPs of PP1caa and PP1cb genes could be useful markers for gene-associated breeding of mandarin fish, which could accept artificial diets. In conclusion, different mRNA expression and SNPs of PP1caa and PP1cb genes in feeders and nonfeeders of artificial diets might contribute to understanding the molecular mechanism of individual difference in acceptance of artificial diets in mandarin fish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B deficiency ameliorates murine experimental colitis via the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

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    Jing Zhang

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is a key molecule in modulating low-degree inflammatory conditions such as diabetes. The role of PTP1B in other chronic inflammations, however, remains unknown. Here, we report that PTP1B deficiency ameliorates Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS-induced murine experimental colitis via expanding CD11b(+Gr-1(+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs. Employing DSS-induced murine experimental colitis as inflammatory animal model, we found that, compared with wild-type littermates, PTP1B-null mice demonstrated greater resistance to DSS-induced colitis, as reflected by slower weight-loss, greater survival rates and decreased PMN and macrophage infiltration into the colon. The evidence collectively also demonstrated that the resistance of PTP1B-null mice to DSS-induced colitis is based on the expansion of MDSCs. First, PTP1B-null mice exhibited a greater frequency of MDSCs in the bone marrow (BM, peripheral blood and spleen when compared with wild-type littermates. Second, PTP1B levels in BM leukocytes were significantly decreased after cells were induced into MDSCs by IL-6 and GM-CSF, and the MDSC induction occurred more rapidly in PTP1B-null mice than in wild-type littermates, suggesting PTP1B as a negative regulator of MDSCs. Third, the adoptive transfer of MDSCs into mice with DSS-colitis significantly attenuated colitis, which accompanies with a decreased serum IL-17 level. Finally, PTP1B deficiency increased the frequency of MDSCs from BM cells likely through enhancing the activities of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and Janus kinase 2 (JAK2. In conclusion, our study provides the first evidences that PTP1B deficiency ameliorates murine experimental colitis via expanding MDSCs.

  4. Beneficial Effect of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Inhibitor and Phytoestrogen in Dyslipidemia-Induced Vascular Dementia in Ovariectomized Rats.

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    Verma, Aditi; Sharma, Saurabh

    2015-11-01

    Estrogen deficiency and increase in protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) activity may be a key mechanism in postmenopausal dyslipidemia-induced vascular dysfunction and dementia. Thus, the present study has been designed to investigate the effect of biochanin A (BCA, a phytoestrogen) and sodium orthovanadate (SOV), an inhibitor of PTPase in dyslipidemia-induced vascular dementia in ovariectomized rats. Female Wistar rats were ovariectomized and fed on high fat diet for 4 weeks to produce dyslipidemia. Dyslipidemia was assessed by estimation of serum lipid levels including total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL, and LDL levels. Dementia was assessed in terms of increase in brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and attenuation of learning ability (escape latency time) and memory retention (time spent in target quadrant) using Morris water maze. Vascular dysfunction was assessed in terms of attenuation of acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation (isolated carotid ring preparation), mRNA expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and increase in serum thiobarbituric acid reactive species, superoxide anion level. Neurodegeneration was assessed in hippocampus by hematoxylin and eosin staining. BCA (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) and SOV (5 and 10 mg/kg) were administered alone and in low-dose combination to ovariectomized dyslipidemic rats. BCA (2.5 and 5 mg/kg), SOV (5 and 10 mg/kg), and donepezil (1 mg/kg) significantly improves vascular function, and learning and memory ability and decreases the neuronal cell death, oxidative stress, and AChE in ovariectomized dyslipidemic rats. Thus, it may be concluded that BCA and SOV attenuate vascular dysfunction and dementia in dyslipidemic ovariectomized rats. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. In vitro screening for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B and dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors from selected Nigerian medicinal plants.

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    Saidu, Yusuf; Muhammad, Suleiman Alhaji; Abbas, Abdullahi Yahaya; Onu, Andrew; Tsado, Ibrahim Mohammed; Muhammad, Luba

    2017-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP 1B) and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) have been identified as one of the drug targets for the treatment of Type-2 diabetes. This study was designed to screen for PTP 1B and DPP-IV inhibitors from some Nigerian medicinal plants. PTP 1B and DPP-IV drug discovery kits from Enzo Life Sciences were used to investigate in vitro inhibitory effect of crude methanolic extract of 10 plants; Mangifera indica, Moringa oleifera, Acacia nilotica, Arachis hypogaea, Senna nigricans, Azadirachta indica, Calotropis procera, Leptadenia hastata, Ziziphus mauritiana, and Solanum incanum. The results indicated PTP IB inhibition by S. nigricans (68.2 ± 2.29%), A. indica (67.4 ± 2.80%), A. hypogaea (57.2 ± 2.50%), A. nilotica (55.1 ± 2.19%), and M. oleifera (41.2 ± 1.87%) were significantly (P 0.05) different from that of sumarin. The DPP-IV inhibition by S. incanum (68.1 ± 2.71%) was significantly higher as compared with a known inhibitor, P32/98. S. nigrican (57.0±1.91%), Z. mauritiana (56.6±2.01%), A. hypogaea (51.0±1.30%), M. indica (44.6 ± 2.40%), C. procera (36.2 ± 2.00%), A. nilotica (35.4 ± 2.10%), and A. indica (33.6 ± 1.50%) show significantly (P < 0.05) lower inhibitions toward DPP-IV. The work demonstrated that these plant materials could serve as sources of lead compounds in the development of anti-diabetic agent(s) targeting PTP 1B and/or DPP-IV.

  6. The receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase DEP-1 is constitutively associated with a 64-kDa protein serine/threonine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallal, B; Mossie, K; Vasiloudis, G; Knyazev, P; Zachwieja, J; Clairvoyant, F; Schilling, J; Ullrich, A

    1997-05-02

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes and may function as positive effectors as well as negative regulators of intracellular signaling. Recent data demonstrate that malignant transformation of cells is frequently associated with changes in PTP expression or activity. Our analysis of PTP expression in mammary carcinoma cell lines resulted in the molecular cloning of a receptor-like PTP, also known as DEP-1. DEP-1 was found to be expressed at varying levels in mammary carcinoma cell lines and A431 cells. In all tumor cell lines analyzed, DEP-1 was constitutively phosphorylated on tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of DEP-1 increased significantly after treatment of cells with the PTP inhibitor pervanadate. In A431 cells, tyrosine phosphorylation of DEP-1 was also observed after stimulation with epidermal growth factor, however, only after prolonged exposure of the cells to the ligand, suggesting an indirect mechanism of phosphorylation. In addition, DEP-1 coprecipitated with several tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins from pervanadate-treated cells. In vitro binding experiments using a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the catalytically inactive PTP domain of DEP-1 (Gst-DEP-1-C/S) identify these proteins as potential substrates of DEP-1. In addition, we found a 64-kDa serine/threonine kinase to be constitutively associated with DEP-1 in all tumor cell lines tested. The 64-kDa kinase forms a stable complex with DEP-1 and phosphorylates DEP-1 and DEP-1-interacting proteins in vitro. These data suggest a possible mechanism of DEP-1 regulation in tumor cell lines involving serine/threonine and/or tyrosine phosphorylation.

  7. Reduced phosphorylation of Stat3 at Ser-727 mediated by casein kinase 2 - protein phosphatase 2A enhances Stat3 Tyr-705 induced tumorigenic potential of glioma cells.

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    Mandal, Tapashi; Bhowmik, Arijit; Chatterjee, Anirban; Chatterjee, Uttara; Chatterjee, Sandip; Ghosh, Mrinal Kanti

    2014-08-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) is a transcription factor that is involved in cell survival and proliferation and has been found to be persistently activated in most human cancers mainly through its phosphorylation at Tyr-705. However, the role and regulation of Stat3 Ser-727 phosphorylation in cancer cells have not been clearly evaluated. In our findings, correlation studies on the expression of CK2 and Stat3 Ser-727 phosphorylation levels in human glioma patient samples as well as rat orthotopic tumor model show a degree of negative correlation. Moreover, brain tumor cell lines were treated with various pharmacological inhibitors to inactivate the CK2 pathway. Here, increased Stat3 Ser-727 phosphorylation upon CK2 inhibition was observed. Overexpression of CK2 (α, α' or β subunits) by transient transfection resulted in decreased Stat3 Ser-727 phosphorylation. Stat3 Tyr-705 residue was conversely phosphorylated in similar situations. Interestingly, we found PP2A, a protein phosphatase, to be a mediator in the negative regulation of Stat3 Ser-727 phosphorylation by CK2. In vitro assays prove that Ser-727 phosphorylation of Stat3 affects the transcriptional activity of its downstream targets like SOCS3, bcl-xl and Cyclin D1. Stable cell lines constitutively expressing Stat3 S727A mutant showed increased survival, proliferation and invasion which are characteristics of a cancer cell. Rat tumor models generated with the Stat3 S727A mutant cell line formed more aggressive tumors when compared to the Stat3 WT expressing stable cell line. Thus, in glioma, reduced Stat3 Ser-727 phosphorylation enhances tumorigenicity which may be regulated in part by CK2-PP2A pathway. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Identification of a novel conserved mixed-isoform B56 regulatory subunit and spatiotemporal regulation of protein phosphatase 2A during Xenopus laevis development

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    Seeling Joni M

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wnt signaling is a key regulator of development and tumorigenesis. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, which consists of a catalytic C, a structural A, and a regulatory B subunit, plays diverse roles in Wnt signaling through its B56 subunits. B56 is a multigene family encoding for proteins with a conserved core domain and divergent amino- and carboxy-termini. Ectopic B56α and B56γ reduce β-catenin abundance and B56α reduces Wnt-dependent transcription, suggesting that B56α and B56γ inhibit Wnt signaling. In contrast, B56ε is required for Wnt signaling. Knowledge of where and when B56 subunits are expressed during Xenopus development will aid in our understanding of their roles in Wnt signaling. Results We have undertaken expression analyses of B56α and B56γ in Xenopus laevis. We cloned Xenopus B56α; it is 88% identical to human B56α. Xenopus B56γ is 94% identical with human B56γ, however, a novel evolutionarily conserved mixed-isoform transcript was identified that contains a B56δ-like amino-terminal domain and a B56γ core domain. The B56δ-like variable domain exon is located upstream of the B56γ variable domain exon at the human B56γ locus, suggesting that the mixed-isoform transcript is due to alternative splicing. B56γ transcripts with different 3' ends were identified that lack or possess a 35 base pair sequence, resulting in either a transcript similar to human B56γ1, or an uncharacterized evolutionarily conserved sequence. Real time RT-PCR analyses revealed that B56α is expressed at moderate levels before the midblastula transition (MBT, at reduced levels during gastrulation and neurulation, and at high levels during organogenesis, while B56γ is expressed at low levels until organogenesis. B56α is enriched in the ventral hemisphere pre-MBT, while B56γ is ventrally enriched post-MBT. Aα, Aβ, Cα and Cβ are expressed in early Xenopus development, suggesting the presence of a functional heterotrimer

  9. Dynamic regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK by protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56γ1 in nuclei induces cell migration.

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    Ei Kawahara

    Full Text Available Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signalling plays a central role in various biological processes, including cell migration, but it remains unknown what factors directly regulate the strength and duration of ERK activation. We found that, among the B56 family of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A regulatory subunits, B56γ1 suppressed EGF-induced cell migration on collagen, bound to phosphorylated-ERK, and dephosphorylated ERK, whereas B56α1 and B56β1 did not. B56γ1 was immunolocalized in nuclei. The IER3 protein was immediately highly expressed in response to costimulation of cells with EGF and collagen. Knockdown of IER3 inhibited cell migration and enhanced dephosphorylation of ERK. Analysis of the time course of PP2A-B56γ1 activity following the costimulation showed an immediate loss of phosphatase activity, followed by a rapid increase in activity, and this activity then remained at a stable level that was lower than the original level. Our results indicate that the strength and duration of the nuclear ERK activation signal that is initially induced by ERK kinase (MEK are determined at least in part by modulation of the phosphatase activity of PP2A-B56γ1 through two independent pathways.

  10. Type 1 protein phosphatase acts in opposition to IpL1 protein kinase in regulating yeast chromosome segregation.

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco, L; Wang, W.; Chan, C S

    1994-01-01

    The IPL1 gene is required for high-fidelity chromosome segregation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conditional ipl1ts mutants missegregate chromosomes severely at 37 degrees C. Here, we report that IPL1 encodes an essential putative protein kinase whose function is required during the later part of each cell cycle. At 26 degrees C, the permissive growth temperature, ipl1 mutant cells are defective in the recovery from a transient G2/M-phase arrest caused by the antimicrotubule ...

  11. Whole genome sequencing identifies a deletion in protein phosphatase 2A that affects its stability and localization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

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    Huawen Lin

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequencing is a powerful tool in the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and small insertions/deletions (indels among mutant strains, which simplifies forward genetics approaches. However, identification of the causative mutation among a large number of non-causative SNPs in a mutant strain remains a big challenge. In the unicellular biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we generated a SNP/indel library that contains over 2 million polymorphisms from four wild-type strains, one highly polymorphic strain that is frequently used in meiotic mapping, ten mutant strains that have flagellar assembly or motility defects, and one mutant strain, imp3, which has a mating defect. A comparison of polymorphisms in the imp3 strain and the other 15 strains allowed us to identify a deletion of the last three amino acids, Y313F314L315, in a protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2A3 in the imp3 strain. Introduction of a wild-type HA-tagged PP2A3 rescues the mutant phenotype, but mutant HA-PP2A3 at Y313 or L315 fail to rescue. Our immunoprecipitation results indicate that the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations do not affect the binding of PP2A3 to the scaffold subunit, PP2A-2r. In contrast, the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations affect both the stability and the localization of PP2A3. The PP2A3 protein is less abundant in these mutants and fails to accumulate in the basal body area as observed in transformants with either wild-type HA-PP2A3 or a HA-PP2A3 with a V310T change. The accumulation of HA-PP2A3 in the basal body region disappears in mated dikaryons, which suggests that the localization of PP2A3 may be essential to the mating process. Overall, our results demonstrate that the terminal YFL tail of PP2A3 is important in the regulation on Chlamydomonas mating.

  12. Age-dependent targeting of protein phosphatase 1 to Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II by spinophilin in mouse striatum.

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    Anthony J Baucum

    Full Text Available Mechanisms underlying age-dependent changes of dendritic spines on striatal medium spiny neurons are poorly understood. Spinophilin is an F-actin- and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1-binding protein that targets PP1 to multiple downstream effectors to modulate dendritic spine morphology and function. We found that calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII directly and indirectly associates with N- and C-terminal domains of spinophilin, but F-actin can displace CaMKII from the N-terminal domain. Spinophilin co-localizes PP1 with CaMKII on the F-actin cytoskeleton in heterologous cells, and spinophilin co-localizes with synaptic CaMKII in neuronal cultures. Thr286 autophosphorylation enhances the binding of CaMKII to spinophilin in vitro and in vivo. Although there is no change in total levels of Thr286 autophosphorylation, maturation from postnatal day 21 into adulthood robustly enhances the levels of CaMKII that co-immunoprecipitate with spinophilin from mouse striatal extracts. Moreover, N- and C-terminal domain fragments of spinophilin bind more CaMKII from adult vs. postnatal day 21 striatal lysates. Total levels of other proteins that interact with C-terminal domains of spinophilin decrease during maturation, perhaps reducing competition for CaMKII binding to the C-terminal domain. In contrast, total levels of α-internexin and binding of α-internexin to the spinophilin N-terminal domain increases with maturation, perhaps bridging an indirect interaction with CaMKII. Moreover, there is an increase in the levels of myosin Va, α-internexin, spinophilin, and PP1 in striatal CaMKII immune complexes isolated from adult and aged mice compared to those from postnatal day 21. These changes in spinophilin/CaMKII interactomes may contribute to changes in striatal dendritic spine density, morphology, and function during normal postnatal maturation and aging.

  13. Biochemical characterization and inhibitory effects of dinophysistoxin-1, okadaic acid and microcystine l-r on protein phosphatase 2a purified from the mussel Mytilus chilensis.

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    MARIELLA RIVAS

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatases are involved in many cellular processes. One of the most abundant and best studied members of this class is protein phosphatase type-2A (PP2A. In this study, PP2A was purified from the mussel Mytilus chilensis. Using both SDS-PAGE and size exclusion gel filtration under denaturant conditions, it was confirmed that the PP2A fraction was essentially pure. The isolated enzyme is a heterodimer and the molecular estimated masses of the subunits are 62 and 28 kDa. The isolated PP2A fraction has a notably high p-NPP phosphatase activity, which is inhibited by NaCl. The hydrolytic p-NPP phosphatase activity is independent of the MgCl2 concentration. The time courses of the inhibition of the PP2A activity of p-NPP hydrolysis by increasing concentrations of three phycotoxins that are specific inhibitors of PP2A are shown. Inhibitions caused by Okadaic acid, dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX1, 35-methylokadiac acid and Microcystine L-R are dose-dependent with inhibition constants (Ki of 1.68, 0.40 and 0.27 nM respectively. Microcystine L-R, the most potent phycotoxin inhibitor of PP2A isolated from Mytilus chilensis with an IC50 = 0.25 ng/ml, showed the highest specific inhibition effect an the p-NPP hydrolisis. The calculated IC50 for DTX1 and OA was 0.75 ng/ml and 1.8 ng/ml respectively.

  14. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2

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    Eum, Sung Yong, E-mail: seum@miami.edu; Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1 h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24 h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. - Highlights: • PCB153 disturbed human brain endothelial barrier through disruption of occludin. • Lipid raft-associated PP

  15. Menaquinone-4 (vitamin K2) up-regulates expression of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase in Caco-2 cells.

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    Noda, Seiko; Yamada, Asako; Tanabe, Rieko; Nakaoka, Kanae; Hosoi, Takayuki; Goseki-Sone, Masae

    2016-11-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) hydrolyzes several monophosphate esters into inorganic acid and alcohol. In humans, 4 kinds of ALP isozymes have been identified: tissue-nonspecific ALP, intestinal ALP, placental ALP, and germ cell ALP. Intestinal ALP is expressed at a high concentration in the brush border membrane of intestinal epithelial cells and is known to be affected by several kinds of nutrients, such as lipids, but the physiological function of intestinal ALP has remained elusive. Vitamin K is an essential cofactor for the posttranslational carboxylation of glutamate residues into γ-carboxy glutamate. Menaquinone-4 (MK-4) with 4 isoprene units, vitamin K2, has been shown to induce bone-type ALP activity and osteoblastogenesis in human bone marrow cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of MK-4 on the level of ALP activity and expression of ALP messenger RNA in the human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2, which is known to differentiate into small intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. After treatment with MK-4, there were significant increases in the ALP activities of Caco-2 cells. Inhibitor and thermal inactivation experiments demonstrated that the increased ALP had properties of intestinal-type ALP. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that expressions of human intestinal ALP and sucrase-isomaltase, which are intestinal differentiation markers, were highly enhanced in Caco-2 cells by MK-4. This is the first report concerning ALP messenger RNA expression induced by vitamin K2 in Caco-2 cells. Further studies on the physiological functions of human intestinal ALP will provide useful data on the novel effects of vitamin K. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Primary human osteoblasts with reduced alkaline phosphatase and matrix mineralization baseline capacity are responsive to extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic field exposure — Clinical implication possible

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    Sabrina Ehnert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For many years electromagnetic fields (EMFs have been used clinically with various settings as an exogenous stimulation method to promote fracture healing. However, underlying mechanisms of action and EMF parameters responsible for certain effects remain unclear. Our aim was to investigate the influence of defined EMFs on human osteoblasts' and osteoclasts' viability and function. Primary human osteoblasts and osteoclasts were treated 3 times weekly for 21 days during their maturation process using the Somagen® device (Sachtleben GmbH, Hamburg, Germany, generating defined extremely low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (ELF-PEMFs. Certain ELF-PEMF treatment significantly increased the total protein content (up to 66%, mitochondrial activity (up to 91.1% and alkaline phosphatase (AP activity (up to 129.9% of human osteoblasts during the entire differentiation process. Furthermore, ELF-PEMF treatment enhanced formation of mineralized matrix (up to 276%. Interestingly, ELF-PEMF dependent induction of AP activity and matrix mineralization was strongly donor dependent — only osteoblasts with a poor initial osteoblast function responded to the ELF-PEMF treatment. As a possible regulatory mechanism, activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway was identified. Maturation of osteoclasts from human monocytes was not affected by the ELF-PEMF treatment. In summary the results indicate that a specific ELF-PEMF treatment with the Somagen® device improves viability and maturation of osteoblasts, while osteoclast viability and maturation was not affected. Hence, ELF-PEMF might represent an interesting adjunct to conventional therapy supporting bone formation during fracture healing or even for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  17. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) regulate DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Neal, Jessica A; De Wever, Veerle; Morrice, Nick A; Meek, Katheryn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2014-06-25

    The protein kinase activity of the DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit) and its autophosphorylation are critical for DBS (DNA double-strand break) repair via NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining). Recent studies have shown that depletion or inactivation of DNA-PKcs kinase activity also results in mitotic defects. DNA-PKcs is autophosphorylated on Ser2056, Thr2647 and Thr2609 in mitosis and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and the midbody. DNA-PKcs also interacts with PP6 (protein phosphatase 6), and PP6 has been shown to dephosphorylate Aurora A kinase in mitosis. Here we report that DNA-PKcs is phosphorylated on Ser3205 and Thr3950 in mitosis. Phosphorylation of Thr3950 is DNA-PK-dependent, whereas phosphorylation of Ser3205 requires PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1). Moreover, PLK1 phosphorylates DNA-PKcs on Ser3205 in vitro and interacts with DNA-PKcs in mitosis. In addition, PP6 dephosphorylates DNA-PKcs at Ser3205 in mitosis and after IR (ionizing radiation). DNA-PKcs also phosphorylates Chk2 on Thr68 in mitosis and both phosphorylation of Chk2 and autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs in mitosis occur in the apparent absence of Ku and DNA damage. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into the roles of DNA-PKcs and PP6 in mitosis and suggest that DNA-PKcs' role in mitosis may be mechanistically distinct from its well-established role in NHEJ.

  18. Serum Alkaline Phosphatase and Risk of Incident Cardiovascular Disease : Interrelationship with High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunutsor, Setor K.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E.; Gansevoort, Ronald T.; Gregson, John; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) has been suggested to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, however, important aspects of the association, such as shape and independence from established risk factors, have yet to be characterized in detail. We assessed the association of ALP

  19. Knockdown of Phospholipase Cε (PLCε) Inhibits Cell Proliferation via Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog Deleted on Chromosome 10 (PTEN)/AKT Signaling Pathway in Human Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Fan, Yanru; Du, Zhongbo; Fan, Jiaxin; Hao, Yanni; Wang, Jinhua; Wu, Xiaohou; Luo, Chunli

    2018-01-13

    BACKGROUND Phospholipase Cε (PLCε), a member of the plc family, has been extensively studied to reveal its role in the regulation of different cell functions, but understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains limited. In the present study, we explored the effects of PLCε on PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) in cell proliferation in prostate cancer cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS We assessed PLCε and PTEN expression in human benign prostate tissues compared to prostate cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry. Lentivirus-shPLCε (LV-shPLCε) was designed to silence PLCε expression in DU145 and PC3 cell lines, and the effectiveness was tested by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. MTT assay and colony formation assay were conducted to observe cell proliferation. Western blotting and immunofluorescence assays were used to detect changed PTEN expression in DU145. RESULTS We observed that PLCε expression was reduced in human benign prostate tissues compared to prostate cancer tissues, while PTEN expression showed the opposite trend. Silencing of the PLCε gene significantly inhibited cell proliferation in DU145 and PC3 cell lines. DU145 is a PTEN-expressing cell, while PC3 is PTEN-deficient. After infection by LV-shPLCε, we noticed that PTEN expression was up-regulated in DU145 cells but not in PC3 cells. Furthermore, we found that PLCε gene knockdown decreased P-AKT protein levels, but AKT protein levels were not affected. Immunofluorescence assays showed that PTEN expression had an intracellular distribution change in the DU145 cell line, and Western blot analysis showed that PTEN was obviously up-regulated in cell nucleus and cytoplasm. CONCLUSIONS PLCε is an oncogene, and knockdown of expression of PLCe inhibits PCa cells proliferation via the PTEN/AKT signaling pathway.

  20. Gene Expression Profiles of Human Phosphotyrosine Phosphatases Consequent to Th1 Polarisation and Effector Function

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patricia Castro-Sánchez; Rocio Ramirez-Munoz; Pedro Roda-Navarro

    2017-01-01

    .... Despite the relevance of CD4 T cell polarisation and effector function in human autoimmune diseases, the expression profile of PTPs during T helper polarisation and restimulation at inflammatory...

  1. Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F) interacts with neurofilament L and inhibits its filament association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, Hana [Laboratory of Molecular Brain Science, Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8521 (Japan); Katoh, Tsuyoshi [Department of Biochemistry, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, 078-8510 (Japan); Nakagawa, Ryoko; Ishihara, Yasuhiro [Laboratory of Molecular Brain Science, Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8521 (Japan); Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Kameshita, Isamu [Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagawa University, Kagawa, 761-0795 (Japan); Taniguchi, Takanobu [Department of Biochemistry, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, 078-8510 (Japan); Hirano, Tetsuo; Yamazaki, Takeshi [Laboratory of Molecular Brain Science, Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8521 (Japan); Ishida, Atsuhiko, E-mail: aishida@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Brain Science, Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8521 (Japan)

    2016-09-02

    Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F) is a Ser/Thr phosphatase that belongs to the PPM family. Growing evidence suggests that PPM phosphatases including CaMKP act as a complex with other proteins to regulate cellular functions. In this study, using the two-dimensional far-western blotting technique with digoxigenin-labeled CaMKP as a probe, in conjunction with peptide mass fingerprinting analysis, we identified neurofilament L (NFL) as a CaMKP-binding protein in a Triton-insoluble fraction of rat brain. We confirmed binding of fluorescein-labeled CaMKP (F-CaMKP) to NFL in solution by fluorescence polarization. The analysis showed that the dissociation constant of F-CaMKP for NFL is 73 ± 17 nM (n = 3). Co-immunoprecipitation assay using a cytosolic fraction of NGF-differentiated PC12 cells showed that endogenous CaMKP and NFL form a complex in cells. Furthermore, the effect of CaMKP on self-assembly of NFL was examined. Electron microscopy revealed that CaMKP markedly prevented NFL from forming large filamentous aggregates, suggesting that CaMKP-binding to NFL inhibits its filament association. These findings may provide new insights into a novel mechanism for regulating network formation of neurofilaments during neuronal differentiation. - Highlights: • NFL was identified as a CaMKP-binding protein in an insoluble fraction of rat brain. • CaMKP bound to NFL in solution with a K{sub d} value of 73 ± 17 nM. • A CaMKP-NFL complex was found in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. • CaMKP-binding to NFL inhibited its filament association. • CaMKP may regulate network formation of neurofilaments in neurons.

  2. α-Glucosidase and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitory Activity of Plastoquinones from Marine Brown Alga Sargassum serratifolium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Yousof Ali

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sargassum serratifolium C. Agardh (Phaeophyceae, Fucales is a marine brown alga that belongs to the family Sargassaceae. It is widely distributed throughout coastal areas of Korea and Japan. S. serratifolium has been found to contain high concentrations of plastoquinones, which have strong anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective activity. This study aims to investigate the anti-diabetic activity of S. serratifolium and its major constituents through inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B, α-glucosidase, and ONOO−-mediated albumin nitration. S. serratifolium ethanolic extract and fractions exhibited broad PTP1B and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50, 1.83~7.04 and 3.16~24.16 µg/mL for PTP1B and α-glucosidase, respectively. In an attempt to identify bioactive compounds, three plastoquinones (sargahydroquinoic acid, sargachromenol and sargaquinoic acid were isolated from the active n-hexane fraction of S. serratifolium. All three plastoquinones exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity against PTP1B in the IC50 range of 5.14–14.15 µM, while sargachromenol and sargaquinoic acid showed dose-dependent inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase (IC50 42.41 ± 3.09 and 96.17 ± 3.48 µM, respectively. In the kinetic study of PTP1B enzyme inhibition, sargahydroquinoic acid and sargaquinoic acid led to mixed-type inhibition, whereas sargachromenol displayed noncompetitive-type inhibition. Moreover, plastoquinones dose-dependently inhibited ONOO−-mediated albumin nitration. Docking simulations of these plastoquinones demonstrated negative binding energies and close proximity to residues in the binding pocket of PTP1B and α-glucosidase, indicating that these plastoquinones have high affinity and tight binding capacity towards the active site of the enzymes. These results demonstrate that S. serratifolium and its major plastoquinones may have the potential as functional food ingredients for the

  3. Essential roles of the Tap42-regulated protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A family in wing imaginal disc development of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    Full Text Available Protein ser/thr phosphatase 2A family members (PP2A, PP4, and PP6 are implicated in the control of numerous biological processes, but our understanding of the in vivo function and regulation of these enzymes is limited. In this study, we investigated the role of Tap42, a common regulatory subunit for all three PP2A family members, in the development of Drosophila melanogaster wing imaginal discs. RNAi-mediated silencing of Tap42 using the binary Gal4/UAS system and two disc drivers, pnr- and ap-Gal4, not only decreased survival rates but also hampered the development of wing discs, resulting in a remarkable thorax cleft and defective wings in adults. Silencing of Tap42 also altered multiple signaling pathways (HH, JNK and DPP and triggered apoptosis in wing imaginal discs. The Tap42(RNAi-induced defects were the direct result of loss of regulation of Drosophila PP2A family members (MTS, PP4, and PPV, as enforced expression of wild type Tap42, but not a phosphatase binding defective Tap42 mutant, rescued fly survivorship and defects. The experimental platform described herein identifies crucial roles for Tap42•phosphatase complexes in governing imaginal disc and fly development.

  4. Ginsenoside Rd attenuates beta-amyloid-induced tau phosphorylation by altering the functional balance of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta and protein phosphatase 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Liu, Zhirong; Liu, Juanfang; Tai, Xuhui; Hu, Xinghua; Liu, Xuedong; Wu, Zhongliang; Zhang, Guangyun; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Gang

    2013-06-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles are aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau that are one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau phosphorylation is regulated by a balance of kinase and phosphatase activities. Our previous study has demonstrated that ginsenoside Rd, one of the principal active ingredients of Pana notoginseng, inhibits okadaic acid-induced tau phosphorylation in vivo and in vitro, but the underlying mechanism(s) is unknown. In this study, we showed that ginsenoside Rd pretreatment inhibited tau phosphorylation at multiple sites in beta-amyloid (Aβ)-treated cultured cortical neurons, and in vivo in both a rat and transgenic mouse model. Ginsenoside Rd not only reduced Aβ-induced increased expression of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3β), the most important kinase involved in tau phosphorylation, but also inhibited its activity by enhancing and attenuating its phosphorylation at Ser9 and Tyr216, respectively. Moreover, ginsenoside Rd enhanced the activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP-2A), a key phosphatase involved in tau dephosphorylation. Finally, an in vitro biochemical assay revealed that ginsenoside Rd directly affected GSK-3β and PP-2A activities. Thus, our findings provide the first evidence that ginsenoside Rd attenuates Aβ-induced pathological tau phosphorylation by altering the functional balance of GSK-3β and PP-2A. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of a human cell line stably over-expressing the candidate oncogene, dual specificity phosphatase 12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Cain

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of chromosomal rearrangements within primary tumors has been influential in the identification of novel oncogenes. Identification of the "driver" gene(s within cancer-derived amplicons is, however, hampered by the fact that most amplicons contain many gene products. Amplification of 1q21-1q23 is strongly associated with liposarcomas and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization narrowed down the likely candidate oncogenes to two: the activating transcription factor 6 (atf6 and the dual specificity phosphatase 12 (dusp12. While atf6 is an established transcriptional regulator of the unfolded protein response, the potential role of dusp12 in cancer remains uncharacterized.To evaluate the oncogenic potential of dusp12, we established stable cell lines that ectopically over-express dusp12 in isolation and determined whether this cell line acquired properties frequently associated with transformed cells. Here, we demonstrate that cells over-expressing dusp12 display increased cell motility and resistance to apoptosis. Additionally, over-expression of dusp12 promoted increased expression of the c-met proto-oncogene and the collagen and laminin receptor intergrin alpha 1 (itga1 which is implicated in metastasis.Collectively, these results suggest that dusp12 is oncologically relevant and exposes a potential association between dusp12 and established oncogenes that could be therapeutically targeted.

  6. Active β-catenin is regulated by the PTEN/PI3 kinase pathway: a role for protein phosphatase PP2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, Amit; Venkateswaran, Geetha; Hao, Li; Garcia, Maria E; Yoon, Jenny; Sidhu, Jaskiran; Persad, Sujata

    2016-11-01

    Dysregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been associated with the development and progression of many cancers. The stability and subcellular localization of β-catenin, a dual functional protein that plays a role in intracellular adhesion and in regulating gene expression, is tightly regulated. However, little is known about the transcriptionally active form of β-catenin, Active Beta Catenin (ABC), that is unphosphorylated at serine 37 (Ser37) and threonine 41 (Thr41). Elucidating the mechanism by which β-catenin is activated to generate ABC is vital to the development of therapeutic strategies to block β-catenin signaling for cancer treatment. Using melanoma, breast and prostate cancer cell lines, we show that while cellular β-catenin levels are regulated by the Wnt pathway, cellular ABC levels are mainly regulated by the PI3K pathway and are dependent on the phosphatase activity of the protein phosphatase PP2A. Furthermore, we demonstrate that although the PI3K/PTEN pathway does not regulate total β-catenin protein levels within the cell, it plays a role in regulating the subcellular localization of β-catenin. Our results support a novel functional interaction/cross-talk between the PTEN/PI3K and Wnt pathways in the regulation of the subcellular/nuclear levels of ABC, which is crucially important for the protein's activity as a transcription factor and its biological effects in health and disease.

  7. The defective protein level of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) in the isolated saphenous vein, as a vascular conduit in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), harvested from patients with diabetes mellitus (DM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yasuko; Kuwabara, Masachika; Tanaka-Totoribe, Naoko; Kanai, Tasuku; Nakamura, Eisaku; Gamoh, Shuji; Suzuki, Akito; Asada, Yujiro; Hisa, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Ryuichi

    2011-08-26

    We examined the contractile reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in isolated human saphenous vein (SV), as a vascular conduit in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), harvested from patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and non-DM (NDM). Vascular rings of endothelium-denuded SV were used for functional and biochemical experiments. The vasoconstrictions caused by 5-HT were significantly greater (hyperreactivity) in the DM group than in the NDM group. RhoA/ROCK pathway is activated by various G-protein-coupled receptor agonists and consequently induces phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1), a subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP), which inhibits MLCP activity. In the resting state of the vessels, total tissue protein levels of 5-HT(2A) receptor, 5-HT(1B) receptor, RhoA, ROCK1, and ROCK2 did not differ between NDM and DM groups. However, the total protein level of MYPT1 was significantly lower in the DM group than in the NDM group. Furthermore, the ratio of P(Thr(696))-MYPT1 to total MYPT1 was significantly higher in the DM group than in the NDM group. These results suggest that the hyperreactivity to 5-HT in the SV smooth muscle of patients with DM is due to not only enhanced phosphorylation of MLCP but also defective protein level of MLCP. Thus, we reveal for the first time that the defective protein level of MLCP in the DM group can partially explain the poor patency of SV graft harvested from patients with DM. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The preparation of monoclonal antibodies to human bone and liver alkaline phosphatase and their use in immunoaffinity purification and in studying these enzymes when present in serum.

    OpenAIRE

    Bailyes, E M; Seabrook, R N; Calvin, J; Maguire, G A; Price, C P; Siddle, K; Luzio, J P

    1987-01-01

    1. Liver and bone alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes were solubilized with the zwitterionic detergent sulphobetaine 14, and purified to homogeneity by using a monoclonal antibody previously raised against a partially-purified preparation of the liver isoenzyme. Both purified isoenzymes had a specific activity in the range 1100-1400 mumol/min per mg of protein with a subunit Mr of 80,000 determined by SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Butanol extraction instead of detergent solubilization, ...

  9. microRNA-183 plays as oncogenes by increasing cell proliferation, migration and invasion via targeting protein phosphatase 2A in renal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Mingning, E-mail: lcuzfy@163.com; Liu, Lei, E-mail: leiliulab@163.com; Chen, Lieqian, E-mail: lieqianchen@163.com; Tan, Guobin, E-mail: guobintan@163.com; Liang, Ziji, E-mail: zijilianglab@163.com; Wang, Kangning, E-mail: kangningwanglab@163.com; Liu, Jianjun, E-mail: jianjunliulab@163.com; Chen, Hege, E-mail: hegechen@163.com

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • miR-183 was up-regulated in renal cancer tissues. • Inhibition of endogenous miR-183 suppressed renal cancer cell growth and metastasis. • miR-183 increased cell growth and metastasis. • miR-183 regulated renal cancer cell growth and metastasis via directly targeting tumor suppressor protein phosphatase 2A. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the function of miR-183 in renal cancer cells and the mechanisms miR-183 regulates this process. In this study, level of miR-183 in clinical renal cancer specimens was detected by quantitative real-time PCR. miR-183 was up- and down-regulated in two renal cancer cell lines ACHN and A498, respectively, and cell proliferation, Caspase 3/7 activity, colony formation, in vitro migration and invasion were measured; and then the mechanisms of miR-183 regulating was analyzed. We found that miR-183 was up-regulated in renal cancer tissues; inhibition of endogenous miR-183 suppressed in vitro cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion and stimulated Caspase 3/7 activity; up-regulated miR-183 increased cell growth and metastasis and suppressed Caspase 3/7 activity. We also found that miR-183 directly targeted tumor suppressor, specifically the 3′UTR of three subunits of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-Cα, PP2A-Cβ, and PP2A-B56-γ) transcripts, inhibiting their expression and regulated the downstream regulators p21, p27, MMP2/3/7 and TIMP1/2/3/4. These results revealed the oncogenes role of miR-183 in renal cancer cells via direct targeting protein phosphatase 2A.

  10. Optimization of extraction parameters of PTP1β (protein tyrosine phosphatase 1β), inhibitory polyphenols, and anthocyanins from Zea mays L. using response surface methodology (RSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kwon, Shin Hwa; Wang, Zhiqiang; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung

    2016-08-26

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase expressed in insulin-sensitive tissues (such as liver, muscle, and adipose tissue) has a key role in the regulation of insulin signaling and pathway activation, making protein tyrosine phosphatase a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity and response surface methodology (RSM) is an effective statistical technique for optimizing complex processes using a multi-variant approach. In this study, Zea mays L. (Purple corn kernel, PCK) and its constituents were investigated for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1β (PTP1β) inhibitory activity including enzyme kinetic study and to improve total yields of anthocyanins and polyphenols, four extraction parameters, including temperature, time, solid-liquid ratio, and solvent volume, were optimized by RSM. Isolation of seven polyphenols and five anthocyanins was achieved by PTP1β assay. Among them, cyanidin-3-(6"malonylglucoside) and 3'-methoxyhirsutrin showed the highest PTP1β inhibition with IC50 values of 54.06 and 64.04 μM, respectively and 4.52 mg gallic acid equivalent/g (GAE/g) of total polyphenol content (TPC) and 43.02 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalent/100 g (C3GE/100g) of total anthocyanin content (TAC) were extracted at 40 °C for 8 h with a 33 % solid-liquid ratio and a 1:15 solvent volume. Yields were similar to predictions of 4.58 mg GAE/g of TPC and 42.28 mg C3GE/100 g of TAC. These results indicated that PCK and 3'-methoxyhirsutrin and cyanidin-3-(6"malonylglucoside) might be active natural compounds and could be apply by optimizing of extraction process using response surface methodology.

  11. Theophylline Represses IL-8 Secretion from Airway Smooth Muscle Cells Independently of Phosphodiesterase Inhibition. Novel Role as a Protein Phosphatase 2A Activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Brijeshkumar S; Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Rumzhum, Nowshin N; Oliver, Brian G; Verrills, Nicole M; Ammit, Alaina J

    2016-06-01

    Theophylline is an old drug experiencing a renaissance owing to its beneficial antiinflammatory effects in chronic respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Multiple modes of antiinflammatory action have been reported, including inhibition of the enzymes that degrade cAMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE). Using primary cultures of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, we recently revealed that PDE4 inhibitors can potentiate the antiinflammatory action of β2-agonists by augmenting cAMP-dependent expression of the phosphatase that deactivates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-MAPK phosphatase (MKP)-1. Therefore, the aim of this study was to address whether theophylline repressed cytokine production in a similar, PDE-dependent, MKP-1-mediated manner. Notably, theophylline did not potentiate cAMP release from ASM cells treated with the long-acting β2-agonist formoterol. Moreover, theophylline (0.1-10 μM) did not increase formoterol-induced MKP-1 messenger RNA expression nor protein up-regulation, consistent with the lack of cAMP generation. However, theophylline (at 10 μM) was antiinflammatory and repressed secretion of the neutrophil chemoattractant cytokine IL-8, which is produced in response to TNF-α. Because theophylline's effects were independent of PDE4 inhibition or antiinflammatory MKP-1, we then wished to elucidate the novel mechanisms responsible. We investigated the impact of theophylline on protein phosphatase (PP) 2A, a master controller of multiple inflammatory signaling pathways, and show that theophylline increases TNF-α-induced PP2A activity in ASM cells. Confirmatory results were obtained in A549 lung epithelial cells. PP2A activators have beneficial effects in ex vivo and in vivo models of respiratory disease. Thus, our study is the first to link theophylline with PP2A activation as a novel mechanism to control respiratory inflammation.

  12. Tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase production by human dental pulp stromal cells is enhanced by high density cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Matthew J; Dennis, Caitriona; Yang, Xuebin B; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    The cell surface hydrolase tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) (also known as MSCA-1) is used to identify a sub-population of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) with high mineralising potential and is found on subsets of cells within the dental pulp. We aim to determine whether TNAP is co-expressed by human dental pulp stromal cells (hDPSCs) alongside a range of BMSC markers, whether this is an active form of the enzyme and the effects of culture duration and cell density on its expression. Cells from primary dental pulp and culture expanded hDPSCs expressed TNAP. Subsequent analyses revealed persistent TNAP expression and co-expression with BMSC markers such as CD73 and CD90. Flow cytometry and biochemical assays showed that increased culture durations and cell densities enhanced TNAP expression by hDPSCs. Arresting the hDPSC cell cycle also increased TNAP expression. These data confirm that TNAP is co-expressed by hDPSCs together with other BMSC markers and show that cell density affects TNAP expression levels. We conclude that TNAP is a potentially useful marker for hDPSC selection especially for uses in mineralised tissue regenerative therapies.

  13. In vitro induction of alkaline phosphatase levels predicts in vivo bone forming capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk-Jan Prins

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the applications of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs that are produced by ex vivo expansion is for use in in vivo bone tissue engineering. Cultured stromal cells are a mixture of cells at different stages of commitment and expansion capability, leading to a heterogeneous cell population that each time can differ in the potential to form in vivo bone. A parameter that predicts for in vivo bone forming capacity is thus far lacking. We employed single colony-derived BMSC cultures to identify such predictive parameters. Using limiting dilution, we have produced sixteen single CFU-F derived BMSC cultures from human bone marrow and found that only five of these formed bone in vivo. The single colony-derived BMSC strains were tested for proliferation, osteogenic-, adipogenic- and chondrogenic differentiation capacity and the expression of a variety of associated markers. The only robust predictors of in vivo bone forming capacity were the induction of alkaline phosphatase, (ALP mRNA levels and ALP activity during in vitro osteogenic differentiation. The predictive value of in vitro ALP induction was confirmed by analyzing “bulk-cultured” BMSCs from various bone marrow biopsies. Our findings show that in BMSCs, the additional increase in ALP levels over basal levels during in vitro osteogenic differentiation is predictive of in vivo performance.

  14. Valproic acid induces hair regeneration in murine model and activates alkaline phosphatase activity in human dermal papilla cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soung-Hoon Lee

    Full Text Available Alopecia is the common hair loss problem that can affect many people. However, current therapies for treatment of alopecia are limited by low efficacy and potentially undesirable side effects. We have identified a new function for valproic acid (VPA, a GSK3β inhibitor that activates the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, to promote hair re-growth in vitro and in vivo.Topical application of VPA to male C3H mice critically stimulated hair re-growth and induced terminally differentiated epidermal markers such as filaggrin and loricrin, and the dermal papilla marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP. VPA induced ALP in human dermal papilla cells by up-regulating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, whereas minoxidil (MNX, a drug commonly used to treat alopecia, did not significantly affect the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. VPA analogs and other GSK3β inhibitors that activate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway such as 4-phenyl butyric acid, LiCl, and BeCl(2 also exhibited hair growth-promoting activities in vivo. Importantly, VPA, but not MNX, successfully stimulate hair growth in the wounds of C3H mice.Our findings indicate that small molecules that activate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, such as VPA, can potentially be developed as drugs to stimulate hair re-growth.

  15. Trichocyalides A and B, new inhibitors of alkaline phosphatase activity in bone morphogenetic protein-stimulated myoblasts, produced by Trichoderma sp. FKI-5513.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Takashi; Uchida, Ryuji; Ohte, Satoshi; Inoue, Hiroyo; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Daisuke; Nonaka, Kenichi; Masuma, Rokurou; Katagiri, Takenobu; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Two new butenolides, designated trichocyalides A and B, were isolated along with the known compound harzianolide, from the culture broth of Trichoderma sp. FKI-5513 by solvent extraction, ODS column chromatography and HPLC. Their structures were elucidated by several spectral analyses, showing that they have the common skeleton of butenofuranone. Trichocyalides A and B inhibited alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a typical marker enzyme of osteoblastic differentiation (IC(50): 83.0 and 187 μM, respectively), in bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-stimulated C2C12 myoblasts mutant cells, which stably express BMP receptor activity, whereas harzianolide showed no inhibitory activity against ALP even at 500 μM.

  16. Protein phosphatase 2A associates with Rb2/p130 and mediates retinoic acid-induced growth suppression of ovarian carcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuocolo, Scott; Purev, Enkhtsetseg; Zhang, Dongmei

    2003-01-01

    treatment. A significant increase in Ser/Thr phosphatase activity was found, which correlated with a rise in the level of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit-alpha. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase pull-down studies demonstrated that PP2A and Rb2/p130 associate....... We have made use of a battery of Rb2/p130 mutants to determine the sites dephosphorylated in response to ATRA treatment of CAOV3 cells. Obligate CDK4 phosphorylation sites seemed most important to the stability of the protein and are among the candidate sites that are dephosphorylated by PP2A...... following ATRA treatment. Finally, using both small interfering RNA specific to the catalytic subunit of PP2A and a variant of the SKOV3 cell line that overexpresses PP2A, we have shown that modulation of PP2A protein levels correlates with the ability of ATRA to inhibit growth of ovarian carcinoma cells...

  17. Possible involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-induced prolactin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oride, Aki; Kanasaki, Haruhiko; Purwana, Indri N; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2009-05-15

    The role of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in mediating the ability of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) to stimulate the prolactin gene has been well elucidated. ERK is inactivated by a dual specificity phosphatase, mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP). In this study, we examined the induction of MKP-1 protein by thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in pituitary GH3 cells, and investigated the possible role for MKP-1 in TRH-induced prolactin gene expression. MKP-1 protein was induced significantly from 60 min after TRH stimulation, and remained elevated at 4h. The effect of TRH on MKP-1 expression was completely prevented in the presence of the MEK inhibitor, U0126. In the experiments using triptolide, a potent blocker for MKP-1, MKP-1 induction by TRH was completely inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. TRH-induced ERK activation was significantly enhanced in this condition. Prolactin promoter activity, activated by TRH, was reduced to the control level in the presence of triptolide in a dose-dependent manner. In GH3 cells, which were transfected with MKP-1 specific siRNA, both the basal and TRH-stimulated activities of the prolactin promoter were significantly reduced compared to the cells transfected with negative control siRNA. Our present results support a critical role of MKP-1 in TRH-induced, ERK-dependent, prolactin gene expression.

  18. Activation of c-Src and Fyn kinases by protein tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha is substrate-specific and compatible with lipid raft localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vacaresse, Nathalie; Møller, Bente; Danielsen, Erik Michael

    2008-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases of the Src family (SFKs) function in multiple signaling pathways, raising the question of how appropriate regulation and substrate choice are achieved. SFK activity is modulated by several protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), among which RPTPa and SHP2 are the best established. We...... studied how RPTPa affects substrate specificity and regulation of c-Src and Fyn in response to EGF and PDGF. We find that RPTPa, in a growth factor-specific manner, directs the specificity of these kinases towards a specific subset of SFK substrates, particularly the focal adhesion protein Paxillin...... and the lipid raft scaffolding protein Cbp/PAG. A significant fraction of RPTPa is present in lipid rafts, where its targets Fyn and Cbp/PAG reside, and growth factor-mediated SFK activation within this compartment is strictly dependent on RPTPa. Forced concentration of RPTPa into lipid rafts is compatible...

  19. Up-regulation of phosphoinositide metabolism in tobacco cells constitutively expressing the human type I inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Imara Y.; Love, John; Heilmann, Ingo; Thompson, William F.; Boss, Wendy F.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of suppressing inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) in plants, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells were transformed with the human type I inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase (InsP 5-ptase), an enzyme which specifically hydrolyzes InsP(3). The transgenic cell lines showed a 12- to 25-fold increase in InsP 5-ptase activity in vitro and a 60% to 80% reduction in basal InsP(3) compared with wild-type cells. Stimulation with Mas-7, a synthetic analog of the wasp venom peptide mastoparan, resulted in an approximately 2-fold increase in InsP(3) in both wild-type and transgenic cells. However, even with stimulation, InsP(3) levels in the transgenic cells did not reach wild-type basal values, suggesting that InsP(3) signaling is compromised. Analysis of whole-cell lipids indicated that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdInsP(2)), the lipid precursor of InsP(3), was greatly reduced in the transgenic cells. In vitro assays of enzymes involved in PtdInsP(2) metabolism showed that the activity of the PtdInsP(2)-hydrolyzing enzyme phospholipase C was not significantly altered in the transgenic cells. In contrast, the activity of the plasma membrane PtdInsP 5 kinase was increased by approximately 3-fold in the transgenic cells. In vivo labeling studies revealed a greater incorporation of (32)P into PtdInsP(2) in the transgenic cells compared with the wild type, indicating that the rate of PtdInsP(2) synthesis was increased. These studies show that the constitutive expression of the human type I InsP 5-ptase in tobacco cells leads to an up-regulation of the phosphoinositide pathway and highlight the importance of PtdInsP(2) synthesis as a regulatory step in this system.

  20. Human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H; Nielsen, B B

    1997-01-01

    The recombinant human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin (TN) and the C-type lectin CRD of this protein (TN3) have been crystallized. TN3 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4(2)2(1)2 with cell dimensions a = b = 64.0, c = 75.7 A and with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals...... to at least 2.5 A. A full data set has been collected to 3.0 A. The asymmetric unit contains one monomer of TN. Molecular replacement solutions for TN3 and TN have been obtained using the structure of the C-type lectin CRD of rat mannose-binding protein as search model. The rhombohedral space group indicates...... diffract X-rays to at least 2.0 A resolution. A complete diffraction data set has been collected to 2.7 A resolution. The crystals of TN, obtained by the vapour-diffusion reverse salting-in method at 280 K, are rhombohedral, space group R3, with the hexagonal axes a = b = 89.1, c = 75.8 A, and diffract...

  1. Protein phosphatase magnesium-dependent 1δ (PPM1D mRNA expression is a prognosis marker for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Bing Li

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase magnesium-dependent 1δ (PPM1D is an oncogene, overexpressed in many solid tumors, including ovarian cancer and breast cancer. The current study examined the expression and the prognostic value of PPM1D mRNA in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC.Total RNA was extracted from 86 HCC and paired non-cancerous liver tissues. PPM1D mRNA expression was determined by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. Immunohistochemistry assay was used to verify the expression of ppm1d protein in the HCC and non-cancerous liver tissues. HCC patients were grouped according to PPM1D mRNA expression with the average PPM1D mRNA level in non-cancerous liver tissue samples as the cut-off. Correlations between clinicopathologic variables, overall survival and PPM1D mRNA expression were analyzed.PPM1D mRNA was significantly higher in HCC than in the paired non-cancerous tissue (p<0.01. This was confirmed by ppm1d staining. 56 patients were classified as high expression group and the other 30 patients were categorized as low expression group. There were significant differences between the two groups in term of alpha-fetoprotein (α-FP level (p<0.01, tumor size (p<0.01, TNM stage (p<0.01, recurrence incidence (p<0.01 and family history of liver cancer (p<0.01. The current study failed to find significant differences between the two groups in the following clinical characteristics: age, gender, portal vein invasion, lymphnode metastasis, hepatitis B virus (HBV infection and alcohol intake. Survival time of high expression group was significantly shorter than that of low expression group (median survival, 13 months and 32 months, respectively, p<0.01.Up-regulation of PPM1D mRNA was associated with progressive pathological feature and poor prognosis in HCC patients. PPM1D mRNA may serve as a prognostic marker in HCC.

  2. Identification of gp17 glycoprotein and characterization of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and carboxypeptidase E (CPE) fragments in a human seminal plasma fraction interacting with concanavalin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquínez, A C; Andreetta, A M; González, N; Wolfenstein-Todel, C; Scacciati de Cerezo, J M

    2003-07-01

    The decapacitating fraction of human seminal plasma, which strongly interacts with concanavalin A, is constituted by high mannose-type N-linked glycoproteins, most of them of less than 44 kDa. Each component with apparent molecular mass of 30, 18, and 17 kDa respectively, as judged by SDS-PAGE, was submitted to "in gel" digestion with trypsin followed by HPLC separation of the peptides and sequencing. They were characterized at microscale as gp17, an aspartyl protease that possibly contributes to liquefaction of the seminal plasma coagulum, two fragments of human acid phosphatase (17 and 30 kDa, respectively), and a 17-kDa fragment of carboxypeptidase E. Neither the fragments of prostatic acid phosphatase nor that of carboxypeptidase E had been described before in the human seminal fluid. Very weak bands, of apparent molecular masses 44 and 52 kDa, are consistent with presence of small amounts of parent compounds, prostatic acid phosphatase and carboxypeptidase E.

  3. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32 can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized

  4. VPS29 is not an active metallo-phosphatase but is a rigid scaffold required for retromer interaction with accessory proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Swarbrick

    Full Text Available VPS29 is a key component of the cargo-binding core complex of retromer, a protein assembly with diverse roles in transport of receptors within the endosomal system. VPS29 has a fold related to metal-binding phosphatases and mediates interactions between retromer and other regulatory proteins. In this study we examine the functional interactions of mammalian VPS29, using X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. We find that although VPS29 can coordinate metal ions Mn(2+ and Zn(2+ in both the putative active site and at other locations, the affinity for metals is low, and lack of activity in phosphatase assays using a putative peptide substrate support the conclusion that VPS29 is not a functional metalloenzyme. There is evidence that structural elements of VPS29 critical for binding the retromer subunit VPS35 may undergo both metal-dependent and independent conformational changes regulating complex formation, however studies using ITC and NMR residual dipolar coupling (RDC measurements show that this is not the case. Finally, NMR chemical shift mapping indicates that VPS29 is able to associate with SNX1 via a conserved hydrophobic surface, but with a low affinity that suggests additional interactions will be required to stabilise the complex in vivo. Our conclusion is that VPS29 is a metal ion-independent, rigid scaffolding domain, which is essential but not sufficient for incorporation of retromer into functional endosomal transport assemblies.

  5. Profile of serum alkaline phosphatase after inoculation of mononuclear cells and bone morphogenetic protein in the repair of osteochondral defects in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Augusto de Souza

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, serum alkaline phosphatase activity was measured in response to the repair of osteochondral defects in twenty-four New Zealand rabbits. The animals were divided into three groups: a control (GC, those treated with bone marrow mononuclear cells (GCM and those that received mononuclear cells with autologous bone morphogenetic protein (BMP + GCM. After exposing the trochlear groove of the left stifle joint, a wedge-shaped segment was removed. Later, the defect was filled with an osteochondral autograft preserved in 98% glycerin. For the GC group, only the bone graft was performed. For the GCM, in addition to the graft, 2x106 seed mononuclear cells were implanted. For the GCM + BMP, the same number of cells, associated with 1μg of bone morphogenetic protein, were intraarticularly administered. The osteoblastic response was measured by analyzing the serum alkaline phosphatase on day 0 (preoperative 3, 15, 30, and 45 after surgery, and by radiographic examinations. Analysis of variance in randomized blocks, factorial and Tukey’s test (p = 0.05 were made. The overall mean GCM was superior to the other groups and the highest rates were among the 15th and 45th days postoperatively. The discrepancy in values between individuals of the same group casts doubts on the veracity of the test.

  6. Calyculins and Related Marine Natural Products as Serine- Threonine Protein Phosphatase PP1 and PP2A Inhibitors and Total Syntheses of Calyculin A, B, and C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari M. P. Koskinen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Calyculins, highly cytotoxic polyketides, originally isolated from the marine sponge Discodermia calyx by Fusetani and co-workers, belong to the lithistid sponges group. These molecules have become interesting targets for cell biologists and synthetic organic chemists. The serine/threonine protein phosphatases play an essential role in the cellular signalling, metabolism, and cell cycle control. Calyculins express potent protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitory activity, and have therefore become valuable tools for cellular biologists studying intracellular processes and their control by reversible phosphorylation. Calyculins might also play an important role in the development of several diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and type 2-diabetes mellitus. The fascinating structures of calyculins have inspired various groups of synthetic organic chemists to develop total syntheses of the most abundant calyculins A and C. However, with fifteen chiral centres, a cyano-capped tetraene unit, a phosphate-bearing spiroketal, an anti, anti, anti dipropionate segment, an α-chiral oxazole, and a trihydroxylated γ-amino acid, calyculins reach versatility that only few natural products can surpass, and truly challenge modern chemists’ asymmetric synthesis skills.

  7. Adaptation of HepG2 cells to a steady-state reduction in the content of protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) catalytic subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boylan, Joan M. [Department of Pediatrics, Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Salomon, Arthur R. [Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Tantravahi, Umadevi [Division of Genetics, Department of Pathology, Brown University and Women and Infants Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Gruppuso, Philip A., E-mail: philip_gruppuso@brown.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) is a ubiquitous Ser/Thr phosphatase involved in an array of cellular processes. To assess the potential of PP6 as a therapeutic target in liver disorders, we attenuated expression of the PP6 catalytic subunit in HepG2 cells using lentiviral-transduced shRNA. Two PP6 knock-down (PP6KD) cell lines (90% reduction of PP6-C protein content) were studied in depth. Both proliferated at a rate similar to control cells. However, flow cytometry indicated G2/M cell cycle arrest that was accounted for by a shift of the cells from a diploid to tetraploid state. PP6KD cells did not show an increase in apoptosis, nor did they exhibit reduced viability in the presence of bleomycin or taxol. Gene expression analysis by microarray showed attenuated anti-inflammatory signaling. Genes associated with DNA replication were downregulated. Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic analysis yielded 80 phosphopeptides representing 56 proteins that were significantly affected by a stable reduction in PP6-C. Proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA damage repair and pre-mRNA splicing were overrepresented among these. PP6KD cells showed intact mTOR signaling. Our studies demonstrated involvement of PP6 in a diverse set of biological pathways and an adaptive response that may limit the effectiveness of targeting PP6 in liver disorders. - Highlights: • Lentiviral-transduced shRNA was used to generate a stable knockdown of PP6 in HepG2 cells. • Cells adapted to reduced PP6; cell proliferation was unaffected, and cell survival was normal. • However, PP6 knockdown was associated with a transition to a tetraploid state. • Genomic profiling showed downregulated anti-inflammatory signaling and DNA replication. • Phosphoproteomic profiling showed changes in proteins associated with DNA replication and repair.

  8. Hematopoietic cell phosphatase is recruited to CD22 following B cell antigen receptor ligation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankester, A. C.; van Schijndel, G. M.; van Lier, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell phosphatase is a nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase that is preferentially expressed in hematopoietic cell lineages. Motheaten mice, which are devoid of (functional) hematopoietic cell phosphatase, have severe disturbances in the regulation of B cell activation and

  9. beta2-adaptin is constitutively de-phosphorylated by serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP2A and phosphorylated by a staurosporine-sensitive kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst; Menné, C; Kastrup, J

    2000-01-01

    -adaptin undergoes cycles of phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation in intact cells. Thus, beta2-adaptin was constitutively de-phosphorylated by serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A and phosphorylated by a staurosporine-sensitive kinase in vivo. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated...... the hypothesis that phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation of coat proteins plays a regulatory role in the assembly/disassembly cycle of clathrin-coated vesicles.......Clathrin-mediated endocytosis includes cycles of assembly and disassembly of the clathrin-coated vesicle constituents. How these cycles are regulated is still not fully known but previous studies have indicated that phosphorylation of coat subunits may play a role. Here we describe that beta2...

  10. Previously undescribed fridooleanenes and oxygenated labdanes from the brown seaweed Sargassum wightii and their protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneesh, Anusree; Chakraborty, Kajal

    2017-12-01

    Previously undescribed fridooleanene triterpenoids 2α-hydroxy-(28,29)-frido-olean-12(13), 21(22)-dien-20-propyl-21-hex-4'(Z)-enoate, 2α-hydroxy-(28,29)-frido-olean-12(13), 21(22)-dien-20-prop-2(E)-en-21-butanoate and oxygenated labdane diterpenoids 2α-hydroxy-8(17), (12E), 14-labdatriene, 3β, 6β, 13α-tri hydroxy 8(17), 12E, 14-labdatriene were purified from the ethyl acetate-methanol and dichloromethane fractions of the air-dried thalli of Sargassum wightii (Sargassaceae), a brown seaweed collected from the Gulf-of-Mannar of Penninsular India. Inhibitory potential of Δ12 oleanenes towards protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B, the critical regulator of insulin-receptor activity were found to be significantly greater (IC50 0.1 × 10-2 and 0.09 × 10-2 mg/mL, respectively) than the standard sodium metavanadate (IC50 0.31 × 10-2 mg/mL). Fridooleanene triterpenoids displayed greater antioxidant activities (IC50DPPH 0.16-0.18 mg/mL) than the commercially available antioxidants, butylated hydroxytoluene and α-tocopherol (IC50DPPH 0.25 and 0.63 mg/mL, respectively). In general, the oxygenated labdane diterpenoids displayed significantly lesser antioxidant and tyrosine phosphatase-1B inhibitory properties than those exhibited by the fridooleanenes. Bioactivities of the titled compounds were primarily determined by the electronic and lipophilic parameters and not by the steric descriptors. Molecular docking simulations and kinetic studies were employed to describe the tyrosine phosphatase-1B inhibitory mechanism. The previously undescribed fridooleanene triterpenoids might be used as potential anti-hyperglycaemic pharmacophore leads to reduce the risk of elevated postprandial glucose levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Osteocalcin and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase in Sickle cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    specific alkaline phosphatase (b-AP) total protein levels were evaluated as indicators of bone turnover in twenty patients with sickle cell haemoglobinopathies and in twenty normal healthy individuals. The serum bonespecific alkaline phosphatase ...

  12. Involvement of the Eukaryote-Like Kinase-Phosphatase System and a Protein That Interacts with Penicillin-Binding Protein 5 in Emergence of Cephalosporin Resistance in Cephalosporin-Sensitive Class A Penicillin-Binding Protein Mutants in Enterococcus faecium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene Desbonnet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic resistance of Enterococcus faecium to ceftriaxone and cefepime (here referred to as “cephalosporins” is reliant on the presence of class A penicillin-binding proteins (Pbps PbpF and PonA. Mutants lacking these Pbps exhibit cephalosporin susceptibility that is reversible by exposure to penicillin and by selection on cephalosporin-containing medium. We selected two cephalosporin-resistant mutants (Cro1 and Cro2 of class A Pbp-deficient E. faecium CV598. Genome analysis revealed changes in the serine-threonine kinase Stk in Cro1 and a truncation in the associated phosphatase StpA in Cro2 whose respective involvements in resistance were confirmed in separate complementation experiments. In an additional effort to identify proteins linked to cephalosporin resistance, we performed tandem affinity purification using Pbp5 as bait in penicillin-exposed E. faecium; these experiments yielded a protein designated Pbp5-associated protein (P5AP. Transcription of the P5AP gene was increased after exposure to penicillin in wild-type strains and in Cro2 and suppressed in Cro2 complemented with the wild-type stpA. Transformation of class A Pbp-deficient strains with the plasmid-carried P5AP gene conferred cephalosporin resistance. These data suggest that Pbp5-associated cephalosporin resistance in E. faecium devoid of typical class A Pbps is related to the presence of P5AP, whose expression is influenced by the activity of the serine-threonine phosphatase/kinase system.

  13. Arabidopsis ABA-Activated Kinase MAPKKK18 is Regulated by Protein Phosphatase 2C ABI1 and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitula, Filip; Tajdel, Malgorzata; Cieśla, Agata; Kasprowicz-Maluśki, Anna; Kulik, Anna; Babula-Skowrońska, Danuta; Michalak, Michal; Dobrowolska, Grazyna; Sadowski, Jan; Ludwików, Agnieszka

    2015-12-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events play an important role in the transmission of the ABA signal. Although SnRK2 [sucrose non-fermenting1-related kinase2] protein kinases and group A protein phosphatase type 2C (PP2C)-type phosphatases constitute the core ABA pathway, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are also involved in plant response to ABA. However, little is known about the interplay between MAPKs and PP2Cs or SnRK2 in the regulation of ABA pathways. In this study, an effort was made to elucidate the role of MAP kinase kinase kinase18 (MKKK18) in relation to ABA signaling and response. The MKKK18 knockout lines showed more vigorous root growth, decreased abaxial stomatal index and increased stomatal aperture under normal growth conditions, compared with the control wild-type Columbia line. In addition to transcriptional regulation of the MKKK18 promoter by ABA, we demonstrated using in vitro and in vivo kinase assays that the kinase activity of MKKK18 was regulated by ABA. Analysis of the cellular localization of MKKK18 showed that the active kinase was targeted specifically to the nucleus. Notably, we identified abscisic acid insensitive 1 (ABI1) PP2C as a MKKK18-interacting protein, and demonstrated that ABI1 inhibited its activity. Using a cell-free degradation assay, we also established that MKKK18 was unstable and was degraded by the proteasome pathway. The rate of MKKK18 degradation was delayed in the ABI1 knockout line. Overall, we provide evidence that ABI1 regulates the activity and promotes proteasomal degradation of MKKK18. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists.

  14. The second catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase delta (PTP delta) binds to and inhibits the first catalytic domain of PTP sigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, M J; Fladd, C; Batt, J; Rotin, D

    1998-05-01

    The LAR family protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), including LAR, PTP delta, and PTP sigma, are transmembrane proteins composed of a cell adhesion molecule-like ectodomain and two cytoplasmic catalytic domains: active D1 and inactive D2. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen with the first catalytic domain of PTP sigma (PTP sigma-D1) as bait to identify interacting regulatory proteins. Using this screen, we identified the second catalytic domain of PTP delta (PTP delta-D2) as an interactor of PTP sigma-D1. Both yeast two-hybrid binding assays and coprecipitation from mammalian cells revealed strong binding between PTP sigma-D1 and PTP delta-D2, an association which required the presence of the wedge sequence in PTP sigma-D1, a sequence recently shown to mediate D1-D1 homodimerization in the phosphatase RPTP alpha. This interaction was not reciprocal, as PTP delta-D1 did not bind PTP sigma-D2. Addition of a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-PTP delta-D2 fusion protein (but not GST alone) to GST-PTP sigma-D1 led to approximately 50% inhibition of the catalytic activity of PTP sigma-D1, as determined by an in vitro phosphatase assay against p-nitrophenylphosphate. A similar inhibition of PTP sigma-D1 activity was obtained with coimmunoprecipitated PTP delta-D2. Interestingly, the second catalytic domains of LAR (LAR-D2) and PTP sigma (PTP sigma-D2), very similar in sequence to PTP delta-D2, bound poorly to PTP sigma-D1. PTP delta-D1 and LAR-D1 were also able to bind PTP delta-D2, but more weakly than PTP sigma-D1, with a binding hierarchy of PTP sigma-D1 > PTP delta-D1 > LAR-D1. These results suggest that association between PTP sigma-D1 and PTP delta-D2, possibly via receptor heterodimerization, provides a negative regulatory function and that the second catalytic domains of this and likely other receptor PTPs, which are often inactive, may function instead to regulate the activity of the first catalytic domains.

  15. Deletion of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B Enhances Endothelial Cyclooxygenase 2 Expression and Protects Mice from Type 1 Diabetes-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Herren

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B dephosphorylates receptors tyrosine kinase and acts as a molecular brake on insulin signaling pathway. Conditions of metabolic dysfunction increase PTP1B, when deletion of PTP1B protects against metabolic disorders by increasing insulin signaling. Although vascular insulin signaling contributes to the control of glucose disposal, little is known regarding the direct role of PTP1B in the control of endothelial function. We hypothesized that metabolic dysfunctions increase PTP1B expression in endothelial cells and that PTP1B deletion prevents endothelial dysfunction in situation of diminished insulin secretion. Type I diabetes (T1DM was induced in wild-type (WT and PTP1B-deficient mice (KO with streptozotocin (STZ injection. After 28 days of T1DM, KO mice exhibited a similar reduction in body weight and plasma insulin levels and a comparable increase in glycemia (WT: 384 ± 20 vs. Ko: 432 ± 29 mg/dL, cholesterol and triglycerides, as WT mice. T1DM increased PTP1B expression and impaired endothelial NO-dependent relaxation, in mouse aorta. PTP1B deletion did not affect baseline endothelial function, but preserved endothelium-dependent relaxation, in T1DM mice. NO synthase inhibition with L-NAME abolished endothelial relaxation in control and T1DM WT mice, whereas L-NAME and the cyclooxygenases inhibitor indomethacin were required to abolish endothelium relaxation in T1DM KO mice. PTP1B deletion increased COX-2 expression and PGI2 levels, in mouse aorta and plasma respectively, in T1DM mice. In parallel, simulation of diabetic conditions increased PTP1B expression and knockdown of PTP1B increased COX-2 but not COX-1 expression, in primary human aortic endothelial cells. Taken together these data indicate that deletion of PTP1B protected endothelial function by compensating the reduction in NO bioavailability by increasing COX-2-mediated release of the vasodilator prostanoid PGI2, in T1DM mice.

  16. The solubilization of tetrameric alkaline phosphatase from human liver and its conversion into various forms by phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C or proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawrylak, K; Stinson, R A

    1988-10-05

    When membrane-bound human liver alkaline phosphatase was treated with a phosphatidylinositol (PI) phospholipase C obtained from Bacillus cereus, or with the proteases ficin and bromelain, the enzyme released was dimeric. Butanol extraction of the plasma membranes at pH 7.6 yielded a water-soluble, aggregated form that PI phospholipase C could also convert to dimers. When the membrane-bound enzyme was solubilized with a non-ionic detergent (Nonidet P-40), it had the Mr of a tetramer; this, too, was convertible to dimers with PI phospholipase C or a protease. Butanol extraction of whole liver tissue at pH 6.6 and subsequent purification yielded a dimeric enzyme on electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions, whereas butanol extraction at pH values of 7.6 or above and subsequent purification by immunoaffinity chromatography yielded an enzyme with a native Mr twice that of the dimeric form. This high molecular weight form showed a single Coomassie-stained band (Mr = 83,000) on electrophoresis under denaturing conditions in sodium dodecyl sulfate, as did its PI phospholipase C cleaved product; this Mr was the same as that obtained with the enzyme purified from whole liver using butanol extraction at pH 6.6. These results are highly suggestive of the presence of a butanol-activated endogenous enzyme activity (possibly a phospholipase) that is optimally active at an acidic pH. Inhibition of this activity by maintaining an alkaline pH during extraction and purification results in a tetrameric enzyme. Alkaline phosphatase, whether released by phosphatidylinositol (PI) phospholipase C or protease treatment of intact plasma membranes, or purified in a dimeric form, would not adsorb to a hydrophobic medium. PI phospholipase C treatment of alkaline phosphatase solubilized from plasma membranes by either detergent or butanol at pH 7.6 yielded a dimeric enzyme that did not absorb to the hydrophobic medium, whereas the untreated preparations did. This adsorbed activity was

  17. Utilization of Nitrophenylphosphates and Oxime-Based Ligation for the Development of Nanomolar Affinity Inhibitors of the Yersinia pestis Outer Protein H (YopH) Phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahta, Medhanit; Lountos, George T.; Dyas, Beverly; Kim, Sung-Eun; Ulrich, Robert G.; Waugh, David S.; Burke, Jr., Terrence R. (NIH); (USARL)

    2012-08-10

    Our current study reports the first K{sub M} optimization of a library of nitrophenylphosphate-containing substrates for generating an inhibitor lead against the Yersinia pestis outer protein phosphatase (YopH). A high activity substrate identified by this method (K{sub M} = 80 {micro}M) was converted from a substrate into an inhibitor by replacement of its phosphate group with difluoromethylphosphonic acid and by attachment of an aminooxy handle for further structural optimization by oxime ligation. A cocrystal structure of this aminooxy-containing platform in complex with YopH allowed the identification of a conserved water molecule proximal to the aminooxy group that was subsequently employed for the design of furanyl-based oxime derivatives. By this process, a potent (IC{sub 50} = 190 nM) and nonpromiscuous inhibitor was developed with good YopH selectivity relative to a panel of phosphatases. The inhibitor showed significant inhibition of intracellular Y. pestis replication at a noncytotoxic concentration. The current work presents general approaches to PTP inhibitor development that may be useful beyond YopH.

  18. A RNA interference screen identifies the protein phosphatase 2A subunit PR55gamma as a stress-sensitive inhibitor of c-SRC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter J A Eichhorn

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein Phosphatase type 2A (PP2A represents a family of holoenzyme complexes with diverse biological activities. Specific holoenzyme complexes are thought to be deregulated during oncogenic transformation and oncogene-induced signaling. Since most studies on the role of this phosphatase family have relied on the use of generic PP2A inhibitors, the contribution of individual PP2A holoenzyme complexes in PP2A-controlled signaling pathways is largely unclear. To gain insight into this, we have constructed a set of shRNA vectors targeting the individual PP2A regulatory subunits for suppression by RNA interference. Here, we identify PR55gamma and PR55delta as inhibitors of c-Jun NH(2-terminal kinase (JNK activation by UV irradiation. We show that PR55gamma binds c-SRC and modulates the phosphorylation of serine 12 of c-SRC, a residue we demonstrate to be required for JNK activation by c-SRC. We also find that the physical interaction between PR55gamma and c-SRC is sensitive to UV irradiation. Our data reveal a novel mechanism of c-SRC regulation whereby in response to stress c-SRC activity is regulated, at least in part, through loss of the interaction with its inhibitor, PR55gamma.

  19. The R3 receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase subfamily inhibits insulin signalling by dephosphorylating the insulin receptor at specific sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Takafumi; Higashi, Satoru; Takeuchi, Yasushi; Gaudio, Eugenio; Trapasso, Francesco; Fusco, Alfredo; Noda, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    The autophosphorylation of specific tyrosine residues occurs in the cytoplasmic region of the insulin receptor (IR) upon insulin binding, and this in turn initiates signal transduction. The R3 subfamily (Ptprb, Ptprh, Ptprj and Ptpro) of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) is characterized by an extracellular region with 6-17 fibronectin type III-like repeats and a cytoplasmic region with a single phosphatase domain. We herein identified the IR as a substrate for R3 RPTPs by using the substrate-trapping mutants of R3 RPTPs. The co-expression of R3 RPTPs with the IR in HEK293T cells suppressed insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the IR. In vitro assays using synthetic phosphopeptides revealed that R3 RPTPs preferentially dephosphorylated a particular phosphorylation site of the IR: Y960 in the juxtamembrane region and Y1146 in the activation loop. Among four R3 members, only Ptprj was co-expressed with the IR in major insulin target tissues, such as the skeletal muscle, liver and adipose tissue. Importantly, the activation of IR and Akt by insulin was enhanced, and glucose and insulin tolerance was improved in Ptprj-deficient mice. These results demonstrated Ptprj as a physiological enzyme that attenuates insulin signalling in vivo, and indicate that an inhibitor of Ptprj may be an insulin-sensitizing agent. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Phylogenetic and genomewide analyses suggest a functional relationship between kayak, the Drosophila fos homolog, and fig, a predicted protein phosphatase 2c nested within a kayak intron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Stephanie G; Garrett, Matthew J; Carlson, Joseph W; Micklem, Gos; Celniker, Susan E; Goldstein, Elliott S; Newfeld, Stuart J

    2007-11-01

    A gene located within the intron of a larger gene is an uncommon arrangement in any species. Few of these nested gene arrangements have been explored from an evolutionary perspective. Here we report a phylogenetic analysis of kayak (kay) and fos intron gene (fig), a divergently transcribed gene located in a kay intron, utilizing 12 Drosophila species. The evolutionary relationship between these genes is of interest because kay is the homolog of the proto-oncogene c-fos whose function is modulated by serine/threonine phosphorylation and fig is a predicted PP2C phosphatase specific for serine/threonine residues. We found that, despite an extraordinary level of diversification in the intron-exon structure of kay (11 inversions and six independent exon losses), the nested arrangement of kay and fig is conserved in all species. A genomewide analysis of protein-coding nested gene pairs revealed that approximately 20% of nested pairs in D. melanogaster are also nested in D. pseudoobscura and D. virilis. A phylogenetic examination of fig revealed that there are three subfamilies of PP2C phosphatases in all 12 species of Drosophila. Overall, our phylogenetic and genomewide analyses suggest that the nested arrangement of kay and fig may be due to a functional relationship between them.

  1. Antihelminthic drug niclosamide inhibits CIP2A and reactivates tumor suppressor protein phosphatase 2A in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong-Ok; Choe, Min Ho; Yoon, Yi Na; Ahn, Jiyeon; Yoo, Minjin; Jung, Kwan-Young; An, Sungkwan; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Oh, Jeong Su; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2017-11-15

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a critical tumor suppressor complex responsible for the inactivation of various oncogenes. Recently, PP2A reactivation has emerged asan anticancer strategy. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A), an endogenous inhibitor of PP2A, is upregulated in many cancer cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. We demonstrated that the antihelminthic drug niclosamide inhibited the expression of CIP2A and reactivated the tumor suppressor PP2A in NSCLC cells. We performed a drug-repurposing screen and identified niclosamide asa CIP2A suppressor in NSCLC cells. Niclosamide inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, and tumor sphere formation, and induced mitochondrial dysfunction through increased mitochondrial ROS production in NSCLC cells; however, these effec