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Sample records for human primary liver

  1. Human primary liver cancer-derived organoid cultures for disease modeling and drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broutier, Laura; Mastrogiovanni, Gianmarco; Verstegen, Monique Ma; Francies, Hayley E; Gavarró, Lena Morrill; Bradshaw, Charles R; Allen, George E; Arnes-Benito, Robert; Sidorova, Olga; Gaspersz, Marcia P; Georgakopoulos, Nikitas; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Dietmann, Sabine; Davies, Susan E; Praseedom, Raaj K; Lieshout, Ruby; IJzermans, Jan N M; Wigmore, Stephen J; Saeb-Parsy, Kourosh; Garnett, Mathew J; van der Laan, Luc Jw; Huch, Meritxell

    2017-12-01

    Human liver cancer research currently lacks in vitro models that can faithfully recapitulate the pathophysiology of the original tumor. We recently described a novel, near-physiological organoid culture system, wherein primary human healthy liver cells form long-term expanding organoids that retain liver tissue function and genetic stability. Here we extend this culture system to the propagation of primary liver cancer (PLC) organoids from three of the most common PLC subtypes: hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), cholangiocarcinoma (CC) and combined HCC/CC (CHC) tumors. PLC-derived organoid cultures preserve the histological architecture, gene expression and genomic landscape of the original tumor, allowing for discrimination between different tumor tissues and subtypes, even after long-term expansion in culture in the same medium conditions. Xenograft studies demonstrate that the tumorogenic potential, histological features and metastatic properties of PLC-derived organoids are preserved in vivo. PLC-derived organoids are amenable for biomarker identification and drug-screening testing and led to the identification of the ERK inhibitor SCH772984 as a potential therapeutic agent for primary liver cancer. We thus demonstrate the wide-ranging biomedical utilities of PLC-derived organoid models in furthering the understanding of liver cancer biology and in developing personalized-medicine approaches for the disease.

  2. [Establishment of nude mice liver metastatic model of human primary malignant melanoma of the small intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuo, Shuai; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Qiu-Zhen

    2008-07-01

    To provide ideal animal models for exploring pathogenesis and experimental therapy of primary malignant melanoma of the small intestine. The histologically intact primary and liver metastatic fragments derived from surgical specimens of one patient with metastatic malignant melanoma of the small intestine were orthotopically implanted in the small intestinal mucous layer of nude mice. The take rate, invasion and liver metastasis were observed. Morphology (light microscopy, electron microscopy), immunophenotype analysis, flow cytometry and karyotype analysis were applied for the original human tumors and the transplanted tumors. The primary and liver metastatic fragments of malignant melanoma of the small intestine were successfully implanted in nude mice. After continuous passages in nude mice,an orthotopic model of human primary malignant melanoma of the small intestine(from the primary focus)in nude mice (termed HSIM-0501) and a liver metastatic model of human primary malignant melanoma of the small intestine (from the liver metastatic focus) in nude mice (termed HSIM-0502) were established. Histological examination of transplanted tumors revealed high-grade melanoma. S-100 protein and HMB45 were positive. Massive melanin granules and melanin complex were seen in cytoplasm of tumor cells.Chromosomal modal number was between 55 and 59. DNA index (DI) was 1.49-1.61, representing heteroploid. HSIM-0501 and HSIM-0502 were maintained for 25 and 27 passages in nude mice respectively. Three hundred and seventeen nude mice were used for transplantation. Both the take rate after transplantation and resuscitation rate of liquid nitrogen cryopreservation were 100%. HSIM-0501 exhibited 46.2% liver metastasis and 36.7% lymph node metastases. In HSIM-0502, both liver and lymph node metastases were 100%.The transplanted tumors autonomically and invasively grew in the small intestines of nude mice and hematogenous metastasis, lymph node metastasis and celiac planting metastasis

  3. Rate of hepatitis C viral clearance by human livers in human patients: Liver transplantation modeling primary infection and implications for studying entry inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Hughes

    Full Text Available To better understand the dynamics of early hepatitis C virus (HCV infection, we determined how rapidly non-cirrhotic HCV-uninfected liver allografts clear HCV from the circulation of cirrhotic HCV-infected patients at the time of transplantation but before administration of immunosuppression. Specifically, we characterized serum HCV kinetics during the first 90 min of reperfusion for 19 chronically HCV-infected patients transplanted with an HCV-uninfected liver by measuring serum viral load immediately prior to reperfusion (t = 0 and then every 15 min for a total of 90 min (t = 90. Immunosuppression was withheld until all samples were taken to better model primary infection. During this period, rates of viral clearance varied more than 20-fold with a median rate constant of 0.0357 1/min, range 0.0089-0.2169; half-life (minutes median 19.4, range 3.2-77.8. The majority of viral clearance occurred within the first 60 min. The amount of blood transfused during this 90-min period (a potential confounding variable of this human liver transplant model of primary infection accounted for 53% and 59% of k (r = 0.53, p = 0.05 and half-life (r = 0.59, p = 0.03 variability, respectively. No other clinical variables tested (age, allograft weight, and degree of reperfusion injury as assessed by peak postoperative ALT or AST accounted for the remaining variability (p>0.05.In a human liver transplant model of primary infection, HCV rapidly clears the bloodstream. With approximately 90% of clearance occurring in the first 90 minutes of reperfusion, studies of HCV entry inhibition could utilize rate of clearance during this early period as an outcome measure.

  4. Protocol for Isolation of Primary Human Hepatocytes and Corresponding Major Populations of Non-parenchymal Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Victoria; Deharde, Daniela; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Zeilinger, Katrin; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2016-03-30

    Beside parenchymal hepatocytes, the liver consists of non-parenchymal cells (NPC) namely Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC) and hepatic Stellate cells (HSC). Two-dimensional (2D) culture of primary human hepatocyte (PHH) is still considered as the "gold standard" for in vitro testing of drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity. It is well-known that the 2D monoculture of PHH suffers from dedifferentiation and loss of function. Recently it was shown that hepatic NPC play a central role in liver (patho-) physiology and the maintenance of PHH functions. Current research focuses on the reconstruction of in vivo tissue architecture by 3D- and co-culture models to overcome the limitations of 2D monocultures. Previously we published a method to isolate human liver cells and investigated the suitability of these cells for their use in cell cultures in Experimental Biology and Medicine(1). Based on the broad interest in this technique the aim of this article was to provide a more detailed protocol for the liver cell isolation process including a video, which will allow an easy reproduction of this technique. Human liver cells were isolated from human liver tissue samples of surgical interventions by a two-step EGTA/collagenase P perfusion technique. PHH were separated from the NPC by an initial centrifugation at 50 x g. Density gradient centrifugation steps were used for removal of dead cells. Individual liver cell populations were isolated from the enriched NPC fraction using specific cell properties and cell sorting procedures. Beside the PHH isolation we were able to separate KC, LEC and HSC for further cultivation. Taken together, the presented protocol allows the isolation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from one donor tissue sample. The access to purified liver cell populations could allow the creation of in vivo like human liver models.

  5. Gene disruption of Plasmodium falciparum p52 results in attenuation of malaria liver stage development in cultured primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben C L van Schaijk

    Full Text Available Difficulties with inducing sterile and long lasting protective immunity against malaria with subunit vaccines has renewed interest in vaccinations with attenuated Plasmodium parasites. Immunizations with sporozoites that are attenuated by radiation (RAS can induce strong protective immunity both in humans and rodent models of malaria. Recently, in rodent parasites it has been shown that through the deletion of a single gene, sporozoites can also become attenuated in liver stage development and, importantly, immunization with these sporozoites results in immune responses identical to RAS. The promise of vaccination using these genetically attenuated sporozoites (GAS depends on translating the results in rodent malaria models to human malaria. In this study, we perform the first essential step in this transition by disrupting, p52, in P. falciparum an ortholog of the rodent parasite gene, p36p, which we had previously shown can confer long lasting protective immunity in mice. These P. falciparum P52 deficient sporozoites demonstrate gliding motility, cell traversal and an invasion rate into primary human hepatocytes in vitro that is comparable to wild type sporozoites. However, inside the host hepatocyte development is arrested very soon after invasion. This study reveals, for the first time, that disrupting the equivalent gene in both P. falciparum and rodent malaria Plasmodium species generates parasites that become similarly arrested during liver stage development and these results pave the way for further development of GAS for human use.

  6. Sex differences in liver toxicity-do female and male human primary hepatocytes react differently to toxicants in vitro?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Mennecozzi

    Full Text Available There is increasing amount of evidence for sex variation in drug efficiency and toxicity profiles. Women are more susceptible than men to acute liver injury from xenobiotics. In general, this is attributed to sex differences at a physiological level as well as differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but neither of these can give a sufficient explanation for the diverse responses to xenobiotics. Existing data are mainly based on animal models and limited data exist on in vitro sex differences relevant to humans. To date, male and female human hepatocytes have not yet been compared in terms of their responses to hepatotoxic drugs. We investigated whether sex-specific differences in acute hepatotoxicity can be observed in vitro by comparing hepatotoxic drug effects in male and female primary human hepatocytes. Significant sex-related differences were found for certain parameters and individual drugs, showing an overall higher sensitivity of female primary hepatocytes to hepatotoxicants. Moreover, our work demonstrated that high content screening is feasible with pooled primary human hepatocytes in suspension.

  7. A Primary Human Liver Cell Culture Model for Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djavani, Mahmoud

    2018-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers affect liver functions such as important metabolic processes and the replacement of new blood cells, coagulation factors, and growth factors. Typically, multi-organ diseases such as viral hemorrhagic fevers are studied in an organism, but it is also possible to derive information about the molecular events involved in disease processes by focusing on liver cell culture. Here we describe a multi-cell culture system that is capable of replicating the arenavirus LCMV-WE, a virus that can cause hemorrhagic fever in primates, as a model for liver infection by a hemorrhagic fever virus.

  8. Therapy of primary and metastatic liver cancer by human iPS cell-derived myeloid cells producing interferon-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakisaka, Masataka; Haruta, Miwa; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Umemoto, Satoshi; Matsumura, Keiko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Takeya, Motohiro; Inomata, Yukihiro; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2017-02-01

    iPS-ML are myeloid lineage cells with a proliferative capacity derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This study aimed to examine therapeutic effect of iPS-ML producing interferon-β (iPS-ML/IFN-β) towards primary and metastatic liver cancer and investigate the mechanism of that effect. We established a xenograft model of liver metastasis by injecting the spleen of SCID mice with MKN-45 human gastric cancer cells and also a primary liver cancer model by injecting SK-HEP-1 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells into the liver. After cancer lesions were established, iPS-ML/IFN-β was administered by intraperitoneal injection, and therapeutic effect was evaluated. The i.p. injection of iPS-ML/IFN-β resulted in a significant retardation of cancer progression and prolonged mouse survival. The infiltration of i.p. administered iPS-ML into tumor lesions located below the liver capsule was observed, suggesting tumor-directed migration and penetration of the liver capsule by iPS-ML. The IFN-β concentration in the liver was maintained at levels sufficient to exert an anti-cancer effect for at least 3 days post-injection, accounting for the potent therapeutic effect obtained by injection two to three times per week. This study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of the iPS-ML/IFN-β in patients with liver cancer. © 2017 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  9. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klompmaker, IJ; Haagsma, EB; Jansen, PLM; Slooff, MJH

    1996-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic disease, strongly associated with ulcerative colitis and cholangiocarcinoma. Ulcerative colitis itself does not influence the liver transplant results. However; intensified screening after liver transplantation for carcinoma of the colon may be necessary.

  10. Enhanced uptake of lactosaminated human albumin by rat hepatocarcinomas: implications for an improved chemotherapy of primary liver tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Giuseppina; Fiume, Luigi; Bolondi, Luigi; Lanza, Marcella; Pariali, Milena; Chieco, Pasquale

    2005-08-01

    The hepatocyte receptor for asialoglycoproteins (ASGP-R) internalizes macromolecules exposing galactosyl residues (MEGRs) which can be used as liver-addressed drug carriers. This receptor was also found on the cells of the large majority of well differentiated hepatocarcinomas (HCCs). The aim of the present experiments was to ascertain whether ASGP-R of HCCs is functionally active and these tumors can internalize higher quantities of MEGRs than extra-hepatic tissues. We injected radioactive lactosaminated human albumin (L-HSA) in rats with HCCs produced by nitroso-diethylamine and measured the radioactivity of tumors, surrounding liver, heart, intestine and kidney. L-HSA is a MEGR successfully used in humans as a hepatotropic drug carrier. The levels of radioactivity of HCCs were two to three times lower than those of surrounding liver, but several times higher than those of extra-hepatic tissues. L-HSA accumulation in the tumors mainly occurred via the ASGP-R, as indicated by the 20 times lower penetration of non-lactosaminated HSA. L-HSA uptake by the well-differentiated tumors were four times higher compared with that by the poorly differentiated forms. The present results suggest that in the chemotherapy of HCCs expressing the ASGP-R the extra-hepatic toxicity of anticancer agents can be reduced by conjugation to L-HSA.

  11. Recent developments on human cell lines for the bioartificial liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Chamuleau, R. A. F. M.

    2002-01-01

    Most bioartificial liver (BAL) devices contain porcine primary hepatocytes as their biological component. However, alternatives are needed due to xenotransplantation associated risks. Human liver cell lines have excellent growth characteristics and are therefore candidates for application in BAL

  12. Primary carcinoid tumors of the liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olichney John

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary carcinoid tumors of the liver are uncommon and rarely symptomatic. The diagnosis of primary hepatic etiology requires rigorous workup and continued surveillance to exclude a missed primary. Case Presentation We present a case of a 62-year-old female with a primary hepatic carcinoid tumor successfully resected, now with three years of disease-free follow-up. We present a review of the current literature regarding the diagnosis, pathology, management, and natural history of this disease entity. Conclusion Primary carcinoid tumors of the liver are rare, therefore classifying their nature as primary hepatic in nature requires extensive workup and prolonged follow-up. All neuroendocrine tumors have an inherent malignant potential that must be recognized. Management remains surgical resection, with several alternative options available for non-resectable tumors and severe symptoms. The risk of recurrence of primary hepatic carcinoid tumors after resection remains unknown.

  13. Report on Liver Cell Transplantation Using Human Fetal Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrosi, Giada; Chinnici, Cinzia

    2017-01-01

    In an era of organ shortage, human fetuses donated after medically indicated abortion could be considered a potential liver donor for hepatic cell isolation. We investigated transplantation of fetal liver cells as a strategy to support liver functionality in end-stage liver disease. Here, we report our protocol of human fetal liver cells (hFLC) isolation in fetuses from 17 to 22 gestational weeks, and our clinical procedure of hFLC transplantation through the splenic artery.

  14. Hepatic toxicology following single and multiple exposure of engineered nanomaterials utilising a novel primary human 3D liver microtissue model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Løhr, Mille; Roursgaard, Martin

    2014-01-01

    microtissue model to investigate the toxicological effects associated with a single or multiple exposure of a panel of engineered NMs (Ag, ZnO, MWCNT and a positively charged TiO2).ResultsHere we demonstrate that the repeated exposure of the NMs is more damaging to the liver tissue as in comparison...

  15. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in primary liver rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geary, T.R.; Maclennan, A.C.; Irwin, G.J. [Radiology Dept., Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Yorkhill NHS Trust, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2004-03-01

    Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is a well-documented paraneoplastic phenomenon in adults. It is a rare, but important finding in children with malignant disease as it can indicate prognosis. We present a case of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy associated with primary liver rhabdomyosarcoma in a 14-year-old boy. (orig.)

  16. Sex Differences in Liver Toxicity—Do Female and Male Human Primary Hepatocytes React Differently to Toxicants In Vitro?

    OpenAIRE

    Milena Mennecozzi; Brigitte Landesmann; Taina Palosaari; Georgina Harris; Maurice Whelan

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing amount of evidence for sex variation in drug efficiency and toxicity profiles. Women are more susceptible than men to acute liver injury from xenobiotics. In general, this is attributed to sex differences at a physiological level as well as differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but neither of these can give a sufficient explanation for the diverse responses to xenobiotics. Existing data are mainly based on animal models and limited data exist on in vitro se...

  17. Primary liver cancer; Tumeurs primitives hepatiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quivrina, M.; Martin, E.; Ligey-Bartolomeu, A.; Nouhaud, E.; Chamois, J.; Maingon, P.; Crehange, G. [Departement de radiotherapie, Centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 21 - Dijon (France); Mornex, F.; Enachescu, C. [Departement de radiotherapie, Centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 69 - Lyon-Pierre-Benite (France)

    2010-07-01

    Due to its increasing incidence and a grim prognosis, primary liver cancer remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. For small localized tumors, surgical resection and liver transplantation are standard treatments with a curative-intent. Therapeutic options for locally advanced or metastatic diseases are limited. Globally, surgery fits less than 20% of patients. Early detection in high-risk patients and prevention of risk factors remain the key points in the standard care. External radiotherapy is a non invasive treatment with encouraging results for non operable patients. Emerging stereotactic radiotherapy yields high rates of local control without compromising toxicity. Tumors with bad prognostic factors could be cured with this approach. (authors)

  18. Cutaneous features seen in primary liver cell (Hepatocellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    growth of the liver from increased mitosis in the hepatocytes and a stretching of the liver capsule. Metastasis to the liver accounts for a very small percentage in Nigerians. A nodular liver is thus likely to be from a primary liver pathology. [Afr J Health Sci. 2007;14:14-18]. Introduction. It strikes all age groups and both genders ...

  19. PET-CT in Determining the Radioembolization Dose Delivered to Patients With Liver Metastasis, Primary Liver Cancer, or Biliary Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage D Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  20. Transarterial therapies for primary liver tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talenfeld, Adam D; Sista, Akhilesh K; Madoff, David C

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decade, transarterial therapies have gained worldwide acceptance as standard of care for inoperable primary liver cancer. Survival times after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) continue to improve as the technique and selection criteria are refined. Transarterial treatments, frequently provided in an outpatient setting, are now safely and effectively being applied to patients with even advanced malignancy or partially decompensated cirrhosis. In the coming years, newer transarterial therapies such as radiation segmentectomy, boosted-transarterial radioembolzation, combined TACE-ablation, TACE-portal vein embolization, and transarterial infusion of cancer-specific metabolic inhibitors promise to continue improving survival and quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Outgrowth of human liver metastases after resection of the primary colorectal tumor: a shift in the balance between apoptosis and proliferation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, C.F.J.M.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Wobbes, Th.; Westphal, J.R.; Ruers, T.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid outgrowth of metastases after removal of the primary tumor has been described in several mouse models. Loss of primary tumor-induced inhibition of angiogenesis in the metastases has been suggested as the underlying cause. Accordingly, we recently demonstrated that vascular density in human

  2. Mice with humanized liver endothelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Filali, E.

    2014-01-01

    The only curative treatment option for a large proportion of patients suffering from a liver disorder is liver transplantation. The use of ex vivo genetically modified autologous liver cells instead of whole liver transplantation could overcome the problem of donor scarcity. Even though clinical

  3. Survival without biliary complications after liver transplant for primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogl, Martina T; Albert, Kathrin; Pascher, Andreas; Sauer, Igor; Puhl, Gero; Gül, Safak; Schönemann, Constanze; Neuhaus, Peter; Guckelberger, Olaf

    2013-12-01

    Patients who have a liver transplant for primary sclerosing cholangitis may develop recurrent disease and biliary complications, organ loss necessitating revision liver transplant, or death. We evaluated long-term outcomes in patients who had liver transplant for primary sclerosing cholangitis. In 71 patients who had a liver transplant for end-stage liver disease because of primary sclerosing cholangitis, a retrospective review was done to evaluate biliary complication-free survival, transplanted organ survival, and death. Human leukocyte antigen typing and matching were reviewed. There were 39 patients (55%) who had biliary complications, loss of the liver transplant, or death at a mean 12.1 years after transplant. The 5- and 10-year event-free survival reached 74.6% and 45% (53 patients after 5 years, and 32 patients after 10 years). Male sex of transplant recipients was a significant risk factor for biliary complications, revision liver transplant, or death. Most patients had inflammatory bowel disease, primarily ulcerative colitis. The human leukocyte antigen profile or number of mismatches had no effect on complication-free survival. Biliary complications, revision liver transplant, and death are a useful combined primary endpoint for recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis after liver transplant.

  4. Susceptibility of human liver cells to porcine endogenous retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xinzi; Qi, Lin; Li, Zhiguo; Chi, Hao; Lin, Wanjun; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Zesheng; Pan, Mingxin; Gao, Yi

    2013-12-01

    The risk of porcine endogenous retrovirus infection is a major barrier for pig-to-human xenotransplant. Porcine endogenous retrovirus, present in porcine cells, can infect many human and nonhuman primate cells in vitro, but there is no evidence available about in vitro infection of human liver cells. We investigated the susceptibility of different human liver cells to porcine endogenous retrovirus. The supernatant from a porcine kidney cell line was added to human liver cells, including a normal hepatocyte cell line (HL-7702 cells), primary hepatocytes (Phh cells), and a liver stellate cell line (Lx-2 cells), and to human embryonic kidney cells as a reference control. Expression of the porcine endogenous retrovirus antigen p15E in the human cells was evaluated with polymerase chain reaction, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot. The porcine endogenous retrovirus antigen p15E was not expressed in any human liver cells (HL-7702, Phh, or Lx-2 cells) that had been exposed to supernatants from porcine kidney cell lines. Porcine endogenous retrovirus-specific fragments were amplified in human kidney cells. Human liver cells tested were not susceptible to infection by porcine endogenous retrovirus. Therefore, not all human cells are susceptible to porcine endogenous retrovirus.

  5. A Primary Hepatic Lymphoma Treated with Liver Resection and Chemotherapy

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    Konstantinos Bouliaris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary hepatic lymphoma (PHL is a rare malignancy, which is frequently misdiagnosed. Although chemotherapy is the treatment of choice there are reports that a combination of surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy can offer better results. Herein we present an interesting case of a large primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma originating from liver was treated with a liver which resection and chemotherapy.

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Primary Liver Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  7. Treatment Options for Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  8. General Information about Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This type of liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. This summary ... Therapy and You: Support for People With Cancer Coping with Cancer Questions to Ask Your Doctor about ...

  9. Stages of Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This type of liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. This summary ... Therapy and You: Support for People With Cancer Coping with Cancer Questions to Ask Your Doctor about ...

  10. Potential health risks of heavy metals in cultivated topsoil and grain, including correlations with human primary liver, lung and gastric cancer, in Anhui province, Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qihong; Wang, Ying; Cao, Ye; Chen, Anguo; Ren, Min; Ge, Yongsheng; Yu, Zongfan; Wan, Shengyun; Hu, Anla; Bo, Qingli; Ruan, Liang; Chen, Hang; Qin, Shuyang; Chen, Wenjun; Hu, Chuanlai; Tao, Fangbiao; Xu, Dexiang; Xu, Jing; Wen, Longping; Li, Li

    2014-02-01

    Environmental exposure to heavy metals is a well-known risk factor for cancers. To evaluate potential health risks of heavy metals (Cr, Cd, Pb, As and Hg) and Se in cultivated topsoil and grains, we investigated the concentrations of Hg, As and Se using atomic fluorescence spectrometry and Cr, Cd and Pb using inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP-MS). We also analyzed human cancer tissues for heavy metals. Potential health risks for local residents were evaluated by calculating the hazard index (HI) and the total carcinogenic risk (TCR) for soil heavy metals and the target hazard quotient (THQ) and the carcinogenic risk (CR) for grain heavy metals. A bioconcentration factor (BCF) was applied to quantify the bioaccumulation of heavy metals. Our results demonstrated that the mean concentrations of heavy metals in soil were all within the safety limits set by FAO/WHO and Chinese regulations; however, the mean concentrations of Cr and Hg in grain exceeded the safety limits. HI and TCR for soil heavy metals were all within acceptable levels, but the THQ for four grain heavy metals exceeded the target value of 1 (Cr, 2.64; Pb, 1.41; As, 1.24; Hg, 1.07; Cd, 0.39). The grain CR for Cr, Pb and As exceeded the accepted risk level of 10(-6). BCF values indicated that the bioaccumulation capacity decreased in the following sequence: Hg>Se>Cd>Cr>Pb>As. We also observed statistically significant correlations of topsoil Pb concentration with human gastric cancer and grain Hg with human liver cancer. Therefore, long-term low dose exposure of heavy metals may play a key role in tumorigenesis, and it may not be necessary to accumulate a high concentration of heavy metals in the human body for those metals to induce tumorigenesis. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Primary liver tumors in beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of plutonium-238 dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, N. A.; Muggenburg, B. A.; Mewhinney, J. A.; Hahn, F. F.; Seiler, F. A.; Boecker, B. B.; McClellan, R. O.

    1988-01-01

    Primary liver tumors developed in Beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of 238PuO2. Initial deposition of 238PuO2 in the respiratory tract was followed by translocation of a portion of the 238Pu to the liver and skeleton, which resulted in a large dose commitment and tumor risk to all three tissues. In a population of 144 dogs exposed to 238PuO2, 112 dogs died or were killed 4000 days after 238Pu exposure, 100 dogs had osteosarcoma, and 28 dogs had lung cancers. At increasing times after exposure, however, liver lesions have become more pronounced. Ten primary liver tumors in nine animals were diagnosed in the dogs dying before 4000 days after exposure. An additional five primary liver tumors in three dogs occurred in 9 animals killed after 4000 days after exposure. The majority of these tumors have been fibrosarcomas. The liver tumors were usually not the cause of death, and rarely metastasized. The occurrence of liver tumors in this study indicates that 238Pu is an effective hepatic carcinogen. Liver carcinogenesis is assuming an increasing importance in this study at late times after inhalation exposure. These results suggest that the liver may be an important organ at risk for the development of neoplasia in humans at time periods long after inhalation of 238Pu. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3142267

  12. Comparative Study of Human Liver Ferritin and Chicken Liver by Moessbauer Spectroscopy. Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M. I. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Division of Applied Biophysics, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation); Milder, O. B.; Semionkin, V. A. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Prokopenko, P. G. [Russian State Medical University, Faculty of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Malakheeva, L. I. [Simbio Holding, Science Consultation Department (Russian Federation)

    2004-12-15

    A comparative study of normal human liver ferritin and livers from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease was made by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Small differences of quadrupole splitting and isomer shift were found for human liver ferritin and chicken liver. Moessbauer parameters for liver from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease were the same.

  13. PREDICTION AND PREVENTION OF LIVER FAILURE AFTER MAJOR LIVER PRIMARY AND METASTATIC TUMORS RESECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose of the study. Improvement of results of treatment in patients with primary and metastatic liver cancer by decreasing the risk of post-resection liver failure on the basis of the evaluation of the functional reserves of the liver.Materials and Methods. The study included two independent samples of patients operated about primary or metastatic lesions of the liver at the Department of abdominal Oncology, P. A. Hertsen MORI. The first group included 53 patients who carried out 13C-breath test metallimovie and dynamic scintigraphy of the liver in the preoperative stage in addition to the standard algorithm of examination. Patients of the 2nd group (n=35 had a standard clinical and laboratory examination, the patients were not performed the preoperative evaluation of the functional reserve of the liver, the incidences of total bilirubin, albumin and prothrombin time did not reveal a reduction of liver function. Post-resection liver failure have been established on the basis of the 50/50 criterion in the evaluation on day 5 after surgery.Results. Analysis of operating characteristics of the functional tests showed the absolute methacin breath test sensitivity (SE≥100%, high specificity (SP≥67% of scintigraphy of the liver and the negative predictive value of outcome (VP≥100% at complex use of two diagnostic methods. The incidence of PROPS in the study group was significantly 2 times higher in the control group –15,1% and 26.8%, respectively (p<0.001.Conclusion. The combination of preoperative dynamic scintigraphy of the liver with carrying out 13C-breath methacin test allows you to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the liver functional reserve and can significantly improve preoperative evaluation and postoperative results of anatomic resection in patients with primary and metastatic liver lesions.

  14. AGE WISE HISTOMORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN HUMAN LIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tribeni

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Hepato cellular carcinoma (HCC results in between 2.5 lakhs to 1million deaths globally per annum. Liver transplantation nowadays is a well accepted treatment option for end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. AIMS: Keeping this concept in view, a study was conducted in the Guwahati Zone of Northeast India, to compare the histomorphological features of the human liver in different age groups. SETTING AND DESIGN: Apparently healthy livers were obtained from 21 subjects on whom medicolegal post-mortems had been performed. Their ages varied from newborn to 90 years. Subjects were divided into 3 groups. 7 specimens were taken from each group. (1 Pediatric (2 Adult (3 Old age. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In all the above age groups, immediately after removal of the livers, they were washed in normal saline, dried with blotting paper and weighed in an electronic weighing machine. Sections of liver were fixed, processed, cut and stained with Harris Haematoxylin and Eosin stain. RESULTS: The liver loses weight from 50 years onwards. There appears to be racial and environmental differences in the change in liver weight in old age. Autopsy studies show a diminution of nearly 46% in liver weight between the 3rd and 10th decades of life. The liver decreases in size with age. The hepatocytes are radially disposed in the liver lobule. They are piled up, forming a layer one cell thick (except in young children in a fashion similar to the bricks of a wall. These plates are directed from the periphery of the lobule to its centre and anastomose freely forming a complex labyrinthine and sponge-like structure. CONCLUSIONS: From the findings in the present study it can be concluded that: 1. Nowadays, the measurement of liver volume has gained practical use in relation to liver transplantation. 2. We have compared the histomorphology of adult liver with a child. The findings in both the groups are very similar. This feature is important, since in

  15. Recurrence of primary sclerosing cholangitis in pediatric liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Veena L; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Mazariegos, George V; Sun, Qing; Sindhi, Rakesh

    2014-06-01

    There is little detailed clinical information on recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis (rPSC) after liver transplantation in children. Our purpose was to describe the characteristics of children who had experienced rPSC after liver transplantation so that we could identify potential risk factors for recurrence. Clinical information for pediatric patients undergoing transplantation for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) was retrospectively reviewed, and variables related to the pretransplant diagnosis of PSC and posttransplant variables were abstracted. The studied variables included the following: cytomegalovirus/Epstein-Barr virus status, early/late rejection, induction regimen, immunosuppression in the first year, steroid-resistant rejection, diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease, and human leukocyte antigen markers commonly associated with PSC. A diagnosis of rPSC was made on the basis of radiographic features, histology, or both. Twelve patients underwent liver transplantation for PSC between 1993 and 2012. Patients received tacrolimus for maintenance immunosuppression after induction with steroids (n = 6) or thymoglobulin (n = 6). Three patients were diagnosed with rPSC 44, 60, and 62 months after transplantation. A fourth patient underwent retransplantation for graft failure with features of both hepatic artery stenosis and rPSC. This patient had distinct histological features of rPSC in the second graft. Three of the 4 patients were 7 years old or younger at the diagnosis of PSC. The patient and graft survival rates were similar for the steroid and thymoglobulin groups. All 4 children with rPSC received steroid-free thymoglobulin induction. In conclusion, our observation of an association between thymoglobulin, and age less than 10 years at the diagnosis of PSC, and rPSC adds to the existing suggestion of a link between the immune environment and the pathogenesis of rPSC. Defining the natural history of rPSC and searching for the etiology and

  16. Primary hepatic leiomyosarcoma with liver metastasis of rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Kiyoto; Aoki, Hideki; Takehara, Yuko; Yamasaki, Rie; Tanakaya, Kohji; Takeuchi, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Primary hepatic leiomyosarcoma is a particularly rare tumor with a poor prognosis. Curative resection is currently the only effective treatment, and the efficacy of chemotherapy is unclear. This represents the first case report of a patient with primary hepatic leiomyosarcoma co-existing with metastatic liver carcinoma. We present a 59-year-old man who was diagnosed preoperatively with rectal cancer with multiple liver metastases. He underwent a curative hepatectomy after a series of chemotherapy regimens with modified FOLFOX6 consisting of 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab, FOLFIRI consisting of 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan plus bevacizumab, and irinotecan plus cetuximab. One of the liver tumors showed a different response to chemotherapy and was diagnosed as a leiomyosarcoma following histopathological examination. This case suggests that irinotecan has the potential to inhibit the growth of hepatic leiomyosarcomas. The possibility of comorbid different histological types of tumors should be suspected when considering the treatment of multiple liver tumors. PMID:23082067

  17. Radioembolization for primary and metastatic liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Khairuddin; Lewandowski, Robert J; Kulik, Laura; Riaz, Ahsun; Mulcahy, Mary F; Salem, Riad

    2011-10-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma is increasing. Most patients present beyond potentially curative options and are usually affected by underlying cirrhosis. In this scenario, transarterial therapies, such as radioembolization, are rapidly gaining acceptance as a potential therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma and liver metastases. Radioembolization is a catheter-based liver-directed therapy that involves the injection of micron-sized embolic particles loaded with a radioisotope by use of percutaneous transarterial techniques. Cancer cells are preferentially supplied by arterial blood and normal hepatocytes by portal venous blood; therefore, radioembolization specifically targets tumor cells with a high dose of lethal radiation and spares healthy hepatocytes. The antitumor effect mostly comes from radiation rather than embolization. The most commonly used radioisotope is yttrium-90. The commercially available devices are TheraSphere (glass based; MDS Nordion, Ottawa, Canada) and SIR-Sphere (resin based; Sirtex, Lane Cove, Australia). The procedure is performed on an outpatient basis. The incidence of complications is comparatively less than other locoregional therapies and may include nausea, fatigue, abdominal pain, hepatic dysfunction, biliary injury, fibrosis, radiation pneumonitis, gastrointestinal ulcers, and vascular injury. However, these complications can be avoided by meticulous pretreatment assessment, careful patient selection, and adequate dosimetry. This article focuses on both the technical and clinical aspects of radioembolization with emphasis on patient selection, uses and complications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Thy-1 (CD90)-Positive Hepatic Progenitor Cells, Hepatoctyes, and Non-parenchymal Liver Cells Isolated from Human Livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Thomas S; Dayoub, Rania

    2017-01-01

    In response to liver injury, hepatic cells, especially hepatocytes, can rapidly proliferate to repair liver damage. Additionally, it was shown that under certain circumstances liver resident cells with progenitor capabilities are involved in liver cell proliferation and differentiation. These hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), known as oval cells in rodents, are derived from the canals of Hering, which are located in the periportal region of the liver. Regarding to different cell niches, which were defined for human HPCs, several markers have been used to identify these cells such as CD34, c-kit, OV-6, and Thy-1 (CD90). The latter was shown to be expressed on HPCs in human liver tissue with histological signs of regeneration. In this chapter we describe a detailed method for the isolation of Thy-1 positive cells from human resected liver tissue. Based on a procedure for isolating primary human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) we expanded this protocol to additional enzymatic dissociation, filtration, and centrifugation steps. This results in a bile duct cell enriched fraction of NPCs from which Thy-1 (CD90) positive cells were purified by Thy-1 positivity selection using MACS technique. Bipotential progenitor cells from human liver resections can be isolated using Thy-1 and was shown to be a suitable tool for the enrichment of liver resident progenitor cells for xenotransplantation.

  19. Obesity accelerates epigenetic aging of human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Steve; Erhart, Wiebke; Brosch, Mario; Ammerpohl, Ole; von Schönfels, Witigo; Ahrens, Markus; Heits, Nils; Bell, Jordana T; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Spector, Tim D; Deloukas, Panos; Siebert, Reiner; Sipos, Bence; Becker, Thomas; Röcken, Christoph; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen

    2014-10-28

    Because of the dearth of biomarkers of aging, it has been difficult to test the hypothesis that obesity increases tissue age. Here we use a novel epigenetic biomarker of aging (referred to as an "epigenetic clock") to study the relationship between high body mass index (BMI) and the DNA methylation ages of human blood, liver, muscle, and adipose tissue. A significant correlation between BMI and epigenetic age acceleration could only be observed for liver (r = 0.42, P = 6.8 × 10(-4) in dataset 1 and r = 0.42, P = 1.2 × 10(-4) in dataset 2). On average, epigenetic age increased by 3.3 y for each 10 BMI units. The detected age acceleration in liver is not associated with the Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score or any of its component traits after adjustment for BMI. The 279 genes that are underexpressed in older liver samples are highly enriched (1.2 × 10(-9)) with nuclear mitochondrial genes that play a role in oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport. The epigenetic age acceleration, which is not reversible in the short term after rapid weight loss induced by bariatric surgery, may play a role in liver-related comorbidities of obesity, such as insulin resistance and liver cancer.

  20. Increased Porphyrins in Primary Liver Cancer Mainly Reflect a Parallel Liver Disease

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    Jerzy Kaczynski

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic porphyries have been associated with an increased risk of primary liver cancer (PLC, which on the other hand may cause an increased porphyrin production. To evaluate the role of an underlying liver disorder we analyzed porphyrins in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC (n=65, cholangiocellular carcinoma (n=3, or suspected PLC, which turned out to be metastases (n=18 or a benign disorder (n=11. None of the patients had a family history of porphyry or clinical signs of porphyry. Increased aminolevulinic acid or porphyrin values were common not only in patients with PLC (43% but also in metastatic (50% and benign (64% liver disorders. The corresponding proportion for HCC patients with liver cirrhosis (55% was higher (P<.05 than in those without cirrhosis (17%. We conclude that symptomatic porphyries are unusual in PLC, whereas elevated urinary and/or faecal porphyrins are common, primarily reflecting a parallel liver disease and not the PLC.

  1. Primary amyloidosis with spontaneous splenic rupture, cholestasis, and liver failure treated with emergency liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg-Gertzén, H; Ericzon, B G; Blomberg, B

    1998-11-01

    A 61-yr-old man with cholestatic jaundice soon after presentation had an emergency operation because of spontaneous rupture of the spleen. This was found to be caused by primary systemic amyloidosis. After the splenectomy, the patient deteriorated with liver failure and was successfully treated with liver transplantation. Osteopenic fractures of the thoracic columna developed after transplantation. Except for this, the patient is well 18 months after transplantation.

  2. Increased Porphyrins in Primary Liver Cancer Mainly Reflect a Parallel Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jerzy Kaczynski; Göran Hansson; Sven Wallerstedt

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic porphyries have been associated with an increased risk of primary liver cancer (PLC), which on the other hand may cause an increased porphyrin production. To evaluate the role of an underlying liver disorder we analyzed porphyrins in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (n = 65), cholangiocellular carcinoma (n = 3), or suspected PLC, which turned out to be metastases (n = 18) or a benign disorder (n = 11). None of the patients had a family history of porphyry or clinical signs...

  3. Liver Effects of Clinical Drugs Differentiated in Human Liver Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E. M. Vickers

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Drugs with clinical adverse effects are compared in an ex vivo 3-dimensional multi-cellular human liver slice model. Functional markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, glutathione GSH and ATP levels, were affected by acetaminophen (APAP, 1 mM, diclofenac (DCF, 1 mM and etomoxir (ETM, 100 μM. Drugs targeting mitochondria more than GSH were dantrolene (DTL, 10 μM and cyclosporin A (CSA, 10 μM, while GSH was affected more than ATP by methimazole (MMI, 500 μM, terbinafine (TBF, 100 μM, and carbamazepine (CBZ 100 μM. Oxidative stress genes were affected by TBF (18%, CBZ, APAP, and ETM (12%–11%, and mitochondrial genes were altered by CBZ, APAP, MMI, and ETM (8%–6%. Apoptosis genes were affected by DCF (14%, while apoptosis plus necrosis were altered by APAP and ETM (15%. Activation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial energy, heat shock, ER stress, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage, immune and inflammation genes ranked CSA (75%, ETM (66%, DCF, TBF, MMI (61%–60%, APAP, CBZ (57%–56%, and DTL (48%. Gene changes in fatty acid metabolism, cholestasis, immune and inflammation were affected by DTL (51%, CBZ and ETM (44%–43%, APAP and DCF (40%–38%, MMI, TBF and CSA (37%–35%. This model advances multiple dosing in a human ex vivo model, plus functional markers and gene profile markers of drug induced human liver side-effects.

  4. Decellularized human liver as a natural 3D-scaffold for liver bioengineering and transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Giuseppe; Rombouts, Krista; Rennie Hall, Andrew; Urbani, Luca; Vinh Luong, Tu; Al-Akkad, Walid; Longato, Lisa; Brown, David; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Dhillon, Amar P.; Fuller, Barry; Davidson, Brian; Moore, Kevin; Dhar, Dipok; De Coppi, Paolo; Malago, Massimo; Pinzani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Liver synthetic and metabolic function can only be optimised by the growth of cells within a supportive liver matrix. This can be achieved by the utilisation of decellularised human liver tissue. Here we demonstrate complete decellularization of whole human liver and lobes to form an extracellular matrix scaffold with a preserved architecture. Decellularized human liver cubic scaffolds were repopulated for up to 21 days using human cell lines hepatic stellate cells (LX2), hepatocellular carcinoma (Sk-Hep-1) and hepatoblastoma (HepG2), with excellent viability, motility and proliferation and remodelling of the extracellular matrix. Biocompatibility was demonstrated by either omental or subcutaneous xenotransplantation of liver scaffold cubes (5 × 5 × 5 mm) into immune competent mice resulting in absent foreign body responses. We demonstrate decellularization of human liver and repopulation with derived human liver cells. This is a key advance in bioartificial liver development. PMID:26248878

  5. Cutaneous features seen in primary liver cell (Hepatocellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary liver cell carcinoma (PLCC), predominantly hepatocellular carcinoma is a killer. In the southwestern region of Nigeria it occupies the second position, behind prostate cancer in males. Females account for about a third of diagnosed cases. Children are not spared. Over 80 % of PLCC cases present to the hospital at ...

  6. Time spent in hospital after liver transplantation: Effects of primary liver disease and comorbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovikkai, Chutwichai; Charman, Susan C; Praseedom, Raaj K; Gimson, Alexander E; van der Meulen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the effect of primary liver disease and comorbidities on transplant length of stay (TLOS) and LOS in later admissions in the first two years after liver transplantation (LLOS). METHODS A linked United Kingdom Liver Transplant Audit - Hospital Episode Statistics database of patients who received a first adult liver transplant between 1997 and 2010 in England was analysed. Patients who died within the first two years were excluded from the primary analysis, but a sensitivity analysis was also performed including all patients. Multivariable linear regression was used to evaluate the impact of primary liver disease and comorbidities on TLOS and LLOS. RESULTS In 3772 patients, the mean (95%CI) TLOS was 24.8 (24.2 to 25.5) d, and the mean LLOS was 24.2 (22.9 to 25.5) d. Compared to patients with cancer, we found that the largest difference in TLOS was seen for acute hepatic failure group (6.1 d; 2.8 to 9.4) and the largest increase in LLOS was seen for other liver disease group (14.8 d; 8.1 to 21.5). Patients with cardiovascular disease had 8.5 d (5.7 to 11.3) longer TLOS and 6.0 d (0.2 to 11.9) longer LLOS, compare to those without. Patients with congestive cardiac failure had 7.6 d longer TLOS than those without. Other comorbidities did not significantly increase TLOS nor LLOS. CONCLUSION The time patients spent in hospital varied according to their primary liver disease and some comorbidities. Time spent in hospital of patients with cancer was relatively short compared to most other indications. Cardiovascular disease and congestive cardiac failure were the comorbidities with a strong impact on increased LOS. PMID:28058226

  7. [Primary intrahepatic lithiasis: indications and results of liver resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Gennaro; De Rose, Agostino Maria; Giordano, Marco; Mele, Caterina; Vellone, Maria; Ardito, Francesco; Murazio, Marino; Giuliante, Felice; Giovannini, Ivo; Nuzzo, Gennaro

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review a series of patients submitted to hepatectomy for primary intrahepatic lithiasis to evaluate early and late results with an assessment of indications, methods and long-term outcomes. From January 1992 to December 2007, 40 patients (25 males and 15 females with a mean age of 51 years) underwent surgery for primary intrahepatic lithiasis in our Hepato-biliary Surgery Unit. Left hepatectomy (20 patients) and left lateral segmentectomy (12 patients) were the most common procedures performed. A cholangiocarcinoma was found in 4 patients (10%) and only two of these underwent liver resection, while an exploratory laparotomy was performed in the remaining two patients for an unresectable tumour, unexpected before surgery. There was no postoperative mortality. The morbidity rate was 22.5% with a prevalence of infectious complications related to bile leakage. Long-term results, assessed in 30 patients with a follow-up longer than 12 months, were good or fair in 28 patients (93.3%). Primary intrahepatic lithiasis is diagnosed increasingly in Western countries as a result of the improvement in imaging techniques. The stones originate inside the liver at the level of dilatations of the bile ducts above congenital strictures of the main hilar ducts. Biliary pain and cholangitis are the most common presenting symptoms, whereas cholangiocarcinoma represents the unfavourable complication of the disease. In the majority of cases, a single liver lobe or segment is involved and liver resection allows definitive treatment of the disease and prevention of cancer.

  8. Primary liver transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis: A comparative analysis of the European liver transplant registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Schramm (Christoph); M. Bubenheim (Michael); R. Adam (René); V. Karam (Vincent); J. Buckels (John); J.G. O'Grady (John); N. Jamieson (Neville); S. Pollard (Stephen); P. Neuhaus (Peter); M.M. Manns (Michael); R.J. Porte (Robert); D. Castaing (Denis); A. Paul (Anna); O. Traynor (Oscar); J. Garden (James); S. Friman (Styrbjörn); B.G. Ericzon; L. Fischer (Lutz); S. Vitko (Stefan); M. Krawczyk (Marek); H.J. Metselaar (Herold); A. Foss (Aksel); M. Kilic (Murat); K. Rolles (Keith); P. Burra (Patrizia); X. Rogiers (Xavier); A.W. Lohse (Ansgar)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe principal aim of this study was to compare the probability of and potential risk factors for death and graft loss after primary adult and pediatric liver transplantation in patients undergoing transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) to those in patients undergoing

  9. Primary Liver Transplantation for Autoimmune Hepatitis : A Comparative Analysis of the European Liver Transplant Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schramm, Christoph; Bubenheim, Michael; Adam, Rene; Karam, Vincent; Buckels, John; O'Grady, John G.; Jamieson, Neville; Pollard, Stephen; Neuhaus, Peter; Manns, Michael M.; Porte, Robert; Castaing, Denis; Paul, Andreas; Traynor, Oscar; Garden, James; Friman, Styrbjorn; Ericzon, Bo-Goran; Fischer, Lutz; Vitko, Stefan; Krawczyk, Marek; Metselaar, Herold J.; Foss, Aksel; Kilic, Murat; Rolles, Keith; Burra, Patrizia; Rogiers, Xavier; Lohse, Ansgar W.

    The principal aim of this study was to compare the probability of and potential risk factors for death and graft loss after primary adult and pediatric liver transplantation in patients undergoing transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) to those in patients undergoing transplantation for

  10. Locally ablative therapies for primary and metastatic liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, David; Kang, Josephine; Madoff, David C

    2014-08-01

    Locally ablative therapies have an increasing role in the effective multidisciplinary approach towards the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver tumors. In patients who are not considered surgical candidates and have low volume disease, these therapies have now become established into consensus practice guidelines. A large range of therapeutic options exist including percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), cryoablation, percutaneous laser ablation (PLA), irreversible electroporation (IRE), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU); each having benefits and drawbacks. The greatest body of evidence supporting clinical utility in the liver currently exists for RFA, with PEI having fallen out of favor. MWA, IRE, SBRT and HIFU are relatively nascent technologies, and outcomes data supporting their use is promising. Future directions of ablative therapies include tandem approaches to improve efficacy in the treatment of liver tumors.

  11. New psychoactive substances: Studies on the metabolism of XLR-11, AB-PINACA, FUB-PB-22, 4-methoxy-α-PVP, 25-I-NBOMe, and meclonazepam using human liver preparations in comparison to primary human hepatocytes, and human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Lilian H J; Maurer, Hans H; Meyer, Markus R

    2017-10-05

    New psychoactive substances (NPS) are an increasing problem in clinical and forensic toxicology. The knowledge of their metabolism is important for toxicological risk assessment and for developing toxicological urine screenings. Considering the huge numbers of NPS annually appearing on the market, metabolism studies should be realized in a fast, simple, cost efficient, and reliable way. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) were recommended to be the gold standard for in vitro metabolism studies as they are expected to contain natural enzyme clusters, co-substrates, and drug transporters. In addition, they were already successfully used for metabolism studies of NPS. However, they also have disadvantages such as high costs and limited applicability without special equipment. The aims of the present study were therefore first to investigate exemplarily the phase I and phase II metabolism of six NPS (XLR-11, AB-PINACA, FUB-PB-22, 4-methoxy-α-PVP, 25-I-NBOMe, and meclonazepam) from different drug classes using pooled human S9 fraction (pS9) or pooled human liver microsomes combined with cytosol (pHLM/pHLC) after addition of the co-substrates for the main metabolic phase I and II reactions. Second to compare results to published data generated using primary human hepatocytes and human urine samples. Results of the incubations with pS9 or pHLM/pHLC were comparable in number and abundance of metabolites. Formation of metabolites, particularly after multi-step reactions needed a longer incubation time. However, incubations using human liver preparations resulted in a lower number of total detected metabolites compared to PHH, but they were still able to allow the identification of the main human urinary excretion products. Human liver preparations and particularly the pooled S9 fraction could be shown to be a sufficient and more cost-efficient alternative in context of metabolism studies also for developing toxicological urine screenings. It might be recommended to use the

  12. Recurrence of primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cholangitis and auto-immune hepatitis after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visseren, T; Darwish Murad, S

    2017-04-01

    Liver transplantation is a well-accepted treatment for decompensated chronic liver disease due to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and auto-immune hepatitis (AIH). Survival after liver transplantation is generally good with 1 and 5-year survival rates around 90% and 70-85%. After transplantation, however, these diseases recur in 8.6-27% (rPSC), 10.9-42.3% (rPBC) and 7-42% (rAIH), and this poses significant challenges in terms of management and graft outcome in these patients. In this review we discuss the incidence, clinical presentation, challenges in diagnosis, reported risk factors and impact on post-transplant outcomes of recurrence of PSC, PBC and AIH after liver transplantation. We also discuss some of the limitations of current investigations and formulate idea's for future research objectives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dataset of protein species from human liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Naryzhny

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article contains data related to the research article entitled “Zipf׳s law in proteomics” (Naryzhny et al., 2017 [1]. The protein composition in the human liver or hepatocarcinoma (HepG2 cells extracts was estimated using a filter-aided sample preparation (FASP protocol. The protein species/proteoform composition in the human liver was determined by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE followed by Electrospray Ionization Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (ESI LC-MS/MS. In the case of two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE, the gel was stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue R350, and image analysis was performed with ImageMaster 2D Platinum software (GE Healthcare. The 96 sections in the 2D gel were selected and cut for subsequent ESI LC-MS/MS and protein identification. If the same protein was detected in different sections, it was considered to exist as different protein species/proteoforms. A list of human liver proteoforms detected in this way is presented.

  14. Molecular Structure of Human-Liver Glycogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Deng

    Full Text Available Glycogen is a highly branched glucose polymer which is involved in maintaining blood-sugar homeostasis. Liver glycogen contains large composite α particles made up of linked β particles. Previous studies have shown that the binding which links β particles into α particles is impaired in diabetic mice. The present study reports the first molecular structural characterization of human-liver glycogen from non-diabetic patients, using transmission electron microscopy for morphology and size-exclusion chromatography for the molecular size distribution; the latter is also studied as a function of time during acid hydrolysis in vitro, which is sensitive to certain structural features, particularly glycosidic vs. proteinaceous linkages. The results are compared with those seen in mice and pigs. The molecular structural change during acid hydrolysis is similar in each case, and indicates that the linkage of β into α particles is not glycosidic. This result, and the similar morphology in each case, together imply that human liver glycogen has similar molecular structure to those of mice and pigs. This knowledge will be useful for future diabetes drug targets.

  15. Cellular distribution and handling of liver-targeting preparations in human livers studied by a liver lobe perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgert, B N; Olinga, P; Weert, B; Slooff, M J; Meijer, D K; Poelstra, K; Groothuis, G M

    2001-06-01

    We developed and tested a novel method for perfusing parts of human liver to study uptake and handling of drug-targeting preparations. These preparations, designed for the treatment of liver fibrosis in man, have been extensively studied in animals, but little is known about the uptake and handling by human livers. Human liver tissue was obtained from livers procured from multiorgan donors and from cirrhotic livers of patients. To assess tissue viability, perfusate glutamate-oxalacetate-transaminase (GOT), glutamate-pyruvate-transaminase (GPT), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were determined. To assess tissue functionality, the uptake of taurocholic acid and phase I and II metabolism of lidocaine and 7-hydroxycoumarin were determined. Uptake of a drug-targeting preparation was studied with Dexa(10)-HSA, which is designed for targeting of dexamethasone to nonparenchymal cells in the liver. During a 90-min perfusion period, no elevation of either GOT, GPT, or LDH was found. Both healthy control livers and cirrhotic livers showed phase I and II drug metabolism and functional taurocholic acid uptake. Studies with Dexa(10)-HSA revealed that 60 min after administration, 40% of the dose had been taken up by control livers and only 5% by cirrhotic livers. In control livers, Kupffer and endothelial cells had taken up Dexa(10)-HSA, whereas in cirrhotic livers only Kupffer cells were responsible for the uptake. Viability parameters and liver function tests clearly showed the applicability of this method. In the perfusion set-up, we showed uptake of the drug-targeting preparation Dexa(10)-HSA by healthy and cirrhotic human liver tissue, although the distribution patterns differed. This demonstrates the need to study new concepts in (diseased) human tissue.

  16. Primary liver tumour of intermediate (hepatocyte-bile duct cell) phenotype: a progenitor cell tumour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robrechts, C; De Vos, R; Van den Heuvel, M; Van Cutsem, E; Van Damme, B; Desmet, V; Roskams, T

    1998-08-01

    A 57-year-old female patient presented with painless obstructive jaundice and mild mesogastric pain; she was in good general condition on admission. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed diffuse tumoral invasion of the liver, suggesting diffuse metastases. A liver biopsy showed a tumour with a trabecular growth pattern, composed of uniform relatively small cells, very suggestive of an endocrine carcinoma. Additional immunohistochemical stains, however, did not show any endocrine differentiation, but showed positivity for both hepatocyte-type cytokeratins (cytokeratin 8 and 18) and bile duct-type cytokeratins (cytokeratin 7 and 19). In addition, parathyroid hormone-related peptide, shown to be a good marker for cholangiocarcinoma, was immunoreactive. Electron microscopy revealed tumour cells with an intermediate phenotype: the cells clearly showed hepatocyte features on one hand and bile duct cell features on the other hand. Nine days after admission, the patient died due to liver failure and hepatic encephalopathy. Autopsy excluded another primary tumour site. Overall, this tumour was a primary liver tumour with an intermediate phenotype and with a very rapid clinical course. The intermediate (between hepatocyte and bile duct cell) phenotype suggests an immature progenitor cell origin, which is concordant with a rapid clinical course. This type of tumour has not been described previously and provides additional evidence for the existence of progenitor cells in human liver.

  17. HUMAN LIVER SLICES EXPRESS THE SAME LIDOCAINE BIOTRANSFORMATION RATE AS ISOLATED HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OLINGA, P; MEIJER, DKF; SLOOFF, MJH; GROOTHUIS, GMM; Merema, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    In order to investigate whether liver slices are a valuable tool for the assessment of drug metabolism in human liver, we compared the phase I metabolism of lidocaine in human liver slices and hepatocytes prepared from three human livers. Lidocaine is mainly metabolised to monoethylglycinexylidide

  18. Current status of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization combined with radiofrequency ablation in treatment of primary liver cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LYU Tianshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, more and more therapeutic methods have been applied for the treatment of primary liver cancer; however, since most lesions develop from progressive liver disease or liver cirrhosis, primary liver cancer is still a refractory malignant tumor. Although surgical resection and liver transplantation are radical therapeutic methods, they are not applicable to most patients due to complex issues related to transplantation and insidious onset of such disease. With the improvement in equipment and technology, the interventional therapies for primary liver cancer have been taken more seriously, especially transcatheter arterial chemoembolization and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation. This article investigates the effect and feasibility of the combination of these two therapies for primary liver cancer and introduces the research advances in interventional therapy for primary liver cancer.

  19. Primary Lymphoma of the Liver: A Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franzjosef Schweiger

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of a previously healthy man who developed primary non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the liver is presented. Biopsy confirmed that the tumour was of the diffuse large cell type and was of apparent T-cell origin. The diagnosis of these rare tumours is suggested by the presence of a hepatic mass without lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly or bone marrow involvement, as well as normal carcinoembryonic antigen and alpha-fetoprotein levels. However, histological examination of tissue is essential to confirm the diagnosis. The response to treatment varies, but surgical resection and/or chemotherapy can result in prolonged remissions. The literature on this topic is briefly reviewed.

  20. The Gut-Liver Axis in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eksteen, Bertus

    2016-02-01

    Dysregulation of the key genetic, immunologic, and microbiome compounds of the gut-liver axis is the basis for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). This creates opportunities to accelerate therapies that have been traditionally developed for IBD to be used in PSC to the benefit of both diseases. Shared genetic susceptibility loci has yielded important clues into the pathogenesis of PSC-IBD. Understanding of the critical links between PSC and IBD are essential in designing clinical care pathways for these complex patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Safety of frozen liver for human consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada A.K. Kirrella

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to ensure and evaluate the safety of imported frozen beef liver traded in supermarkets of Kafr El-Sheikh Governorate, Egypt, through detection of Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella enteritidies, Escherichia coli O157:H7, antibiotic residues, and aflatoxin B1 residue. Fifty samples of imported frozen liver were randomly collected from different shops at Kafr El-Sheikh Governorate for isolation of S. typhimurium, S. enteritidies, and E. coli O157:H7. The results revealed that for both microorganisms 4% of the examined samples presumed to contain Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 organisms, according to the colonial character on Harlequin Salmonella ABC agar media and Harlequin SMAC-BCIG agar media. According to biochemical and serological identifications, both organisms could not be detected in the examined samples. A total of 29 (58% samples were positive for antibiotic residues, using the Premi test (a broad-spectrum screening test for the detection of antibiotic residues in meat at or below the maximum residue limits. In addition, aflatoxin B1 was detected in one (2% samples with a concentration of 1.1 μg/kg. The results reflect that there was good hygiene practice for handling and preparation of frozen liver while selling to consumers. However, a high percentage of antibiotic residues reflect ignorance of withdrawal time before slaughtering of animals as well as misuse of antibiotics in veterinary fields. Furthermore, aflatoxin B1 residue was detected in examined frozen liver samples at a concentration below the maximum residual level, which is not enough to cause threat to humans, but it is enough to cause problem if it is eaten regularly reflect contamination of animal feed with aflatoxins.

  2. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Katrin; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-09-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  3. Primary stent placement for hepatic artery stenosis after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Linda; Terral, William; Zea, Nicolas; Bazan, Hernan A; Smith, Taylor A; Loss, George E; Bluth, Edward; Sternbergh, W Charles

    2015-09-01

    Significant hepatic artery stenosis (HAS) after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) can lead to thrombosis, with subsequent liver failure in 30% of patients. Although operative intervention or retransplantation has been the traditional solution, endovascular therapy has emerged as a less invasive treatment strategy. Prior smaller studies have been conflicting in the relative efficacy of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) vs primary stent placement for HAS. This was a single-center retrospective review of all endovascular interventions for HAS after OLT during a 54-month period (August 2009-December 2013). Patients with ultrasound imaging with evidence of severe HAS (peak systolic velocity >400-450 cm/s, resistive index arterial rupture and two hepatic artery dissections. The long-term risk of hepatic artery thrombosis in the entire patient cohort was 3.2%. HAS after OLT can be treated endovascularly with high technical success and excellent primary assisted patency. This series represents the largest reported cohort of endovascular interventions for HAS to date. Initial use of a stent showed a strong trend toward decreasing the need for reintervention. Avoidance of hepatic artery thrombosis is possible in >95% of patients with endovascular treatment and close follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Differential genomic effects of six different TiO2 nanomaterials on human liver HepG2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineered nanoparticles are reported to cause liver toxicity in vivo. To better assess the mechanism of the in vivo liver toxicity, we used the human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2) as a model system. Human HepG2 cells were exposed to 6 TiO2 nanomaterials (with dry primary partic...

  5. Knockout of the primary sclerosing cholangitis-risk gene Fut2 causes liver disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroni, Luca; Hohenester, Simon D; van de Graaf, Stan F J; Tolenaars, Dagmar; van Lienden, Krijn; Verheij, Joanne; Marzioni, Marco; Karlsen, Tom H; Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Beuers, Ulrich

    2017-08-01

    The etiopathogenesis of primary sclerosing cholangitis is unknown. Genetic variants of fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2) have been identified in genome-wide association studies as risk factors for primary sclerosing cholangitis. We investigated the role of Fut2 in murine liver pathophysiology by studying Fut2-/- mice. Fut2-/- mice were viable and fertile, had lower body weight than wild-type (wt) littermates and gray fur. Half of the Fut2-/- mice showed serum bile salt levels 40 times higher than wt (Fut2-/-high ), whereas the remainder were normocholanemic (Fut2-/-low ). Fut2-/- mice showed normal serum liver tests, bile flow, biliary bile salt secretion, fecal bile salt loss, and expression of major hepatocellular bile salt transporters and cytochrome P450 7a1, the key regulator of bile salt synthesis, indicating that elevated serum bile salts in Fut2-/-high mice were not explained by cholestasis. Fut2-/-high mice, but not Fut2-/-low mice, were sensitive to hydrophobic bile salt feeding (0.3% glycochenodeoxycholate); they rapidly lost weight and showed elevation of serum liver tests (alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase) and areas of liver parenchymal necrosis. Histomorphological evaluation revealed the presence of paraportal shunting vessels, increased numbers of portal vascular structures, wall thickening of some portal arteries, and periductal fibrosis in Fut2-/-high mice more than Fut2-/-low mice and not wt mice. Unconjugated bilirubin and ammonia were or tended to be elevated in Fut2-/-high mice only. Portosystemic shunting was demonstrated by portal angiography, which disclosed virtually complete portosystemic shunting in Fut2-/-high mice, discrete portosystemic shunting in Fut2-/-low mice, and no shunting in wt littermates. Liver pathology in Fut2-/- mice is dominated by consequences of portosystemic shunting resulting in microcirculatory disturbances, mild (secondary) periductal fibrosis, and sensitivity toward human bile

  6. Cholestatic Liver Injury: Care of Patients With Primary Biliary Cholangitis or Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Laurie; James, Michelle; Gossard, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    The most common causes of chronic cholestatic liver disease are primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Both disease processes are characterized by a destruction of intrahepatic and/or extrahepatic biliary ducts. The etiology is not entirely clear; however, there is an underlying autoimmune component contributing to both disease processes. Although PBC and PSC are often diagnosed and managed in the outpatient setting, in some instances, a patient may have jaundice, fatigue, and pruritus requiring evaluation and determination of the cholestatic cause. Patients with PSC should be monitored for evidence of cholangiocarcinoma, colon cancer, and gallbladder polyps as they are at an increased risk of malignant neoplasms. Liver transplant has the potential for improving quality of life, although disease recurrence is a risk. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  7. Cellular distribution and handling of liver-targeting preparations in human livers studied by a liver lobe perfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melgert, BN; Olinga, P; Weert, B; Slooff, MJH; Meijer, DKF; Poelstra, K; Groothuis, GMM

    We developed and tested a novel method for perfusing parts of human liver to study uptake and handling of drug-targeting preparations. These preparations, designed for the treatment of liver fibrosis in man, have been extensively studied in animals, but little is known about the uptake and handling

  8. Recurrence and rejection in liver transplantation for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosby, Bjarte; Karlsen, Tom H; Melum, Espen

    2012-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic progressive inflammatory disease affecting the bile ducts, leading to fibrosis and eventually cirrhosis in most patients. Its etiology is unknown and so far no effective medical therapy is available. Liver transplantation (LTX) is the only curative treatment and at present PSC is the main indication for LTX in the Scandinavian countries. Close to half of the PSC patients experience one or more episodes of acute cellular rejection (ACR) following transplantation and approximately 1/5 of the transplanted patients develop recurrent disease in the graft. In addition, some reports indicate that ACR early after LTX for PSC can influence the risk for recurrent disease. For these important post-transplantation entities affecting PSC patients, we have reviewed the current literature on epidemiology, pathogenesis, treatment and the possible influence of rejection on the risk of recurrent disease in the allograft. PMID:22228965

  9. Radiologic findings following Y90 radioembolization for primary liver malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Saad M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Miller, Frank H; Lewandowski, Robert J; Ryu, Robert K; Sato, Kent T; Senthilnathan, Sean; Riaz, Ahsun; Kulik, Laura; Mulcahy, Mary F; Omary, Reed A; Salem, Riad

    2009-01-01

    A therapy gaining rapid clinical adoption involves radioembolization with the use of Yttrium-90 (90Y) microspheres. The 20-60 microm-sized microspheres are injected trans-arterially and flow to hepatic tumors given their preferential blood supply from the hepatic artery. Once they lodge in the arterioles, they impart a very intense local radiotherapeutic effect. Given the combined radiation and embolic effect, the imaging findings imparted by this mode of action differ significantly from other treatments. This work represents a comprehensive review of the imaging findings following radioembolization in patients with primary liver tumors. The report discusses imaging response, benign secondary effects, and complications. This should help educate the radiologist on imaging findings that should be expected following radioembolization and therefore aid in the proper image interpretation.

  10. Characterization of Liver-Specific Functions of Human Fetal Hepatocytes in Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnici, Cinzia Maria; Timoneri, Francesca; Amico, Giandomenico; Pietrosi, Giada; Vizzini, Giovanni; Spada, Marco; Pagano, Duilio; Gridelli, Bruno; Conaldi, Pier Giulio

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to assess liver-specific functions of human fetal liver cells proposed as a potential source for hepatocyte transplantation. Fetal liver cells were isolated from livers of different gestational ages (16-22 weeks), and the functions of cell preparations were evaluated by establishing primary cultures. We observed that 20- to 22-week-gestation fetal liver cell cultures contained a predominance of cells with hepatocytic traits that did not divide in vitro but were functionally competent. Fetal hepatocytes performed liver-specific functions at levels comparable to those of their adult counterpart. Moreover, exposure to dexamethasone in combination with oncostatin M promptly induced further maturation of the cells through the acquisition of additional functions (i.e., ability to store glycogen and uptake of indocyanine green). In some cases, particularly in cultures obtained from fetuses of earlier gestational ages (16-18 weeks gestation), cells with mature hepatocytic traits proved to be sporadic, and the primary cultures were mainly populated by clusters of proliferating cells. Consequently, the values of liver-specific functions detected in these cultures were low. We observed that a low cell density culture system rapidly prompted loss of the mature hepatocytic phenotype with downregulations of all the liver-specific functions. We found that human fetal liver cells can be cryopreserved without significant loss of viability and function and evaluated up to 1 year in storage in liquid nitrogen. They might, therefore, be suitable for cell banking and allow for the transplantation of large numbers of cells, thus improving clinical outcomes. Overall, our results indicate that fetal hepatocytes could be used as a cell source for hepatocyte transplantation. Fetal liver cells have been used so far to treat end-stage liver disease. Additional studies are needed to include these cells in cell-based therapies aimed to treat liver failure and inborn

  11. Assessment of Liver and Renal Functions of Asymptomatic Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winniecure), used in our institute for the treatment of Human Immuno Deficiency Virus (HIV) infection, on liver and renal functions of individuals undergoing therapy. A total of 100 asymptomatic Human Immuno Deficiency Virus (HIV) seropositive ...

  12. Diagnosis of Liver Involvement in Primary Sjögren Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeron, Pilar Brito; Retamozo, Soledad; Bové, Albert; Kostov, Belchin Adriyanov; Sisó, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Liver involvement was one of the first extraglandular manifestations to be reported in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome (SS). In the 1990s, a study of liver involvement in patients with primary SS integrated the evaluation of clinical signs of liver disease, liver function and a complete panel of autoantibodies. Recent developments in the field of hepatic and viral diseases have significantly changed the diagnostic approach to liver involvement in SS. The most recent studies have shown that, after eliminating hepatotoxic drugs and fatty liver disease, the two main causes of liver disease in primary SS are chronic viral infections and autoimmune liver diseases. The differential diagnosis of liver disease in primary SS (viral vs autoimmune) is clinically important, since the two processes require different therapeutic approaches and have different prognoses. With respect to viral infections, chronic HCV infection is the main cause of liver involvement in SS patients from the Mediterranean area, while chronic HBV infection may be the main cause of liver involvement in SS patients from Asian countries. After eliminating viral hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) should be considered the main cause of liver disease in primary SS. PBC-related SS patients may have a broad spectrum of abnormalities of the liver, including having no clinical or analytical data suggestive of liver disease. Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is the second most frequently found autoimmune liver disease to be associated with SS (all reported cases are type I), and nearly 10% of these patients have an AIH-PBC overlap. Finally, IgG4-related disease must be investigated in patients with SS presenting with sclerosing cholangitis, especially when autoimmune pancreatitis or retroperitoneal fibrosis are also present. PMID:26355632

  13. Human inmmunoglobulin in primary immunodeficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheffler Mendoza Selma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human immunoglobulin replacement therapy has become a corner- stone in the treatment of patients with primary immunodeficiencies (PID. Currently indicated as first-line therapy for predominantly antibody deficiencies, severe combined immunodeficiencies, and some well-defined syndromes with immunodeficiencies, it is also indicated as adjunct therapy in many other PID. Although considered a high-cost medication, elegant studies had showed that patients correctly treated with human immunoglobulin replacement therapy result in lower costs derived from their health- attention. Major benefits of immunoglobulin replacement therapy include but are not restricted to: protection against infectious processes, organ damage progression-arrest, immune modulation and quality-of-life improvement. Two modalities of treatment are currently used, intravenous and subcutaneous, each has clear advantages and disadvantages when compared to the other, which are presented in this article. The correct use of human immunoglobulin for the treatment of patients with PID translates in better medical-practices improving survival and quality of life of affected patients.

  14. Mathematical model of liver regeneration in human live donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periwal, V; Gaillard, J R; Needleman, L; Doria, C

    2014-05-01

    Liver regeneration after injury occurs in many mammals. Rat liver regenerates after partial hepatectomy over a period of 2 weeks while human liver regeneration takes several months. Notwithstanding this enormous difference in time-scales, with new data from five human live liver transplant donors, we show that a mathematical model of rat liver regeneration can be transferred to human, with all biochemical interactions and signaling unchanged. Only six phenomenological parameters need change, and three of these parameter changes are rescalings of rate constants by the ratio of human lifespan to rat lifespan. Data from three donor subjects with approximately equal resections were used to fit the three parameters and the data from the other two donor subjects was used to independently verify the fit. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Phenotyping and auto-antibody production by liver-infiltrating B cells in primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Brian K; Guevel, Bardia T; Reynolds, Gary M; Gupta Udatha, D B R K; Henriksen, Eva Kristine Klemsdal; Stamataki, Zania; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Karlsen, Tom Hemming; Liaskou, Evaggelia

    2017-02-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are immune-mediated biliary diseases that demonstrate prominent and restricted genetic association with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. In PBC, anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are specific and used as diagnostic biomarkers. PSC-relevant auto-antibodies remain controversial despite a distinct HLA association that mirrors archetypical auto-antigen driven disorders. Herein, we compared antibody-secreting B cells (ASCs) in PSC and PBC liver explants to determine if liver-infiltrating ASCs represent an opportune and novel source of disease-relevant auto-antibodies. Using enzymatic digestion and mechanical disruption, liver mononuclear cells (LIMCs) were isolated from fresh PSC and PBC explants and plasmablast (CD19+CD27+CD38hiCD138-) and plasma cell (CD19+CD27+CD38hiCD138+) ASCs were enumerated by flow cytometry. We observed 45-fold fewer plasma cells in PSC explants (n = 9) compared to PBC samples (n = 5, p < 0.01) and 10-fold fewer IgA-, IgG- and IgM-positive ASCs (p < 0.05). Liver-infiltrating ASCs from PSC and PBC explants were functional and produced similar concentrations of IgA, IgG and IgM following 2 weeks of culture. Antibody production by PBC ASCs (n = 3) was disease-specific as AMA to pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E2 subunit (PDC-E2) was detected by immunostaining, immunoblotting and ELISA. Antibody profiling of PSC supernatants (n = 9) using full-length recombinant human protein arrays (Cambridge Protein Arrays) revealed reactivities to nucleolar protein 3 (5/9) and hematopoietic cell-specific Lyn substrate 1 (3/9). Array analysis of PBC supernatants (n = 3) detected reactivities to PDC-E2 and hexokinase 1 (3/3). In conclusion, we detected unique frequencies of liver-infiltrating ASCs in PSC and PBC and in so doing, highlight a feasible approach for understanding disease-relevant antibodies in PSC. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. NEUTROPHIL CYTOPLASMIC AUTOANTIBODIES AFTER LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY SCLEROSING CHOLANGITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAAGSMA, EB; MULDER, AHL; GOUW, ASH; HORST, G; MEERMAN, L; SLOOFF, MJH; KALLENBERG, CGM

    The immunopathogenic importance of neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies in ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis is unknown. These autoantibodies were investigated before and after liver transplantation in 9 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis. Sera from 10 patients

  17. NEUTROPHIL CYTOPLASMIC AUTOANTIBODIES AFTER LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY SCLEROSING CHOLANGITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagsma, E.B.; MULDER, A.H.L.; Gouw, A.S.H.; MEERMAN, L.; Slooff, M.JH; Kallenberg, Cees; Horst, G.

    1993-01-01

    The immunopathogenic importance of neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies in ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis is unknown. These autoantibodies were investigated before and after liver transplantation in 9 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis. Sera from 10 patients

  18. LiverWiki: a wiki-based database for human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Li, Mansheng; He, Qiang; Zou, Lei; Li, Youhuan; Chang, Cheng; Zhao, Dongyan; Zhu, Yunping

    2017-10-13

    Recent advances in omics technology have produced a large amount of liver-related data. A comprehensive and up-to-date source of liver-related data is needed to allow biologists to access the latest data. However, current liver-related data sources each cover only a specific part of the liver. It is difficult for them to keep pace with the rapid increase of liver-related data available at those data resources. Integrating diverse liver-related data is a critical yet formidable challenge, as it requires sustained human effort. We present LiverWiki, a first wiki-based database that integrates liver-related genes, homolog genes, gene expressions in microarray datasets and RNA-Seq datasets, proteins, protein interactions, post-translational modifications, associated pathways, diseases, metabolites identified in the metabolomics datasets, and literatures into an easily accessible and searchable resource for community-driven sharing. LiverWiki houses information in a total of 141,897 content pages, including 19,787 liver-related gene pages, 17,077 homolog gene pages, 50,251 liver-related protein pages, 36,122 gene expression pages, 2067 metabolites identified in the metabolomics datasets, 16,366 disease-related molecules, and 227 liver disease pages. Other than assisting users in searching, browsing, reviewing, refining the contents on LiverWiki, the most important contribution of LiverWiki is to allow the community to create and update biological data of liver in visible and editable tables. This integrates newly produced data with existing knowledge. Implemented in mediawiki, LiverWiki provides powerful extensions to support community contributions. The main goal of LiverWiki is to provide the research community with comprehensive liver-related data, as well as to allow the research community to share their liver-related data flexibly and efficiently. It also enables rapid sharing new discoveries by allowing the discoveries to be integrated and shared immediately

  19. Fructose and galactose enhance postexercise human liver glycogen synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Décombaz Jacques; Jentjens Roy; Ith Michael; Scheurer Eva; Buehler Tania; Jeukendrup Asker; Boesch Chris

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Both liver and muscle glycogen stores play a fundamental role in exercise and fatigue but the effect of different CHO sources on liver glycogen synthesis in humans is unclear. The aim was to compare the effect of maltodextrin (MD) drinks containing galactose fructose or glucose on postexercise liver glycogen synthesis. METHODS In this double blind triple crossover randomized clinical trial 10 well trained male cyclists performed three experimental exercise sessions separated by at ...

  20. Study of Silymarin and Vitamin E Protective Effects on Silver Nanoparticle Toxicity on Mice Liver Primary Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firouz Faedmaleki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is a most promising field for generating new applications in medicine, although, only few nano products are currently in use for medical purposes. A most prominent nanoproduct is nanosilver. Nano-silver has biological properties which are significant for consumer products, food technology, textiles, and medical applications (e.g. wound care products, implantable medical devices, in diagnosis, drug delivery, and imaging. For their antibacterial activity, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs are largely used in various commercially available products. The use of nano-silver is becoming more and more widespread in medicine and related applications, and due to its increasing exposure, toxicological and environmental issues need to be raised. Cytotoxicity induced by silver nanoparticles (AgNPs and the role that oxidative stress plays in this process were demonstrated in human hepatoma cells AgNPs agglomerated in the cytoplasm and nuclei of treated cells, and they induced intracellular oxidative stress. AgNP reduced ATP content of the cell and caused damage to mitochondria and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in a dose-dependent manner. Silymarin was known as a hepatoprotective agent that is used in the treatment of hepatic diseases including viral hepatitis, alcoholic liver diseases, Amanita mushroom poisoning, liver cirrhosis, toxic and drug-induced liver diseases. It promotes protein synthesis, helps in regenerating liver tissue, controls inflammation, enhances glucuronidation, and protects against glutathione depletion. Vitamin E is a well-known antioxidant and has hepatoprotective effect in liver diseases. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of Ag NPs on primary liver cells of mice. Cell viability (cytotoxicity was examined with MTT assay after primary liver cells of mice exposure to AgNPs at 1, 10, 50, 100, 150, 200, 400 ppm for 24h. AgNPs caused a concentration- dependent decrease of cell viability

  1. Human liver chimeric mouse model based on diphtheria toxin-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiao-Nan; Ren, Rong-Rong; Yang, Hua; Qin, Bo-Yin; Peng, Xiu-Hua; Chen, Li-Xiang; Li, Shun; Yuan, Meng-Jiao; Wang, Chao; Zhou, Xiao-Hui

    2017-07-21

    To establish an inducible liver injury mouse model and transplant human hepatocytes to obtain liver-humanized mice. We crossed three mouse strains, including albumin (Alb)-cre transgenic mice, inducible diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) transgenic mice and severe combined immune deficient (SCID)-beige mice, to create Alb-cre/DTR/SCID-beige (ADSB) mice, which coincidentally harbor Alb-cre and DTR transgenes and are immunodeficient. As the Cre expression is driven by the liver-specific promoter Alb (encoding ALB), the DTR stop signal flanked by two loxP sites can be deleted in the ADSB mice, resulting in DTR expression in the liver. ADSB mice aged 8-10 wk were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with diphtheria toxin (DT) and liver damage was assessed by serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level. Two days later, mouse livers were sampled for histological analysis, and human hepatocytes were transplanted into the livers on the same day. A human ALB enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed 7, 14, 21 and 28 d after transplantation. Human CD68 immunohistochemistry was performed 30 and 90 d after transplantation. We crossed Alb-cre with DTR and SCID-beige mice to obtain ADSB mice. These mice were found to have liver damage 4 d after i.p. injection of 2.5 ng/g bodyweight DT. Bodyweight began to decrease on day 2, increased on day 7, and was lowest on day 4 (range, 10.5%-13.4%). Serum ALT activity began to increase on day 2 and reached a peak value of 289.7 ± 16.2 IU/mL on day 4, then returned to background values on day 7. After transplantation of human liver cells, peripheral blood human ALB level was 1580 ± 454.8 ng/mL (range, 750.2-3064.9 ng/mL) after 28 d and Kupffer cells were present in the liver at 30 d in ADSB mice. Human hepatocytes were successfully repopulated in the livers of ADSB mice. The inducible mouse model of humanized liver in ADSB mice may have functional applications, such as hepatocyte transplantation, hepatic regeneration and drug metabolism.

  2. Human placental alkaline phosphatase in liver and intestine.

    OpenAIRE

    Garattini, E; Margolis, J; Heimer, E; Felix, A.; Udenfriend, S

    1985-01-01

    Three distinct forms of human alkaline phosphatase, presumably isozymes, are known, each apparently associated with a specific tissue. These are placental, intestinal, and liver (kidney and bone). We have used a specific immunoassay and HPLC to show that placental alkaline phosphatase is also present in extracts of liver and intestine in appreciable amounts.

  3. Liver regeneration studies with rat hepatocytes in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalopoulos, G; Cianciulli, H D; Novotny, A R; Kligerman, A D; Strom, S C; Jirtle, R L

    1982-11-01

    Adult rat parenchymal hepatocytes in primary culture can be induced to enter into DNA synthesis and mitosis. The optimal conditions for hepatocyte replication are low plating density (less than 10,000 cells/sq cm) and 50% serum from two-thirds partially hepatectomized rats (48 hr after hepatectomy). Approximately 80% of the hepatocytes enter the cell cycle, and most of these cells go through mitosis. The replicating hepatocytes remain positive for glucose-6-phosphatase and negative for gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and they accumulate fat, in analogy to regenerating liver. Most of the replicating hepatocytes enter into multiple consecutive rounds of DNA synthesis. Dose-response studies between control animal serum and hepatocyte labeling index indicate that in unoperated animals the serum contains substances stimulatory as well as inhibitory for hepatic growth, with the inhibitory effect prevailing at high concentrations. After partial hepatectomy, the inhibitory activity disappears whereas the hepatopoietin activity reaches almost 90% of maximal biological effectiveness at 25% serum concentration. Addition of hormones to the system shows that the hepatopoietin activity is not identical to epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, thyroxine, glucagon, or hydrocortisone. Norepinephrine abolishes the difference between control and hepatectomized serum but does not restore hepatopoietin activity when added to heat-inactivated serum. The results show that this system of replicating hepatocytes can be used to investigate the trophic factors that control growth of normal and neoplastic hepatocytes.

  4. IS THERE RECURRENCE OF PRIMARY BILIARY-CIRRHOSIS AFTER LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION - A CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL STUDY IN LONG-TERM SURVIVORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GOUW, ASH; HAAGSMA, EB; MANNS, M; KLOMPMAKER, IJ; SLOOFF, MJH; GERBER, MA

    Liver transplantation has been accepted as a successful therapeutic tool for irreversible liver diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis. However, removal of the diseased liver may not eliminate this autoimmune disease, and recurrence of primary biliary cirrhosis in the liver graft has been

  5. Polycystic liver disease: ductal plate malformation and the primary cilium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wills, E.S.; Roepman, R.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic livers are found in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), caused by polycystic kidney disease (PKD)1 and PKD2 mutations in virtually all cases, and in isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD), where 20% of cases are caused by mutations in Protein kinase C substrate 80K-H

  6. Aggressive Recurrence of Primary Hepatic Epithelioid Haemangioendothelioma after Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoh, Qusay A; Alnajjar, Asma M; Abaalkhail, Faisal A; Al Sebayel, Mohammed; Al-Hussaini, Hussa F; Al-Hamoudi, Waleed K; Helmy, Hazem; Almansour, Mohamad; Elsiesy, Hussien A

    2016-01-01

    HEHE is a rare neoplasm of vascular origin that occurs in the liver; UNOS reported a favorable outcome after liver transplantation in 110 patients with 1-year and 5-year survival of 80% and 64%. Case Report. A 40-year-old lady presented with a three-month history of right upper abdominal pain with nausea, vomiting, and significant loss of weight associated with scleral icterus and progressive abdominal distension. Examination revealed jaundice, hepatomegaly, and ascites. Serum bilirubin was 26.5 mg/dL and ALP was 552 CT. Abdomen and pelvis showed diffuse infiltrative neoplastic process of the liver with a mass effect and stretching of the hepatic and portal veins, in addition to bile duct dilatation. Viral hepatitis markers were negative and serum alpha fetoprotein was within reference range. Liver biopsy was consistent with HEHE, with positive endothelial markers (CD31, CD34, and factor VIII-related antigen). She underwent living related liver transplantation on June 2013 and was discharged after 20 days with normal liver enzymes. Four months later, she presented with diffuse disease recurrence. Liver biopsy confirmed disease recurrence; she received supportive treatment and unfortunately she died 2 weeks later. Conclusion. HEHE can have rapid and aggressive recurrence after liver transplantation.

  7. Aggressive Recurrence of Primary Hepatic Epithelioid Haemangioendothelioma after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qusay A. Abdoh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available HEHE is a rare neoplasm of vascular origin that occurs in the liver; UNOS reported a favorable outcome after liver transplantation in 110 patients with 1-year and 5-year survival of 80% and 64%. Case Report. A 40-year-old lady presented with a three-month history of right upper abdominal pain with nausea, vomiting, and significant loss of weight associated with scleral icterus and progressive abdominal distension. Examination revealed jaundice, hepatomegaly, and ascites. Serum bilirubin was 26.5 mg/dL and ALP was 552 CT. Abdomen and pelvis showed diffuse infiltrative neoplastic process of the liver with a mass effect and stretching of the hepatic and portal veins, in addition to bile duct dilatation. Viral hepatitis markers were negative and serum alpha fetoprotein was within reference range. Liver biopsy was consistent with HEHE, with positive endothelial markers (CD31, CD34, and factor VIII-related antigen. She underwent living related liver transplantation on June 2013 and was discharged after 20 days with normal liver enzymes. Four months later, she presented with diffuse disease recurrence. Liver biopsy confirmed disease recurrence; she received supportive treatment and unfortunately she died 2 weeks later. Conclusion. HEHE can have rapid and aggressive recurrence after liver transplantation.

  8. Metabolism and covalent binding of [14C]toluene by human and rat liver microsomal fractions and liver slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, D E; Moore, T J; Michener, S R; Powis, G

    1990-01-01

    The in vitro metabolism of [14C]toluene by liver microsomes and liver slices from male Fischer F344 rats and human subjects has been compared. Rat liver microsomes produced only benzyl alcohol from toluene. Liver microsomes from human subjects metabolized toluene to benzyl alcohol, benzaldehyde, and benzoic acid. Liver microsomes from one human donor also produced p-cresol and o-cresol. The overall rate of toluene metabolism by human liver microsomes was 9-fold greater than by rat liver microsomes. Human liver microsomal metabolism of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde required NADPH and was inhibited by carbon monoxide and high pH (pH 10). but was not inhibited by ADP-ribose or sodium azide. These results suggest that cytochrome P-450, rather than alcohol dehydrogenase, was responsible for the metabolism of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Human and rat liver slices metabolized toluene to hippuric acid and benzoic acid. The overall rate of toluene metabolism by human liver slices was 1.3-fold greater than by rat liver slices. Cresols and cresol conjugates were not detected in human or rat liver slice incubations. Covalent binding of [14C]toluene to human liver microsomes and slices was 21-fold and 4-fold greater than to the comparable rat liver preparations. Covalent binding did not occur in the absence of NADPH, was significantly decreased by coincubation with cysteine, glutathione, or superoxide dismutase, and was unaffected by coincubation with lysine. Protease and ribonuclease digestion decreased the amount of toluene covalently bound to human liver microsomes by 78% and 27% respectively. Acid washing of human liver microsomes had no effect on covalent binding.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Increased morbidity odds ratio of primary liver cancer and cirrhosis of the liver among vinyl chloride monomer workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, C L; Wang, J D

    1998-08-01

    To determine if there is an increased risk of admission to hospital for various diseases among vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) workers. 2224 workers with occupational exposure to VCM were identified for occurrence of disease based on a search of hospital computer files on labour insurance. These data were compared with those of workers manufacturing optical equipment and motorcycles from 1 January 1985 to 31 March 1994. Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases were used as reference diseases, and the age adjusted morbidity odds ratio (MOR) was calculated. A significantly increased risk of admission to hospital among VCM workers due to primary liver cancer (MOR 4.5-6.5), cirrhosis of the liver (MOR 1.7-2.1), and other chronic diseases (MOR 1.5-2.0) was found. There were eight cases of primary liver cancer, all with heavy previous exposure to VCM. Another four cases of hepatoma in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) workers were found in the death registry. Ten out of 11 cases of hepatoma, with detailed medical information, were carriers of hepatitis B virus. The average latent period (20 years) was not different from other studies. Alternative agents of primary liver cancer were largely ruled out, suggesting that the combination of hepatitis B and VCM may lead to primary liver cancer. There is an increased risk of primary liver cancer in workers exposed to VCM, although the incomplete coverage of the Labor Insurance Bureau data warrants cautious interpretation of the results. Further study exploring the synergistic effects of VCM and hepatitis B is also indicated.

  10. Simultaneous characterization of progenitor cell compartments in adult human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porretti, Laura; Cattaneo, Alessandra; Colombo, Federico; Lopa, Raffaella; Rossi, Giorgio; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Battiston, Carlo; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Bertolini, Francesco; Rebulla, Paolo; Prati, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    The human liver is a complex tissue consisting of epithelial, endothelial, hematopoietic, and mesenchymal elements that probably derive from multiple lineage-committed progenitors, but no comprehensive study aimed at identifying and characterizing intrahepatic precursors has yet been published. Cell suspensions for this study were obtained by enzymatic digestion of liver specimens taken from 20 patients with chronic liver disease and 13 multiorgan donors. Stem and progenitor cells were first isolated, amplified, and characterized ex vivo according to previously validated methods, and then optimized flow cytometry was used to assess their relative frequencies and characterize their immunophenotypes in the clinical specimens. Stem and progenitor cells committed to hematopoietic, endothelial, epithelial, and mesenchymal lineages were clearly identifiable in livers from both healthy and diseased subjects. Within the mononuclear liver cell compartment, epithelial progenitors [epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)(+)/CD49f(+)/CD29(+)/CD45(-)] accounted for 2.7-3.5% whereas hematopoietic (CD34(+)/CD45(+)), endothelial [vascular endothelial growth factor-2 (KDR)(+)/CD146(+)/CD45(-)], and mesenchymal [CD73(+)/CD105(+)/CD90 (Thy-1)(+)/CD45 (-)] stem cells and progenitors accounted for smaller fractions (0.02-0.6%). The patients' livers had higher percentages of hematopoietic and endothelial precursors than those of the donors. In conclusion, we identified and characterized precursors committed to four different lineages in adult human liver. We also optimized a flow cytometry approach that will be useful in exploring the contribution of these cells to the pathogenesis of liver disease.

  11. Primary lymphoma of the liver. Report of a case with diagnosis by fine needle aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, D; Spielberger, R; Awasthi, S; Balaban, E P; Nowak, J A; Demian, S D

    1993-01-01

    In a 69-year-old man with hepatomegaly, a diagnosis of primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of the liver was made by fine needle aspiration (FNA). At the time of presentation there was no evidence of involvement of the lymph nodes, bone marrow or any other organ. Although hepatic involvement is common in advanced stages of Hodgkin's disease and NHL, primary lymphoma of the liver is rare. The purpose of this paper is to report a rare occurrence of primary lymphoma of the liver and to demonstrate the possibility of making this diagnosis by FNA.

  12. Toxicity Effect of Silver Nanoparticles on Mice Liver Primary Cell Culture and HepG2 Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faedmaleki, Firouz; H Shirazi, Farshad; Salarian, Amir-Ahmad; Ahmadi Ashtiani, Hamidreza; Rastegar, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Nano-silver (AgNP) has biological properties which are significant for consumer products, food technology, textiles and medical applications (e.g. wound care products, implantable medical devices, in diagnosis, drug delivery, and imaging). For their antibacterial activity, silver nanoparticles are largely used in various commercially available products. Thus, the use of nano-silver is becoming more and more widespread in medicine. In this study we investigated the cytotoxic effects of AgNPs on liver primary cells of mice, as well as the human liver HepG2 cell. Cell viability was examined with MTT assay after HepG2 cells exposure to AgNPs at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7.5, 10 ppm compared to mice primary liver cells at 1, 10, 50, 100, 150, 200, 400 ppm for 24h. AgNPs caused a concentration-dependent decrease of cell viability in both cells. IC50 value of 2.764 ppm (µg/mL) was calculated in HepG2 cell line and IC50 value of 121.7 ppm (µg/mL) was calculated in primary liver cells of mice. The results of this experiment indicated that silver nanoparticles had cytotoxic effects on HepG2 cell line and primary liver cells of mice. The results illustrated that nano-silver had 44 times stronger inhibitory effect on the growth of cancerous cells (HepG2 cell line) compared to the normal cells (primary liver cells of mice). which might further justify AgNPs as a cytotoxic agents and a potential anticancer candidate which needs further studies in this regard. PMID:24734076

  13. [Metabolism of nicousamide in rat and human liver in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Li; Hu, Jin-ping; Chen, Hui; Li, Yan

    2008-09-01

    This paper is aimed to study the metabolic kinetics of nicousamide in rat liver microsomes and cytosol and to identify the major metabolite and drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the metabolism of nicousamide in rat and human liver microsomes by selective inhibitors in vitro. The concentration of nicousamide was determined by HPLC-UV method. The metabolite of nicousamide in rat and human liver microsomes was isolated and identified by LC-MS/MS. The major metabolite of nicousamide in rat and human liver microsomes was identified to be 3-(3'-carboxy-4'-hydroxy-anilino-carbo-)-6-amino-7-hydroxy-8-methyl-coumarin (M1). The metabolite of nicousamide in rat plasma, urine, bile and liver was consistent with M1. The metabolism of nicousamide can be catalyzed by several reductases, including CYP450 reductases, cytochrome b5 reductases and CYP2C6 in rat liver microsomes, as well as xanthine oxidase and DT-diaphorase in rat liver cytosol.

  14. Cyclosporin versus tacrolimus as primary immunosuppressant after liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAlister, V C; Haddad, E; Renouf, E

    2006-01-01

    A systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCT) was undertaken to evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of immunosuppression with cyclosporin versus tacrolimus for liver transplanted patients. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central and Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Registers were...

  15. Ambient air pollution and primary liver cancer incidence in four European cohorts within the ESCAPE project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedersen, Marie; Andersen, Zorana J; Stafoggia, Massimo; Weinmayr, Gudrun; Galassi, Claudia; Sørensen, Mette; Eriksen, Kirsten T; Tjønneland, Anne; Loft, Steffen; Jaensch, Andrea; Nagel, Gabriele; Concin, Hans; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Grioni, Sara; Marcon, Alessandro; Krogh, Vittorio; Ricceri, Fulvio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Ranzi, Andrea; Sokhi, Ranjeet; Vermeulen, Roel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Hoogh, Kees de; Wang, Meng; Beelen, Rob|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483100X; Vineis, Paolo; Brunekreef, Bert|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067548180; Hoek, Gerard|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069553475; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tobacco smoke exposure increases the risk of cancer in the liver, but little is known about the possible risk associated with exposure to ambient air pollution. OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the association between residential exposure to air pollution and primary liver cancer incidence.

  16. Immunosuppression after liver transplantation for primary sclerosing cholangitis influences activity of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristin Kaasen; Lindström, Lina; Cvancarova, Milada

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting results regarding the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) after liver transplantation in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We studied the progression of IBD in patients with PSC who have undergone liver transplantation. We also...

  17. Quality of life after stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romero, Alejandra Mendez; Wunderink, Wouter; van Os, Rob M.; Nowak, Peter J. C. M.; Helimen, Ben J. M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Brandwijk, Rene P.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a high local control rate for primary and metastatic liver tumors. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of this treatment on the patient's quality of life. This is the first report of quality of life associated with liver SBRT.

  18. Genome-wide binding and transcriptome analysis of human farnesoid X receptor in primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Zhan

    Full Text Available Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, NR1H4 is a ligand-activated transcription factor, belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR is highly expressed in the liver and is essential in regulating bile acid homeostasis. FXR deficiency is implicated in numerous liver diseases and mice with modulation of FXR have been used as animal models to study liver physiology and pathology. We have reported genome-wide binding of FXR in mice by chromatin immunoprecipitation - deep sequencing (ChIP-seq, with results indicating that FXR may be involved in regulating diverse pathways in liver. However, limited information exists for the functions of human FXR and the suitability of using murine models to study human FXR functions.In the current study, we performed ChIP-seq in primary human hepatocytes (PHHs treated with a synthetic FXR agonist, GW4064 or DMSO control. In parallel, RNA deep sequencing (RNA-seq and RNA microarray were performed for GW4064 or control treated PHHs and wild type mouse livers, respectively.ChIP-seq showed similar profiles of genome-wide FXR binding in humans and mice in terms of motif analysis and pathway prediction. However, RNA-seq and microarray showed more different transcriptome profiles between PHHs and mouse livers upon GW4064 treatment.In summary, we have established genome-wide human FXR binding and transcriptome profiles. These results will aid in determining the human FXR functions, as well as judging to what level the mouse models could be used to study human FXR functions.

  19. Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by Toxcast Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary human hepatocyte cultures are useful in vitro model systems of human liver because when cultured under appropriate conditions the hepatocytes retain liver-like functionality such as metabolism, transport, and cell signaling. This model system was used to characterize the ...

  20. Functional Blood Progenitor Markers in Developing Human Liver Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Goldman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the early fetal liver, hematopoietic progenitors expand and mature together with hepatoblasts, the liver progenitors of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Previous analyses of human fetal livers indicated that both progenitors support each other's lineage maturation and curiously share some cell surface markers including CD34 and CD133. Using the human embryonic stem cell (hESC system, we demonstrate that virtually all hESC-derived hepatoblast-like cells (Hep cells transition through a progenitor stage expressing CD34 and CD133 as well as GATA2, an additional hematopoietic marker that has not previously been associated with human hepatoblast development. Dynamic expression patterns for CD34, CD133, and GATA2 in hepatoblasts were validated in human fetal livers collected from the first and second trimesters of gestation. Knockdown experiments demonstrate that each gene also functions to regulate hepatic fate mostly in a cell-autonomous fashion, revealing unprecedented roles of fetal hematopoietic progenitor markers in human liver progenitors.

  1. Technique of Hepatectomy for Primary Liver Cell Carcinoma in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experience in managing a 36 year-old Nigerian male with a histopathologically confirmed hepatocellular carcinoma confined to the left lobe by surgical resection of the liver, using the finger-fracture technique is presented. The literature review on the aetiopathogenesis of this disease and the role and technique of ...

  2. Cancer stem cells in primary liver cancers: pathological concepts and imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Ijin; Kim, Haeryoung; Lee, Jeong Min

    2015-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play an integral role in the initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis and the maintaining of tumor growth. Liver CSCs derived from hepatic stem/progenitor cells have the potential to differentiate into either hepatocytes or cholangiocytes. Primary liver cancers originating from CSCs constitute a heterogeneous histopathologic spectrum, including hepatocellular carcinoma, combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with various radiologic manifestations. In this article, we reviewed the recent concepts of CSCs in the development of primary liver cancers, focusing on their pathological and radiological findings. Awareness of the pathological concepts and imaging findings of primary liver cancers with features of CSCs is critical for accurate diagnosis, prediction of outcome, and appropriate treatment options for patients.

  3. Cancer Stem Cells in Primary Liver Cancers: Pathological Concepts and Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Ijin [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haeryoung [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    There is accumulating evidence that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play an integral role in the initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis and the maintaining of tumor growth. Liver CSCs derived from hepatic stem/progenitor cells have the potential to differentiate into either hepatocytes or cholangiocytes. Primary liver cancers originating from CSCs constitute a heterogeneous histopathologic spectrum, including hepatocellular carcinoma, combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with various radiologic manifestations. In this article, we reviewed the recent concepts of CSCs in the development of primary liver cancers, focusing on their pathological and radiological findings. Awareness of the pathological concepts and imaging findings of primary liver cancers with features of CSCs is critical for accurate diagnosis, prediction of outcome, and appropriate treatment options for patients.

  4. The emergent role of focal liver ablation techniques in the treatment of primary and secondary liver tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcea, G; Lloyd, T D; Aylott, C; Maddern, G; Berry, D P

    2003-10-01

    Only 20% of patients with primary or secondary liver tumours are suitable for resection because of extrahepatic disease or the anatomical distribution of their disease. These patients could be treated by ablation of the tumour, thus preserving functioning liver. This study presents a detailed review of established and experimental ablation procedures. The relative merits of each technique will be discussed and clinical data regarding the efficacy of the techniques evaluated. A literature search from 1966 to 2003 was undertaken using Medline, Pubmed and Web of Science databases. Keywords were Hepatocellular carcinoma, liver metastases, percutaneous ethanol injection, cryotherapy, microwave coagulation therapy, radiofrequency ablation, interstitial laser photocoagulation, focused high-intensity ultrasound, hot saline injection, electrolysis and acetic acid injection. Ablative techniques offer a promising therapeutic modality to treat unresectable tumours. Large-scale randomised controlled trials are required before widespread acceptance of these techniques can occur.

  5. Review of outcomes of primary liver cancers in children: our institutional experience with resection and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Marcus M; Shah, Sohail R; Atri, Prashant; Paredes, Jose L; DiCicco, Leigh Anne; Sindhi, Rakesh; Soltys, Kyle A; Mazariegos, George V; Kane, Timothy D

    2010-10-01

    Operative intervention plays an important role in the management of primary liver cancers in children. Recent improvements in diagnostic modalities, pre- and postoperative chemotherapy, and operative technique have all led to improved survival in these patients. Both hepatic resection and orthotopic liver transplantation are effective operations for pediatric liver tumors; which intervention is pursued is based on preoperative extent of disease. This is a review of our institution's experience with operative management of pediatric liver cancer over an 18-year period. A retrospective chart review from 1990 to 2007 identified patients who were ≤18 years old who underwent operative intervention for primary liver cancer. Demographics, type of operation, intraoperative details, pre- and postoperative management, as well as outcomes were recorded for all patients. Fifty-four patients underwent 57 operations for primary liver cancer, 30 of whom underwent resection; the remaining 27 underwent orthotopic liver transplantation. The mean age at diagnosis was 41 months. Twenty patients had stage 1 or 2 disease and 34 patients had stage 3 or 4 disease. Forty-eight (89%) patients received preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 92% of patients. Mean overall and intensive care unit duration of stay were 18 and 6 days, respectively. About 45% of patients had a postoperative complication, including hepatic artery thrombosis (n = 8), line sepsis (n = 6), mild acute rejection (n = 3), biliary stricture (n = 2), pneumothorax (n = 2), incarcerated omentum (n = 1), Horner's syndrome (n = 1), and urosepsis (n = 1). Only 6 patients had a recurrence of their cancer, 5 after liver resection, 3 of whom later received a transplant. There was only 1 recurrence after liver transplantation. There was 1 perioperative mortality from cardiac arrest. Overall survival was 93%. Operative intervention plays a critical role in the management of primary liver cancer in the

  6. The Use of an Acellular Oxygen Carrier in a Human Liver Model of Normothermic Machine Perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Richard W; Bhogal, Ricky H; Wallace, Lorraine; Boteon, Yuri; Neil, Desley A H; Smith, Amanda; Stephenson, Barney T F; Schlegel, Andrea; Hübscher, Stefan G; Mirza, Darius F; Afford, Simon C; Mergental, Hynek

    2017-11-01

    Normothermic machine perfusion of the liver (NMP-L) is a novel technique that preserves liver grafts under near-physiological conditions while maintaining their normal metabolic activity. This process requires an adequate oxygen supply, typically delivered by packed red blood cells (RBC). We present the first experience using an acellular hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC) Hemopure in a human model of NMP-L. Five discarded high-risk human livers were perfused with HBOC-based perfusion fluid and matched to 5 RBC-perfused livers. Perfusion parameters, oxygen extraction, metabolic activity, and histological features were compared during 6 hours of NMP-L. The cytotoxicity of Hemopure was also tested on human hepatic primary cell line cultures using an in vitro model of ischemia reperfusion injury. The vascular flow parameters and the perfusate lactate clearance were similar in both groups. The HBOC-perfused livers extracted more oxygen than those perfused with RBCs (O2 extraction ratio 13.75 vs 9.43 % ×10 per gram of tissue, P = 0.001). In vitro exposure to Hemopure did not alter intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species, and there was no increase in apoptosis or necrosis observed in any of the tested cell lines. Histological findings were comparable between groups. There was no evidence of histological damage caused by Hemopure. Hemopure can be used as an alternative oxygen carrier to packed red cells in NMP-L perfusion fluid.

  7. Hepatic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in a Perfused 3D Porous Polymer Scaffold for Liver Tissue Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Mette; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan

    to limitations of primary hepatocytes regarding availability and maintenance of functionality, stem cells and especially human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPS cells) are an attractive cell source for liver tissue engineering. The aim of this part of NanoBio4Trans is to optimize culture and hepatic......A huge shortage of liver organs for transplantation has motivated the research field of tissue engineering to develop bioartificial liver tissue and even a whole liver. The goal of NanoBio4Trans is to create a vascularized bioartificial liver tissue, initially as a liver-support system. Due...... differentiation of hIPS-derived definitive endoderm (DE) cells in a 3D porous polymer scaffold built-in a perfusable bioreactor. The use of a microfluidic bioreactor array enables the culture of 16 independent tissues in one experimental run and thereby an optimization study to be performed....

  8. Ascertainment of acute liver injury in two European primary care databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigómez, A.; Brauer, R.; Rodríguez, L. A García; Huerta, C.; Requena, G.; Gil, M.; de Abajo, Francisco; Downey, G.; Bate, A.; Tepie, M. Feudjo; de Groot, M.C.H.; Schlienger, R.; Reynolds, R.; Klungel, O.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to ascertain acute liver injury (ALI) in primary care databases using different computer algorithms. The aim of this investigation was to study and compare the incidence of ALI in different primary care databases and using different definitions of ALI. Methods

  9. An Unusual Presentation of Liver Failure in a Patient with Primary Gastrointestinal Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle B. Rocque

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL presenting either with primary bowel involvement or with cholestasis is unusual. The combination of primary gastrointestinal HL presenting with cholestasis and ductopenia has not been previously described. Case Report. We present a case of primary gastrointestinal HL with evidence of liver involvement, but also with prominent ductopenia on liver biopsy and associated intrahepatic cholestasis. A 50-year-old man with a history of Crohn's disease presented with a bowel obstruction, for which he underwent a small bowel resection. Histology revealed HL. His course was complicated by cholestatic liver failure. A subsequent liver biopsy revealed both focal involvement by lymphoma and ductopenia, resembling vanishing bile duct syndrome (VBDS. He was treated with chemotherapy with improvement in his cholestasis, but he eventually succumbed due to further complications of his disease and treatment toxicities. Conclusion. This case of primary gastrointestinal HL associated with ductopenia does not meet classic criteria for VBDS, but the clinical presentation and pathology are suggestive of a VBDS-like paraneoplastic process. Therapies for HL in the setting of cholestatic liver failure require special consideration, but some reports of durable remissions and recovery of liver function have been reported.

  10. A shift in paradigm towards human biology-based systems for cholestatic-liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Fozia

    2015-12-01

    Cholestatic-liver diseases (CLDs) arise from diverse causes ranging from genetic factors to drug-induced cholestasis. The so-called diseases of civilization (obesity, diabetes, metabolic disorders, non-alcoholic liver disease, cardiovascular diseases, etc.) are intricately implicated in liver and gall bladder diseases. Although CLDs have been extensively studied, there seem to be important gaps in the understanding of human disease. Despite the fact that many animal models exist and substantial clinical data are available, translation of this knowledge towards therapy has been disappointingly limited. Recent advances in liver cell culture such as in vivo-like 3D cultivation of human primary hepatic cells, human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes; and cutting-edge analytical techniques such as 'omics' technologies and high-content screenings could play a decisive role in deeper mechanistic understanding of CLDs. This Topical Review proposes a roadmap to human biology-based research using omics technologies providing quantitative information on mechanisms in an adverse outcome/disease pathway framework. With modern sensitive tools, a shift in paradigm in human disease research seems timely and even inevitable to overcome species barriers in translation. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  11. Effect of ultrasound frequency on the Nakagami statistics of human liver tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Hsiang Tsui

    Full Text Available The analysis of the backscattered statistics using the Nakagami parameter is an emerging ultrasound technique for assessing hepatic steatosis and fibrosis. Previous studies indicated that the echo amplitude distribution of a normal liver follows the Rayleigh distribution (the Nakagami parameter m is close to 1. However, using different frequencies may change the backscattered statistics of normal livers. This study explored the frequency dependence of the backscattered statistics in human livers and then discussed the sources of ultrasound scattering in the liver. A total of 30 healthy participants were enrolled to undergo a standard care ultrasound examination on the liver, which is a natural model containing diffuse and coherent scatterers. The liver of each volunteer was scanned from the right intercostal view to obtain image raw data at different central frequencies ranging from 2 to 3.5 MHz. Phantoms with diffuse scatterers only were also made to perform ultrasound scanning using the same protocol for comparisons with clinical data. The Nakagami parameter-frequency correlation was evaluated using Pearson correlation analysis. The median and interquartile range of the Nakagami parameter obtained from livers was 1.00 (0.98-1.05 for 2 MHz, 0.93 (0.89-0.98 for 2.3 MHz, 0.87 (0.84-0.92 for 2.5 MHz, 0.82 (0.77-0.88 for 3.3 MHz, and 0.81 (0.76-0.88 for 3.5 MHz. The Nakagami parameter decreased with the increasing central frequency (r = -0.67, p < 0.0001. However, the effect of ultrasound frequency on the statistical distribution of the backscattered envelopes was not found in the phantom results (r = -0.147, p = 0.0727. The current results demonstrated that the backscattered statistics of normal livers is frequency-dependent. Moreover, the coherent scatterers may be the primary factor to dominate the frequency dependence of the backscattered statistics in a liver.

  12. Effect of ultrasound frequency on the Nakagami statistics of human liver tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Hung, Chieh-Ming; Chung, Shih-Jou; Wan, Yung-Liang

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of the backscattered statistics using the Nakagami parameter is an emerging ultrasound technique for assessing hepatic steatosis and fibrosis. Previous studies indicated that the echo amplitude distribution of a normal liver follows the Rayleigh distribution (the Nakagami parameter m is close to 1). However, using different frequencies may change the backscattered statistics of normal livers. This study explored the frequency dependence of the backscattered statistics in human livers and then discussed the sources of ultrasound scattering in the liver. A total of 30 healthy participants were enrolled to undergo a standard care ultrasound examination on the liver, which is a natural model containing diffuse and coherent scatterers. The liver of each volunteer was scanned from the right intercostal view to obtain image raw data at different central frequencies ranging from 2 to 3.5 MHz. Phantoms with diffuse scatterers only were also made to perform ultrasound scanning using the same protocol for comparisons with clinical data. The Nakagami parameter-frequency correlation was evaluated using Pearson correlation analysis. The median and interquartile range of the Nakagami parameter obtained from livers was 1.00 (0.98-1.05) for 2 MHz, 0.93 (0.89-0.98) for 2.3 MHz, 0.87 (0.84-0.92) for 2.5 MHz, 0.82 (0.77-0.88) for 3.3 MHz, and 0.81 (0.76-0.88) for 3.5 MHz. The Nakagami parameter decreased with the increasing central frequency (r = -0.67, p statistical distribution of the backscattered envelopes was not found in the phantom results (r = -0.147, p = 0.0727). The current results demonstrated that the backscattered statistics of normal livers is frequency-dependent. Moreover, the coherent scatterers may be the primary factor to dominate the frequency dependence of the backscattered statistics in a liver.

  13. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Joerg C.

    2016-01-01

    Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications. PMID:27403430

  14. Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver, CREST syndrome and primary biliary cirrhosis: an overlap syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    McMahon, R F; Babbs, C; Warnes, T. W.

    1989-01-01

    Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver (NRHL) has been found in association with collagen vascular diseases, after drug therapy, with autoimmune disease, and with a variety of haematological disorders. The association of NRHL with the syndrome of Calcinosis cutis, Raynaud's phenomenon, oesophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia (CREST syndrome) has only been reported on two previous occasions. The liver disease usually associated with CREST syndrome is primary biliary ci...

  15. Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver, CREST syndrome and primary biliary cirrhosis: an overlap syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, R F; Babbs, C; Warnes, T W

    1989-01-01

    Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver (NRHL) has been found in association with collagen vascular diseases, after drug therapy, with autoimmune disease, and with a variety of haematological disorders. The association of NRHL with the syndrome of Calcinosis cutis, Raynaud's phenomenon, oesophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia (CREST syndrome) has only been reported on two previous occasions. The liver disease usually associated with CREST syndrome is primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and recently nodular hyperplasia of the liver has been reported in patients with early stage PBC. We present a case of NRHL with CREST syndrome and serological and biochemical features of PBC, a newly recognised overlap syndrome. Images Figure PMID:2583572

  16. No Increased Risk for Primary Osteoarthritis in Liver Cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, Thomas; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Overgaard, Søren

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic synovial inflammation causes primary osteoarthritis, but it is unknown whether chronic systemic inflammation does, too. Patients with cirrhosis have chronic systemic inflammation and therefore we examined the association between cirrhosis and primary osteoarthritis of the hip...... and knee. METHODS: In Danish healthcare databases we identified all residents over 60 years diagnosed with cirrhosis in 1994-2011, and for each of them we sampled five age- and gender-matched reference persons from the general population. We excluded everyone with risk factors for secondary osteoarthritis...... and computed incidence rates of primary osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. We used stratified Cox regression to estimate the hazard ratios of primary osteoarthritis for cirrhosis patients vs. reference persons in strata defined by gender, age, cirrhosis etiology, and ascites vs. no ascites. We also computed...

  17. PVA matches human liver in needle-tissue interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Tonke L; Pluymen, Loes H; van Gerwen, Dennis J; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; Dankelman, Jenny; van den Dobbelsteen, John J

    2017-05-01

    Medical phantoms can be used to study needle-tissue interaction and to train medical residents. The purpose of this research is to study the suitability of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a liver tissue mimicking material in terms of needle-tissue interaction. Insertions into ex-vivo human livers were used for reference. Six PVA samples were created by varying the mass percentage of PVA to water (4m% and 7m%) and the number of freeze-thaw cycles (1, 2 and 3 cycles, 16hours of freezing at -19°C, 8hours of thawing). The inner needle of an 18 Gauge trocar needle with triangular tip was inserted 13 times into each of the samples, using an insertion velocity of 5 mm/s. In addition, 39 insertions were performed in two ex-vivo human livers. Axial forces on the needle were captured during insertion and retraction and characterized by friction along the needle shaft, peak forces, and number of peak forces per unit length. The concentration of PVA and the number of freeze-thaw cycles both influenced the mechanical interaction between needle and specimen. Insertions into 4m% PVA phantoms with 2 freeze-thaw cycles were comparable to human liver in terms of estimated friction along the needle shaft and the number of peak forces. Therefore, these phantoms are considered to be suitable liver mimicking materials for image-guided needle interventions. The mechanical properties of PVA hydrogels can be influenced in a controlled manner by varying the concentration of PVA and the number of freeze-thaw cycles, to mimic liver tissue characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Glycome Patterns of Perfusate in Livers Before Transplantation Associate With Primary Non-function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhelst, Xavier; Geerts, Anja; Jochmans, Ina; Vanderschaeghe, Dieter; Paradissis, Agnes; Vanlander, Aude; Berrevoet, Frederik; Dahlqvuist, Géraldine; Nevens, Frederik; Pirenne, Jacques; Rogiers, Xavier; Callewaert, Nico; I Troisi, Roberto; Van Vlierberghe, Hans

    2018-01-05

    Primary non-function (PNF) is a rare complication after liver transplantation that requires urgent re-transplantation. PNF is associated with livers from extended-criteria donors. Clinical and biochemical factors have not been identified that reliably associate with graft function after liver transplantation. Serum patterns of N-glycans associate with changes in the liver. We analyzed perfusate from grafted liver to identify protein glycosylation patterns associated with PNF. We performed a prospective study of consecutive patients who underwent liver transplantation (66 patients, from 1 center, in the derivation set and 56 patients, from 2 centers, in the validation set) in Belgium, from October 1, 2011 through July 31, 2013. All donor grafts were transported using cold static storage, and perfusate samples were collected from the livers by flushing of hepatic veins before transplantation. Protein-linked N-glycans were isolated from perfusate samples and analyzed with a multi-capillary electrophoresis-based ABI3130 sequencer. We compared glycan patterns between patients with vs without PNF of transplanted livers. PNF was defined as the need for urgent re-transplantation when a graft had no evidence of function, after exclusion of other causes such as hepatic artery thrombosis or acute cellular rejection. The relative abundance of a single glycan, agalacto core-alpha-1,6-fucosylated biantennary glycan (NGA2F) was significantly increased in perfusate of livers given to 4 patients who developed PNF after liver transplantation compared to livers given to patients who did not develop PNF. Level of NGA2F could identified patients with PNF with 100% accuracy. This glycomarker was the only factor associated with PNF in multivariate analysis in the derivation and the validation sets (PPNF with 100% accuracy, and validated this finding in a separate cohort of patients. This biomarker might be used to assess grafts before transplantation-especially when high-risk organs are

  19. Clinical outcomes of donation after circulatory death liver transplantation in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Palak J; Scalera, Irene; Slaney, Emma; Laing, Richard W; Gunson, Bridget; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Schlegel, Andrea; Ferguson, James; Muiesan, Paolo

    2017-11-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a progressive fibro-inflammatory cholangiopathy for which liver transplantation is the only life-extending intervention. These patients may benefit from accepting liver donation after circulatory death (DCD), however their subsequent outcome is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical impact of using DCD liver grafts in patients specifically undergoing transplantation for PSC. Clinical outcomes were prospectively evaluated in PSC patients undergoing transplantation from 2006 to 2016 stratified by donor type (DCD, n=35 vs. donation after brainstem death [DBD], n=108). In liver transplantation for PSC; operating time, days requiring critical care support, total ventilator days, incidence of acute kidney injury, need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) or total days requiring RRT were not significantly different between DCD vs. DBD recipients. Although the incidence of ischaemic-type biliary lesions was greater in the DCD group (incidence rate [IR]: 4.4 vs. 0 cases/100-patient-years; pdeath (DCD), compared to donation after brainstem death (DBD). We show that in appropriately selected patients, the outcomes for DCD transplantation mirror those using DBD livers, with no significant differences in complication rate, patient survival or transplanted liver survival. In an era of organ shortage and increasing wait-list times, DCD livers represent a potential treatment option for transplantation in PSC. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. APACHE II score and primary liver cancer history had risk of hospital mortality in patients with pyogenic liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, C-B; Tzao, C; Yu, C-Y; Chen, C-J; Chang, W-K; Chu, C-H; Chou, S-J; Tung, H-J; Yu, J-C

    2006-07-01

    The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II classification system has been extensively used for predicting the patient mortality in various diseases. However, its utilisation on the pyogenic liver abscess has not yet been well studied. The purpose of this study was to validate this system on this high death rate disease. A retrospective study was conducted to assess 314 patients with pyogenic liver abscesses admitted to tertiary medical centre in past 12 years. The outcome measurement was the in-hospital mortality. A multiple logistic regression model was used to assess the association between mortality and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score while controlling for the potential confounding factors. The overall in-hospital mortality was 8.3%. The mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of the expired patients was higher (Por=15. After controlling for the potential confounding factors, patient with high admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score >or=15 had a higher chance of in-hospital mortality (Pliver cancer history is also a risk factor (P=0.03). The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score and the primary liver cancer history predict the in-hospital mortality of the pyogenic liver abscess patient.

  1. Human precision-cut liver slices as a model to test antifibrotic drugs in the early onset of liver fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Inge M.; Mutsaers, Henricus A. M.; Luangmonkong, Theerut; Hadi, Mackenzie; Oosterhuis, Dorenda; de Jong, Koert P.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Olinga, Peter

    Liver fibrosis is the progressive accumulation of connective tissue ultimately resulting in loss of organ function. Currently, no effective antifibrotics are available due to a lack of reliable human models. Here we investigated the fibrotic process in human precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) and

  2. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITINABSTRACT Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  3. Biomechanic study of the human liver during a frontal deceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheynel, Nicolas; Serre, Thierry; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Baque, Patrick; Benoit, Laurent; Berdah, Stephane-Victor; Brunet, Christian

    2006-10-01

    Mechanisms of hepatic injury remain poorly understood. Surgical literature reports some speculative theories that have never been proved. The aim of this study was to examine the behavior of the liver during brutal frontal deceleration. Six trunks, removed from human cadavers, underwent free falls at 4, 6, and 8 meters per second (mps). Accelerometers were positioned in the two lobes of the liver, in front of the vertebra L2, and in the retro hepatic inferior vena cava. Relative motions of the lobes of the liver and of the two other anatomic marks were observed. In parallel, numerical simulations of this experiment have been performed using a finite element model. In the direction of impact, the vertebra L2 had no considerable displacement with the inferior vena cava. There was a noteworthy displacement between the two hepatic lobes. The left hepatic lobe had a large relative displacement with the vertebra L2 and the inferior vena cava. The right hepatic lobe was more stable with the vertebra L2 and the inferior vena cava. Numerical simulation of the same protocol underlined a rotation effect of the liver to the left around the axis of the inferior vena cava. These results support the surgical data. They highlight a crucial zone and explain how dramatic lacerations between the two lobes of the liver can occur.

  4. Obesity accelerates epigenetic aging of human liver

    OpenAIRE

    Horvath, S; Erhart, W.; Brosch, M; Ammerpohl, O.; von Schonfels, W.; Ahrens, M.; Heits, N; Bell, J.T.; Tsai, P.-C.; Spector, T. D.; Deloukas, P; Siebert, R; Sipos, B.; Becker, T.; Rocken, C.

    2014-01-01

    Because obese people are at an increased risk of many age-related diseases, it is a plausible hypothesis that obesity increases the biological age of some tissues and cell types. However, it has been difficult to detect such an accelerated aging effect because it is unclear how to measure tissue age. Here we use a recently developed biomarker of aging (known as “epigenetic clock”) to study the relationship between epigenetic age and obesity in several human tissues. We report an unexpectedly ...

  5. The Human Amnion Epithelial Cell Secretome Decreases Hepatic Fibrosis in Mice with Chronic Liver Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Alhomrani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs are the primary collagen-secreting cells in the liver. While HSCs are the major cell type involved in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis, hepatic macrophages also play an important role in mediating fibrogenesis and fibrosis resolution. Previously, we observed a reduction in HSC activation, proliferation, and collagen synthesis following exposure to human amnion epithelial cells (hAEC and hAEC-conditioned media (hAEC-CM. This suggested that specific factors secreted by hAEC might be effective in ameliorating liver fibrosis. hAEC-derived extracellular vesicles (hAEC-EVs, which are nanosized (40–100 nm membrane bound vesicles, may act as novel cell–cell communicators. Accordingly, we evaluated the efficacy of hAEC-EV in modulating liver fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic liver fibrosis and in human HSC.Methods: The hAEC-EVs were isolated and characterized. C57BL/6 mice with CCl4-induced liver fibrosis were administered hAEC-EV, hAEC-CM, or hAEC-EV depleted medium (hAEC-EVDM. LX2 cells, a human HSC line, and bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages were exposed to hAEC-EV, hAEC-CM, and hAEC-EVDM. Mass spectrometry was used to examine the proteome profile of each preparation.Results: The extent of liver fibrosis and number of activated HSCs were reduced significantly in CCl4-treated mice given hAEC-EVs, hAEC-CM, and hAEC EVDM compared to untreated controls. Hepatic macrophages were significantly decreased in all treatment groups, where a predominant M2 phenotype was observed. Human HSCs cultured with hAEC-EV and hAEC-CM displayed a significant reduction in collagen synthesis and hAEC-EV, hAEC-CM, and hAEC-EVDM altered macrophage polarization in bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages. Proteome analysis showed that 164 proteins were unique to hAEC-EV in comparison to hAEC-CM and hAEC-EVDM, and 51 proteins were co-identified components with the hAEC-EV fraction.Conclusion: This study provides novel data

  6. MiRNA-21 Expression Decreases from Primary Tumors to Liver Metastases in Colorectal Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Feiersinger

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the major cause of death in colorectal cancer patients. Expression of certain miRNAs in the primary tumors has been shown to be associated with progression of colorectal cancer and the initiation of metastasis. In this study, we compared miRNA expression in primary colorectal cancer and corresponding liver metastases in order to get an idea of the oncogenic importance of the miRNAs in established metastases.We analyzed the expression of miRNA-21, miRNA-31 and miRNA-373 in corresponding formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue samples of primary colorectal cancer, liver metastasis and healthy tissues of 29 patients by quantitative real-time PCR.All three miRNAs were significantly up-regulated in the primary tumor tissues as compared to healthy colon mucosa of the respective patients (p < 0.01. MiRNA-21 and miRNA-31 were also higher expressed in liver metastases as compared to healthy liver tissues (p < 0.01. No significant difference of expression of miRNA-31 and miRNA-373 was observed between primary tumors and metastases. Of note, miRNA-21 expression was significantly reduced in liver metastases as compared to the primary colorectal tumors (p < 0.01.In the context of previous studies demonstrating increased miRNA-21 expression in metastatic primary tumors, our findings raise the question whether miRNA-21 might be involved in the initiation but not in the perpetuation and growth of metastases.

  7. Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Hepatic Endoderm and Its Role in Bioartificial Liver Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver carries out a range of functions essential for bodily homeostasis. The impairment of liver functions has serious implications and is responsible for high rates of patient morbidity and mortality. Presently, liver transplantation remains the only effective treatment, but donor availability is a major limitation. Therefore, artificial and bioartificial liver devices have been developed to bridge patients to liver transplantation. Existing support devices improve hepatic encephalopathy to a certain extent; however their usage is associated with side effects. The major hindrance in the development of bioartificial liver devices and cellular therapies is the limited availability of human hepatocytes. Moreover, primary hepatocytes are difficult to maintain and lose hepatic identity and function over time even with sophisticated tissue culture media. To overcome this limitation, renewable cell sources are being explored. Human embryonic stem cells are one such cellular resource and have been shown to generate a reliable and reproducible supply of human hepatic endoderm. Therefore, the use of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic endoderm in combination with tissue engineering has the potential to pave the way for the development of novel bioartificial liver devices and predictive drug toxicity assays.

  8. Primary localized malignant biphasic mesothelioma of the liver in a patient with asbestosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Motoko; Araki, Ichiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Kinoshita, Masaru; Itatsu, Keita; Nojima, Takayuki; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of primary localized malignant biphasic mesothelioma of the liver in a 66-year-old man associated with asbestosis. The tumor was detected as a hepatic nodule, 4 cm in diameter, in the right lobe (S8 segment) on CT scan. Histopathological examination demonstrated an intrahepatic tumor with central necrosis consisting of a papillary epithelioid pattern on the surface of the liver, microcystic (microglandular or adenomatoid) pattern mainly in the subcapsular area and sarcomatoid pattern intermingled with microcystic pattern in the major part of the hepatic nodular tumor. Tumor cells, especially of epithelioid type, showed distinct immunoreactivity for mesothelial markers (WT-1, calretinin, D2-40, CK5/6, mesothelin, thrombomodulin) and no immunoreactivity for epithelial (adenocarcinoma) markers (CEA, CD15, BerEP4, BG8, MOC31). P53 immunoreactivity was detected focally in papillary epithelioid tumor cells and extensively in microcystic and sarcomatoid components, suggesting that the papillary epithelioid mesothelioma arose on the surface of the liver, and tumor cells showing microcystic and sarcomatoid patterns invaded and grew into the liver. To date, this is the first case of primary localized malignant biphasic mesothelioma of the liver, since all three primary hepatic mesotheliomas reported so far were epithelioid type. PMID:19195066

  9. Incidence of primary colorectal cancer from colonoscopy examinations in patients presenting with liver mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirikurnpiboon, Siripong; Awapittaya, Burin; Wannaprasert, Jerasak

    2013-03-01

    An in-patient presented with atypical primary liver mass and was suspected of having liver metastasis. One method of investigation is colonoscopy; however, there are currently no clear guidelines to indicate when this procedure should be performed. This was a retrospective review of 6 years' data from the surgical endoscopic unit in Rajavithi Hospital. The inclusion criteria were: (1) patient presented with liver mass, (2) radiological findings (mainly from CT scan or MRI) were not typicalfor hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), intrahepatic cholagiocarcinoma (ICGC) and other primary liver tumors. The exclusion criteria were: (1) patients did not undergo the operation in Rajavithi Hospital, (2) there was loss of patient data during the follow-up period. A total of 1,532 cases underwent colonoscopy, of which 109 met the inclusion criteria. There were 24 cases of positive primary colorectal cancer and the incidence was 22% (95% CI 14.1-29.9), and 1 case of terminal ileum cancer. The final results after operation showed 40 cases of HCC, and 21 cases of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Risk factors for testing positive for colorectal cancer were: presenting with GI symptoms; abnormal CEA levels; and positive family history of colorectal cancer To increase the incidence of positive results for colorectal cancer and reduce unnecessary colonoscopy in patients who present with liver mass, the factors which indicate colonoscopy should be patients who present with GI symptom, abnormal CEA level, and whose family history raises concern.

  10. Phenotype Determines Nanoparticle Uptake by Human Macrophages from Liver and Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacParland, Sonya A; Tsoi, Kim M; Ouyang, Ben; Ma, Xue-Zhong; Manuel, Justin; Fawaz, Ali; Ostrowski, Mario A; Alman, Benjamin A; Zilman, Anton; Chan, Warren C W; McGilvray, Ian D

    2017-03-28

    A significant challenge to delivering therapeutic doses of nanoparticles to targeted disease sites is the fact that most nanoparticles become trapped in the liver. Liver-resident macrophages, or Kupffer cells, are key cells in the hepatic sequestration of nanoparticles. However, the precise role that the macrophage phenotype plays in nanoparticle uptake is unknown. Here, we show that the human macrophage phenotype modulates hard nanoparticle uptake. Using gold nanoparticles, we examined uptake by human monocyte-derived macrophages that had been driven to a "regulatory" M2 phenotype or an "inflammatory" M1 phenotype and found that M2-type macrophages preferentially take up nanoparticles, with a clear hierarchy among the subtypes (M2c > M2 > M2a > M2b > M1). We also found that stimuli such as LPS/IFN-γ rather than with more "regulatory" stimuli such as TGF-β/IL-10 reduce per cell macrophage nanoparticle uptake by an average of 40%. Primary human Kupffer cells were found to display heterogeneous expression of M1 and M2 markers, and Kupffer cells expressing higher levels of M2 markers (CD163) take up significantly more nanoparticles than Kupffer cells expressing lower levels of surface CD163. Our results demonstrate that hepatic inflammatory microenvironments should be considered when studying liver sequestration of nanoparticles, and that modifying the hepatic microenvironment might offer a tool for enhancing or decreasing this sequestration. Our findings also suggest that models examining the nanoparticle/macrophage interaction should include studies with primary tissue macrophages.

  11. Primary Humanities: A Perspective from Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mark; Whitehouse, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    How the humanities subjects are represented in primary schools in Wales has been influenced by curriculum developments including Curriculum Cymraeg, the Skills Framework and the Foundation Phase. A central tenet of Welsh Government policy has been to actively encourage schools to promote a sense of "Welshness" through curriculum content,…

  12. Primary biliary cirrhosis : Dutch application of the Mayo model before and after orthotopic liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanDam, GM; Verbaan, BW; Therneau, TM; Dickson, ER; Malinchoc, M; Murtaugh, PA; Huizenga, [No Value; Gips, CH

    1997-01-01

    Background/Aims: A retrospective study of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) was performed to study the Original Mayo Model for predicting survival by a Dutch data-set of patients, presentation of disease progression; assessment of liver transplantation, prediction of post-transplantation survival; and

  13. Colorectal neoplasia in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis undergoing liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristin Kaasen; Lindström, Lina; Cvancarova, Milada

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several studies have implicated primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) as an additional risk factor for colorectal neoplasia in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Some reports have indicated that the risk is even higher in PSC-IBD patients after liver transplantation (Ltx), but this issue...

  14. Risk factors and prognosis for recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis after liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindström, Lina; Jørgensen, Kristin K; Boberg, Kirsten M

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The risk for recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis (rPSC) after liver transplantation is associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We assessed the frequency of rPSC and studied risk factors for recurrent disease with special focus on IBD. We also evaluated the importance of r...

  15. Maintenance of Hepatic Functions in Primary Human Hepatocytes Cultured on Xeno-Free and Chemical Defined Human Recombinant Laminins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masaaki; Zemack, Helen; Johansson, Helene; Hagbard, Louise; Jorns, Carl; Li, Meng; Ellis, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Refined methods for maintaining specific functions of isolated hepatocytes under xeno-free and chemical defined conditions is of great importance for the development of hepatocyte research and regenerative therapy. Laminins, a large family of heterotrimeric basement membrane adhesion proteins, are highly cell and tissue type specific components of the extracellular matrix and strongly influence the behavior and function of associated cells and/or tissues. However, detailed biological functions of many laminin isoforms are still to be evaluated. In this study, we determined the distribution of laminin isoforms in human liver tissue and isolated primary human hepatocytes by western blot analysis, and investigated the efficacy of different human recombinant laminin isoforms on hepatic functions during culture. Protein expressions of laminin-chain α2, α3, α4, β1, β3, γ1, and γ2 were detected in both isolated human hepatocytes and liver tissue. No α1 and α5 expression could be detected in liver tissue or hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from five different individual livers, and cultured on human recombinant laminin isoforms -111, -211, -221, -332, -411, -421, -511, and -521 (Biolamina AB), matrigel (extracted from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma), or collagen type IV (Collagen). Hepatocytes cultured on laminin showed characteristic hexagonal shape in a flat cell monolayer. Viability, double stranded DNA concentration, and Ki67 expression for hepatocytes cultured for six days on laminin were comparable to those cultured on EHS and Collagen. Hepatocytes cultured on laminin also displayed production of human albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, bile acids, and gene expression of liver-enriched factors, such as hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, glucose-6-phosphate, cytochrome P450 3A4, and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. We conclude that all forms of human recombinant laminin tested maintain cell viability and liver-specific functions of primary human

  16. Bioprinted 3D Primary Liver Tissues Allow Assessment of Organ-Level Response to Clinical Drug Induced Toxicity In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Deborah G; Funk, Juergen; Robbins, Justin B; Crogan-Grundy, Candace; Presnell, Sharon C; Singer, Thomas; Roth, Adrian B

    2016-01-01

    Modeling clinically relevant tissue responses using cell models poses a significant challenge for drug development, in particular for drug induced liver injury (DILI). This is mainly because existing liver models lack longevity and tissue-level complexity which limits their utility in predictive toxicology. In this study, we established and characterized novel bioprinted human liver tissue mimetics comprised of patient-derived hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells in a defined architecture. Scaffold-free assembly of different cell types in an in vivo-relevant architecture allowed for histologic analysis that revealed distinct intercellular hepatocyte junctions, CD31+ endothelial networks, and desmin positive, smooth muscle actin negative quiescent stellates. Unlike what was seen in 2D hepatocyte cultures, the tissues maintained levels of ATP, Albumin as well as expression and drug-induced enzyme activity of Cytochrome P450s over 4 weeks in culture. To assess the ability of the 3D liver cultures to model tissue-level DILI, dose responses of Trovafloxacin, a drug whose hepatotoxic potential could not be assessed by standard pre-clinical models, were compared to the structurally related non-toxic drug Levofloxacin. Trovafloxacin induced significant, dose-dependent toxicity at clinically relevant doses (≤ 4uM). Interestingly, Trovafloxacin toxicity was observed without lipopolysaccharide stimulation and in the absence of resident macrophages in contrast to earlier reports. Together, these results demonstrate that 3D bioprinted liver tissues can both effectively model DILI and distinguish between highly related compounds with differential profile. Thus, the combination of patient-derived primary cells with bioprinting technology here for the first time demonstrates superior performance in terms of mimicking human drug response in a known target organ at the tissue level.

  17. Bioprinted 3D Primary Liver Tissues Allow Assessment of Organ-Level Response to Clinical Drug Induced Toxicity In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah G Nguyen

    Full Text Available Modeling clinically relevant tissue responses using cell models poses a significant challenge for drug development, in particular for drug induced liver injury (DILI. This is mainly because existing liver models lack longevity and tissue-level complexity which limits their utility in predictive toxicology. In this study, we established and characterized novel bioprinted human liver tissue mimetics comprised of patient-derived hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells in a defined architecture. Scaffold-free assembly of different cell types in an in vivo-relevant architecture allowed for histologic analysis that revealed distinct intercellular hepatocyte junctions, CD31+ endothelial networks, and desmin positive, smooth muscle actin negative quiescent stellates. Unlike what was seen in 2D hepatocyte cultures, the tissues maintained levels of ATP, Albumin as well as expression and drug-induced enzyme activity of Cytochrome P450s over 4 weeks in culture. To assess the ability of the 3D liver cultures to model tissue-level DILI, dose responses of Trovafloxacin, a drug whose hepatotoxic potential could not be assessed by standard pre-clinical models, were compared to the structurally related non-toxic drug Levofloxacin. Trovafloxacin induced significant, dose-dependent toxicity at clinically relevant doses (≤ 4uM. Interestingly, Trovafloxacin toxicity was observed without lipopolysaccharide stimulation and in the absence of resident macrophages in contrast to earlier reports. Together, these results demonstrate that 3D bioprinted liver tissues can both effectively model DILI and distinguish between highly related compounds with differential profile. Thus, the combination of patient-derived primary cells with bioprinting technology here for the first time demonstrates superior performance in terms of mimicking human drug response in a known target organ at the tissue level.

  18. HANPP Collection: Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity as a Percentage of Net Primary Productivity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) as a Percentage of Net Primary Productivity (NPP) portion of the Human Appropriation of Net Primary...

  19. Usage analysis of human serum albumin in patients with liver cancer and liver cirrhosis after hepatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Donghai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo analyze the usage of human serum albumin in patients with liver cancer and liver cirrhosis after hepatectomy. MethodsA total of 121 patients with liver cancer and liver cirrhosis who received hepatectomy in our hospital from January 2012 to January 2014 were divided into control group (n=60 and observation group (n=61. Both groups received human serum albumin in addition to the routine treatment for liver protection. The observation group was given intravenous drip of 5% human serum albumin within 48 h after surgery. The plasma albumin concentrations of patients were measured at 48 h after surgery, and if the concentration was <35 g/L, the patients would be given 20% human serum albumin until the concentration was ≥35 g/L. The control group was given intravenous drip of 20% human serum albumin within 48 h after surgery until the plasma albumin concentration was ≥35 g/L. The amounts of used human serum albumin and plasma were recorded for both groups. The urine volume, abdominal drainage volume, central venous pressure (CVP, mean arterial pressure (MAP, and thromboelastogram (TEG R and K values were measured at 1, 3, 7, and 10 days after surgery. The liver function indices before and after surgery and the indocyanine green retention rate at 15 minutes (ICG R15 at 7 days after surgery were measured. Comparison of continuous data between the two groups was made by t test, while comparison of categorical data was made by chisquare test. Results(1 There were no significant differences in age, sex, Child-Pugh classification, surgical approach, intraoperative blood loss, occlusion time of the first porta hepatis, and operation time between the two groups (P>0.05. But there were significant differences in the amounts of used human serum albumin and plasma and the length of hospital stay between the two groups (P<0.05. (2 There were significant differences in daily urine volume, CVP, MAP, abdominal drainage volume, and interstitial

  20. Long-Term Culture of Genome-Stable Bipotent Stem Cells from Adult Human Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; van Boxtel, Ruben; Hamer, Karien; Blokzijl, Francis; Verstegen, Monique M.A.; Ellis, Ewa; van Wenum, Martien; Fuchs, Sabine A.; de Ligt, Joep; van de Wetering, Marc; Sasaki, Nobuo; Boers, Susanne J.; Kemperman, Hans; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N.M.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.S.; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje; Strom, Stephen; Vries, Robert R.G.; van der Laan, Luc J.W.; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite the enormous replication potential of the human liver, there are currently no culture systems available that sustain hepatocyte replication and/or function in vitro. We have shown previously that single mouse Lgr5+ liver stem cells can be expanded as epithelial organoids in vitro and can be differentiated into functional hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. We now describe conditions allowing long-term expansion of adult bile duct-derived bipotent progenitor cells from human liver. The expanded cells are highly stable at the chromosome and structural level, while single base changes occur at very low rates. The cells can readily be converted into functional hepatocytes in vitro and upon transplantation in vivo. Organoids from α1-antitrypsin deficiency and Alagille syndrome patients mirror the in vivo pathology. Clonal long-term expansion of primary adult liver stem cells opens up experimental avenues for disease modeling, toxicology studies, regenerative medicine, and gene therapy. PMID:25533785

  1. Human fetal liver cells for regulated ex vivo erythropoietin gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebtisam El Filali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Possible risks and lack of donor livers limit application of liver transplantation. Liver cell transplantation is, at this moment, not a feasible alternative because engraftment in the liver is poor. Furthermore, there is also shortage of cells suitable for transplantation. Fetal liver cells are able to proliferate in cell culture and could therefore present an alternative source of cells for transplantation. In this study, we investigated the utility of human fetal liver cells for therapeutic protein delivery. We transplanted human fetal liver cells in immunodeficient mice but were not able to detect engraftment of human hepatocytes. In contrast, transplantation of human adult hepatocytes led to detectable engraftment of hepatocytes in murine liver. Transplantation of fetal liver cells did lead to abundant reconstitution of murine liver with human endothelium, indicating that endothelial cells are the most promising cell type for ex vivo liver cell gene therapy. Human liver endothelial cells were subsequently transduced with a lentiviral autoregulatory erythropoietin expression vector. After transplantation in immunodeficient mice, these cells mediated long-term regulation of murine hematocrits. Our study shows the potential of human liver endothelial cells for long-term regulated gene therapy.

  2. Expression of ATP7B in normal human liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Fanni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available ATP7B is a copper transporting P-type ATPase, also known as Wilson disease protein, which plays a key role in copper distribution inside cells. Recent experimental data in cell culture have shown that ATP7B putatively serves a dual function in hepatocytes: when localized to the Golgi apparatus, it has a biosynthetic role, delivering copper atoms to apoceruloplasmin; when the hepatocytes are under copper stress, ATP7B translocates to the biliary pole to transport excess copper out of the cell and into the bile canaliculus for subsequent excretion from the body via the bile. The above data on ATP7B localization have been mainly obtained in tumor cell systems in vitro. The aim of the present work was to assess the presence and localization of the Wilson disease protein in the human liver. We tested immunoreactivity for ATP7B in 10 human liver biopsies, in which no significant pathological lesion was found using a polyclonal antiserum specific for ATP7B. In the normal liver, immunoreactivity for ATP7B was observed in hepatocytes and in biliary cells. In the hepatocytes, immunoreactivity for ATP7B was observed close to the plasma membrane, both at the sinusoidal and at the biliary pole. In the biliary cells, ATP7B was localized close to the cell membrane, mainly concentrated at the basal pole of the cells. The data suggest that, in human liver, ATP7B is localized to the plasma membrane of both hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells.

  3. Innumerable Liver Masses in a Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Overlap Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibpoor, Alireza; Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Sadeghi, Mahbobe; Gharibpoor, Faeze; Joukar, Farahnaz; Mavaddati, Sara

    2017-02-07

    BACKGROUND In patients with the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), the presence of cholestatic features raise the possibility of an overlap syndrome with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Here, we present a unique case with AIH-PSC overlap syndrome and innumerable liver masses. CASE REPORT A 26-year-old man presented with generalized icterus. Based on the serological findings of hypergamainmunoglobulinemia and positive anti-nuclear antibody tests, together with an abnormal cholangiogram, he was diagnosed with overlap syndrome (AIH-PSC). Liver imaging revealed innumerable liver masses with a benign appearance in the pathological evaluation. To rule out the colon abnormalities that usually coexist with such liver masses, colonoscopy was performed and showed no significant changes. The liver masses were nonmalignant and were resolved after immunosuppressant therapy. CONCLUSIONS Because AIH-PSC overlap syndrome is rare, it is suggested that radiological evaluation of the biliary tree should be performed routinely in adults diagnosed with AIH to reduce the missed diagnosis of overlap syndrome and liver masses.

  4. Adverse effects of the antimalaria drug, mefloquine: due to primary liver damage with secondary thyroid involvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herxheimer Andrew

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mefloquine is a clinically important antimalaria drug, which is often not well tolerated. We critically reviewed 516 published case reports of mefloquine adverse effects, to clarify the phenomenology of the harms associated with mefloquine, and to make recommendations for safer prescribing. Presentation We postulate that many of the adverse effects of mefloquine are a post-hepatic syndrome caused by primary liver damage. In some users we believe that symptomatic thyroid disturbance occurs, either independently or as a secondary consequence of the hepatocellular injury. The mefloquine syndrome presents in a variety of ways including headache, gastrointestinal disturbances, nervousness, fatigue, disorders of sleep, mood, memory and concentration, and occasionally frank psychosis. Previous liver or thyroid disease, and concurrent insults to the liver (such as from alcohol, dehydration, an oral contraceptive pill, recreational drugs, and other liver-damaging drugs may be related to the development of severe or prolonged adverse reactions to mefloquine. Implications We believe that people with active liver or thyroid disease should not take mefloquine, whereas those with fully resolved neuropsychiatric illness may do so safely. Mefloquine users should avoid alcohol, recreational drugs, hormonal contraception and co-medications known to cause liver damage or thyroid damage. With these caveats, we believe that mefloquine may be safely prescribed in pregnancy, and also to occupational groups who carry out safety-critical tasks. Testing Mefloquine's adverse effects need to be investigated through a multicentre cohort study, with small controlled studies testing specific elements of the hypothesis.

  5. Early renal failure after domino liver transplantation using organs from donors with primary hyperoxaluria type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saner, Fuat H; Treckmann, Juergen; Pratschke, Johann; Arbogast, Helmut; Rahmel, Axel; Vester, Udo; Paul, Andreas

    2010-10-15

    Organ shortage is responsible for high mortality rates of patients awaiting liver transplantation (LT). Domino transplantation has had reported success in patients with metabolic disorders. Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is a rare metabolic disorder. There are a few case reports that suggest that PH1 livers originating from donors that have undergone combined liver-kidney transplantation can be successfully used for domino transplantation. In the last decade, five patients received a domino liver transplant from patients with PH1 in the EUROTRANSPLANT region. In this study, we report the clinical course and outcome of these five patients who were received a domino graft transplant. All patients, with the exception of one, suffered from multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma and underwent domino LT from patients undergoing combined liver-kidney transplantation for PH1. Within the first 4 weeks, all the domino recipients developed dialysis-dependent kidney failure despite good liver function. Four of the five patients died. The only survivor underwent retransplantation due to hepatic artery thrombosis. Twenty months after transplantation, this patient is doing well and has had no recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma. Domino LT using donors with PH1 results in early renal failure and cannot be recommended for transplantation unless preventive strategies have been identified.

  6. Incidence and mortality of primary liver cancer in England and Wales: changing patterns and ethnic variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladep, Nimzing G; Khan, Shahid A; Crossey, Mary Me; Thillainayagam, Andrew V; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Toledano, Mireille B

    2014-02-14

    To explore recent trends, modes of diagnosis, ethnic distribution and the mortality to incidence ratio of primary liver cancer by subtypes in England and Wales. We obtained incidence (1979-2008) and mortality (1968-2008) data for primary liver cancer for England and Wales and calculated age-standardised incidence and mortality rates. Trends in age-standardised mortality (ASMR) and incidence (ASIR) rates and basis of diagnosis of primary liver cancer and subcategories: hepatocellular carcinoma, intrahepatic bile duct and unspecified liver tumours, were analysed over the study period. Changes in guidelines for the diagnosis of primary liver cancer (PLC) may impact changing trends in the rates that may be obtained. We thus explored changes in the mode of diagnosis as reported to cancer registries. Furthermore, we examined the distribution of these tumours by ethnicity. Most of the statistical manipulations of these data was carried out in Microsoft excel® (Seattle, Washington, United Sttaes). Additional epidemiological statistics were done in Epi Info software (Atlanta, GA, United Sttaes). To define patterns of change over time, we evaluated trends in ASMR and ASIR of PLC and intrahepatic bile duct carcinoma (IHBD) using a least squares regression line fitted to the natural logarithm of the mortality and incidence rates. We estimated the patterns of survival over subsequent 5 and 10 years using complement of mortality to incidence ratio (1-MIR). Age-standardised mortality rate of primary liver cancer increased in both sexes: from 2.56 and 1.29/100000 in 1968 to 5.10 and 2.63/100000 in 2008 for men and women respectively. The use of histology for diagnostic confirmation of primary liver cancer increased from 35.7% of registered cases in 1993 to plateau at about 50% during 2005 to 2008. Reliance on cytology as a basis of diagnosis has maintained a downward trend throughout the study period. Although approximately 30% of the PLC registrations had information on

  7. Cellular distribution and handling of liver-targeting preparations in human livers studied by a liver lobe perfusion (vol 29, pg 361, 2001)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melgert, BN; Olinga, P; Weert, B; Slooff, MJH; Meijer, DKF; Poelstra, K; Groothuis, GMM

    We developed and tested a novel method for perfusing parts of human liver to study uptake and handling of drug-targeting preparations. These preparations, designed for the treatment of liver fibrosis in man, have been extensively studied in animals, but little is known about the uptake and handling

  8. Ultrasound and Point Shear Wave Elastography in Livers of Patients with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjelle, Anders Batman; Mulabecirovic, Anesa; Hausken, Trygve; Havre, Roald Flesland; Gilja, Odd Helge; Vesterhus, Mette

    2016-09-01

    Point shear wave elastography (pSWE) is an ultrasound-based method for non-invasive quantification of liver fibrosis. The objective of this study was to explore liver pSWE in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) for assessment of fibrosis. Fifty-five non-transplant patients with PSC (38 males, 17 females; mean age: 46.4 y) were included and compared with 24 matched controls. Median (range) PSC duration was 8.1 (0-33) y. Ultrasonographic scanning followed by liver stiffness measurement by pSWE was performed using a conventional ultrasound system (Philips iU22). Signs of liver fibrosis on B-mode were identified in 21 patients (38%). Splenomegaly was found in 19 patients (35%) and ascites in two patients (4%). Successful pSWE measurements were achieved in the right liver lobe of all individuals and in the left liver lobe of 36 patients (65.5%). PSC patients had significantly higher median shear wave velocity (SWV) than controls in the right liver (median [range] SWV 1.26 [0.73-2.57] m/s vs. 1.09 [0.88-1.25] m/s, p liver lobe and spleen did not differ between PSC patients and controls. Our findings indicate that PSC patients have increased median SWV, indicating more fibrosis compared with controls; however, a wide range of SWV values were obtained among PSC patients, possibly reflecting the various stages in disease development. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolomic Modularity Analysis (MMA) to Quantify Human Liver Perfusion Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Gautham Vivek; Bruinsma, Bote; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Swaminathan, Anandh; Saeidi, Nima; Yarmush, Martin L; Uygun, Korkut

    2017-11-13

    Large-scale -omics data are now ubiquitously utilized to capture and interpret global responses to perturbations in biological systems, such as the impact of disease states on cells, tissues, and whole organs. Metabolomics data, in particular, are difficult to interpret for providing physiological insight because predefined biochemical pathways used for analysis are inherently biased and fail to capture more complex network interactions that span multiple canonical pathways. In this study, we introduce a nov-el approach coined Metabolomic Modularity Analysis (MMA) as a graph-based algorithm to systematically identify metabolic modules of reactions enriched with metabolites flagged to be statistically significant. A defining feature of the algorithm is its ability to determine modularity that highlights interactions between reactions mediated by the production and consumption of cofactors and other hub metabolites. As a case study, we evaluated the metabolic dynamics of discarded human livers using time-course metabolomics data and MMA to identify modules that explain the observed physiological changes leading to liver recovery during subnormothermic machine perfusion (SNMP). MMA was performed on a large scale liver-specific human metabolic network that was weighted based on metabolomics data and identified cofactor-mediated modules that would not have been discovered by traditional metabolic pathway analyses.

  10. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Roskams, Tania [Department of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, University of Leuven (Belgium); Oben, Jude A., E-mail: j.oben@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  11. Influence of the primary tumour location in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Aurélien; Malik, Hassan Z; Jones, Robert P; Diaz-Nieto, Rafael; Fenwick, Stephen W; Poston, Graeme J

    2017-11-21

    The prognosis of patients undergoing liver resection for colorectal liver metastases (CLM) seems to be altered when the primary tumour is right-sided. However, data are lacking and conflicting. We aimed to evaluate the influence of the primary tumour location on oncologic outcomes following such surgery. We retrospectively analysed prospectively collected data from 376 consecutive patients who underwent liver surgery for CLM between June 2010 and August 2015. We compared the outcomes of patients with right colon tumours and those with left colorectal tumours. The splenic flexure was used as the cut-off point to determine the anatomic primary site. Among the 364 patients eligible, 74 (20.3%) had a right-sided primary tumour. These patients were older, had a poorer American Society of Anaesthesiologists status and had fewer node-positive primary tumours. The CLM characteristics were similar between both groups. Median PFS was not significantly different between the two groups at 9.9 months, as well as the pattern of recurrence. Median OS was shorter for patients with right-sided primary tumour (34.6 versus 45.3 months, p = 0.035). Similar results were observed when patients with rectal tumour were excluded from analysis (34.6 vs. 47.5 months, p = 0.007). Primary tumour site was an independent prognosis factor in multivariate analysis. Right-sided location of the primary tumour is associated with worse OS after surgery for CLM, but seems to have no influence on PFS, and on the pattern of recurrence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  12. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I. [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Gholami, Parviz [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Li, Feng [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fan, Fang [Department of Pathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Hagenbuch, Bruno [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Olyaee, Mojtaba [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  13. Ambient air pollution and primary liver cancer incidence in four European cohorts within the ESCAPE project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie; Andersen, Zorana J.; Stafoggia, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tobacco smoke exposure increases the risk of cancer in the liver, but little is known about the possible risk associated with exposure to ambient air pollution. Objectives: We evaluated the association between residential exposure to air pollution and primary liver cancer incidence....... Methods: We obtained data from four cohorts with enrolment during 1985–2005 in Denmark, Austria and Italy. Exposure to nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOX), particulate matter (PM) with diameter of less than 10 µm (PM10), less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5), between 2.5 and 10 µm (PM2.5–10) and PM2.5 absorbance (soot...... in PM2.5. Conclusions: The results provide suggestive evidence that ambient air pollution may increase the risk of liver cancer. Confidence intervals for associations with NO2 and NOX were narrower than for the other exposures....

  14. Differential distribution of age and HBV serological markers in liver cirrhosis and non-cirrhotic patients with primary liver cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Xiuhua

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo compare the age distributions and presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV serological markers between primary hepatic cancer (PHC patients with and without liver cirrhosis. MethodsA total of 547 PHC cases were analyzed retrospectively. After dividing into two groups according to liver cirrhosis status, the between-group differences in age and HBV serological markers, such as hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg status, were statistically compared using the Chi-squared test. ResultsThe number of cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic PHC patients was 265 and 282, respectively. HBV infection was present in 221 cirrhotic PHC patients and 256 non-cirrhotic PHC patients (834% vs. 90.8%. There was a substantial bias in the proportion of males to females in the cirrhotic PHC patients (7.83∶1. The number of PHC patients <60 years old was similar between the cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic groups, but the non-cirrhotic group had significantly more patients >60 years old (P<0.005. In cirrhotic PHC patients, the HBV infection rate was highest in the <40 years old age group (96.7% and the HBeAg serological conversion rate was highest in the 40-60 years old age group (89.5%. In non-cirrhotic PHC patients, the 40-60 years old age group showed the highest HBV infection rate (90.3% but the lowest HBeAg serological conversion rate (80.0%. ConclusionPHC with liver cirrhosis mainly occurred in males, with the HBV infection rate being higher in individuals <60 years old. Non-cirrhotic PHC patients were more often >60 years old. Many of the HBV-infected PHC patients with cirrhosis had high HBeAg serological conversion rate.

  15. Primary graft dysfunction of the liver: definitions, diagnostic criteria and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Douglas Bastos; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Salvalaggio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Primary graft dysfunction is a multifactorial syndrome with great impact on liver transplantation outcomes. This review article was based on studies published between January 1980 and June 2015 and retrieved from PubMed database using the following search terms: "primary graft dysfunction", "early allograft dysfunction", "primary non-function" and "liver transplantation". Graft dysfunction describes different grades of graft ischemia-reperfusion injury and can manifest as early allograft dysfunction or primary graft non-function, its most severe form. Donor-, surgery- and recipient-related factors have been associated with this syndrome. Primary graft dysfunction definition, diagnostic criteria and risk factors differ between studies. RESUMO A disfunção primária do enxerto hepático é uma síndrome multifatorial com grande impacto no resultado do transplante de fígado. Foi realizada uma ampla revisão da literatura, consultando a base de dados PubMed, em busca de estudos publicados entre janeiro de 1980 e junho de 2015. Os termos descritivos utilizados foram: "primary graft dysfunction", "early allograft dysfunction", "primary non-function" e "liver transplantation". A disfunção traduz graus diferentes da lesão de isquemia e reperfusão do órgão, e pode se manifestar como disfunção precoce ou, na forma mais grave, pelo não funcionamento primário do enxerto. Fatores relacionados ao doador, ao transplante e ao receptor contribuem para essa síndrome. Existem definições diferentes na literatura quanto ao diagnóstico e aos fatores de risco associados à disfunção primária.

  16. Pattern of distant extrahepatic metastases in primary liver cancer: a SEER based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenrui; He, Xingkang; Andayani, Dewi; Yang, Liya; Ye, Jianzhong; Li, Yating; Chen, Yanfei; Li, Lanjuan

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Primary liver cancer remains still the common cause of cancer-related deaths globally and the prognosis for patients with extrahepatic metastasis is poor. The aim of our study was to assess extrahepatic metastatic pattern of different histological subtypes and evaluate prognostic effects of extrahepatic metastasis in patients with advanced disease. Methods: Based on the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database, eligible patients diagnosed with primary liver cancer was identified between 2010 to 2012. We adopted Chi-square test to compared metastasis distribution among different histological types. We compared survival difference of patients with different extrahepatic metastasises by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Cox proportional hazard models were performed to identify other prognostic factors of overall survival. Results: We finally identified 8677 patients who were diagnosed with primary liver cancer from 2010 to 2012 and 1775 patients were in distant metastasis stages. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma was more invasive and had a higher percentage of metastasis compared with hepatocellular carcinoma. Lung was the most common metastasis and brain was the least common site for both hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Extrahepatic metastasis could consider as an independent prognostic factor for patients with liver cancer. Patients with brain metastasis had the worst prognosis, compared with other metastasis in overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) analysis. Conclusions: Different histological subtypes of liver cancer had different metastasis patterns. There were profound differences in risk of mortality among distant extrahepatic metastatic sites. Results from our studies would provide some information for follow-up strategies and future studies.

  17. Liver resection as the definitive treatment for unilateral non-oriental primary intrahepatic lithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Paulo; Perini, Marcos V; Machado, Marcel Autran C; Bacchella, Telesforo; Pugliese, Vincenzo; Saad, William A; da Cunha, Jose Eduardo M; Machado, Marcel C C; Rodrigues, Joaquim Gama

    2006-04-01

    The current study sought to evaluate the results of liver resection as the treatment for unilateral non-oriental primary intrahepatic lithiasis (PHIL). Twenty-seven symptomatic patients (mean age 42 years) were submitted to liver resection; the indications were parenchymal fibrosis/atrophy in 22 and biliary stenosis in 5. Resection was associated with a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy in patients with a significant degree of dilation of the extrahepatic biliary duct. There was no operative mortality and the morbidity rate was 7.4% (2 patients with biliary fistula). After a median follow-up of 41.2 months, the overall rate of good results was 92.6%. All patients submitted to liver resection alone presented good late results, while 80% of those with associated hepaticojejunostomy did not have complications (P = .12). Late complications were observed in 2 patients (7.4%): 1 with a liver abscess and 1 with cholangitis and recurrent stones. There was no mortality during long-term follow-up. Liver resection showed low incidence of complications and good long-term results. None of the patients with unilateral disease without associated extrahepatic bile duct dilation presented complications and they were considered cured. We believe that resection indications should be expanded and the procedure should be indicated as routine in patients with unilateral PHIL even in the absence of parenchymal fibrosis/atrophy or biliary stenosis.

  18. Human Liver Infection in a Dish: Easy-To-Build 3D Liver Models for Studying Microbial Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropolis, Debora B; Faust, Daniela M; Tolle, Matthieu; Rivière, Lise; Valentin, Tanguy; Neuveut, Christine; Hernandez-Cuevas, Nora; Dufour, Alexandre; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Guillen, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Human liver infection is a major cause of death worldwide, but fundamental studies on infectious diseases affecting humans have been hampered by the lack of robust experimental models that accurately reproduce pathogen-host interactions in an environment relevant for the human disease. In the case of liver infection, one consequence of this absence of relevant models is a lack of understanding of how pathogens cross the sinusoidal endothelial barrier and parenchyma. To fill that gap we elaborated human 3D liver in vitro models, composed of human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and Huh-7 hepatoma cells as hepatocyte model, layered in a structure mimicking the hepatic sinusoid, which enable studies of key features of early steps of hepatic infection. Built with established cell lines and scaffold, these models provide a reproducible and easy-to-build cell culture approach of reduced complexity compared to animal models, while preserving higher physiological relevance compared to standard 2D systems. For proof-of-principle we challenged the models with two hepatotropic pathogens: the parasitic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica and hepatitis B virus (HBV). We constructed four distinct setups dedicated to investigating specific aspects of hepatic invasion: 1) pathogen 3D migration towards hepatocytes, 2) hepatocyte barrier crossing, 3) LSEC and subsequent hepatocyte crossing, and 4) quantification of human hepatic virus replication (HBV). Our methods comprise automated quantification of E. histolytica migration and hepatic cells layer crossing in the 3D liver models. Moreover, replication of HBV virus occurs in our virus infection 3D liver model, indicating that routine in vitro assays using HBV or others viruses can be performed in this easy-to-build but more physiological hepatic environment. These results illustrate that our new 3D liver infection models are simple but effective, enabling new investigations on infectious disease mechanisms. The better

  19. Prospective study of periostitis and finger clubbing in primary biliary cirrhosis and other forms of chronic liver disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, O; Dick, R; Sherlock, S

    1981-01-01

    The association of finger clubbing and periostitis has been reported in primary biliary cirrhosis and, more rarely, in other forms of chronic liver disease. The prevalence of periostitis and its relationship to finger clubbing is unknown. In this prospective study, we have determined the prevalence of periostitis and finger clubbing in 74 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and 54 with other forms of chronic liver disease. Clubbing was present in 24% of patients with primary biliary cirrh...

  20. Identifying independent risk factors for graft loss after primary liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwiasda, Jill; Schrem, Harald; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Kaltenborn, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study is the identification of independent risk factors for re-transplantation after primary liver transplantation beyond the occurrence of hepatic artery thrombosis. Eight hundred thirty-four adult patients undergoing primary liver transplantation were analyzed. A propensity score was developed using multivariable binary logistic regression with hepatic artery thrombosis as the dependent variable. The logit link function of the propensity score was included into multivariable Cox regression analysis for graft survival to adjust the study population. Graft loss was observed in 134 patients (16.1%). Independent significant risk factors for graft loss were recipient platelet count (p = 0.040; HR: 1.002; 95%-CI: 1.000-1.003), preoperative portal vein thrombosis (p = 0.032; HR: 1.797; 95%-CI: 1.054-2.925), donor age (p logit of the propensity score did not reach statistical significance in the final multivariable Cox regression model (p = 0.111) indicating good adjustment for the occurrence of hepatic artery thrombosis. Liver transplant programs might benefit from regular donor organ biopsies to assess the amount of macrovesicular steatosis. An elevated recipient platelet count can promote reperfusion injury leading to graft loss. A liver graft from an elderly donor should not be split or be transplanted in a recipient with detected portal vein thrombosis.

  1. Expression of neural cell adhesion molecule in human liver development and in congenital and acquired liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbrecht, L; Cassiman, D; Desmet, V; Roskams, T

    2001-09-01

    In the liver, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is a marker of immature cells committed to the biliary lineage and is expressed by reactive bile ductules in human liver diseases. We investigated the possible role of NCAM in the development of intrahepatic bile ducts and aimed at determining whether immature biliary cells can contribute to the repair of damaged bile ducts in chronic liver diseases. Therefore, we performed immunohistochemistry for NCAM and bile duct cell markers cytokeratin 7 and cytokeratin 19 on frozen sections of 85 liver specimens taken from 14 fetuses, 10 donor livers, 18 patients with congenital liver diseases characterized by ductal plate malformations (DPMs), and 43 cirrhotic explant livers. Duplicated ductal plates and incorporating bile ducts during development showed a patchy immunoreactivity for NCAM, while DPMs were continuously positive for NCAM. Bile ducts showing complete or patchy immunoreactivity for NCAM were found in cirrhotic livers, with higher frequency in biliary than in posthepatitic cirrhosis. Our results suggest that NCAM may have a function in the development of the intrahepatic bile ducts and that NCAM-positive immature biliary cells can contribute to the repair of damaged bile ducts in chronic liver diseases.

  2. Identification of potential biomarkers of hepatitis B-induced acute liver failure using hepatic cells derived from human skin precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Robim M; Sachinidis, Agapios; De Boe, Veerle; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; De Kock, Joery

    2015-09-01

    Besides their role in the elucidation of pathogenic processes of medical and pharmacological nature, biomarkers can also be used to document specific toxicological events. Hepatic cells generated from human skin-derived precursors (hSKP-HPC) were previously shown to be a promising in vitro tool for the evaluation of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. In this study, their capacity to identify potential liver-specific biomarkers at the gene expression level was investigated with particular emphasis on acute liver failure (ALF). To this end, a set of potential ALF-specific biomarkers was established using clinically relevant liver samples obtained from patients suffering from hepatitis B-associated ALF. Subsequently, this data was compared to data obtained from primary human hepatocyte cultures and hSKP-HPC, both exposed to the ALF-inducing reference compound acetaminophen. It was found that both in vitro systems revealed a set of molecules that was previously identified in the ALF liver samples. Yet, only a limited number of molecules was common between both in vitro systems and the ALF liver samples. Each of the in vitro systems could be used independently to identify potential toxicity biomarkers related to ALF. It seems therefore more appropriate to combine primary human hepatocyte cultures with complementary in vitro models to efficiently screen out potential hepatotoxic compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Time and deprivation trends in incidence of primary liver cancer subtypes in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konfortion, Julie; Coupland, Victoria H; Kocher, Hemant M; Allum, William; Grocock, Melanie J; Jack, Ruth H

    2014-08-01

    Primary liver cancer consists of distinct subtypes with differing aetiology so it is valuable to study the incidence of these subtypes separately. This study aims to investigate time and socio-economic deprivation trends in the incidence of primary liver cancer subtypes in England, identifying the burden in the population. Data were extracted from the population-based National Cancer Data Repository (NCDR) for patients diagnosed with primary liver cancer between 1990 and 2009. Subtypes were defined by the 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) codes: liver cell carcinoma (C22.0), intrahepatic bile duct carcinoma (C22.1), other (C22.2-C22.4, C22.7) and unspecified (C22.9). A sensitivity analysis was carried out on the main histological subtypes of liver cell carcinoma and intrahepatic bile duct using the 2nd edition of the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O-2). Male and female age-standardized incidence rates per 100 000 World standard population were calculated for each year and for the period 1999-2009 by socio-economic deprivation quintile. A total of 40 945 patients were diagnosed with primary liver cancer between 1990 and 2009. Liver cell carcinoma incidence increased in men from 0.63 in 1990 to 2.48 per 100 000 in 2009. While incidence was low in women, rates increased from 0.18 to 0.59, respectively. Intrahepatic bile duct carcinoma incidence increased between 1990 and 2009 from 0.40 to 1.25 per 100 000 in men, and from 0.28 to 1.08 in women. Incidence of the other liver cancer subtype remained low throughout the study period at less than 0.3 per 100 000 in each year in both men and women. The highest rate of liver cell carcinoma and intrahepatic bile duct carcinoma was generally in men and women resident in the most deprived areas between 1999 and 2009. The largest difference by deprivation quintile was observed for liver cell carcinoma in men, where the incidence was more than double in the

  4. Preoperative Nutritional Risk Index to predict postoperative survival time in primary liver cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Yacong; Yao, Mingjie; Zhang, Ling; Bekalo, Wolde; Lu, Weiquan; Lu, Quanjun

    2015-01-01

    We designed this study to determine the predictive value of Nutritional Risk Index (NRI) for postoperative survival time of patients who had undergone hepatectomy for primary liver cancer. The 620 patients who underwent hepatectomy for primary liver cancer (PLC) in the Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Cancer Hospital of Henan Province, Zhengzhou, China from December 1, 2008 to December 1, 2012 were followed up. A nutritional risk index (NRI) was used to screen the patients with malnutrition (NRI100) patients had longer postoperative survival time compared with malnourished patients. NRI values>100 was sig-nificantly associated with longer postoperative survival time. Cox proportional hazards model showed that NRI was an independent predictor of postoperative survival time and that NRI varied inversely with the risk of death. The patients with NRI values>100 survived longer than those with NRI values

  5. Human factors and ergonomics for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Paul; Jeffcott, Shelly

    2016-03-01

    In the second paper of this series, we provide a brief overview of the scientific discipline of human factors and ergonomics (HFE). Traditionally the HFE focus in healthcare has been in acute hospital settings which are perceived to exhibit characteristics more similar to other high-risk industries already applying related principles and methods. This paper argues that primary care is an area which could benefit extensively from an HFE approach, specifically in improving the performance and well-being of people and organisations. To this end, we define the purpose of HFE, outline its three specialist sub-domains (physical, cognitive and organisational HFE) and provide examples of guiding HFE principles and practices. Additionally, we describe HFE issues of significance to primary care education, improvement and research and outline early plans for building capacity and capability in this setting.

  6. Gene expression profiles of primary colorectal carcinomas, liver metastases, and carcinomatoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myklebost Ola

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the fact that metastases are the leading cause of colorectal cancer deaths, little is known about the underlying molecular changes in these advanced disease stages. Few have studied the overall gene expression levels in metastases from colorectal carcinomas, and so far, none has investigated the peritoneal carcinomatoses by use of DNA microarrays. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate and compare the gene expression patterns of primary carcinomas (n = 18, liver metastases (n = 4, and carcinomatoses (n = 4, relative to normal samples from the large bowel. Results Transcriptome profiles of colorectal cancer metastases independent of tumor site, as well as separate profiles associated with primary carcinomas, liver metastases, or peritoneal carcinomatoses, were assessed by use of Bayesian statistics. Gains of chromosome arm 5p are common in peritoneal carcinomatoses and several candidate genes (including PTGER4, SKP2, and ZNF622 mapping to this region were overexpressed in the tumors. Expression signatures stratified on TP53 mutation status were identified across all tumors regardless of stage. Furthermore, the gene expression levels for the in vivo tumors were compared with an in vitro model consisting of cell lines representing all three tumor stages established from one patient. Conclusion By statistical analysis of gene expression data from primary colorectal carcinomas, liver metastases, and carcinomatoses, we are able to identify genetic patterns associated with the different stages of tumorigenesis.

  7. Positron emission tomography / computerized tomography evaluation of primary Hodgkin's disease of liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, V S; Purandare, N C; Gujral, S; Shah, S; Nair, R; Rangarajan, V

    2009-01-01

    Occurrence of primary Hodgkin's lymphoma (PHL) of the liver is extremely rare. We report on a case of a 60-year-old male who presented with liver mass and B-symptomatology. Hepatoma or hepatic metastasis from a gastrointestinal primary was initially suspected. Tumor markers like AFP, CEA, Total PSA, and CA-19.9 were within normal limits. Positron Emission Tomography / Computerized Tomography (PET/CT) revealed a large hepatic lesion and a nodal mass in the porta hepatis. A liver biopsy was consistent with Hodgkin's lymphoma. There was complete regression of the hepatic lesion and evidence of shrinkage of the nodal mass following four cycles of chemotherapy. 18F Fluro -de-oxy Glucose (FDG) PET / CT in this case helped in establishing a primary hepatic lymphoma by demonstrating the absence of pathologically hypermetabolic foci in any other nodes or organs. PET / CT scan is a useful adjunct to conventional imaging and histopathology, not only to establish the initial diagnosis, but also to monitor treatment response in PHL.

  8. Stoichiometries of transferrin receptors 1 and 2 in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloupková, Maja; Zhang, An-Sheng; Enns, Caroline A

    2010-01-15

    Mutations in either the hereditary hemochromatosis protein, HFE, or transferrin receptor 2, TfR2, result in a similarly severe form of the most common type of iron overload disease called hereditary hemochromatosis. Models of the interactions between HFE, TfR1, and TfR2 imply that these proteins are present in different molar concentrations in the liver, where they control expression of the iron regulatory hormone, hepcidin, in response to body iron loading. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo levels of mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR and concentrations of these proteins by quantitative immunoblotting in human liver tissues. The level of TfR2 mRNA was 21- and 63-fold higher than that of TfR1 and HFE, respectively. Molar concentration of TfR2 protein was the highest and determined to be 1.95 nmol/g protein in whole cell lysates and 10.89 nmol/g protein in microsomal membranes. Molar concentration of TfR1 protein was 4.5- and 6.1-fold lower than that of TfR2 in whole cell lysates and membranes, respectively. The level of HFE protein was below 0.53 nmol/g of total protein. HFE is thus present in substoichiometric concentrations with respect to both TfR1 and TfR2 in human liver tissue. This finding supports a model, in which availability of HFE is limiting for formation of complexes with TfR1 or TfR2. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Development and validation of a microRNA based diagnostic assay for primary tumor site classification of liver core biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perell, Katharina; Vincent, Martin; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    negatively affect the accuracy and usability of molecular classifiers. We have developed and validated a microRNA-based classifier, which predicts the primary tumor site of liver biopsies, containing a limited number of tumor cells. Concurrently we explored the influence of surrounding normal tissue...... for normal liver tissue contamination. Performance was estimated by cross-validation, followed by independent validation on 55 liver core biopsies with a tumor content as low as 10%. A microRNA classifier developed, using the statistical contamination model, showed an overall classification accuracy of 74...... on classification. MicroRNA profiling was performed using quantitative Real-Time PCR on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. 278 primary tumors and liver metastases, representing nine primary tumor classes, as well as normal liver samples were used as a training set. A statistical model was applied to adjust...

  10. Heterogeneity of ductular reactions in adult rat and human liver revealed by novel expression of deleted in malignant brain tumor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hanne Cathrine; Holmskov, Uffe; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric

    2002-01-01

    reactions after ligation of the common bile duct. In human liver diseases, DMBT1 was expressed in ductular reactions after infection with hepatitis B and acetaminophen intoxication, but not in primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and obstruction of the large bile duct. The expression...

  11. Primary hepatocellular carcinoma in ectopic liver masquerading as left adrenal carcinoma: a rare occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailendra Kumar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a unique case of primary hepatocellular carcinoma in an ectopic liver rest in the left renal hilum masquerading as a left adrenal tumor. Adrenal tumors have been reported within adrenal rests inside the liver but hepatocellular carcinoma in ectopic liver rests in the adrenal area is an extremely rare entity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report from the Indian subcontinent to describe this event in the English literature. Our patient, a sixty-year-old, non-diabetic, non-hypertensive male, presented with a history of left flank pain for the past six months. He was a chronic smoker and also consumed excessive amounts of alcohol. He had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and was hepatitis B surface antigen positive. A contrast enhanced computer tomography scan of the abdomen showed an 8¥8¥8 cm, well-defined, heterogeneously enhancing mass with central necrosis, in the left suprarenal region. The provisional diagnosis of an adrenal tumor was made and open transperitoneal excision of the tumor along with two enlarged lymph nodes was done. Immunohistochemistry staining of the specimen revealed it to be a primary hepatocellular carcinoma. The patient died within six months of surgery owing to extensive metastases. We concluded that chronic hepatitis B infection and chronic and excessive alcohol consumption and/or chronic smoking may have been the predisposing factors for the occurrence of primary hepatocellular carcinoma in the liver rest in our patient. The prognosis appears to be poor despite surgical management.

  12. All-Trans-Retinoic Acid Enhances Mitochondrial Function in Models of Human Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathy, Sasmita; Chapman, John D.; Han, Chang Y; Hogarth, Cathryn A.; Arnold, Samuel L. M.; Onken, Jennifer; Kent, Travis; Goodlett, David R.; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is the active metabolite of vitamin A. The liver is the main storage organ of vitamin A, but activation of the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in mouse liver and in human liver cell lines has also been shown. Although atRA treatment improves mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle in rodents, its role in modulating mitochondrial function in the liver is controversial, and little data are available regarding the human liver. The aim of this study was to determin...

  13. Efficacy of oral vancomycin in recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis following liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Penelope; Lokan, Julie; Johnson, Paul; Gow, Paul

    2017-09-25

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a liver disease that leads to progressive destruction and stricturing of the biliary tree. Unfortunately, apart from orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), there are no universally accepted therapies to treat this disease. Even following transplantation, recurrence of PSC is seen in approximately one quarter of patients and leads to high rates of graft failure. Oral vancomycin, through possible immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms, has been shown in small-scale studies to be successful in improving liver function tests in patients with pretransplant PSC. We report the first case of an adult patient diagnosed with recurrent PSC 4 years after OLT who was treated with oral vancomycin leading to complete normalisation of his liver biochemistry. This case adds to the growing literature of a potential therapeutic role for this antibiotic in PSC and highlights interesting questions regarding mechanisms of disease. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Motion – Patients with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Should Undergo Early Liver Transplantation: Arguments against the Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S Crippin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation is an accepted form of treatment for patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC and can provide long term survival. Cholangiocarcinoma occurs in 10% to 20% of patients with PSC, is difficult to diagnose and has a poor prognosis. It has been proposed that liver transplantation be undertaken early in the course of the PSC, before cancer develops. Such a proposal would have significant implications for the method of assigning priority to patients awaiting liver transplantation. Other patients on the waiting list would experience further delays, while there is no proven benefit for PSC patients. Few patients with this disease are removed from the waiting list because they developed cancer. If one were to state that PSC patients warrant special consideration because of the hypothetical risk of cholangiocarcinoma, the same argument could be applied to patients with hepatitis C and other causes of cirrhosis, who are at increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. The transplant allocation system is applied in an equitable fashion to patients with a large variety of liver diseases. Alteration of this system to benefit a small number of patients with PSC would violate the principles on which it was created, and cannot be justified.

  15. Does bilioenteric anastomosis impair results of liver resection in primary intrahepatic lithiasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Paulo; Perini, Marcos V; Pugliese, Vincenzo; Pereira, Julio Cesar; Machado, Marcel Autran C; Saad, William A; D'Albuquerque, Luiz A C; Cecconello, Ivan

    2010-07-21

    To evaluate the long-term results of liver resection for the treatment of primary intrahepatic lithiasis. Prognostic factors, especially the impact of bilioenteric anastomosis on recurrence of symptoms were assessed. Forty one patients with intrahepatic stones and parenchyma fibrosis/atrophy and/or biliary stenosis were submitted to liver resection. Resection was associated with a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy in all patients with bilateral stones and in those with unilateral disease and dilation of the extrahepatic biliary duct (> 2 cm). Late results and risk factors for recurrence of symptoms or stones were evaluated. There was no operative mortality. After a mean follow-up of 50.3 mo, good late results were observed in 82.9% of patients; all patients submitted to liver resection alone and 58.8% of those submitted to liver resection and hepaticojejunostomy were free of symptoms (P = 0.0006). Patients with unilateral and bilateral disease showed good late results in 94.1% and 28.6%, respectively (P < 0.001). Recurrence of symptoms in patients with hepaticojejunostomy showed that this may not be the ideal solution. Further studies are needed to establish the best treatment for patients with bilateral stones or unilateral disease and a dilated extrahepatic duct.

  16. Does pyogenic liver abscess increase the risk of delayed-onset primary liver cancer?: Evidence from a nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chia-Sheng; Lin, Che-Chen; Peng, Cheng-Yuan; Chuang, Po-Heng; Su, Wen-Pang; Lai, Shih-Wei; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Chung, Chi-Jung; Lai, Hsueh-Chou

    2017-08-01

    Delayed-onset primary liver cancer (PLC) including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) in patients with pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is not common. The relationship between PLA and delayed-onset PLC is unclear. We investigated the association in a nationwide cohort study.From Taiwan National Health Insurance claims data, a cohort of 17,531 patients with PLA was generated after excluding patients with a history of cancer (n = 2034) and those diagnosed with PLC (n = 572) and other cancers (n = 627) within 1 year of a diagnosis of PLA. An age-, sex-, index year-, and diabetes mellitus (DM)-matched control cohort of 70,124 persons without PLA was selected from the same dataset. Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011. The risk of PLC was estimated for both cohorts.The incidence of PLC was nearly 2-fold greater in the PLA group than in the control cohort (29.3 per 10,000 person-years vs. 16.2 per 10,000 person-years). The incidences of HCC and ICC were 1.5- (22.1 per 10,000 person-years vs. 15.0 per 10,000 person-years) and 11-fold greater (6.73 per 10,000 person-years vs. 0.62 per 10,000 person-years), respectively, in the PLA group than in the control cohort. The PLA cohort also had high risks of PLC (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.56; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.35-1.81), HCC (aHR = 1.34; 95% CI = 1.15-1.57), and ICC (aHR = 6.94; 95% CI = 4.23-11.57).In conclusion, in this nationwide cohort study, PLA increased the risk of delayed-onset PLC.

  17. Primary Effusion Lymphoma Involving both Pleural and Abdominal Cavities in a Patient with Hepatitis B Virus-related Liver Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ying Hsieh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL is an unusual form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is characterized by lymphomatous effusion in body cavities, but no associated mass lesions. It is usually associated with an immunodeficient state most often with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. We describe a 54-year-old man with HIV-negative PEL, with a history of hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis. Both abdominal and pleural cavities were involved; no solid tumor masses were found and bone marrow investigations were normal. The ascites and pleural effusion contained numerous pleomorphic lymphoid cells. Immunophenotyping was positive for CD138. Chromosome study showed complex cytogenetics. The genomic human herpesvirus-8 was detected in the lymphoma cells. It is postulated that the immuno-suppressed state in this patient may have been caused by cirrhosis. The patient received four cycles of chemotherapy of CHOP and Picibanil (OK-432 intraperitoneal administration. However, no durable remission was achieved. Adefovir failed to halt the progressive liver failure after the development of YMDD mutant related to lamivudine. He died of sepsis and hepatic failure.

  18. The challenges of liver transplantation in children with primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Veena L; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Sindhi, Rakesh

    2015-03-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) in children can progress to end-stage liver disease requiring liver transplantation. PSC poses many challenges beginning with evaluation and classification of ductal involvement and overlap syndromes, few options for medical management and unique risks in the post-transplant period. The construct that PSC may be an autoimmune disease is based on positive autoantibodies, association with inflammatory bowel disease, linkage to HLA type and overlap/autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis; however, PSC is not responsive to standard immunosuppression. Study of PSC and post-transplant outcomes in children may provide a unique background in which to study this challenging disease. This is particularly intriguing in the subset of patients diagnosed in the first decade of life, suggesting a strong link to predisposing genetic susceptibility and immune dysregulation. Long-term, multicenter effort is likely to be the only mechanism to study this rare disease in children and to improve outcomes in the future.

  19. Foxa1 reduces lipid accumulation in human hepatocytes and is down-regulated in nonalcoholic fatty liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Moya

    Full Text Available Triglyceride accumulation in nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL results from unbalanced lipid metabolism which, in the liver, is controlled by several transcription factors. The Foxa subfamily of winged helix/forkhead box (Fox transcription factors comprises three members which play important roles in controlling both metabolism and homeostasis through the regulation of multiple target genes in the liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. In the mouse liver, Foxa2 is repressed by insulin and mediates fasting responses. Unlike Foxa2 however, the role of Foxa1 in the liver has not yet been investigated in detail. In this study, we evaluate the role of Foxa1 in two human liver cell models, primary cultured hepatocytes and HepG2 cells, by adenoviral infection. Moreover, human and rat livers were analyzed to determine Foxa1 regulation in NAFL. Results demonstrate that Foxa1 is a potent inhibitor of hepatic triglyceride synthesis, accumulation and secretion by repressing the expression of multiple target genes of these pathways (e.g., GPAM, DGAT2, MTP, APOB. Moreover, Foxa1 represses the fatty acid transporter protein FATP2 and lowers fatty acid uptake. Foxa1 also increases the breakdown of fatty acids by inducing peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation and ketone body synthesis. Finally, Foxa1 is able to largely up-regulate UCP1, thereby dissipating energy and consistently decreasing the mitochondria membrane potential. We also report that human and rat NAFL have a reduced Foxa1 expression, possibly through a protein kinase C-dependent pathway. We conclude that Foxa1 is an antisteatotic factor that coordinately tunes several lipid metabolic pathways to block triglyceride accumulation in hepatocytes. However, Foxa1 is down-regulated in human and rat NAFL and, therefore, increasing Foxa1 levels could protect from steatosis. Altogether, we suggest that Foxa1 could be a novel therapeutic target for NAFL disease and insulin resistance.

  20. Antimitochondrial antibodies in acute liver failure: implications for primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Patrick S C; Rossaro, Lorenzo; Davis, Paul A; Park, Ogyi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Miyakawa, Hiroshi; Norman, Gary L; Lee, William; Gershwin, M Eric

    2007-11-01

    In our previous work, including analysis of more than 10,000 sera from control patients and patients with a variety of liver diseases, we have demonstrated that with the use of recombinant autoantigens, antimitochondrial autoantibodies (AMAs) are only found in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and that a positive AMA is virtually pathognomonic of either PBC or future development of PBC. Although the mechanisms leading to the generation of AMA are enigmatic, we have postulated that xenobiotic-induced and/or oxidative modification of mitochondrial autoantigens is a critical step leading to loss of tolerance. This thesis suggests that a severe liver oxidant injury would lead to AMA production. We analyzed 217 serum samples from 69 patients with acute liver failure (ALF) collected up to 24 months post-ALF, compared with controls, for titer and reactivity with the E2 subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase, branched chain 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase, and 2-oxo-glutarate dehydrogenase. AMAs were detected in 28/69 (40.6%) ALF patients with reactivity found against all of the major mitochondrial autoantigens. In addition, and as further controls, sera were analyzed for autoantibodies to gp210, Sp100, centromere, chromatin, soluble liver antigen, tissue transglutaminase, and deaminated gliadin peptides; the most frequently detected nonmitochondrial autoantibody was against tissue transglutaminase (57.1% of ALF patients). The strikingly high frequency of AMAs in ALF supports the thesis that oxidative stress-induced liver damage may lead to AMA induction. The rapid disappearance of AMAs in these patients provides further support for the contention that PBC pathogenesis requires additional factors, including genetic susceptibility.

  1. 3D hepatic cultures simultaneously maintain primary hepatocyte and liver sinusoidal endothelial cell phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonhee Kim

    Full Text Available Developing in vitro engineered hepatic tissues that exhibit stable phenotype is a major challenge in the field of hepatic tissue engineering. However, the rapid dedifferentiation of hepatic parenchymal (hepatocytes and non-parenchymal (liver sinusoidal endothelial, LSEC cell types when removed from their natural environment in vivo remains a major obstacle. The primary goal of this study was to demonstrate that hepatic cells cultured in layered architectures could preserve or potentially enhance liver-specific behavior of both cell types. Primary rat hepatocytes and rat LSECs (rLSECs were cultured in a layered three-dimensional (3D configuration. The cell layers were separated by a chitosan-hyaluronic acid polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM, which served to mimic the Space of Disse. Hepatocytes and rLSECs exhibited several key phenotypic characteristics over a twelve day culture period. Immunostaining for the sinusoidal endothelial 1 antibody (SE-1 demonstrated that rLSECs cultured in the 3D hepatic model maintained this unique feature over twelve days. In contrast, rLSECs cultured in monolayers lost their phenotype within three days. The unique stratified structure of the 3D culture resulted in enhanced heterotypic cell-cell interactions, which led to improvements in hepatocyte functions. Albumin production increased three to six fold in the rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures. Only rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures exhibited increasing CYP1A1/2 and CYP3A activity. Well-defined bile canaliculi were observed only in the rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures. Together, these data suggest that rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures are highly suitable models to monitor the transformation of toxins in the liver and their transport out of this organ. In summary, these results indicate that the layered rLSEC-PEM-hepatocyte model, which recapitulates key features of hepatic sinusoids, is a potentially powerful medium for obtaining comprehensive knowledge on liver metabolism

  2. Development of in silico models for human liver microsomal stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pil H.; Cucurull-Sanchez, Lourdes; Lu, Jing; Du, Yuhua J.

    2007-12-01

    We developed highly predictive classification models for human liver microsomal (HLM) stability using the apparent intrinsic clearance (CLint, app) as the end point. HLM stability has been shown to be an important factor related to the metabolic clearance of a compound. Robust in silico models that predict metabolic clearance are very useful in early drug discovery stages to optimize the compound structure and to select promising leads to avoid costly drug development failures in later stages. Using Random Forest and Bayesian classification methods with MOE, E-state descriptors, ADME Keys, and ECFP_6 fingerprints, various highly predictive models were developed. The best performance of the models shows 80 and 75% prediction accuracy for the test and validation sets, respectively. A detailed analysis of results will be shown, including an assessment of the prediction confidence, the significant descriptors, and the application of these models to drug discovery projects.

  3. Metabolism of diazepam and related benzodiazepines by human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, W D; Watt, J A; McKinnon, G E; Reilly, P E

    1992-01-01

    The metabolism of diazepam has been studied in vitro using microsomal preparations from five human livers. An HPLC method was developed for the assay of diazepam, its congeners and its metabolites. Various methods for the incorporation of diazepam into the incubation medium were explored. It was shown that the use of organic solvents or small quantities of hydrochloric acid enhanced the solubility of this substrate. However all of the organic solvents tested were associated with substantial (around 50%) inhibition of metabolism of diazepam by both major pathways (N-demethylation and C3-hydroxylation). The use of hydrochloric acid gave satisfactory solubilization of diazepam, but not of pinazepam, prazepam or halazepam. Detailed metabolic studies were conducted only for diazepam, using neither hydrochloric acid nor organic solvents in the incubation medium. Formation of N-desmethyl-diazepam increased approximately linearly with diazepam concentration to 200 microM, and did not show saturation. Formation of temazepam gave a curved profile over the same range of diazepam concentrations, suggestive of a sigmoidal relationship. Michaelis-Menten parameters could not be determined for either reaction, but intrinsic clearances for N-demethylation varied over a 6-fold range. Diazepam N-demethylation was apparently promoted by the inclusion of temazepam in the incubation medium, while C3-hydroxylation of diazepam was enhanced in the presence of N-desmethyldiazepam. Mephenytoin in the incubation mixture had no effect on diazepam metabolism by either pathway. The present studies have defined some of the methodological problems inherent in in vitro metabolic studies with benzodiazepines, and have shed further light on the metabolism of diazepam in vitro by human liver.

  4. Effect of the Human Amniotic Membrane on Liver Regeneration in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipahi, Mesut; Şahin, Sevinç; Arslan, Ergin; Börekci, Hasan; Metin, Bayram; Cantürk, Nuh Zafer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Operations are performed for broader liver surgery indications for a better understanding of hepatic anatomy/physiology and developments in operation technology. Surgery can cure some patients with liver metastasis of some tumors. Nevertheless, postoperative liver failure is the most feared complication causing mortality in patients who have undergone excision of a large liver mass. The human amniotic membrane has regenerative effects. Thus, we investigated the effects of the human amniotic membrane on regeneration of the resected liver. Methods. Twenty female Wistar albino rats were divided into control and experimental groups and underwent a 70% hepatectomy. The human amniotic membrane was placed over the residual liver in the experimental group. Relative liver weight, histopathological features, and biochemical parameters were assessed on postoperative day 3. Results. Total protein and albumin levels were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group. No difference in relative liver weight was observed between the groups. Hepatocyte mitotic count was significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Hepatic steatosis was detected in the experimental group. Conclusion. Applying the amniotic membrane to residual liver adversely affected liver regeneration. However, mesenchymal stem cell research has the potential to accelerate liver regeneration investigations. PMID:26457000

  5. Effect of the Human Amniotic Membrane on Liver Regeneration in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Sipahi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Operations are performed for broader liver surgery indications for a better understanding of hepatic anatomy/physiology and developments in operation technology. Surgery can cure some patients with liver metastasis of some tumors. Nevertheless, postoperative liver failure is the most feared complication causing mortality in patients who have undergone excision of a large liver mass. The human amniotic membrane has regenerative effects. Thus, we investigated the effects of the human amniotic membrane on regeneration of the resected liver. Methods. Twenty female Wistar albino rats were divided into control and experimental groups and underwent a 70% hepatectomy. The human amniotic membrane was placed over the residual liver in the experimental group. Relative liver weight, histopathological features, and biochemical parameters were assessed on postoperative day 3. Results. Total protein and albumin levels were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group. No difference in relative liver weight was observed between the groups. Hepatocyte mitotic count was significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Hepatic steatosis was detected in the experimental group. Conclusion. Applying the amniotic membrane to residual liver adversely affected liver regeneration. However, mesenchymal stem cell research has the potential to accelerate liver regeneration investigations.

  6. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A improves hepatic differentiation of immortalized adult human hepatocytes and improves liver function and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Hua-Lian; Liu, Xin-Yu; Wang, Hai-Tian; Xu, Ning; Bian, Jian-Min; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Xia, Lei; Xia, Qiang

    2017-11-15

    Immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) could provide an unlimited supply of hepatocytes, but insufficient differentiation and phenotypic instability restrict their clinical application. This study aimed to determine the role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A (HNF4A) in hepatic differentiation of IHH, and whether encapsulation of IHH overexpressing HNF4A could improve liver function and survival in rats with acute liver failure (ALF). Primary human hepatocytes were transduced with lentivirus-mediated catalytic subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) to establish IHH. Cells were analyzed for telomerase activity, proliferative capacity, hepatocyte markers, and tumorigenicity (c-myc) expression. Hepatocyte markers, hepatocellular functions, and morphology were studied in the HNF4A-overexpressing IHH. Hepatocyte markers and karyotype analysis were completed in the primary hepatocytes using shRNA knockdown of HNF4A. Nuclear translocation of β-catenin was assessed. Rat models of ALF were treated with encapsulated IHH or HNF4A-overexpressing IHH. A HNF4A-positive IHH line was established, which was non-tumorigenic and conserved properties of primary hepatocytes. HNF4A overexpression significantly enhanced mRNA levels of genes related to hepatic differentiation in IHH. Urea levels were increased by the overexpression of HNF4A, as measured 24h after ammonium chloride addition, similar to that of primary hepatocytes. Chromosomal abnormalities were observed in primary hepatocytes transfected with HNF4A shRNA. HNF4α overexpression could significantly promote β-catenin activation. Transplantation of HNF4A overexpressing IHH resulted in better liver function and survival of rats with ALF compared with IHH. HNF4A improved hepatic differentiation of IHH. Transplantation of HNF4A-overexpressing IHH could improve the liver function and survival in a rat model of ALF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Extensive double humanization of both liver and hematopoiesis in FRGN mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Elizabeth M; Bial, J; Tarlow, Branden; Bial, G; Jensen, B; Greiner, D L; Brehm, M A; Grompe, M

    2014-11-01

    Preclinical research in animals often fails to adequately predict the outcomes observed in human patients. Chimeric animals bearing individual human tissues have been developed to provide improved models of human-specific cellular processes. Mice transplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells can be used to study human immune responses, infections of blood cells and processes of hematopoiesis. Animals with humanized livers are useful for modeling hepatotropic infections as well as drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity. However, many pathophysiologic processes involve both the liver and the hematolymphoid system. Examples include hepatitis C/HIV co-infection, immune mediated liver diseases, liver injuries with inflammation such as steatohepatitis and alcoholic liver disease. We developed a robust protocol enabling the concurrent double-humanization of mice with mature hepatocytes and human blood. Immune-deficient, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah(-/-)), Rag2(-/-) and Il2rg(-/-) deficient animals on the NOD-strain background (FRGN) were simultaneously co-transplanted with adult human hepatocytes and hematopoietic stem cells after busulfan and Ad:uPA pre-conditioning. Four months after transplantation the average human liver repopulation exceeded 80% and hematopoietic chimerism also was high (40-80% in bone marrow). Importantly, human macrophages (Kupffer cells) were present in the chimeric livers. Double-chimeric FRGN mice will serve as a new model for disease processes that involve interactions between hepatocytes and hematolymphoid cells. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging with liver-specific contrast agent in primary amyloidosis and intrahepatic cholestasis

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    Moeller, J.M.; Santoni-Rugiu, E.; Chabanova, E.; Logager, V.; Hansen, A.B.; Thomsen, H.S. [Depts. of Radiology and Pathology, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital, Herlev (Denmark)

    2007-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in hepatic amyloidosis are not well defined. Here, we report on a patient with renal failure caused by primary amyloidosis (AL type) who developed jaundice. Ultrasound and computed tomography were normal except for some ascites. MRI with oral manganese-containing contrast agent revealed several focal areas without contrast uptake in the hepatocytes and no bile secretion after 8 hours. No extrahepatic bile obstructions were found. Liver biopsy showed severe intraportal, vascular, and parenchymal amyloidosis causing severe cholestasis and atrophy of hepatocytes.

  9. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasmid DNA damage caused by methylated arsenicals, ascorbic acid and human liver ferritin. Arsenic causes cancer in human skin, urinary bladder, lung, liver and kidney and is a significant world-wide public health problem. Although the metabolism of inorganic arsenic is ...

  10. Prospective study of periostitis and finger clubbing in primary biliary cirrhosis and other forms of chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, O; Dick, R; Sherlock, S

    1981-01-01

    The association of finger clubbing and periostitis has been reported in primary biliary cirrhosis and, more rarely, in other forms of chronic liver disease. The prevalence of periostitis and its relationship to finger clubbing is unknown. In this prospective study, we have determined the prevalence of periostitis and finger clubbing in 74 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and 54 with other forms of chronic liver disease. Clubbing was present in 24% of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, 29% with HBsAg negative chronic active hepatitis, and 23% in the group of miscellaneous liver diseases. Symmetrical periostitis affecting the tibiae and fibulae occurred in 35% of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, 29% with chronic, active hepatitis and 40% of patients in the miscellaneous group. The distal radii and ulnae were affected in only eight patients (6%). In primary biliary cirrhosis, the presence of finger clubbing was strongly associated with periostitis (P less than 0.01), but this association was uncommon in other forms of chronic liver disease. In all forms of chronic liver disease periostitis commonly occurs in the absence of finger clubbing. Marked tenderness over the distal leg bones is a reliable sign of underlying periostitis, but this sign is present in only a third of affected patients. This study indicates that periostitis affecting the lower leg bones is common in patients with chronic liver disease, and its presence should be sought whether or not the patient has finger clubbing. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7227854

  11. Human-scale whole-organ bioengineering for liver transplantation: a regenerative medicine approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Hiroshi; Fukumitsu, Ken; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Kitago, Minoru; Shinoda, Masahiro; Obara, Hideaki; Itano, Osamu; Kawachi, Shigeyuki; Tanabe, Minoru; Coudriet, Gina M; Piganelli, Jon D; Gilbert, Thomas W; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    At this time, the only definitive treatment of hepatic failure is liver transplantation. However, transplantation has been limited by the severely limited supply of human donor livers. Alternatively, a regenerative medicine approach has been recently proposed in rodents that describe the production of three-dimensional whole-organ scaffolds for assembly of engineered complete organs. In the present study, we describe the decellularization of porcine livers to generate liver constructs at a scale that can be clinically relevant. Adult ischemic porcine livers were successfully decellularized using a customized perfusion protocol, the decellularization process preserved the ultrastructural extracellular matrix components, functional characteristics of the native microvascular and the bile drainage network of the liver, and growth factors necessary for angiogenesis and liver regeneration. Furthermore, isolated hepatocytes engrafted and reorganized in the porcine decellularized livers using a human-sized organ culture system. These results provide proof-of-principle for the generation of a human-sized, three-dimensional organ scaffold as a potential structure for human liver grafts reconstruction for transplantation to treat liver disease.

  12. Body mass index in childhood and adult risk of primary liver cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berentzen, Tina Landsvig; Gamborg, Michael; Holst, Claus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Childhood overweight increases the risk of early development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which may predispose to carcinogenesis. We investigated if childhood body size during school ages was associated with the risk of primary liver cancer in adults. METHODS: A cohort...... (95% CI) of adult liver cancer was 1.20 (1.07-1.33) and 1.30 (1.16-1.46) per 1-unit BMI z-score at 7 years and 13 years of age, respectively. Similar associations were found in boys and girls, for hepatocellular carcinoma only, across years of birth, and after accounting for diagnoses of viral...... of 285,884 boys and girls, born 1930 through 1980, who attended school in Copenhagen, were followed from 1977 to 31 December 2010. Their heights and weights were measured by school doctors or nurses at ages 7 through 13 years. Body mass index (BMI) z-scores were calculated from an internal age- and sex...

  13. Determination of Radiation Absorbed Dose to Primary Liver Tumors and Normal Liver Tissue Using Post Radioembolization 90Y PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Mohan Srinivas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radioembolization with Yttrium-90 (90Y microspheres is becoming a more widely used transcatheter treatment for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Using post-treatment 90Y PET/CT scans,the distribution of microspheres within the liver can be determined and quantitatively assessesed . We studied the radiation dose of 90Y delivered to liver and treated tumors.Methods: This retrospective study of 56 patients with HCC, including analysis of 98 liver tumors, measured and correlated the dose of radiation delivered to liver tumors and normal liver tissue using glass microspheres (TheraSpheres® to the frequency of complications with mRECIST. 90Y PET/CT and triphasic liver CT scans were used to contour treated tumor and normal liver regions and determine their respective activity concentrations. An absorbed dose factor was used to convert the measured activity concentration (Bq/mL to an absorbed dose (Gy.Results: The 98 studied tumors received a mean dose of 169 Gy (mode 90-120 Gy;range 0-570 Gy. Tumor response by mRECIST criteria was performed for 48 tumors that had follow up scans. There were 21 responders (mean dose 215 Gy and 27 nonresponders (mean dose 167 Gy. The association between mean tumor absorbed dose and response suggests a trend but did not reach statistical significance (p=0.099. Normal liver tissue received a mean dose of 67 Gy (mode 60-70 Gy; range 10-120 Gy. There was a statistically significant association between absorbed dose to normal liver and the presence of two or more severe complications (p=0.036.Conclusion: Our cohort of patients showed a possible dose response trend for the tumors. Collateral dose to normal liver is nontrivial and can have clinical implications. These methods help us understand whether patient adverse events, treatment success, or treatment failure can be attributed to the dose which the tumor or normal liver received.

  14. Featured Article: Isolation, characterization, and cultivation of human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal liver cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Elisa; Kegel, Victoria; Zeilinger, Katrin; Hengstler, Jan G; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are considered to be the gold standard for in vitro testing of xenobiotic metabolism and hepatotoxicity. However, PHH cultivation in 2D mono-cultures leads to dedifferentiation and a loss of function. It is well known that hepatic non-parenchymal cells (NPC), such as Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC), and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), play a central role in the maintenance of PHH functions. The aims of the present study were to establish a protocol for the simultaneous isolation of human PHH and NPC from the same tissue specimen and to test their suitability for in vitro co-culture. Human PHH and NPC were isolated from tissue obtained by partial liver resection by a two-step EDTA/collagenase perfusion technique. The obtained cell fractions were purified by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. KC, LEC, and HSC contained in the NPC fraction were separated using specific adherence properties and magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS®). Identified NPC revealed a yield of 1.9 × 106 KC, 2.7 × 105 LEC and 4.7 × 105 HSC per gram liver tissue, showing viabilities >90%. Characterization of these NPC showed that all populations went through an activation process, which influenced the cell fate. The activation of KC strongly depended on the tissue quality and donor anamnesis. KC became activated in culture in association with a loss of viability within 4–5 days. LEC lost specific features during culture, while HSC went through a transformation process into myofibroblasts. The testing of different culture conditions for HSC demonstrated that they can attenuate, but not prevent dedifferentiation in vitro. In conclusion, the method described allows the isolation and separation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from the same donor. PMID:25394621

  15. A human liver microphysiology platform for investigating physiology, drug safety, and disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernetti, Lawrence A; Senutovitch, Nina; Boltz, Robert; DeBiasio, Richard; Shun, Tong Ying; Gough, Albert; Taylor, D Lansing

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of a microphysiology platform for drug safety and efficacy in liver models of disease that includes a human, 3D, microfluidic, four-cell, sequentially layered, self-assembly liver model (SQL-SAL); fluorescent protein biosensors for mechanistic readouts; as well as a microphysiology system database (MPS-Db) to manage, analyze, and model data. The goal of our approach is to create the simplest design in terms of cells, matrix materials, and microfluidic device parameters that will support a physiologically relevant liver model that is robust and reproducible for at least 28 days for stand-alone liver studies and microfluidic integration with other organs-on-chips. The current SQL-SAL uses primary human hepatocytes along with human endothelial (EA.hy926), immune (U937) and stellate (LX-2) cells in physiological ratios and is viable for at least 28 days under continuous flow. Approximately, 20% of primary hepatocytes and/or stellate cells contain fluorescent protein biosensors (called sentinel cells) to measure apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or cell location by high content analysis (HCA). In addition, drugs, drug metabolites, albumin, urea and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) are monitored in the efflux media. Exposure to 180 μM troglitazone or 210 μM nimesulide produced acute toxicity within 2-4 days, whereas 28 μM troglitazone produced a gradual and much delayed toxic response over 21 days, concordant with known mechanisms of toxicity, while 600 µM caffeine had no effect. Immune-mediated toxicity was demonstrated with trovafloxacin with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but not levofloxacin with LPS. The SQL-SAL exhibited early fibrotic activation in response to 30 nM methotrexate, indicated by increased stellate cell migration, expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen, type 1, alpha 2. Data collected from the in vitro model can be integrated into a database with access to related

  16. The role and regulation of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Sander; Stienstra, Rinke

    2017-05-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is abundantly expressed in liver. PPARα is activated by fatty acids and various other lipid species, as well as by a class of chemicals referred to as peroxisome proliferators. Studies in mice have shown that PPARα serves as the master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism during fasting. In addition, PPARα suppresses inflammation and the acute phase response. Comparatively little is known about PPARα in human liver. Here, an overview is provided of the role and regulation of PPARα in human liver. The main outcomes are: 1) the level of PPARA mRNA expression in human and mouse liver is similar. 2) Expression of PPARA in human liver is reduced in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or infected with the hepatitis C virus. 3) PPARα in human liver is able to effectively induce the expression of numerous genes involved in numerous lipid metabolic pathways, including microsomal, peroxisomal and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, fatty acid binding and activation, fatty acid elongation and desaturation, synthesis and breakdown of triglycerides and lipid droplets, lipoprotein metabolism, gluconeogenesis, bile acid metabolism, and various other metabolic pathways and genes. 4) PPARα activation in human liver causes the down-regulation of a large number of genes involved in various immunity-related pathways. 5) Peroxisome proliferators do not promote tumour formation in human liver as opposed to mouse liver because of structural and functional differences between human and mouse PPARα. 6) In addition to helping to correct dyslipidemia, PPARα agonists may hold promise as a therapy for patients with cholestatic liver diseases, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and/or type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  17. Photoacoustic physio-chemical analysis of liver conditions in animal and human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueding; Xu, Guan; Tian, Chao; Wan, Shanshan; Welling, Theodore H.; Lok, Anna S. F.; Rubin, Jonathan M.

    2016-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common liver disease affecting 30% of the population in the United States. Biopsy is the gold standard for diagnosing NAFLD. Liver histology assesses the amount of fat, and determines type and extent of cell injury, inflammation and fibrosis. However, liver biopsy is invasive and is limited by sampling error. Current radiological diagnostic modalities can evaluate the 'physical' morphology in liver by quantifying the backscattered US signals, but cannot interrogate the 'histochemical' components forming these backscatterers. For example, ultrasound (US) imaging can detect the presence of fat but cannot differentiate steatosis alone from steatohepatitis. Our previous study of photoacoustic physiochemical analysis (PAPCA) has demonstrated that this method can characterize the histological changes in livers during the progression of NAFLD in animal models. In this study, we will further validate PAPCA with human livers. Ex vivo human liver samples with steatosis, fibrosis and cirrhosis will be scanned using optical illumination at wavelengths of 680-1700 nm and compared to histology results. In vivo study on human subjects with confirmed steatosis is planned using our PA-ultrasound (US) parallel imaging system based on Verasonic US imaging flatform with an L7-4 probe. 10 mJ/cm2 per pulse optical energy at 755 nm will be delivered to the skin surface, which is under the safety limit of American National Standard Institute. Preliminary study with ex vivo human tissue has demonstrated the potential of the proposed approach in differentiating human liver conditions.

  18. Human liver endothelial cells, but not macrovascular or microvascular endothelial cells, engraft in the mouse liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filali, Ebtisam El; Hiralall, Johan K.; van Veen, Henk A.; Stolz, Donna B.; Seppen, Jurgen

    2013-01-01

    Liver cell transplantation has had limited clinical success so far, partly due to poor engraftment of hepatocytes. Instead of hepatocytes. other cell types, such as endothelial cells, could be used in ex vivo liver gene therapy. The goal of the present study was to compare the grafting and

  19. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is protective against nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Dustin E; Yeh, Matthew M

    2017-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) occurs with higher prevalence in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) relative to the general population, and susceptibility is related to the metabolic syndrome, as well as higher prevalence of bowel resection and gut microbiotal factors. Liver complications, including NAFLD and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), contribute to treatment and prognosis of patients with IBD. However, the potential interplay of NAFLD and PSC is not well understood. We retrospectively assessed severity of steatosis and steatohepatitis in liver specimens from 49 patients with IBD only, 44 with IBD and comorbid PSC, and 30 with IBD and PSC after liver transplantation. Patients with IBD had higher prevalence of at least grade 1 steatosis (59%) than IBD and PSC (11%), or IBD and PSC posttransplant (3%) (P < .001). The average severity of steatosis was 25% ± 8% (95% confidence interval) for IBD only, 3% ± 1% for comorbid IBD and PSC, and 1% ± 1% for IBD and PSC posttransplant (P < .001). Steatohepatitis was significantly higher in IBD only (12%) than in IBD and PSC ± transplant (0%) (P = .01). Despite these differences in susceptibility to NAFLD, the 3 populations had statistically indistinguishable average body mass index and total cholesterol and prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and alcohol use. Multivariate regression modeling revealed body mass index, hypertension, and diabetes as significant correlates to NAFLD severity in all studied populations. In conclusion, patients with comorbid IBD and PSC have significantly less susceptibility to NAFLD than those with IBD alone, despite similar prevalence of major NAFLD risk factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In utero transplantation of fetal liver stem cells in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touraine, J L

    1991-01-01

    Following 15 years experience in postnatal fetal liver transplantation (FLT), we have developed a new therapeutical method, namely the in utero transplantation of stem cells from the human fetal liver. This early transplant takes advantage of the immunological tolerance that exists in young fetal recipients. The three fetuses that we treated were 28, 26, and 12 weeks of age (weeks after fecundation). The first two patients had immunodeficiencies, the third one had thalassemia major. Donor cells were obtained from 7- to 10-week-old fetuses, with conditions approved by the National Committee for Bioethics. Donors and recipients were not matched. The fetal cells were infused through the umbilical vein of the first two patients and injected intraperitoneally into the third one, under ultrasonic visualization. The first patient, born in 1988, has evidence of engraftment and reconstitution of cell-mediated immunity: initially 10% than 26% of lymphocytes of donor origin (with distinct phenotype), T cell responses to tetanus toxoid and candida antigens. This child, who had bare lymphocyte syndrome, has no clinical manifestation of the disease and lives normally at home. The second child was born in 1989 and it is too early for a thorough evaluation of the immunological effects of the transplant, although donor cell engraftment has been proven (Y chromosome in this female patient). The third patient has also evidence of donor cell take (Y chromosome in a female patient) but the effect on thalassemia has not yet been fully analyzed (donor hemoglobin present in small quantity). In all three cases, no side effect of any kind developed in the mother nor in the fetus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells promote intracellular crawling of lymphocytes during recruitment: A new step in migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Daniel A; Wilson, Garrick K; Bailey, Dalan; Shaw, Robert K; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salmi, Marko; Rot, Antal; Weston, Chris J; Adams, David H; Shetty, Shishir

    2017-01-01

    The recruitment of lymphocytes via the hepatic sinusoidal channels and positioning within liver tissue is a critical event in the development and persistence of chronic inflammatory liver diseases. The hepatic sinusoid is a unique vascular bed lined by hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (HSECs), a functionally and phenotypically distinct subpopulation of endothelial cells. Using flow-based adhesion assays to study the migration of lymphocytes across primary human HSECs, we found that lymphocytes enter into HSECs, confirmed by electron microscopy demonstrating clear intracellular localization of lymphocytes in vitro and by studies in human liver tissues. Stimulation by interferon-γ increased intracellular localization of lymphocytes within HSECs. Furthermore, using confocal imaging and time-lapse recordings, we demonstrated "intracellular crawling" of lymphocytes entering into one endothelial cell from another. This required the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and stabilin-1 and was facilitated by the junctional complexes between HSECs. Lymphocyte migration is facilitated by the unique structure of HSECs. Intracellular crawling may contribute to optimal lymphocyte positioning in liver tissue during chronic hepatitis. (Hepatology 2017;65:294-309). © 2016 The Authors. Hepatology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc., on behalf of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  2. The histogenesis of regenerative nodules in human liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wey-Ran; Lim, Siew-Na; McDonald, Stuart A C; Graham, Trevor; Wright, Victoria L; Peplow, Claire L; Humphries, Adam; Kocher, Hemant M; Wright, Nicholas A; Dhillon, Amar P; Alison, Malcolm R

    2010-03-01

    Here, we investigate the clonality and cells of origin of regenerative nodules in human liver cirrhosis using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations as markers of clonal expansion. Mutated cells are identified phenotypically by deficiency in the entirely mtDNA encoded cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) enzyme by histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Nodules were classified as either CCO-deficient or CCO-positive, and among 526 nodules from 10 cases, 18% were homogeneously CCO-deficient, whereas only 3% had a mixed phenotype. From frozen sections, hepatocytes were laser-capture microdissected from several sites within individual CCO-deficient nodules. Mutations were identified by polymerase chain reaction sequencing of the entire mtDNA genome. In all cases except for one, the nodules were monoclonal in nature, possessing up to four common mutations in all hepatocytes in a given nodule. Moreover, the identification of identical mutations in hepatic progenitor cells abutting CCO-deficient nodules proves that nodules can have their origins from such cells. These data support a novel pathway for the monoclonal derivation of human cirrhotic regenerative nodules from hepatic progenitor cells.

  3. The 24-hour normothermic machine perfusion of discarded human liver grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Thomas; Brockmann, Jens G; Quaglia, Alberto; Morovat, Alireza; Jassem, Wayel; Heaton, Nigel D; Coussios, Constantin C; Friend, Peter J

    2017-02-01

    Donor organ shortage necessitates use of less than optimal donor allografts for transplantation. The current cold storage preservation technique fails to preserve marginal donor grafts sufficiently. Evidence from large animal experiments suggests superiority of normothermic machine preservation (NMP) of liver allografts. In this study, we analyze discarded human liver grafts that underwent NMP for the extended period of 24 hours. Thirteen human liver grafts which had been discarded for transplantation were entered into this study. Perfusion was performed with an automated device using an oxygenated, sanguineous perfusion solution at normothermia. Automated control was incorporated for temperature-, flow-, and pressure-regulation as well as oxygenation. All livers were perfused for 24 hours; parameters of biochemical and synthetic liver function as well as histological parameters of liver damage were analyzed. Livers were stratified for expected viability according to the donor's medical history, procurement data, and their macroscopic appearance. Normothermic perfusion preservation of human livers for 24 hours was shown to be technically feasible. Human liver grafts, all of which had been discarded for transplantation, showed levels suggesting organ viability with respect to metabolic and synthetic liver function (to varying degrees). There was positive correlation between instantly available perfusion parameters and generally accepted predictors of posttransplant graft survival. In conclusion, NMP is feasible reliably for periods of at least 24 hours, even in highly suboptimal donor organs. Potential benefits include not only viability testing (as suggested in recent clinical implementations), but also removal of the time constraints associated with the utilization of high-risk livers, and recovery of ischemic and other preretrieval injuries (possibly by enabling therapeutic strategies during NMP). Liver Transplantation 23 207-220 2017 AASLD. © 2016 by the

  4. Differences in Phenotypes and Liver Transplantation Outcomes by Age Group in Patients with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Jacqueline B; Patel, Yuval A; Wilder, Julius M; Zheng, Jiayin; Chow, Shein-Chung; King, Lindsay Y; Muir, Andrew J

    2017-11-01

    There is increasing evidence for a heterogeneity of phenotypes in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), but differences across the age spectrum in adults with PSC have not been well characterized. To characterize phenotypic variations and liver transplantation outcomes by age group in adults with PSC. The United Network for Organ Sharing database was used to identify waitlist registrations for primary liver transplantation in adults with PSC. Patients were split into three age groups: 18-39 (young), 40-59 (middle-aged), and ≥60 (older). Their clinical characteristics and outcomes on the waitlist and post-transplant were compared. Overall, 8272 adults with PSC were listed for liver transplantation during the study period, of which 28.9% were young, 52.0% were middle-aged, and 19.1% were older. The young age group had the greatest male predominance (70.0 vs. 66.2 vs. 65.1%, p = 0.001), the highest proportion of black individuals (20.0 vs. 11.0 vs. 5.5%, p < 0.001), and the most patients listed with concomitant autoimmune hepatitis (2.2 vs. 1.0 vs. 0.8%, p < 0.001). Older patients experienced the greatest waitlist and post-transplant mortality. Graft survival was greatest in the middle-aged group. Young patients were most likely to experience acute rejection (31 vs. 22.8 vs. 18.0%, p < 0.001) and have graft failure due to chronic rejection or PSC recurrence (47.8 vs. 42.3 vs. 17.9%, p < 0.001). Age-related differences exist among adults with PSC and are associated with outcomes pre- and post-transplant. Young patients may have a more robust immune-related phenotype that is associated with poorer graft survival. Future studies are needed to further investigate these findings.

  5. Management of Postembolization Syndrome Following Hepatic Transarterial Chemoembolization for Primary or Metastatic Liver Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Helen; West, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is an established treatment in managing liver primary neoplasms or liver metastases. Postembolization syndrome (PES) is a common adverse event defined as fever without associated sepsis, pain in the right upper quadrant, and nausea and/or vomiting. This integrative review aims to identify effective management strategies for PES or one of its characterizing symptoms (fever, pain, and nausea and/or vomiting). Searches of electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL were conducted. Fifteen articles were identified for inclusion. Seven addressed all symptoms of PES, and 8 studies focused on individual symptoms of PES. Interventions identified are intra-arterial lidocaine, oral and intravenous analgesics, steroids, wrist-ankle acupuncture, antibiotics, and 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. Findings are explicated according to individual symptoms of PES. Intra-arterial lidocaine, steroids, and a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist are found to offer potential benefit in the management of PES symptoms. A number of interventions have shown potential benefit in the management of PES. A systemic approach using combination therapy is necessary to effectively manage characterizing symptoms. Further research is needed to determine the impact of primary disease site, TACE technique, and chemotherapeutic agent on PES. Oncology nurses are uniquely placed to undertake thorough patient assessment after TACE and implement early intervention to effectively manage PES.

  6. Human urine and plasma concentrations of bisphenol A extrapolated from pharmacokinetics established in in vivo experiments with chimeric mice with humanized liver and semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, Takamori; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Makiko; Shida, Satomi; Nishiyama, Sayako; Takano, Ryohji; Murayama, Norie; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to extrapolate to humans the pharmacokinetics of estrogen analog bisphenol A determined in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Higher plasma concentrations and urinary excretions of bisphenol A glucuronide (a primary metabolite of bisphenol A) were observed in chimeric mice than in control mice after oral administrations, presumably because of enterohepatic circulation of bisphenol A glucuronide in control mice. Bisphenol A glucuronidation was faster in mouse liver microsomes than in human liver microsomes. These findings suggest a predominantly urinary excretion route of bisphenol A glucuronide in chimeric mice with humanized liver. Reported human plasma and urine data for bisphenol A glucuronide after single oral administration of 0.1mg/kg bisphenol A were reasonably estimated using the current semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model extrapolated from humanized mice data using algometric scaling. The reported geometric mean urinary bisphenol A concentration in the U.S. population of 2.64μg/L underwent reverse dosimetry modeling with the current human semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model. This yielded an estimated exposure of 0.024μg/kg/day, which was less than the daily tolerable intake of bisphenol A (50μg/kg/day), implying little risk to humans. Semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling will likely prove useful for determining the species-dependent toxicological risk of bisphenol A. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. HANPP Collection: Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity as a Percentage of Net Primary Productivity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) as a Percentage of Net Primary Product (NPP) portion of the HANPP Collection represents a map identifying...

  8. Human Papillomavirus Infections in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunmodede, Folashade; Yale, Steven H.; Krawisz, Bruce; Tyler, Gregory C.; Evans, Anthony C.

    2007-01-01

    Cervical cancer continues to be a leading cause of mortality worldwide. The incidence and mortality associated with invasive cervical cancer have declined significantly in developed countries due to widespread availability of screening with the Papanicolaou (Pap) test. However, the incidence and prevalence of non-invasive cervical intraepithelial neoplasms and genital warts related to oncogenic and nononcogenic strains of human papilloma viruses (HPV) have remained relatively stable. Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have resulted in improved characterization of various HPV types and have led to changes in terminology of Pap test findings. Changes in nomenclature may lead to confusion among primary care providers regarding how best to further evaluate abnormal cytological results. This article provides a concise overview of the approach to the treatment of genital warts and management of abnormal cervical cytology based on guidelines from the American Society of Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology. It also reviews advances in HPV vaccine development and the new recombinant vaccine recently approved for use in the United States. PMID:18086908

  9. The liver is a common non-exocrine target in primary Sjögren's syndrome: A retrospective review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ike Robert W

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autoimmune destruction of exocrine glands that defines primary Sjögren's syndrome (1°SS often extends to non-exocrine organs including the liver. We aimed to determine the prevalence of liver disease in patients with 1°SS and to evaluate the association of this complication with other non-exocrine features and serologic markers of autoimmunity and systemic inflammation. Methods We reviewed 115 charts of patients with 1°SS and further analyzed the 73 cases that fulfilled the European Epidemiology Center Criteria, seeking evidence for clinical and subclinical liver disease. Results Liver function tests had been determined in 59 of the 73 patients. Of those, 29 patients (49.1% had abnormal liver function tests including 20.3% with clinically overt hepatic disease. Liver disease was the most common non-exocrine feature in this cohort. Risk factors for abnormal liver function tests were distributed similarly between the patients with and without liver disease. In 60% of patients with abnormal liver function tests no explanation for this complication was found except for 1°SS. Liver involvement was significantly more common in 1°SS patients who also had evidence of lung, kidney and hematological abnormalities. Patients with abnormal liver function tests were also more likely to have an elevated sedimentation rate and a positive anti-ENA during the course of their disease. Conclusion Liver involvement is a common complication in 1°SS. Its presence correlates with systemic disease. We consider that this complication should be routinely sought in patients with 1°SS, especially when a positive anti-ENA or evidence of systemic inflammation is found.

  10. 3D Cultivation Techniques for Primary Human Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Bachmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges in drug development is the prediction of in vivo toxicity based on in vitro data. The standard cultivation system for primary human hepatocytes is based on monolayer cultures, even if it is known that these conditions result in a loss of hepatocyte morphology and of liver-specific functions, such as drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. As it has been demonstrated that hepatocytes embedded between two sheets of collagen maintain their function, various hydrogels and scaffolds for the 3D cultivation of hepatocytes have been developed. To further improve or maintain hepatic functions, 3D cultivation has been combined with perfusion. In this manuscript, we discuss the benefits and drawbacks of different 3D microfluidic devices. For most systems that are currently available, the main issues are the requirement of large cell numbers, the low throughput, and expensive equipment, which render these devices unattractive for research and the drug-developing industry. A higher acceptance of these devices could be achieved by their simplification and their compatibility with high-throughput, as both aspects are of major importance for a user-friendly device.

  11. Gene expression profiling and secretome analysis differentiate adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells and human hepatic stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Berardis

    Full Text Available Adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells (ADHLSC are obtained after primary culture of the liver parenchymal fraction. The cells are of fibroblastic morphology and exhibit a hepato-mesenchymal phenotype. Hepatic stellate cells (HSC derived from the liver non-parenchymal fraction, present a comparable morphology as ADHLSC. Because both ADHLSC and HSC are described as liver stem/progenitor cells, we strived to extensively compare both cell populations at different levels and to propose tools demonstrating their singularity. ADHLSC and HSC were isolated from the liver of four different donors, expanded in vitro and followed from passage 5 until passage 11. Cell characterization was performed using immunocytochemistry, western blotting, flow cytometry, and gene microarray analyses. The secretion profile of the cells was evaluated using Elisa and multiplex Luminex assays. Both cell types expressed α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, fibronectin, CD73 and CD90 in accordance with their mesenchymal origin. Microarray analysis revealed significant differences in gene expression profiles. HSC present high expression levels of neuronal markers as well as cytokeratins. Such differences were confirmed using immunocytochemistry and western blotting assays. Furthermore, both cell types displayed distinct secretion profiles as ADHLSC highly secreted cytokines of therapeutic and immuno-modulatory importance, like HGF, interferon-γ and IL-10. Our study demonstrates that ADHLSC and HSC are distinct liver fibroblastic cell populations exhibiting significant different expression and secretion profiles.

  12. Primary follicular lymphoma of the spleen incidentally found in a patient with alcohol- and hepatitis C-related liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Ikuo; Okada, Masaya; Inoue, Takayuki; Tokugawa, Tazuko; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Hirota, Seiichi

    2014-01-01

    Primary splenic lymphoma is rare as non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Splenic infiltration of lymphoma cells may cause splenomegaly in many cases. However, splenomegaly is caused not only by tumor involvement but also by non-tumorous disorders. One of the most prevalent non-neoplastic causes is portal hypertension mostly due to liver cirrhosis. On the other hand, liver cirrhosis may underlie various extrahepatic manifestations including development of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Here, we report a case of primary follicular lymphoma of the spleen in a patient with liver cirrhosis related to hepatitis C and alcohol. The lymphoma was incidentally found in an enlarged spleen resected palliatively to alleviate symptomatic pancytopenia of the patient. The main characteristic of our case is an incidental finding of a rare situation brought by careful pathological examination. Our case illustrates the importance to recognize a possibility of co-occurrence of chronic liver disease and extrahepatic lymphoma.

  13. Pattern of tumour growth of the primary colon cancer predicts long-term outcome after resection of liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelt, Lidewij; Sasor, Agata; Ansari, Daniel; Andersson, Roland

    2016-10-01

    To identify significant predictive factors for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) after liver resection for colon cancer metastases, with special focus on features of the primary colon cancer, such as lymph node ratio (LNR), vascular invasion, and perineural invasion. Patients operated for colonic cancer liver metastases between 2006 and 2014 were included. Details on patient characteristics, the primary colon cancer operation and metastatic disease were collected. Multivariate analysis was performed to select predictive variables for OS and DFS. Median OS and DFS were 67 and 20 months, respectively. 1-, 3- and 5-year OS were 97, 76, and 52%. 1-, 3- and 5-year DFS were 65, 42, and 37%. Multivariate analysis showed LNR to be an independent predictive factor for DFS but not for OS. Other identified predictive factors were vascular and perineural invasion of the primary colon cancer, size of the largest metastasis and severe complications after liver surgery for OS, and perineural invasion, number of liver metastases and preoperative CEA-level for DFS. Traditional N-stage was also considered to be an independent predictive factor for DFS in a separate multivariate analysis. LNR and perineural invasion of the primary colon cancer can be used as a prognostic variable for DFS after a concomitant liver resection for colon cancer metastases. Vascular and perineural invasion of the primary colon cancer are predictive for OS.

  14. Significant influence of the primary liver disease on the outcomes of hepatic retransplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Qasim, A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: There are many indications for hepatic retransplantation. AIM: To identify factors influencing retransplantation needs and outcomes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retransplantation records from January 1993 to March 2005 were analysed. Patient and disease characteristics and survival outcomes for retransplantation were compared between various groups. RESULTS: Totally, 286 primary and 42 hepatic retransplantations were performed. Retransplantation indications included primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), primary biliary cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis C (HCV), chronic active hepatitis (CAH), and alcohol-related disease. Mean follow-up post-retransplantation was 31 +\\/- 9 months. Actuarial patient survival at 3 months, 1 year, 3 years, 5 years, and at the end of study was 71.4, 69, 59.5, 54.7, and 50%, respectively. Early and late retransplantation had 1-year survival of 73 and 68.5%, respectively. Retransplantation need was significantly higher for PSC, HCV, and CAH. CONCLUSIONS: Hepatic retransplantation remains a successful salvage option for transplant complications; however, its need is significantly influenced by the primary liver disease.

  15. Global Patterns in Human Consumption of Net Primary Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Bounoua, Lahouari; Ricketts, Taylor; Loucks, Colby; Harriss, Robert; Lawrence William T.

    2004-01-01

    The human population and its consumption profoundly affect the Earth's ecosystems. A particularly compelling measure of humanity's cumulative impact is the fraction of the planet's net primary production that we appropriate for our Net primary production-the net amount of solar energy converted to plant organic matter through photosynthesis-can be measured in units of elemental carbon and represents the primary food energy source for the world's ecosystems. Human appropriation of net primary production, apart from leaving less for other species to use, alters the composition of the atmosphere, levels of biodiversity, flows within food webs and the provision of important primary production required by humans and compare it to the total amount generated on the landscape. We then derive a spatial ba!mce sheet of net primary production supply and demand for the world. We show that human appropriation of net primary production varies spatially from almost zero to many times the local primary production. These analyses reveal the uneven footprint of human consumption and related environmental impacts, indicate the degree to which human populations depend on net primary production "imports" and suggest policy options for slowing future growth of human appropriation of net primary production.

  16. Primary liver tumors. Hepatocellular versus intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma; Primaere Lebertumoren. Hepatozellulaeres vs. intrahepatisches cholangiozellulaeres Karzinom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wengert, G.J.; Bickel, H.; Breitenseher, J.; Ba-Ssalamah, A. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Wien (Austria)

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma (ICC) are the most commonly occurring and important primary liver tumors. Originating from one pluripotent liver stem cell both tumor entities can occur in a cirrhotic liver and also in patients without cirrhosis. Several risk factors have been identified as causative for both carcinomas; therefore, tumor screening is advantageous, especially for high-risk patients who could be diagnosed in an early stage to allow curative treatment. Surgical resection, interventional procedures and transplantation are available as curative treatment options when diagnosed in time. Common characteristic features and morphology in cross-sectional imaging by ultrasound (US), multidetector computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as screening aspects are presented and discussed. Recent findings show a better understanding of the carcinogenesis model of both liver tumors originating from one pluripotent liver stem cell. Further developments of modern cross-sectional imaging modalities, especially MRI in combination with diffusion-weighted imaging and intravenous administration of hepatocyte-specific contrast agents enable early detection, exact differentiation, staging and treatment evaluation of HCC and ICC In this article we discuss modern, multiparametric imaging modalities, which allow a complete and reliable diagnosis of the majority of these tumor entities. Contrast-enhanced MRI, using hepatocyte-specific contrast agents, is currently the most accurate procedure for the noninvasive diagnosis and treatment evaluation of HCC and ICC. (orig.) [German] Das hepatozellulaere Karziom (HCC) sowie das intrahepatische cholangiozellulaere Karzinom (ICC) zaehlen zu den wichtigsten primaeren Lebertumoren. Mit dem Ursprung aus einer pluripotenten Stammzelle koennen beide Tumorentitaeten bei bestehender, aber auch bei nicht bestehender Leberzirrhose auftreten. Im Folgenden werden

  17. Trends in the incidence of primary liver and biliary tract cancers in England and Wales 1971?2001

    OpenAIRE

    West, J.; Wood, H.; Logan, R F A; Quinn, M.; Aithal, G P

    2006-01-01

    In the last two decades, mortality from primary liver cancer has increased in the UK. We aimed to determine whether the incidence trends for these cancers were similar and in particular if the increasing occurrence of cholangiocarcinoma has continued. We calculated directly age-standardised incidence rates (using the European standard population) by subsite and histological type for all cancers of the liver, gallbladder and biliary tract in England and Wales from 1971 to 2001, using cancer re...

  18. Ascertainment of acute liver injury in two European primary care databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruigómez, A; Brauer, R; Rodríguez, L A García; Huerta, C; Requena, G; Gil, M; de Abajo, Francisco; Downey, G; Bate, A; Tepie, M Feudjo; de Groot, M; Schlienger, R; Reynolds, R; Klungel, O

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain acute liver injury (ALI) in primary care databases using different computer algorithms. The aim of this investigation was to study and compare the incidence of ALI in different primary care databases and using different definitions of ALI. The Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) in UK and the Spanish "Base de datos para la Investigación Farmacoepidemiológica en Atención Primaria" (BIFAP) were used. Both are primary care databases from which we selected individuals of all ages registered between January 2004 and December 2009. We developed two case definitions of idiopathic ALI using computer algorithms: (i) restrictive definition (definite cases) and (ii) broad definition (definite and probable cases). Patients presenting prior liver conditions were excluded. Manual review of potential cases was performed to confirm diagnosis, in a sample in CPRD (21%) and all potential cases in BIFAP. Incidence rates of ALI by age, sex and calendar year were calculated. In BIFAP, all cases considered definite after manual review had been detected with the computer algorithm as potential cases, and none came from the non-cases group. The restrictive definition of ALI had a low sensitivity but a very high specificity (95% in BIFAP) and showed higher rates of agreement between computer search and manual review compared to the broad definition. Higher incidence rates of definite ALI in 2008 were observed in BIFAP (3.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.13-4.25) per 100,000 person-years than CPRD (1.35 (95% CI 1.03-1.78)). This study shows that it is feasible to identify ALI cases if restrictive selection criteria are used and the possibility to review additional information to rule out differential diagnoses. Our results confirm that idiopathic ALI is a very rare disease in the general population. Finally, the construction of a standard definition with predefined criteria facilitates the timely comparison across databases.

  19. Three-dimensional reconstructions of intrahepatic bile duct tubulogenesis in human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestentoft, Peter S; Jelnes, Peter; Hopkinson, Branden M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During liver development, intrahepatic bile ducts are thought to arise by a unique asymmetric mode of cholangiocyte tubulogenesis characterized by a series of remodeling stages. Moreover, in liver diseases, cells lining the Canals of Hering can proliferate and generate new hepatic...... tissue. The aim of this study was to develop protocols for three-dimensional visualization of protein expression, hepatic portal structures and human hepatic cholangiocyte tubulogenesis. RESULTS: Protocols were developed to digitally visualize portal vessel branching and protein expression of hepatic...... in normal liver and in the extensive ductular reactions originating from intrahepatic bile ducts and branching into the parenchyma of the acetaminophen intoxicated liver. In the developing human liver, three-dimensional reconstructions using multiple marker proteins confirmed that the human intrahepatic...

  20. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Tacrolimus versus Ciclosporin as Primary Immunosuppression After Liver Transplant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorden Muduma

    Full Text Available Several meta-analyses comparing ciclosporin with tacrolimus have been conducted since the 1994 publication of the tacrolimus registration trials, but most captured data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs predating recent improvements in waiting list prioritization, induction protocols and concomitant medications. The present study comprised a systematic review and meta-analysis of ciclosporin and tacrolimus in liver transplant recipients using studies published since January 2000.Searches of PubMed, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE identified RCTs of tacrolimus and ciclosporin as the immunosuppressant in adult primary liver transplant recipients, published between January 2000 and August 6, 2014. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the relative risk of death, graft loss, acute rejection (AR, new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT and hypertension with tacrolimus relative to ciclosporin at 12 months.The literature search identified 11 RCTs comparing ciclosporin with tacrolimus. Relative to ciclosporin, tacrolimus was associated with significantly improved outcomes in terms of patient mortality (risk ratio [RR] with ciclosporin of 1.26; 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.01-1.58. Tacrolimus was superior to ciclosporin in terms of hypertension (RR with ciclosporin 1.26; 95%CI 1.07-1.47, but inferior in terms of NODAT (RR with ciclosporin 0.60; 95%CI 0.47-0.77. There were no significant differences between ciclosporin and tacrolimus in terms of graft loss or AR.Meta-analysis of RCTs published since 2000 showed tacrolimus to be superior to ciclosporin in terms of patient mortality and hypertension, while ciclosporin was superior in terms of NODAT. No significant differences were identified in terms of graft loss or AR. These findings provide further evidence supporting the use of tacrolimus as the cornerstone of immunosuppressive therapy in liver transplant recipients.

  1. Liver Transplantation for Children With Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and Autoimmune Hepatitis: UNOS Database Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jossen, Jacqueline; Annunziato, Rachel; Kim, Hee-Sung; Chu, Jaime; Arnon, Ronen

    2017-04-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are progressive immune-mediated inflammatory diseases that may require liver transplant (LT). Outcomes in children undergoing LT for these diseases are poorly studied in the pediatric end-stage liver disease era. We aimed to characterize the outcome of LT in children with AIH and PSC. Children 18 years or younger with PSC or AIH who had a first, isolated LT from 2002 to 2012 were identified from the United Network for Organ Sharing database. Graft and patient outcomes were studied. A total of 174 children with AIH and 113 with PSC were transplanted in the study period. One-year patient survival was 95.4% for AIH and 97.3% for PSC. Five-year patient survival was 91.4% for AIH and 92.9% for PSC. Patient survival was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Forty-four (25.2%) children with AIH were listed as status 1 for transplant (fulminant hepatic failure at presentation or acute-on-chronic disease). Patients transplanted as status 1 had significantly lower patient survival compared with patients transplanted with AIH and end-stage liver disease. The one- and five-year graft survival rates were not significantly different between patients with AIH and PSC. Children with AIH transplanted as status 1 had significantly lower patient survival rates but similar graft survival rates to children with chronic AIH. Children transplanted for AIH versus PSC showed no significant differences in patient or graft survival at both 1 and 5 years.

  2. Risk of colonic neoplasia after liver transplantation for primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanouneh, Ibrahim A; Macaron, Carole; Lopez, Rocio; Zein, Nizar N; Lashner, Bret A

    2012-02-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) confers an increased risk of colon cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, there is a scarcity of data to determine whether the rate of colon cancer changes after liver transplantation (LT) in IBD patients with PSC. The aims were 1) to estimate the risk of colon neoplasia after LT in IBD patients with PSC; 2) to identify the factors associated with colon neoplasia after LT in IBD patients with PSC. We identified patients with IBD/PSC who underwent LT from 1998-2005 (n = 43). Two control groups were identified. Control 1 was IBD/PSC who did not undergo LT, matched 1:1 for age, gender, and type of IBD. Control 2 was patients with chronic liver disease other than PSC who underwent LT, matched 1:1 for age, gender, and follow-up time since LT. All patients were monitored by serial colonoscopy. Logistic regression analysis was used. During a mean follow-up of 54.7 ± 47.7 months, patients with IBD/PSC who underwent LT had similar rate of colon neoplasia compared to those who did not have LT (34% versus 30%, P = 0.24). The rate of colon neoplasia in LT recipients was higher in PSC patients compared to those with other forms of chronic liver disease (34% versus 0%, P = 0.018). Post-LT cytomegalovirus infection was associated with higher likelihood of colon neoplasia post-LT in IBD/PSC patients (hazard ratio = 4.4, P = 0.024). There was no significant difference in survival outcome between the three study groups. IBD/PSC patients remain at an increased risk of colon neoplasia after LT. Copyright © 2011 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  3. Frequent overlap of active hepatitis in recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis after living-donor liver transplantation relates to its rapidly progressive course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Egawa, Hiroto; Yoshizawa, Atsusi; Ueda, Yoshihide; Ichida, Takafumi; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Uemoto, Shinji; Harada, Kenichi; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2011-09-01

    Recurrence of primary sclerosing cholangitis after liver transplantation is a challenging issue. Liver pathologies of recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis after living-donor liver transplantation have not been reported. Here, liver pathologies of explanted grafts and biopsies of 9 patients who underwent retransplantation for recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis were compared with those of native livers. Recurrence was diagnosed in 13 of 36 patients for primary sclerosing cholangitis post-living-donor liver transplantation, and 9 of them underwent retransplantation. All explanted grafts revealed biliary cirrhosis with sclerosing cholangitis, and 6 patients had additional features of active hepatitis. Liver biopsies showed that 3 had active hepatitis in addition to fibrous cholangitis at recurrence of primary sclerosing cholangitis. Two developed active hepatitis later after the diagnosis of recurrence. In explanted grafts, in addition to extensive hilar lymphoplasmacytic cholangitis, 4 cases showed hilar xanthogranulomatous cholangitis. The latter was not evident in 7 native livers. Ductopenia was extensive in all native livers, although such changes were relatively mild in explanted grafts at retransplantation. Patients with recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis developed progressive graft failure, and the interval between diagnosis of recurrence and retransplantation (mean, 3.2 years) was shorter than that between diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis and first transplantation (mean, 7.7 years). The rather rapid deterioration of recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis after liver transplantation may be related to the frequent overlap of active hepatitis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Primary Fibrosarcoma of the Liver: We Don’t Know Much

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaf Ali

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old lady presented to us with a right upper abdominal mass. With a clinical diagnosis of liver tumor, she was evaluated with abdominal CT, MRI, nuclear scan, tumor markers, USG guided FNAC and other baseline investigations. On evaluation she had a massive right lobe tumor crossing the midline. In view of the ambiguous diagnosis she was subjected to laparotomy where the lesion was judged unresectable and a biopsy was taken. Histopathological examination showed the rare pathology of primary fibrosarcoma of the liver with features of homogeneous, spindle-shaped cells with abundant collagen fibers showing a classic herringbone pattern. Tissue samples were then sent to another referral cancer hospital for immunohistochemistry and immunoreactive vimentin was found in the tumor cells. Electron microscopically, the tumor cells were rich in rough endoplasmic reticulum without a basement membrane, and were surrounded by large amounts of collagen fibers. The fibroblastic character of the tumor cells was suggested by light and electron microscopy.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in primary lymphoma of the liver: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilaj Fatmir

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Primary lymphoma of the liver is an extremely rare finding, with the few such cases reported in the literature to date describing indeterminate imaging findings, being focused more on computed tomography. To the best of our knowledge, there is no prior report describing magnetic resonance imaging scan findings with such a lesion. In the case reported here, magnetic resonance imaging gave us the opportunity to ascertain the correct diagnosis, confirmed by histopathology, thus avoiding unnecessary surgery or other treatments. Although this condition is rare, knowledge of magnetic resonance imaging findings will be invaluable for radiologists and other medical subspecialties that may face such cases in the future in helping to provide adequate management for affected patients. Case presentation A focal lesion was incidentally detected by ultrasound in a 75-year-old asymptomatic Albanian man being treated for benign hypertrophy of prostate. Chest and abdomen computed tomography scans did not reveal any abnormal findings besides a solid focal lesion on the right lobe of the liver and a mild homogenous enlargement of the prostate gland. Subsequently, magnetic resonance imaging of the upper abdomen was performed for better characterization of this lesion. Our patient was free of symptoms and his laboratory test results were normal. Conclusions The magnetic resonance imaging scan results showed some distinctive features that helped us to make the correct diagnosis, and were thus very important in helping us provide the correct treatment for our patient.

  6. Primary liver sarcomatous carcinoma: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunchi, Francesca; Vasuri, Francesco; Baldin, Pamela; Rosini, Francesca; Corti, Barbara; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia

    2013-04-01

    Primary liver sarcomatous carcinomas (PLSCs) are very aggressive tumors. They are characterized by a fast clinical course, and therefore need a prompt histological diagnosis. Here, we report two cases of PLSC. One arises in a non-cirrhotic liver and the other in cirrhosis, with differences in onset and histological features. Special emphasis is put on the expression of albumin and HCC markers, and their possible usefulness in the diagnosis. The English literature of the last 20 years was revised (92 cases). Immunohistochemistry was performed manually or automatically; in situ hybridization (ISH) technique for albumin mRNA detection was carried out. The sarcomatoid components in both cases were immunoreactive for K8/18, Glutamine Synthetase and EZH2, and negative for Glypican 3, SMA, caldesmon, desmin, DOG-1, CD34, CD31, CD117, CD56, and alpha-fetoprotein. The detection of albumin mRNA by ISH was negative in the sarcomatoid component in both cases. PLSC represents a diagnostic challenge for pathologists, especially in its "pure" form: neither albumin mRNA detection nor HCC markers are useful for the diagnosis: positivity for K8/18 and the negativity for the mesenchymal markers seem to represent the main tools for the histological diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of a decision support tool to facilitate primary care management of patients with abnormal liver function tests without clinically apparent liver disease [HTA03/38/02]. Abnormal Liver Function Investigations Evaluation (ALFIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Frank M

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver function tests (LFTs are routinely performed in primary care, and are often the gateway to further invasive and/or expensive investigations. Little is known of the consequences in people with an initial abnormal liver function (ALF test in primary care and with no obvious liver disease. Further investigations may be dangerous for the patient and expensive for Health Services. The aims of this study are to determine the natural history of abnormalities in LFTs before overt liver disease presents in the population and identify those who require minimal further investigations with the potential for reduction in NHS costs. Methods/Design A population-based retrospective cohort study will follow up all those who have had an incident liver function test (LFT in primary care to subsequent liver disease or mortality over a period of 15 years (approx. 2.3 million tests in 99,000 people. The study is set in Primary Care in the region of Tayside, Scotland (pop approx. 429,000 between 1989 and 2003. The target population consists of patients with no recorded clinical signs or symptoms of liver disease and registered with a GP. The health technologies being assessed are LFTs, viral and auto-antibody tests, ultrasound, CT, MRI and liver biopsy. The study will utilise the Epidemiology of Liver Disease In Tayside (ELDIT database to determine the outcomes of liver disease. These are based on hospital admission data (Scottish Morbidity Record 1, dispensed medication records, death certificates, and examination of medical records from Tayside hospitals. A sample of patients (n = 150 with recent initial ALF tests or invitation to biopsy will complete questionnaires to obtain quality of life data and anxiety measures. Cost-effectiveness and cost utility Markov model analyses will be performed from health service and patient perspectives using standard NHS costs. The findings will also be used to develop a computerised clinical decision

  8. Prognostic factors in patients with hepatitis B-related primary liver cancer treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YIN Hao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo analyze the prognostic factors in patients with hepatitis B-related primary liver cancer treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE and to provide a basis for properly selecting indications and treatment regimen in clinical practice. MethodsA total of 140 patients with hepatitis B-related primary liver cancer, who underwent TACE in our hospital from January to December 2010, were enrolled in this study. Follow-up was continued until December 2011 to observe the patients′ survival within 12 months after treatment. The Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank (Mantel-Cox test were used for univariate and multivariate analyses to identify the prognostic factors in patients with hepatitis B-related primary liver cancer treated with TACE. ResultsThe univariate analysis showed that age, portal vein metastasis, peritoneal metastasis, pleural metastasis, Child-Pugh classification, bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase, number of interventional therapies, and antiviral therapy were prognostic factors in patients with hepatitis B-related primary liver cancer treated with TACE. There was significant difference in 12-month survival curve between patients treated with TACE plus antiviral therapy and those who did not receive antiviral therapy (P<0.05. The multivariate analysis showed that portal vein metastasis (P=0.004, peritoneal metastasis (P=0.009, bilirubin level (P=0.017, antiviral therapy (P=0.000, and number of TACE therapies (P=0.000 were prognostic factors in patients with hepatitis B-related primary liver cancer treated with TACE. ConclusionPortal vein metastasis, peritoneal metastasis, and bilirubin level may be independent risk factors in patients with hepatitis B-related primary liver cancer treated with TACE, and antiviral therapy and number of interventional therapies may be protective factors for these patients.

  9. Volumetric Growth of the Liver in the Human Fetus: An Anatomical, Hydrostatic, and Statistical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Szpinda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using anatomical, hydrostatic, and statistical methods, liver volumes were assessed in 69 human fetuses of both sexes aged 18–30 weeks. No sex differences were found. The median of liver volume achieved by hydrostatic measurements increased from 6.57 cm3 at 18–21 weeks through 14.36 cm3 at 22–25 weeks to 20.77 cm3 at 26–30 weeks, according to the following regression: y = −26.95 + 1.74 × age ± Z  × (−3.15 + 0.27 × age. The median of liver volume calculated indirectly according to the formula liver volume = 0.55 × liver length × liver transverse diameter × liver sagittal diameter increased from 12.41 cm3 at 18–21 weeks through 28.21 cm3 at 22–25 weeks to 49.69 cm3 at 26–30 weeks. There was a strong relationship (r=0.91, p<0.001 between the liver volumes achieved by hydrostatic (x and indirect (y methods, expressed by y = −0.05 + 2.16x  ± 7.26. The liver volume should be calculated as follows liver volume = 0.26 × liver length × liver transverse diameter × liver sagittal diameter. The age-specific liver volumes are of great relevance in the evaluation of the normal hepatic growth and the early diagnosis of fetal micro- and macrosomias.

  10. [A case-control study on relationship between hepatitis C infection and primary liver cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z Q; Zhou, G Y; Huang, T R

    1994-09-01

    All the cases and controls emerged from a cohort study held in the past years. They were male, more than 20 years of age at the time of their enrollment into the cohort study, with serum specimens taken and kept at -20 degrees C. Every death of primary liver cancer (PLC), occurred since then, as a 'case' (78 in total), was compared with no more than 4 matched controls chosen from cohort members who were still alive until the last follow-up. ELISA technique was used to test anti-HCV antibodies in the stored serum specimens of the cases and controls. The Results showed that anti-HCV prevalence rates were 33.3% (26/78) of the cases and 15.3% (40/262) of their matched controls, respectively (chi 2 = 11.86, P case-control studies.

  11. Genomic sequencing identifies a few mutations driving the independent origin of primary liver tumors in a chronic hepatitis murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zuyu; Jia, Mingming; Liu, Guojing; Hao, Huaining; Chen, Li; Li, Guanghao; Liu, Sixue; Li, Yawei; Wu, Chung-I; Lu, Xuemei; Wang, Shengdian

    2017-01-01

    With the development of high-throughput genomic analysis, sequencing a mouse primary cancer model provides a new opportunity to understand fundamental mechanisms of tumorigenesis and progression. Here, we characterized the genomic variations in a hepatitis-related primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) mouse model. A total of 12 tumor sections and four adjacent non-tumor tissues from four mice were used for whole exome and/or whole genome sequencing and validation of genotyping. The functions of the mutated genes in tumorigenesis were studied by analyzing their mutation frequency and expression in clinical HCC samples. A total of 46 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) were detected within coding regions. All SNVs were only validated in the sequencing samples, except the Hras mutation, which was shared by three tumors in the M1 mouse. However, the mutated allele frequency varied from high (0.4) to low (0.1), and low frequency (0.1-0.2) mutations existed in almost every tumor. Together with a diploid karyotype and an equal distribution pattern of these SNVs within the tumor, these results suggest the existence of subclones within tumors. A total of 26 mutated genes were mapped to 17 terms describing different molecular and cellular functions. All 41 human homologs of the mutated genes were mutated in the clinical samples, and some mutations were associated with clinical outcomes, suggesting a high probability of cancer driver genes in the spontaneous tumors of the mouse model. Genomic sequencing shows that a few mutations can drive the independent origin of primary liver tumors and reveals high heterogeneity among tumors in the early stage of hepatitis-related primary hepatocellular carcinoma.

  12. Genomic sequencing identifies a few mutations driving the independent origin of primary liver tumors in a chronic hepatitis murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuyu Yang

    Full Text Available With the development of high-throughput genomic analysis, sequencing a mouse primary cancer model provides a new opportunity to understand fundamental mechanisms of tumorigenesis and progression. Here, we characterized the genomic variations in a hepatitis-related primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC mouse model. A total of 12 tumor sections and four adjacent non-tumor tissues from four mice were used for whole exome and/or whole genome sequencing and validation of genotyping. The functions of the mutated genes in tumorigenesis were studied by analyzing their mutation frequency and expression in clinical HCC samples. A total of 46 single nucleotide variations (SNVs were detected within coding regions. All SNVs were only validated in the sequencing samples, except the Hras mutation, which was shared by three tumors in the M1 mouse. However, the mutated allele frequency varied from high (0.4 to low (0.1, and low frequency (0.1-0.2 mutations existed in almost every tumor. Together with a diploid karyotype and an equal distribution pattern of these SNVs within the tumor, these results suggest the existence of subclones within tumors. A total of 26 mutated genes were mapped to 17 terms describing different molecular and cellular functions. All 41 human homologs of the mutated genes were mutated in the clinical samples, and some mutations were associated with clinical outcomes, suggesting a high probability of cancer driver genes in the spontaneous tumors of the mouse model. Genomic sequencing shows that a few mutations can drive the independent origin of primary liver tumors and reveals high heterogeneity among tumors in the early stage of hepatitis-related primary hepatocellular carcinoma.

  13. [Mortality of primary liver cancer in China from 1990 through 1992].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S; Li, L; Lu, F

    1999-07-01

    To study the geographical distribution and mortality of primary liver cancer (PLC) in China from 1990 through 1992. A death survey among one tenth of Chinese population was conducted in 1990-1992 and the data on PLC mortality were analyzed. The crude mortality for PLC was 20.4 per 100,000 population (29.0 per 100,000 for males and 11.2 per 100,000 for females), accounted for 18.8% of the total cancer deaths in 1990-1992. In China, PLC mortality ranked second after stomach cancer. The age-standardized mortality rate (adjusted by the world population) of male Chinese was 33.7 per 100,000 which was 2. 2 times as high as that of male Japanese and 4.6 times as high as that of male Italian. The age-standardized rate of female Chinese was 12.3 per 100,000 which was 3.1 and 5.1 times as high compared to female Japanese and female Italian, respectively. PLC occurred in every age group but the mortality rate was highest in the age group of 30-44 years. The mortality was slightly higher in the rural than in the urban population. The cumulative death rate in the urban population was 3.5% for males and 1.2% for females, while that in the rural population was 4.1% for males and 1.6% for females. PLC showed geographical clustering along the south-east coast of China. To prevent primary liver cancer remains to be the major task of cancer control in China.

  14. Human Rights Texts: Converting Human Rights Primary Source Documents into Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fariss, Christopher J; Linder, Fridolin J; Jones, Zachary M; Crabtree, Charles D; Biek, Megan A; Ross, Ana-Sophia M; Kaur, Taranamol; Tsai, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and make publicly available a large corpus of digitized primary source human rights documents which are published annually by monitoring agencies that include Amnesty International, Human...

  15. Stable liver-specific expression of human IDOL in humanized mice raises plasma cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Salam; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Wilson, James M; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-05-01

    IDOL (inducible degrader of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, LDLR) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that promotes the ubiquitination and degradation of the LDLR. IDOL is a potential therapeutic target for the development of a novel class of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering therapies. In an attempt to develop a mouse model for testing IDOL inhibitors, we examined the effects of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated stable expression of human IDOL in the livers of mice 'humanized' with regard to lipoprotein metabolism. Using a liver-specific AAV serotype 8 (AAV8)-mediated delivery, AAV-hIDOL produced a dose-dependent increase in LDL-C levels and a decrease in liver LDLR protein. Furthermore, we expressed hIDOL in a 'humanized' mouse model of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (LDLR(+/-)/Apobec1(-/-)/hApoB-Tg, LAhB). In this model, total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-C levels were increased by ∼60% starting from 1 week and were sustainable for at least 3 weeks post-injection. Finally, we demonstrate that the effects caused by hIDOL expression are LDLR- dependent given the unchanged plasma lipids in LAhB mice lacking LDLR. In conclusion, our study demonstrates a dose-dependent physiological effect of human IDOL on LDL metabolism in mice. This provides a potential model for preclinical testing of IDOL inhibitors for reduction of LDL-C levels. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Radiosensitivity Differences Between Liver Metastases Based on Primary Histology Suggest Implications for Clinical Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Caudell, Jimmy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); El-Haddad, Ghassan [Department of Interventional Radiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Berglund, Anders E.; Welsh, Eric A. [Department of Bioinformatics, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Yue, Binglin [Department of Biostastistics, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Hoffe, Sarah E.; Naghavi, Arash O.; Abuodeh, Yazan A.; Frakes, Jessica M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Eschrich, Steven A. [Department of Bioinformatics, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Torres-Roca, Javier F., E-mail: Javier.torresroca@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Evidence from the management of oligometastases with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) reveals differences in outcomes based on primary histology. We have previously identified a multigene expression index for tumor radiosensitivity (RSI) with validation in multiple independent cohorts. In this study, we assessed RSI in liver metastases and assessed our clinical outcomes after SBRT based on primary histology. Methods and Materials: Patients were identified from our prospective, observational protocol. The previously tested RSI 10 gene assay was run on samples and calculated using the published algorithm. An independent cohort of 33 patients with 38 liver metastases treated with SBRT was used for clinical correlation. Results: A total of 372 unique metastatic liver lesions were identified for inclusion from our prospective, institutional metadata pool. The most common primary histologies for liver metastases were colorectal adenocarcinoma (n=314, 84.4%), breast adenocarcinoma (n=12, 3.2%), and pancreas neuroendocrine (n=11, 3%). There were significant differences in RSI of liver metastases based on histology. The median RSIs for liver metastases in descending order of radioresistance were gastrointestinal stromal tumor (0.57), melanoma (0.53), colorectal neuroendocrine (0.46), pancreas neuroendocrine (0.44), colorectal adenocarcinoma (0.43), breast adenocarcinoma (0.35), lung adenocarcinoma (0.31), pancreas adenocarcinoma (0.27), anal squamous cell cancer (0.22), and small intestine neuroendocrine (0.21) (P<.0001). The 12-month and 24-month Kaplan-Meier rates of local control (LC) for colorectal lesions from the independent clinical cohort were 79% and 59%, compared with 100% for noncolorectal lesions (P=.019), respectively. Conclusions: In this analysis, we found significant differences based on primary histology. This study suggests that primary histology may be an important factor to consider in SBRT radiation dose selection.

  17. CD13 is a therapeutic target in human liver cancer stem cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Ishii, Hideshi; Mimori, Koshi; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Ohkuma, Masahisa; Kim, Ho Min; Akita, Hirofumi; Takiuchi, Daisuke; Hatano, Hisanori; Nagano, Hiroaki; Barnard, Graham F; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    .... Here, we have demonstrated that CD13 is a marker for semiquiescent CSCs in human liver cancer cell lines and clinical samples and that targeting these cells might provide a way to treat this disease. CD13...

  18. Cadmium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis of Human Liver Carcinoma Cells via Oxidative Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skipper, Anthony; Sims, Jennifer N; Yedjou, Clement G; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    ... mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In this research, we hypothesized that oxidative stress plays a key role in cadmium chloride-induced toxicity, DNA damage, and apoptosis of human liver carcinoma (HepG₂) cells...

  19. The value of primary vascular stents in management of early portal vein stenosis after liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tsan Chang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available If portal vein stenosis (PVS occurs within 1 month after liver transplantation (LT, especially within 1 week, it can be catastrophic and result in rapid loss of the grafts and mortality. Although surgical treatments have been considered standard treatment for PVS, patients are usually unable to receive operations or re-transplantations, because of their critical conditions and a shortage of grafts. Recently, primary percutaneous transhepatic portal vein stents (PTPS were suggested as alternative and less-invasive treatments of PVS. However, because lethal complications may follow these primary stent placements for patients in early stages after LT, primary PTPS placements for patients suffering PVS 1 month after LT has been suggested. From November 2009 to July 2015, 38 consecutive adult patients underwent LT at our institution. Among them, six recipients suffered PVS within 1 month after LT. Technical success was achieved in all six patients. Clinical success was obtained in two of the four patients suffering PVS within 1 week after LT, and in the other two patients suffering PVS>1 week after LT. All surviving patients and their grafts were in good condition, and their stents remained patent. Our experience showed that primary PTPS placements can be used to effectively treat patients with PVS encountered within 1 month, and even within 1 week, after LT with acceptable short-term results. However, possible fatal complications should be kept in mind. Long-term results of these procedures need further follow-up.

  20. Gene expression data from acetaminophen-induced toxicity in human hepatic in vitro systems and clinical liver samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robim M. Rodrigues

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This data set is composed of transcriptomics analyses of (i liver samples from patients suffering from acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure (ALF and (ii hepatic cell systems exposed to acetaminophen and their respective controls. The in vitro systems include widely employed cell lines i.e. HepaRG and HepG2 cells as well as a novel stem cell-derived model i.e. human skin-precursors-derived hepatocyte-like cells (hSKP-HPC. Data from primary human hepatocytes was also added to the data set “Open TG-GATEs: a large-scale toxicogenomics database” (Igarashi et al., 2015 [1]. Changes in gene expression due to acetaminophen intoxication as well as comparative information between human in vivo and in vitro samples are provided. The microarray data have been deposited in NCBI׳s Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GEO: GSE74000. The provided data is used to evaluate the predictive capacity of each hepatic in vitro system and can be directly compared with large-scale publically available toxicogenomics databases. Further interpretation and discussion of these data feature in the corresponding research article “Toxicogenomics-based prediction of acetaminophen-induced liver injury using human hepatic cell systems” (Rodrigues et al., 2016 [2].

  1. 3-Tesla MRI Response to TACE in HCC (Liver Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-22

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Stage A Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Stage B Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC)

  2. Side Population Cells Derived from Adult Human Liver Generate Hepatocyte-like Cells In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    HUSSAIN, SUNNY ZAHEED; Strom, Stephen C.; Kirby, Martha R.; Burns, Sean; Langemeijer, Saskia; Ueda, Takahiro; HSIEH, MATTHEW; Tisdale, John F.

    2005-01-01

    We sought to determine whether hepatic side population (SP) cells derived from adult human liver possess the potential of a novel candidate hepatic stem cell. Human cadaveric donor liver was subjected to collagenase perfusion and hepatocytes were separated from nonparenchymal cells by differential centrifugation. SP cells were isolated from the nonparenchymal portion after Hoechst 33342 staining. Since CD45 is a panleukocyte antigen, CD45-negative SP cells were separated from the vast majorit...

  3. Long term culture of genome-stable bipotent progenitor cells from adult human liver

    OpenAIRE

    Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; van, Boxtel Ruben; Hamer, Karien; Blokzijl, Francis; Verstegen, Monique MA; Ellis, Ewa; van, Wenum Martien; Fuchs, Sabine A; de, Ligt Joep; van, de Wetering Marc; Sasaki, Nobuo; Boers, Susanne J; Kemperman, Hans; de, Jonge Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Despite the enormous replication potential of the human liver, there are currently no culture systems available that sustain hepatocyte replication and/or function in vitro. We have shown previously that single mouse Lgr5+ liver stem cells can be expanded as epithelial organoids in vitro and can be differentiated into functional hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. We now describe conditions allowing long-term expansion of adult bile duct-derived bipotent progenitor cells from human liver. The e...

  4. Sarcopenia Adversely Impacts Postoperative Complications Following Resection or Transplantation in Patients with Primary Liver Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Vicente; Amini, Neda; Spolverato, Gaya; Weiss, Matthew J.; Hirose, Kenzo; Dagher, Nabil N.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Cameron, Andrew A.; Philosophe, Benjamin; Kamel, Ihab R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sarcopenia is a surrogate marker of patient frailty that estimates the physiologic reserve of an individual patient. We sought to investigate the impact of sarcopenia on short- and long-term outcomes in patients having undergone surgical intervention for primary hepatic malignancies. Methods Ninety-six patients who underwent hepatic resection or liver transplantation for HCC or ICC at the John Hopkins Hospital between 2000 and 2013 met inclusion criteria. Sarcopenia was assessed by the measurement of total psoas major volume (TPV) and total psoas area (TPA). The impact of sarcopenia on perioperative complications and survival was assessed. Results Mean age was 61.9 years and most patients were men (61.4 %). Mean adjusted TPV was lower in women (23.3 cm3/m) versus men (34.9 cm3/m) (Psarcopenia. The incidence of a postoperative complication was 40.4 % among patients with sarcopenia versus 18.4 % among patients who did not have sarcopenia (P=0.01). Of note, all Clavien grade ≥3 complications (n=11, 23.4 %) occurred in the sarcopenic group. On multivariable analysis, the presence of sarcopenia was an independent predictive factor of postoperative complications (OR=3.06). Sarcopenia was not associated with long-term survival (HR=1.23; P=0.51). Conclusions Sarcopenia, as assessed by TPV, was an independent factor predictive of postoperative complications following surgical intervention for primary hepatic malignancies. PMID:25389056

  5. Analysis of bile acid-induced regulation of FXR target genes in human liver slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, Diana; Elferink, Marieke G. L.; Stellaard, Frans; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    Information about the role of nuclear receptors has rapidly increased over the last decade. However, details about their role in human are lacking. Owing to species differences, a powerful human in vitro system is needed. This study uses for the first time precision-cut human liver slices in the

  6. Underappreciation of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease by primary care clinicians: limited awareness of surrogate markers of fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Preya J; Banh, Xuan; Horsfall, Leigh U; Hayward, Kelly L; Hossain, Fabrina; Johnson, Tracey; Stuart, Katherine A; Brown, Nigel N; Saad, Nivene; Clouston, Andrew; Irvine, Katharine M; Russell, Anthony W; Valery, Patricia C; Williams, Suzanne; Powell, Elizabeth E

    2017-10-30

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common cause of incidental liver test abnormalities. General practitioners have a key role in identifying people with NAFLD at risk of significant liver disease. Recent specialist guidelines emphasize the use of fibrosis algorithms or serum biomarkers rather than routine liver tests, to assess advanced fibrosis. This study evaluated primary care clinicians' current approach to diagnosis, management and referral of NAFLD. A cross-sectional survey of primary care clinicians was undertaken through a structured questionnaire about NAFLD. A convenience sample of general practice clinics and general practice conferences in Metropolitan Brisbane and regional south east Queensland was selected. 108 primary care clinicians completed the survey (participation rate 100%). Fifty-one percent of respondents considered the prevalence of NAFLD in the general population to be ≤10%. Twenty-four percent of respondents felt that liver enzymes were sufficiently sensitive to detect underlying NAFLD. Most respondents were unsure whether the FIB-4 score (62.7% unsure) or ELF score (63.7% unsure) could help to identify advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis. Although 47% of respondents said they would refer a patient to a Gastroenterologist/Hepatologist if they suspect the patient has NAFLD, 44.1% do not make any referrals. Of concern, 70.6% of clinicians said they were unlikely to refer a patient to Hepatology unless liver function tests are abnormal. Our findings demonstrate that many primary care clinicians underestimate the prevalence of NAFLD and under-recognise the clinical spectrum of NAFLD and how this is assessed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Epidemiological and clinical features of primary liver cancer: an analysis of 236 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Rongrong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the epidemiological and clinical features of patients with primary liver cancer (PLC. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 236 patients with complete information who were admitted to The First Hospital of Lanzhou University and diagnosed with PLC for the first time form August 2012 to August 2014, and their epidemiological and clinical features were analyzed. The chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups. ResultsAmong the 236 PLC patients, there were 198 male patients (83.9% and 38 female patients (16.1%, and the patients aged 41-60 years has the highest incidence rate (58.5%, 138/236. Nineteen patients had a family history of liver cancer, 28 had a history of heavy drinking, 34 were complicated by type 2 diabetes, and 44 were complicated by hypertension. Among these patients, 232 (98.3% developed PLC on the basis of chronic liver disease, and 4 (1.7% had no chronic liver disease. There were 207 patients (87.7% with chronic HBV infection, and most of them had HBeAg-negative infection. Fourteen patients (5.9% had chronic HCV infection, 5 (2.1% had HBV/HCV co-infection, and 6 (2.5% had chronic alcoholic hepatitis. Among the 212 patients with HBV infection, 51(241% had HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B, and 95(448% had HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B; there was significant difference in HBV DNA level between the two groups (χ2=40687,Ρ=0001. Among all the PLC patients, 104 had an alpha-fetoprotein(AFP level of >400 IU/ml, 48 had an AFP level of 200-400 IU/ml, and 84 had an AFP level of <200 IU/ml; 154 (62.3% had a single lesion, and 72 (30.5% had multiple lesions; most (72.7% of patients with a single lesion had the single lesion in the right lobe, and the proportions of patients with multiple lesions in the right lobe and in both lobes accounted for 58.3% and 41.7%, respectively. Among the 80 PLC patients with

  8. Integrated Modular Teaching of Human Biology for Primary Care Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Michael S.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the use of integrated modular teaching of the human biology component of the Health Associate Program at Johns Hopkins University, where the goal is to develop an understanding of the sciences as applied to primary care. Discussion covers the module sequence, the human biology faculty, goals of the human biology faculty, laboratory…

  9. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, April D. [University of Arizona, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Novak, Petr [Biology Centre ASCR, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Ceske Budejovice 37001 (Czech Republic); Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D. [Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Lu, Zhenqiang [The Arizona Statistical Consulting Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D. [Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Cherrington, Nathan J., E-mail: cherrington@pharmacy.arizona.edu [University of Arizona, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  10. Influence of gemcitabine thermal-chemotherapy infusion combined with carboplatin chemotherapy embolization on liver function, renal function and immune function in patients with primary carcinoma of liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Du

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the influence of Gemcitabine Thermal-chemotherapy infusion combined with Carboplatin Chemotherapy embolization on liver function, renal function and immune function in patients with primary carcinoma of liver. Method: A total of 90 paitents with primary carcinoma of liver in our hospital were selected and randomly divided into 2 groups: the control group (45 cases and the observation group (45 cases. The patients in the observation group were treated by Gemcitabine Thermal-chemotherapy infusion combined with Carboplatin Chemotherapy embolization. And the patients in the control group were treated by Gemcitabine normal temperature chemotherapy infusion combined with Carboplatin Chemotherapy embolization. The changes of liver function, renal function and immune function were compared in 2 groups before and after treatment. Result: The comparison of ALT and AST in the two groups before treatment was not statistically significant. 3 d after treatment, the ALT and AST in both groups increased compared with that before treatment. And the ALT (175.35±10.06 U/L , AST (173.54±13.47 U/L, in control group were increased more significantly compared with ALT (84.21±12.07 U/L and AST (94.20±11.31 U/L in observation group. The difference was statistically significant. 30 d after treatment, The ALT and AST in both groups came back to the former level. The difference was not statistically significant. The comparison of BUN, Crea in the two groups before treatment, 3 d after treatment and 30 d after treatment were not statistically significant. The comparison of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+/CD8+ and NK cells in the two groups before treatment were not statistically significant. 7 d after treatment, CD3+ (72.34±6.95, NK cells (23.56±6.62 increased compared with that before treatment. And they increased more significantly compared with CD3+ (64.78±5.46 and NK cells (18.32±5.72 in the control group. CD8+, (22.01±2.77 in observation group

  11. Human intrahepatic ILC2 are IL-13positive amphiregulinpositive and their frequency correlates with model of end stage liver disease score.

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    Hannah C Jeffery

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILC have been implicated in the initiation of inflammation and fibrosis in mice. However, ILC have not been characterized in inflamed human liver tissue.Human intrahepatic lymphocytes were isolated by mechanical digestion and phenotyped by flow cytometry. Conditioned medium from cultures of primary human biliary epithelial cells, stellate cells, fibroblasts and inflamed human liver tissue was used to model the effects of the inflammatory liver environment of ILC phenotype and function.All three ILC subsets were present in the human liver, with the ILC1 (CRTH2negCD117neg subset constituting around 70% of intrahepatic ILCs. Both NCRpos (NKp44+ and NCRneg ILC3 (CRTH2negCD117pos subsets were also detected. ILC2 (CRTH2pos frequency correlated with disease severity measured by model of end stage liver disease (MELD scoring leading us to study this subset in more detail. ILC2 displayed a tissue resident CD69+ CD161++ phenotype and expressed chemokine receptor CCR6 allowing them to respond to CCL20 secreted by cholangiocytes and stellate cells. ILC2 expressed integrins VLA-5 and VLA-6 and the IL-2 and IL-7 cytokine receptors CD25 and CD127 although IL-2 and IL-7 were barely detectable in inflamed liver tissue. Although biliary epithelial cells secrete IL-33, intrahepatic ILC2 had low expression of the ST2 receptor. Intrahepatic ILC2 secreted the immunoregulatory and repair cytokines IL-13 and amphiregulin.Intrahepatic ILC2 express receptors allowing them to be recruited to bile ducts in inflamed portal tracts. Their frequencies increased with worsening liver function. Their secretion of IL-13 and amphiregulin suggests they may be recruited to promote resolution and repair and thereby they may contribute to ongoing fibrogenesis in liver disease.

  12. Paediatric gastroenterology evaluation of overweight and obese children referred from primary care for suspected non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwimmer, J B; Newton, K P; Awai, H I; Choi, L J; Garcia, M A; Ellis, L L; Vanderwall, K; Fontanesi, J

    2013-01-01

    Background Screening overweight and obese children for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is recommended by paediatric and endocrinology societies. However, gastroenterology societies have called for more data before making a formal recommendation. Aim To determine whether the detection of suspected NAFLD in overweight and obese children through screening in primary care and referral to paediatric gastroenterology resulted in a correct diagnosis of NAFLD. Methods Information generated in the clinical evaluation of 347 children identified with suspected NAFLD through screening in primary care and referral to paediatric gastroenterology was captured prospectively. Diagnostic outcomes were reported. The diagnostic performance of two times the upper limit of normal (ULN) for alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was assessed. Results Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was diagnosed in 55% of children identified by screening and referral. Liver disease other than NAFLD was present in 18% of those referred. Autoimmune hepatitis was the most common alternative diagnosis. Children with NAFLD had significantly (P gastroenterology has the potential to identify clinically relevant liver pathology. Consensus is needed on how to value the risk and rewards of screening and referral, to identify children with liver disease in the most appropriate manner. PMID:24117728

  13. Primary non-function is frequently associated with fatty liver allografts and high mortality after re-transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Ulf; Lehner, Frank; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Borlak, Jürgen

    2017-08-01

    The shortage of liver donations demands the use of suboptimal grafts with steatosis being a frequent finding. Although ≤30% macrovesicular steatosis is considered to be safe the risk for primary non-function (PNF) and outcome after re-transplantation (re-OLT) is unknown. Among 1205 orthotopic liver transplantations performed at our institution the frequency, survival and reason of re-OLT were evaluated. PNF (group A) cases and those with initial transplant function but subsequent need for re-OLT (group B) were analysed. Histopathology and clinical judgement determined the cause of PNF and included an assessment of hepatic steatosis. Additionally, survival of fatty liver allografts (group C) not requiring re-OLT was considered in Kaplan-Meier and multivariate regression analysis. A total of 77 high urgency re-OLTs were identified and included 39 PNF cases. Nearly 70% of PNF cases were due to primary fatty liver allografts. The 3-month in-hospital mortality for PNF cases after re-OLT was 46% and the mean survival after re-OLT was 0.5 years as compared to 5.2 and 5.1 years for group B, C, respectively, (PPNF with excessive mortality after re-transplantation. The findings demand the development of new methods to predict risk for PNF of fatty liver allografts. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Cloning and characterization of human liver cytosolic beta-glycosidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Graaf, M; Van Veen, IC; Van Der Meulen-Muileman, IH; Gerritsen, WR; Pinedo, HM; Haisma, HJ

    2001-01-01

    Cytosolic beta -glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) from mammalian liver is a member of the family 1 glycoside hydrolases and is known for its ability to hydrolyse a range of beta -D-glycosides. including beta -D-glucoside acid beta -D-galactoside. We therefore refer to this enzyme as cytosolic beta

  15. Chimeric mice with humanized liver: Application in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics studies for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naritomi, Yoichi; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru

    2017-11-09

    Predicting human drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (PK) is key to drug discovery. In particular, it is important to predict human PK, metabolite profiles and drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Various methods have been used for such predictions, including in vitro metabolic studies using human biological samples, such as hepatic microsomes and hepatocytes, and in vivo studies using experimental animals. However, prediction studies using these methods are often inconclusive due to discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo results, and interspecies differences in drug metabolism. Further, the prediction methods have changed from qualitative to quantitative to solve these issues. Chimeric mice with humanized liver have been developed, in which mouse liver cells are mostly replaced with human hepatocytes. Since human drug metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the liver of these mice, they are regarded as suitable models for mimicking the drug metabolism and PK observed in humans; therefore, these mice are useful for predicting human drug metabolism and PK. In this review, we discuss the current state, issues, and future directions of predicting human drug metabolism and PK using chimeric mice with humanized liver in drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Proteomic analysis of tyrosine phosphorylation during human liver transplantation

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    Boutros Tarek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R causes a dramatic reprogramming of cell metabolism during liver transplantation and can be linked to an alteration of the phosphorylation level of several cellular proteins. Over the past two decades, it became clear that tyrosine phosphorylation plays a pivotal role in a variety of important signalling pathways and was linked to a wide spectrum of diseases. Functional profiling of the tyrosine phosphoproteome during liver transplantation is therefore of great biological significance and is likely to lead to the identification of novel targets for drug discovery and provide a basis for novel therapeutic strategies. Results Using liver biopsies collected during the early phases of organ procurement and transplantation, we aimed at characterizing the global patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation during hepatic I/R. A proteomic approach, based on the purification of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins followed by their identification using mass spectrometry, allowed us to identify Nck-1, a SH2/SH3 adaptor, as a potential regulator of I/R injury. Using immunoblot, cell fractionation and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrate that Nck-1 phosphorylation, expression and localization were affected in liver tissue upon I/R. In addition, mass spectrometry identification of Nck-1 binding partners during the course of the transplantation also suggested a dynamic interaction between Nck-1 and actin during I/R. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggest that Nck-1 may play a role in I/R-induced actin reorganization, which was previously reported to be detrimental for the hepatocytes of the transplanted graft. Nck-1 could therefore represent a target of choice for the design of new organ preservation strategies, which could consequently help to reduce post-reperfusion liver damages and improve transplantation outcomes.

  17. Transcriptome analysis reveals a classical interferon signature induced by IFNλ4 in human primary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauber, Chris; Vieyres, Gabrielle; Terczynska-Dyla, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    4 could be a tissue-specific regulation of an unknown subset of genes. To address both tissue and subtype specificity in the interferon response, we treated primary human hepatocytes and airway epithelial cells with IFNα, IFNλ3 or IFNλ4 and assessed interferon mediated gene regulation using...... genes being regulated in hepatocytes as well as airway epithelial cells. Thus we provide an in-depth analysis of the liver interferon response seen over an array of interferon subtypes and compare it to the response in the lung epithelium....

  18. Mapping chronic liver disease questionnaire scores onto SF-6D utility values in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalaitzakis, Evangelos; Benito de Valle, Maria; Rahman, Monira

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The chronic liver disease questionnaire (CLDQ) is a frequently used liver-specific quality of life instrument, but it does not provide information on preference-adjusted health status, which is essential for cost-utility analysis. We aimed to develop a mapping function deriving utilities...... from the CLDQ in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Methods: Short form-6D (SF-6D) utilities were calculated from SF-36 data collected in a recent prospective study in which unselected patients with PSC also completed the CLDQ. Ordinary least squares (OLS), generalized linear, median, and kernel...

  19. Immune-mediated liver failure

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    WANG Xiaojing

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary causative factors of liver failure include direct damage and immune-mediated liver injury. Increasing evidence suggests that immune-mediated injury plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of liver failure. The new concepts concerning the mechanisms of immune-mediated liver injury in liver failure are reviewed with relevant basic and clinical studies in both humans and animals. The innate and adaptive immunity, particularly the interaction of various immune cells and molecules, as well as apoptosis-related molecules, are discussed in detail.

  20. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Human isoenzymes of adenylate kinase: isolation and physicochemical comparison of the crystalline human ATP-AMP transphosphorylases from muscle and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, S A; Fleming, G; Frischat, A; Cress, M C; Hamada, M

    1983-02-10

    Procedures are described for the isolation, in crystalline form, of the adenylate kinases from autopsy samples of human muscle and from human liver. Weight average molecular weights were determined by sedimentation equilibrium to be 22,000 (+/- 700) and 25,450 (+/- 160) for the human muscle and liver isoenzymes, respectively. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, their molecular weights were estimated to be 21,700 and 26,500 for the muscle and liver enzymes, respectively. Both isoenzymes are accordingly monomeric proteins in their native state. Amino acid analyses are reported here for the normal human liver, calf liver, and rabbit liver adenylate kinases and compared with the normal human muscle, calf muscle, and rabbit muscle myokinases. The liver types as a group and the muscle types as a group show a great deal of homology, but some distinct differences are evident between the liver and muscle enzyme groups, especially in the number of residues of His, Pro, half-cystine, and the presence of tryptophan in the liver enzymes. The normal human liver adenylate kinase, as isolated in this report, has proved to be similar in its properties, if not identical, to the adenylate kinase isolated directly from human liver mitochondria (Hamada, M., Sumida, M., Okuda, H., Watanabe, T., Nojima, M., and Kuby, S. A. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 13120-13128). Therefore, the liver-type adenylate kinase may be considered a mitochondrial type.

  1. [Professor Ling Changquan's experience in treating primary liver cancer: an analysis of herbal medication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhen; Su, Yong-hua; Yue, Xiao-qiang

    2008-12-01

    On the basis of outpatients' medical records concerning primary liver cancer (PLC), data of 552 patients (with 2020 effective prescriptions) from the Outpatient Department of Changhai Hospital treated by Professor Ling Changquan were collected. The nature, flavor and meridian distribution of the herbs used in the prescriptions were summarized by frequency method, and the features of the herbs used according to syndrome differentiation were analyzed by logistic regression. The couple herbs used were analyzed by cluster analysis. All the data were analyzed in combination with the experience of the specialist. It showed that most of the frequently used herbs were herbs for invigorating the spleen to promote appetite, removing toxic materials to inhibit tumor growth, and activating blood circulation to dissipate blood stasis. These herbs are mostly of plain or cool nature, and mainly of sweet, bitter, or acrid taste. It also showed that the most frequently used herbs for qi deficiency were Astragalus membranaceus, Atractylodes macrocephala, and Pseudostellariae; Caulis Spatholobi and Chinese jujube for blood asthenia; Fructus Corni and Ophiopogon japonicus for yin deficiency; Agastache rugosa, Semen Plantaginis and Poria for water-dampness; cape jasmine fruit and baikal skullcap root for heat excess; peach seed and Radix Paeoniae Rubra for blood stasis; Curcuma wenyujin, Akebia trifoliata and Bupleurum chinese for qi stagnation. A total of 19 pairs of couple herbs were summarized by the cluster analysis.

  2. A comparison of trends in mortality from primary liver cancer and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuccio, P; Bosetti, C; Levi, F; Decarli, A; Negri, E; La Vecchia, C

    2013-06-01

    To update and compare mortality from primary liver cancer (PLC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) in Europe in 1990-2010. We used data from the World Health Organization (WHO) to compute age-standardized (world population) mortality rates, and used joinpoint analysis to identify substantial changes. Between 2002 and 2007, PLC rates in the European Union (EU) declined from 3.9 to 3.6/100,000 men. Around 2007, the highest male rates were in France (6.2/100,000), Spain (4.9), and Italy (4.0), while the lowest ones were in Sweden (1.1), the Netherlands (1.2), and the UK (1.8). In women, mortality was lower (0.8/100,000 in 2007 in the EU), and showed more favourable trends, with a decline of over 2% per year over the last two decades as compared with 0.4% in men, in the EU. In contrast, the EU mortality from ICC increased by around 9% in both sexes from 1990 to 2008, reaching rates of 1.1/100,000 men and 0.75/100,000 women. The highest rates were in UK, Germany, and France (1.2-1.5/100,000 men, 0.8-1.1/100,000 women). PLC mortality has become more uniform across Europe over recent years, with an overall decline; in contrast, ICC mortality has substantially increased in most Europe.

  3. Characterization of ethanol-inducible human liver N-nitrosodimethylamine demethylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrighton, S.A.; Thomas P.E.; Molowa, D.T.; Haniu, M.; Shively, J.E.; Maines, S.L.; Watkins, P.B.; Parker, G.; Mendez-Picon, G.; Levin, W.; Guzelian, P.S.

    1986-11-04

    Through the use of monospecific antibodies directed against hepatic cytochrome P-450j, an enzyme induced in rats treated with ethanol or isoniazid, we have purified from human liver the related cytochrome P-450 termed HLj. HLj resembles rat P-450j and P-450 LM3a, the homologous cytochrome in rabbit liver, in its NH/sub 2/-terminal amino acid sequence, in being in highest concentration in liver microsome samples prepared from two patients intoxicated by ethanol and one patient given isoniazid, and in catalyzing the metabolic activation of the procarcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine. Furthermore, each of nine human liver RNA samples contained a species of mRNA hybridizable to a cloned HLj cDNA. We conclude that HLj is related by structure, function, and some regulator characteristics to rat P-450j and rabbit P-450 LM3a, cytochromes critical for metabolism of several clinically relevant cytotoxic and carcinogenic agents.

  4. Human Adipose Tissue Derived Stem Cells Promote Liver Regeneration in a Rat Model of Toxic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Koellensperger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the light of the persisting lack of donor organs and the risks of allotransplantations, the possibility of liver regeneration with autologous stem cells from adipose tissue (ADSC is an intriguing alternative. Using a model of a toxic liver damage in Sprague Dawley rats, generated by repetitive intraperitoneal application of retrorsine and allyl alcohol, the ability of human ADSC to support the restoration of liver function was investigated. A two-thirds hepatectomy was performed, and human ADSC were injected into one remaining liver lobe in group 1 (n = 20. Injection of cell culture medium performed in group 2 (n = 20 served as control. Cyclosporine was applied to achieve immunotolerance. Blood samples were drawn weekly after surgery to determine liver-correlated blood values. Six and twelve weeks after surgery, animals were sacrificed and histological sections were analyzed. ADSC significantly raised postoperative albumin (P < 0.017, total protein (P < 0.031, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (P < 0.001, and lactate dehydrogenase (P < 0.04 levels compared to injection of cell culture medium alone. Transplanted cells could be found up to twelve weeks after surgery in histological sections. This study points towards ADSC being a promising alternative to hepatocyte or liver organ transplantation in patients with severe liver failure.

  5. Human ovarian surface epithelium in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auersperg, N; Siemens, C H; Myrdal, S E

    1984-10-01

    The ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) represents a minute fraction of the cell mass of the ovary but gives rise to over 80% of human ovarian carcinomas. No experimental models for the study of human OSE exist. To characterize OSE cells in culture, explants of ovarian surface from normal ovary of premenopausal women were grown on plastic, glass, and collagen gel in 25% fetal bovine serum/Waymouth's medium 752/1. About 25% of explants produced epithelial outgrowths. Morphologically, these outgrowths resembled OSE in vivo and endothelial and mesothelial cells in culture, but they differed from cultured ovarian stromal, granulosa, and luteal cells. Only OSE among ovarian cell types were intensely keratin positive by immunofluorescence. Keratin also distinguished OSE cells from the keratin-negative endothelial cells. Most but not all OSE colonies tested showed 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) activity, which was absent in peritoneal mesothelial cells. Colonies from most patients were limited to a few millimetres and became stationary within a few weeks. Changes that accompanied cessation of growth included senescence, increased keratin content, or the formation of multicellular papillary aggregates. With time, OSE cells tended to assume a fibroblast-like morphology but remained keratin positive and continued to resemble OSE by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Subcultured OSE cells persisted in a stationary keratin-positive form for many weeks. Throughout this study, all pavementlike epithelial outgrowths that were contiguous with an explant stained for keratin; thus, such colonies can be assumed to be OSE. Conversely, fibroblast-shaped cells may represent OSE as indicated by keratin content and SEM appearance. The methods presented here permit culture of normal human OSE under conditions in which the cells exhibit morphologic plasticity, variable 17 beta-HSD activity, and presence of keratin.

  6. Diabetes mellitus and primary liver cancer: risk factor or real cause?

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Jing; Han, Tao

    2017-01-01

    With an increasing prevalence all over the world, diabetes mellitus is considered as a potential cause of liver cancer in patients with non-viral hepatitis. Whether diabetes mellitus is the cause of liver cancer and related pathogenesis remain unknown. The article reviews recent large-sample cohort studies and confirms that diabetes mellitus increases the incidence rate of liver cancer and affects its prognosis. This article also investigates the association of hepatitis C, obesity, and nonal...

  7. Infection with the carcinogenic human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smout, Michael J.; Sripa, Banchob; Laha, Thewarach; Mulvenna, Jason; Gasser, Robin B.; Young, Neil D.; Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Brindley, Paul J.; Loukas, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Summary Throughout Southeast Asia there is a strikingly high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA - hepatic cancer of the bile duct epithelium), particularly in people from rural settings in Laos and Northeast Thailand who are infected with the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, one of only three carcinogenic eukaryotic pathogens. More ubiquitous carcinogenic microbes, such as Helicobacter pylori, induce cancer in less than 1% of infected people, while as many as one-sixth of people with opisthorchiasis will develop CCA. The mechanisms by which O. viverrini causes cancer are multi-factorial, involving mechanical irritation from the activities and movements of the flukes, immunopathology, dietary nitrosamines and the secretion of parasite proteins that promote a tumourigenic environment. Genomic and proteomic studies of the liver fluke secretome have accelerated the discovery of parasite proteins with known/potential roles in pathogenesis and tumourigenesis, establishing a framework towards understanding, and ultimately preventing, the morbidity and mortality attributed to this highly carcinogenic parasite. PMID:21311794

  8. A new human 3D-liver model unravels the role of galectins in liver infection by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora B Petropolis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of human parasitic diseases depend on the availability of appropriate in vivo animal models and ex vivo experimental systems, and are particularly difficult for pathogens whose exclusive natural hosts are humans, such as Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite responsible for amoebiasis. This common infectious human disease affects the intestine and liver. In the liver sinusoids E. histolytica crosses the endothelium and penetrates into the parenchyma, with the concomitant initiation of inflammatory foci and subsequent abscess formation. Studying factors responsible for human liver infection is hampered by the complexity of the hepatic environment and by the restrictions inherent to the use of human samples. Therefore, we built a human 3D-liver in vitro model composed of cultured liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatocytes in a 3D collagen-I matrix sandwich. We determined the presence of important hepatic markers and demonstrated that the cell layers function as a biological barrier. E. histolytica invasion was assessed using wild-type strains and amoebae with altered virulence or different adhesive properties. We showed for the first time the dependence of endothelium crossing upon amoebic Gal/GalNAc lectin. The 3D-liver model enabled the molecular analysis of human cell responses, suggesting for the first time a crucial role of human galectins in parasite adhesion to the endothelial cells, which was confirmed by siRNA knockdown of galectin-1. Levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including galectin-1 and -3, were highly increased upon contact of E. histolytica with the 3D-liver model. The presence of galectin-1 and -3 in the extracellular medium stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokine release, suggesting a further role for human galectins in the onset of the hepatic inflammatory response. These new findings are relevant for a better understanding of human liver infection by E. histolytica.

  9. Paracrine interactions between primary human macrophages and human fibroblasts enhance murine mammary gland humanization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jodie M; Miller, Tyler C; Kidacki, Michal; Ginsburg, Erika; Stuelten, Christina H; Stewart, Delisha A; Troester, Melissa A; Vonderhaar, Barbara K

    2012-06-25

    Macrophages comprise an essential component of the mammary microenvironment necessary for normal gland development. However, there is no viable in vivo model to study their role in normal human breast function. We hypothesized that adding primary human macrophages to the murine mammary gland would enhance and provide a novel approach to examine immune-stromal cell interactions during the humanization process. Primary human macrophages, in the presence or absence of ectopic estrogen stimulation, were used to humanize mouse mammary glands. Mechanisms of enhanced humanization were identified by cytokine/chemokine ELISAs, zymography, western analysis, invasion and proliferation assays; results were confirmed with immunohistological analysis. The combined treatment of macrophages and estrogen stimulation significantly enhanced the percentage of the total gland humanized and the engraftment/outgrowth success rate. Timecourse analysis revealed the disappearance of the human macrophages by two weeks post-injection, suggesting that the improved overall growth and invasiveness of the fibroblasts provided a larger stromal bed for epithelial cell proliferation and structure formation. Confirming their promotion of fibroblasts humanization, estrogen-stimulated macrophages significantly enhanced fibroblast proliferation and invasion in vitro, as well as significantly increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive cells in humanized glands. Cytokine/chemokine ELISAs, zymography and western analyses identified TNFα and MMP9 as potential mechanisms by which estrogen-stimulated macrophages enhanced humanization. Specific inhibitors to TNFα and MMP9 validated the effects of these molecules on fibroblast behavior in vitro, as well as by immunohistochemical analysis of humanized glands for human-specific MMP9 expression. Lastly, glands humanized with macrophages had enhanced engraftment and tumor growth compared to glands humanized with fibroblasts alone. Herein, we

  10. Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary liver cell carcinoma; Tumor - liver; Cancer - liver; Hepatoma ... Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for most liver cancers. This type of cancer occurs more often in men than women. It is usually diagnosed in people age 50 or ...

  11. Cell Pleomorphism and Cytoskeleton Disorganization in Human Liver Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chiung-Chi; Lai, Yen-Chang Clark; Lai, Yih-Shyong; Chao, Wei-Ting; Tseng, Yu-Hui; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Chen, You-Yin; Liu, Yi-Hsiang

    Nucleoskeleton maintains the framework of a cell nucleus that is required for a variety of nuclear functions. However, the nature of nucleoskeleton structure has not been yet clearly elucidated due to microscopy visualization limitations. Plectin, a nuclear pore-permeable component of cytoskeleton, exhibits a role of cross-linking between cytoplasmic intermediate filaments and nuclear lamins. Presumably, plectin is also a part of nucleoskeleton. Previously, we demonstrated that pleomorphism of hepatoma cells is the consequence of cytoskeletal changes mediated by plectin deficiency. In this study, we applied a variety of technologies to detect the cytoskeletons in liver cells. The images of confocal microscopy did not show the existence of plectin, intermediate filaments, microfilaments and microtubules in hepatic nuclei. However, in the isolated nuclear preparation, immunohistochemical staining revealed positive results for plectin and cytoskeletal proteins that may contribute to the contamination derived from cytoplasmic residues. Therefore, confocal microscopy provides a simple and effective technology to observe the framework of nucleoskeleton. Accordingly, we verified that cytoskeletons are not found in hepatic cell nuclei. Furthermore, the siRNA-mediated knockdown of plectin in liver cells leads to collapsed cytoskeleton, cell transformation and pleomorphic nuclei. Plectin and cytoskeletons were not detected in the nuclei of liver cells compared to the results of confocal microscopy. Despite the absence of nuclear plectin and cytoskeletal filaments, the evidence provided support that nuclear pleomorphism of cancer cells is correlated with the cytoplasmic disorganization of cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. Squamous cell carcinoma antigen in human liver carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, M; Roskams, T; Pontisso, P; Fassan, M; Thung, S N; Giacomelli, L; Sergio, A; Farinati, F; Cillo, U; Rugge, M

    2008-04-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) is a serine protease inhibitor that can be overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at both molecular and protein level, but no data are available on its expression in pre-malignant stages. To assess SCCA expression by immunohistochemistry in HCC and its nodular precursors in cirrhotic livers. 55 nodules from 42 explanted livers were evaluated: 7 large regenerative nodules (LRNs), 7 low-grade dysplastic nodules (LG-DNs), 10 high-grade DNs (HG-DNs), and 31 HCC. SCCA expression was semiquantitatively scored on a four-tiered scale. SCCA hepatocyte immunostaining was always restricted to the cytoplasm, mainly exhibiting a granular pattern. Stain intensity varied, ranging from weak to very strong. Within the nodules, positive cells were unevenly distributed, either scattered or in irregular clusters. The prevalence of SCCA expression was 29% in LRNs, 100% in DNs and 93% in HCC. A significant difference emerged in both prevalence and score for LRNs versus LG-DNs (pHCC (p = 0.000). A barely significant difference (p = 0.49) was observed between LG-DNs and HG-DNs, while no difference in SCCA expression was detected between HG-DNs and HCC. Cirrhotic tissue adjacent to the nodules was positive in 96% of cases, with a significant difference in the score (p = 0.000) between hepatocytes adjacent to HCC and those surrounding LRNs. This study provides the first evidence that aberrant SCCA expression is an early event in liver cell carcinomatous transformation.

  13. Systemic chimerism in human female recipients of male livers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzl, Thomas E.; Trucco, Massimo; Zeevi, Adriana; Kocova, Mirjana; Ildstad, Suzanne; Demetris, Antony J.; Ramos, Hector; Rudert, William A.; Ricordi, Camillo; Murase, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    We have previously reported data from clinical and laboratory animal observations which suggest that organ tolerance after transplantation depends on a state of balanced lymphodendritic cell chimerism between the host and donor graft. We have sought further evidence to support this hypothesis by investigating HLA-mismatched liver allograft recipients. 9 of 9 female recipients of livers from male donors had chimerism in their allografts and extrahepatic tissues, according to in-situ hybridisation and molecular techniques 10 to 19 years post-transplantation. In 8 women with good graft function, evidence of the Y chromosome was found in the blood (6/8), skin (8/8), and lymph nodes (7/8). A ninth patient whose transplant failed after 12 years from recurrent chronic viral hepatitis had chimerism in her lymph nodes, skin, jejunum, and aorta at the time of retransplantation. Although cell migration is thought to take place after all types of transplantation, the large population of migratory cells in, and the extent of their seeding from, hepatic grafts may explain the privileged tolerogenicity of the liver compared with other organs. PMID:1357298

  14. In vitro functionality of human fetal liver cells and clonal derivatives under proliferative conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurholt, Tanja; ten Bloemendaal, Lysbeth; Chhatta, Aniska A.; van Wijk, Albert C. W. A.; Weijer, Kees; Seppen, Jurgen; Elferink, Ronald P. J. Oude; Chamuleau, Robert A. F. M.; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje

    2006-01-01

    Mature human hepatocytes are not suitable for large-scale in vitro applications that rely on hepatocyte function, due to their limited availability and insufficient proliferation capacity in vitro. In contrast, human fetal liver cells (HFLC) can be easily expanded in vitro. In this study we

  15. Effect of extracellular vesicles of human adipose tissue on insulin signaling in liver and muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranendonk, Mariëtte E G; Visseren, Frank L J; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; de Jager, Wilco; Wauben, Marca H M; Kalkhoven, Eric; Nolte - t Hoen, Esther

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin resistance (IR) is a key mechanism in obesity-induced cardiovascular disease. To unravel mechanisms whereby human adipose tissue (AT) contributes to systemic IR, the effect of human AT-extracellular vesicles (EVs) on insulin signaling in liver and muscle cells was determined.

  16. Hepatocytic Differentiation Potential of Human Fetal Liver Mesenchymal Stem Cells: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda El-Kehdy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In line with the search of effective stem cell population that would progress liver cell therapy and because the rate and differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC decreases with age, the current study investigates the hepatogenic differentiation potential of human fetal liver MSCs (FL-MSCs. After isolation from 11-12 gestational weeks’ human fetal livers, FL-MSCs were shown to express characteristic markers such as CD73, CD90, and CD146 and to display adipocytic and osteoblastic differentiation potential. Thereafter, we explored their hepatocytic differentiation potential using the hepatogenic protocol applied for adult human liver mesenchymal cells. FL-MSCs differentiated in this way displayed significant features of hepatocyte-like cells as demonstrated in vitro by the upregulated expression of specific hepatocytic markers and the induction of metabolic functions including CYP3A4 activity, indocyanine green uptake/release, and glucose 6-phosphatase activity. Following transplantation, naive and differentiated FL-MSC were engrafted into the hepatic parenchyma of newborn immunodeficient mice and differentiated in situ. Hence, FL-MSCs appeared to be interesting candidates to investigate the liver development at the mesenchymal compartment level. Standardization of their isolation, expansion, and differentiation may also support their use for liver cell-based therapy development.

  17. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Han, Bing [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Setoyama, Kentaro [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamamoto, Toshiyuki [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzman-Lepe, Jorge [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Galambos, Csaba [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Fong, Jason V. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamanouchi, Kosho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  18. The Humanities in English Primary Schools: Struggling to Survive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jonathan; Scoffham, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    This article surveys the state of the humanities in English primary schools drawing on evidence from serving head teachers, current literature and policy documents. The findings suggest that whilst the humanities are highly valued in schools, there are serious challenges which threaten the "broad and balanced" curriculum. It is suggested…

  19. Reelin expression in human liver of patients with chronic hepatitis C infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Carotti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Reelin is a secreted extracellular glycoprotein that plays a critical role during brain development. Several studies have described Reelin expression in hepatic stellate cells of the human liver. In order to investigate the possible role of Reelin in the process of hepatic fibrogenesis, in this study we investigated Reelin expression in the liver tissue of patients infected with the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV. On this basis, Reelin expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry during liver biopsies of 81 patients with HCV-related chronic hepatitis. A Knodell score was used to stage liver fibrosis. Hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblast immunohistochemical markers (CRBP-1, alpha-SMA were also evaluated. As further confirmed by co-localization experiments (Reelin +CRBP-1, Reelin protein was expressed by hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts, and a significant positive correlation was found between Reelin expression and the stage of liver fibrosis (P=0.002. Moreover, Reelin correlated with CRBP-1 positive cells (P=0.002, but not with alpha-SMA, suggesting that Reelin should not be regarded as a marker of hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts differentiation but rather as a functional protein expressed during some phases of liver fibrosis. Furthermore, Disabled-1 (Dab1, a Reelin adaptor protein, was expressed in cells of ductular reaction suggesting a paracrine role for Reelin with regards these elements. In conclusion, Reelin was expressed by human hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts and the number of these cells increased significantly in the lobule as the liver fibrosis progressed, suggesting a role for Reelin in the activation of hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts during liver injury. Reelin may potentially be incorporated into liver injury evaluations in combination with other histological data.

  20. Minimally invasive liver resection for primary and metastatic liver tumors: influence of age on perioperative complications and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucandy, Iswanto; Cheek, Susannah; Tsung, Allan; Marsh, J Wallis; Geller, David A

    2017-10-18

    As minimally invasive technique becomes more popular, an increasing number of elderly patients were considered for minimally invasive liver resection (MILR). Limited physiologic reserve remains a major concern, which frequently leads surgeons to recommend nonresectional alternatives. We sought to evaluate complications and outcomes of elderly patients undergoing MILR. Eight hundred and thirty-one patients who underwent MILR were classified into groups A, B, and C based on age [(< 70, n = 629), (70-79, n = 148), (≥ 80, n = 54) years old, respectively]. Gender distribution, BMI, and cirrhotic status were comparable among all groups. Groups B and C had higher MELD (p = 0.047) and ASA (p = 0.001) scores. Operative time (170, 157, 152 min; p = 0.64) and estimated blood loss (145, 130, 145 ml; p = 0.95) were statistically equal. Overall postoperative complications were greater in groups B and C (12.9 and 9.3 vs. 6.5%, respectively). Complications in group C were all minor. Clavien-Dindo grade III-IV complications were higher in group B when compared to group A (6.8 vs. 2.7%, p = 0.43). There was no significant difference in cardiopulmonary complications, thromboembolic events, ICU admissions, and transfusion rates seen in groups B and C when compared to group A. Duration of hospital stay was statistically longer in groups B and C (3.6, 3.5 vs. 2.5 days, p = 0.0012). 30- and 90-day mortality rates were comparable among the groups, irrespective of age. In spite of greater preoperative comorbidities and ASA score, there was no significant increase in postoperative morbidity after minimally invasive liver resection in patients ≥ 70 years of age.

  1. Phases I-II Matched Case-Control Study of Human Fetal Liver Cell Transplantation for Treatment of Chronic Liver Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pietrosi, Giada; Vizzini, Giovanni; Gerlach, Jorg; Chinnici, Cinzia; Luca, Angelo; Amico, Giandomenico; D'amato, Monica; Conaldi, Pier Giulio; Petri, Sergio Li; Spada, Marco; Tuzzolino, Fabio; Alio, Luigi; Schmelzer, Eva; Gridelli, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Fetal hepatocytes have a high regenerative capacity. The aim of the study was to assess treatment safety and clinical efficacy of human fetal liver cell transplantation through splenic artery infusion...

  2. Hypogammaglobulinemia in BLT humanized mice--an animal model of primary antibody deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martinez-Torres

    Full Text Available Primary antibody deficiencies present clinically as reduced or absent plasma antibodies without another identified disorder that could explain the low immunoglobulin levels. Bone marrow-liver-thymus (BLT humanized mice also exhibit primary antibody deficiency or hypogammaglobulinemia. Comprehensive characterization of B cell development and differentiation in BLT mice revealed other key parallels with primary immunodeficiency patients. We found that B cell ontogeny was normal in the bone marrow of BLT mice but observed an absence of switched memory B cells in the periphery. PC-KLH immunizations led to the presence of switched memory B cells in immunized BLT mice although plasma cells producing PC- or KLH- specific IgG were not detected in tissues. Overall, we have identified the following parallels between the humoral immune systems of primary antibody deficiency patients and those in BLT mice that make this in vivo model a robust and translational experimental platform for gaining a greater understanding of this heterogeneous array of humoral immunodeficiency disorders in humans: (i hypogammaglobulinemia; (ii normal B cell ontogeny in bone marrow; and (iii poor antigen-specific IgG response to immunization. Furthermore, the development of strategies to overcome these humoral immune aberrations in BLT mice may in turn provide insights into the pathogenesis of some primary antibody deficiency patients which could lead to novel clinical interventions for improved humoral immune function.

  3. Stoichiometries of Transferrin Receptors 1 and 2 in Human Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Chloupková, Maja; Zhang, An-Sheng; Enns, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in either the hereditary hemochromatosis protein, HFE, or transferrin receptor 2, TfR2, result in a similarly severe form of the most common type of iron overload disease called hereditary hemochromatosis. Models of the interactions between HFE, TfR1, and TfR2 imply that these proteins are present in different molar concentrations in the liver, where they control expression of the iron regulatory hormone, hepcidin, in response to body iron loading. The aim of this study was to deter...

  4. Embryonic origin of primary colon cancer predicts survival in patients undergoing ablation for colorectal liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, S; Odisio, B C; Huang, S Y; Kopetz, S E; Ahrar, K; Chun, Y S; Conrad, C; Aloia, T A; Gupta, S; Harmoush, S; Hicks, M E; Vauthey, J-N

    2017-06-01

    In patients with primary colorectal cancer (CRC) or unresectable metastatic CRC, midgut embryonic origin is associated with worse prognosis. The impact of embryonic origin on survival after ablation of colorectal liver metastases (CLM) is unclear. We identified 74 patients with CLM who underwent percutaneous ablation during 2004-2015. Survival and recurrence after ablation of CLM from midgut origin (n = 18) and hindgut origin (n = 56) were analyzed. Prognostic value of embryonic origin was evaluated. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) after percutaneous ablation were worse in patients from midgut origin (3-year RFS: 5.6% vs. 24%, P = 0.004; 3-year OS: 25% vs. 70%, P 0.001). In multivariable analysis, factors associated with worse OS were midgut origin (hazard ratio [HR] 4.87, 95% CI 2.14-10.9, P 0.001), multiple CLM (HR 2.35, 95% CI 1.02-5.39, P = 0.044), and RAS mutation (HR 2.78, 95% CI 1.25-6.36, P = 0.013). At a median follow-up of 25 months, 56 patients (76%) had developed recurrence, 16 (89%) with midgut origin and 40 (71%) with hindgut origin (P = 0.133). Recurrent disease was treated with local therapy in 20 patients (36%), 2 (13%) with midgut origin and 18 (45%) with hindgut origin (P = 0.022). Compared to CLM from hindgut origin tumors, CLM from midgut origin tumors were associated with worse survival after ablation, which was partly attributable to the fact that patients with hindgut origin were more frequently candidates for local therapy at recurrence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  5. In vitro metabolism of aflatoxin B2 by animal and human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebuck, B D; Siegel, W G; Wogan, G N

    1978-04-01

    The metabolism of aflatoxin B2 by postmitochondrial supernatant fractions of duck, rat, mouse, and human livers was studied in an in vitro system. Duck liver had a much higher level of activity than had tissues from other species. Postmitochondrial supernatant equivalent to 0.2 g whole liver metabolized 40 to 80% of the initial substrate in 30 min, compared to less than 6% for the other species. Among several metabolites formed by duck liver, aflatoxin B1 was produced in amounts equivalent to 2 to 8% of the initial substrate, and metabolites having chromatographic properties postualted for aflatoxicols 1 and 2 and aflatoxins M1 and M2 were also formed in small amounts. In contrast, rat, mouse, and human liver preparations produced no detectable aflatoxin B1 and only small amounts of compounds thought to be aflatoxins Q2 and P2. The greater susceptibility of duck liver to the toxicity of aflatoxin B2 may be attributable to its ability to form aflatoxin B2 may be attributable to its ability to form aflatoxin B1, which could then be activated through further metabolism.

  6. HLA-G and classical HLA class I expression in primary colorectal cancer and associated liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swets, Marloes; König, Marion H; Zaalberg, Anniek; Dekker-Ensink, Neeltje G; Gelderblom, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; van den Elsen, Peter J; Kuppen, Peter J K

    2016-09-01

    De novo expression of HLA-G has been demonstrated in colorectal cancer. HLA-G, amongst others, inhibits natural killer cell function, contributing to host immune defense evasion. Another mechanism to escape anti-tumor immunity is loss of HLA class I. Therefore, we determined HLA-G and HLA class I expression on primary colorectal tumors and associated liver metastases, in order to get insight in the metastasizing process regarding escaping anti-tumor immunity. HLA-G expression was evaluated using three mAbs; 4H84, MEM-G/1 and MEM-G/2. In total 81 colorectal cancer patients were evaluated. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of primary tumors and associated liver metastases, were immunohistochemically stained. A concordance between expression or loss/downregulation in the primary tumor and associated liver metastasis regarding HLA class I expression was observed in 80% of the cases. In contrast with the hypothesis of escaping NK cell-killing, we demonstrated for each HLA-G detecting mAbs used in this study, that the majority of the primary tumors that positively stained for HLA-G did not express HLA-G in the associated liver metastasis. Furthermore, we revealed the existence of non-specific binding and in addition we found that the different epitopes of HLA-G detected by 4H84, MEM-G/1 and MEM-G/2 mAbs were expressed differentially in colorectal tumor tissues. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced cell death in primary human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most prevalent cause of drug-induced liver injury in western countries. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of injury after APAP overdose in various animal models; however, the importance of these mechanisms for humans remains unclear. Here we investigated APAP hepatotoxicity using freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from either donor livers or liver resections. PHH were exposed to 5 mM, 10 mM or 20 mM APAP over a period of 48 h and multiple parameters were assessed. APAP dose-dependently induced significant hepatocyte necrosis starting from 24 h, which correlated with the clinical onset of human liver injury after APAP overdose. Interestingly, cellular glutathione was depleted rapidly during the first 3 h. APAP also resulted in early formation of APAP-protein adducts (measured in whole cell lysate and in mitochondria) and mitochondrial dysfunction, indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential after 12 h. Furthermore, APAP time-dependently triggered c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol and translocation of phospho-JNK to the mitochondria. Both co-treatment and post-treatment (3 h) with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reduced JNK activation and significantly attenuated cell death at 24 h and 48 h after APAP. The clinical antidote N-acetylcysteine offered almost complete protection even if administered 6 h after APAP and a partial protection when given at 15 h. Conclusion: These data highlight important mechanistic events in APAP toxicity in PHH and indicate a critical role of JNK in the progression of injury after APAP in humans. The JNK pathway may represent a therapeutic target in the clinic. - Highlights: • APAP reproducibly causes cell death in freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes. • APAP induces adduct formation, JNK activation and mitochondrial dysfunction in PHH. • Mitochondrial adducts and JNK translocation are delayed in PHH compared to

  8. Endovascular treatment with primary stenting of inferior cava vein torsion following orthotopic liver transplantation with modified piggyback technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Carlo; Andorno, Enzo; Guastavino, Andrea; Rossi, Umberto G; Seitun, Sara; Bovio, Giulio; Valente, Umberto

    2014-03-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate primary stenting in patients with inferior vena cava torsion after orthotopic liver transplantation performed with modified piggyback technique. From November 2003 to October 2010, six patients developed clinical, laboratory and imaging findings suggestive of caval stenosis, after a mean period of 21 days from an orthotopic liver transplantation performed with modified piggyback technique. Vena cavography showed stenosis due to torsion of the inferior vena cava at the anastomoses and a significant caval venous pressure gradient. All patients were treated with primary stenting followed by in-stent angioplasty in three cases. In all patients, the stents were successfully positioned at the caval anastomosis and the venous gradient pressure fell from a mean value of 10 to 2 mmHg. Signs and symptoms resolved in all six patients. One patient died 3 months after stent placement due to biliary complications. No evidence of recurrence or complications was noted during the follow-up (mean 49 months). Primary stenting of inferior vena cava stenosis due to torsion of the anastomoses in patients receiving orthotopic liver transplantation with modified piggyback technique is a safe, effective and durable treatment.

  9. Long-Term Culture of Genome-Stable Bipotent Stem Cells from Adult Human Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Huch Meritxell; Gehart Helmuth; van Boxtel Ruben; Hamer Karien; Blokzijl Francis; Verstegen Monique M. A.; Ellis Ewa; van Wenum Martien; Fuchs Sabine A.; de Ligt Joep; van de Wetering Marc; Sasaki Nobuo; Boers Susanne J.; Kemperman Hans; de Jonge Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite the enormous replication potential of the human liver, there are currently no culture systems available that sustain hepatocyte replication and/or function in?vitro. We have shown previously that single mouse Lgr5+ liver stem cells can be expanded as epithelial organoids in?vitro and can be differentiated into functional hepatocytes in?vitro and in?vivo. We now describe conditions allowing long-term expansion of adult bile duct-derived bipotent progenitor cells from human live...

  10. Alloxan-Induced Diabetes Causes Morphological and Ultrastructural Changes in Rat Liver that Resemble the Natural History of Chronic Fatty Liver Disease in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Natália Lucchesi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study evaluated the long-term effects of alloxan-induced diabetes in rat liver. Methods. Thirty nondiabetic control rats (NC and 30 untreated diabetic (UD rats were divided into three subgroups sacrificed after 6, 14, or 26 weeks. Clinical and laboratory parameters were assessed. Fresh liver weight and its relationship with body weight were obtained, and liver tissue was analyzed. Results. UD rats showed sustained hyperglycemia, high glycosylated hemoglobin, and low plasma insulin. High serum levels of AST and ALT were observed in UD rats after 2 weeks, but only ALT remained elevated throughout the experiment. Fresh liver weight was equal between NC and UD rats, but the fresh liver weight/body weight ratio was significantly higher in UD rats after 14 and 26 weeks. UD rats showed liver morphological changes characterized by hepatic sinusoidal enlargement and micro- and macrovesicular hepatocyte fatty degeneration with progressive liver structure loss, steatohepatitis, and periportal fibrosis. Ultrastructural changes of hepatocytes, such as a decrease in the number of intracytoplasmic organelles and degeneration of mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and nuclei, were also observed. Conclusion. Alloxan-induced diabetes triggered liver morphological and ultrastructural changes that closely resembled human disease, ranging from steatosis to steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis.

  11. Eugenol Toxicity in Human Dental Pulp Fibroblasts of Primary Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-García, Maria; Rodríguez-Contreras, Karen; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Pierdant-Pérez, Mauricio; Cerda-Cristerna, Bernardino; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the eugenol concentrations at which toxicity occurs in human dental pulp fibroblasts of primary teeth. Samples of primary dental pulp tissue were taken. Tissue samples were seeded by means of explant technique and used in the 4(th)-5th pass. Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (Comet), phenazine MeThoSulfate (MTS), LIVE/DEAD Cell Viability/Toxicity and trypan blue assays for evaluation of the cytotoxicity of increasing concentrations of eugenol (0.06 to 810 μM) were performed. The results of toxicity tests showed toxic effects on dental pulp fibroblasts, even at very low concentrations of eugenol (0.06 μM). Very low concentrations of eugenol produce high toxicity in human dental pulp fibroblasts. All of the concentrations of eugenol that we evaluated produced high toxicity in human dental pulp fibroblasts of primary teeth.

  12. All-Trans-Retinoic Acid Enhances Mitochondrial Function in Models of Human Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sasmita; Chapman, John D; Han, Chang Y; Hogarth, Cathryn A; Arnold, Samuel L.M.; Onken, Jennifer; Kent, Travis; Goodlett, David R

    2016-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is the active metabolite of vitamin A. The liver is the main storage organ of vitamin A, but activation of the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in mouse liver and in human liver cell lines has also been shown. Although atRA treatment improves mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle in rodents, its role in modulating mitochondrial function in the liver is controversial, and little data are available regarding the human liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether atRA regulates hepatic mitochondrial activity. atRA treatment increased the mRNA and protein expression of multiple components of mitochondrial β-oxidation, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and respiratory chain. Additionally, atRA increased mitochondrial biogenesis in human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells with and without lipid loading based on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α and 1β and nuclear respiratory factor 1 mRNA and mitochondrial DNA quantification. atRA also increased β-oxidation and ATP production in HepG2 cells and in human hepatocytes. Knockdown studies of RARα, RARβ, and PPARδ revealed that the enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis and β-oxidation by atRA requires peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta. In vivo in mice, atRA treatment increased mitochondrial biogenesis markers after an overnight fast. Inhibition of atRA metabolism by talarozole, a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 26 specific inhibitor, increased the effects of atRA on mitochondrial biogenesis markers in HepG2 cells and in vivo in mice. These studies show that atRA regulates mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism and that increasing atRA concentrations in human liver via CYP26 inhibition may increase mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid β-oxidation and provide therapeutic benefit in diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26921399

  13. Human Liver Cells Expressing Albumin and Mesenchymal Characteristics Give Rise to Insulin-Producing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irit Meivar-Levy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the pancreatic lineage in the liver has been suggested as a potential autologous cell replacement therapy for diabetic patients. Transcription factors-induced liver-to-pancreas reprogramming has been demonstrated in numerous species both in vivo and in vitro. However, human-derived liver cells capable of acquiring the alternate pancreatic repertoire have never been characterized. It is yet unknown whether hepatic-like stem cells or rather adult liver cells give rise to insulin-producing cells. Using an in vitro experimental system, we demonstrate that proliferating adherent human liver cells acquire mesenchymal-like characteristics and a considerable level of cellular plasticity. However, using a lineage-tracing approach, we demonstrate that insulin-producing cells are primarily generated in cells enriched for adult hepatic markers that coexpress both albumin and mesenchymal markers. Taken together, our data suggest that adult human hepatic tissue retains a substantial level of developmental plasticity, which could be exploited in regenerative medicine approaches.

  14. Criteria for viability assessment of discarded human donor livers during ex vivo normothermic machine perfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Sutton

    Full Text Available Although normothermic machine perfusion of donor livers may allow assessment of graft viability prior to transplantation, there are currently no data on what would be a good parameter of graft viability. To determine whether bile production is a suitable biomarker that can be used to discriminate viable from non-viable livers we have studied functional performance as well as biochemical and histological evidence of hepatobiliary injury during ex vivo normothermic machine perfusion of human donor livers. After a median duration of cold storage of 6.5 h, twelve extended criteria human donor livers that were declined for transplantation were ex vivo perfused for 6 h at 37 °C with an oxygenated solution based on red blood cells and plasma, using pressure controlled pulsatile perfusion of the hepatic artery and continuous portal perfusion. During perfusion, two patterns of bile flow were identified: (1 steadily increasing bile production, resulting in a cumulative output of ≥ 30 g after 6 h (high bile output group, and (2 a cumulative bile production <20 g in 6 h (low bile output group. Concentrations of transaminases and potassium in the perfusion fluid were significantly higher in the low bile output group, compared to the high bile output group. Biliary concentrations of bilirubin and bicarbonate were respectively 4 times and 2 times higher in the high bile output group. Livers in the low bile output group displayed more signs of hepatic necrosis and venous congestion, compared to the high bile output group. In conclusion, bile production could be an easily assessable biomarker of hepatic viability during ex vivo machine perfusion of human donor livers. It could potentially be used to identify extended criteria livers that are suitable for transplantation. These ex vivo findings need to be confirmed in a transplant experiment or a clinical trial.

  15. Primary liver cancer deaths and related years of life lost attributable to hepatitis B and C viruses in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami, Farhad; Dikshit, Rajesh; Mallath, Mohandas K; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2016-02-01

    More than 25,000 people die of liver cancer annually in India. There is little information about the contribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) to these deaths. We conducted a systematic review of published studies on HBV or HCV infection and liver cancer in India and estimated the population attributable fraction (PAF) of liver cancer deaths caused by these infections and the corresponding annual number of deaths and years of life lost (YLL) in the country. We searched the PubMed and Scopus databases, as well as the reference list of relevant articles in the systematic review. For calculation of the number of liver cancer deaths attributable to HBV and HCV, we used two sources of outcome data and two relative risks for the association between HCV and liver cancer. The PAF was 67% for HBV, 17-19% for HCV, and 71-72% for HBV and/or HCV. The annual attributable number of liver cancer deaths was approximately 17,000 for HBV; 4500 for HCV; and 18,500 for HBV and/or HCV, corresponding to approximately 297,000, 75,000, and 315,000 YLL, respectively. There was little difference in these numbers using the two sources of outcome data or the two risk estimates for HCV. Our findings underscore the importance of primary prevention of HBV and HCV by appropriate measures, including vaccination (HBV only), prevention of transfusion-related infections, and increased awareness of the routes of transmission and long-term health outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene discovery for the carcinogenic human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

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    Gasser Robin B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA – cancer of the bile ducts – is associated with chronic infection with the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini. Despite being the only eukaryote that is designated as a 'class I carcinogen' by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, little is known about its genome. Results Approximately 5,000 randomly selected cDNAs from the adult stage of O. viverrini were characterized and accounted for 1,932 contigs, representing ~14% of the entire transcriptome, and, presently, the largest sequence dataset for any species of liver fluke. Twenty percent of contigs were assigned GO classifications. Abundantly represented protein families included those involved in physiological functions that are essential to parasitism, such as anaerobic respiration, reproduction, detoxification, surface maintenance and feeding. GO assignments were well conserved in relation to other parasitic flukes, however, some categories were over-represented in O. viverrini, such as structural and motor proteins. An assessment of evolutionary relationships showed that O. viverrini was more similar to other parasitic (Clonorchis sinensis and Schistosoma japonicum than to free-living (Schmidtea mediterranea flatworms, and 105 sequences had close homologues in both parasitic species but not in S. mediterranea. A total of 164 O. viverrini contigs contained ORFs with signal sequences, many of which were platyhelminth-specific. Examples of convergent evolution between host and parasite secreted/membrane proteins were identified as were homologues of vaccine antigens from other helminths. Finally, ORFs representing secreted proteins with known roles in tumorigenesis were identified, and these might play roles in the pathogenesis of O. viverrini-induced CCA. Conclusion This gene discovery effort for O. viverrini should expedite molecular studies of cholangiocarcinogenesis and accelerate research focused on developing new interventions

  17. Control of oxygen tension recapitulates zone-specific functions in human liver microphysiology systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Montiel, Felipe T; George, Subin M; Gough, Albert H; Sharma, Anup D; Wu, Juanfang; DeBiasio, Richard; Vernetti, Lawrence A; Taylor, D Lansing

    2017-10-01

    This article describes our next generation human Liver Acinus MicroPhysiology System (LAMPS). The key demonstration of this study was that Zone 1 and Zone 3 microenvironments can be established by controlling the oxygen tension in individual devices over the range of ca. 3 to 13%. The oxygen tension was computationally modeled using input on the microfluidic device dimensions, numbers of cells, oxygen consumption rates of hepatocytes, the diffusion coefficients of oxygen in different materials and the flow rate of media in the MicroPhysiology System (MPS). In addition, the oxygen tension was measured using a ratiometric imaging method with the oxygen sensitive dye, Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate (RTDP) and the oxygen insensitive dye, Alexa 488. The Zone 1 biased functions of oxidative phosphorylation, albumin and urea secretion and Zone 3 biased functions of glycolysis, α1AT secretion, Cyp2E1 expression and acetaminophen toxicity were demonstrated in the respective Zone 1 and Zone 3 MicroPhysiology System. Further improvements in the Liver Acinus MicroPhysiology System included improved performance of selected nonparenchymal cells, the inclusion of a porcine liver extracellular matrix to model the Space of Disse, as well as an improved media to support both hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells. In its current form, the Liver Acinus MicroPhysiology System is most amenable to low to medium throughput, acute through chronic studies, including liver disease models, prioritizing compounds for preclinical studies, optimizing chemistry in structure activity relationship (SAR) projects, as well as in rising dose studies for initial dose ranging. Impact statement Oxygen zonation is a critical aspect of liver functions. A human microphysiology system is needed to investigate the impact of zonation on a wide range of liver functions that can be experimentally manipulated. Because oxygen zonation has such diverse physiological effects in the liver, we

  18. The adult livers of immunodeficient mice support human hematopoiesis: evidence for a hepatic mast cell population that develops early in human ontogeny.

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    Marcus O Muench

    Full Text Available The liver plays a vital role in hematopoiesis during mammalian prenatal development but its hematopoietic output declines during the perinatal period. Nonetheless, hepatic hematopoiesis is believed to persist into adulthood. We sought to model human adult-liver hematopoiesis by transplantation of fetal and neonatal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs into adult immunodeficient mice. Livers were found to be engrafted with human cells consisting primarily of monocytes and B-cells with lesser contributions by erythrocytes, T-cells, NK-cells and mast-cells. A resident population of CD117(++CD203c(+ mast cells was also documented in human midgestation liver, indicating that these cells comprise part of the liver's resident immune cell repertoire throughout human ontogeny. The murine liver was shown to support human multilineage hematopoiesis up to 321 days after transplant. Evidence of murine hepatic hematopoiesis was also found in common mouse strains as old as 2 years. Human HSC engraftment of the murine liver was demonstrated by detection of high proliferative-potential colony-forming cells in clonal cultures, observation of CD38-CD34(++ and CD133(+CD34(++ cells by flow cytometry, and hematopoietic reconstitution of secondary transplant recipients of chimeric liver cells. Additionally, chimeric mice with both hematopoietic and endothelial reconstitution were generated by intrasplenic injection of immunodeficient mice with liver specific expression of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA transgene. In conclusion, the murine liver is shown to be a hematopoietic organ throughout adult life that can also support human hematopoiesis in severely immunodeficient strains. Further humanization of the murine liver can be achieved in mice harboring an uPA transgene, which support engraftment of non-hematopoietic cells types. Thus, offering a model system to study the interaction of diverse human liver cell types that regulate hematopoiesis and immune

  19. Liver graft-transmitted glioblastoma multiforme. A case report and experience with 13 multiorgan donors suffering from primary cerebral neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, S; Bechstein, W O; Lemmens, H P; Neuhaus, R; Thalmann, U; Neuhaus, P

    1996-01-01

    The transmission of donor-related malignancies by organ transplantation is a rather rare event. There has only been one report on the development of a brain tumor metastasis in liver transplantation. From September 1988 to January 1993, 342 donor hepatectomies with subsequent transplantation were performed at our center. The main donor diagnoses included subarachnoidal bleeding (n = 128; 37.4%), isolated head injury (n = 114; 33.3%), multiple injuries (n = 55; 16.1%), primary cerebral neoplasia (n = 13; 3.8%), and other (n = 32; 9.4%). Primary cerebral neoplasia included glioblastoma (n = 4), meningioma (n = 3), astrocytoma (n = 2), angioma (n = 2), neurocytoma (n = 1), and ependymoma (n = 1). In the group of donors suffering from primary cerebral neoplasia, procured organs other than the liver included kidneys (n = 20), combined kidneys and pancreata (n = 1), pancreata (n = 2), hearts (n = 8), combined hearts and lungs (n = 1), and single lungs (n = 1). Follow-up of the respective graft recipients ranged from 28 to 68 months (median 43 months). Recurrent malignancy was observed once, in a liver graft recipient. The donor, a 48-year-old female, had undergone surgical resection of an intracerebral multiform glioblastoma and died 4 months later of a relapse in the brain stem. The 28-year-old female recipient had undergone transplantation for an autoimmune-hepatitic cirrhosis. Four months later, histopathological examination of an intraperitoneal and intrahepatic mass revealed a poorly differentiated, small-cell pleomorphic cancer, identified as a glioma metastasis by S100- and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunohistochemical staining. The patient died 6 months post-transplantation. On autopsy, no further neoplastic lesions were detected. Our review adds a second reported case of a liver graft-transmitted brain tumor to the literature and the fourth donor-related malignancy after hepatic transplantation in general.

  20. Role of Tumor Associated Fibroblasts in Human Liver Regeneration, Cirrhosis, and Cancer

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    Daniela Cesselli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor associated fibroblasts (TAFs are considered a microenvironmental element critical for tumor growth and progression. Experimental studies suggest that their origin could be from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs derived from the bone marrow. However, the role played by TAFs in cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma development, and progression is largely unknown, and in vitro human models are missing. This paper for the first time demonstrates that (1 human neoplastic livers possess a population of multipotent adult stem cells (MASCs with properties of TAFs; (2 a population of MASC-derived TAFs is already present in cirrhotic, not yet neoplastic, livers; (3 MASCs isolated from nonneoplastic and noncirrhotic liver scan acquire a TAF phenotype when grown in a medium conditioned by tumor cell lines, supporting the notion that TAF could originate from resident primitive cells (MASCs, possibly through a paracrine mechanism.

  1. Scaffold-free 3D bio-printed human liver tissue stably maintains metabolic functions useful for drug discovery

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    Hideki Kizawa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The liver plays a central role in metabolism. Although many studies have described in vitro liver models for drug discovery, to date, no model has been described that can stably maintain liver function. Here, we used a unique, scaffold-free 3D bio-printing technology to construct a small portion of liver tissue that could stably maintain drug, glucose, and lipid metabolism, in addition to bile acid secretion. This bio-printed normal human liver tissue maintained expression of several kinds of hepatic drug transporters and metabolic enzymes that functioned for several weeks. The bio-printed liver tissue displayed glucose production via cAMP/protein kinase A signaling, which could be suppressed with insulin. Bile acid secretion was also observed from the printed liver tissue, and it accumulated in the culture medium over time. We observed both bile duct and sinusoid-like structures in the bio-printed liver tissue, which suggested that bile acid secretion occurred via a sinusoid-hepatocyte-bile duct route. These results demonstrated that our bio-printed liver tissue was unique, because it exerted diverse liver metabolic functions for several weeks. In future, we expect our bio-printed liver tissue to be applied to developing new models that can be used to improve preclinical predictions of long-term toxicity in humans, generate novel targets for metabolic liver disease, and evaluate biliary excretion in drug development.

  2. Scaffold-free 3D bio-printed human liver tissue stably maintains metabolic functions useful for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizawa, Hideki; Nagao, Eri; Shimamura, Mitsuru; Zhang, Guangyuan; Torii, Hitoshi

    2017-07-01

    The liver plays a central role in metabolism. Although many studies have described in vitro liver models for drug discovery, to date, no model has been described that can stably maintain liver function. Here, we used a unique, scaffold-free 3D bio-printing technology to construct a small portion of liver tissue that could stably maintain drug, glucose, and lipid metabolism, in addition to bile acid secretion. This bio-printed normal human liver tissue maintained expression of several kinds of hepatic drug transporters and metabolic enzymes that functioned for several weeks. The bio-printed liver tissue displayed glucose production via cAMP/protein kinase A signaling, which could be suppressed with insulin. Bile acid secretion was also observed from the printed liver tissue, and it accumulated in the culture medium over time. We observed both bile duct and sinusoid-like structures in the bio-printed liver tissue, which suggested that bile acid secretion occurred via a sinusoid-hepatocyte-bile duct route. These results demonstrated that our bio-printed liver tissue was unique, because it exerted diverse liver metabolic functions for several weeks. In future, we expect our bio-printed liver tissue to be applied to developing new models that can be used to improve preclinical predictions of long-term toxicity in humans, generate novel targets for metabolic liver disease, and evaluate biliary excretion in drug development.

  3. Multifactorial Biological Modulation of Warm Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Liver Transplantation From Non-Heart-Beating Donors Eliminates Primary Nonfunction and Reduces Bile Salt Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monbaliu, Diethard; Vekemans, Katrien; Hoekstra, Harm; Vaahtera, Lauri; Libbrecht, Louis; Derveaux, Katelijne; Parkkinen, Jaakko; Liu, Qiang; Heedfeld, Veerle; Wylin, Tine; Deckx, Hugo; Zeegers, Marcel; Balligand, Erika; Buurman, Wim; van Pelt, Jos; Porte, Robert J.; Pirenne, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To design a multifactorial biological modulation approach targeting ischemia reperfusion injury to augment viability of porcine liver grafts from non-heart-beating donors (NHBD). Background Data: Liver Transplantation (LTx) from NHBD is associated with an increased risk of primary

  4. Micro-RNA profiling in human serum reveals compartment-specific roles of miR-571 and miR-652 in liver cirrhosis.

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    Christoph Roderburg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Micro-RNAs (miRNAs have recently emerged as crucial modulators of molecular processes involved in chronic liver diseases. The few miRNAs with previously proposed roles in liver cirrhosis were identified in screening approaches on liver parenchyma, mostly in rodent models. Therefore, in the present study we performed a systematic screening approach in order to identify miRNAs with altered levels in the serum of patients with chronic liver disease and liver cirrhosis. METHODS: We performed a systematic, array-based miRNA expression analysis on serum samples from patients with liver cirrhosis. In functional experiments we evaluated the relationship between alterations of miRNA serum levels and their role in distinct cellular compartments involved in hepatic cirrhosis. RESULTS: The array analysis and the subsequent confirmation by qPCR in a larger patient cohort identified significant alterations in serum levels of miR-513-3p, miR-571 and miR-652, three previously uncharacterized miRNAs, in patients with alcoholic or hepatitis C induced liver cirrhosis. Of these, miR-571 serum levels closely correlated with disease stages, thus revealing potential as a novel biomarker for hepatic cirrhosis. Further analysis revealed that up-regulation of miR-571 in serum reflected a concordant regulation in cirrhotic liver tissue. In isolated primary human liver cells, miR-571 was up-regulated in human hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells in response to the pro-fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β. In contrast, alterations in serum levels of miR-652 were stage-independent, reflecting a concordant down-regulation of this miRNA in circulating monocytes of patients with liver cirrhosis, which was inducible by proinflammatory stimuli like bacterial lipopolysaccharide. CONCLUSION: Alterations of miR571 and miR-652 serum levels in patients with chronic liver disease reflect their putative roles in the mediation of fibrogenic and inflammatory processes in

  5. Human Parechovirus as a Cause of Isolated Pediatric Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Amee M; Scott, John P; Hong, Johnny C; Cronin, David C; Vitola, Bernadette E; Fons, Roger A; Petersen, Tara L

    2016-11-01

    Among infants, almost half of acute liver failure cases are classified as indeterminate, whereas only a small number of cases show a documented viral infection. We present the first reported case of isolated acute hepatic failure in an infant in the setting of a human parechovirus (HPeV) infection. HPeV also may have been contributory to the posttransplant complication of 2 intussusceptions. This is a 10-month-old girl who presented with only symptoms of fussiness and was noted to have progressive decline in synthetic liver function as well as worsening coagulopathy requiring a liver transplant. The acute liver failure was in the setting of a positive serum RNA HPeV, subtype 3 (HPeV-3), after extensive diagnostic testing with genetic, autoimmune, and infectious causes otherwise negative. After liver transplantation, the postoperative course was complicated by both an ileal-ileal intussusception as well as a jejunal intussusception. Viral testing in pediatric acute liver failure is often performed, but the workup is frequently incomplete. This case report would support more extensive viral testing in this population of patients. In the setting of HPeV, clinicians could be alerted to the possibility of delayed gastrointestinal pathology in the posttransplant phase. Wider use of routine HPeV testing may more clearly define the variable clinical presentations and outcomes. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Side Population Cells Derived from Adult Human Liver Generate Hepatocyte-like Cells In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    HUSSAIN, SUNNY ZAHEED; STROM, STEPHEN C.; KIRBY, MARTHA R.; BURNS, SEAN; LANGEMEIJER, SASKIA; UEDA, TAKAHIRO; HSIEH, MATTHEW; TISDALE, JOHN F.

    2009-01-01

    We sought to determine whether hepatic side population (SP) cells derived from adult human liver possess the potential of a novel candidate hepatic stem cell. Human cadaveric donor liver was subjected to collagenase perfusion and hepatocytes were separated from nonparenchymal cells by differential centrifugation. SP cells were isolated from the nonparenchymal portion after Hoechst 33342 staining. Since CD45 is a panleukocyte antigen, CD45-negative SP cells were separated from the vast majority of CD45-positive SP cells (90%), and hepatic growth medium was used to culture both groups. Both CD45-negative and CD45-positive hepatic SP cells generated colonies in the hepatic growth medium in 2–3 weeks. The colonies yielded large cells morphologically consistent with human hepatocytes, demonstrating granule-rich cytoplasm, dense, often double nuclei, and intracellular lipofuscin pigment. The cultured cells from both sources were positive for markers of human hepatocytes: HepPar, cytokeratin 8 (CK8), and human albumin. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) performed on both groups demonstrated positivity for additional liver markers including human albumin, CK18, α-1 anti-trypsin, and the human cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP2B6. Double immunostaining (CD45 and HepPar) and RT-PCR confirmed that the hepatocyte-like cells derived from the CD45-negative SP cells acquired HepPar positivity but had no detectable CD45 antigen expression. In contrast, the cultured cells derived from the CD45-positive SP cells also acquired HepPar positivity, but only a minimal fraction expressed the CD45 antigen. We conclude that hepatic SP cells derived from the nonparenchymal portion of human liver are a potential source of human hepatocytes irrespective of their CD45 status, and further animal studies will be required to assess their regenerative potential. PMID:16187169

  7. Human leucocyte antigens B*08, DRB1*03 and DRB1*13 are significantly associated with autoimmune liver and biliary diseases in Finnish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylinen, E; Salmela, L; Peräsaari, J; Jaatinen, T; Tenca, A; Vapalahti, O; Färkkilä, M; Jalanko, H; Kolho, K-L

    2017-02-01

    The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) allele and haplotype frequencies of the Finnish population are unique because of the restricted and homogenous gene population. There are no published data on HLA genotype associations in paediatric autoimmune liver diseases in Scandinavia. This study characterised the HLA genotypes of children with autoimmune liver or biliary disease in Finland. The study cohort comprised 19 paediatric patients (13 female) aged three years to 15 years treated for autoimmune liver or biliary disease at the Children's Hospital, Helsinki University Hospital, between 2000 and 2011, and followed up for four years and three months to 14.6 years. We genotyped HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 in the children, and the HLA antigen frequencies were compared with 19 807 records from the Finnish Bone Marrow Donor Registry. All paediatric patients with autoimmune liver or biliary disease had either autoimmune HLA haplotype B*08;DRB1*03 or DRB1*13. These were significantly more common among patients with autoimmune hepatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune hepatitis/primary sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome than the Finnish control population. HLA RB1*04 was not found in the study cohort. Our study found that B*08, DRB1*03 and DRB1*13 were significantly associated with autoimmune liver and biliary diseases in Finnish paediatric patients. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Risk assessment of paracetamol-induced liver toxicity based on human in vitro data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, Geny; Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Proost, Johannes; Jetten, M; Kleinjans, Jos; Lommen, A; Peijnenburg, A; Vredenburg, G; Vermeulen, N; Russel, Frans G. M.

    Currently risk assessment is based on animal experiments with limited success. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility to replace the use of animals in risk assessment for drug-induced liver injury, by hazard identification and kinetic modeling based on human in vitro data for

  9. The fate of the vitelline and umbilical veins during the development of the human liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikspoors, Jill P. J. M.; Peeters, Mathijs M. J. P.; Mekonen, Hayelom K.; Kruepunga, Nutmethee; Mommen, Greet M. C.; Cornillie, Pieter; Köhler, S. Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation of endodermal cells into hepatoblasts is well studied, but the remodeling of the vitelline and umbilical veins during liver development is less well understood. We compared human embryos between 3 and 10 weeks of development with pig and mouse embryos at comparable stages, and used

  10. Differences in Redox Regulatory Systems in Human Lung and Liver Tumors Suggest Different Avenues for Therapy

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    Ryuta Tobe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A common characteristic of many cancer cells is that they suffer from oxidative stress. They, therefore, require effective redox regulatory systems to combat the higher levels of reactive oxygen species that accompany accelerated growth compared to the normal cells of origin. An elevated dependence on these systems in cancers suggests that targeting these systems may provide an avenue for retarding the malignancy process. Herein, we examined the redox regulatory systems in human liver and lung cancers by comparing human lung adenocarcinoma and liver carcinoma to their respective surrounding normal tissues. Significant differences were found in the two major redox systems, the thioredoxin and glutathione systems. Thioredoxin reductase 1 levels were elevated in both malignancies, but thioredoxin was highly upregulated in lung tumor and only slightly upregulated in liver tumor, while peroxiredoxin 1 was highly elevated in lung tumor, but downregulated in liver tumor. There were also major differences within the glutathione system between the malignancies and their normal tissues. The data suggest a greater dependence of liver on either the thioredoxin or glutathione system to drive the malignancy, while lung cancer appeared to depend primarily on the thioredoxin system.

  11. Primary cultures of endothelial cells of the rat liver: a model for ultrastructural and functional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, A M; Barelds, R J; de Zanger, R; Knook, D L

    1982-01-01

    A new isolation and purification procedure for endothelial cells of the rat liver and the conditions for large scale survival of these cells in maintenance culture are reported. Cells isolated by this new method and cultured with homologous rat serum on a collagen matrix show the restoration of several ultrastructural characteristics typical of rat liver endothelial cells in situ, including the broad cytoplasmic extensions that contain the sieve plates. These fenestrated cytoplasmic projections, which cover the liver sinusoids in vivo, are well preserved and are reformed in a manner reminiscent of the situation in situ. Reformation of specific membrane receptors is indicated by the reappearance of the capacity to take up horseradish peroxidase by adsorptive endocytosis, a characteristic that is lost during the cell isolation procedure. From the results obtained in this study, maintenance culture of rat liver endothelial cells seems to be a promising system for studying the regulation of pore size of the fenestrated sieve plates by alcohol and certain hormones, for studying the interaction of endothelial cells with other liver cells and tumor cells, and for studying the mechanisms of adsorptive endocytosis.

  12. Primary and secondary infection with human parvovirus B19 in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary and secondary infection with human parvovirus. B19 in pregnant women in South Africa ... I Infection during pregnancy may lead to fetal loss, especially during the second trimester, because of severe ... IgG antibodies) with viruses such as rubella: cyto- megalovirus' and varicella." Subjects and methods. A total of 1 ...

  13. Functional sex differences in human primary auditory cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruytjens, Liesbet; Georgiadis, Janniko R.; Holstege, Gert; Wit, Hero P.; Albers, Frans W. J.; Willemsen, Antoon T. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background We used PET to study cortical activation during auditory stimulation and found sex differences in the human primary auditory cortex (PAC). Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 10 male and 10 female volunteers while listening to sounds (music or white noise) and during a

  14. Time trends in incidence and prognosis of primary liver cancer and liver metastases of unknown origin in a Danish region, 1985-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Rune; Jepsen, Peter; Jacobsen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Changes, over the last 20 years, in the diagnostic procedures and treatment of primary liver cancer (PLC) and liver metastases of unknown origin (LMUO) may have affected the clinical course of both cancers. Few longitudinal studies examined this issue. In a population-based setting, we...... studied changes in the incidence and prognosis of PLC and LMUO over time. METHODS: Between 1985 and 2004, we identified 2675 patients with PLC and LMUO in three Danish counties, with a population of 1.4 million. We computed the standardized incidence rate (SIR), ratio of PLC to LMUO diagnoses, median...... survival, and estimated mortality rate ratio adjusted for age, sex, and comorbidity. RESULTS: The SIR of PLC increased from 3.2 in 1985 to 5.0 in 2003, and the SIR of LMUO increased from 3.7 to 6.4. No increase was noted in the PLC-to-LMUO ratio over time (P=0.1 for trend). From 1985 to 2004, the median...

  15. Orthotopic Liver Transplantation in Human-Immunodeficiency-Virus-Positive Patients in Germany

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    E. Anadol

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This summary evaluates the outcomes of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT of HIV-positive patients in Germany. Methods. Retrospective chart analysis of HIV-positive patients, who had been liver-transplanted in Germany between July 1997 and July 2011. Results. 38 transplantations were performed in 32 patients at 9 German transplant centres. The reasons for OLT were end-stage liver disease (ESLD and/or liver failure due to hepatitis C (HCV (=19, hepatitis B (HBV (=10, multiple viral infections of the liver (=2 and Budd-Chiari-Syndrome. In July 2011 19/32 (60% of the transplanted patients were still alive with a median survival of 61 months (IQR (interquartile range: 41–86 months. 6 patients had died in the early post-transplantation period from septicaemia (=4, primary graft dysfunction (=1, and intrathoracal hemorrhage (=1. Later on 7 patients had died from septicaemia (=2, delayed graft failure (=2, recurrent HCC (=2, and renal failure (=1. Recurrent HBV infection was efficiently prevented in 11/12 patients; HCV reinfection occurred in all patients and contributed considerably to the overall mortality. Conclusions. Overall OLT is a feasible approach in HIV-infected patients with acceptable survival rates in Germany. Reinfection with HCV still remains a major clinical challenge in HIV/HCV coinfection after OLT.

  16. Engineered Liver Platforms for Different Phases of Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Brenton R; Khetani, Salman R

    2017-02-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) remains a leading cause of drug withdrawal from human clinical trials or the marketplace. Owing to species-specific differences in liver pathways, predicting human-relevant DILI using in vitro human liver models is crucial. Microfabrication tools allow precise control over the cellular microenvironment towards stabilizing liver functions for weeks. These tools are used to engineer human liver models with different complexities and throughput using cell lines, primary cells, and stem cell-derived hepatocytes. Including multiple human liver cell types can mimic cell-cell interactions in specific types of DILI. Finally, organ-on-a-chip models demonstrate how drug metabolism in the liver affects multi-organ toxicities. In this review we survey engineered human liver platforms within the needs of different phases of drug development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Coexistence of Two Rare Sarcomas: Primary Leiomyosarcoma of Bone and Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma of the Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hitt

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old woman sought medical attention for a painful swelling of the left ankle. Plain radiographs revealed an osteolytic lesion involving the left distal tibia. An excisional biopsy provided the diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma in the tibia. A staging work-up was performed and an abdominal CT showed 4 liver hypodense lesions in both lobes with peripheral contrast enhancement. A liver biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of the liver. No association between these two entities has been described before. This case introduces the importance of the pathological confirmation of apparent metastatic lesions in low grade sarcomas and provides a review of the literature of both tumours.

  18. The association between individual metabolic syndrome components, primary liver cancer and cirrhosis: A study in the Swedish AMORIS cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nderitu, Paul; Bosco, Cecilia; Garmo, Hans; Holmberg, Lars; Malmström, Håkan; Hammar, Niklas; Walldius, Göran; Jungner, Ingmar; Ross, Paul; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke

    2017-09-15

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which may progress to cirrhosis, a significant risk factor of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the commonest malignant primary liver cancer (PLC). We investigated the association between the individual components of MetS (lipids, apolipoproteins, raised glucose, diabetes and obesity), PLC and cirrhosis. A total of 509,436 participants from the Swedish AMORIS cohort, recruited between January 1985 and December 1996 (end-date December 2011), aged ≥20 with baseline triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), glucose and liver enzymes were included. Those with baseline benign liver tumours, PLC or cirrhosis were excluded. Multivariate Cox regression, adjusted for age, gender, socio-economic status, liver disease (excluding cirrhosis) and MetS factors were used to estimate the association with PLC and cirrhosis. There were 766 PLC and 2,775 cirrhosis cases over 13 years. Raised TG, low TC, raised glucose, diabetes and low HDL were associated with an increased risk of developing PLC and cirrhosis. ApoB/ApoA-I ratio were also associated with PLC, whilst low LDL, raised TG/HDL, low ApoA-I and low ApoB were associated with cirrhosis. Obesity was significantly associated with PLC but not cirrhosis. Raised TG, low TC, raised glucose and diabetes showed stronger associations with PLC in participants with cirrhosis but many participants developed PLC without cirrhosis. Individual components of MetS (lipids, apolipoproteins, raised glucose, diabetes and obesity) were associated with an increased risk of developing PLC or cirrhosis. MetS components were more strongly associated with PLC with preceding cirrhosis history but many participants developed PLC without cirrhosis. © 2017 UICC.

  19. Human liver cell trafficking mutants: characterization and whole exome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yuan

    Full Text Available The HuH7 liver cell mutant Trf1 is defective in membrane trafficking and is complemented by the casein kinase 2α subunit CK2α''. Here we identify characteristic morphologies, trafficking and mutational changes in six additional HuH7 mutants Trf2-Trf7. Trf1 cells were previously shown to be severely defective in gap junction functions. Using a Lucifer yellow transfer assay, remarkable attenuation of gap junction communication was revealed in each of the mutants Trf2-Trf7. Electron microscopy and light microscopy of thiamine pyrophosphatase showed that several mutants exhibited fragmented Golgi apparatus cisternae compared to parental HuH7 cells. Intracellular trafficking was investigated using assays of transferrin endocytosis and recycling and VSV G secretion. Surface binding of transferrin was reduced in all six Trf2-Trf7 mutants, which generally correlated with the degree of reduced expression of the transferrin receptor at the cell surface. The mutants displayed the same transferrin influx rates as HuH7, and for efflux rate, only Trf6 differed, having a slower transferrin efflux rate than HuH7. The kinetics of VSV G transport along the exocytic pathway were altered in Trf2 and Trf5 mutants. Genetic changes unique to particular Trf mutants were identified by exome sequencing, and one was investigated in depth. The novel mutation Ile34Phe in the GTPase RAB22A was identified in Trf4. RNA interference knockdown of RAB22A or overexpression of RAB22AI34F in HuH7 cells caused phenotypic changes characteristic of the Trf4 mutant. In addition, the Ile34Phe mutation reduced both guanine nucleotide binding and hydrolysis activities of RAB22A. Thus, the RAB22A Ile34Phe mutation appears to contribute to the Trf4 mutant phenotype.

  20. Hepatopulmonary shunting in patients with primary and secondary liver tumors scheduled for radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powerski, Maciej Janusz, E-mail: maciej.powerski@med.ovgu.de [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Strasse 44, 39120 Magdeburg (Germany); Erxleben, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.erxleben@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Scheurig-Münkler, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Scheurig@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Geisel, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.geisel@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Heimann, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.heimann@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd, E-mail: bernd.hamm@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Gebauer, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.gebauer@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In patients undergoing transarterial radioembolization (RE) of malignant liver tumors, hepatopulmonary shunts (HPS) can lead to nontarget irradiation of the lungs. This study aims at analyzing the HPS fraction in relation to liver volume, tumor volume, tumor-to-liver volume ratio, tumor vascularity, type of tumor, and portal vein occlusion. Materials and methods: In the presented retrospective study the percentage HPS fraction was calculated from SPECT/CT after infusion of Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin (Tc-99m MAA) into the proper hepatic artery of 233 patients evaluated for RE. Results: HPS fractions correlate very weakly with liver volume (r = 0.303), tumor volume (r = 0.345), and tumor-to-liver volume ratio (r = 0.340). Tumors with strong contrast enhancement (HPS{sub median(range)} = 11.7%(46.3%); n = 73) have significantly larger shunt fractions than tumors with little enhancement (HPS = 8.3%(16.4%); n = 61; p < 0.001). Colorectal cancer metastases (HPS = 10.6%(28.6%); n = 68) and hepatocellular cancers (HPS = 11.7%(39.4%); n = 63) have significantly larger HPS fractions than metastases from breast cancer (HPS = 7.4%(16.7%); n = 40; p = 0.012 and p = 0.001). Patients with compression (HPS = 13.9%(43.7%); n = 33) or tumor thrombosis (HPS = 15.8% (31.2%); n = 33) of a major portal vein branch have significantly higher degrees of shunting than patients with normal portal vein perfusion (HPS = 8.1% (47.0%); n = 167; both p < 0.001). The shunt fraction is largest in patients with HCC and thrombosis or occlusion of a major portal vein branch (HPS = 16.6% (31.0%); n = 32). Conclusion: The degree of hepatopulmonary shunting depends on the type of liver tumor, tumor vascularity, and portal vein perfusion. There is little to no correlation of HPS with liver volume, tumor volume, or tumor-to-liver volume ratio.

  1. Isoflavones modulate the glucuronidation of estradiol in human liver microsomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pfeiffer, Erika; Treiling, Christian R; Hoehle, Simone I; Metzler, Manfred

    2005-01-01

    ... by the endogenous hormone 17beta-estradiol (E2). In the present study, we have examined if daidzein and genistein as well as several structurally related isoflavones are able to modulate the in vitro glucuronidation of E2 in human hepatic microsomes...

  2. Disruption of clock gene expression in human colorectal liver metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Huisman (Sander); K.R. Ahmadi (Kourosh); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); C. Verhoef (Kees); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); R.W.F. de Bruin (Ron)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe circadian timing system controls about 40 % of the transcriptome and is important in the regulation of a wide variety of biological processes including metabolic and proliferative functions. Disruption of the circadian clock could have significant effect on human health and has an

  3. IL-7 licenses activation of human liver intrasinusoidal mucosal-associated invariant T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xin-Zi; Jo, Juandy; Tan, Anthony T; Sandalova, Elena; Chia, Adeline; Tan, Kai Chah; Lee, Kang Hoe; Gehring, Adam J; De Libero, Gennaro; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Human mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a T cell population characterized by the expression of a semi-invariant TCR capable of recognizing bacterial products in the context of MR1. MAIT cells are enriched in the human liver, which is constantly exposed to bacterial products from the intestine. Whether this specific parenchymal localization influences their function remains unknown. We analyzed MAIT cells resident in the vascular bed of livers and showed that they represented the majority of T cells expressing NK markers and the dominant IL-17A(+) T cell subset in the human liver sinusoids. In comparison with MAIT cells purified from peripheral blood, intrasinusoidal MAIT cells expressed markers of T cell activation; however, TCR-mediated cytokine production was equally suppressed in both circulating and intrasinusoidal MAIT cells. MAIT cells also expressed high levels of IL-7R, and we showed that IL-7, a cytokine produced by hepatocytes during inflammation, regulated TCR-mediated activation of MAIT cells, licensing them to dramatically increase Th1 cytokines and IL-17A production. Our quantitative and functional data indicate that MAIT cells are a specialized cell population highly adapted to exert their immune functions in the vascular network of the liver.

  4. Several Human Liver Cell Expressed Apolipoproteins Complement HCV Virus Production with Varying Efficacy Conferring Differential Specific Infectivity to Released Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueging, Kathrin; Weller, Romy; Doepke, Mandy; Vieyres, Gabrielle; Todt, Daniel; Wölk, Benno; Vondran, Florian W R; Geffers, Robert; Lauber, Chris; Kaderali, Lars; Penin, François; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE), an exchangeable apolipoprotein, is necessary for production of infectious Hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles. However, ApoE is not the only liver-expressed apolipoprotein and the role of other apolipoproteins for production of infectious HCV progeny is incompletely defined. Therefore, we quantified mRNA expression of human apolipoproteins in primary human hepatocytes. Subsequently, cDNAs encoding apolipoproteins were expressed in 293T/miR-122 cells to explore if they complement HCV virus production in cells that are non-permissive due to limiting endogenous levels of human apolipoproteins. Primary human hepatocytes expressed high mRNA levels of ApoA1, A2, C1, C3, E, and H. ApoA4, A5, B, D, F, J, L1, L2, L3, L4, L6, M, and O were expressed at intermediate levels, and C2, C4, and L5 were not detected. All members of the ApoA and ApoC family of lipoproteins complemented HCV virus production in HCV transfected 293T/miR-122 cells, albeit with significantly lower efficacy compared with ApoE. In contrast, ApoD expression did not support production of infectious HCV. Specific infectivity of released particles complemented with ApoA family members was significantly lower compared with ApoE. Moreover, the ratio of extracellular to intracellular infectious virus was significantly higher for ApoE compared to ApoA2 and ApoC3. Since apolipoproteins complementing HCV virus production share amphipathic alpha helices as common structural features we altered the two alpha helices of ApoC1. Helix breaking mutations in both ApoC1 helices impaired virus assembly highlighting a critical role of alpha helices in apolipoproteins supporting HCV assembly. In summary, various liver expressed apolipoproteins with amphipathic alpha helices complement HCV virus production in human non liver cells. Differences in the efficiency of virus assembly, the specific infectivity of released particles, and the ratio between extracellular and intracellular infectivity point to

  5. IgG4-associated cholangitis: a comparative histological and immunophenotypic study with primary sclerosing cholangitis on liver biopsy material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Vikram; Sainani, Nisha I; Chung, Raymond T; Pratt, Daniel S; Mentha, Gilles; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2009-10-01

    IgG4-associated cholangitis is a steroid-responsive hepatobiliary inflammatory condition associated with autoimmune pancreatitis that clinically and radiologically mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis. In this study, we conducted a morphological and immunohistochemical analysis of liver material obtained from individuals with IgG4-associated cholangitis, and compared these with well-characterized cases of primary sclerosing cholangitis. The study group consisted of 10 patients (9 biopsy and 1 hepatectomy case) with IgG4-associated cholangitis and 17 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (16 needle biopsy and 1 hepatectomy case). All patients with IgG4-associated cholangitis had pancreatic involvement as well, and six pancreatectomy samples revealed characteristic histopathological features of autoimmune pancreatitis. Primary sclerosing cholangitis cases were defined by the presence of a characteristic ERCP appearance. Clinical, pathological, radiological, and follow-up data were recorded for all cases. Portal and periportal inflammation was graded according to Ishak's guidelines. Immunohistochemical stains for IgG and IgG4 were performed. The cohort of patients with IgG4-associated cholangitis (mean age: 63 years) was older than individuals with primary sclerosing cholangitis (mean age: 44 years). Seven of these cases showed intrahepatic biliary strictures. IgG4-associated cholangitis liver samples showed higher portal (P=0.06) and lobular (P=0.009) inflammatory scores. Microscopic portal-based fibro-inflammatory nodules that were composed of fibroblasts, plasma cells, lymphocytes, and eosinophils were exclusively observed in five of the IgG4-associated cholangitis cases (50%). More than 10 IgG4-positive plasma cells per HPF (high power field) were observed in 6 of the IgG4-associated cholangitis cases (mean: 60, range: 0-140 per HPF), whereas all primary sclerosing cholangitis cases showed significantly lesser numbers (mean: 0.08, range: 0-1 per HPF). On a

  6. Simulation of Human Plasma Concentrations of Thalidomide and Primary 5-Hydroxylated Metabolites Explored with Pharmacokinetic Data in Humanized TK-NOG Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Sayako; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Shibata, Norio; Guengerich, F Peter; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-11-16

    Plasma concentrations of thalidomide and primary 5-hydroxylated metabolites including 5,6-dihydroxythalidomide and glutathione (GSH) conjugate(s) were investigated in chimeric mice with highly "humanized" liver cells harboring cytochrome P450 3A5*1. Following oral administration of thalidomide (100 mg/kg), plasma concentrations of GSH conjugate(s) of 5-hydroxythalidomide were higher in humanized mice than in controls. Simulation of human plasma concentrations of thalidomide were achieved with a simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic model in accordance with reported thalidomide concentrations. The results indicate that the pharmacokinetics in humans of GSH conjugate and/or catechol primary 5-hydroxylated thalidomide contributing in vivo activation can be estimated for the first time.

  7. In vitro Phase I and Phase II metabolism of α-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (α-PVP), methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and methedrone by human liver microsomes and human liver cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negreira, Noelia; Erratico, Claudio; Kosjek, Tina; van Nuijs, Alexander L N; Heath, Ester; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the in vitro Phase I and Phase II metabolites of three new psychoactive substances: α-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (α-PVP), methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and methedrone, using human liver microsomes and human liver cytosol. Accurate-mass spectra of metabolites were obtained using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Six Phase I metabolites of α-PVP were identified, which were formed involving reduction, hydroxylation, and pyrrolidine ring opening reactions. The lactam compound was the major metabolite observed for α-PVP. Two glucuronidated metabolites of α-PVP, not reported in previous in vitro studies, were further identified. MDPV was transformed into 10 Phase I metabolites involving reduction, hydroxylation, and loss of the pyrrolidine ring. Also, six glucuronidated and two sulphated metabolites were detected. The major metabolite of MDPV was the catechol metabolite. Methedrone was transformed into five Phase I metabolites, involving N- and O-demethylation, hydroxylation, and reduction of the ketone group. Three metabolites of methedrone are reported for the first time. In addition, the contribution of individual human CYP enzymes in the formation of the detected metabolites was investigated.

  8. Primary Hepatic Lymphoma Is Difficult to Discriminate from a Liver Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Takeuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An 82-year-old woman presented with a high-grade fever of 40°C and was admitted to our institution for intensive examination and treatment. Noncontrast abdominal computed tomography (CT revealed low-density masses at segments 5 and 8, suggestive of a liver abscess. On further examination, a contrast-enhanced abdominal CT showed a 30×30 mm mass with an enhanced margin at segment 8 in the arterial phase; the contrast agents were washed out in the venous phase. In addition, a 63×52 mm mass with a density lower than that of liver parenchyma was observed at segment 8 in the portal phase. On the basis of these findings, either a liver abscess or hepatocellular carcinoma was suspected. To confirm the diagnosis, a fine needle biopsy was scheduled. Histopathological analysis of the biopsied specimens confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Chemotherapy was not indicated owing to the patient’s age and poor performance status; thus, best supportive care was planned. On day 22 after admission, the patient died of pneumonia. We experienced a case of PHL that was difficult to discriminate from a liver abscess. Imaging alone is insufficient to diagnose PHL; therefore, fine needle biopsy is recommended for a definitive diagnosis.

  9. Surgical treatment of a rare primary renal carcinoid tumor with liver metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowland Randall G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcinoid tumors are characteristically low grade malignant neoplasms with neuroendocrine differentiation that arise in various body sites, most commonly the lung and gastrointestinal tract, but less frequently the kidneys, breasts, ovaries, testes, prostate and other locations. We report a case of a carcinoid of renal origin with synchronous single liver metastases on radiological studies. Case presentation A 45 year-old patient who presented with abdominal pain was found on CT scan to have lesions in the right ovary, right kidney, and left hepatic lobe. CA-125, CEA, and CA 19-9 were within normal limits, as were preoperative liver function tests and renal function. Biopsy of the liver mass demonstrated metastatic neuroendocrine tumor. At laparotomy, the patient underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, radical right nephrectomy with lymphadenectomy, and left hepatectomy. Pathology evaluation reported a right ovarian borderline serous tumor, well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the kidney (carcinoid with 2 positive retroperitoneal lymph nodes, and a single liver metastasis. Immunohistochemistry revealed that this lesion was positive for synaptophysin and CD56, but negative for chromogranin as well as CD10, CD7, and CD20, consistent with a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. She is doing well one year after her initial surgery, with no evidence of tumor recurrence. Conclusion Early surgical intervention, together with careful surveillance and follow-up, can achieve successful long-term outcomes in patients with this rare malignancy.

  10. Primary genotoxicity in the liver following pulmonary exposure to carbon black nanoparticles in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modrzynska, Justyna; Berthing, Trine; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2018-01-01

    Background Little is known about the mechanism underlying the genotoxicity observed in the liver following pulmonary exposure to carbon black (CB) nanoparticles (NPs). The genotoxicity could be caused by the presence of translocated particles or by circulating inflammatory mediators released during...

  11. [Protective effect of intraperitoneal transplantation of human liver-derived stem cells at different times against concanavalin A-induced acute liver injury in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Y Z; Fan, Z; Chen, D F; Li, S S; Wang, Q Y; Gao, P F; Wang, Q Q; Duan, Z P; Chen, Y; Kong, L B; Wang, Y B; Hong, F

    2017-03-20

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of intraperitoneal transplantation of human liver-derived stem cells at different times against concanavalin A (ConA)-induced acute liver injury in mice. Methods: A total of 88 male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into normal control group (group C), ConA model group (group M), and human liver-derived stem cells (HYX1)+ConA group (group E); according to the interval between phosphate buffer/HYX1 injection and ConA injection, Groups M and E were further divided into 3-hour groups (M1 and E1 groups), 6-hour groups (M2 and E2 groups), 12-hour groups (M3 and E3 groups), 24-hour groups (M4 and E4 groups), and 48-hour groups (M5 and E5 groups). The levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and total bilirubin (TBil) in peripheral blood were measured, liver tissue sections were used to observe pathological changes, and the Ishak score for liver inflammation was determined. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison between groups, and P 0.05). The pathological sections of liver tissue showed that compared with group M, group E had significant reductions in the degree of necrosis and Ishak score (both P transplantation of human liver-derived stem cells has a protective effect against ConA-induced acute liver injury in mice, and the injection at 6 and 12 hours in advance has the best protective effect.

  12. Microwave ablation of primary and secondary liver tumours: ex vivo, in vivo, and clinical characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Claudio; Ahmed, Muneeb; Solbiati, Luigi; Meloni, Maria Franca; Solbiati, Marco; Cassarino, Simone; Tosoratti, Nevio; Nissenbaum, Yitzhak; Ierace, Tiziana; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of a microwave ablation (MWA) apparatus in preclinical and clinical settings. The same commercial 2.45 GHz MWA apparatus was used throughout this study. In total 108 ablations at powers ranging from 20 to 130 W and lasting from 3 to 30 min were obtained on ex vivo bovine liver; 28 ablations at 60 W, 80 W and 100 W lasting 5 and 10 min were then obtained in an in vivo swine model. Finally, 32 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and 19 liver metastases in 46 patients were treated percutaneously by administering 60 W for either 5 or 10 min. The treatment outcome was characterised in terms of maximum longitudinal and transversal axis of the induced ablation zone. Ex vivo ablation volumes increased linearly with deposited energy (r2 = 0.97), with higher sphericity obtained at lower power for longer ablation times. Larger ablations were obtained on liver metastases compared to HCCs treated with 60 W for 10 min (p vivo swine model at 60 W were substantially smaller than the ex vivo and clinical results (either populations). No statistically significant difference was observed between ex vivo results at 60 W and HCC results (p > 0.08). For the selected MW ablation device, ex vivo data on bovine liver was more predictive of the actual clinical performance on liver malignancies than an in vivo porcine model. Equivalent MW treatments yielded a significantly different response for HCC and metastases at higher deposited energy, suggesting that outcomes are not only device-specific but must also be characterised on a tissue-by-tissue basis.

  13. Humanization policy in primary health care: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Carlise Rigon Dalla; Junges, José Roque

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze humanization practices in primary health care in the Brazilian Unified Health System according to the principles of the National Humanization Policy. METHODS A systematic review of the literature was carried out, followed by a meta-synthesis, using the following databases: BDENF (nursing database), BDTD (Brazilian digital library of theses and dissertations), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to nursing and allied health literature), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean health care sciences literature), MedLine (International health care sciences literature), PAHO (Pan-American Health Care Organization Library) and SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online). The following descriptors were used: Humanization; Humanizing Health Care; Reception: Humanized care: Humanization in health care; Bonding; Family Health Care Program; Primary Care; Public Health and Sistema Único de Saúde (the Brazilian public health care system). Research articles, case studies, reports of experiences, dissertations, theses and chapters of books written in Portuguese, English or Spanish, published between 2003 and 2011, were included in the analysis. RESULTS Among the 4,127 publications found on the topic, 40 studies were evaluated and included in the analysis, producing three main categories: the first referring to the infrastructure and organization of the primary care service, made clear the dissatisfaction with the physical structure and equipment of the services and with the flow of attendance, which can facilitate or make difficult the access. The second, referring to the health work process, showed issues about the insufficient number of professionals, fragmentation of the work processes, the professional profile and responsibility. The third category, referring to the relational technologies, indicated the reception, bonding, listening, respect and dialog with the service users. CONCLUSIONS Although many practices were cited as humanizing they do not produce changes

  14. [Humanization policy in primary health care: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Carlise Rigon Dalla; Junges, Jose Roque

    2013-12-01

    To analyze humanization practices in primary health care in the Brazilian Unified Health System according to the principles of the National Humanization Policy. A systematic review of the literature was carried out, followed by a meta-synthesis, using the following databases: BDENF (nursing database), BDTD (Brazilian digital library of theses and dissertations), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to nursing and allied health literature), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean health care sciences literature), MedLine (International health care sciences literature), PAHO (Pan-American Health Care Organization Library) and SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online). The following descriptors were used: Humanization; Humanizing Health Care; Reception: Humanized care: Humanization in health care; Bonding; Family Health Care Program; Primary Care; Public Health and Sistema Único de Saúde (the Brazilian public health care system). Research articles, case studies, reports of experiences, dissertations, theses and chapters of books written in Portuguese, English or Spanish, published between 2003 and 2011, were included in the analysis. Among the 4,127 publications found on the topic, 40 studies were evaluated and included in the analysis, producing three main categories: the first referring to the infrastructure and organization of the primary care service, made clear the dissatisfaction with the physical structure and equipment of the services and with the flow of attendance, which can facilitate or make difficult the access. The second, referring to the health work process, showed issues about the insufficient number of professionals, fragmentation of the work processes, the professional profile and responsibility. The third category, referring to the relational technologies, indicated the reception, bonding, listening, respect and dialog with the service users. Although many practices were cited as humanizing they do not produce changes in the health services because of the

  15. Proteomic Profiling of Human Liver Biopsies: Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Fibrosis and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, Deborah L.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Paeper, Bryan; Proll, Sean; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Larson , Anne M.; Yeh, Matthew M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2007-09-01

    Liver biopsies from HCV-infected patients offer the unique opportunity to study human liver biology and disease in vivo. However, the low protein yields associated with these small samples present a significant challenge for proteomic analysis. In this study we describe the application of an ultra-sensitive proteomics platform for performing robust quantitative proteomic studies on microgram amounts of HCV-infected human liver tissue from 15 patients at different stages of fibrosis. A high quality liver protein data base containing 5,920 unique protein identifications supported high throughput quantitative studies using 16O:18O stable isotope labeling in combination with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach. A total of 1,641 liver biopsy proteins were quantified and ANOVA identified 210 proteins exhibiting statistically significant differences associated with fibrosis stage. Hierarchical clustering revealed that biopsies representative of later fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 3-4) exhibited a distinct protein expression profile indicating an apparent down-regulation of many proteins when compared to samples from earlier fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 0-2). Functional analysis of these signature proteins suggests that impairment of key mitochondrial processes including fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, and response to oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species occurs during advanced stage 3-4 fibrosis. In conclusion, the results reported here represent a significant advancement in clinical proteomics providing to our knowledge, the first demonstration of global proteomic alterations accompanying liver disease progression in patients chronically infected with HCV. Our findings contribute to a generally emerging theme associating oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction with HCV pathogenesis.

  16. Systemic human T cell developmental processes in humanized mice cotransplanted with human fetal thymus/liver tissue and hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Sung-Yeon; Chung, Yun Shin; Choi, Bongkum; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Jong-Hwa; Jun, Tae-Gook; Chang, Jun; Sprent, Jonathan; Surh, Charles D; Joh, Jae-won; Kim, Sung Joo

    2012-12-15

    In many humanized mouse models, there are few T cells in the engrafted human cell, whereas the number of B cells is high. We attempted to overcome this limitation and investigate whether the entire process of human T cell development arose similarly to the process in humans, as previously reported. To produce an advanced humanized mice model, we transplanted human fetal liver/thymus tissue subrenally and injected human CD34(+) stem cells intravenously into NOD/SCID/IL2Rgamma null (NSG) mice. Humanized mice transplanted with fetal thymus/liver tissues and fetal liver-derived CD34(+) stem cells (FLT+FLCD34) showed higher levels of human cells and T cells than mice transplanted with fetal liver-derived CD34(+) stem cells only (FLCD34). In the transplanted thymus tissue of FLT+FLCD34 mice, thymus seeding progenitors (TSPs), early thymic progenitors (ETPs), pre-T cells, and all the other human T cell populations were identified. In the periphery, FLT+FLCD34 mice have high levels of CD45RA(+) T cells; conversely, FLCD34 mice have higher levels of CD45RO(+) T cells. The CD45RO(+) T cells of FLCD34 mice proliferated rapidly after stimulation and exhibited innate T cells properties, expressing PLZF (promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein). Human T cells educated by mouse MHC II in mice without a human thymus differ from normal human T cells. On the basis of these findings, numerous T cell-tropic human diseases could be explored in our humanized mice and molecular aspects of human T cell development could be also studied extensively.

  17. Safety and efficacy of Y-90 microsphere treatment in patients with primary and metastatic liver cancer: The tumor selectivity of the treatment as a function of tumor to liver flow ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezarn William A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment records and follow-up data on 40 patients with primary and metastatic liver malignancies who underwent a single whole-liver treatment with Y-90 resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres® Sirtex Medical, Lake Forest, IL were retrospectively reviewed. The objective of the study was to evaluate the anatomic and physiologic determinants of radiation dose distribution, and the dose response of tumor and liver toxicity in patients with liver malignancies who underwent hepatic arterial Y-90 resin microsphere treatment. Methods Liver and tumor volume calculations were performed on pre-treatment CT scans. Fractional tumor and liver flow characteristics and lung shunt fractions were determined using hepatic arterial Tc-99m MAA imaging. Absorbed dose calculations were performed using the MIRD equations. Liver toxicity was assessed clinically and by liver function tests. Tumor response to therapy was assessed by CT and/or tumor markers. Results Of the 40 patients, 5 had hepatocellular cancer (HCC, and 35 had metastatic liver tumors (15 colorectal cancer, 10 neuroendocrine tumors, 4 breast cancer, 2 lung cancer, 1 ovarian cancer, 1 endometrial cancer, and 2 unknown primary adenocarcinoma. All patients were treated in a salvage setting with a 3 to 80 week follow-up (mean: 19 weeks. Tumor volumes ranged from 15.0 to 984.2 cc (mean: 294.9 cc and tumor to normal liver uptake ratios ranged from 2.8 to 15.4 (mean: 5.4. Average administered activity was 1.2 GBq (0.4 to 2.4 GBq. Liver absorbed doses ranged from 0.7 to 99.5 Gy (mean: 17.2 Gy. Tumor absorbed doses ranged from 40.1 to 494.8 Gy (mean: 121.5 Gy. None of the patients had clinical venoocclusive disease or therapy-induced liver failure. Seven patients (17.5 % had transient and 7 patients (17.5 % had persistent LFT abnormalities. There were 27 (67.5% responders (complete response, partial response, and stable disease. Tumor response correlated with higher tumor flow ratio as measured by

  18. MicroRNA-146b-5p Identified in Porcine Liver Donation Model is Associated with Early Allograft Dysfunction in Human Liver Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheukfai; Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Maogen; Ju, Weiqiang; Wu, Linwei; Han, Ming; Ma, Yi; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Dongping; Guo, Zhiyong; He, Xiaoshun

    2017-01-01

    Background Poor transplant outcome was observed in donation after brain death followed by circulatory death (DBCD), since the donor organs suffered both cytokine storm of brain death and warm ischemia injury. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as promising disease biomarkers, so we sought to establish a miRNA signature of porcine DBCD and verify the findings in human liver transplantation. Material/Methods MiRNA expression was determined with miRNA sequencing in 3 types of the porcine model of organ donation, including donation after brain death (DBD) group, donation after circulatory death (DCD) group, and DBCD group. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to reveal the potential regulatory behavior of target miRNA. Human liver graft biopsy samples after reperfusion detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization were used to verify the expression of target miRNA. Results We compared miRNA expression profiles of the 3 donation types. The porcine liver graft miR-146b was significantly increased and selected in the DBCD group versus in the DBD and DCD groups. The donor liver expression of human miR-146b-5p, which is homologous to porcine miR-146b, was further examined in 42 cases of human liver transplantations. High expression of miR-146b-5p successfully predicted the post-transplant early allograft dysfunction (EAD) with the area under the ROC curve (AUC) 0.759 (P=0.004). Conclusions Our results revealed the miRNA signature of DBCD liver grafts for the first time. The miR-146b-5p may have important clinical implications for monitoring liver graft function and predicating transplant outcomes. PMID:29227984

  19. Improving animal and human health through understanding liver fluke immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedrafita, D; Spithill, T W; Smith, R E; Raadsma, H W

    2010-08-01

    Sheep, goats and cattle represent the most numerous and economically important agricultural species worldwide used as sources for milk, fibre and red meat. In addition, in the developing world, these species often represent the sole asset base for small-holder livestock farmers and cattle/buffaloes often provide the majority of draught power for crop production. Production losses caused by helminth diseases of these animals are a major factor in extending the cycle of poverty in developing countries and a major food security issue for developed economies. Fasciola spp. are one of the most important zoonotic diseases with a global economic impact in livestock production systems and a poorly defined but direct effect on human health. Improvements in human and animal health will require a concerted research effort into the development of new accurate and simple diagnostic tests and increased vaccine and drug development against Fasciola infections. Here, the use of definitive natural host breeds with contrasting resistance to Fasciola infections is discussed as a resource to contrast parasite-host interactions and identify parasite immune evasion strategies. Such studies are likely to boost the discovery of new vaccine, drug and diagnostic candidates and provide the foundation for future genetic selection of resistant animals.

  20. Detection of Intrahepatic Human Islets Following Combined Liver-Islet Allotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricordi, Camillo; Tzakis, Andreas; Alejandro, Rodolfo; Zeng, Yijun; Demetris, Anthony J.; Carroll, Patricia; Fung, John J.; Mintz, Daniel H.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary This article describes the localization of intact insulin-containing intrahepatic islets after combined liver-islet allotransplantation. The patient was a 36-year-old woman who underwent upper abdominal exenteration for neuroendocrine carcinoma; 289,000 islets were transplanted via portal vein infusion immediately after complete revascularization of the liver. Immunosuppression was with low-dose FK-506. OKT3 and steroids were used to treat one rejection episode 2 weeks after transplantation, but the patient subsequently developed multiple infections and died 109 days after transplantation. At autopsy, the transplanted liver did not show any sign of rejection and well-preserved islets were present in portal triads sampled from the anterior inferior edge of the right lobe. Immunohistochemical labeling confirmed the presence of insulin-containing cells. This finding indicated that human islets can survive after intrahepatic allotransplantation, despite positive cross-match with no HLA antigen match, suggesting that upper abdominal exenteration and liver transplantation may constitute a protective factor for the survival of allogeneic human islets. PMID:1641394

  1. Immunological quantitation and localization of ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 in human liver and small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C C; Sakashita, N; Ornvold, K; Lee, O; Chang, E T; Dong, R; Lin, S; Lee, C Y; Strom, S C; Kashyap, R; Fung, J J; Farese, R V; Patoiseau, J F; Delhon, A; Chang, T Y

    2000-09-08

    By using specific anti-ACAT-1 antibodies in immunodepletion studies, we previously found that ACAT-1, a 50-kDa protein, plays a major catalytic role in the adult human liver, adrenal glands, macrophages, and kidneys but not in the intestine. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the intestine may be largely derived from a different ACAT protein. To test this hypothesis, we produced specific polyclonal anti-ACAT-2 antibodies that quantitatively immunodepleted human ACAT-2, a 46-kDa protein expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. In hepatocyte-like HepG2 cells, ACAT-1 comprises 85-90% of the total ACAT activity, with the remainder attributed to ACAT-2. In adult intestines, most of the ACAT activity can be immunodepleted by anti-ACAT-2. ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 do not form hetero-oligomeric complexes. In differentiating intestinal enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells, ACAT-2 protein content increases by 5-10-fold in 6 days, whereas ACAT-1 protein content remains relatively constant. In the small intestine, ACAT-2 is concentrated at the apices of the villi, whereas ACAT-1 is uniformly distributed along the villus-crypt axis. In the human liver, ACAT-1 is present in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. In contrast, ACAT-2 is evident in fetal but not adult hepatocytes. Our results collectively suggest that in humans, ACAT-2 performs significant catalytic roles in the fetal liver and in intestinal enterocytes.

  2. Risk of primary liver cancer associated with gallstones and cholecystectomy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanqiong; He, Yu; Li, Taijie; Xie, Li; Wang, Jian; Qin, Xue; Li, Shan

    2014-01-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence points to an association between gallstones or cholecystectomy and the incidence risk of liver cancer, but the results are inconsistent. We present a meta-analysis of observational studies to explore this association. We identified studies by a literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and relevant conference proceedings up to March 2014. A random-effects model was used to generate pooled multivariable adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Between-study heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran's Q statistic and the I2. Fifteen studies (five case-control and 10 cohort studies) were included in this analysis. There were 4,487,662 subjects in total, 17,945 diagnoses of liver cancer, 328,420 exposed to gallstones, and 884,507 exposed to cholecystectomy. Pooled results indicated a significant increased risk of liver cancer in patients with a history of gallstones (OR = 2.54; 95% CI, 1.71-3.79; n = 11 studies), as well as cholecystectomy (OR = 1.62; 95% CI, 1.29-2.02; n = 12 studies), but there was considerable heterogeneity among these studies. The effects estimates did not vary markedly when stratified by gender, study design, study region, and study quality. The multivariate meta-regression analysis suggested that study region and study quality appeared to explain the heterogeneity observed in the cholecystectomy analysis. Our results suggest that individuals with a history of gallstones and cholecystectomy may have an increased risk of liver cancer.

  3. Comparison of delta-aminolaevulinic acid dehydratase activity in chick liver during sex steroid hormone dependent primary and secondary stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, N; Yamada, M

    1990-01-01

    1. Comparative study on primary and secondary stimulation of hepatic delta-aminolaevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) (EC 4.2.1.24) was carried out after oestradiol-17 beta and/or testosterone administration in immature female chicken. 2. When 2 mg/day oestradiol was administered to birds for 15 days successively, hepatic total ALAD activity increased to 170% by day 15 of primary stimulation, whereas a more rapid increased rate was observed within day 3 of secondary stimulation and thereafter the hepatic ALAD activity maintained the same high level from day 3 to day 15. 3. Testosterone (2 mg/day) alone decreased hepatic total ALAD activity during both primary and secondary stimulation. 4. When testosterone (0.25-10 mg/day) was injected into birds in combination with 2 mg oestradiol for 15 days during primary and secondary stimulation, only an antagonistic effect of testosterone on oestradiol-stimulated total ALAD activity in liver was observed independently of the testosterone amount administered. However, the extent of suppression of hepatic ALAD activity by testosterone during primary stimulation was markedly different from that of secondary stimulation.

  4. Mapping chronic liver disease questionnaire scores onto SF-6D utility values in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaitzakis, Evangelos; Benito de Valle, Maria; Rahman, Monira; Lindkvist, Björn; Björnsson, Einar; Chapman, Roger; Kontodimopoulos, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The chronic liver disease questionnaire (CLDQ) is a frequently used liver-specific quality of life instrument, but it does not provide information on preference-adjusted health status, which is essential for cost-utility analysis. We aimed to develop a mapping function deriving utilities from the CLDQ in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Short form-6D (SF-6D) utilities were calculated from SF-36 data collected in a recent prospective study in which unselected patients with PSC also completed the CLDQ. Ordinary least squares (OLS), generalized linear, median, and kernel regression analyses were employed to devise a mapping function predicting utilities. This was validated in three random subsamples of the cohort and in a separate sample of PSC patients following liver transplantation. Adjusted R (2) and root-mean-square error (RMSE) as well as Pearson's r coefficients and mean absolute errors between predicted and observed values were used to determine model performance. Decompensated liver disease and fatigue, systemic symptoms, and emotional distress, assessed with the CLDQ, were related to worse SF-6D utilities. The final OLS prediction model explained 66.3 % of the variance in the derivation sample. Predicted and observed utilities were strongly correlated (r = 0.807, p < 0.001), but the mean absolute error (0.0604) and adjusted RMSE (10.6 %) were of intermediate size. Similar model characteristics were observed after employment of generalized linear and median regression models and at validation. A model has been constructed, showing good validity predicting SF-6D utilities from CLDQ scores at the group level in PSC. Further testing is required to externally validate the model.

  5. BiodentineTM is cytocompatible with human primary osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Zaccaro SCELZA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium silicate-based materials have been widely studied due to their resemblance to, and similar applicability of, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Among these, Biodentine™ (BD was specifically designed as a “dentin replacement” material for applications such as root perforations, apexification, treatment of resorptive lesions, and as a retrograde filling material. The present study aimed to assess the in vitro response of human primary osteoblasts to BD using MTA AngelusTM as a reference material, by simultaneously analyzing three different cell viability parameters, namely mitochondrial activity, membrane integrity, and cell density. BD and MTA extracts were prepared by incubation on culture media for 24 h or 42 days after mixing. Primary human osteoblasts were exposed to extracts for 24 h, at 37oC with 5% CO2, and cell viability was evaluated by the XTT, NRU, and CVDE assays. Both materials induced cell viability levels higher than 70% when extracted for 24 h. However, when cells were exposed to extracts with increased conditioning times, MTA presented significant cytotoxic effects (p < 0.05 in comparison to the control and MTA at 24 h. After 42 days, the XTT assay identified a significant reduction in cell viability by BD when compared to the control (p<0.05, despite the fact that levels above the 70% viability cutoff were attained for biocompatible materials. It can be concluded that BD is cytocompatible with human primary osteoblasts, indicating its adequacy in direct contact with bone tissues.

  6. In vitro biotransformation of tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) in human liver and serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Eede, Nele, E-mail: nele.vandeneede@uantwerpen.be [Toxicological Center, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Antwerp (Belgium); Erratico, Claudio [Toxicological Center, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Antwerp (Belgium); Exarchou, Vassiliki [Natural Products & Food Research and Analysis (NatuRA), Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Antwerp (Belgium); Maho, Walid; Neels, Hugo [Toxicological Center, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Antwerp (Belgium); Covaci, Adrian, E-mail: adrian.covaci@uantwerpen.be [Toxicological Center, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2015-04-15

    Tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) is a plasticizer present in indoor dust, reaching levels of several micrograms per gram. Such levels could lead to significant daily exposure of adults and children. Currently, no toxicokinetic data are available to estimate TBOEP clearance in humans after uptake and therefore, one objective of this study was to investigate intrinsic clearance of TBOEP by human liver microsome (HLM) and serum enzymes. Another objective was to generate information to identify and prioritize several metabolites of TBOEP for investigation of human exposure by biomonitoring. 1D and 2D-NMR methodologies were successfully applied on a mixture of the metabolites to confirm the structure of 3-HO-TBOEP (bis(2-butoxyethyl) 3-hydroxyl-2-butoxyethyl phosphate) and to tentatively assign structures to 1-HO-TBOEP and 2-HO-TBOEP. HO-TBOEP isomers and bis(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (BBOEP), bis(2-butoxyethyl) hydroxyethyl phosphate (BBOEHEP) were further monitored by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Rates of formation of BBOEHEP and HO-TBOEP metabolites by liver enzymes were best described by the Michaelis–Menten model. Apparent K{sub m} values for BBOEHEP, 3-HO-TBOEP, and sum of 1- and 2-HO-TBOEP isomer formation were 152, 197 and 148 μM, respectively. Apparent V{sub max} values for the formation of BBOEHEP, 3-HO-TBOEP, and the sum of 1- and 2-HO-TBOEP isomers were 2560, 643, and 254 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. No detectable formation of BBOEP occurred with liver or serum enzymes. Our findings indicate that intrinsic clearance of TBOEP is mainly catalyzed by oxidative enzymes in the liver and that its major in vitro metabolite is BBOEHEP. These findings can be applied in human biomonitoring studies and risk assessment. - Highlights: • First steps in the elucidation of TBOEP toxicokinetics • Quantification of TBOEP metabolites in human serum and liver microsomes • No detectable formation of BBOEP occurred with liver or serum

  7. A nested case-control study on association between hepatitis C virus antibodies and primary liver cancer in a cohort of 9,775 men in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C C; Yu, M W; Lu, C F; Yang, C S; Chen, C J

    1994-07-01

    Most studies on the association between antibodies against hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) and primary liver cancer (PLC) were limited to case-series, or cross-sectional case-control studies leaving a controversy on causal temporality. A nested case-control study on 38 newly-developed PLC patients and 152 matched controls selected from a cohort of 9,775 men in Taiwan recruited from September, 1984, to February, 1986, was carried out to examine the relation between HCV infection and PLC. Case-control pairs were matched on age (+/- 1 year), residence, and the date at recruitment. Serum samples collected from study subjects at the initial recruitment were examined for anti-HCV by enzyme immunoassay and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) by reverse passive hemagglutination assay combined with radioimmunoassay. History of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, vegetable consumption, vegetarian habit, and chronic liver diseases were also obtained through standardized interviews according to a structured questionnaire at the recruitment. After adjusting for HBsAg status and other risk factors, the anti-HCV was significantly associated with the development of PLC showing a multivariate-adjusted relative risk of 88.24. The results suggest that HCV infection may play an important role in the etiology of human PLC in Taiwan.

  8. Hepatic Lesions Detected after Mastectomy, in Breast Cancer Patients with Hepatitis Background May Need to Undergo Liver Biopsy to Rule Out Second Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi-wen; Li, Hai-jin; Chen, Ya-nan; Ning, Zhou-yu; Gao, Song; Shen, Ye-hua; Meng, Zhi-qiang; Vargulick, Sonya; Wang, Bi-yun; Chen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Liver metastasis is a common phenomenon in breast cancer patients. Hepatic lesions detected in breast cancer patients may be easily misdiagnosed as metastatic sites, rather than being treated as primary foci. This descriptive study aims to investigate the clinicopathological characteristics of second primary hepatocellular carcinoma in breast cancer patients and to infer in which circumstances liver biopsy is needed. Eighty-one consecutive breast cancer patients with hepatic lesions admitted to our department were retrospectively studied and analyzed from January 2009 to March 2014 according to Warren and Gates' criteria for second primary cancers. Second primary hepatocellular carcinoma was observed in sixteen of seventy eight patients with breast cancer. There was a significant difference in HBV status between the second HCC group and liver metastases group (Phistory (P = 0.1160) between second primary HCC and metastases group. Two of these patients had synchronous second primary hepatocellular carcinoma and the remaining fourteen patients had metachronous second primary HCC. All sixteen patients were infected with hepatitis, including hepatitis virus B and C, or resolved HBV infection. Breast cancer patients with either HBV infection or resolved HBV infection, regardless of an elevated AFP level, may receive liver biopsy to avoid unnecessary and inappropriate treatments for metastasis. Awareness of second primary HCC in breast cancer patients needs to be emphasized.

  9. Treatment of unresectable primary and metastatic liver cancer with yttrium-90 microspheres (TheraSphere): assessment of hepatic arterial embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kent; Lewandowski, Robert J; Bui, James T; Omary, Reed; Hunter, Russell D; Kulik, Laura; Mulcahy, Mary; Liu, David; Chrisman, Howard; Resnick, Scott; Nemcek, Albert A; Vogelzang, Robert; Salem, Riad

    2006-01-01

    In Canada and Europe, yttrium-90 microspheres (TheraSphere); MDS Nordion, Ottawa, Canada) are a primary treatment option for primary and secondary hepatic malignancies. We present data from 30 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic liver disease treated with TheraSphere from a single academic institution to evaluate the angiographically evident embolization that follows treatment. Seven interventional radiologists from one treatment center compared pretreatment and posttreatment angiograms. The reviewers were blinded to the timing of the studies. The incidence of postembolization syndrome (PES) was determined as well as objective tumor response rates by the World Health Organization (WHO), Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), and European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria. There were 420 independent angiographic observations that were assessed using the chi-squared statistic. The pretreatment and posttreatment angiograms could not be correctly identified on average more than 43% of the time (p = 0.0004). The postprocedure arterial patency rate was 100%. The objective tumor response rates for all patients were 24%, 31%, and 72% for WHO, RECIST, and EASL criteria, respectively. All of the patients tolerated the procedure without complications and were treated on an outpatient basis, and four patients had evidence of PES. This treatment method does not result in macroscopic embolization of the hepatic arteries, thereby maintaining hepatic tissue perfusion. These data support the principle that the favorable response rates reported with TheraSphere are likely due to radiation and microscopic embolization rather than flow-related macroscopic embolization and ischemia.

  10. Modeling tissue contamination to improve molecular identification of the primary tumor site of metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Martin; Perell, Katharina; Nielsen, Finn Cilius

    2014-01-01

    with any predictor model. The usability of the model is illustrated on primary tumor site identification of liver biopsies, specifically, on a human dataset consisting of microRNA expression measurements of primary tumor samples, benign liver samples and liver metastases. For a predictor trained on primary...

  11. Rapid production of human liver scaffolds for functional tissue engineering by high shear stress oscillation-decellularization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazza, G. (Giuseppe); Al-Akkad, W. (Walid); Telese, A. (Andrea); Longato, L. (Lisa); Urbani, L. (Luca); Robinson, B. (Benjamin); Hall, A. (Andrew); Kong, K. (Kenny); Frenguelli, L. (Luca); Marrone, G. (Giusi); Willacy, O. (Oliver); Shaeri, M. (Mohsen); A.J. Burns (Alan); Malago, M. (Massimo); Gilbertson, J. (Janet); Rendell, N. (Nigel); Moore, K. (Kevin); Hughes, D. (David); Notingher, I. (Ioan); Jell, G. (Gavin); Del Rio Hernandez, A. (Armando); P. de Coppi (Paolo); Rombouts, K. (Krista); Pinzani, M. (Massimo)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe development of human liver scaffolds retaining their 3-dimensional structure and extra-cellular matrix (ECM) composition is essential for the advancement of liver tissue engineering. We report the design and validation of a new methodology for the rapid and accurate production of

  12. Completion of hepatitis C virus replication cycle in heterokaryons excludes dominant restrictions in human non-liver and mouse liver cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Frentzen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is hepatotropic and only infects humans and chimpanzees. Consequently, an immunocompetent small animal model is lacking. The restricted tropism of HCV likely reflects specific host factor requirements. We investigated if dominant restriction factors expressed in non-liver or non-human cell lines inhibit HCV propagation thus rendering these cells non-permissive. To this end we explored if HCV completes its replication cycle in heterokaryons between human liver cell lines and non-permissive cell lines from human non-liver or mouse liver origin. Despite functional viral pattern recognition pathways and responsiveness to interferon, virus production was observed in all fused cells and was only ablated when cells were treated with exogenous interferon. These results exclude that constitutive or virus-induced expression of dominant restriction factors prevents propagation of HCV in these cell types, which has important implications for HCV tissue and species tropism. In turn, these data strongly advocate transgenic approaches of crucial human HCV cofactors to establish an immunocompetent small animal model.

  13. Helium generated cold plasma finely regulates activation of human fibroblast-like primary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Paola; Pathak, Surajit; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Palù, Giorgio; Brun, Paola; Zuin, Matteo; Cavazzana, Roberto; Martines, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are being developed for a wide range of health care applications, including wound healing. However in order to exploit the potential of plasma for clinical applications, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-induced activation of fibroblasts, the cells active in the healing process, is mandatory. In this study, the role of helium generated plasma in the tissue repairing process was investigated in cultured human fibroblast-like primary cells, and specifically in hepatic stellate cells and intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts. Five minutes after treatment, plasma induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured cells, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of fluorescence-activated 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe. Plasma-induced intracellular ROS were characterized by lower concentrations and shorter half-lives with respect to hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS. Moreover ROS generated by plasma treatment increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, nuclear receptor that modulates the inflammatory responses. Plasma exposure promoted wound healing in an in vitro model and induced fibroblast migration and proliferation, as demonstrated, respectively, by trans-well assay and partitioning between daughter cells of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester fluorescent dye. Plasma-induced fibroblast migration and proliferation were found to be ROS-dependent as cellular incubation with antioxidant agents (e.g. N-acetyl L-cysteine) cancelled the biological effects. This study provides evidence that helium generated plasma promotes proliferation and migration in liver and intestinal fibroblast-like primary cells mainly by increasing intracellular ROS levels. Since plasma-evoked ROS are time-restricted and elicit the PPAR-γ anti-inflammatory molecular pathway, this strategy ensures precise regulation of human fibroblast activation and can be considered a

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF HUMAN LIVER MICROSOMAL UDP-GLYCOSYLTRANSFERASES USING PHOTOAFFINITY ANALOGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LITTLE, JM; DRAKE, RR; VONK, R; KUIPERS, F; LESTER, R; RADOMINSKA, A

    The photoaffinity analogs [beta-P-32]5-azido-UDP-glucuronic acid ([P-32]5N3UDP-GlcUA) and [beta-P-32]5-azido-UDP-glucose ([P-32]5N(3)UDP-Glc) were used to characterize UDP-glycosyl-transferases of microsomes prepared from human liver. Photoincorporation of both probes into proteins in the 50- to

  15. Effect of New Water-Soluble Dendritic Phthalocyanines on Human Colorectal and Liver Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru YABAŞ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cells and colorectal adenocarcinoma (DLD-1 cells were treated with the synthesized water soluble phthalocyanine derivatives to understand the effect of the compounds both on colorectal and liver cancer cells. The compounds inhibited cell proliferation and displayed cytotoxic effect on these cancer cell lines however; the effect of the compounds on healthy control fibroblast cell line was comparatively lower. The compounds can be employed for cancer treatment as anticancer agents.

  16. An orphan esterase ABHD10 modulates probenecid acyl glucuronidation in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yusuke; Fukami, Tatsuki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Miki

    2014-12-01

    Probenecid, a widely used uricosuric agent, is mainly metabolized to probenecid acyl glucuronide (PRAG), which is considered a causal substance of severe allergic or anaphylactoid reactions. PRAG can be hydrolyzed (deglucuronidated) to probenecid. The purpose of this study was to identify enzymes responsible for probenecid acyl glucuronidation and PRAG deglucuronidation in human livers and to examine the effect of deglucuronidation in PRAG formation. In human liver homogenates (HLHs), the intrinsic clearance (CLint) of PRAG deglucuronidation was much greater (497-fold) than that of probenecid acyl glucuronidation. Evaluation of PRAG formation by recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms and an inhibition study using HLHs as an enzyme source demonstrated that multiple UGT isoforms, including UGT1A1, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7, catalyzed probenecid acyl glucuronidation. We found that recombinant α/β hydrolase domain containing 10 (ABHD10) substantially catalyzed PRAG deglucuronidation activity, whereas carboxylesterases did not. Similar inhibitory patterns by chemicals between HLHs and recombinant ABHD10 supported the major contribution of ABHD10 to PRAG deglucuronidation in human liver. Interestingly, it was demonstrated that the CLint value of probenecid acyl glucuronidation in HLHs was increased by 1.7-fold in the presence of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, which potently inhibited ABHD10 activity. In conclusion, we found that PRAG deglucuronidation catalyzed by ABHD10 suppressively regulates PRAG formation via multiple UGT enzymes in human liver. The balance of activities by these enzymes is important for the formation of PRAG, which may be associated with the adverse reactions observed after probenecid administration. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Role of inflammation and infection in the pathogenesis of human acute liver failure: Clinical implications for monitoring and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Mhairi C; Hayes, Peter C; Simpson, Kenneth J

    2016-07-14

    Acute liver failure is a rare and devastating clinical condition. At present, emergency liver transplantation is the only life-saving therapy in advanced cases, yet the feasibility of transplantation is affected by the presence of systemic inflammation, infection and resultant multi-organ failure. The importance of immune dysregulation and acquisition of infection in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure and its associated complications is now recognised. In this review we discuss current thinking regarding the role of infection and inflammation in the pathogenesis of and outcome in human acute liver failure, the implications for the management of such patients and suggest directions for future research.

  18. Imaging findings of a primary paraganglioma of the liver: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Seung Woo; Kang, Ung Rae; Park, Jae Bok [Daegu Catholic University Medical Center, Catholic University of Daegu College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Primary hepatic paraganglioma is an extremely rare type of tumor originating from extra-adrenal chromaffin cells. We report a case of primary intrahepatic paraganglioma in a 52-year-old man, with pathologic confirmation through right hepatectomy. An imaging study indicated a predominately hemorrhagic septated cystic mass and peripheral marked enhancement of the solid portions, which showed persistent enhancement.

  19. Partial isolation and identification of hepatic stimulator substance mRNA extracted from human fetal liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Ming; Xie, Ling; Xing, Gui-Chun; Wu, Zu-Ze; He, Fu-Chu

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To partially isolate and identify hepatic stimulator substance mRNA from human fetal liver tissues. METHODS: The poly (A) mRNA was extracted from human fetal liver tissues of 4-5 month gestation, fractionated by size on sucrose gradient centrifugation, translated into protein from each fraction in vitro and then its products were tested for HSS activity. RESULTS: Twenty-two 500 μg total RNA was obtained from human fetal liver tissues and pooled. mRNA of 420 μg was yielded, processed by oligo (dT)-cellulose column chromatography, then was size-fractionated by ultracentrifution on a continuous sucrose density gradient (5%-25%), and separated into 18 fractions. Translated products of mRNA in fraction 8 and 9 could produce a two-fold increase in the incorporation of 3H-TdR into DNA of SMMC-7721 hepatoma cells and in a heat resistant and organ-specific way. CONCLUSION: The partially purified HSS mRNA was obtained and this would facilitate the cloning of HSS using expression vectors. PMID:11819247

  20. Allicin induces p53-mediated autophagy in Hep G2 human liver cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yung-Lin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Chung, Jing-Gung; Rajasekaran, Raghu; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2012-08-29

    Garlic has been used throughout history for both culinary and medicinal purpose. Allicin is a major component of crushed garlic. Although it is sensitive to heat and light and easily metabolized into various compounds such as diallyl disulfide, diallyl trisulfide, and diallyl sulfide, allicin is still a major bioactive compound of crushed garlic. The mortality of hepatocellular carcinoma is quite high and ranks among the top 10 cancer-related deaths in Taiwan. Although numerous studies have shown the cancer-preventive properties of garlic and its components, there is no study on the effect of allicin on the growth of human liver cancer cells. In this study, we focused on allicin-induced autophagic cell death in human liver cancer Hep G2 cells. Our results indicated that allicin induced p53-mediated autophagy and inhibited the viability of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. Using Western blotting, we observed that allicin decreased the level of cytoplasmic p53, the PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway, and the level of Bcl-2 and increased the expression of AMPK/TSC2 and Beclin-1 signaling pathways in Hep G2 cells. In addition, the colocalization of LC3-II with MitoTracker-Red (labeling mitochondria), resulting in allicin-induced degradation of mitochondria, could be observed by confocal laser microscopy. In conclusion, allicin of garlic shows great potential as a novel chemopreventive agent for the prevention of liver cancer.

  1. Human primary auditory cortex follows the shape of Heschl's gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Sandra; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Marques, Jose P; Frackowiak, Richard S J; Clarke, Stephanie; Saenz, Melissa

    2011-10-05

    The primary auditory cortex (PAC) is central to human auditory abilities, yet its location in the brain remains unclear. We measured the two largest tonotopic subfields of PAC (hA1 and hR) using high-resolution functional MRI at 7 T relative to the underlying anatomy of Heschl's gyrus (HG) in 10 individual human subjects. The data reveals a clear anatomical-functional relationship that, for the first time, indicates the location of PAC across the range of common morphological variants of HG (single gyri, partial duplications, and complete duplications). In 20/20 individual hemispheres, two primary mirror-symmetric tonotopic maps were clearly observed with gradients perpendicular to HG. PAC spanned both divisions of HG in cases of partial and complete duplications (11/20 hemispheres), not only the anterior division as commonly assumed. Specifically, the central union of the two primary maps (the hA1-R border) was consistently centered on the full Heschl's structure: on the gyral crown of single HGs and within the sulcal divide of duplicated HGs. The anatomical-functional variants of PAC appear to be part of a continuum, rather than distinct subtypes. These findings significantly revise HG as a marker for human PAC and suggest that tonotopic maps may have shaped HG during human evolution. Tonotopic mappings were based on only 16 min of fMRI data acquisition, so these methods can be used as an initial mapping step in future experiments designed to probe the function of specific auditory fields.

  2. Cloning the human betaretrovirus proviral genome from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lizhe; Sakalian, Michael; Shen, Zhiwei; Loss, George; Neuberger, James; Mason, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) have both serologic and tissue evidence of infection. A recently identified human betaretrovirus was originally cloned from the biliary epithelium cDNA library of a patient with PBC. By conducting a BLASTN search, the initial partial pol gene fragment was found to have 95% to 97% nucleotide homology with mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) and with retrovirus sequences derived from human breast cancer samples. Using an anti-p27(CA) MMTV antibody, viral proteins were detected in the perihepatic lymph nodes but not in liver tissue samples from patients with PBC, suggesting a higher viral burden in lymphoid tissue. Therefore, in the current study, we used lymph node DNA to clone the proviral genome of the human betaretrovirus from two patients with PBC using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) walking methodology with conserved primers complementary to MMTV. The human betaretrovirus genome contains five potential open reading frames (ORF) for Gag, protease (Pro), polymerase (Pol), envelope (Env), and superantigen (Sag) proteins that are collinear with their counterparts in MMTV. Alignment studies performed with characterized MMTV and human breast cancer betaretrovirus amino acid sequences revealed a 93% to 99% identity with the p27 capsid proteins, a 93% to 97% identity with the betaretrovirus envelope proteins, and a 76% to 85% identity with the more variable superantigen proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of known betaretrovirus superantigen proteins showed that the human and murine sequences did not cluster as two distinct species. In conclusion, human betaretrovirus nucleic acid sequences have been cloned from patients with PBC. They share marked homology with MMTV and human breast cancer-derived retrovirus sequences.

  3. "Non alcoholic fatty liver disease and eNOS dysfunction in humans".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persico, Marcello; Masarone, Mario; Damato, Antonio; Ambrosio, Mariateresa; Federico, Alessandro; Rosato, Valerio; Bucci, Tommaso; Carrizzo, Albino; Vecchione, Carmine

    2017-03-07

    NAFLD is associated to Insulin Resistance (IR). IR is responsible for Endothelial Dysfunction (ED) through the impairment of eNOS function. Although eNOS derangement has been demonstrated in experimental models, no studies have directly shown that eNOS dysfunction is associated with NAFLD in humans. The aim of this study is to investigate eNOS function in NAFLD patients. Fifty-four NAFLD patients were consecutively enrolled. All patients underwent clinical and laboratory evaluation and liver biopsy. Patients were divided into two groups by the presence of NAFL or NASH. We measured vascular reactivity induced by patients' platelets on isolated mice aorta rings. Immunoblot assays for platelet-derived phosphorylated-eNOS (p-eNOS) and immunohistochemistry for hepatic p-eNOS have been performed to evaluate eNOS function in platelets and liver specimens. Flow-mediated-dilation (FMD) was also performed. Data were compared with healthy controls. Twenty-one (38, 8%) patients had NAFL and 33 (61, 7%) NASH. No differences were found between groups and controls except for HOMA and insulin (p liver (p liver tissue didn't match with FMD.

  4. [Acute liver failure due to human herpesvirus 6 in an infant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronconi, G M; Mariani, B; Pajno, R; Fomasi, M; Cococcioni, L; Biffi, V; Bove, M; Corsin, P; Garbetta, G; Barera, G

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a 4-months infant with fever in the absence of other specific symptoms that has rapidly and unexpectedly developed acute liver failure (ALF) with coagulopathy and complicated with bone marrow failure without encephalopathy. The main viral infection agents (hepatitis virus A, B, C, Citomegalovirus, Ebstain Barr virus, Parvovirus B19, Adenovirus), drug-induced hepatotoxicity and metabolic disorders associated to ALF were excluded. Quantitative determination of Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) genome was positive with a significant number of copies for mL. A favorable evolution of the clinical symptoms and a progressive hematochemical resolution were obtained. Plasma and Vitamin K were administrated as a support therapy for treating coagulopathy. The present case report and the cases' review from the literature, evidence the importance of always including screening for HHV6 infection in the diagnostic approach to acute onset of liver failure. HHV6 is a common virus in the pediatric population with a greater number of cases of fulminant viral non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis in immunocompetent patients due to this virus: these forms have often a high mortality rate and maybe necessitate liver transplantation; for this reason correct etiological agent identification is mandatory for the prognosis and it has to be based on the quantitative search of the virus's genome. Pathogenesis of liver-induced damage associated to HHV6 remains unclear; however in vitro studies demonstrate the potential hepatotoxicity effects of this virus.

  5. Molecular Recognition of Human Liver Cancer Cells Using DNA Aptamers Generated via Cell-SELEX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiehua Xu

    Full Text Available Most clinical cases of liver cancer cannot be diagnosed until they have evolved to an advanced stage, thus resulting in high mortality. It is well recognized that the implementation of early detection methods and the development of targeted therapies for liver cancer are essential to reducing the high mortality rates associated with this disease. To achieve these goals, molecular probes capable of recognizing liver cancer cell-specific targets are needed. Here we describe a panel of aptamers able to distinguish hepatocarcinoma from normal liver cells. The aptamers, which were selected by cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment, have Kd values in the range of 64-349 nM toward the target human hepatoma cell HepG2, and also recognize ovarian cancer cells and lung adenocarcinoma. The proteinase treatment experiment indicated that all aptamers could recognize target HepG2 cells through surface proteins. This outcome suggested that these aptamers could be used as potential probes for further research in cancer studies, such as developing early detection assays, targeted therapies, and imaging agents, as well as for the investigation of common membrane proteins in these distinguishable cancers.

  6. Anticarcinogenic effects of glycoalkaloids from potatoes against human cervical, liver, lymphoma, and stomach cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mendel; Lee, Kap-Rang; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Lee, In-Seon; Kozukue, Nobuyuke

    2005-07-27

    Methods were devised for the isolation of large amounts of pure alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine from Dejima potatoes and for the extraction and analysis of total glycoalkaloids from five fresh potato varieties (Dejima, Jowon, Sumi, Toya, and Vora Valley). These compounds were then evaluated in experiments using a tetrazolium microculture (MTT) assay to assess the anticarcinogenic effects of (a) the isolated pure glycoalkaloids separately, (b) artificial mixtures of the two glycoalkaloids, and (c) the total glycoalkaloids isolated from each of the five potato varieties. All samples tested reduced the numbers of the following human cell lines: cervical (HeLa), liver (HepG2), lymphoma (U937), stomach (AGS and KATO III) cancer cells and normal liver (Chang) cells. The results show that (a) the effects of the glycoalkaloids were concentration dependent in the range of 0.1-10 mug/mL (0.117-11.7 nmol/mL); (b) alpha-chaconine was more active than was alpha-solanine; (c) some mixtures exhibited synergistic effects, whereas other produced additive ones; (d) the different cancer cells varied in their susceptibilities to destruction; and (e) the destruction of normal liver cells was generally lower than that of cancer liver cells. The decreases in cell populations were also observed visually by reversed-phase microscopy. The results complement related observations on the anticarcinogenic potential of food ingredients.

  7. Acute liver failure due to Human Herpesvirus 6 in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Tronconi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 4-months infant with fever in the absence of other specific symptoms that has rapidly and unexpectedly developed acute liver failure (ALF with coagulopathy and complicated with bone marrow failure without encephalopathy. The main viral infection agents (hepatitis virus A, B, C, Citomegalovirus, Ebstain Barr virus, Parvovirus B19, Adenovirus, drug-induced hepatotoxicity and metabolic disorders associated to ALF were excluded. Quantitative determination of Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV6 genome was positive with a significant number of copies for mL. A favorable evolution of the clinical symptoms and a progressive hematochemical resolution were obtained. Plasma and Vitamin K were administrated as a support therapy for treating coagulopathy. The present case report and the cases’ review from the literature, evidence the importance of always including screening for HHV6 infection in the diagnostic approach to acute onset of liver failure. HHV6 is a common virus in the pediatric population with a greater number of cases of fulminant viral non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis in immunocompetent patients due to this virus: these forms have often a high mortality rate and maybe necessitate liver transplantation; for this reason correct etiological agent identification is mandatory for the prognosis and it has to be based on the quantitative search of the virus’s genome. Pathogenesis of liver-induced damage associated to HHV6 remains unclear; however in vitro studies demonstrate the potential hepatotoxicity effects of this virus.

  8. High frequency of Human Cytomegalovirus DNA in the Liver of Infants with Extrahepatic Neonatal Cholestasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escanhoela Cecília AF

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biliary atresia (BA is the most severe hepatic disorder in newborns and its etiopathogenesis remains unknown. Viral involvement has been proposed, including the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. The aims of the study were to use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR to screen the liver tissue of infants with extrahepatic cholestasis for HCMV and to correlate the results with serological antibodies against HCMV and histological findings. Methods A retrospective study in a tertiary care setting included 35 patients (31 BA, 1 BA associated with a choledochal cyst, 2 congenital stenosis of the distal common bile duct and 1 hepatic cyst. HCMV serology was determined by ELISA. Liver and porta hepatis were examined histologically. Liver samples from infants and a control group were screened for HCMV DNA. Results Twelve patients had HCMV negative serology, 9 were positive for IgG antibodies and 14 were positive for IgG and IgM. Nine liver and seven porta hepatis samples were positive for HCMV DNA but none of the control group were positive (general frequency of positivity was 34.3% – 12/35. There was no correlation between HCMV positivity by PCR and the histological findings. The accuracy of serology for detecting HCMV antibodies was low. Conclusion These results indicate an elevated frequency of HCMV in pediatric patients with extrahepatic neonatal cholestasis. They also show the low accuracy of serological tests for detecting active HCMV infection and the lack of correlation between HCMV positivity by PCR and the histopathological changes.

  9. Murine Cyp3a knockout chimeric mice with humanized liver: prediction of the metabolic profile of nefazodone in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Naoyuki; Kawamura, Akio; Kamimura, Hidetaka; Sato, Koya; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Kakuni, Masakazu; Ohbuchi, Masato; Kato, Kota; Tateno, Chise; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Usui, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric mice with humanized livers (PXB mice) are used to investigate the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of drugs in humans. However, residual murine enzymatic activities derived from the liver and the presence of mouse small intestinal metabolism can hamper the prediction of human drug metabolism. Recently murine Cytochrome P450 3a gene knockout chimeric mice with humanized livers (Cyp3a KO CM) were developed. To evaluate the prediction of drug metabolism, nefazodone (NEF) was administered orally at 10 mg/kg to the following mouse strains: Cyp3a KO CM, murine Cyp3a gene knockout (Cyp3a KO), PXB and severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for metabolic profiling of plasma, urine and bile. The prediction of human metabolite levels such as hydroxy nefazodone (OH-NEF), triazoledione form (TD), m-chlorophenylpiperazine and dealkyl metabolites in Cyp3a KO CM was superior to that in Cyp3a KO, PXB or SCID mice. Further, clinical exposure levels of NEF, OH-NEF and TD were reproduced in Cyp3a KO CM. In contrast, NEF was rapidly metabolized to TD in both PXB and SCID mice but not in Cyp3a KO mice, suggesting that murine CYP3A is involved in the elimination of NEF in these mice. These findings demonstrate that the metabolic profile of NEF in Cyp3a KO CM differs qualitatively and quantitatively from that in PXB mice due to the higher metabolic rate of NEF and its metabolites via murine CYP3A. Therefore Cyp3a KO CM might be useful in predicting the metabolic profiles of drug candidates in humans. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Purification of nonspecific lipid transfer protein (sterol carrier protein 2) from human liver and its deficiency in livers from patients with cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger) syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amerongen, A. van; Helms, J.B.; Krift, T.P. van der; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Wirtz, K.W.A.

    1987-01-01

    The nonspecific lipid transfer protein (i.e., sterol carrier protein 2) from human liver was purified to homogeneity using ammonium sulfate precipitation, CM-cellulose chromatography, molecular sieve chromatography and fast protein liquid chromatography. Its amino acid composition was determined and

  11. Primary pulmonary choriocarcinoma after human chorionic gonadotropin normalization following hydatidiform mole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maestá, Izildinha; Leite, Fábio Vicente; Michelin, Odair Carlito

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary pulmonary choriocarcinoma (PPC) is rare and frequently leads to death. CASES: Two young patients presented with previous molar pregnancy and spontaneous serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) normalization. Patient 1 was referred to our center after partial response to chemo......BACKGROUND: Primary pulmonary choriocarcinoma (PPC) is rare and frequently leads to death. CASES: Two young patients presented with previous molar pregnancy and spontaneous serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) normalization. Patient 1 was referred to our center after partial response...... to chemotherapy. Pulmonary lobectomy was performed, and hCG rapidly declined. During further chemotherapy, liver metastasis was detected by positron emission tomography. Right hepatectomy was performed, and hCG declined for 28 days, but increased again despite chemotherapy. This patient died from hepatic failure...... 3 years after diagnosis. Patient 2 presented with persistently high hCG, though the affected organ was not identified. Chemotherapy was unsuccessful. Patient reevaluation showed an isolated pulmonary mass. Pulmonary lobectomy was performed; 2 weeks later, hCG was normal and consolidation with 2...

  12. Microstructure of mineralized tissues in human primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschel, H C; Ligocki, G D; Flaminghi, D L; Fossati, A C M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the structural characteristics of the mineralized dental tissues--enamel, dentin and cementum--in primary teeth and to correlate the histological aspects observed in function of the dental type--single-rooted or multi-rooted. Eighteen human primary noncarious teeth were sectioned in facial-lingual (single-rooted) and mesio-distal direction (multi-rooted). One to three samples from each tooth were obtained. The samples were prepared by the ground technique and analyzed under light microscopy at different magnifications. A quantitative and descriptive analysis of the morphology of the mineralized tissues was performed. Spindles, tufts and lamellae were consistently observed mainly in the occlusal surface of the primary molars. The scalloped pattern of the dentinoenamel junction was not always present. The same was seen for zones of interglobular dentin. Dead tracts in dentin and tertiary dentin were observed mainly in single-rooted teeth below areas of dental attrition. Areas of cellular and acellular cementum were observed in the two dental types. Primary teeth have some structural peculiarities and these should be investigated concerning the clinical repercussion.

  13. Mechanisms and regulation of vitamin C uptake: studies of the hSVCT systems in human liver epithelial cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jack C. Reidling; Veedamali S. Subramanian; Tamara Dahhan; Mohammed Sadat; Hamid M. Said

    2008-01-01

    .... Although the human liver plays a pivotal role in regulating and maintaining vitamin C homeostasis, vitamin C transport physiology and regulation of the hSVCT systems in this organ have not been well defined...

  14. Establishment of a general NAFLD scoring system for rodent models and comparison to human liver pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wen; Menke, Aswin L; Driessen, Ann; Koek, Ger H; Lindeman, Jan H; Stoop, Reinout; Havekes, Louis M; Kleemann, Robert; van den Hoek, Anita M

    2014-01-01

    The recently developed histological scoring system for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by the NASH Clinical Research Network (NASH-CRN) has been widely used in clinical settings, but is increasingly employed in preclinical research as well. However, it has not been systematically analyzed whether the human scoring system can directly be converted to preclinical rodent models. To analyze this, we systematically compared human NAFLD liver pathology, using human liver biopsies, with liver pathology of several NAFLD mouse models. Based upon the features pertaining to mouse NAFLD, we aimed at establishing a modified generic scoring system that is applicable to broad spectrum of rodent models. The histopathology of NAFLD was analyzed in several different mouse models of NAFLD to define generic criteria for histological assessment (preclinical scoring system). For validation of this scoring system, 36 slides of mouse livers, covering the whole spectrum of NAFLD, were blindly analyzed by ten observers. Additionally, the livers were blindly scored by one observer during two separate assessments longer than 3 months apart. The criteria macrovesicular steatosis, microvesicular steatosis, hepatocellular hypertrophy, inflammation and fibrosis were generally applicable to rodent NAFLD. The inter-observer reproducibility (evaluated using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient) between the ten observers was high for the analysis of macrovesicular steatosis and microvesicular steatosis (ICC = 0.784 and 0.776, all p<0.001, respectively) and moderate for the analysis of hypertrophy and inflammation (ICC = 0.685 and 0.650, all p<0.001, respectively). The intra-observer reproducibility between the different observations of one observer was high for the analysis of macrovesicular steatosis, microvesicular steatosis and hypertrophy (ICC = 0.871, 0.871 and 0.896, all p<0.001, respectively) and very high for the analysis of inflammation (ICC = 0.931, p<0.001). We

  15. Catalysis of nitro-aci tautomerism of the genotoxicant 2-nitropropane by cytosol from rodent and human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, C; Gescher, A

    1996-01-05

    2-Nitropropane (2-NP) is a genotoxicant and hepatocarcinogen in rodents. Conversion to propane 2-nitronate (P2N), the anion of the tautomeric aci form of 2-NP, seems to be a pivotal part of the mechanism by which 2-NP causes its toxicity. We tested the hypothesis that the tautomeric equilibrium is influenced by enzymes in the liver, the target organ of 2-NP toxicity. Rat or mouse hepatocytes were incubated with 2-NP, P2N or the 2-NP isotopomer 2-deutero 2-nitropropane (2H-2-NP), which equilibrates with P2N much more slowly than 2-NP. Tautomers were analyzed by HPLC. The rates of conversion of 2-NP to P2N expressed as nmol P2N x (10(6) cells/ml)-1 x min-1 were 4.0 and 4.2 in the presence of hepatocytes from rats or mice, respectively, and 2.6 in the absence of cells. Production of 2-NP to P2N expressed as nmol 2-NP x (10(6) cells/ml)-1 x min-1 was increased from 6.1 in the absence of cells to 11.9 or 9.9 in the presence of hepatocytes from rats or mice, respectively. The rate of formation of P2N from 2H-2-NP as compared to 2-NP was characterised by a primary isotope effect of 3.4 and 3.8 in hepatocytes from rats and mice, respectively, contrasting with a value of 9.6 measured in medium omitting cells. When 2-NP was incubated with subfractions of rodent or human liver homogenate, production of P2N by cytosol was between 7.3 (mouse liver) and 28.1 times (human liver) higher than that observed in microsomes. Similarly generation of 2-NP from P2N by cytosol exceeded that in microsomes by a factor of two. Tautomerism in heat-activated cytosol, mitochondria or microsomes was not different from that in buffer only. The results suggest that the nitro-aci tautomerism of secondary nitroalkanes is catalysed by a hepatic enzyme which resides predominantly in the cytosol and may thus contribute to the generation of the toxic species via which 2-NP exerts its toxicity.

  16. Specific genomic aberrations in primary colorectal cancer are associated with liver metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, S.C.; Klijn, C.N.; Liefers, G.J.; Braaf, L.M.; Joosse, S.A.; Van Beers, E.H.; Verwaal, V.J.; Morreau, H.; Wessels, L.F.; Van Velthuysen, M.L.F.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Van 't Veer, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Accurate staging of colorectal cancer (CRC) with clinicopathological parameters is important for predicting prognosis and guiding treatment but provides no information about organ site of metastases. Patterns of genomic aberrations in primary colorectal tumors may reveal a chromosomal

  17. No Increased Risk for Primary Osteoarthritis in Liver Cirrhosis - A Danish Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleuran, Thomas; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Overgaard, Søren; Jepsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Chronic synovial inflammation causes primary osteoarthritis, but it is unknown whether chronic systemic inflammation does, too. Patients with cirrhosis have chronic systemic inflammation and therefore we examined the association between cirrhosis and primary osteoarthritis of the hip and knee. In Danish healthcare databases we identified all residents over 60 years diagnosed with cirrhosis in 1994-2011, and for each of them we sampled five age- and gender-matched reference persons from the general population. We excluded everyone with risk factors for secondary osteoarthritis and computed incidence rates of primary osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. We used stratified Cox regression to estimate the hazard ratios of primary osteoarthritis for cirrhosis patients vs. reference persons in strata defined by gender, age, cirrhosis etiology, and ascites vs. no ascites. We also computed separate HRs for primary osteoarthritis of the hips or knees. We identified 10,049 cirrhosis patients. Their median age was 67 years, and 65% were men. Among the cirrhosis patients the crude incidence rate of primary osteoarthritis was 8.40 (95% CI: 7.30-9.63) per 1000 person-years. The rate was similar in the reference persons: 8.76 (95% CI: 8.43-9.12) per 1000 person-years. Accordingly, the hazard ratio for primary osteoarthritis for cirrhosis patients vs. reference persons was 0.99 (95% CI: 0.85-1.16), and we found the same null association in all patient strata and in both joints. Cirrhosis, and thus chronic systemic inflammation, is not a risk factor for primary osteoarthritis.

  18. Cellular Proteome Dynamics during Differentiation of Human Primary Myoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Bihan, Marie-Catherine; Barrio, Inigo; Mortensen, Tenna Pavia

    2015-01-01

    Muscle stem cells, or satellite cells, play an important role in the maintenance and repair of muscle tissue and have the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in response to physiological or environmental changes. Although they have been extensively studied, the key regulatory steps and the ......Muscle stem cells, or satellite cells, play an important role in the maintenance and repair of muscle tissue and have the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in response to physiological or environmental changes. Although they have been extensively studied, the key regulatory steps...... and the complex temporal protein dynamics accompanying the differentiation of primary human muscle cells remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the advantages of applying a MS-based quantitative approach, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), for studying human myogenesis...... in vitro and characterize the fine-tuned changes in protein expression underlying the dramatic phenotypic conversion of primary mononucleated human muscle cells during in vitro differentiation to form multinucleated myotubes. Using an exclusively optimized triple encoding SILAC procedure, we generated...

  19. Pulpotomies with portland cement in human primary molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taísa Regina Conti

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Two clinical cases in which Portland cement (PC was applied as a medicament after pulpotomy of mandibular primary molars in children are presented. Pulpotomy using PC was carried out in two mandibular first molars and one mandibular second molar, which were further followed-up. At the 3, 6 and 12-month follow-up appointments, clinical and radiographic examinations of the pulpotomized teeth and their periradicular area revealed that the treatments were successful in maintaining the teeth asymptomatic and preserving pulpal vitality. Additionally, the formation of a dentin bridge immediately below the PC could be observed in the three molars treated. PC may be considered as an effective alternative for primary molar pulpotomies, at least in a short-term period. Randomized clinical trials with human teeth are required in order to determine the suitability of PC before unlimited clinical use can be recommended.

  20. Transcriptional Profiling of Breast Cancer Metastases Identifies Liver Metastasis-Selective Genes Associated with Adverse Outcome in Luminal A Primary Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbung, Siker; Johansson, Ida; Danielsson, Anna; Veerla, Srinivas; Egyhazi Brage, Suzanne; Frostvik Stolt, Marianne; Skoog, Lambert; Carlsson, Lena; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Lidbrink, Elisabet; Linderholm, Barbro; Loman, Niklas; Malmström, Per-Olof; Söderberg, Martin; Walz, Thomas M; Fernö, Mårten; Hatschek, Thomas; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    The complete molecular basis of the organ-specificity of metastasis is elusive. This study aimed to provide an independent characterization of the transcriptional landscape of breast cancer metastases with the specific objective to identify liver metastasis-selective genes of prognostic importance following primary tumor diagnosis. A cohort of 304 women with advanced breast cancer was studied. Associations between the site of recurrence and clinicopathologic features were investigated. Fine-needle aspirates of metastases (n = 91) were subjected to whole-genome transcriptional profiling. Liver metastasis-selective genes were identified by significance analysis of microarray (SAM) analyses and independently validated in external datasets. Finally, the prognostic relevance of the liver metastasis-selective genes in primary breast cancer was tested. Liver relapse was associated with estrogen receptor (ER) expression (P = 0.002), luminal B subtype (P = 0.01), and was prognostic for an inferior postrelapse survival (P = 0.01). The major variation in the transcriptional landscape of metastases was also associated with ER expression and molecular subtype. However, liver metastases displayed unique transcriptional fingerprints, characterized by downregulation of extracellular matrix (i.e., stromal) genes. Importantly, we identified a 17-gene liver metastasis-selective signature, which was significantly and independently prognostic for shorter relapse-free (P breast cancer by site of relapse and may be used to further refine prognostication in ER positive primary breast cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Human CD34(lo)CD133(lo) fetal liver cells support the expansion of human CD34(hi)CD133(hi) hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Kylie Su Mei; Keng, Choong Tat; Tan, Shu Qi; Loh, Eva; Chang, Kenneth Te; Tan, Thiam Chye; Hong, Wanjin; Chen, Qingfeng

    2016-09-01

    We have recently discovered a unique CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cell population in the human fetal liver (FL) that gives rise to cells in the hepatic lineage. In this study, we further characterized the biological functions of FL CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells. Our findings show that these CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells express markers of both endodermal and mesodermal lineages and have the capability to differentiate into hepatocyte and mesenchymal lineage cells by ex vivo differentiation assays. Furthermore, we show that CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells express growth factors that are important for human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion: stem cell factor (SCF), insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12), and factors in the angiopoietin-like protein family. Co-culture of autologous FL HSCs and allogenic HSCs derived from cord blood with CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells supports and expands both types of HSCs.These findings are not only essential for extending our understanding of the HSC niche during the development of embryonic and fetal hematopoiesis but will also potentially benefit adult stem cell transplantations in clinics because expanded HSCs demonstrate the same capacity as primary cells to reconstitute the human immune system and mediate long-term hematopoiesis in vivo. Together, CD34(lo)CD133(lo) cells not only serve as stem/progenitor cells for liver development but are also an essential component of the HSC niche in the human FL.

  2. Low dose perfluorooctanoate exposure promotes cell proliferation in a human non-tumor liver cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Cui, Ruina [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Guo, Xuejiang [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Hu, Jiayue [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Dai, Jiayin, E-mail: daijy@ioz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Differential expression of proteins induced by PFOA in HL-7702 was identified. • Most of the differentially expressed proteins are related to cell proliferation. • A low dose of PFOA stimulates HL-7702 cell proliferation. • A high dose of PFOA inhibits HL-7702 cell proliferation. - Abstract: Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) is a well-known persistent organic pollutant widely found in the environment, wildlife and humans. Medical surveillance and experimental studies have investigated the potential effects of PFOA on human livers, but the hepatotoxicity of PFOA on humans and its underlying mechanism remain to be clarified. We exposed a human liver cell line (HL-7702) to 50 μM PFOA for 48 h and 96 h, and identified 111 significantly differentially expressed proteins by iTRAQ analysis. A total of 46 proteins were related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. Through further analysis of the cell cycle, apoptosis and their related proteins, we found that low doses of PFOA (50–100 μM) promoted cell proliferation and numbers by promoting cells from the G1 to S phases, whereas high doses of PFOA (200–400 μM) led to reduced HL-7702 cell numbers compared with that of the control mainly due to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the promotion of cell cycle progression in human cells following PFOA exposure.

  3. Serum microRNA profiles in patients with chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis C, primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, or drug-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaura, Yu; Tatsumi, Naoyuki; Takagi, Shingo; Tokumitsu, Shinsaku; Fukami, Tatsuki; Tajiri, Kazuto; Minemura, Masami; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Miki

    2017-12-01

    Some blood biomarkers or histological examination by liver biopsy are used for the diagnosis of liver diseases in clinics. However, conventional blood biomarkers show poor specificity and sensitivity, and liver biopsy is highly invasiveness. Therefore, to overcome such disadvantages, specific/sensitive and noninvasive options are desirable. In recent years, circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have been acknowledged for their potential as disease markers. Actually, several miRNAs have been reported to be biomarker candidates of liver diseases. However, these earlier studies were performed for one disease. Therefore, the specificity as biomarkers was not guaranteed, because they didn't study for the other types of liver injury. In this study, we examined if circulating miRNA could distinguish different types of liver diseases. Serum miRNA profiles in 28 patients with chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis C, primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis or drug-induced liver injury as well as 4 control subjects were determined by TaqMan MicroRNA Array analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) of selected miRNAs was performed. We identified 37 miRNAs whose levels were significantly different between any of the groups. Although individual miRNAs could not distinguish different types of liver diseases, probably because of similar liver pathology, their profiling by PCA could classify different liver disease groups. The profiling of the selected miRNAs can be useful to distinguish different types of liver diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Intervention of raltitrexed combined with epirubicin in hepatic arterial infusion and embolization in treatment of primary liver cancer

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    WANG Baoxin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the therapeutic effect of intervention of raltitrexed combined with epirubicin in hepatic arterial infusion and embolization in the treatment of advanced primary liver cancer. MethodsA total of 80 patients with advanced primary liver cancer who were admitted to the Central Hospital of China National Petroleum Corporation from January 2011 to May 2013 and not suitable for surgical treatment were selected and randomly divided into study group (n=40 and control group (n=40. The study group was treated with intervention of raltitrexed combined with epirubicin in hepatic arterial infusion and embolization, while the control group was treated with intervention of fluorouracil (5-FU combined with epirubicin in hepatic arterial infusion and embolization. The treatment was given once every four weeks for a total of three to six circles. The response rate (RR, disease control rate (DCR, median time to progression, survival rate, and the decreases in alpha fetoprotein (AFP, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, transaminase, and bilirubin of the two groups were observed. Comparison of categorical data between the two groups was made by chi-square test, and comparison of continuous data was made by t test. ResultsThe RRs of the study group and control group were 52.5% and 22.5%, respectively, and the difference was significant (χ2=7.680, P=0.006; the DCRs of the study group and control group were 87.5% and 60.0%, respectively, and the difference was significant (χ2=7.813, P=0.005; the median time to progression of the study group and control group was 12.2 and 8.0 months, respectively, and the difference was significant (t=5.118, P=0.00; the 1- and 2-year survival rates of the study group were 85.0% and 60.0%, respectively, with the control group being 65.0% and 37.5%, and the difference was significant (χ2=4.267, P=0.039; χ2=4.053, P=0.044. One month after chemoembolization, the number of patients whose AFP, transaminase, and bilirubin

  5. Liver Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.; Gao, Bin; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    The liver is the largest organ in the body and is generally regarded by non-immunologists as not having lymphoid function. However, such is far from accurate. This review highlights the importance of the liver as a lymphoid organ. Firstly, we discuss experimental data surrounding the role of liver as a lymphoid organ. The liver facilitates a tolerance rather than immunoreactivity, which protects the host from antigenic overload of dietary components and drugs derived from the gut and is also instrumental to fetal immune tolerance. Loss of liver tolerance leads to autoaggressive phenomena which if are not controlled by regulatory lymphoid populations may lead to the induction of autoimmune liver diseases. Liver-related lymphoid subpopulations also act as critical antigen-presenting cells. The study of the immunological properties of liver and delineation of the microenvironment of the intrahepatic milieu in normal and diseased livers provides a platform to understand the hierarchy of a series of detrimental events which lead to immune-mediated destruction of the liver and the rejection of liver allografts. The majority of emphasis within this review will be on the normal mononuclear cell composition of the liver. However, within this context, we will discus select, but not all, immune mediated liver disease and attempt to place these data in the context of human autoimmunity. PMID:23720323

  6. Effects of hypophysectomy and GH administration on bovine and human GH binding to rat liver membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, J L; Edén, S; Kostyo, J L

    1985-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the specific binding of highly purified bovine and human growth hormones (bGH and hGH) to purified liver plasma membranes of male rats at various times after hypophysectomy and after the acute intravenous administration of bGH. Liver membranes prepared from hypophysectomized male rats showed a two- to threefold increase in the specific binding of either [125I]iodo-bGH or [125I]iodo-hGH, when compared with membranes prepared from the livers of age-matched normal male rats. The increase in GH binding was apparent within 3 days after hypophysectomy and persisted for a number of weeks after the operation. The increase in GH binding produced by hypophysectomy appeared to be due to an increase in the number of binding sites present on the membranes. The intravenous injection of 200 micrograms of bGH into hypophysectomized male rats 5-60 min before they were killed markedly reduced the ability of liver membranes prepared from these animals to bind [125I]iodo-bGH specifically. This decrease in GH binding seen after the injection of bGH may have been due to the development of a slowly dissociating hormone-binding site complex, which thereby reduced the number of available binding sites. This conclusion is supported by the finding that bGH, which is bound in vitro to isolated liver membranes, dissociates slowly and incompletely in the presence of an excess of unlabeled hormone. Moreover, the degree to which the bound hormone can dissociate appears to depend on the length of time that association is allowed to occur.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Unique cell type-specific junctional complexes in vascular endothelium of human and rat liver sinusoids.

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    Cyrill Géraud

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelium is strategically positioned to control access of fluids, macromolecules and cells to the liver parenchyma and to serve clearance functions upstream of the hepatocytes. While clearance of macromolecular debris from the peripheral blood is performed by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs using a delicate endocytic receptor system featuring stabilin-1 and -2, the mannose receptor and CD32b, vascular permeability and cell trafficking are controlled by transcellular pores, i.e. the fenestrae, and by intercellular junctional complexes. In contrast to blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells in other organs, the junctional complexes of LSECs have not yet been consistently characterized in molecular terms. In a comprehensive analysis, we here show that LSECs express the typical proteins found in endothelial adherens junctions (AJ, i.e. VE-cadherin as well as α-, β-, p120-catenin and plakoglobin. Tight junction (TJ transmembrane proteins typical of endothelial cells, i.e. claudin-5 and occludin, were not expressed by rat LSECs while heterogenous immunreactivity for claudin-5 was detected in human LSECs. In contrast, junctional molecules preferentially associating with TJ such as JAM-A, B and C and zonula occludens proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 were readily detected in LSECs. Remarkably, among the JAMs JAM-C was considerably over-expressed in LSECs as compared to lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we show here that LSECs form a special kind of mixed-type intercellular junctions characterized by co-occurrence of endothelial AJ proteins, and of ZO-1 and -2, and JAMs. The distinct molecular architecture of the intercellular junctional complexes of LSECs corroborates previous ultrastructural findings and provides the molecular basis for further analyses of the endothelial barrier function of liver sinusoids under pathologic conditions ranging from hepatic inflammation to formation of liver metastasis.

  8. Ovarian senescence increases liver fibrosis in humans and zebrafish with steatosis

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    Elena Turola

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Contrasting data exist on the effect of gender and menopause on the susceptibility, development and liver damage progression in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Our aim was to assess whether menopause is associated with the severity of liver fibrosis in individuals with NAFLD and to explore the issue of ovarian senescence in experimental liver steatosis in zebrafish. In 244 females and age-matched males with biopsy-proven NAFLD, we assessed anthropometric, biochemical and metabolic features, including menopausal status (self-reported; liver biopsy was scored according to ‘The Pathology Committee of the NASH Clinical Research Network’. Young and old male and female zebrafish were fed for 24 weeks with a high-calorie diet. Weekly body mass index (BMI, histopathological examination and quantitative real-time PCR analysis on genes involved in lipid metabolism, inflammation and fibrosis were performed. In the entire cohort, at multivariate logistic regression, male gender [odds ratio (OR: 1.408, 95% confidence interval (95% CI: 0.779-2.542, P=0.25] vs women at reproductive age was not associated with F2-F4 fibrosis, whereas a trend was observed for menopause (OR: 1.752, 95% CI: 0.956-3.208, P=0.06. In women, menopause (OR: 2.717, 95% CI: 1.020-7.237, P=0.04 was independently associated with F2-F4 fibrosis. Similarly, in overfed zebrafish, old female fish with failing ovarian function [as demonstrated by extremely low circulating estradiol levels (1.4±0.1 pg/µl and prevailing presence of atretic follicles in the ovaries] developed massive steatosis and substantial fibrosis (comparable with that occurring in males, whereas young female fish developed less steatosis and were totally protected from the development of fibrosis. Ovarian senescence significantly increases the risk of fibrosis severity both in humans with NAFLD and in zebrafish with experimental steatosis.

  9. Liver Afferents Contribute to Water Drinking-Induced Sympathetic Activation in Human Subjects: A Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Marcus; Gueler, Faikah; Barg-Hock, Hannelore; Heiringhoff, Karl-Heinz; Engeli, Stefan; Heusser, Karsten; Diedrich, André; Brandt, André; Strassburg, Christian P.; Tank, Jens; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Jordan, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Water drinking acutely increases sympathetic activity in human subjects. In animals, the response appears to be mediated through transient receptor potential channel TRPV4 activation on osmosensitive hepatic spinal afferents, described as osmopressor response. We hypothesized that hepatic denervation attenuates water drinking-induced sympathetic activation. We studied 20 liver transplant recipients (44±2.6 years, 1.2±0.1 years post transplant) as model of hepatic denervation and 20 kidney transplant recipients (43±2.6 years, 0.8±0.1 years post transplant) as immunosuppressive drug matched control group. Before and after 500 ml water ingestion, we obtained venous blood samples for catecholamine analysis. We also monitored brachial and finger blood pressure, ECG, and thoracic bioimpedance. Plasma norepinephrine concentration had changed by 0.01±0.07 nmol/l in liver and by 0.21±0.07 nmol/l in kidney transplant recipients (pwater drinking. While blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance increased in both groups, the responses tended to be attenuated in liver transplant recipients. Our findings support the idea that osmosensitive hepatic afferents are involved in water drinking-induced sympathetic activation in human subjects. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01237431 PMID:22016786

  10. HCV-induced immune responses influence the development of operational tolerance after liver transplantation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohne, Felix; Londoño, María-Carlota; Benítez, Carlos; Miquel, Rosa; Martínez-Llordella, Marc; Russo, Carolina; Ortiz, Cecilia; Bonaccorsi-Riani, Eliano; Brander, Christian; Bauer, Tanja; Protzer, Ulrike; Jaeckel, Elmar; Taubert, Richard; Forns, Xavier; Navasa, Miquel; Berenguer, Marina; Rimola, Antoni; Lozano, Juan-José; Sánchez-Fueyo, Alberto

    2014-06-25

    Pathogen-induced immune responses prevent the establishment of transplantation tolerance in experimental animal models. Whether this occurs in humans as well remains unclear. The development of operational tolerance in liver transplant recipients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection allows us to address this question. We conducted a clinical trial of immunosuppression withdrawal in HCV-infected adult liver recipients to elucidate (i) the mechanisms through which allograft tolerance can be established in the presence of an ongoing inflammatory response and (ii) whether anti-HCV heterologous immune responses influence this phenomenon. Of 34 enrolled liver recipients, drug withdrawal was successful in 17 patients (50%). Tolerance was associated with intrahepatic overexpression of type I interferon and immunoregulatory genes and with an expansion of exhausted PD1/CTLA4/2B4-positive HCV-specific circulating CD8(+) T cells. These findings were already present before immunosuppression was discontinued and were specific for HCV infection. In contrast, the magnitude of HCV-induced proinflammatory gene expression and the breadth of anti-HCV effector T cell responses did not influence drug withdrawal outcome. Our data suggest that in humans, persistent viral infections exert immunoregulatory effects that could contribute to the restraining of alloimmune responses, and do not necessarily preclude the development of allograft tolerance. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Liver afferents contribute to water drinking-induced sympathetic activation in human subjects: a clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus May

    Full Text Available Water drinking acutely increases sympathetic activity in human subjects. In animals, the response appears to be mediated through transient receptor potential channel TRPV4 activation on osmosensitive hepatic spinal afferents, described as osmopressor response. We hypothesized that hepatic denervation attenuates water drinking-induced sympathetic activation. We studied 20 liver transplant recipients (44±2.6 years, 1.2±0.1 years post transplant as model of hepatic denervation and 20 kidney transplant recipients (43±2.6 years, 0.8±0.1 years post transplant as immunosuppressive drug matched control group. Before and after 500 ml water ingestion, we obtained venous blood samples for catecholamine analysis. We also monitored brachial and finger blood pressure, ECG, and thoracic bioimpedance. Plasma norepinephrine concentration had changed by 0.01±0.07 nmol/l in liver and by 0.21±0.07 nmol/l in kidney transplant recipients (p<0.05 between groups after 30-40 minutes of water drinking. While blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance increased in both groups, the responses tended to be attenuated in liver transplant recipients. Our findings support the idea that osmosensitive hepatic afferents are involved in water drinking-induced sympathetic activation in human subjects.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01237431.

  12. [Vitamin D metabolism and signaling in human hepatocellular carcinoma and surrounding non-tumorous liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Evelin; Balla, Bernadett; Kósa, János; Lakatos, Péter András; Lazáry, Áron; Németh, Dániel; Jozilan, Hasan; Somorácz, Áron; Korompay, Anna; Gyöngyösi, Benedek; Borka, Katalin; Kiss, András; Kupcsulik, Péter; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Szalay, Ferenc

    2016-11-01

    1,25-Dihydroxy vitamin D 3 mediates antitumor effects in hepatocellular carcinoma. We examined mRNA and protein expression differences in 1,25-Dihydroxy vitamin D 3 -inactivating CYP24A1, mRNA of activating CYP27B1 enzymes, and that of VDR between human hepatocellular carcinoma and surrounding non-tumorous liver. Snap-frozen tissues from 13 patients were studied for mRNA and protein expression of CYP24A1. Paraffin-embedded tissues from 36 patients were used to study mRNA of VDR and CYP27B1. mRNA expression was measured by RT-PCR, CYP24A1 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry. Expression of VDR and CYP27B1 was significantly lower in hepatocellular carcinoma compared with non-tumorous liver (pexpressed CYP24A1 mRNA, but neither of the non-tumorous liver. The gene activation was followed by CYP24A1 protein synthesis. The presence of CYP24A1 mRNA and the reduced expression of VDR and CYP27B1 mRNA in human hepatocellular carcinoma samples indicate decreased bioavailability of 1,25-Dihydroxy vitamin D 3 , providing an escape mechanism from the anti-tumor effect. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(48), 1910-1918.

  13. Adiposity across the adult life course and incidence of primary liver cancer: The NIH-AARP cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baiyu; Petrick, Jessica L; Kelly, Scott P; Graubard, Barry I; Freedman, Neal D; McGlynn, Katherine A

    2017-07-15

    Obesity relatively late in adulthood has been consistently associated with increased risk of primary liver cancer. However, little is known about the role of early adult adiposity and evolution of adiposity across adulthood in hepatocarcinogenesis. We examined adult body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2) ) in relation to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) in a large prospective cohort. Weight at ages 18, 35, 50 and at study baseline was retrospectively reported by 303,620 participants. BMI trajectories were identified using latent class trajectory modeling. Incidence of HCC and ICC was determined through 2011. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 372 HCC cases and 104 ICC cases occurred during follow-up. Being obese (BMI ≥ 30) at ages 18, 35, 50 and at baseline (mean age 62.3 years, range 50.3-71.5 years) was associated with an 86-119% elevated risk of HCC. BMI trajectories that resulted in obesity were associated with ∼80% higher HCC incidence. BMI at age 18, per 5 kg/m(2) , was associated with a 34% higher risk of ICC, but the association attenuated for BMI at older ages. In conclusion, our findings suggest that maintaining a healthy BMI throughout the lifetime may reduce liver cancer risk. Future studies with longitudinally collected weight information are warranted to further elucidate the role of life-course adiposity in liver cancer development. Published 2017. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain of the United States of America.

  14. ISOLATION AND PRIMARY CULTURES OF HUMAN INTRAHEPATIC BILE DUCTULAR EPITHELIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetris, A. J.; Markus, B. H.; Saidman, S.; Fung, J. J.; Makowka, L.; Graner, S.; Duquesnoy, R.; Starzl, T. E.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY A technique for the isolation of human intrahepatic bile ductular epithelium, and the establishment of primary cultures using a serum- and growth-factor-supplemented medium combined with a connective tissue substrata is described. Initial cell isolates and monolayer cultures display phenotypic characteristics of biliary epithelial cells (low molecular weight prekeratin positive; albumin, alphafetoprotein, and Factor VIII-related antigen negative). Ultrastructural features of the cultured cells show cell polarization with surface microvilli, numerous interepithelial junctional complexes and cytoplasmic intermediate prekeratin filaments. PMID:3131298

  15. Robot-assisted radiofrequency ablation of primary and secondary liver tumours: early experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet [University of Malaya, Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yeong, Chai Hong [University of Malaya, University of Malaya Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Goh, Khean Lee [University of Malaya, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yoong, Boon Koon [University of Malaya, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ho, Gwo Fuang [University of Malaya, Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yim, Carolyn Chue Wai [University of Malaya, Department of Anesthesia, Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Kulkarni, Anjali [Perfint Healthcare Corporation, Florence, OR (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Computed tomography (CT)-compatible robots, both commercial and research-based, have been developed with the intention of increasing the accuracy of needle placement and potentially improving the outcomes of therapies in addition to reducing clinical staff and patient exposure to radiation during CT fluoroscopy. In the case of highly inaccessible lesions that require multiple plane angulations, robotically assisted needles may improve biopsy access and targeted drug delivery therapy by avoidance of the straight line path of normal linear needles. We report our preliminary experience of performing radiofrequency ablation of the liver using a robotic-assisted CT guidance system on 11 patients (17 lesions). Robotic-assisted planning and needle placement appears to have high accuracy, is technically easier than the non-robotic-assisted procedure, and involves a significantly lower radiation dose to both patient and support staff. (orig.)

  16. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  17. Liver and Muscle Contribute Differently to the Plasma Acylcarnitine Pool During Fasting and Exercise in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.; Hansen, J S; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasma acylcarnitine levels are elevated by physiological conditions such as fasting and exercise but also in states of insulin resistance and obesity. AIM: To elucidate the contribution of liver and skeletal muscle to plasma acylcarnitines in the fasting state and during exercise...... in humans. METHODS: In 2 independent studies, young healthy males were fasted overnight and performed an acute bout of exercise to investigate either acylcarnitines in skeletal muscle biopsies and arterial-to-venous plasma differences over the exercising and resting leg (n = 9) or the flux over the hepato......:1-carnitines were released from the exercising leg and simultaneously; C6, C8, C10, C10:1, C14, and C16:1 were taken up by the hepato-splanchnic. CONCLUSION: These data provide novel insight to the organo-specific release/uptake of acylcarnitines. The liver is a major contributor to systemic short chain...

  18. GMP-grade human fetal liver-derived mesenchymal stem cells for clinical transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larijani, Bagher; Aghayan, Hamid-Reza; Goodarzi, Parisa; Arjmand, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy seems a promising avenue in regenerative medicine. Within various stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells have progressively used for cellular therapy. Because of the age-related decreasing in the frequency and differentiating capacity of adult MSCs, fetal tissues such as fetal liver, lung, pancreas, spleen, etc. have been introduced as an alternative source of MSCs for cellular therapy. On the other hand, using stem cells as advanced therapy medicinal products, must be performed in compliance with cGMP as a quality assurance system to ensure the safety, quality, and identity of cell products during translation from the basic stem cell sciences into clinical cell transplantation. In this chapter the authors have demonstrated the manufacturing of GMP-grade human fetal liver-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

  19. Secretome Analysis of Human Primary Fibroblasts Undergoing Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Micutkova, Lucia; Diener, Thomas

    Introduction Cultures of diploid human fibroblasts can replicate only a finite number of times; rapid proliferation is followed by decline in replicative frequency and finally cells become senescent and are incapable of further proliferation. Senescencent cells display altered growth, morphology......-degrading. In this study we use proteomic tools to characterise the secretome of young and senescent fibroblasts.   Methods Three independent preparations of primary human foreskin fibroblasts were grown to senescence. Young, rapidly proliferating cells at passage 11 and cells from passage 28 displaying senescent...... spectrometry; peptide count was used to estimate protein abundance.   Results 2DGE based analysis of secretion profiles of young and senescent cells derived from the same cell lineage revealed a number of protein spots differentially expressed. We have observed an increased secretion of matrix...

  20. Transfection of Primary Hepatocytes with Liver-Enriched Transcription Factors Using Adenoviral Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benet, Marta; Jover, Ramiro; Bort, Roque

    2015-01-01

    Primary cultured hepatocytes are probably the best model to study endogenous metabolic pathways, toxicity, or drug metabolism. Many of these studies require expression of ectopic genes. It would be desirable to use a method of transfection that allows dose-response studies, high efficiency of transfection, and the possibility to express several genes at the same time. Adenoviral vectors fulfill these requirements, becoming a valuable tool for primary hepatocyte transfection. Moreover, they are easy to generate and do not require a high level of biocontainment. In the present chapter, we describe the generation, cloning, amplification, and purification of an adenoviral vector capable of infecting primary cultured hepatocytes. This recombinant adenovirus induces robust expression of the protein of interest in hepatocytes within a wide range of doses.

  1. Viral load affects the immune response to HBV in mice with humanized immune system and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusséaux, Mathilde; Masse-Ranson, Guillemette; Darche, Sylvie; Ahodantin, James; Li, Yan; Fiquet, Oriane; Beaumont, Elodie; Moreau, Pierrick; Rivière, Lise; Neuveut, Christine; Soussan, Patrick; Roingeard, Philippe; Kremsdorf, Dina; Di Santo, James P; Strick-Marchand, Helene

    2017-08-26

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects hepatocytes, but the mechanisms of the immune response against the virus, and how it affects disease progression, are unclear. We performed studies with BALB/c Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-)Sirpa(NOD)Alb-uPA(tg/tg) mice, stably engrafted with human hepatocytes (HUHEP) with or without a human immune system (HIS). HUHEP and HIS-HUHEP mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of HBV. Mononuclear cells were isolated from spleen and liver for analysis by flow cytometry. Liver was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and mRNA levels were measured by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Plasma levels of HBV DNA was quantified by quantitative PCR, and antigen-specific antibodies were detected by immunocytochemistry of HBV transfected BHK-21 cells. Following HBV infection, a complete viral life cycle, with production of HBV DNA, hepatitis B e, core (HBc) and surface (HBs) antigens, and covalently closed circular DNA, was observed in HUHEP and HIS-HUHEP mice. HBV replicated unrestricted in HUHEP mice resulting in high viral titers without pathologic effects. In contrast, HBV-infected HIS-HUHEP mice developed chronic hepatitis with 10-fold lower titers and antigen-specific IgGs, (anti-HBs, anti-HBc), consistent with partial immune control. HBV-infected HIS-HUHEP livers contained infiltrating Kupffer cells, mature activated natural killer cells (CD69+), and PD-1+ effector memory T cells (CD45RO+). Reducing the viral inoculum resulted in more efficient immune control. Plasma from HBV-infected HIS-HUHEP mice had increased levels of inflammatory and immune-suppressive cytokines (C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 10 and interleukin 10), which correlated with populations of intrahepatic CD4+ T cells (CD45RO+PD-1+). Mice with high levels of viremia had HBV-infected liver progenitor cells. Giving the mice the nucleoside analogue entecavir reduced viral loads and decreased liver inflammation. In HIS-HUHEP mice, HBV infection completes a full life cycle and

  2. Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Progression of Liver Disease Diagnosing Liver Disease – Liver Biopsy and Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant ... The Progression of Liver Disease Diagnosing Liver Disease: Liver Biopsy and Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant ...

  3. Warm ischemic injury is reflected in the release of injury markers during cold preservation of the human liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bote G Bruinsma

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation plays a pivotal role in the treatment of patients with end-stage liver disease. Despite excellent outcomes, the field is strained by a severe shortage of viable liver grafts. To meet high demands, attempts are made to increase the use of suboptimal livers by both pretransplant recovery and assessment of donor livers. Here we aim to assess hepatic injury in the measurement of routine markers in the post-ischemic flush effluent of discarded human liver with a wide warm ischemic range.Six human livers discarded for transplantation with variable warm and cold ischemia times were flushed at the end of preservation. The liver grafts were flushed with NaCl or Lactated Ringer's, 2 L through the portal vein and 1 L through the hepatic artery. The vena caval effluent was sampled and analyzed for biochemical markers of injury; lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, alanine transaminase (ALT, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP. Liver tissue biopsies were analyzed for ATP content and histologically (H&E examined.The duration of warm ischemia in the six livers correlated significantly to the concentration of LDH, ALT, and ALP in the effluent from the portal vein flush. No correlation was found with cold ischemia time. Tissue ATP content at the end of preservation correlated very strongly with the concentration of ALP in the arterial effluent (P<0.0007, R2 = 0.96.Biochemical injury markers released during the cold preservation period were reflective of the duration of warm ischemic injury sustained prior to release of the markers, as well as the hepatic energy status. As such, assessment of the flush effluent at the end of cold preservation may be a useful tool in evaluating suboptimal livers prior to transplantation, particularly in situations with undeterminable ischemic durations.

  4. General Information about Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hepatitis C Hepatitis D Hepatitis E Hepatitis G Liver cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells ... Primary Liver Cancer Treatment Childhood Liver Cancer Treatment Liver cancer is not common in the United States. Liver ...

  5. Sex-specific associations between birth weight and adult primary liver cancer in a large cohort of Danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Esther; Berentzen, Tina L.; Gamborg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Whether the prenatal period is critical for the development of adult primary liver cancer (PLC) is sparsely investigated. Recently, attention has been drawn to potential sex-differences in the early origins of adult disease. We investigated the association between birth weight and adult PLC...... separately in men and women, using a large cohort of 217,227 children (51% boys), born from 1936 to 1980, from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, and followed them until 2010 in national registers. Hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of PLC (30 years or older) were estimated by Cox...... regression models stratified by birth cohort. During 5.1 million person-years of follow-up, 185 men and 65 women developed PLC. Sex modified the association between birth weight and adult PLC (p-value for interaction=0.0005). Compared with a sex-specific reference group of birth weights between 3.25-3.75 kg...

  6. Effect of extracellular vesicles of human adipose tissue on insulin signaling in liver and muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranendonk, Mariëtte E G; Visseren, Frank L J; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; de Jager, Wilco; Wauben, Marca H M; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a key mechanism in obesity-induced cardiovascular disease. To unravel mechanisms whereby human adipose tissue (AT) contributes to systemic IR, the effect of human AT-extracellular vesicles (EVs) on insulin signaling in liver and muscle cells was determined. EVs released from human subcutaneous (SAT) and omental AT (OAT)-explants ex vivo were used for stimulation of hepatocytes and myotubes in vitro. Subsequently, insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and expression of gluconeogenic genes (G6P, PEPCK) was determined. AT-EV adipokine levels were measured by multiplex immunoassay, and AT-EVs were quantified by high-resolution flow cytometry. In hepatocytes, AT-EVs from the majority of patients inhibited insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation, while EVs from some patients stimulated insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation. In myotubes AT-EVs exerted an ambiguous effect on insulin signaling. Hepatic Akt phosphorylation related negatively to G6P-expression by both SAT-EVs (r = -0.60, P = 0.01) and OAT-EVs (r = -0.74, P = 0.001). MCP-1, IL-6, and MIF concentrations were higher in OAT-EVs compared to SAT-EVs and differently related to lower Akt phosphorylation in hepatocytes. Finally, the number of OAT-EVs correlated positively with liver enzymes indicative for liver dysfunction. Human AT-EVs can stimulate or inhibit insulin signaling in hepatocytes- possibly depending on their adipokine content- and may thereby contribute to systemic IR. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  7. Effects of Eupatilin and Jaceosidin on Cytochrome P450 Enzyme Activities in Human Liver Microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyun Jeong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Eupatilin and jaceosidin are bioactive flavones found in the medicinal herbs of the genus Artemisia. These bioactive flavones exhibit various antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antiallergic, and antitumor activities. The inhibitory potentials of eupatilin and jaceosidin on the activities of seven major human cytochrome P450 enzymes in human liver microsomes were investigated using a cocktail probe assay. Eupatilin and jaceosidin potently inhibited CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylation with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 9.4 mM and 5.3 mM, respectively, and CYP2C9-catalyzed diclofenac 4-hydroxylation with IC50 values of 4.1 mM and 10.2 mM, respectively. Eupatilin and jaceosidin were also found to moderately inhibit CYP2C19-catalyzed [S]-mephenytoin 4¢-hydroxylation, CYP2D6-catalyzed bufuralol 1¢-hydroxylation, and CYP2C8-catalyzed amodiaquine N-deethylation. Kinetic analysis of human liver microsomes showed that eupatilin is a competitive inhibitor of CYP1A2 with a Ki value of 2.3 mM and a mixed-type inhibitor of CYP2C9 with a Ki value of 1.6 mM. Jaceosidin was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of CYP1A2 with a Ki value of 3.8 mM and a mixed-type inhibitor of CYP2C9 with Ki value of 6.4 mM in human liver microsomes. These in vitro results suggest that eupatilin and jaceosidin should be further examined for potential pharmacokinetic drug interactions in vivo due to inhibition of CYP1A2 and CYP2C9.

  8. The role of radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of primary and metastatic tumours of the liver: initial lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Pui Yee Grace; Koea, Jonathan; McCall, John; Holden, Andrew; Osbourne, Mark

    2002-08-09

    The majority of patients with hepatic malignancies are not suitable for potentially curative resection due to tumour size, location, inadequate hepatic reserve or widely spread disease. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a novel technique of local tumour destruction by heat. The aim of this study was to report the initial experience with RFA in the management of primary and metastatic liver tumours in New Zealand. Patients who underwent RFA between February 2000 and August 2001 were included. The clinical, pathological and follow-up information of individual patients entered prospectively on a computerised database was collated and analysed. Thirty one procedures were performed in 30 patients (18 male, median age 58 years). Nineteen procedures were performed percutaneously under ultrasound guidance and twelve were carried out as part of a surgical procedure. Eight patients had primary tumours, and 22 patients had metastatic tumours (colorectal 9, neuroendocrine 7, non-colorectal non-neuroendocrine 6). The median diameter of treated lesions was 25 mm (range 5 60 mm). The median number of treated lesions per patient was 2 (range 1 6). Twenty four of the 31 procedures were classified as curative (all disease treated). Six patients with neuroendocrine tumours underwent cytoreduction only and were classified as palliative. Eight patients (4 percutaneous, 4 surgical) developed complications leading to 3 prolonged hospital stays (bile leak, abscess and burn). There was no treatment-related mortality. At a median follow up of 12 months (range 1 22 months), 6 patients (all treated with percutaneous RFA) have developed tumour recurrence in treated lesions, 5 patients have developed new liver lesions, 16 are alive and disease free, and 3 have developed extra hepatic disease. RFA is safe but significant complications can occur. RFA and enteral resection should not be undertaken together, as there is an increased risk of hepatic sepsis and abscess. RFA performed percutaneously is

  9. Telomerase contributes to fludarabine resistance in primary human leukemic lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Shawi

    Full Text Available We report that Imetelstat, a telomerase inhibitor that binds to the RNA component of telomerase (hTR, can sensitize primary CLL lymphocytes to fludarabine in vitro. This effect was observed in lymphocytes from clinically resistant cases and with cytogenetic abnormalities associated with bad prognosis. Imetelstat mediated-sensitization to fludarabine was not associated with telomerase activity, but with the basal expression of Ku80. Since both Imetelstat and Ku80 bind hTR, we assessed 1 if Ku80 and Imetelstat alter each other's binding to hTR in vitro and 2 the effect of an oligonucleotide complementary to the Ku binding site in hTR (Ku oligo on the survival of primary CLL lymphocytes exposed to fludarabine. We show that Imetelstat interferes with the binding of Ku70/80 (Ku to hTR and that the Ku oligo can sensitize CLL lymphocytes to FLU. Our results suggest that Ku binding to hTR may contribute to fludarabine resistance in CLL lmphocytes. This is the first report highlighting the potentially broad effectiveness of Imetelstat in CLL, and the potential biological and clinical implications of a functional interaction between Ku and hTR in primary human cancer cells.

  10. Proteoglycans in liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghy, Kornélia; Tátrai, Péter; Regős, Eszter; Kovalszky, Ilona

    2016-01-07

    Proteoglycans are a group of molecules that contain at least one glycosaminoglycan chain, such as a heparan, dermatan, chondroitin, or keratan sulfate, covalently attached to the protein core. These molecules are categorized based on their structure, localization, and function, and can be found in the extracellular matrix, on the cell surface, and in the cytoplasm. Cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, such as syndecans, are the primary type present in healthy liver tissue. However, deterioration of the liver results in overproduction of other proteoglycan types. The purpose of this article is to provide a current summary of the most relevant data implicating proteoglycans in the development and progression of human and experimental liver cancer. A review of our work and other studies in the literature indicate that deterioration of liver function is accompanied by an increase in the amount of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. The alteration of proteoglycan composition interferes with the physiologic function of the liver on several levels. This article details and discusses the roles of syndecan-1, glypicans, agrin, perlecan, collagen XVIII/endostatin, endocan, serglycin, decorin, biglycan, asporin, fibromodulin, lumican, and versican in liver function. Specifically, glypicans, agrin, and versican play significant roles in the development of liver cancer. Conversely, the presence of decorin could potentially provide protective effects.

  11. An Experimental Study to Measure the Mechanical Properties of the Human Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Shojaei, Ahmad

    2017-10-31

    Since the liver is one of the most important organs of the body that can be injured during trauma, that is, during accidents like car crashes, understanding its mechanical properties is of great interest. Experimental data is needed to address the mechanical properties of the liver to be used for a variety of applications, such as the numerical simulations for medical purposes, including the virtual reality simulators, trauma research, diagnosis objectives, as well as injury biomechanics. However, the data on the mechanical properties of the liver capsule is limited to the animal models or confined to the tensile/compressive loading under single direction. Therefore, this study was aimed at experimentally measuring the axial and transversal mechanical properties of the human liver capsule under both the tensile and compressive loadings. To do that, 20 human cadavers were autopsied and their liver capsules were excised and histologically analyzed to extract the mean angle of a large fibers population (bundle of the fine collagen fibers). Thereafter, the samples were cut and subjected to a series of axial and transversal tensile/compressive loadings. The results revealed the tensile elastic modulus of 12.16 ± 1.20 (mean ± SD) and 7.17 ± 0.85 kPa under the axial and transversal loadings respectively. Correspondingly, the compressive elastic modulus of 196.54 ± 13.15 and 112.41 ± 8.98 kPa were observed under the axial and transversal loadings respectively. The compressive axial and transversal maximum/failure stress of the capsule were 32.54 and 37.30 times higher than that of the tensile ones respectively. The capsule showed a stiffer behavior under the compressive load compared to the tensile one. In addition, the axial elastic modulus of the capsule was found to be higher than that of the transversal one. The findings of the current study have implications not only for understanding the mechanical properties of the human capsule tissue under tensile

  12. Gene expression of 17beta-estradiol-metabolizing isozymes: comparison of normal human mammary gland to normal human liver and to cultured human breast adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Leane; Wagner, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic activation of 17beta-estradiol (E2) to catechols and quinones together with lack of deactivation constitute risk factors in human breast carcinogenesis. E2-catchols are generated by cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases (CYPs). Deactivation of E2, E2-catechols, and E2-quinones is mediated by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), sulfotransferase (SULT), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and NADPH-quinone-oxidoreductase (QR) isozymes, respectively. The aim of the present study was to quantify mRNA levels of E2-metabolizing isozymes expressed in MCF-7 cells cultured in the presence/absence of steroids by reverse transcription/competitive PCR in relation to the housekeeping gene hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and compare them with expression levels in normal human mammary gland (MG) and liver tissue. CYP1A1, 1B1, SULT1A1, 1A2, membrane-bound and soluble COMT, GSTT1, QR1, and UGT2B7 were detected in both tissues and MCF-7 cells; however, most enzymes were expressed at least tenfold higher in liver. Yet, CYP1B1 was expressed as high in breast as in liver and UGTs were not detected in MCF-7 cells cultured with steroids. MCF-7 cells cultured steroid-free additionally expressed CYP1A2 as well as UGT1A4, 1A8, and 1A9. Normal human liver but not MG expressed CYP1A2, 3A4, UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A9, and SULT2A1. UGT1A8 was only detected in MCF7 cells but was not found in human liver. Thus, our study provides a comprehensive overview of expression levels of E2-metabolizing enzymes in a popular in vitro model and in human tissues, which will contribute to the interpretation of in vitro studies concerning the activation/deactivation of E2.

  13. Pulpal status of human primary teeth with physiological root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Joana; Day, Peter; Duggal, Monty; Morgan, Claire; Rodd, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was to determine whether any changes occur in the pulpal structure of human primary teeth in association with physiological root resorption. The experimental material comprised 64 sound primary molars, obtained from children requiring routine dental extractions under general anaesthesia. Pulp sections were processed for indirect immunofluorescence using combinations of: (i) protein gene product 9.5 (a general neuronal marker); (ii) leucocyte common antigen CD45 (a general immune cell marker); and (iii) Ulex europaeus I lectin (a marker of vascular endothelium). Image analysis was then used to determine the percentage area of staining for each label within both the pulp horn and mid-coronal region. Following measurement of the greatest degree of root resorption in each sample, teeth were subdivided into three groups: those with physiological resorption involving less than one-third, one-third to two-thirds, and more than two-thirds of their root length. Wide variation was evident between different tooth samples with some resorbed teeth showing marked changes in pulpal histology. Decreased innervation density, increased immune cell accumulation, and increased vascularity were evident in some teeth with advanced root resorption. Analysis of pooled data, however, did not reveal any significant differences in mean percentage area of staining for any of these variables according to the three root resorption subgroups (P > 0.05, analysis of variance on transformed data). This investigation has revealed some changes in pulpal status of human primary teeth with physiological root resorption. These were not, however, as profound as one may have anticipated. It is therefore speculated that teeth could retain the potential for sensation, healing, and repair until advanced stages of root resorption.

  14. Nutritional modulation of mouse and human liver bud growth through a branched-chain amino acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Ran-Ran; Ueno, Yasuharu; Sekine, Keisuke; Zheng, Yun-Wen; Takebe, Takanori; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2017-03-15

    Liver bud progenitors experience a transient amplification during the early organ growth phase, yet the mechanism responsible is not fully understood. Collective evidence highlights the specific requirements in stem cell metabolism for expanding organ progenitors during organogenesis and regeneration. Here, transcriptome analyses show that progenitors of the mouse and human liver bud growth stage specifically express the gene branched chain aminotransferase 1, encoding a known breakdown enzyme of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) for energy generation. Global metabolome analysis confirmed the active consumption of BCAAs in the growing liver bud, but not in the later fetal or adult liver. Consistently, maternal dietary restriction of BCAAs during pregnancy significantly abrogated the conceptus liver bud growth capability through a striking defect in hepatic progenitor expansion. Under defined conditions, the supplementation of L-valine specifically among the BCAAs promoted rigorous growth of the human liver bud organoid in culture by selectively amplifying self-renewing bi-potent hepatic progenitor cells. These results highlight a previously underappreciated role of branched-chain amino acid metabolism in regulating mouse and human liver bud growth that can be modulated by maternal nutrition in vivo or cultural supplement in vitro. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. A CD13-targeting peptide integrated protein inhibits human liver cancer growth by killing cancer stem cells and suppressing angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan-Bo; Gong, Jian-Hua; Liu, Xiu-Jun; Li, Yi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2017-05-01

    CD13 is a marker of angiogenic endothelial cells, and recently it is proved to be a biomarker of human liver cancer stem cells (CSCs). Herein, the therapeutic effects of NGR-LDP-AE, a fusion protein composed of CD13-targeting peptide NGR and antitumor antibiotic lidamycin, on human liver cancer and its mechanism were studied. Western blot and immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that CD13 (WM15 epitope) was expressed in both human liver cancer cell lines and vascular endothelial cells, while absent in normal liver cells. MTT assay showed that NGR-LDP-AE displayed potent cytotoxicity to cultured tumor cell lines with IC50 values at low nanomolar level. NGR-LDP-AE inhibited tumorsphere formation of liver cancer cells, and the IC50 values were much lower than that in MTT assay, indicating selectively killing of CSCs. In endothelial tube formation assay, NGR-LDP-AE at low cytotoxic dose significantly inhibited the formation of intact tube networks. Animal experiment demonstrated that NGR-LDP-AE inhibited the growth of human liver cancer xenograft. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that NGR-LDP-AE induced the down-regulation of CD13. In vitro experiment using cultured tumor cells also confirmed this result. NGR-LDP-AE activated both apoptotic and autophagic pathways in cultured tumor cells, while the induced autophagy protected cells from death. Conclusively, NGR-LDP-AE exerts its antitumor activity via killing liver CSCs and inhibiting angiogenesis. With one targeting motif, NGR-LDP-AE acts on both liver CSCs and angiogenic endothelial cells. It is a promising dual targeting fusion protein for liver cancer therapy, especially for advanced or relapsed cancers. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. High-depth sequencing of over 750 genes supports linear progression of primary tumors and metastases in most patients with liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Iain Beehuat; Malik, Simeen; Ramnarayanan, Kalpana; McPherson, John R; Ho, Dan Liang; Suzuki, Yuka; Ng, Sarah Boonhsui; Yan, Su; Lim, Kiat Hon; Koh, Dennis; Hoe, Chew Min; Chan, Chung Yip; Ten, Rachel; Goh, Brian Kp; Chung, Alexander Yf; Tan, Joanna; Chan, Cheryl Xueli; Tay, Su Ting; Alexander, Lezhava; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Hillmer, Axel M; Tang, Choon Leong; Chua, Clarinda; Teh, Bin Tean; Rozen, Steve; Tan, Patrick

    2015-02-12

    Colorectal cancer with metastases limited to the liver (liver-limited mCRC) is a distinct clinical subset characterized by possible cure with surgery. We performed high-depth sequencing of over 750 cancer-associated genes and copy number profiling in matched primary, metastasis and normal tissues to characterize genomic progression in 18 patients with liver-limited mCRC. High depth Illumina sequencing and use of three different variant callers enable comprehensive and accurate identification of somatic variants down to 2.5% variant allele frequency. We identify a median of 11 somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) per tumor. Across patients, a median of 79.3% of somatic SNVs present in the primary are present in the metastasis and 81.7% of all alterations present in the metastasis are present in the primary. Private alterations are found at lower allele frequencies; a different mutational signature characterized shared and private variants, suggesting distinct mutational processes. Using B-allele frequencies of heterozygous germline SNPs and copy number profiling, we find that broad regions of allelic imbalance and focal copy number changes, respectively, are generally shared between the primary tumor and metastasis. Our analyses point to high genomic concordance of primary tumor and metastasis, with a thick common trunk and smaller genomic branches in general support of the linear progression model in most patients with liver-limited mCRC. More extensive studies are warranted to further characterize genomic progression in this important clinical population.

  17. Liver-related deaths among persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus: The D:A:D Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, R; Sabin, CA; Friis-Møller, Nina

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increasing proportion of deaths among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons with access to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) are due to complications of liver diseases. METHODS: We investigated the frequency of and risk factors associated with liver......-related deaths in the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs study, which prospectively evaluated 76 893 person-years of follow-up in 23 441 HIV-infected persons. Multivariable Poisson regression analyses identified factors associated with liver-related, AIDS-related, and other causes of death....... RESULTS: There were 1246 deaths (5.3%; 1.6 per 100 person-years); 14.5% were from liver-related causes. Of these, 16.9% had active hepatitis B virus (HBV), 66.1% had hepatitis C virus (HCV), and 7.1% had dual viral hepatitis co-infections. Predictors of liver-related deaths were latest CD4 cell count...

  18. Liver-related deaths among persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus: The D:A:D Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, R; Sabin, CA; Friis-Møller, Nina

    2006-01-01

    -related deaths in the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs study, which prospectively evaluated 76 893 person-years of follow-up in 23 441 HIV-infected persons. Multivariable Poisson regression analyses identified factors associated with liver-related, AIDS-related, and other causes of death......BACKGROUND: An increasing proportion of deaths among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons with access to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) are due to complications of liver diseases. METHODS: We investigated the frequency of and risk factors associated with liver....... RESULTS: There were 1246 deaths (5.3%; 1.6 per 100 person-years); 14.5% were from liver-related causes. Of these, 16.9% had active hepatitis B virus (HBV), 66.1% had hepatitis C virus (HCV), and 7.1% had dual viral hepatitis co-infections. Predictors of liver-related deaths were latest CD4 cell count...

  19. ADAM12 in human liver cancers: TGF-beta-regulated expression in stellate cells is associated with matrix remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Pabic, Hélène; Bonnier, Dominique; Wewer, Ulla M

    2003-01-01

    -activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor UO126 prevented ADAM12 induction by TGF-beta, suggesting the involvement of PI3K and MEK activities. In vivo, the steady-state of both ADAM9 and ADAM12 mRNA levels was nearly undetectable in both normal livers and benign tumors and increased in hepatocellular...... carcinomas (up to 3- and 6-fold, respectively) and liver metastases from colonic carcinomas (up to 40- and 60-fold, respectively). The up-regulation of both ADAM9 and ADAM12 was correlated with an increase in matrix metalloproteinase 2 expression and activity. In conclusion, in liver cancers ADAM9 and ADAM12......"A disintegrin and metalloproteinases" (ADAMs) form a family of cell-surface glycoproteins with potential protease and cell-adhesion activities. We have investigated ADAM expression in human liver cancers and their regulation by several cytokines involved in liver injury. Using degenerative RT...

  20. Higher protein kinase C ζ in fatty rat liver and its effect on insulin actions in primary hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    Full Text Available We previously showed the impairment of insulin-regulated gene expression in the primary hepatocytes from Zucker fatty (ZF rats, and its association with alterations of hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the molecular mechanism is unknown. A preliminary experiment shows that the expression level of protein kinase C ζ (PKCζ, a member of atypical PKC family, is higher in the liver and hepatocytes of ZF rats than that of Zucker lean (ZL rats. Herein, we intend to investigate the roles of atypical protein kinase C in the regulation of hepatic gene expression. The insulin-regulated hepatic gene expression was evaluated in ZL primary hepatocytes treated with atypical PKC recombinant adenoviruses. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PKCζ, or the other atypical PKC member PKCι/λ, alters the basal and impairs the insulin-regulated expressions of glucokinase, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c, the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, the catalytic subunit of glucose 6-phosphatase, and insulin like growth factor-binding protein 1 in ZL primary hepatocytes. PKCζ or PKCι/λ overexpression also reduces the protein level of insulin receptor substrate 1, and the insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473 and Thr308. Additionally, PKCι/λ overexpression impairs the insulin-induced Prckz expression, indicating the crosstalk between PKCζ and PKCι/λ. We conclude that the PKCζ expression is elevated in hepatocytes of insulin resistant ZF rats. Overexpressions of aPKCs in primary hepatocytes impair insulin signal transduction, and in turn, the down-stream insulin-regulated gene expression. These data suggest that elevation of aPKC expression may contribute to the hepatic insulin resistance at gene expression level.

  1. Evidence of Distinct Tumour-Propagating Cell Populations with Different Properties in Primary Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Federico; Baldan, Francesca; Mazzucchelli, Silvia; Martin-Padura, Ines; Marighetti, Paola; Cattaneo, Alessandra; Foglieni, Barbara; Spreafico, Marta; Guerneri, Silvana; Baccarin, Marco; Bertolini, Francesco; Rossi, Giorgio; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Cadamuro, Massimiliano; Maggioni, Marco; Agnelli, Luca; Rebulla, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Increasing evidence that a number of malignancies are characterised by tumour cell heterogeneity has recently been published, but there is still a lack of data concerning liver cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate and characterise tumour-propagating cell (TPC) compartments within human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods After long-term culture, we identified three morphologically different tumour cell populations in a single HCC specimen, and extensively characterised them by means of flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, karyotyping and microarray analyses, single cell cloning, and xenotransplantation in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ−/− mice. Results The primary cell populations (hcc-1, -2 and -3) and two clones generated by means of limiting dilutions from hcc-1 (clone-1/7 and -1/8) differently expressed a number of tumour-associated stem cell markers, including EpCAM, CD49f, CD44, CD133, CD56, Thy-1, ALDH and CK19, and also showed different doubling times, drug resistance and tumorigenic potential. Moreover, we found that ALDH expression, in combination with CD44 or Thy-1 negativity or CD56 positivity identified subpopulations with a higher clonogenic potential within hcc-1, hcc-2 and hcc-3 primary cell populations, respectively. Karyotyping revealed the clonal evolution of the cell populations and clones within the primary tumour. Importantly, the primary tumour cell population with the greatest tumorigenic potential and drug resistance showed more chromosomal alterations than the others and contained clones with epithelial and mesenchymal features. Conclusions Individual HCCs can harbor different self-renewing tumorigenic cell types expressing a variety of morphological and phenotypical markers, karyotypic evolution and different gene expression profiles. This suggests that the models of hepatic carcinogenesis should take into account TPC heterogeneity due to intratumour clonal evolution. PMID:21731718

  2. Evidence of distinct tumour-propagating cell populations with different properties in primary human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Colombo

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence that a number of malignancies are characterised by tumour cell heterogeneity has recently been published, but there is still a lack of data concerning liver cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate and characterise tumour-propagating cell (TPC compartments within human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC.After long-term culture, we identified three morphologically different tumour cell populations in a single HCC specimen, and extensively characterised them by means of flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, karyotyping and microarray analyses, single cell cloning, and xenotransplantation in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ/⁻ mice.The primary cell populations (hcc-1, -2 and -3 and two clones generated by means of limiting dilutions from hcc-1 (clone-1/7 and -1/8 differently expressed a number of tumour-associated stem cell markers, including EpCAM, CD49f, CD44, CD133, CD56, Thy-1, ALDH and CK19, and also showed different doubling times, drug resistance and tumorigenic potential. Moreover, we found that ALDH expression, in combination with CD44 or Thy-1 negativity or CD56 positivity identified subpopulations with a higher clonogenic potential within hcc-1, hcc-2 and hcc-3 primary cell populations, respectively. Karyotyping revealed the clonal evolution of the cell populations and clones within the primary tumour. Importantly, the primary tumour cell population with the greatest tumorigenic potential and drug resistance showed more chromosomal alterations than the others and contained clones with epithelial and mesenchymal features.Individual HCCs can harbor different self-renewing tumorigenic cell types expressing a variety of morphological and phenotypical markers, karyotypic evolution and different gene expression profiles. This suggests that the models of hepatic carcinogenesis should take into account TPC heterogeneity due to intratumour clonal evolution.

  3. Hepatic energy metabolism in human diabetes mellitus, obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koliaki, Chrysi; Roden, Michael

    2013-10-15

    Alterations of hepatic mitochondrial function have been observed in states of insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Patients with overt type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) can exhibit reduction in hepatic adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis and impaired repletion of their hepatic ATP stores upon ATP depletion by fructose. Obesity and NAFLD may also associate with impaired ATP recovery after ATP-depleting challenges and augmented oxidative stress in the liver. On the other hand, patients with obesity or NAFLD can present with upregulated hepatic anaplerotic and oxidative fluxes, including β-oxidation and tricarboxylic cycle activity. The present review focuses on the methods and data on hepatic energy metabolism in various states of human insulin resistance. We propose that the liver can adapt to increased lipid exposition by greater lipid storing and oxidative capacity, resulting in increased oxidative stress, which in turn could deteriorate hepatic mitochondrial function in chronic insulin resistance and NAFLD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In vitro inhibitory effects of pristimerin on human liver cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaoyi; Yuan, Jianlei; Xu, Yansen; Wang, Zhao; Hou, Jianzhang; Hu, Tao

    2017-04-07

    1. Pristimerin (PTM) is a biological component isolated from Chinese herbal plant Celastrus and Maytenus spp and it possesses numerous pharmacological activities. However, whether PTM affects the activity of human liver cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes remains unclear. 2. In this study, the inhibitory effects of PTM on the eight human liver CYP isoforms (i.e., 1A2, 3A4, 2A6, 2E1, 2D6, 2C9, 2C19, and 2C8) were investigated in vitro using human liver microsomes (HLMs). 3. The results showed that PTM inhibited the activity of CYP1A2, 3A4, and 2C9, with IC50 values of 21.74, 15.88, and 16.58 μM, respectively, but that other CYP isoforms were not affected. Enzyme kinetic studies showed that PTM was not only a non-competitive inhibitor of CYP3A4, but also a competitive inhibitor of CYP1A2 and 2C9, with Ki values of 7.33, 11.60, and 8.09 μM, respectively. In addition, PTM is a time-dependent inhibitor for CYP3A4 with Kinact/KI value of 0.049/11.62 μM-1min-1. 4. The in vitro studies of PTM with CYP isoforms indicate that PTM has the potential to cause pharmacokinetic drug interactions with other co-administered drugs metabolized by CYP1A2, 3A4, and 2C9. Further clinical studies are needed to evaluate the significance of this interaction.

  5. Applying of hierarchical clustering to analysis of protein patterns in the human cancer-associated liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petushkova, Natalia A; Pyatnitskiy, Mikhail A; Rudenko, Vladislav A; Larina, Olesya V; Trifonova, Oxana P; Kisrieva, Julya S; Samenkova, Natalia F; Kuznetsova, Galina P; Karuzina, Irina I; Lisitsa, Andrey V

    2014-01-01

    There are two ways that statistical methods can learn from biomedical data. One way is to learn classifiers to identify diseases and to predict outcomes using the training dataset with established diagnosis for each sample. When the training dataset is not available the task can be to mine for presence of meaningful groups (clusters) of samples and to explore underlying data structure (unsupervised learning). We investigated the proteomic profiles of the cytosolic fraction of human liver samples using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE). Samples were resected upon surgical treatment of hepatic metastases in colorectal cancer. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of 2DE gel images (n = 18) revealed a pair of clusters, containing 11 and 7 samples. Previously we used the same specimens to measure biochemical profiles based on cytochrome P450-dependent enzymatic activities and also found that samples were clearly divided into two well-separated groups by cluster analysis. It turned out that groups by enzyme activity almost perfectly match to the groups identified from proteomic data. Of the 271 reproducible spots on our 2DE gels, we selected 15 to distinguish the human liver cytosolic clusters. Using MALDI-TOF peptide mass fingerprinting, we identified 12 proteins for the selected spots, including known cancer-associated species. Our results highlight the importance of hierarchical cluster analysis of proteomic data, and showed concordance between results of biochemical and proteomic approaches. Grouping of the human liver samples and/or patients into differing clusters may provide insights into possible molecular mechanism of drug metabolism and creates a rationale for personalized treatment.

  6. Regulation of coagulation factor XI expression by microRNAs in the human liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam Salloum-Asfar

    Full Text Available High levels of factor XI (FXI increase the risk of thromboembolic disease. However, the genetic and environmental factors regulating FXI expression are still largely unknown. The aim of our study was to evaluate the regulation of FXI by microRNAs (miRNAs in the human liver. In silico prediction yielded four miRNA candidates that might regulate FXI expression. HepG2 cells were transfected with miR-181a-5p, miR-23a-3p, miR-16-5p and miR-195-5p. We used mir-494, which was not predicted to bind to F11, as a negative control. Only miR-181a-5p caused a significant decrease both in FXI protein and F11 mRNA levels. In addition, transfection with a miR-181a-5p inhibitor in PLC/PRF/5 hepatic cells increased both the levels of F11 mRNA and extracellular FXI. Luciferase assays in human colon cancer cells deficient for Dicer (HCT-DK demonstrated a direct interaction between miR-181a-5p and 3'untranslated region of F11. Additionally, F11 mRNA levels were inversely and significantly correlated with miR-181a-5p levels in 114 healthy livers, but not with miR-494. This study demonstrates that FXI expression is directly regulated by a specific miRNA, miR-181a-5p, in the human liver. Future studies are necessary to further investigate the potential consequences of miRNA dysregulation in pathologies involving FXI.

  7. Applying of hierarchical clustering to analysis of protein patterns in the human cancer-associated liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A Petushkova

    Full Text Available There are two ways that statistical methods can learn from biomedical data. One way is to learn classifiers to identify diseases and to predict outcomes using the training dataset with established diagnosis for each sample. When the training dataset is not available the task can be to mine for presence of meaningful groups (clusters of samples and to explore underlying data structure (unsupervised learning.We investigated the proteomic profiles of the cytosolic fraction of human liver samples using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE. Samples were resected upon surgical treatment of hepatic metastases in colorectal cancer. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of 2DE gel images (n = 18 revealed a pair of clusters, containing 11 and 7 samples. Previously we used the same specimens to measure biochemical profiles based on cytochrome P450-dependent enzymatic activities and also found that samples were clearly divided into two well-separated groups by cluster analysis. It turned out that groups by enzyme activity almost perfectly match to the groups identified from proteomic data. Of the 271 reproducible spots on our 2DE gels, we selected 15 to distinguish the human liver cytosolic clusters. Using MALDI-TOF peptide mass fingerprinting, we identified 12 proteins for the selected spots, including known cancer-associated species.Our results highlight the importance of hierarchical cluster analysis of proteomic data, and showed concordance between results of biochemical and proteomic approaches. Grouping of the human liver samples and/or patients into differing clusters may provide insights into possible molecular mechanism of drug metabolism and creates a rationale for personalized treatment.

  8. Keratin Hypersumoylation Alters Filament Dynamics and Is a Marker for Human Liver Disease and Keratin Mutation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Natasha T.; Weerasinghe, Sujith V. W.; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge A.; Herrmann, Harald; Omary, M. Bishr

    2011-01-01

    Keratin polypeptide 8 (K8) associates noncovalently with its partners K18 and/or K19 to form the intermediate filament cytoskeleton of hepatocytes and other simple-type epithelial cells. Human K8, K18, and K19 variants predispose to liver disease, whereas site-specific keratin phosphorylation confers hepatoprotection. Because stress-induced protein phosphorylation regulates sumoylation, we hypothesized that keratins are sumoylated in an injury-dependent manner and that keratin sumoylation is an important regulatory modification. We demonstrate that K8/K18/K19, epidermal keratins, and vimentin are sumoylated in vitro. Upon transfection, K8, K18, and K19 are modified by poly-SUMO-2/3 chains on Lys-285/Lys-364 (K8), Lys-207/Lys-372 (K18), and Lys-208 (K19). Sumoylation affects filament organization and stimulus-induced keratin solubility and is partially inhibited upon mutation of one of three known K8 phosphorylation sites. Extensive sumoylation occurs in cells transfected with individual K8, K18, or K19 but is limited upon heterodimerization (K8/K18 or K8/K19) in the absence of stress. In contrast, keratin sumoylation is significantly augmented in cells and tissues during apoptosis, oxidative stress, and phosphatase inhibition. Poly-SUMO-2/3 conjugates are present in chronically injured but not normal, human, and mouse livers along with polyubiquitinated and large insoluble keratin-containing complexes. Notably, common human K8 liver disease-associated variants trigger keratin hypersumoylation with consequent diminished solubility. In contrast, modest sumoylation of wild type K8 promotes solubility. Hence, conformational changes induced by keratin natural mutations and extensive tissue injury result in K8/K18/K19 hypersumoylation, which retains keratins in an insoluble compartment, thereby limiting their cytoprotective function. PMID:21062750

  9. Keratin hypersumoylation alters filament dynamics and is a marker for human liver disease and keratin mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Natasha T; Weerasinghe, Sujith V W; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge A; Herrmann, Harald; Omary, M Bishr

    2011-01-21

    Keratin polypeptide 8 (K8) associates noncovalently with its partners K18 and/or K19 to form the intermediate filament cytoskeleton of hepatocytes and other simple-type epithelial cells. Human K8, K18, and K19 variants predispose to liver disease, whereas site-specific keratin phosphorylation confers hepatoprotection. Because stress-induced protein phosphorylation regulates sumoylation, we hypothesized that keratins are sumoylated in an injury-dependent manner and that keratin sumoylation is an important regulatory modification. We demonstrate that K8/K18/K19, epidermal keratins, and vimentin are sumoylated in vitro. Upon transfection, K8, K18, and K19 are modified by poly-SUMO-2/3 chains on Lys-285/Lys-364 (K8), Lys-207/Lys-372 (K18), and Lys-208 (K19). Sumoylation affects filament organization and stimulus-induced keratin solubility and is partially inhibited upon mutation of one of three known K8 phosphorylation sites. Extensive sumoylation occurs in cells transfected with individual K8, K18, or K19 but is limited upon heterodimerization (K8/K18 or K8/K19) in the absence of stress. In contrast, keratin sumoylation is significantly augmented in cells and tissues during apoptosis, oxidative stress, and phosphatase inhibition. Poly-SUMO-2/3 conjugates are present in chronically injured but not normal, human, and mouse livers along with polyubiquitinated and large insoluble keratin-containing complexes. Notably, common human K8 liver disease-associated variants trigger keratin hypersumoylation with consequent diminished solubility. In contrast, modest sumoylation of wild type K8 promotes solubility. Hence, conformational changes induced by keratin natural mutations and extensive tissue injury result in K8/K18/K19 hypersumoylation, which retains keratins in an insoluble compartment, thereby limiting their cytoprotective function.

  10. Metabolism of Ginger Component [6]-Shogaol in Liver Microsomes from Mouse, Rat, Dog, Monkey, and Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huadong; Soroka, Dominique; Zhu, Yingdong; Sang, Shengmin

    2013-01-01

    Scope There are limited data on the metabolism of [6]-shogaol, a major bioactive component of ginger. This study demonstrates metabolism of [6]-shogaol in liver microsomes from mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human. Methods and results The in vitro metabolism of [6]-shogaol was compared among five species using liver microsomes from mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human. Following incubations with [6]-shogaol, three major reductive metabolites 1-(4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-4-decen-3-ol (M6), 1-(4′-hydroxy-3′-methoxyphenyl)-decan-3-ol (M9), and 1-(4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-decan-3-one (M11), as well as two new oxidative metabolites (1E, 4E)-1-(4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-deca-1,4-dien-3-one (M14) and (E)-1-(4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-dec-1-en-3-one (M15) were found in all species. The kinetic parameters of M6 in liver microsomes from each respective species were quantified using Michaelis-Menten theory. A broad CYP-450 inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole, precluded the formation of oxidative metabolites M14 and M15, and 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, an aldo-keto reductase inhibitor, eradicated the formation of the reductive metabolites M6, M9, and M11 in all species. Metabolites M14 and M15 were tested for cancer cell growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis and both showed substantial activity, with M14 displaying greater potency than [6]-shogaol. Conclusion We conclude that [6]-shogaol is metabolized extensively in mammalian species mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human, and that there are significant interspecies differences to consider when planning pre-clinical trials towards [6]-shogaol chemoprevention. PMID:23322474

  11. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Submandibular Gland, Locoregional Recurrence, and a Solitary Liver Metastasis More Than 30 Years Since Primary Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Coupland

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC is a relatively rare tumour of the salivary glands, accounting for approximately 5%–10% of all salivary gland tumours. An important feature of ACCs is the long clinical course with a high rate of distant metastases. The preferential sites of metastases are the lung and bone, followed by the brain and liver. Most liver metastases are derived from nonparotid ACCs, and the presentation is often related to local recurrence or metastases to other organs. Solitary metastases to the liver are rare and optimal management is unknown. We present the case of a metastatic ACC to the liver with primary disease presentation at a young age. We discuss our management and other potential treatment modalities.

  12. RANK and RANK ligand expression in primary human osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Branstetter

    2015-09-01

    Our results demonstrate RANKL expression was observed in the tumor element in 68% of human OS using IHC. However, the staining intensity was relatively low and only 37% (29/79 of samples exhibited≥10% RANKL positive tumor cells. RANK expression was not observed in OS tumor cells. In contrast, RANK expression was clearly observed in other cells within OS samples, including the myeloid osteoclast precursor compartment, osteoclasts and in giant osteoclast cells. The intensity and frequency of RANKL and RANK staining in OS samples were substantially less than that observed in GCTB samples. The observation that RANKL is expressed in OS cells themselves suggests that these tumors may mediate an osteoclastic response, and anti-RANKL therapy may potentially be protective against bone pathologies in OS. However, the absence of RANK expression in primary human OS cells suggests that any autocrine RANKL/RANK signaling in human OS tumor cells is not operative, and anti-RANKL therapy would not directly affect the tumor.

  13. Isolation of viable human hepatic progenitors from adult livers is possible even after 48 hours of cold ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupet, Sophie; Simoné, Gael; Heyd, Bruno; Bachellier, Philippe; Vidal, Isabelle; Richert, Lysiane; Martin, Hélène

    2013-07-01

    Liver transplantation, utilized routinely for end-stage liver disease, has been constrained by the paucity of organ donors, and is being complemented by alternative strategies such as liver cell transplantation. One of the most promising forms of liver cell transplantation is hepatic stem cell therapies, as the number of human hepatic stem cells (hHpSCs) and other early hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) are sufficient to provide treatment for multiple patients from a single liver source. In the present study, human adult livers were exposed to cold ischemia and then processed after numbers, albeit somewhat lower, were obtained from those exposed to 48 h of cold ischemia. The yields are similar to those reported from livers with minimal exposure to ischemia. When cultured on plastic dishes and in Kubota's Medium, a serum-free medium designed for early lineage stage HPCs, colonies of rapidly expanding cells formed. They were confirmed to be probable hHpSCs by their ability to survive and expand on plastic and in Kubota's Medium for months, by co-expression of EpCAM and neural cell adhesion molecule, minimal if any albumin expression, with EpCAM found throughout the cells, and no expression of alpha-fetoprotein. The yields of viable EpCAM(+) cells were surprisingly large, and the numbers from a single donor liver are sufficient to treat approximately 50-100 patients given the numbers of EpCAM(+) cells currently used in hepatic stem cell therapies. Thus, cold ischemic livers for up to 48 h are a new source of cells that might be used for liver cell therapies.

  14. Production of factor VIII by human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells transplanted in immunodeficient uPA mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina E Fomin

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs form a semi-permeable barrier between parenchymal hepatocytes and the blood. LSECs participate in liver metabolism, clearance of pathological agents, immunological responses, architectural maintenance of the liver and synthesis of growth factors and cytokines. LSECs also play an important role in coagulation through the synthesis of Factor VIII (FVIII. Herein, we phenotypically define human LSECs isolated from fetal liver using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Isolated LSECs were cultured and shown to express endothelial markers and markers specific for the LSEC lineage. LSECs were also shown to engraft the liver when human fetal liver cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice with liver specific expression of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA transgene (uPA-NOG mice. Engrafted cells expressed human Factor VIII at levels approaching those found in human plasma. We also demonstrate engraftment of adult LSECs, as well as hepatocytes, transplanted into uPA-NOG mice. We propose that overexpression of uPA provides beneficial conditions for LSEC engraftment due to elevated expression of the angiogenic cytokine, vascular endothelial growth factor. This work provides a detailed characterization of human midgestation LSECs, thereby providing the means for their purification and culture based on their expression of CD14 and CD32 as well as a lack of CD45 expression. The uPA-NOG mouse is shown to be a permissive host for human LSECs and adult hepatocytes, but not fetal hepatoblasts. Thus, these mice provide a useful model system to study these cell types in vivo. Demonstration of human FVIII production by transplanted LSECs encourages further pursuit of LSEC transplantation as a cellular therapy for the treatment of hemophilia A.

  15. Embryonic Origin of Primary Colon Cancer Predicts Pathologic Response and Survival in Patients Undergoing Resection for Colon Cancer Liver Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Suguru; Brudvik, Kristoffer Watten; Kopetz, Scott E; Maru, Dipen; Clarke, Callisia N; Passot, Guillaume; Conrad, Claudius; Chun, Yun Shin; Aloia, Thomas A; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-12-19

    The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of embryonic origin in patients undergoing resection after chemotherapy for colon cancer liver metastases (CCLM). We identified 725 patients with primary colon cancer and known RAS mutation status who underwent hepatic resection after preoperative chemotherapy for CCLM (1990 to 2015). Survival after resection of CCLM from midgut origin (n = 238) and hindgut origin (n = 487) was analyzed. Predictors of pathologic response and survival were determined. Prognostic value of embryonic origin was validated with a separate cohort of 252 patients with primary colon cancer who underwent resection of CCLM without preoperative chemotherapy. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) after hepatic resection were worse in patients with midgut origin tumors (RFS rate at 3 years: 15% vs 27%, P origin [odds ratio (OR) 1.55, P = 0.010], absence of bevacizumab (OR 1.42, P = 0.034), and mutant RAS (OR 1.41, P = 0.043). Independent factors associated with worse OS were midgut embryonic origin [hazard ratio (HR) 2.04, P origin had a worse 3-year OS rate (55% vs 78%, P = 0.003). Compared with CCLM from hindgut origin, CCLM from midgut origin are associated with worse pathologic response to chemotherapy and worse survival after resection. This effect appears to be independent of RAS mutation status.

  16. [Damage effect of Polygonum multiflorum fractions on human normal liver cells L02 and liver cancer cells HepG2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruichen; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Zhenxiao; Deng, Qiaohong

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the damage effect of different fractions from Polygonum multiflorum on normal human liver and liver cancer cells, in order to seek for fractions that can obviously kill cancer cells but have less impact on normal liver cells, and make a preliminary study on different mechanism of the two kinds of cells. P. multiflorum water-eluted fraction (RW), 50% ethanol-eluted fraction (R50) and 95% ethanol-eluted fraction (R95) were successively obtained from 70% ethanol extracts of P. multiflorum, after being eluted by water, 50% ethanol and 95% ethanol and then absorbed by AB-8 macroporous resin. Normal human liver L02 cells and liver cancer HepG2 cells were incubated with cell supernatants from different fractions and cells. MTT method and inverted microscope were adopted to observe the impact of L02 on growth of HepG2 cells, screening fractions with damage effect and detect their doses and time effect. Giemsa stain showed changes in cell nucleus after administration and flow cytometry analysis was used to detect cycle and apoptosis of L02 cells. MTT method and inverted microscope showed that R50 had significant growth inhibition effects on L02 and HepG2 cells. According to giemsa stain and flow cytometry analysis, R50 showed different effect on inducing the two cells: there are much more apoptotic HepG2 cells than apoptotic L02 cells in each time phase (the proportion of the apoptosis cells in HepG2 group were 83.62%, 60.52% and 74.49%, and ID2 31.02%, 20.57% and 25.32% after treated with R50 for 24, 48, 72 h. Both cells showed less than 5% of apoptotic cells in the negative control group in each time phase). However, there is no significant impact on cycle of both cells. R50 from P. multiflorum extracts had different damage effects on human liver L02 cells and liver cancer HepG2 cells, which was caused by different degree of induction on apoptosis of the two cells in nature.

  17. Inhibition of aromatase activity by methyl sulfonyl PCB metabolites in primary culture of human mammary fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M. van den; Heneweer, M.; Geest, M. de; Sanderson, T. [Inst. for Risk Assessment Sciences and Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands); Jong, P. de [St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Bergman, A. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Methyl sulfonyl PCB metabolites (MeSO2-PCBs) are persistent contaminants and are ubiquitously present in humans and the environment. Lipophilicity of MeSO2- PCB metabolites is similar to the parent compounds and they have been detected in human milk, adipose, liver and lung tissue. 4- MeSO2-PCB-149 is the most abundant PCB metabolite in human adipose tissue and milk at a level of 1.5 ng/g lipids. Human blood concentration of 4-MeSO2-PCB-149 is approximately 0.03 nM. 3- MeSO2-PCB-101 is the predominant PCB metabolite in muscle and blubber in wildlife, such as otter, mink and grey seal. In the environment, they have been linked to chronic and reproductive toxicity in exposed mink. Additionaly, some MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs have been shown to be glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists. Since approximately 60% of all breast tumors are estrogen responsive, exposure to compounds that are able to alter estrogen synthesis through interference with the aromatase enzyme, can lead to changes in estrogen levels and possibly to accelerated or inhibit breast tumor growth. Therefore, it is important to identify exogenous compounds that can alter aromatase activity in addition to those compounds which have direct interaction with the estrogen receptor (ER). Aromatase (CYP19) comprises the ubiquitous flavoprotein, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and a unique cytochrome P450 that is exclusively expressed in estrogen producing cells. Previous studies have revealed that expression of the aromatase gene is regulated in a species- and tissue specific manner. In healthy breast tissue, the predominantly active aromatase promoter region I.4 is regulated by glucocorticoids and class I cytokines. Therefore, it is important to investigate possible aromatase inhibiting properties of MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs (as anti glucocorticoids?) in relevant human tissues. We used primary human mammary fibroblasts because of their role in breast cancer development. We compared the results in primary fibroblasts with

  18. Uptake of gold nanoparticles in primary human endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingberg, Henrik; Oddershede, Lene B.; Löschner, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are relevant in nanomedicine for drug delivery in the vascular system, where endothelial cells are the first point of contact. We investigated the uptake of 80 nm AuNPs in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by flow cytometry, 3D confocal microscopy......, nano-scale 3D-imaging using focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), and single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (spICP-MS). HUVECs were cultured for 3 h or 24 h in medium with AuNPs in a concentration range of 1.25–10 μg ml−1. There was a concentration...

  19. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of human liver cytochrome(s) P450

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Mindaye, Samuel T.; Getie-Kebtie, Melkamu; Alterman, Michail A., E-mail: Michail.Alterman@fda.hhs.gov

    2013-02-15

    The major objective of personalized medicine is to select optimized drug therapies and to a large degree such mission is determined by the expression profiles of cytochrome(s) P450 (CYP). Accordingly, a proteomic case study in personalized medicine is provided by the superfamily of cytochromes P450. Our knowledge about CYP isozyme expression on a protein level is very limited and based exclusively on DNA/mRNA derived data. Such information is not sufficient because transcription and translation events do not lead to correlated levels of expressed proteins. Here we report expression profiles of CYPs in human liver obtained by mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approach. We analyzed 32 samples of human liver microsomes (HLM) of different sexes, ages and ethnicity along with samples of recombinant human CYPs. We have experimentally confirmed that each CYP isozyme can be effectively differentiated by their unique isozyme-specific tryptic peptide(s). Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes were established. Those findings should assist in selecting tryptic peptides suitable for MS-based quantitation. The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. CYP2E1, CYP2C8 and CYP4A11 were the only isozymes found in all HLM samples. Female and pediatric HLM samples revealed much more diverse spectrum of expressed CYPs isozymes compared to male HLM. We have confirmed expression of a number of “rare” CYP (CYP2J2, CYP4B1, CYP4V2, CYP4F3, CYP4F11, CYP8B1, CYP19A1, CYP24A1 and CYP27A1) and obtained first direct experimental data showing expression of such CYPs as CYP2F1, CYP2S1, CYP2W1, CYP4A22, CYP4X1, and CYP26A1 on a protein level. - Highlights: ► First detailed proteomic analysis of CYP isozymes expression in human liver ► Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes established ► The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. ► Female HLM samples revealed more

  20. Risk factors associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in subjects from primary care units. A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernad Jesús

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFL consists in the accumulation of fat vacuoles in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes. Many etiologic factors are associated with NAFL, such as, the metabolic syndrome factors, medications, bariatric surgery, nutritional disorders. However, very little information is available on the clinical relevance of this disorder as a health problem in the general population. Methods and design The aim of the study is establish the risk factors most frequently associated with NAFL in a general adult population assigned to the primary care units and to investigate the relationship between each component of the metabolic syndrome and the risk of having a NAFL. A population based case-control, observational and multicenter study will be carried out in 18 primary care units from the "Area de Gestión del Barcelonés Nord y Maresme" (Barcelona attending a population of 360,000 inhabitants and will include 326 cases and 370 controls. Cases are defined as all subjects fulfilling the inclusion criteria and with evidence of fatty liver in an abdominal ultrasonography performed for any reason. One control will be randomly selected for each case from the population, matched for age, gender and primary care center. Controls with fatty liver or other liver diseases will be excluded. All cases and controls will be asked about previous hepatic diseases, consumption of alcohol, smoking and drugs, and a physical examination, biochemical analyses including liver function tests, the different components of the metabolic syndrome and the HAIR score will also be performed. Paired controls will also undergo an abdominal ultrasonography. Discussion This study will attempt to determine the factors most frequently associated with the presence of NAFL investigate the relationship between the metabolic syndrome and the risk of fatty liver and study the influence of the different primary care professionals in avoiding the evolution

  1. Optimized DNA electroporation for primary human T cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Qiu, Shunfang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Chen, Wei

    2018-01-30

    Effective gene-delivery systems for primary human T cell engineering are useful tools for both basic research and clinical immunotherapy applications. Pseudovirus-based systems and electro-transfection are the most popular strategies for genetic material transduction. Compared with viral-particle-mediated approaches, electro-transfection is theoretically safer, because it does not promote transgene integration into the host genome. Additionally, the simplicity and speed of the procedure increases the attractiveness of electroporation. Here, we developed and optimized an electro-transfection method for the production of engineered chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells. Stimulation of T cells had the greatest effect on their transfection, with stimulation of cells for up to 3 days substantially improving transfection efficiency. Additionally, the strength of the external electric field, input cell number, and the initial amount of DNA significantly affected transfection performance. The voltage applied during electroporation affected plasmid permeation and was negatively correlated with the number of viable cells after electroporation. Moreover, higher plasmid concentration increased the proportion of positively transfected cells, but decreased cell viability, and for single-activated cells, higher cell density enhanced their viability. We evaluated the effects of two clinically relevant factors, serum supplementation in the culture medium and cryopreservation immediately after the isolation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Our findings showed that our protocol performed well using xeno-free cultured, fresh T cells, with application resulting in a lower but acceptable transfection efficiency of cells cultured with fetal bovine serum or thawed cells. Furthermore, we described an optimized procedure to generate CAR-T cells within 6 days and that exhibited cytotoxicity toward targeted cells. Our investigation of DNA electro-transfection for the use in human primary

  2. Youth who sexual offended: primary human goods and offense pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chi Meng; Koh, Li Lian; Zeng, Gerald; Teoh, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    There has been an increased focus on understanding youth sexual offending in recent years, but there has been limited empirical research on the causes, pathways, and treatment of youth who have sexually offended-especially within a non-Western context. The Good Lives and Self-Regulation Models have often been used to understand and rehabilitate adult sexual offenders, but (unfortunately) there is scant research on youth who sexually offended using these models. The present study aims to describe the different primary goods that are associated with youth sexual offending behaviors in an Asian context. In addition, the study sought to explore whether the age of victim (child vs. nonchild) and nature of sexual offense (penetrative vs. nonpenetrative) influenced the youth's engagement in offense pathways. The results suggest that pleasure, relatedness, and inner peace were the primary human goods that were most sought after by a sample of 168 youth who sexually offended in Singapore. In addition, offender classification (in relation to the age of victim and nature of sexual offense) influenced the pathways to sexual offending. Therefore, these findings have important clinical implications for assessment, management, and intervention planning for youth who sexually offended. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. The cutaneous rabbit illusion affects human primary sensory cortex somatotopically.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Blankenburg

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to study neural correlates of a robust somatosensory illusion that can dissociate tactile perception from physical stimulation. Repeated rapid stimulation at the wrist, then near the elbow, can create the illusion of touches at intervening locations along the arm, as if a rabbit hopped along it. We examined brain activity in humans using fMRI, with improved spatial resolution, during this version of the classic cutaneous rabbit illusion. As compared with control stimulation at the same skin sites (but in a different order that did not induce the illusion, illusory sequences activated contralateral primary somatosensory cortex, at a somatotopic location corresponding to the filled-in illusory perception on the forearm. Moreover, the amplitude of this somatosensory activation was comparable to that for veridical stimulation including the intervening position on the arm. The illusion additionally activated areas of premotor and prefrontal cortex. These results provide direct evidence that illusory somatosensory percepts can affect primary somatosensory cortex in a manner that corresponds somatotopically to the illusory percept.

  4. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  5. Human fetal liver stromal cells that overexpress bFGF support growth and maintenance of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafei Xi

    Full Text Available In guiding hES cell technology toward the clinic, one key issue to be addressed is to culture and maintain hES cells much more safely and economically in large scale. In order to avoid using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs we isolated human fetal liver stromal cells (hFLSCs from 14 weeks human fetal liver as new human feeder cells. hFLSCs feeders could maintain hES cells for 15 passages (about 100 days. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF is known to play an important role in promoting self-renewal of human embryonic stem (hES cells. So, we established transgenic hFLSCs that stably express bFGF by lentiviral vectors. These transgenic human feeder cells--bFGF-hFLSCs maintained the properties of H9 hES cells without supplementing with any exogenous growth factors. H9 hES cells culturing under these conditions maintained all hES cell features after prolonged culture, including the developmental potential to differentiate into representative tissues of all three embryonic germ layers, unlimited and undifferentiated proliferative ability, and maintenance of normal karyotype. Our results demonstrated that bFGF-hFLSCs feeder cells were central to establishing the signaling network among bFGF, insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2, and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β, thereby providing the framework in which hES cells were instructed to self-renew or to differentiate. We also found that the conditioned medium of bFGF-hFLSCs could maintain the H9 hES cells under feeder-free conditions without supplementing with bFGF. Taken together, bFGF-hFLSCs had great potential as feeders for maintaining pluripotent hES cell lines more safely and economically.

  6. Processing of acetylated human low-density lipoprotein by parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cells. Involvement of calmodulin?

    OpenAIRE

    Van Berkel, Theo J.C.; Nagelkerke, Jan F.; Harkes, Leen; Kruijt, Johan K.

    1982-01-01

    1. Modified lipoproteins have been implicated to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In view of this we studied the fate and mechanism of uptake in vivo of acetylated human low-density lipoprotein (acetyl-LDL). Injected intravenously into rats, acetyl-LDL is rapidly cleared from the blood. At 10min after intravenous injection, 83% of the injected dose is recovered in liver. Separation of the liver into a parenchymal and non-parenchymal cell fraction indicates that ...

  7. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary and metastatic liver tumors: A single institution phase i-ii study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez Romero, Alejandra; Wunderink, Wouter [Erasmus MC - Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hussain, Shahid M. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (US). Dept. of Radiology] (and others)

    2006-09-15

    The feasibility, toxicity and tumor response of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for treatment of primary and metastastic liver tumors was investigated. From October 2002 until June 2006, 25 patients not suitable for other local treatments were entered in the study. In total 45 lesions were treated, 34 metastases and 11 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Median follow-up was 12.9 months (range 0.5-31). Median lesion size was 3.2 cm (range 0.5-7.2) and median volume 22.2 cm{sup 3} (range 1.1-322). Patients with metastases, HCC without cirrhosis, and HCC < 4 cm with cirrhosis were mostly treated with 3x12.5 Gy. Patients with HCC =4cm and cirrhosis received 5x5 Gy or 3x10 Gy. The prescription isodose was 65%. Acute toxicity was scored following the Common Toxicity Criteria and late toxicity with the SOMA/LENT classification. Local failures were observed in two HCC and two metastases. Local control rates at 1 and 2 years for the whole group were 94% and 82%. Acute toxicity grade =3 was seen in four patients; one HCC patient with Child B developed a liver failure together with an infection and died (grade 5), two metastases patients presented elevation of gamma glutamyl transferase (grade 3) and another asthenia (grade 3). Late toxicity was observed in one metastases patient who developed a portal hypertension syndrome with melena (grade 3). SBRT was feasible, with acceptable toxicity and encouraging local control. Optimal dose-fractionation schemes for HCC with cirrhosis have to be found. Extreme caution should be used for patients with Child B because of a high toxicity risk.

  8. Genetic variability in CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 in primary liver, gastric and colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Monserrat

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug-metabolizing enzymes play a role in chemical carcinogenesis through enzymatic activation of procarcinogens to biologically reactive metabolites. The role of gene polymorphisms of several cytochrome P450 enzymes in digestive cancer risk has been extensively investigated. However, the drug-metabolizing enzymes with the broader substrate specificity, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5, have not been analyzed so far. This study aims to examine associations between common CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 polymorphisms and digestive cancer risk. Methods CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 genotypes were determined in 574 individuals including 178 patients with primary liver cancer, 82 patients with gastric cancer, 151 patients with colorectal cancer, and 163 healthy individuals. Results The variant allele frequencies for patients with liver cancer, gastric cancer, colorectal cancer and healthy controls, respectively, were: CYP3A4*1B, 4.8 % (95% C.I. 2.6–7.0, 3.7 % (0.8–6.6 4.3% (2.0–6.6 and 4.3% (2.1–6.5; CYP3A5*3, 91.8 % (93.0–97.4, 95.7% (92.6–98.8, 91.7% (88.6–94.8 and 90.8% (87.7–93.9. The association between CYP3A4*1B and CYP3A5*3 variant alleles did not significantly differ among patients and controls. No differences in genotypes, allele frequencies, or association between variant alleles were observed with regard to gender, age at diagnosis, tumour site or stage. Conclusion Common polymorphisms on CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 genes do not modify the risk of developing digestive cancers in Western Europe.

  9. Human Rights Texts: Converting Human Rights Primary Source Documents into Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariss, Christopher J.; Linder, Fridolin J.; Jones, Zachary M.; Crabtree, Charles D.; Biek, Megan A.; Ross, Ana-Sophia M.; Kaur, Taranamol; Tsai, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and make publicly available a large corpus of digitized primary source human rights documents which are published annually by monitoring agencies that include Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, and the United States Department of State. In addition to the digitized text, we also make available and describe document-term matrices, which are datasets that systematically organize the word counts from each unique document by each unique term within the corpus of human rights documents. To contextualize the importance of this corpus, we describe the development of coding procedures in the human rights community and several existing categorical indicators that have been created by human coding of the human rights documents contained in the corpus. We then discuss how the new human rights corpus and the existing human rights datasets can be used with a variety of statistical analyses and machine learning algorithms to help scholars understand how human rights practices and reporting have evolved over time. We close with a discussion of our plans for dataset maintenance, updating, and availability. PMID:26418817

  10. Human Rights Texts: Converting Human Rights Primary Source Documents into Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariss, Christopher J; Linder, Fridolin J; Jones, Zachary M; Crabtree, Charles D; Biek, Megan A; Ross, Ana-Sophia M; Kaur, Taranamol; Tsai, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and make publicly available a large corpus of digitized primary source human rights documents which are published annually by monitoring agencies that include Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, and the United States Department of State. In addition to the digitized text, we also make available and describe document-term matrices, which are datasets that systematically organize the word counts from each unique document by each unique term within the corpus of human rights documents. To contextualize the importance of this corpus, we describe the development of coding procedures in the human rights community and several existing categorical indicators that have been created by human coding of the human rights documents contained in the corpus. We then discuss how the new human rights corpus and the existing human rights datasets can be used with a variety of statistical analyses and machine learning algorithms to help scholars understand how human rights practices and reporting have evolved over time. We close with a discussion of our plans for dataset maintenance, updating, and availability.

  11. Steroid synthesis by primary human keratinocytes; implications for skin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannen, Rosalind F., E-mail: r.f.hannen@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Michael, Anthony E. [Centre for Developmental and Endocrine Signalling, Academic Section of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Clinical Developmental Sciences, 3rd Floor, Lanesborough Wing, St. George' s, University of London, Cranmer Terrace, Tooting, London SW17 0RE (United Kingdom); Jaulim, Adil [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Bhogal, Ranjit [Life Science, Unilever R and D Colworth House, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom); Burrin, Jacky M. [Centre for Endocrinology, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Philpott, Michael P. [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Primary keratinocytes express the steroid enzymes required for cortisol synthesis. {yields} Normal primary human keratinocytes can synthesise cortisol. {yields} Steroidogenic regulators, StAR and MLN64, are expressed in normal epidermis. {yields} StAR expression is down regulated in eczema and psoriatic epidermis. -- Abstract: Cortisol-based therapy is one of the most potent anti-inflammatory treatments available for skin conditions including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Previous studies have investigated the steroidogenic capabilities of keratinocytes, though none have demonstrated that these skin cells, which form up to 90% of the epidermis are able to synthesise cortisol. Here we demonstrate that primary human keratinocytes (PHK) express all the elements required for cortisol steroidogenesis and metabolise pregnenolone through each intermediate steroid to cortisol. We show that normal epidermis and cultured PHK express each of the enzymes (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, 3{beta}HSD1, CYP21 and CYP11B1) that are required for cortisol synthesis. These enzymes were shown to be metabolically active for cortisol synthesis since radiometric conversion assays traced the metabolism of [7-{sup 3}H]-pregnenolone through each steroid intermediate to [7-{sup 3}H]-cortisol in cultured PHK. Trilostane (a 3{beta}HSD1 inhibitor) and ketoconazole (a CYP17A1 inhibitor) blocked the metabolism of both pregnenolone and progesterone. Finally, we show that normal skin expresses two cholesterol transporters, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), regarded as the rate-determining protein for steroid synthesis, and metastatic lymph node 64 (MLN64) whose function has been linked to cholesterol transport in steroidogenesis. The expression of StAR and MLN64 was aberrant in two skin disorders, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, that are commonly treated with cortisol, suggesting dysregulation of epidermal steroid synthesis in these patients. Collectively these data

  12. Transesterification of a series of 12 parabens by liver and small-intestinal microsomes of rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Chieri; Watanabe, Yoko; Uramaru, Naoto; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    Hydrolytic transformation of parabens (4-hydroxybenzoic acid esters; used as antibacterial agents) to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols by tissue microsomes is well-known both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated transesterification reactions of parabens catalyzed by rat and human microsomes, using a series of 12 parabens with C1-C12 alcohol side chains. Transesterification of parabens by rat liver and small-intestinal microsomes occurred in the presence of alcohols in the microsomal incubation mixture. Among the 12 parabens, propylparaben was most effectively transesterified by rat liver microsomes with methanol or ethanol, followed by butylparaben. Relatively low activity was observed with longer-side-chain parabens. In contrast, small-intestinal microsomes exhibited higher activity towards moderately long side-chain parabens, and showed the highest activity toward octylparaben. When parabens were incubated with liver or small-intestinal microsomes in the presence of C1-C12 alcohols, ethanol and decanol were most effectively transferred to parabe