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Sample records for human polarized intestinal

  1. A microengineered collagen scaffold for generating a polarized crypt-villus architecture of human small intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuli; Gunasekara, Dulan B; Reed, Mark I; DiSalvo, Matthew; Bultman, Scott J; Sims, Christopher E; Magness, Scott T; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2017-06-01

    The human small intestinal epithelium possesses a distinct crypt-villus architecture and tissue polarity in which proliferative cells reside inside crypts while differentiated cells are localized to the villi. Indirect evidence has shown that the processes of differentiation and migration are driven in part by biochemical gradients of factors that specify the polarity of these cellular compartments; however, direct evidence for gradient-driven patterning of this in vivo architecture has been hampered by limitations of the in vitro systems available. Enteroid cultures are a powerful in vitro system; nevertheless, these spheroidal structures fail to replicate the architecture and lineage compartmentalization found in vivo, and are not easily subjected to gradients of growth factors. In the current work, we report the development of a micropatterned collagen scaffold with suitable extracellular matrix and stiffness to generate an in vitro self-renewing human small intestinal epithelium that replicates key features of the in vivo small intestine: a crypt-villus architecture with appropriate cell-lineage compartmentalization and an open and accessible luminal surface. Chemical gradients applied to the crypt-villus axis promoted the creation of a stem/progenitor-cell zone and supported cell migration along the crypt-villus axis. This new approach combining microengineered scaffolds, biophysical cues and chemical gradients to control the intestinal epithelium ex vivo can serve as a physiologically relevant mimic of the human small intestinal epithelium, and is broadly applicable to model other tissues that rely on gradients for physiological function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ricin crosses polarized human intestinal cells and intestines of ricin-gavaged mice without evident damage and then disseminates to mouse kidneys.

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    Alyssa D Flora

    Full Text Available Ricin is a potent toxin found in the beans of Ricinus communis and is often lethal for animals and humans when aerosolized or injected and causes significant morbidity and occasional death when ingested. Ricin has been proposed as a bioweapon because of its lethal properties, environmental stability, and accessibility. In oral intoxication, the process by which the toxin transits across intestinal mucosa is not completely understood. To address this question, we assessed the impact of ricin on the gastrointestinal tract and organs of mice after dissemination of toxin from the gut. We first showed that ricin adhered in a specific pattern to human small bowel intestinal sections, the site within the mouse gut in which a variable degree of damage has been reported by others. We then monitored the movement of ricin across polarized human HCT-8 intestinal monolayers grown in transwell inserts and in HCT-8 cell organoids. We observed that, in both systems, ricin trafficked through the cells without apparent damage until 24 hours post intoxication. We delivered a lethal dose of purified fluorescently-labeled ricin to mice by oral gavage and followed transit of the toxin from the gastrointestinal tracts to the internal organs by in vivo imaging of whole animals over time and ex vivo imaging of organs at various time points. In addition, we harvested organs from unlabeled ricin-gavaged mice and assessed them for the presence of ricin and for histological damage. Finally, we compared serum chemistry values from buffer-treated versus ricin-intoxicated animals. We conclude that ricin transverses human intestinal cells and mouse intestinal cells in situ prior to any indication of enterocyte damage and that ricin rapidly reaches the kidneys of intoxicated mice. We also propose that mice intoxicated orally with ricin likely die from distributive shock.

  3. Ricin crosses polarized human intestinal cells and intestines of ricin-gavaged mice without evident damage and then disseminates to mouse kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flora, Alyssa D; Teel, Louise D; Smith, Mark A; Sinclair, James F; Melton-Celsa, Angela R; O'Brien, Alison D

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potent toxin found in the beans of Ricinus communis and is often lethal for animals and humans when aerosolized or injected and causes significant morbidity and occasional death when ingested. Ricin has been proposed as a bioweapon because of its lethal properties, environmental stability, and accessibility. In oral intoxication, the process by which the toxin transits across intestinal mucosa is not completely understood. To address this question, we assessed the impact of ricin on the gastrointestinal tract and organs of mice after dissemination of toxin from the gut. We first showed that ricin adhered in a specific pattern to human small bowel intestinal sections, the site within the mouse gut in which a variable degree of damage has been reported by others. We then monitored the movement of ricin across polarized human HCT-8 intestinal monolayers grown in transwell inserts and in HCT-8 cell organoids. We observed that, in both systems, ricin trafficked through the cells without apparent damage until 24 hours post intoxication. We delivered a lethal dose of purified fluorescently-labeled ricin to mice by oral gavage and followed transit of the toxin from the gastrointestinal tracts to the internal organs by in vivo imaging of whole animals over time and ex vivo imaging of organs at various time points. In addition, we harvested organs from unlabeled ricin-gavaged mice and assessed them for the presence of ricin and for histological damage. Finally, we compared serum chemistry values from buffer-treated versus ricin-intoxicated animals. We conclude that ricin transverses human intestinal cells and mouse intestinal cells in situ prior to any indication of enterocyte damage and that ricin rapidly reaches the kidneys of intoxicated mice. We also propose that mice intoxicated orally with ricin likely die from distributive shock.

  4. Intermediate Filaments and Polarization in the Intestinal Epithelium

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    Richard A. Coch

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The cytoplasmic intermediate filament cytoskeleton provides a tissue-specific three-dimensional scaffolding with unique context-dependent organizational features. This is particularly apparent in the intestinal epithelium, in which the intermediate filament network is localized below the apical terminal web region and is anchored to the apical junction complex. This arrangement is conserved from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. The review summarizes compositional, morphological and functional features of the polarized intermediate filament cytoskeleton in intestinal cells of nematodes and mammals. We emphasize the cross talk of intermediate filaments with the actin- and tubulin-based cytoskeleton. Possible links of the intermediate filament system to the distribution of apical membrane proteins and the cell polarity complex are highlighted. Finally, we discuss how these properties relate to the establishment and maintenance of polarity in the intestine.

  5. Intermediate Filaments and Polarization in the Intestinal Epithelium.

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    Coch, Richard A; Leube, Rudolf E

    2016-07-15

    The cytoplasmic intermediate filament cytoskeleton provides a tissue-specific three-dimensional scaffolding with unique context-dependent organizational features. This is particularly apparent in the intestinal epithelium, in which the intermediate filament network is localized below the apical terminal web region and is anchored to the apical junction complex. This arrangement is conserved from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. The review summarizes compositional, morphological and functional features of the polarized intermediate filament cytoskeleton in intestinal cells of nematodes and mammals. We emphasize the cross talk of intermediate filaments with the actin- and tubulin-based cytoskeleton. Possible links of the intermediate filament system to the distribution of apical membrane proteins and the cell polarity complex are highlighted. Finally, we discuss how these properties relate to the establishment and maintenance of polarity in the intestine.

  6. The pathogenic potential of Helicobacter cinaedi isolated from non-human sources: adherence, invasion and translocation ability in polarized intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells in vitro.

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    Taniguchi, Takako; Yamazaki, Wataru; Saeki, Yuji; Takajo, Ichiro; Okayama, Akihiko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Misawa, Naoaki

    2016-05-03

    Helicobacter cinaedi infection has been recognized as an increasingly important emerging disease in humans. Infection with H. cinaedi causes bacteremia, cellulitis and enteritis. H. cinaedi has been isolated from non-human sources, including dogs, cats and rodents; however, it remains unclear whether animal strains are pathogenic in humans and as zoonotic pathogens. In this study, H. cinaedi isolates were recovered from a dog and a hamster, and the ability of these isolates to adhere to, invade and translocate across polarized human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells was examined in vitro. To better understand the pathogenic potential of animal H. cinaedi isolates, these results were compared with those for a human strain that was isolated from a patient with bacteremia. The animal and human strains adhered to and invaded Caco-2 cells, but to a lesser degree than the C. jejuni 81-176 strain, which was used as a control. The integrity of tight junctions was monitored by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) with a membrane insert system. The TER values for all H. cinaedi strains did not change during the experimental periods compared with those of the controls; however, translocation of H. cinaedi from the apical side to the basolateral side was confirmed by cultivation and H. cinaedi-specific PCR, suggesting that the H. cinaedi strains translocated by transcellular route. This study demonstrated that H. cinaedi strains of animal origin might have a pathogenic potential in human epithelial cells as observed in a translocation assay in vitro with a human isolate.

  7. Krüppel-like factor 4 regulates intestinal epithelial cell morphology and polarity.

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    Tianxin Yu

    Full Text Available Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4 is a zinc finger transcription factor that plays a vital role in regulating cell lineage differentiation during development and maintaining epithelial homeostasis in the intestine. In normal intestine, KLF4 is predominantly expressed in the differentiated epithelial cells. It has been identified as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. KLF4 knockout mice demonstrated a decrease in number of goblet cells in the colon, and conditional ablation of KLF4 from the intestinal epithelium led to altered epithelial homeostasis. However, the role of KLF4 in differentiated intestinal cells and colon cancer cells, as well as the mechanism by which it regulates homeostasis and represses tumorigenesis in the intestine is not well understood. In our study, KLF4 was partially depleted in the differentiated intestinal epithelial cells by a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase. We found a significant increase in the number of goblet cells in the KLF4-deleted small intestine, suggesting that KLF4 is not only required for goblet cell differentiation, but also required for maintaining goblet cell numbers through its function in inhibiting cell proliferation. The number and position of Paneth cells also changed. This is consistent with the KLF4 knockout study using villin-Cre [1]. Through immunohistochemistry (IHC staining and statistical analysis, we found that a stem cell and/or tuft cell marker, DCAMKL1, and a proliferation marker, Ki67, are affected by KLF4 depletion, while an enteroendocrine cell marker, neurotensin (NT, was not affected. In addition, we found KLF4 depletion altered the morphology and polarity of the intestinal epithelial cells. Using a three-dimensional (3D intestinal epithelial cyst formation assay, we found that KLF4 is essential for cell polarity and crypt-cyst formation in human colon cancer cells. These findings suggest that, as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer, KLF4 affects intestinal epithelial cell

  8. The Human Intestinal Microbiome: A New Frontier of Human Biology

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    Hattori, Masahira; Taylor, Todd D.

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the vast number and variety of microorganisms inhabiting the human intestine, emerging metagenomic technologies are extremely powerful. The intestinal microbes are taxonomically complex and constitute an ecologically dynamic community (microbiota) that has long been believed to possess a strong impact on human physiology. Furthermore, they are heavily involved in the maturation and proliferation of human intestinal cells, helping to maintain their homeostasis and can be causative o...

  9. Bioengineering of functional human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal grafts.

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    Kitano, Kentaro; Schwartz, Dana M; Zhou, Haiyang; Gilpin, Sarah E; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Ren, Xi; Sommer, Cesar A; Capilla, Amalia V; Mathisen, Douglas J; Goldstein, Allan M; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Ott, Harald C

    2017-10-10

    Patients with short bowel syndrome lack sufficient functional intestine to sustain themselves with enteral intake alone. Transplantable vascularized bioengineered intestine could restore nutrient absorption. Here we report the engineering of humanized intestinal grafts by repopulating decellularized rat intestinal matrix with human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal epithelium and human endothelium. After 28 days of in vitro culture, hiPSC-derived progenitor cells differentiate into a monolayer of polarized intestinal epithelium. Human endothelial cells seeded via native vasculature restore perfusability. Ex vivo isolated perfusion testing confirms transfer of glucose and medium-chain fatty acids from lumen to venous effluent. Four weeks after transplantation to RNU rats, grafts show survival and maturation of regenerated epithelium. Systemic venous sampling and positron emission tomography confirm uptake of glucose and fatty acids in vivo. Bioengineering intestine on vascularized native scaffolds could bridge the gap between cell/tissue-scale regeneration and whole organ-scale technology needed to treat intestinal failure patients.There is a need for humanised grafts to treat patients with intestinal failure. Here, the authors generate intestinal grafts by recellularizing native intestinal matrix with human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived epithelium and human endothelium, and show nutrient absorption after transplantation in rats.

  10. Transmigration route of Campylobacter jejuni across polarized intestinal epithelial cells: paracellular, transcellular or both?

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    2013-01-01

    Intact intercellular junctions and cellular matrix contacts are crucial structural components for the formation and maintenance of epithelial barrier functions in humans to control the commensal flora and protect against intruding microbes. Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most important zoonotic pathogens causing food-borne gastroenteritis and potentially more severe diseases such as reactive arthritis or Guillain–Barré syndrome. Crossing the intestinal epithelial barrier and host cell invasion by C. jejuni are considered to represent the primary reasons of gut tissue damage in humans and various animal model systems including monkeys, piglets, rabbits, hamsters and ferrets. C. jejuni is also able to invade underlying tissues such as the lamina propria, can enter the bloodstream, and possibly reach distinct organs such as spleen, liver or mesenteric lymph nodes. However, the molecular mechanisms as well as major bacterial and host cell factors involved in these activities are poorly understood. Various models exist by which the pathogen can trigger its own transmigration across polarized intestinal epithelial cells in vitro, the paracellular and/or transcellular mechanism. Recent studies suggest that bacterial factors such as flagellum, serine protease HtrA and lipooligosaccharide LOS may play an active role in bacterial transmigration. Here we review our knowledge on transmigration of C. jejuni as well as some other Campylobacter species, and discuss the pros and cons for the route(s) taken to travel across polarized epithelial cell monolayers. These studies provide fresh insights into the infection strategies employed by this important pathogen. PMID:24079544

  11. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, Leon J.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we

  12. The Contributions of Human Mini-Intestines to the Study of Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

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    Yu, Huimin; Hasan, Nesrin M; In, Julie G; Estes, Mary K; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C; Donowitz, Mark

    2017-02-10

    The lack of accessibility to normal and diseased human intestine and the inability to separate the different functional compartments of the intestine even when tissue could be obtained have held back the understanding of human intestinal physiology. Clevers and his associates identified intestinal stem cells and established conditions to grow "mini-intestines" ex vivo in differentiated and undifferentiated conditions. This pioneering work has made a new model of the human intestine available and has begun making contributions to the understanding of human intestinal transport in normal physiologic conditions and the pathophysiology of intestinal diseases. However, this model is reductionist and lacks many of the complexities of normal intestine. Consequently, it is not yet possible to predict how great the advances using this model will be for understanding human physiology and pathophysiology, nor how the model will be modified to include multiple other intestinal cell types and physical forces necessary to more closely approximate normal intestine. This review describes recent studies using mini-intestines, which have readdressed previously established models of normal intestinal transport physiology and newly examined intestinal pathophysiology. The emphasis is on studies with human enteroids grown either as three-dimensional spheroids or two-dimensional monolayers. In addition, comments are provided on mouse studies in cases when human studies have not yet been described.

  13. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

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    Drummond, Coyne G; Nickerson, Cheryl A; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2016-01-01

    Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and encounters the

  14. Polarity of mature human odontoblasts.

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    Tjäderhane, L; Koivumäki, S; Pääkkönen, V; Ilvesaro, J; Soini, Y; Salo, T; Metsikkö, K; Tuukkanen, J

    2013-11-01

    Odontoblast polarization is based on histological appearance as columnar cells with asymmetric disposition of organelles and plasma membrane domains. However, little is known about the odontoblast plasma membrane organization. We investigated odontoblast membrane polarity using influenza virus hemagglutinin and vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein as model proteins in mature human odontoblast organ culture. We also examined the distribution patterns of aquaporin 4 and 5, which are basolateral and apical proteins in epithelial cells, respectively. Confocal microscopy immunofluorescence and electron microscopy demonstrated that the apical markers located at the surface toward pulp and basolateral markers located at the plasma membrane of odontoblast processes. Therefore, odontoblast plasma membrane polarity was different from that in epithelial cells. Also, certain lectins stained odontoblast processes while others stained the soma, reflecting the different natures of their membrane domains. Strong ZO-1 and weaker claudin expression suggest weak tight junctions in the odontoblasts. TGF-β1 showed a tendency to reinstate the expression of selected TJ genes, indicating that TGF-β1 may control odontoblast cell layer integrity by controlling tight junction protein expression.

  15. Human and mouse tissue-engineered small intestine both demonstrate digestive and absorptive function

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    Grant, Christa N.; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Sala, Frederic G.; Hill, J. Ryan; Levin, Daniel E.; Speer, Allison L.; Barthel, Erik R.; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Zachos, Nicholas C.

    2015-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a devastating condition in which insufficient small intestinal surface area results in malnutrition and dependence on intravenous parenteral nutrition. There is an increasing incidence of SBS, particularly in premature babies and newborns with congenital intestinal anomalies. Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) offers a therapeutic alternative to the current standard treatment, intestinal transplantation, and has the potential to solve its biggest challenges, namely donor shortage and life-long immunosuppression. We have previously demonstrated that TESI can be generated from mouse and human small intestine and histologically replicates key components of native intestine. We hypothesized that TESI also recapitulates native small intestine function. Organoid units were generated from mouse or human donor intestine and implanted into genetically identical or immunodeficient host mice. After 4 wk, TESI was harvested and either fixed and paraffin embedded or immediately subjected to assays to illustrate function. We demonstrated that both mouse and human tissue-engineered small intestine grew into an appropriately polarized sphere of intact epithelium facing a lumen, contiguous with supporting mesenchyme, muscle, and stem/progenitor cells. The epithelium demonstrated major ultrastructural components, including tight junctions and microvilli, transporters, and functional brush-border and digestive enzymes. This study demonstrates that tissue-engineered small intestine possesses a well-differentiated epithelium with intact ion transporters/channels, functional brush-border enzymes, and similar ultrastructural components to native tissue, including progenitor cells, whether derived from mouse or human cells. PMID:25573173

  16. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and human intestinal health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miquel, S.; Martin, R.; Rossi, O.; Bermudez-Humaran, L.G.; Chatel, J.M.; Sokol, H.; Thomas, M.; Wells, J.M.; Langella, P.

    2013-01-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is the most abundant bacterium in the human intestinal microbiota of healthy adults, representing more than 5% of the total bacterial population. Over the past five years, an increasing number of studies have clearly described the importance of this highly metabolically

  17. TTC7A mutations disrupt intestinal epithelial apicobasal polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bigorgne, Amélie E; Farin, Henner F; Lemoine, Roxane; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Lambert, Nathalie; Gil, Marine; Schulz, Ansgar; Philippet, Pierre; Schlesser, Patrick; Abrahamsen, Tore G; Oymar, Knut; Davies, E Graham; Ellingsen, Christian Lycke; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Moreau-Massart, Brigitte; Berrebi, Dominique; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nischke, Patrick; Brousse, Nicole; Fischer, Alain; Clevers, Hans; de Saint Basile, Geneviève

    Multiple intestinal atresia (MIA) is a rare cause of bowel obstruction that is sometimes associated with a combined immunodeficiency (CID), leading to increased susceptibility to infections. The factors underlying this rare disease are poorly understood. We characterized the immunological and

  18. Human intestinal spirochetosis – a review

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    Gebbers, Jan-Olaf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human intestinal spirochetosis (IS is a condition defined histologically by the presence of spirochetal microorganisms attached to the apical cell membrane of the colorectal epithelium. Intestinal spirochetes comprise a heterogeneous group of bacteria. In humans, Brachyspira aalborgi and Brachyspira pilosicoli predominate. Prevalence rates of IS are low where living standards are high, in contrast to poorly developed areas where IS is common. Homosexuals and HIV-infected individuals are at high risk of being colonized. Clinical significance in individual cases has remained unclear up to now. A review of the literature assumes that invasion of spirochetes beyond the surface epithelium may be associated with gastrointestinal symptoms which respond to antibiotic treatment (metronidazole, whereas individuals lacking this feature may be mostly asymptomatic. Of unknown reason, homosexual and HIV-positive men as well as children are more likely to be symptomatic irrespective of invasion. Rare cases of spirochetemia and multiple organ failure have been reported in critically ill patients with IS.

  19. The human intestinal microbiome: a new frontier of human biology.

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    Hattori, Masahira; Taylor, Todd D

    2009-02-01

    To analyze the vast number and variety of microorganisms inhabiting the human intestine, emerging metagenomic technologies are extremely powerful. The intestinal microbes are taxonomically complex and constitute an ecologically dynamic community (microbiota) that has long been believed to possess a strong impact on human physiology. Furthermore, they are heavily involved in the maturation and proliferation of human intestinal cells, helping to maintain their homeostasis and can be causative of various diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. A simplified animal model system has provided the mechanistic basis for the molecular interactions that occur at the interface between such microbes and host intestinal epithelia. Through metagenomic analysis, it is now possible to comprehensively explore the genetic nature of the intestinal microbiome, the mutually interacting system comprising the host cells and the residing microbial community. The human microbiome project was recently launched as an international collaborative research effort to further promote this newly developing field and to pave the way to a new frontier of human biology, which will provide new strategies for the maintenance of human health.

  20. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, B. van den; Erkus, O.; Boekhorst, J.; Goffau, M. de; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed

  1. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Erkus, Oylum; Boekhorst, Jos; de Goffau, Marcus; Smid, Eddy J.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed

  2. The PTEN phosphatase controls intestinal epithelial cell polarity and barrier function: role in colorectal cancer progression.

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    Marie-Josée Langlois

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The PTEN phosphatase acts on phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphates resulting from phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K activation. PTEN expression has been shown to be decreased in colorectal cancer. Little is known however as to the specific cellular role of PTEN in human intestinal epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PTEN in human colorectal cancer cells.Caco-2/15, HCT116 and CT26 cells were infected with recombinant lentiviruses expressing a shRNA specifically designed to knock-down PTEN. The impact of PTEN downregulation was analyzed on cell polarization and differentiation, intercellular junction integrity (expression of cell-cell adhesion proteins, barrier function, migration (wound assay, invasion (matrigel-coated transwells and on tumor and metastasis formation in mice. Electron microscopy analysis showed that lentiviral infection of PTEN shRNA significantly inhibited Caco-2/15 cell polarization, functional differentiation and brush border development. A strong reduction in claudin 1, 3, 4 and 8 was also observed as well as a decrease in transepithelial resistance. Loss of PTEN expression increased the spreading, migration and invasion capacities of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. PTEN downregulation also increased tumor size following subcutaneous injection of colorectal cancer cells in nude mice. Finally, loss of PTEN expression in HCT116 and CT26, but not in Caco-2/15, led to an increase in their metastatic potential following tail-vein injections in mice.Altogether, these results indicate that PTEN controls cellular polarity, establishment of cell-cell junctions, paracellular permeability, migration and tumorigenic/metastatic potential of human colorectal cancer cells.

  3. Development and Characterization of a Human and Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cell Monolayer Platform

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    Kenji Kozuka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We describe the development and characterization of a mouse and human epithelial cell monolayer platform of the small and large intestines, with a broad range of potential applications including the discovery and development of minimally systemic drug candidates. Culture conditions for each intestinal segment were optimized by correlating monolayer global gene expression with the corresponding tissue segment. The monolayers polarized, formed tight junctions, and contained a diversity of intestinal epithelial cell lineages. Ion transport phenotypes of monolayers from the proximal and distal colon and small intestine matched the known and unique physiology of these intestinal segments. The cultures secreted serotonin, GLP-1, and FGF19 and upregulated the epithelial sodium channel in response to known biologically active agents, suggesting intact secretory and absorptive functions. A screen of over 2,000 pharmacologically active compounds for inhibition of potassium ion transport in the mouse distal colon cultures led to the identification of a tool compound. : Siegel and colleagues describe their development of a human and mouse intestinal epithelial cell monolayer platform that maintains the cellular, molecular, and functional characteristics of tissue for each intestinal segment. They demonstrate the platform's application to drug discovery by screening a library of over 2,000 compounds to identify an inhibitor of potassium ion transport in the mouse distal colon. Keywords: intestinal epithelium, organoids, monolayer, colon, small intestine, phenotype screening assays, enteroid, colonoid

  4. Alternative Functional In Vitro Models of Human Intestinal Epithelia

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    Amanda L Kauffman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically relevant sources of absorptive intestinal epithelial cells are crucial for human drug transport studies. Human adenocarcinoma-derived intestinal cell lines, such as Caco-2, offer conveniences of easy culture maintenance and scalability, but do not fully recapitulate in vivo intestinal phenotypes. Additional sources of renewable physiologically relevant human intestinal cells would provide a much needed tool for drug discovery and intestinal physiology. We sought to evaluate and compare two alternative sources of human intestinal cells, commercially available primary human intestinal epithelial cells (hInEpCs and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived intestinal cells to Caco-2, for use in in vitro transwell monolayer intestinal transport assays. To achieve this for iPSC-derived cells, our previously described 3-dimensional intestinal organogenesis method was adapted to transwell differentiation. Intestinal cells were assessed by marker expression through immunocytochemical and mRNA expression analyses, monolayer integrity through Transepithelial Electrical Resistance (TEER measurements and molecule permeability, and functionality by taking advantage the well-characterized intestinal transport mechanisms. In most cases, marker expression for primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells appeared to be as good as or better than Caco-2. Furthermore, transwell monolayers exhibited high TEER with low permeability. Primary hInEpCs showed molecule efflux indicative of P-glycoprotein transport. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells also showed neonatal Fc receptor-dependent binding of immunoglobulin G variants. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived intestinal cells exhibit expected marker expression and demonstrate basic functional monolayer formation, similar to or better than Caco-2. These cells could offer an alternative source of human intestinal cells for understanding normal intestinal epithelial physiology and drug transport.

  5. A new approach to predict human intestinal absorption using porcine intestinal tissue and biorelevant matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.; Steeg, E. van de; Grossouw, D.; Zeijdner, E.E.; Krul, C.A.M.; Verwei, M.; Wortelboer, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    A reliable prediction of the oral bioavailability in humans is crucial and of high interest for pharmaceutical and food industry. The predictive value of currently used in silico methods, in vitro cell lines, ex vivo intestinal tissue and/or in vivo animal studies for human intestinal absorption,

  6. Human Enteroids/Colonoids and Intestinal Organoids Functionally Recapitulate Normal Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

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    Zachos, Nicholas C; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Blutt, Sarah E; de Jonge, Hugo R; Estes, Mary K; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-02-19

    Identification of Lgr5 as the intestinal stem cell marker as well as the growth factors necessary to replicate adult intestinal stem cell division has led to the establishment of the methods to generate "indefinite" ex vivo primary intestinal epithelial cultures, termed "mini-intestines." Primary cultures developed from isolated intestinal crypts or stem cells (termed enteroids/colonoids) and from inducible pluripotent stem cells (termed intestinal organoids) are being applied to study human intestinal physiology and pathophysiology with great expectations for translational applications, including regenerative medicine. Here we discuss the physiologic properties of these cultures, their current use in understanding diarrhea-causing host-pathogen interactions, and potential future applications. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Dynamic efficiency of the human intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Marco; Biagi, Elena; Turroni, Silvia; Maccaferri, Simone; Figini, Paolo; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2015-06-01

    The emerging dynamic dimensions of the human intestinal microbiota (IM) are challenging the traditional definition of healthy gut microbiota, principally based on the static concepts of phylogenetic and functional core. On the other hand, recent researches are revealing that the microbiota plasticity is strategic for several aspects of our biology, addressing the different immunological and metabolic needs at various ages, and adjusting the ecosystem services in response to different lifestyle, physiological states or diets. In light of these studies, we propose to revise the traditional concept of healthy human IM, including its degree of plasticity among the fundamental requisites for providing host health. In order to make a model taking into account the relative importance of IM core functions and plasticity for the maintenance of host health, we address to Economics, where the efficiency of a productive system is measured by computing static and dynamic parameters.

  8. IKKα promotes intestinal tumorigenesis by limiting recruitment of M1-like polarized myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göktuna, Serkan I; Canli, Ozge; Bollrath, Julia; Fingerle, Alexander A; Horst, David; Diamanti, Michaela A; Pallangyo, Charles; Bennecke, Moritz; Nebelsiek, Tim; Mankan, Arun K; Lang, Roland; Artis, David; Hu, Yinling; Patzelt, Thomas; Ruland, Jürgen; Kirchner, Thomas; Taketo, M Mark; Chariot, Alain; Arkan, Melek C; Greten, Florian R

    2014-06-26

    The recruitment of immune cells into solid tumors is an essential prerequisite of tumor development. Depending on the prevailing polarization profile of these infiltrating leucocytes, tumorigenesis is either promoted or blocked. Here, we identify IκB kinase α (IKKα) as a central regulator of a tumoricidal microenvironment during intestinal carcinogenesis. Mice deficient in IKKα kinase activity are largely protected from intestinal tumor development that is dependent on the enhanced recruitment of interferon γ (IFNγ)-expressing M1-like myeloid cells. In IKKα mutant mice, M1-like polarization is not controlled in a cell-autonomous manner but, rather, depends on the interplay of both IKKα mutant tumor epithelia and immune cells. Because therapies aiming at the tumor microenvironment rather than directly at the mutated cancer cell may circumvent resistance development, we suggest IKKα as a promising target for colorectal cancer (CRC) therapy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. IKKα Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis by Limiting Recruitment of M1-like Polarized Myeloid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan I. Göktuna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment of immune cells into solid tumors is an essential prerequisite of tumor development. Depending on the prevailing polarization profile of these infiltrating leucocytes, tumorigenesis is either promoted or blocked. Here, we identify IκB kinase α (IKKα as a central regulator of a tumoricidal microenvironment during intestinal carcinogenesis. Mice deficient in IKKα kinase activity are largely protected from intestinal tumor development that is dependent on the enhanced recruitment of interferon γ (IFNγ-expressing M1-like myeloid cells. In IKKα mutant mice, M1-like polarization is not controlled in a cell-autonomous manner but, rather, depends on the interplay of both IKKα mutant tumor epithelia and immune cells. Because therapies aiming at the tumor microenvironment rather than directly at the mutated cancer cell may circumvent resistance development, we suggest IKKα as a promising target for colorectal cancer (CRC therapy.

  10. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Poston; Nasir U. Bhuiyan; R. Alex Redd; Neil Parham; Jennifer Watson

    2005-02-28

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents.

  11. Human placental alkaline phosphatase in liver and intestine.

    OpenAIRE

    Garattini, E; Margolis, J; Heimer, E; Felix, A.; Udenfriend, S

    1985-01-01

    Three distinct forms of human alkaline phosphatase, presumably isozymes, are known, each apparently associated with a specific tissue. These are placental, intestinal, and liver (kidney and bone). We have used a specific immunoassay and HPLC to show that placental alkaline phosphatase is also present in extracts of liver and intestine in appreciable amounts.

  12. Efficient genetic engineering of human intestinal organoids using electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Masayuki; Matano, Mami; Nanki, Kosaku; Sato, Toshiro

    2015-10-01

    Gene modification in untransformed human intestinal cells is an attractive approach for studying gene function in intestinal diseases. However, because of the lack of practical tools, such studies have largely depended upon surrogates, such as gene-engineered mice or immortalized human cell lines. By taking advantage of the recently developed intestinal organoid culture method, we developed a methodology for modulating genes of interest in untransformed human colonic organoids via electroporation of gene vectors. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the generation of intestinal organoids by culture with essential growth factors in a basement membrane matrix. We also describe how to stably integrate genes via the piggyBac transposon, as well as precise genome editing using the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Beginning with crypt isolation from a human colon sample, genetically modified organoids can be obtained in 3 weeks.

  13. Human intestinal microbiota and type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaarala, Outi

    2013-10-01

    The role of intestinal microbiota in immune-mediated diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, has deservedly received a lot of attention. Evidently, changes in the intestinal microbiota are associated with type 1 diabetes as demonstrated by recent studies. Children with beta-cell autoimmunity have shown low abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria and increase in the abundance of members of the Bacteroidetes phylum in fecal microbiota. These alterations could explain increased gut permeability, subclinical small intestinal inflammation, and dysregulation of oral tolerance in type 1 diabetes. However, these studies do not provide evidence of the causative role of the gut microbiota in the development of beta-cell autoimmunity, yet. In animal models, the composition of gut microbiota modulates the function of both innate and adaptive immunity, and intestinal bacteria are regulators of autoimmune diabetes. Thus, prevention of type 1 diabetes could, in the future, be based on the interventions targeted to the gut microbiota.

  14. Precision-cut rat, mouse, and human intestinal slices as novel models for the early-onset of intestinal fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, Bao Tung; van Haaften, Wouter Tobias; Oosterhuis, Dorenda; Nieken, Judith; de Graaf, Inge Anne Maria; Olinga, Peter

    Intestinal fibrosis (IF) is a major complication of inflammatory bowel disease. IF research is limited by the lack of relevant in vitro and in vivo models. We evaluated precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) prepared from human, rat, and mouse intestine as ex vivo models mimicking the early-onset of

  15. In Silico Prediction for Intestinal Absorption and Brain Penetration of Chemical Pesticides in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chedik, Lisa; Mias-Lucquin, Dominique; Bruyere, Arnaud; Fardel, Olivier

    2017-06-30

    Intestinal absorption and brain permeation constitute key parameters of toxicokinetics for pesticides, conditioning their toxicity, including neurotoxicity. However, they remain poorly characterized in humans. The present study was therefore designed to evaluate human intestine and brain permeation for a large set of pesticides ( n = 338) belonging to various chemical classes, using an in silico graphical BOILED-Egg/SwissADME online method based on lipophilicity and polarity that was initially developed for drugs. A high percentage of the pesticides (81.4%) was predicted to exhibit high intestinal absorption, with a high accuracy (96%), whereas a lower, but substantial, percentage (38.5%) displayed brain permeation. Among the pesticide classes, organochlorines ( n = 30) constitute the class with the lowest percentage of intestine-permeant members (40%), whereas that of the organophosphorus compounds ( n = 99) has the lowest percentage of brain-permeant chemicals (9%). The predictions of the permeations for the pesticides were additionally shown to be significantly associated with various molecular descriptors well-known to discriminate between permeant and non-permeant drugs. Overall, our in silico data suggest that human exposure to pesticides through the oral way is likely to result in an intake of these dietary contaminants for most of them and brain permeation for some of them, thus supporting the idea that they have toxic effects on human health, including neurotoxic effects.

  16. Type I collagen as an extracellular matrix for the in vitro growth of human small intestinal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyad Jabaji

    Full Text Available We previously reported in vitro maintenance and proliferation of human small intestinal epithelium using Matrigel, a proprietary basement membrane product. There are concerns over the applicability of Matrigel-based methods for future human therapies. We investigated type I collagen as an alternative for the culture of human intestinal epithelial cells.Human small intestine was procured from fresh surgical pathology specimens. Small intestinal crypts were isolated using EDTA chelation. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts were isolated from a pediatric sample and expanded in vitro. After suspension in Matrigel or type I collagen gel, crypts were co-cultured above a confluent layer of myofibroblasts. Crypts were also grown in monoculture with exposure to myofibroblast conditioned media; these were subsequently sub-cultured in vitro and expanded with a 1∶2 split ratio. Cultures were assessed with light microscopy, RT-PCR, histology, and immunohistochemistry.Collagen supported viable human epithelium in vitro for at least one month in primary culture. Sub-cultured epithelium expanded through 12 passages over 60 days. Histologic sections revealed polarized columnar cells, with apical brush borders and basolaterally located nuclei. Collagen-based cultures gave rise to monolayer epithelial sheets at the gel-liquid interface, which were not observed with Matrigel. Immunohistochemical staining identified markers of differentiated intestinal epithelium and myofibroblasts. RT-PCR demonstrated expression of α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin in myofibroblasts and E-Cadherin, CDX2, villin 1, intestinal alkaline phosphatase, chromogranin A, lysozyme, and Lgr5 in epithelial cells. These markers were maintained through several passages.Type I collagen gel supports long-term in vitro maintenance and expansion of fully elaborated human intestinal epithelium. Collagen-based methods yield familiar enteroid structures as well as a new pattern of sheet

  17. Intestinal, extra-intestinal and systemic sequelae of Toxoplasma gondii induced acute ileitis in mice harboring a human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Klitzing, Eliane; Ekmekciu, Ira; Kühl, Anja A; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M

    2017-01-01

    Within seven days following peroral high dose infection with Toxoplasma gondii susceptible conventionally colonized mice develop acute ileitis due to an underlying T helper cell (Th) -1 type immunopathology. We here addressed whether mice harboring a human intestinal microbiota developed intestinal, extra-intestinal and systemic sequelae upon ileitis induction. Secondary abiotic mice were generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and associated with a complex human intestinal microbiota following peroral fecal microbiota transplantation. Within three weeks the human microbiota had stably established in the murine intestinal tract as assessed by quantitative cultural and culture-independent (i.e. molecular 16S rRNA based) methods. At day 7 post infection (p.i.) with 50 cysts of T. gondii strain ME49 by gavage human microbiota associated (hma) mice displayed severe clinical, macroscopic and microscopic sequelae indicating acute ileitis. In diseased hma mice increased numbers of innate and adaptive immune cells within the ileal mucosa and lamina propria and elevated intestinal secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators including IFN-γ, IL-12 and nitric oxide could be observed at day 7 p.i. Ileitis development was accompanied by substantial shifts in intestinal microbiota composition of hma mice characterized by elevated total bacterial loads and increased numbers of intestinal Gram-negative commensals such as enterobacteria and Bacteroides / Prevotella species overgrowing the small and large intestinal lumen. Furthermore, viable bacteria translocated from the inflamed ileum to extra-intestinal including systemic compartments. Notably, pro-inflammatory immune responses were not restricted to the intestinal tract as indicated by increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in extra-intestinal (i.e. liver and kidney) and systemic compartments including spleen and serum. With respect to the intestinal microbiota composition "humanized" mice display acute ileitis

  18. Intestinal, extra-intestinal and systemic sequelae of Toxoplasma gondii induced acute ileitis in mice harboring a human gut microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane von Klitzing

    Full Text Available Within seven days following peroral high dose infection with Toxoplasma gondii susceptible conventionally colonized mice develop acute ileitis due to an underlying T helper cell (Th -1 type immunopathology. We here addressed whether mice harboring a human intestinal microbiota developed intestinal, extra-intestinal and systemic sequelae upon ileitis induction.Secondary abiotic mice were generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and associated with a complex human intestinal microbiota following peroral fecal microbiota transplantation. Within three weeks the human microbiota had stably established in the murine intestinal tract as assessed by quantitative cultural and culture-independent (i.e. molecular 16S rRNA based methods. At day 7 post infection (p.i. with 50 cysts of T. gondii strain ME49 by gavage human microbiota associated (hma mice displayed severe clinical, macroscopic and microscopic sequelae indicating acute ileitis. In diseased hma mice increased numbers of innate and adaptive immune cells within the ileal mucosa and lamina propria and elevated intestinal secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators including IFN-γ, IL-12 and nitric oxide could be observed at day 7 p.i. Ileitis development was accompanied by substantial shifts in intestinal microbiota composition of hma mice characterized by elevated total bacterial loads and increased numbers of intestinal Gram-negative commensals such as enterobacteria and Bacteroides / Prevotella species overgrowing the small and large intestinal lumen. Furthermore, viable bacteria translocated from the inflamed ileum to extra-intestinal including systemic compartments. Notably, pro-inflammatory immune responses were not restricted to the intestinal tract as indicated by increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in extra-intestinal (i.e. liver and kidney and systemic compartments including spleen and serum.With respect to the intestinal microbiota composition "humanized" mice display

  19. In vitro enteroid-derived three-dimensional tissue model of human small intestinal epithelium with innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Zhou, Wenda; Roh, Terrence; Estes, Mary K; Kaplan, David L

    2017-01-01

    There is a need for functional in vitro 3D human intestine systems that can bridge the gap between conventional cell culture studies and human trials. The successful engineering in vitro of human intestinal tissues relies on the use of the appropriate cell sources, biomimetic scaffolds, and 3D culture conditions to support vital organ functions. We previously established a compartmentalized scaffold consisting of a hollow space within a porous bulk matrix, in which a functional and physiologically relevant intestinal epithelium system was generated using intestinal cell lines. In this study, we adopt the 3D scaffold system for the cultivation of stem cell-derived human small intestinal enteriods (HIEs) to engineer an in vitro 3D model of a nonstransformed human small intestinal epithelium. Characterization of tissue properties revealed a mature HIE-derived epithelium displaying four major terminally differentiated epithelial cell types (enterocytes, Goblet cells, Paneth cells, enteroendocrine cells), with tight junction formation, microvilli polarization, digestive enzyme secretion, and low oxygen tension in the lumen. Moreover, the tissue model demonstrates significant antibacterial responses to E. coli infection, as evidenced by the significant upregulation of genes involved in the innate immune response. Importantly, many of these genes are activated in human patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), implicating the potential application of the 3D stem-cell derived epithelium for the in vitro study of host-microbe-pathogen interplay and IBD pathogenesis.

  20. In vitro enteroid-derived three-dimensional tissue model of human small intestinal epithelium with innate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    Full Text Available There is a need for functional in vitro 3D human intestine systems that can bridge the gap between conventional cell culture studies and human trials. The successful engineering in vitro of human intestinal tissues relies on the use of the appropriate cell sources, biomimetic scaffolds, and 3D culture conditions to support vital organ functions. We previously established a compartmentalized scaffold consisting of a hollow space within a porous bulk matrix, in which a functional and physiologically relevant intestinal epithelium system was generated using intestinal cell lines. In this study, we adopt the 3D scaffold system for the cultivation of stem cell-derived human small intestinal enteriods (HIEs to engineer an in vitro 3D model of a nonstransformed human small intestinal epithelium. Characterization of tissue properties revealed a mature HIE-derived epithelium displaying four major terminally differentiated epithelial cell types (enterocytes, Goblet cells, Paneth cells, enteroendocrine cells, with tight junction formation, microvilli polarization, digestive enzyme secretion, and low oxygen tension in the lumen. Moreover, the tissue model demonstrates significant antibacterial responses to E. coli infection, as evidenced by the significant upregulation of genes involved in the innate immune response. Importantly, many of these genes are activated in human patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, implicating the potential application of the 3D stem-cell derived epithelium for the in vitro study of host-microbe-pathogen interplay and IBD pathogenesis.

  1. Transepithelial Transport of PAMAM Dendrimers Across Isolated Human Intestinal Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Dallin; Enda, Michael; Bond, Tanner; Moghaddam, Seyyed Pouya Hadipour; Conarton, Josh; Scaife, Courtney; Volckmann, Eric; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2015-11-02

    Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have shown transepithelial transport across intestinal epithelial barrier in rats and across Caco-2 cell monolayers. Caco-2 models innately lack mucous barriers, and rat isolated intestinal tissue has been shown to overestimate human permeability. This study is the first report of transport of PAMAM dendrimers across isolated human intestinal epithelium. It was observed that FITC labeled G4-NH2 and G3.5-COOH PAMAM dendrimers at 1 mM concentration do not have a statistically higher permeability compared to free FITC controls in isolated human jejunum and colonic tissues. Mannitol permeability was increased at 10 mM concentrations of G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 dendrimers. Significant histological changes in human colonic and jejunal tissues were observed at G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 concentrations of 10 mM implying that dose limiting toxicity may occur at similar concentrations in vivo. The permeability through human isolated intestinal tissue in this study was compared to previous rat and Caco-2 permeability data. This study implicates that PAMAM dendrimer oral drug delivery may be feasible, but it may be limited to highly potent drugs.

  2. Toxicological significance of azo dye metabolism by human intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinhui; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 0.7 million tons of azo dyes are synthesized each year. Azo dyes are composed of one or more R₁-N=N-R₂ linkages. Studies have shown that both mammalian and microbial azoreductases cleave the azo bonds of the dyes to form compounds that are potentially genotoxic. The human gastrointestinal tract harbors a diverse microbiota comprised of at least several thousand species. Both water-soluble and water-insoluble azo dyes can be reduced by intestinal bacteria. Some of the metabolites produced by intestinal microbiota have been shown to be carcinogenic to humans although the parent azo dyes may not be classified as being carcinogenic. Azoreductase activity is commonly found in intestinal bacteria. Three types of azoreductases have been characterized in bacteria. They are flavin dependent NADH preferred azoreductase, flavin dependent NADPH preferred azoreductase, and flavin free NADPH preferred azoreductase. This review highlights how azo dyes are metabolized by intestinal bacteria, mechanisms of azo reduction, and the potential contribution in the carcinogenesis/mutagenesis of the reduction of the azo dyes by intestinal microbiota.

  3. Long-term monitoring of the human intestinal microbiota composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajilic-Stojanovic, M.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Tims, S.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Vos, de W.M.

    2013-01-01

    The microbiota that colonizes the human intestinal tract is complex and its structure is specific for each of us. In this study we expand the knowledge about the stability of the subject-specific microbiota and show that this ecosystem is stable in short-term intervals (¿10 years). The faecal

  4. Small intestinal MUC2 synthesis in human preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, Maaike W.; de Bruijn, Adrianus C. J. M.; Schierbeek, Henk; Tibboel, Dick; Renes, Ingrid B.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    Schaart MW, de Bruijn ACJM, Schierbeek H, Tibboel D, Renes IB, van Goudoever JB. Small intestinal MUC2 synthesis in human preterm infants. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 296: G1085-G1090, 2009. First published February 26, 2009; doi:10.1152/ajpgi.90444.2008.-Mucin2 (MUC2) is the structural

  5. In Silico Modelling of the Human Intestinal Microflora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamerman, Derk Jan; Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    2002-01-01

    The ecology of the human intestinal microflora and its interaction with the host are poorly understood. Though more and more data are being acquired, in part using modern molecular methods, development of a quantitative theory has not kept pace with this development. This is in part due to the

  6. In silico modelling of the human intestinal microflora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamerman, DJ; Wilkinson, MHF; Sloot, P; Tan, CJK; Dongarra, JJ; Hoekstra, AG

    2002-01-01

    The ecology of the human intestinal microflora and its interaction with the host are poorly understood. Though more and more data are being acquired, in part using modern molecular methods, development of a quantitative theory has not kept pace with this development. This is in part due to the

  7. Mouse models for human intestinal microbiota research: a critical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, Floor; de Vos, Willem M.

    2018-01-01

    Since the early days of the intestinal microbiota research, mouse models have been used frequently to study the interaction of microbes with their host. However, to translate the knowledge gained from mouse studies to a human situation, the major spatio-temporal similarities and differences between

  8. Biotransformation of Food Dyes by Human Intestinal Bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biotransformation of food dyes (Tartrazine and Quinoline yellow) by Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli isolated from human intestinal microflora was investigated. Decolourisation of the media containing the dyes was used as an index of biotransformation. Biotransformation was higher under aerobic than under ...

  9. The growth pattern of the human intestine and its mesentery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soffers, Jelly H. M.; Hikspoors, Jill P. J. M.; Mekonen, Hayelom K.; Koehler, S. Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear to what extent midgut rotation determines human intestinal topography and pathology. We reinvestigated the midgut during its looping and herniation phases of development, using novel 3D visualization techniques. We distinguished 3 generations of midgut loops. The topography of

  10. Dietary protein absorption of the small intestine in human neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, Maaike W.; de Bruijn, Adrianus C. J. M.; Tibboel, Dick; Renes, Ingrid B.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2007-01-01

    The intestine plays a key role in the absorption of dietary proteins, which determines growth of human neonates. Bowel resection in the neonatal period brings loss of absorptive and protective surface and may consequently lead to malabsorption of dietary nutrients. However, there are no data on net

  11. Functional characterization of cholera toxin inhibitors using human intestinal organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer-van Ommen, Domenique D.; Pukin, Aliaksei V.; Fu, Ou; Quarles Van Ufford, Linda H C; Janssens, Hettie M.; Beekman, Jeffrey M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/27160378X; Pieters, Roland J.

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical drug testing in primary human cell models that recapitulate disease can significantly reduce animal experimentation and time-to-the-clinic. We used intestinal organoids to quantitatively study the potency of multivalent cholera toxin inhibitors. The method enabled the determination of

  12. Development of the human infant intestinal microbiota.

    OpenAIRE

    Chana Palmer; Elisabeth M Bik; DiGiulio, Daniel B.; David A. Relman; Brown, Patrick O.

    2007-01-01

    Almost immediately after a human being is born, so too is a new microbial ecosystem, one that resides in that person's gastrointestinal tract. Although it is a universal and integral part of human biology, the temporal progression of this process, the sources of the microbes that make up the ecosystem, how and why it varies from one infant to another, and how the composition of this ecosystem influences human physiology, development, and disease are still poorly understood. As a step toward s...

  13. Intestinal parasites: a study of human appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, L; Schrottenbaum, M; Kliment, V

    1991-01-01

    Histological sections of 414 appendices were examined parasitologically. Enterobius vermicularis was found in 8.7%, eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides in 0.5%, trophozites of Dientamoeba fragilis in 4.8%, Endolimax nana in 2.2%, Entamoeba coli in 1% and cysts of Giardia intestinalis in 1.9% of cases. Appendicopathies associated with Enterobius were most frequent in the age group from 6 to 10 years (24.3%) and from 21 to 25 years (12.2%). Patients older than 15 years were practically women only. Dientamoeba was most frequent in the age group from 11 to 15 years (11.3%). In women D. fragilis was three times more frequent than in men. The coincidence of D. fragilis and E. vermicularis infections was 50%. No interactions were seen between the protozoans in the contents of the appendix and its mucous membrane. Statistical evaluation indicates possible etiologic role of E. vermicularis in the occurrence of acute appendicities. D. fragilis appears to be the most common intestinal protozoan parasite in Bohemia.

  14. Impact of diet on human intestinal microbiota and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, Anne; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-01-01

    Our intestinal microbiota is involved in the breakdown and bioconversion of dietary and host components that are not degraded and taken up by our own digestive system. The end products generated by our microbiota fuel our enterocytes and support growth but also have signaling functions that generate systemic immune and metabolic responses. Due to the immense metabolic capacity of the intestinal microbiota and its relatively high plasticity, there is great interest in identifying dietary approaches that allow intentional and predictable modulation of the microbiota. In this article, we review the current insights on dietary influence on the human intestinal microbiota based on recent high-throughput molecular studies and interconnections with health. We focus especially on the emerging data that identify the amount and type of dietary fat as significant modulators of the colonic microbiota and its metabolic output.

  15. Microbial contact during pregnancy, intestinal colonization and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautava, Samuli; Luoto, Raakel; Salminen, Seppo; Isolauri, Erika

    2012-10-01

    Interaction with colonizing intestinal bacteria is essential for healthy intestinal and immunological development in infancy. Advances in understanding early host-microbe interactions indicate that this early microbial programming begins in utero and is substantially modulated by mode of birth, perinatal antibiotics and breastfeeding. Furthermore, it has become evident that this stepwise microbial colonization process, as well as immune and metabolic programming by the microbiota, might have a long-lasting influence on the risk of not only gastrointestinal disease, but also allergic, autoimmune and metabolic disease, in later life. Modulating early host-microbe interaction by maternal probiotic intervention during pregnancy and breastfeeding offers a promising novel tool to reduce the risk of disease. In this Review, we describe the current body of knowledge regarding perinatal microbial contact, initial intestinal colonization and its association with human disease, as well as means of modulating early host-microbe interaction to reduce the risk of disease in the child.

  16. Human gut-on-a-chip inhabited by microbial flora that experiences intestinal peristalsis-like motions and flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Huh, Dongeun; Hamilton, Geraldine; Ingber, Donald E

    2012-06-21

    Development of an in vitro living cell-based model of the intestine that mimics the mechanical, structural, absorptive, transport and pathophysiological properties of the human gut along with its crucial microbial symbionts could accelerate pharmaceutical development, and potentially replace animal testing. Here, we describe a biomimetic 'human gut-on-a-chip' microdevice composed of two microfluidic channels separated by a porous flexible membrane coated with extracellular matrix (ECM) and lined by human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells that mimics the complex structure and physiology of living intestine. The gut microenvironment is recreated by flowing fluid at a low rate (30 μL h(-1)) producing low shear stress (0.02 dyne cm(-2)) over the microchannels, and by exerting cyclic strain (10%; 0.15 Hz) that mimics physiological peristaltic motions. Under these conditions, a columnar epithelium develops that polarizes rapidly, spontaneously grows into folds that recapitulate the structure of intestinal villi, and forms a high integrity barrier to small molecules that better mimics whole intestine than cells in cultured in static Transwell models. In addition, a normal intestinal microbe (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG) can be successfully co-cultured for extended periods (>1 week) on the luminal surface of the cultured epithelium without compromising epithelial cell viability, and this actually improves barrier function as previously observed in humans. Thus, this gut-on-a-chip recapitulates multiple dynamic physical and functional features of human intestine that are critical for its function within a controlled microfluidic environment that is amenable for transport, absorption, and toxicity studies, and hence it should have great value for drug testing as well as development of novel intestinal disease models.

  17. Review article: the human intestinal virome in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carding, S R; Davis, N; Hoyles, L

    2017-11-01

    The human virome consists of animal-cell viruses causing transient infections, bacteriophage (phage) predators of bacteria and archaea, endogenous retroviruses and viruses causing persistent and latent infections. High-throughput, inexpensive, sensitive sequencing methods and metagenomics now make it possible to study the contribution dsDNA, ssDNA and RNA virus-like particles make to the human virome, and in particular the intestinal virome. To review and evaluate the pioneering studies that have attempted to characterise the human virome and generated an increased interest in understanding how the intestinal virome might contribute to maintaining health, and the pathogenesis of chronic diseases. Relevant virome-related articles were selected for review following extensive language- and date-unrestricted, electronic searches of the literature. The human intestinal virome is personalised and stable, and dominated by phages. It develops soon after birth in parallel with prokaryotic communities of the microbiota, becoming established during the first few years of life. By infecting specific populations of bacteria, phages can alter microbiota structure by killing host cells or altering their phenotype, enabling phages to contribute to maintaining intestinal homeostasis or microbial imbalance (dysbiosis), and the development of chronic infectious and autoimmune diseases including HIV infection and Crohn's disease, respectively. Our understanding of the intestinal virome is fragmented and requires standardised methods for virus isolation and sequencing to provide a more complete picture of the virome, which is key to explaining the basis of virome-disease associations, and how enteric viruses can contribute to disease aetiologies and be rationalised as targets for interventions. © 2017 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. In silico vs. in vivo human intestinal permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idkaidek, N M; Najib, N

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research is to calculate human intestinal permeability in silico and correlate results with those measured in vivo. Optimized human intestinal permeability values were calculated for 16 drugs by de-convolution of human plasma profiles using Parameter Estimation module of SimCYP program V13. Results showed high in silico-in vivo correlation coefficient of 0.89 for drugs with high/low permeability values. In silico permeability, if properly optimized, can be used as surrogate for in vivo permeability for BCS class I drugs and hence is suggested that such methodology could be employed as a support for waiver of in vivo studies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Optimization of micro-fabricated porous membranes for intestinal epithelial cell culture and in vitro modeling of the human intestinal barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair Gourikutty Sajay, Bhuvanendran; Yin, Chiam Su; Ramadan, Qasem

    2017-12-01

    In vitro modeling of organs could provide a controlled platform for studying physiological events and has great potential in the field of pharmaceutical development. Here, we describe the characterization of in vitro modeling of the human intestinal barrier mimicked using silicon porous membranes as a substrate. To mimic an intestinal in vivo setup as closely as possible, a porous substrate is required in a dynamic environment for the cells to grow rather than a static setup with an impermeable surface such as a petri dish. In this study, we focus on the detailed characterization of Caco-2 cells cultured on a silicon membrane with different pore sizes as well as the effect of dynamic fluid flow on the model. The porous silicon membrane together with continuous perfusion of liquid applying shear stress on the cells enhances the differentiation of polarized cells by providing access to the both their basal and apical surfaces. Membranes with pore sizes of 0.5–3 µm were used and a shear stress of ~0.03 dyne cm‑2 was created by applying a low flow rate of 20 nl s‑1. By providing these optimized conditions, cells were able to differentiate with columnar morphology, which developed microvilli structures on their apical side and tight junctions between adjacent cells like those in a healthy human intestinal barrier. In this setup, it is possible to study the important cellular functions of the intestine such as transport, absorption and secretion, and thus this model has great potential in drug screening.

  20. Development of the human infant intestinal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chana Palmer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Almost immediately after a human being is born, so too is a new microbial ecosystem, one that resides in that person's gastrointestinal tract. Although it is a universal and integral part of human biology, the temporal progression of this process, the sources of the microbes that make up the ecosystem, how and why it varies from one infant to another, and how the composition of this ecosystem influences human physiology, development, and disease are still poorly understood. As a step toward systematically investigating these questions, we designed a microarray to detect and quantitate the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA gene sequences of most currently recognized species and taxonomic groups of bacteria. We used this microarray, along with sequencing of cloned libraries of PCR-amplified SSU rDNA, to profile the microbial communities in an average of 26 stool samples each from 14 healthy, full-term human infants, including a pair of dizygotic twins, beginning with the first stool after birth and continuing at defined intervals throughout the first year of life. To investigate possible origins of the infant microbiota, we also profiled vaginal and milk samples from most of the mothers, and stool samples from all of the mothers, most of the fathers, and two siblings. The composition and temporal patterns of the microbial communities varied widely from baby to baby. Despite considerable temporal variation, the distinct features of each baby's microbial community were recognizable for intervals of weeks to months. The strikingly parallel temporal patterns of the twins suggested that incidental environmental exposures play a major role in determining the distinctive characteristics of the microbial community in each baby. By the end of the first year of life, the idiosyncratic microbial ecosystems in each baby, although still distinct, had converged toward a profile characteristic of the adult gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Development of the human infant intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Chana; Bik, Elisabeth M; DiGiulio, Daniel B; Relman, David A; Brown, Patrick O

    2007-07-01

    Almost immediately after a human being is born, so too is a new microbial ecosystem, one that resides in that person's gastrointestinal tract. Although it is a universal and integral part of human biology, the temporal progression of this process, the sources of the microbes that make up the ecosystem, how and why it varies from one infant to another, and how the composition of this ecosystem influences human physiology, development, and disease are still poorly understood. As a step toward systematically investigating these questions, we designed a microarray to detect and quantitate the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene sequences of most currently recognized species and taxonomic groups of bacteria. We used this microarray, along with sequencing of cloned libraries of PCR-amplified SSU rDNA, to profile the microbial communities in an average of 26 stool samples each from 14 healthy, full-term human infants, including a pair of dizygotic twins, beginning with the first stool after birth and continuing at defined intervals throughout the first year of life. To investigate possible origins of the infant microbiota, we also profiled vaginal and milk samples from most of the mothers, and stool samples from all of the mothers, most of the fathers, and two siblings. The composition and temporal patterns of the microbial communities varied widely from baby to baby. Despite considerable temporal variation, the distinct features of each baby's microbial community were recognizable for intervals of weeks to months. The strikingly parallel temporal patterns of the twins suggested that incidental environmental exposures play a major role in determining the distinctive characteristics of the microbial community in each baby. By the end of the first year of life, the idiosyncratic microbial ecosystems in each baby, although still distinct, had converged toward a profile characteristic of the adult gastrointestinal tract.

  2. Polar bear attacks on humans: Implications of a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, James; Vongraven, Dag; Atwood, Todd C.; Hansen, Bob; Jessen, Amalie; Kochnev, Anatoly A.; York, Geoff; Vallender, Rachel; Hedman, Daryll; Gibbons, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Understanding causes of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) attacks on humans is critical to ensuring both human safety and polar bear conservation. Although considerable attention has been focused on understanding black (U. americanus) and grizzly (U. arctos) bear conflicts with humans, there have been few attempts to systematically collect, analyze, and interpret available information on human-polar bear conflicts across their range. To help fill this knowledge gap, a database was developed (Polar Bear-Human Information Management System [PBHIMS]) to facilitate the range-wide collection and analysis of human-polar bear conflict data. We populated the PBHIMS with data collected throughout the polar bear range, analyzed polar bear attacks on people, and found that reported attacks have been extremely rare. From 1870–2014, we documented 73 attacks by wild polar bears, distributed among the 5 polar bear Range States (Canada, Greenland, Norway, Russia, and United States), which resulted in 20 human fatalities and 63 human injuries. We found that nutritionally stressed adult male polar bears were the most likely to pose threats to human safety. Attacks by adult females were rare, and most were attributed to defense of cubs. We judged that bears acted as a predator in most attacks, and that nearly all attacks involved ≤2 people. Increased concern for both human and bear safety is warranted in light of predictions of increased numbers of nutritionally stressed bears spending longer amounts of time on land near people because of the loss of their sea ice habitat. Improved conflict investigation is needed to collect accurate and relevant data and communicate accurate bear safety messages and mitigation strategies to the public. With better information, people can take proactive measures in polar bear habitat to ensure their safety and prevent conflicts with polar bears. This work represents an important first step towards improving our understanding of factors influencing

  3. Intestinal, extra-intestinal and systemic sequelae of Toxoplasma gondii induced acute ileitis in mice harboring a human gut microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Klitzing, Eliane; Ekmekciu, Ira; Kühl, Anja A.; Bereswill, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background Within seven days following peroral high dose infection with Toxoplasma gondii susceptible conventionally colonized mice develop acute ileitis due to an underlying T helper cell (Th) -1 type immunopathology. We here addressed whether mice harboring a human intestinal microbiota developed intestinal, extra-intestinal and systemic sequelae upon ileitis induction. Methodology/Principal findings Secondary abiotic mice were generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and associated with a complex human intestinal microbiota following peroral fecal microbiota transplantation. Within three weeks the human microbiota had stably established in the murine intestinal tract as assessed by quantitative cultural and culture-independent (i.e. molecular 16S rRNA based) methods. At day 7 post infection (p.i.) with 50 cysts of T. gondii strain ME49 by gavage human microbiota associated (hma) mice displayed severe clinical, macroscopic and microscopic sequelae indicating acute ileitis. In diseased hma mice increased numbers of innate and adaptive immune cells within the ileal mucosa and lamina propria and elevated intestinal secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators including IFN-γ, IL-12 and nitric oxide could be observed at day 7 p.i. Ileitis development was accompanied by substantial shifts in intestinal microbiota composition of hma mice characterized by elevated total bacterial loads and increased numbers of intestinal Gram-negative commensals such as enterobacteria and Bacteroides / Prevotella species overgrowing the small and large intestinal lumen. Furthermore, viable bacteria translocated from the inflamed ileum to extra-intestinal including systemic compartments. Notably, pro-inflammatory immune responses were not restricted to the intestinal tract as indicated by increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in extra-intestinal (i.e. liver and kidney) and systemic compartments including spleen and serum. Conclusion/Significance With respect to the intestinal

  4. Conversion of dehydrodiferulic acids by human intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braune, Annett; Bunzel, Mirko; Yonekura, Reiko; Blaut, Michael

    2009-04-22

    Plant cell wall associated dehydrodiferulic acids (DFA) are abundant components of cereal insoluble dietary fibers ingested by humans. The ability of human intestinal microbiota to convert DFA was studied in vitro by incubating 8-O-4- and 5-5-coupled DFA with fecal suspensions. 8-O-4-DFA was completely degraded by the intestinal microbiota of the majority of donors, yielding homovanillic acid, 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)propionic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid as the main metabolites. The transient formation of ferulic acid and presumably 3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)pyruvic acid suggests an initial cleavage of the ether bond. In contrast to 8-O-4-DFA, the 5-5-coupled DFA was not cleaved into monomers by any of the fecal suspensions. Only the side chains were hydrogenated and the methoxy groups were demethylated. The cleavage of DFA by human intestinal microbiota, which depended on their coupling type, may affect both the bioavailability of DFA and the degradability of DFA-coupled fiber in the gut.

  5. An Ecological Network of Polysaccharide Utilization Among Human Intestinal Symbionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Coyne, Michael J.; Comstock, Laurie E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background: The human intestine is colonized with trillions of microorganisms important to health and disease. There has been an intensive effort to catalog the species and genetic content of this microbial ecosystem. However, little is known of the ecological interactions between these microbes, a prerequisite to understanding the dynamics and stability of this host-associated microbial community. Here we perform a systematic investigation of public goods-based syntrophic interactions among the abundant human gut bacteria, the Bacteroidales. Results: We find evidence for a rich interaction network based on the breakdown and use of polysaccharides. Species that utilize a particular polysaccharide (producers) liberate polysaccharide breakdown products (PBP) that are consumed by other species unable to grow on the polysaccharide alone (recipients). Cross-species gene addition experiments demonstrate that recipients can grow on a polysaccharide if the producer-derived glycoside hydrolase, responsible for PBP generation, is provided. These producer-derived glycoside hydrolases are public goods transported extracellularly in outer membrane vesicles allowing for the creation of PBP and concomitant recipient growth spatially distant from the producer. Recipients can exploit these ecological interactions and conditionally outgrow producers. Finally, we show that these public good-based interactions occur among Bacteroidales species co-resident within a natural human intestinal community. Conclusions: This study examines public-goods based syntrophic interactions between bacterial members of the critically important gut microbial ecosystem. This polysaccharide-based network likely represents foundational relationships creating organized ecological units within the intestinal microbiota, knowledge of which can be applied to impact human health. PMID:24332541

  6. Human Milk Hyaluronan Enhances Innate Defense of the Intestinal Epithelium*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David R.; Rho, Hyunjin K.; Kessler, Sean P.; Amin, Ripal; Homer, Craig R.; McDonald, Christine; Cowman, Mary K.; de la Motte, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast-feeding is associated with enhanced protection from gastrointestinal disease in infants, mediated in part by an array of bioactive glycan components in milk that act through molecular mechanisms to inhibit enteric pathogen infection. Human milk contains hyaluronan (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polymer found in virtually all mammalian tissues. We have shown that synthetic HA of a specific size range promotes expression of antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelium. We hypothesize that hyaluronan from human milk also enhances innate antimicrobial defense. Here we define the concentration of HA in human milk during the first 6 months postpartum. Importantly, HA isolated from milk has a biological function. Treatment of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA at physiologic concentrations results in time- and dose-dependent induction of the antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin 2 and is abrogated by digestion of milk HA with a specific hyaluronidase. Milk HA induction of human β-defensin 2 expression is also reduced in the presence of a CD44-blocking antibody and is associated with a specific increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting a role for the HA receptor CD44. Furthermore, oral administration of human milk-derived HA to adult, wild-type mice results in induction of the murine Hβ D2 ortholog in intestinal mucosa and is dependent upon both TLR4 and CD44 in vivo. Finally, treatment of cultured colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA enhances resistance to infection by the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Together, our observations suggest that maternally provided HA stimulates protective antimicrobial defense in the newborn. PMID:23950179

  7. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Erkus, Oylum; Boekhorst, Jos; de Goffau, Marcus; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-08-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed abundant populations of Streptococcus spp. most affiliated with S. salivarius, S. thermophilus, and S. parasanguinis, as well as Veillonella spp. affiliated with V. atypica, V. parvula, V. dispar, and V. rogosae. Relative abundances varied per subject and time of sampling. Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates were cultured using selective media from ileostoma effluent samples collected at two time points from a single subject. The richness of the Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates was assessed at species and strain level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and genetic fingerprinting, respectively. A total of 160 Streptococcus and 37 Veillonella isolates were obtained. Genetic fingerprinting differentiated seven Streptococcus lineages from ileostoma effluent, illustrating the strain richness within this ecosystem. The Veillonella isolates were represented by a single phylotype. Our study demonstrated that the small intestinal Streptococcus populations displayed considerable changes over time at the genetic lineage level because only representative strains of a single Streptococcus lineage could be cultivated from ileostoma effluent at both time points. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Human milk and infant intestinal mucosal glycans guide succession of the neonatal intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburg, David S; Morelli, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Infants begin acquiring intestinal microbiota at parturition. Initial colonization by pioneer bacteria is followed by active succession toward a dynamic ecosystem. Keystone microbes engage in reciprocal transkingdom communication with the host, which is essential for human homeostasis and health; therefore, these bacteria should be considered mutualists rather than commensals. This review discusses the maternal role in providing infants with functional and stable microbiota. The initial fecal inoculum of microbiota results from the proximity of the birth canal and anus; the biological significance of this anatomic proximity could underlie observed differences in microbiota between vaginal and cesarean birth. Secondary sources of inocula include mouths and skin of kin, animals and objects, and the human milk microbiome, but guiding microbial succession may be a primary role of human milk. The unique glycans of human milk cannot be digested by the infant, but are utilized by mutualist bacteria. These prebiotic glycans support expansion of mutualist microbiota, which manifests as differences in microbiota among breastfed and artificially fed infants. Human milk glycans vary by maternal genotype. Milks of genetically distinct mothers and variations in infant mucosal glycan expression support discrete microbiota. Early colonization may permanently influence microbiota composition and function, with ramifications for health.

  9. Establishment and Characterization of a Novel Caco-2 Subclone with a Similar Low Expression Level of Human Carboxylesterase 1 to Human Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohura, Kayoko; Nishiyama, Hikaru; Saco, Saori; Kurokawa, Keisuke; Imai, Teruko

    2016-12-01

    Caco-2 cells predominantly express human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1), unlike the human intestine that predominantly expresses human carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2). Transport experiments using Caco-2 cell monolayers often lead to misestimation of the intestinal absorption of prodrugs because of this difference, as prodrugs designed to increase the bioavailability of parent drugs are made to be resistant to hCE2 in the intestine, so that they can be hydrolyzed by hCE1 in the liver. In the present study, we tried to establish a new Caco-2 subclone, with a similar pattern of carboxylase expression to human intestine, to enable a more accurate estimation of the intestinal absorption of prodrugs. Although no subclone could be identified with high expression levels of only hCE2, two subclones, #45 and #78, with extremely low expression levels of hCE1 were subcloned from parental Caco-2 cells by the limiting dilution technique. Unfortunately, subclone #45 did not form enterocyte-like cell monolayers due to low expression of claudins and β-actin. However, subclone #78 formed polarized cell monolayers over 4 weeks and showed similar paracellular and transcellular transport properties to parental Caco-2 cell monolayers. In addition, the intestinal transport of oseltamivir, a hCE1 substrate, could be evaluated in subclone #78 cell monolayers, including P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux under nonhydrolysis conditions, unlike parental Caco-2 cells. Consequently, it is proposed that subclone #78 may provide a more effective system in which to evaluate the intestinal absorption of prodrugs that are intended to be hydrolyzed by hCE1. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. Enrichment of sulfidogenic bacteria from the human intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuan; Stams, Alfons J M; de Vos, Willem M; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is formed in the human intestinal tract as the end product of the anaerobic microbial degradation of sulfur compounds present in mucus, bile or proteins. Since human gut microbial sulfur metabolism has been poorly characterized, we aimed to identify and isolate the microorganisms involved in sulfide formation. Fresh fecal samples from one healthy donor and one diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome were used as inocula for enrichments that were supplemented with sulfate or sulfite as electron acceptors in combination with different electron donors. After two transfers, cultures with high sulfide production were selected and the phylogenetic composition of the enriched microbial communities was determined. Sulfite respiration and cysteine degradation were the dominant sulfidogenic processes, and the most abundant bacteria enriched belonged to Bilophila and Clostridium cluster XIVa. Different isolates were obtained and remarkably included a novel sulfite reducer, designated strain 2C. Strain 2C belongs to the Veillonellaceae family of Firmicutes phylum and showed limited (91%) 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with that of known Sporomusa species and hence may represent a novel genus. This study indicates that bacteria that utilize sulfite and organic sulfur compounds rather than merely sulfate are relevant for human intestinal sulfur metabolism. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Electromagnetic radiation from ingested sources in the human intestine between 150 MHz and 1.2 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirwa, Lawrence C; Hammond, Paul A; Roy, Scott; Cumming, David R S

    2003-04-01

    The conventional method of diagnosing disorders of the human gastro-intestinal (GI) tract is by sensors embedded in cannulae that are inserted through the anus, mouth, or nose. However, these cannulae cause significant patient discomfort and cannot be used in the small intestine. As a result, there is considerable ongoing work in developing wireless sensors that can be used in the small intestine. The radiation characteristics of sources in the GI tract cannot be readily calculated due to the complexity of the human body and its composite tissues, each with different electrical characteristics. In addition, the compact antennas used are electrically small, making them inefficient radiators. This paper presents radiation characteristics for sources in the GI tract that should allow for the optimum design of more efficient telemetry systems. The characteristics are determined using the finite-difference time-domain method with a realistic antenna model on an established fully segmented human body model. Radiation intensity outside the body was found to have a Gaussian-form relationship with frequency. Maximum radiation occurs between 450 and 900 MHz. The gut region was found generally to inhibit vertically polarized electric fields more than horizontally polarized fields.

  12. Trichinella and polar bears: a limited risk for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupouy-Camet, J; Bourée, P; Yera, H

    2017-07-01

    In this review, we identified 63 cases reported since World War II of human trichinellosis linked to the consumption of parasitized polar bear (Ursus maritimus) meat. This low number contrasts to the numerous cases of human trichinellosis related to consumption of the meat of black (U. americanus) or brown bears (U. arctos). The prevalence of Trichinella infection is high in bears, but larval muscular burden is usually lower in polar bears compared to other bear species. Polar bears, therefore, seem to play a limited role in the transmission of trichinellosis to humans, as native residents living in the Arctic traditionally consume well-cooked bear meat, and travellers and foreign hunters have only limited access to this protected species due to the declining polar bear population.

  13. [Human intestinal parasitosis: role of Dientamoeba fragilis in human infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotti, D; D'Annibale, M L

    2007-01-01

    The Authors report prevalences of intestinal parasitosis among home children and adults during 2002-2004, as in O&P as in acute or prolonged diarrhoea, with particular attention to the role of Dientamoeba fragilis, because often undervalued. Among 3139 subjects, 116 cases of dientamoebiasis (3.7%) and 62 of giardiasis (2.0%) were observed; not typical pathogenic protozoa were reported in 71 cases (2.3%); helminths were identified only in 8 cases (0.5%). Particularly, inside O&P group D. fragilis prevailed in 5.2% of cases (7.8% in adults and 0.5% in children) and G. duodenalis in 2.7% (3.5% and 1.3% respectively); inside acute diarrhoeas D. fragilis prevailed in 1.6% (3.9% and 0.3%) and G. duodenalis in 0.6% (1.3% and 0. 1%); inside prolonged diarrhoeas D. fragilis prevailed in 3.5 % (2.6% and 5.4%) and G. duodenalis in 3.9% (5.8% in adults and never in children). D. fragilis was more often observed among adults (6.3% of all) than among children (0.6%), like G. duodenalis (3.1% versus 0.6%). So, 107 strains of D. fragilis (92.2%) and 53 strains of G. duodenalis (85.5%) were identified in adults. D. fragilis was more frequent among females (24/39 cases, 61.5%, in the last year) while G. duodenalis was more frequent in males (13/23 cases, 56.5%). The Authors conclude underlining the importance of a permanent stain, as Giemsa stain, for a good and complete diagnosis of protozoal intestinal infections, particularly for D. fragilis.

  14. First report of human intestinal sarcocystosis in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khieu, Virak; Marti, Hanspeter; Chhay, Saomony; Char, Meng Chuor; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Human intestinal sarcocystosis (HIS), caused by Sarcocystis species, is acquired by eating undercooked meat from sarcocyst-containing cattle (S. hominis, S. heydorni) and pigs (S. suihominis). We report on the detection of human intestinal Sarcocystis infections in a cross-sectional survey of Strongyloides stercoralis in early 2014, in Rovieng District, Preah Vihear Province, northern Cambodia. Among 1081 participants, 108 (10.0%) were diagnosed with Sarcocystis spp. oocysts in stool samples. Males had a significantly higher risk of infection than females (OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9, p=0.001). None of the reported symptoms (abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, muscle pain and itching skin) occurring in the two weeks preceding the examinations were associated with a Sarcocystis infection. Many Sarcocystis cases were found among those who had participated in a wedding celebration and Chinese New Year festivities, where they had consumed raw or insufficiently cooked beef (83.3%) and pork (38.9%) based dishes. This report documents the first HIS cases in Cambodia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Transgenic Expression of Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor LPA2 in Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells Induces Intestinal Dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Yoshida

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA acts on LPA2 receptor to mediate multiple pathological effects that are associated with tumorigenesis. The absence of LPA2 attenuates tumor progression in rodent models of colorectal cancer, but whether overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to malignant transformation in the intestinal tract has not been studied. In this study, we expressed human LPA2 in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs under control of the villin promoter. Less than 4% of F1-generation mice had germline transmission of transgenic (TG human LPA2; as such only 3 F1 mice out of 72 genotyped had TG expression. These TG mice appeared anemic with hematochezia and died shortly after birth. TG mice were smaller in size compared with the wild type mouse of the same age and sex. Morphological analysis showed that TG LPA2 colon had hyper-proliferation of IECs resulting in increased colonic crypt depth. Surprisingly, TG small intestine had villus blunting and decreased IEC proliferation and dysplasia. In both intestine and colon, TG expression of LPA2 compromised the terminal epithelial differentiation, consistent with epithelial dysplasia. Furthermore, we showed that epithelial dysplasia was observed in founder mouse intestine, correlating LPA2 overexpression with epithelial dysplasia. The current study demonstrates that overexpression of LPA2 alone can lead to intestinal dysplasia.

  16. Polarized spectral features of human breast tissues through wavelet ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Fluorescence characteristics of human breast tissues are investigated through wavelet transform and principal component analysis (PCA). Wavelet transform of polarized fluorescence spectra of human breast tissues is found to localize spectral features that can reliably differentiate different tissue types.

  17. INTESTINAL VIROME AND NORMAL MICROFLORA OF HUMAN: FEATURES OF INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobyr V.V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Intestinal bacteria defend the host organism and narrow pathogenic bacterial colonization. However, the microbiome effect to enteric viruses is unexplored largely as well as role of microbiota in the pathogenesis of viral infections in general. This review focuses on precisely these issues. Keywords: microbiome, virome, normal microflora, enteric viruses, contagiousness. In this review article, facts about viral persistence in the human gut are summarized. It is described the role of viral populations during health and diseases. After analyzing of the literary facts it was concluded that the gastrointestinal tract is an environment for one from the most complex microbial ecosystems, which requires of more deeper study of its composition, role in physiological processes, as well as the dynamics of changes under influence of the environment. Normal microflora performs a different important functions providing the physiological homeostasis of the human body, including, in particular, an important role in the human metabolic processes, supporting of homeostasis, limiting of colonization by infectious bacteria. The multifactorial significance of the normal gastrointestinal microflora can be divided into immunological, structural and metabolic functions. At the same time, interaction between intestinal microflora and enteric viruses has not been studied largely. In recent years, much attention is paid to study of viruses-bacteria associations, and it is possible, obtained results should change our understanding of microbiota role in the systematic pathogenesis of the diseases with viral etiology. In contrast to the well-known benefits of normal microflora to the host, the viruses can use intestinal microflora as a trigger for replication at the optimal region. Recent studies give a reason for assumption that depletion of normal microflora with antibiotics can determining the antiviral effect. Thus, the role of commensal bacteria in viral

  18. Intestinal microbiota in human health and disease: the impact of probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Gerritsen, J; Smidt, H.; Rijkers, G. T.; de Vos,

    2011-01-01

    The complex communities of microorganisms that colonise the human gastrointestinal tract play an important role in human health. The development of culture-independent molecular techniques has provided new insights in the composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota. Here, we summarise the present state of the art on the intestinal microbiota with specific attention for the application of high-throughput functional microbiomic approaches to determine the contribution of the intestin...

  19. Common occurrence of antibacterial agents in human intestinal microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima eDrissi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory experiments have revealed many active mechanisms by which bacteria can inhibit the growth of other organisms. Bacteriocins are a diverse group of natural ribosomally-synthesized antimicrobial peptides produced by a wide range of bacteria and which seem to play an important role in mediating competition within bacterial communities. In this study, we have identified and established the structural classification of putative bacteriocins encoded by 317 microbial genomes in the human intestine. On the basis of homologies to available bacteriocin sequences, mainly from lactic acid bacteria, we report the widespread occurrence of bacteriocins across the gut microbiota: 175 bacteriocins were found to be encoded in Firmicutes, 79 in Proteobacteria, 34 in Bacteroidetes and 25 in Actinobacteria. Bacteriocins from gut bacteria displayed wide differences among phyla with regard to class distribution, net positive charge, hydrophobicity and secondary structure, but the α-helix was the most abundant structure. The peptide structures and physiochemical properties of bacteriocins produced by the most abundant bacteria in the gut, the Firmicutes and the Bacteroidetes, seem to ensure low antibiotic activity and participate in permanent intestinal host defence against the proliferation of harmful bacteria. Meanwhile, the potentially harmful bacteria, including the Proteobacteria, displayed highly effective bacteriocins, probably supporting the virulent character of diseases. These findings highlight the eventual role played by bacteriocins in gut microbial competition and their potential place in antibiotic therapy.

  20. NFATc1 regulation of TRAIL expression in human intestinal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingding Wang

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL; Apo2 has been shown to promote intestinal cell differentiation. Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT participates in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes, including differentiation. Here, we examined the role of NFAT in the regulation of TRAIL in human intestinal cells. Treatment with a combination of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA plus the calcium ionophore A23187 (Io increased NFAT activation and TRAIL expression; pretreatment with the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA, an antagonist of NFAT signaling, diminished NFAT activation and TRAIL induction. In addition, knockdown of NFATc1, NFATc2, NFATc3, and NFATc4 blocked PMA/Io increased TRAIL protein expression. Expression of NFATc1 activated TRAIL promoter activity and increased TRAIL mRNA and protein expression. Deletion of NFAT binding sites from the TRAIL promoter did not significantly abrogate NFATc1-increased TRAIL promoter activity, suggesting an indirect regulation of TRAIL expression by NFAT activation. Knockdown of NFATc1 increased Sp1 transcription factor binding to the TRAIL promoter and, importantly, inhibition of Sp1, by chemical inhibition or RNA interference, increased TRAIL expression. These studies identify a novel mechanism for TRAIL regulation by which activation of NFATc1 increases TRAIL expression through negative regulation of Sp1 binding to the TRAIL promoter.

  1. Community and genomic analysis of the human small intestine microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, van den B.

    2013-01-01

      Our intestinal tract is densely populated by different microbes, collectively called microbiota, of which the majority are bacteria. Research focusing on the intestinal microbiota often use fecal samples as a representative of the bacteria that inhabit the end of the large intestine. These

  2. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal in circular muscle of human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Mikkelsen, H B; Qvortrup, Klaus

    1993-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) may be important regulatory cells in gut muscle layers. This study examined ICC within the circular muscle of human small intestine.......Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) may be important regulatory cells in gut muscle layers. This study examined ICC within the circular muscle of human small intestine....

  3. Reevaluation of nitrate and nitrite levels in the human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, R L; Kabir, S H; Cohen, Z; Bruce, W R; Archer, M C

    1981-06-01

    Analyses of human fecal and ileostomy samples by a method that is insensitive and free from interferences indicate that nitrate and nitrite levels in the intestine are lower than reported previously. Fecal nitrate and nitrite concentrations ranged from 0 to 14 mumol/kg (0 to 0.9 ppm) and 5 to 19 mumol/kg (0.3 to 0.9 ppm), respectively. Ileostomy samples contained from 0 to 7 mumol/kg (0 to 0.4 ppm) and 0 to 15 mumol/kg (0 to 0.7 ppm) for nitrate and nitrite, respectively. We also showed that, when deliberately added to feces samples, nitrate and nitrite were destroyed during a two-hr incubation period in a reaction that depended on the presence of microorganisms. The results suggest that conditions in the lower gastrointestinal tract favor denitrification, not nitrification as had been proposed previously.

  4. Functional Metagenomic Investigations of the Human Intestinal Microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Aimee M.; Munck, Christian; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2011-01-01

    of this microbial community, its recalcitrance to standard cultivation, and the immense diversity of its encoded genes has necessitated the development of novel molecular, microbiological, and genomic tools. Functional metagenomics is one such culture-independent technique, used for decades to study environmental...... microorganisms, but relatively recently applied to the study of the human commensal microbiota. Metagenomic functional screens characterize the functional capacity of a microbial community, independent of identity to known genes, by subjecting the metagenome to functional assays in a genetically tractable host....... Here we highlight recent work applying this technique to study the functional diversity of the intestinal microbiota, and discuss how an approach combining high-throughput sequencing, cultivation, and metagenomic functional screens can improve our understanding of interactions between this complex...

  5. [Studies on metabolism of total terpene ketones from Swertia mussotii with human intestinal bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Tian, Cheng-Wang; Wu, Shuai; Yang, Xiu-Wei; Wang, Li-Li; Zhang, Tie-Jun

    2012-12-01

    To study the metabolism of total terpene ketones from Swertia mussotii with human intestinal bacteria. Total terpene ketones were incubated with human intestinal bacteria under an anaerobic environment and at 37 degrees C. The metabolites were extracted by ethyl acetate processing, detected by HPLC-DAD method. A qualitative analysis was made for its metabolites by HPLC-MS. Eight metabolites were detected from total terpene ketones from S. mussotii with human intestinal bacteria, and two of them were preliminarily identified as gentianine and mangiferin aglycon. Total terpene ketones can be metabolized with human intestinal bacteria, which provides basis for experiments on the metabolism process total terpene ketones from S. mussotii with human intestinal bacteria.

  6. Quantitative prediction of intestinal metabolism in humans from a simplified intestinal availability model and empirical scaling factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadono, Keitaro; Akabane, Takafumi; Tabata, Kenji; Gato, Katsuhiko; Terashita, Shigeyuki; Teramura, Toshio

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to establish a practical and convenient method of predicting intestinal availability (F(g)) in humans for highly permeable compounds at the drug discovery stage, with a focus on CYP3A4-mediated metabolism. We constructed a "simplified F(g) model," described using only metabolic parameters, assuming that passive diffusion is dominant when permeability is high and that the effect of transporters in epithelial cells is negligible. Five substrates for CYP3A4 (alprazolam, amlodipine, clonazepam, midazolam, and nifedipine) and four for both CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (nicardipine, quinidine, tacrolimus, and verapamil) were used as model compounds. Observed fraction of drug absorbed (F(a)F(g)) values for these compounds were calculated from in vivo pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters, whereas in vitro intestinal intrinsic clearance (CL(int,intestine)) was determined using human intestinal microsomes. The CL(int,intestine) for the model compounds corrected with that of midazolam was defined as CL(m,index) and incorporated into a simplified F(g) model with empirical scaling factor. Regardless of whether the compound was a P-gp substrate, the F(a)F(g) could be reasonably fitted by the simplified F(g) model, and the value of the empirical scaling factor was well estimated. These results suggest that the effects of P-gp on F(a) and F(g) are substantially minor, at least in the case of highly permeable compounds. Furthermore, liver intrinsic clearance (CL(int,liver)) can be used as a surrogate index of intestinal metabolism based on the relationship between CL(int,liver) and CL(m,index). F(g) can be easily predicted using a simplified F(g) model with the empirical scaling factor, enabling more confident selection of drug candidates with desirable PK profiles in humans.

  7. Differentiation-dependent activation of the human intestinal alkaline phosphatase promoter by HNF-4 in intestinal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Line; Bressendorff, Simon; Troelsen, Jesper T

    2005-01-01

    The intestinal alkaline phosphatase gene (ALPI) encodes a digestive brush-border enzyme, which is highly upregulated during small intestinal epithelial cell differentiation. To identify new putative promoter motifs responsible for the regulation of ALPI expression during differentiation...... of the enterocytes, we have conducted a computer-assisted cis-element search of the proximal human ALPI promoter sequence. A putative recognition site for the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4 was predicted at the positions from -94 to -82 in relation to the translational start site. The ability...

  8. Long Polar Fimbriae participates in the induction of neutrophils transepithelial migration across intestinal cells infected with enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra eVergara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC strains are causative agents of diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis, both diseases associated with intestinal inflammation and cell damage. Several studies have correlated EHEC virulence factors to high levels of intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokines and we have previously described that the Long polar fimbriae (Lpf is involved in the secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8 and up-regulation of genes belonging to the NF-κB pathway using non-polarized epithelial intestinal T84 cells. In the current study, we evaluated the two EHEC O157 Lpf fimbriae (Lpf1 and Lpf2 for their ability to induce intestinal secretion of IL-8 and the activation of IL8, CCL20 and ICAM1 genes on polarized T84 cells. We also determined the participation of Lpf1 and Lpf2 in transepithelial migration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs. Polarized T84 cells infected with EHEC revealed that both, Lpf1 and Lpf2, were required for the secretion of IL-8 and the induction of IL8, CCL20 and ICAM1 genes. Both fimbriae also played a role in the migration of PMNs trough the intestinal cells monolayer. Overall, the present work further demonstrated that the fimbriae Lpf1 and Lpf2 are important bacterial virulence factors that might be involved in the inflammatory responses associated with EHEC infections.

  9. Long polar fimbriae participates in the induction of neutrophils transepithelial migration across intestinal cells infected with enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Alejandra F; Vidal, Roberto M; Torres, Alfredo G; Farfan, Mauricio J

    2014-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains are causative agents of diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis, both diseases associated with intestinal inflammation and cell damage. Several studies have correlated EHEC virulence factors to high levels of intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokines and we have previously described that the Long polar fimbriae (Lpf) is involved in the secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and up-regulation of genes belonging to the NF-κB pathway using non-polarized epithelial intestinal T84 cells. In the current study, we evaluated the two EHEC O157 Lpf fimbriae (Lpf1 and Lpf2) for their ability to induce intestinal secretion of IL-8 and the activation of IL8, CCL20, and ICAM1 genes on polarized T84 cells. We also determined the participation of Lpf1 and Lpf2 in transepithelial migration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Polarized T84 cells infected with EHEC revealed that both, Lpf1 and Lpf2, were required for the secretion of IL-8 and the induction of IL8, CCL20, and ICAM1 genes. Both fimbriae also played a role in the migration of PMNs trough the intestinal cells monolayer. Overall, the present work further demonstrated that the fimbriae Lpf1 and Lpf2 are important bacterial virulence factors that might be involved in the inflammatory responses associated with EHEC infections.

  10. A survey of intestinal parasites including associated risk factors in humans in Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Nidia R; Ríos, Nivia; Mena, Alberto; Fernández, Rigoberto; Perea, Milixa; Manzano-Román, Raúl; Santa-Quiteria, José A Ruiz; Hernández-Gonzalez, Ana; Siles-Lucas, Mar

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are among the most common infections worldwide, leading to illness with serious and long lasting implications in children and immunocompromised people. Transmission of intestinal parasites is more frequent in tropical and sub-tropical areas where sanitation is poor and socioeconomic conditions are deficient. Panama is a country where climate and social conditions could be reflected in a high number of people infected with intestinal parasites. The presence, prevalence, and distribution of intestinal parasites in this country have been approached to date only in very restricted areas and population groups, but the impact of intestinal parasite infections at the national level is unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional survey between 2008 and 2010 to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites across Panama. Overall, 14 municipalities in seven provinces of Panama were surveyed. The presence of eggs, cysts, and larvae was assessed by microscopy in 1123 human fecal samples using a concentration technique. A questionnaire to identify risk factors associated with the frequency of intestinal parasites in the study population was also prepared and performed. Overall, 47.4% of human samples presented parasites. Variables including community type, age group, occupation, co-presence of commensals and socioeconomic factors (use of shoes and type of sanitation) were significantly associated with intestinal parasites (pPanama, place intestinal parasitism as a major health problem in this country. Specific interventions should be planned for the indigenous population, the group most afflicted by intestinal parasites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A role for interleukin-33 in T(H)2-polarized intestinal inflammation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, J B; Rogler, G; Nielsen, O H

    2011-01-01

    to the ST2/IL-1 receptor accessory protein complex. Recent studies have shown IL-33 to be upregulated in intestinal parasite infection and in epithelial cells and myofibroblasts in ulcerative colitis (UC). The findings point to a role for IL-33 in directing the T(H)2-type immune responses in these types...

  12. Human intestinal dendritic cells as controllers of mucosal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bernardo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are the most potent, professional antigen-presenting cells in the body; following antigen presentation they control the type (proinflammatory/regulatory of immune response that will take place, as well as its location. Given their high plasticity and maturation ability in response to local danger signals derived from innate immunity, dendritic cells are key actors in the connection between innate immunity and adaptive immunity responses. In the gut dendritic cells control immune tolerance mechanisms against food and/or commensal flora antigens, and are also capable of initiating an active immune response in the presence of invading pathogens. Dendritic cells are thus highly efficient in controlling the delicate balance between tolerance and immunity in an environment so rich in antigens as the gut, and any factor involving these cells may impact their function, ultimately leading to the development of bowel conditions such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease. In this review we shall summarize our understanding of human intestinal dendritic cells, their ability to express and induce migration markers, the various environmental factors modulating their properties, their subsets in the gut, and the problems entailed by their study, including identification strategies, differences between humans and murine models, and phenotypical variations along the gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Small intestinal MUC2 synthesis in human preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, Maaike W.; de Bruijn, Adrianus C. J. M.; Schierbeek, Henk; Tibboel, Dick; Renes, Ingrid B.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2009-01-01

    Mucin 2 (MUC2) is the structural component of the intestinal protective mucus layer, which contains high amounts of threonine in its peptide backbone. MUC2 synthesis rate might be a potential parameter for intestinal barrier function. In this study, we aimed to determine whether systemic threonine

  14. Effect of Electronic Polarization to Human α-Thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Li-Li; Li, Zong-Chao; He, Xiang; Zhang, Qing-Gang

    2014-04-01

    The polarized protein-specific charges (PPC) of human α-thrombin (thrombin) and its inhibitor (L86) are made possible by employing the recently developed molecular fractionation with conjugate caps approach incorporated the Poisson—Boltzmann model. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of thrombin have been carried out to investigate the dynamics and stability of the thrombin-inhibitor using PPC and AMBER charges respectively. Detailed analysis and comparison of MD results show that the PPC can correctly describe the polarized state of the thrombin and L86. Especially, the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms and the hydrogen bonds using PPC are more stable than the AMBER charge. The present results indicate that protein polarization plays critical roles in maintaining the compact structure of thrombin.

  15. Human mini-guts: new insights into intestinal physiology and host–pathogen interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Julie G.; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; Estes, Mary K.; Zachos, Nicholas C.; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The development of indefinitely propagating human ‘mini-guts’ has led to a rapid advance in gastrointestinal research related to transport physiology, developmental biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology. These mini-guts, also called enteroids or colonoids, are derived from LGR5+ intestinal stem cells isolated from the small intestine or colon. Addition of WNT3A and other growth factors promotes stemness and results in viable, physiologically functional human intestinal or colonic cultures that develop a crypt–villus axis and can be differentiated into all intestinal epithelial cell types. The success of research using human enteroids has highlighted the limitations of using animals or in vitro, cancer-derived cell lines to model transport physiology and pathophysiology. For example, curative or preventive therapies for acute enteric infections have been limited, mostly due to the lack of a physiological human intestinal model. However, the human enteroid model enables specific functional studies of secretion and absorption in each intestinal segment as well as observations of the earliest molecular events that occur during enteric infections. This Review describes studies characterizing these human mini-guts as a physiological model to investigate intestinal transport and host pathogen interactions. PMID:27677718

  16. Human mini-guts: new insights into intestinal physiology and host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Julie G; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; Estes, Mary K; Zachos, Nicholas C; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The development of indefinitely propagating human 'mini-guts' has led to a rapid advance in gastrointestinal research related to transport physiology, developmental biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology. These mini-guts, also called enteroids or colonoids, are derived from LGR5 + intestinal stem cells isolated from the small intestine or colon. Addition of WNT3A and other growth factors promotes stemness and results in viable, physiologically functional human intestinal or colonic cultures that develop a crypt-villus axis and can be differentiated into all intestinal epithelial cell types. The success of research using human enteroids has highlighted the limitations of using animals or in vitro, cancer-derived cell lines to model transport physiology and pathophysiology. For example, curative or preventive therapies for acute enteric infections have been limited, mostly due to the lack of a physiological human intestinal model. However, the human enteroid model enables specific functional studies of secretion and absorption in each intestinal segment as well as observations of the earliest molecular events that occur during enteric infections. This Review describes studies characterizing these human mini-guts as a physiological model to investigate intestinal transport and host-pathogen interactions.

  17. Human tissue-engineered small intestine forms from postnatal progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Daniel E; Barthel, Erik R; Speer, Allison L; Sala, Frédéric G; Hou, Xiaogang; Torashima, Yasuhiro; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2013-01-01

    Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) represents a potential cure for short bowel syndrome (SBS). We previously reported full-thickness intestine formation using an organoid units-on-scaffold approach in rodent and swine models. Transplanted intestinal xenografts have been documented to survive from human fetal tissue but not from postnatal tissue. We now present the first report of human TESI from postnatal tissue. Organoid units (OU) were prepared from human small bowel resection specimens, loaded onto biodegradable scaffolds and implanted into NOD/SCID gamma chain-deficient mice. After 4 weeks, TESI was harvested and immunostained for β2-microglobulin to identify human tissue, villin for enterocytes, lysozyme for Paneth cells, chromogranin-A for enteroendocrine cells, mucin-2 for goblet cells, smooth muscle actin and desmin to demonstrate muscularis, and S-100 for nerves. All TESI was of human origin. Immunofluorescence staining of human TESI reveals the presence of all four differentiated cell types of mature human small intestine, in addition to the muscularis and the supporting intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts. Nerve tissue is also present. Our technique demonstrates survival, growth, and differentiation of postnatally derived human small intestinal OU into full thickness TESI in murine hosts. This regenerative medicine strategy may eventually assist in the treatment of SBS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Polarized spectral features of human breast tissues through wavelet ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polarized spectral features of human breast tissues. 0. 5. 10. 15. 20. 25. 0. 10. 20. 30. 40. 50 patient number cancer normal. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 0.95. 0.96. 0.97. 0.98. 0.99. 1 levels. Normalized low pass power cancer normal. (a). (b). Figure 1. (a) Standard deviation of percentage fluctuation (of difference of intensities of parallel and ...

  19. Human milk oligosaccharide effects on intestinal function and inflammation after preterm birth in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Stine O.; Martin, Lena; Østergaard, Mette V.

    2017-01-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) may mediate prebiotic and anti-inflammatory effects in newborns. This is particularly important for preterm infants who are highly susceptible to intestinal dysfunction and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We hypothesized that HMO supplementation of infant formu...

  20. Fecal transplant: A safe and sustainable clinical therapy for restoring intestinal microbial balance in human disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieze, A.; de Groot, P. F.; Kootte, R. S.; Knaapen, M.; van Nood, E.; Nieuwdorp, M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested an association between intestinal microbiota composition and human disease, however causality remains to be proven. With hindsight, the application of fecal transplantation (FMT) does indeed suggest a causal relation between interfering with gut microbiota composition

  1. Human Intestinal Parasite Infections In Ishiagu, A Lead Mining Area ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... Abstract. A survey of intestinal parasite infections in a heavy metal (Pb) mining area of Abia State (Ishiagu) was carried out using both direct wet preparation and formal/ether concentration methods.

  2. Dietary fat composition, food matrix and relative polarity modulate the micellarization and intestinal uptake of carotenoids from vegetables and fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashurabad, Purna Chandra; Palika, Ravindranadh; Jyrwa, Yvette Wilda; Bhaskarachary, K; Pullakhandam, Raghu

    2017-02-01

    Dietary fat increases carotenoid bioavailability by facilitating their transfer to the aqueous micellar fraction during digestion. However, the specific effect of both quantity and type of dietary fat required for optimal carotenoid absorption remained unexplored. In the present study, the effect of amount and type of vegetable oils on carotenoid micellarization from carrot, spinach, drumstick leaves and papaya using in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model have been assessed. Although, dietary fat (0.5-10% w/w) significantly increased the micellarization of carotenoids from all the test foods, the extent of increase was determined by the food matrix (papaya > drumstick = spinach > carrot) and polarity of carotenoids (lutein > β-carotene = α-carotene > lycopene). Among the dietary fats tested the carotenoid micellarization was twofold to threefold higher with dietary fat rich in unsaturated fatty acids (olive oil = soybean oil = sunflower oil) compared to saturated fatty acids (peanut oil = palm oil > coconut oil). Intestinal cell uptake of lutein exceeded that of β-carotene from micellar fraction of spinach leaves digested with various oils. However, cellular uptake of β-carotene is depended on the carotenoid content in micellar fraction rather than the type of fat used. Together these results suggest that food matrix, polarity of carotenoids and type of dietary fat determines the extent of carotenoid micellarization from vegetables and fruits.

  3. Bioactivities of Milk Polar Lipids in Influencing Intestinal Barrier Integrity, Systemic Inflammation, and Lipid Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Albert Lihong

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of lactation is for nutrient provision and also importantly for protection from various environmental stressors. Milk polar lipids reduce cholesterol, protect against bacterial infection, reduce inflammation and help maintain gut integrity. Dynamic interactions within dietary fat, lipid metabolism, gut permeability and inflammatory cytokines remain unclear in the context of obesity and systemic inflammation. A rat model and three mouse models were developed to test the hypotheses ...

  4. Mucosal biofilm communities in the human intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Sandra; Bahrami, Bahram; Macfarlane, George T

    2011-01-01

    Complex and highly variable site-dependent bacterial ecosystems exist throughout the length of the human gastrointestinal tract. Until relatively recently, the majority of our information on intestinal microbiotas has come from studies on feces, or from aspirates taken from the upper gut. However, there is evidence showing that mucosal bacteria growing in biofilms on surfaces lining the gut differ from luminal populations, and that due to their proximity to the epithelial surface, these organisms may be important in modulating the host's immune system and contributing to some chronic inflammatory diseases. Over the past decade, increasing interest in mucosal bacteria, coupled with advances in molecular approaches for assessing microbial diversity, has begun to provide some insight into the complexity of these mucosa-associated communities. In gastrointestinal conditions such as inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease), it has been shown that a dysbiosis exists in microbial community structure, and that there is a reduction in putatively protective mucosal organisms such as bifidobacteria. Therefore, manipulation of mucosal communities may be beneficial in restoring normal functionality in the gut, thereby improving the immune status and general health of the host. Biofilm structure and function has been studied intensively in the oral cavity, and as a consequence, mucosal communities in the mouth will not be covered in this chapter. This review addresses our current knowledge of mucosal populations in the gastrointestinal tract, changes that can occur in community structure in disease, and therapeutic modulation of biofilm composition by antibiotics, prebiotics, and probiotics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A role for interleukin-33 in T(H)2-polarized intestinal inflammation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, J B; Rogler, G; Nielsen, O H

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin 33 (IL-33) is a recently discovered cytokine member of the IL-1 superfamily that is widely expressed in fixed tissue cells, including endothelial and epithelial cells. IL-33 induces helper T cells, mast cells, eosinophils, and basophils to produce type-2 cytokines through binding...... to the ST2/IL-1 receptor accessory protein complex. Recent studies have shown IL-33 to be upregulated in intestinal parasite infection and in epithelial cells and myofibroblasts in ulcerative colitis (UC). The findings point to a role for IL-33 in directing the T(H)2-type immune responses in these types...... of mucosal inflammation. As the IL-33/ST2 receptor axis can be manipulated by various blocking antibodies, this could be a potential therapeutic target in the future treatment of UC....

  6. Laminin receptor 37/67LR regulates adhesion and proliferation of normal human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taoufik Khalfaoui

    Full Text Available Interactions between the cell basal membrane domain and the basement membrane are involved in several cell functions including proliferation, migration and differentiation. Intestinal epithelial cells can interact with laminin, a major intestinal basement membrane glycoprotein, via several cell-surface laminin-binding proteins including integrin and non-integrin receptors. The 37/67kDa laminin receptor (37/67LR is one of these but its role in normal epithelial cells is still unknown. The aim of this study was to characterise the expression pattern and determine the main function of 37/67LR in the normal human small intestinal epithelium. Immunolocalization studies revealed that 37/67LR was predominantly present in the undifferentiated/proliferative region of the human intestinal crypt in both the immature and adult intestine. Using a human intestinal epithelial crypt (HIEC cell line as experimental model, we determined that 37/67LR was expressed in proliferative cells in both the cytoplasmic and membrane compartments. Small-interfering RNA-mediated reduction of 37/67LR expression led to HIEC cell-cycle reduction and loss of the ability to adhere to laminin-related peptides under conditions not altering ribosomal function. Taken together, these findings indicate that 37/67LR regulates proliferation and adhesion in normal intestinal epithelial cells independently of its known association with ribosomal function.

  7. Comparative proteomic analysis of cell lines and scrapings of the human intestinal epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renes Johan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vitro models are indispensable study objects in the fields of cell and molecular biology, with advantages such as accessibility, homogeneity of the cell population, reproducibility, and growth rate. The Caco-2 cell line, originating from a colon carcinoma, is a widely used in vitro model for small intestinal epithelium. Cancer cells have an altered metabolism, making it difficult to infer their representativity for the tissue from which they are derived. This study was designed to compare the protein expression pattern of Caco-2 cells with the patterns of intestinal epithelial cells from human small and large intestine. HT-29 intestinal cells, Hep G2 liver cells and TE 671 muscle cells were included too, the latter two as negative controls. Results Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed on each tissue and cell line protein sample. Principal component and cluster analysis revealed that global expression of intestinal epithelial scrapings differed from that of intestinal epithelial cell lines. Since all cultured cell lines clustered together, this finding was ascribed to an adaptation of cells to culture conditions and their tumor origin, and responsible proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. When investigating the profiles of Caco-2 cells and small intestinal cells in detail, a considerable overlap was observed. Conclusion Numerous proteins showed a similar expression in Caco-2 cells, HT-29 cells, and both the intestinal scrapings, of which some appear to be characteristic to human intestinal epithelium in vivo. In addition, several biologically significant proteins are expressed at comparable levels in Caco-2 cells and small intestinal scrapings, indicating the usability of this in vitro model. Caco-2 cells, however, appear to over-express as well as under-express certain proteins, which needs to be considered by scientists using this cell line. Hence, care should be taken to prevent misinterpretation of

  8. Human Intestinal Microbiota: Interaction Between Parasites and the Host Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partida-Rodríguez, Oswaldo; Serrano-Vázquez, Angélica; Nieves-Ramírez, Miriam E; Moran, Patricia; Rojas, Liliana; Portillo, Tobias; González, Enrique; Hernández, Eric; Finlay, B Brett; Ximenez, Cecilia

    2017-12-28

    The human gut is a highly complex ecosystem with an extensive microbial community, and the influence of the intestinal microbiota reaches the entire host organism. For example, the microbiome regulates fat storage, stimulates or renews epithelial cells, and influences the development and maturation of the brain and the immune system. Intestinal microbes can protect against infection by pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. Hence, the maintenance of homeostasis between the gut microbiota and the rest of the body is crucial for health, with dysbiosis affecting disease. This review focuses on intestinal protozoa, especially those still representing a public health problem in Mexico, and their interactions with the microbiome and the host. The decrease in prevalence of intestinal helminthes in humans left a vacant ecological niche that was quickly occupied by protozoa. Although the mechanisms governing the interaction between intestinal microbiota and protozoa are poorly understood, it is known that the composition of the intestinal bacterial populations modulates the progression of protozoan infection and the outcome of parasitic disease. Most reports on the complex interactions between intestinal bacteria, protozoa and the immune system emphasize the protective role of the microbiota against protozoan infection. Insights into such protection may facilitate the manipulation of microbiota components to prevent and treat intestinal protozoan infections. Here we discuss recent findings about the immunoregulatory effect of intestinal microbiota with regards to intestinal colonization by protozoa, focusing on infections by Entamoeba histolytica, Blastocystis spp, Giardia duodenalis, Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. The possible consequences of the microbiota on parasitic, allergic and autoimmune disorders are also considered. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Immunological quantitation and localization of ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 in human liver and small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C C; Sakashita, N; Ornvold, K; Lee, O; Chang, E T; Dong, R; Lin, S; Lee, C Y; Strom, S C; Kashyap, R; Fung, J J; Farese, R V; Patoiseau, J F; Delhon, A; Chang, T Y

    2000-09-08

    By using specific anti-ACAT-1 antibodies in immunodepletion studies, we previously found that ACAT-1, a 50-kDa protein, plays a major catalytic role in the adult human liver, adrenal glands, macrophages, and kidneys but not in the intestine. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the intestine may be largely derived from a different ACAT protein. To test this hypothesis, we produced specific polyclonal anti-ACAT-2 antibodies that quantitatively immunodepleted human ACAT-2, a 46-kDa protein expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. In hepatocyte-like HepG2 cells, ACAT-1 comprises 85-90% of the total ACAT activity, with the remainder attributed to ACAT-2. In adult intestines, most of the ACAT activity can be immunodepleted by anti-ACAT-2. ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 do not form hetero-oligomeric complexes. In differentiating intestinal enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells, ACAT-2 protein content increases by 5-10-fold in 6 days, whereas ACAT-1 protein content remains relatively constant. In the small intestine, ACAT-2 is concentrated at the apices of the villi, whereas ACAT-1 is uniformly distributed along the villus-crypt axis. In the human liver, ACAT-1 is present in both fetal and adult hepatocytes. In contrast, ACAT-2 is evident in fetal but not adult hepatocytes. Our results collectively suggest that in humans, ACAT-2 performs significant catalytic roles in the fetal liver and in intestinal enterocytes.

  10. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide: a potent activator of human intestinal ion transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, M; Adermann, K; Raab, H R; Forssmann, W G; Kuhn, M

    1996-12-26

    To investigate the effects of PACAP-27 on electrolyte transport across the isolated human intestinal mucosa, changes in short-circuit current (Isc) were measured in Ussing chamber experiments. Serosally added PACAP-27 increased Isc in a concentration-dependent manner, eliciting a similar maximal effect in both the jejunal and the colonic mucosa. Bumetanide inhibited Isc responses, indicating stimulation of Cl- secretion. The potency and efficacy of PACAP-27 were comparable to those of VIP, suggesting that both peptides activate intestinal secretion by way of a common receptor located in the basolateral membrane of the intestinal epithelium.

  11. Associations between common intestinal parasites and bacteria in humans as revealed by qPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Brien Andersen, L.; Karim, A. B.; Roager, Henrik Munch

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown associations between groups of intestinal bacterial or specific ratios between bacterial groups and various disease traits. Meanwhile, little is known about interactions and associations between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in the human gut. In this work, we...... set out to investigate potential associations between common single-celled parasites such as Blastocystis spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis and intestinal bacteria. Stool DNA from patients with intestinal symptoms were selected based on being Blastocystis spp.-positive (B+)/negative (B-) and D. fragilis...

  12. Impact of Diet on Human Intestinal Microbiota and Health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salonen, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Our intestinal microbiota is involved in the breakdown and bioconversion of dietary and host components that are not degraded and taken up by our own digestive system. The end products generated by our microbiota fuel our enterocytes and support growth but also have signaling functions that generate

  13. Study of Human Gastro-Intestinal Parasites Among Primary School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four different intestinal parasites were encountered. The respective infection rates of each parasite were; Ascaris lumbricoides (14.9%), Entamoeba histolytica (13.7%), Trichuris trichiura (6.9%) and hookworms (5.4%). Infections cut across the different age groups and sexes. Infection in males (40.6%) was comparable to ...

  14. SM22 a Plasma Biomarker for Human Transmural Intestinal Ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Dirk H. S. M.; Reisinger, Kostan W.; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Hadfoune, M.'hamed; Olde Damink, Steven W.; Buurman, Wim A.; Dejong, Cornelis H. C.; Derikx, Joep P. M.

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of smooth muscle protein of 22 kDa (SM22) as plasma biomarker for the detection of transmural intestinal ischemia. Acute mesenteric ischemia is an abdominal emergency requiring rapid diagnosis and treatment. Especially, detection of transmural damage is

  15. Uptake of phenolic compounds from plant foods in human intestinal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    19

    Hence, it was proposed to study the differences in the uptake of these compounds using Caco-2. 57 cell line as a model of the intestinal barrier. Although there are various reports on the natural. 58 sources of antioxidants, cereal grains being one among them, information on the bioavailability. 59 of these phenolic ...

  16. Prevalence of Human Intestinal Helminthiasis in Njikoka Area of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These included: Ancyclostoma duodenale, Necator americanus, Enterobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoiides,Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides steroralis, Taenia spp, and Schistosoma mansoni. Of the 1,059 stool specimens examined, 527 were infected giving a prevalence of 49.7%. The prevalence of intestinal helminth ...

  17. Human intestinal parasitism in a rural settlement of northern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pretested questionnaire was administered to the respondents with specific hygienic components such as: sources of drinking water, methods of sewage disposal and water purification among others. Stool samples were collected and analysed microscopically and findings analysed. The overall prevalence of intestinal ...

  18. Lipoxin A4 modulates transmigration of human neutrophils across intestinal epithelial monolayers.

    OpenAIRE

    Colgan, S P; Serhan, C N; Parkos, C A; Delp-Archer, C; Madara, J L

    1993-01-01

    Neutrophil (PMN) migration across intestinal epithelial barriers, such as occurs in many disease states, results in modifications in epithelial barrier. Here, we investigated the impact of lipoxin A4 (LXA4), an eicosanoid with counterregulatory inflammatory roles, on PMN migration across cultured monolayers of the human intestinal epithelial cell line T84. Transepithelial migration of PMN was assessed in the apical-to-basolateral direction and in the basolateral-to-apical direction. In the ap...

  19. Engineered human pluripotent-stem-cell-derived intestinal tissues with a functional enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Michael J; Mahe, Maxime M; Trisno, Stephen; Poling, Holly M; Watson, Carey L; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Chang, Ching-Fang; Schiesser, Jacqueline; Aubert, Philippe; Stanley, Edouard G; Elefanty, Andrew G; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Mandegar, Mohammad A; Conklin, Bruce R; Neunlist, Michel; Brugmann, Samantha A; Helmrath, Michael A; Wells, James M

    2017-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) of the gastrointestinal tract controls many diverse functions, including motility and epithelial permeability. Perturbations in ENS development or function are common, yet there is no human model for studying ENS-intestinal biology and disease. We used a tissue-engineering approach with embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to generate human intestinal tissue containing a functional ENS. We recapitulated normal intestinal ENS development by combining human-PSC-derived neural crest cells (NCCs) and developing human intestinal organoids (HIOs). NCCs recombined with HIOs in vitro migrated into the mesenchyme, differentiated into neurons and glial cells and showed neuronal activity, as measured by rhythmic waves of calcium transients. ENS-containing HIOs grown in vivo formed neuroglial structures similar to a myenteric and submucosal plexus, had functional interstitial cells of Cajal and had an electromechanical coupling that regulated waves of propagating contraction. Finally, we used this system to investigate the cellular and molecular basis for Hirschsprung's disease caused by a mutation in the gene PHOX2B. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of human-PSC-derived intestinal tissue with a functional ENS and how this system can be used to study motility disorders of the human gastrointestinal tract.

  20. Development of Functional Microfold (M Cells from Intestinal Stem Cells in Primary Human Enteroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Rouch

    Full Text Available Intestinal microfold (M cells are specialized epithelial cells that act as gatekeepers of luminal antigens in the intestinal tract. They play a critical role in the intestinal mucosal immune response through transport of viruses, bacteria and other particles and antigens across the epithelium to immune cells within Peyer's patch regions and other mucosal sites. Recent studies in mice have demonstrated that M cells are generated from Lgr5+ intestinal stem cells (ISCs, and that infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium increases M cell formation. However, it is not known whether and how these findings apply to primary human small intestinal epithelium propagated in an in vitro setting.Human intestinal crypts were grown as monolayers with growth factors and treated with recombinant RANKL, and assessed for mRNA transcripts, immunofluorescence and uptake of microparticles and S. Typhimurium.Functional M cells were generated by short-term culture of freshly isolated human intestinal crypts in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. RANKL stimulation of the monolayer cultures caused dramatic induction of the M cell-specific markers, SPIB, and Glycoprotein-2 (GP2 in a process primed by canonical WNT signaling. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a pseudopod phenotype of GP2-positive M cells that preferentially take up microparticles. Furthermore, infection of the M cell-enriched cultures with the M cell-tropic enteric pathogen, S. Typhimurium, led to preferential association of the bacteria with M cells, particularly at lower inoculum sizes. Larger inocula caused rapid induction of M cells.Human intestinal crypts containing ISCs can be cultured and differentiate into an epithelial layer with functional M cells with characteristic morphological and functional properties. This study is the first to demonstrate that M cells can be induced to form from primary human intestinal epithelium, and that S. Typhimurium preferentially infect these cells in an

  1. Assessing DNA methylation in the developing human intestinal epithelium: potential link to inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraiczy, J; Nayak, K; Ross, A; Raine, T; Mak, T N; Gasparetto, M; Cario, E; Rakyan, V; Heuschkel, R; Zilbauer, M

    2016-05-01

    DNA methylation is one of the major epigenetic mechanisms implicated in regulating cellular development and cell-type-specific gene expression. Here we performed simultaneous genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression analysis on purified intestinal epithelial cells derived from human fetal gut, healthy pediatric biopsies, and children newly diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Results were validated using pyrosequencing, real-time PCR, and immunostaining. The functional impact of DNA methylation changes on gene expression was assessed by employing in-vitro assays in intestinal cell lines. DNA methylation analyses allowed identification of 214 genes for which expression is regulated via DNA methylation, i.e. regulatory differentially methylated regions (rDMRs). Pathway and functional analysis of rDMRs suggested a critical role for DNA methylation in regulating gene expression and functional development of the human intestinal epithelium. Moreover, analysis performed on intestinal epithelium of children newly diagnosed with IBD revealed alterations in DNA methylation within genomic loci, which were found to overlap significantly with those undergoing methylation changes during intestinal development. Our study provides novel insights into the physiological role of DNA methylation in regulating functional maturation of the human intestinal epithelium. Moreover, we provide data linking developmentally acquired alterations in the DNA methylation profile to changes seen in pediatric IBD.

  2. Antigen-Presenting Human γδ T Cells Promote Intestinal CD4+ T Cell Expression of IL-22 and Mucosal Release of Calprotectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Christopher J; McCarthy, Neil E; Lindsay, James O; Stagg, Andrew J; Moser, Bernhard; Eberl, Matthias

    2017-05-01

    The cytokine IL-22 plays a critical role in mucosal barrier defense, but the mechanisms that promote IL-22 expression in the human intestine remain poorly understood. As human microbe-responsive Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells are abundant in the gut and recognize microbiota-associated metabolites, we assessed their potential to induce IL-22 expression by intestinal CD4+ T cells. Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells with characteristics of APCs were generated from human blood and intestinal organ cultures, then cocultured with naive and memory CD4+ T cells obtained from human blood or the colon. The potency of blood and intestinal γδ T-APCs was compared with that of monocytes and dendritic cells, by assessing CD4+ T cell phenotypes and proliferation as well as cytokine and transcription factor profiles. Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells in human blood, colon, and terminal ileum acquired APC functions upon microbial activation in the presence of microenvironmental signals including IL-15, and were capable of polarizing both blood and colonic CD4+ T cells toward distinct effector fates. Unlike monocytes or dendritic cells, gut-homing γδ T-APCs employed an IL-6 independent mechanism to stimulate CD4+ T cell expression of IL-22 without upregulating IL-17. In human intestinal organ cultures, microbial activation of Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells promoted mucosal secretion of IL-22 and ICOSL/TNF-α-dependent release of the IL-22 inducible antimicrobial protein calprotectin without modulating IL-17 expression. In conclusion, human γδ T-APCs stimulate CD4+ T cell responses distinct from those induced by myeloid APCs to promote local barrier defense via mucosal release of IL-22 and calprotectin. Targeting of γδ T-APC functions may lead to the development of novel gut-directed immunotherapies and vaccines. Copyright © 2017 The Authors.

  3. Expression, Distribution and Role of Aquaporin Water Channels in Human and Animal Stomach and Intestines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Zhu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stomach and intestines are involved in the secretion of gastrointestinal fluids and the absorption of nutrients and fluids, which ensure normal gut functions. Aquaporin water channels (AQPs represent a major transcellular route for water transport in the gastrointestinal tract. Until now, at least 11 AQPs (AQP1–11 have been found to be present in the stomach, small and large intestines. These AQPs are distributed in different cell types in the stomach and intestines, including gastric epithelial cells, gastric glands cells, absorptive epithelial cells (enterocytes, goblet cells and Paneth cells. AQP1 is abundantly distributed in the endothelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract. AQP3 and AQP4 are mainly distributed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells in the stomach and intestines. AQP7, AQP8, AQP10 and AQP11 are distributed in the apical of enterocytes in the small and large intestines. Although AQP-null mice displayed almost no phenotypes in gastrointestinal tracts, the alterations of the expression and localization of these AQPs have been shown to be associated with the pathology of gastrointestinal disorders, which suggests that AQPs play important roles serving as potential therapeutic targets. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the expression, localization and distribution of AQPs in the stomach, small and large intestine of human and animals. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the potential roles of AQPs in the physiology and pathophysiology of stomach and intestines.

  4. Expression, Distribution and Role of Aquaporin Water Channels in Human and Animal Stomach and Intestines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-08-29

    Stomach and intestines are involved in the secretion of gastrointestinal fluids and the absorption of nutrients and fluids, which ensure normal gut functions. Aquaporin water channels (AQPs) represent a major transcellular route for water transport in the gastrointestinal tract. Until now, at least 11 AQPs (AQP1-11) have been found to be present in the stomach, small and large intestines. These AQPs are distributed in different cell types in the stomach and intestines, including gastric epithelial cells, gastric glands cells, absorptive epithelial cells (enterocytes), goblet cells and Paneth cells. AQP1 is abundantly distributed in the endothelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract. AQP3 and AQP4 are mainly distributed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells in the stomach and intestines. AQP7, AQP8, AQP10 and AQP11 are distributed in the apical of enterocytes in the small and large intestines. Although AQP-null mice displayed almost no phenotypes in gastrointestinal tracts, the alterations of the expression and localization of these AQPs have been shown to be associated with the pathology of gastrointestinal disorders, which suggests that AQPs play important roles serving as potential therapeutic targets. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the expression, localization and distribution of AQPs in the stomach, small and large intestine of human and animals. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the potential roles of AQPs in the physiology and pathophysiology of stomach and intestines.

  5. Human flora-associated (HFA) animals as a model for studying the role of intestinal flora in human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Kikuji

    2005-09-01

    Although the intestinal flora in animals plays an important role in health and disease, there is little direct information regarding the role of the human intestinal flora. By inoculating germfree animals with human faeces, the major components of the human flora can be transferred into the ex-germfree animals, i.e. human flora-associated (HFA) animals. HFA animals therefore provide a stable model for studying the ecosystem and metabolism of the human intestinal flora. Results with HFA animals suggest the role of the human intestinal flora is somewhat different from the role of the animal flora in conventional experimental animals. Studies using HFA animals, therefore, will provide much needed information on the precise role of the intestinal flora in relation to humans. HFA animals also can be used as models to investigate the interactions between the human intestinal flora, host factors, dietary manipulations, and therapeutics, such as probiotics, prebiotics, and antibiotics.

  6. Intestinal microbiota in human health and disease: the impact of probiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, J.; Smidt, H.; Rijkers, G.T.; Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    The complex communities of microorganisms that colonise the human gastrointestinal tract play an important role in human health. The development of culture-independent molecular techniques has provided new insights in the composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota. Here, we summarise the

  7. Analyzing the functionality of the human intestinal microbiota by stable isotope probing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovatcheva, P.P.

    2010-01-01

    Key words: gut bacteria, dietary carbohydrates, digestion, RNA-SIP, TIM-2, HITChip, human trial The human gastro-intestinal (GI) tract comprises a series of complex and dynamic organs ranging from the stomach to the distal colon, which harbor immense microbial assemblages, with considerable

  8. Study of the Biotransformation of Tongmai Formula by Human Intestinal Flora and Its Intestinal Permeability across the Caco-2 Cell Monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuai; Xu, Wei; Wang, Fu-Rong; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2015-10-15

    Tongmai formula (TMF) is a well-known Chinese medicinal preparation that contains isoflavones as its major bioactive constituents. As traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) are usually used by oral administration, their fate inside the intestinal lumen, including their biotransformation by human intestinal flora (HIF) and intestinal absorption deserves study. In this work TMF extract was incubated with human intestinal bacteria under anaerobic conditions and the changes in the twelve main constituents of TMF were then investigated. Their intestinal permeabilities, i.e., the transport capability across the intestinal brush border were investigated with a human colon carcinoma cell line (Caco-2) cell monolayer model to predict the absorption mechanism. Meanwhile, rapid HPLC-DAD methods were established for the assay. According to the biotransformation curves of the twelve constituents and the permeability coefficients, the intestinal absorption capacity of the typical compounds was elevated from the levels of 10(-7) cm/s to 10(-5) cm/s from those of the original compounds in TMF. Among them the main isoflavone glycosides puerarin (4), mirificin (6) and daidzin (7) were transformed into the same aglycone, daidzein (10). Therefore it was predicted that the aglycone compounds might be the real active ingredients in TMF. The models used can represent a novel path for the TCM studies.

  9. Transgenic milk containing recombinant human lactoferrin modulates the intestinal flora in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenping; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Jianwu; Yu, Tian; Wang, Jing; Li, Ning

    2012-06-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a beneficial multifunctional protein in milk. The objective of this study was to determine whether bovine transgenic milk containing recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF) can modulate intestinal flora in the neonatal pig as an animal model for the human infant. We fed 7-day-old piglets (i) ordinary whole milk (OM), (ii) a 1:1 mixture of OM and rhLF milk (MM), or (iii) rhLF milk (LFM). LFM provided better average daily mass gain than OM (P = 0.007). PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rDNA sequencing analysis revealed that the LFM piglets exhibited more diversity of the intestinal flora than the OM group. Except for the colon in the LFM group, an increasing trend in microbial diversity occurred from the duodenum to the colon. Fecal flora was not different across different ages or different treatment groups, but a cluster analysis showed that the fecal flora of OM- and MM-fed piglets had a higher degree of similarity than that of LFM-fed piglets. Based on culture-based bacterial counts of intestinal content samples, concentrations of Salmonella spp. in the colon and of Escherichia coli throughout the intestine were reduced with LFM (P intestine were also increased with LFM (P ≤ 0.01). We suggest that rhLF can modulate the intestinal flora in piglets.

  10. Human intervention study to investigate the intestinal accessibility and bioavailability of anthocyanins from bilberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Dolores; Jung, Kathrin; Winter, Manuel; Rogoll, Dorothee; Melcher, Ralph; Richling, Elke

    2017-09-15

    We investigated the importance of the large intestine on the bioavailability of anthocyanins from bilberries in humans with/without a colon. Low bioavailability of anthocyanins in plasma and urine was observed in the frame of this study. Anthocyanins reached the circulation mainly as glucuronides. Analysis of ileal effluents (at end of small intestine) demonstrated that 30% of ingested anthocyanins were stable during 8h passage through the upper intestine. Only 20% degradants were formed and mostly intact anthocyanins were absorbed from the small intestine. Higher amounts of degradants than anthocyanins reached the circulation after bilberry extract consumption in both groups of subjects. Comparison of the bioavailability of anthocyanins in healthy subjects versus ileostomists revealed substantially higher amounts of anthocyanins and degradants in the plasma/urine of subjects with an intact gut. The results suggested that the colon is a significant site for absorption of bioactive components such as anthocyanins and their degradation products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comprehensive postmortem analyses of intestinal microbiota changes and bacterial translocation in human flora associated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus M Heimesaat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postmortem microbiological examinations are performed in forensic and medical pathology for defining uncertain causes of deaths and for screening of deceased tissue donors. Interpretation of bacteriological data, however, is hampered by false-positive results due to agonal spread of microorganisms, postmortem bacterial translocation, and environmental contamination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a kinetic survey of naturally occurring postmortem gut flora changes in the small and large intestines of conventional and gnotobiotic mice associated with a human microbiota (hfa applying cultural and molecular methods. Sacrificed mice were kept under ambient conditions for up to 72 hours postmortem. Intestinal microbiota changes were most pronounced in the ileal lumen where enterobacteria and enterococci increased by 3-5 orders of magnitude in conventional and hfa mice. Interestingly, comparable intestinal overgrowth was shown in acute and chronic intestinal inflammation in mice and men. In hfa mice, ileal overgrowth with enterococci and enterobacteria started 3 and 24 hours postmortem, respectively. Strikingly, intestinal bacteria translocated to extra-intestinal compartments such as mesenteric lymphnodes, spleen, liver, kidney, and cardiac blood as early as 5 min after death. Furthermore, intestinal tissue destruction was characterized by increased numbers of apoptotic cells and neutrophils within 3 hours postmortem, whereas counts of proliferative cells as well as T- and B-lymphocytes and regulatory T-cells decreased between 3 and 12 hours postmortem. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that kinetics of ileal overgrowth with enterobacteria and enterococci in hfa mice can be used as an indicator for compromized intestinal functionality and for more precisely defining the time point of death under defined ambient conditions. The rapid translocation of intestinal bacteria starting within a few minutes after death will help

  12. Comprehensive postmortem analyses of intestinal microbiota changes and bacterial translocation in human flora associated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimesaat, Markus M; Boelke, Silvia; Fischer, André; Haag, Lea-Maxie; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Kühl, Anja A; Göbel, Ulf B; Bereswill, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Postmortem microbiological examinations are performed in forensic and medical pathology for defining uncertain causes of deaths and for screening of deceased tissue donors. Interpretation of bacteriological data, however, is hampered by false-positive results due to agonal spread of microorganisms, postmortem bacterial translocation, and environmental contamination. We performed a kinetic survey of naturally occurring postmortem gut flora changes in the small and large intestines of conventional and gnotobiotic mice associated with a human microbiota (hfa) applying cultural and molecular methods. Sacrificed mice were kept under ambient conditions for up to 72 hours postmortem. Intestinal microbiota changes were most pronounced in the ileal lumen where enterobacteria and enterococci increased by 3-5 orders of magnitude in conventional and hfa mice. Interestingly, comparable intestinal overgrowth was shown in acute and chronic intestinal inflammation in mice and men. In hfa mice, ileal overgrowth with enterococci and enterobacteria started 3 and 24 hours postmortem, respectively. Strikingly, intestinal bacteria translocated to extra-intestinal compartments such as mesenteric lymphnodes, spleen, liver, kidney, and cardiac blood as early as 5 min after death. Furthermore, intestinal tissue destruction was characterized by increased numbers of apoptotic cells and neutrophils within 3 hours postmortem, whereas counts of proliferative cells as well as T- and B-lymphocytes and regulatory T-cells decreased between 3 and 12 hours postmortem. We conclude that kinetics of ileal overgrowth with enterobacteria and enterococci in hfa mice can be used as an indicator for compromized intestinal functionality and for more precisely defining the time point of death under defined ambient conditions. The rapid translocation of intestinal bacteria starting within a few minutes after death will help to distinguish between relevant bacteria and secondary contaminants thus providing

  13. Development of microfluidic cell culture devices towards an in vitro human intestinal barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin

    Existing in vitro models of the human intestine such as the established epithelial cell line, Caco-2, cultured on porous membranes have been extensively used for assessing and predicting permeability and absorption of oral drugs in the pharmaceutical industries. However, such in vitro human...... the potential to revolutionise the way of in vitro cell culture. In particular, microfluidics provides avenues for researchers to tailor the cellular microenvironment to better mimic the cellcell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions, while at the same time reducing the scale of the experimental studies...... using different compounds on the in vitro human intestinal model in the microfluidic device showed comparable results with static cultures. In addition, a normal commensal intestinal bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) was successfully co-cultured on the luminal surface of the cultured epithelium...

  14. Human Intestinal Tissue with Adult Stem Cell Properties Derived from Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Forster

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetically engineered human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have been proposed as a source for transplantation therapies and are rapidly becoming valuable tools for human disease modeling. However, many applications are limited due to the lack of robust differentiation paradigms that allow for the isolation of defined functional tissues. Here, using an endogenous LGR5-GFP reporter, we derived adult stem cells from hPSCs that gave rise to functional human intestinal tissue comprising all major cell types of the intestine. Histological and functional analyses revealed that such human organoid cultures could be derived with high purity and with a composition and morphology similar to those of cultures obtained from human biopsies. Importantly, hPSC-derived organoids responded to the canonical signaling pathways that control self-renewal and differentiation in the adult human intestinal stem cell compartment. This adult stem cell system provides a platform for studying human intestinal disease in vitro using genetically engineered hPSCs.

  15. Human intestinal capillariasis: A rare case report from non-endemic area (Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P L Vasantha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human intestinal capillariasis is caused by Capillaria philippinensis. This disease is endemic in Philippines and Thailand. To the best of our knowledge, we report the third case of human intestinal capillariasis from India and the first case from Andhra Pradesh, which is a non-endemic area. A 40-year-old female presented with diarrhoea, vomiting, decreased urinary output, ascitis, pedal oedema, hypoalbuminemia, and electrolyte imbalance. Microscopic examination of stool sample revealed the presence of ova, larvae, and adult worms of C. philippinensis. Patient recovered from the disease after taking albendazole 400 mg daily for 1 month along with supportive treatment.

  16. Influenza H5N1 virus infection of polarized human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Kit M

    2009-10-01

    data suggests that viremia, secondary to, for example, gastro-intestinal infection, can potentially lead to infection of the lung. HPAI H5N1 virus was a more potent inducer of cytokines (e.g. IP-10, RANTES, IL-6 in comparison to H1N1 virus in alveolar epithelial cells, and these virus-induced chemokines were secreted onto both the apical and basolateral aspects of the polarized alveolar epithelium. Conclusion The predilection of viruses for different routes of entry and egress from the infected cell is important in understanding the pathogenesis of influenza H5N1 infection and may help unravel the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease.

  17. Intestinal Microbiota Distinguish Gout Patients from Healthy Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhuang; Zhang, Jiachao; Wang, Zhanli; Ang, Kay Ying; Huang, Shi; Hou, Qiangchuan; Su, Xiaoquan; Qiao, Jianmin; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Lifeng; Koh, Eileen; Danliang, Ho; Xu, Jian; Lee, Yuan Kun; Zhang, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Current blood-based approach for gout diagnosis can be of low sensitivity and hysteretic. Here via a 68-member cohort of 33 healthy and 35 diseased individuals, we reported that the intestinal microbiota of gout patients are highly distinct from healthy individuals in both organismal and functional structures. In gout, Bacteroides caccae and Bacteroides xylanisolvens are enriched yet Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum depleted. The established reference microbial gene catalogue for gout revealed disorder in purine degradation and butyric acid biosynthesis in gout patients. In an additional 15-member validation-group, a diagnosis model via 17 gout-associated bacteria reached 88.9% accuracy, higher than the blood-uric-acid based approach. Intestinal microbiota of gout are more similar to those of type-2 diabetes than to liver cirrhosis, whereas depletion of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and reduced butyrate biosynthesis are shared in each of the metabolic syndromes. Thus the Microbial Index of Gout was proposed as a novel, sensitive and non-invasive strategy for diagnosing gout via fecal microbiota. PMID:26852926

  18. [Establishment of nude mice liver metastatic model of human primary malignant melanoma of the small intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuo, Shuai; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Qiu-Zhen

    2008-07-01

    To provide ideal animal models for exploring pathogenesis and experimental therapy of primary malignant melanoma of the small intestine. The histologically intact primary and liver metastatic fragments derived from surgical specimens of one patient with metastatic malignant melanoma of the small intestine were orthotopically implanted in the small intestinal mucous layer of nude mice. The take rate, invasion and liver metastasis were observed. Morphology (light microscopy, electron microscopy), immunophenotype analysis, flow cytometry and karyotype analysis were applied for the original human tumors and the transplanted tumors. The primary and liver metastatic fragments of malignant melanoma of the small intestine were successfully implanted in nude mice. After continuous passages in nude mice,an orthotopic model of human primary malignant melanoma of the small intestine(from the primary focus)in nude mice (termed HSIM-0501) and a liver metastatic model of human primary malignant melanoma of the small intestine (from the liver metastatic focus) in nude mice (termed HSIM-0502) were established. Histological examination of transplanted tumors revealed high-grade melanoma. S-100 protein and HMB45 were positive. Massive melanin granules and melanin complex were seen in cytoplasm of tumor cells.Chromosomal modal number was between 55 and 59. DNA index (DI) was 1.49-1.61, representing heteroploid. HSIM-0501 and HSIM-0502 were maintained for 25 and 27 passages in nude mice respectively. Three hundred and seventeen nude mice were used for transplantation. Both the take rate after transplantation and resuscitation rate of liquid nitrogen cryopreservation were 100%. HSIM-0501 exhibited 46.2% liver metastasis and 36.7% lymph node metastases. In HSIM-0502, both liver and lymph node metastases were 100%.The transplanted tumors autonomically and invasively grew in the small intestines of nude mice and hematogenous metastasis, lymph node metastasis and celiac planting metastasis

  19. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake and transport in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability. In the present study, we measured the uptake and transport of various Se compounds in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. We found that two sources...

  20. Morphological changes in the enteric nervous system caused by carcinoma of the human large intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Godlewski

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The innervations of the large intestine is responsible for it peristalsis and contractibility. Investigations of the enteric nervous system in many colon diseases have revealed changes in this structure. No study has been carried out on morphological changes of the enteric nervous system in the human large intestine with carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate potential changes in the structure of the enteric neurons in patients with sigmoid and rectal cancer. Material for the study was obtained from patients undergoing operations due to carcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectum. Microscopic observation of the cancerous tumor of the human large intestine revealed changes in the enteric nervous system innervating this part of the gastrointestinal tract. In the region of the enteric plexuses located close to the tumour, disruption of their correct placement and structure was observed. The changes also consisted of the disappearance of neurons and nerve fibers forming these plexuses. In the solid cancerous tumour, elements of the enteric nervous system were not present. Destruction of the enteric nervous system in the course of carcinoma of the large intestine may cause disruption of proper intestinal function and may be responsible for part of symptoms which the patients suffer.

  1. Effectiveness of dried Carica papaya seeds against human intestinal parasitosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeniyi, John A O; Ogunlesi, Tinuade A; Oyelami, Oyeku A; Adeyemi, Lateef A

    2007-03-01

    The tropical fruit Carica papaya and its seeds have proven antihelminthic and anti-amoebic activities. To determine the effectiveness of air-dried C. papaya seeds on human intestinal parasitosis, 60 asymptomatic Nigerian children with stool microscopic evidence of intestinal parasites received immediate doses (20 mL) of either an elixir composed with air-dried C. papaya seeds and honey (CPH) or honey alone (placebo) in two randomized treatment groups. Repeat stool microscopic examinations were conducted 7 days postintervention for intestinal parasites. Significantly more subjects given CPH elixir than those given honey had their stools cleared of parasites [23 of 30 (76.7%) vs. five of 30 (16.7%); z = 4.40, P = .0000109]. There were no harmful effects. The stool clearance rate for the various types of parasites encountered was between 71.4% and 100% following CPH elixir treatment compared with 0-15.4% with honey. Thus, air-dried C. papaya seeds are efficacious in treating human intestinal parasites and without significant side effects. Their consumption offers a cheap, natural, harmless, readily available monotherapy and preventive strategy against intestinal parasitosis, especially in tropical communities. Further and large-scale intervention studies to compare C. papaya with standard antiparasitic preparation are desirous.

  2. Microbial Eco-Physiology of the human intestinal tract: a flow cytometric approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amor, Ben K.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a multifaceted approach to further enhance our view of the complex human intestinal microbial ecosystem. This approach combines me advantages of flow cyrometry (FCM), a single cell and high-throughput technology, and molecular techniques that have proven themselves to be

  3. High-throughput analysis of the impact of antibiotics on the human intestinal microbiota composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ladirat, S.E.; Schols, H.A.; Nauta, A.; Schoterman, M.H.C.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Montijn, R.C.; Gruppen, H.; Schuren, F.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic treatments can lead to a disruption of the human microbiota. In this in-vitro study, the impact of antibiotics on adult intestinal microbiota was monitored in a new high-throughput approach: a fermentation screening-platform was coupled with a phylogenetic microarray analysis

  4. Lactobacillus plantarum-survival, functional and potential probiotic properties in the human intestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de M.C.; Vaughan, E.E.; Kleerebezem, M.; Vos, de W.M.

    2006-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a versatile lactic acid bacterium that is encountered in a range of environmental niches, has a proven ability to survive gastric transit, and can colonize the intestinal tract of human and other mammals. Several studies describe the effects of L. plantarum consumption on

  5. Complete amino acid sequence of human intestinal aminopeptidase N as deduced from cloned cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowell, G M; Kønigshøfer, E; Danielsen, E M

    1988-01-01

    The complete primary structure (967 amino acids) of an intestinal human aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) was deduced from the sequence of a cDNA clone. Aminopeptidase N is anchored to the microvillar membrane via an uncleaved signal for membrane insertion. A domain constituting amino acid 250...

  6. ADHESION OF 3 LACTOBACILLUS STRAINS TO HUMAN URINARY AND INTESTINAL EPITHELIAL-CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    REID, G; SERVIN, AL; BRUCE, AW; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1993-01-01

    Three strains of urogenital lactobacilli were found to adhere in phosphate buffered saline to human uroepithelial cells in vitro according to thermodynamic principles, and to adhere in culture medium to intestinal cells with no such correlation. The most hydrophilic strain (water contact angle

  7. Human intestinal flora and the induction of chronic arthritis : studies in an animal model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Severijnen

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe etiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic joint inflammation, is unknown. A microbial involvement is suspected, but no particular microorganism has been incriminated. The human intestinal microflora is an abundant and continuous source of bacterial antigens and may be

  8. Investigation of the interactions between Chrysanthemum morifolium flowers extract and intestinal bacteria from human and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jin-Hua; Duan, Jin-Ao; Qian, Yi-Yun; Qian, Da-Wei; Guo, Jian-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Flos Chrysanthemi, dried flower of Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat, has drawn much attention recently owing to its potential beneficial health effects for human. Flos Chrysanthemi products are usually taken orally and metabolized by intestinal microflora. However, there has been no investigation of the comprehensive metabolic profile of the Flos Chrysanthemi extract by intestinal flora owing to its chemical complexity and the limitations of analytical methods. In this paper, a rapid, sensitive and automated analysis method, ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry including MS E technology and automated data processing Metabolynx™ software, was developed and successfully applied for the biotransformation and metabolic profile of flavonoids in the Flos Chrysanthemi extract by intestinal flora from human and rat. A total of 32 metabolites were detected and tentatively identified in human and rat intestinal bacterial samples. These metabolites indicated that hydrolysis, hydroxylation, acetylation, methylation, hydrogenation and deoxygenation were the major conversion pathways of flavonoids in the Flos Chrysanthemi extract in vitro. Furthermore, the effects of the Flos Chrysanthemi extract on the growth of different intestinal bacteria were detected using an Emax precision microplate reader. Certain pathogenic bacteria such as Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Clostridium and Bacteroides were significantly inhibited by Flos Chrysanthemi, while commensal probiotics such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium were moderately promoted. Our observation provided further evidence for the importance of intestinal bacteria in the metabolism and potential activity of the Flos Chrysanthemi extract. The results will also be helpful for the further pharmacokinetic study of Flos Chrysanthemi and to unravel how it works in vivo. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Ultrasound elasticity imaging for detecting intestinal fibrosis and inflammation in rats and humans with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stidham, Ryan W; Xu, Jingping; Johnson, Laura A; Kim, Kang; Moons, David S; McKenna, Barbara J; Rubin, Jonathan M; Higgins, Peter D R

    2011-09-01

    Intestinal fibrosis causes many complications of Crohn's disease (CD). Available biomarkers and imaging modalities lack sufficient accuracy to distinguish intestinal inflammation from fibrosis. Transcutaneous ultrasound elasticity imaging (UEI) is a promising, noninvasive approach for measuring tissue mechanical properties. We hypothesized that UEI could differentiate inflammatory from fibrotic bowel wall changes in both animal models of colitis and humans with CD. Female Lewis rats underwent weekly trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid enemas yielding models of acute inflammatory colitis (n = 5) and chronic intestinal fibrosis (n = 6). UEI scanning used a novel speckle-tracking algorithm to estimate tissue strain. Resected bowel segments were evaluated for evidence of inflammation and fibrosis. Seven consecutive patients with stenotic CD were studied with UEI and their resected stenotic and normal bowel segments were evaluated by ex vivo elastometry and histopathology. Transcutaneous UEI normalized strain was able to differentiate acutely inflamed (-2.07) versus chronic fibrotic (-1.10) colon in rat models of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; P = .037). Transcutaneous UEI normalized strain also differentiated stenotic (-0.87) versus adjacent normal small bowel (-1.99) in human CD (P = .0008), and this measurement also correlated well with ex vivo elastometry (r = -0.81). UEI can differentiate inflammatory from fibrotic intestine in rat models of IBD and can differentiate between fibrotic and unaffected intestine in a pilot study in humans with CD. UEI represents a novel technology with potential to become a new objective measure of progression of intestinal fibrosis. Prospective clinical studies in CD are needed. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human intestinal microbiota: cross-talk with the host and its potential role in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Marco; Guidotti, Marco; Fabbri, Alessia; Brigidi, Patrizia; Franceschi, Claudio; Fiorentini, Carla

    2011-02-01

    In this review, we discuss the multifactorial role of intestinal microbiota in colorectal cancer. The peculiar metabolism of dietary compounds of the individual microbiota complement, its overall immunostimulation and immunomodulatory activity, and eventually the production of toxins that perturb the regulation of cell growth, define the balance of positive and negative risk factors for colorectal cancer development. Moreover, shaping the composition of the human intestinal microbiota, diet has an indirect impact in determining the balance between health and disease. The integration of diet, microbial, and host factors in a system approach is mandatory to determine the overall balance of risk and protective factors for colorectal cancer onset.

  11. The human small intestinal microbiota is driven by rapid uptake and conversion of simple carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetendal, Erwin G; Raes, Jeroen; van den Bogert, Bartholomeus

    2012-01-01

    the microbiota at other parts of the GI tract, which is especially true for the small intestine because of its limited accessibility. Here we deduce an ecological model of the microbiota composition and function in the small intestine, using complementing culture-independent approaches. Phylogenetic microarray......The human gastrointestinal tract (GI tract) harbors a complex community of microbes. The microbiota composition varies between different locations in the GI tract, but most studies focus on the fecal microbiota, and that inhabiting the colonic mucosa. Consequently, little is known about...

  12. Human Intestinal Cells Modulate Conjugational Transfer of Multidrug Resistance Plasmids between Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Sommer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    to study this process. We established an in vitro co-culture system to study the interaction between human intestinal cells and bacteria. We show that the conjugation efficiency of a plasmid encoding an extended spectrum beta-lactamase is reduced when clinical isolates of Escherichia coli are co......Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems......-cultured with human intestinal cells. We show that filtered media from co-cultures contain a factor that reduces conjugation efficiency. Protease treatment of the filtered media eliminates this inhibition of conjugation. This data suggests that a peptide or protein based factor is secreted on the apical side...

  13. Transcriptional modulation of intestinal innate defense/inflammation genes by preterm infant microbiota in a humanized gnotobiotic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lei; Yu, Yueyue; Guo, Yuee; Wang, Yunwei; Chang, Eugene B; Claud, Erika C

    2015-01-01

    It is known that postnatal functional maturation of the small intestine is facilitated by microbial colonization of the gut. Preterm infants exhibit defects in gut maturation, weak innate immunity against intestinal infection and increased susceptibility to inflammatory disorders, all of which may be related to the inappropriate microbial colonization of their immature intestines. The earliest microbes to colonize the preterm infant gut encounter a naïve, immature intestine. Thus this earliest microbiota potentially has the greatest opportunity to fundamentally influence intestinal development and immune function. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of early microbial colonization on global gene expression in the distal small intestine during postnatal gut development. Gnotobiotic mouse models with experimental colonization by early (prior to two weeks of life) intestinal microbiota from preterm human infants were utilized. Microarray analysis was used to assess global gene expression in the intestinal epithelium. Multiple intestinal genes involved in metabolism, cell cycle regulation, cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix communication, and immune function are developmental- and intestinal microbiota- regulated. Using a humanized gnotobiotic mouse model, we demonstrate that certain early preterm infant microbiota from prior to 2 weeks of life specifically induce increased NF-κB activation and a phenotype of increased inflammation whereas other preterm microbiota specifically induce decreased NF-κB activation. These fundamental differences correlate with altered clinical outcomes and suggest the existence of optimal early microbial communities to improve health outcomes.

  14. The topographic distribution of Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale in the human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rep, B H

    1975-06-01

    During an investigation in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 28 human intestinal tracts were systematically inspected on the presence of hookworms. In total, 643 hookworms (508 Necator americanus and 135 Ancylostoma duodenale) were isolated from 19 intestinal tracts. The localization of these hookworms was determined. N. americanus worms were concentrated in the duodenum and jejunum, whereas A. duodenale worms rather prefer the jejunum and proximal ileum. Some preference of hookworms for the antimesenteric site of the intestinal wall was found. The relative distance between adjoining worms in the observed hookworm populations was 3.8 cm on the average for Necator and 5.5 cm for Ancylostoma. The distribution of the sexes in the worm-population revealed no monosexual or bisexual prevalence of the hookworms.

  15. Interaction of Campylobacter spp. and human probiotics in chicken intestinal mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganan, M; Martinez-Rodriguez, A J; Carrascosa, A V; Vesterlund, S; Salminen, S; Satokari, R

    2013-03-01

    Campylobacter is the most common cause of bacterial food-borne diarrhoeal disease throughout the world. The principal risk of human contamination is handling and consumption of contaminated poultry meat. To colonize poultry, Campylobacter adheres to and persists in the mucus layer that covers the intestinal epithelium. Inhibiting adhesion to the mucus could prevent colonization of the intestine. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the protective effect of defined commercial human probiotic strains on the adhesion of Campylobacter spp. to chicken intestinal mucus, in a search for alternatives to antibiotics to control this food-borne pathogen. The probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii JS and a starter culture strain Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis adhered well to chicken intestinal mucus and were able to reduce the binding of Campylobacter spp. when the mucus was colonized with the probiotic strain before contacting the pathogen. Human-intended probiotics could be useful as prophylactics in poultry feeding for controlling Campylobacter spp. colonization. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Transformation of trollioside and isoquercetin by human intestinal flora in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming; Shi, Duo-Zhi; Wang, Teng-Yu; Zheng, Shi-Qi; Liu, Li-Jia; Sun, Zhen-Xiao; Wang, Ru-Feng; Ding, Yi

    2016-03-01

    The present study was designed to determine the intestinal bacterial metabolites of trollioside and isoquercetin and their antibacterial activities. A systematic in vitro biotransformation investigation on trollioside and isoquercetin, including metabolite identification, metabolic pathway deduction, and time course, was accomplished using a human intestinal bacterial model. The metabolites were analyzed and identified by HPLC and HPLC-MS. The antibacterial activities of trollioside, isoquercetin, and their metabolites were evaluated using the broth microdilution method with berberine as a positive control, and their potency was measured as minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). Our results indicated that trollioside and isoquercetin were metabolized by human intestinal flora through O-deglycosylation, yielding aglycones proglobeflowery acid and quercetin, respectively The antibacterial activities of both metabolites were more potent than that of their parent compounds. In conclusion, trollioside and isoquercetin are totally and rapidly transformed by human intestinal bacteria in vitro and the transformation favors the improvement of the antibacterial activities of the parent compounds. Copyright © 2016 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibition of human pancreatic and biliary output but not intestinal motility by physiological intraileal lipid loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Jutta; Holst, Jens Juul; Layer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Lipid perfusion into the distal ileal lumen at supraphysiological loads inhibits pancreatic exocrine secretion and gastrointestinal motility in humans. In the present study, we sought to determine the effects of physiological postprandial intraileal lipid concentrations on endogenously stimulated....... Physiological postprandial ileal lipid concentrations dose dependently inhibited human digestive pancreatic protease and bile acid output, but not intestinal motor activity. Thus physiological postprandial ileal nutrient exposure may be of importance for the termination of digestive secretory responses...

  18. Human Intestinal Parasite Burden and Poor Sanitation in Rural Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Megan L; McAtee, Shannon; Bryan, Patricia E; Jeun, Rebecca; Ward, Tabitha; Kraus, Jacob; Bottazzi, Maria E; Hotez, Peter J; Flowers, Catherine C; Mejia, Rojelio

    2017-11-01

    Hookworm infection affects 430 million people worldwide, causing iron deficiency, impaired cognitive development, and stunting in children. Because of the environmental conditions needed for the hookworm life-cycle, this parasite is endemic to resource-limited countries. Necator americanus was endemic in the southern United States before improvement of sewage disposal systems and eradication programs. With continued poverty, poor sanitation, and an environment suitable for the hookworm life-cycle in some regions of the southern United States, a current prevalence study using modern molecular diagnostics is warranted. Lowndes County, Alabama, was chosen as the study site given previous high hookworm burdens, degree of poverty, and use of open-sewage systems. Participants were interviewed, and stool, serum, and soil samples were tested for nine intestinal parasites using a multiparallel quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We found that, among 24 households, 42.4% reported exposure to raw sewage within their home, and from 55 stool samples, 19 (34.5%) tested positive for N. americanus, four (7.3%) for Strongyloides stercoralis, and one (1.8%) for Entamoeba histolytica. Stool tested positive for N. americanus contained low levels of parasite DNA (geometric mean 0.0302 fg/μL). Soil studies detected one (2.9%) Cryptosporidium species, and Toxocara serology assay detected one (5.2%) positive in this population. Individuals living in this high-risk environment within the United States continue to have stool samples positive for N. americanus. Gastrointestinal parasites known to be endemic to developing countries are identifiable in American poverty regions, and areas with lower disease burden are more likely to be identified by using qPCR.

  19. Reduced expression of aquaporins in human intestinal mucosa in early stage inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricanek P

    2015-01-01

    -dimensional structures of AQP1, 3, 7, and 8 were modeled. Results: AQP1, 3, 7, and 8 mRNAs were detected in all parts of the intestinal mucosa. Notably, AQP1 and AQP3 mRNA levels were reduced in the ileum of patients with Crohn's disease, and AQP7 and AQP8 mRNA levels were reduced in the ileum and the colon of patients with ulcerative colitis. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy showed localization of AQP3, 7, and 8 at the mucosal epithelium, whereas the expression of AQP1 was mainly confined to the endothelial cells and erythrocytes. The reduction in the level of AQP3, 7, and 8 mRNA was confirmed by immunofluorescence, which also indicated a reduction of apical immunolabeling for AQP8 in the colonic surface epithelium and crypts of the IBD samples. This could indicate loss of epithelial polarity in IBD, leading to disrupted barrier function. Conclusion: AQPs 1 and 8 and the aquaglyceroporins AQPs 3 and 7 are the AQPs predominantly expressed in the lower intestinal tract of humans. Their expression is significantly reduced in patients with IBD, and they are differentially expressed in specific bowel segments in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The data present a link between gut inflammation and water/solute homeostasis, suggesting that AQPs may play a significant role in IBD pathophysiology. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, aquaporins, aquaglyceroporins

  20. Nitroreduction and formation of hemoglobin adducts in rats with a human intestinal microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheepers, P.T.J.; Straetemans, M.M.E.; Koopman, J.P.; Bos, R.P. [Univ. of Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    1994-10-01

    In the covalent binding of nitroarenes to macromolecules, nitroreduction is an important step. The intestinal microflora represents an enormous potential of bacterial nitroreductase activity. As a consequence, the in vivo nitroreduction of orally administerednitroarenes is primarily located in the intestine. In this study, we have investigated the nitroreduction of 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF) by a human microflora in female Wistar rats. Germ-free (FG) rats were equipped with a bacterial flora derived from human feces. Nontreated GF rats and GF animals equipped with a conventional rat flora were used as controls. The composition of the human and the conventional microflora isolated from the rats were consistent with the microflora of the administered feces. In the rats receiving only sunflower seed oil, no adducts were detected. The animals equipped with a human or rat microflora that received 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) formed 2-AF hemoglobin (Hb)-adducts at average levels mean {+-} 0.003 and 0.043 {+-} 0.010 {mu}mole/g Hb, respectively. In the FG rats, an adduct level of 0.57 {+-} 0.09 was determined after 2-AF administration and non adducts were detected after 2-NF administration. The results show that nitroreduction by an acquired human intestinal microflora and subsequent adduct formation can be studied in the rate in vivo. 21 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. Human Intestinal Cells Modulate Conjugational Transfer of Multidrug Resistance Plasmids between Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Sommer, Morten O. A.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems to study this process. We established an in vitro co-culture system to study the interaction between human intestinal cells and bacteria. We show that the conjugation efficiency of a plasmid encoding an extended spectrum beta-lactamase is reduced when clinical isolates of Escherichia coli are co-cultured with human intestinal cells. We show that filtered media from co-cultures contain a factor that reduces conjugation efficiency. Protease treatment of the filtered media eliminates this inhibition of conjugation. This data suggests that a peptide or protein based factor is secreted on the apical side of the intestinal cells exposed to bacteria leading to a two-fold reduction in conjugation efficiency. These results show that human gut epithelial cells can modulate bacterial conjugation and may have relevance to gene exchange in the gut. PMID:24955767

  2. Human intestinal cells modulate conjugational transfer of multidrug resistance plasmids between clinical Escherichia coli isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Manuel Dantas Machado

    Full Text Available Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems to study this process. We established an in vitro co-culture system to study the interaction between human intestinal cells and bacteria. We show that the conjugation efficiency of a plasmid encoding an extended spectrum beta-lactamase is reduced when clinical isolates of Escherichia coli are co-cultured with human intestinal cells. We show that filtered media from co-cultures contain a factor that reduces conjugation efficiency. Protease treatment of the filtered media eliminates this inhibition of conjugation. This data suggests that a peptide or protein based factor is secreted on the apical side of the intestinal cells exposed to bacteria leading to a two-fold reduction in conjugation efficiency. These results show that human gut epithelial cells can modulate bacterial conjugation and may have relevance to gene exchange in the gut.

  3. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair eWalsham

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small intestinal biopsies were used. Adherence of L. reuteri to HT-29 cells was strain-specific, and the mucus-binding proteins CmbA and MUB increased binding to both HT-29 and LS174T cells. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 significantly inhibited EPEC binding to HT-29 but not LS174T cells. While pre-incubation of LS174T cells with ATCC PTA 6475 did not affect EPEC A/E lesion formation, it increased the size of EPEC microcolonies. ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 binding to the mucus layer resulted in decreased EPEC adherence to small intestinal biopsy epithelium. Our findings show that L. reuteri reduction of EPEC adhesion is strain-specific and has the potential to target either the epithelium or the mucus layer, providing further rationale for the selection of probiotic strains.

  4. Characterization of two cysteine proteases secreted by Blastocystis ST7, a human intestinal parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Texier, Catherine; Poirier, Philippe; Viscogliosi, Eric; Tan, Kevin S W; Delbac, Frédéric; El Alaoui, Hicham

    2012-09-01

    Blastocystis spp. are unicellular anaerobic intestinal parasites of both humans and animals and the most prevalent ones found in human stool samples. Their association with various gastrointestinal disorders raises the questions of its pathogenicity and of the molecular mechanisms involved. Since secreted proteases are well-known to be implicated in intestinal parasite virulence, we intended to determine whether Blastocystis spp. possess such pathogenic factors. In silico analysis of the Blastocystis subtype 7 (ST7) genome sequence highlighted 22 genes coding proteases which were predicted to be secreted. We characterized the proteolytic activities in the secretory products of Blastocystis ST7 using specific protease inhibitors. Two cysteine proteases, a cathepsin B and a legumain, were identified in the parasite culture supernatant by gelatin zymographic SDS-PAGE gel and MS/MS analysis. These proteases might act on intestinal cells and disturb gut function. This work provides serious molecular candidates to link Blastocystis spp. and intestinal disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Short- and long-term effects of oral vancomycin on the human intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Sandrine; Scher, Jose U; Djukovic, Ana; Jiménez, Nuria; Littman, Dan R; Abramson, Steven B; Pamer, Eric G; Ubeda, Carles

    2017-01-01

    Oral vancomycin remains the mainstay of therapy for severe infections produced by Clostridium difficile, the most prevalent cause of healthcare-associated infectious diarrhoea in developed countries. However, its short- and long-term effects on the human intestinal microbiota remain largely unknown. We utilized high-throughput sequencing to analyse the effects of vancomycin on the faecal human microbiota up to 22 weeks post-antibiotic cessation. The clinical relevance of the observed microbiota perturbations was studied in mice. During vancomycin therapy, most intestinal microbiota genera and operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were depleted in all analysed subjects, including all baseline OTUs from the phylum Bacteroidetes. This was accompanied by a vast expansion of genera associated with infections, including Klebsiella and Escherichia/Shigella. Following antibiotic cessation, marked differences in microbiota resilience were observed among subjects. While some individuals recovered a microbiota close to baseline composition, in others, up to 89% of abundant OTUs could no longer be detected. The clinical relevance of the observed microbiota changes was further demonstrated in mice, which developed analogous microbiota alterations. During vancomycin treatment, mice were highly susceptible to intestinal colonization by an antibiotic-resistant pathogen and, upon antibiotic cessation, a less-resilient microbiota allowed higher levels of pathogen colonization. Oral vancomycin induces drastic and consistent changes in the human intestinal microbiota. Upon vancomycin cessation, the microbiota recovery rate varied considerably among subjects, which could influence, as validated in mice, the level of susceptibility to pathogen intestinal colonization. Our results demonstrate the negative long-term effects of vancomycin, which should be considered as a fundamental aspect of the cost-benefit equation for antibiotic prescription. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  6. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Reveals their Adaptation to a Highly Dynamic Ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, van den B.; Boekhorst, te J.; Herrmann, R.; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus

  7. Epidemiology of infections with intestinal parasites and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among sugar-estate residents in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanet, A. L.; Sahlu, T.; Rinke de Wit, T.; Messele, T.; Masho, W.; Woldemichael, T.; Yeneneh, H.; Coutinho, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections could play an important role in the progression of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), by further disturbing the immune system whilst it is already engaged in the fight against HIV. HIV and intestinal parasitic infections were investigated in 1239,

  8. Megaselia scalaris causing human intestinal myiasis in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazayad, Said A M; Rifaat, Manal M A

    2005-04-01

    Megaselia scalaris is a worldwide distributed insect of medical importance. In a laboratory-based study, stool samples with undefined maggot infestation were examined and the presence of M. scalaris maggots was confirmed. Binocular stereo-microscopy was used for identification of the maggots. Larvae were allowed to develop into adults onto a human stool culture. The larvae and the emerged flies were identified using standard keys. This may be the first report of M. scalaris as a causative agent of human myiasis in Egypt. Details of the third instar larva, pupa and adults were given.

  9. Intestinal organoids model human responses to infection by commensal and Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karve, Sayali S; Pradhan, Suman; Ward, Doyle V; Weiss, Alison A

    2017-01-01

    Infection with Shiga toxin (Stx) producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 can cause the potentially fatal complication hemolytic uremic syndrome, and currently only supportive therapy is available. Lack of suitable animal models has hindered study of this disease. Induced human intestinal organoids (iHIOs), generated by in vitro differentiation of pluripotent stem cells, represent differentiated human intestinal tissue. We show that iHIOs with addition of human neutrophils can model E. coli intestinal infection and innate cellular responses. Commensal and O157:H7 introduced into the iHIO lumen replicated rapidly achieving high numbers. Commensal E. coli did not cause damage, and were completely contained within the lumen, suggesting defenses, such as mucus production, can constrain non-pathogenic strains. Some O157:H7 initially co-localized with cellular actin. Loss of actin and epithelial integrity was observed after 4 hours. O157:H7 grew as filaments, consistent with activation of the bacterial SOS stress response. SOS is induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS), and O157:H7 infection increased ROS production. Transcriptional profiling (RNAseq) demonstrated that both commensal and O157:H7 upregulated genes associated with gastrointestinal maturation, while infection with O157:H7 upregulated inflammatory responses, including interleukin 8 (IL-8). IL-8 is associated with neutrophil recruitment, and infection with O157:H7 resulted in recruitment of human neutrophils into the iHIO tissue.

  10. Purification and fermentation in vitro of sesaminol triglucoside from sesame cake by human intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiuling; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yongkang; Su, Di; Sun, Yi; Hu, Bing; Zeng, Xiaoxiong

    2013-02-27

    Sesaminol triglucoside (STG), the most abundant lignan glycoside existing in sesame cake/meal, has exhibited various biological activities. However, little information about its in vitro fermentation with intestinal microbiota is available. Therefore, the effect of STG from sesame cake on the fermentation of human fecal microbiota was evaluated. First, high-purity STG was successfully prepared from defatted sesame cake by extraction with 80% ethanol and simple purification procedures of polyamide column chromatography and Toyopearl HW-40S column chromatography. Then the influence of STG on intestinal microbiota was conducted by monitoring bacterial populations and analyzing the concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). We found that STG could significantly induce an increase in numbers of Lactobacillus - Enterococcus group and Bifidobacterium in fermentation in vitro with human fecal microbiota, while it did not stimulate the bacterial growth of Eubacterium rectale - Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium histolyticum group, and Bacteroides - Prevotella group. Furthermore, it was found that concentrations of formic, acetic, propionic, and butyric acids in STG culture increased significantly during the fermentation, and its total SCFA concentration was relatively higher than those of the control and glucose cultures at 6 and 12 h fermentation. Our findings provided further evidence for the importance of human intestinal bacteria in the bioactivity of STG and its metabolites in the maintenance of human health.

  11. Spontaneous and Evoked Contractility of Human Intestinal Lymphatic Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telinius, Niklas; Majgaard, Jens; Mohanakumar, Sheyanth; Pahle, Einar; Nielsen, Jørn; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Aalkjær, Christian; Boedtkjer, Donna Briggs

    2017-03-01

    Mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLVs) from various animal species have been intensively studied. We aimed to establish the viability and basic contractile characteristics of human MLVs maintained in vitro and to determine the reactivity of MLVs with norepinephrine (NE) and substance P (SP) and to compare with the thoracic duct (TD). Isolated human lymphatic vessels were mounted on a wire myograph under isometric conditions and tension was recorded. The diameter-tension characteristics for MLVs were generated by stretching the vessels and stimulating with a 125 mM K+ solution containing 10 μM NE. The diameter-tension data generated for MLVs from two separate surgical patient groups were found to be similar: maximum active tension for MLVs occurred when the passive stretch corresponded to a transmural pressure of 22 mmHg. Subsequent experiments on human MLVs were performed by normalization with 22 mmHg as the equivalent target pressure. The majority of MLVs were responders (spontaneous activity and/or reactivity with 10 μM NE or 125 mM K+ solution). Nonresponders (16% of vessel segments) had significantly smaller inner diameters. MLVs responded consistently to NE (1 nM-10 μM) but the responsiveness of MLVs and TD to SP (0.1 nM-10 μM) was poor: TD reacted only with 10 μM SP, whereas MLVs were sensitive to nanomolar concentrations and the contractile response declined with higher concentrations. Under in vitro isometric conditions, human MLVs generate maximum tension when stretched to a passive level corresponding to 22 mmHg, and the majority of MLVs are responsive when normalized to this pressure. MLVs respond to NE and SP though NE produces a more consistent response in the concentration range tested.

  12. Analysis and formation of nitrosamines in the human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, M C; Lee, L; Bruce, W R

    1982-01-01

    The method employed for nitrosamine analysis gave high recovery values and did not produce artefactual nitrosamines. Nitrosation reactions are not catalysed by the microbial ecosystem of human feces. Rapid loss of nitrate and nitrite in feces also precludes nitrosamine formation, unless very high concentrations of precursors are present. These concentrations are not physiological and it is therefore unlikely that N-nitroso compounds form in the lower gastrointestinal tract of man.

  13. Phosphatidylcholine passes through lateral tight junctions for paracellular transport to the apical side of the polarized intestinal tumor cell-line CaCo2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stremmel, Wolfgang; Staffer, Simone; Gan-Schreier, Hongying; Wannhoff, Andreas; Bach, Margund; Gauss, Annika

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the most abundant phospholipid in intestinal mucus, indicative of a specific transport system across the mucosal epithelium to the intestinal lumen. To elucidate this transport mechanism, we employed a transwell tissue culture system with polarized CaCo2 cells. It was shown that PC could not substantially be internalized by the cells. However, after basal application of increasing PC concentrations, an apical transport of 47.1±6.3nmolh(-1)mMPC(-1) was observed. Equilibrium distribution studies with PC applied in equal concentrations to the basal and apical compartments showed a 1.5-fold accumulation on the expense of basal PC. Disruption of tight junctions (TJ) by acetaldehyde or PPARγ inhibitors or by treatment with siRNA to TJ proteins suppressed paracellular transport by at least 50%. Transport was specific for the choline containing the phospholipids PC, lysoPC and sphingomyelin. We showed that translocation is driven by an electrochemical gradient generated by apical accumulation of Cl(-) and HCO3(-) through CFTR. Pretreatment with siRNA to mucin 3 which anchors in the apical plasma membrane of mucosal cells inhibited the final step of luminal PC secretion. PC accumulates in intestinal mucus using a paracellular, apically directed transport route across TJs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Reveals their Adaptation to a Highly Dynamic Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine. PMID:24386196

  15. Comparative genomics analysis of Streptococcus isolates from the human small intestine reveals their adaptation to a highly dynamic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine.

  16. The Influence of Different Apple Based Supplements on the Intestinal Microbiota of Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Wilcks, Andrea; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    Background and objective: The present project is part of the large ISAFRUIT project, where one of the objectives is to identify effects of apple and apple product on parameters related to gut health. In a previous rat study we observed changes in the intestinal microbiota of rats fed whole apples...... supplements did not show any effect on the microbiota by DGGE. Conclusion: Consumption of whole apples or pomace is able to modify the intestinal microbiota of humans......., pomace or apple pectin ([1], and we were interested in finding out if the same effect can be observed in humans. Method: The study was conducted as a randomized, controlled 5 x 28 days cross-over study with 24 healthy persons of both genders. The persons were following a pectin- and polyphenol free...

  17. The Influence of Different Apple Based Supplements on the Intestinal Microbiota of Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Wilcks, Andrea; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective: The present project is part of the large ISAFRUIT project, where one of the objectives is to identify effects of apple and apple product on parameters related to gut health. In a previous rat study we observed changes in the intestinal microbiota of rats fed whole apples...... supplements did not show any effect on the microbiota by DGGE. Conclusion: Consumption of whole apples or pomace is able to modify the intestinal microbiota of humans......., pomace or apple pectin ([1], and we were interested in finding out if the same effect can be observed in humans. Method: The study was conducted as a randomized, controlled 5 x 28 days cross-over study with 24 healthy persons of both genders. The persons were following a pectin- and polyphenol free...

  18. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal associated with deep muscular plexus of human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Mikkelsen, H B; Thuneberg, L

    1992-01-01

    Evidence showing that interstitial cells of Cajal have important regulatory functions in the gut musculature is accumulating. In the current study, the ultrastructure of the deep muscular plexus and associated interstial cells of Cajal in human small intestine were studied to provide a reference...... for identification and further physiological or pathological studies. The deep muscular plexus was sandwiched between a thin inner layer of smooth muscle (one to five cells thick) and the bulk of the circular muscle. Interstitial cells of Cajal in this region very much resembled smooth muscle cells (with......, and only few gap junctions with other interstitial cells of Cajal or with the musculature were observed. Compared with interstitial cells of Cajal from other mammals, those associated with the deep muscular plexus in the human small intestine more closely resemble smooth muscle cells...

  19. Characterization of macrophage-like cells in the external layers of human small and large intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Rumessen, J J

    1992-01-01

    vesicles and pits. However, very few secondary lysosomes were present. Birbeck granules were not observed. It is concluded that in the external muscle layer of human small and large intestine numerous macrophages of a special type are present. It is discussed whether this cell type plays a role......In the external layers of human small and large intestine macrophage-like cells were characterized by immunohistochemical, histochemical and electron-microscopical methods. Using immunohistochemistry and a number of monoclonal antibodies, the presence and distribution of phenotypic subpopulations...... of macrophages were evaluated. In all locations macrophage-like cells were identified with antibody EBM11, which recognizes CD68 antigen, C3bi which recognizes CD11b, and partly with an antibody which recognizes protein 150,95 (CD11c). Macrophage-like cells in the external muscle layer were HLA...

  20. Human Enteroids as a Model of Upper Small Intestinal Ion Transport Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Yin, Jianyi; Zachos, Nicholas C; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Estes, Mary K; de Jonge, Hugo; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Human intestinal crypt-derived enteroids are a model of intestinal ion transport that require validation by comparison with cell culture and animal models. We used human small intestinal enteroids to study neutral Na(+) absorption and stimulated fluid and anion secretion under basal and regulated conditions in undifferentiated and differentiated cultures to show their functional relevance to ion transport physiology and pathophysiology. Human intestinal tissue specimens were obtained from an endoscopic biopsy or surgical resections performed at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Crypts were isolated, enteroids were propagated in culture, induced to undergo differentiation, and transduced with lentiviral vectors. Crypt markers, surface cell enzymes, and membrane ion transporters were characterized using quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunoblot, or immunofluorescence analyses. We used multiphoton and time-lapse confocal microscopy to monitor intracellular pH and luminal dilatation in enteroids under basal and regulated conditions. Enteroids differentiated upon withdrawal of WNT3A, yielding decreased crypt markers and increased villus-like characteristics. Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 activity was similar in undifferentiated and differentiated enteroids, and was affected by known inhibitors, second messengers, and bacterial enterotoxins. Forskolin-induced swelling was completely dependent on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and partially dependent on Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 and Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter 1 inhibition in undifferentiated and differentiated enteroids. Increases in cyclic adenosine monophosphate with forskolin caused enteroid intracellular acidification in HCO3(-)-free buffer. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-induced enteroid intracellular pH acidification as part of duodenal HCO3(-) secretion appears to require cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and electrogenic Na(+)/HCO3(-) cotransporter 1

  1. Impact of Different Fecal Processing Methods on Assessments of Bacterial Diversity in the Human Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Hsin Hsieh; Peterson, Courtney M.; Anne Raggio; Michael Keenan; Martin, Roy J.; Eric Ravussin; Maria Louise Marco

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota are integral to understanding the relationships between nutrition and health. Therefore, fecal sampling and processing protocols for metagenomic surveys should be sufficiently robust, accurate, and reliable to identify the microorganisms present. We investigated the use of different fecal preparation methods on the bacterial community structures identified in human stools. Complete stools were collected from six healthy individuals and processed according to the foll...

  2. Ultrastructural study of adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to erythrocytes and human intestinal epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Knutton, S; Lloyd, D R; Candy, D C; McNeish, A S

    1984-01-01

    The adhesion to erythrocytes and human intestinal epithelial cells of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains H10407, B2C, and H10407P, expressing colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I), CFA/II, and type 1 fimbriae, respectively, was examined by electron microscopy. CFA and type 1 fimbriae were visualized by negative staining in thin sections after en bloc staining with ruthenium red and by immune labeling with antisera raised against purified fimbriae. By negative and ruthenium red staining,...

  3. Prediction of Human Intestinal Absorption by GA Feature Selection and Support Vector Machine Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Zongyuan Cai; Zhi Wang; Aixia Yan

    2008-01-01

    QSAR (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships) models for the prediction of human intestinal absorption (HIA) were built with molecular descriptors calculated by ADRIANA.Code, Cerius2 and a combination of them. A dataset of 552 compounds covering a wide range of current drugs with experimental HIA values was investigated. A Genetic Algorithm feature selection method was applied to select proper descriptors. A Kohonen's self-organizing Neural Network (KohNN) map was used to split the who...

  4. A General O-Glycosylation System Important to the Physiology of a Major Human Intestinal Symbiont

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, C. Mark; Coyne, Michael J.; Villa, Otto F.; Chatzidaki-Livanis, Maria; Comstock, Laurie E.

    2009-01-01

    The Bacteroides are a numerically dominant genus of the human intestinal microbiota. These organisms harbor a rare bacterial pathway for incorporation of exogenous fucose into capsular polysaccharides and glycoproteins. The infrequency of glycoprotein synthesis by bacteria prompted a more detailed analysis of this process. Here, we demonstrate that Bacteroides fragilis has a general O-glycosylation system. The proteins targeted for glycosylation include those predicted to be involved in prote...

  5. Consensus hologram QSAR modeling for the prediction of human intestinal absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Tiago L; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2012-04-15

    Consistent in silico models for ADME properties are useful tools in early drug discovery. Here, we report the hologram QSAR modeling of human intestinal absorption using a dataset of 638 compounds with experimental data associated. The final validated models are consistent and robust for the consensus prediction of this important pharmacokinetic property and are suitable for virtual screening applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Human amniotic membrane as an intestinal patch for neomucosal growth in the rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlas, M; Gökçora, H; Erekul, S; Dindar, H; Yücesan, S

    1992-05-01

    This experiment was carried out as a preliminary study, an attempt to grow new intestinal mucosa on human amniotic membrane in the terminal ileum in 37 rabbits. After ketamin sulfate anesthesia at laparatomy, 5-cm ileal defects were patched with human amniotic membrane (5 x 2 cm). These patched intestines were investigated on the first postoperative day and the 2nd, 5th, 10th, and 20th weeks corresponding to 4, 5, 5, 10, and 10 rabbits, respectively. Only three rabbits died in the early postoperative period. There was no evidence of intestinal obstruction or dilatation with barium meal. Microscopically, the neomucosa consisted of a thin layer of columnar epithelial cells at 2 weeks with more maturity of the villi and less irregularity and branching by 20 weeks. All patches were covered with neomucosa commencing at 2 weeks and covering the whole patch area by 20 weeks. This technique's advantages are the large size and the ease of the availability of the human amniotic membrane for neonates at risk without jeopardizing the neonates tissues. It is hoped that this method might be considered when neonatal material is scarce.

  7. Mutagenicity of arbutin in mammalian cells after activation by human intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaut, Michael; Braune, Annett; Wunderlich, Sandra; Sauer, Patrick; Schneider, Heiko; Glatt, Hansruedi

    2006-11-01

    Arbutin (hydroquinone-beta-D-glucopyranoside) is present in various food plants. Its aglycone, hydroquinone, is mutagenic and carcinogenic. We investigated whether hydroquinone may be released under conditions encountered in the human gastrointestinal tract. Arbutin was stable in artificial gastric juice. Fecal slurries from nine human subjects completely converted arbutin (2 mM) into hydroquinone. Four of nine representative human intestinal species investigated, namely Eubacterium ramulus, Enterococcus casseliflavus, Bacteroides distasonis, and Bifidobacterium adolescentis, deglycosylated arbutin at rates of 21.08, 16.62, 8.43 and 3.59 nmol x min(-1) x (mg protein)(-1), respectively. In contrast, homogenates from small intestinal mucosa and cytosolic fractions from colon mucosa deglycosylated arbutin at substantially lower rates: 0.50 and 0.09 nmol x min(-1) x (mg protein)(-1), respectively. Arbutin, unlike hydroquinone, did not induce gene mutations in Chinese hamster V79 cells in the absence of an activating system. However, in the presence of cytosolic fractions from E. ramulus or B. distasonis, arbutin was strongly mutagenic. Cytosolic fraction from Escherichia coli, showing no arbutin glycosidase activity, was not able to activate arbutin in this model system. The release of the proximate mutagen hydroquinone from arbutin by intestinal bacteria in the immediate vicinity of the colon mucosa may pose a potential risk.

  8. Metabolic profile and underlying improved bio-activity of Fructus aurantii immaturus by human intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing Yan; Fan, Meng Lin; Wang, Huai You; Yu, Bo Yang; Liu, Ji Hua

    2017-06-21

    Fructus aurantii immaturus (FAI) is the dried young fruit of Citrus aurantium L. or Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck. The purpose of this paper was to investigate the metabolic fate of FAI upon incubation with human intestinal bacteria, meanwhile to evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of FAI and the transformed Fructus aurantii immaturus (TFAI). The water extract of FAI was anaerobically incubated with human intestinal bacterial suspensions for 48 h at 37 °C. Liquid chromatography-hybridised with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF/MS) was applied to identify FAI metabolites. A total of 45 compounds were identified in FAI, eleven of which were metabolized by human intestinal bacteria. Nine major metabolites were identified as eriodictyol, naringenin, hesperetin, luteolin, apigenin, chryseriol, isosakuranetin, phloretin and diosmetin. The metabolic profile of FAI was elucidated on the basis of metabolite information. We found that the concentrations of acetic, propionic and butyric acids in FAI culture were all increased during fermentation relative to those of the control. Further bioactive evaluations showed that TFAI exhibited more potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory abilities than FAI in vitro. Additionally, in vivo experiment confirmed that FAI significantly attenuated the blood endotoxin and TNF-α levels in the conventional rats compared to those of pseudo-germ-free (PGF) rats. This study revealed that metabolites may play a key role in the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacities of FAI.

  9. Comparative analysis of pyrosequencing and a phylogenetic microarray for exploring microbial community structures in the human distal intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claesson, M.J.; O'Sullivan, O.; Wang, Q.; Nikkilä, J.; Marchesi, J.R.; Smidt, H.; Vos, de W.M.; Ross, R.P.; O'Toole, P.W.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Variations in the composition of the human intestinal microbiota are linked to diverse health conditions. High-throughput molecular technologies have recently elucidated microbial community structure at much higher resolution than was previously possible. Here we compare two such

  10. Prediction of human drug clearance by multiple metabolic pathways: integration of hepatic and intestinal microsomal and cytosolic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubitt, Helen E; Houston, J Brian; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2011-05-01

    The current study assesses hepatic and intestinal glucuronidation, sulfation, and cytochrome P450 (P450) metabolism of raloxifene, quercetin, salbutamol, and troglitazone using different in vitro systems. The fraction metabolized by conjugation and P450 metabolism was estimated in liver and intestine, and the importance of multiple metabolic pathways on accuracy of clearance prediction was assessed. In vitro intrinsic sulfation clearance (CL(int, SULT)) was determined in human intestinal and hepatic cytosol and compared with hepatic and intestinal microsomal glucuronidation (CL(int, UGT)) and P450 clearance (CL(int, CYP)) expressed per gram of tissue. Hepatic and intestinal cytosolic scaling factors of 80.7 mg/g liver and 18 mg/g intestine were estimated from published data. Scaled CL(int, SULT) ranged between 0.7 and 11.4 ml · min(-1) · g(-1) liver and 0.1 and 3.3 ml · min(-1) · g(-1) intestine (salbutamol and quercetin were the extremes). Salbutamol was the only compound with a high extent of sulfation (51 and 28% of total CL(int) for liver and intestine, respectively) and also significant renal clearance (26-57% of observed plasma clearance). In contrast, the clearance of quercetin was largely accounted for by glucuronidation. Drugs metabolized by multiple pathways (raloxifene and troglitazone) demonstrated improved prediction of intravenous clearance using data from all hepatic pathways (44-86% of observed clearance) compared with predictions based only on the primary pathway (22-36%). The assumption of no intestinal first pass resulted in underprediction of oral clearance for raloxifene, troglitazone, and quercetin (3-22% of observed, respectively). Accounting for the intestinal contribution to oral clearance via estimated intestinal availability improved prediction accuracy for raloxifene and troglitazone (within 2.5-fold of observed). Current findings emphasize the importance of both hepatic and intestinal conjugation for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation

  11. Azoreductase activity of anaerobic bacteria isolated from human intestinal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, F; Franklin, W; Cerniglia, C E

    1990-07-01

    A plate assay was developed for the detection of anaerobic bacteria that produce azoreductases. With this plate assay, 10 strains of anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing azo dyes were isolated from human feces and identified as Eubacterium hadrum (2 strains), Eubacterium spp. (2 species), Clostridium clostridiiforme, a Butyrivibrio sp., a Bacteroides sp., Clostridium paraputrificum, Clostridium nexile, and a Clostridium sp. The average rate of reduction of Direct Blue 15 dye (a dimethoxybenzidine-based dye) in these strains ranged from 16 to 135 nmol of dye per min per mg of protein. The enzymes were inactivated by oxygen. In seven isolates, a flavin compound (riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide, or flavin mononucleotide) was required for azoreductase activity. In the other three isolates and in Clostridium perfringens, no added flavin was required for activity. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that each bacterium expressed only one azoreductase isozyme. At least three types of azoreductase enzyme were produced by the different isolates. All of the azoreductases were produced constitutively and released extracellularly.

  12. Supplementation transgenic cow's milk containing recombinant human lactoferrin enhances systematic and intestinal immune responses in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiuling; Hu, Wenping; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Jianwu; Dai, Yunping; Zhao, Yaofeng; Meng, Qingyong; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) plays an important role in the body's immune system. However, the immunomodulatory effects of supplementation transgenic cow's milk containing recombinant human LF (rhLF) on the systemic and intestinal immune systems in infants remain unclear. Our laboratory has used genetic engineer to produce transgenic cow secreted rhLF. To assess the immune responses we took piglets as an animal model for infants. Eighteen piglets at 7 days of age were fed ordinary milk, 1:1 mix of ordinary and rhLF milk, or rhLF milk (LFM) for 30 days. The incidence of diarrhea in piglets in natural condition was observed. The protein abundances of immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA, IgM, IgE, histamine, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 interferon, tumor necrosis factor in the plasma, spleen or intestine were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Intestinal structure was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin. The mRNA levels of immune and allergy-related genes were measured by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that LFM-fed significantly reduced incidence of diarrhea, enhanced humoral immunity, T helper (Th) 1, and Th2 cell responses, improved the structure of the intestinal mucosal and did not induce food allergy. LFM increased mRNA levels of toll-like receptor 2 and nuclear factor-κB p65 and decreased that of FCεRI β. In conclusion, rhLF-enriched formula could improve systematic and intestinal immune responses and did not elicit food allergies in neonatal piglets.

  13. Menaquinone-4 (vitamin K2) up-regulates expression of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Seiko; Yamada, Asako; Tanabe, Rieko; Nakaoka, Kanae; Hosoi, Takayuki; Goseki-Sone, Masae

    2016-11-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) hydrolyzes several monophosphate esters into inorganic acid and alcohol. In humans, 4 kinds of ALP isozymes have been identified: tissue-nonspecific ALP, intestinal ALP, placental ALP, and germ cell ALP. Intestinal ALP is expressed at a high concentration in the brush border membrane of intestinal epithelial cells and is known to be affected by several kinds of nutrients, such as lipids, but the physiological function of intestinal ALP has remained elusive. Vitamin K is an essential cofactor for the posttranslational carboxylation of glutamate residues into γ-carboxy glutamate. Menaquinone-4 (MK-4) with 4 isoprene units, vitamin K2, has been shown to induce bone-type ALP activity and osteoblastogenesis in human bone marrow cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of MK-4 on the level of ALP activity and expression of ALP messenger RNA in the human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2, which is known to differentiate into small intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. After treatment with MK-4, there were significant increases in the ALP activities of Caco-2 cells. Inhibitor and thermal inactivation experiments demonstrated that the increased ALP had properties of intestinal-type ALP. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that expressions of human intestinal ALP and sucrase-isomaltase, which are intestinal differentiation markers, were highly enhanced in Caco-2 cells by MK-4. This is the first report concerning ALP messenger RNA expression induced by vitamin K2 in Caco-2 cells. Further studies on the physiological functions of human intestinal ALP will provide useful data on the novel effects of vitamin K. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multispectral tissue characterization for intestinal anastomosis optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Shademan, Azad; Le, Hanh N. D.; Decker, Ryan; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal anastomosis is a surgical procedure that restores bowel continuity after surgical resection to treat intestinal malignancy, inflammation, or obstruction. Despite the routine nature of intestinal anastomosis procedures, the rate of complications is high. Standard visual inspection cannot distinguish the tissue subsurface and small changes in spectral characteristics of the tissue, so existing tissue anastomosis techniques that rely on human vision to guide suturing could lead to problems such as bleeding and leakage from suturing sites. We present a proof-of-concept study using a portable multispectral imaging (MSI) platform for tissue characterization and preoperative surgical planning in intestinal anastomosis. The platform is composed of a fiber ring light-guided MSI system coupled with polarizers and image analysis software. The system is tested on ex vivo porcine intestine tissue, and we demonstrate the feasibility of identifying optimal regions for suture placement.

  15. Anthocyanin Absorption and Metabolism by Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells--A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiloglu, Senem; Capanoglu, Esra; Grootaert, Charlotte; Van Camp, John

    2015-09-08

    Anthocyanins from different plant sources have been shown to possess health beneficial effects against a number of chronic diseases. To obtain any influence in a specific tissue or organ, these bioactive compounds must be bioavailable, i.e., effectively absorbed from the gut into the circulation and transferred to the appropriate location within the body while still maintaining their bioactivity. One of the key factors affecting the bioavailability of anthocyanins is their transport through the gut epithelium. The Caco-2 cell line, a human intestinal epithelial cell model derived from a colon carcinoma, has been proven to be a good alternative to animal studies for predicting intestinal absorption of anthocyanins. Studies investigating anthocyanin absorption by Caco-2 cells report very low absorption of these compounds. However, the bioavailability of anthocyanins may be underestimated since the metabolites formed in the course of digestion could be responsible for the health benefits associated with anthocyanins. In this review, we critically discuss recent findings reported on the anthocyanin absorption and metabolism by human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

  16. Comprehensive Survey of Intestinal Microbiota Changes in Offspring of Human Microbiota-Associated Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Klitzing, Eliane; Öz, Fulya; Ekmekciu, Ira; Escher, Ulrike; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2017-01-01

    Secondary abiotic mice generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment provide a valuable tool for association studies with microbiota derived from different vertebrate hosts. We here generated human microbiota-associated (hma) mice by human fecal microbiota transplantation of secondary abiotic mice and performed a comprehensive survey of the intestinal microbiota dynamics in offspring of hma mice over 18 weeks following weaning as compared to their mothers applying both cultural and molecular methods. Mice were maintained under standard hygienic conditions with open cages, handled under aseptic conditions, and fed autoclaved chow and water. Within 1 week post weaning, fecal loads of commensal enterobacteria and enterococci had decreased, whereas obligate anaerobic bacteria such as Bacteroides/Prevotella species and clostridia were stably colonizing the intestines of hma offspring at high loads. Lactobacilli numbers were successively increasing until 18 weeks post weaning in both hma offspring and mothers, whereas by then, bifidobacteria were virtually undetectable in the former only. Interestingly, fecal lactobacilli and bifidobacteria were higher in mothers as compared to their offspring at 5 and 18 weeks post weaning. We conclude that the intestinal microbiota composition changes in offspring of hma mice, but also their mothers over time particularly affecting aerobic and microaerobic species. PMID:28386472

  17. The Ussing Chamber Assay to Study Drug Metabolism and Transport in the Human Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisser, Beatrice; Mangelsen, Eva; Wingolf, Caroline; Partecke, Lars Ivo; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Tannergren, Christer; Oswald, Stefan; Keiser, Markus

    2017-06-22

    The Ussing chamber is an old but still powerful technique originally designed to study the vectorial transport of ions through frog skin. This technique is also used to investigate the transport of chemical agents through the intestinal barrier as well as drug metabolism in enterocytes, both of which are key determinants for the bioavailability of orally administered drugs. More contemporary model systems, such as Caco-2 cell monolayers or stably transfected cells, are more limited in their use compared to the Ussing chamber because of differences in expression rates of transporter proteins and/or metabolizing enzymes. While there are limitations to the Ussing chamber assay, the use of human intestinal tissue remains the best laboratory test for characterizing the transport and metabolism of compounds following oral administration. Detailed in this unit is a step-by-step protocol for preparing human intestinal tissue, for designing Ussing chamber experiments, and for analyzing and interpreting the findings. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Assessment of intestinal absorption of trace metals in humans by means of stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, E; Roth, P; Höllriegl, V; Hansen, Ch; Kaltwasser, J P; Giussani, A; Cantone, M C; Greim, H; Zilker, T; Felgenhauer, N

    2002-03-01

    This study is aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of stable isotopes for the assessment of reliable data on fractional intestinal absorption of trace metals in healthy humans. Among the various methods available, the double isotope technique, i.e. one isotope given orally together with the test substance to be investigated and another isotope injected intravenously to correct for retention and endogenous excretion of the particular trace metal, provides quantitative figures of intestinal absorption at reasonable expenses with regard to costs for materials and number of samples to be evaluated. The trace metals exemplarily included in this study, i.e. iron, cobalt and molybdenum show diverging relations between absorbed fractions and amounts administered which are indicative for different regulatory mechanisms of their body content. Food ligands influence the fractional absorption significantly so that the uptake from a composite meal cannot be derived from results on uptake from particular foodstuffs. Therefore, validated data on the behaviour of intestinal absorption will significantly contribute to a better understanding of human trace metal metabolism.

  19. Vibrio cholerae cytolysin causes an inflammatory response in human intestinal epithelial cells that is modulated by the PrtV protease.

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    Gangwei Ou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vibrio cholerae is the causal intestinal pathogen of the diarrheal disease cholera. It secretes the protease PrtV, which protects the bacterium from invertebrate predators but reduces the ability of Vibrio-secreted factor(s to induce interleukin-8 (IL-8 production by human intestinal epithelial cells. The aim was to identify the secreted component(s of V. cholerae that induces an epithelial inflammatory response and to define whether it is a substrate for PrtV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Culture supernatants of wild type V. cholerae O1 strain C6706, its derivatives and pure V. cholerae cytolysin (VCC were analyzed for the capacity to induce changes in cytokine mRNA expression levels, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha secretion, permeability and cell viability when added to the apical side of polarized tight monolayer T84 cells used as an in vitro model for human intestinal epithelium. Culture supernatants were also analyzed for hemolytic activity and for the presence of PrtV and VCC by immunoblot analysis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that VCC is capable of causing an inflammatory response characterized by increased permeability and production of IL-8 and TNF-alpha in tight monolayers. Pure VCC at a concentration of 160 ng/ml caused an inflammatory response that reached the magnitude of that caused by Vibrio-secreted factors, while higher concentrations caused epithelial cell death. The inflammatory response was totally abolished by treatment with PrtV. The findings suggest that low doses of VCC initiate a local immune defense reaction while high doses lead to intestinal epithelial lesions. Furthermore, VCC is indeed a substrate for PrtV and PrtV seems to execute an environment-dependent modulation of the activity of VCC that may be the cause of V. cholerae reactogenicity.

  20. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

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    Benoît Couvigny

    Full Text Available The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health.

  1. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induced by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in cultured human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Anshu; Kaur, Kiranjeet; Bhattacharyya, Shalmoli; Chakraborti, Anuradha; Ghosh, Sujata

    2017-03-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emerging enteric pathogen causing diarrhoeal diseases in multiple epidemiological and clinical settings. However, understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease caused by this organism is still suboptimal. Studies have indicated that enteric bacteria induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in host intestinal epithelial cells might play a vital role in the pathogenesis caused by these organisms. In this study an attempt was made to assess EAEC-induced apoptosis and cell cycle modulation in human intestinal epithelial cell lines. INT-407 and HCT-15 cells were infected with EAEC-T8 (clinical isolate) as well as plasmid cured variant of EAEC-T8 (EAEC-pT8). Propidium iodide staining was done to select the time of infection and the incubation period of the infected culture. Apoptosis was further assessed in EAEC infected both the cell lines by annexin-V-FLUOS & propidium iodide, cell death detection ELISA, DNA strand breaks and microscopic analysis. Further, the DNA content of the EAEC-infected cells at different phases of cell cycle was also monitored. We have found that EAEC could induce apoptosis in human small intestinal as well as colonic epithelial cell lines, which was assessed by the expression of phosphatidylserine on host cell surface, internucleosomal cleavage of host cell DNA and microscopic analysis of the characteristic apoptotic features of these cells. EAEC was also found to arrest cells at S phase and G2-M phase of the cell cycle. EAEC-T8 could induce maximum apoptosis and cell cycle modulation in both small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells. Further, we have observed that the plasmid of this organism had maximum contribution to these processes. The outcome of this study has undoubtedly led to a better understanding of the basic mechanism of pathogenesis caused by EAEC.

  2. Development of an in vitro co-culture model to mimic the human intestine in healthy and diseased state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpfer, Angela A M; Urbán, Patricia; Gioria, Sabrina; Kanase, Nilesh; Stone, Vicki; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka

    2017-12-01

    The intestine forms the largest interface between the environment and the human organism. Its integrity and functioning are crucial for the uptake of nutrients while preventing access of harmful antigens. Inflammatory conditions can significantly change the normal functioning of the intestine. In vitro models that adequately reproduce both healthy and inflamed intestinal tissue could provide a useful tool for studying the mechanisms of intestinal inflammation and investigating new therapeutic drugs. We established a co-culture of Caco-2 and PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells that mimics the intestine in healthy and controlled inflamed states. In homoeostatic conditions without stimulation, Caco-2 and THP-1 cells were co-cultured for 48h without affecting the barrier integrity and with no increase in the release of cytokines, nitric oxide or lactate dehydrogenase. To simulate the inflamed intestine, the Caco-2 barrier was primed with IFN-γ and THP-1 cells were pre-stimulated with LPS and IFN-γ. In these conditions a significant but temporary reduction in barrier integrity was measured, and large concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cytotoxicity markers detected. With its ability to feature numerous hallmarks of intestinal inflammation the presented co-culture model of epithelial cells and macrophages offers a unique possibility to study exposure effects in relation to the health status of the intestine. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Human intestinal parasites in non-biting synanthropic flies in Ogun State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenusi, Adedotun Adesegun; Adewoga, Thomas O Sunday

    2013-01-01

    Filth-feeding and breeding, non-biting synanthropic flies have been incriminated in the dissemination of human enteropathogens in the environment. This study determined the species of non-biting synanthropic flies associated with four filthy sites in Ilishan, Ogun State, southwest Nigeria, and assessed their potentials for mechanical transmission of human intestinal parasites. 7190 flies identified as Musca domestica (33.94%), Chrysomya megacephala (26.01%), Musca sorbens (23.23%), Lucilia cuprina (8.76%), Calliphora vicina (4.59%), Sarcophaga sp. (2.78%) and Fannia scalaris (0.70%) were examined for human intestinal parasites by the formol-ether concentration and modified Ziehl-Neelsen techniques. Eggs of the following parasites: Ascaris lumbricoides (34.08%), Trichuris trichiura (25.87%), hookworms (20.45%), Taenia sp. (2.36%), Hymenolepis nana (1.11%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.56%), Strongyloides stercoralis (larvae; 3.89%) and cysts of Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (27.26%), Entamoeba coli (22.67%), Giardia lamblia (3.34%) and Cryptosporidium sp. (1.81%) were isolated from the body surfaces and or gut contents of 75.24% of 719 pooled fly batches. The helminths A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura and the protozoans, E. histolytica/dispar and E. coli were the dominant parasites detected, both on body surfaces and in the gut contents of flies. C. megacephala was the highest carrier of parasites (diversity and number). More parasites were isolated from the gut than from body surfaces (P < 0.05). Flies from soiled ground often carried more parasites than those from abattoir, garbage or open-air market. Synanthropic fly species identified in this study can be of potential epidemiological importance as mechanical transmitters of human intestinal parasites acquired naturally from filth and carried on their body surfaces and or in the gut, because of their vagility and feeding mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Doxycycline protects human intestinal cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury: Implications from an in-vitro hypoxia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummitzsch, Lars; Zitta, Karina; Berndt, Rouven; Kott, Matthias; Schildhauer, Christin; Parczany, Kerstin; Steinfath, Markus; Albrecht, Martin

    2017-04-15

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a grave clinical emergency and associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Based on the complex underlying mechanisms, a multimodal pharmacological approach seems necessary to prevent intestinal I/R injury. The antibiotic drug doxycycline, which exhibits a wide range of pleiotropic therapeutic properties, might be a promising candidate for also reducing I/R injury in the intestine. To investigate possible protective effects of doxycycline on intestinal I/R injury, human intestinal CaCo-2 cells were exposed to doxycycline at clinically relevant concentrations. In order to mimic I/R injury, CaCo-2 were thereafter subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation by using our recently described two-enzyme in-vitro hypoxia model. Investigations of cell morphology, cell damage, apoptosis and hydrogen peroxide formation were performed 24h after the hypoxic insult. Hypoxia/reoxygenation injury resulted in morphological signs of cell damage, elevated LDH concentrations in the respective culture media (Pdoxycycline (5µM, 10µM, 50µM) reduced the hypoxia induced signs of cell damage and LDH release (Pdoxycycline protects human intestinal cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in-vitro. Further animal and clinical studies are required to prove the protective potential of doxycycline on intestinal I/R injury under in-vivo conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Metabolism of the benzidine-based azo dye Direct Black 38 by human intestinal microbiota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, B.W.; Cerniglia, C.E.; Federle, T.W.

    1985-07-01

    Benzidine-based azo dyes are proven mutagens and have been linked to bladder cancer. Previous studies have indicated that their initial reduction is the result of the azo reductase activity of the intestinal microbiota. Metabolism of the benzidine-based dye Direct Black 38 was examined by using a semicontinuous culture system that simulates the lumen of the human large intestine. The system was inoculated with freshly voided feces, and an active flora was maintained as evidenced by volatile fatty acid and gas production. Within 7 days after exposure to the dye, the following metabolites were isolated and identified by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry: benzidine, 4-aminobiphenyl, monoacetylbenzidine, and acetylaminobiphenyl. Benzidine reached its peak level after 24 h, accounting for 39.1% of the added dye. Its level began to decline, and by day 7 the predominant metabolite was acetylaminobiphenyl, which accounted for 51.1% of the parent compound. Formation of the deaminated and N-acetylated analogs of benzidine, which have enhanced mutagenicity and lipophilicity, previously has not been attributed to the intestinal microbiota.

  6. Associations between common intestinal parasites and bacteria in humans as revealed by qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien Andersen, L; Karim, A B; Roager, H M; Vigsnæs, L K; Krogfelt, K A; Licht, T R; Stensvold, C R

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have shown associations between groups of intestinal bacterial or specific ratios between bacterial groups and various disease traits. Meanwhile, little is known about interactions and associations between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in the human gut. In this work, we set out to investigate potential associations between common single-celled parasites such as Blastocystis spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis and intestinal bacteria. Stool DNA from patients with intestinal symptoms were selected based on being Blastocystis spp.-positive (B+)/negative (B-) and D. fragilis-positive (D+)/negative (D-), and split into four groups of 21 samples (B+ D+, B+ D-, B- D+, and B- D-). Quantitative PCR targeting the six bacterial taxa Bacteroides, Prevotella, the butyrate-producing clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, the mucin-degrading Akkermansia muciniphila, and the indigenous group of Bifidobacterium was subsequently performed, and the relative abundance of these bacteria across the four groups was compared. The relative abundance of Bacteroides in B- D- samples was significantly higher compared with B+ D- and B+ D+ samples (P Blastocystis alone or combined with D. fragilis is associated with gut microbiota characterized by low relative abundances of Bacteroides and Clostridial cluster XIVa and high levels of Prevotella.

  7. Prediction of Human Intestinal Absorption of Compounds Using Artificial Intelligence Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Sharma, Anju; Siddiqui, Mohammed Haris; Tiwari, Rajesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Information about Pharmacokinetics of compounds is an essential component of drug design and development. Modeling the pharmacokinetic properties require identification of the factors effecting absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of compounds. There have been continuous attempts in the prediction of intestinal absorption of compounds using various Artificial intelligence methods in the effort to reduce the attrition rate of drug candidates entering to preclinical and clinical trials. Currently, there are large numbers of individual predictive models available for absorption using machine learning approaches. Six Artificial intelligence methods namely, Support vector machine, k- nearest neighbor, Probabilistic neural network, Artificial neural network, Partial least square and Linear discriminant analysis were used for prediction of absorption of compounds. Prediction accuracy of Support vector machine, k- nearest neighbor, Probabilistic neural network, Artificial neural network, Partial least square and Linear discriminant analysis for prediction of intestinal absorption of compounds was found to be 91.54%, 88.33%, 84.30%, 86.51%, 79.07% and 80.08% respectively. Comparative analysis of all the six prediction models suggested that Support vector machine with Radial basis function based kernel is comparatively better for binary classification of compounds using human intestinal absorption and may be useful at preliminary stages of drug design and development. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Immunohistochemical localization of a gap junction protein (connexin43) in the muscularis externa of murine, canine, and human intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Huizinga, J D; Thuneberg, L

    1993-01-01

    Electron-microscopic studies have revealed a heterogeneous distribution of gap junctions in the muscularis externa of mammalian intestines. This heterogeneity is observed at four different levels: among species; between small and large intestines; between longitudinal and circular muscle layers...... also included the vascular smooth muscle of coronary arteries into our study. Two versions of the immunotechnique (peroxidase-antiperoxidase and fluorescence methods) were applied to frozen sections of murine, canine, and human small and large intestines, as well as to pig coronary artery. In the small...... intestine of all three species a very strong reactivity marked the outer main division of the circular muscle layer, while the longitudinal muscle layer as well as the inner thin division of the circular muscle layer were negative. In murine and human colon both muscle layers were negative, while in canine...

  9. Exogenous HIV-1 Nef Upsets the IFN-γ-Induced Impairment of Human Intestinal Epithelial Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Maria Giovanna; Vincentini, Olimpia; Felli, Cristina; Spadaro, Francesca; Silano, Marco; Moricoli, Diego; Giordani, Luciana; Viora, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Background The mucosal tissues play a central role in the transmission of HIV-1 infection as well as in the pathogenesis of AIDS. Despite several clinical studies reported intestinal dysfunction during HIV infection, the mechanisms underlying HIV-induced impairments of mucosal epithelial barrier are still unclear. It has been postulated that HIV-1 alters enterocytic function and HIV-1 proteins have been detected in several cell types of the intestinal mucosa. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of the accessory HIV-1 Nef protein on human epithelial cell line. Methodology/Principal Findings We used unstimulated or IFN-γ-stimulated Caco-2 cells, as a model for homeostatic and inflamed gastrointestinal tracts, respectively. We investigated the effect of exogenous recombinant Nef on monolayer integrity analyzing its uptake, transepithelial electrical resistance, permeability to FITC-dextran and the expression of tight junction proteins. Moreover, we measured the induction of proinflammatory mediators. Exogenous Nef was taken up by Caco-2 cells, increased intestinal epithelial permeability and upset the IFN-γ-induced reduction of transepitelial resistance, interfering with tight junction protein expression. Moreover, Nef inhibited IFN-γ-induced apoptosis and up-regulated TNF-α, IL-6 and MIP-3α production by Caco-2 cells while down-regulated IL-10 production. The simultaneous exposure of Caco-2 cells to Nef and IFN-γ did not affect cytokine secretion respect to untreated cells. Finally, we found that Nef counteracted the IFN-γ induced arachidonic acid cascade. Conclusion/Significance Our findings suggest that exogenous Nef, perturbing the IFN-γ-induced impairment of intestinal epithelial cells, could prolong cell survival, thus allowing for accumulation of viral particles. Our results may improve the understanding of AIDS pathogenesis, supporting the discovery of new therapeutic interventions. PMID:21858117

  10. Exogenous HIV-1 Nef upsets the IFN-γ-induced impairment of human intestinal epithelial integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giovanna Quaranta

    Full Text Available The mucosal tissues play a central role in the transmission of HIV-1 infection as well as in the pathogenesis of AIDS. Despite several clinical studies reported intestinal dysfunction during HIV infection, the mechanisms underlying HIV-induced impairments of mucosal epithelial barrier are still unclear. It has been postulated that HIV-1 alters enterocytic function and HIV-1 proteins have been detected in several cell types of the intestinal mucosa. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of the accessory HIV-1 Nef protein on human epithelial cell line.We used unstimulated or IFN-γ-stimulated Caco-2 cells, as a model for homeostatic and inflamed gastrointestinal tracts, respectively. We investigated the effect of exogenous recombinant Nef on monolayer integrity analyzing its uptake, transepithelial electrical resistance, permeability to FITC-dextran and the expression of tight junction proteins. Moreover, we measured the induction of proinflammatory mediators. Exogenous Nef was taken up by Caco-2 cells, increased intestinal epithelial permeability and upset the IFN-γ-induced reduction of transepithelial resistance, interfering with tight junction protein expression. Moreover, Nef inhibited IFN-γ-induced apoptosis and up-regulated TNF-α, IL-6 and MIP-3α production by Caco-2 cells while down-regulated IL-10 production. The simultaneous exposure of Caco-2 cells to Nef and IFN-γ did not affect cytokine secretion respect to untreated cells. Finally, we found that Nef counteracted the IFN-γ induced arachidonic acid cascade.Our findings suggest that exogenous Nef, perturbing the IFN-γ-induced impairment of intestinal epithelial cells, could prolong cell survival, thus allowing for accumulation of viral particles. Our results may improve the understanding of AIDS pathogenesis, supporting the discovery of new therapeutic interventions.

  11. Xenotransplantation of human intestine into mouse abdomen or subcutaneous tissue: Novel platforms for the study of the human enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, N; Marsiano, N; Bruckner, R S; Scharl, M; Gutnick, M J; Yagel, S; Arciero, E; Goldstein, A M; Shpigel, N Y

    2017-09-08

    Current efforts to develop stem cell therapy as a novel treatment for neurointestinal diseases are limited by the unavailability of a model system to study cell transplantation in the human intestine. We propose that xenograft models support enteric nervous system (ENS) development in the fetal human intestine when transplanted into mice subcutaneously or intra-abdominally. Fetal human small and large intestine were grafted onto the small intestinal mesentery and into the subcutaneous tissue of immunodeficient mice for up to 4 months. Intestinal cytoarchitecture and ENS development were studied using immunohistochemistry. In both abdominal and subcutaneous grafts, the intestine developed normally with formation of mature epithelial and mesenchymal layers. The ENS was patterned in two ganglionated plexuses containing enteric neurons and glia, including cholinergic and nitrergic neuronal subtypes. c-Kit-immunoreactive interstitial cells of Cajal were present in the gut wall. Abdominal xenografts represent a novel model that supports the growth and development of fetal human intestine. This in vivo approach will be a useful method to study maturation of the ENS, the pathophysiology of neurointestinal diseases, and the long-term survival and functional differentiation of neuronal stem cells for the treatment of enteric neuropathies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Dietary emulsifiers directly alter human microbiota composition and gene expression ex vivo potentiating intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassaing, Benoit; Van de Wiele, Tom; De Bodt, Jana; Marzorati, Massimo; Gewirtz, Andrew T

    2017-08-01

    The intestinal microbiota plays a central role in the development of many chronic inflammatory diseases including IBD and metabolic syndrome. Administration of substances that alter microbiota composition, including the synthetic dietary emulsifiers polysorbate 80 (P80) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), can promote such inflammatory disorders. However, that inflammation itself impacts microbiota composition has obfuscated defining the extent to which these compounds or other substances act directly upon the microbiota versus acting on host parameters that promote inflammation, which subsequently reshapes the microbiota. We examined the direct impact of CMC and P80 on the microbiota using the mucosal simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (M-SHIME) model that maintains a complex stable human microbiota in the absence of a live host. This approach revealed that both P80 and CMC acted directly upon human microbiota to increase its proinflammatory potential, as revealed by increased levels of bioactive flagellin. The CMC-induced increase in flagellin was rapid (1 day) and driven by altered microbiota gene expression. In contrast, the P80-induced flagellin increase occurred more slowly and was closely associated with altered species composition. Transfer of both emulsifier-treated M-SHIME microbiotas to germ-free recipient mice recapitulated many of the host and microbial alterations observed in mice directly treated with emulsifiers. These results demonstrate a novel paradigm of deconstructing host-microbiota interactions and indicate that the microbiota can be directly impacted by these commonly used food additives, in a manner that subsequently drives intestinal inflammation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Human in vivo regional intestinal permeability: importance for pharmaceutical drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennernäs, Hans

    2014-01-06

    Both the development and regulation of pharmaceutical dosage forms have undergone significant improvements and development over the past 25 years, due primarily to the extensive application of the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS). The Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System, which was published in 2005, has also been a useful resource for predicting the influence of transporters in several pharmacokinetic processes. However, there remains a need for the pharmaceutical industry to develop reliable in vitro/in vivo correlations and in silico methods for predicting the rate and extent of complex gastrointestinal (GI) absorption, the bioavailability, and the plasma concentration-time curves for orally administered drug products. Accordingly, a more rational approach is required, one in which high quality in vitro or in silico characterizations of active pharmaceutical ingredients and formulations are integrated into physiologically based in silico biopharmaceutics models to capture the full complexity of GI drug absorption. The need for better understanding of the in vivo GI process has recently become evident after an unsuccessful attempt to predict the GI absorption of BCS class II and IV drugs. Reliable data on the in vivo permeability of the human intestine (Peff) from various intestinal regions is recognized as one of the key biopharmaceutical requirements when developing in silico GI biopharmaceutics models with improved predictive accuracy. The Peff values for human jejunum and ileum, based on historical open, single-pass, perfusion studies are presented in this review. The main objective of this review is to summarize and discuss the relevance and current status of these human in vivo regional intestinal permeability values.

  14. Comparison of DNA extraction kits for PCR-DGGE analysis of human intestinal microbial communities from fecal specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Nakatsu Cindy H; Savaiano Dennis A; Ariefdjohan Merlin W

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The influence of diet on intestinal microflora has been investigated mainly using conventional microbiological approaches. Although these studies have advanced knowledge on human intestinal microflora, it is imperative that new methods are applied to facilitate scientific progress. Culture-independent molecular fingerprinting method of Polymerase Chain Reaction and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) has been used to study microbial communities in a variety ...

  15. Generation of L cells in mouse and human small intestine organoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Natalia; Reimann, Frank; Bartfeld, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Upon a nutrient challenge, L cells produce glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a powerful stimulant of insulin release. Strategies to augment endogenous GLP-1 production include promoting L-cell differentiation and increasing L-cell number. Here we present a novel in vitro platform to generate...... lineage of intestinal stem cell development. Thus, our platform allows us to study and modulate the development of L cells in mouse and human crypts as a potential basis for novel therapeutic strategies in patients with type 2 diabetes....

  16. RGD-Dependent Epithelial Cell-Matrix Interactions in the Human Intestinal Crypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick D. Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between the extracellular matrix (ECM and integrin receptors trigger structural and functional bonds between the cell microenvironment and the cytoskeleton. Such connections are essential for adhesion structure integrity and are key players in regulating transduction of specific intracellular signals, which in turn regulate the organization of the cell microenvironment and, consequently, cell function. The RGD peptide-dependent integrins represent a key subgroup of ECM receptors involved in the maintenance of epithelial homeostasis. Here we review recent findings on RGD-dependent ECM-integrin interactions and their roles in human intestinal epithelial crypt cells.

  17. E Durans Strain M4-5 Isolated From Human Colonic Flora Attenuates Intestinal Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avram-Hananel, L.; Stock, J.; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro and in vivo effects of a unique high-butyrate-producing bacterial strain from human colonic flora, Enterococcus durans, in prevention and treatment of intestinal inflammation. METHODS: A compartmentalized Caco-2/leukocyte coculture model...... was used to examine the in vitro effects of E durans and its metabolite butyrate on basal and Escherichia coli–stimulated secretion of proinflammatory immune factors (IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. A murine model of dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis was used...

  18. Vitrification preserves murine and human donor cells for generation of tissue-engineered intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Ryan G; Speer, Allison L; Grant, Christa N; Levin, Daniel E; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2014-08-01

    Short bowel syndrome causes significant morbidity and mortality. Tissue-engineered intestine may serve as a viable replacement. Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) has previously been generated in the mouse model from donor cells that were harvested and immediately reimplanted; however, this technique may prove impossible in children who are critically ill, hemodynamically unstable, or septic. We hypothesized that organoid units (OU), multicellular clusters containing epithelium and mesenchyme, could be cryopreserved for delayed production of TESI. OU were isolated from TESI was analyzed by histology and immunofluorescence. After cryopreservation, the viability of murine OU was significantly higher in the vitrification group (93 ± 2%, mean ± standard error of the mean) compared with standard freezing (56 ± 6%) (P TESI was successfully generated from the preserved OU. Hematoxylin and eosin staining demonstrated a mucosa composed of a simple columnar epithelium whereas immunofluorescence staining confirmed the presence of both progenitor and differentiated epithelial cells. Furthermore, beta-2-microglobulin confirmed that the human TESI epithelium originated from human cells. We demonstrated improved multicellular viability after vitrification over conventional cryopreservation techniques and the first successful vitrification of murine and human OU with subsequent TESI generation. Clinical application of this method may allow for delayed autologous implantation of TESI for children in extremis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Combined Effects of Lipophilic Phycotoxins (Okadaic Acid, Azapsiracid-1 and Yessotoxin on Human Intestinal Cells Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Jean Ferron

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Phycotoxins are monitored in seafood because they can cause food poisonings in humans. Phycotoxins do not only occur singly but also as mixtures in shellfish. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro toxic interactions of binary combinations of three lipophilic phycotoxins commonly found in Europe (okadaic acid (OA, yessotoxin (YTX and azaspiracid-1 (AZA-1 using the neutral red uptake assay on two human intestinal cell models, Caco-2 and the human intestinal epithelial crypt-like cells (HIEC. Based on the cytotoxicity of individual toxins, we studied the interactions between toxins in binary mixtures using the combination index-isobologram equation, a method widely used in pharmacology to study drug interactions. This method quantitatively classifies interactions between toxins in mixtures as synergistic, additive or antagonistic. AZA-1/OA, and YTX/OA mixtures showed increasing antagonism with increasing toxin concentrations. In contrast, the AZA-1/YTX mixture showed increasing synergism with increasing concentrations, especially for mixtures with high YTX concentrations. These results highlight the hazard potency of AZA-1/YTX mixtures with regard to seafood intoxication.

  20. Spatial heterogeneity and co-occurrence patterns of human mucosal-associated intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhigang; Geng, Jiawei; Tang, Xiaodan; Fan, Hong; Xu, Jinchao; Wen, Xiujun; Ma, Zhanshan Sam; Shi, Peng

    2014-04-01

    Human gut microbiota shows high inter-subject variations, but the actual spatial distribution and co-occurrence patterns of gut mucosa microbiota that occur within a healthy human instestinal tract remain poorly understood. In this study, we illustrated a model of this mucosa bacterial communities' biogeography, based on the largest data set so far, obtained via 454-pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rDNAs associated with 77 matched biopsy tissue samples taken from terminal ileum, ileocecal valve, ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon and rectum of 11 healthy adult subjects. Borrowing from macro-ecology, we used both Taylor's power law analysis and phylogeny-based beta-diversity metrics to uncover a highly heterogeneous distribution pattern of mucosa microbial inhabitants along the length of the intestinal tract. We then developed a spatial dispersion model with an R-squared value greater than 0.950 to map out the gut mucosa-associated flora's non-linear spatial distribution pattern for 51.60% of the 188 most abundant gut bacterial species. Furthermore, spatial co-occurring network analysis of mucosa microbial inhabitants together with occupancy (that is habitat generalists, specialists and opportunist) analyses implies that ecological relationships (both oppositional and symbiotic) between mucosa microbial inhabitants may be important contributors to the observed spatial heterogeneity of mucosa microbiota along the human intestine and may even potentially be associated with mutual cooperation within and functional stability of the gut ecosystem.

  1. Transepithelial transport of ambroxol hydrochloride across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetinová, Vera; Smetanová, Libuse; Kholová, Dagmar; Svoboda, Zbynek; Kvetina, Jaroslav

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed i) to characterize the transepithelial transport of the mucolytic agent ambroxol hydrochloride across the intestinal barrier, ii) to classify the ambroxol according to Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) and iii) to predict ambroxol absorption in humans. Transport of ambroxol (100, 300 and 1000 micromol/l) was studied in a human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2 in apical to basolateral and basolateral to apical direction, under iso-pH 7.4 and pH-gradient (6 vs. 7.4) conditions. The relative contribution of the paracellular route was estimated using Ca2+-free transport medium. Ambroxol samples from receiver compartments were analysed by HPLC with UV detection (242 nm). Results showed that ambroxol transport is linear with time, pH-dependent and direction-independent, displays non-saturable (first-order) kinetics. Thus, the transport seems to be transcellular mediated by passive diffusion. Estimated high solubility and high permeability (P(app) = 45 x 10(-6) cm/s) of ambroxol rank it among well absorbed compounds and class I of BCS. It can be expected that the oral dose fraction of ambroxol absorbed in human intestine is high.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus induces IL-8 expression through its lipoproteins in the human intestinal epithelial cell, Caco-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seok-Seong; Noh, Su Young; Park, Ok-Jin; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause the intestinal inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of S. aureus infection in the intestine. In the present study, we investigated whether S. aureus could stimulate human intestinal epithelial cells triggering inflammation. When the human intestinal epithelial cell-line, Caco-2, and the primary colon cells were stimulated with ethanol-inactivated S. aureus, IL-8 expression was induced in a dose-dependent manner. The inactivated S. aureus preferentially stimulated Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 rather than TLR4. Lipoproteins, lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and peptidoglycan (PGN) are considered as potential TLR2 ligands of S. aureus. Interestingly, S aureus lipoproteins and Pam2CSK4 mimicking Gram-positive bacterial lipoproteins, but not LTA and PGN of S. aureus, significantly induced IL-8 expression in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, lipoprotein-deficient S. aureus mutant strain failed to induce IL-8 production. Collectively, these results suggest that S. aureus stimulates the human intestinal epithelial cells to induce the chemokine IL-8 production through its lipoproteins, potentially contributing the development of intestinal inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Transesterification of a series of 12 parabens by liver and small-intestinal microsomes of rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Chieri; Watanabe, Yoko; Uramaru, Naoto; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    Hydrolytic transformation of parabens (4-hydroxybenzoic acid esters; used as antibacterial agents) to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols by tissue microsomes is well-known both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated transesterification reactions of parabens catalyzed by rat and human microsomes, using a series of 12 parabens with C1-C12 alcohol side chains. Transesterification of parabens by rat liver and small-intestinal microsomes occurred in the presence of alcohols in the microsomal incubation mixture. Among the 12 parabens, propylparaben was most effectively transesterified by rat liver microsomes with methanol or ethanol, followed by butylparaben. Relatively low activity was observed with longer-side-chain parabens. In contrast, small-intestinal microsomes exhibited higher activity towards moderately long side-chain parabens, and showed the highest activity toward octylparaben. When parabens were incubated with liver or small-intestinal microsomes in the presence of C1-C12 alcohols, ethanol and decanol were most effectively transferred to parabens by rat liver microsomes and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively. Human liver and small-intestinal microsomes also exhibited significant transesterification activities with different substrate specificities, like rat microsomes. Carboxylesterase isoforms, CES1b and CES1c, and CES2, exhibited significant transesterification activity toward parabens, and showed similar substrate specificity to human liver and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Initiation of an inflammatory response in resident intestinal lamina propria cells -use of a human organ culture model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutta Schröder-Braunstein

    Full Text Available Resident human lamina propria immune cells serve as powerful effectors in host defense. Molecular events associated with the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells are largely unknown. Here, we aimed to characterize phenotypic and functional changes induced in these cells at the onset of intestinal inflammation using a human intestinal organ culture model. In this model, healthy human colonic mucosa was depleted of epithelial cells by EDTA treatment. Following loss of the epithelial layer, expression of the inflammatory mediators IL1B, IL6, IL8, IL23A, TNFA, CXCL2, and the surface receptors CD14, TLR2, CD86, CD54 was rapidly induced in resident lamina propria cells in situ as determined by qRT-PCR and immunohistology. Gene microarray analysis of lamina propria cells obtained by laser-capture microdissection provided an overview of global changes in gene expression occurring during the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells. Bioinformatic analysis gave insight into signalling pathways mediating this inflammatory response. Furthermore, comparison with published microarray datasets of inflamed mucosa in vivo (ulcerative colitis revealed a significant overlap of differentially regulated genes underlining the in vivo relevance of the organ culture model. Furthermore, genes never been previously associated with intestinal inflammation were identified using this model. The organ culture model characterized may be useful to study molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in normal mucosa as well as potential alterations of this response in inflammatory bowel disease.

  5. Towards a defined ECM and small molecule based monolayer culture system for the expansion of mouse and human intestinal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhixiang; Martyn, Keir; Yang, Andy; Yin, Xiaolei; Mead, Benjamin E; Joshi, Nitin; Sherman, Nicholas E; Langer, Robert S; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2018-02-01

    Current ISC culture systems face significant challenges such as animal-derived or undefined matrix compositions, batch-to-batch variability (e.g. Matrigel-based organoid culture), and complexity of assaying cell aggregates such as organoids which renders the research and clinical translation of ISCs challenging. Here, through screening for suitable ECM components, we report a defined, collagen based monolayer culture system that supports the growth of mouse and human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) enriched for an Lgr5+ population comparable or higher to the levels found in a standard Matrigel-based organoid culture. The system, referred to as the Bolstering Lgr5 Transformational (BLT) Sandwich culture, comprises a collagen IV-coated porous substrate and a collagen I gel overlay which sandwich an IEC monolayer in between. The distinct collagen cues synergistically regulate IEC attachment, proliferation, and Lgr5 expression through maximizing the engagement of distinct cell surface adhesion receptors (i.e. integrin α2β1, integrin β4) and cell polarity. Further, we apply our BLT Sandwich system to identify that the addition of a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor inhibitor (LDN-193189) improves the expansion of Lgr5-GFP+ cells from mouse small intestinal crypts by nearly 2.5-fold. Notably, the BLT Sandwich culture is capable of expanding human-derived IECs with higher LGR5 mRNA levels than conventional Matrigel culture, providing superior expansion of human LGR5+ ISCs. Considering the key roles Lgr5+ ISCs play in intestinal epithelial homeostasis and regeneration, we envision that our BLT Sandwich culture system holds great potential for understanding and manipulating ISC biology in vitro (e.g. for modeling ISC-mediated gut diseases) or for expanding a large number of ISCs for clinical utility (e.g. for stem cell therapy). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of human norovirus in intestinal biopsies from immunocompromised transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karandikar, Umesh C; Crawford, Sue E; Ajami, Nadim J; Murakami, Kosuke; Kou, Baijun; Ettayebi, Khalil; Papanicolaou, Genovefa A; Jongwutiwes, Ubonvan; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Shia, Jinru; Mercer, David; Finegold, Milton J; Vinjé, Jan; Atmar, Robert L; Estes, Mary K

    2016-09-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) can often cause chronic infections in solid organ and haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients. Based on histopathological changes observed during HuNoV infections, the intestine is the presumed site of virus replication in patients; however, the cell types infected by HuNoVs remain unknown. The objective of this study was to characterize histopathological changes during HuNoV infection and to determine the cell types that may be permissive for HuNoV replication in transplant patients. We analysed biopsies from HuNoV-infected and non-infected (control) transplant patients to assess histopathological changes in conjunction with detection of HuNoV antigens to identify the infected cell types. HuNoV infection in immunocompromised patients was associated with histopathological changes such as disorganization and flattening of the intestinal epithelium. The HuNoV major capsid protein, VP1, was detected in all segments of the small intestine, in areas of biopsies that showed histopathological changes. Specifically, VP1 was detected in enterocytes, macrophages, T cells and dendritic cells. HuNoV replication was investigated by detecting the non-structural proteins, RdRp and VPg. We detected RdRp and VPg along with VP1 in duodenal and jejunal enterocytes. These results provide critical insights into histological changes due to HuNoV infection in immunocompromised patients and propose human enterocytes as a physiologically relevant cell type for HuNoV cultivation.

  7. Metabolism and transfer of the mycotoxin zearalenone in human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videmann, Bernadette; Mazallon, Michelle; Tep, Jonathan; Lecoeur, Sylvaine

    2008-10-01

    The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA) is found worldwide as contaminant in cereals and grains. It is implicated in reproductive disorders and hyperestrogenic syndromes in animals and humans exposed by food. We investigated metabolism and transfer of ZEA using the human Caco-2 cell line as a model of intestinal epithelial barrier. Cells exposed to 10-200 microM ZEA showed efficacious metabolism of the toxin. alpha-zearalenol and beta-zearalenol were the measured preponderant metabolites (respectively 40.7+/-3.1% and 31.9+/-4.9% of total metabolites, after a 3h exposure to 10 microM ZEA), whereas ZEA-glucuronide and alpha-zearalenol glucuronide were less produced (respectively 8.2+/-0.9% and 19.1+/-1.3% of total metabolites, after a 3h exposure to 10 microM ZEA). Cell production of reduced metabolites was strongly inhibited by alpha-and beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitors, and Caco-2 cells exhibited alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II and beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I mRNA. After cell apical exposure to ZEA, alpha-zearalenol was preponderantly found at the basal side, whereas beta-zearalenol and both glucuronides were preferentially excreted at the apical side. As alpha-zearalenol shows the strongest estrogenic activity, the preferential production and basal transfer of this metabolite suggests that intestinal cells may contribute to the manifestation of zearalenone adverse effects.

  8. Strain-specific probiotic (Lactobacillus helveticus) inhibition of Campylobacter jejuni invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wine, Eytan; Gareau, Mélanie G; Johnson-Henry, Kathene; Sherman, Philip M

    2009-11-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common bacterial cause of enterocolitis in humans, leading to diarrhoea and chronic extraintestinal diseases. Although probiotics are effective in preventing other enteric infections, beneficial microorganisms have not been extensively studied with C. jejuni. The aim of this study was to delineate the ability of selected probiotic Lactobacillus strains to reduce epithelial cell invasion by C. jejuni. Human colon T84 and embryonic intestine 407 epithelial cells were pretreated with Lactobacillus strains and then infected with two prototypic C. jejuni pathogens. Lactobacillus helveticus, strain R0052 reduced C. jejuni invasion into T84 cells by 35-41%, whereas Lactobacillus rhamnosus R0011 did not reduce pathogen invasion. Lactobacillus helveticus R0052 also decreased invasion of one C. jejuni isolate (strain 11168) into intestine 407 cells by 55%. Lactobacillus helveticus R0052 adhered to both epithelial cell types, which suggest that competitive exclusion could contribute to protection by probiotics. Taken together, these findings indicate that the ability of selected probiotics to prevent C. jejuni-mediated disease pathogenesis depends on the pathogen strain, probiotic strain and the epithelial cell type selected. The data support the concept of probiotic strain selectivity, which is dependent on the setting in which it is being evaluated and tested.

  9. Expression of Tn, sialosyl-Tn and T antigens in human foetal large intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Barresi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Tn, sialosyl-Tn and T antigens are simple mucintype carbohydrate antigens that may be expressed in human neoplasies due to alteration of the glycoprotein biosynthetic pathway. Utilising specific monoclonal antibodies (HB-Tn1, HB-STn1 and HB-T1, we have investigated the expression of these simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens in large intestine of 8 human foetuses at early gestational age (9-10 weeks, obtained after therapeutic abortion. In all cases the expression of Tn antigen was mainly localised as a thin rim at the cell membrane and occasionally in the supranuclear region of epithelial cells, while sialosyl-Tn antigen was documented in some goblet cell vacuoles and occasionally in the cytoplasm of columnar cells. T antigen was not expressed in any case. These results indicate that Tn and sialosyl-Tn antigens are expressed as early as nine weeks of gestation, further supporting the notion that they may be considered as oncodevelopmental cancerassociated antigens in the large intestine.

  10. Relative influences of climate change and human activity on the onshore distribution of polar bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ryan R.; Regehr, Eric V.; St. Martin, Michelle; Atwood, Todd C.; Peacock, Elizabeth; Miller, Susanne; Divoky, George J.

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is altering habitat for many species, leading to shifts in distributions that can increase levels of human-wildlife conflict. To develop effective strategies for minimizing human-wildlife conflict, we must understand the relative influences that climate change and other factors have on wildlife distributions. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are increasingly using land during summer and autumn due to sea ice loss, leading to higher incidents of conflict and concerns for human safety. We sought to understand the relative influence of sea ice conditions, onshore habitat characteristics, and human-provisioned food attractants on the distribution and abundance of polar bears while on shore. We also wanted to determine how mitigation measures might reduce human-polar bear conflict associated with an anthropogenic food source. We built a Bayesian hierarchical model based on 14 years of aerial survey data to estimate the weekly number and distribution of polar bears on the coast of northern Alaska in autumn. We then used the model to predict how effective two management options for handling subsistence-harvested whale remains in the community of Kaktovik, Alaska might be. The distribution of bears on shore was most strongly influenced by the presence of whale carcasses and to a lesser extent sea ice and onshore habitat conditions. The numbers of bears on shore were related to sea ice conditions. The two management strategies for handling the whale carcasses reduced the estimated number of bears near Kaktovik by > 75%. By considering multiple factors associated with the onshore distribution and abundance of polar bears we discerned what role human activities played in where bears occur and how successful efforts to manage the whale carcasses might be for reducing human-polar bear conflict.

  11. Butyrate stimulates the growth of human intestinal smooth muscle cells by activation of yes-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Li-Na; Yan, Jun-Kai; Xiao, Yong-Tao; Wen, Jie; Zhang, Tian; Zhou, Ke-Jun; Wang, Yang; Cai, Wei

    2017-08-23

    Intestinal smooth muscle cells play a critical role in the remodeling of intestinal structure and functional adaptation after bowel resection. Recent studies have shown that supplementation of butyrate (Bu) contributes to the compensatory expansion of a muscular layer of the residual intestine in a rodent model of short-bowel syndrome (SBS). However, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we found that the growth of human intestinal smooth muscle cells (HISMCs) was significantly stimulated by Bu via activation of Yes-Associated Protein (YAP). Incubation with 0.5 mM Bu induced a distinct proliferative effect on HISMCs, as indicated by the promotion of cell cycle progression and increased DNA replication. Notably, YAP silencing by RNA interference or its specific inhibitor significantly abolished the proliferative effect of Bu on HISMCs. Furthermore, Bu induced YAP expression and enhanced the translocation of YAP from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, which led to changes in the expression of mitogenesis genes, including TEAD1, TEAD4, CTGF, and Cyr61. These results provide evidence that Bu stimulates the growth of human intestinal muscle cells by activation of YAP, which may be a potential treatment for improving intestinal adaptation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Partitioning of polar and non-polar neutral organic chemicals into human and cow milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Anett; Endo, Satoshi; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a predictive model for milk/water partition coefficients of neutral organic compounds. Batch experiments were performed for 119 diverse organic chemicals in human milk and raw and processed cow milk at 37°C. No differences (milk were observed. The polyparameter linear free energy relationship model fit the calibration data well (SD=0.22 log units). An experimental validation data set including hormones and hormone active compounds was predicted satisfactorily by the model. An alternative modelling approach based on log K(ow) revealed a poorer performance. The model presented here provides a significant improvement in predicting enrichment of potentially hazardous chemicals in milk. In combination with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling this improvement in the estimation of milk/water partitioning coefficients may allow a better risk assessment for a wide range of neutral organic chemicals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bifidobacteria isolated from infants and cultured on human milk oligosaccharides affect intestinal epithelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichlowski, Maciej; De Lartigue, Guillaume; German, J Bruce; Raybould, Helen E; Mills, David A

    2012-09-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are the third most abundant component of breast milk. Our laboratory has previously revealed gene clusters specifically linked to HMO metabolism in selected bifidobacteria isolated from fecal samples of infants. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that growth of selected bifidobacteria on HMO stimulates the intestinal epithelium. Caco-2 and HT-29 cells were incubated with lactose (LAC)- or HMO-grown Bifidobacterium longum subsp infantis (B infantis) or B bifidum. Bacterial adhesion and translocation were measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and tight junction proteins was analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase. Distribution of tight junction proteins was measured using immunofluorescent microscopy. We showed that HMO-grown B infantis had a significantly higher rate of adhesion to HT-29 cells compared with B bifidum. B infantis also induced expression of a cell membrane glycoprotein, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1. Both B infantis and B bifidum grown on HMO caused less occludin relocalization and higher expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 compared with LAC-grown bacteria in Caco-2 cells. B bifidum grown on HMO showed higher expression of junctional adhesion molecule and occludin in Caco-2 cells and HT-29 cells. There were no significant differences between LAC or HMO treatments in bacterial translocation. The study provides evidence for the specific relation between HMO-grown bifidobacteria and intestinal epithelial cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing HMO-induced changes in the bifidobacteria-intestinal cells interaction.

  14. Intestinal microbiome landscaping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shetty, Sudarshan A.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Lahti, Leo; Smidt, Hauke; Vos, de Willem M.

    2017-01-01

    High individuality, large complexity and limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying human intestinal microbiome function remain the major challenges for designing beneficial modulation strategies. Exemplified by the analysis of intestinal bacteria in a thousand Western adults, we discuss

  15. Intestinal and Systemic Immune Responses upon Multi-drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Colonization of Mice Harboring a Human Gut Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliane, von Klitzing; Ekmekciu, Ira; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization has rated multi-drug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa as serious threat for human health. It is, however, unclear, whether intestinal MDR P. aeruginosa carriage is associated with inflammatory responses in intestinal or even systemic compartments. In the present study, we generated with respect to their microbiota “humanized” mice by human fecal microbiota transplantation of secondary abiotic mice. Following peroral challenge with a clinical P. aeruginosa isolate on two consecutive days, mice harboring a human or murine microbiota were only partially protected from stable intestinal P. aeruginosa colonization given that up to 78% of mice were P. aeruginosa-positive at day 28 post-infection (p.i.). Irrespective of the host-specificity of the microbiota, P. aeruginosa colonized mice were clinically uncompromised. However, P. aeruginosa colonization resulted in increased intestinal epithelial apoptosis that was accompanied by pronounced proliferative/regenerative cell responses. Furthermore, at day 7 p.i. increased innate immune cell populations such as macrophages and monocytes could be observed in the colon of mice harboring either a human or murine microbiota, whereas this held true at day 28 p.i. for adaptive immune cells such as B lymphocytes in both the small and large intestines of mice with murine microbiota. At day 7 p.i., pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion was enhanced in the colon and mesenteric lymph nodes, whereas the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was down-regulated in the former at day 28 p.i. Strikingly, cytokine responses upon intestinal P. aeruginosa colonization were not restricted to the intestinal tract, but could also be observed systemically, given that TNF and IFN-γ concentrations were elevated in spleens as early as 7 days p.i., whereas splenic IL-10 levels were dampened at day 28 p.i. of mice with human microbiota. In conclusion, mere intestinal carriage of MDR P. aeruginosa by clinically unaffected

  16. Intestinal and Systemic Immune Responses upon Multi-drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Colonization of Mice Harboring a Human Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Klitzing Eliane

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization has rated multi-drug resistant (MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa as serious threat for human health. It is, however, unclear, whether intestinal MDR P. aeruginosa carriage is associated with inflammatory responses in intestinal or even systemic compartments. In the present study, we generated with respect to their microbiota “humanized” mice by human fecal microbiota transplantation of secondary abiotic mice. Following peroral challenge with a clinical P. aeruginosa isolate on two consecutive days, mice harboring a human or murine microbiota were only partially protected from stable intestinal P. aeruginosa colonization given that up to 78% of mice were P. aeruginosa-positive at day 28 post-infection (p.i.. Irrespective of the host-specificity of the microbiota, P. aeruginosa colonized mice were clinically uncompromised. However, P. aeruginosa colonization resulted in increased intestinal epithelial apoptosis that was accompanied by pronounced proliferative/regenerative cell responses. Furthermore, at day 7 p.i. increased innate immune cell populations such as macrophages and monocytes could be observed in the colon of mice harboring either a human or murine microbiota, whereas this held true at day 28 p.i. for adaptive immune cells such as B lymphocytes in both the small and large intestines of mice with murine microbiota. At day 7 p.i., pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion was enhanced in the colon and mesenteric lymph nodes, whereas the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was down-regulated in the former at day 28 p.i. Strikingly, cytokine responses upon intestinal P. aeruginosa colonization were not restricted to the intestinal tract, but could also be observed systemically, given that TNF and IFN-γ concentrations were elevated in spleens as early as 7 days p.i., whereas splenic IL-10 levels were dampened at day 28 p.i. of mice with human microbiota. In conclusion, mere intestinal carriage of MDR P. aeruginosa by

  17. Human intestinal microbiota composition is associated with local and systemic inflammation in obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdam, F.J.; Fuentes Enriquez de Salamanca, S.; Jonge, de C.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Erbil, R.; Greve, J.W.; Buurman, W.A.; Vos, de W.M.; Rensen, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Intestinal microbiota have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity, but the mechanism remains elusive. The relationship between microbiota composition, intestinal permeability, and inflammation in nonobese and obese subjects was investigated. DESIGN AND METHODS: Fecal

  18. Intestinal microbiology in early life: specific prebiotics can have similar functionalities as human-milk oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oozeer, Raish; van Limpt, Kees; Ludwig, Thomas; Ben Amor, Kaouther; Martin, Rocio; Wind, Richèle D; Boehm, Günther; Knol, Jan

    2013-08-01

    Human milk is generally accepted as the best nutrition for newborns and has been shown to support the optimal growth and development of infants. On the basis of scientific insights from human-milk research, a specific mixture of nondigestible oligosaccharides has been developed, with the aim to improve the intestinal microbiota in early life. The mixture has been extensively studied and has been shown to be safe and to have potential health benefits that are similar to those of human milk. The specific mixture of short-chain galacto-oligosaccharides and long-chain fructo-oligosaccharides has been found to affect the development of early microbiota and to increase the Bifidobacterium amounts as observed in human-milk-fed infants. The resulting gut ecophysiology is characterized by high concentrations of lactate, a slightly acidic pH, and specific short-chain fatty acid profiles, which are high in acetate and low in butyrate and propionate. Here, we have summarized the main findings of dietary interventions with these specific oligosaccharides on the gut microbiota in early life. The gut ecophysiology in early life may have consequences for the metabolic, immunologic, and even neurologic development of the child because reports increasingly substantiate the important function of gut microbes in human health. This review highlights major findings in the field of early gut colonization and the potential impact of early nutrition in healthy growth and development.

  19. Human intestinal parasites in the past: new findings and a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Luiz Carvalho Gonçalves

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost all known human specific parasites have been found in ancient feces. A review of the paleoparasitological helminth and intestinal protozoa findings available in the literature is presented. We also report the new paleoparasitologic findings from the examination performed in samples collected in New and Old World archaeological sites. New finds of ancylostomid, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis, Trichostrongylus spp., Diphyllobothrium latum, Hymenolepis nana and Acantocephalan eggs are reported. According to the findings, it is probable that A. lumbricoides was originally a human parasite. Human ancylostomids, A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura, found in the New World in pre-Columbian times, have not been introduced into the Americas by land via Beringia. These parasites could not supported the cold climate of the region. Nomadic prehistoric humans that have crossed the Bering Land Bridge from Asia to the Americas in the last glaciation, probably during generations, would have lost these parasites, which life cycles need warm temperatures in the soil to be transmitted from host to host. Alternative routes are discussed for human parasite introduction into the Americas.

  20. Study of opportunistic intestinal parasitic infections in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients

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    Manish Kumar Mathur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intestinal parasites predominantly coccidian parasites are a common cause for diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive patients. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted during January 2009-December 2010. A total of 1,088 stool samples from 544 seropositive HIV positive cases were examined microscopically for ova and cyst using wet mount preparations and stained smears. Out of 544 patients, 343 had prolonged diarrhea for more than 4 weeks, 57 had acute diarrhea of lesser than 7 days and 144 were asymptomatic cases who attended out-patient department; included in this study after taking consent from patients. Enteric pathogens were detected in 274 (50.36% of the 544 patients. Results and Conclusions: The parasites identified were Cryptosporidium (135, Isospora belli (42, Cyclospora (12, Microsporidia (02, Entamoeba histolytica (49, Hookworm (34. Intestinal parasites in chronic diarrhea were significantly higher than the acute diarrhea (63.05% vs. 7.35%; P < 0.05. Parasitic pathogens were frequently associated with HIV-positive patients with diarrhea in Western India. Stools of all HIV-positive patients with diarrhea should thoroughly be investigated to identify etiologic agents for proper management.

  1. Intestinal infections in humans in the Rocky Mountain region, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Cynthia; Neill, Andrea; Schotthoefer, Anna M

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the seasonal prevalence of human intestinal parasites in the western states of Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, and Montana, fecal samples were examined as part of routine diagnostic testing from patients experiencing gastrointestinal discomfort in August (summer) 2006, January (winter), and April (spring) 2007. Parasite identification in positive samples was confirmed using light microscopy after wet mount and trichrome staining techniques. Seventy-eight of the 1,083 patients surveyed (7.2%) in August tested positive for at least 1 species of intestinal parasite. Forty-eight of 726 (6.6%) patients and 51 of 795 (6.4%) patients tested positive for at least 1 species in January and April, respectively. Blastocystis sp. was the most prevalent, followed by Giardia lamblia. Approximately 25% of the parasite occurrences were multiple infections involving fecal-oral transmitted species. Co-infections with Entamoeba spp. and Blastocystis sp. were common, suggesting a possible fecal-oral transmission for the latter parasite. Entamoeba spp. were more likely to co-occur than independently. Other species detected included Endolimax nana, Diphyllobothrium latum, Hymenolepis nana, Dientamoeba fragilis, and Iodamoeba butschlii.

  2. Role of intestinal microbiota and metabolites on gut homeostasis and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lan; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2017-01-06

    A vast diversity of microbes colonizes in the human gastrointestinal tract, referred to intestinal microbiota. Microbiota and products thereof are indispensable for shaping the development and function of host innate immune system, thereby exerting multifaceted impacts in gut health. This paper reviews the effects on immunity of gut microbe-derived nucleic acids, and gut microbial metabolites, as well as the involvement of commensals in the gut homeostasis. We focus on the recent findings with an intention to illuminate the mechanisms by which the microbiota and products thereof are interacting with host immunity, as well as to scrutinize imbalanced gut microbiota (dysbiosis) which lead to autoimmune disorders including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and systemic immune syndromes such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to their well-recognized benefits in the gut such as occupation of ecological niches and competition with pathogens, commensal bacteria have been shown to strengthen the gut barrier and to exert immunomodulatory actions within the gut and beyond. It has been realized that impaired intestinal microbiota not only contribute to gut diseases but also are inextricably linked to metabolic disorders and even brain dysfunction. A better understanding of the mutual interactions of the microbiota and host immune system, would shed light on our endeavors of disease prevention and broaden the path to our discovery of immune intervention targets for disease treatment.

  3. Transepithelial transport of putrescine across monolayers of the human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovic, Vladan; Turchanowa, Lyudmila; Stein, Jürgen; Caspary, Wolfgang F.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the transepithelial transport characteristics of the polyamine putrescine in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers to elucidate the mechanisms of the putrescine intestinal absorption. METHODS: The transepithelial transport and the cellular accumulation of putrescine was measured using Caco-2 cell monolayers grown on permeable filters. RESULTS: Transepithelial transport of putrescine in physiological concentrations ( > 0.5 mM) from the apical to basolateral side was linear. Intracellular accumulation of putrescine was higher in confluent than in fully differentiated Caco-2 cells, but still negligible (less than 0.5%) of the overall transport across the monolayers in apical to basolateral direction.EGF enhanced putrescine accumulation in Caco-2 cells by four fold, as well as putrescine conversion to spermidine and spermine by enhancing the activity of S adenosylmethionine decarboxylase. However, EGF did not have any significant influence on putrescine flux across the Caco- 2 cell monolayers. Excretion of putrescine from Caco-2 cells into the basolateral medium did not exceed 50 picomoles, while putrescine passive flux from the apical to the basolateral chamber, contributed hundreds of micromoles polyamines to the basolateral chamber. CONCLUSION: Transepithelial transport of putrescine across Caco-2 cell monolayers occurs in passive diffusion, and is not influenced when epithelial cells are stimulated to proliferate by a potent mitogen such as EGF. PMID:11819759

  4. Presence of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene segments in human intestinal lymph follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, M; Kono, M; Hoshina, S; Komatsu, M; Kitagawa, Y; Iizuka, M; Watanabe, S

    2000-08-01

    There is currently no information regarding microbial agents inside the intestinal lymph follicles. Biopsy or resected specimens, mostly from macroscopically normal areas, were sectioned with a cryostat. DNA was extracted from microdissected samples, exclusively from the lymph follicle. Amplification of DNA was performed using universal primers designed from conserved regions of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Several clones with inserts of around 400 base pairs were subjected to DNA sequence analysis followed by a database homology search. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene segments were detected in the lymph follicle in 2 of 14 (14%) non-inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) cases, 4 of 14 (28%) Crohn disease cases, and in 2 of 5 (40%) ulcerative colitis cases. Nineteen 16S rRNA gene segments were recognized in the eight positive cases. Five segments showed 100% identity to known bacterial 16S rRNAs, namely staphylococcus species, Streptococcus sanguis, and Paracoccus marcusii. However, the other 14 segments showed below 100% identity, indicating either the presence of unknown bacteria or of bacteria without known DNA data. No single identified or unidentified bacterium, characteristic of IBD, including Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and Listeria monocytogenes, was detected. The present study confirms the presence of bacterial 16S rRNA gene segments in human intestinal lymph follicles and paves the way for new investigations into the microbiology of the lymph follicle. Whether or not bacteria inside the lymph follicle is a primary stimulus in IBD has yet to be clarified.

  5. Partial Characterization of Bacteriocins Produced by Two New Enterococcus faecium Isolated from Human Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgis, Mélanie; Vu, Khanh Dang; Lacroix, Monique

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed at characterizing two novel bacteriocin-producing enterococcal strains isolated from human intestine. A total of 200 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from a woman stool sample. Two of them were selected for characterization due to their high antimicrobial activity against five strains of Listeria monocytogenes. The selected bacteria were identified as two different strains of Enterococcus faecium and designated MT 104 and MT 162. The bacteriocins produced by MT 104 and MT 162 were stable at different pH ranging from 2 to 11 and were active after different treatments such as heat, enzymes, detergents, and γ-irradiation. The two isolated strains exhibited some probiotic properties such as survival in simulated gastric fluid and intestinal fluid, lack of expression of bile salt hydrolase or hemolytic activity, adhesion to Caco-2 cells efficiently, and sensitivity to clinical antimicrobial agents. Thus, the two isolated strains of E. faecium could become new probiotic bacteria and their bacteriocins could be used for controlling L. monocytogenes in combination with irradiation for food preservation.

  6. Evaluation of impact of exposure of Sudan azo dyes and their metabolites on human intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongmiao; Feng, Jinhui; He, Gui-Xin; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2012-08-01

    Sudan azo dyes are banned for food usage in most countries, but they are illegally used to maintain or enhance the color of food products due to low cost, bright staining, and wide availability of the dyes. In this report, we examined the toxic effects of these azo dyes and their potential reduction metabolites on 11 prevalent human intestinal bacterial strains. Among the tested bacteria, cell growth of 2, 3, 5, 5, and 1 strains was inhibited by Sudan I, II, III, IV, and Para Red, respectively. At the tested concentration of 100 μM, Sudan I and II inhibited growth of Clostridium perfringens and Lactobacillus rhamnosus with decrease of growth rates from 14 to 47%. Sudan II also affected growth of Enterococcus faecalis. Growth of Bifidobacterium catenulatum, C. perfringens, E. faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Peptostreptococcus magnus was affected by Sudan III and IV with decrease in growth rates from 11 to 67%. C. perfringens was the only strain in which growth was affected by Para Red with 47 and 26% growth decreases at 6 and 10 h, respectively. 1-Amino-2-naphthol, a common metabolite of the dyes, was capable of inhibiting growth of most of the tested bacteria with inhibition rates from 8 to 46%. However, the other metabolites of the dyes had no effect on growth of the bacterial strains. The dyes and their metabolites had less effect on cell viability than on cell growth of the tested bacterial strains. Clostridium indolis and Clostridium ramosum were the only two strains with about a 10 % decrease in cell viability in the presence of Sudan azo dyes. The present results suggested that Sudan azo dyes and their metabolites potentially affect the human intestinal bacterial ecology by selectively inhibiting some bacterial species, which may have an adverse effect on human health. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Human and rodent ex vivo model for intestinal fibrosis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, B.T.; Van Haaften, T.; Oosterhuis, D.; De Graaf, I.A.M.; Olinga, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: One of the major complications in IBD is intestinal fibrosis (IF). It is the result of the chronic inflammation of intestinal tissue. IF causes narrowing of the intestinal lumen and potential stricture formation. For the study of the cellular and molecular mechanism of IF in IBD adequate

  8. Use of hydrogel scaffolds to develop an in vitro 3D culture model of human intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosh, R H; Essa, A; Jordan-Mahy, N; Sammon, C; Le Maitre, C L

    2017-10-15

    The human intestinal cell lines: Caco-2 and HT29-MTX cells have been used extensively in 2D and 3D cell cultures as simple models of the small intestinal epithelium in vitro. This study aimed to investigate the potential of three hydrogel scaffolds to support the 3D culture of Caco-2 and HT29-MTX cells and critically assess their use as scaffolds to stimulate villi formation to model a small intestinal epithelium in vitro. Here, alginate, l-pNIPAM, and l-pNIPAM-co-DMAc hydrogels were investigated. The cells were suspended within or layered on these hydrogels and maintained under static or dynamic culture conditions for up to 21days. Caco-2 cell viability was increased when layered on the synthetic hydrogel scaffolds, but reduced when suspended within the synthetic hydrogels. In contrast, HT29-MTX cells remained viable when suspended within or layered on all 3D cultures. Interestingly, cells cultured in and on the alginate hydrogel scaffolds formed multilayer spheroid structures, whilst the cells layered on synthetic hydrogels formed villus-like structures. Immunohistochemistry staining demonstrated positive expression of enterocyte differentiation markers and goblet cell marker. In conclusion, l-pNIPAM hydrogel scaffolds supported both cell lines and induced formation of villus-like structures when cells were layered on and cultured under dynamic conditions. The ability of the l-pNIPAM to recapitulate the 3D structure and differentiate main cell types of human intestinal villi may deliver a potential alternative in vitro model for studying intestinal disease and for drug testing. Forty percent of hospital referrals are linked to disorders of the digestive tract. Current studies have utilised animal models or simple cultures of isolated cells which do not behave in the same manner as human intestine. Thus new models are required which more closely mimic the behaviour of intestinal cells. Here, we tested a number of scaffolds and conditions to develop a cell culture

  9. CONTROL AND CANCEROUS TISSUES OF HUMAN STOMACH, SMALL INTESTINE AND LARGE INTESTINE - THE AVERAGE CONTENT OF SODIUM AND POTASSIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Głogowska

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sodium and potassium regulate the total amount of water in the body and the transmission of sodium into and out of individual cells also plays a role in critical body functions. The movement of sodium is critical in generation of these electrical signals. Research was conducted on samples taken from women and men aged 20-90 years, derived from the stomach, small intestine and large intestine. Samples were dried at 80ºC for 24 hours, and then increased temperature to 105ºC and dried for seven days until dry mass was obtained. All dry material of each sample was weighted and placed in a separate mineralization tubes and mixed with 1 cm3 of 65% HNO3 and heated at 105°C for 120 minutes in a thermostat-controlled digestion block, VELP Scientifica DK 20. Metals such as sodium and potassium were detected using FAAS method. The average content of sodium in patients diagnosed with stomach cancer is lower, than in healthy person. Indicate higher mean content of sodium in the control tissues of stomach (2151,730 μg•g-1d.m., compared to a sodium content in tissues adjacent to the tumor (1813,958 μg•g-1d.m. and tumor tissues (2029,442 μg•g-1d.m.. In the case of colon, control tissues have lower average content of sodium (2160,886 μg•g-1d.m., than the tissues surrounding the tumor (3325,963 μg•g-1d.m. and tumor tissues (3037,121 μg•g-1d.m.. The potassium level is higher in the control tissues of stomach (1428,993 μg•g-1d.m., than in the tissues adjacent to the tumor (1091,544 μg•g-1d.m. and tumor tissues (1220,471 μg•g-1d.m.. In the large intestine higher average content of potassium is characterized by tumor tissues (2307,234 μg•g-1d.m. and tissues adjacent to the tumor (1712,779 μg•g-1d.m., than control tissue (1389,703 μg•g-1d.m.. Comparing this relationship with data on potassium channels, it can be assumed that in the some case of malignant transformation in the colon, potassium channels also play a big role.

  10. Identification of glucose-fermenting bacteria present in an in vitro model of the human intestine by RNA-stable isotope probing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egert, M.; Graaf, A.A. de; Maathuis, A.; Waard, P. de; Plugge, C.M.; Smidt, H.; Deutz, N.E.P.; Dijkema, C.; Vos, W.M. de; Venema, K.

    2007-01-01

    16S rRNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based metabolic profiling were used to identify bacteria fermenting glucose under conditions simulating the human intestine. The TIM-2 in vitro model of the human intestine was inoculated with a GI tract

  11. Transport of Antihypertensive Peptide RVPSL, Ovotransferrin 328-332, in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Long; Wang, Liying; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jingbo

    2015-09-23

    The objective of this study was to investigate the transepithelial transport of RVPSL (Arg-Val-Pro-Ser-Leu), an egg-white-derived peptide with angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and antihypertensive activity, in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers. Results revealed that RVPSL could be passively transported across Caco-2 cell monolayers. However, during the process of transport, 36.31% ± 1.22% of the initial RVPSL added to the apical side was degraded, but this degradation decreased to 23.49% ± 0.68% when the Caco-2 cell monolayers were preincubated with diprotin A (P Caco-2 cell monolayers was studied by mutation of RVPSL. It was found that N-terminal Pro residues were more beneficial for transport of pentapeptides across Caco-2 cell monolayers than Arg and Val. Furthermore, RVPSL could be more easily transported as smaller peptides, especially in the form of dipeptides and tripeptides.

  12. Unique Biologic Properties of Recombinant AAV1 Transduction in Polarized Human Airway Epithelia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ziying Yan; Diana C. M. Lei-Butters; Xiaoming Liu; Yulong Zhang; Liang Zhang; Meihui Luo; Roman Zak; John F. Engelhardt

    2006-01-01

    .... In the present study, we sought to compare the biologic properties of rAAV2/1, rAAV2/2, and rAAV2/5 transduction in polarized human airway epithelia using viruses purified by a newly developed common...

  13. Bifidobacteria Prevent Tunicamycin-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Subsequent Barrier Disruption in Human Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Monolayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Akiyama

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is caused by accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER, thereby compromising its vital cellular functions in protein production and secretion. Genome wide association studies in humans as well as experimental animal models linked ER stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs with intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the mechanisms linking the outcomes of ER stress in IECs to intestinal disease have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the impact of ER stress on intestinal epithelial barrier function using human colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 monolayers. Tunicamycin-induced ER stress decreased the trans-epithelial electrical resistance of Caco-2 monolayers, concomitant with loss of cellular plasma membrane integrity. Epithelial barrier disruption in Caco-2 cells after ER stress was not caused by caspase- or RIPK1-dependent cell death but was accompanied by lysosomal rupture and up-regulation of the ER stress markers Grp78, sXBP1 and Chop. Interestingly, several bifidobacteria species inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress and thereby diminished barrier disruption in Caco-2 monolayers. Together, these results showed that ER stress compromises the epithelial barrier function of Caco-2 monolayers and demonstrate beneficial impacts of bifidobacteria on ER stress in IECs. Our results identify epithelial barrier loss as a potential link between ER stress and intestinal disease development, and suggest that bifidobacteria could exert beneficial effects on this phenomenon.

  14. Bifidobacteria Prevent Tunicamycin-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Subsequent Barrier Disruption in Human Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Takuya; Oishi, Kenji; Wullaert, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is caused by accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER, thereby compromising its vital cellular functions in protein production and secretion. Genome wide association studies in humans as well as experimental animal models linked ER stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) with intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. However, the mechanisms linking the outcomes of ER stress in IECs to intestinal disease have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the impact of ER stress on intestinal epithelial barrier function using human colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 monolayers. Tunicamycin-induced ER stress decreased the trans-epithelial electrical resistance of Caco-2 monolayers, concomitant with loss of cellular plasma membrane integrity. Epithelial barrier disruption in Caco-2 cells after ER stress was not caused by caspase- or RIPK1-dependent cell death but was accompanied by lysosomal rupture and up-regulation of the ER stress markers Grp78, sXBP1 and Chop. Interestingly, several bifidobacteria species inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress and thereby diminished barrier disruption in Caco-2 monolayers. Together, these results showed that ER stress compromises the epithelial barrier function of Caco-2 monolayers and demonstrate beneficial impacts of bifidobacteria on ER stress in IECs. Our results identify epithelial barrier loss as a potential link between ER stress and intestinal disease development, and suggest that bifidobacteria could exert beneficial effects on this phenomenon.

  15. Spectroscopic issues in optical polarization of 3He gas for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of human lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnalik, T.; Głowacz, B.; Olejniczak, Z.; Pałasz, T.; Suchanek, M.; Wojna, A.

    2013-10-01

    The Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of human lungs for diagnostic purposes became possible by using nuclear spin hyperpolarized noble gases, such as 3He. One of the methods to polarize 3He is the Metastability Exchange Optical Pumping (MEOP), which up to now has been performed at low pressure of about 1 mbar and in low magnetic field below 0.1 T (standard conditions). The equilibrium nuclear polarization can reach up to 80%, but it is dramatically reduced during the subsequent gas compression to the atmospheric pressure that is necessary for the lungs examination. Further polarization losses occur during the transportation of the gas to the hospital scanner. It was shown recently that up to 50% polarization can be obtained at elevated pressure exceeding 20 mbar, by using magnetic field higher than 0.1 T (nonstandard conditions). Therefore, following the construction of the low-field MEOP polarizer located in the lab, a dedicated portable unit was developed, which uses the magnetic field of the 1.5 T MR medical scanner and works in the continuous-flow regime. The first in Poland MRI images of human lungs in vivo were obtained on the upgraded to 3He resonance frequency Siemens Sonata medical scanner. An evident improvement in the image quality was achieved when using the new technique. The paper shows how spectroscopic measurements of 3He carried out in various experimental conditions led both to useful practical results and to significant progress in understanding fundamental processes taking place during MEOP.

  16. Transport of Aflatoxin M1 in human intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca eCaloni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1 is a hydroxylated metabolite of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1. After it is formed, it is secreted in the milk of mammals.Despite the potential risk of human exposure to AFM1, data reported in literature on the metabolism, toxicity and bioavailability of this molecule are limited and out of date. The aim of the present research was to study the absorption profile of AFM1 and possible damage to tight junctions of the intestinal Caco-2/TC7 clone grown on microporous filter supports. These inserts allowed for the separation of the apical and basolateral compartments which correspond to the in vivo lumen and the interstitial space/vascular systems of intestinal mucosa respectively.In this study, the Caco-2/TC7 cells were treated with different AFM1 concentrations (10-10,000 ng/kg for short (40 minutes and long periods of time (48 hours. The AFM1 influx/efflux transport and effects on tight junctions were evaluated by measuring trans-epithelial electrical resistance and observing tight junction protein (Zonula occludens-1 and occludin localization.The results showed that: i when introduced to the apical and basolateral compartments, AFM1 was poorly absorbed by the Caco-2/TC7 cells but its transport across the cell monolayer occurred very quickly (Papp value of 105.10 ± 7.98 cm/s x 10-6. ii The integrity of tight junctions was not permanently compromised after exposure to the mycotoxin. Viability impairment or barrier damage did not occur either.The present results contribute to the evaluation of human risk exposure to AFM1, although the AFM1 transport mechanism need to be clarified.

  17. The Nucleotide Synthesis Enzyme CAD Inhibits NOD2 Antibacterial Function in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Amy L.; Kabi, Amrita; Homer, Craig R.; García, Noemí Marina; Nickerson, Kourtney P.; NesvizhskiI, Alexey I.; Sreekumar, Arun; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Nuñez, Gabriel; McDonald, Christine

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Polymorphisms that reduce the function of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)2, a bacterial sensor, have been associated with Crohn’s disease (CD). No proteins that regulate NOD2 activity have been identified as selective pharmacologic targets. We sought to discover regulators of NOD2 that might be pharmacologic targets for CD therapies. METHODS Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase/ aspartate transcarbamylase/dihydroorotase (CAD) is an enzyme required for de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis; it was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein by immunoprecipitation-coupled mass spectrometry. CAD expression was assessed in colon tissues from individuals with and without inflammatory bowel disease by immunohistochemistry. The interaction between CAD and NOD2 was assessed in human HCT116 intestinal epithelial cells by immunoprecipitation, immunoblot, reporter gene, and gentamicin protection assays. We also analyzed human cell lines that express variants of NOD2 and the effects of RNA interference, overexpression and CAD inhibitors. RESULTS CAD was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein expressed at increased levels in the intestinal epithelium of patients with CD compared with controls. Overexpression of CAD inhibited NOD2-dependent activation of nuclear factor κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, as well as intracellular killing of Salmonella. Reduction of CAD expression or administration of CAD inhibitors increased NOD2-dependent signaling and antibacterial functions of NOD2 variants that are and are not associated with CD. CONCLUSIONS The nucleotide synthesis enzyme CAD is a negative regulator of NOD2. The antibacterial function of NOD2 variants that have been associated with CD increased in response to pharmacologic inhibition of CAD. CAD is a potential therapeutic target for CD. PMID:22387394

  18. Innervation of enteric mast cells by primary spinal afferents in guinea pig and human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Meihua; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2014-10-01

    Mast cells express the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor in guinea pig and human small intestine. Enzyme-linked immunoassay showed that activation of intramural afferents by antidromic electrical stimulation or by capsaicin released SP and CGRP from human and guinea pig intestinal segments. Electrical stimulation of the afferents evoked slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in the enteric nervous system. The slow EPSPs were mediated by tachykinin neurokinin 1 and CGRP receptors. Capsaicin evoked slow EPSP-like responses that were suppressed by antagonists for protease-activated receptor 2. Afferent stimulation evoked slow EPSP-like excitation that was suppressed by mast cell-stabilizing drugs. Histamine and mast cell protease II were released by 1) exposure to SP or CGRP, 2) capsaicin, 3) compound 48/80, 4) elevation of mast cell Ca²⁺ by ionophore A23187, and 5) antidromic electrical stimulation of afferents. The mast cell stabilizers cromolyn and doxantrazole suppressed release of protease II and histamine when evoked by SP, CGRP, capsaicin, A23187, electrical stimulation of afferents, or compound 48/80. Neural blockade by tetrodotoxin prevented mast cell protease II release in response to antidromic electrical stimulation of mesenteric afferents. The results support a hypothesis that afferent innervation of enteric mast cells releases histamine and mast cell protease II, both of which are known to act in a diffuse paracrine manner to influence the behavior of enteric nervous system neurons and to elevate the sensitivity of spinal afferent terminals. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Cholinergic interactions between donepezil and prucalopride in human colon: potential to treat severe intestinal dysmotility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, J; Kung, V W S; Boundouki, G; Aziz, Q; De Maeyer, J H; Knowles, C H; Sanger, G J

    2013-11-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors such as neostigmine are used for acute colonic pseudo-obstruction, but cardio-bronchial side-effects limit use. To minimize side-effects, lower doses could be combined with a 5-HT4 receptor agonist, which also facilitates intestinal cholinergic activity. However, safety concerns, especially in the elderly, require drugs with good selectivity of action. These include the AChE inhibitor donepezil (used for Alzheimer's disease, with reduced cardio-bronchial liability) and prucalopride, the first selective, clinically available 5-HT4 receptor agonist. This study examined their individual and potential synergistic activities in human colon. Neuronally mediated muscle contractions and relaxations of human colon were evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and defined phenotypically as cholinergic, nitrergic or tachykinergic using pharmacological tools; the effects of drugs were determined as changes in 'area under the curve'. Prucalopride increased cholinergically mediated contractions (EC50 855 nM; 33% maximum increase), consistent with its ability to stimulate intestinal motility; donepezil (477%) and neostigmine (2326%) had greater efficacy. Concentrations of donepezil (30-100 nM) found in venous plasma after therapeutic doses had minimal ability to enhance cholinergic activity. However, donepezil (30 nM) together with prucalopride (3, 10 μM) markedly increased EFS-evoked contractions compared with prucalopride alone (P = 0.04). For example, the increases observed with donepezil and prucalopride 10 μM together or alone were, respectively, 105 ± 35%, 4 ± 6% and 35 ± 21% (n = 3-7, each concentration). Potential synergy between prucalopride and donepezil activity calls for exploration of this combination as a safer, more effective treatment of colonic pseudo-obstruction. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. A comparative analysis of the intestinal metagenomes present in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) and humans (Homo sapiens)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrand, Falk; Ebersbach, Tine; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Background: Guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) is an important model for human intestinal research. We have characterized the faecal microbiota of 60 guinea pigs using Illumina shotgun metagenomics, and used this data to compile a gene catalogue of its prevalent microbiota. Subsequently, we compared th...

  1. Morphometric analysis of vasopressin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide neurons in the human suprachiasmatic nucleus: influence of microwave treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, J. N.; Hofman, M. A.; Swaab, D. F.

    1996-01-01

    The vasopressin (VP) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-expressing neurons in the human suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) were morphometrically determined with or without microwave (MW) treatment. Both an enlarged volume and an increased number of neurons were found in the VP and VIP subnucleus

  2. Conjugated linoleic acid enhances transepithelial calcium transport in human intestinal-like Caco-2 cells: An insight into molecular changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murphy, E.F.; Jewell, C.; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J.; Müller, M.R.; Cashman, K.D.

    2006-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been shown to enhance paracellular and transcellular Ca transport across human intestinal-like Caco-2 cell monolayers. The mechanisms of action, however, are still unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying CLA-induced

  3. Hepatic-intestinal disposal of endogenous human alpha atrial natriuretic factor99-126 in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Bendtsen, Flemming; Schütten, H J

    1990-01-01

    Hepatic-intestinal disposal of endogenous human alpha atrial natriuretic factor99-126 (ANF) was assessed in 13 patients with cirrhosis (six Child-Turcotte class A, five class B, and two class C) and eight control subjects. The Fick principle was applied during hepatic vein catheterization. Arterial...

  4. Streptococcal Adhesin P (SadP contributes to Streptococcus suis adhesion to the human intestinal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura Ferrando

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen, causing meningitis and septicemia. We previously demonstrated that the gastrointestinal tract (GIT is an entry site for zoonotic S. suis infection. Here we studied the contribution of Streptococcal adhesin Protein (SadP to host-pathogen interaction at GIT level.SadP expression in presence of Intestinal Epithelial Cells (IEC was compared with expression of other virulence factors by measuring transcript levels using quantitative Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR. SadP variants were identified by phylogenetic analysis of complete DNA sequences. The interaction of SadP knockout and complementation mutants with IEC was tested in vitro.Expression of sadP was significantly increased in presence of IEC. Sequence analysis of 116 invasive strains revealed five SadP sequence variants, correlating with genotype. SadP1, present in zoonotic isolates of clonal complex 1, contributed to binding to both human and porcine IEC and translocation across human IEC. Antibodies against the globotriaosylceramide Gb3/CD77 receptor significantly inhibited adhesion to human IEC.SadP is involved in the host-pathogen interaction in the GIT. Differences between SadP variants may determine different affinities to the Gb3/CD77 host-receptor, contributing to variation in adhesion capacity to host IEC and thus to S. suis zoonotic potential.

  5. Differential modulation of human intestinal bifidobacterium populations after consumption of a wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) drink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Fracassetti, Daniela; Taverniti, Valentina; Del Bo', Cristian; Vendrame, Stefano; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy; Arioli, Stefania; Riso, Patrizia; Porrini, Marisa

    2013-08-28

    Bifidobacteria are gaining increasing interest as health-promoting bacteria. Nonetheless, the genus comprises several species, which can exert different effects on human host. Previous studies showed that wild blueberry drink consumption could selectively increase intestinal bifidobacteria, suggesting an important role for the polyphenols and fiber present in wild blueberries. This study evaluated the modulation of the most common and abundant bifidobacterial taxonomic groups inhabiting the human gut in the same fecal samples. The analyses carried out showed that B. adolescentis, B. breve, B. catenulatum/pseudocatelulatum, and B. longum subsp. longum were always present in the group of subjects enrolled, whereas B. bifidum and B. longum subsp. infantis were not. Furthermore, it was found that the most predominant bifidobacterial species were B. longum subsp. longum and B. adolescentis. The results obtained revealed a high interindividual variability; however, a significant increase of B. longum subsp. infantis cell concentration was observed in the feces of volunteers after the wild blueberry drink treatment. This bifidobacterial group was shown to possess immunomodulatory abilities and to relieve symptoms and promote the regression of several gastrointestinal disorders. Thus, an increased cell concentration of B. longum subsp. infantis in the human gut could be considered of potential health benefit. In conclusion, wild blueberry consumption resulted in a specific bifidogenic effect that could positively affect certain populations of bifidobacteria with demonstrated health-promoting properties.

  6. Expression of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 reflects the state of villus architecture in human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gassler, Nikolaus; Kopitz, Jürgen; Tehrani, Arman

    2004-01-01

    . Screening of antibodies from a hybridoma library led to the identification of an acyl-CoA synthetase 5-specific monoclonal antibody. Protein synthesis, mRNA expression, and the enzyme activity of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 were studied by several methods in human small intestinal tissues with Crohn's disease...... or coeliac disease, respectively. Acyl-CoA synthetase 5 mRNA and protein levels were substantially reduced in injured small intestinal mucosa. Moreover, impaired synthesis of the acyl-CoA synthetase 5 protein was reflected by a decrease in intramucosal enzyme activity. Subtle changes of the acyl...

  7. Rapid reversal of human intestinal ischemia-reperfusion induced damage by shedding of injured enterocytes and reepithelialisation.

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    Joep P M Derikx

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR is a phenomenon related to physiological conditions (e.g. exercise, stress and to pathophysiological events (e.g. acute mesenteric ischemia, aortic surgery. Although intestinal IR has been studied extensively in animals, results remain inconclusive and data on human intestinal IR are scarce. Therefore, an experimental harmless model for human intestinal IR was developed, enabling us to clarify the sequelae of human intestinal IR for the first time. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In 30 patients undergoing pancreatico-duodenectomy we took advantage of the fact that in this procedure a variable length of jejunum is removed. Isolated jejunum (5 cm was subjected to 30 minutes ischemia followed by reperfusion. Intestinal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (I-FABP arteriovenous concentration differences across the bowel segment were measured before and after ischemia to assess epithelial cell damage. Tissue sections were collected after ischemia and at 25, 60 and 120 minutes reperfusion and stained with H&E, and for I-FABP and the apoptosis marker M30. Bonferroni's test was used to compare I-FABP differences. Mean (SEM arteriovenous concentration gradients of I-FABP across the jejunum revealed rapidly developing epithelial cell damage. I-FABP release significantly increased from 290 (46 pg/ml before ischemia towards 3,997 (554 pg/ml immediately after ischemia (p<0.001 and declined gradually to 1,143 (237 pg/ml within 1 hour reperfusion (p<0.001. Directly after ischemia the intestinal epithelial lining was microscopically normal, while subepithelial spaces appeared at the villus tip. However, after 25 minutes reperfusion, enterocyte M30 immunostaining was observed at the villus tip accompanied by shedding of mature enterocytes into the lumen and loss of I-FABP staining. Interestingly, within 60 minutes reperfusion the epithelial barrier resealed, while debris of apoptotic, shedded epithelial cells was observed in the lumen

  8. Human Regional Pulmonary Gas Exchange with Xenon Polarization Transfer (XTC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradian, Iga; Butler, James; Hrovat, Mirko; Topulos, George; Hersman, Elizabeth; Ruset, Iulian; Covrig, Silviu; Frederick, Eric; Ketel, Stephen; Hersman, F. W.; Patz, Samuel

    2007-03-01

    Xenon Transfer Contrast (XTC) is an existing imaging method (Ruppert et al, Magn Reson Med, 51:676-687, 2004) that measures the fraction F of ^129Xe magnetization that diffuses from alveolar gas spaces to septal parenchymal tissue in lungs in a specified exchange time. As previously implemented, XTC is a 2-breath method and has been demonstrated in anesthetized animals. To use XTC in humans and to avoid issues associated with obtaining identical gas volumes on subsequent breath-hold experiments as well as precise image registration in post-processing, a single breath XTC method was developed that acquires three consecutive gradient echo images in an 8s acquisition. We report here initial measurements of the mean and variance of F for 5 normal healthy subjects as well as 7 asymptomatic smokers. The experiments were performed at two lung volumes (˜45 and 65% of TLC). We found that both the mean and variance of F increased with smoking history. In comparison, standard pulmonary function tests such as DLCO FEV1 showed no correlation with smoking history.

  9. Human milk glycosaminoglycans inhibit in vitro the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Salmonella fyris to human intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppa, Giovanni V; Facinelli, Bruna; Magi, Gloria; Marini, Emanuela; Zampini, Lucia; Mantovani, Veronica; Galeazzi, Tiziana; Padella, Lucia; Marchesiello, Rita L; Santoro, Lucia; Coscia, Alessandra; Peila, Chiara; Volpi, Nicola; Gabrielli, Orazio

    2016-04-01

    Breast-fed infants have a lower incidence of acute gastroenteritis due to the presence of several anti-infective factors in human milk. The aim of this work is to study the capacity of human milk glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) to inhibit the adhesion of some common pathogenic bacteria. GAGs were isolated from a pool of milk samples collected from different mothers during the first month of lactation. Experiments were carried out to study the ability of GAGs to inhibit the adhesion of two intestinal micro-organisms (enteropathogenic Escherichia coli serotype 0119 and Salmonella fyris) to Caco-2 and Int-407 cell lines. The study showed that the GAGs had an anti-adhesive effect on the two pathogenic strains studied with different degrees of inhibition. In particular, in the presence of human milk GAGs, the adhesion of S. fyris to Caco-2 cells and to Int-407 cells of both tested strains was significantly reduced. Our results demonstrated that GAGs in human milk can be one of the important defensive factors against acute diarrheal infections in breast-fed infants.

  10. Evaluation of physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability of six dietary polyphenols in human intestinal colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Himanshu; Jana, Snehasis

    2016-02-01

    Phenolic compounds are common ingredients in many dietary supplements and functional foods. However, data concerning physicochemical properties and permeability of polyphenols on the intestinal epithelial cells are scarce. The aims of this study were to determine the experimental partition coefficient (Log P), and parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA), to characterize the bi-directional transport of six phenolic compounds viz. caffeic acid, chrysin, gallic acid, quercetin, resveratrol and rutin in Caco-2 cells. The experimental Log P values of six polyphenols were correlated (R (2) = 0.92) well with the calculated Log P values. The apparent permeability (P app) range of all polyphenols in PAMPA for the apical (AP) to basolateral (BL) was 1.18 ± 0.05 × 10(-6) to 5.90 ± 0.16 × 10(-6) cm/s. The apparent Caco-2 permeability (P app) range for the AP-BL was 0.96 ± 0.03 × 10(-6) to 3.80 ± 0.45 × 10(-6) cm/s. The efflux ratio of P app (BL → AP) to P app (AP → BL) for all phenolics was Caco-2 cell monolayer permeation data. Dietary six polyphenols were poorly absorbed through PAMPA and Caco-2 cells, and their transepithelial transports were mainly by passive diffusion.

  11. Biotransformation of 1-nitropyrene to 1-aminopyrene and N-formyl-1-aminopyrene by the human intestinal microbiota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, B.W.; Cerniglia, C.E.; Federle, T.W.

    1986-01-01

    The nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 1-nitropyrene (1-NP) is an environmental pollutant, a potent bacterial and mammalian mutagen, and a carcinogen. The metabolism of 1-NP by the human intestinal microbiota was studied using a semicontinuous culture system that simulates the colonic lumen. (/sup 3/H)-1-Nitropyrene was metabolized by the intestinal microbiota to 1-aminopyrene (1-AP) and N-formyl-1-aminopyrene (FAP) as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry. Twenty-four hours after the addition of (/sup 3/H)-1-NP, the formylated compound and 1-AP accounted for 20 and 80% of the total metabolism respectively. This percentage increased to 66% for FAP after 24 h following 10 d of chronic exposure to unlabeled 1-NP, suggesting metabolic adaptation to 1-NP by the microbiota. Both 1-AP and FAP have been shown to be nonmutagenic towards Salmonella typhimurium TA98, which indicates that the intestinal microflora may potentially detoxify 1-NP.

  12. Effect of intravenous infusion of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric and small intestinal motor function in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Fuglsang, Stefan; Graff, J

    2006-01-01

    : To examine the effect of intravenous infusion of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric and small intestinal motor function after a meal in healthy humans. METHODS: Nine healthy volunteers participated in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover study. Each volunteer was examined during intravenous infusion......BACKGROUND: Glyceryl trinitrate is a donor of nitric oxide that relaxes smooth muscle cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Little is known about the effect of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric emptying and no data exist on the possible effect of glyceryl trinitrate on small intestinal transit. AIM...... of glyceryl trinitrate 1 microg/kg x min or saline. A gamma camera technique was used to measure gastric emptying and small intestinal transit after a 1600-kJ mixed liquid and solid meal. Furthermore, duodenal motility was assessed by manometry. RESULTS: Glyceryl trinitrate did not change gastric mean...

  13. Effect of intravenous infusion of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric and small intestinal motor function in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Fuglsang, Stefan; Graff, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glyceryl trinitrate is a donor of nitric oxide that relaxes smooth muscle cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Little is known about the effect of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric emptying and no data exist on the possible effect of glyceryl trinitrate on small intestinal transit. AIM......: To examine the effect of intravenous infusion of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric and small intestinal motor function after a meal in healthy humans. METHODS: Nine healthy volunteers participated in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover study. Each volunteer was examined during intravenous infusion...... of glyceryl trinitrate 1 microg/kg x min or saline. A gamma camera technique was used to measure gastric emptying and small intestinal transit after a 1600-kJ mixed liquid and solid meal. Furthermore, duodenal motility was assessed by manometry. RESULTS: Glyceryl trinitrate did not change gastric mean...

  14. Effect of intravenous infusion of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric and small intestinal motor function in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Fuglsang, Stefan; Graff, J

    2006-01-01

    : To examine the effect of intravenous infusion of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric and small intestinal motor function after a meal in healthy humans. METHODS: Nine healthy volunteers participated in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover study. Each volunteer was examined during intravenous infusion...... of glyceryl trinitrate 1 microg/kg x min or saline. A gamma camera technique was used to measure gastric emptying and small intestinal transit after a 1600-kJ mixed liquid and solid meal. Furthermore, duodenal motility was assessed by manometry. RESULTS: Glyceryl trinitrate did not change gastric mean...... trinitrate 1 microg/kg x min does not induce major changes in gastric or small intestinal motor function after a 1600-kJ meal in healthy volunteers....

  15. An ex-vivo human intestinal model to study Entamoeba histolytica pathogenesis.

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    Devendra Bansal

    Full Text Available Amoebiasis (a human intestinal infection affecting 50 million people every year is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying human colon invasion by E. histolytica, we have set up an ex vivo human colon model to study the early steps in amoebiasis. Using scanning electron microscopy and histological analyses, we have established that E. histolytica caused the removal of the protective mucus coat during the first two hours of incubation, detached the enterocytes, and then penetrated into the lamina propria by following the crypts of Lieberkühn. Significant cell lysis (determined by the release of lactodehydrogenase and inflammation (marked by the secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin 1 beta, interferon gamma, interleukin 6, interleukin 8 and tumour necrosis factor were detected after four hours of incubation. Entamoeba dispar (a closely related non-pathogenic amoeba that also colonizes the human colon was unable to invade colonic mucosa, lyse cells or induce an inflammatory response. We also examined the behaviour of trophozoites in which genes coding for known virulent factors (such as amoebapores, the Gal/GalNAc lectin and the cysteine protease 5 (CP-A5, which have major roles in cell death, adhesion (to target cells or mucus and mucus degradation, respectively were silenced, together with the corresponding tissue responses. Our data revealed that the signalling via the heavy chain Hgl2 or via the light chain Lgl1 of the Gal/GalNAc lectin is not essential to penetrate the human colonic mucosa. In addition, our study demonstrates that E. histolytica silenced for CP-A5 does not penetrate the colonic lamina propria and does not induce the host's pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion.

  16. Solution structure of human intestinal fatty acid binding protein: Implications for ligand entry and exit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fengli [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Biophysics (United States); Luecke, Christian [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet (Germany); Baier, Leslie J. [NIDDK, NIH, Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch (United States); Sacchettini, James C. [Texas A and M University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics (United States); Hamilton, James A. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Biophysics (United States)

    1997-04-15

    The human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a small (131 amino acids) protein which binds dietary long-chain fatty acids in the cytosol of enterocytes. Recently, an alanine to threonine substitution at position 54 in I-FABP has been identified which affects fatty acid binding and transport, and is associated with the development of insulin resistance in several populations including Mexican-Americans and Pima Indians. To investigate the molecular basis of the binding properties of I-FABP, the 3D solution structure of the more common form of human I-FABP (Ala54) was studied by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy.Recombinant I-FABP was expressed from E. coli in the presence and absence of 15N-enriched media. The sequential assignments for non-delipidated I-FABP were completed by using 2D homonuclear spectra (COSY, TOCSY and NOESY) and 3D heteronuclear spectra(NOESY-HMQC and TOCSY-HMQC). The tertiary structure of human I-FABP was calculated by using the distance geometry program DIANA based on 2519 distance constraints obtained from the NMR data. Subsequent energy minimization was carried out by using the program SYBYL in the presence of distance constraints. The conformation of human I-FABP consists of 10 antiparallel {beta}-strands which form two nearly orthogonal {beta}-sheets of five strands each, and two short {alpha}-helices that connect the {beta}-strands A and B. The interior of the protein consists of a water-filled cavity between the two {beta}-sheets. The NMR solution structure of human I-FABP is similar to the crystal structure of rat I-FABP.The NMR results show significant conformational variability of certain backbone segments around the postulated portal region for the entry and exit of fatty acid ligand.

  17. Clinicopathologic study of intestinal spirochetosis in Japan with special reference to human immunodeficiency virus infection status and species types: analysis of 5265 consecutive colorectal biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Yoko; Takahashi, Masae; Horiguchi, Shin-ichiro; Funata, Nobuaki; Koizumi, Koichi; Okudela, Koji; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Ohashi, Kenichi

    2015-01-13

    Previous studies reported that the incidence of intestinal spirochetosis was high in homosexual men, especially those with Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection. The aim of the present study was to clarify the clinicopathological features of intestinal spirochetosis in Japan with special reference to Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection status and species types. A pathology database search for intestinal spirochetosis was performed at Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Disease Center Komagome Hospital between January 2008 and October 2011, and included 5265 consecutive colorectal biopsies from 4254 patients. After patient identification, a retrospective review of endoscopic records and clinical information was performed. All pathology slides were reviewed by two pathologists. The length of the spirochetes was measured using a digital microscope. Causative species were identified by polymerase chain reaction. Intestinal spirochetosis was diagnosed in 3 out of 55 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-positive patients (5.5%). The mean length of intestinal spirochetes was 8.5 μm (range 7-11). Brachyspira pilosicoli was detected by polymerase chain reaction in all 3 patients. Intestinal spirochetosis was also diagnosed in 73 out of 4199 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative patients (1.7%). The mean length of intestinal spirochetes was 3.5 μm (range 2-8). The species of intestinal spirochetosis was identified by polymerase chain reaction in 31 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative patients. Brachyspira aalborgi was detected in 24 cases (78%) and Brachyspira pilosicoli in 6 cases (19%). Both Brachyspira aalborgi and Brachyspira pilosicoli were detected in only one Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative patient (3%). The mean length of Brachyspira aalborgi was 3.8 μm, while that of Brachyspira pilosicoli was 5.5 μm. The length of Brachyspira pilosicoli was significantly longer than that of Brachyspira aalborgi (p < 0.01). The lengths of intestinal spirochetes were

  18. Intestinal colonization of IL-2 deficient mice with non-colitogenic B. vulgatus prevents DC maturation and T-cell polarization.

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    Martina Müller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: IL-2 deficient (IL-2(-/- mice mono-colonized with E. coli mpk develop colitis whereas IL-2(-/--mice mono-colonized with B. vulgatus mpk do not and are even protected from E. coli mpk induced colitis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated if mono-colonization with E. coli mpk or B. vulgatus mpk differentially modulates distribution, activation and maturation of intestinal lamina propria (LP dendritic cells (DC. LP DC in mice mono-colonized with protective B. vulgatus mpk or co-colonized with E. coli mpk/B. vulgatus mpk featured a semi-mature LP DC phenotype (CD40(loCD80(loMHC-II(hi whereas mono-colonization with colitogenic E. coli mpk induced LP DC activation and maturation prior to onset of colitis. Accordingly, chemokine receptor (CCR 7 surface expression was more strikingly enhanced in mesenteric lymph node DC from E. coli mpk than B. vulgatus mpk mono- or co-colonized mice. Mature but not semi-mature LP DC promoted Th1 polarization. As B. vulgatus mpk promotes differentiation of semi-mature DC presumably by IL-6, mRNA and protein expression of IL-6 was investigated in LP DC. The data demonstrated that IL-6 mRNA and protein was increased in LP DC of B. vulgatus mpk as compared to E. coli mpk mono-colonized IL-2(-/--mice. The B. vulgatus mpk mediated suppression of CCR7 expression and DC migration was abolished in IL-6(-/--DC in vitro. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: From this data we conclude that the B. vulgatus triggered IL-6 secretion by LP DC in absence of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-12 or TNF-alpha induces a semi-mature LP DC phenotype, which might prevent T-cell activation and thereby the induction of colitis in IL-2(-/--mice. The data provide new evidence that IL-6 might act as an immune regulatory cytokine in the mucosa by targeting intestinal DC.

  19. Two-dimensional gel proteome reference map of human small intestine

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    Canzonieri Vincenzo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The small intestine is an important human organ that plays a central role in many physiological functions including digestion, absorption, secretion and defense. Duodenal pathologies include, for instance, the ulcer associated to Helicobacter Pylori infection, adenoma and, in genetically predisposed individuals, celiac disease. Alterations in the bowel reduce its capability to absorb nutrients, minerals and fat-soluble vitamins. Anemia and osteopenia or osteoporosis may develop as a consequence of vitamins malabsorption. Adenoma is a benign tumor that has the potential to become cancerous. Adult celiac disease patients present an overall risk of cancer that is almost twice than that found in the general population. These disease processes are not completely known. To date, a two dimensional (2D reference map of proteins expressed in human duodenal tissue is not yet available: the aim of our study was to characterize the 2D protein map, and to identify proteins of duodenal mucosa of adult individuals without duodenal illness, to create a protein database. This approach, may be useful for comparing similar protein samples in different laboratories and for the molecular characterization of intestinal pathologies without recurring to the use of surgical material. Results The enrolled population comprised five selected samples (3 males and 2 females, aged 19 to 42, taken from 20 adult subjects, on their first visit at the gastroenterology unit for a suspected celiac disease, who did not turn to be affected by any duodenal pathology after gastrointestinal and histological evaluations. Proteins extracted from the five duodenal mucosal specimens were singly separated by 2D gel electrophoresis. After image analysis of each 2D gel, 179 protein spots, representing 145 unique proteins, from 218 spots tested, were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF ms analysis. Normalized volumes, for each protein, have been reported for every gel

  20. Isolation of Human Intestinal Bacteria Capable of Producing the Bioactive Metabolite Isourolithin A from Ellagic Acid

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    María V. Selma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Urolithins are intestinal microbial metabolites produced from ellagitannin- and ellagic acid-containing foods such as walnuts, strawberries, and pomegranates. These metabolites, better absorbed than their precursors, can contribute significantly to the beneficial properties attributed to the polyphenols ellagitannins and ellagic acid (EA. However, both the ability of producing the final metabolites in this catabolism (urolithins A, B and isourolithin A and the health benefits associated with ellagitannin consumption differ considerably among individuals depending on their gut microbiota composition. Three human urolithin metabotypes have been previously described, i.e., metabotype 0 (urolithin non-producers, metabotype A (production of urolithin A as unique final urolithin and metabotype B (urolithin B and/or isourolithin A are produced besides urolithin A. Although production of some intermediary urolithins has been recently attributed to intestinal species from Eggerthellaceae family named Gordonibacter urolithinfaciens and Gordonibacter pamelaeae, the identification of the microorganisms responsible for the complete transformation of EA into the final urolithins, especially those related to metabotype B, are still unknown. In the present research we illustrate the isolation of urolithin-producing strains from human feces of a healthy adult and their ability to transform EA into different urolithin metabolites, including isourolithin A. The isolates belong to a new genus from Eggerthellaceae family. EA transformation and urolithin production arisen during the stationary phase of the growth of the bacteria under anaerobic conditions. The HPLC-DAD-MS analyses demonstrated the sequential appearance of 3,8,9,10-tetrahydroxy-urolithin (urolithin M6, 3,8,9-trihydroxy-urolithin (urolithin C and 3,9-dihydroxy-urolithin (isourolithin A while 3,8-dihydroxy-urolithin (urolithin A and 3-hydroxy-urolithin (urolithin B were not detected. For the first time

  1. Molecular Paleoparasitological Hybridization Approach as Effective Tool for Diagnosing Human Intestinal Parasites from Scarce Archaeological Remains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Lauren Hubert; Iñiguez, Alena Mayo

    2014-01-01

    Paleoparasitology is the science that uses parasitological techniques for diagnosing parasitic diseases in the past. Advances in molecular biology brought new insights into this field allowing the study of archaeological material. However, due to technical limitations a proper diagnosis and confirmation of the presence of parasites is not always possible, especially in scarce and degraded archaeological remains. In this study, we developed a Molecular Paleoparasitological Hybridization (MPH) approach using ancient DNA (aDNA) hybridization to confirm and complement paleoparasitological diagnosis. Eight molecular targets from four helminth parasites were included: Ascaris sp., Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis, and Strongyloides stercoralis. The MPH analysis using 18th century human remains from Praça XV cemetery (CPXV), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, revealed for the first time the presence E. vermicularis aDNA (50%) in archaeological sites of Brazil. Besides, the results confirmed T. trichiura and Ascaris sp. infections. The prevalence of infection by Ascaris sp. and E. vermicularis increased considerably when MPH was applied. However, a lower aDNA detection of T. trichiura (40%) was observed when compared to the diagnosis by paleoparasitological analysis (70%). Therefore, based on these data, we suggest a combination of Paleoparasitological and MPH approaches to verify the real panorama of intestinal parasite infection in human archeological samples. PMID:25162694

  2. Effect of the artificial sweetener, sucralose, on small intestinal glucose absorption in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Chang, Jessica; Checklin, Helen L; Young, Richard L; Jones, Karen L; Horowitz, Michael; Rayner, Christopher K

    2010-09-01

    It has been reported that the artificial sweetener, sucralose, stimulates glucose absorption in rodents by enhancing apical availability of the transporter GLUT2. We evaluated whether exposure of the proximal small intestine to sucralose affects glucose absorption and/or the glycaemic response to an intraduodenal (ID) glucose infusion in healthy human subjects. Ten healthy subjects were studied on two separate occasions in a single-blind, randomised order. Each subject received an ID infusion of sucralose (4 mM in 0.9% saline) or control (0.9% saline) at 4 ml/min for 150 min (T = - 30 to 120 min). After 30 min (T = 0), glucose (25 %) and its non-metabolised analogue, 3-O-methylglucose (3-OMG; 2.5 %), were co-infused intraduodenally (T = 0-120 min; 4.2 kJ/min (1 kcal/min)). Blood was sampled at frequent intervals. Blood glucose, plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and serum 3-OMG concentrations increased during ID glucose/3-OMG infusion (P sucralose and control infusions. In conclusion, sucralose does not appear to modify the rate of glucose absorption or the glycaemic or incretin response to ID glucose infusion when given acutely in healthy human subjects.

  3. An immunohistochemical study and review of potential markers of human intestinal M cells

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    NACS Wong

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available M cells are found in intestinal follicle associated epithelium. Studies into the physiological and pathological roles of human M cells have been hampered by the lack of well-substantiated, specific markers for these cells. A critical literature review suggests the following molecules may potentially serve as such markers: CK7, FcaR (CD89, S100, CD1a, CD21, CD23, sialyl Lewis A, and cathepsin E. Normal ileum, appendix and colorectum were studied using paraffinembedded, formalin-fixed tissue and immunohistochemistry for these 8 markers. Cathepsin E immunohistochemistry was also performed on cases of colorectal adenocarcinoma, colorectal adenoma, colorectal hyperplastic/metaplastic polyp, lymphocytic colitis, collagenous colitis, pseudomembranous colitis and active ulcerative colitis. Of the 8 markers tested, only cathepsin E appeared to be specific to follicle associated epithelium (expressed by cells with and without M cell morphology and follicular crypt epithelium; this specificity was limited to the colorectum. Focal epithelial expression of cathepsin E was seen in adenocarcinoma, adenoma, hyperplastic/metaplastic polyp, ulcerative colitis and pseudomembranous colitis. In conclusion, cathepsin E is a specific marker of normal colorectal follicle associated epithelium and follicular crypt epithelium though is not specific to M cells within these compartments. None of the other 7 markers studied is exclusively expressed by human M cells.

  4. The intestinal archaea Methanosphaera stadtmanae and Methanobrevibacter smithii activate human dendritic cells.

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    Corinna Bang

    Full Text Available The methanoarchaea Methanosphaera stadtmanae and Methanobrevibacter smithii are known to be part of the indigenous human gut microbiota. Although the immunomodulatory effects of bacterial gut commensals have been studied extensively in the last decade, the impact of methanoarchaea in human's health and disease was rarely examined. Consequently, we studied and report here on the effects of M. stadtmanae and M. smithii on human immune cells. Whereas exposure to M. stadtmanae leads to substantial release of proinflammatory cytokines in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs, only weak activation was detected after incubation with M. smithii. Phagocytosis of M. stadtmanae by moDCs was demonstrated by confocal microscopy as well as transmission electronic microscopy (TEM and shown to be crucial for cellular activation by using specific inhibitors. Both strains, albeit to different extents, initiate a maturation program in moDCs as revealed by up-regulation of the cell-surface receptors CD86 and CD197 suggesting additional activation of adaptive immune responses. Furthermore, M. stadtmanae and M. smithii were capable to alter the gene expression of antimicrobial peptides in moDCs to different extents. Taken together, our findings strongly argue that the archaeal gut inhabitants M. stadtmanae and M. smithii are specifically recognized by the human innate immune system. Moreover, both strains are capable of inducing an inflammatory cytokine response to different extents arguing that they might have diverse immunomodulatory functions. In conclusion, we propose that the impact of intestinal methanoarchaea on pathological conditions involving the gut microbiota has been underestimated until now.

  5. Human Breast Milk and Infant Formulas Differentially Modify the Intestinal Microbiota in Human Infants and Host Physiology in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenmin; Roy, Nicole C; Guo, Yanhong; Jia, Hongxin; Ryan, Leigh; Samuelsson, Linda; Thomas, Ancy; Plowman, Jeff; Clerens, Stefan; Day, Li; Young, Wayne

    2016-02-01

    In the absence of human breast milk, infant and follow-on formulas can still promote efficient growth and development. However, infant formulas can differ in their nutritional value. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of human milk (HM) and infant formulas in human infants and a weanling rat model. In a 3 wk clinical randomized controlled trial, babies (7- to 90-d-old, male-to-female ratio 1:1) were exclusively breastfed (BF), exclusively fed Synlait Pure Canterbury Stage 1 infant formula (SPCF), or fed assorted standard formulas (SFs) purchased by their parents. We also compared feeding HM or SPCF in weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats for 28 d. We examined the effects of HM and infant formulas on fecal short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and bacterial composition in human infants, and intestinal SCFAs, the microbiota, and host physiology in weanling rats. Fecal Bifidobacterium concentrations (mean log copy number ± SEM) were higher (P = 0.003) in BF (8.17 ± 0.3) and SPCF-fed infants (8.29 ± 0.3) compared with those fed the SFs (6.94 ± 0.3). Fecal acetic acid (mean ± SEM) was also higher (P = 0.007) in the BF (5.5 ± 0.2 mg/g) and SPCF (5.3 ± 2.4 mg/g) groups compared with SF-fed babies (4.3 ± 0.2 mg/g). Colonic SCFAs did not differ between HM- and SPCF-fed rats. However, cecal acetic acid concentrations were higher (P = 0.001) in rats fed HM (42.6 ± 2.6 mg/g) than in those fed SPCF (30.6 ± 0.8 mg/g). Cecal transcriptome, proteome, and plasma metabolite analyses indicated that the growth and maturation of intestinal tissue was more highly promoted by HM than SPCF. Fecal bacterial composition and SCFA concentrations were similar in babies fed SPCF or HM. However, results from the rat study showed substantial differences in host physiology between rats fed HM and SPCF. This trial was registered at Shanghai Jiào tong University School of Medicine as XHEC-C-2012-024. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Optical properties of human normal small intestine tissue determined by Kubelka-Munk method in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hua-Jiang; Xing, Da; Wu, Guo-Yong; Jin, Ying; Gu, Huai-Min

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the optical properties of human normal small intestine tissue at 476.5 nm, 488 nm, 496.5 nm, 514.5 nm, 532 nm, 808 nm wavelengths of laser irradiation. METHODS: A double-integrating-sphere system, the basic principle of measuring technology of light radiation, and an optical model of biological tissues were used in the study. RESULTS: The results of measurement showed that there were no significant differences in the absorption coefficients of human normal small intestine tissue at 476.5 nm, 488 nm, 496.5 nm laser in the Kubelka-Munk two-flux model (P > 0.05). The absorption coefficients of the tissue at 514.5 nm, 532 nm, 808 nm laser irradiation were obviously increased with the decrease of these wavelengths. The scattering coefficients of the tissue at 476.5 nm, 488 nm, 496.5 nm laser irradiation were increased with the decrease of these wavelengths. The scattering coefficients at 496.5 nm, 514.5 nm, 532 nm laser irradiation were obviously increased with the increase of these wavelengths. The scattering coefficient of the tissue at 532 nm laser irradiation was bigger than that at 808 nm. There were no significant differences in the total attenuation coefficient of the tissue at 476.5 nm and 488 nm laser irradiation (P > 0.05). The total attenuation coefficient of the tissue at 488 nm, 496.5 nm, 514.5 nm, 532 nm, 808 nm laser irradiation was obviously increased with the decrease of these wavelengths, and their effective attenuation coefficient revealed the same trend. There were no significant differences among the forward scattered photon fluxe, backward scattered photon fluxe, and total scattered photon fluxe of the tissue at 476.5 nm, 488 nm, 496.5 nm laser irradiation. They were all obviously increased with attenuation of tissue thickness. The attenuations of forward and backward scattered photon fluxes, and the total scattered photon fluxe of the tissue at 514.5 nm laser irradiation were slower than those at 476.5 nm, 488 nm, 496.5 nm laser

  7. Role of metabolism by the human intestinal microflora in arbutin-induced cytotoxicity in HepG2 cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Tilak; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Hwang, Yong Pil; Kong, Min Jeong; Kang, Mi Jeong; Yeo, Hee Kyung; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-09-23

    A possible role for metabolism by the human intestinal microflora in arbutin-induced cytotoxicity was investigated using human hepatoma HepG2 cells. When the cytotoxic effects of arbutin and hydroquinone (HQ), a deglycosylated metabolite of arbutin, were compared, HQ was more toxic than arbutin. Incubation of arbutin with a human fecal preparation could produce HQ. Following incubation of arbutin with a human fecal preparation for metabolic activation, the reaction mixture was filter-sterilized to test its toxic effects on HepG2 cells. The mixture induced cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, the mixture considerably inhibited expression of Bcl-2 together with an increase in Bax expression. Likewise, activation stimulated cleavage of caspase-3 and production of reactive oxygen species in HepG2 cell cultures. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis by the intestinal microflora reaction mixture was confirmed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling assay. Taken together, these findings suggest that the human intestinal microflora is capable of metabolizing arbutin to HQ, which can induce apoptosis in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Exploring drug solubility in fasted human intestinal fluid aspirates: Impact of inter-individual variability, sampling site and dilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz-Moreno, Mariangeles Pérez; Montejo, Consuelo; Aguilar-Ros, Antonio; Dewe, Walthère; Beck, Benoît; Stappaerts, Jef; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2017-08-07

    One of the main factors defining intestinal drug absorption is the solubility of the compound in the gastrointestinal environment. This study reports the solubility of a series of 27 commonly used acidic, neutral and basic drugs in human intestinal fluid samples collected from the duodenum or jejunum of healthy volunteers under fasted state conditions. The interindividual variability as well as the impact of factors such as pH, sampling site and bile salts on the solubility in human intestinal fluids was investigated. The solubility measurements were evaluated using a statistical experimental design. Variability in solubility across volunteers and sampling sites was highly compound-specific and appeared to be substantial for weak acids and bases and for lipophilic drugs. Both pH of the samples and the abundance of amphiphilic components were responsible for the variability observed in the solubility values obtained. The results confirm strong interindividual differences in intraluminal solubility, especially for compounds with high lipophilicity and/or compounds with a pKa value within the physiological pH range. It is important to recognize this variability in intestinal drug solubility as it may considerably influence the therapeutic outcome among patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Compartment-specific distribution of human intestinal innate lymphoid cells is altered in HIV patients under effective therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Krämer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphocyte cells (ILCs, a novel family of innate immune cells are considered to function as key orchestrators of immune defences at mucosal surfaces and to be crucial for maintaining an intact intestinal barrier. Accordingly, first data suggest depletion of ILCs to be involved in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-associated damage of the intestinal mucosa and subsequent microbial translocation. However, although ILCs are preferentially localized at mucosal surfaces, only little is known regarding distribution and function of ILCs in the human gastrointestinal tract. Here, we show that in HIV(- individuals composition and functional capacity of intestinal ILCs is compartment-specific with group 1 ILCs representing the major fraction in the upper gastrointestinal (GI tract, whereas ILC3 are the predominant population in ileum and colon, respectively. In addition, we present first data indicating that local cytokine concentrations, especially that of IL-7, might modulate composition of gut ILCs. Distribution of intestinal ILCs was significantly altered in HIV patients, who displayed decreased frequency of total ILCs in ileum and colon owing to reduced numbers of both CD127(+ILC1 and ILC3. Of note, frequency of colonic ILC3 was inversely correlated with serum levels of I-FABP and sCD14, surrogate markers for loss of gut barrier integrity and microbial translocation, respectively. Both expression of the IL-7 receptor CD127 on ILCs as well as mucosal IL-7 mRNA levels were decreased in HIV(+ patients, especially in those parts of the GI tract with reduced ILC frequencies, suggesting that impaired IL-7 responses of ILCs might contribute to incomplete reconstitution of ILCs under effective anti-retroviral therapy. This is the first report comparing distribution and function of ILCs along the intestinal mucosa of the entire human gastrointestinal tract in HIV(+ and HIV(- individuals.

  10. Specific binding of lactoferrin to Escherichia coli isolated from human intestinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, S.S.; Erdei, J.; Forsgren, A.; Naidu, A.S. (Departments of Medical Microbiology, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden)); Czirok, E.; Gado, I. (National Institute of Hygiene, Budapest (Hungary)); Kalfas, S. (School of Dentistry, University of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden)); Thoren, A. (Infectious Diseases, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    The degrees of human lactoferrin (HLf) and bovine lactoferrin (BLf) binding in 169 Escherichia coli strains isolated from human intestinal infections, and in an additional 68 strains isolated from healthy individuals, were examined in a {sup 125}I-labelled protein binding assay. The binding was expressed as a percentage calculated from the total labelled ligand added to bacteria. The HLf and BLf binding to E. coli was in the range 3.7 to 73.4% and 4.8 to 61.6%, respectively. Enterotoxigenic strains demonstrated a significantly higher HLf binding (median = 19%) than enteropathogenic, enteroinvasive, enterohaemorrhagic strains or normal intestinal E. coli isolates (medians 6 to 9). Enteropathogenic strains belonging to serotypes O44 and O127 demonstrated significantly higher HLf binding compared to O26, O55, O111, O119 and O126. No significant differences in the degree of HLf or BLf binding were found between aerobactin-producing and non-producing strains. The interaction was further characterized in a high Lf-binging EPEC strain, E34663 (serotype O127). The binding was stable in the pH range 4.0 to 7.5, did not dissociate in the presence of 2M NaCl or 2M urea, and reached saturation within two h. Unlabelled HLf and BLf displaced the {sup 125}I-HLf binding to E34663 in a dose-dependent manner. Apo- and iron-saturated forms of Lf demonstrated similar binding to E34663. Among various unlabelled subephithelial matrix proteins and carbohydrates tested (in 10{sup 4}-fold excess) only fibronectin and fibrinogen caused a moderate inhibition of {sup 125}I-HLf binding. According to Scatchard plot analysis, 5,400 HLf-binding sites/cell, with an affinity constant (K{sub a}) of 1.4 x 10{sup -7} M, were estimated in strain E34663. These data establish the presence of a specific Lf-binding mechanism in E. coli. (au).

  11. Novel resveratrol-based substrates for human hepatic, renal, and intestinal UDP-glucuronosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Aleksandra K; Madadi, Nikhil R; Bratton, Stacie M; Eddy, Sarah D; Mazerska, Zofia; Hendrickson, Howard P; Crooks, Peter A; Radominska-Pandya, Anna

    2014-04-21

    Trans-Resveratrol (tRes) has been shown to have powerful antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, and antiaging properties; however, its use as a therapeutic agent is limited by its rapid metabolism into its conjugated forms by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). The aim of the current study was to test the hypothesis that the limited bioavailability of tRes can be improved by modifying its structure to create analogs which would be glucuronidated at a lower rate than tRes itself. In this work, three synthetic stilbenoids, (E)-3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-2-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)acrylic acid (NI-12a), (E)-2,4-dimethoxy-6-(4-methoxystyryl)benzaldehyde oxime (NI-ST-05), and (E)-4-(3,5-dimethoxystyryl)-2,6-dinitrophenol (DNR-1), have been designed based on the structure of tRes and synthesized in our laboratory. UGTs recognize and glucuronidate tRes at each of the 3 hydroxyl groups attached to its aromatic rings. Therefore, each of the above compounds was designed with the majority of the hydroxyl groups blocked by methylation and the addition of other novel functional groups as part of a drug optimization program. The activities of recombinant human UGTs from the 1A and 2B families were examined for their capacity to metabolize these compounds. Glucuronide formation was identified using HPLC and verified by β-glucuronidase hydrolysis and LC-MS/MS analysis. NI-12a was glucuronidated at both the -COOH and -OH functions, NI-ST-05 formed a novel N-O-glucuronide, and no product was observed for DNR-1. NI-12a is primarily metabolized by the hepatic and renal enzyme UGT1A9, whereas NI-ST-05 is primarily metabolized by an extrahepatic enzyme, UGT1A10, with apparent Km values of 240 and 6.2 μM, respectively. The involvement of hepatic and intestinal UGTs in the metabolism of both compounds was further confirmed using a panel of human liver and intestinal microsomes, and high individual variation in activity was demonstrated between donors. In summary, these

  12. Contribution of the Intestinal Microbiota to Human Health: From Birth to 100 Years of Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, J.; Palva, A.M.; Vos, de W.M.; Satokari, R.

    2013-01-01

    Our intestinal tract is colonized since birth by multiple microbial species that show a characteristic succession in time. Notably the establishment of the microbiota in early life is important as it appears to impact later health. While apparently stable in healthy adults, the intestinal microbiota

  13. Assessment of the mode of action underlying development of rodent small intestinal tumors following oral exposure to hexavalent chromium and relevance to humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Deborah M.; Suh, Mina; Haws, Laurie C.; Kirman, Christopher R.; Harris, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in drinking water causes intestinal adenomas and carcinomas in mice, but not in rats. Cr(VI) causes damage to intestinal villi and crypt hyperplasia in mice after only one week of exposure. After two years of exposure, intestinal damage and crypt hyperplasia are evident in mice (but not rats), as are intestinal tumors. Although Cr(VI) has genotoxic properties, these findings suggest that intestinal tumors in mice arise as a result of chronic mucosal injury. To better understand the mode of action (MOA) of Cr(VI) in the intestine, a 90-day drinking water study was conducted to collect histological, biochemical, toxicogenomic and pharmacokinetic data in intestinal tissues. Using MOA analyses and human relevance frameworks proposed by national and international regulatory agencies, the weight of evidence supports a cytotoxic MOA with the following key events: (a) absorption of Cr(VI) from the intestinal lumen, (b) toxicity to intestinal villi, (c) crypt regenerative hyperplasia and (d) clonal expansion of mutations within the crypt stem cells, resulting in late onset tumorigenesis. This article summarizes the data supporting each key event in the MOA, as well as data that argue against a mutagenic MOA for Cr(VI)-induced intestinal tumors. PMID:23445218

  14. Antioxidant-Enhancing Property of the Polar Fraction of Mangosteen Pericarp Extract and Evaluation of Its Safety in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Wichit Suthammarak; Pornpayom Numpraphrut; Ratiya Charoensakdi; Neelobol Neungton; Vachara Tunrungruangtavee; Nattapon Jaisupa; Suwit Charoensak; Primchanien Moongkarndi; Weerasak Muangpaisan

    2016-01-01

    Crude extract from the pericarp of the mangosteen (mangosteen extract [ME]) has exhibited several medicinal properties in both animal models and human cell lines. Interestingly, the cytotoxic activities were always observed in nonpolar fraction of the extract whereas the potent antioxidant was often found in polar fraction. Although it has been demonstrated that the polar fraction of ME exhibited the antioxidant activity, the safety of the polar fraction of ME has never been thoroughly invest...

  15. Regional Expression Levels of Drug Transporters and Metabolizing Enzymes along the Pig and Human Intestinal Tract and Comparison with Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaessen, Stefan F C; van Lipzig, Marola M H; Pieters, Raymond H H; Krul, Cyrille A M; Wortelboer, Heleen M; van de Steeg, Evita

    2017-04-01

    Intestinal transporter proteins and metabolizing enzymes play a crucial role in the oral absorption of a wide variety of drugs. The aim of the current study was to characterize better available intestinal in vitro models by comparing expression levels of these proteins and enzymes between porcine intestine, human intestine, and Caco-2 cells. We therefore determined the absolute protein expression of 19 drug transporters and the mRNA expression of 12 metabolic enzymes along the pig intestinal tract (duodenum, jejunum, ileum; N = 4), in human intestine (jejunum; N = 9), and Caco-2 cells. Expression of the included transporters and enzymes was in general well comparable between porcine and human intestinal tissue, although breast cancer resistance protein, monocarboxylate transporter 5, multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 1, MRP1, MRP3 (∼2-fold), and organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 4A1 (∼6-fold) was higher expressed in pig compared with human jejunum. Alternatively, expression level of relevant transporter proteins (glucose transporter 1, OATP4A1, MRP2, MRP1, and OATP2B1) was significantly higher (3- to 130-fold) in Caco-2 cells compared with human jejunum. Moreover, all examined CYPs showed at least a fivefold lower gene expression in Caco-2 cells compared with human jejunum, with the smallest differences for CYP1A1 and CYP3A5 and the largest difference for CYP3A4 (871-fold higher expression in human jejunum compared with Caco-2 cells). In conclusion, a comprehensive overview is provided of the expression levels of clinically relevant transporter proteins and metabolic enzymes in porcine and human intestinal tissue and Caco-2 cells, which may assist in deciding upon the most suitable model to further improve our understanding of processes that determine intestinal absorption of compounds. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. Cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of mycotoxins in human small intestinal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina Skau; Sørensen, Izel Fourie; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2016-01-01

    for consumers and for animal health and welfare. The aim of the present study was to determine the cytotoxicity of several mycotoxins potentially present in feed and food in a sensitive screening assay with normal human small intestinal cells (FHs 74 Int.). For cytotoxicity studies, cells were treated...... with mycotoxins for 72 h, and viability was measured by AlamarBlue reduction. For apoptosis studies, cells were treated with mycotoxins for 24 h, and apoptosis was measured by caspase 3/7 activation. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of mycotoxins was calculated from sigmoidal dose-response plots....... T-2 toxin was the most cytotoxic mycotoxin (6.4 nM), followed by HT-2 toxin (24 nM), PR toxin (44 nM), gliotoxin (0.11 µM), NIV (0.32 µM), deoxynivalenol (DON; 0.34 µM), patulin (0.97 µM), and zearalenone (ZEA; 11 µM). Mycophenolic acid, roquefortine, citrinin, and moniformin did not cause...

  17. Investigation of intestinal parasites in pig feces that are also human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Hayriye Kirkoyun; Boral, Ozden; Metiner, Kemal; Ilgaz, Atilla

    2009-01-01

    A total of 238 pig fecal specimens were collected from pig farms in Corlu (Tekirdağ), Ayazma, and Arnavutköy (Istanbul) during the summer. Out of the 238 pig specimens, 105 were from pigs younger than 6 months and 133 from pigs older than 6 months. These were investigated for intestine parasites in particular the ones that are human pathogens. Cryptosporidium spp. was detected In 21 fecal specimens (8.8%), Giardia spp. in 9 (3.7%), Balantidium coli cysts in 4 (1.6%) and Ascaris suum eggs in 9 (4.1%). Giardia lamblia were found in 8 (7.6%) of 105 pigs younger than 6 months, Cryptosporidium spp. in 12 (11.4%), Balantidium coli cysts in 2 (1.5%). In the pigs older than 6 months Giardia lamblia were found in 1 (0.7%), Cryptosporidium spp. in 9 (6.7%), Balantidium coli cysts in 2 (1.5%). and Ascaris suum eggs in 9 (6.7%). The difference in the rate of G. lamblia (p=0.01) in pigs less than 6 months and of A. suum in those over 6 months was found to be statistically significant (p=0.005). Our results revealed that pigs are important sources of these parasites.

  18. Selective growth inhibitor toward human intestinal bacteria derived from Pulsatilla cernua root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H S; Beon, M S; Kim, M K

    2001-10-01

    Among 21 medicinal plants, the growth-inhibiting activity of Pulsatilla cernua root-derived materials toward human intestinal bacteria was examined by using an impregnated paper disk method. The biologically active components of P. cernua roots were characterized as 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid and 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid by spectroscopic analysis. The activity was compared with that of six commercially available cinnamic acid derivatives trans-cinnamaldehyde, trans-cinnamic acid, cinnamyl alcohol, 2-methoxycinnamic acid, 3-methoxycinnamic acid, and 4-methoxycinnamic acid. The growth responses varied with each bacterial strain tested. Two isolated compounds revealed a potent inhibition against Clostridium perfringens, and moderate to weak activity against Escherichia coli was exhibited by 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid. Weak or no inhibitory activity was obtained against the bifidobacteria or Lactobacillus acidophilus. The inhibitory effect was much more pronounced in C. perfringens and E. coli as compared to B. adolescentis, B. bifidum, B. fragilis, B. longum, or L. acidophilus. Cinnamaldehyde exhibited a strong growth-inhibiting activity, but no inhibition was observed from treatments with trans-cinnamic acid, cinnamyl alcohol, 2-methoxycinnamic acid, 3-methoxycinnamic acid, and 4-methoxycinnamic acid. These results may be an indication of at least one of the pharmacological actions of P. cernua root.

  19. Modulation of chromatin remodelling induced by the freshwater cyanotoxin cylindrospermopsin in human intestinal caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Huguet

    Full Text Available Cylindrospermopsin (CYN is a cyanotoxin that has been recognised as an emerging potential public health risk. Although CYN toxicity has been demonstrated, the mechanisms involved have not been fully characterised. To identify some key pathways related to this toxicity, we studied the transcriptomic profile of human intestinal Caco-2 cells exposed to a sub-toxic concentration of CYN (1.6 µM for 24hrs using a non-targeted approach. CYN was shown to modulate different biological functions which were related to growth arrest (with down-regulation of cdkn1a and uhrf1 genes, and DNA recombination and repair (with up-regulation of aptx and pms2 genes. Our main results reported an increased expression of some histone-modifying enzymes (histone acetyl and methyltransferases MYST1, KAT5 and EHMT2 involved in chromatin remodelling, which is essential for initiating transcription. We also detected greater levels of acetylated histone H2A (Lys5 and dimethylated histone H3 (Lys4, two products of these enzymes. In conclusion, CYN overexpressed proteins involved in DNA damage repair and transcription, including modifications of nucleosomal histones. Our results highlighted some new cell processes induced by CYN.

  20. Reduction of azo dyes and nitroaromatic compounds by bacterial enzymes from the human intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, F; Cerniglia, C E

    1995-01-01

    Several anaerobic bacteria from the human intestinal tract are capable of reducing azo dyes and nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the corresponding aromatic amines with enzymes that have azoreductase and nitroreductase activities. The majority of bacteria with these activities belong to the genera Clostridium and Eubacterium. The azoreductases and nitroreductases from three Clostridium strains and one Eubacterium strain were studied. Both enzymes were produced constitutively in each of the bacteria; the enzymes from various bacteria had different electrophoretic mobilities. The azoreductases from all of the bacteria had immunological homology, as was evident from the cross-reactivity of an antibody raised against the azoreductase of C. perfringens with azoreductases from other bacteria. Comparison of azoreductases and nitroreductases showed that they both had identical electrophoretic mobilities on polyacrylamide gels and reacted with the antibody against the azoreductase from C. perfringens. Furthermore, the nitroaromatic compounds competitively inhibited the azoreductase activity. The data indicate that the reduction of both nitroaromatic compounds and azo dyes may be carried out by the same enzyme, which is possibly a flavin adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase that is synthesized throughout the cell and not associated with any organized subcellular structure. Images Figure 1. PMID:8565901

  1. Assessment of the prebiotic effect of quinoa and amaranth in the human intestinal ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullón, Beatriz; Gullón, Patricia; Tavaria, Freni K; Yáñez, Remedios

    2016-09-14

    Quinoa and amaranth belong to the group of the so called "superfoods" and have a nutritional composition that confers multiple benefits. In this work, we explored the possibility of these foods exhibiting a prebiotic effect. These pseudocereals were subjected to an in vitro digestion and used as carbon sources in batch cultures with faecal human inocula. The effects on the microbiota composition and their metabolic products were determined by assessment of variations in pH, short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production and changes in the dynamic bacterial populations by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). After 48 h of incubation, the total SCFAs were 106.5 mM for quinoa and 108.83 mM for amaranth, in line with the decrease in pH. Considerable differences (p < 0.05) were found in certain microbial groups, including Bifidobacterium spp., Lactobacillus-Enterococcus, Atopobium, Bacteroides-Prevotella, Clostridium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Roseburia intestinalis. Our research suggests that these pseudocereals can have the prebiotic potential and that their intake may improve dysbiosis or maintain the gastrointestinal health through a balanced intestinal microbiota, although additional studies are necessary.

  2. Intestinal parasitic infections and eosinophilia in an human immunedeficiency virus positive population in Honduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina G Kaminsky

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of intestinal parasites, their regional distribution and their relations to eosinophilia were studied in 133 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive individuals from Honduras. After signing an informed consent, participants answered a socio-demographic and risk factor questionnaire, a complete physical examination, medical history, and a series of laboratory tests. All participants were HIV positive but not acquired immunodeficiency syndrome positive. Of them, 67% were co-infected with pathogen and non pathogen parasites. Overall occurrence of nematodes was: 44.3% for Trichuris trichiura, 24% for Ascaris lumbricoides, 12% for Hookworm and 7.5% for Strongyloides stercoralis. No cases of Giardia lamblia, acute amebiasis or cryptosporidiasis were diagnosed. Mean eosinophil percents for participants were consistently and significantly higher in infected than in non infected individuals: 22% for Hookworm vs 7.2% (p < 0.001, 11% for Trichuris compared to 5.2% (p < 0.001, 13.2% compared to 7.5% for S. stercoralis (p < 0.05, and 12% compared to 6% for Ascaris cases (p < 0.05. Helminths and non pathogenic protozoa, as single or mixed infections, occurred among the participants. There was a strong correlation between eosinophilia and helminthiasis infections; however, none was identified between CD4 levels and eosinophilia. Because parasitic infections aggravate malnutrition and promote a disbalanced Th2 response in a potentially immuno-compromised host, their effect on HIV disease progression needs further study, mainly in countries were HIV and parasitic infections are highly prevalent.

  3. Lubiprostone reverses the inhibitory action of morphine on mucosal secretion in human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaohong; Wang, Xiyu; Wang, Guo-Du; Xia, Yun; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Meihua; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Melvin, W Scott; Bohn, Laura M; Ueno, Ryuji; Wood, Jackie D

    2011-02-01

    Treatments with morphine or opioid agonists cause constipation. Lubiprostone is approved for treatment of adult idiopathic constipation and constipation-predominant IBS in adult women. We tested whether lubiprostone can reverse morphine-suppression of mucosal secretion in human intestine and explored the mechanism of action. Fresh segments of jejunum discarded during Roux-En-Y gastric bypass surgeries were used. Changes in short-circuit current (ΔIsc) were recorded in Ussing flux chambers as a marker for electrogenic chloride secretion during pharmacological interactions between morphine, prostaglandin receptor antagonists, chloride channel blockers and lubiprostone. Morphine suppressed basal Isc. Lubiprostone reversed morphine suppression of basal Isc. Lubiprostone, applied to the mucosa in concentrations ranging from 3 nM to 30 μM, evoked increases in Isc in concentration-dependent manner when applied to the mucosal side of muscle-stripped preparations. Blockade of enteric nerves did not change stimulation of Isc by lubiprostone. Removal of chloride or application of bumetanide or NPPB suppressed or abolished responses to lubiprostone. Antagonists acting at CFTR channels and prostaglandin EP(4) receptors, but not at E(1), EP(1-3) receptors, partially suppressed stimulation of Isc by lubiprostone. Antisecretory action of morphine results from suppression of excitability of secretomotor neurons in the enteric nervous system. Lubiprostone, which does not affect enteric neurons directly, bypasses the action of morphine by directly opening mucosal chloride channels.

  4. Reduction of azo dyes and nitroaromatic compounds by bacterial enzymes from the human intestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafii, F.; Cerniglia, C.E. [Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Several anaerobic bacteria from the human intestinal tract are capable of reducing azo dyes and nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the corresponding aromatic amines with enzymes that have azoreductase and nitroreductase activities. The majority of bacteria with these activities belong to the genera Clostridium and Eubacterium. The azoreductases and nitroreductases from three Clostridium strains and one Eubacterium strain were studied. Both enzymes were produced constitutively in each of the bacteria; the enzymes from various bacteria had different electrophoretic mobilities. The azoreductases from all of the bacteria had immunological homology, as was evident from the cross-reactivity of an antibody raised against the azoreductase of C perfringens with azoreductases from other bacteria. Comparison of azoreductases and nitroreductases showed that they both had identical electrophoretic mobilities on polyacrylamide gels and reacted with the antibody against the azoreductase from C. perfringens. Furthermore, the nitroaromatic compounds competitively inhibited the azoreductase activity. The data indicate that the reduction of both nitroaromatic compounds and azo dyes may be carried out by the same enzyme, which is possibly a flavin adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase that is synthesized throughout the cell and not associated with any organized subcellular structure. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. [Studies on biotransformation of chemical constituents of tongmai formula by human intestinal flora].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuai; Xu, Wei; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2013-10-01

    To study the chemical constituents in Tongmai formula (TMF) after biotransformation by human intestinal flora (HIF), water extract of TMF was anaerobically incubated with HIF at 37 degrees C. Column chromatographic methods over silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 and semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography as well as recrystallization were used to isolate and purify the chemical constituents in TMF after biotransformation by HIF. The chemical structures of isolated compounds were identified on the basis of MS and NMR data. Twenty-six compounds were obtained and identified as phenylpropionic acid (1), 6"-O-acetylpuerarin (2), formononetin(3), daidzein(4), p-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid (5), 3-indolepropionic acid (6), genistein (7), isoformononetin (8), isoononin (9), a mixture of (-)-puerol B-2"-O-glucopyranoside (10a) and (+) -puerol B-2"-O-glucopyranoside (10b), 8-hydroxydaidzein (11), puerol A (12), 3'-methoxy-6"-O-acetylpuerarin (13), 6"-O-acetyldaidzin (14), 3'-methoxydaidzin (15), puerol B (16), 3-methyluracil (17), genistin (18), daidzin (19), 3'-methoxypuerarin (20), mirificin (21), swertiamarin (22) , daidzein-7, 4'-O-glucoside (23), adenine (24), 3'-hydroxypuerarin (25), and puerarin (26). After biotransformation by HIF, the glycosides in TMF were transformed into aglycone and/or less glycosyl compounds along with some hydroxylation and demethylation reactions. Therefore, the glycosides in the TMF are the pro-drug.

  6. Evaluation of an FDA approved library against laboratory models of human intestinal nematode infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Jennifer; Panic, Gordana; Adelfio, Roberto; Cowan, Noemi; Vargas, Mireille; Scandale, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Treatment options for infections with soil-transmitted helminths (STH) - Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and the two hookworm species, Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus - are limited despite their considerable global health burden. The aim of the present study was to test the activity of an openly available FDA library against laboratory models of human intestinal nematode infections. All 1,600 drugs were first screened against Ancylostoma ceylanicum third-stage larvae (L3). Active compounds were scrutinized and toxic compounds, drugs indicated solely for topical use, and already well-studied anthelmintics were excluded. The remaining hit compounds were tested in parallel against Trichuris muris first-stage larvae (L1), Heligmosomoides polygyrus third-stage larvae (L3), and adult stages of the three species in vitro. In vivo studies were performed in the H. polygyrus and T. muris mice models. Fifty-four of the 1,600 compounds tested revealed an activity of > 60 % against A. ceylanicum L3 (hit rate of 3.4 %), following incubation at 200 μM for 72 h. Twelve compounds progressed into further screens. Adult A. ceylanicum were the least affected (1/12 compounds active at 50 μM), while eight of the 12 test compounds revealed activity against T. muris L1 (100 μM) and adults (50 μM), and H. polygyrus L3 (200 μM). Trichlorfon was the only compound active against all stages of A. ceylanicum, H. polygyrus and T. muris. In addition, trichlorfon achieved high worm burden reductions of 80.1 and 98.9 %, following a single oral dose of 200 mg/kg in the T. muris and H. polygyrus mouse model, respectively. Drug screening on the larval stages of intestinal parasitic nematodes is feasible using small libraries and important given the empty drug discovery and development pipeline for STH infections. Differences and commonalities in drug activities across the different STH species and stages were confirmed. Hits identified might serve as a

  7. A Role for the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling in Development of Intestinal Serrated Polyps in Mice and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Gerold; Muniz, Luciana R.; Pacer, Michelle E.; Iuga, Alina C.; Thirunarayanan, Nanthakumar; Slinger, Erik; Smit, Martine J.; Reddy, E. Premkumar; Mayer, Lloyd; Furtado, Glaucia C.; Harpaz, Noam; Lira, Sergio A.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Epithelial cancers can be initiated by activating mutations in components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway such as BRAF, KRAS, or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Human intestinal serrated polyps are a heterogeneous group of benign lesions, but some progress to colorectal cancer. Tumors that arise from these polyps frequently contain activating mutations in BRAF or KRAS, but little is known about the role of EGFR activation in their development. Methods Polyp samples were obtained from adults during screening colonoscopies at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. We measured levels of EGFR protein and phosphorylation in human serrated polyps by immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses. We generated transgenic mice that express the ligand for EGFR, HB-EGF, in the intestine. Results EGFR and the extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2 were phosphorylated in serrated areas of human hyperplastic polyps (HPPs), sessile serrated adenomas, and traditional serrated adenomas. EGFR and ERK1/2 were phosphorylated in the absence of KRAS or BRAF activating mutations in a subset of HPP. Transgenic expression of the EGFR ligand HB-EGF in the intestines of mice promoted development of small cecal serrated polyps. Mice that expressed a combination of HB-EGF and US28 (a constitutively active, G-protein–coupled receptor that increases processing of HB-EGF from the membrane) rapidly developed large cecal serrated polyps. These polyps were similar to HPPs and had increased phosphorylation of EGFR and ERK1/2 within the serrated epithelium. Administration of pharmacologic inhibitors of EGFR or MAP kinase to these transgenic mice significantly reduced polyp development. Conclusions Activation of EGFR signaling in the intestine of mice promotes development of serrated polyps. EGFR signaling is also activated in human HPPs, sessile serrated adenomas, and traditional serrated adenomas. PMID:22643351

  8. Development of 3D human intestinal equivalents for substance testing in microliter-scale on a multi-organ-chip

    OpenAIRE

    Jaenicke, Annika; Tordy, Dominique; Groeber, Florian; Hansmann, Jan; Nietzer, Sarah; Tripp, Carolin; Walles, Heike; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    First published by BioMed Central: Jaenicke, Annika; Tordy, Dominique; Groeber, Florian; Hansmann, Jan; Nietzer, Sarah; Tripp, Carolin; Walles, Heike; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe: Development of 3D human intestinal equivalents for substance testing in microliter-scale on a multi-organ-chip. - In: BMC Proceedings. - ISSN 1753-6561 (online). - 7 (2013), suppl. 6, P65. - doi:10.1186/1753-6561-7-S6-P65.

  9. Conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil by human intestinal microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, B.; Manning, B.; Federle, T.; Diasio, R.

    1986-03-01

    5-Fluorocytosine (FC) is used to treat systemic fungal infections in man. Its clinical effectiveness has been limited by hematologic toxicity which may be secondary to the formation of 5-fluorouracil (FU). It is unclear how FU is formed since human cells lack cytosine deaminase. The present study examined if intestinal microflora (IMF) could convert FC to FU in man. An in vitro semicontinuous culture system was inoculated with human feces and maintained with sterile nutrient suspension. The microbial community was assessed for cell count and anaerobes as well as formation of volatile fatty acids and CH/sub 4/. The system approximated that believed to occur in vivo. The study was initiated with addition of purified (6-/sup 14/C)-FC. Unlabelled FC was then added to the system daily for 2 weeks following which (6-/sup 14/C)-FC was again added. Following each addition of (6-/sup 14/C)-FC, samples were removed at 2,4,8,24,48,72, and 96 hr. Utilizing HPLC, FC and FU could be separated with quantitation of radioactivity in each peak. Following the initial dose, no detectable FU was observed during the first 8 hr, but after 24 hr increasing levels were detected (9.42 ..mu..g FU/ml after 4 days). Following chronic administration of FC, increased levles of FU were noted without an 8 hr lag time in the production of FU (31.86 ..mu..g FU/ml after 4 days). In summary, these studies demonstrate that IMF can convert FC to FU possibly accounting for toxicity observed following administration of FC.

  10. Impact of Different Fecal Processing Methods on Assessments of Bacterial Diversity in the Human Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsin Hsieh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota are integral to understanding the relationships between nutrition and health. Therefore, fecal sampling and processing protocols for metagenomic surveys should be sufficiently robust, accurate, and reliable to identify the microorganisms present. We investigated the use of different fecal preparation methods on the bacterial community structures identified in human stools. Complete stools were collected from six healthy individuals and processed according to the following methods: (i randomly sampled fresh stool, (ii fresh stool homogenized in a blender for 2 min, (iii randomly sampled frozen stool, and (iv frozen stool homogenized in a blender for 2 min or (v homogenized in a pneumatic mixer for either 10, 20, or 30 min. High-throughput DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA V4 regions of bacterial community DNA extracted from the stools showed that the fecal microbiota remained distinct between individuals, independent of processing method. Moreover, the different stool preparation approaches did not alter intra-individual bacterial diversity. Distinctions were found at the level of individual taxa, however. Stools that were frozen and then homogenized tended to have higher proportions of Faecalibacterium, Streptococcus, and Bifidobacterium and decreased quantities of Oscillospira, Bacteroides, and Parabacteroides compared to stools that were collected in small quantities and not mixed prior to DNA extraction. These findings indicate that certain taxa are at particular risk for under or over sampling due to protocol differences. Importantly, homogenization by any method significantly reduced the intra-individual variation in bacteria detected per stool. Our results confirm the robustness of fecal homogenization for microbial analyses and underscore the value of collecting and mixing large stool sample quantities in human nutrition intervention studies.

  11. Impact of Different Fecal Processing Methods on Assessments of Bacterial Diversity in the Human Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Peterson, Courtney M; Raggio, Anne; Keenan, Michael J; Martin, Roy J; Ravussin, Eric; Marco, Maria L

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota are integral to understanding the relationships between nutrition and health. Therefore, fecal sampling and processing protocols for metagenomic surveys should be sufficiently robust, accurate, and reliable to identify the microorganisms present. We investigated the use of different fecal preparation methods on the bacterial community structures identified in human stools. Complete stools were collected from six healthy individuals and processed according to the following methods: (i) randomly sampled fresh stool, (ii) fresh stool homogenized in a blender for 2 min, (iii) randomly sampled frozen stool, and (iv) frozen stool homogenized in a blender for 2 min, or (v) homogenized in a pneumatic mixer for either 10, 20, or 30 min. High-throughput DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA V4 regions of bacterial community DNA extracted from the stools showed that the fecal microbiota remained distinct between individuals, independent of processing method. Moreover, the different stool preparation approaches did not alter intra-individual bacterial diversity. Distinctions were found at the level of individual taxa, however. Stools that were frozen and then homogenized tended to have higher proportions of Faecalibacterium, Streptococcus, and Bifidobacterium and decreased quantities of Oscillospira, Bacteroides, and Parabacteroides compared to stools that were collected in small quantities and not mixed prior to DNA extraction. These findings indicate that certain taxa are at particular risk for under or over sampling due to protocol differences. Importantly, homogenization by any method significantly reduced the intra-individual variation in bacteria detected per stool. Our results confirm the robustness of fecal homogenization for microbial analyses and underscore the value of collecting and mixing large stool sample quantities in human nutrition intervention studies.

  12. Thalidomide inhibits inflammatory and angiogenic activation of human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Daniel J.; Nelson, Victoria M.; Otterson, Mary F.; Shaker, Reza; Binion, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The glutamic acid derivative thalidomide is a transcriptional inhibitor of TNF-α but is also known to affect human blood vessels, which may underlie its teratogenicity. Thalidomide has been used in the treatment of refractory Crohn's disease (CD), but the therapeutic mechanism is not defined. We examined the effect of thalidomide on primary cultures of human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMEC), the relevant endothelial cell population in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), to determine its effect on endothelial activation, leukocyte interaction, and VEGF-induced angiogenesis. HIMEC cultures were pretreated with thalidomide before activation with either TNF-α/LPS or VEGF. A low-shear-stress flow adhesion assay with either U-937 or whole blood was used to assess HIMEC activation following TNF-α/LPS, and a Wright's stain identified adherent leukocytes. Expression of cell adhesion molecules (E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) was assessed using radioimmunoassay. Effects of thalidomide on NF-κB activation, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in TNF-α/LPS-activated HIMEC were determined by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Thalidomide blocked adhesion of both U-937 and whole blood leukocytes by 50% in HIMEC, inhibiting binding of all classes of leukocytes. Thalidomide also blocked NF-κB and cell adhesion molecule expression in HIMEC. In marked contrast, thalidomide did not affect either iNOS or COX-2 expression, two key molecules that play a role in the downregulation of HIMEC activation. VEGF-induced HIMEC transmigration, growth, proliferation, tube formation, and Akt phosphorylation were significantly inhibited by thalidomide. In summary, thalidomide exerted a potent effect on HIMEC growth and activation, suggesting that it may also function via an endothelial mechanism in the treatment of CD. PMID:19926820

  13. [Effects of different carbohydrates on the simulation of human intestinal bacterial flora with in vitro culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, B; Yin, Y S; Sun, G; Zhu, L Y; Liu, W; Pi, X E; Fei, D B; Peng, L H; Wang, X; Yang, Y S

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the optimal growth condition of human fecal bacterial flora in vitro by comparing the effect of different carbohydrates as cultural media. Three fecal samples (1, 2, 3) were collected and inoculated into a single-stage chemostat system, in which starch medium (VI) and starch polysaccharide medium(XP) were used. Samples were collected for bacterial genomic DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis. Bacterial composition and short chain fatty acid (SCFA) were then analyzed. The single stage chemostat system reached steady after operating 8 days, when evaluated by the PCR-DGGE. Bacterial 16s rRNA high-throughput sequencing showed that the intestinal bacteria of these three volunteers was mainly composed of four bacterial phyla, namely, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. When the influence of bacterial abundance was considered, the similarity of bacterial composition between the original fecal samples to the harvested flora after culture was 0.847, 0.825, 0.968 in VI medium and 0.927, 0.926, 0.836 in XP medium, respectively. The similarity was decreased to 0.553, 0.580, 0.623 with VI medium and 0.617, 0.520, 0.574 with XP medium, when the number of bacterial species was considered. The variation of host individual also influenced the simulation. VI medium favored fecal sample 3, while XP medium more benefited sample 1 and 2. Bacteroides and Lachnospiraceae_incertae_sedis grew in both VI and XP medium. However, some species were only detected in VI medium and some were specifically found in the XP medium. The SCFA concentration in fermenters was 15-35 mmol/L, mainly propionate and butyrate. The chemostat system works for stimulating human gut bacterial flora in vitro. The bacterial composition is affected by different carbohydrate in the culture medium yet with close simulation higher than 80%.

  14. Environmental contaminants activate human and polar bear (Ursus maritimus) pregnane X receptors (PXR, NR1I2) differently

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lille-Langøy, Roger, E-mail: Roger.lille-langoy@bio.uib.no [University of Bergen, Department of Biology, P.O. Box 7803, N-5020 Bergen (Norway); Goldstone, Jared V. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 266 Woods Hole Road, 02543-1050 Woods Hole, MA (United States); Rusten, Marte [University of Bergen, Department of Molecular Biology, P.O. Box 7803, N-5020 Bergen (Norway); Milnes, Matthew R. [Mars Hill University, 100 Athletic Street, Box 6671, Mars Hill, 28754 NC (United States); Male, Rune [University of Bergen, Department of Molecular Biology, P.O. Box 7803, N-5020 Bergen (Norway); Stegeman, John J. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 266 Woods Hole Road, 02543-1050 Woods Hole, MA (United States); Blumberg, Bruce [University of California, Irvine, 92697 CA (United States); Goksøyr, Anders [University of Bergen, Department of Biology, P.O. Box 7803, N-5020 Bergen (Norway)

    2015-04-01

    Background: Many persistent organic pollutants (POPs) accumulate readily in polar bears because of their position as apex predators in Arctic food webs. The pregnane X receptor (PXR, formally NR1I2, here proposed to be named promiscuous xenobiotic receptor) is a xenobiotic sensor that is directly involved in metabolizing pathways of a wide range of environmental contaminants. Objectives: In the present study, we comparably assess the ability of 51 selected pharmaceuticals, pesticides and emerging contaminants to activate PXRs from polar bears and humans using an in vitro luciferase reporter gene assay. Results: We found that polar bear PXR is activated by a wide range of our test compounds (68%) but has a slightly more narrow ligand specificity than human PXR that was activated by 86% of the 51 test compounds. The majority of the agonists identified (70%) produces a stronger induction of the reporter gene via human PXR than via polar bear PXR, however with some notable and environmentally relevant exceptions. Conclusions: Due to the observed differences in activation of polar bear and human PXRs, exposure of each species to environmental agents is likely to induce biotransformation differently in the two species. Bioinformatics analyses and structural modeling studies suggest that amino acids that are not part of the ligand-binding domain and do not interact with the ligand can modulate receptor activation. - Highlights: • Comparative study of ligand activation of human and polar bear PXRs. • Polar bear PXR is a promiscuous ligand-activated nuclear receptor but less so than human PXR. • Environmental contaminants activate human and polar bear PXRs differently. • Expression and ligand promiscuity indicate that PXR is a xenosensor in polar bears.

  15. Development of genetically engineered human intestinal cells for regulated insulin secretion using rAAV-mediated gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shiue-Cheng; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2003-04-04

    Cell-based therapies for treating insulin-dependent diabetes (IDD) can provide a more physiologic regulation of blood glucose levels in a less invasive fashion than daily insulin injections. Promising cells include intestinal enteroendocrine cells genetically engineered to secrete insulin in response to physiologic stimuli; responsiveness occurs at the exocytosis level to regulate the acute release of recombinant insulin. In this work, we established a human cellular model to demonstrate that meat hydrolysate can simultaneously stimulate glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, an enteroendocrine cell-derived incretin hormone) and recombinant insulin secretion from the engineered human NCI-H716 intestinal cell line. Cells were genetically modified using the recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated insulin gene transfer. Recombinant cells were then differentiated to display endocrine features, in particular the formation of granule-like compartments. A fusion protein of insulin and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) was designed to reveal the compartments of localization of the fusion protein and assess its co-localization with endogenous GLP-1. Our work provides a unique human cellular model for regulated insulin release through genetic engineering of GLP-1-secreting intestinal cells, which is expected to be useful for cell-based therapies of IDD.

  16. The effects of di-D-fructofuranose-1,2':2,3'-dianhydride (DFA III) administration on human intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamida, Kimiko; Sujaya, I Nengah; Tamura, Akiko; Shigematsu, Norihiro; Sone, Teruo; Yokota, Atsushi; Asano, Kozo; Benno, Yoshimi; Tomita, Fusao

    2004-01-01

    Di-D-fructofuranose-1,2':2,3'-dianhydride (DFA III) was shown to enhance Ca absorption in rat and human intestine. The effects of DFA III administration (9 g per day for 4 weeks that corresponded to 3-fold the optimal dosage of DFA III) on human intestinal microbiota were studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The major groups of human intestinal microbiota reported previously: the Bacteroides, the Clostridium coccoides group (Clostridium cluster XIVa), the Clostridium leptum group (Clostridium cluster IV), and the Bifidobacterium group were detected. The similarity of 30 DGGE profiles based on the V3 region (before and after administration to the 15 subjects) of the 16S rDNA were calculated using Pearson's correlation based on numbers, positions and intensity of bands, and then a dendrogram of DGGE profiles was constructed by the unweighted pair group method using arithmetic average (UPGMA) clustering method. By these analyses, no difference in DGGE profiles after DFA III administration was observed in healthy subjects, while two subjects with chronic constipation showed different profiles, namely on numbers, positions and the intensity of some bands. Their stools were softer and stool frequencies increased and they obtained relief from constipation.

  17. Comparison of DNA extraction kits for PCR-DGGE analysis of human intestinal microbial communities from fecal specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariefdjohan, Merlin W; Savaiano, Dennis A; Nakatsu, Cindy H

    2010-05-22

    The influence of diet on intestinal microflora has been investigated mainly using conventional microbiological approaches. Although these studies have advanced knowledge on human intestinal microflora, it is imperative that new methods are applied to facilitate scientific progress. Culture-independent molecular fingerprinting method of Polymerase Chain Reaction and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) has been used to study microbial communities in a variety of environmental samples. However, these protocols must be optimized prior to their application in order to enhance the quality and accuracy of downstream analyses. In this study, the relative efficacy of four commercial DNA extraction kits (Mobio Ultra Clean(R) Fecal DNA Isolation Kit, M; QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, Q; FastDNA SPIN Kit, FSp; FastDNA SPIN Kit for Soil, FSo) were evaluated. Further, PCR-DGGE technique was also assessed for its feasibility in detecting differences in human intestinal bacterial fingerprint profiles. Total DNA was extracted from varying weights of human fecal specimens using four different kits, followed by PCR amplification of bacterial 16S rRNA genes, and DGGE separation of the amplicons. Regardless of kit, maximum DNA yield was obtained using 10 to 50 mg (wet wt) of fecal specimens and similar DGGE profiles were obtained. However, kits FSp and FSo extracted significantly larger amounts of DNA per g dry fecal specimens and produced more bands on their DGGE profiles than kits M and Q due to their use of bead-containing lysing matrix and vigorous shaking step. DGGE of 16S rRNA gene PCR products was suitable for capturing the profiles of human intestinal microbial community and enabled rapid comparative assessment of inter- and intra-subject differences. We conclude that extraction kits that incorporated bead-containing lysing matrix and vigorous shaking produced high quality DNA from human fecal specimens (10 to 50 mg, wet wt) that can be resolved as bacterial

  18. Comparison of DNA extraction kits for PCR-DGGE analysis of human intestinal microbial communities from fecal specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakatsu Cindy H

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influence of diet on intestinal microflora has been investigated mainly using conventional microbiological approaches. Although these studies have advanced knowledge on human intestinal microflora, it is imperative that new methods are applied to facilitate scientific progress. Culture-independent molecular fingerprinting method of Polymerase Chain Reaction and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE has been used to study microbial communities in a variety of environmental samples. However, these protocols must be optimized prior to their application in order to enhance the quality and accuracy of downstream analyses. In this study, the relative efficacy of four commercial DNA extraction kits (Mobio Ultra Clean® Fecal DNA Isolation Kit, M; QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit, Q; FastDNA® SPIN Kit, FSp; FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil, FSo were evaluated. Further, PCR-DGGE technique was also assessed for its feasibility in detecting differences in human intestinal bacterial fingerprint profiles. Method Total DNA was extracted from varying weights of human fecal specimens using four different kits, followed by PCR amplification of bacterial 16S rRNA genes, and DGGE separation of the amplicons. Results Regardless of kit, maximum DNA yield was obtained using 10 to 50 mg (wet wt of fecal specimens and similar DGGE profiles were obtained. However, kits FSp and FSo extracted significantly larger amounts of DNA per g dry fecal specimens and produced more bands on their DGGE profiles than kits M and Q due to their use of bead-containing lysing matrix and vigorous shaking step. DGGE of 16S rRNA gene PCR products was suitable for capturing the profiles of human intestinal microbial community and enabled rapid comparative assessment of inter- and intra-subject differences. Conclusion We conclude that extraction kits that incorporated bead-containing lysing matrix and vigorous shaking produced high quality DNA from human fecal

  19. Human intestinal microbiota composition is associated with local and systemic inflammation in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdam, Froukje J; Fuentes, Susana; de Jonge, Charlotte; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Erbil, Runi; Greve, Jan Willem; Buurman, Wim A; de Vos, Willem M; Rensen, Sander S

    2013-12-01

    Intestinal microbiota have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity, but the mechanism remains elusive. The relationship between microbiota composition, intestinal permeability, and inflammation in nonobese and obese subjects was investigated. Fecal microbiota composition of 28 subjects (BMI 18.6-60.3 kg m(-2) ) was analyzed by a phylogenetic profiling microarray. Fecal calprotectin and plasma C-reactive protein levels were determined to evaluate intestinal and systemic inflammation. Furthermore, HbA1c , and plasma levels of transaminases and lipids were analyzed. Gastroduodenal, small intestinal, and colonic permeability were assessed by a multisaccharide test. Based on microbiota composition, the study population segregated into two clusters with predominantly obese (15/19) or exclusively nonobese (9/9) subjects. Whereas intestinal permeability did not differ between clusters, the obese cluster showed reduced bacterial diversity, a decreased Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio, and an increased abundance of potential proinflammatory Proteobacteria. Interestingly, fecal calprotectin was only detectable in subjects within the obese microbiota cluster (n = 8/19, P = 0.02). Plasma C-reactive protein was also increased in these subjects (P = 0.0005), and correlated with the Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio (rs = -0.41, P = 0.03). Intestinal microbiota alterations in obese subjects are associated with local and systemic inflammation, suggesting that the obesity-related microbiota composition has a proinflammatory effect. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  20. Water and solute absorption from carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions in the human proximal small intestine: a review and statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaocai; Passe, Dennis H

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to summarize water, carbohydrate (CHO), and electrolyte absorption from carbohydrate-electrolyte (CHO-E) solutions based on all of the triple-lumen-perfusion studies in humans since the early 1960s. The current statistical analysis included 30 reports from which were obtained information on water absorption, CHO absorption, total solute absorption, CHO concentration, CHO type, osmolality, sodium concentration, and sodium absorption in the different gut segments during exercise and at rest. Mean differences were assessed using independent-samples t tests. Exploratory multiple-regression analyses were conducted to create prediction models for intestinal water absorption. The factors influencing water and solute absorption are carefully evaluated and extensively discussed. The authors suggest that in the human proximal small intestine, water absorption is related to both total solute and CHO absorption; osmolality exerts various impacts on water absorption in the different segments; the multiple types of CHO in the ingested CHO-E solutions play a critical role in stimulating CHO, sodium, total solute, and water absorption; CHO concentration is negatively related to water absorption; and exercise may result in greater water absorption than rest. A potential regression model for predicting water absorption is also proposed for future research and practical application. In conclusion, water absorption in the human small intestine is influenced by osmolality, solute absorption, and the anatomical structures of gut segments. Multiple types of CHO in a CHO-E solution facilitate water absorption by stimulating CHO and solute absorption and lowering osmolality in the intestinal lumen.

  1. Prevalence of Campylobacter Species in Adult Crohn's Disease and the Preferential Colonization Sites of Campylobacter Species in the Human Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendran, Vikneswari; Riordan, Stephen M.; Grimm, Michael C.; Tran, Thi Anh Tuyet; Major, Joelene; Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Mitchell, Hazel; Zhang, Li

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A high prevalence of Campylobacter concisus was previously detected in paediatric CD and adult UC. Currently, the prevalence of C. concisus in adult CD and the preferential colonization sites of Campylobacter species in the human intestine are unknown. In this study, we examined the prevalence of Campylobacter species in biopsies collected from multiple anatomic sites of adult patients with IBD and controls. Methods Three hundred and one biopsies collected from ileum, caecum, descending colon and rectum of 28 patients IBD (15 CD and 13 UC) and 33 controls were studied. Biopsies were used for DNA extraction and detection of Campylobacter species by PCR-sequencing and Campylobacter cultivation. Results A significantly higher prevalence of C. concisus in colonic biopsies of patients with CD (53%) was detected as compared with the controls (18%). Campylobacter genus-PCR positivity and C. concisus positivity in patients with UC were 85% and 77% respectively, being significantly higher than that in the controls (48% and 36%). C. concisus was more often detected in descending colonic and rectal biopsies from patients with IBD in comparison to the controls. C. concisus was isolated from patients with IBD. Conclusion The high intestinal prevalence of C. concisus in patients with IBD, particularly in the proximal large intestine, suggests that future studies are needed to investigate the possible involvement of C. concisus in a subgroup of human IBD. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the association between adult CD and C. concisus as well as the first study of the preferential colonization sites of C. concisus in the human intestine. PMID:21966525

  2. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor attenuates ER stress-induced inflammation in human M2-polarized macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espada, Sandra; Stavik, Benedicte; Holm, Sverre; Sagen, Ellen Lund; Bjerkeli, Vigdis; Skjelland, Mona; Dahl, Tuva B; Espevik, Terje; Kanse, Sandip; Sandset, Per Morten; Skretting, Grethe; Halvorsen, Bente

    2017-09-16

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been shown to play a key role during the initiation and clinical progression of the cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis. We have recently shown that expression of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) was induced by cholesterol crystals (CC). In the present study we aimed to determine the role of TFPI under ER stress conditions using human MDMs. qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analysis were performed to determine the presence of the ER stress marker CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) and TFPI in human carotid plaque material and also in human MDMs polarized into pro-inflammatory M1 or anti-inflammatory M2 populations. CHOP mRNA levels were upregulated in the plaques compared to healthy vessels, and CHOP protein was localized in the same area as TFPI in the plaques. Both CHOP and TFPI mRNA levels were upregulated after CC treatment, especially in the M2 phenotype, and the ER stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) reversed this effect. Furthermore, CC treatment increased the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8, which for TNF-α and IL-8 was inhibited by PBA, and reduced the levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in M2-polarized macrophages. Knockdown of TFPI prior to CC treatment exacerbated TNF-α and IL-6 levels, but reduced IL-8 and IL-10 levels. Our results show that CC induce TFPI and cytokine expression in M2-polarized macrophages through activation of the ER stress pathway and that TFPI has a protective effect against TNF-α and IL-6 mediated inflammation. These mechanisms may have implications for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. NKX2-3 transcriptional regulation of endothelin-1 and VEGF signaling in human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Wei Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NKX2-3 is associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. NKX2-3 is expressed in microvascular endothelial cells and the muscularis mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMECs are actively involved in the pathogenesis of IBD and IBD-associated microvascular dysfunction. To understand the cellular function of NKX2-3 and its potential role underlying IBD pathogenesis, we investigated the genes regulated by NKX2-3 in HIMEC using cDNA microarray. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: NKX2-3 expression was suppressed by shRNA in two HIMEC lines and gene expression was profiled by cDNA microarray. Pathway Analysis was used to identify gene networks according to biological functions and associated pathways. Validation of microarray and genes expression in intestinal tissues was assessed by RT-PCR. NKX2-3 regulated genes are involved in immune and inflammatory response, cell proliferation and growth, metabolic process, and angiogenesis. Several inflammation and angiogenesis related signaling pathways that play important roles in IBD were regulated by NKX2-3, including endothelin-1 and VEGF-PI3K/AKT-eNOS. Expression levels of NKX2-3, VEGFA, PI3K, AKT, and eNOS are increased in intestinal tissues from IBD patients and expression levels of EDN1 are decreased in intestinal tissues from IBD patients. These results demonstrated the important roles of NKX2-3, VEGF, PI3K, AKT, eNOS, and EDN1 in IBD pathogenesis. Correlation analysis showed a positive correlation between mRNA expression of NKX2-3 and VEGFA and a negative correlation between mRNA expression of NKX2-3 and EDN1 in intestinal tissues from IBD patients. CONCLUSION/RELEVANCE: NKX2-3 may play an important role in IBD pathogenesis by regulating endothelin-1 and VEGF signaling in HIMECs.

  4. Normalizing genes for quantitative RT-PCR in differentiating human intestinal epithelial cells and adenocarcinomas of the colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dydensborg, Anders Bondo; Herring, Elizabeth; Auclair, Joëlle; Tremblay, Eric; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois

    2006-05-01

    As for other mRNA measurement methods, quantitative RT-PCR results need to be normalized relative to stably expressed genes. Widely used normalizing genes include beta-actin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. It has, however, become clear that these and other normalizing genes can display modulated patterns of expression across tissue types and during complex cellular processes such as cell differentiation and cancer progression. Our objective was to set the basis for identifying normalizing genes that displayed stable expression during enterocytic differentiation and between healthy tissue and adenocarcinomas of the human colon. We thus identified novel potential normalizing genes using previously generated cDNA microarray data and examined the alterations of expression of two of these genes as well as seven commonly used normalizing genes during the enterocytic differentiation process and between matched pairs of resection margins and primary carcinomas of the human colon using real-time RT-PCR. We found that ribosomal phosphoprotein P0 was particularly stable in all intestinal epithelial cell extracts, thereby representing a particularly robust housekeeping reference gene for the assessment of gene expression during the human enterocytic differentiation process. On the other hand, beta-2-microglobulin generated the best score as a normalizing gene for comparing human colon primary carcinomas with their corresponding normal mucosa of the resection margin, although others were found to represent acceptable alternatives. In conclusion, we identified and characterized specific normalizing genes that should significantly improve quantitative mRNA studies related to both the differentiation process of the human intestinal epithelium and adenocarcinomas of the human colon. This approach should also be useful to validate normalizing genes in other intestinal contexts.

  5. Gelatin tannate reduces the proinflammatory effects of lipopolysaccharide in human intestinal epithelial cells

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    Frasca G

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppina Frasca1, Venera Cardile1, Carmelo Puglia2, Claudia Bonina2, Francesco Bonina21Department of Biomedical Sciences, (Physiology, 2Department of Drug Sciences, University of Catania, Catania, ItalyBackground: Gelatin tannate is a mixture of tannic acid and gelatin. Tannic acid has astringent properties, due to its capacity to form protein–macromolecular complexes, as well as antibacterial and antioxidant properties. However, little is known about its anti-inflammatory properties. Purpose: To evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of gelatin tannate by quantifying the suppression of key molecules produced during inflammatory events in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated human intestinal cells. Methods: Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 expression was determined by Western blot analysis; interleukin-8 (IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in Caco-2 cells 24 hours after treatment with LPS (1 μg/mL in presence of different concentrations of gelatin tannate. Results: ICAM-1 is induced on a wide variety of cells by inflammatory stimuli such as LPS. Our results have shown gelatin tannate as a potent inhibitor of ICAM-1 expression in LPS-stimulated Caco-2 cells. IL-8 and TNF-α are important inflammatory mediators, recruiting neutrophils and T-lymphocytes. Together with LPS, adding gelatin tannate at different concentrations induced a dose-dependent inhibition of IL-8 and TNF-α released by Caco-2 cells. Conclusion: These results suggest that gelatin tannate exerts anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the specific cytokines and adhesion molecules involved in several inflammatory disorders.Keywords: Caco-2, ICAM-1, IL-8, TNF-α

  6. Predicting human intestinal absorption of diverse chemicals using ensemble learning based QSAR modeling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basant, Nikita; Gupta, Shikha; Singh, Kunwar P

    2016-04-01

    Human intestinal absorption (HIA) of the drugs administered through the oral route constitutes an important criterion for the candidate molecules. The computational approach for predicting the HIA of molecules may potentiate the screening of new drugs. In this study, ensemble learning (EL) based qualitative and quantitative structure-activity relationship (SAR) models (gradient boosted tree, GBT and bagged decision tree, BDT) have been established for the binary classification and HIA prediction of the chemicals, using the selected molecular descriptors. The structural diversity of the chemicals and the nonlinear structure in the considered data were tested by the similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. The external predictive power of the developed SAR models was evaluated through the internal and external validation procedures recommended in the literature. All the statistical criteria parameters derived for the performance of the constructed SAR models were above their respective thresholds suggesting for their robustness for future applications. In complete data, the qualitative SAR models rendered classification accuracy of >99%, while the quantitative SAR models yielded correlation (R(2)) of >0.91 between the measured and predicted HIA values. The performances of the EL-based SAR models were also compared with the linear models (linear discriminant analysis, LDA and multiple linear regression, MLR). The GBT and BDT SAR models performed better than the LDA and MLR methods. A comparison of our models with the previously reported QSARs for HIA prediction suggested for their better performance. The results suggest for the appropriateness of the developed SAR models to reliably predict the HIA of structurally diverse chemicals and can serve as useful tools for the initial screening of the molecules in the drug development process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Production of enterodiol from defatted flaxseeds through biotransformation by human intestinal bacteria

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    Ma Miao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of enterolignans, e.g., enterodiol (END and particularly its oxidation product, enterolactone (ENL, on prevention of hormone-dependent diseases, such as osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases, hyperlipemia, breast cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer and menopausal syndrome, have attracted much attention. To date, the main way to obtain END and ENL is chemical synthesis, which is expensive and inevitably leads to environmental pollution. To explore a more economic and eco-friendly production method, we explored biotransformation of enterolignans from precursors contained in defatted flaxseeds by human intestinal bacteria. Results We cultured fecal specimens from healthy young adults in media containing defatted flaxseeds and detected END from the culture supernatant. Following selection through successive subcultures of the fecal microbiota with defatted flaxseeds as the only carbon source, we obtained a bacterial consortium, designated as END-49, which contained the smallest number of bacterial types still capable of metabolizing defatted flaxseeds to produce END. Based on analysis with pulsed field gel electrophoresis, END-49 was found to consist of five genomically distinct bacterial lineages, designated Group I-V, with Group I strains dominating the culture. None of the individual Group I-V strains produced END, demonstrating that the biotransformation of substrates in defatted flaxseeds into END is a joint work by different members of the END-49 bacterial consortium. Interestingly, Group I strains produced secoisolariciresinol, an important intermediate of END production; 16S rRNA analysis of one Group I strain established its close relatedness with Klebsiella. Genomic analysis is under way to identify all members in END-49 involved in the biotransformation and the actual pathway leading to END-production. Conclusion Biotransformation is a very economic, efficient and environmentally friendly way of mass

  8. CD34+ cells in human intestine are fibroblasts adjacent to, but distinct from, interstitial cells of Cajal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderwinden, J M; Rumessen, J J; De Laet, M H

    1999-01-01

    on ICC in human intestine. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors express both Kit and CD34, suggesting that these tumors may derive from ICC. We characterized the distribution of CD34 immunoreactivity at the cellular level in the normal human gut, using double immunofluorescence immunohistochemistry...... and confocal microscopy. CD34 immunoreactivity identified previously unrecognized cells closely adjacent to, but distinct from, the Kit immunoreactive ICC. These CD34 immunoreactive cells expressed the fibroblast marker prolyl 4-hydroxylase-whereas ICC did not-and were also distinct from smooth muscle cells...

  9. Anatomical study on The Arm Greater Yang Small Intestine Meridian Muscle in Human

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    Kyoung-Sik, Park

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried to identify the component of Small Intestine Meridian Muscle in human, dividing the regional muscle group into outer, middle, and inner layer. the inner part of body surface were opened widely to demonstrate muscles, nerve, blood vessels and the others, displaying the inner structure of Small Intestine Meridian Muscle. We obtained the results as follows; 1. Small Intestine Meridian Muscle is composed of the muscle, nerve and blood vessels. 2. In human anatomy, it is present the difference between a term of nerve or blood vessels which control the muscle of Meridian Muscle and those which pass near by Meridian Muscle. 3. The inner composition of meridian muscle in human arm is as follows ; 1 Muscle ; Abd. digiti minimi muscle(SI-2, 3, 4, pisometacarpal lig.(SI-4, ext. retinaculum. ext. carpi ulnaris m. tendon.(SI-5, 6, ulnar collateral lig.(SI-5, ext. digiti minimi m. tendon(SI-6, ext. carpi ulnaris(SI-7, triceps brachii(SI-9, teres major(SI-9, deltoid(SI-10, infraspinatus(SI-10, 11, trapezius(Sl-12, 13, 14, 15, supraspinatus(SI-12, 13, lesser rhomboid(SI-14, erector spinae(SI-14, 15, levator scapular(SI-15, sternocleidomastoid(SI-16, 17, splenius capitis(SI-16, semispinalis capitis(SI-16, digasuicus(SI-17, zygomaticus major(Il-18, masseter(SI-18, auriculoris anterior(SI-19 2 Nerve ; Dorsal branch of ulnar nerve(SI-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, br. of mod. antebrachial cutaneous n.(SI-6, 7, br. of post. antebrachial cutaneous n.(SI-6,7, br. of radial n.(SI-7, ulnar n.(SI-8, br. of axillary n.(SI-9, radial n.(SI-9, subscapular n. br.(SI-9, cutaneous n. br. from C7, 8(SI-10, 14, suprascapular n.(SI-10, 11, 12, 13, intercostal n. br. from T2(SI-11, lat. supraclavicular n. br.(SI-12, intercostal n. br. from C8, T1(SI-12, accessory n. br.(SI-12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, intercostal n. br. from T1,2(SI-13, dorsal scapular n.(SI-14, 15, cutaneous n. br. from C6, C7(SI-15, transverse cervical n.(SI-16, lesser occipital n. & great auricular n. from

  10. Suppressive effect of nobiletin and epicatechin gallate on fructose uptake in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satsu, Hideo; Awara, Sohei; Unno, Tomonori; Shimizu, Makoto

    2017-12-01

    Inhibition of excessive fructose intake in the small intestine could alleviate fructose-induced diseases such as hypertension and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We examined the effect of phytochemicals on fructose uptake using human intestinal epithelial-like Caco-2 cells which express the fructose transporter, GLUT5. Among 35 phytochemicals tested, five, including nobiletin and epicatechin gallate (ECg), markedly inhibited fructose uptake. Nobiletin and ECg also inhibited the uptake of glucose but not of L-leucine or Gly-Sar, suggesting an inhibitory effect specific to monosaccharide transporters. Kinetic analysis further suggested that this reduction in fructose uptake was associated with a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface GLUT5 molecules, and not with a change in the affinity of GLUT5 for fructose. Lastly, nobiletin and ECg suppressed the permeation of fructose across Caco-2 cell monolayers. These findings suggest that nobiletin and ECg are good candidates for preventing diseases caused by excessive fructose intake.

  11. Interstitial cells of Cajal in human small intestine. Ultrastructural identification and organization between the main smooth muscle layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Thuneberg, L

    1991-01-01

    studied. Freshly resected intestine was examined by light and electron microscopy. The interstitial cells of Cajal resembled modified smooth muscle cells. They had caveolae and dense bodies, an incomplete basal lamina, a very well-developed smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and abundant intermediate (10 nm......Previous morphological and electrophysiological studies have supported the hypothesis that interstitial cells of Cajal have important regulatory (pacemaker) functions in the gut. In the current study, interstitial cells of Cajal associated with Auerbach's plexus in human small intestine were...... of bundles containing processes of two to seven cells with fibroblastlike cells interspersed in the bundles. The bundles were innervated by nerve elements of Auerbach's plexus and extended into both layers of smooth muscle, between muscle cells, and into septa. The bundles were closely associated...

  12. Microstructural analysis of human white matter architecture using Polarized Light Imaging (PLI: Views from neuroanatomy

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    Hubertus eAxer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available To date, there are several methods for mapping connectivity, ranging from the macroscopic to molecular scales. However, it is difficult to integrate this multiply-scaled data into one concept. Polarized light imaging (PLI is a method to quantify fiber orientation in gross histological brain sections based on the birefringent properties of the myelin sheaths. The method is capable of imaging fiber orientation of larger-scale architectural patterns with higher detail than diffusion MRI of the human brain. PLI analyses light transmission through a gross histological section of a human brain under rotation of a polarization filter combination. Estimates of the angle of fiber direction and the angle of fiber inclination are automatically calculated at every point of the imaged section. Multiple sections can be assembled into a 3D volume. We describe the principles of PLI and present several studies of fiber anatomy in the human brain: 6 brainstems were serially sectioned, imaged with PLI, and 3D reconstructed. Pyramidal tract and lemniscus medialis were segmented in the PLI datasets. PLI data from the internal capsule was related to results from confocal laser scanning microscopy, which is a method of smaller scale fiber anatomy. PLI fiber architecture of the extreme capsule was compared to macroscopical dissection, which represents a method of larger scale anatomy. The microstructure of the anterior human cingulum bundle was analyzed in serial sections of 6 human brains. PLI can generate highly-resolved 3D datsets of fiber orientation of the human brain and has, therefore, a high comparability to diffusion MR. To get additional information regarding axon structure and density, PLI can also be combined with classical histological stains. It brings the directional aspects of diffusion MRI into the range of histology and may represent a promising tool to close the gap between larger scale diffusion orientation and microstructural histological analysis

  13. Concurrent profiling of polar metabolites and lipids in human plasma using HILIC-FTMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaoming; Li, Ruibin

    2016-11-01

    Blood plasma is the most popularly used sample matrix for metabolite profiling studies, which aim to achieve global metabolite profiling and biomarker discovery. However, most of the current studies on plasma metabolite profiling focused on either the polar metabolites or lipids. In this study, a comprehensive analysis approach based on HILIC-FTMS was developed to concurrently examine polar metabolites and lipids. The HILIC-FTMS method was developed using mixed standards of polar metabolites and lipids, the separation efficiency of which is better in HILIC mode than in C5 and C18 reversed phase (RP) chromatography. This method exhibits good reproducibility in retention times (CVs profiling and smoking-related biomarker discovery in human plasma samples. Heavy smokers could be successfully distinguished from non smokers by univariate and multivariate statistical analysis of the profiling data, and 62 biomarkers for cigarette smoke were found. These results indicate that our concurrent analysis approach could be potentially used for clinical biomarker discovery, metabolite-based diagnosis, etc.

  14. Daidzein and genistein are converted to equol and 5-hydroxy-equol by human intestinal Slackia isoflavoniconvertens in gnotobiotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthies, Anastasia; Loh, Gunnar; Blaut, Michael; Braune, Annett

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal conversion of the isoflavone daidzein to the bioactive equol is exclusively catalyzed by gut bacteria, but a direct role in equol formation under in vivo conditions has not yet been demonstrated. Slackia isoflavoniconvertens is one of the few equol-forming gut bacteria isolated from humans and, moreover, it also converts genistein to 5-hydroxy-equol. To demonstrate the isoflavone-converting ability of S. isoflavoniconvertens in vivo, the metabolization of dietary daidzein and genistein was investigated in male and female rats harboring a simplified human microbiota without (control) or with S. isoflavoniconvertens (SIA). Feces, urine, intestinal contents, and plasma of the rats were analyzed for daidzein, genistein, and their metabolites. Equol and 5-hydroxy-equol were found in intestinal contents, feces, and urine of SIA rats but not in the corresponding samples of the control rats. 5-Hydroxy-equol was present at much lower concentrations than equol and the main metabolite produced from genistein was the intermediate dihydrogenistein. The plasma of SIA rats contained equol but no 5-hydroxy-equol. Equol formation had no effect on plasma concentrations of the insulin-like growth factor I. The concentrations of daidzein and genistein were considerably lower in all samples of the SIA rats than in those of the control rats. Male SIA rats had higher intestinal and fecal concentrations of the isoflavones and their metabolites than female SIA rats. The observed activity in the rat model indicates that S. isoflavoniconvertens is capable of contributing in vivo to the bioactivation of daidzein and genistein by formation of equol and 5-hydroxy-equol.

  15. Prostate cancer chemoprevention by soy isoflavones: role of intestinal bacteria as the "second human genome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaza, Hideyuki

    2012-06-01

    It has been found that the composition of intestinal microbiota can indicate the risk of disease to each individual. The concepts of biodynamics as used by the Benziger Winery in California, which treats every part of an agricultural environment as a living, breathing entity, can be usefully used in the construction of a system for cancer prevention, which seeks to use the relationship of coexistence (symbiosis) shared between people and intestinal symbiosis, that is, microbiota. Changes in the incidence rate of cancer among Japanese emigrants to Hawaii demonstrate the effect of the changes in the living environment. This leads to the hypothesis that an intake of soy-derived food products and the metabolization of the isoflavones they contain by intestinal microbiota is one of the factors for the significant difference in the incidence rate of prostate cancer among Asian and European/North American populations. It is further hypothesized that isoflavones, particularly equol, are a key factor in the difference in incidence rate between Asia and the West. It is suggested that not having equol converting bacteria in the intestine (non-equol producers) can be a risk factor for prostate cancer and that one direction for future research will be to examine the possibility of improving the intestinal environment to enable equol production. © 2012 Japanese Cancer Association.

  16. Hypoxic pretreatment of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells regulating macrophage polarization

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    Chuan TONG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effect of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs on macrophage polarization under hypoxia. Methods  hUC-MSCs were obtained by explants adherent culture and cultured under normoxia (21% O2 and hypoxia (5% O2. The multi-directional differentiation of hUC-MSCs was observed by osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation induction. Live/death staining was performed to detect the cell viability, and ELISA was executed to detect the protein content in supernatant of hUC-MSCs. Transwell chamber was employed to co-culture the hUC-MSCs cultured under normoxia and hypoxia and macrophage (THP-1 stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (IPS, then the polarization of THP-1 was detected by immunofluorescence, and the secretions of inflammatory factor and anti-inflammatory factor of THP-1 were detected by ELISA. Results  hUC-MSCs cultured under hypoxia showed the ability of osteogenic and adipogenic multi-directional differentiation. Live/death staining showed the high cell viability of hUC-MSCs cultured under normoxia and hypoxia. The expression levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO were significantly higher in the hUC-MSCs cultured under hypoxia than in those cultured under normoxia. hUCMSCs cultured under hypoxia promoted the polarization of THP-1 to M2, obviously reduced the expression of TNF-α and IL-1β, and increased the expression of IL-10 significantly. Conclusion hUC-MSCs cultured under hypoxia may promote the polarization of THP-1 to M2 and improve the viability of anti-inflammatory. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.07.01

  17. The effect of reducing numbers of Campylobacter in broiler intestines on human health risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauta, Maarten; Johannessen, Gro; Laureano Adame, Laura

    2016-01-01

    One option for Campylobacter control in broiler chickens is to reduce the concentration in the intestinal content of the birds prior to slaughter, for example by vaccination or phage therapy. It is however unsure how such a reduction in concentration can be translated into a reduction......, a previously published risk assessment model is used, that describes the dynamics of transfer and survival of Campylobacter during broiler processing at the slaughterhouse. Data from five European countries are used as inputs for the models. For both approaches the analyses show that a one to two log reduction...... in concentration in the intestinal content has a large impact on the risk of campylobacteriosis due to the consumption of chicken meat: a relative risk reduction between 44% and 95%. Therefore it seems promising to aim interventions at a reduction of the concentration of Campylobacter in the broiler intestines...

  18. Interstitial cells of Cajal in human small intestine. Ultrastructural identification and organization between the main smooth muscle layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johannes; Thuneberg, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, small intestine, gut motility, pacemaker cells, smooth muscle......Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, small intestine, gut motility, pacemaker cells, smooth muscle...

  19. Epidermal growth factor inhibits glycyl sarcosine transport and hPepT1 expression in a human intestinal cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Amstrup, Jan; Steffansen, Bente

    2001-01-01

    Intestinal oligopeptide transporter, growth factor, immunocytochemistry, laser scanning confocal microscopy......Intestinal oligopeptide transporter, growth factor, immunocytochemistry, laser scanning confocal microscopy...

  20. Rho GTPases and regulation of cell migration and polarization in human corneal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Hou

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Epithelial cell migration is required for regeneration of tissues and can be defective in a number of ocular surface diseases. This study aimed to determine the expression pattern of Rho family small G-proteins in human corneal epithelial cells to test their requirement in directional cell migration. METHODS: Rho family small G-protein expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Dominant-inhibitory constructs encoding Rho proteins or Rho protein targeting small interfering RNA were transfected into human corneal epithelial large T antigen cells, and wound closure rate were evaluated by scratch wounding assay, and a complementary non-traumatic cell migration assay. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to study cell polarization and to assess Cdc42 downstream effector. RESULTS: Cdc42, Chp, Rac1, RhoA, TC10 and TCL were expressed in human corneal epithelial cells. Among them, Cdc42 and TCL were found to significantly affect cell migration in monolayer scratch assays. These results were confirmed through the use of validated siRNAs directed to Cdc42 and TCL. Scramble siRNA transfected cells had high percentage of polarized cells than Cdc42 or TCL siRNA transfected cells at the wound edge. We showed that the Cdc42-specific effector p21-activated kinase 4 localized predominantly to cell-cell junctions in cell monolayers, but failed to translocate to the leading edge in Cdc42 siRNA transfected cells after monolayer wounding. CONCLUSION: Rho proteins expressed in cultured human corneal epithelial cells, and Cdc42, TCL facilitate two-dimensional cell migration in-vitro. Although silencing of Cdc42 and TCL did not noticeably affect the appearance of cell adhesions at the leading edge, the slower migration of these cells indicates both GTP-binding proteins play important roles in promoting cell movement of human corneal epithelial cells.

  1. M2 Polarization of Human Macrophages Favors Survival of the Intracellular Pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchacher, Tanja; Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Stockinger, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens have developed various strategies to escape immunity to enable their survival in host cells, and many bacterial pathogens preferentially reside inside macrophages, using diverse mechanisms to penetrate their defenses and to exploit their high degree of metabolic diversity and plasticity. Here, we characterized the interactions of the intracellular pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae with polarized human macrophages. Primary human monocytes were pre-differentiated with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor or macrophage colony-stimulating factor for 7 days to yield M1-like and M2-like macrophages, which were further treated with interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide or with interleukin-4 for 48 h to obtain fully polarized M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 and M2 cells exhibited distinct morphology with round or spindle-shaped appearance for M1 and M2, respectively, distinct surface marker profiles, as well as different cytokine and chemokine secretion. Macrophage polarization did not influence uptake of C. pneumoniae, since comparable copy numbers of chlamydial DNA were detected in M1 and M2 at 6 h post infection, but an increase in chlamydial DNA over time indicating proliferation was only observed in M2. Accordingly, 72±5% of M2 vs. 48±7% of M1 stained positive for chlamydial lipopolysaccharide, with large perinuclear inclusions in M2 and less clearly bordered inclusions for M1. Viable C. pneumoniae was present in lysates from M2, but not from M1 macrophages. The ability of M1 to restrict chlamydial replication was not observed in M1-like macrophages, since chlamydial load showed an equal increase over time for M1-like and M2-like macrophages. Our findings support the importance of macrophage polarization for the control of intracellular infection, and show that M2 are the preferred survival niche for C. pneumoniae. M1 did not allow for chlamydial proliferation, but failed to completely eliminate chlamydial infection, giving further evidence

  2. The inhibitory effects of cephalosporin and dipeptide on ceftibuten uptake by human and rat intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, M; Toda, T; Kobayashi, M; Iseki, K; Miyazaki, K; Shiroto, H; Uchino, J; Kondo, Y

    1994-08-01

    The types of inhibitory effects caused by compound V (an analogue of ceftibuten) and alanylproline (dipeptide) on the uptake of ceftibuten by brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) prepared from human and rat small intestine were analysed. In the presence of an inward H(+)-gradient, the initial uptake rate of ceftibuten by both human and rat intestinal BBMV was concentration-dependent with apparent Km and Vmax values of 0.35 mM and 2.052 nmol (mg protein)-1 min-1 for human BBMV, and 0.50 mM and 3.056 nmol (mg protein)-1 min-1 for rat BBMV, respectively. For both human and rat BBMV, kinetic analysis by Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that the uptake of ceftibuten was competitively inhibited by compound V, whereas inhibition by alanylproline was noncompetitive or partially competitive. These results suggest that there is a stereospecific transport system which is common to ceftibuten and compound V, and that this system is not identical to the carrier system for the dipeptide, alanylproline.

  3. The Effect of Lactulose on the Composition of the Intestinal Microbiota and Short-chain Fatty Acid Production in Human Volunteers and a Computer-controlled Model of the Proximal Large Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, K.; Nuenen, M.H.M.C. van; Heuvel, E.G. van den; Pool, W.; Vossen, J.M.B.M. van der

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the in vivo effect of lactulose on faecal parameters with the effect in a dynamic, computer-controlled in vitro model of the proximal large intestine (TIM-2). Faecal samples from 10 human volunteers collected before (non-adapted) and after 1 week of

  4. Respiratory influenza virus infection induces intestinal immune injury via microbiota-mediated Th17 cell–dependent inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Li, Fengqi; Wei, Haiming; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; Sun, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Influenza in humans is often accompanied by gastroenteritis-like symptoms such as diarrhea, but the underlying mechanism is not yet understood. We explored the occurrence of gastroenteritis-like symptoms using a mouse model of respiratory influenza infection. We found that respiratory influenza infection caused intestinal injury when lung injury occurred, which was not due to direct intestinal viral infection. Influenza infection altered the intestinal microbiota composition, which was mediated by IFN-γ produced by lung-derived CCR9+CD4+ T cells recruited into the small intestine. Th17 cells markedly increased in the small intestine after PR8 infection, and neutralizing IL-17A reduced intestinal injury. Moreover, antibiotic depletion of intestinal microbiota reduced IL-17A production and attenuated influenza-caused intestinal injury. Further study showed that the alteration of intestinal microbiota significantly stimulated IL-15 production from intestinal epithelial cells, which subsequently promoted Th17 cell polarization in the small intestine in situ. Thus, our findings provide new insights into an undescribed mechanism by which respiratory influenza infection causes intestinal disease. PMID:25366965

  5. Respiratory influenza virus infection induces intestinal immune injury via microbiota-mediated Th17 cell-dependent inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Li, Fengqi; Wei, Haiming; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2014-11-17

    Influenza in humans is often accompanied by gastroenteritis-like symptoms such as diarrhea, but the underlying mechanism is not yet understood. We explored the occurrence of gastroenteritis-like symptoms using a mouse model of respiratory influenza infection. We found that respiratory influenza infection caused intestinal injury when lung injury occurred, which was not due to direct intestinal viral infection. Influenza infection altered the intestinal microbiota composition, which was mediated by IFN-γ produced by lung-derived CCR9(+)CD4(+) T cells recruited into the small intestine. Th17 cells markedly increased in the small intestine after PR8 infection, and neutralizing IL-17A reduced intestinal injury. Moreover, antibiotic depletion of intestinal microbiota reduced IL-17A production and attenuated influenza-caused intestinal injury. Further study showed that the alteration of intestinal microbiota significantly stimulated IL-15 production from intestinal epithelial cells, which subsequently promoted Th17 cell polarization in the small intestine in situ. Thus, our findings provide new insights into an undescribed mechanism by which respiratory influenza infection causes intestinal disease. © 2014 Wang et al.

  6. CfaE tip mutations in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CFA/I fimbriae define critical human intestinal binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K K; Levine, M M; Morison, J; Phillips, A; Barry, E M

    2009-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) use colonization factors to attach to the human intestinal mucosa, followed by enterotoxin expression that induces net secretion and diarrhoeal illness. ETEC strain H10407 expresses CFA/I fimbriae, which are composed of multiple CfaB structural subunits and a CfaE tip subunit. Currently, the contribution of these individual fimbrial subunits in intestinal binding remains incompletely defined. To identify the role of CfaE in attachment in the native ETEC background, an R181A single-amino-acid substitution was introduced by recombination into the H10407 genome. The substitution of R181A eliminated haemagglutination and binding of intestinal mucosa biopsies in in vitro organ culture assays, without loss of CFA/I fimbriae expression. Wild-type in trans plasmid-expressed cfaE restored the binding phenotype. In contrast, in trans expression of cfaE containing amino acid 181 substitutions with similar amino acids, lysine, methionine and glutamine did not restore the binding phenotype, indicating that the loss of the binding phenotype was due to localized areas of epitope disruption. R181 appears to have an irreplaceable role in the formation of a receptor-binding feature on CFA/I fimbriae. The results specifically indicate that the CfaE tip protein is a required binding factor in CFA/I-mediated ETEC colonization, making it a potentially important vaccine antigen. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Role of intestinal dysfunction in the nutritional compromise seen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults in rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Rita; Paul, Biswajit; Geethanajali, F S; Kang, Gagandeep; Wanke, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression is often marked by significant weight loss with or without chronic diarrhoea. We studied the extent of intestinal dysfunction using a D-xylose absorption test and association with nutritional compromise as measured by body mass index (BMI) and serum antioxidants levels in HIV-infected individuals through a cross-sectional survey of 45 ART naïve, HIV-positive and 45, age-socioeconomic status matched negative controls in a rural population in India. More than 40% of HIV-positive and HIV-negative participants had intestinal dysfunction (42.2% vs. 44.4%). However an increasing gradient of low D-xylose absorption was noted with decreasing CD4 counts (32%, 50% and 58.3% among those with >350, 200-350 and HIV infection and calorie intake per day (P = 0.02). Weight loss in HIV-infected individuals should be investigated for intestinal dysfunction especially in low resource settings. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Cellular mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effect of flufenamic acid on chloride secretion in human intestinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawin Pongkorpsakol

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal Cl− secretion is involved in the pathogenesis of secretory diarrheas including cholera. We recently demonstrated that flufenamic acid (FFA suppressed Vibrio cholerae El Tor variant-induced intestinal fluid secretion via mechanisms involving AMPK activation and NF-κB-suppression. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of FFA on transepithelial Cl− secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84 cells. FFA inhibited cAMP-dependent Cl− secretion in T84 cell monolayers with IC50 of ∼8 μM. Other fenamate drugs including tolfenamic acid, meclofenamic acid and mefenamic acid exhibited the same effect albeit with lower potency. FFA also inhibited activities of CFTR, a cAMP-activated apical Cl− channel, and KCNQ1/KCNE3, a cAMP-activated basolateral K+ channel. Mechanisms of CFTR inhibition by FFA did not involve activation of its negative regulators. Interestingly, FFA inhibited Ca2+-dependent Cl− secretion with IC50 of ∼10 μM. FFA inhibited activities of Ca2+-activated Cl− channels and KCa3.1, a Ca2+-activated basolateral K+ channels, but had no effect on activities of Na+–K+–Cl− cotransporters and Na+–K+ ATPases. These results indicate that FFA inhibits both cAMP and Ca2+-dependent Cl− secretion by suppressing activities of both apical Cl− channels and basolateral K+ channels. FFA and other fenamate drugs may be useful in the treatment of secretory diarrheas.

  9. SURVEY OF HOUSE RAT INTESTINAL PARASITES FROM SURABAYA DISTRICT, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA THAT CAN CAUSE OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS IN HUMANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, R H

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of house rat zoonotic intestinal parasites from Surabaya District, East Java, Indonesia that have the potential to cause opportunistic infection in humans. House rat fecal samples were collected from an area of Surabaya District with a dense rat population during May 2015. Intestinal parasites were detected microscopically using direct smear of feces stained with Lugol's iodine and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stains. The fecal samples were also cultured for Strongyloides stercoralis. Ninety-eight house rat fecal samples were examined. The potential opportunistic infection parasite densities found in those samples were Strongyloides stercoralis in 53%, Hymenolepis nana in 42%, Cryptosporidium spp in 33%, and Blastocystis spp in 6%. This is the first report of this kind in Surabaya District. Measures need to be taken to control the house rat population in the study area to reduce the risk of the public health problem. Keywords: zoonotic intestinal parasites, opportunistic infection, house rat, densely populated area, Indonesia

  10. Polarized light study of giant tubules in human and red deer coronal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hals, E

    1983-04-01

    Previously described giant tubules in human and red deer coronal dentin have been subjected to a study by polarized light microscopy. Structure of the giant tubules was similar in both species. The lumen of each tubule was bordered by a 5-15-micrometers-thick collagenous mantle in which the fibers were orientate parallel to its long axis. In a circular dentin area encompassing the mantle, the course of the collagen fibers might be characterized as a winding of fibers around the cylindrical mantle. This structure of the giant tubules conforms with that described earlier in the rudimentary maxillary canine of a red deer. Thus, such tubules do not represent a rare anomaly, but occur regularly in both human and red deer coronal dentin.

  11. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  12. Structural features of colloidal species in the human fasted upper small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullertz, Anette; Reppas, Christos; Psachoulias, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to study the features of colloidal species in the lumen of the upper small intestine of two healthy adults at fasted state by means of electron microscopy. Methods Samples were aspirated from a location near the ligament of Treitz 30 min (volunteer no. 1, Aspirate30min ...

  13. Intestinal handling-induced mast cell activation and inflammation in human postoperative ileus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The, F. O.; Bennink, R. J.; Ankum, W. M.; Buist, M. R.; Busch, O. R. C.; Gouma, D. J.; Van der Heide, S.; van den Wijngaard, R. M.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    Background: Murine postoperative ileus results from intestinal inflammation triggered by manipulation-induced mast cell activation. As its extent depends on the degree of handling and subsequent inflammation, it is hypothesised that the faster recovery after minimal invasive surgery results from

  14. Intestinal handling-induced mast cell activation and inflammation in human postoperative ileus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The, F. O.; Bennink, R. J.; Ankum, W. M.; Buist, M. R.; Busch, O. R. C.; Gouma, D. J.; van der Heide, S.; van den Wijngaard, R. M.; de Jonge, W. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Murine postoperative ileus results from intestinal inflammation triggered by manipulation-induced mast cell activation. As its extent depends on the degree of handling and subsequent inflammation, it is hypothesised that the faster recovery after minimal invasive surgery results from

  15. Digestion of so-called resistant starch sources in the human small intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, RJ; Hagedoorn, RE; de Graaff, R; Elzinga, H; Tabak, S; Yang, YX; Stellaard, F

    Background: Resistant starch sources, which are only partially digested in the small intestine, can be used to increase colonic availability of short-chain fatty acids. Objective: To study the characteristics of the fermentation of resistant starch, the digestion of resistant starch in the small

  16. Human intestinal P-glycoprotein activity estimated by the model substrate digoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, U L; Hyldahl Olesen, L; Nyvold, Charlotte Guldborg

    2007-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) plays a part in the intestinal uptake of xenobiotics and has been associated with susceptibility to ulcerative colitis. The aim of this study was to examine Pgp activity in relation to age, gender, medical treatment (rifampicin or ketoconazole) and the multidrug resistance (MDR...

  17. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and peptide histidine methionine. Presence in human follicular fluid and effects on DNA synthesis and steroid secretion in cultured human granulosa/lutein cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, S; Ovesen, P; Andersen, A N

    1994-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and peptide histidine methionine (PHM) originate from the same precursor molecule, prepro VIP. In the present study we examined the concentrations of VIP and PHM in human follicular fluid and their effects on cultured human granulosa/lutein cells. Follicular...... fluid and cells were obtained from patients undergoing in-vitro fertilization for tubal infertility. The concentrations of VIP and PHM in pre-ovulatory human follicular fluid were measured radioimmunochemically. Granulosa/lutein cells isolated from follicular fluid were cultured under serum....... We conclude that VIP and PHM are present in human preovulatory follicular fluid and that VIP stimulates DNA synthesis and oestradiol secretion in cultured human granulosa/lutein cells. This indicates that VIP and perhaps PHM participate in the local nervous regulation of human ovarian function....

  18. Pro-inflammatory flagellin proteins of prevalent motile commensal bacteria are variably abundant in the intestinal microbiome of elderly humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, B Anne; Sheridan, Paul O; Harris, Hugh M B; Coughlan, Simone; Flint, Harry J; Duncan, Sylvia H; Jeffery, Ian B; Claesson, Marcus J; Ross, R Paul; Scott, Karen P; O'Toole, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Some Eubacterium and Roseburia species are among the most prevalent motile bacteria present in the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults. These flagellate species contribute "cell motility" category genes to the intestinal microbiome and flagellin proteins to the intestinal proteome. We reviewed and revised the annotation of motility genes in the genomes of six Eubacterium and Roseburia species that occur in the human intestinal microbiota and examined their respective locus organization by comparative genomics. Motility gene order was generally conserved across these loci. Five of these species harbored multiple genes for predicted flagellins. Flagellin proteins were isolated from R. inulinivorans strain A2-194 and from E. rectale strains A1-86 and M104/1. The amino-termini sequences of the R. inulinivorans and E. rectale A1-86 proteins were almost identical. These protein preparations stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human intestinal epithelial cell lines, suggesting that these flagellins were pro-inflammatory. Flagellins from the other four species were predicted to be pro-inflammatory on the basis of alignment to the consensus sequence of pro-inflammatory flagellins from the β- and γ- proteobacteria. Many fliC genes were deduced to be under the control of σ(28). The relative abundance of the target Eubacterium and Roseburia species varied across shotgun metagenomes from 27 elderly individuals. Genes involved in the flagellum biogenesis pathways of these species were variably abundant in these metagenomes, suggesting that the current depth of coverage used for metagenomic sequencing (3.13-4.79 Gb total sequence in our study) insufficiently captures the functional diversity of genomes present at low (≤1%) relative abundance. E. rectale and R. inulinivorans thus appear to synthesize complex flagella composed of flagellin proteins that stimulate IL-8 production. A greater depth of sequencing, improved evenness of sequencing and improved

  19. VESGEN Mapping of Bioactive Protection against Intestinal Inflammation: Application to Human Spaceflight and ISS Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons-Wingerter, P. A.; Chen, X.; Kelly, C. P.; Reinecker, H. C.

    2011-01-01

    Challenges to successful space exploration and colonization include adverse physiological reactions to micro gravity and space radiation factors. Constant remodeling of the microvasculature is critical for tissue preservation, wound healing, and recovery after ischemia. Regulation of the vascular system in the intestine is particularly important to enable nutrient absorption while maintaining barrier function and mucosal defense against micro biota. Although tremendous progress has been made in understanding the molecular circuits regulating neovascularization, our knowledge of the adaptations of the vascular system to environmental challenges in the intestine remains incomplete. This is in part because of the lack of methods to observe and quantify the complex processes associated with vascular responses in vivo. Developed by GRC as a mature beta version, pre-release research software, VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) maps and quantifies the fractal-based complexity of vascular branching for novel insights into the cytokine, transgenic and therapeutic regulation of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and microvascular remodeling. Here we demonstrate that VESGEN can be used to characterize the dynamic vascular responses to acute intestinal inflammation and mucosal recovery from in vivo confocal microscopic 3D image series. We induced transient intestinal inflammation in mice by DSS treatment and investigated whether the ability of the pro biotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb) to protect against intestinal inflammation was due to regulation of vascular remodeling. A primary characteristic of inflammation is excessive neovascularization (angiogenesis) resulting in fragile vessels prone to bleeding. Morphological parameters for triplicate specimens revealed that Sb treatment greatly reduced the inflammatory response of vascular networks by an average of 78%. This resulted from Sb inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signaling, a major

  20. [Biotransformation by human intestinal flora and absorption-transportation characteristic in a model of Caco-2 cell monolayer of d-corydaline and tetrahydropalmatine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang-Zi; Yang, Xin-Bao; Yang, Xiu-Wei; Yao, Chun-Mei; Ran, Li; Wu, Shuai; Xu, Wei; Liu, Jian-Xun

    2013-01-01

    To study the biotransformation by human intestinal flora, and the absorption and transportation characteristic in a model of human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines (Caco-2 cell) monolayer of d-corydaline (CDL) and tetrahydropalmatine (THP). CDL or THP was incubated with crude enzymes of human intestinal flora under the anaerobic environment and 37 degrees C conditions to transform CDL or THP. Caco-2 cell monolayer was used as an intestinal epithelial cell model for determination of the permeability of CDL or THP from apical side (AP side) to basolateral side (BL side) or from BL side to AP side. Transportation parameters and permeability coefficients (P(app)) were then calculated, and P(app) values were compared with the reported values for model compounds, propranolol as a well absorbed drug and atenolol as a poor absorbed drug. The concentration of CDL or THP was measured by HPLC coupled with photodiode array detector. CDL or THP in the human intestinal flora incubation system did not happen biotransformation. In the Caco-2 cell monolayer model, the P(app) magnitudes of both CDL and THP were 1 x 10(-5) cm x s(-1) in the bi-directional transport, which were identical with propranolol. And their transports were concentration dependent between 0-180 min. Both CDL and THP may be stable in the human intestinal flora incubation system, and their absorption and transportation in the human Caco-2 cell monolayer model are mainly via passive diffusion mechanism.

  1. Interferon-Alpha Promotes Th1 Response and Epithelial Apoptosis via Inflammasome Activation in Human Intestinal MucosaSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Jarry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgound & Aims: Several lines of investigation suggest that interferon (IFN alpha can alter human intestinal mucosa homeostasis. These include the endogenous production of IFN alpha in celiac disease or inflammatory bowel diseases, as well as the occurrence of intestinal side effects of exogenous IFN alpha used as a therapeutic tool. Here, we present an ex vivo translational approach to investigate the effects of IFN alpha on the human normal intestinal mucosa, as well as its underlying mechanisms. Methods: Human normal colonic mucosa explants were cultured in the presence or absence of IFN alpha 2a. Epithelial homeostasis was assessed using the immunohistochemical marker of apoptosis M30. The Wnt inhibitor Dickkopf-Homolog-1 (DKK1 was assayed in the supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Activation of the inflammasome (caspase-1/interleukin [IL]18 and of a Th1 response was determined by in situ detection of active caspase-1, as well as by measurement of mature IL18 production and the prototype Th1 cytokine IFN gamma by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, mechanistic studies were performed using the specific caspase-1 inhibitor Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe-fluoromethylketone (YVAD-FMK, IL18-binding protein, neutralizing anti–IFN gamma, and anti-DKK1 antibodies. Results: IFN alpha 2a elicited a rapid (24 hours disruption of surface and crypt colonic epithelial cells via apoptosis that was variable in intensity among the 20 individuals studied. This apoptotic effect was dependent on the initiation of an IFN gamma response elicited by resident T box expressed in T cells–positive lamina propria cells. Both apoptosis and Th1 response were subordinated to active caspase-1 and IL18 production. Finally, neutralization of IFN gamma–induced DKK1 partially protected against IFN alpha–induced epithelial apoptosis. Conclusions: By using an ex vivo model, we show an interindividual heterogeneity of IFN alpha effects

  2. Hepatic-intestinal disposal of endogenous human alpha atrial natriuretic factor99-126 in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Bendtsen, F; Schütten, H J

    1990-01-01

    Hepatic-intestinal disposal of endogenous human alpha atrial natriuretic factor99-126 (ANF) was assessed in 13 patients with cirrhosis (six Child-Turcotte class A, five class B, and two class C) and eight control subjects. The Fick principle was applied during hepatic vein catheterization. Arterial...... ANF concentration in patients with cirrhosis [11.1 +/- 1.6 (SEM) pmol/L] was not significantly different from that of the control subjects (14.9 +/- 4.2 pmol/L, NS). Arteriohepatic venous extraction ratio of ANF (0.43 +/- 0.05 in cirrhosis vs 0.37 +/- 0.09 in controls, NS), hepatic...

  3. Unique biologic properties of recombinant AAV1 transduction in polarized human airway epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ziying; Lei-Butters, Diana C M; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yulong; Zhang, Liang; Luo, Meihui; Zak, Roman; Engelhardt, John F

    2006-10-06

    The choice of adeno-associated virus serotypes for clinical applications is influenced by the animal model and model system used to evaluate various serotypes. In the present study, we sought to compare the biologic properties of rAAV2/1, rAAV2/2, and rAAV2/5 transduction in polarized human airway epithelia using viruses purified by a newly developed common column chromatography method. Results demonstrated that apical transduction of human airway epithelia with rAAV2/1 was 100-fold more efficient than rAAV2/2 and rAAV2/5. This transduction profile in human airway epithelia (rAAV2/1 > rAAV2/2 = rAAV2/5) was significantly different from that seen following nasal administration of these vectors to mouse lung (rAAV2/5 > rAAV2/1 > rAAV2/2), emphasizing differences in transduction of these serotypes between these two species. In stark contrast to rAAV2/2 and rAAV2/5, rAAV2/1 transduced both the apical and basolateral membrane of human airway epithelia with similar efficiency. However, the overall level of transduction across serotypes did not correlate with vector internalization. We hypothesized that differences in post-entry processing of these serotypes might influence the efficiency of apical transduction. To this end, we tested the effectiveness of proteasome inhibitors to augment nuclear translocation and gene expression from the three serotypes. Augmentation of rAAV2/1 apical transduction of human polarized airway epithelia was 10-fold lower than that for rAAV2/2 and rAAV2/5. Cellular fractionation studies demonstrated that proteasome inhibitors more significantly enhanced rAAV2/2 and rAAV2/5 translocation to the nucleus than rAAV2/1. These results demonstrate that AAV1 transduction biology in human airway epithelia differs from that of AAV2 and AAV5 by virtue of altered ubiquitin/proteasome sensitivities that influence nuclear translocation.

  4. Enhanced innate immune responsiveness and intolerance to intestinal endotoxins in human biliary epithelial cells contributes to chronic cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Tobias; Beutler, Claudia; Picó, Almudena Hurtado; Shibolet, Oren; Pratt, Daniel S; Pascher, Andreas; Neuhaus, Peter; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Berg, Thomas; Podolsky, Daniel K

    2011-11-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) orchestrate the innate immune defence in human biliary epithelial cells (BECs). Tight control of PRR signalling provides tolerance to physiological amounts of intestinal endotoxins in human bile to avoid constant innate immune activation in BECs. We wanted to determine whether inappropriate innate immune responses to intestinal endotoxins contribute to the development and perpetuation of chronic biliary inflammation. We examined PRR-mediated innate immune responses and protective endotoxin tolerance in primary BECs isolated from patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), alcoholic liver disease and patients without chronic liver disease. Expression studies comprised northern blots, RT-PCR, Western blots and immunocytochemistry. Functional studies comprised immuno-precipitation Western blots, FACS for endotoxin uptake, and NF-κB activation assays and ELISA for secreted IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Primary BECs from explanted PSC livers showed reversibly increased TLR and NOD protein expression and activation of the MyD88/IRAK signalling complex. Consecutively, PSC BECs exhibited inappropriate innate immune responses to endotoxins and did not develop immune tolerance after repeated endotoxin exposures. This endotoxin hyper-responsiveness was probably because of the stimulatory effect of abundantly expressed IFN-γ and TNF-α in PSC livers, which stimulated TLR4-mediated endotoxin signalling in BECs, leading to increased TLR4-mediated endotoxin incorporation and impaired inactivation of the TLR4 signalling cascade. As TNF-α inhibition partly restored protective innate immune tolerance, endogenous TNF-α secretion probably contributed to inappropriate endotoxin responses in BECs. Inappropriate innate immune responses to intestinal endotoxins and subsequent endotoxin intolerance because of enhanced PRR signalling in BECs probably contribute to chronic cholangitis. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides modulate intestinal microbiota and metabolic parameters of humanized gnotobiotic diet induced obesity mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederique Respondek

    Full Text Available Prebiotic fibres like short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scFOS are known to selectively modulate the composition of the intestinal microbiota and especially to stimulate Bifidobacteria. In parallel, the involvement of intestinal microbiota in host metabolic regulation has been recently highlighted. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of scFOS on the composition of the faecal microbiota and on metabolic parameters in an animal model of diet-induced obesity harbouring a human-type microbiota. Forty eight axenic C57BL/6J mice were inoculated with a sample of faecal human microbiota and randomly assigned to one of 3 diets for 7 weeks: a control diet, a high fat diet (HF, 60% of energy derived from fat or an isocaloric HF diet containing 10% of scFOS (HF-scFOS. Mice fed with the two HF gained at least 21% more weight than mice from the control group. Addition of scFOS partially abolished the deposition of fat mass but significantly increased the weight of the caecum. The analysis of the taxonomic composition of the faecal microbiota by FISH technique revealed that the addition of scFOS induced a significant increase of faecal Bifidobacteria and the Clostridium coccoides group whereas it decreased the Clostridium leptum group. In addition to modifying the composition of the faecal microbiota, scFOS most prominently affected the faecal metabolome (e.g. bile acids derivatives, hydroxyl monoenoic fatty acids as well as urine, plasma hydrophilic and plasma lipid metabolomes. The increase in C. coccoides and the decrease in C. leptum, were highly correlated to these metabolic changes, including insulinaemia, as well as to the weight of the caecum (empty and full but not the increase in Bifidobacteria. In conclusion scFOS induce profound metabolic changes by modulating the composition and the activity of the intestinal microbiota, that may partly explain their effect on the reduction of insulinaemia.

  6. Short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides modulate intestinal microbiota and metabolic parameters of humanized gnotobiotic diet induced obesity mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respondek, Frederique; Gerard, Philippe; Bossis, Mathilde; Boschat, Laura; Bruneau, Aurélia; Rabot, Sylvie; Wagner, Anne; Martin, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    Prebiotic fibres like short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scFOS) are known to selectively modulate the composition of the intestinal microbiota and especially to stimulate Bifidobacteria. In parallel, the involvement of intestinal microbiota in host metabolic regulation has been recently highlighted. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of scFOS on the composition of the faecal microbiota and on metabolic parameters in an animal model of diet-induced obesity harbouring a human-type microbiota. Forty eight axenic C57BL/6J mice were inoculated with a sample of faecal human microbiota and randomly assigned to one of 3 diets for 7 weeks: a control diet, a high fat diet (HF, 60% of energy derived from fat)) or an isocaloric HF diet containing 10% of scFOS (HF-scFOS). Mice fed with the two HF gained at least 21% more weight than mice from the control group. Addition of scFOS partially abolished the deposition of fat mass but significantly increased the weight of the caecum. The analysis of the taxonomic composition of the faecal microbiota by FISH technique revealed that the addition of scFOS induced a significant increase of faecal Bifidobacteria and the Clostridium coccoides group whereas it decreased the Clostridium leptum group. In addition to modifying the composition of the faecal microbiota, scFOS most prominently affected the faecal metabolome (e.g. bile acids derivatives, hydroxyl monoenoic fatty acids) as well as urine, plasma hydrophilic and plasma lipid metabolomes. The increase in C. coccoides and the decrease in C. leptum, were highly correlated to these metabolic changes, including insulinaemia, as well as to the weight of the caecum (empty and full) but not the increase in Bifidobacteria. In conclusion scFOS induce profound metabolic changes by modulating the composition and the activity of the intestinal microbiota, that may partly explain their effect on the reduction of insulinaemia.

  7. [Study on metabolism of Coptis chinensis alkaloids from different compatibility of Wuji Wan in human intestinal flora].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Wei; Chen, Ying; Yang, Qing; Li, Yu-Jie; Gong, Zi-Peng; Weng, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Ya-Jie; Zhang, Rui-Jie; Zhu, Xiao-Xin

    2013-02-01

    To study the metabolism of berberine and palmatine in prescription compatibility of Wuji Wan in human intestinal flora. The L9 (3(4)) orthogonal design was adopted to compare prescription compatibility of nine groups of Wuji Wan composed of Coptis chinensis, Evodiae and fried Radix paeoniae alba into and single ingredient of C. chinensis. They were cultivated with fresh human excrements under anaerobic conditions for 24 h. A HPLC-UV method was adopted for determining berberine and palmatine in bacteria culture medium, in order to compare the metabolism of the two components in different prescription compatibility. Metabolism of berberine was positively correlated with doses, whereas metabolism of palmatine was negatively correlated with doses in extracts from C. chinensis. Compound compatibility speeded up the metabolism of berberine in low dose, which was positively related to the doses of Evodiae and fried Paeoniae Alba Radix; meanwhile Compound compatibility slowed down the metabolism of berberine in high dose, which was negatively related to the dose of Evodiae. Compound compatibility speeded up the metabolism of palmatine in high dose, which was negatively related to the doses of Evodiae and fried Paeoniae Alba Radix. The metabolism of the compatibility of Wuji Wan speeds up, when Coptis chinensis components metabolite rapidly in intestinal flora; while the metabolism of the compatibility of Wuji Wan slows down, when C. chinensis components metabolite slowly in intestinal flora. Therefore, they show a balanced effect. Additionally, different proportion of C. chinensis, Evodiae and fried Paeoniae Alba Radix cause difference in metabolism speed of berberine and palmatine to some extent.

  8. Human saccadic eye movements and tracking by active foveation in log polar space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Fee-Lee; Venkatesh, Svetha; West, Geoffrey A. W.

    1996-04-01

    One of the possible models of the human visual system (HVS) in the computer vision literature has a high resolution fovea and exponentially decreasing resolution periphery. The high resolution fovea is used to extract necessary information in order to solve a vision task and the periphery may be used to detect motion. To obtain the desired information, the fovea is guided by the contents of the scene and other knowledge to position the fovea over areas of interest. These eye movements are called saccades and corrective saccades. A two stage process has been implemented as a mechanism for changing foveation in log polar space. Initially, the open loop stage roughly foveates on the best interest feature and then the closed loop stage is invoked to accurately iteratively converge onto the foveation point. The open loop stage developed for the foveation algorithm is applied to saccadic eye movements and a tracking system. Log polar space is preferred over Cartesian space as: (1) it simultaneously provides high resolution and a wide viewing angle; and (2) feature invariance occurs in the fovea which simplifies the foveation process.

  9. Environmental contaminants activate human and polar bear (Ursus maritimus) pregnane X receptors (PXR, NR1I2) differently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lille-Langøy, Roger; Goldstone, Jared V; Rusten, Marte; Milnes, Matthew R; Male, Rune; Stegeman, John J; Blumberg, Bruce; Goksøyr, Anders

    2015-04-01

    Many persistent organic pollutants (POPs) accumulate readily in polar bears because of their position as apex predators in Arctic food webs. The pregnane X receptor (PXR, formally NR1I2, here proposed to be named promiscuous xenobiotic receptor) is a xenobiotic sensor that is directly involved in metabolizing pathways of a wide range of environmental contaminants. In the present study, we comparably assess the ability of 51 selected pharmaceuticals, pesticides and emerging contaminants to activate PXRs from polar bears and humans using an in vitro luciferase reporter gene assay. We found that polar bear PXR is activated by a wide range of our test compounds (68%) but has a slightly more narrow ligand specificity than human PXR that was activated by 86% of the 51 test compounds. The majority of the agonists identified (70%) produces a stronger induction of the reporter gene via human PXR than via polar bear PXR, however with some notable and environmentally relevant exceptions. Due to the observed differences in activation of polar bear and human PXRs, exposure of each species to environmental agents is likely to induce biotransformation differently in the two species. Bioinformatics analyses and structural modeling studies suggest that amino acids that are not part of the ligand-binding domain and do not interact with the ligand can modulate receptor activation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Human Intestinal Parasites in Roudehen, Tehran Province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Nasrin; Razmjou, Elham; Hashemi-Hafshejani, Saeideh; Motevalian, Abbas; Akhlaghi, Lameh; Meamar, Ahmad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are among the most common infections and health problems worldwide. Due to the lack of epidemiologic information of such infections, the prevalence of, and the risk factors for, enteric parasites were investigated in residents of Roudehen, Tehran Province, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, 561 triple fecal samples were collected through a two-stage cluster-sampling protocol from Jun to Dec 2014. The samples were examined by formalin-ether concentration, culture, and with molecular methods. The prevalence of enteric parasites was 32.7% (95% CI 27.3-38). Blastocystis sp. was the most common intestinal protozoan (28.4%; 95% CI 23.7-33.0). The formalin-ether concentration and culture methods detected Blastocystis sp., Entamoeba coli , Giardia intestinalis , Dientamoeba fragilis , Iodamoeba butschlii , Entamoeba complex cysts or trophozoite , Chilomastix mesnilii , and Enterobius vermicularis . Single-round PCR assay for Entamoeba complex were identified Entamoeba dispar and E. moshkovskii . E. histolytica was not observed in any specimen. Multivariate analysis showed a significant association of parasites with water source and close animal contact. There was no correlation between infections and gender, age, occupation, education, or travel history. Protozoan infections were more common than helminth infections. This study revealed a high prevalence of enteric protozoan parasite infection among citizens of Rodehen. As most of the species detected are transmitted through a water-resistant cyst, public and individual education on personal hygiene should be considered to reduce transmission of intestinal parasites in the population.

  11. Farnesoid X receptor signal is involved in deoxycholic acid-induced intestinal metaplasia of normal human gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2015-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling pathway is known to be involved in the metabolism of bile acid, glucose and lipid. In the present study, we demonstrated that 400 µmol/l deoxycholic acid (DCA) stimulation promotes the proliferation of normal human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1). In addition, DCA activated FXR and increased the expression of intestinal metaplasia genes, including caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (Cdx2) and mucin 2 (MUC2). The treatment of FXR agonist GW4064/antagonist guggulsterone (Gug.) significantly increased/decreased the expression levels of FXR, Cdx2 and MUC2 protein in DCA-induced GES-1 cells. GW4064/Gug. also enhanced/reduced the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity and binding of the Cdx2 promoter region and NF-κB, the most common subunit p50 protein. Taken together, the results indicated that DCA is capable of modulating the expression of Cdx2 and the downstream MUC2 via the nuclear receptor FXR-NF-κB activity in normal gastric epithelial cells. FXR signaling pathway may therefore be involved in the intestinal metaplasia of human gastric mucosa.

  12. In vitro impact of five pesticides alone or in combination on human intestinal cell line Caco-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilboudo, Sylvain; Fouche, Edwin; Rizzati, Virginie; Toé, Adama M; Gamet-Payrastre, Laurence; Guissou, Pierre I

    2014-01-01

    In Burkina Faso, as in most Sahelian countries, the failure to follow good agricultural practices coupled with poor soil and climate conditions in the locust control context lead to high environmental contaminations with pesticide residues. Thus, consumers being orally exposed to a combination of multiple pesticide residues through food and water intake, the digestive tract is a tissue susceptible to be directly exposed to these food contaminants. The aim of our work was to compare in vitro the impact of five desert locust control pesticides (Deltamethrin DTM, Fenitrothion FNT, Fipronil FPN, Lambda-cyalothrine LCT, and Teflubenzuron TBZ) alone and in combination on the human intestinal Caco-2 cells viability and function. Cells were exposed to 0.1-100 μM pesticides for 10 days alone or in mixture (MIX). Our results showed a cytotoxic effect of DTM, FNT, FPN, LCT, and TBZ alone or in combination in human intestinal Caco-2 cells. The most efficient were shown to be FPN and FNT impacting the cell layer integrity and/or barrier function, ALP activity, antioxidant enzyme activity, lipid peroxidation, Akt activation, and apoptosis. The presence of antioxidant reduced lipid peroxidation level and attenuated the pesticides-induced cell toxicity, suggesting that key mechanism of pesticides cytotoxicity may be linked to their pro-oxidative potential. A comparative analysis with the predicted cytotoxic effect of pesticides mixture using mathematical modeling shown that the combination of these pesticides led to synergistic effects rather than to a simple independent or dose addition effect.

  13. Study on human intestinal bacterium Blautia sp. AUH-JLD56 for the conversion of arctigenin to (-)-3'-desmethylarctigenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Yue; Li, Meng; Wang, Xiu-Ling; Liu, Peng; Hao, Qing-Hong; Yu, Xiu-Mei

    2013-12-11

    Arctium lappa L. (A. lappa) is a popularly used vegetable as well as herbal medicine. Human intestinal microflora was reported to convert arctiin, the lignan compound with highest content in the dried fruits of Arctium lappa, to a series of metabolites. However, the specific bacterium responsible for the formation of 3'-desmethylarctigenin (3'-DMAG), the most predominant metabolite of arctiin by rat or human intestinal microflora, has not been isolated yet. In the present study, we isolated one single bacterium, which we named Blautia sp. AUH-JLD56, capable of solely biotransforming arctiin or arctigenin to (-)-3'-DMAG. The structure of the metabolite 3'-DMAG was elucidated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biotransforming kinetics and maximum biotransforming capacity of strain AUH-JLD56 was investigated. In addition, the metabolite 3'-DMAG showed significantly higher 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity than that of the substrate arctigenin at the concentrations tested.

  14. Surfactants enhance the tight-junction permeability of food allergens in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine, Yoshinori; Zhang, Jie Wie

    2003-02-01

    Food additives are responsible for certain allergic types of symptoms. Here Caco-2 cell monolayers were used as a model of the intestinal epithelium for the study of the effect of a food grade surfactant. We determined whether or not the presence of a surfactant enhances the transportation of food allergens across human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. This study investigated sucrose monoester fatty acids, which are a food grade surfactant. As an in vitro model of human epithelial cells, Caco-2 cells were grown in monolayers and exposed to different doses of the surfactant in conjunction with ovomucoid, a major egg white allergen. The integrity of the monolayer was assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). The permeability of tight junctions and transport of the antigen were studied. TEER correlated with the permeability of tight junctions. TEER significantly decreased upon exposure to a surfactant, indicating an increase in ovomucoid permeability without degradation. The surfactant induced shortening in microvilli, actin disbandment and structural separation of tight junctions. The results indicate that food grade surfactants can increase the paracellular uptake of food allergens. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Retracted: Physiologically based pharmacokinetic predictions of intestinal BCRP-mediated effect of telmisartan on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Soo Hyeon; Park, Wan-Su; Han, Seunghoon; Park, Gab-Jin; Lee, Jongtae; Hong, Taegon; Jeon, Sangil; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2017-07-01

    'Physiologically based pharmacokinetic predictions of intestinal BCRP-mediated effect of telmisartan on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin in humans' by Soo Hyeon Bae, Wan-Su Park, Seunghoon Han, Gab-jin Park, Jongtae Lee, Taegon Hong, Sangil Jeon and Dong-Seok Yim The above article, published online on 06 February 2017 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, K. Sandy Pang, and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. The authors retracted the paper due to errors associated with use of log D vs. log P of telmisartan as inputs of the PBPK model. The authors concluded that there are too many changes in the article to be resolved by an Erratum, and had requested a retraction. Reference Bae, S. H., Park, W.-S., Han, S., Park, G., Lee, J., Hong, T., Jeon, S., and Yim, D.-S. (2016) Physiologically based pharmacokinetic predictions of intestinal BCRP-mediated effect of telmisartan on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin in humans. Biopharm. Drug Dispos., doi: 10.1002/bdd.2060. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Serum and intestinal isotype antibody responses to Wa human rotavirus in gnotobiotic pigs are modulated by maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreño, V; Hodgins, D C; de Arriba, L; Kang, S Y; Yuan, L; Ward, L A; Tô, T L; Saif, L J

    1999-06-01

    The effects of passive antibodies on protection and active immune responses to human rotavirus were studied in gnotobiotic pigs. Pigs were injected at birth with saline or sow serum of high (immunized) or low (control) antibody titre and subsets of pigs were fed colostrum and milk from immunized or control sows. Pigs were inoculated at 3-5 days of age and challenged at 21 days post-inoculation (p.i.) with virulent Wa human rotavirus. Pigs receiving immune serum with or without immune colostrum/milk were partially protected against diarrhoea and virus shedding after inoculation, but had significantly lower IgA antibody titres in serum and small intestinal contents at 21 days p.i. and lower protection rates after challenge compared with pigs given control or no maternal antibodies. IgG antibody titres were consistently higher in small than in large intestinal contents. Pigs given control serum with control colostrum/milk had lower rates of virus shedding after inoculation than those given control serum alone. In summary, high titres of circulating maternal antibodies with or without local (milk) antibodies provided passive protection after inoculation but suppressed active mucosal antibody responses. These findings may have implications for the use of live, oral rotavirus vaccines in breast-fed infants.

  17. Antioxidant-Enhancing Property of the Polar Fraction of Mangosteen Pericarp Extract and Evaluation of Its Safety in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wichit Suthammarak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Crude extract from the pericarp of the mangosteen (mangosteen extract [ME] has exhibited several medicinal properties in both animal models and human cell lines. Interestingly, the cytotoxic activities were always observed in nonpolar fraction of the extract whereas the potent antioxidant was often found in polar fraction. Although it has been demonstrated that the polar fraction of ME exhibited the antioxidant activity, the safety of the polar fraction of ME has never been thoroughly investigated in humans. In this study, we investigated the safety of oral administration of the polar fraction of ME in 11 healthy Thai volunteers. During a 24-week period of the study, only minor and tolerable side effects were reported; no serious side effects were documented. Blood chemistry studies also showed no liver damage or kidney dysfunction in all subjects. We also demonstrated antioxidant property of the polar fraction of ME both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, oral administration of the polar fraction of ME enhanced the antioxidant capability of red blood cells and decreased oxidative damage to proteins within red blood cells and whole blood.

  18. Antioxidant-Enhancing Property of the Polar Fraction of Mangosteen Pericarp Extract and Evaluation of Its Safety in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthammarak, Wichit; Numpraphrut, Pornpayom; Charoensakdi, Ratiya; Neungton, Neelobol; Tunrungruangtavee, Vachara; Jaisupa, Nattapon; Charoensak, Suwit; Moongkarndi, Primchanien; Muangpaisan, Weerasak

    2016-01-01

    Crude extract from the pericarp of the mangosteen (mangosteen extract [ME]) has exhibited several medicinal properties in both animal models and human cell lines. Interestingly, the cytotoxic activities were always observed in nonpolar fraction of the extract whereas the potent antioxidant was often found in polar fraction. Although it has been demonstrated that the polar fraction of ME exhibited the antioxidant activity, the safety of the polar fraction of ME has never been thoroughly investigated in humans. In this study, we investigated the safety of oral administration of the polar fraction of ME in 11 healthy Thai volunteers. During a 24-week period of the study, only minor and tolerable side effects were reported; no serious side effects were documented. Blood chemistry studies also showed no liver damage or kidney dysfunction in all subjects. We also demonstrated antioxidant property of the polar fraction of ME both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, oral administration of the polar fraction of ME enhanced the antioxidant capability of red blood cells and decreased oxidative damage to proteins within red blood cells and whole blood.

  19. Mouse gastric tumor models with prostaglandin E2 pathway activation show similar gene expression profiles to intestinal-type human gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshima Masanobu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastric cancers are generally classified into better differentiated intestinal-type tumor and poorly differentiated diffuse-type one according to Lauren's histological categorization. Although induction of prostaglandin E2 pathway promotes gastric tumors in mice in cooperation with deregulated Wnt or BMP signalings, it has remained unresolved whether the gastric tumor mouse models recapitulate either of human gastric cancer type. This study assessed the similarity in expression profiling between gastric tumors of transgenic mice and various tissues of human cancers to find best-fit human tumors for the transgenic mice models. Results Global expression profiling initially found gastric tumors from COX-2/mPGES-1 (C2mE-related transgenic mice (K19-C2mE, K19-Wnt1/C2mE, and K19-Nog/C2mE resembled gastric cancers among the several tissues of human cancers including colon, breast, lung and gastric tumors. Next, classification of the C2mE-related transgenic mice by a gene signature to distinguish human intestinal- and diffuse-type tumors showed C2mE-related transgenic mice were more similar to intestinal-type compared with diffuse one. We finally revealed that induction of Wnt pathway cooperating with the prostaglandin E2 pathway in mice (K19-Wnt1/C2mE mice further reproduce features of human gastric intestinal-type tumors. Conclusion We demonstrated that C2mE-related transgenic mice show significant similarity to intestinal-type gastric cancer when analyzed by global expression profiling. These results suggest that the C2mE-related transgenic mice, especially K19-Wnt1/C2mE mice, serve as a best-fit model to study molecular mechanism underlying the tumorigenesis of human gastric intestinal-type cancers.

  20. Fate and effect of ingested Bacillus cereus spores and vegetative cells in the intestinal tract of human-flora-associated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcks, Andrea; Hansen, Bjarne Munk; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse

    2006-01-01

    gradient gel electrophoresis analysis with universal 16S rRNA gene primers revealed significant changes in the intestinal microbiota of animals dosed with spores. Vero cell assays and a commercial kit (BCET-RPLA) did not reveal any enterotoxin production from B. cereus F4433/73R in the intestinal tract.......The fate and effect of Bacillus cereus F4433/73R in the intestine of human-flora-associated rats was studied using bacteriological culturing techniques and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in combination with cell assays and immunoassays for detection of enterotoxins. In faecal samples...... from animals receiving vegetative cells, only few B. cereus cells were detected. Spores survived the gastric barrier well, and were in some cases detected up to 2 weeks after ingestion. Selective growing revealed no major changes in the intestinal flora during passage of B. cereus. However, denaturing...

  1. The Human Milk Oligosaccharide 2'-Fucosyllactose Quenches Campylobacter jejuni-Induced Inflammation in Human Epithelial Cells HEp-2 and HT-29 and in Mouse Intestinal Mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhuo-Teng; Nanthakumar, N Nanda; Newburg, David S

    2016-10-01

    Campylobacter jejuni causes diarrhea worldwide; young children are most susceptible. Binding of virulent C. jejuni to the intestinal mucosa is inhibited ex vivo by α1,2-fucosylated carbohydrate moieties, including human milk oligosaccharides (HMOSs). The simplest α1,2-fucosylated HMOS structure, 2'-fucosyllactose (2'-FL), can be predominant at ≤5 g/L milk. Although 2'-FL inhibits C. jejuni binding ex vivo and in vivo, the effects of 2'FL on the cell invasion central to C. jejuni pathogenesis have not been tested. Clinical isolates of C. jejuni infect humans, birds, and ferrets, limiting studies on its mammalian pathobiology. Human epithelial cells HEp-2 and HT-29 infected with the virulent C. jejuni strain 81-176 human isolate were treated with 5 g 2'-FL/L, and the degree of infection and inflammatory response was measured. Four-week-old male wild-type C57BL/6 mice were fed antibiotics to reduce their intestinal microbiota and were inoculated with C. jejuni strain 81-176. The sensitivity of the resulting acute transient enteric infection and immune response to inhibition by 2'-FL ingestion was tested. In HEp-2 and HT-29 cells, 2'-FL attenuated 80% of C. jejuni invasion (P jejuni colonization by 80%, weight loss by 5%, histologic features of intestinal inflammation by 50-70%, and induction of inflammatory signaling molecules of the acute-phase mucosal immune response by 50-60% (P jejuni clinical disease, 2'-FL inhibited pathogenesis and its sequelae. These data strongly support the hypothesis that 2'-FL represents a new class of oral agent for prevention, and potentially for treatment, of specific enteric infectious diseases. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. Human Lactobacillus Strains from the Intestine can Suppress IgE-Mediated Degranulation of Rat Basophilic Leukaemia (RBL-2H3 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaku Harata

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells play a critical role in immunoglobulin E (IgE-mediated allergic diseases, and the degranulation of mast cells is important in the pathogenesis of these diseases. A disturbance of the intestinal microflora, especially of endogenous lactic acid bacteria, might be a contributing factor for IgE-mediated allergic diseases. Additional knowledge regarding the interaction of human intestinal Lactobacilli with mast cells is still necessary. Twenty-three strains of Lactobacilli, including commercial and reference strains and strains from the human intestine, were tested for their ability to regulate degranulation of cells from rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells (RBL-2H3 in vitro based on a β-hexosaminidase release assay. Each of the tested Lactobacilli characteristically suppressed IgE-mediated degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells, and Lactobacillus GG showed the strongest inhibitory effect on the cells. Furthermore, the bacteria isolated from the human intestine significantly suppressed degranulation of RBL-2H3 cellsin comparison with the reference strains. These results suggest that Lactobacilli, particularly those from the human intestine, can affect the activation of mast cells in a strain-dependent manner. Further study should be conducted to analyse the understanding mechanism.

  3. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression and function of the lipocalin-2 (24p3/NGAL receptor in rodent and human intestinal epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Langelueddecke

    Full Text Available The lipocalin 2//NGAL/24p3 receptor (NGAL-R/24p3-R is expressed in rodent distal nephron where it mediates protein endocytosis. The mechanisms of apical endocytosis and transcytosis of proteins and peptides in the intestine are poorly understood. In the present study, the expression and localization of rodent 24p3-R (r24p3-R and human NGAL-R (hNGAL-R was investigated in intestinal segments by immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. r24p3-R/hNGAL-R was also studied in human Caco-2 BBE cells and CHO cells transiently transfected with r24p3-R by immunofluorescence microscopy, RT-PCR and immunoblotting of plasma membrane enriched vesicles (PM. To assay function, endocytosis/transcytosis of putative ligands phytochelatin (PC₃, metallothionein (MT and transferrin (Tf was assayed by measuring internalization of fluorescence-labelled ligands in Caco-2 BBE cells grown on plastic or as monolayers on Transwell inserts. The binding affinity of Alexa 488-PC₃ to colon-like Caco-2 BBE PM was quantified by microscale thermophoresis (MST. r24p3-R/hNGAL-R expression was detected apically in all intestinal segments but showed the highest expression in ileum and colon. Colon-like, but not duodenum-like, Caco-2 BBE cells expressed hNGAL-R on their surface. Colon-like Caco-2 BBE cells or r24p3-R transfected CHO cells internalized fluorescence-labelled PC₃ or MT with half-maximal saturation at submicromolar concentrations. Uptake of PC₃ and MT (0.7 µM by Caco-2 BBE cells was partially blocked by hNGAL (500 pM and an EC₅₀ of 18.6 ± 12.2 nM was determined for binding of Alexa 488-PC₃ to PM vesicles by MST. Transwell experiments showed rapid (0.5-2 h apical uptake and basolateral delivery of fluorescent PC₃/MT/Tf (0.7 µM. Apical uptake of ligands was significantly blocked by 500 pM hNGAL. hNGAL-R dependent uptake was more prominent with MT but transcytosis efficiency was reduced compared to

  5. Expression and function of the lipocalin-2 (24p3/NGAL) receptor in rodent and human intestinal epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelueddecke, Christian; Roussa, Eleni; Fenton, Robert A; Thévenod, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The lipocalin 2//NGAL/24p3 receptor (NGAL-R/24p3-R) is expressed in rodent distal nephron where it mediates protein endocytosis. The mechanisms of apical endocytosis and transcytosis of proteins and peptides in the intestine are poorly understood. In the present study, the expression and localization of rodent 24p3-R (r24p3-R) and human NGAL-R (hNGAL-R) was investigated in intestinal segments by immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. r24p3-R/hNGAL-R was also studied in human Caco-2 BBE cells and CHO cells transiently transfected with r24p3-R by immunofluorescence microscopy, RT-PCR and immunoblotting of plasma membrane enriched vesicles (PM). To assay function, endocytosis/transcytosis of putative ligands phytochelatin (PC₃), metallothionein (MT) and transferrin (Tf) was assayed by measuring internalization of fluorescence-labelled ligands in Caco-2 BBE cells grown on plastic or as monolayers on Transwell inserts. The binding affinity of Alexa 488-PC₃ to colon-like Caco-2 BBE PM was quantified by microscale thermophoresis (MST). r24p3-R/hNGAL-R expression was detected apically in all intestinal segments but showed the highest expression in ileum and colon. Colon-like, but not duodenum-like, Caco-2 BBE cells expressed hNGAL-R on their surface. Colon-like Caco-2 BBE cells or r24p3-R transfected CHO cells internalized fluorescence-labelled PC₃ or MT with half-maximal saturation at submicromolar concentrations. Uptake of PC₃ and MT (0.7 µM) by Caco-2 BBE cells was partially blocked by hNGAL (500 pM) and an EC₅₀ of 18.6 ± 12.2 nM was determined for binding of Alexa 488-PC₃ to PM vesicles by MST. Transwell experiments showed rapid (0.5-2 h) apical uptake and basolateral delivery of fluorescent PC₃/MT/Tf (0.7 µM). Apical uptake of ligands was significantly blocked by 500 pM hNGAL. hNGAL-R dependent uptake was more prominent with MT but transcytosis efficiency was reduced compared to PC₃ and

  6. Circular polarization induced by the three-dimensional chiral structure of human sweat ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayut, Itai; Ben Ishai, Paul; Agranat, Aharon J; Feldman, Yuri

    2014-04-01

    The upper part of the human eccrine sweat ducts, embedded within the epidermis layer, have a well-defined helical structure. It was recently suggested that, as electromagnetic entities, the sweat ducts interact with sub-mm waves [Y. Feldman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 128102 (2008)]. Although correlation between changes in the reflectance spectrum in this frequency range and physiological activities has been shown, a direct link between the electromagnetic reflection and the helical structure itself has remained to be established. The fact that the sweat ducts manifest natural homochirality is henceforth used to produce this link. We report the detection of circular polarization asymmetry in the electromagnetic reflection from the human skin at sub-THz frequencies in vivo. We compare the results to numerical simulations and to measurements of a fabricated metamaterial. We argue that the observed circular dichroism can be interpreted uniquely as the signature of the helical structure itself. By twisting reflected electromagnetic waves, the human skin exhibits properties which are usually discussed only in the framework of metamaterial science.

  7. Polarized Secretion of PEDF from Human Embryonic Stem Cell–Derived RPE Promotes Retinal Progenitor Cell Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Danhong; Deng, Xuemei; Spee, Christine; Sonoda, Shozo; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Barron, Ernesto; Pera, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Human embryonic stem cell–derived RPE (hES-RPE) transplantation is a promising therapy for atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD); however, future therapeutic approaches may consider co-transplantation of hES-RPE with retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) as a replacement source for lost photoreceptors. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of polarization of hES-RPE monolayers on their ability to promote survival of RPCs. Methods. The hES-3 cell line was used for derivation of RPE. Polarization of hES-RPE was achieved by prolonged growth on permeable inserts. RPCs were isolated from 16- to 18-week-gestation human fetal eyes. ELISA was performed to measure pigment epithelium–derived factor (PEDF) levels from conditioned media. Results. Pigmented RPE-like cells appeared as early as 4 weeks in culture and were subcultured at 8 weeks. Differentiated hES-RPE had a normal chromosomal karyotype. Phenotypically polarized hES-RPE cells showed expression of RPE-specific genes. Polarized hES-RPE showed prominent expression of PEDF in apical cytoplasm and a marked increase in secretion of PEDF into the medium compared with nonpolarized culture. RPCs grown in the presence of supernatants from polarized hES-RPE showed enhanced survival, which was ablated by the presence of anti-PEDF antibody. Conclusions. hES-3 cells can be differentiated into functionally polarized hES-RPE cells that exhibit characteristics similar to those of native RPE. On polarization, hES-RPE cells secrete high levels of PEDF that can support RPC survival. These experiments suggest that polarization of hES-RPE would be an important feature for promotion of RPC survival in future cell therapy for atrophic AMD. PMID:21087957

  8. The rule of unity for human intestinal absorption 2: application to pharmaceutical drugs that are marketed as salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Raj B; Admire, Brittany; Yalkowsky, Samuel H

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of the human intestinal absorption (HIA) of the 59 drugs which are marketed as salts is predicted using the rule of unity. Intrinsic aqueous solubilities and partition coefficients along with the drug dose are used to calculate modified absorption potential (MAP) values. These values are shown to be related to the fraction of the dose that is absorbed upon oral administration in humans (FA). It is shown that the MAP value can distinguish between drugs that are poorly absorbed (FA drugs. This forms the basis of a simple rule of unity based solely on in vitro data for predicting whether or not a drug will be well absorbed at a given dose.

  9. Intestinal and Systemic Immune Responses upon Multi-drug ResistantPseudomonas aeruginosaColonization of Mice Harboring a Human Gut Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliane, von Klitzing; Ekmekciu, Ira; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization has rated multi-drug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa as serious threat for human health. It is, however, unclear, whether intestinal MDR P. aeruginosa carriage is associated with inflammatory responses in intestinal or even systemic compartments. In the present study, we generated with respect to their microbiota "humanized" mice by human fecal microbiota transplantation of secondary abiotic mice. Following peroral challenge with a clinical P. aeruginosa isolate on two consecutive days, mice harboring a human or murine microbiota were only partially protected from stable intestinal P. aeruginosa colonization given that up to 78% of mice were P. aeruginosa -positive at day 28 post-infection (p.i.). Irrespective of the host-specificity of the microbiota, P. aeruginosa colonized mice were clinically uncompromised. However, P. aeruginosa colonization resulted in increased intestinal epithelial apoptosis that was accompanied by pronounced proliferative/regenerative cell responses. Furthermore, at day 7 p.i. increased innate immune cell populations such as macrophages and monocytes could be observed in the colon of mice harboring either a human or murine microbiota, whereas this held true at day 28 p.i. for adaptive immune cells such as B lymphocytes in both the small and large intestines of mice with murine microbiota. At day 7 p.i., pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion was enhanced in the colon and mesenteric lymph nodes, whereas the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was down-regulated in the former at day 28 p.i. Strikingly, cytokine responses upon intestinal P. aeruginosa colonization were not restricted to the intestinal tract, but could also be observed systemically, given that TNF and IFN-γ concentrations were elevated in spleens as early as 7 days p.i., whereas splenic IL-10 levels were dampened at day 28 p.i. of mice with human microbiota. In conclusion, mere intestinal carriage of MDR P. aeruginosa by clinically unaffected

  10. Lunar Polar In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) as a Stepping Stone for Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Gerald B.

    2013-01-01

    A major emphasis of NASA is to extend and expand human exploration across the solar system. While specific destinations are still being discussed as to what comes first, it is imperative that NASA create new technologies and approaches that make space exploration affordable and sustainable. Critical to achieving affordable and sustainable exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) are the development of technologies and approaches for advanced robotics, power, propulsion, habitats, life support, and especially, space resource utilization systems. Space resources and how to use them, often called In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), can have a tremendous beneficial impact on robotic and human exploration of the Moon, Mars, Phobos, and Near Earth Objects (NEOs), while at the same time helping to solve terrestrial challenges and enabling commercial space activities. The search for lunar resources, demonstration of extraterrestrial mining, and the utilization of resource-derived products, especially from polar volatiles, can be a stepping stone for subsequent human exploration missions to other destinations of interest due to the proximity of the Moon, complimentary environments and resources, and the demonstration of critical technologies, processes, and operations. ISRU and the Moon: There are four main areas of development interest with respect to finding, obtaining, extracting, and using space resources: Prospecting for resources, Production of mission critical consumables like propellants and life support gases, Civil engineering and construction, and Energy production, storage, and transfer. The search for potential resources and the production of mission critical consumables are the primary focus of current NASA technology and system development activities since they provide the greatest initial reduction in mission mass, cost, and risk. Because of the proximity of the Moon, understanding lunar resources and developing, demonstrating, and implementing lunar ISRU

  11. Probiotic Bifidobacterium species stimulate human SLC26A3 gene function and expression in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anoop; Hecht, Cameron; Priyamvada, Shubha; Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N; Alakkam, Anas; Borthakur, Alip; Alrefai, Waddah A; Gill, Ravinder K; Dudeja, Pradeep K

    2014-12-15

    SLC26A3, or downregulated in adenoma (DRA), plays a major role in mediating Cl(-) absorption in the mammalian intestine. Disturbances in DRA function and expression have been implicated in intestinal disorders such as congenital Cl(-) diarrhea and gut inflammation. We previously showed that an increase in DRA function and expression by Lactobacillus acidophilus and its culture supernatant (CS) might underlie antidiarrheal effects of this probiotic strain. However, the effects of Bifidobacterium species, important inhabitants of the human colon, on intestinal Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange activity are not known. Our current results demonstrate that CS derived from Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium infantis, and Bifidobacterium bifidum increased anion exchange activity in Caco-2 cells (∼1.8- to 2.4-fold). Consistent with the increase in DRA function, CS also increased the protein, as well as the mRNA, level of DRA (but not putative anion transporter 1). CS of all three Bifidobacterium sp. increased DRA promoter activity (-1,183/+114 bp) in Caco-2 cells (1.5- to 1.8-fold). Furthermore, the increase in DRA mRNA expression by CS of B. breve and B. infantis was blocked in the presence of the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D (5 μM) and the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway inhibitor U0126 (10 μM). Administration of live B. breve, B. infantis, and B. bifidum by oral gavage to mice for 24 h increased DRA mRNA and protein levels in the colon. These data demonstrate an upregulation of DRA via activation of the ERK1/2 pathway that may underlie potential antidiarrheal effects of Bifidobacterium sp.

  12. Use of recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin in patients with sepsis-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation after intestinal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eTagami

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anticoagulant therapy has been evaluated with respect to its potential usefulness in reducing the high mortality rates associated with severe sepsis, including sepsis-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC after intestinal perforation. We examined the hypothesis that recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rhTM is effective in the treatment of patients with septic shock with sepsis-induced DIC after laparotomy for intestinal perforation. Methods: We performed propensity-score and instrumental variable analyses of the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination inpatient database, a nationwide administrative database. The main outcome was 28-day in-hospital all-cause mortality.Results: We categorized eligible patients (n = 2202 from 622 hospitals into the rhTM group (n = 726 and control group (n = 1476. Propensity-score matching created 621 matched pairs of patients with and without rhTM. There was no significant difference in 28-day mortality between the two groups in the unmatched analysis (rhTM vs. control, 25.3% vs. 23.4%, respectively; difference, 1.9%; 95%CI, −1.9 to 5.7, nor in the propensity-score matched analysis (rhTM vs. control, 26.1% vs. 24.8%, respectively; difference, 1.3%; 95%CI, −3.6 to 6.1. The logistic analysis showed no significant association between the use of rhTM and the mortality in propensity-score matched patients ((OR, 1.1; 95%CI, 0.82−1.4. The instrumental variable analyses, using the hospital rhTM-prescribing proportion as the variable, found that receipt of rhTM was not associated with the reduction in the mortality (risk difference, −6.7%; 95%CI, −16.4 to 3.0.Conclusions: We found no association between administration of rhTM and 28-day mortality in mechanically ventilated patients with septic shock and concurrent DIC after intestinal perforation.

  13. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Human Intestinal Parasites in Roudehen, Tehran Province, Iran

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    Nasrin HEMMATI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal parasitic infections are among the most common infections and health problems worldwide. Due to the lack of epidemiologic information of such infections, the prevalence of, and the risk factors for, enteric parasites were investigated in residents of Roudehen, Tehran Province, Iran.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 561 triple fecal samples were collected through a two-stage cluster-sampling protocol from Jun to Dec 2014. The samples were examined by formalin-ether concentration, culture, and with molecular methods.Results: The prevalence of enteric parasites was 32.7% (95% CI 27.3–38. Blastocystis sp. was the most common intestinal protozoan (28.4%; 95% CI 23.7–33.0. The formalin-ether concentration and culture methods detected Blastocystis sp., Entamoeba coli, Giardia intestinalis, Dientamoeba fragilis, Iodamoeba butschlii, Entamoeba complex cysts or trophozoite, Chilomastix mesnilii, and Enterobius vermicularis. Single-round PCR assay for Entamoeba complex were identified Entamoeba dispar and E. moshkovskii. E. histolytica was not observed in any specimen. Multivariate analysis showed a significant association of parasites with water source and close animal contact. There was no correlation between infections and gender, age, occupation, education, or travel history. Protozoan infections were more common than helminth infections.Conclusion: This study revealed a high prevalence of enteric protozoan parasite infection among citizens of Rodehen. As most of the species detected are transmitted through a water-resistant cyst, public and individual education on personal hygiene should be considered to reduce transmission of intestinal parasites in the population. 

  14. A modular organization of the human intestinal mucosal microbiota and its association with inflammatory bowel disease.

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    Maomeng Tong

    Full Text Available Abnormalities of the intestinal microbiota are implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, two spectra of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. However, the high complexity and low inter-individual overlap of intestinal microbial composition are formidable barriers to identifying microbial taxa representing this dysbiosis. These difficulties might be overcome by an ecologic analytic strategy to identify modules of interacting bacteria (rather than individual bacteria as quantitative reproducible features of microbial composition in normal and IBD mucosa. We sequenced 16S ribosomal RNA genes from 179 endoscopic lavage samples from different intestinal regions in 64 subjects (32 controls, 16 CD and 16 UC patients in clinical remission. CD and UC patients showed a reduction in phylogenetic diversity and shifts in microbial composition, comparable to previous studies using conventional mucosal biopsies. Analysis of weighted co-occurrence network revealed 5 microbial modules. These modules were unprecedented, as they were detectable in all individuals, and their composition and abundance was recapitulated in an independent, biopsy-based mucosal dataset 2 modules were associated with healthy, CD, or UC disease states. Imputed metagenome analysis indicated that these modules displayed distinct metabolic functionality, specifically the enrichment of oxidative response and glycan metabolism pathways relevant to host-pathogen interaction in the disease-associated modules. The highly preserved microbial modules accurately classified IBD status of individual patients during disease quiescence, suggesting that microbial dysbiosis in IBD may be an underlying disorder independent of disease activity. Microbial modules thus provide an integrative view of microbial ecology relevant to IBD.

  15. A Mathematical Model of the Human Small Intestine Following Acute Radiation and Burn Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Related Studies in Physics , Chemistry , and Medicine 24.3, pp. 275– 283. Matsuzawa T and R Wilson (1965). “The intestinal mucosa of germfree mice after...Disseminate in accordance with provisions of DoD Directive 5230.25. January 2013 DTRA01-03-D-0014 Prepared by: Applied Research Associates...is u DTRA01-0 Authored b Terry C. Pe Darren R. O Prepared by Applied Re 801 N. Qui Suite 700 Arlington, D IPD nt) nlimited 3-D-0014 y

  16. Carboxypeptidase-B-like processing of the C-terminus of glucagon-like peptide-2 in pig and human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orskov, C; Buhl, T; Rabenhøj, L

    1989-01-01

    no mutual cross-reactivity. By gel filtration of extracts of pig and human small intestine, the immunoreactivity eluting at the position of GLP-2 was identified by the radioimmunoassays for glucagon-like peptide-2 (PG 126-159) and for PG 151-158, whereas the assay for PG 151-160 was completely negative. We...... conclude that the C-terminal amino acid residue of pig and human ileal GLP-2 is PG 158. Thus the basic residues, PG 159 and 160 are removed during its processing in the small intestine....

  17. Loss of LMOD1 impairs smooth muscle cytocontractility and causes megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome in humans and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Halim (Danny); M.P. Wilson (Michael P.); D. Oliver (Daniel); E. Brosens (Erwin); J.B. Verheij (Joke); Y. Han (Yu); V. Nanda (Vivek); Q. Lyu (Qing); M. Doukas (Michael); H.A. Stoop (Hans A.); R.W.W. Brouwer (Rutger); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); O.J. Slivano (Orazio J.); A.J. Burns (Alan); C.K. Christie (Christine K.); K.L. De Mesy Bentley (Karen L.); A.S. Brooks (Alice); D. Tibboel (Dick); S. Xu (Suowen); Z.G. Jin (Zheng Gen); T. Djuwantono (Tono); W. Yan (Wei); M.M. Alves (Maria); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); J.M. Miano (Joseph M.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractMegacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a congenital visceral myopathy characterized by severe dilation of the urinary bladder and defective intestinal motility. The genetic basis of MMIHS has been ascribed to spontaneous and autosomal dominant mutations in

  18. Human responses to wave slamming vibration on a polar supply and research vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, H; Bekker, A

    2018-02-01

    A polar supply and research vessel is pre-disposed to wave slamming which has caused complaints among crew and researchers regarding interference with sleep, equipment use and research activities. The present work undertook to survey passenger claims of sleep interference, disturbed motor tasks and equipment damage as a result of wave slamming during normal operations of this vessel. The hypothesis was investigated that whole-body vibration metrics from ISO 2631-1 are potentially suitable for the prediction of human slamming complaints. Full-scale acceleration measurements were performed and wave slamming events were subsequently identified from the human weighted acceleration time histories. A daily diary survey was also conducted to gather the human response. The vibration caused by wave slamming was found to be strongly correlated with sleep disturbances and activity interference. Sleep and equipment use were found to be the most affected parameters by slamming. Daily vibration dose values were determined by accumulating the vibration as a result of slamming over 24 h periods. This metric accounted for increased magnitudes and frequency of slamming incidents and proved to be the best metric to represent human responses to slamming vibration. The greatest percentage of activities affected by slamming related to sleep regardless of daily cumulative VDV magnitude. More than 50% of the recorded responses related to sleep when the daily cumulative VDV ranged between 8.0 m/s1.75-10.0 m/s1.75. The peak vertical vibration levels recorded on the vessel reach magnitudes which are associated with sleep disturbance in environments where acoustic noise is present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Marine Oils, Digested with Human Fluids, on Cellular Viability and Stress Protein Expression in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Tullberg

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In vitro digestion of marine oils has been reported to promote lipid oxidation, including the formation of reactive aldehydes (e.g., malondialdehyde (MDA and 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (HHE. We aimed to investigate if human in vitro digestion of supplemental levels of oils from algae, cod liver, and krill, in addition to pure MDA and HHE, affect intestinal Caco-2 cell survival and oxidative stress. Cell viability was not significantly affected by the digests of marine oils or by pure MDA and HHE (0–90 μM. Cellular levels of HSP-70, a chaperone involved in the prevention of stress-induced protein unfolding was significantly decreased (14%, 28%, and 14% of control for algae, cod and krill oil, respectively; p ≤ 0.05. The oxidoreductase thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1 involved in reducing oxidative stress was also lower after incubation with the digested oils (26%, 53%, and 22% of control for algae, cod, and krill oil, respectively; p ≤ 0.001. The aldehydes MDA and HHE did not affect HSP-70 or Trx-1 at low levels (8.3 and 1.4 μM, respectively, whilst a mixture of MDA and HHE lowered Trx-1 at high levels (45 μM, indicating less exposure to oxidative stress. We conclude that human digests of the investigated marine oils and their content of MDA and HHE did not cause a stress response in human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

  20. The role of selective cyclooxygenase isoforms in human intestinal smooth muscle cell stimulated prostanoid formation and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter E. Longo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal smooth muscle plays a major role in the repair of injured intestine and contributes to the prostanoid pool during intestinal inflammatory states. Cyclooxygenase (COX, which catalyzes the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostanoids exists in two isoforms, COX-1 and COX-2. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative contributions of COX-1 and COX-2 in the production of prostanoids by human intestinal smooth muscle (HISM cells when stimulated by interleukin-1β (IL-1β and lipopolsaccharide (LPS. Furthermore the effects of specific COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors on the proliferation of smooth muscle cells was also evaluated. Confluent monolayer cultures of HISM cells were incubated with IL-1β or LPS for 0-24 h while control cells received medium alone. PGE2 and PGI2 as 6-keto-PGF1α and LTB4 were measured by a specific radioimmunoassay. COX enzymes were evaluated by Western immunoblotting. Unstimulated and stimulated cells were exposed to the specific COX-1 inhibitor valerylsalicylic acid (VSA and the COX-2 inhibitors NS-398 and SC-58125. The effects of serum on proliferation were then evaluated in the presence of each of the specific COX inhibitors by incorporation of 3H-thym idine into DNA. IL-1β and LPS increased both PGE2 and 6-ketoPGF1α in a dose dependent fashion with enhanced production detected two hours following exposure. Neither stimulus stimulated LTB4 release. Immunoblot analysis using isoform-specific antibodies showed that both COX-1 and COX-2 were present constitutively. Furthermore, COX-1 was upregulated by each inflammatory stimulus. In a separate set of experiments cells were pretreated with either the selective COX-1 inhibitor VSA or the selective COX-2 inhibitors NS-398 or SC-58125 prior to treatment with IL-1β or LPS. The COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors decreased both basal and IL-1β and LPS stimulated prostanoid release. Spontaneous DNA synthesis was present and serum consistently increased proliferation

  1. Absorption of 3(2H)-furanones by human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Nicole Christina; Somoza, Veronika; Schwab, Wilfried

    2009-05-13

    A number of 3(2H)-furanones are synthesized by fruits and have been found in cooked foodstuffs, where they impart flavor and odor because of their low perception thresholds. They show genotoxic properties in model studies but are also ranked among the antioxidants and anticarcinogens. This study examined the efficiency of intestinal absorption and metabolic conversion of 3(2H)-furanones by using Caco-2 cell monolayers as an intestinal epithelial cell model. The permeability of each agent was measured in both the apical to basal and basal to apical directions. 2,5-Dimethyl-4-methoxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMMF) showed the highest absorption rate in all experiments, while similar amounts of 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone (HDMF), 4-hydroxy-2(or 5)-ethyl-5(or 2)-methyl-3(2H)-furanone (HEMF), and 4-hydroxy-5-methyl-3(2H)-furanone (HMF) were taken up. HDMF-glucoside was almost not absorbed but was hydrolyzed to a small extent. The transport of 3(2H)-furanones could not be saturated even at levels of 500 microM and occurred in both directions. Because the uptake was only slightly reduced by apical hyperosmolarity, passive diffusion by paracellular transport is proposed.

  2. The Bacterial Species Campylobacter jejuni Induce Diverse Innate Immune Responses in Human and Avian Intestinal Epithelial Cells

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    Daniel A. John

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter remain the major cause of human gastroenteritis in the Developed World causing a significant burden to health services. Campylobacter are pathogens in humans and chickens, although differences in mechanistic understanding are incomplete, in part because phenotypic strain diversity creates inconsistent findings. Here, we took Campylobacter jejuni isolates (n = 100 from multi-locus sequence typed collections to assess their pathogenic diversity, through their inflammatory, cytotoxicity, adhesion, invasion and signaling responses in a high-throughput model using avian and human intestinal epithelial cells. C. jejuni induced IL-8 and CXCLi1/2 in human and avian epithelial cells, respectively, in a MAP kinase-dependent manner. In contrast, IL-10 responses in both cell types were PI 3-kinase/Akt-dependent. C. jejuni strains showed diverse levels of invasion with high invasion dependent on MAP kinase signaling in both cell lines. C. jejuni induced diverse cytotoxic responses in both cell lines with cdt-positive isolates showing significantly higher toxicity. Blockade of endocytic pathways suggested that invasion by C. jejuni was clathrin- and dynamin-dependent but caveolae- independent in both cells. In contrast, IL-8 (and CXCLi1/2 production was dependent on clathrin, dynamin, and caveolae. This study is important because of its scale, and the data produced, suggesting that avian and human epithelial cells use similar innate immune pathways where the magnitude of the response is determined by the phenotypic diversity of the Campylobacter species.

  3. The Bacterial Species Campylobacter jejuni Induce Diverse Innate Immune Responses in Human and Avian Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Daniel A.; Williams, Lisa K.; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Humphrey, Thomas J.; Wilkinson, Thomas S.

    2017-01-01

    Campylobacter remain the major cause of human gastroenteritis in the Developed World causing a significant burden to health services. Campylobacter are pathogens in humans and chickens, although differences in mechanistic understanding are incomplete, in part because phenotypic strain diversity creates inconsistent findings. Here, we took Campylobacter jejuni isolates (n = 100) from multi-locus sequence typed collections to assess their pathogenic diversity, through their inflammatory, cytotoxicity, adhesion, invasion and signaling responses in a high-throughput model using avian and human intestinal epithelial cells. C. jejuni induced IL-8 and CXCLi1/2 in human and avian epithelial cells, respectively, in a MAP kinase-dependent manner. In contrast, IL-10 responses in both cell types were PI 3-kinase/Akt-dependent. C. jejuni strains showed diverse levels of invasion with high invasion dependent on MAP kinase signaling in both cell lines. C. jejuni induced diverse cytotoxic responses in both cell lines with cdt-positive isolates showing significantly higher toxicity. Blockade of endocytic pathways suggested that invasion by C. jejuni was clathrin- and dynamin-dependent but caveolae- independent in both cells. In contrast, IL-8 (and CXCLi1/2) production was dependent on clathrin, dynamin, and caveolae. This study is important because of its scale, and the data produced, suggesting that avian and human epithelial cells use similar innate immune pathways where the magnitude of the response is determined by the phenotypic diversity of the Campylobacter species. PMID:29033908

  4. Intestinal Damage and Inflammatory Biomarkers in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Exposed and HIV-Infected Zimbabwean Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Andrew J; Chasekwa, Bernard; Rukobo, Sandra; Govha, Margaret; Mutasa, Kuda; Ntozini, Robert; Humphrey, Jean H

    2017-09-15

    Disease progression is rapid in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected infants. Whether intestinal damage and inflammation underlie mortality is unknown. We measured plasma intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), soluble CD14 (sCD14), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein (CRP) at 6 weeks and 6 months of age in 272 HIV-infected infants who either died (cases) or survived (controls), and in 194 HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) and 197 HIV-unexposed infants. We estimated multivariable odds ratios for mortality and postnatal HIV transmission for each biomarker using logistic regression. At 6 weeks, HIV-infected infants had higher sCD14 and IL-6 but lower I-FABP than HIV-exposed and HIV-unexposed infants (P HIV-exposed than HIV-unexposed infants (P = .02). At 6 months, HIV-infected infants had highest sCD14, IL-6, and CRP concentrations (P HIV-exposed vs HIV-unexposed infants (P = .04). No biomarker was associated with mortality in HIV-infected infants, or with odds of breast-milk HIV transmission in HIV-exposed infants. HIV-infected infants have elevated inflammatory markers by 6 weeks of age, which increase over time. In contrast to adults and older children, inflammatory biomarkers were not associated with mortality. HEU infants have higher inflammation than HIV-unexposed infants until at least 6 months, which may contribute to poor health outcomes.

  5. Growth-inhibiting effects of seco-tanapartholides identified in Artemisia princeps var. orientalis whole plant on human intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S-H; Na, Y-E; Ahn, Y-J

    2003-01-01

    The present work aimed at isolating antibacterial constituents from the whole plant of Artemisia princeps var. orientalis active towards nine human intestinal bacteria. The growth-inhibiting activities of materials derived from the Artemisia whole plant towards test bacteria were examined using an impregnated paper disc method. The biologically active constituents of the Artemisia whole plant were characterized as the sesquiterpene lactones seco-tanapartholides A and B by spectroscopic analysis. In a test using 1 mg per disc, seco-tanapartholides A and B produced a clear inhibitory effect against Clostridium perfringens, Bacteroides fragilis and Staphylococcus aureus. These compounds did not affect the growth of test lactic acid-producing bacteria (Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bif. breve, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lact. casei) and Escherichia coli, whereas weak growth inhibition towards Bif. bifidum was observed. At 0.5 mg per disc, seco-tanapartholides A and B exhibited moderate growth inhibition towards Cl. perfringens but weak growth inhibition towards Bact. fragilis and Staph. aureus. Inhibitory action of seco-tanapartholides A and B towards specific bacteria without any adverse effects on lactic acid-producing bacteria may be an indication of at least one of the pharmacological actions of A. princeps var. orientalis whole plant. These naturally occurring Artemisia whole plant-derived materials could be useful as a new preventive agent against various diseases caused by harmful intestinal bacteria such as clostridia.

  6. The transepithelial transport mechanism of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in human intestine determined using a Caco-2 cell monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingxin; Wang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Kaiqiong; Yang, Dan; Zhong, Yufang; An, Jing; Lei, Bingli; Zhang, Xinyu

    2017-04-01

    Oral ingestion plays an important role in human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The uptake of PBDEs primarily occurs in the small intestine. The aim of the present study is to investigate the transepithelial transport characteristics and mechanisms of PBDEs in the small intestine using a Caco-2 cell monolayer model. The apparent permeability coefficients of PBDEs indicated that tri- to hepta-BDEs were poorly absorbed compounds. A linear increase in transepithelial transport was observed with various concentrations of PBDEs, which suggested that passive diffusion dominated their transport at the concentration range tested. In addition, the pseudo-first-order kinetics equation can be applied to the transepithelial transport of PBDEs. The rate-determining step in transepithelial transport of PBDEs was trans-cell transport including the trans-pore process. The significantly lower transepithelial transport rates at low temperature for bidirectional transepithelial transport suggested that an energy-dependent transport mechanism was involved. The efflux transporters (P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein) and influx transporters (organic cation transporters) participated in the transepithelial transport of PBDEs. In addition, the transepithelial transport of PBDEs was pH sensitive; however, more information is required to understand the influence of pH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hes1 promotes the IL-22-mediated antimicrobial response by enhancing STAT3-dependent transcription in human intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murano, Tatsuro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Ryuichi, E-mail: rokamoto.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Go; Nakata, Toru; Hibiya, Shuji; Shimizu, Hiromichi; Fujii, Satoru; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Yui, Shiro; Akiyama-Morio, Junko; Nemoto, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, Mamoru [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Hes1 enhances IL-22-STAT3 signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. •Hes1 enhances REG family gene induction by IL-22-STAT3 signaling. •Protein level of Hes1 restricts the response to IL-22. •Present regulation of a cytokine signal represents a new mode of Hes1 function. -- Abstract: Notch signaling plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have previously shown that Notch signaling is up-regulated in the inflamed mucosa of ulcerative colitis (UC) and thereby plays an indispensable role in tissue regeneration. Here we show that in addition to Notch signaling, STAT3 signaling is highly activated in the inflamed mucosa of UC. Forced expression of the Notch target gene Hes1 dramatically enhanced the IL-22-mediated STAT3-dependent transcription in human IECs. This enhancement of STAT3-dependent transcription was achieved by the extended phosphorylation of STAT3 by Hes1. Microarray analysis revealed that Hes1-mediated enhancement of IL-22-STAT3 signaling significantly increased the induction of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as REG1A, REG3A and REG3G, in human IECs. Conversely, the reduction of Hes1 protein levels with a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly down-regulated the induction of those genes in IECs, resulting in a markedly poor response to IL-22. Our present findings identify a new role for the molecular function of Hes1 in which the protein can interact with cytokine signals and regulate the immune response of IECs.

  8. Next-generation sequencing of microRNAs in primary human polarized macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Cobos Jiménez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are important for mounting inflammatory responses to tissue damage or infection by invading pathogens, and therefore modulation of their cellular functions is essential for the success of the immune system as well as for maintaining tissue homeostasis. Small non-coding RNAs are important regulatory elements of gene expression and microRNAs are the most widely known to be fundamental for the proper development of cells of the immune system. Macrophages can exhibit different phenotypes, depending on the cytokine environment they encounter in the affected tissues. We have analyzed the microRNA expression profiles during maturation of human primary monocytes into macrophages and polarization by pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines. Here we describe the analysis of next-generation sequencing data deposited in EMBL–EBI ArrayExpress under accession number E-MTAB-1969 and associated with the study published by Cobos Jiménez and collaborators in Physiological Genomics in 2014 (1. The data presented here contributes to our understanding of microRNA expression profiles in human monocytes and macrophages and will also serve as a resource for novel microRNAs and other small RNA species expressed in these cells.

  9. STORM: a general model to determine the number and adaptive changes of epithelial stem cells in teleost, murine and human intestinal tracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyuan Wang

    Full Text Available Intestinal stem cells play a pivotal role in the epithelial tissue renewal, homeostasis and cancer development. The lack of a general marker for intestinal stem cells across species has hampered analysis of stem cell number in different species and their adaptive changes upon intestinal lesions or during development of cancer. Here a two-dimensional model, named STORM, has been developed to address this issue. By optimizing epithelium renewal dynamics, the model examines the epithelial stem cell number by taking experimental input information regarding epithelium proliferation and differentiation. As the results suggest, there are 2.0-4.1 epithelial stem cells on each pocket section of zebrafish intestine, 2.0-4.1 stem cells on each crypt section of murine small intestine and 1.8-3.5 stem cells on each crypt section of human duodenum. The model is able to provide quick results for stem cell number and its adaptive changes, which is not easy to measure through experiments. Its general applicability to different species makes it a valuable tool for analysis of intestinal stem cells under various pathological conditions.

  10. Comparative analysis of pyrosequencing and a phylogenetic microarray for exploring microbial community structures in the human distal intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus J Claesson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Variations in the composition of the human intestinal microbiota are linked to diverse health conditions. High-throughput molecular technologies have recently elucidated microbial community structure at much higher resolution than was previously possible. Here we compare two such methods, pyrosequencing and a phylogenetic array, and evaluate classifications based on two variable 16S rRNA gene regions. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Over 1.75 million amplicon sequences were generated from the V4 and V6 regions of 16S rRNA genes in bacterial DNA extracted from four fecal samples of elderly individuals. The phylotype richness, for individual samples, was 1,400-1,800 for V4 reads and 12,500 for V6 reads, and 5,200 unique phylotypes when combining V4 reads from all samples. The RDP-classifier was more efficient for the V4 than for the far less conserved and shorter V6 region, but differences in community structure also affected efficiency. Even when analyzing only 20% of the reads, the majority of the microbial diversity was captured in two samples tested. DNA from the four samples was hybridized against the Human Intestinal Tract (HIT Chip, a phylogenetic microarray for community profiling. Comparison of clustering of genus counts from pyrosequencing and HITChip data revealed highly similar profiles. Furthermore, correlations of sequence abundance and hybridization signal intensities were very high for lower-order ranks, but lower at family-level, which was probably due to ambiguous taxonomic groupings. CONCLUSIONS: The RDP-classifier consistently assigned most V4 sequences from human intestinal samples down to genus-level with good accuracy and speed. This is the deepest sequencing of single gastrointestinal samples reported to date, but microbial richness levels have still not leveled out. A majority of these diversities can also be captured with five times lower sampling-depth. HITChip hybridizations and resulting community profiles correlate

  11. Raloxifene glucuronidation in liver and intestinal microsomes of humans and monkeys: contribution of UGT1A1, UGT1A8 and UGT1A9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Naoki; Takasuka, Akane; Kokawa, Yuki; Isobe, Takashi; Taguchi, Maho; Shigeyama, Masato; Murata, Mikio; Suno, Manabu; Hanioka, Nobumitsu

    2016-01-01

    1. Raloxifene is an antiestrogen that has been marketed for the treatment of osteoporosis, and is metabolized into 6- and 4'-glucuronides by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes. In this study, the in vitro glucuronidation of raloxifene in humans and monkeys was examined using liver and intestinal microsomes and recombinant UGT enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A8 and UGT1A9). 2. Although the K(m) and CL(int) values for the 6-glucuronidation of liver and intestinal microsomes were similar between humans and monkeys, and species differences in Vmax values (liver microsomes, humans > monkeys; intestinal microsomes, humans  UGT1A8 >UGT1A9 for humans, and UGT1A8 > UGT1A1 > UGT1A9 for monkeys. The activities of 4'-glucuronidation were UGT1A8 > UGT1A1 > UGT1A9 in humans and monkeys. 4. These results demonstrated that the profiles for the hepatic and intestinal glucuronidation of raloxifene by microsomes were moderately different between humans and monkeys.

  12. Binding of Candida albicans to Human CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 Modulates the Inflammatory Response of Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Klaile

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans colonizes human mucosa, including the gastrointestinal tract, as a commensal. In immunocompromised patients, C. albicans can breach the intestinal epithelial barrier and cause fatal invasive infections. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1; CD66a, CEACAM5 (CEA, and CEACAM6 (CD66c are immunomodulatory receptors expressed on human mucosa and are recruited by bacterial and viral pathogens. Here we show for the first time that a fungal pathogen (i.e., C. albicans also binds directly to the extracellular domain of human CEACAM1, CEACAM3, CEACAM5, and CEACAM6. Binding was specific for human CEACAMs and mediated by the N-terminal IgV-like domain. In enterocytic C2BBe1 cells, C. albicans caused a transient tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM1 and induced higher expression of membrane-bound CEACAM1 and soluble CEACAM6. Lack of the CEACAM1 receptor after short hairpin RNA (shRNA knockdown abolished CXCL8 (interleukin-8 secretion by C2BBe1 cells in response to C. albicans. In CEACAM1-competent cells, the addition of recombinant soluble CEACAM6 reduced the C. albicans-induced CXCL8 secretion.

  13. An essential role of intestinal cell kinase in lung development is linked to the perinatal lethality of human ECO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yixin; Park, So Hyun; Wu, Di; Xu, Wenhao; Guillot, Stacey J; Jin, Li; Li, Xudong; Wang, Yalin; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Fu, Zheng

    2017-05-01

    Human endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome, caused by the loss-of-function mutation R272Q in the intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene, is a neonatal-lethal developmental disorder. To elucidate the molecular basis of ECO syndrome, we constructed an Ick R272Q knock-in mouse model that recapitulates ECO pathological phenotypes. Newborns bearing Ick R272Q homozygous mutations die at birth due to respiratory distress. Ick mutant lungs exhibit not only impaired branching morphogenesis associated with reduced mesenchymal proliferation but also significant airspace deficiency in primitive alveoli concomitant with abnormal interstitial mesenchymal differentiation. ICK dysfunction induces elongated primary cilia and perturbs ciliary Hedgehog signaling and autophagy during lung sacculation. Our study identifies an essential role for ICK in lung development and advances the mechanistic understanding of ECO syndrome. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. Cyclical DNA Methylation and Histone Changes Are Induced by LPS to Activate COX-2 in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Angrisano

    Full Text Available Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces release of inflammatory mediators both in immune and epithelial cells. We investigated whether changes of epigenetic marks, including selected histone modification and DNA methylation, may drive or accompany the activation of COX-2 gene in HT-29 human intestinal epithelial cells upon exposure to LPS. Here we describe cyclical histone acetylation (H3, methylation (H3K4, H3K9, H3K27 and DNA methylation changes occurring at COX-2 gene promoter overtime after LPS stimulation. Histone K27 methylation changes are carried out by the H3 demethylase JMJD3 and are essential for COX-2 induction by LPS. The changes of the histone code are associated with cyclical methylation signatures at the promoter and gene body of COX-2 gene.

  15. Digestion and absorption of an egg white ACE-inhibitory peptide in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Long; Wang, Liying; Yu, Zhipeng; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the digestion and absorption of egg white-derived angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptide TNGIIR in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers. Results showed that the digestion of TNGIIR to simulated gastrointestinal enzymes and brush border membrane peptidases were 5.87% ± 1.92% and 17.17% ± 0.64%, respectively (p Caco-2 cell monolayers was determined to be (4.92 ± 0.40) × 10(-6) cm/s, indicating that TNGIIR can transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers in intact form. In addition, only cytochalasin D, a disruptor of tight junctions (TJs), changed TNGIIR transport rate significantly (p Caco-2 cell monolayers was paracellular pathway via TJs.

  16. Analysis of the human intestinal epithelial cell transcriptional response to Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus salivarius, Bifidobacterium lactis and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putaala, H; Barrangou, R; Leyer, G J

    2010-01-01

    a comparative analysis of the global in vitro transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis 420, and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Interestingly, L. salivarius Ls-33...... DCE-induced changes were overall more similar to those of B. lactis 420 than to L. acidophilus NCFM™, which is consistent with previously observed in vivo immunomodulation properties. In the gene ontology and pathway analyses both specific and unspecific changes were observed. Common to all...... was the regulation of apoptosis and adipogenesis, and lipid-metabolism related regulation by the probiotics. Specific changes such as regulation of cell-cell adhesion by B. lactis 420, superoxide metabolism by L. salivarius Ls-33, and regulation of MAPK pathway by L. acidophilus NCFM™ were noted. Furthermore...

  17. Epidermal growth factor inhibits glycylsarcosine transport and hPepT1 expression in a human intestinal cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C U; Amstrup, J; Steffansen, B

    2001-01-01

    The human intestinal cell line Caco-2 was used as a model system to study the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on peptide transport. EGF decreased apical-to-basolateral fluxes of [(14)C]glycylsarcosine ([(14)C]Gly-Sar) up to 50.2 +/- 3.6% (n = 6) of control values. Kinetic analysis......(max) decreased from 2.61 +/- 0.4 to 1.06 +/- 0.1 nmol x cm(-2) x min(-1) (n = 3, P T1 mRNA (using glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA as control......) in cells treated with EGF. Western blotting indicated a decrease in hPepT1 protein in cell lysates. We conclude that EGF treatment decreases Gly-Sar transport in Caco-2 cells by decreasing the number of peptide transporter molecules in the apical membrane....

  18. Biotransformation of prim-O-glucosylcimifugin by human intestinal flora and its inhibition on NO production and DPPH free radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Yang, Xin-Bao; Yang, Xiu-Wei; Liu, Jian-Xun

    2012-01-01

    prim-O-Glucosylcimifugin (PGCN), a highest content chromone in the roots of Saposhnikovia divaricata, was incubated with human intestinal flora (HIF), and two biotransformation products were obtained from the incubated solution by chromatographic methods. The chemical structures of the two biotransformation products were elucidated as cimifugin (CN) and 5-O-methylvisamminol (MVL), respectively, on the basis of NMR and MS data. The biotransformation product CN was formed through a deglucosylation of PGCN by β-glucosidase secreted from the HIF, and then the hydroxymethyl group of CN was reduced to lead to occurrence of MVL. All of these compounds were evaluated for their effect on the inhibition of nitric oxide production induced by lipopolysaccharide in macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free-radical scavenging activity in cell-free bioassay system.

  19. Substrate selectivity of human intestinal UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs): in silico and in vitro insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Satya Prakash; Bhadauriya, Anuseema; Patil, Abhijeet; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-05-01

    The current drug development process aims to produce safe, effective drugs within a reasonable time and at a reasonable cost. Phase II metabolism (glucuronidation) can affect drug action and pharmacokinetics to a considerable extent and so its studies and prediction at initial stages of drug development are very imperative. Extensive glucuronidation is an obstacle to oral bioavailability because the first-pass glucuronidation [or premature clearance by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs)] of orally administered agents frequently results in poor oral bioavailability and lack of efficacy. Modeling of new chemical entities/drugs for UGTs and their kinetic data can be useful in understanding the binding patterns to be used in the design of better molecules. This review concentrates on first-pass glucuronidation by intestinal UGTs, including their topology, expression profile, and pharmacogenomics. In addition, recent advances are discussed with respect to substrate selectivity at the binding pocket, structural requirements, and mechanism of enzyme actions.

  20. Functional studies of human intestinal alkaline sphingomyelinase by deglycosylation and mutagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jun; Hansen, Gert H; Nilsson, Ake

    2005-01-01

    with that of NPP or mutation of T75 in the core abolished the enzyme activity against sphingomyelin but failed to render the enzyme NPP active. Our results indicate that alk-SMase activity is severely affected by defective N-glycosylation and structural alterations of the putative metal-binding sites......Intestinal alk-SMase (alkaline sphingomyelinase) is an ectoenzyme related to the NPP (nucleotide phosphodiesterase) family. It has five potential N-glycosylation sites and predicated transmembrane domains at both the N- and C-termini. The amino acid residues forming the two metal-binding sites......-truncated enzyme was released into the medium. Deglycosylation blocked the release of the enzyme that accumulated in endosome-like structures. The enzyme activity was also decreased by mutations of the residues forming the putative metal-binding sites and the active core. Substitution of the active core sequence...

  1. The prenylflavonoid isoxanthohumol from hops (Humulus lupulus L.) is activated into the potent phytoestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin in vitro and in the human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possemiers, Sam; Bolca, Selin; Grootaert, Charlotte; Heyerick, Arne; Decroos, Karel; Dhooge, Willem; De Keukeleire, Denis; Rabot, Sylvie; Verstraete, Willy; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2006-07-01

    Hops, an essential beer ingredient, are a source of prenylflavonoids, including 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), one of the most potent phytoestrogens. Because 8-PN concentrations in beers are generally low, its health effects after moderate beer consumption were considered negligible. However, human intestinal microbiota may activate up to 4 mg/L isoxanthohumol (IX) in beer into 8-PN. Depending on interindividual differences in the intestinal transformation potential, this conversion could easily increase the 8-PN exposure 10-fold upon beer consumption. Here, we present a further investigation of the process both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments with the dynamic SHIME model showed that hop prenylflavonoids pass unaltered through the stomach and small intestine and that activation of IX into 8-PN (up to 80% conversion) occurs only in the distal colon. In vitro incubations of 51 fecal samples from female volunteers with IX enabled us to separate the fecal microbiota into high (8 of 51), moderate (11 of 51) and slow (32 of 51) 8-PN producers, clearly illustrating an interindividual variability. Three women, selected from the respective groups, received a daily dose of 5.59 mg IX for 4 d. Intestinal IX activation and urinary 8-PN excretion were correlated (R(2) = 0.6417, P < 0.01). These data show that intestinal conversion of IX upon moderate beer consumption can lead to 8-PN exposure values that might fall within the range of human biological activity.

  2. Rapid appraisal of human intestinal helminth infections among schoolchildren in Osh oblast, Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Peter; Usubalieva, Jumagul; Imanalieva, Cholpon; Minbaeva, Gulnara; Stefiuk, Kayte; Jeandron, Aurelie; Utzinger, Jürg

    2010-12-01

    A population-representative lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) survey was conducted in 2009 to determine the prevalence of intestinal helminth infections among schoolchildren across Osh oblast, Kyrgyzstan. The diagnostic approach consisted of duplicate Kato-Katz thick smears from a single stool sample and an adhesive tape test. A questionnaire was administered to identify risk factors for infections. A total of 1262 schoolchildren aged 6-15 years were recruited; 41% of them harboured at least one of the eight identified helminth species. The two most prevalent helminths were Ascaris lumbricoides (23.1%) and Enterobius vermicularis (19.3%). Lower prevalences were found for Hymenolepis nana (4.4%), Fasciola hepatica (1.9%) and Dicrocoelium dendriticum (1.8%). Washing raw vegetables was a protective factor with regard to A. lumbricoides infection (odds ratio (OR)=0.69, p=0.022); tap water was borderline protective (OR=0.56, p=0.057). Children of the richest families were at a lower risk of E. vermicularis infection than the poorest ones (OR=0.41, p=0.011). Sharing the bed with more than one person was a risk factor for E. vermicularis infection (OR=2.0, p=0.002). The results call for targeted interventions against intestinal helminths in Osh oblast. In a first stage, annual deworming of schoolchildren and other high-risk groups with albendazole or mebendazole should be implemented, and reliable diagnosis and additional anthelminthic drugs should be made available. Subsequently, transmission control including locally-adapted health education, improved water supply and adequate sanitation should become the central features. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Lactobacillus acidophilus alleviates platelet-activating factor-induced inflammatory responses in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alip Borthakur

    Full Text Available Probiotics have been used as alternative prevention and therapy modalities in intestinal inflammatory disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. Pathophysiology of IBD and NEC includes the production of diverse lipid mediators, including platelet-activating factor (PAF that mediate inflammatory responses in the disease. PAF is known to activate NF-κB, however, the mechanisms of PAF-induced inflammation are not fully defined. We have recently described a novel PAF-triggered pathway of NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs, requiring the pivotal role of the adaptor protein Bcl10 and its interactions with CARMA3 and MALT1. The current studies examined the potential role of the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus in reversing the PAF-induced, Bcl10-dependent NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in IECs. PAF treatment (5 µM×24 h of NCM460 and Caco-2 cells significantly increased nuclear p65 NF-κB levels and IL-8 secretion (2-3-fold, P<0.05, compared to control, which were blocked by pretreatment of the cells for 6 h with L. acidophilus (LA or its culture supernatant (CS, followed by continued treatments with PAF for 24 h. LA-CS also attenuated PAF-induced increase in Bcl10 mRNA and protein levels and Bcl10 promoter activity. LA-CS did not alter PAF-induced interaction of Bcl10 with CARMA3, but attenuated Bcl10 interaction with MALT1 and also PAF-induced ubiquitination of IKKγ. Efficacy of bacteria-free CS of LA in counteracting PAF-induced inflammatory cascade suggests that soluble factor(s in the CS of LA mediate these effects. These results define a novel mechanism by which probiotics counteract PAF-induced inflammation in IECs.

  4. In vitro impact of five pesticides alone or in combination on human intestinal cell line Caco-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Ilboudo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Burkina Faso, as in most Sahelian countries, the failure to follow good agricultural practices coupled with poor soil and climate conditions in the locust control context lead to high environmental contaminations with pesticide residues. Thus, consumers being orally exposed to a combination of multiple pesticide residues through food and water intake, the digestive tract is a tissue susceptible to be directly exposed to these food contaminants. The aim of our work was to compare in vitro the impact of five desert locust control pesticides (Deltamethrin DTM, Fenitrothion FNT, Fipronil FPN, Lambda-cyalothrine LCT, and Teflubenzuron TBZ alone and in combination on the human intestinal Caco-2 cells viability and function. Cells were exposed to 0.1–100 μM pesticides for 10 days alone or in mixture (MIX. Our results showed a cytotoxic effect of DTM, FNT, FPN, LCT, and TBZ alone or in combination in human intestinal Caco-2 cells. The most efficient were shown to be FPN and FNT impacting the cell layer integrity and/or barrier function, ALP activity, antioxidant enzyme activity, lipid peroxidation, Akt activation, and apoptosis. The presence of antioxidant reduced lipid peroxidation level and attenuated the pesticides-induced cell toxicity, suggesting that key mechanism of pesticides cytotoxicity may be linked to their pro-oxidative potential. A comparative analysis with the predicted cytotoxic effect of pesticides mixture using mathematical modeling shown that the combination of these pesticides led to synergistic effects rather than to a simple independent or dose addition effect.

  5. Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Replication, Intracellular Trafficking, and Pathogenicity in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Lars; Schulzke, Joerg D.; Niedrig, Matthias; Bücker, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is one of the most important vector-borne viruses in Europe and Asia. Its transmission mainly occurs by the bite of an infected tick. However, consuming milk products from infected livestock animals caused TBEV cases. To better understand TBEV transmission via the alimentary route, we studied viral infection of human intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were used to investigate pathological effects of TBEV infection. TBEV-infected Caco-2 monolayers showed morphological changes including cytoskeleton rearrangements and cytoplasmic vacuolization. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and further enlargement to TBEV containing caverns. Caco-2 monolayers maintained an intact epithelial barrier with stable transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) during early stage of infection. Concomitantly, viruses were detected in the basolateral medium, implying a transcytosis pathway. When Caco-2 cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of cellular pathways of endocytosis TBEV cell entry was efficiently blocked, suggesting that actin filaments (Cytochalasin) and microtubules (Nocodazole) are important for PI3K-dependent (LY294002) virus endocytosis. Moreover, experimental fluid uptake assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of FITC-dextran containing vesicles. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of TBEV with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1) as well as with sorting nexin-5 (SNX5), pointing to macropinocytosis as trafficking mechanism. In the late phase of infection, further evidence was found for translocation of virus via the paracellular pathway. Five days after infection TER was slightly decreased. Epithelial barrier integrity was impaired due to increased epithelial apoptosis, leading to passive viral translocation. These findings illuminate pathomechanisms in TBEV infection of human intestinal epithelial cells and viral transmission via the alimentary route. PMID

  6. Tick-borne encephalitis virus replication, intracellular trafficking, and pathogenicity in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yu

    Full Text Available Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV is one of the most important vector-borne viruses in Europe and Asia. Its transmission mainly occurs by the bite of an infected tick. However, consuming milk products from infected livestock animals caused TBEV cases. To better understand TBEV transmission via the alimentary route, we studied viral infection of human intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were used to investigate pathological effects of TBEV infection. TBEV-infected Caco-2 monolayers showed morphological changes including cytoskeleton rearrangements and cytoplasmic vacuolization. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and further enlargement to TBEV containing caverns. Caco-2 monolayers maintained an intact epithelial barrier with stable transepithelial electrical resistance (TER during early stage of infection. Concomitantly, viruses were detected in the basolateral medium, implying a transcytosis pathway. When Caco-2 cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of cellular pathways of endocytosis TBEV cell entry was efficiently blocked, suggesting that actin filaments (Cytochalasin and microtubules (Nocodazole are important for PI3K-dependent (LY294002 virus endocytosis. Moreover, experimental fluid uptake assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of FITC-dextran containing vesicles. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of TBEV with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1 as well as with sorting nexin-5 (SNX5, pointing to macropinocytosis as trafficking mechanism. In the late phase of infection, further evidence was found for translocation of virus via the paracellular pathway. Five days after infection TER was slightly decreased. Epithelial barrier integrity was impaired due to increased epithelial apoptosis, leading to passive viral translocation. These findings illuminate pathomechanisms in TBEV infection of human intestinal epithelial cells and viral transmission via the alimentary

  7. Tick-borne encephalitis virus replication, intracellular trafficking, and pathogenicity in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Achazi, Katharina; Möller, Lars; Schulzke, Joerg D; Niedrig, Matthias; Bücker, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is one of the most important vector-borne viruses in Europe and Asia. Its transmission mainly occurs by the bite of an infected tick. However, consuming milk products from infected livestock animals caused TBEV cases. To better understand TBEV transmission via the alimentary route, we studied viral infection of human intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were used to investigate pathological effects of TBEV infection. TBEV-infected Caco-2 monolayers showed morphological changes including cytoskeleton rearrangements and cytoplasmic vacuolization. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and further enlargement to TBEV containing caverns. Caco-2 monolayers maintained an intact epithelial barrier with stable transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) during early stage of infection. Concomitantly, viruses were detected in the basolateral medium, implying a transcytosis pathway. When Caco-2 cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of cellular pathways of endocytosis TBEV cell entry was efficiently blocked, suggesting that actin filaments (Cytochalasin) and microtubules (Nocodazole) are important for PI3K-dependent (LY294002) virus endocytosis. Moreover, experimental fluid uptake assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of FITC-dextran containing vesicles. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of TBEV with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1) as well as with sorting nexin-5 (SNX5), pointing to macropinocytosis as trafficking mechanism. In the late phase of infection, further evidence was found for translocation of virus via the paracellular pathway. Five days after infection TER was slightly decreased. Epithelial barrier integrity was impaired due to increased epithelial apoptosis, leading to passive viral translocation. These findings illuminate pathomechanisms in TBEV infection of human intestinal epithelial cells and viral transmission via the alimentary route.

  8. Spatial heterogeneity and co-occurrence patterns of human mucosal-associated intestinal microbiota

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Zhigang; Geng, Jiawei; Tang, Xiaodan; Fan, Hong; Xu, Jinchao; Wen, Xiujun; Ma, Zhanshan Sam; Shi, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Human gut microbiota shows high inter-subject variations, but the actual spatial distribution and co-occurrence patterns of gut mucosa microbiota that occur within a healthy human instestinal tract...

  9. The effect of consumption of milk fermented by Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota on the intestinal microflora and immune parameters in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanhaak, S.; Havenaar, R.; Schaafsma, G.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of consumption of milk fermented by Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (L. casei Shirota) on the composition and metabolic activities of the intestinal microflora, and immune parameters in humans. Subjects: Twenty healthy male subjects aged 40-65 years were

  10. Novel polyfucosylated N-linked glycopeptides with blood group A, H, X and Y determinants from human small intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Finne, J.; Breimer, M.E.; Hansson, G.C.; Karlsson, K.-A.; Leffler, H.; Halbeek, H. van

    1989-01-01

    A novel type of N-linked glycopeptides representing a major part of the glycans in human small intestinal epithelial cells from blood group A and O individuals were isolated by gel filtrations and affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose and Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin I-Sepharose.

  11. In vitro study of soil arsenic release by human gut microbiota and its intestinal absorption by Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Naiyi; Cai, Xiaolin; Du, Huili; Zhang, Zhennan; Li, Zejiao; Chen, Xiaochen; Sun, Guoxin; Cui, Yanshan

    2017-02-01

    Arsenic (As) speciation is essential in assessing health risks from As-contaminated soil. Release of soil-bound arsenic, As transformation by human gut microbiota, and the subsequent intestinal absorption of soil As metabolites were evaluated. A colon microbial community in a dynamic human gut model and the intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2 were cultured. Arsenic speciation analysis and absorption of different As species were undertaken. In this study, soil As release (3.7-581.2 mg kg-1) was observed in the colon. Arsenic in the colon digests was transformed more quickly than that in the soil solid phase. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis showed that 44.2-97.6% of arsenite [As(III)] generated due to arsenate [As(V)] reduction was in the soil solid phase after the colon phase. We observed a high degree of cellular absorption of soil As metabolites, exhibiting that the intestinal absorption of monomethylarsonic acid and As(III) (33.6% and 30.2% resp.) was slightly higher than that of dimethylarsinic acid and As(V) (25.1% and 21.7% resp.). Our findings demonstrate that human gut microbiota can directly release soil-bound arsenic, particularly As-bearing amorphous Fe/Al-oxides. Determining As transformation and intestinal absorption simultaneously will result in an accurate risk assessment of human health with soil As exposures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Human intestinal maltase-glucoamylase: crystal structure of the N-terminal catalytic subunit and basis of inhibition and substrate specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) is one of the two enzymes responsible for catalyzing the last glucose-releasing step in starch digestion. MGAM is anchored to the small-intestinal brush-border epithelial cells and contains two homologous glycosyl hydrolase family 31 catalytic subunits: an N-termina...

  13. Human intestinal and lung cell lines exposed to beta-carotene show a large variation in intracellular levels of beta-carotene and its metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen-Hal, van N.L.W.; Bunschoten, J.E.; Venema, D.P.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Riss, G.; Keijer, J.

    2005-01-01

    Although in vitro models are often used in ß-carotene research, knowledge about the uptake and metabolism of ß-carotene in cell lines is lacking. We measured by HPLC the intracellular levels of ß-carotene and its metabolites in 9 human intestinal and lung cell lines after exposure to 1 ¿M ß-carotene

  14. A method for high purity intestinal epithelial cell culture from adult human and murine tissues for the investigation of innate immune function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christina L; Harden, Scott W; LaPato, Melissa; Nelson, Michael; Amador, Byron; Sorenson, Heather; Frazier, Charles J; Wallet, Shannon M

    2014-12-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) serve as an important physiologic barrier between environmental antigens and the host intestinal immune system. Thus, IECs serve as a first line of defense and may act as sentinel cells during inflammatory insults. Despite recent renewed interest in IEC contributions to host immune function, the study of primary IEC has been hindered by lack of a robust culture technique, particularly for small intestinal and adult tissues. Here, a novel adaptation for culture of primary IEC is described for human duodenal organ donor tissue as well as duodenum and colon of adult mice. These epithelial cell cultures display characteristic phenotypes and are of high purity. In addition, the innate immune function of human primary IEC, specifically with regard to Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression and microbial ligand responsiveness, is contrasted with a commonly used intestinal epithelial cell line (HT-29). Specifically, TLR expression at the mRNA level and production of cytokine (IFNγ and TNFα) in response to TLR agonist stimulation is assessed. Differential expression of TLRs as well as innate immune responses to ligand stimulation is observed in human-derived cultures compared to that of HT-29. Thus, use of this adapted method to culture primary epithelial cells from adult human donors and from adult mice will allow for more appropriate studies of IECs as innate immune effectors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Binding of Candida albicans to Human CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 Modulates the Inflammatory Response of Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaile, Esther; Müller, Mario M; Schäfer, Miriam R; Clauder, Ann-Katrin; Feer, Sabina; Heyl, Kerstin A; Stock, Magdalena; Klassert, Tilman E; Zipfel, Peter F; Singer, Bernhard B; Slevogt, Hortense

    2017-03-14

    Candida albicans colonizes human mucosa, including the gastrointestinal tract, as a commensal. In immunocompromised patients, C. albicans can breach the intestinal epithelial barrier and cause fatal invasive infections. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1; CD66a), CEACAM5 (CEA), and CEACAM6 (CD66c) are immunomodulatory receptors expressed on human mucosa and are recruited by bacterial and viral pathogens. Here we show for the first time that a fungal pathogen (i.e., C. albicans) also binds directly to the extracellular domain of human CEACAM1, CEACAM3, CEACAM5, and CEACAM6. Binding was specific for human CEACAMs and mediated by the N-terminal IgV-like domain. In enterocytic C2BBe1 cells, C. albicans caused a transient tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM1 and induced higher expression of membrane-bound CEACAM1 and soluble CEACAM6. Lack of the CEACAM1 receptor after short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown abolished CXCL8 (interleukin-8) secretion by C2BBe1 cells in response to C. albicans In CEACAM1-competent cells, the addition of recombinant soluble CEACAM6 reduced the C. albicans-induced CXCL8 secretion.IMPORTANCE The present study demonstrates for the first time that fungal pathogens can be recognized by at least four members of the immunomodulatory CEACAM receptor family: CEACAM1, -3, -5, and -6. Three of the four receptors (i.e., CEACAM1, -5, and -6) are expressed in mucosal cells of the intestinal tract, where they are implicated in immunomodulation and control of tissue homeostasis. Importantly, the interaction of the major fungal pathogen in humans Candida albicans with CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 resulted in an altered epithelial immune response. With respect to the broad impact of CEACAM receptors on various aspects of the innate and the adaptive immune responses, in particular epithelial, neutrophil, and T cell behavior, understanding the role of CEACAMs in the host response to fungal pathogens might help to improve management of

  16. Dust mite induces multiple polar T-cell axes in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Kunal; Ungar, Benjamin; Garcet, Sandra; Dutt, Riana; Dickstein, Daniel; Zheng, Xiuzhong; Xu, Hui; Estrada, Yeriel D; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Shemer, Avner; Krueger, James G; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2017-10-04

    House dust mite/HDM atopy patch test/APT elicits positive reactions in a high fraction of atopic dermatitis/AD and healthy individuals. Experimental systems for new-onset/chronic AD are needed to support rapid therapeutic development, particularly since animal models representing human AD are lacking. While HDM APT has been considered to simulate AD, its suitability to model AD's emerging Th2/Th22 phenotype with Th1 and Th17 components is unknown. To assess whether HDM APT reproduces AD. Positive HDM APTs (n=15) from patients with and without AD were evaluated, using genomic and immunohistochemistry studies, against intrapersonal control skin. APT lesions showed higher T-cell and dendritic cell infiltrates vs. 743 up- and 326 downregulated genes were differentially expressed in HDM APT (fold-change>2 and false-discovery rate<0.05), with increased expression of Th2, Th9, Th17/Th22 polar cytokines (i.e. IL-5, IL-13, IL-9, IL-17, IL-22). While HDM caused significant Th2 skewing, it also illustrated differences in Th2 induction and barrier defects, thus HDM APT does not fully simulate AD. Given its widespread availability and sensitization rates, HDM may potentially be a useful tool that represents select aspects of AD, psoriasis, or contact dermatitis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. In vivo imaging of human burn injuries with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Hean; Pierce, Mark C.; Maguluri, Gopi; Park, B. Hyle; Yoon, Sang June; Lydon, Martha; Sheridan, Robert; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2012-06-01

    The accurate determination of burn depth is critical in the clinical management of burn wounds. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) has been proposed as a potentially non-invasive method for determining burn depth by measuring thermally induced changes in the structure and birefringence of skin, and has been investigated in pre-clinical burn studies with animal models and ex vivo human skin. In this study, we applied PS-OCT to the in-vivo imaging of two pediatric burn patients. Deep and superficial burned skins along with contralateral controls were imaged in 3D. The imaging size was 8 mm×6 mm×2 mm in width, length, and depth in the air respectively, and the imaging time was approximately 6 s per volume. Superficially burned skins exhibited the same layered structure as the contralateral controls, but more visible vasculature and reduced birefringence compared to the contralateral controls. In contrast, a deeply burned skin showed loss of the layered structure, almost absent vasculature, and smaller birefringence compared to superficial burns. This study suggested the vasculature and birefringence as parameters for characterizing burn wounds.

  18. In vitro biocompatibility and proliferative effects of polar and non-polar extracts of cucurbita ficifolia on human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristatile, Balakrishnan; Alshammari, Ghedeir M

    2017-05-01

    Cucurbita ficifolia (C. ficifolia) has been traditionally known for its medicinal properties as an antioxidant, anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory agent. However, there has been an enduring attention towards the identification of unique method, to isolate the natural components for therapeutic applications. Our study focuses on different polar and non-polar solvents (methanol, hexane and chloroform) to extract the bioactive components from C. ficifolia (pumpkin) and to study the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity effects on human bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). The extracts were screened for their effects on cytotoxicity, cell proliferation and cell cycle on the hBM-MSCs cell line. The assays demonstrated that the chloroform extract was highly biocompatible, with less cytotoxic effect, and enhanced the cell proliferation. The methanol extract did not exhibit significant cytotoxicity when compare to the control. Concordantly, the cell cycle analysis confirmed that chloroform extract enhances the proliferation at lower concentrations. On the other hand, hexane extract showed high level of cytotoxicity with apoptotic and necrotic changes in hBM-MSCs. Collectively, our data revealed that chloroform is a good candidate to extract the bioactive components from C. ficifolia. Furthermore, our results suggest that specific gravity and density of the solvent might play a crucial role in the extraction process, which warrants further investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. A Murine Model for Human ECO Syndrome Reveals a Critical Role of Intestinal Cell Kinase in Skeletal Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Mengmeng; Jin, Li; Xie, Lin; Park, So Hyun; Tong, Yixin; Wu, Di; Chhabra, A Bobby; Fu, Zheng; Li, Xudong

    2017-11-02

    An autosomal-recessive inactivating mutation R272Q in the human intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene caused profound multiplex developmental defects in human endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome. ECO patients exhibited a wide variety of skeletal abnormalities, yet the underlying mechanisms by which ICK regulates skeletal development remained largely unknown. The goal of this study was to understand the structural and mechanistic basis underlying skeletal anomalies caused by ICK dysfunction. Ick R272Q knock-in transgenic mouse model not only recapitulated major ECO skeletal defects such as short limbs and polydactyly but also revealed a deformed spine with defective intervertebral disk. Loss of ICK function markedly reduced mineralization in the spinal column, ribs, and long bones. Ick mutants showed a significant decrease in the proliferation zone of long bones and the number of type X collagen-expressing hypertrophic chondrocytes in the spinal column and the growth plate of long bones. These results implicate that ICK plays an important role in bone and cartilage development by promoting chondrocyte proliferation and maturation. Our findings provided new mechanistic insights into the skeletal phenotype of human ECO and ECO-like syndromes.

  20. The prevalence and diversity of intestinal parasitic infections in humans and domestic animals in a rural Cambodian village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schär, Fabian; Inpankaew, Tawin; Traub, Rebecca J; Khieu, Virak; Dalsgaard, Anders; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Chhoun, Chamnan; Sok, Daream; Marti, Hanspeter; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-08-01

    In Cambodia, intestinal parasitic infections are prevalent in humans and particularly in children. Yet, information on potentially zoonotic parasites in animal reservoir hosts is lacking. In May 2012, faecal samples from 218 humans, 94 dogs and 76 pigs were collected from 67 households in Dong village, Preah Vihear province, Cambodia. Faecal samples were examined microscopically using sodium nitrate and zinc sulphate flotation methods, the Baermann method, Koga Agar plate culture, formalin-ether concentration technique and Kato Katz technique. PCR was used to confirm hookworm, Ascaris spp., Giardia spp. and Blastocystis spp. Major gastrointestinal parasitic infections found in humans included hookworms (63.3%), Entamoeba spp. (27.1%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (24.3%). In dogs, hookworm (80.8%), Spirometra spp. (21.3%) and Strongyloides spp. (14.9%) were most commonly detected and in pigs Isospora suis (75.0%), Oesophagostomum spp. (73.7%) and Entamoeba spp. (31.6%) were found. Eleven parasite species were detected in dogs (eight helminths and three protozoa), seven of which have zoonotic potential, including hookworm, Strongyloides spp., Trichuris spp., Toxocara canis, Echinostoma spp., Giardia duodenalis and Entamoeba spp. Five of the parasite species detected in pigs also have zoonotic potential, including Ascaris spp., Trichuris spp., Capillaria spp., Balantidium coli and Entamoeba spp. Further molecular epidemiological studies will aid characterisation of parasite species and genotypes and allow further insight into the potential for zoonotic cross transmission of parasites in this community. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. DNA damage and oxidative stress induced at low doses by the fungicide hexachlorobenzene in human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalouati, Hela; Boutet, Elisa; Metais, Benjamin; Fouche, Edwin; Ben Sâad, Mohamed Moncef; Gamet-Payrastre, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB), a persistent chlorinated organic chemical, could be detected in human tissues in several countries of the world. Human exposure to Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) occurring primarily through diet, HCB and its metabolites are therefore supposed to interact directly with intestinal mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of low doses of HCB on DNA integrity, cellular viability, differentiation and oxidative status in vitro in human colonic carcinoma cell line Caco-2. Cells were exposed to increasing doses of HCB for 14 days to assess the cytotoxic, genotoxic and oxidative properties of this compound. The involvement of oxidative stress in the observed effects was evaluated by co exposure of Caco-2 cells with HCB and α-tocopherol. Exposure of Caco-2 cells to HCB resulted in a dose-dependent cytotoxicity, DNA damages and alterations of the cell layer integrity and the barrier function. Moreover, exposure of Caco-2 cells to HCB led to an enhancement of H(2)O(2) production and to an increased activity of antioxidant enzymes. In addition, Co exposure of Caco-2 cells to HCB and α-tocopherol reversed the effects observed in cells exposed to HCB alone. These results suggested that HCB effects on Caco-2 cells could be linked, at least in part, to its pro-oxidative potential.

  2. Impact of probiotic drugs, based on Enterobacter faecium autostrains, on human intestinal microflora in confined habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Batov, Alexey; Usanova, Nonna

    The aim of research: Investigation of influence of probiotic drugs based on autostrains of Enter-obacter faecium, selected from the crew in long term isolation experiment in confined habitat. It is known that during long-term presence in confined habitat the risk of infectious diseases increases. One of the main infectious risk occurs during first 20 days of isolation as a result of exchange of strains and stress-mediated disbacterioses. Therefore it is necessary to evaluate activities of probiotics to avoid this risk. Furthermore, in case of super long term autonomous flight there should be possibilities of application of autochthonous microflora strains as pro-biotics to strengthen colonial resistance of crews. Materials and methods: In the experiment there were used probiotic drugs based on autostrains of E. faecium, selected from the crew before the experiment. Probiotic drugs were consumed during 30 days since the beginning of the experiment with the break of consumption between 10th to 19th day. Results: Comparing the state of intestinal microflora of the crew on the baseline and 14th day of experiment re-vealed remarkable changes of microflora: the increasing of concentration of bifidobacteria and E. faecium (approximately 10 times), elimination of hemolytic streptococcus, yeasts, reduction of the rate of S.aureus, hemolytic gramnegative non-fermenting rods, lactobacilli and normal E.coli. On the 45th day of isolation, 15 days after finishing of auto-strains administration, there fere signs of restoration of disbacteriosis: the quantitative decreasing lactobacilli, bifidobacteria and normal E.coli, increasing of the rate of S.aureus, hemolytic gramnegative nonfermentive rods. Conclusion: Thus we managed to avoid risk of pathogenicity potential growth in first 2 decades of isolation. Application of probiotic, based on the autostrains of E. faecium leads to insignificant changes of concentration of lactobacteries, bifidobacteries, normal E. coli and to

  3. The Arctic Human Health Initiative: a legacy of the International Polar Year 2007-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Alan J

    2013-01-01

    The International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008 represented a unique opportunity to further stimulate cooperation and coordination on Arctic health research and increase the awareness and visibility of Arctic regions. The Arctic Human Health Initiative (AHHI) was a US-led Arctic Council IPY coordinating project that aimed to build and expand on existing International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH) and Arctic Council human health interests. The project aimed to link researchers with potential international collaborators and to serve as a focal point for human health research, education, outreach and communication activities during the IPY. The progress of projects conducted as part of this initiative up until the end of the Arctic Council Swedish chairmanship in May 2013 is summarized in this report. The overall goals of the AHHI was to increase awareness and visibility of human health concerns of Arctic peoples, foster human health research, and promote health strategies that will improve health and well-being of all Arctic residents. Proposed activities to be recognized through the initiative included: expanding research networks that will enhance surveillance and monitoring of health issues of concern to Arctic peoples, and increase collaboration and coordination of human health research; fostering research that will examine the health impact of anthropogenic pollution, rapid modernization and economic development, climate variability, infectious and chronic diseases, intentional and unintentional injuries, promoting education, outreach and communication that will focus public and political attention on Arctic health issues, using a variety of publications, printed and electronic reports from scientific conferences, symposia and workshops targeting researchers, students, communities and policy makers; promoting the translation of research into health policy and community action including implementation of prevention strategies and health promotion; and

  4. The Arctic Human Health Initiative: a legacy of the International Polar Year 2007–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J. Parkinson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . The International Polar Year (IPY 2007–2008 represented a unique opportunity to further stimulate cooperation and coordination on Arctic health research and increase the awareness and visibility of Arctic regions. The Arctic Human Health Initiative (AHHI was a US-led Arctic Council IPY coordinating project that aimed to build and expand on existing International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH and Arctic Council human health interests. The project aimed to link researchers with potential international collaborators and to serve as a focal point for human health research, education, outreach and communication activities during the IPY. The progress of projects conducted as part of this initiative up until the end of the Arctic Council Swedish chairmanship in May 2013 is summarized in this report. Design . The overall goals of the AHHI was to increase awareness and visibility of human health concerns of Arctic peoples, foster human health research, and promote health strategies that will improve health and well-being of all Arctic residents. Proposed activities to be recognized through the initiative included: expanding research networks that will enhance surveillance and monitoring of health issues of concern to Arctic peoples, and increase collaboration and coordination of human health research; fostering research that will examine the health impact of anthropogenic pollution, rapid modernization and economic development, climate variability, infectious and chronic diseases, intentional and unintentional injuries, promoting education, outreach and communication that will focus public and political attention on Arctic health issues, using a variety of publications, printed and electronic reports from scientific conferences, symposia and workshops targeting researchers, students, communities and policy makers; promoting the translation of research into health policy and community action including implementation of prevention

  5. The human neonatal small intestine has the potential for arginine synthesis; developmental changes in the expression of arginine-synthesizing and -catabolizing enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijter Jan M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Milk contains too little arginine for normal growth, but its precursors proline and glutamine are abundant; the small intestine of rodents and piglets produces arginine from proline during the suckling period; and parenterally fed premature human neonates frequently suffer from hypoargininemia. These findings raise the question whether the neonatal human small intestine also expresses the enzymes that enable the synthesis of arginine from proline and/or glutamine. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPS, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS, arginase-1 (ARG1, arginase-2 (ARG2, and nitric-oxide synthase (NOS were visualized by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry in 89 small-intestinal specimens. Results Between 23 weeks of gestation and 3 years after birth, CPS- and ASS-protein content in enterocytes was high and then declined to reach adult levels at 5 years. OAT levels declined more gradually, whereas ARG-1 was not expressed. ARG-2 expression increased neonatally to adult levels. Neurons in the enteric plexus strongly expressed ASS, OAT, NOS1 and ARG2, while varicose nerve fibers in the circular layer of the muscularis propria stained for ASS and NOS1 only. The endothelium of small arterioles expressed ASS and NOS3, while their smooth-muscle layer expressed OAT and ARG2. Conclusion The human small intestine acquires the potential to produce arginine well before fetuses become viable outside the uterus. The perinatal human intestine therefore resembles that of rodents and pigs. Enteral ASS behaves as a typical suckling enzyme because its expression all but disappears in the putative weaning period of human infants.

  6. Detection and genotyping of human papillomavirus DNA in cervical cancer tissues with fluorescence polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan-E; Zhang, Ju; Wu, Jing; Chen, Zhong-Can; Yan, Xiao-Jun

    2003-11-01

    To evaluate the type-specific prevalence of eight common types of human papillomavirus (HPV) in patients with cervical cancer living in Shanxi, China, with fluorescence polarization detection, crude DNA extracted from 137 samples of early-stage cervical cancer (within stage IIa) and chronic cervicitis was subjected to HPV L1 consensus GP5+/GP6+ system. Then, the HPV-positive products identified by GP5 + /GP6+ PCR were genotyped based on template-directed dye-terminator incorporation assay with fluorescence polarization detection (TDI-FP): the PCR products were respectively hybridized with designed type-specific probes within the GP5+/GP6+ amplicons for eight common HPV types (HPV 6, 11, 18, 16, 31, 33, 35, and 58), and specific fluorescence-labeled ddNTPs (TAMRA-ddTTP or R110-ddGTP) were directly incorporated to the ends of the corresponding probes under directing of the corresponding template in PCR products, which was reflected and read by high FP values for TAMRA or R110. HPV DNA was detected in 38.89% (28/72) cases of chronic cervicitis, and 87.69% (57/65) cases of cervical cancer. There was a significant difference in HPV prevalence between these two groups. The four commonly identified types in patients with cervical cancer were HPV 16 (45.6%), HPV 18 (22.8%), HPV 58 (17.5%), and HPV 31 (7.02%), and in those with chronic cervicitis were HPV 16 (35.7%), HPV 11 (32.1%), HPV 6 (21.4%), and HPV 18 (10.7%). 57.14% of HPV types detected in patients with chronic cervicitis were high-risk types. HPV 16 was the most common viral type identified in both groups. Type-specific prevalence of HPV DNA has some characteristics in patients with chronic cervicitis and cervical cancer living in Shanxi, China and the worldwide uncommon type HPV 58 is relatively common in both kinds of cases. The high prevalence of HPV 58 in Chinese women should been considered in diagnosis and vaccine designs of HPV.

  7. Contemporary Applications of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation to Treat Intestinal Diseases in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Christopher; Khoruts, Alexander; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2017-11-25

    The intestinal microbiota comprise an important organ that plays a vital role in host digestion, development, energy maintenance, hemostasis, and immunity. Disruption of the gut microbial community due to diet, lifestyle, or antibiotic exposure increases susceptibility to chronic infection and disease. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) involves the transfer of gut microbiota from a healthy donor to a patient in order to restore normal diversity and function of the microbial community. This method has become a well established alternative therapy for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Recent clinical trials and studies in animal models suggest promise for this method to treat inflammatory bowel diseases, as well as metabolic syndrome. In addition, due to signaling interactions between the gut microbiota and brain, FMT has been suggested as a potential treatment for some psychological disorders, including autism spectrum disorder. Importantly, advances in next-generation sequencing and multi-omics approaches are increasingly improving our understanding of the mechanisms by which FMT results in cure of these various conditions. In this review, we summarize the current applications of FMT and highlight potential future uses and current challenges in understanding and optimizing FMT procedures. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Bioaccessibility of phenolic compounds following in vitro large intestine fermentation of nuts for human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetti, Gabriele; Chiodelli, Giulia; Giuberti, Gianluca; Lucini, Luigi

    2018-04-15

    A bioaccessibility study of polyphenols after in vitro simulated large intestine fermentation was carried out on edible nuts. Raw nuts were also analysed for total phenolic content and antioxidant potential, considering both bound and free phenolics. The highest phenolic content was found in walnuts, followed by pistachios extracts (596.9 and 410.1 mg gallic acid equivalents 100 g-1, respectively). Consistently, the total antioxidant capacity was highest in walnuts (3689.7 μM trolox equivalents 100 g-1) followed by peanuts and pistachios (3169.6 and 2990.1 μM trolox equivalents 100 g-1, respectively). Data showed high correlations between total phenolics and both antioxidant activities. The metabolomics-based phenolic profile depicted during in vitro fermentation showed a degradation of higher-molecular-weight phenolics over 48 hours of faecal fermentation, with a concurrent increase in low-molecular-weight compounds (hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids, alkylphenols, and tyrosols). Our findings indicate that nuts deliver polyphenols into the colon, with bioaccessibility values not negligible for alkylphenols, tyrosols and phenolic acids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Glycan-modifying bacteria-derived soluble factors from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Lactobacillus casei inhibit rotavirus infection in human intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varyukhina, Svetlana; Freitas, Miguel; Bardin, Sabine; Robillard, Emilie; Tavan, Emmanuelle; Sapin, Catherine; Grill, Jean-Pierre; Trugnan, Germain

    2012-03-01

    Rotaviruses attach to intestinal cells in a process that requires glycan recognition. Some bacteria from the gut microflora have been shown to modify cell-surface glycans. In this study, human intestinal cultured cells were incubated with bacteria-derived soluble factors and infected with rotavirus. Results show that only bacterial soluble factors that increase cell-surface galactose namely, those of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Lactobacillus casei were able to efficiently block rotavirus infections. Increasing cell-surface galactose using galactosyltransferase resulted in a similar blockage of rotavirus infections. These results indicate that manipulation of cell-surface intestinal glycans by bacterial soluble factors can prevent rotavirus infection in a species-specific manner, and should now be considered a potential therapeutic approach against rotavirus infection. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of purine utilization by Lactobacillus gasseri strains with potential to decrease the absorption of food-derived purines in the human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, N; Iwamoto, C; Kano, H; Yamaoka, N; Fukuuchi, T; Kaneko, K; Asami, Y

    2016-12-01

    It is well accepted that frequent and heavy intake of purine-rich foods causes elevation of serum uric acid levels, which is a risk factor of hyperuricemia. Reducing intestinal absorption of dietary purines may attenuate the elevation of serum uric acid levels and exacerbation of hyperuricemia. This reduction may be achieved by the ingestion of lactic acid bacteria that take up purines in the intestine. In this study, we investigated the degree of uptake and utilization of purines of three lactobacilli strains. Among them, Lactobacillus gasseri PA-3 (PA-3) showed the greatest incorporation of 14C-adenine. PA-3 also incorporated 14C-adenosine and 14C-AMP. Additionally, using defined growth medium, PA-3 demonstrated greater proliferation in the presence of these purines than in their absence. Although further investigation is required, ingestion of PA-3 may lower serum uric acid levels by reducing intestinal absorption of purines in humans.

  11. Persistence of Lactobacillus Reuteri DSM17938 in the Human Intestinal Tract: Response to Consecutive and Alternate-Day Consumption with Varying Storage Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-25

    alternate day intake of “fresh”, but not “stored” L. reuteri-containing pudding. 3 INTRODUCTION The human gut is a complex and diverse microbial...physiological factors affecting responsiveness to L. reuteri consumption, for example, gut microbiota of the individual (5). If volunteers in the alternate-day...USARIEM TECHNICAL REPORT T11-04 PERSISTENCE OF LACTOBACILLUS REUTERI DSM17938 IN THE HUMAN INTESTINAL TRACT: RESPONSE TO

  12. Systematic and intestinal antibody-secreting cell responses and correlates of protective immunity to human rotavirus in a gnotobiotic pig model of disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, L; Ward, L A; Rosen, B I; To, T L; Saif, L J

    1996-01-01

    Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs orally inoculated with virulent (intestinal-suspension) Wa strain human rotavirus (which mimics human natural infection) developed diarrhea, and most pigs which recovered (87% protection rate) were immune to disease upon homologous virulent virus challenge at postinoculation day (PID) 21. Pigs inoculated with cell culture-attenuated Wa rotavirus (which mimics live oral vaccines) developed subclinical infections and seroconverted but were only partially protected agai...

  13. Intestinal microbiology in early life: specific prebiotics can have similar functionalities as human-milk oligosaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oozeer, R.; Limpt, van K.; Ludwig, T.; Amor, Ben K.; Martin, R.; Wind, R.D.; Boehm, G.; Knol, J.

    2013-01-01

    Human milk is generally accepted as the best nutrition for newborns and has been shown to support the optimal growth and development of infants. On the basis of scientific insights from human-milk research, a specific mixture of nondigestible oligosaccharides has been developed, with the aim to

  14. Small-intestinal dysfunction accompanies the complex endocrinopathy of human proprotein convertase 1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Robert S; Creemers, John W M; Farooqi, I Sadaf

    2003-01-01

    We have previously described the only reported case of human proprotein convertase 1 (PC1) deficiency, in a female (Subject A) with obesity, hypogonadism, hypoadrenalism, and reactive hypoglycemia. We now report the second case of human PC1 deficiency (Subject B), also due to compound heterozygos...

  15. Human intestinal tissue with adult stem cell properties derived from pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forster, Ryan; Chiba, Kunitoshi; Schaeffer, Lorian; Regalado, Samuel G; Lai, Christine S; Gao, Qing; Kiani, Samira; Farin, Henner F; Clevers, Hans; Cost, Gregory J; Chan, Andy; Rebar, Edward J; Urnov, Fyodor D; Gregory, Philip D; Pachter, Lior; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Hockemeyer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Genetically engineered human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have been proposed as a source for transplantation therapies and are rapidly becoming valuable tools for human disease modeling. However, many applications are limited due to the lack of robust differentiation paradigms that allow for the

  16. Systematic and intestinal antibody-secreting cell responses and correlates of protective immunity to human rotavirus in a gnotobiotic pig model of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, L; Ward, L A; Rosen, B I; To, T L; Saif, L J

    1996-05-01

    Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs orally inoculated with virulent (intestinal-suspension) Wa strain human rotavirus (which mimics human natural infection) developed diarrhea, and most pigs which recovered (87% protection rate) were immune to disease upon homologous virulent virus challenge at postinoculation day (PID) 21. Pigs inoculated with cell culture-attenuated Wa rotavirus (which mimics live oral vaccines) developed subclinical infections and seroconverted but were only partially protected against challenge (33% protection rate). Isotype-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC were enumerated at selected PID in intestinal (duodenal and ileal lamina propria and mesenteric lymph node [MLN]) and systemic (spleen and blood) lymphoid tissues by using enzyme-linked immunospot assays. At challenge (PID 21), the numbers of virus-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) ASC, but not IgG ASC, in intestines and blood were significantly greater in virulent-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs than in attenuated-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs and were correlated (correlation coefficients: for duodenum and ileum, 0.9; for MLN, 0.8; for blood, 0.6) with the degree of protection induced. After challenge, the numbers of IgA and IgG virus-specific ASC and serum-neutralizing antibodies increased significantly in the attenuated-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs but not in the virulent-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs (except in the spleen and except for IgA ASC in the duodenum). The transient appearance of IgA ASC in the blood mirrored the IgA ASC responses in the gut, albeit at a lower level, suggesting that IgA ASC in the blood of humans could serve as an indicator for IgA ASC responses in the intestine after rotavirus infection. To our knowledge, this is the first report to study and identify intestinal IgA ASC as a correlate of protective active immunity in an animal model of human-rotavirus-induced disease.

  17. Extra-Renal Elimination of Uric Acid via Intestinal Efflux Transporter BCRP/ABCG2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomi, Atsushi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Fujita, Takuya; Tamai, Ikumi

    2012-01-01

    Urinary excretion accounts for two-thirds of total elimination of uric acid and the remainder is excreted in feces. However, the mechanism of extra-renal elimination is poorly understood. In the present study, we aimed to clarify the mechanism and the extent of elimination of uric acid through liver and intestine using oxonate-treated rats and Caco-2 cells as a model of human intestinal epithelium. In oxonate-treated rats, significant amounts of externally administered and endogenous uric acid were recovered in the intestinal lumen, while biliary excretion was minimal. Accordingly, direct intestinal secretion was thought to be a substantial contributor to extra-renal elimination of uric acid. Since human efflux transporter BCRP/ABCG2 accepts uric acid as a substrate and genetic polymorphism causing a decrease of BCRP activity is known to be associated with hyperuricemia and gout, the contribution of rBcrp to intestinal secretion was examined. rBcrp was confirmed to transport uric acid in a membrane vesicle study, and intestinal regional differences of expression of rBcrp mRNA were well correlated with uric acid secretory activity into the intestinal lumen. Bcrp1 knockout mice exhibited significantly decreased intestinal secretion and an increased plasma concentration of uric acid. Furthermore, a Bcrp inhibitor, elacridar, caused a decrease of intestinal secretion of uric acid. In Caco-2 cells, uric acid showed a polarized flux from the basolateral to apical side, and this flux was almost abolished in the presence of elacridar. These results demonstrate that BCRP contributes at least in part to the intestinal excretion of uric acid as extra-renal elimination pathway in humans and rats. PMID:22348008

  18. Polarization sensitive changes in the human macula associated with normal aging and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanNasdale, Dean Allan, Jr.

    2011-12-01

    The human macula occupies a relatively small, but crucial retinal area, as it is the location responsible for our most acute spatial vision and best color discrimination. Localizing important landmarks in the retina is difficult even in normal eyes where morphological inter-individual variability is high. This becomes even more challenging in the presence of sight-threatening pathology. With respect to the human macula, there remains a significant gap in the understanding of normal structure and function. Even less is known about the pathological mechanisms that occur in sight-threatening diseases including age-related macular degeneration. Because relatively little is known about normal aging changes, it is also difficult to differentiate those changes from changes associated with retinal disease. To better understand normal and pathological changes in the macula, imaging techniques using specific optical signatures are required. Structural features in the macula can be distinguished based on their intrinsic properties using specific light/tissue interactions. Because of the high degree of structural regularity in the macula, polarization sensitive imaging is potentially a useful tool for evaluating the morphology and integrity of the cellular architecture for both normal individuals and those affected by disease. In our investigations, we used polarization sensitive imaging to determining normal landmarks that are important clinically and for research investigations. We found that precision and accuracy in localizing the central macula was greatly improved through the use of polarization sensitive imaging. We also found that specific polarization alterations can be used to demonstrate systematic changes as a function of age, disproportionately affecting the central macular region. When evaluating patients with age-related macular degeneration, we found that precision and accuracy of localizing the central macula was also improved, even when significant pathology

  19. Anti-human tissue factor antibody ameliorated intestinal ischemia reperfusion-induced acute lung injury in human tissue factor knock-in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interaction between the coagulation and inflammation systems plays an important role in the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Anti-coagulation is an attractive option for ARDS treatment, and this has promoted development of new antibodies. However, preclinical trials for these antibodies are often limited by the high cost and availability of non-human primates. In the present study, we developed a novel alternative method to test the role of a humanized anti-tissue factor mAb in acute lung injury with transgenic mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human tissue factor knock-in (hTF-KI transgenic mice and a novel humanized anti-human tissue factor mAb (anti-hTF mAb, CNTO859 were developed. The hTF-KI mice showed a normal and functional expression of hTF. The anti-hTF mAb specifically blocked the pro-coagulation activity of brain extracts from the hTF-KI mice and human, but not from wild type mice. An extrapulmonary ARDS model was used by intestinal ischemia-reperfusion. Significant lung tissue damage in hTF-KI mice was observed after 2 h reperfusion. Administration of CNTO859 (5 mg/kg, i.v. attenuated the severity of lung tissue injury, decreased the total cell counts and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and reduced Evans blue leakage. In addition, the treatment significantly reduced alveolar fibrin deposition, and decreased tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity in the serum. This treatment also down-regulated cytokine expression and reduced cell death in the lung. CONCLUSIONS: This novel anti-hTF antibody showed beneficial effects on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion induced acute lung injury, which merits further investigation for clinical usage. In addition, the use of knock-in transgenic mice to test the efficacy of antibodies against human-specific proteins is a novel strategy for preclinical studies.

  20. Brucella invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells elicits a weak proinflammatory response but a significant CCL20 secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Fossati, Carlos A; Rumbo, Martín; Baldi, Pablo C

    2012-10-01

    In spite of the frequent acquisition of Brucella infection by the oral route in humans, the interaction of the bacterium with cells of the intestinal mucosa has been poorly studied. Here, we show that different Brucella species can invade human colonic epithelial cell lines (Caco-2 and HT-29), in which only smooth species can replicate efficiently. Infection with smooth strains did not produce a significant cytotoxicity, while the rough strain RB51 was more cytotoxic. Infection of Caco-2 cells or HT-29 cells with either smooth or rough strains of Brucella did not result in an increased secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, IL-10 or TGF-β as compared with uninfected controls, whereas all the infections induced the secretion of IL-8 and CCL20 by both cell types. The MCP-1 response to flagellin from Salmonella typhimurium was similar in Brucella-infected or uninfected cells, ruling out a bacterial inhibitory mechanism as a reason for the weak proinflammatory response. Infection did not modify ICAM-1 expression levels in Caco-2 cells, but increased them in HT-29 cells. These results suggest that Brucella induces only a weak proinflammatory response in gut epithelial cells, but produces a significant CCL20 secretion. The latter may be important for bacterial dissemination given the known ability of Brucella to survive in dendritic cells. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Down-regulation of liver-intestine cadherin enhances noscapine-induced apoptosis in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xia; Liu, Meng; Zhu, Qingxi; Tan, Jie; Liu, Weijie; Wang, Yanfen; Chen, Wei; Zou, Yanli; Cai, Yishan; Han, Zheng; Huang, Xiaodong

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the signaling pathway of noscapine which induces apoptosis by blocking liver-intestine cadherin (CDH17) gene in colon cancer SW480 cells. Human colon cancer SW480 cells were transfected with CDH17 interference vector and treatment with 10 µmol/L noscapine. The proliferation and apoptosis of SW480 cells were detected by MTT assay and AnnexinV-FITC/PI flow cytometry kit (BD), respectively. Cell invasion were assessed by transwell assays. Apoptosis related proteins (Cyt-c, Bax, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL) levels were evaluated by western blot. Compared to the noscapine group, the proliferation was decreased significantly and the apoptosis was increased significantly in SW480 cells of the siCDH17+noscapine group. Cyt-c and Bax protein levels in siCDH17+noscapine group was higher than that of the noscapine group, but Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL protein levels in siCDH17+noscapine group were lower than that of the noscapine group. Moreover, up-expression of CDH17 inhibited the efficacy of noscapine-induced apoptosis in SW480 cells. We inferred that down-expression of extrinsic CDH17 gene can conspicuously promote apoptosis-inducing effects of noscapine on human colon cancer SW480 cells, which is a novel strategy to improve chemotherapeutic effects on colon cancer.

  2. Human Milk Oligosaccharides and Synthetic Galactosyloligosaccharides Contain 3′-, 4-, and 6′-Galactosyllactose and Attenuate Inflammation in Human T84, NCM-460, and H4 Cells and Intestinal Tissue Ex Vivo12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae Sung; Leone, Serena; Nanthakumar, N Nanda

    2016-01-01

    Background: The immature intestinal mucosa responds excessively to inflammatory insult, but human milk protects infants from intestinal inflammation. The ability of galactosyllactoses [galactosyloligosaccharides (GOS)], newly found in human milk oligosaccharides (HMOS), to suppress inflammation was not known. Objective: The objective was to test whether GOS can directly attenuate inflammation and to explore the components of immune signaling modulated by GOS. Methods: Galactosyllactose composition was measured in sequential human milk samples from days 1 through 21 of lactation and in random colostrum samples from 38 mothers. Immature [human normal fetal intestinal epithelial cell (H4)] and mature [human metastatic colonic epithelial cell (T84) and human normal colon mucosal epithelial cell (NCM-460)] enterocyte cell lines were treated with the pro-inflammatory molecules tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or infected with Salmonella or Listeria. The inflammatory response was measured as induction of IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), or macrophage inflammatory protein-3α (MIP-3α) protein by ELISA and mRNA by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The ability of HMOS or synthetic GOS to attenuate this inflammation was tested in vitro and in immature human intestinal tissue ex vivo. Results: The 3 galactosyllactoses (3′-GL, 4-GL, and 6′-GL) expressed in colostrum rapidly declined over early lactation (P milk, contributing to innate immune modulation. The potential clinical utility of galactosyllactose warrants investigation. PMID:26701795

  3. Human Milk Oligosaccharides and Synthetic Galactosyloligosaccharides Contain 3'-, 4-, and 6'-Galactosyllactose and Attenuate Inflammation in Human T84, NCM-460, and H4 Cells and Intestinal Tissue Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburg, David S; Ko, Jae Sung; Leone, Serena; Nanthakumar, N Nanda

    2016-02-01

    The immature intestinal mucosa responds excessively to inflammatory insult, but human milk protects infants from intestinal inflammation. The ability of galactosyllactoses [galactosyloligosaccharides (GOS)], newly found in human milk oligosaccharides (HMOS), to suppress inflammation was not known. The objective was to test whether GOS can directly attenuate inflammation and to explore the components of immune signaling modulated by GOS. Galactosyllactose composition was measured in sequential human milk samples from days 1 through 21 of lactation and in random colostrum samples from 38 mothers. Immature [human normal fetal intestinal epithelial cell (H4)] and mature [human metastatic colonic epithelial cell (T84) and human normal colon mucosal epithelial cell (NCM-460)] enterocyte cell lines were treated with the pro-inflammatory molecules tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or infected with Salmonella or Listeria. The inflammatory response was measured as induction of IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), or macrophage inflammatory protein-3α (MIP-3α) protein by ELISA and mRNA by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The ability of HMOS or synthetic GOS to attenuate this inflammation was tested in vitro and in immature human intestinal tissue ex vivo. The 3 galactosyllactoses (3'-GL, 4-GL, and 6'-GL) expressed in colostrum rapidly declined over early lactation (P milk, contributing to innate immune modulation. The potential clinical utility of galactosyllactose warrants investigation. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Cytogenetic analysis of human oocytes and isolated polar bodies by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freidine, M.; Dyban, A.; Cieslak, J. [IL Masonic Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Three hundred eighty six human oocytes that had remained unfertilized 1-2 days after insemination, 78 isolated 1st polar bodies (PB) and 26 isolated 2nd PB were fixed and analyzed by FISH technique with probes which hybridized specifically to definite regions of X chromosome, autosomes 18 and 13/21. In 133 secondary oocytes it was possible to count accurately the number of signals specific for X and 18 chromosomes in MII and in the corresponding 1st PB. In two cases, three X chromatids in MII and one X chromatid in the 1st PB were found. In one oocyte the 1st PB was without chromosome 18 and an extra 18 chromosome was located in MII. In two oocytes, extra chromatids 18 segregated to MII and in the 1st PB, only one chromatid was left. FISH analysis was informative in eleven isolated 1st PB which contained a normal number of X and 18 chromosomes. Hybridization was also informative for chromosomes X and 18 in 26 isolated 2nd PB and revealed one case of extra X and one case of extra 18. From 39 isolated 1st PB which were successfully hybridized with a probe for chromosome 13/21, six were abnormal. In four of them one signal was missing and in two, an extra signal was present. The efficiency of FISH strongly depended on the quality and age of chromosomal preparations, the structure of chromatin, the age of PB and oocytes, the DNA probes used. Directly labelled alpha-satellite probes to the centromeric region of chromosomes X and 18 were much more reliable than probes for chromosomes 13/21.

  5. Long term effects on human plasma lipoproteins of a formulation enriched in butter milk polar lipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Åke

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sphingolipids (SL, in particular sphingomyelin (SM are important components of milk fat polar lipids. Dietary SM inhibits cholesterol absorption in rats (Nyberg et al. J Nutr Biochem. 2000 and SLs decrease both cholesterol and TG concentrations in lipid- and cholesterol fed APOE*3Leiden mice (Duivenvoorden et al. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006. This human study examines effects of a butter milk formulation enriched in milk fat globule membrane material, and thereby in SLs, on blood lipids in healthy volunteers. In a four week parallel group study with 33 men and 15 women we examined the effects of an SL-enriched butter milk formulation (A and an equivalent control formulation (B on plasma lipid levels. Plasma concentrations of HDL and LDL cholesterol, triacylglycerols (TG, apolipoproteins AI and B, and lipoprotein (a were measured. The daily dose of SL in A was 975 mg of which 700 mg was SM. The participants registered food and drink intake four days before introducing the test formula and the last four days of the test period. Results A daily increase of SL intake did not significantly influence fasting plasma lipids or lipoproteins. In group B TG, cholesterol, LDL, HDL and apolipoprotein B concentrations increased, however, but not in group A after four weeks. The difference in LDL cholesterol was seen primarily in women and difference in TG primarily in men. No significant side effects were observed. Conclusion The study did not show any significant decrease on plasma lipids or lipoprotein levels of an SL-enriched formulation containing 2-3 times more SL than the normal dietary intake on cholesterol, other plasma lipids or on energy intake. The formulation A may, however, have counteracted the trend towards increased blood lipid concentrations caused by increased energy intake that was seen with the B formulation.

  6. Spatial heterogeneity and co-occurrence patterns of human mucosal-associated intestinal microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhigang; Geng, Jiawei; Tang, Xiaodan; Fan, Hong; Xu, Jinchao; Wen, Xiujun; Ma, Zhanshan (Sam); Shi, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Human gut microbiota shows high inter-subject variations, but the actual spatial distribution and co-occurrence patterns of gut mucosa microbiota that occur within a healthy human instestinal tract remain poorly understood. In this study, we illustrated a model of this mucosa bacterial communities' biogeography, based on the largest data set so far, obtained via 454-pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rDNAs associated with 77 matched biopsy tissue samples taken from terminal ileum, ileocecal valv...

  7. Measurement of small intestinal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Koji; Satoh, Hiroshi

    2010-08-01

    Many animal models have been devised for investigating the pathogenesis of intestinal lesions and for screening drugs for the treatment of intestinal ulcers in humans. Recently, particular attention has been focused on NSAID-induced intestinal lesions as a result of the development of the capsule endoscope and double-balloon endoscope. Ischemic enteritis, one of the most dramatic abdominal emergencies, is known to cause severe damage to the small intestine by a significant decrease of arterial blood flow in the small intestine. In this unit, two animal models for small intestinal damage induced by NSAIDs or intestinal ischemia are described. Also included are methods for lesion induction and evaluation of the damage as well as the measurement of pathogenic functional and biochemical changes.

  8. The intestinal absorption of dietary cholesterol by hypercholesterolemic (type II) and normocholesterolemic humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, W E; Lin, D S

    1974-04-01

    The incomplete absorption of dietary cholesterol may represent an adaptive intestinal barrier that prevents hypercholesterolemia. To explore this mechanism, we compared cholesterol absorption in 15 normocholesterolemic and 6 hypercholesterolemic (type II) subjects fed background cholesterol-free formula diets with 40% of calories as fat. Each test meal consisted of a breakfast into which was incorporated scrambled egg yolk containing 300-500 mg of cholesterol and [4-(14)C]cholesterol (3-22 muCi), either naturally incorporated into the yolk cholesterol by previous isotope injection into the laying hen or added in peanut oil to the yolk of the test breakfast. In some instances [1alpha-(3)H]cholesterol was the radioactive marker. The radioactivity of the fecal neutral sterol fraction was determined in daily stool samples for the next 7 days to provide an estimate of unabsorbed dietary cholesterol. The amount of absorbed and reexcreted labeled cholesterol proved negligible. Most unabsorbed dietary cholesterol appeared in the stool on the second or third day after the meal, and 95% or more was recovered in the stool by 6 days. Plasma specific activity curves were usually maximal at 48 h. Normal subjects absorbed 44.5+/-9.3 (SD) of the administered cholesterol (range 25.9-60.3). Hypercholesterolemics absorbed the same percentage of cholesterol as normals: 47.6+/-12.6% (range 29.3-67.3). Absorption was similar whether the radiolabeled cholesterol was added to egg yolk or naturally incorporated in it (42.1+/-9.3 vs. 48.9+/-9.8%). Six normal subjects were fed a cholesterol-free formula for 4 wk, and then different amounts of cholesterol (110-610 mg/day) were added for another 4 wk. At the end of each period, single test meals containing either 110, 310, or 610 mg of cholesterol and [1alpha-(3)H]cholesterol were administered. Cholesterol absorption was 42.3+/-6.0% and 45.4+/-8.3% for the two dietary periods, respectively. The absolute cholesterol absorption was linearly

  9. Loss of LMOD1 impairs smooth muscle cytocontractility and causes megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome in humans and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halim, Danny; Wilson, Michael P.; Oliver, Daniel; Brosens, Erwin; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Han, Yu; Nanda, Vivek; Lyu, Qing; Doukas, Michael; Stoop, Hans; Brouwer, Rutger W. W.; van IJcken, Wilfred F. J.; Slivano, Orazio J.; Burns, Alan J.; Christie, Christine K.; Bentley, Karen L. de Mesy; Brooks, Alice S.; Tibboel, Dick; Xu, Suowen; Jin, Zheng Gen; Djuwantono, Tono; Yan, Wei; Alves, Maria M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Miano, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a congenital visceral myopathy characterized by severe dilation of the urinary bladder and defective intestinal motility. The genetic basis of MMIHS has been ascribed to spontaneous and autosomal dominant mutations in actin gamma 2

  10. Regulation of VDR expression in rat and human intestine and liver - Consequences for CYP3A expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, Ansar A.; Dragt, Bieuwke S.; Porte, Robert J.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) regulates the expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in intestine and liver, but the regulation of VDR expression in intestine and liver is incompletely understood. We studied the regulation of VDR mRNA expression by ligands for VDR, farnesoid X

  11. Life and death at the mucosal-luminal interface: New perspectives on human intestinal ischemia-reperfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootjans, Joep; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Buurman, Wim A.; Dejong, Cornelis H. C.; Derikx, Joep P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia is a frequently observed phenomenon. Morbidity and mortality rates are extraordinarily high and did not improve over the past decades. This is in part attributable to limited knowledge on the pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) in man, the paucity in

  12. Distinct transduction difference between adeno-associated virus type 1 and type 6 vectors in human polarized airway epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Z; Lei-Butters, D C M; Keiser, N W; Engelhardt, J F

    2013-03-01

    Of the many biologically isolated adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes, AAV1 and AAV6 share the highest degree of sequence homology, with only six different capsid residues. We compared the transduction efficiencies of rAAV1 and rAAV6 in primary polarized human airway epithelia and found significant differences in their abilities to transduce epithelia from the apical and basolateral membranes. rAAV1 transduction was ~10-fold higher than rAAV6 following apical infection, whereas rAAV6 transduction was ~10-fold higher than rAAV1 following basolateral infection. Furthermore, rAAV6 demonstrated significant polarity of transduction (100-fold; basolateral » apical), whereas rAAV1 transduced from both membranes with equal efficiency. To evaluate capsid residues responsible for the observed serotype differences, we mutated the six divergent amino acids either alone or in combination. Results from these studies demonstrated that capsid residues 418 and 531 most significantly controlled membrane polarity differences in transduction between serotypes, with the rAAV6-D418E/K531E mutant demonstrating decreased (~10-fold) basolateral transduction and the rAAV1-E418D/E531K mutant demonstrating a transduction polarity identical to rAAV6-WT (wild type). However, none of the rAAV6 mutants obtained apical transduction efficiencies of rAAV1-WT, suggesting that all six divergent capsid residues in AAV1 act in concert to improve apical transduction of HAE.